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Sample records for functional nuclear localization

  1. Nucleon localization within nuclear density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunli; Schuetrumpf, Bastian; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2016-09-01

    Recently, a nucleon localization measure based on Hartree-Fock densities has been introduced to investigate α-cluster structures in light nuclei. Compared to the local nucleonic density, the nucleon localization function (NLF) has been shown to be an excellent indicator of cluster correlations. To investigate the cluster structures in light nuclei and study the development of fission fragments in heavy nuclei, we analyse NLFs in deformed nuclei. We use both the deformed harmonic oscillator model and self-consistent nuclear density functional theory (DFT) with energy density functionals UNEDF1 and UNEDF1-HFB, which were optimized for fission studies. In this contribution, we will discuss particle densities and spatial localization functions for deformed configurations of 8Be and 20Ne and along fission pathways of 232Th and 240Pu. We illustrate the usefulness of the NLF by showing how the third hyperdeformed minimum of 232Th can be understood in terms of the ground states of 132Sn and 100Zr. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science under Award Numbers DOE-DE-NA0002847, DE-SC0013365 (Michigan State University), and DE-SC0008511 (NUCLEI SciDAC-3 collaboration).

  2. Characterization of functional regions for nuclear localization of NPAT.

    PubMed

    Sagara, Masashi; Takeda, Eri; Nishiyama, Akiyo; Utsumi, Syunsaku; Toyama, Yoshiroh; Yuasa, Shigeki; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Imai, Takashi

    2002-12-01

    NPAT plays a role in S phase entry as a substrate of cyclin E-CDK2 and activation of histone gene transcription. Although analysis of its sequence indicates that NPAT contains typical nuclear localization signals (NLS) comprising segments of positively charged amino acids, there are currently no experimental data to show that these predictive NLS are functional. To investigate whether these sequences are effective for nuclear transport of NPAT, an NPAT-green fluorescent protein fusion (NP-GFP) was constructed. After transfection of the fusion gene containing the full coding region of NPAT into cultured cells, the NP-GFP product was found exclusively in the nucleus. As expected, some deletion mutants that retained the basic amino acid clusters at the carboxyl terminus also localize the fusion protein in the nucleus. However, other fusions that lacked one of the three basic amino acid-clusters were distributed throughout the nucleus and cytoplasm. Therefore all three clusters of basic residues are necessary for localization of NPAT to the nucleus. However, another sequence outside the carboxyl terminal region functions similarly to NLS. Construction of GFP fusions with a series of truncated forms of NPAT indicated that a short peptide sequence consisting of mainly hydrophobic amino acids near the central domain of NPAT also contributes to localizing the protein in the nucleus.

  3. Multiple nuclear localization signals function in the nuclear import of the transcription factor Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Theodore, Melanie; Kawai, Yumiko; Yang, Jianqi; Kleshchenko, Yuliya; Reddy, Sekhar P; Villalta, Fernando; Arinze, Ifeanyi J

    2008-04-04

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) mediates the transcriptional response of cells to oxidative stress and is translocated into the nucleus following, or concomitant with, its activation by electrophiles or reactive oxygen species. The mechanism of its translocation into the nucleus is not entirely elucidated. Here we have identified two novel nuclear localization signal (NLS) motifs in murine Nrf2, one located near the N-terminal region (amino acid residues 42-53) and the other (residues 587-593) located near the C-terminal region. Imaging of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Nrf2 revealed that mutation(s) in any of these sequences resulted in decreased nuclear fluorescence intensity compared with the wild-type Nrf2 when Nrf2 activation was induced with the electrophile tert-butylhydroquinone. The mutations also impaired Nrf2-induced transactivation of antioxidant response element-driven reporter gene expression to the same extent as the Nrf2 construct bearing mutation in a previously identified bipartite NLS that maps at residues 494-511. When linked to GFP or to GFP-PEPCK-C each of the novel NLS motifs was sufficient to drive nuclear translocation of the fusion proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that importins alpha5 and beta1 associate with Nrf2, an interaction that was blocked by the nuclear import inhibitor SN50. SN50 also blocked tert-butylhydroquinone-induced nuclear fluorescence of GFP-Nrf2 in cells transfected with wild-type GFP-Nrf2. Overall these results reveal that multiple NLS motifs in Nrf2 function in its nuclear translocation in response to pro-oxidant stimuli and that the importin alpha-beta heterodimer nuclear import receptor system plays a critical role in the import process.

  4. Empirical Proton-Neutron Interactions and Nuclear Density Functional Theory: Global, Regional, and Local Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Stoitsov, Mario; Cakirli, R. B.; Casten, R. F.; Nazarewicz, Witold; Satula, W.

    2007-01-01

    Calculations of nuclear masses, using nuclear density functional theory, are presented for even-even nuclei spanning the nuclear chart. The resulting binding energy differences can be interpreted in terms of valence proton-neutron interactions. These are compared globally, regionally, and locally with empirical values. Overall, excellent agreement is obtained. Discrepancies highlight neglected degrees of freedom and can point to improved density functionals.

  5. Empirical Proton-Neutron Interactions and Nuclear Density Functional Theory: Global, Regional, and Local Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Stoitsov, M.; Cakirli, R. B.; Casten, R. F.; Nazarewicz, W.; Satula, W.

    2007-03-30

    Calculations of nuclear masses, using nuclear density functional theory, are presented for even-even nuclei spanning the nuclear chart. The resulting binding energy differences can be interpreted in terms of valence proton-neutron interactions. These are compared globally, regionally, and locally with empirical values. Overall, excellent agreement is obtained. Discrepancies highlight neglected degrees of freedom and can point to improved density functionals.

  6. Empirical proton-neutron interactions and nuclear density functional theory: global, regional, and local comparisons.

    PubMed

    Stoitsov, M; Cakirli, R B; Casten, R F; Nazarewicz, W; Satuła, W

    2007-03-30

    Calculations of nuclear masses, using nuclear density functional theory, are presented for even-even nuclei spanning the nuclear chart. The resulting binding energy differences can be interpreted in terms of valence proton-neutron interactions. These are compared globally, regionally, and locally with empirical values. Overall, excellent agreement is obtained. Discrepancies highlight neglected degrees of freedom and can point to improved density functionals.

  7. Identification and functional characterization of a novel bipartite nuclear localization sequence in ARID1A

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Nicholas W.; Shoji, Yutaka; Conrads, Kelly A.; Stroop, Kevin D.; Hamilton, Chad A.; Darcy, Kathleen M.; Maxwell, George L.; Risinger, John I.; and others

    2016-01-01

    AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 1A (ARID1A) is a recently identified nuclear tumor suppressor frequently altered in solid tumor malignancies. We have identified a bipartite-like nuclear localization sequence (NLS) that contributes to nuclear import of ARID1A not previously described. We functionally confirm activity using GFP constructs fused with wild-type or mutant NLS sequences. We further show that cyto-nuclear localized, bipartite NLS mutant ARID1A exhibits greater stability than nuclear-localized, wild-type ARID1A. Identification of this undescribed functional NLS within ARID1A contributes vital insights to rationalize the impact of ARID1A missense mutations observed in patient tumors. - Highlights: • We have identified a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in ARID1A. • Confirmation of the NLS was performed using GFP constructs. • NLS mutant ARID1A exhibits greater stability than wild-type ARID1A.

  8. Intracellular localization of human cytidine deaminase. Identification of a functional nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Somasekaram, A; Jarmuz, A; How, A; Scott, J; Navaratnam, N

    1999-10-01

    The cytidine deaminases belong to the family of multisubunit enzymes that catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of their substrate to a corresponding uracil product. They play a major role in pyrimidine nucleoside and nucleotide salvage. The intracellular distribution of cytidine deaminase and related enzymes has previously been considered to be cytosolic. Here we show that human cytidine deaminase (HCDA) is present in the nucleus. A highly specific, affinity purified polyclonal antibody against HCDA was used to analyze the intracellular localization of native HCDA in a variety of mammalian cells by in situ immunochemistry. Native HCDA was found to be present in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm in several cell types. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy indicated a predominantly nuclear localization of FLAG-tagged HCDA overexpressed in these cells. We have identified an amino-terminal bipartite nuclear localization signal that is both necessary and sufficient to direct HCDA and a non-nuclear reporter protein to the nucleus. We also show HCDA binding to the nuclear import receptor, importin alpha. Similar putative bipartite nuclear localization sequences are found in other cytidine/deoxycytidylate deaminases. The results presented here suggest that the pyrimidine nucleotide salvage pathway may operate in the nucleus. This localization may have implications in the regulation of nucleoside and nucleotide metabolism and nucleic acid biosynthesis.

  9. Functional domains in nuclear import factor p97 for binding the nuclear localization sequence receptor and the nuclear pore.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, N C; Adam, S A

    1997-01-01

    The interaction of the nuclear protein import factor p97 with the nuclear localization sequence (NLS) receptor, the nuclear pore complex, and Ran/TC4 is important for coordinating the events of protein import to the nucleus. We have mapped the binding domains on p97 for the NLS receptor and the nuclear pore. The NLS receptor-binding domain of p97 maps to the C-terminal 60% of the protein between residues 356 and 876. The pore complex-binding domain of p97 maps to residues 152-352. The pore complex-binding domain overlaps the Ran-GTP- and Ran-GDP-binding domains on p97, but only Ran-GTP competes for docking in permeabilized cells. The N-ethylmaleimide sensitivity of the p97 for docking was investigated and found to be due to inhibition of p97 binding to the pore complex and to the NLS receptor. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved cysteine residues in the pore- and receptor-binding domains identified two cysteines, C223 and C228, that were required for p97 to bind the nuclear pore. Inhibition studies on docking and accumulation of a NLS protein provided additional evidence that the domains identified biochemically are the functional domains involved in protein import. Together, these results suggest that Ran-GTP dissociates the receptor complex and prevents p97 binding to the pore by inducing a conformational change in the structure of p97 rather than simple competition for binding sites. Images PMID:9201707

  10. Identification and functional characterization of a novel bipartite nuclear localization sequence in ARID1A.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Nicholas W; Shoji, Yutaka; Conrads, Kelly A; Stroop, Kevin D; Hamilton, Chad A; Darcy, Kathleen M; Maxwell, George L; Risinger, John I; Conrads, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 1A (ARID1A) is a recently identified nuclear tumor suppressor frequently altered in solid tumor malignancies. We have identified a bipartite-like nuclear localization sequence (NLS) that contributes to nuclear import of ARID1A not previously described. We functionally confirm activity using GFP constructs fused with wild-type or mutant NLS sequences. We further show that cyto-nuclear localized, bipartite NLS mutant ARID1A exhibits greater stability than nuclear-localized, wild-type ARID1A. Identification of this undescribed functional NLS within ARID1A contributes vital insights to rationalize the impact of ARID1A missense mutations observed in patient tumors.

  11. Transverse isospin response function of asymmetric nuclear matter from a local isospin density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipparini, Enrico; Pederiva, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    The time dependent local isospin density approximation (TDLIDA) has been extended to the study of the transverse isospin response function in nuclear matter with an arbitrary neutron-proton asymmetry parameter ξ . The energy density functional has been chosen in order to fit existing accurate quantum Monte Carlo calculations with a density dependent potential. The evolution of the response with ξ in the Δ Tz=±1 channels is quite different. While the strength of the Δ Tz=+1 channel disappears rather quickly by increasing the asymmetry, the Δ Tz=-1 channel develops a stronger and stronger collective mode that in the regime typical of neutron star matter at β equilibrium almost completely exhausts the excitation spectrum of the system. The neutrino mean free paths obtained from the TDLIDA responses are strongly dependent on ξ and on the presence of collective modes, leading to a sizable difference with respect to the prediction of the Fermi gas model.

  12. Essential role of nuclear localization for yeast Ulp2 SUMO protease function.

    PubMed

    Kroetz, Mary B; Su, Dan; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2009-04-01

    The SUMO protein is covalently attached to many different substrates throughout the cell. This modification is rapidly reversed by SUMO proteases. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SUMO protease Ulp2 is a nuclear protein required for chromosome stability and cell cycle restart after checkpoint arrest. Ulp2 is related to the human SENP6 protease, also a nuclear protein. All members of the Ulp2/SENP6 family of SUMO proteases have large but poorly conserved N-terminal domains (NTDs) adjacent to the catalytic domain. Ulp2 also has a long C-terminal domain (CTD). We show that CTD deletion has modest effects on yeast growth, but poly-SUMO conjugates accumulate. In contrast, the NTD is essential for Ulp2 function and is required for nuclear targeting. Two short, widely separated sequences within the NTD confer nuclear localization. Efficient Ulp2 import into the nucleus requires the beta-importin Kap95, which functions on classical nuclear-localization signal (NLS)-bearing substrates. Remarkably, replacement of the entire >400-residue NTD by a heterologous NLS results in near-normal Ulp2 function. These data demonstrate that nuclear localization of Ulp2 is crucial in vivo, yet only small segments of the NTD provide the key functional elements, explaining the minimal sequence conservation of the NTDs in the Ulp2/SENP6 family of enzymes.

  13. Prostaglandins regulate nuclear localization of Fascin and its function in nucleolar architecture

    PubMed Central

    Groen, Christopher M.; Jayo, Asier; Parsons, Maddy; Tootle, Tina L.

    2015-01-01

    Fascin, a highly conserved actin-bundling protein, localizes and functions at new cellular sites in both Drosophila and multiple mammalian cell types. During Drosophila follicle development, in addition to being cytoplasmic, Fascin is in the nuclei of the germline-derived nurse cells during stages 10B–12 (S10B–12) and at the nuclear periphery during stage 13 (S13). This localization is specific to Fascin, as other actin-binding proteins, Villin and Profilin, do not exhibit the same subcellular distribution. In addition, localization of fascin1 to the nucleus and nuclear periphery is observed in multiple mammalian cell types. Thus the regulation and function of Fascin at these new cellular locations is likely to be highly conserved. In Drosophila, loss of prostaglandin signaling causes a global reduction in nuclear Fascin and a failure to relocalize to the nuclear periphery. Alterations in nuclear Fascin levels result in defects in nucleolar morphology in both Drosophila follicles and cultured mammalian cells, suggesting that nuclear Fascin plays an important role in nucleolar architecture. Given the numerous roles of Fascin in development and disease, including cancer, our novel finding that Fascin has functions within the nucleus sheds new light on the potential roles of Fascin in these contexts. PMID:25808493

  14. Identification of a functional nuclear localization signal within the human USP22 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Jianjun; Wang, Yaqin; Gong, Zhen; Liu, Jianyun; Li, Weidong

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • USP22 was accumulated in nucleus. • We identified of a functional USP22 NLS. • The KRRK amino acid residues are indispensable in NLS. • The KRRK motif is conserved in USP22 homologues. - Abstract: Ubiquitin-specific processing enzyme 22 (USP22), a member of the deubiquitinase family, is over-expressed in most human cancers and has been implicated in tumorigenesis. Because it is an enzymatic subunit of the human SAGA transcriptional cofactor, USP22 deubiquitylates histone H2A and H2B in the nucleus, thus participating in gene regulation and cell-cycle progression. However, the mechanisms regulating its nuclear translocation have not yet been elucidated. It was here demonstrated that USP22 is imported into the nucleus through a mechanism mediated by nuclear localization signal (NLS). The bipartite NLS sequence KRELELLKHNPKRRKIT (aa152–168), was identified as the functional NLS for its nuclear localization. Furthermore, a short cluster of basic amino acid residues KRRK within this bipartite NLS plays the primary role in nuclear localization and is evolutionarily conserved in USP22 homologues. In the present study, a functional NLS and the minimal sequences required for the active targeting of USP22 to the nucleus were identified. These findings may provide a molecular basis for the mechanism underlying USP22 nuclear trafficking and function.

  15. Functional and structural basis of the nuclear localization signal in the ZIC3 zinc finger domain

    PubMed Central

    Hatayama, Minoru; Tomizawa, Tadashi; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Bouvagnet, Patrice; Kose, Shingo; Imamoto, Naoko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Utsunomiya-Tate, Naoko; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Kigawa, Takanori; Aruga, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Disruptions in ZIC3 cause heterotaxy, a congenital anomaly of the left–right axis. ZIC3 encodes a nuclear protein with a zinc finger (ZF) domain that contains five tandem C2H2 ZF motifs. Missense mutations in the first ZF motif (ZF1) result in defective nuclear localization, which may underlie the pathogenesis of heterotaxy. Here we revealed the structural and functional basis of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of ZIC3 and investigated its relationship to the defect caused by ZF1 mutation. The ZIC3 NLS was located in the ZF2 and ZF3 regions, rather than ZF1. Several basic residues interspersed throughout these regions were responsible for the nuclear localization, but R320, K337 and R350 were particularly important. NMR structure analysis revealed that ZF1–4 had a similar structure to GLI ZF, and the basic side chains of the NLS clustered together in two regions on the protein surface, similar to classical bipartite NLSs. Among the residues for the ZF1 mutations, C253 and H286 were positioned for the metal chelation, whereas W255 was positioned in the hydrophobic core formed by ZF1 and ZF2. Tryptophan 255 was a highly conserved inter-finger connector and formed part of a structural motif (tandem CXW-C-H-H) that is shared with GLI, Glis and some fungal ZF proteins. Furthermore, we found that knockdown of Karyopherin α1/α6 impaired ZIC3 nuclear localization, and physical interactions between the NLS and the nuclear import adapter proteins were disturbed by mutations in the NLS but not by W255G. These results indicate that ZIC3 is imported into the cell nucleus by the Karyopherin (Importin) system and that the impaired nuclear localization by the ZF1 mutation is not due to a direct influence on the NLS. PMID:18716025

  16. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of nuclear localization and functions of integrin-linked kinase

    PubMed Central

    Acconcia, Filippo; Barnes, Christopher J.; Singh, Rajesh R.; Talukder, Amjad H.; Kumar, Rakesh

    2007-01-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a phosphorylated protein that regulates physiological processes that overlap with those regulated by p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). Here we report the possible role of ILK phosphorylation by PAK1 in ILK-mediated signaling and intracellular translocation. We found that PAK1 phosphorylates ILK at threonine-173 and serine-246 in vitro and in vivo. Depletion of PAK1 decreased the levels of endogenous ILK phosphorylation in vivo. Mutation of PAK1 phosphorylation sites on ILK to alanine reduced cell motility and cell proliferation. Biochemical fractionation, confocal microscopy, and chromatin-interaction analyses of human cells revealed that ILK localizes predominantly in the cytoplasm but also resides in the nucleus. Transfection of MCF-7 cells with point mutants ILK-T173A, ILK-S246A, or ILK-T173A; S246A (ILK-DM) altered ILK localization. Selective depletion of PAK1 dramatically increased the nuclear and focal point accumulation of ILK, further demonstrating a role for PAK1 in ILK translocation. We also identified functional nuclear localization sequence and nuclear export sequence motifs in ILK, delineated an apparently integral role for ILK in maintaining normal nuclear integrity, and established that ILK interacts with the regulatory region of the CNKSR3 gene chromatin to negatively modulate its expression. Together, these results suggest that ILK is a PAK1 substrate, undergoes phosphorylation-dependent shuttling between the cell nucleus and cytoplasm, and interacts with gene-regulatory chromatin. PMID:17420447

  17. Functional analysis of the Cucumber mosaic virus 2b protein: pathogenicity and nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongzeng; Tzfira, Tzvi; Gaba, Victor; Citovsky, Vitaly; Palukaitis, Peter; Gal-On, Amit

    2004-10-01

    The 2b protein encoded by Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has been shown to be a silencing suppressor and pathogenicity determinant in solanaceous hosts, but a movement determinant in cucumber. In addition, synergistic interactions between CMV and Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) have been described in several cucurbit species. Here, it was shown that deletion of the 2b gene from CMV prevented extensive systemic movement of the virus in zucchini squash, which could not be complemented by co-infection with ZYMV. Thus, ZYMV expressing a silencing suppressor with a different target could not complement the CMV 2b-specific movement function. Expression of the 2b protein from an attenuated ZYMV vector resulted in a synergistic response, largely restoring infection symptoms of wild-type ZYMV in several cucurbit species. Deletion or alteration of either of two nuclear localization signals (NLSs) did not affect nuclear localization in two assays, but did affect pathogenicity in several cucurbit species, whilst deletion of both NLSs led to loss of nuclear localization. The 2b protein interacted with an Arabidopsis thaliana karyopherin alpha protein (AtKAPalpha) in the yeast two-hybrid system, as did each of the two single NLS-deletion mutants. However, 2b protein containing a deletion of both NLSs was unable to interact with AtKAPalpha. These data suggest that the 2b protein localizes to the nucleus by using the karyopherin alpha-mediated system, but demonstrate that nuclear localization was insufficient for enhancement of the 2b-mediated pathogenic response in cucurbit hosts. Thus, the sequences corresponding to the two NLSs must have another role leading to pathogenicity enhancement.

  18. A Functional Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C. elegans TRPV Channel OCR-2

    PubMed Central

    Ezak, Meredith J.; Ferkey, Denise M.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to modulate gene expression in response to sensory experience is critical to the normal development and function of the nervous system. Calcium is a key activator of the signal transduction cascades that mediate the process of translating a cellular stimulus into transcriptional changes. With the recent discovery that the mammalian Cav1.2 calcium channel can be cleaved, enter the nucleus and act as a transcription factor to control neuronal gene expression, a more direct role for the calcium channels themselves in regulating transcription has begun to be appreciated. Here we report the identification of a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the C. elegans transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) cation channel OCR-2. TRPV channels have previously been implicated in transcriptional regulation of neuronal genes in the nematode, although the precise mechanism remains unclear. We show that the NLS in OCR-2 is functional, being able to direct nuclear accumulation of a synthetic cargo protein as well as the carboxy-terminal cytosolic tail of OCR-2 where it is endogenously found. Furthermore, we discovered that a carboxy-terminal portion of the full-length channel can localize to the nucleus of neuronal cells. These results suggest that the OCR-2 TRPV cation channel may have a direct nuclear function in neuronal cells that was not previously appreciated. PMID:21957475

  19. A functional nuclear localization sequence in the C. elegans TRPV channel OCR-2.

    PubMed

    Ezak, Meredith J; Ferkey, Denise M

    2011-01-01

    The ability to modulate gene expression in response to sensory experience is critical to the normal development and function of the nervous system. Calcium is a key activator of the signal transduction cascades that mediate the process of translating a cellular stimulus into transcriptional changes. With the recent discovery that the mammalian Ca(v)1.2 calcium channel can be cleaved, enter the nucleus and act as a transcription factor to control neuronal gene expression, a more direct role for the calcium channels themselves in regulating transcription has begun to be appreciated. Here we report the identification of a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the C. elegans transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) cation channel OCR-2. TRPV channels have previously been implicated in transcriptional regulation of neuronal genes in the nematode, although the precise mechanism remains unclear. We show that the NLS in OCR-2 is functional, being able to direct nuclear accumulation of a synthetic cargo protein as well as the carboxy-terminal cytosolic tail of OCR-2 where it is endogenously found. Furthermore, we discovered that a carboxy-terminal portion of the full-length channel can localize to the nucleus of neuronal cells. These results suggest that the OCR-2 TRPV cation channel may have a direct nuclear function in neuronal cells that was not previously appreciated.

  20. Functional eukaryotic nuclear localization signals are widespread in terminal proteins of bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Muñoz-Espín, Daniel; Holguera, Isabel; Mencía, Mario; Salas, Margarita

    2012-11-06

    A number of prokaryotic proteins have been shown to contain nuclear localization signals (NLSs), although its biological role remains sometimes unclear. Terminal proteins (TPs) of bacteriophages prime DNA replication and become covalently linked to the genome ends. We predicted NLSs within the TPs of bacteriophages from diverse families and hosts and, indeed, the TPs of Φ29, Nf, PRD1, Bam35, and Cp-1, out of seven TPs tested, were found to localize to the nucleus when expressed in mammalian cells. Detailed analysis of Φ29 TP led us to identify a bona fide NLS within residues 1-37. Importantly, gene delivery into the eukaryotic nucleus is enhanced by the presence of Φ29 TP attached to the 5' DNA ends. These findings show a common feature of TPs from diverse bacteriophages targeting the eukaryotic nucleus and suggest a possible common function by facilitating the horizontal transfer of genes between prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  1. Functional eukaryotic nuclear localization signals are widespread in terminal proteins of bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Muñoz-Espín, Daniel; Holguera, Isabel; Mencía, Mario; Salas, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    A number of prokaryotic proteins have been shown to contain nuclear localization signals (NLSs), although its biological role remains sometimes unclear. Terminal proteins (TPs) of bacteriophages prime DNA replication and become covalently linked to the genome ends. We predicted NLSs within the TPs of bacteriophages from diverse families and hosts and, indeed, the TPs of Φ29, Nf, PRD1, Bam35, and Cp-1, out of seven TPs tested, were found to localize to the nucleus when expressed in mammalian cells. Detailed analysis of Φ29 TP led us to identify a bona fide NLS within residues 1–37. Importantly, gene delivery into the eukaryotic nucleus is enhanced by the presence of Φ29 TP attached to the 5′ DNA ends. These findings show a common feature of TPs from diverse bacteriophages targeting the eukaryotic nucleus and suggest a possible common function by facilitating the horizontal transfer of genes between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PMID:23091024

  2. A functional nuclear localization sequence in the VP1 capsid protein of coxsackievirus B3

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tianying; Yu, Bohai; Lin, Lexun; Zhai, Xia; Han, Yelu; Qin, Ying; Guo, Zhiwei; Wu, Shuo; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yan; Tong, Lei; Zhang, Fengmin; Si, Xiaoning; Zhao, Wenran; Zhong, Zhaohua

    2012-11-25

    The capsid proteins of some RNA viruses can translocate to the nucleus and interfere with cellular phenotypes. In this study we found that the VP1 capsid protein of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) was dominantly localized in the nucleus of the cells transfected with VP1-expressing plasmid. The VP1 nuclear localization also occurred in the cells infected with CVB3. Truncation analysis indicated that the VP1 nuclear localization sequence located near the C-terminal. The substitution of His220 with threonine completely abolished its translocation. The VP1 proteins of other CVB types might have the nuclear localization potential because this region was highly conserved. Moreover, the VP1 nuclear localization induced cell cycle deregulation, including a prolonged S phase and shortened G2-M phase. Besides these findings, we also found a domain between Ala72 and Phe106 that caused the VP1 truncates dotted distributed in the cytoplasm. Our results suggest a new pathogenic mechanism of CVB. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The VP1 protein of coxsackievirus B3 can specifically localize in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear localization signal of coxsackievirus B3 VP1 protein locates near its C-terminal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The VP1 nuclear localization of coxsackievirus B3 can deregulate cell cycle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is a domain in the VP1 that determines it dotted distributed in the cytoplasm.

  3. Nuclear localization and functional characteristics of voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3.

    PubMed

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Byun, Jun Kyu; Jeon, Won-Il; Choi, Seon Young; Park, Jin; Lee, Bo Hyung; Yang, Ji Eun; Park, Jin Bong; O'Grady, Scott M; Kim, Dae-Yong; Ryu, Pan Dong; Joo, Sang-Woo; Lee, So Yeong

    2015-05-15

    It is widely known that ion channels are expressed in the plasma membrane. However, a few studies have suggested that several ion channels including voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels also exist in intracellular organelles where they are involved in the biochemical events associated with cell signaling. In the present study, Western blot analysis using fractionated protein clearly indicates that Kv1.3 channels are expressed in the nuclei of MCF7, A549, and SNU-484 cancer cells and human brain tissues. In addition, Kv1.3 is located in the plasma membrane and the nucleus of Jurkat T cells. Nuclear membrane hyperpolarization after treatment with margatoxin (MgTX), a specific blocker of Kv1.3 channels, provides evidence for functional channels at the nuclear membrane of A549 cells. MgTX-induced hyperpolarization is abolished in the nuclei of Kv1.3 silenced cells, and the effects of MgTX are dependent on the magnitude of the K(+) gradient across the nuclear membrane. Selective Kv1.3 blockers induce the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and c-Fos activation. Moreover, Kv1.3 is shown to form a complex with the upstream binding factor 1 in the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay reveals that Sp1 transcription factor is directly bound to the promoter region of the Kv1.3 gene, and the Sp1 regulates Kv1.3 expression in the nucleus of A549 cells. These results demonstrate that Kv1.3 channels are primarily localized in the nucleus of several types of cancer cells and human brain tissues where they are capable of regulating nuclear membrane potential and activation of transcription factors, such as phosphorylated CREB and c-Fos.

  4. Nuclear Localization and Functional Characteristics of Voltage-gated Potassium Channel Kv1.3*

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Byun, Jun Kyu; Jeon, Won-Il; Choi, Seon Young; Park, Jin; Lee, Bo Hyung; Yang, Ji Eun; Park, Jin Bong; O'Grady, Scott M.; Kim, Dae-Yong; Ryu, Pan Dong; Joo, Sang-Woo; Lee, So Yeong

    2015-01-01

    It is widely known that ion channels are expressed in the plasma membrane. However, a few studies have suggested that several ion channels including voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels also exist in intracellular organelles where they are involved in the biochemical events associated with cell signaling. In the present study, Western blot analysis using fractionated protein clearly indicates that Kv1.3 channels are expressed in the nuclei of MCF7, A549, and SNU-484 cancer cells and human brain tissues. In addition, Kv1.3 is located in the plasma membrane and the nucleus of Jurkat T cells. Nuclear membrane hyperpolarization after treatment with margatoxin (MgTX), a specific blocker of Kv1.3 channels, provides evidence for functional channels at the nuclear membrane of A549 cells. MgTX-induced hyperpolarization is abolished in the nuclei of Kv1.3 silenced cells, and the effects of MgTX are dependent on the magnitude of the K+ gradient across the nuclear membrane. Selective Kv1.3 blockers induce the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and c-Fos activation. Moreover, Kv1.3 is shown to form a complex with the upstream binding factor 1 in the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay reveals that Sp1 transcription factor is directly bound to the promoter region of the Kv1.3 gene, and the Sp1 regulates Kv1.3 expression in the nucleus of A549 cells. These results demonstrate that Kv1.3 channels are primarily localized in the nucleus of several types of cancer cells and human brain tissues where they are capable of regulating nuclear membrane potential and activation of transcription factors, such as phosphorylated CREB and c-Fos. PMID:25829491

  5. The second AT-hook of the architectural transcription factor HMGA2 is determinant for nuclear localization and function

    PubMed Central

    Cattaruzzi, Giacomo; Altamura, Sandro; Tessari, Michela A.; Rustighi, Alessandra; Giancotti, Vincenzo; Pucillo, Carlo; Manfioletti, Guidalberto

    2007-01-01

    High Mobility Group A (HMGA) is a family of architectural nuclear factors which play an important role in neoplastic transformation. HMGA proteins are multifunctional factors that associate both with DNA and nuclear proteins that have been involved in several nuclear processes including transcription. HMGA localization is exclusively nuclear but, to date, the mechanism of nuclear import for these proteins remains unknown. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) for HMGA2, a member of the HMGA family. The NLS overlaps with the second of the three AT-hooks, the DNA-binding domains characteristic for this group of proteins. The functionality of this NLS was demonstrated by its ability to target a heterologous β-galactosidase/green fluorescent protein fusion protein to the nucleus. Mutations to alanine of basic residues within the second AT-hook resulted in inhibition of HMGA2 nuclear localization and impairment of its function in activating the cyclin A promoter. In addition, HMGA2 was shown to directly interact with the nuclear import receptor importin-α2 via the second AT-hook. HMGA proteins are overexpressed and rearranged in a variety of tumors; our findings can thus help elucidating their role in neoplastic transformation. PMID:17324944

  6. SIRT6 deacetylates PKM2 to suppress its nuclear localization and oncogenic functions

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Abhishek; Das, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    SIRT6 (sirtuin 6) is a member of sirtuin family of deacetylases involved in diverse processes including genome stability, metabolic homeostasis, and tumorigenesis. However, the role of SIRT6 deacetylase activity in its tumor-suppressor functions is not well understood. Here we report that SIRT6 binds to and deacetylates nuclear PKM2 (pyruvate kinase M2) at the lysine 433 residue. PKM2 is a glycolytic enzyme with nonmetabolic nuclear oncogenic functions. SIRT6-mediated deacetylation results in PKM2 nuclear export. We further have identified exportin 4 as the specific transporter mediating PKM2 nuclear export. As a result of SIRT6-mediated deacetylation, PKM2 nuclear protein kinase and transcriptional coactivator functions are abolished. Thus, SIRT6 suppresses PKM2 oncogenic functions, resulting in reduced cell proliferation, migration potential, and invasiveness. Furthermore, studies in mouse tumor models demonstrate that PKM2 deacetylation is integral to SIRT6-mediated tumor suppression and inhibition of metastasis. Additionally, reduced SIRT6 levels correlate with elevated nuclear acetylated PKM2 levels in increasing grades of hepatocellular carcinoma. These findings provide key insights into the pivotal role of deacetylase activity in SIRT6 tumor-suppressor functions. PMID:26787900

  7. Breast Cancer–Associated Abraxas Mutation Disrupts Nuclear Localization and DNA Damage Response Functions

    PubMed Central

    Solyom, Szilvia; Aressy, Bernadette; Pylkäs, Katri; Patterson-Fortin, Jeffrey; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kallioniemi, Anne; Kauppila, Saila; Nikkilä, Jenni; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Mannermaa, Arto; Greenberg, Roger A.; Winqvist, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in developed countries and has a well-established genetic component. Germline mutations in a network of genes encoding BRCA1, BRCA2, and their interacting partners confer hereditary susceptibility to breast cancer. Abraxas directly interacts with the BRCA1 BRCT (BRCA1 carboxyl-terminal) repeats and contributes to BRCA1-dependent DNA damage responses, making Abraxas a candidate for yet unexplained disease susceptibility. Here, we have screened 125 Northern Finnish breast cancer families for coding region and splice-site Abraxas mutations and genotyped three tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the gene from 991 unselected breast cancer cases and 868 female controls for common cancer-associated variants. A novel heterozygous alteration, c.1082G>A (Arg361Gln), that results in abrogated nuclear localization and DNA response activities was identified in three breast cancer families and in one additional familial case from an unselected breast cancer cohort, but not in healthy controls (P = 0.002). On the basis of its exclusive occurrence in familial cancers, disease cosegregation, evolutionary conservation, and disruption of critical BRCA1 functions, the recurrent Abraxas c.1082G>A mutation connects to cancer predisposition. These findings contribute to the concept of a BRCA-centered tumor suppressor network and provide the identity of Abraxas as a new breast cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:22357538

  8. Arabidopsis phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase 2 contains a functional nuclear localization sequence and interacts with alpha-importins.

    PubMed

    Gerth, Katharina; Lin, Feng; Daamen, Franziska; Menzel, Wilhelm; Heinrich, Franziska; Heilmann, Mareike

    2017-09-26

    The Arabidopsis phosphoinositide kinase PIP5K2 has been implicated in the control of membrane trafficking and is important for development and growth. In addition to cytosolic functions of phosphoinositides, a nuclear phosphoinositide system has been proposed, but evidence for nuclear phosphoinositides in plants is limited. Fluorescence-tagged variants of PIP5K2 reside in the nucleus of Arabidopsis root meristem cells, in addition to reported plasma membrane localization. Here we report on the interaction of PIP5K2 with alpha-importins and characterize its nuclear localization sequences (NLSs). The PIP5K2 sequence contains four putative NLSs (NLSa-d) and only a PIP5K2 fragment containing NLSs is imported into nuclei of onion epidermis cells upon transient expression. PIP5K2 interacts physically with alpha-importin isoforms in cytosolic split-ubiquitin-based yeast-two-hybrid tests, in dot blot experiments, and in immuno-pull-downs. A 27-amino acid-fragment of PIP5K2 containing NLSc is necessary and sufficient to mediate the nuclear import of a large cargo fusion consisting of two mCherry markers fused to RubisCO large subunit. Substitution of basic residues in NLSc results in reduced import of PIP5K2 or other cargoes into plant nuclei. The data suggest that PIP5K2 is subject to active, alpha-importin-mediated nuclear import, consistent with a nuclear role for PIP5K2 in addition to its reported cytosolic functions. The detection of both substrate and product of PIP5K2 in plant nuclei according to reporter fluorescence and immunofluorescence further supports the notion of a nuclear phosphoinositide system in plants. Variants of PIP5K2 with reduced nuclear residence might serve as tools for the future functional study of plant nuclear phosphoinositides. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional analysis of the C-terminal region of human adenovirus E1A reveals a misidentified nuclear localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Michael J.; King, Cason R.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-11-15

    The immortalizing function of the human adenovirus 5 E1A oncoprotein requires efficient localization to the nucleus. In 1987, a consensus monopartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) was identified at the C-terminus of E1A. Since that time, various experiments have suggested that other regions of E1A influence nuclear import. In addition, a novel bipartite NLS was recently predicted at the C-terminal region of E1A in silico. In this study, we used immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation analysis with importin-α to verify that full nuclear localization of E1A requires the well characterized NLS spanning residues 285–289, as well as a second basic patch situated between residues 258 and 263 ({sup 258}RVGGRRQAVECIEDLLNEPGQPLDLSCKRPRP{sup 289}). Thus, the originally described NLS located at the C-terminus of E1A is actually a bipartite signal, which had been misidentified in the existing literature as a monopartite signal, altering our understanding of one of the oldest documented NLSs. - Highlights: • Human adenovirus E1A is localized to the nucleus. • The C-terminus of E1A contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). • This signal was previously misidentified to be a monopartite NLS. • Key basic amino acid residues within this sequence are highly conserved.

  10. The N-terminal nuclear localization sequences of liver X receptors alpha and beta bind to importin alpha and are essential for both nuclear import and transactivating functions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anna; Crumbley, Christine; Prüfer, Kirsten

    2009-04-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) alpha and beta are nuclear receptors, which form obligate heterodimers with the retinoid X receptor (RXR). The LXRs regulate both redundantly and non-redundantly the transcription of genes controlling cholesterol metabolism and transport as well as lipogenesis. Previously, we showed that mutations in putative N-terminal nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) within both LXRs inhibit nuclear import. Through in vitro studies, we show here that these NLSs bind importin alpha and are both necessary and sufficient for the nuclear import of LXRs. Imaging, transactivation, and electro-mobility shift experiments show that RXR rescues the nuclear import of the LXRalpha NLS mutant yet does not restore its transcriptional activity despite intact DNA binding. In contrast, RXR partially rescues the import of the LXRbeta NLS mutant, but has no effect on its transcriptional activity due to the loss of DNA binding. Experiments with NLS mutant RXR confirmed that RXR may dominate the nuclear import of the RXR/LXRalpha heterodimer, whereas LXRbeta dominates the nuclear import of the RXR/LXRbeta heterodimer. Intriguingly, our data indicate differences between LXRalpha and LXRbeta in their interaction with RXR and in the role their NLSs play in transactivating functions independent of nuclear import.

  11. Identification of two functional nuclear localization signals in the capsid protein of duck circovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Qi-Wang; Zou, Jin-Feng; Wang, Xin; Sun, Ya-Ni; Gao, Ji-Ming; Xie, Zhi-Jing; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Yan-Li; Jiang, Shi-Jin

    2013-02-05

    The capsid protein (CP) of duck circovirus (DuCV) is the major immunogenic protein and has a high proportion of arginine residues concentrated at the N terminus of the protein, which inhibits efficient mRNA translation in prokaryotic expression systems. In this study, we investigated the subcellular distribution of DuCV CP expressed via recombinant baculoviruses in Sf9 cells and the DNA binding activities of the truncated recombinant DuCV CPs. The results showed that two independent bipartite nuclear localization signals (NLSs) situated at N-terminal 1-17 and 18-36 amino acid residue of the CP. Moreover, two expression level regulatory signals (ELRSs) and two DNA binding signals (DBSs) were also mapped to the N terminus of the protein and overlapped with the two NLSs. The ability of CP to bind DNA, coupled with the karyophilic nature of this protein, strongly suggests that it may be responsible for nuclear targeting of the viral genome.

  12. Identification of a karyopherin alpha 2 recognition site in PLAG1, which functions as a nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Braem, Caroline V; Kas, Koen; Meyen, Eva; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Van De Ven, Wim J M; Voz, Marianne L

    2002-05-31

    The activation of the pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) is the most frequent gain-of-function mutation found in pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands. To gain more insight into the regulation of PLAG1 function, we searched for PLAG1-interacting proteins. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we identified karyopherin alpha2 as a PLAG1-interacting protein. Physical interaction between PLAG1 and karyopherin alpha2 was confirmed by an in vitro glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay. Karyopherin alpha2 escorts proteins into the nucleus via interaction with a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) composed of short stretches of basic amino acids. Two putative NLSs were identified in PLAG1. The predicted NLS1 (KRKR) was essential for physical interaction with karyopherin alpha2 in glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay, and its mutation resulted in decreased nuclear import of PLAG1. Moreover, NLS1 was able to drive the nuclear import of the cytoplasmic protein beta-galactosidase. In contrast, predicted NLS2 of PLAG1 (KPRK) was not involved in karyopherin alpha2 binding nor in its nuclear import. The residual nuclear import of PLAG1 after mutation of the NLS1 was assigned to the zinc finger domain of PLAG1. These observations indicate that the nuclear import of PLAG1 is governed by its zinc finger domain and by NLS1, a karyopherin alpha2 recognition site.

  13. Nuclear and nucleolar localization signals and their targeting function in phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase PI4K230

    SciTech Connect

    Kakuk, Annamaria; Friedlaender, Elza; Vereb, Gyoergy; Lisboa, Duarte; Bagossi, Peter; Toth, Gabor; Gergely, Pal; Vereb, Gyoergy

    2008-08-01

    PI4K230, an isoform of phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase, known primarily as a cytoplasmic membrane-bound enzyme, was detected recently also in the nucleolus of several cells. Here we provide mechanistic insight on the targeting function of its putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences using molecular modeling, digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells and binding to various importins. The synthetic sequence {sup 916}NFNHIHKRIRRVADKYLSG{sup 934} comprising a putative monopartite NLS (NLS1), targeted covalently bound fluorescent BSA to the nucleoplasm via classical importin {alpha}/{beta} mechanism employing importins {alpha}1 and {alpha}3 but not {alpha}5. This transport was inhibited by wheat germ agglutinin and GTP{gamma}S. The sequence {sup 1414}SKKTNRGSQLHKYYMKRRTL{sup 1433}, a putative bipartite NLS (NLS2) proved ineffective in nuclear targeting if conjugated to fluorescently labeled BSA. Nonetheless, NLS2 or either of its basic clusters directed to the nucleolus soybean trypsin inhibitor that can pass the nuclear pore complex passively; moreover, an expressed 58 kDa fragment of PI4K230 (AA1166-1667) comprising NLS2 was also imported into the nucleus by import factors of reticulocyte lysate or by importin {alpha}1/{beta} or {alpha}3/{beta} complexes and localized to the nucleolus. We conclude that the putative bipartite NLS itself is a nucleolar targeting signal, and for nuclear import PI4K230 requires a larger sequence around it or, alternatively, the monopartite NLS.

  14. Transcription-dependent nucleolar cap localization and possible nuclear function of DExH RNA helicase RHAU

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, Fumiko; Stadler, Michael; Chalupnikova, Katerina; Oakeley, Edward; Nagamine, Yoshikuni

    2008-04-01

    RHAU (RNA helicase associated with AU-rich element) is a DExH protein originally identified as a factor accelerating AU-rich element-mediated mRNA degradation. The discovery that RHAU is predominantly localized in the nucleus, despite mRNA degradation occurring in the cytoplasm, prompted us to consider the nuclear functions of RHAU. In HeLa cells, RHAU was found to be localized throughout the nucleoplasm with some concentrated in nuclear speckles. Transcriptional arrest altered the localization to nucleolar caps, where RHAU is closely localized with RNA helicases p68 and p72, suggesting that RHAU is involved in transcription-related RNA metabolism in the nucleus. To see whether RHAU affects global gene expression transcriptionally or posttranscriptionally, we performed microarray analysis using total RNA from RHAU-depleted HeLa cell lines, measuring both steady-state mRNA levels and mRNA half-lives by actinomycin D chase. There was no change in the half-lives of most transcripts whose steady-state levels were affected by RHAU knockdown, suggesting that these transcripts are subjected to transcriptional regulation. We propose that RHAU has a dual function, being involved in both the synthesis and degradation of mRNA in different subcellular compartments.

  15. Cysteine (C)-X-C Receptor 4 Undergoes Transportin 1-Dependent Nuclear Localization and Remains Functional at the Nucleus of Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Don-Salu-Hewage, Ayesha S.; Chan, Siu Yuen; McAndrews, Kathleen M.; Chetram, Mahandranauth A.; Dawson, Michelle R.; Bethea, Danaya A.; Hinton, Cimona V.

    2013-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), Cysteine (C)-X-C Receptor 4 (CXCR4), plays an important role in prostate cancer metastasis. CXCR4 is generally regarded as a plasma membrane receptor where it transmits signals that support transformation, progression and eventual metastasis. Due to the central role of CXCR4 in tumorigenesis, therapeutics approaches such as antagonist and monoclonal antibodies have focused on receptors that exist on the plasma membrane. An emerging concept for G-protein coupled receptors is that they may localize to and associate with the nucleus where they retain function and mediate nuclear signaling. Herein, we demonstrate that CXCR4 associated with the nucleus of malignant prostate cancer tissues. Likewise, expression of CXCR4 was detected in nuclear fractions among several prostate cancer cell lines, compared to normal prostate epithelial cells. Our studies identified a nuclear pool of CXCR4 and we defined a nuclear transport pathway for CXCR4. We reveal a putative nuclear localization sequence (NLS), ‘RPRK’, within CXCR4 that contributed to nuclear localization. Additionally, nuclear CXCR4 interacted with Transportinβ1 and Transportinβ1-binding to CXCR4 promoted its nuclear translocation. Importantly, Gαi immunoprecipitation and calcium mobilization studies indicated that nuclear CXCR4 was functional and participated in G-protein signaling, revealing that the nuclear pool of CXCR4 retained function. Given the suggestion that functional, nuclear CXCR4 may be a mechanism underlying prostate cancer recurrence, increased metastatic ability and poorer prognosis after tumors have been treated with therapy that targets plasma membrane CXCR4, these studies addresses a novel mechanism of nuclear signaling for CXCR4, a novel mechanism of clinical targeting, and demonstrate an active nuclear pool that provides important new information to illuminate what has been primarily clinical reports of nuclear CXCR4. PMID:23468933

  16. Nuclear localization of the DNA repair scaffold XRCC1: Uncovering the functional role of a bipartite NLS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Thomas W.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Smith, Cassandra E.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Gabel, Scott A.; Sobhany, Mack; Wilson, Samuel H.; London, Robert E.

    2015-08-25

    We have characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of XRCC1 structurally using X-ray crystallography and functionally using fluorescence imaging. Crystallography and binding studies confirm the bipartite nature of the XRCC1 NLS interaction with Importin α (Impα) in which the major and minor binding motifs are separated by >20 residues, and resolve previous inconsistent determinations. Binding studies of peptides corresponding to the bipartite NLS, as well as its major and minor binding motifs, to both wild-type and mutated forms of Impα reveal pronounced cooperative binding behavior that is generated by the proximity effect of the tethered major and minor motifs of the NLS. The cooperativity stems from the increased local concentration of the second motif near its cognate binding site that is a consequence of the stepwise binding behavior of the bipartite NLS. We predict that the stepwise dissociation of the NLS from Impα facilitates unloading by providing a partially complexed intermediate that is available for competitive binding by Nup50 or the Importin β binding domain. This behavior gives a basis for meeting the intrinsically conflicting high affinity and high flux requirements of an efficient nuclear transport system.

  17. Nuclear localization of the DNA repair scaffold XRCC1: Uncovering the functional role of a bipartite NLS

    DOE PAGES

    Kirby, Thomas W.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Smith, Cassandra E.; ...

    2015-08-25

    We have characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of XRCC1 structurally using X-ray crystallography and functionally using fluorescence imaging. Crystallography and binding studies confirm the bipartite nature of the XRCC1 NLS interaction with Importin α (Impα) in which the major and minor binding motifs are separated by >20 residues, and resolve previous inconsistent determinations. Binding studies of peptides corresponding to the bipartite NLS, as well as its major and minor binding motifs, to both wild-type and mutated forms of Impα reveal pronounced cooperative binding behavior that is generated by the proximity effect of the tethered major and minor motifs ofmore » the NLS. The cooperativity stems from the increased local concentration of the second motif near its cognate binding site that is a consequence of the stepwise binding behavior of the bipartite NLS. We predict that the stepwise dissociation of the NLS from Impα facilitates unloading by providing a partially complexed intermediate that is available for competitive binding by Nup50 or the Importin β binding domain. This behavior gives a basis for meeting the intrinsically conflicting high affinity and high flux requirements of an efficient nuclear transport system.« less

  18. Nuclear Localization of the DNA Repair Scaffold XRCC1: Uncovering the Functional Role of a Bipartite NLS.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Thomas W; Gassman, Natalie R; Smith, Cassandra E; Pedersen, Lars C; Gabel, Scott A; Sobhany, Mack; Wilson, Samuel H; London, Robert E

    2015-08-25

    We have characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of XRCC1 structurally using X-ray crystallography and functionally using fluorescence imaging. Crystallography and binding studies confirm the bipartite nature of the XRCC1 NLS interaction with Importin α (Impα) in which the major and minor binding motifs are separated by >20 residues, and resolve previous inconsistent determinations. Binding studies of peptides corresponding to the bipartite NLS, as well as its major and minor binding motifs, to both wild-type and mutated forms of Impα reveal pronounced cooperative binding behavior that is generated by the proximity effect of the tethered major and minor motifs of the NLS. The cooperativity stems from the increased local concentration of the second motif near its cognate binding site that is a consequence of the stepwise binding behavior of the bipartite NLS. We predict that the stepwise dissociation of the NLS from Impα facilitates unloading by providing a partially complexed intermediate that is available for competitive binding by Nup50 or the Importin β binding domain. This behavior provides a basis for meeting the intrinsically conflicting high affinity and high flux requirements of an efficient nuclear transport system.

  19. Nuclear Localization and Interaction with COP1 Are Required for STO/BBX24 Function during Photomorphogenesis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Huili; Marquardt, Katrin; Indorf, Martin; Jutt, Dominic; Kircher, Stefan; Neuhaus, Gunther; Rodríguez-Franco, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SALT TOLERANCE/B-BOX ZINC FINGER PROTEIN24 (STO/BBX24) is a negative regulator of the light signal transduction that localizes to the nucleus of plant cells and interacts with CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1) in the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid system. The protein contains two B-box zinc-finger motives at the N terminus and a conserved motif at the C-terminal part required for the interaction with COP1. BBX24 accumulates during deetiolation of young seedlings in the first hours of exposure to light. However, this accumulation is transient and decreases after prolonged light irradiation. Here, we identified the amino acidic residues necessary for the nuclear import of the protein. In addition, we created mutated forms of the protein, and analyzed them by overexpression in the bbx24-1 mutant background. Our results indicate that the degradation of BBX24 occurs, or at least is initiated in the nucleus, and this nuclear localization is a prerequisite to fulfill its function in light signaling. Moreover, mutations in the region responsible for the interaction with COP1 revealed that a physical interaction of the proteins is also required for degradation of BBX24 in the light and for normal photomorphogenesis. PMID:21685177

  20. Phosphorylation controls a dual-function polybasic nuclear localization sequence in the adapter protein SH2B1β to regulate its cellular function and distribution.

    PubMed

    Maures, Travis J; Su, Hsiao-Wen; Argetsinger, Lawrence S; Grinstein, Sergio; Carter-Su, Christin

    2011-05-01

    An intriguing question in cell biology is what targets proteins to, and regulates their translocation between, specific cellular locations. Here we report that the polybasic nuclear localization sequence (NLS) required for nuclear entry of the adapter protein and candidate human obesity gene product SH2B1β, also localizes SH2B1β to the plasma membrane (PM), most probably via electrostatic interactions. Binding of SH2B1β to the PM also requires its dimerization domain. Phosphorylation of serine residues near this polybasic region, potentially by protein kinase C, releases SH2B1β from the PM and enhances nuclear entry. Release of SH2B1β from the PM and/or nuclear entry appear to be required for SH2B1β enhancement of nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced expression of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor gene and neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells. Taken together, our results provide strong evidence that the polybasic NLS region of SH2B1 serves the dual function of localizing SH2B1 to both the nucleus and the PM, the latter most probably through electrostatic interactions that are enhanced by SH2B1β dimerization. Cycling between the different cellular compartments is a consequence of the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of serine residues near the NLS and is important for physiological effects of SH2B1, including NGF-induced gene expression and neurite outgrowth.

  1. Functional characterization of nuclear localization and export signals in hepatitis C virus proteins and their role in the membranous web.

    PubMed

    Levin, Aviad; Neufeldt, Christopher J; Pang, Daniel; Wilson, Kristen; Loewen-Dobler, Darci; Joyce, Michael A; Wozniak, Richard W; Tyrrell, D Lorne J

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive strand RNA virus of the Flavivirus family that replicates in the cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes. Previously, several nuclear localization signals (NLS) and nuclear export signals (NES) have been identified in HCV proteins, however, there is little evidence that these proteins travel into the nucleus during infection. We have recently shown that nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins (termed nucleoporins or Nups) are present in the membranous web and are required during HCV infection. In this study, we identify a total of 11 NLS and NES sequences in various HCV proteins. We show direct interactions between HCV proteins and importin α5 (IPOA5/kapα1), importin β3 (IPO5/kap β3), and exportin 1 (XPO1/CRM1) both in-vitro and in cell culture. These interactions can be disrupted using peptides containing the specific NLS or NES sequences of HCV proteins. Moreover, using a synchronized infection system, we show that these peptides inhibit HCV infection during distinct phases of the HCV life cycle. The inhibitory effects of these peptides place them in two groups. The first group binds IPOA5 and inhibits infection during the replication stage of HCV life cycle. The second group binds IPO5 and is active during both early replication and early assembly. This work delineates the entire life cycle of HCV and the active involvement of NLS sequences during HCV replication and assembly. Given the abundance of NLS sequences within HCV proteins, our previous finding that Nups play a role in HCV infection, and the relocation of the NLS double-GFP reporter in HCV infected cells, this work supports our previous hypothesis that NPC-like structures and nuclear transport factors function in the membranous web to create an environment conducive to viral replication.

  2. Functional Characterization of Nuclear Localization and Export Signals in Hepatitis C Virus Proteins and Their Role in the Membranous Web

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Aviad; Neufeldt, Christopher J.; Pang, Daniel; Wilson, Kristen; Loewen-Dobler, Darci; Joyce, Michael A.; Wozniak, Richard W.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne J

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive strand RNA virus of the Flavivirus family that replicates in the cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes. Previously, several nuclear localization signals (NLS) and nuclear export signals (NES) have been identified in HCV proteins, however, there is little evidence that these proteins travel into the nucleus during infection. We have recently shown that nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins (termed nucleoporins or Nups) are present in the membranous web and are required during HCV infection. In this study, we identify a total of 11 NLS and NES sequences in various HCV proteins. We show direct interactions between HCV proteins and importin α5 (IPOA5/kapα1), importin β3 (IPO5/kap β3), and exportin 1 (XPO1/CRM1) both in-vitro and in cell culture. These interactions can be disrupted using peptides containing the specific NLS or NES sequences of HCV proteins. Moreover, using a synchronized infection system, we show that these peptides inhibit HCV infection during distinct phases of the HCV life cycle. The inhibitory effects of these peptides place them in two groups. The first group binds IPOA5 and inhibits infection during the replication stage of HCV life cycle. The second group binds IPO5 and is active during both early replication and early assembly. This work delineates the entire life cycle of HCV and the active involvement of NLS sequences during HCV replication and assembly. Given the abundance of NLS sequences within HCV proteins, our previous finding that Nups play a role in HCV infection, and the relocation of the NLS double-GFP reporter in HCV infected cells, this work supports our previous hypothesis that NPC-like structures and nuclear transport factors function in the membranous web to create an environment conducive to viral replication. PMID:25485706

  3. Molecular cloning, functional expression, and chromosomal localization of mouse hepatocyte nuclear factor 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, C.J.; Conley, P.B.; Hsieh, Chihlin; Francke, U.; Crabtree, G.R. )

    1990-12-01

    The homeodomain-containing transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF-1) most likely plays and essential role during liver organogenesis by transactivating a family of {gt}15 predominantly hepatic genes. The authors have isolated cDNA clones encoding mouse HNF-1 and expressed them in monkey COS cells and in the human T-cell line Jurkat, producing HNF-1 DNA-binding activity as well as transactivation of reporter constructs containing multimerized NHF-1 binding sites. In addition, the HNF-1 gene was assigned by somatic cell hybrids and recombinant inbred strain mapping to mouse chromosome 5 near Bcd-1 and to human chromosome 12 region q22-qter, revealing a homologous chromosome region in these two species. The presence of HNF-1 mRNA in multiple endodermal tissues (liver, stomach, intestine) suggests that HNF-1 may constitute an early marker for endodermal, rather than hepatocyte, differentiation. Further, that HNF-1 DNA-binding and transcriptional activity can be conferred by transfecting the HNF-1 cDNA into several cell lines indicates that it is sufficient to activate transcription in the context of ubiquitously expressed factors.

  4. Identification of a highly conserved, functional nuclear localization signal within the N-terminal region of herpes simplex virus type 1 VP1-2 tegument protein.

    PubMed

    Abaitua, F; O'Hare, P

    2008-06-01

    VP1-2 is a large structural protein assembled into the tegument compartment of the virion, conserved across the herpesviridae, and essential for virus replication. In herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pseudorabies virus, VP1-2 is tightly associated with the capsid. Studies of its assembly and function remain incomplete, although recent data indicate that in HSV, VP1-2 is recruited onto capsids in the nucleus, with this being required for subsequent recruitment of additional structural proteins. Here we have developed an antibody to characterize VP1-2 localization, observing the protein in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments, frequently in clusters in both locations. Within the nucleus, a subpopulation of VP1-2 colocalized with VP26 and VP5, though VP1-2-positive foci devoid of these components were observed. We note a highly conserved basic motif adjacent to the previously identified N-terminal ubiquitin hydrolase domain (DUB). The DUB domain in isolation exhibited no specific localization, but when extended to include the adjacent motif, it efficiently accumulated in the nucleus. Transfer of the isolated motif to a test protein, beta-galactosidase, conferred specific nuclear localization. Substitution of a single amino acid within the motif abolished the nuclear localization function. Deletion of the motif from intact VP1-2 abrogated its nuclear localization. Moreover, in a functional assay examining the ability of VP1-2 to complement growth of a VP1-2-ve mutant, deletion of the nuclear localization signal abolished complementation. The nuclear localization signal may be involved in transport of VP1-2 early in infection or to late assembly sites within the nucleus or, considering the potential existence of VP1-2 cleavage products, in selective localization of subdomains to different compartments.

  5. A Balance Between Two Nuclear Localization Sequences and a Nuclear Export Sequence Governs Extradenticle Subcellular Localization

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Katherine E.; Mann, Richard S.

    2007-01-01

    During animal development, transcription factor activities are modulated by several means, including subcellular localization. The Hox cofactor Extradenticle (Exd) has a dynamic subcellular localization, such that Exd is cytoplasmic by default, but is nuclear when complexed with another homeodomain protein, Homothorax (Hth). These observations raise the question of whether dimerization with Hth simply induces Exd's nuclear localization or, alternatively, if Hth is also necessary for Exd activity. To address this question, we analyzed the nuclear transport signals in Exd, including a divergent nuclear export signal (NES) and two nuclear localization signals (NLSs). We show that, although these signals are weak compared to canonical signals, they balance each other in Exd. We also provide evidence that Exd contains an NLS mask that contributes to its cytoplasmic localization. With these signals characterized, we generated forms of Exd that are nuclear localized in the absence of Hth. Surprisingly, although these Exd forms are functional, they do not phenocopy Hth overexpression. These findings suggest that Hth is required for Exd activity, not simply for inducing its nuclear localization. PMID:17277370

  6. Nuclear factor-kappa B localization and function within intrauterine tissues from term and preterm labor and cultured fetal membranes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to quantify the nuclear localization and DNA binding activity of p65, the major transactivating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) subunit, in full-thickness fetal membranes (FM) and myometrium in the absence or presence of term or preterm labor. Methods Paired full-thickness FM and myometrial samples were collected from women in the following cohorts: preterm no labor (PNL, N = 22), spontaneous preterm labor (PTL, N = 21), term no labor (TNL, N = 23), and spontaneous term labor (STL, N = 21). NF-kappaB p65 localization was assessed by immunohistochemistry, and DNA binding activity was evaluated using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based method. Results Nuclear p65 labeling was rare in amnion and chorion, irrespective of clinical context. In decidua, nuclear p65 labeling was greater in the STL group relative to the TNL cohort, but there were no differences among the TNL, PTL, and PNL cohorts. In myometrium, diffuse p65 nuclear labeling was significantly associated with both term and preterm labor. There were no significant differences in ELISA-based p65 binding activity in amnion, choriodecidual, and myometrial specimens in the absence or presence of term labor. However, parallel experiments using cultured term fetal membranes demonstrated high levels of p65-like binding even the absence of cytokine stimulation, suggesting that this assay may be of limited value when applied to tissue specimens. Conclusions These results suggest that the decidua is an important site of NF-kappaB regulation in fetal membranes, and that mechanisms other than cytoplasmic sequestration may limit NF-kappaB activation prior to term. PMID:20100341

  7. Recombinant Sj16 from Schistosoma japonicum contains a functional N-terminal nuclear localization signal necessary for nuclear translocation in dendritic cells and interleukin-10 production.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xi; Yang, Fan; Shen, Jia; Liu, Zhen; Liang, Jinyi; Zheng, Huanqin; Fung, Mingchiu; Wu, Zhongdao

    2016-12-01

    Sj16 is a Schistosoma japonicum-derived protein (16 kDa in molecular weight) that has been identified as an immune modulation molecule, but the mechanisms of modulation of immune responses are not known. In this report, we aimed to investigate the host immune regulation mechanism by recombinant Sj16 (rSj16) and thus illuminate the molecular mechanism of immune evasion by S. japonicum. The effect of rSj16 and rSj16 mutants on the biology of dendritic cells (DCs) was assessed by examining DC maturation, cytokine production, and expression of surface markers by flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We found that rSj16 significantly stimulated interleukin (IL)-10 production and inhibited LPS-induced bone marrow-derived dendrite cell (BMDC) maturation in a dose-dependent manner. By using antibody neutralization experiments and IL-10-deficient (knockout) mice, we confirmed that the inhibitory effect of rSj16 on LPS-induced BMDCs is due to its induction of IL-10 production. To understand how rSj16 induces the production of IL-10, we analyzed the protein sequence and revealed two potential nuclear localization signals (NLS) in Sj16. The N-terminal NLS (NLS1) is both necessary and sufficient for translocation of rSj16 to the nucleus of BMDCs and is important for subsequent induction of IL-10 production and the inhibition of BMDC maturation by rSj16. The results of our study concluded that the ability of rSj16 to inhibit DC functions is IL-10 dependent which is operated by IL-10R signal pathway. This study also confirmed that NLS is an important domain associated with increased production of IL-10. Our findings will extend the current understanding on host-schistosome relationship and provide insight about bottleneck of parasitic control.

  8. Sumoylation regulates nuclear localization of repressor DREAM.

    PubMed

    Palczewska, Malgorzata; Casafont, Iñigo; Ghimire, Kedar; Rojas, Ana M; Valencia, Alfonso; Lafarga, Miguel; Mellström, Britt; Naranjo, Jose R

    2011-05-01

    DREAM is a Ca(2+)-binding protein with specific functions in different cell compartments. In the nucleus, DREAM acts as a transcriptional repressor, although the mechanism that controls its nuclear localization is unknown. Yeast two-hybrid assay revealed the interaction between DREAM and the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 and bioinformatic analysis identified four sumoylation-susceptible sites in the DREAM sequence. Single K-to-R mutations at positions K26 and K90 prevented in vitro sumoylation of recombinant DREAM. DREAM sumoylation mutants retained the ability to bind to the DRE sequence but showed reduced nuclear localization and failed to regulate DRE-dependent transcription. In PC12 cells, sumoylated DREAM is present exclusively in the nucleus and neuronal differentiation induced nuclear accumulation of sumoylated DREAM. In fully differentiated trigeminal neurons, DREAM and SUMO-1 colocalized in nuclear domains associated with transcription. Our results show that sumoylation regulates the nuclear localization of DREAM in differentiated neurons. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nuclear localization of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Elzaouk, Lina; Laufs, Stephanie; Heerklotz, Dirk; Leimbacher, Walter; Blau, Nenad; Résibois, Annette; Thöny, Beat

    2004-01-05

    Biosynthesis of the tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) cofactor, essential for catecholamines and serotonin production and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, requires the enzymes GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), 6-pyruvoyl-tetrahydropterin synthase (PTPS), and sepiapterin reductase (SR). Upon studying the distribution of GTPCH and PTPS with polyclonal immune sera in cross sections of rat brain, prominent nuclear staining in many neurons was observed besides strong staining in peri-ventricular structures. Furthermore, localization studies in transgenic mice expressing a Pts-LacZ gene fusion containing the N-terminal 35 amino acids of PTPS revealed beta-galactosidase in the nucleus of neurons. In contrast, PTPS-beta-galactosidase was exclusively cytoplasmic in the convoluted kidney tubules but nuclear in other parts of the nephron, indicating again that nuclear targeting may occur only in specific cell categories. Furthermore, the N terminus of PTPS acts as a domain able to target the PTPS-beta-galactosidase fusion protein to the nucleus. In transiently transfected COS-1 cells, which do not express GTPCH and PTPS endogenously, we found cytoplasmic and nuclear staining for GTPCH and PTPS. To further investigate nuclear localization of all three BH(4)-biosynthetic enzymes, we expressed Flag-fusion proteins in transiently transfected COS-1 cells and analyzed the distribution by immunolocalization and sub-cellular fractionation using anti-Flag antibodies and enzymatic assays. Whereas 5-10% of total GTPCH and PTPS and approximately 1% of total SR were present in the nucleus, only GTPCH was confirmed to be an active enzyme in nuclear fractions. The in vitro studies together with the tissue staining corroborate specific nuclear localization of BH(4)-biosynthetic proteins with yet unknown biological function.

  10. Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Schienbein, I.; Yu, J.-Y.; Keppel, Cynthia; Morfin, Jorge; Olness, F.; Owens, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    We study nuclear effects of charged current deep inelastic neutrino-iron scattering in the framework of a chi^2 analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs). We extract a set of iron PDFs which are used to compute x_Bj-dependent and Q^2-dependent nuclear correction factors for iron structure functions which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs. We compare our results with nuclear correction factors from neutrino-nucleus scattering models and correction factors for charged-lepton--iron scattering. We find that, except for very high x_Bj, our correction factors differ in both shape and magnitude from the correction factors of the models and charged-lepton scattering.

  11. Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    I. Schienbein, J.Y. Yu, C. Keppel, J.G. Morfin, F. Olness, J.F. Owens

    2009-06-01

    We study nuclear effects of charged current deep inelastic neutrino-iron scattering in the framework of a {chi}{sup 2} analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs). We extract a set of iron PDFs which are used to compute x{sub Bj}-dependent and Q{sup 2}-dependent nuclear correction factors for iron structure functions which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs. We compare our results with nuclear correction factors from neutrino-nucleus scattering models and correction factors for charged-lepton--iron scattering. We find that, except for very high x{sub Bj}, our correction factors differ in both shape and magnitude from the correction factors of the models and charged-lepton scattering.

  12. Nuclear functions of prefoldin

    PubMed Central

    Millán-Zambrano, Gonzalo; Chávez, Sebastián

    2014-01-01

    Prefoldin is a cochaperone, present in all eukaryotes, that cooperates with the chaperonin CCT. It is known mainly for its functional relevance in the cytoplasmic folding of actin and tubulin monomers during cytoskeleton assembly. However, both canonical and prefoldin-like subunits of this heterohexameric complex have also been found in the nucleus, and are functionally connected with nuclear processes in yeast and metazoa. Plant prefoldin has also been detected in the nucleus and physically associated with a gene regulator. In this review, we summarize the information available on the involvement of prefoldin in nuclear phenomena, place special emphasis on gene transcription, and discuss the possibility of a global coordination between gene regulation and cytoplasmic dynamics mediated by prefoldin. PMID:25008233

  13. The Arginine/Lysine-Rich Element within the DNA-Binding Domain Is Essential for Nuclear Localization and Function of the Intracellular Pathogen Resistance 1

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kezhen; Wu, Yongyan; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Zihan; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The mouse intracellular pathogen resistance 1 (Ipr1) gene plays important roles in mediating host immunity and previous work showed that it enhances macrophage apoptosis upon mycobacterium infection. However, to date, little is known about the regulation pattern of Ipr1 action. Recent studies have investigated the protein-coding genes and microRNAs regulated by Ipr1 in mouse macrophages, but the structure and the functional motif of the Ipr1 protein have yet to be explored. In this study, we analyzed the domains and functional motif of the Ipr1 protein. The resulting data reveal that Ipr1 protein forms a homodimer and that the Sp100-like domain mediates the targeting of Ipr1 protein to nuclear dots (NDs). Moreover, we found that an Ipr1 mutant lacking the classic nuclear localization signal (cNLS) also translocated into the nuclei, suggesting that the cNLS is not the only factor that directs Ipr1 nuclear localization. Additionally, mechanistic studies revealed that an arginine/lysine-rich element within the DNA-binding domain (SAND domain) is critical for Ipr1 binding to the importin protein receptor NPI-1, demonstrating that this element plays an essential role in mediating the nuclear localization of Ipr1 protein. Furthermore, our results show that this arginine/lysine-rich element contributes to the transcriptional regulation and apoptotic activity of Ipr1. These findings highlight the structural foundations of Ipr1 action and provide new insights into the mechanism of Ipr1-mediated resistance to mycobacterium. PMID:27622275

  14. Phenotype of HIV-1 lacking a functional nuclear localization signal in matrix protein of gag and Vpr is comparable to wild-type HIV-1 in primary macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kootstra, N A; Schuitemaker, H

    1999-01-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is considered to infect nondividing cells because nuclear localization signals (NLS) in matrix (MA, p17(Gag)) and Vpr allow active nuclear transport of the preintegration complex. Previous studies demonstrated that HIV-1 reverse transcription is successful only in cells with proliferative potential, thus restricting HIV-1 replication to cycling cells. To sort out this apparent discrepancy we compared the phenotype of a chimeric HIV-1 variant lacking a functional Vpr and MA-NLS (R7. deltaVpr.deltaNLS), and previously described to lack replicative capacity in macrophages and growth-arrested cells, with a chimera lacking a functional Vpr (R7.deltaVpr). Both variants replicated efficiently in primary macrophages, with only minimal differences in the kinetics of reverse transcription, integration, or p24 production. In agreement with our previous observation, elongation of reverse transcription was restricted to the proliferating subpopulation of macrophages. Replication of R7.deltaVpr and R7.deltaVpr.deltaNLS could also be demonstrated in aphidicolin-treated macrophages, indicating efficient nuclear transport in G1/S phase-arrested cells. In conclusion, our results confirm the dependency of the process of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase on cell proliferation in primary macrophages and exclude an important role of MA-NLS and Vpr in macrophage infection.

  15. Dissection of a nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Hodel, M R; Corbett, A H; Hodel, A E

    2001-01-12

    The regulated process of protein import into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell is mediated by specific nuclear localization signals (NLSs) that are recognized by protein import receptors. This study seeks to decipher the energetic details of NLS recognition by the receptor importin alpha through quantitative analysis of variant NLSs. The relative importance of each residue in two monopartite NLS sequences was determined using an alanine scanning approach. These measurements yield an energetic definition of a monopartite NLS sequence where a required lysine residue is followed by two other basic residues in the sequence K(K/R)X(K/R). In addition, the energetic contributions of the second basic cluster in a bipartite NLS ( approximately 3 kcal/mol) as well as the energy of inhibition of the importin alpha importin beta-binding domain ( approximately 3 kcal/mol) were also measured. These data allow the generation of an energetic scale of nuclear localization sequences based on a peptide's affinity for the importin alpha-importin beta complex. On this scale, a functional NLS has a binding constant of approximately 10 nm, whereas a nonfunctional NLS has a 100-fold weaker affinity of 1 microm. Further correlation between the current in vitro data and in vivo function will provide the foundation for a comprehensive quantitative model of protein import.

  16. One pot synthesis of highly luminescent polyethylene glycol anchored carbon dots functionalized with a nuclear localization signal peptide for cell nucleus imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Jiang, Weihua; Qiu, Lipeng; Jiang, Xuewei; Zuo, Daiying; Wang, Dongkai; Yang, Li

    2015-04-14

    Strong blue fluorescent polyethylene glycol (PEG) anchored carbon nitride dots (CDs@PEG) with a high quantum yield (QY) of 75.8% have been synthesized by a one step hydrothermal treatment. CDs with a diameter of ca. 6 nm are well dispersed in water and present a graphite-like structure. Photoluminescence (PL) studies reveal that CDs display excitation-dependent behavior and are stable under various test conditions. Based on the as-prepared CDs, we designed novel cell nucleus targeting imaging carbon dots functionalized with a nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide. The favourable biocompatibilities of CDs and NLS modified CDs (NLS-CDs) are confirmed by in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Importantly, intracellular localization experiments in MCF7 and A549 cells demonstrate that NLS-CDs could be internalized in the nucleus and show blue light, which indicates that CDs may serve as cell nucleus imaging probes.

  17. One pot synthesis of highly luminescent polyethylene glycol anchored carbon dots functionalized with a nuclear localization signal peptide for cell nucleus imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Jiang, Weihua; Qiu, Lipeng; Jiang, Xuewei; Zuo, Daiying; Wang, Dongkai; Yang, Li

    2015-03-01

    Strong blue fluorescent polyethylene glycol (PEG) anchored carbon nitride dots (CDs@PEG) with a high quantum yield (QY) of 75.8% have been synthesized by a one step hydrothermal treatment. CDs with a diameter of ca. 6 nm are well dispersed in water and present a graphite-like structure. Photoluminescence (PL) studies reveal that CDs display excitation-dependent behavior and are stable under various test conditions. Based on the as-prepared CDs, we designed novel cell nucleus targeting imaging carbon dots functionalized with a nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide. The favourable biocompatibilities of CDs and NLS modified CDs (NLS-CDs) are confirmed by in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Importantly, intracellular localization experiments in MCF7 and A549 cells demonstrate that NLS-CDs could be internalized in the nucleus and show blue light, which indicates that CDs may serve as cell nucleus imaging probes.Strong blue fluorescent polyethylene glycol (PEG) anchored carbon nitride dots (CDs@PEG) with a high quantum yield (QY) of 75.8% have been synthesized by a one step hydrothermal treatment. CDs with a diameter of ca. 6 nm are well dispersed in water and present a graphite-like structure. Photoluminescence (PL) studies reveal that CDs display excitation-dependent behavior and are stable under various test conditions. Based on the as-prepared CDs, we designed novel cell nucleus targeting imaging carbon dots functionalized with a nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide. The favourable biocompatibilities of CDs and NLS modified CDs (NLS-CDs) are confirmed by in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Importantly, intracellular localization experiments in MCF7 and A549 cells demonstrate that NLS-CDs could be internalized in the nucleus and show blue light, which indicates that CDs may serve as cell nucleus imaging probes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The formulation of PEGylation CD optimization procedure, Table S1 and Fig. S1-S7. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01080

  18. Nuclear Localization of the Autism Candidate Gene Neurobeachin and Functional Interaction with the NOTCH1 Intracellular Domain Indicate a Role in Regulating Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tuand, Krizia; Stijnen, Pieter; Volders, Karolien; Declercq, Jeroen; Nuytens, Kim; Meulemans, Sandra; Creemers, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Neurobeachin (NBEA) is an autism spectrum disorders (ASD) candidate gene. NBEA deficiency affects regulated secretion, receptor trafficking, synaptic architecture and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation. NBEA is a large multidomain scaffolding protein. From N- to C-terminus, NBEA has a concanavalin A-like lectin domain flanked by armadillo repeats (ACA), an A-kinase anchoring protein domain that can bind to PKA, a domain of unknown function (DUF1088) and a BEACH domain, preceded by a pleckstrin homology-like domain and followed by WD40 repeats (PBW). Although most of these domains mediate protein-protein interactions, no interaction screen has yet been performed. Methods Yeast two-hybrid screens with the ACA and PBW domain modules of NBEA gave a list of interaction partners, which were analyzed for Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment. Neuro-2a cells were used for confocal microscopy and nuclear extraction analysis. NOTCH-mediated transcription was studied with luciferase reporter assays and qRT-PCR, combined with NBEA knockdown or overexpression. Results Both domain modules showed a GO enrichment for the nucleus. PBW almost exclusively interacted with transcription regulators, while ACA interacted with a number of PKA substrates. NBEA was partially localized in the nucleus of Neuro-2a cells, albeit much less than in the cytoplasm. A nuclear localization signal was found in the DUF1088 domain, which was shown to contribute to the nuclear localization of an EGFP-DPBW fusion protein. Yeast two-hybrid identified the Notch1 intracellular domain as a physical interactor of the PBW domain and a role for NBEA as a negative regulator in Notch-mediated transcription was demonstrated. Conclusion Defining novel interaction partners of conserved NBEA domain modules identified a role for NBEA as transcriptional regulator in the nucleus. The physical interaction of NBEA with NOTCH1 is most relevant for ASD pathogenesis because NOTCH signaling is essential for

  19. Nuclear co-localization and functional interaction of COX-2 and HIF-1α characterize bone metastasis of human breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Maroni, Paola; Matteucci, Emanuela; Luzzati, Alessandro; Perrucchini, Giuseppe; Bendinelli, Paola; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this article is to identify nuclear co-localization of COX-2 and HIF-1α in human-bone metastasis of breast cancer, index of transcriptionally activated cells and functional for gene expression. In particular, we verified whether hypoxia exerted a direct role on metastasis-gene expression or through COX-2 signaling, due to the relevance for clinical implications to individuate molecular targets for diagnosis and therapy. The experiments were performed in vitro with two metastatic clones, 1833 and MDA-231BO, and the parental MDA-MB231 cells, in vivo (1833-xenograft model), and in human-bone metastasis specimens. In 1833 cells in vitro, COX-2 signaling pathway was critical for nuclear HIF-1α-protein expression/translocation, mechanisms determining HIF-1 activity and gene expression. The data were corroborated by immunohistochemistry in human-bone metastasis specimens. COX-2 and HIF-1α showed wide co-localization in the nucleus, indicative of COX-2-nuclear import in transcriptionally activated metastatic cells and consistent with COX-2-HIF-1α functional interaction. A network of microenvironmental signals controlled COX-2 induction and HIF-1 activation downstream. In fact, hypoxia through HGF and TGF-β1 autoregulatory loops triggered a specific array of transcription factors responsible for COX-2 transactivation. The novelty was that HGF and TGF-β1 biological signals were produced by hypoxic metastatic cells and, therefore, the microenvironment seemed to be modified by metastatic-cell engraftment in the bone. In agreement, HIF-1α expression in bone marrow supportive cells occurred in metastasis-bearing animals. Altogether, the data supported the pre-metastatic-niche theory. Our observations might be useful to design therapies against bone metastasis, by affecting the phenotype changes of metastatic cells occurring at the secondary growth site through COX-2-HIF-1 interaction.

  20. A novel function for the IκB inhibitor Cactus in promoting Dorsal nuclear localization and activity in the Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Maira Arruda; Fontenele, Marcio; Lim, Bomyi; Bisch, Paulo Mascarello; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Araujo, Helena Marcolla

    2017-08-15

    The evolutionarily conserved Toll signaling pathway controls innate immunity across phyla and embryonic patterning in insects. In the Drosophila embryo, Toll is required to establish gene expression domains along the dorsal-ventral axis. Pathway activation induces degradation of the IκB inhibitor Cactus, resulting in a ventral-to-dorsal nuclear gradient of the NFκB effector Dorsal. Here, we investigate how cactus modulates Toll signals through its effects on the Dorsal gradient and on Dorsal target genes. Quantitative analysis using a series of loss- and gain-of-function conditions shows that the ventral and lateral aspects of the Dorsal gradient can behave differently with respect to Cactus fluctuations. In lateral and dorsal embryo domains, loss of Cactus allows more Dorsal to translocate to the nucleus. Unexpectedly, cactus loss-of-function alleles decrease Dorsal nuclear localization ventrally, where Toll signals are high. Overexpression analysis suggests that this ability of Cactus to enhance Toll stems from the mobilization of a free Cactus pool induced by the Calpain A protease. These results indicate that Cactus acts to bolster Dorsal activation, in addition to its role as a NFκB inhibitor, ensuring a correct response to Toll signals. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Espin actin-cytoskeletal proteins are in rat type I spiral ganglion neurons and include splice-isoforms with a functional nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Sekerková, Gabriella; Zheng, Lili; Mugnaini, Enrico; Bartles, James R

    2008-08-20

    The espins are Ca(2+)-resistant actin-bundling proteins that are enriched in hair cell stereocilia and sensory cell microvilli. Here, we report a novel localization of espins to a large proportion of rat type I spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) and their projections to the cochlear nucleus (CN). Moreover, we show that a fraction of these espins is in the nucleus of SGNs owing to the presence of splice-isoforms that contain a functional nuclear localization signal (NLS). Espin antibody labeled approximately 83% of type I SGNs, and the labeling intensity increased dramatically during early postnatal development. Type II SGNs and vestibular ganglion neurons were unlabeled. In the CN, espin-positive auditory nerve fibers showed a projection pattern typical of type I SGNs, with intense labeling in the nerve root region and posteroventral CN (PVCN). The anteroventral CN (AVCN) showed moderate labeling, whereas the dorsal CN showed weak labeling that was restricted to the deep layer. Espin-positive synaptic terminals were enriched around nerve root neurons and octopus cells in the PVCN and were also found on globular bushy cells and multipolar neurons in the PVCN and AVCN. SGNs expressed multiple espin transcripts and proteins, including splice-isoforms that contain a nonapeptide, which is rich in positively charged amino acids and creates a bipartite NLS. The nonapeptide was necessary to target espin isoforms to the nucleus and was sufficient to target an unrelated protein to the nucleus when joined with the upstream di-arginine-containing octapeptide. The presence of cytoplasmic and nuclear espins in SGNs suggests additional roles for espins in auditory neuroscience.

  2. Distinctive Nuclear Localization Signals in the Oomycete Phytophthora sojae

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yufeng; Jang, Hyo Sang; Watson, Gregory W.; Wellappili, Dulani P.; Tyler, Brett M.

    2017-01-01

    To date, nuclear localization signals (NLSs) that target proteins to nuclei in oomycetes have not been defined, but have been assumed to be the same as in higher eukaryotes. Here, we use the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae as a model to investigate these sequences in oomycetes. By establishing a reliable in vivo NLS assay based on confocal microscopy, we found that many canonical monopartite and bipartite classical NLSs (cNLSs) mediated nuclear import poorly in P. sojae. We found that efficient localization of P. sojae nuclear proteins by cNLSs requires additional basic amino acids at distal sites or collaboration with other NLSs. We found that several representatives of another well-characterized NLS, proline-tyrosine NLS (PY-NLS) also functioned poorly in P. sojae. To characterize PY-NLSs in P. sojae, we experimentally defined the residues required by functional PY-NLSs in three P. sojae nuclear-localized proteins. These results showed that functional P. sojae PY-NLSs include an additional cluster of basic residues for efficient nuclear import. Finally, analysis of several highly conserved P. sojae nuclear proteins including ribosomal proteins and core histones revealed that these proteins exhibit a similar but stronger set of sequence requirements for nuclear targeting compared with their orthologs in mammals or yeast. PMID:28210240

  3. Distinctive Nuclear Localization Signals in the Oomycete Phytophthora sojae.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yufeng; Jang, Hyo Sang; Watson, Gregory W; Wellappili, Dulani P; Tyler, Brett M

    2017-01-01

    To date, nuclear localization signals (NLSs) that target proteins to nuclei in oomycetes have not been defined, but have been assumed to be the same as in higher eukaryotes. Here, we use the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae as a model to investigate these sequences in oomycetes. By establishing a reliable in vivo NLS assay based on confocal microscopy, we found that many canonical monopartite and bipartite classical NLSs (cNLSs) mediated nuclear import poorly in P. sojae. We found that efficient localization of P. sojae nuclear proteins by cNLSs requires additional basic amino acids at distal sites or collaboration with other NLSs. We found that several representatives of another well-characterized NLS, proline-tyrosine NLS (PY-NLS) also functioned poorly in P. sojae. To characterize PY-NLSs in P. sojae, we experimentally defined the residues required by functional PY-NLSs in three P. sojae nuclear-localized proteins. These results showed that functional P. sojae PY-NLSs include an additional cluster of basic residues for efficient nuclear import. Finally, analysis of several highly conserved P. sojae nuclear proteins including ribosomal proteins and core histones revealed that these proteins exhibit a similar but stronger set of sequence requirements for nuclear targeting compared with their orthologs in mammals or yeast.

  4. Nuclear overlap functions

    SciTech Connect

    Eskola, K.J.; Vogt, R.; Wang, X.N.

    1995-07-01

    A three parameter Wood-Saxon shape is used to describe the nuclear density distribution, which R{sub A} is the nuclear radius, {approx} is the surface thickness, and {omega} allows for central irregularities. The electron scattering data is used where available for R{sub A}, z, and {omega}. When data is unavailable, the parameters {omega} = O, z = 0.54 fm and R{sub A} = 1.19 A{sup 1/3} - 1.61 A{sup -1/3} fm are used. The central density {rho}{sub 0} is found from the normalization {infinity} d{sup 3}r{rho}{sub A}(r) = A.

  5. Functional evolution of nuclear structure

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of the nucleus, the defining feature of eukaryotic cells, was long shrouded in speculation and mystery. There is now strong evidence that nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and nuclear membranes coevolved with the endomembrane system, and that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) had fully functional NPCs. Recent studies have identified many components of the nuclear envelope in living Opisthokonts, the eukaryotic supergroup that includes fungi and metazoan animals. These components include diverse chromatin-binding membrane proteins, and membrane proteins with adhesive lumenal domains that may have contributed to the evolution of nuclear membrane architecture. Further discoveries about the nucleoskeleton suggest that the evolution of nuclear structure was tightly coupled to genome partitioning during mitosis. PMID:22006947

  6. Fragmentation functions in nuclear media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassot, Rodolfo; Stratmann, Marco; Zurita, Pia

    2010-03-01

    We perform a detailed phenomenological analysis of how well hadronization in nuclear environments can be described in terms of effective fragmentation functions. The medium modified fragmentation functions are assumed to factorize from the partonic scattering cross sections and evolve in the hard scale in the same way as the standard or vacuum fragmentation functions. Based on precise data on semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering off nuclei and hadron production in deuteron-gold collisions, we extract sets of effective fragmentation functions for pions and kaons at next-to-leading order accuracy. The obtained sets provide a rather accurate description of the kinematical dependence of the analyzed cross sections and are found to differ significantly from standard fragmentation functions both in shape and magnitude. Our results support the notion of factorization and universality in the studied nuclear environments, at least in an effective way and within the precision of the available data.

  7. Screening of nuclear targeting proteins in Acinetobacter baumannii based on nuclear localization signals.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong Chan; Gurung, Mamata; Lee, Jung Hwa; Lee, Yong Seok; Choi, Chi Won; Kim, Seung Il; Lee, Je Chul

    2012-05-01

    Nuclear targeting of bacterial proteins is an emerging pathogenic mechanism in bacteria. However, due to the absence of an appropriate screening system for nuclear targeting proteins, systematic approaches to nuclear targeting of bacterial proteins and subsequent host cell pathology are limited. In this study, we developed a screening system for nuclear targeting proteins in Acinetobacter baumannii using a combination of bioinformatic analysis based on nuclear localization signal (NLS) and the Gateway(®) recombinational cloning system. Among 3367 open reading frames of A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 34 functional or hypothetical proteins were predicted to carry the putative NLS sequences. Of the 29 clones generated by the Gateway(®) recombinational cloning system, 14 proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were targeted to nuclei of host cells. Among the 14 nuclear targeting proteins, S21, L20, and L32 ribosomal proteins and transposase carried putative nuclear export signal (NES) sequences, but only transposase harbored the functional NES. After translocation to nuclei of host cells, four A. baumannii proteins induced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, we have developed a screening system for nuclear targeting proteins in A. baumannii. This system may open the way to a new field of bacterial pathogenesis.

  8. Whole-genome screening identifies proteins localized to distinct nuclear bodies.

    PubMed

    Fong, Ka-Wing; Li, Yujing; Wang, Wenqi; Ma, Wenbin; Li, Kunpeng; Qi, Robert Z; Liu, Dan; Songyang, Zhou; Chen, Junjie

    2013-10-14

    The nucleus is a unique organelle that contains essential genetic materials in chromosome territories. The interchromatin space is composed of nuclear subcompartments, which are defined by several distinctive nuclear bodies believed to be factories of DNA or RNA processing and sites of transcriptional and/or posttranscriptional regulation. In this paper, we performed a genome-wide microscopy-based screening for proteins that form nuclear foci and characterized their localizations using markers of known nuclear bodies. In total, we identified 325 proteins localized to distinct nuclear bodies, including nucleoli (148), promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (38), nuclear speckles (27), paraspeckles (24), Cajal bodies (17), Sam68 nuclear bodies (5), Polycomb bodies (2), and uncharacterized nuclear bodies (64). Functional validation revealed several proteins potentially involved in the assembly of Cajal bodies and paraspeckles. Together, these data establish the first atlas of human proteins in different nuclear bodies and provide key information for research on nuclear bodies.

  9. Nuclear tropomyosin and troponin in striated muscle: new roles in a new locale?

    PubMed

    Chase, P Bryant; Szczypinski, Mark P; Soto, Elliott P

    2013-08-01

    Tropomyosin and troponin have well known Ca(2+)-regulatory functions in the striated muscle sarcomere. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence that tropomyosin and troponin are localized, with as yet unidentified functional roles, in the striated muscle cell nucleus. We also apply bioinformatics approaches that predict localization of some tropomyosin and troponin to the nucleus, and that SUMOylation could be a covalent modification that modulates their nuclear localization and function. Further, we provide examples of cardiomyopathy mutations that alter the predicted likelihood of nuclear localization and SUMOylation of tropomyosin. These observations suggest novel mechanisms by which cardiomyopathy mutations in tropomyosin and troponin might alter not only cardiac contractility but also nuclear function.

  10. Cellular stress stimulates nuclear localization signal (NLS) independent nuclear transport of MRJ

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Joel F.; Sykora, Landon J.; Barik Letostak, Tiasha; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Mitra, Aparna; Barik, Sailen; Shevde, Lalita A.; Samant, Rajeev S.

    2012-06-10

    HSP40 family member MRJ (DNAJB6) has been in the spot light for its relevance to Huntington's, Parkinson's diseases, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, placental development, neural stem cells, cell cycle and malignancies such as breast cancer and melanoma. This gene has two spliced variants coding for 2 distinct proteins with significant homology. However, MRJ(L) (large variant) is predominantly localized to the nucleus whereas MRJ(S) (small variant) is predominantly cytoplasmic. Interestingly MRJ(S) translocates to the nucleus in response to heat shock. The classical heat shock proteins respond to crises (stress) by increasing the number of molecules, usually by transcriptional up-regulation. Our studies imply that a quick increase in the molar concentration of MRJ in the nuclear compartment is a novel method by which MRJ responds to stress. We found that MRJ(S) shows NLS (nuclear localization signal) independent nuclear localization in response to heat shock and hypoxia. The specificity of this response is realized due to lack of such response by MRJ(S) when challenged by other stressors, such as some cytokines or UV light. Deletion analysis has allowed us to narrow down on a 20 amino acid stretch at the C-terminal region of MRJ(S) as a potential stress sensing region. Functional studies indicated that constitutive nuclear localization of MRJ(S) promoted attributes of malignancy such as proliferation and invasiveness overall indicating distinct phenotypic characteristics of nuclear MRJ(S).

  11. Cellular stress stimulates nuclear localization signal (NLS) independent nuclear transport of MRJ

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Joel F.; Sykora, Landon J.; Barik-Letostak, Tiasha; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Mitra, Aparna; Barik, Sailen; Shevde, Lalita A.; Samant, Rajeev S.

    2012-01-01

    HSP40 family member MRJ (DNAJB6) has been in the spot light for its relevance to Huntington’s, Parkinson’s diseases, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, placental development, neural stem cells, cell cycle and malignancies such as breast cancer and melanoma. This gene has two spliced variants coding for 2 distinct proteins with significant homology. However, MRJ(L) (large variant) is predominantly localized to the nucleus whereas MRJ(S) (small variant) is predominantly cytoplasmic. Interestingly MRJ(S) translocates to the nucleus in response to heat shock. The classical heat shock proteins respond to crises (stress) by increasing the number of molecules, usually by transcriptional up-regulation. Our studies imply that a quick increase in the molar concentration of MRJ in the nuclear compartment is a novel method by which MRJ responds to stress. We found that MRJ(S) shows NLS (nuclear localization signal) independent nuclear localization in response to heat shock and hypoxia. The specificity of this response is realized due to lack of such response by MRJ(S) when challenged by other stressors, such as some cytokines or UV light. Deletion analysis has allowed us to narrow down on a 20 amino acid stretch at the C-terminal region of MRJ(S) as a potential stress sensing region. Functional studies indicated that constitutive nuclear localization of MRJ(S) promoted attributes of malignancy such as proliferation and invasiveness overall indicating distinct phenotypic characteristics of nuclear MRJ(S). PMID:22504047

  12. HMG Modifications and Nuclear Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingchun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2009-01-01

    High mobility group (HMG) proteins assume important roles in regulating chromatin dynamics, transcriptional activities of genes and other cellular processes. Post-translational modifications of HMG proteins can alter their interactions with DNA and proteins, and consequently, affect their biological activities. Although the mechanisms through which these modifications are involved in regulating biological processes in different cellular contexts are not fully understood, new insights into these modification “codes” have emerged from the increasing appreciation of the functions of these proteins. In this review, we focus on the chemical modifications of mammalian HMG proteins and highlight their roles in nuclear functions. PMID:20123066

  13. [Mechanism for subcellular localization of nuclear receptor CAR].

    PubMed

    Kanno, Yuichiro; Inouye, Yoshio

    2011-03-01

    Animals including human beings have defense mechanisms against the toxicity of xenobiotics such as medicinal compounds and environmental pollutants. Receptor-type transcriptional factors, such as aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR), play important roles in the defense against xenobiotic toxicities. In the absence of stimuli, these receptors are distributed predominantly in the cytoplasmic compartment. Following xenobiotic stimuli, receptors translocate into the nucleus and transactivate its target genes. However, the exogenously expressed CAR translocates spontaneously into the nucleus in immortal cells. Previously, we identified subcellular localization signals in rat CAR: nuclear localization signal (NLS), nuclear export signal (NES) and cytoplasmic retention region (CRR). Lack of CRR function might be responsible for the spontaneous nuclear accumulation of CAR in immortal cells. Further, the nuclear import of CAR is regulated by the importin-Ran system, which is required for maintaining an intact microtubule network. Clarifying the mechanisms underlying the nuclear translocation of CAR would be useful for the establishment of novel assay systems for the screening of ligands and activators of CAR using immortal cells without sacrificing animals.

  14. Classic Nuclear Localization Signals and a Novel Nuclear Localization Motif Are Required for Nuclear Transport of Porcine Parvovirus Capsid Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Boisvert, Maude; Bouchard-Lévesque, Véronique; Fernandes, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nuclear targeting of capsid proteins (VPs) is important for genome delivery and precedes assembly in the replication cycle of porcine parvovirus (PPV). Clusters of basic amino acids, corresponding to potential nuclear localization signals (NLS), were found only in the unique region of VP1 (VP1up, for VP1 unique part). Of the five identified basic regions (BR), three were important for nuclear localization of VP1up: BR1 was a classic Pat7 NLS, and the combination of BR4 and BR5 was a classic bipartite NLS. These NLS were essential for viral replication. VP2, the major capsid protein, lacked these NLS and contained no region with more than two basic amino acids in proximity. However, three regions of basic clusters were identified in the folded protein, assembled into a trimeric structure. Mutagenesis experiments showed that only one of these three regions was involved in VP2 transport to the nucleus. This structural NLS, termed the nuclear localization motif (NLM), is located inside the assembled capsid and thus can be used to transport trimers to the nucleus in late steps of infection but not for virions in initial infection steps. The two NLS of VP1up are located in the N-terminal part of the protein, externalized from the capsid during endosomal transit, exposing them for nuclear targeting during early steps of infection. Globally, the determinants of nuclear transport of structural proteins of PPV were different from those of closely related parvoviruses. IMPORTANCE Most DNA viruses use the nucleus for their replication cycle. Thus, structural proteins need to be targeted to this cellular compartment at two distinct steps of the infection: in early steps to deliver viral genomes to the nucleus and in late steps to assemble new viruses. Nuclear targeting of proteins depends on the recognition of a stretch of basic amino acids by cellular transport proteins. This study reports the identification of two classic nuclear localization signals in the minor

  15. Chitosan Nanoparticles for Nuclear Targeting: The Effect of Nanoparticle Size and Nuclear Localization Sequence Density.

    PubMed

    Tammam, Salma N; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Breitinger, Hans G; Lamprecht, Alf

    2015-12-07

    Many recently discovered therapeutic proteins exert their main function in the nucleus, thus requiring both efficient uptake and correct intracellular targeting. Chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted interest as protein delivery vehicles due to their biocompatibility and ability to escape the endosomes offering high potential for nuclear delivery. Molecular entry into the nucleus occurs through the nuclear pore complexes, the efficiency of which is dependent on NP size and the presence of nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Chitosan nanoparticles of different sizes (S-NPs ≈ 25 nm; L-NP ≈ 150 nm) were formulated, and they were modified with different densities of the octapeptide NLS CPKKKRKV (S-NPs, 0.25, 0.5, 2.0 NLS/nm(2); L-NPs, 0.6, 0.9, 2 NLS/nm(2)). Unmodified and NLS-tagged NPs were evaluated for their protein loading capacity, extent of cell association, cell uptake, cell surface binding, and finally nuclear delivery efficiency in L929 fibroblasts. To avoid errors generated with cell fractionation and nuclear isolation protocols, nuclear delivery was assessed in intact cells utilizing Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) fluorometry and microscopy. Although L-NPs showed ≈10-fold increase in protein loading per NP when compared to S-NPs, due to higher cell association and uptake S-NPs showed superior protein delivery. NLS exerts a size and density dependent effect on nanoparticle uptake and surface binding, with a general reduction in NP cell surface binding and an increase in cell uptake with the increase in NLS density (up to 8.4-fold increase in uptake of High-NLS-L-NPs (2 NLS/nm(2)) compared to unmodified L-NPs). However, for nuclear delivery, unmodified S-NPs show higher nuclear localization rates when compared to NLS modified NPs (up to 5-fold by FRET microscopy). For L-NPs an intermediate NLS density (0.9 NLS/nm(2)) seems to provide highest nuclear localization (3.7-fold increase in nuclear delivery compared to High

  16. Autoacetylation regulates P/CAF nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Blanco-García, Noemí; Asensio-Juan, Elena; de la Cruz, Xavier; Martínez-Balbás, Marian A

    2009-01-16

    Acetylation is a posttranslational modification that alters the biological activities of proteins by affecting their association with other proteins or DNA, their catalytic activities, or their subcellular distribution. The acetyltransferase P/CAF is autoacetylated and acetylated by p300 in vivo. P/CAF autoacetylation is an intramolecular or intermolecular event. Intramolecular acetylation targets five lysines within the nuclear localization signal at the P/CAF C terminus. We analyzed how the subcellular distribution of P/CAF is regulated by intramolecular autoacetylation and found that a P/CAF mutant lacking histone acetyltransferase activity accumulated primarily in the cytoplasm. This cytoplasmic fraction of P/CAF is enriched for nonautoacetylated P/CAF. In addition, P/CAF deacetylation by HDAC3 and in a minor degree by HDAC1, HDAC2, or HDAC4 leads to cytoplasmic accumulation of P/CAF. Importantly, our data show that P/CAF accumulates in the cytoplasm during apoptosis. These results reveal the molecular mechanism of autoacetylation control of P/CAF nuclear translocation and suggest a novel pathway by which P/CAF activity is controlled in vivo.

  17. Localized functionalization of single nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, J; Lee, J I; Ratto, T V; Letant, S E

    2005-09-12

    We demonstrate the localization of chemical functionality at the entrance of single nanopores for the first time by using the controlled growth of an oxide ring. Nanopores were fabricated by Focused Ion Beam machining on silicon platforms, locally derivatized by ion beam assisted oxide deposition, and further functionalized with DNA probes via silane chemistry. Ionic current recorded through single nanopores at various stages of the fabrication process demonstrated that the apertures can be locally functionalized with DNA probes. Future applications for this functional platform include the selective detection of biological organisms and molecules by ionic current blockade measurements.

  18. Expanding the definition of the classical bipartite nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Lange, Allison; McLane, Laura M; Mills, Ryan E; Devine, Scott E; Corbett, Anita H

    2010-03-01

    Nuclear localization signals (NLSs) are amino acid sequences that target cargo proteins into the nucleus. Rigorous characterization of NLS motifs is essential to understanding and predicting pathways for nuclear import. The best-characterized NLS is the classical NLS (cNLS), which is recognized by the cNLS receptor, importin-alpha. cNLSs are conventionally defined as having one (monopartite) or two clusters of basic amino acids separated by a 9-12 aa linker (bipartite). Motivated by the finding that Ty1 integrase, which contains an unconventional putative bipartite cNLS with a 29 aa linker, exploits the classical nuclear import machinery, we assessed the functional boundaries for linker length within a bipartite cNLS. We confirmed that the integrase cNLS is a bona fide bipartite cNLS, then carried out a systematic analysis of linker length in an obligate bipartite cNLS cargo, which revealed that some linkers longer than conventionally defined can function in nuclear import. Linker function is dependent on the sequence and likely the inherent flexibility of the linker. Subsequently, we interrogated the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome to identify cellular proteins containing putative long bipartite cNLSs. We experimentally confirmed that Rrp4 contains a bipartite cNLS with a 25 aa linker. Our studies show that the traditional definition of bipartite cNLSs is too restrictive and linker length can vary depending on amino acid composition.

  19. Dipole rescattering and the nuclear structure function

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, F.; Goncalves, V. P.; Navarra, F. S.; Oliveira, E. G.

    2013-03-25

    In the framework of the dipole model, we study the effects of the dipole multiple scatterings in a nuclear target and compute the nuclear structure function. We compare different unitarization schemes and confront our results with the E665 data.

  20. The human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 Tof protein contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal that is able to functionally replace the amino-terminal domain of Rex.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, D M; Ciminale, V; Zotti, L; Rosato, A; Chieco-Bianchi, L

    1997-01-01

    The X region of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) encodes two nucleolar/nuclear proteins, the posttranscriptional regulator of mRNA expression Rex and a protein of unknown function named Tof. To gain insight into the possible biological role of Tof, we investigated the mechanism governing its intracellular trafficking and identified its nucleolar/nuclear localization signal (NLS). Mutational analysis of Tof revealed that its NLS was located between amino acids 71 and 98 and contained two arginine-rich domains that functioned in an interdependent manner. Studies of Tof-Rex hybrid proteins showed that the Tof NLS could functionally replace the NLS of Rex at the level of nuclear targeting. As the NLS of Rex is known to mediate its interaction with its RNA target, the Rex-responsive element (RXRE), we tested whether the NLS of Tof could replace that of Rex in mediating activation of a RXRE-containing mRNA. Results showed that the NLS of Tof was indeed able to mediate activation of RXRE-containing mRNAs, suggesting that Tof itself may function as a regulator of RNA expression and utilization. A comparison of their compartmentalization in response to actinomycin D treatment indicated that Tof did not share Rex's shuttling pathway. Expression of Tof from its natural multiply spliced mRNA required the presence of Rex, suggesting that Tof may regulate viral or cellular mRNA expression during the later stages of viral replication.

  1. Characterization of a baculovirus nuclear localization signal domain in the late expression factor 3 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Au, Victoria; Yu Mei; Carstens, Eric B.

    2009-03-01

    The baculovirus Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) single-stranded DNA binding protein LEF-3 is a multi-functional protein that is required to transport the helicase protein P143 into the nucleus of infected cells where they function to replicate viral DNA. The N-terminal 56 amino acid region of LEF-3 is required for nuclear transport. In this report, we analyzed the effect of site-specific mutagenesis of LEF-3 on its intracellular distribution. Fluorescence microscopy of expression plasmid-transfected cells demonstrated that the residues 28 to 32 formed the core nuclear localization signal, but other adjacent positively-charged residues augmented these sequences. Comparison with other group I Alphabaculoviruses suggested that this core region functionally duplicated residues including 18 and 19. This was demonstrated by the loss of nuclear localization when the equivalent residues (18 to 20) in Choristoneura fumiferana nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV) LEF-3 were mutated. The AcMNPV LEF-3 nuclear localization domain was also shown to drive nuclear transport in mammalian cells indicating that the protein nuclear import systems in insect and mammalian cells are conserved. We also demonstrated by mutagenesis that two conserved cysteine residues located at 82 and 106 were not essential for nuclear localization or for interaction with P143. However, by using a modified construct of P143 that localized on its own to the nucleus, we demonstrated that a functional nuclear localization domain on LEF-3 was required for interaction between LEF-3 and P143.

  2. Nuclear Localization of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling-1 Regulates Local Immunity in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jana; Weitnauer, Michael; Boutin, Sébastien; Küblbeck, Günter; Thiele, Sabrina; Walker, Patrick; Lasitschka, Felix; Lunding, Lars; Orinska, Zane; Vock, Christina; Arnold, Bernd; Wegmann, Michael; Dalpke, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) is a negative feedback inhibitor of cytoplasmic Janus kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling. SOCS1 also contains a nuclear localization sequence (NLS), yet, the in vivo importance of nuclear translocation is unknown. We generated transgenic mice containing mutated Socs1ΔNLS that fails to translocate in the cell nucleus (MGLtg mice). Whereas mice fully deficient for SOCS1 die within the first 3 weeks due to excessive interferon signaling and multiorgan inflammation, mice expressing only non-nuclear Socs1ΔNLS (Socs1−/−MGLtg mice) were rescued from early lethality. Canonical interferon gamma signaling was still functional in Socs1−/−MGLtg mice as shown by unaltered tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1 and whole genome expression analysis. However, a subset of NFκB inducible genes was dysregulated. Socs1−/−MGLtg mice spontaneously developed low-grade inflammation in the lung and had elevated Th2-type cytokines. Upon ovalbumin sensitization and challenge, airway eosinophilia was increased in Socs1−/−MGLtg mice. Decreased transepithelial electrical resistance in trachea epithelial cells from Socs1−/−MGLtg mice suggests disrupted epithelial cell barrier. The results indicate that nuclear SOCS1 is a regulator of local immunity in the lung and unravel a so far unrecognized function for SOCS1 in the cell nucleus. PMID:27917175

  3. Identification of a nuclear localization signal in the polo box domain of Plk1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moon-Sing; Huang, Yi-Han; Huang, Shu-Ping; Lin, Ru-Inn; Wu, Shu-Fen; Li, Chin

    2009-10-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 plays an essential role in mitosis and cytokinesis. Expression and nuclear localization of Plk1 during the S phase are necessary for its functions. Although it was reported that a bipartite nuclear localization signal located at the N-terminal kinase domain is required for nuclear import of Plk1, Plk1 carrying mutations in the polo box I of the polo box domain exhibited increased cytoplasmic accumulation. We further showed that the polo box domain was able to confer nuclear import of beta-galactosidase in vivo and GST-EGFP in vitro. The import carriers transportin and importin alpha were found to interact with the polo box domain directly in a Ran-GTP sensitive manner. These results indicate the presence of a nuclear localization signal in the polo box domain. A 38 amino acid sequence with the function of nuclear localization signal was identified to interact with transportin. Our findings demonstrated that a transportin-dependent nuclear localization signal is present in the polo box domain of Plk1, possibly required for efficient nuclear import. Showing little similarity to the M9 sequence, the 38 amino acid sequence identified here likely represents a novel nuclear localization signal.

  4. Regulation of Greatwall kinase by protein stabilization and nuclear localization

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tomomi M; Wang, Ling; Fisher, Laura A; Eckerdt, Frank D; Peng, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    Greatwall (Gwl) functions as an essential mitotic kinase by antagonizing protein phosphatase 2A. In this study we identified Hsp90, Cdc37 and members of the importin α and β families as the major binding partners of Gwl. Both Hsp90/Cdc37 chaperone and importin complexes associated with the N-terminal kinase domain of Gwl, whereas an intact glycine-rich loop at the N-terminus of Gwl was essential for binding of Hsp90/Cdc37 but not importins. We found that Hsp90 inhibition led to destabilization of Gwl, a mechanism that may partially contribute to the emerging role of Hsp90 in cell cycle progression and the anti-proliferative potential of Hsp90 inhibition. Moreover, in agreement with its importin association, Gwl exhibited nuclear localization in interphase Xenopus S3 cells, and dynamic nucleocytoplasmic distribution during mitosis. We identified KR456/457 as the locus of importin binding and the functional NLS of Gwl. Mutation of this site resulted in exclusion of Gwl from the nucleus. Finally, we showed that the Gwl nuclear localization is indispensable for the biochemical function of Gwl in promoting mitotic entry. PMID:25483093

  5. A novel RNA motif mediates the strict nuclear localization of a long noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Gunawardane, Lalith; Niazi, Farshad; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Chen, Xin; Valadkhan, Saba

    2014-06-01

    The ubiquitous presence of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in eukaryotes points to the importance of understanding how their sequences impact function. As many lncRNAs regulate nuclear events and thus must localize to nuclei, we analyzed the sequence requirements for nuclear localization in an intergenic lncRNA named BORG (BMP2-OP1-responsive gene), which is both spliced and polyadenylated but is strictly localized in nuclei. Subcellular localization of BORG was not dependent on the context or level of its expression or decay but rather depended on the sequence of the mature, spliced transcript. Mutational analyses indicated that nuclear localization of BORG was mediated through a novel RNA motif consisting of the pentamer sequence AGCCC with sequence restrictions at positions -8 (T or A) and -3 (G or C) relative to the first nucleotide of the pentamer. Mutation of the motif to a scrambled sequence resulted in complete loss of nuclear localization, while addition of even a single copy of the motif to a cytoplasmically localized RNA was sufficient to impart nuclear localization. Further, the presence of this motif in other cellular RNAs showed a direct correlation with nuclear localization, suggesting that the motif may act as a general nuclear localization signal for cellular RNAs. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. A Novel RNA Motif Mediates the Strict Nuclear Localization of a Long Noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bing; Gunawardane, Lalith; Niazi, Farshad; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Chen, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous presence of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in eukaryotes points to the importance of understanding how their sequences impact function. As many lncRNAs regulate nuclear events and thus must localize to nuclei, we analyzed the sequence requirements for nuclear localization in an intergenic lncRNA named BORG (BMP2-OP1-responsive gene), which is both spliced and polyadenylated but is strictly localized in nuclei. Subcellular localization of BORG was not dependent on the context or level of its expression or decay but rather depended on the sequence of the mature, spliced transcript. Mutational analyses indicated that nuclear localization of BORG was mediated through a novel RNA motif consisting of the pentamer sequence AGCCC with sequence restrictions at positions −8 (T or A) and −3 (G or C) relative to the first nucleotide of the pentamer. Mutation of the motif to a scrambled sequence resulted in complete loss of nuclear localization, while addition of even a single copy of the motif to a cytoplasmically localized RNA was sufficient to impart nuclear localization. Further, the presence of this motif in other cellular RNAs showed a direct correlation with nuclear localization, suggesting that the motif may act as a general nuclear localization signal for cellular RNAs. PMID:24732794

  7. Localized Hartree product treatment of multiple protons in the nuclear-electronic orbital framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Benjamin; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2010-02-01

    An approximation for treating multiple quantum nuclei within the nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) framework for molecular systems is presented. In the approximation to NEO-Hartree-Fock, the nuclear wave function is represented by a Hartree product rather than a Slater determinant, corresponding to the neglect of the nuclear exchange interactions. In the approximation to NEO-density functional theory, the nuclear exchange-correlation functional is chosen to be the diagonal nuclear exchange interaction terms, thereby eliminating the nuclear self-interaction terms. To further enhance the simplicity and computational efficiency, the nuclear molecular orbitals or Kohn-Sham orbitals are expanded in terms of localized nuclear basis sets. These approximations are valid because of the inherent localization of the nuclear orbitals and the numerical insignificance of the nuclear exchange interactions in molecular systems. Moreover, these approximations lead to substantial computational savings due to the reduction in both the number of integrals that must be calculated and the size of the matrices that must be diagonalized. These nuclear Hartree product approximation (HPA) methods scale linearly with the number of quantum protons and are highly parallelizable. Applications to a water hexamer, glycine dimer, and 32-water cluster, where all hydrogen nuclei are treated quantum mechanically, illustrate the accuracy and computational efficiency of the nuclear HPA methods. These strategies will facilitate the implementation of explicitly correlated NEO methods for molecular systems with multiple quantum protons.

  8. PKCι regulates nuclear YAP1 localization and ovarian cancer tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin; Justilien, Verline; Brennan, Katharyn I.; Jamieson, Lee; Murray, Nicole R.; Fields, Alan P.

    2016-01-01

    Atypical protein kinase Cι (PKCι) is an oncogene in lung and ovarian cancer. The PKCι gene PRKCI is targeted for frequent tumor-specific copy number gain (CNG) in both lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and ovarian serous carcinoma (OSC). We recently demonstrated that in LSCC cells PRKCI CNG functions to drive transformed growth and tumorigenicity by activating PKCι-dependent cell autonomous Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Here, we assessed whether OSC cells harboring PRKCI CNG exhibit similar PKCι-dependent Hh signaling. Surprisingly, we find that whereas PKCι is required for the transformed growth for OSC cells harboring PRKCI CNG, these cells do not exhibit PKCι-dependent Hh signaling or Hh-dependent proliferation. Rather, transformed growth of OSC cells is regulated by PKCι-dependent nuclear localization of the oncogenic transcription factor, YAP1. Lentiviral shRNA-mediated knock down (KD) of PKCι leads to decreased nuclear YAP1 and increased YAP1 binding to angiomotin (AMOT), which sequesters YAP1 in the cytoplasm. Biochemical analysis reveals that PKCι directly phosphorylates AMOT at a unique site, Thr750, whose phosphorylation inhibits YAP1 binding. Pharmacologic inhibition of PKCι decreases YAP1 nuclear localization and blocks OSC tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemical analysis reveals a strong positive correlation between tumor PKCι expression and nuclear YAP1 in primary OSC tumor samples, indicating the clinical relevance of PKCι-YAP1 signaling. Our results uncover a novel PKCι-AMOT-YAP1 signaling axis that promotes OSC tumor growth, and provide a rationale for therapeutic targeting of this pathway for treatment of OSC. PMID:27321186

  9. Nuclear import of glucokinase in pancreatic beta-cells is mediated by a nuclear localization signal and modulated by SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Bente Berg; Fjeld, Karianne; Solheim, Marie Holm; Shirakawa, Jun; Zhang, Enming; Keindl, Magdalena; Hu, Jiang; Lindqvist, Andreas; Døskeland, Anne; Mellgren, Gunnar; Flatmark, Torgeir; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Wierup, Nils; Aukrust, Ingvild; Bjørkhaug, Lise

    2017-10-15

    The localization of glucokinase in pancreatic beta-cell nuclei is a controversial issue. Although previous reports suggest such a localization, the mechanism for its import has so far not been identified. Using immunofluorescence, subcellular fractionation and mass spectrometry, we present evidence in support of glucokinase localization in beta-cell nuclei of human and mouse pancreatic sections, as well as in human and mouse isolated islets, and murine MIN6 cells. We have identified a conserved, seven-residue nuclear localization signal ((30)LKKVMRR(36)) in the human enzyme. Substituting the residues KK(31,32) and RR(35,36) with AA led to a loss of its nuclear localization in transfected cells. Furthermore, our data indicates that SUMOylation of glucokinase modulates its nuclear import, while high glucose concentrations do not significantly alter the enzyme nuclear/cytosolic ratio. Thus, for the first time, we provide data in support of a nuclear import of glucokinase mediated by a redundant mechanism, involving a nuclear localization signal, and which is modulated by its SUMOylation. These findings add new knowledge to the functional role of glucokinase in the pancreatic beta-cell. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Constitutive and ligand-induced nuclear localization of oxytocin receptor.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Conan G; Bussolati, Gianni; Bosco, Martino; Kimura, Tadashi; Pizzorno, Marie C; Chernin, Mitchell I; Cassoni, Paola; Novak, Josef F

    2007-01-01

    Oxytocin receptor (OTR) is a membrane protein known to mediate oxytocin (OT) effects, in both normal and neoplastic cells. We report here that human osteosarcoma (U2OS, MG63, OS15 and SaOS2), breast cancer (MCF7), and primary human fibroblastic cells (HFF) all exhibit OTR not only on the cell membrane, but also in the various nuclear compartments including the nucleolus. Both an OTR-GFP fusion protein and the native OTR appear to be localized to the nucleus as detected by transfection and/or confocal immunofluorescence, respectively. Treatment with oxytocin causes internalization of OTR and the resulting vesicles accumulate in the vicinity of the nucleus and some of the perinuclear OTR enters the nucleus. Western blots indicate that OTR in the nucleus and on the plasma membrane are likely to be the same biochemical and immunological entities. It appears that OTR is first visible in the nucleoli and subsequently disperses within the nucleus into 4-20 spots while some of the OTR diffuses throughout the nucleoplasm. The behaviour and kinetics of OTR-GFP and OTR are different, indicating interference by GFP in both OTR entrance into the nucleus and subsequent relocalization of OTR within the nucleus. There are important differences among the tested cells, such as the requirement of a ligand for transfer of OTR in nuclei. A constitutive internalization of OTR was found only in osteosarcoma cells, while the nuclear localization in all other tested cells was dependent on ligand binding. The amount of OTR-positive material within and in the vicinity of the nucleus increased following a treatment with oxytocin in both constitutive and ligand-dependent type of cells. The evidence of OTR compartmentalization at the cell nucleus (either ligand-dependent or constitutive) in different cell types suggests still unknown biological functions of this protein or its ligand and adds this G-protein-coupled receptor to other heptahelical receptors displaying this atypical and unexpected

  11. Clustering and pasta phases in nuclear density functional theory

    DOE PAGES

    Schuetrumpf, Bastian; Zhang, Chunli; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2017-05-23

    Nuclear density functional theory is the tool of choice in describing properties of complex nuclei and intricate phases of bulk nucleonic matter. It is a microscopic approach based on an energy density functional representing the nuclear interaction. An attractive feature of nuclear DFT is that it can be applied to both finite nuclei and pasta phases appearing in the inner crust of neutron stars. While nuclear pasta clusters in a neutron star can be easily characterized through their density distributions, the level of clustering of nucleons in a nucleus can often be difficult to assess. To this end, we usemore » the concept of nucleon localization. We demonstrate that the localization measure provides us with fingerprints of clusters in light and heavy nuclei, including fissioning systems. Furthermore we investigate the rod-like pasta phase using twist-averaged boundary conditions, which enable calculations in finite volumes accessible by state of the art DFT solvers.« less

  12. Nuclear localization of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Sato, Yuko; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ito, Hideki; Shimonohara, Nozomi; Tsuji, Takahiro; Nakajima, Noriko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Matsuo, Koma; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Katano, Harutaka

    2010-03-15

    To clarify whether mutations in the large T gene encoded by Merkel cell polyomavirus affect the expression and function of large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma cases, we investigated the expression of large T antigen in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal antibody revealed that large T antigen was expressed in the nuclei of Merkel cell carcinoma cells with Merkel cell polyomavirus infection. Deletion mutant analyses identified an Arg-Lys-Arg-Lys sequence (amino acids 277-280) as a nuclear localization signal in large T antigen. Sequence analyses revealed that there were no mutations in the nuclear localization signal in any of the eleven Merkel cell polyomavirus strains examined. Furthermore, stop codons were not observed in the upstream of the nuclear localization signal in any of the Merkel cell carcinoma cases examined. These data suggest that the nuclear localization signal is highly conserved and functional in Merkel cell carcinoma cases.

  13. T-Loop Phosphorylated Cdk9 Localizes to Nuclear Speckle Domains Which May Serve as Sites of Active P-TEFb Function and Exchange Between the Brd4 and 7SK/HEXIM1 Regulatory Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Eugene C.; Liu, Hongbing; Rice, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    P-TEFb functions to induce the elongation step of RNA polymerase II transcription by phosphorylating the carboxyl-terminal domain of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Core P-TEFb is comprised of Cdk9 and a cyclin regulatory subunit, with Cyclin T1 being the predominant Cdk9-associated cyclin. The kinase activity of P-TEFb is dependent on phosphorylation of the Thr186 residue located within the T-loop domain of the Cdk9 subunit. Here, we used immunofluorescence deconvolution microscopy to examine the subcellular distribution of phospho-Thr186 Cdk9/Cyclin T1 P-TEFb heterodimers. We found that phospho-Thr186 Cdk9 displays a punctate distribution throughout the non-nucleolar nucleoplasm and it co-localizes with Cyclin T1 almost exclusively within nuclear speckle domains. Phospho-Thr186 Cdk9 predominantly co-localized with the hyperphosphorylated forms of RNA polymerase II. Transient expression of kinase-defective Cdk9 mutants revealed that neither is Thr186 phosphorylation or kinase activity required for Cdk9 speckle localization. Lastly, both the Brd4 and HEXIM1 proteins interact with P-TEFb at or very near speckle domains and treatment of cells with the Cdk9 inhibitor flavopiridol alters this distribution. These results indicate that the active form of P-TEFb resides in nuclear speckles and raises the possibility that speckles are sites of P-TEFb function and exchange between negative and positive P-TEFb regulatory complexes. PMID:20201073

  14. Nuclear Lamins: Thin Filaments with Major Functions.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Rebecca; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Medalia, Ohad

    2017-09-08

    The nuclear lamina is a nuclear peripheral meshwork that is mainly composed of nuclear lamins, although a small fraction of lamins also localizes throughout the nucleoplasm. Lamins are classified as type V intermediate filament (IF) proteins. Mutations in lamin genes cause at least 15 distinct human diseases, collectively termed laminopathies, including muscle, metabolic, and neuronal diseases, and can cause accelerated aging. Most of these mutations are in the LMNA gene encoding A-type lamins. A growing number of nuclear proteins are known to bind lamins and are implicated in both nuclear and cytoskeletal organization, mechanical stability, chromatin organization, signaling, gene regulation, genome stability, and cell differentiation. Recent studies reveal the organization of the lamin filament meshwork in somatic cells where they assemble as tetramers in cross-section of the filaments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sumoylation of SAE2 C terminus regulates SAE nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Truong, Khue; Lee, Terry D; Li, Baozong; Chen, Yuan

    2012-12-14

    SUMOylation occurs predominantly in the nucleus, but non-nuclear proteins can also be SUMOylated. It is unclear how intracellular trafficking of the SUMOylation enzymes is regulated to catalyze SUMOylation in different cellular compartments. Here we report that the SAE2 subunit of human SUMO activation enzyme (SAE) underwent rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and its nuclear accumulation depended on SUMO modification at the C terminus. The SUMOylation sites included three Lys residues on the bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and two Lys residues outside of but adjacent to the NLS, and their SUMOylation was catalyzed by Ubc9. Because SAE2 forms a tight heterodimer with SAE1 and it controls the trafficking of the heterodimer, this study has identified the mechanism used to localize SAE to the nucleus. Similar mechanisms are likely to exist for other proteins that depend on SUMOylation for nuclear localization.

  16. Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Joseph; Furnstahl, Richard; Horoi, Mihai; Lusk, Rusty; Nazarewicz, Witold; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. Until recently such an undertaking was hard to imagine, and even at the present time such an ambitious endeavor would be far beyond what a single researcher or a traditional research group could carry out.

  17. Characterization of a nuclear localization signal in the foot-and-mouth disease virus polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Aparicio, Maria Teresa; Rosas, Maria Flora; Sobrino, Francisco

    2013-09-15

    We have experimentally tested whether the MRKTKLAPT sequence in FMDV 3D protein (residues 16 to 24) can act as a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Mutants with substitutions in two basic residues within this sequence, K18E and K20E, were generated. A decreased nuclear localization was observed in transiently expressed 3D and its precursor 3CD, suggesting a role of K18 and K20 in nuclear targeting. Fusion of MRKTKLAPT to the green fluorescence protein (GFP) increased the nuclear localization of GFP, which was not observed when GFP was fused to the 3D mutated sequences. These results indicate that the sequence MRKTKLAPT can be functionally considered as a NLS. When introduced in a FMDV full length RNA replacements K18E and K20E led to production of revertant viruses that replaced the acidic residues introduced (E) by K, suggesting that the presence of lysins at positions 18 and 20 of 3D is essential for virus multiplication. - Highlights: • The FMDV 3D polymerase contains a nuclear localization signal. • Replacements K18E and K20E decrease nuclear localization of 3D and its precursor 3CD. • Fusion of the MRKTKLAPT 3D motif to GFP increases the nuclear localization of GFP. • Replacements K18E and K20E abolish the ability of MRKTKLAPT to relocate GFP. • RNAs harboring replacements K18E and K20E lead to recovery of revertant FMDVs.

  18. Nuclear localization of the testis determining gene product SRY

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the expression of the human SRY protein (termed p27SRY) in two different cell lines by using specific antibodies. Confocal microscopy enabled us to localize p27SRY precisely in the nucleus in a discrete punctuate pattern. Furthermore, through microinjection experiments, we have demonstrated that the localization of the p27SRY protein into the nucleus was an event involving the NH2-terminal part of the high mobility group (HMG) domain. With the help of several synthetic peptides and various p27SRY mutants, we have characterized a bipartite basic motif in this part of the protein corresponding to a nuclear localization signal. This nuclear localization signal appears to be highly conserved in SRY box- and HMB box-containing proteins, suggesting common properties of nuclear targeting within the HMG box protein family. PMID:7876301

  19. Identification of a bipartite nuclear localization signal in the silkworm Masc protein.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Yudai; Kokusho, Ryuhei; Ueda, Masamichi; Fujimoto, Masaru; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Shimada, Toru; Kiuchi, Takashi; Katsuma, Susumu

    2016-07-01

    The silkworm Masculinizer (Masc) gene encodes a CCCH-tandem zinc finger protein that controls both masculinization and dosage compensation. Masc protein is a nuclear protein, but the mechanism underlying the transport of this protein into the nucleus has not yet been elucidated. Here, we identified a functional bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) located between residues 274 and 290 of the Masc protein. Sequence comparison revealed that this bipartite NLS is evolutionarily conserved in Masc proteins from other lepidopteran insects. Furthermore, we showed that the degree of nuclear localization is not associated with the masculinizing activity of the Masc protein.

  20. Nuclear energy density functional and the nuclear α decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yeunhwan; Oh, Yongseok

    2017-03-01

    The nuclear α decay of heavy nuclei is investigated based on the nuclear energy density functional, which leads to the α potential inside the parent nucleus in terms of the proton and neutron density profiles of the daughter nucleus. We use the Skyrme force model, Gogny force model, and relativistic mean-field model to get the nucleon density profiles inside heavy nuclei. Once the nucleon density profiles are determined, the parameters of the nuclear α potential are fitted to the observed α decay half-lives of heavy nuclei. This approach is then applied to predict unknown α decay half-lives of heavy nuclei. To estimate the Q values of unobserved α decays, we make use of the liquid droplet model.

  1. Evolution: functional evolution of nuclear structure.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Katherine L; Dawson, Scott C

    2011-10-17

    The evolution of the nucleus, the defining feature of eukaryotic cells, was long shrouded in speculation and mystery. There is now strong evidence that nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and nuclear membranes coevolved with the endomembrane system, and that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) had fully functional NPCs. Recent studies have identified many components of the nuclear envelope in living Opisthokonts, the eukaryotic supergroup that includes fungi and metazoan animals. These components include diverse chromatin-binding membrane proteins, and membrane proteins with adhesive lumenal domains that may have contributed to the evolution of nuclear membrane architecture. Further discoveries about the nucleoskeleton suggest that the evolution of nuclear structure was tightly coupled to genome partitioning during mitosis.

  2. LINCing complex functions at the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Rothballer, Andrea; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Kutay, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes span the double membrane of the nuclear envelope (NE) and physically connect nuclear structures to cytoskeletal elements. LINC complexes are envisioned as force transducers in the NE, which facilitate processes like nuclear anchorage and migration, or chromosome movements. The complexes are built from members of two evolutionary conserved families of transmembrane (TM) proteins, the SUN (Sad1/UNC-84) domain proteins in the inner nuclear membrane (INM) and the KASH (Klarsicht/ANC-1/SYNE homology) domain proteins in the outer nuclear membrane (ONM). In the lumen of the NE, the SUN and KASH domains engage in an intimate assembly to jointly form a NE bridge. Detailed insights into the molecular architecture and atomic structure of LINC complexes have recently revealed the molecular basis of nucleo-cytoskeletal coupling. They bear important implications for LINC complex function and suggest new potential and as yet unexplored roles, which the complexes may play in the cell. PMID:23324460

  3. Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Keevil, Stephen F

    2006-08-21

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications.

  4. Uncertainty Quantification for Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, Jordan; Schunck, Nicolas; Nazarewicz, Witold; Higdon, Dave; Sarich, Jason; Wild, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear density functional theory exhibits good overall agreement with measured nuclear masses for medium-mass to heavy nuclei. But the predictions of various models diverge substantially near the neutron and proton drip lines. Quantifying the theory's inherent uncertainty is essential for making reliable predictions. Through a Bayesian analysis, we calculate the theoretical uncertainty for nuclear masses obtained with a Skyrme-class energy density functional. We also assess whether a recent set of mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclei reduces the uncertainty in this model's predictions near the neutron drip line. Nuclear density functional theory exhibits good overall agreement with measured nuclear masses for medium-mass to heavy nuclei. But the predictions of various models diverge substantially near the neutron and proton drip lines. Quantifying the theory's inherent uncertainty is essential for making reliable predictions. Through a Bayesian analysis, we calculate the theoretical uncertainty for nuclear masses obtained with a Skyrme-class energy density functional. We also assess whether a recent set of mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclei reduces the uncertainty in this model's predictions near the neutron drip line. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy under Contracts No. DE-SC0008499 and No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Tpr is localized within the nuclear basket of the pore complex and has a role in nuclear protein export.

    PubMed

    Frosst, Phyllis; Guan, Tinglu; Subauste, Cecilia; Hahn, Klaus; Gerace, Larry

    2002-02-18

    Tpr is a coiled-coil protein found near the nucleoplasmic side of the pore complex. Since neither the precise localization of Tpr nor its functions are well defined, we generated antibodies to three regions of Tpr to clarify these issues. Using light and EM immunolocalization, we determined that mammalian Tpr is concentrated within the nuclear basket of the pore complex in a distribution similar to Nup153 and Nup98. Antibody localization together with imaging of GFP-Tpr in living cells revealed that Tpr is in discrete foci inside the nucleus similar to several other nucleoporins but is not present in intranuclear filamentous networks (Zimowska et al., 1997) or in long filaments extending from the pore complex (Cordes et al., 1997) as proposed. Injection of anti-Tpr antibodies into mitotic cells resulted in depletion of Tpr from the nuclear envelope without loss of other pore complex basket proteins. Whereas nuclear import mediated by a basic amino acid signal was unaffected, nuclear export mediated by a leucine-rich signal was retarded significantly. Nuclear injection of anti-Tpr antibodies in interphase cells similarly yielded inhibition of protein export but not import. These results indicate that Tpr is a nucleoporin of the nuclear basket with a role in nuclear protein export.

  6. Coordinate nuclear targeting of the FANCD2 and FANCI proteins via a FANCD2 nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Rebecca A; Rego, Meghan A; Azzinaro, Paul A; Mauro, Maurizio; Howlett, Niall G

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare recessive disease, characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, and increased cancer susceptibility. FA is caused by biallelic mutation of any one of sixteen genes. The protein products of these genes function cooperatively in the FA-BRCA pathway to repair DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). A central step in the activation of this pathway is the monoubiquitination of the FANCD2 and FANCI proteins. Monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI localize to discrete chromatin regions where they function in ICL repair. Despite their critical role in ICL repair, very little is known about the structure, function, and regulation of the FANCD2 and FANCI proteins, or how they are targeted to the nucleus and chromatin. In this study, we describe the functional characterization of an amino-terminal FANCD2 nuclear localization signal (NLS). We demonstrate that the amino terminal 58 amino acids of FANCD2 can promote the nuclear expression of GFP and is necessary for the nuclear localization of FANCD2. Importantly, mutation of this FANCD2 NLS reveals that intact FANCD2 is required for the nuclear localization of a subset of FANCI. In addition, the NLS is necessary for the efficient monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI and, consequently, for their localization to chromatin. As a result, FANCD2 NLS mutants fail to rescue the ICL sensitivity of FA-D2 patient cells. Our studies yield important insight into the domain structure of the poorly characterized FANCD2 protein, and reveal a previously unknown mechanism for the coordinate nuclear import of a subset of FANCD2 and FANCI, a key early step in the cellular ICL response.

  7. Coordinate Nuclear Targeting of the FANCD2 and FANCI Proteins via a FANCD2 Nuclear Localization Signal

    PubMed Central

    Boisvert, Rebecca A.; Rego, Meghan A.; Azzinaro, Paul A.; Mauro, Maurizio; Howlett, Niall G.

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare recessive disease, characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, and increased cancer susceptibility. FA is caused by biallelic mutation of any one of sixteen genes. The protein products of these genes function cooperatively in the FA-BRCA pathway to repair DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). A central step in the activation of this pathway is the monoubiquitination of the FANCD2 and FANCI proteins. Monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI localize to discrete chromatin regions where they function in ICL repair. Despite their critical role in ICL repair, very little is known about the structure, function, and regulation of the FANCD2 and FANCI proteins, or how they are targeted to the nucleus and chromatin. In this study, we describe the functional characterization of an amino-terminal FANCD2 nuclear localization signal (NLS). We demonstrate that the amino terminal 58 amino acids of FANCD2 can promote the nuclear expression of GFP and is necessary for the nuclear localization of FANCD2. Importantly, mutation of this FANCD2 NLS reveals that intact FANCD2 is required for the nuclear localization of a subset of FANCI. In addition, the NLS is necessary for the efficient monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI and, consequently, for their localization to chromatin. As a result, FANCD2 NLS mutants fail to rescue the ICL sensitivity of FA-D2 patient cells. Our studies yield important insight into the domain structure of the poorly characterized FANCD2 protein, and reveal a previously unknown mechanism for the coordinate nuclear import of a subset of FANCD2 and FANCI, a key early step in the cellular ICL response. PMID:24278431

  8. Nuclear localization signal-dependent and -independent movements of Drosophila melanogaster dUTPase isoforms during nuclear cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Muha, Villo; Zagyva, Imre; Venkei, Zsolt; Szabad, Janos; Vertessy, Beata G.

    2009-04-03

    Two dUTPase isoforms (23 kDa and 21 kDa) are present in the fruitfly with the sole difference of an N-terminal extension. In Drosophila embryo, both isoforms are detected inside the nucleus. Here, we investigated the function of the N-terminal segment using eYFP-dUTPase constructs. In Schneider 2 cells, only the 23 kDa construct showed nuclear localization arguing that it may contain a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Sequence comparisons identified a lysine-rich nonapeptide with similarity to the human c-myc NLS. In Drosophila embryos during nuclear cleavages, the 23 kDa isoform showed the expected localization shifts. Contrariwise, although the 21 kDa isoform was excluded from the nuclei during interphase, it was shifted to the nucleus during prophase and forthcoming mitotic steps. The observed dynamic localization character showed strict timing to the nuclear cleavage phases and explained how both isoforms can be present within the nuclear microenvironment, although at different stages of cell cycle.

  9. Reflection-Asymmetric Nuclear Deformations within the Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, E; Erler, J; Nazarewicz, W.; Stoitsov, M

    2012-01-01

    Within the nuclear density functional theory (DFT) we study the effect of reflection- asymmetric shapes on ground-state binding energies and binding energy differences. To this end, we developed the new DFT solver axialhfb that uses an approximate second-order gradient to solve the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equations of superconducting DFT with the quasi-local Skyrme energy density functionals. Illustrative calculations are carried out for even- even isotopes of radium and thorium.

  10. Immunological and biochemical evidence for nuclear localization of annexin in peas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    Immunofluorescent localization of annexins using an anti-pea annexin polyclonal antibody (anti-p35) in pea (Pisum sativum) leaf and stem epidermal peels showed staining of the nuclei and the cell periphery. Nuclear staining was also seen in cell teases prepared from pea plumules. The amount of nuclear stain was reduced both by fixation time and by dehydration and organic solvent treatment. Observation with confocal microscopy demonstrated that the anti-p35 stain was diffusely distributed throughout the nuclear structure. Immunoblots of purified nuclei, nuclear envelope matrix, nucleolar, and chromatin fractions showed a cross-reactive protein band of 35 kDa. These data are the first to show annexins localized in plant cell nuclei where they may play a role in nuclear function.

  11. Immunological and biochemical evidence for nuclear localization of annexin in peas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    Immunofluorescent localization of annexins using an anti-pea annexin polyclonal antibody (anti-p35) in pea (Pisum sativum) leaf and stem epidermal peels showed staining of the nuclei and the cell periphery. Nuclear staining was also seen in cell teases prepared from pea plumules. The amount of nuclear stain was reduced both by fixation time and by dehydration and organic solvent treatment. Observation with confocal microscopy demonstrated that the anti-p35 stain was diffusely distributed throughout the nuclear structure. Immunoblots of purified nuclei, nuclear envelope matrix, nucleolar, and chromatin fractions showed a cross-reactive protein band of 35 kDa. These data are the first to show annexins localized in plant cell nuclei where they may play a role in nuclear function.

  12. Nuclear modifications of Parton Distribution Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeluyi, Adeola Adeleke

    This dissertation addresses a central question of modern nuclear physics: how does the behavior of fundamental degrees of freedom (quarks and gluons) change in the nuclear environment? This is an important aspect of experimental studies at current facilities such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLAB). It is also highly relevant to planned experimental efforts at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the future Electron Ion Collider (EIC). All these facilities probe matter via collisions involving nuclei; thus complications arise due to the presence of the attendant nuclear medium. Theoretical efforts to understand and interpret experimental results from such collisions are therefore largely dependent on the resolution of this question. The development of nuclear physics demonstrates that theoretical description is most efficient in terms of the effective degrees of freedom relevant to the scale (energy) being probed. Thus at low energies, nuclei are described as bound states of protons and neutrons (nucleons). At higher energies, the nucleons are no longer elementary, but are revealed to possess an underlying substructure: they are made up of quarks and gluons, collectively termed partons. The mometum distributions of these partons in the nucleon are referred to as Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs). Parton distributions can be determined from experimental measurements of structure functions. The ratio of nuclear structure functions to nucleon structure functions (generically referred to as nuclear ratio) is a measure of the nuclear modifications of the free nucleon PDFs. Thus a study of the nuclear ratio suffices to gain an understanding of nuclear modifications. In this dissertation we aim to describe theoretically nuclear modifications in a restricted region where the nuclear ratio is less than unity, the so

  13. Localization of nuclear retained mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    THOMSEN, RUNE; LIBRI, DOMENICO; BOULAY, JOCELYNE; ROSBASH, MICHAEL; JENSEN, TORBEN HEICK

    2003-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a common conditional phenotype associated with deletion or mutation of genes encoding mRNA export factors is the rapid accumulation of mRNAs in intranuclear foci, suggested to be near transcription sites. The nuclear RNA exosome has been implicated in retaining RNAs in these foci; on deletion of the exosome component Rrp6p, the RNA is released. To determine the exact nuclear location of retained as well as released mRNAs, we have used mRNA export mutant strains to analyze the spatial relationship between newly synthesized heat shock mRNA, the chromosomal site of transcription, and known S. cerevisiae nuclear structures such as the nucleolus and the nucleolar body. Our results show that retained SSA4 RNA localizes to an area in close proximity to the SSA4 locus. On deletion of Rrp6p and release from the genomic locus, heat shock mRNAs produced in the rat7–1 strain colocalize predominantly with nucleolar antigens. Bulk poly(A)+ RNA, on the other hand, is localized primarily to the nuclear rim. Interestingly, the RNA binding nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Npl3p shows strong colocalization with bulk poly(A)+ RNA, regardless of its nuclear location. Taken together, our data show that retention occurs close to the gene and indicate distinct nuclear fates of different mRNAs. PMID:12923254

  14. Compartmentalization and Functionality of Nuclear Disorder: Intrinsic Disorder and Protein-Protein Interactions in Intra-Nuclear Compartments.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanchi; Na, Insung; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-12-25

    The cell nucleus contains a number of membrane-less organelles or intra-nuclear compartments. These compartments are dynamic structures representing liquid-droplet phases which are only slightly denser than the bulk intra-nuclear fluid. They possess different functions, have diverse morphologies, and are typically composed of RNA (or, in some cases, DNA) and proteins. We analyzed 3005 mouse proteins localized in specific intra-nuclear organelles, such as nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinuclear compartment and compared them with ~29,863 non-nuclear proteins from mouse proteome. Our analysis revealed that intrinsic disorder is enriched in the majority of intra-nuclear compartments, except for the nuclear pore and lamina. These compartments are depleted in proteins that lack disordered domains and enriched in proteins that have multiple disordered domains. Moonlighting proteins found in multiple intra-nuclear compartments are more likely to have multiple disordered domains. Protein-protein interaction networks in the intra-nuclear compartments are denser and include more hubs compared to the non-nuclear proteins. Hubs in the intra-nuclear compartments (except for the nuclear pore) are enriched in disorder compared with non-nuclear hubs and non-nuclear proteins. Therefore, our work provides support to the idea of the functional importance of intrinsic disorder in the cell nucleus and shows that many proteins associated with sub-nuclear organelles in nuclei of mouse cells are enriched in disorder. This high level of disorder in the mouse nuclear proteins defines their ability to serve as very promiscuous binders, possessing both large quantities of potential disorder-based interaction sites and the ability of a single such site to be involved in a large number of interactions.

  15. Compartmentalization and Functionality of Nuclear Disorder: Intrinsic Disorder and Protein-Protein Interactions in Intra-Nuclear Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanchi; Na, Insung; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    The cell nucleus contains a number of membrane-less organelles or intra-nuclear compartments. These compartments are dynamic structures representing liquid-droplet phases which are only slightly denser than the bulk intra-nuclear fluid. They possess different functions, have diverse morphologies, and are typically composed of RNA (or, in some cases, DNA) and proteins. We analyzed 3005 mouse proteins localized in specific intra-nuclear organelles, such as nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinuclear compartment and compared them with ~29,863 non-nuclear proteins from mouse proteome. Our analysis revealed that intrinsic disorder is enriched in the majority of intra-nuclear compartments, except for the nuclear pore and lamina. These compartments are depleted in proteins that lack disordered domains and enriched in proteins that have multiple disordered domains. Moonlighting proteins found in multiple intra-nuclear compartments are more likely to have multiple disordered domains. Protein-protein interaction networks in the intra-nuclear compartments are denser and include more hubs compared to the non-nuclear proteins. Hubs in the intra-nuclear compartments (except for the nuclear pore) are enriched in disorder compared with non-nuclear hubs and non-nuclear proteins. Therefore, our work provides support to the idea of the functional importance of intrinsic disorder in the cell nucleus and shows that many proteins associated with sub-nuclear organelles in nuclei of mouse cells are enriched in disorder. This high level of disorder in the mouse nuclear proteins defines their ability to serve as very promiscuous binders, possessing both large quantities of potential disorder-based interaction sites and the ability of a single such site to be involved in a large number of interactions. PMID:26712748

  16. Nuclear structure and dynamics with density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetcu, Ionel

    2015-10-01

    Even in the absence of ab initio methods capable of tackling heavy nuclei without restrictions, one can obtain an ab initio description of ground-state properties by means of the density functional theory (DFT), and its extension to superfluid systems in its local variant, the superfluid local density approximation (SLDA). Information about the properties of excited states can be obtained in the same framework by using an extension to the time-dependent (TD) phenomena. Unlike other approaches in which the nuclear structure information is used as a separate input into reaction models, the TD approach treats on the same footing the nuclear structure and dynamics, and is well suited to provide more reliable description for a large number of processes involving heavy nuclei, from the nuclear response to electroweak probes, to nuclear reactions, such as neutron-induced reactions, or nuclear fusion and fission. Such processes, sometimes part of integrated nuclear systems, have important applications in astrophysics, energy production, global security, etc. In this talk, I will present the simulation of a simple reaction, that is the Coulomb excitation of a 238U nucleus, and discuss the application of the TD-DFT formalism to the description of induced fission. I gratefully acknowledge partial support of the U.S. Department of Energy through an Early Career Award of the LANL/LDRD Program.

  17. The human cytomegalovirus nuclear egress complex unites multiple functions: Recruitment of effectors, nuclear envelope rearrangement, and docking to nuclear capsids.

    PubMed

    Marschall, Manfred; Muller, Yves A; Diewald, Benedikt; Sticht, Heinrich; Milbradt, Jens

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear replication represents a common hallmark of herpesviruses achieved by a number of sequentially unrolled regulatory processes. A rate-limiting step is provided by nucleo-cytoplasmic capsid export, for which a defined multiregulatory protein complex, namely, the nuclear egress complex (NEC), is assembled comprising both viral and cellular components. The NEC regulates at least 3 aspects of herpesviral nuclear replication: (1) multimeric recruitment of NEC-associated effector proteins, (2) reorganization of the nuclear lamina and membranes, and (3) the docking to nuclear capsids. Here, we review published data and own experimental work that characterizes the NEC of HCMV and other herpesviruses. A systematic review of information on nuclear egress of HCMV compared to selected alpha-, beta-, and gamma-herpesviruses: proteomics-based approaches, high-resolution imaging techniques, and functional investigations. A large number of reports on herpesviral NECs have been published during the last two decades, focusing on protein-protein interactions, nuclear localization, regulatory phosphorylation, and functional validation. The emerging picture provides an illustrated example of well-balanced and sophisticated protein networking in virus-host interaction. Current evidence refined the view about herpesviral NECs. Datasets published for HCMV, murine CMV, herpes simplex virus, and Epstein-Barr virus illustrate the marked functional consistency in the way herpesviruses achieve nuclear egress. However, this compares with only limited sequence conservation of core NEC proteins and a structural conservation restricted to individual domains. The translational use of this information might help to define a novel antiviral strategy on the basis of NEC-directed small molecules. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Controlling Androgen receptor nuclear localization by dendrimer conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoyu

    Androgen Receptor (AR) antagonists, such as bicalutamide and flutamide have been used widely in the treatment of prostate cancer. Although initial treatment is effective, prostate cancer cells often acquire antiandrogen resistance with prolonged treatment. AR over-expression and AR mutations contribute to the development of antiandrogen resistant cancer. Second generation antiandrogens such as enzalutamide are more effective and show reduced AR nuclear localization. In this study, derivatives of PAN52, a small molecule antiandrogen previously developed in our lab, were conjugated to the surface of generation 4 and generation 6 PAMAM dendrimers to obtain antiandrogen PAMAM dendrimer conjugates (APDC). APDCs readily enter cells and associate with AR in the cytoplasm. Due to their large size and positive charge, they can not enter the nucleus, thus retaining AR in the cytoplasm. In addition, APDCs are effective in decreasing AR mediated transcription and cell proliferation. APDC is the first AR antagonists that inhibit DHT-induced nuclear localization of AR. By inhibiting AR nuclear localization, APDC represents a new class of antiandrogens that offer an alternative approach to addressing antiandrogen-resistant prostate cancer. Lysine post-translational modification of AR Nuclear Localization Sequence (NLS) has great impact on AR cellular localization. It is of interest to understand which modifications modulate AR translocation into the nucleus. In this study, we prepared dendrimer-based acetyltransferase mimetic (DATM), DATM is able to catalytically acetylate AR in CWR22Rv1 cells, which will be a useful tool for studying AR modification effect on AR cellular localization. Derivatives of DATM, which transfer other chemical groups to AR, can be prepared similarly, and with more dendrimer based AR modification tools prepared in future, we will be able to understand and control AR cellular localization through AR modification.

  19. MECHANICAL REGULATION OF NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Rui P.; Finan, John D.; Guilak, Farshid; Lee, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical loading induces both nuclear distortion and alterations in gene expression in a variety of cell types. Mechanotransduction is the process by which extracellular mechanical forces can activate a number of well-studied cytoplasmic signaling cascades. Inevitably such signals are transduced to the nucleus and induce transcription factor-mediated changes in gene expression. However, gene expression can be also regulated through alterations in nuclear architecture, providing direct control of genome function. One putative transduction mechanism for this phenomenon involves alterations in nuclear architecture that result from the mechanical perturbation of the cell. This perturbation is associated with direct mechanical strain or osmotic stress, which is transferred to the nucleus. This review describes the current state of knowledge relating the nuclear architecture and the transfer of mechanical forces to the nucleus mediated by the cytoskeleton, the nucleoskeleton, and the LINC (linker of the nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex. Moreover, remodeling of the nucleus induces alterations in nuclear stiffness, which may be associated with cell differentiation. These phenomena are discussed in relation to the potential influence of nuclear architecture-mediated mechanoregulation of transcription and cell fate. PMID:22655599

  20. Mechanical regulation of nuclear structure and function.

    PubMed

    Martins, Rui P; Finan, John D; Guilak, Farshid; Lee, David A

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical loading induces both nuclear distortion and alterations in gene expression in a variety of cell types. Mechanotransduction is the process by which extracellular mechanical forces can activate a number of well-studied cytoplasmic signaling cascades. Inevitably, such signals are transduced to the nucleus and induce transcription factor-mediated changes in gene expression. However, gene expression also can be regulated through alterations in nuclear architecture, providing direct control of genome function. One putative transduction mechanism for this phenomenon involves alterations in nuclear architecture that result from the mechanical perturbation of the cell. This perturbation is associated with direct mechanical strain or osmotic stress, which is transferred to the nucleus. This review describes the current state of knowledge relating the nuclear architecture and the transfer of mechanical forces to the nucleus mediated by the cytoskeleton, the nucleoskeleton, and the LINC (linker of the nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex. Moreover, remodeling of the nucleus induces alterations in nuclear stiffness, which may be associated with cell differentiation. These phenomena are discussed in relation to the potential influence of nuclear architecture-mediated mechanoregulation of transcription and cell fate.

  1. Nuclear localization of DMP1 proteins suggests a role in intracellular signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Siyam, Arwa; Wang, Suzhen; Qin, Chunlin; Mues, Gabriele; Stevens, Roy; D'Souza, Rena N.; Lu, Yongbo

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of DMP1 in various cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-synchronized cells show either nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of DMP1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear DMP1 is restricted to the nucleoplasm but absent in the nucleolus. -- Abstract: Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is highly expressed in odontoblasts and osteoblasts/osteocytes and plays an essential role in tooth and bone mineralization and phosphate homeostasis. It is debatable whether DMP1, in addition to its function in the extracellular matrix, can enter the nucleus and function as a transcription factor. To better understand its function, we examined the nuclear localization of endogenous and exogenous DMP1 in C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells, MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells and 17IIA11 odontoblast-like cells. RT-PCR analyses showed the expression of endogenous Dmp1 in all three cell lines, while Western-blot analysis detected a major DMP1 protein band corresponding to the 57 kDa C-terminal fragment generated by proteolytic processing of the secreted full-length DMP1. Immunofluorescent staining demonstrated that non-synchronized cells presented two subpopulations with either nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of endogenous DMP1. In addition, cells transfected with a construct expressing HA-tagged full-length DMP1 also showed either nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of the exogenous DMP1 when examined with an antibody against the HA tag. Furthermore, nuclear DMP1 was restricted to the nucleoplasm but was absent in the nucleolus. In conclusion, these findings suggest that, apart from its role as a constituent of dentin and bone matrix, DMP1 might play a regulatory role in the nucleus.

  2. Nuclear cyclophilins affect spliceosome assembly and function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Adams, B M; Coates, Miranda N; Jackson, S RaElle; Jurica, Melissa S; Davis, Tara L

    2015-07-15

    Cyclophilins are ubiquitously expressed proteins that bind to prolines and can catalyse cis/trans isomerization of proline residues. There are 17 annotated members of the cyclophilin family in humans, ubiquitously expressed and localized variously to the cytoplasm, nucleus or mitochondria. Surprisingly, all eight of the nuclear localized cyclophilins are found associated with spliceosomal complexes. However, their particular functions within this context are unknown. We have therefore adapted three established assays for in vitro pre-mRNA splicing to probe the functional roles of nuclear cyclophilins in the context of the human spliceosome. We find that four of the eight spliceosom-associated cyclophilins exert strong effects on splicing in vitro. These effects are dose-dependent and, remarkably, uniquely characteristic of each cyclophilin. Using both qualitative and quantitative means, we show that at least half of the nuclear cyclophilins can act as regulatory factors of spliceosome function in vitro. The present work provides the first quantifiable evidence that nuclear cyclophilins are splicing factors and provides a novel approach for future work into small molecule-based modulation of pre-mRNA splicing. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  3. Nuclear cyclophilins affect spliceosome assembly and function in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Adams, B.M.; Coates, Miranda N.; Jackson, S. RaElle; Jurica, Melissa S.; Davis, Tara L.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophilins are ubiquitously expressed proteins that bind to prolines and can catalyse cis/trans isomerization of proline residues. There are 17 annotated members of the cyclophilin family in humans, ubiquitously expressed and localized variously to the cytoplasm, nucleus or mitochondria. Surprisingly, all eight of the nuclear localized cyclophilins are found associated with spliceosomal complexes. However, their particular functions within this context are unknown. We have therefore adapted three established assays for in vitro pre-mRNA splicing to probe the functional roles of nuclear cyclophilins in the context of the human spliceosome. We find that four of the eight spliceosom-associated cyclophilins exert strong effects on splicing in vitro. These effects are dose-dependent and, remarkably, uniquely characteristic of each cyclophilin. Using both qualitative and quantitative means, we show that at least half of the nuclear cyclophilins can act as regulatory factors of spliceosome function in vitro. The present work provides the first quantifiable evidence that nuclear cyclophilins are splicing factors and provides a novel approach for future work into small molecule-based modulation of pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:25967372

  4. Regulation of Nuclear Localization of Signaling Proteins by Cytokinin

    SciTech Connect

    Kieber, J.J.

    2010-05-01

    Cytokinins are a class of mitogenic plant hormones that play an important role in most aspects of plant development, including shoot and root growth, vascular and photomorphogenic development and leaf senescence. A model for cytokinin perception and signaling has emerged that is similar to bacterial two-component phosphorelays. In this model, binding of cytokinin to the extracellular domain of the Arabidopsis histidine kinase (AHKs) receptors induces autophosphorylation within the intracellular histidine-kinase domain. The phosphoryl group is subsequently transferred to cytosolic Arabidopsis histidine phosphotransfer proteins (AHPs), which have been suggested to translocate to the nucleus in response to cytokinin treatment, where they then transfer the phosphoryl group to nuclear-localized response regulators (Type-A and Type-B ARRs). We examined the effects of cytokinin on AHP subcellular localization in Arabidopsis and, contrary to expectations, the AHPs maintained a constant nuclear/cytosolic distribution following cytokinin treatment. Furthermore, mutation of the conserved phosphoacceptor histidine residue of the AHP, as well as disruption of multiple cytokinin signaling elements, did not affect the subcellular localization of the AHP proteins. Finally, we present data indicating that AHPs maintain a nuclear/cytosolic distribution by balancing active transport into and out of the nucleus. Our findings suggest that the current models indicating relocalization of AHP protein into the nucleus in response to cytokinin are incorrect. Rather, AHPs actively maintain a consistent nuclear/cytosolic distribution regardless of the status of the cytokinin response pathway.

  5. Protein kinase A regulates RNA polymerase III transcription through the nuclear localization of Maf1

    PubMed Central

    Moir, Robyn D.; Lee, JaeHoon; Haeusler, Rebecca A.; Desai, Neelam; Engelke, David R.; Willis, Ian M.

    2006-01-01

    Maf1 is an essential and specific mediator of transcriptional repression in the RNA polymerase (pol) III system. Maf1-dependent repression occurs in response to a wide range of conditions, suggesting that the protein itself is targeted by the major nutritional and stress-signaling pathways. We show that Maf1 is a substrate for cAMP-dependent PKA in vitro and is differentially phosphorylated on PKA sites in vivo under normal versus repressing conditions. PKA activity negatively regulates Maf1 function because strains with unregulated high PKA activity block repression of pol III transcription in vivo, and strains lacking all PKA activity are hyperrepressible. Nuclear accumulation of Maf1 is required for transcriptional repression and is regulated by two nuclear localization sequences in the protein. An analysis of PKA phosphosite mutants shows that the localization of Maf1 is affected via the N-terminal nuclear localization sequence. In particular, mutations that prevent phosphorylation at PKA consensus sites promote nuclear accumulation of Maf1 without inducing repression. These results indicate that negative regulation of Maf1 by PKA is achieved by inhibiting its nuclear import and suggest that a PKA-independent activation step is required for nuclear Maf1 to function in the repression of pol III transcription. Finally, we report a previously undescribed phenotype for Maf1 in tRNA gene-mediated silencing of nearby RNA pol II transcription. PMID:17005718

  6. Novel nuclear localization signal regulated by ambient tonicity in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min Seong; Lee, Sang Do; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Colla, Emanuela; Choi, Yu Jeong; Suh, Pann-Ghil; Kwon, H Moo

    2008-08-15

    TonEBP is a Rel domain-containing transcription factor implicated in adaptive immunity, viral replication, and cancer. In the mammalian kidney, TonEBP is a central regulator of water homeostasis. Animals deficient in TonEBP suffer from life-threatening dehydration due to renal water loss. Ambient tonicity (effective osmolality) is the prominent signal for TonEBP in a bidirectional manner; TonEBP activity decreases in hypotonicity, whereas it increases in hypertonicity. Here we found that TonEBP displayed nuclear export in response to hypotonicity and nuclear import in response to hypertonicity. The nuclear export of TonEBP was not mediated by the nuclear export receptor CRM1 or discrete nuclear export signal. In contrast, a dominant nuclear localization signal (NLS) was found in a small region of 16 amino acid residues. When short peptides containing the NLS were fused to constitutively cytoplasmic proteins, the fusion proteins displayed tonicity-dependent nucleocytoplasmic trafficking like TonEBP. Thus, tonicity-dependent activation of the NLS is crucial in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of TonEBP. The novel NLS is present only in the vertebrates, indicating that it developed late in evolution.

  7. Novel Nuclear Localization Signal Regulated by Ambient Tonicity in Vertebrates*

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min Seong; Lee, Sang Do; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Colla, Emanuela; Choi, Yu Jeong; Suh, Pann-Ghil; Kwon, H. Moo

    2008-01-01

    TonEBP is a Rel domain-containing transcription factor implicated in adaptive immunity, viral replication, and cancer. In the mammalian kidney, TonEBP is a central regulator of water homeostasis. Animals deficient in TonEBP suffer from life-threatening dehydration due to renal water loss. Ambient tonicity (effective osmolality) is the prominent signal for TonEBP in a bidirectional manner; TonEBP activity decreases in hypotonicity, whereas it increases in hypertonicity. Here we found that TonEBP displayed nuclear export in response to hypotonicity and nuclear import in response to hypertonicity. The nuclear export of TonEBP was not mediated by the nuclear export receptor CRM1 or discrete nuclear export signal. In contrast, a dominant nuclear localization signal (NLS) was found in a small region of 16 amino acid residues. When short peptides containing the NLS were fused to constitutively cytoplasmic proteins, the fusion proteins displayed tonicity-dependent nucleocytoplasmic trafficking like TonEBP. Thus, tonicity-dependent activation of the NLS is crucial in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of TonEBP. The novel NLS is present only in the vertebrates, indicating that it developed late in evolution. PMID:18579527

  8. Identification of the nuclear localization and export signals of high risk HPV16 E7 oncoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Alixandra A.; McManus, Patrick M.; Bockstall, Katy; Moroianu, Junona

    2009-01-05

    The E7 oncoprotein of high risk human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) binds and inactivates the retinoblastoma (RB) family of proteins. Our previous studies suggested that HPV16 E7 enters the nucleus via a novel Ran-dependent pathway independent of the nuclear import receptors (Angeline, M., Merle, E., and Moroianu, J. (2003). The E7 oncoprotein of high-risk human papillomavirus type 16 enters the nucleus via a nonclassical Ran-dependent pathway. Virology 317(1), 13-23.). Here, analysis of the localization of specific E7 mutants revealed that the nuclear localization of E7 is independent of its interaction with pRB or of its phosphorylation by CKII. Fluorescence microscopy analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and 2xEGFP fusions with E7 and E7 domains in HeLa cells revealed that E7 contains a novel nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the N-terminal domain (aa 1-37). Interestingly, treatment of transfected HeLa cells with two specific nuclear export inhibitors, Leptomycin B and ratjadone, changed the localization of 2xEGFP-E7{sub 38-98} from cytoplasmic to mostly nuclear. These data suggest the presence of a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) and a second NLS in the C-terminal domain of E7 (aa 38-98). Mutagenesis of critical amino acids in the putative NES sequence ({sub 76}IRTLEDLLM{sub 84}) changed the localization of 2xEGFP-E7{sub 38-98} from cytoplasmic to mostly nuclear suggesting that this is a functional NES. The presence of both NLSs and an NES suggests that HPV16 E7 shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus which is consistent with E7 having functions in both of these cell compartments.

  9. Separate information required for nuclear and subnuclear localization: additional complexity in localizing an enzyme shared by mitochondria and nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, A M; Joyce, P B; Hopper, A K; Martin, N C

    1992-01-01

    The TRM1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae codes for a tRNA modification enzyme, N2,N2-dimethylguanosine-specific tRNA methyltransferase (m2(2)Gtase), shared by mitochondria and nuclei. Immunofluorescent staining at the nuclear periphery demonstrates that m2(2)Gtase localizes at or near the nuclear membrane. In determining sequences necessary for targeting the enzyme to nuclei and mitochondria, we found that information required to deliver the enzyme to the nucleus is not sufficient for its correct subnuclear localization. We also determined that mislocalizing the enzyme from the nucleus to the cytoplasm does not destroy its biological function. This change in location was caused by altering a sequence similar to other known nuclear targeting signals (KKSKKKRC), suggesting that shared enzymes are likely to use the same import pathway as proteins that localize only to the nucleus. As with other well-characterized mitochondrial proteins, the mitochondrial import of the shared methyltransferase depends on amino-terminal amino acids, and removal of the first 48 amino acids prevents its import into mitochondria. While this truncated protein is still imported into nuclei, the immunofluorescent staining is uniform throughout rather than at the nuclear periphery, a staining pattern identical to that described for a fusion protein consisting of the first 213 amino acids of m2(2)Gtase in frame with beta-galactosidase. As both of these proteins together contain the entire m2(2)Gtase coding region, the information necessary for association with the nuclear periphery must be more complex than the short linear sequence necessary for nuclear localization. Images PMID:1448094

  10. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Joe A.; Furnstahl, Dick; Horoi, Mihai; Lust, Rusty; Nazaewicc, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-30

    During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: First, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties; Second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data; Third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  11. Local acceptance of a high-level nuclear waste repository.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Lennart

    2004-06-01

    The siting of nuclear waste facilities has been very difficult in all countries. Recent experience in Sweden indicates, however, that it may be possible, under certain circumstances, to gain local support for the siting of a high-level nuclear waste (HLNW) repository. The article reports on a study of attitudes and risk perceptions of people living in four municipalities in Sweden where HLNW siting was being intensely discussed at the political level, in media, and among the public. Data showed a relatively high level of consensus on acceptability of at least further investigation of the issue; in two cases local councils have since voted in favor of a go-ahead, and in one case only a very small majority defeated the issue. Models of policy attitudes showed that these were related to attitude to nuclear power, attributes of the perceived HLNW risk, and trust. Factors responsible for acceptance are discussed at several levels. One is the attitude to nuclear power, which is becoming more positive, probably because no viable alternatives are in sight. Other factors have to do with the extensive information programs conducted in these municipalities, and with the logical nature of the conclusion that they would be good candidates for hosting the national HLNW repository.

  12. Construction of maximally localized Wannier functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Junbo; Chen, Zhu; Wu, Biao

    2017-10-01

    We present a general method for constructing maximally localized Wannier functions. It consists of three steps: (i) picking a localized trial wave function, (ii) performing a full band projection, and (iii) orthonormalizing with the Löwdin method. Our method is capable of producing maximally localized Wannier functions without further minimization, and it can be applied straightforwardly to random potentials without using supercells. The effectiveness of our method is demonstrated for both simple bands and composite bands.

  13. Expression and subcellular localization of a novel nuclear acetylcholinesterase protein.

    PubMed

    Santos, Susana Constantino Rosa; Vala, Inês; Miguel, Cláudia; Barata, João T; Garção, Pedro; Agostinho, Paula; Mendes, Marta; Coelho, Ana V; Calado, Angelo; Oliveira, Catarina R; e Silva, João Martins; Saldanha, Carlota

    2007-08-31

    Acetylcholine is found in the nervous system and also in other cell types (endothelium, lymphocytes, and epithelial and blood cells), which are globally termed the non-neuronal cholinergic system. In this study we investigated the expression and subcellular localization of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in endothelial cells. Our results show the expression of the 70-kDa AChE in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. We also describe, for the first time, a nuclear and cytoskeleton-bound AChE isoform with approximately 55 kDa detected in endothelial cells. This novel isoform is decreased in response to vascular endothelial growth factor via the proteosomes pathway, and it is down-regulated in human leukemic T-cells as compared with normal T-cells, suggesting that the decreased expression of the 55-kDa AChE protein may contribute to an angiogenic response and associate with tumorigenesis. Importantly, we show that its nuclear expression is not endothelial cell-specific but also evidenced in non-neuronal and neuronal cells. Concerning neuronal cells, we can distinguish an exclusively nuclear expression in postnatal neurons in contrast to a cytoplasmic and nuclear expression in embryonic neurons, suggesting that the cell compartmentalization of this new AChE isoform is changed during the development of nervous system. Overall, our studies suggest that the 55-kDa AChE may be involved in different biological processes such as neural development, tumor progression, and angiogenesis.

  14. Frequency-modulated nuclear localization bursts coordinate gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Long; Dalal, Chiraj K.; Elowitz, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    In yeast, the transcription factor Crz1 is dephosphorylated and translocates into the nucleus in response to extracellular calcium. Using time-lapse microscopy, we found that Crz1 exhibited short bursts of nuclear localization (∼2 minutes) that occurred stochastically in individual cells and propagated to the expression of downstream genes. Strikingly, calcium concentration controlled the frequency, but not duration, of localization bursts. Using an analytic model, we found that this frequency modulation (FM) of bursts ensures proportional expression of multiple target genes across a wide dynamic range of expression levels, independent of promoter characteristics. We experimentally confirmed this theory with natural and synthetic Crz1 target promoters. Another stress response transcription factor, Msn2, exhibits similar, but largely uncorrelated, localization bursts under calcium stress. These results suggest that FM regulation of localization bursts may be a general control strategy utilized by the cell to coordinate multi-gene responses to external signals. PMID:18818649

  15. Functional Localization of Genetic Network Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Shinji; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Hu, Jinglu

    According to the knowledge of brain science, it is suggested that there exists cerebral functional localization, which means that a specific part of the cerebrum is activated depending on various kinds of information human receives. The aim of this paper is to build an artificial model to realize functional localization based on Genetic Network Programming (GNP), a new evolutionary computation method recently developed. GNP has a directed graph structure suitable for realizing functional localization. We studied the basic characteristics of the proposed system by making GNP work in a functionally localized way.

  16. Constitutive nuclear localization of an alternatively spliced sirtuin-2 isoform.

    PubMed

    Rack, Johannes G M; VanLinden, Magali R; Lutter, Timo; Aasland, Rein; Ziegler, Mathias

    2014-04-17

    Sirtuin-2 (SIRT2), the cytoplasmic member of the sirtuin family, has been implicated in the deacetylation of nuclear proteins. Although the enzyme has been reported to be located to the nucleus during G2/M phase, its spectrum of targets suggests functions in the nucleus throughout the cell cycle. While a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling mechanism has been proposed for SIRT2, recent studies have indicated the presence of a constitutively nuclear isoform. Here we report the identification of a novel splice variant (isoform 5) of SIRT2 that lacks a nuclear export signal and encodes a predominantly nuclear isoform. This novel isoform 5 fails to show deacetylase activity using several assays, both in vitro and in vivo, and we are led to conclude that this isoform is catalytically inactive. Nevertheless, it retains the ability to interact with p300, a known interaction partner. Moreover, changes in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence upon denaturation indicate that the protein is properly folded. These data, together with computational analyses, confirm the structural integrity of the catalytic domain. Our results suggest an activity-independent nuclear function of the novel isoform.

  17. Nucleon localization and fragment formation in nuclear fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. L.; Schuetrumpf, B.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-12-01

    Background: An electron localization measure was originally introduced to characterize chemical bond structures in molecules. Recently, a nucleon localization based on Hartree-Fock densities has been introduced to investigate α -cluster structures in light nuclei. Compared to the local nucleonic densities, the nucleon localization function has been shown to be an excellent indicator of shell effects and cluster correlations. Purpose: Using the spatial nucleon localization measure, we investigate the emergence of fragments in fissioning heavy nuclei. Methods: To illustrate basic concepts of nucleon localization, we employ the self-consistent energy density functional method with a quantified energy density functional optimized for fission studies. Results: We study the particle densities and spatial nucleon localization distributions along the fission pathways of 264Fm, 232Th, and 240Pu. We demonstrate that the fission fragments are formed fairly early in the evolution, well before scission. We illustrate the usefulness of the localization measure by showing how the hyperdeformed state of 232Th can be understood in terms of a quasimolecular state made of 132Sn and 100Zr fragments. Conclusions: Compared to nucleonic distributions, the nucleon localization function more effectively quantifies nucleonic clustering: its characteristic oscillating pattern, traced back to shell effects, is a clear fingerprint of cluster/fragment configurations. This is of particular interest for studies of fragment formation and fragment identification in fissioning nuclei.

  18. The role of nuclear localization signal in parvovirus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Chen, Shun; Wang, Mingshu; Cheng, Anchun

    2017-04-14

    Parvoviruses are small, non-enveloped viruses with an approximately 5.0 kb, single-stranded DNA genome. Usually, the parvovirus capsid gene contains one or more nuclear localization signals (NLSs), which are required for guiding the virus particle into the nucleus through the nuclear pore. However, several classical NLSs (cNLSs) and non-classical NLSs (ncNLSs) have been identified in non-structural genes, and the ncNLSs can also target non-structural proteins into the nucleus. In this review, we have summarized recent research findings on parvovirus NLSs. The capsid protein of the adeno-associated virus has four potential nuclear localization sequences, named basic region 1 (BR), BR2, BR3 and BR4. BR3 was identified as an NLS by fusing it with green fluorescent protein. Moreover, BR3 and BR4 are required for infectivity and virion assembly. In Protoparvovirus, the canine parvovirus has a common cNLS located in the VP1 unique region, similar to parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM) and porcine parvovirus. Moreover, an ncNLS is found in the C-terminal region of MVM VP1/2. Parvovirus B19 also contains an ncNLS in the C-terminal region of VP1/2, which is essential for the nuclear transport of VP1/VP2. Approximately 1 or 2 cNLSs and 1 ncNLS have been reported in the non-structural protein of bocaviruses. Understanding the role of the NLS in the process of parvovirus infection and its mechanism of nuclear transport will contribute to the development of therapeutic vaccines and novel antiviral medicines.

  19. The defective nuclear lamina in Hutchinson-gilford progeria syndrome disrupts the nucleocytoplasmic Ran gradient and inhibits nuclear localization of Ubc9.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Joshua B; Datta, Sutirtha; Snow, Chelsi J; Chatterjee, Mandovi; Ni, Li; Spencer, Adam; Yang, Chun-Song; Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Matunis, Michael J; Paschal, Bryce M

    2011-08-01

    The mutant form of lamin A responsible for the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (termed progerin) acts as a dominant negative protein that changes the structure of the nuclear lamina. How the perturbation of the nuclear lamina in progeria is transduced into cellular changes is undefined. Using patient fibroblasts and a variety of cell-based assays, we determined that progerin expression in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome inhibits the nucleocytoplasmic transport of several factors with key roles in nuclear function. We found that progerin reduces the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration of the Ran GTPase and inhibits the nuclear localization of Ubc9, the sole E2 for SUMOylation, and of TPR, the nucleoporin that forms the basket on the nuclear side of the nuclear pore complex. Forcing the nuclear localization of Ubc9 in progerin-expressing cells rescues the Ran gradient and TPR import, indicating that these pathways are linked. Reducing nuclear SUMOylation decreases the nuclear mobility of the Ran nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 in vivo, and the addition of SUMO E1 and E2 promotes the dissociation of RCC1 and Ran from chromatin in vitro. Our data suggest that the cellular effects of progerin are transduced, at least in part, through reduced function of the Ran GTPase and SUMOylation pathways.

  20. Error analysis in nuclear density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, Nicolas; McDonnell, Jordan D.; Sarich, Jason; Wild, Stefan M.; Higdon, Dave

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is the only microscopic, global approach to the structure of atomic nuclei. It is used in numerous applications, from determining the limits of stability to gaining a deep understanding of the formation of elements in the Universe or the mechanisms that power stars and reactors. The predictive power of the theory depends on the amount of physics embedded in the energy density functional as well as on efficient ways to determine a small number of free parameters and solve the DFT equations. In this article, we discuss the various sources of uncertainties and errors encountered in DFT and possible methods to quantify these uncertainties in a rigorous manner.

  1. Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schunck, Nicolas; McDonnell, Jordan D.; Sarich, Jason; Wild, Stefan M.; Higdon, Dave

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is the only microscopic, global approach to the structure of atomic nuclei. It is used in numerous applications, from determining the limits of stability to gaining a deep understanding of the formation of elements in the Universe or the mechanisms that power stars and reactors. The predictive power of the theory depends on the amount of physics embedded in the energy density functional as well as on efficient ways to determine a small number of free parameters and solve the DFT equations. In this article, we discuss the various sources of uncertainties and errors encountered in DFT and possible methods to quantify these uncertainties in a rigorous manner.

  2. Nuclear localization signals for four distinct karyopherin-β nuclear import systems.

    PubMed

    Soniat, Michael; Chook, Yuh Min

    2015-06-15

    The Karyopherin-β family of proteins mediates nuclear transport of macromolecules. Nuclear versus cytoplasmic localization of proteins is often suggested by the presence of NLSs (nuclear localization signals) or NESs (nuclear export signals). Import-Karyopherin-βs or Importins bind to NLSs in their protein cargos to transport them through nuclear pore complexes into the nucleus. Until recently, only two classes of NLS had been biochemically and structurally characterized: the classical NLS, which is recognized by the Importin-α/β heterodimer and the PY-NLS (proline-tyrosine NLS), which is recognized by Karyopherin-β2 or Transportin-1. Structures of two other Karyopherin-βs, Kap121 and Transportin-SR2, in complex with their respective cargos were reported for the first time recently, revealing two new distinct classes of NLSs. The present paper briefly describes the classical NLS, reviews recent literature on the PY-NLS and provides in-depth reviews of the two newly discovered classes of NLSs that bind Kap121p and Transportin-SR respectively.

  3. Nucleon localization and fragment formation in nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C. L.; Schuetrumpf, B.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-12-27

    An electron localization measure was originally introduced to characterize chemical bond structures in molecules. Recently, a nucleon localization based on Hartree-Fock densities has been introduced to investigate α-cluster structures in light nuclei. Compared to the local nucleonic densities, the nucleon localization function has been shown to be an excellent indicator of shell effects and cluster correlations. In this work, using the spatial nucleon localization measure, we investigated the emergence of fragments in fissioning heavy nuclei using the self-consistent energy density functional method with a quantified energy density functional optimized for fission studies. We studied the particle densities and spatial nucleon localization distributions along the fission pathways of 264Fm, 232Th, and 240Pu. We demonstrated that the fission fragments were formed fairly early in the evolution, well before scission. To illustrate the usefulness of the localization measure, we showed how the hyperdeformed state of 232Th could be understood in terms of a quasimolecular state made of 132Sn and 100Zr fragments. Compared to nucleonic distributions, the nucleon localization function more effectively quantifies nucleonic clustering: its characteristic oscillating pattern, traced back to shell effects, is a clear fingerprint of cluster/fragment configurations. This is of particular interest for studies of fragment formation and fragment identification in fissioning nuclei.

  4. Nucleon localization and fragment formation in nuclear fission

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, C. L.; Schuetrumpf, B.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-12-27

    An electron localization measure was originally introduced to characterize chemical bond structures in molecules. Recently, a nucleon localization based on Hartree-Fock densities has been introduced to investigate α-cluster structures in light nuclei. Compared to the local nucleonic densities, the nucleon localization function has been shown to be an excellent indicator of shell effects and cluster correlations. In this work, using the spatial nucleon localization measure, we investigated the emergence of fragments in fissioning heavy nuclei using the self-consistent energy density functional method with a quantified energy density functional optimized for fission studies. We studied the particle densities and spatial nucleonmore » localization distributions along the fission pathways of 264Fm, 232Th, and 240Pu. We demonstrated that the fission fragments were formed fairly early in the evolution, well before scission. To illustrate the usefulness of the localization measure, we showed how the hyperdeformed state of 232Th could be understood in terms of a quasimolecular state made of 132Sn and 100Zr fragments. Compared to nucleonic distributions, the nucleon localization function more effectively quantifies nucleonic clustering: its characteristic oscillating pattern, traced back to shell effects, is a clear fingerprint of cluster/fragment configurations. This is of particular interest for studies of fragment formation and fragment identification in fissioning nuclei.« less

  5. [Structure and Function of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor].

    PubMed

    Inouye, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Animal defense mechanisms against both endogenous and exogenous toxic compounds function mainly through receptor-type transcription factors, including the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Following xenobiotic stimulation, CAR translocates into the nucleus and transactivates its target genes including oxygenic and conjugative enzymes and transporters in hepatocytes. We identified subcellular localization signals in the rat CAR: two nuclear localization signals (NLS1 and 2); two nuclear export signals (NES1 and 2); and a cytoplasmic retention region. The nuclear import of CAR is regulated by the importin-Ran system and microtubule network. Five splice variants (SV1-5) were identified in rat liver in addition to wild-type CAR. When expressed in immortalized cells, their artificial transcripts were inactive as transcription factors. A CAR mutant with three consecutive alanine residues inserted into the ligand-binding domain of CAR showed ligand-dependent activation of target genes in immortalized cells, which is in marked contrast to the constitutive transactivating nature of wild-type CAR. Using this assay system, androstenol and clotrimazole, both of which are inverse agonists of CAR, were classified as an antagonist and weak agonist, respectively. A member of the DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase family (DP97) and protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) were found to be gene (or promotor)-specific coactivators of CAR. The expression of the CAR gene might be under the control of clock genes mediated by the nuclear receptor Rev-erb-α.

  6. Nuclear Energy Density Functional for KIDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, H.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Hyun, C. H.; Park, T.-S.; Oh, Y.

    The density functional theory (DFT) is based on the existence and uniqueness of a universal functional $E[\\rho]$, which determines the dependence of the total energy on single-particle density distributions. However, DFT says nothing about the form of the functional. Our strategy is to first look at what we know, from independent considerations, about the analytical density dependence of the energy of nuclear matter and then, for practical applications, to obtain an appropriate density-dependent effective interaction by reverse engineering. In a previous work on homogeneous matter, we identified the most essential terms to include in our "KIDS" functional, named after the early-stage participating institutes. We now present first results for finite nuclei, namely the energies and radii of $^{16,28}$O, $^{40,60}$Ca.

  7. Green's function Monte Carlo in nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.

    1990-01-01

    We review the status of Green's Function Monte Carlo (GFMC) methods as applied to problems in nuclear physics. New methods have been developed to handle the spin and isospin degrees of freedom that are a vital part of any realistic nuclear physics problem, whether at the level of quarks or nucleons. We discuss these methods and then summarize results obtained recently for light nuclei, including ground state energies, three-body forces, charge form factors and the coulomb sum. As an illustration of the applicability of GFMC to quark models, we also consider the possible existence of bound exotic multi-quark states within the framework of flux-tube quark models. 44 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Growth hormone-specific induction of the nuclear localization of porcine growth hormone receptor in porcine hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lan, H N; Hong, P; Li, R N; Shan, A S; Zheng, X

    2017-10-01

    The phenomenon of nuclear translocation of growth hormone receptor (GHR) in human, rat, and fish has been reported. To date, this phenomenon has not been described in a domestic animal (such as pig). In addition, the molecular mechanisms of GHR nuclear translocation have not been thoroughly elucidated. To this end, porcine hepatocytes were isolated and used as a cell model. We observed that porcine growth hormone (pGH) can induce porcine GHR's nuclear localization in porcine hepatocytes. Subsequently, the dynamics of pGH-induced pGHR's nuclear localization were analyzed and demonstrated that pGHR's nuclear localization occurs in a time-dependent manner. Next, we explored the mechanism of pGHR nuclear localization using different pGHR ligands, and we demonstrated that pGHR's nuclear translocation is GH(s)-dependent. We also observed that pGHR translocates into cell nuclei in a pGH dimerization-dependent fashion, whereas further experiments indicated that IMPα/β is involved in the nuclear translocation of the pGH-pGHR dimer. The pGH-pGHR dimer may form a pGH-GHR-JAK2 multiple complex in cell nuclei, which would suggest that similar to its function in the cell membrane, the nuclear-localized pGH-pGHR dimer might still have the ability to signal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Meaning of the nuclear wave function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, John D.; Miller, Gerald A.

    2016-07-01

    Background: The intense current experimental interest in studying the structure of the deuteron and using it to enable accurate studies of neutron structure motivate us to examine the four-dimensional space-time nature of the nuclear wave function and the various approximations used to reduce it to an object that depends only on three spatial variables. Purpose: The aim is to determine if the ability to understand and analyze measured experimental cross sections is compromised by making the reduction from four to three dimensions. Method: Simple, exactly calculable, covariant models of a bound-state wave-state wave function (a scalar boson made of two constituent-scalar bosons) with parameters chosen to represent a deuteron are used to investigate the accuracy of using different approximations to the nuclear wave function to compute the quasielastic scattering cross section. Four different versions of the wave function are defined (light-front-spectator, light-front, light-front with scaling, and nonrelativistic) and used to compute the cross sections as a function of how far off the mass shell (how virtual) is the struck constituent. Results: We show that making an exact calculation of the quasielastic scattering cross section involves using the light-front-spectator wave function. All of the other approaches fail to reproduce the model exact calculation if the value of Bjorken x differs from unity. The model is extended to consider an essential effect of spin to show that constituent nucleons cannot be treated as being on their mass shell even when taking the matrix element of a "good" current. Conclusions: Developing realistic light-front-spectator wave functions to meet the needs of current and planned experiments is a worthwhile activity.

  10. p150/Glued Modifies Nuclear Estrogen Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Jung; Chae, Christina; Wang, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    Estrogen modulates gene expression through interactions with estrogen receptors (ERs) that bind chromosomal target genes. Recent studies have suggested an interaction between the cytoskeletal system and estrogen signaling; these have implicated a role of cytoplasmic microtubules in scaffolding ERα and enhancing nongenomic function; in addition, other experiments demonstrate that dynein light chain 1 may chaperone ERα to the nucleus, indirectly increasing transcriptional potency. Actin/myosin and dynein light chain 1 are also required for estrogen-mediated chromosomal movement that is required for transcriptional up-regulation of ERα targets. We present evidence that the dynactin component, p150/glued, directly influences the potency of nuclear ER function. Increasing the stoichiometric ratio of p150/glued and ERα by overexpression enhances estrogen responses. ERα enhancement by p150/glued does not appear to be influenced by shifts in subcellular localization because microtubule disruption fails to increase nuclear ERα. Rather, we find that modest amounts of p150/glued reside in the nucleus of cells, suggesting that it plays a direct role in nuclear transcription. Notably, p150/glued is recruited to the pS2 promoter in the presence of hormone, and, in MCF-7 cells, knockdown of p150/glued levels reduces estrogen-dependent transcription. Our results suggest that p150/glued modulates estrogen sensitivity in cells through nuclear mechanisms. PMID:19228793

  11. Nuclear localization of Formyl-Peptide Receptor 2 in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Fabio; Parisi, Melania; Fioretti, Tiziana; Sarnataro, Daniela; Esposito, Gabriella; Ammendola, Rosario

    2016-08-01

    Current models of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signaling describe binding of external agonists to cell surface receptors which, in turn, trigger several biological responses. New paradigms indicate that GPCRs localize to and signal at the nucleus, thus regulating distinct signaling cascades. The formyl-peptide receptor FPR2 belongs to the GPCR super-family and is coupled to PTX-sensitive Gi proteins. We show by western blot analysis, immunofluorescence experiments and radioligand binding assays that FPR2 is expressed at nuclear level in CaLu-6 and AGS cells. Nuclear FPR2 is a functional receptor, since it participates in intra-nuclear signaling, as assessed by decreased G protein-FPR2 association and enhanced ERK2, c-Jun and c-Myc phosphorylation upon stimulation of intact nuclei with the FPR2 agonist, WKYMVm. We analyzed FPR2 sequence for the search of a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and we found a stretch of basic aminoacids (227-KIHKK-231) in the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor. We performed single (K230A) and multiple (H229A/K230A/K231A) mutagenesis of NLS. The constructs were individually overexpressed in HEK293 cells and immunofluorescence and western blot analysis showed that nuclear localization or translocation of FPR2 depends on the integrity of the H(229) and K(231) residues within the NLS.

  12. Fission yeast Lem2 and Man1 perform fundamental functions of the animal cell nuclear lamina.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Yanira; Saito, Akira; Sazer, Shelley

    2012-01-01

    In animal cells the nuclear lamina, which consists of lamins and lamin-associated proteins, serves several functions: it provides a structural scaffold for the nuclear envelope and tethers proteins and heterochromatin to the nuclear periphery. In yeast, proteins and large heterochromatic domains including telomeres are also peripherally localized, but there is no evidence that yeast have lamins or a fibrous nuclear envelope scaffold. Nonetheless, we found that the Lem2 and Man1 proteins of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, evolutionarily distant relatives of the Lap2/Emerin/Man1 (LEM) sub-family of animal cell lamin-associated proteins, perform fundamental functions of the animal cell lamina. These integral inner nuclear membrane localized proteins, with nuclear localized DNA binding Helix-Extension-Helix (HEH) domains, impact nuclear envelope structure and integrity, are essential for the enrichment of telomeres at the nuclear periphery and by means of their HEH domains anchor chromatin, most likely transcriptionally repressed heterochromatin, to the nuclear periphery. These data indicate that the core functions of the nuclear lamina are conserved between fungi and animal cells and can be performed in fission yeast, without lamins or other intermediate filament proteins.

  13. Fission yeast Lem2 and Man1 perform fundamental functions of the animal cell nuclear lamina

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Yanira; Saito, Akira; Sazer, Shelley

    2012-01-01

    In animal cells the nuclear lamina, which consists of lamins and lamin-associated proteins, serves several functions: it provides a structural scaffold for the nuclear envelope and tethers proteins and heterochromatin to the nuclear periphery. In yeast, proteins and large heterochromatic domains including telomeres are also peripherally localized, but there is no evidence that yeast have lamins or a fibrous nuclear envelope scaffold. Nonetheless, we found that the Lem2 and Man1 proteins of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, evolutionarily distant relatives of the Lap2/Emerin/Man1 (LEM) sub-family of animal cell lamin-associated proteins, perform fundamental functions of the animal cell lamina. These integral inner nuclear membrane localized proteins, with nuclear localized DNA binding Helix-Extension-Helix (HEH) domains, impact nuclear envelope structure and integrity, are essential for the enrichment of telomeres at the nuclear periphery and by means of their HEH domains anchor chromatin, most likely transcriptionally repressed heterochromatin, to the nuclear periphery. These data indicate that the core functions of the nuclear lamina are conserved between fungi and animal cells and can be performed in fission yeast, without lamins or other intermediate filament proteins. PMID:22540024

  14. A proline-tyrosine nuclear localization signal (PY-NLS) is required for the nuclear import of fission yeast PAB2, but not of human PABPN1.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Pierre-Luc; Bachand, François

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) are evolutionarily conserved proteins that play key roles in eukaryotic gene expression. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the major nuclear PABP, Pab2, functions in the maturation of small nucleolar RNAs as well as in nuclear RNA decay. Despite knowledge about its nuclear functions, nothing is known about how Pab2 is imported into the nucleus. Here, we show that Pab2 contains a proline-tyrosine nuclear localization signal (PY-NLS) that is necessary and sufficient for its nuclear localization and function. Consistent with the role of karyopherin β2 (Kapβ2)-type receptors in the import of PY-NLS cargoes, we show that the fission yeast ortholog of human Kapβ2, Kap104, binds to recombinant Pab2 and is required for Pab2 nuclear localization. The absence of arginine methylation in a basic region N-terminal to the PY-core motif of Pab2 did not affect its nuclear localization. However, in the context of a sub-optimal PY-NLS, we found that Pab2 was more efficiently targeted to the nucleus in the absence of arginine methylation, suggesting that this modification can affect the import kinetics of a PY-NLS cargo. Although a sequence resembling a PY-NLS motif can be found in the human Pab2 ortholog, PABPN1, our results indicate that neither a functional PY-NLS nor Kapβ2 activity are required to promote entry of PABPN1 into the nucleus of human cells. Our findings describe the mechanism by which Pab2 is imported into the nucleus, providing the first example of a PY-NLS import system in fission yeast. In addition, this study suggests the existence of alternative or redundant nuclear import pathways for human PABPN1.

  15. Cloning, characterization and subcellular localization of Nuclear LIM interactor interacting factor gene from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Ravinder, R; Goyal, N

    2017-05-05

    LIM domains are zinc-binding motifs that mediate protein-protein interactions and are found in a wide variety of cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins. The nuclear LIM domain family members have a number of different functions including transcription factors, gene regulation, cell fate determination, organization of the cytoskeleton and tumour formation exerting their function through various LIM domain interacting protein partners/cofactors. Nuclear LIM domain interacting proteins/factors have not been reported in any protozoan parasites including Leishmania. Here, we report for the first time cloning, characterization and subcellular localization of nuclear LIM interactor-interacting factor (NLI) like protein from Leishmania donovani, the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar. Primary sequence analysis of LdNLI revealed presence of characteristic features of nuclear LIM interactor-interacting factor. However, leishmanial NLI represents a distinct kinetoplastid group, clustered in a separate branch of the phylogenic tree. The sub-cellular distribution of LdNLI revealed the discreet localization in nucleus and kinetoplast only, suggesting that the gene may have a role in parasite gene expression.

  16. Nuclear targeting of the maize R protein requires two nuclear localization sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, M.W.; Raikhel, N.V. ); Wessler, S.R. )

    1993-02-01

    Previous genetic and structural evidence indicates that the maize R gene encodes a nuclear transcriptional activating factor. In-frame carboxyl- and amino-terminal fusions of the R gene to the reporter gene encoding [beta]-glucuronidase (GUS) were sufficient to direct GUS to the nucleus of the transiently transformed onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells. Further analysis of chimeric constructs containing regions of the R gene fused to the GUS cDNA revealed three specific nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) that were capable of redirecting the GUS protein to the nucleus. Amino-terminal NLS-A (amino acids 100-109, GDRRAAPARP) contained several arginine residues; a similar localization signal is found in only a few viral proteins. The medial NLS-M (amino acids 419-428, MSERKRREKL) is a simian virus 40 large T antigen-type NLS, and the carboxyl-terminal NLS-C (amino acids 598-610, MISESLRKAIGKR) is a mating type [alpha]2 type. NLSs M and C are independently sufficient to direct the GUS protein to the nucleus when it is fused at the amino terminus of GUS, whereas NLS-A fused to GUS partitioned between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Similar partitioning was observed when localization signals NLS-A and NLS-C were independently fused to the carboxy-terminal portion of GUS. A sequential deletion of the localization signals indicated that the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal fusions of R and GUS were redirected to the nucleus only when both NLS-A and -M, or NLS-C and -M, were present. These results indicate that multiple localization signals are necessary for nuclear targeting of this protein. The conservation of the localization signals within the alleles of R and similar proteins from other organisms is also discussed. 45 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Nuclear localization of platelet-activating factor receptor controls retinal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    K Bhosle, Vikrant; Rivera, José Carlos; Zhou, Tianwei (Ellen); Omri, Samy; Sanchez, Melanie; Hamel, David; Zhu, Tang; Rouget, Raphael; Rabea, Areej Al; Hou, Xin; Lahaie, Isabelle; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a pleiotropic phospholipid with proinflammatory, procoagulant and angiogenic actions on the vasculature. We and others have reported the presence of PAF receptor (Ptafr) at intracellular sites such as the nucleus. However, mechanisms of localization and physiologic functions of intracellular Ptafr remain poorly understood. We hereby identify the importance of C-terminal motif of the receptor and uncover novel roles of Rab11a GTPase and importin-5 in nuclear translocation of Ptafr in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Nuclear localization of Ptafr is independent of exogenous PAF stimulation as well as intracellular PAF biosynthesis. Moreover, nuclear Ptafr is responsible for the upregulation of unique set of growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor, in vitro and ex vivo. We further corroborate the intracrine PAF signaling, resulting in angiogenesis in vivo, using Ptafr antagonists with distinct plasma membrane permeability. Collectively, our findings show that nuclear Ptafr translocates in an agonist-independent manner, and distinctive functions of Ptafr based on its cellular localization point to another dimension needed for pharmacologic selectivity of drugs. PMID:27462464

  18. Assembly of the Human Origin Recognition Complex Occurs through Independent Nuclear Localization of Its Components*

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Soma; Vassilev, Alex P.; Zhang, Junmei; Zhao, Yingming; DePamphilis, Melvin L.

    2011-01-01

    Initiation of eukaryotic genome duplication begins when a six-subunit origin recognition complex (ORC) binds to DNA. However, the mechanism by which this occurs in vivo and the roles played by individual subunits appear to differ significantly among organisms. Previous studies identified a soluble human ORC(2–5) complex in the nucleus, an ORC(1–5) complex bound to chromatin, and an Orc6 protein that binds weakly, if at all, to other ORC subunits. Here we show that stable ORC(1–6) complexes also can be purified from human cell extracts and that Orc6 and Orc1 each contain a single nuclear localization signal that is essential for nuclear localization but not for ORC assembly. The Orc6 nuclear localization signal, which is essential for Orc6 function, is facilitated by phosphorylation at its cyclin-dependent kinase consensus site and by association with Kpna6/1, nuclear transport proteins that did not co-purify with other ORC subunits. These and other results support a model in which Orc6, Orc1, and ORC(2–5) are transported independently to the nucleus where they can either assemble into ORC(1–6) or function individually. PMID:21555516

  19. Identification and Functional Characterization of Nuclear Mortalin in Human Carcinogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jihoon; Kaul, Zeenia; Yoon, A-Rum; Liu, Ye; Yaguchi, Tomoko; Na, Youjin; Ahn, Hyo Min; Gao, Ran; Choi, Il-Kyu; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2014-01-01

    The Hsp70 family protein mortalin is an essential chaperone that is frequently enriched in cancer cells and exists in various subcellular sites, including the mitochondrion, plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum, and cytosol. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying its multiple subcellular localizations are not yet clear, their functional significance has been revealed by several studies. In this study, we examined the nuclear fractions of human cells and found that the malignantly transformed cells have more mortalin than the normal cells. We then generated a mortalin mutant that lacked a mitochondrial targeting signal peptide. It was largely localized in the nucleus, and, hence, is called nuclear mortalin (mot-N). Functional characterization of mot-N revealed that it efficiently protects cancer cells against endogenous and exogenous oxidative stress. Furthermore, compared with the full-length mortalin overexpressing cancer cells, mot-N derivatives showed increased malignant properties, including higher proliferation rate, colony forming efficacy, motility, and tumor forming capacity both in in vitro and in vivo assays. We demonstrate that mot-N promotes carcinogenesis and cancer cell metastasis by inactivation of tumor suppressor protein p53 functions and by interaction and functional activation of telomerase and heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP-K) proteins. PMID:25012652

  20. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling enhances nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of BRCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, Cimona V.; Fitzgerald, Latricia D.; Thompson, Marilyn E. . E-mail: methompson@mmc.edu

    2007-05-15

    Signaling pathways involved in regulating nuclear-cytoplasmic distribution of BRCA1 have not been previously reported. Here, we provide evidence that heregulin {beta}1-induced activation of the Akt pathway increases the nuclear content of BRCA1. First, treatment of T47D breast cancer cells with heregulin {beta}1 results in a two-fold increase in nuclear BRCA1 as assessed by FACS analysis, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. This heregulin-induced increase in nuclear BRCA1 is blocked by siRNA-mediated down-regulation of Akt. Second, mutation of threonine 509 in BRCA1, the site of Akt phosphorylation, to an alanine, attenuates the ability of heregulin to induce BRCA1 nuclear accumulation. These data suggest that Akt-catalyzed phosphorylation of BRCA1 is required for the heregulin-regulated nuclear concentration of BRCA1. Because most functions ascribed to BRCA1 occur within the nucleus, we postulated that phosphorylation-dependent nuclear accumulation of BRCA1 would result in enhanced nuclear activity, specifically transcriptional activity, of BRCA1. This postulate is affirmed by our observation that the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate GADD45 promoter constructs was enhanced in T47D cells treated with heregulin {beta}1. Furthermore, the heterologous expression of BRCA1 in HCC1937 human breast cancer cells, which have constitutively active Akt, also induces GADD45 promoter activity, whereas the expression of BRCA1 in which threonine 509 has been mutated to an alanine is able to only minimally induce promoter activity. These findings implicate Akt in upstream events leading to BRCA1 nuclear localization and function.

  1. Characterization of nuclear localization signals and cytoplasmic retention region in the nuclear receptor CAR.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Motoyoshi; Nakahama, Takayuki; Inouye, Yoshio

    2005-09-10

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a ligand/activator-dependent transactivation factor that resides in the cytoplasm and forms part of an as yet unidentified protein complex. Upon stimulation, CAR translocates into the nucleus where it modulates the transactivation of target genes. However, CAR exogenously expressed in rat liver RL-34 cells is located in the nucleus even in the absence of activators. By transiently transfecting RL-34 cells with various mutated rat CAR segments, we identified two nuclear localization signals: a basic amino acid-rich sequence (RRARQARRR) between amino acids 100 and 108; and an assembly of noncontiguous residues widely spread over amino acid residues 111 to 320 within the ligand binding domain. A C-terminal leucine-rich segment corresponding to a previously reported murine xenochemical response signal was not found to exhibit nuclear import activity in cultured cells. Using rat primary hepatocytes transfected with various CAR segments, we identified the region required for the cytoplasmic retention of CAR. Based on these results, the intracellular localization of CAR would be determined by the combined effects of nuclear localization signals, the xenochemical response signal, and the cytoplasmic retention region.

  2. Control of heterochromatin localization and silencing by the nuclear membrane protein Lem2

    PubMed Central

    Barrales, Ramón Ramos; Forn, Marta; Georgescu, Paula Raluca; Sarkadi, Zsuzsa; Braun, Sigurd

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptionally silent chromatin localizes to the nuclear periphery, which provides a special microenvironment for gene repression. A variety of nuclear membrane proteins interact with repressed chromatin, yet the functional role of these interactions remains poorly understood. Here, we show that, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the nuclear membrane protein Lem2 associates with chromatin and mediates silencing and heterochromatin localization. Unexpectedly, we found that these functions can be separated and assigned to different structural domains within Lem2, excluding a simple tethering mechanism. Chromatin association and tethering of centromeres to the periphery are mediated by the N-terminal LEM (LAP2–Emerin–MAN1) domain of Lem2, whereas telomere anchoring and heterochromatin silencing require exclusively its conserved C-terminal MSC (MAN1–Src1 C-terminal) domain. Particularly, silencing by Lem2 is epistatic with the Snf2/HDAC (histone deacetylase) repressor complex SHREC at telomeres, while its necessity can be bypassed by deleting Epe1, a JmjC protein with anti-silencing activity. Furthermore, we found that loss of Lem2 reduces heterochromatin association of SHREC, which is accompanied by increased binding of Epe1. This reveals a critical function of Lem2 in coordinating these antagonistic factors at heterochromatin. The distinct silencing and localization functions mediated by Lem2 suggest that these conserved LEM-containing proteins go beyond simple tethering to play active roles in perinuclear silencing. PMID:26744419

  3. Control of heterochromatin localization and silencing by the nuclear membrane protein Lem2.

    PubMed

    Barrales, Ramón Ramos; Forn, Marta; Georgescu, Paula Raluca; Sarkadi, Zsuzsa; Braun, Sigurd

    2016-01-15

    Transcriptionally silent chromatin localizes to the nuclear periphery, which provides a special microenvironment for gene repression. A variety of nuclear membrane proteins interact with repressed chromatin, yet the functional role of these interactions remains poorly understood. Here, we show that, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the nuclear membrane protein Lem2 associates with chromatin and mediates silencing and heterochromatin localization. Unexpectedly, we found that these functions can be separated and assigned to different structural domains within Lem2, excluding a simple tethering mechanism. Chromatin association and tethering of centromeres to the periphery are mediated by the N-terminal LEM (LAP2-Emerin-MAN1) domain of Lem2, whereas telomere anchoring and heterochromatin silencing require exclusively its conserved C-terminal MSC (MAN1-Src1 C-terminal) domain. Particularly, silencing by Lem2 is epistatic with the Snf2/HDAC (histone deacetylase) repressor complex SHREC at telomeres, while its necessity can be bypassed by deleting Epe1, a JmjC protein with anti-silencing activity. Furthermore, we found that loss of Lem2 reduces heterochromatin association of SHREC, which is accompanied by increased binding of Epe1. This reveals a critical function of Lem2 in coordinating these antagonistic factors at heterochromatin. The distinct silencing and localization functions mediated by Lem2 suggest that these conserved LEM-containing proteins go beyond simple tethering to play active roles in perinuclear silencing.

  4. Troponin T nuclear localization and its role in aging skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Birbrair, Alexander; Wang, Zhong-Min; Taylor, Jackson; Messi, María Laura; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2013-04-01

    Troponin T (TnT) is known to mediate the interaction between Tn complex and tropomyosin (Tm), which is essential for calcium-activated striated muscle contraction. This regulatory function takes place in the myoplasm, where TnT binds Tm. However, recent findings of troponin I and Tm nuclear translocation in Drosophila and mammalian cells imply other roles for the Tn-Tm complex. We hypothesized that TnT plays a nonclassical role through nuclear translocation. Immunoblotting with different antibodies targeting the NH2- or COOH-terminal region uncovered a pool of fast skeletal muscle TnT3 localized in the nuclear fraction of mouse skeletal muscle as either an intact or fragmented protein. Construction of TnT3-DsRed fusion proteins led to the further observation that TnT3 fragments are closely related to nucleolus and RNA polymerase activity, suggesting a role for TnT3 in regulating transcription. Functionally, overexpression of TnT3 fragments produced significant defects in nuclear shape and caused high levels of apoptosis. Interestingly, nuclear TnT3 and its fragments were highly regulated by aging, thus creating a possible link between the deleterious effects of TnT3 and sarcopenia. We propose that changes in nuclear TnT3 and its fragments cause the number of myonuclei to decrease with age, contributing to muscle damage and wasting.

  5. An N-terminal nuclear localization sequence but not the calmodulin-binding domain mediates nuclear localization of nucleomorphin, a protein that regulates nuclear number in Dictyostelium

    SciTech Connect

    Myre, Michael A.; O'Day, Danton H. . E-mail: doday@utm.utoronto.ca

    2005-06-24

    Nucleomorphin is a novel nuclear calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein (CaMBP) containing an extensive DEED (glu/asp repeat) domain that regulates nuclear number. GFP-constructs of the 38 kDa NumA1 isoform localize as intranuclear patches adjacent to the inner nuclear membrane. The translocation of CaMBPs into nuclei has previously been shown by others to be mediated by both classic nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) and CaM-binding domains (CaMBDs). Here we show that NumA1 possesses a CaMBD ({sup 171}EDVSRFIKGKLLQKQQKIYKDLERF{sup 195}) containing both calcium-dependent-binding motifs and an IQ-like motif for calcium-independent binding. GFP-constructs containing only NumA1 residues 1-129, lacking the DEED and CaMBDs, still localized as patches at the internal periphery of nuclei thus ruling out a direct role for the CaMBD in nuclear import. These constructs contained the amino acid residues {sup 48}KKSYQDPEIIAHSRPRK{sup 64} that include both a putative bipartite and classical NLS. GFP-bipartite NLS constructs localized uniformly within nuclei but not as patches. As with previous work, removal of the DEED domain resulted in highly multinucleate cells. However as shown here, multinuclearity only occurred when the NLS was present allowing the protein to enter nuclei. Site-directed mutation analysis in which the NLS was changed to {sup 48}EF{sup 49} abolished the stability of the GFP fusion at the protein but not RNA level preventing subcellular analyses. Cells transfected with the {sup 48}EF{sup 49} construct exhibited slowed growth when compared to parental AX3 cells and other GFP-NumA1 deletion mutants. In addition to identifying an NLS that is sufficient for nuclear translocation of nucleomorphin and ruling out CaM-binding in this event, this work shows that the nuclear localization of NumA1 is crucial to its ability to regulate nuclear number in Dictyostelium.

  6. Enzyme function is regulated by its localization.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Stacey M; Meyer, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    To better understand how enzyme localization affects enzyme activity we studied the cellular localization of the glycosyltransferase MurG, an enzyme necessary for cell wall synthesis at the spore during sporulation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis. During sporulation MurG was gradually enriched to the membrane at the forespore and point mutations in a MurG helical domain disrupting its localization to the membrane caused severe sporulation defects, but did not affect localization nor caused detectable defects during exponential growth. We found that this localization is dependent on the phospholipid cardiolipin, as in strains where the cardiolipin-synthesizing genes were deleted, MurG levels were diminished at the forespore. Furthermore, in this cardiolipin-less strain, MurG localization during sporulation was rescued by external addition of purified cardiolipin. These results support localization as a critical factor in the regulation of proper enzyme function and catalysis.

  7. DNA Ligase IV regulates XRCC4 nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Francis, Dailia B; Kozlov, Mikhail; Chavez, Jose; Chu, Jennifer; Malu, Shruti; Hanna, Mary; Cortes, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    DNA Ligase IV, along with its interacting partner XRCC4, are essential for repairing DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Together, they complete the final ligation step resolving the DNA break. Ligase IV is regulated by XRCC4 and XLF. However, the mechanism(s) by which Ligase IV control the NHEJ reaction and other NHEJ factor(s) remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a C-terminal region of Ligase IV (aa 620-800), which encompasses a NLS, the BRCT I, and the XRCC4 interacting region (XIR), is essential for nuclear localization of its co-factor XRCC4. In Ligase IV deficient cells, XRCC4 showed deregulated localization remaining in the cytosol even after induction of DNA double strand breaks. DNA Ligase IV was also required for efficient localization of XLF into the nucleus. Additionally, human fibroblasts that harbor hypomorphic mutations within the Ligase IV gene displayed decreased levels of XRCC4 protein, implicating that DNA Ligase IV is also regulating XRCC4 stability. Our results provide evidence for a role of DNA Ligase IV in controlling the cellular localization and protein levels of XRCC4. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. DNA Ligase IV regulates XRCC4 nuclear localization

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Dailia B.; Kozlov, Mikhail; Chavez, Jose; Chu, Jennifer; Malu, Shruti; Hanna, Mary; Cortes, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    DNA Ligase IV, along with its interacting partner XRCC4, are essential for repairing DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Together, they complete the final ligation step resolving the DNA break. Ligase IV is regulated by XRCC4 and XLF. However, the mechanism(s) by which Ligase IV control the NHEJ reaction and other NHEJ factor(s) remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a C-terminal region of Ligase IV (aa 620 to 800), which encompasses a NLS, the BRCT I, and the XRCC4 interacting region (XIR), is essential for nuclear localization of its co-factor XRCC4. In Ligase IV deficient cells, XRCC4 showed deregulated localization remaining in the cytosol even after induction of DNA double strand breaks. DNA Ligase IV was also required for efficient localization of XLF into the nucleus. Additionally, human fibroblasts that harbor hypomorphic mutations within the Ligase IV gene displayed decreased levels of XRCC4 protein, implicating that DNA Ligase IV is also regulating XRCC4 stability. Our results provide evidence for a role of DNA Ligase IV in controlling the cellular localization and protein levels of XRCC4. PMID:24984242

  9. Ras-activated RSK1 phosphorylates EBP50 to regulate its nuclear localization and promote cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hooi Cheng; Jou, Tzuu-Shuh

    2016-03-01

    Differential subcellular localization of EBP50 leads to its controversial role in cancer biology either as a tumor suppressor when it resides at the membrane periphery, or a tumor facilitator at the nucleus. However, the mechanism behind nuclear localization of EBP50 remains unclear. A RNA interference screening identified the downstream effector of the Ras-ERK cascade, RSK1, as the molecule unique for nuclear transport of EBP50. RSK1 binds to EBP50 and phosphorylates it at a conserved threonine residue at position 156 (T156) under the regulation of growth factor. Mutagenesis experiments confirmed the significance of T156 residue in nuclear localization of EBP50, cellular proliferation, and oncogenic transformation. Our study sheds light on a possible therapeutic strategy targeting at this aberrant nuclear expression of EBP50 without affecting the normal physiological function of EBP50 at other subcellular localization.

  10. A Role for NIMA in the Nuclear Localization of Cyclin B in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Wu, L.; Osmani, S.A.; Mirabito, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    NIMA promotes entry into mitosis in late G2 by some mechanism that is after activation of the Aspergillus nidulans G2 cyclin-dependent kinase, NIMXCDC2/NIMECyclin B. Here we present two independent lines of evidence which indicate that this mechanism involves control of NIMXCDC2/NIMECyclin B localization. First, we found that NIMECyclin B localized to the nucleus and the nucleus-associated organelle, the spindle pole body, in a NIMA-dependent manner. Analysis of cells from asynchronous cultures, synchronous cultures, and cultures arrested in S or G2 showed that NIMECyclin B was predominantly nuclear during interphase, with maximal nuclear accumulation in late G2. NIMXCDC2 colocalized with NIMECyclin B in G2 cells. Although inactivation of NIMA using either the nimA1 or nimA5 temperature-sensitive mutations blocked cells in G2, NIMXCDC2/NIMECyclin B localization was predominantly cytoplasmic rather than nuclear. Second, we found that nimA interacts genetically with sonA, which is a homologue of the yeast nucleocytoplasmic transporter GLE2/RAE1. Mutations in sonA were identified as allele-specific suppressors of nimA1. The sonA1 suppressor alleviated the nuclear division and NIMECyclin B localization defects of nimA1 cells without markedly increasing NIMXCDC2 or NIMA kinase activity. These results indicate that NIMA promotes the nuclear localization of the NIMXCDC2/ NIMECyclin B complex, by a process involving SONA. This mechanism may be involved in coordinating the functions of NIMXCDC2 and NIMA in the regulation of mitosis. PMID:9647650

  11. New Insights into Mechanisms and Functions of Nuclear Size Regulation.

    PubMed

    Vuković, Lidija D; Jevtić, Predrag; Edens, Lisa J; Levy, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear size is generally maintained within a defined range in a given cell type. Changes in cell size that occur during cell growth, development, and differentiation are accompanied by dynamic nuclear size adjustments in order to establish appropriate nuclear-to-cytoplasmic volume relationships. It has long been recognized that aberrations in nuclear size are associated with certain disease states, most notably cancer. Nuclear size and morphology must impact nuclear and cellular functions. Understanding these functional implications requires an understanding of the mechanisms that control nuclear size. In this review, we first provide a general overview of the diverse cellular structures and activities that contribute to nuclear size control, including structural components of the nucleus, effects of DNA amount and chromatin compaction, signaling, and transport pathways that impinge on the nucleus, extranuclear structures, and cell cycle state. We then detail some of the key mechanistic findings about nuclear size regulation that have been gleaned from a variety of model organisms. Lastly, we review studies that have implicated nuclear size in the regulation of cell and nuclear function and speculate on the potential functional significance of nuclear size in chromatin organization, gene expression, nuclear mechanics, and disease. With many fundamental cell biological questions remaining to be answered, the field of nuclear size regulation is still wide open. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [The role of Piwi nuclear localization in the differentiation and proliferation of germline stem cells].

    PubMed

    Yakushev, E Y; Mikhaleva, E A; Abramov, Y A; Sokolova, O A; Zyrianova, I M; Gvozdev, V A; Klenov, M S

    2016-01-01

    The Piwi protein and its orthologs are considered as the key components of the piRNA machinery implicated in transcriptional silencing of transposons. Неre, we show that nuclear localization of the Piwi protein is required not only for transposon repression, but also for proper differentiation of germline stem cells (GSCs). piwi^(Nt) mutation that causes loss of nuclear Piwi and its retention in the cytoplasm leads to the accumulation of undifferentiated GSC-like cells. The analysis of piwi^(Nt) mutation in combination with a bam gene mutation blocking GSC differentiation shows that the loss of nuclear Piwi decreases GSC proliferation rate. This is accompanied by the accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks in GSCs that may be caused by transposition events. Here, for the first time a set of transposons repressed by Piwi in GSCs and surrounding niche cells has been identified. The present study together with our previous data show that nuclear and cytoplasmic Piwi can regulate different stages of the functioning of germinal cells: cytoplasmic Piwi is sufficient to maintain GSCs, while nuclear Piwi localization is necessary for their proper proliferation and differentiation.

  13. Automated local bright feature image analysis of nuclear proteindistribution identifies changes in tissue phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, David; Sudar, Damir; Bator, Carol; Bissell, Mina

    2006-02-01

    The organization of nuclear proteins is linked to cell and tissue phenotypes. When cells arrest proliferation, undergo apoptosis, or differentiate, the distribution of nuclear proteins changes. Conversely, forced alteration of the distribution of nuclear proteins modifies cell phenotype. Immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy have been critical for such findings. However, there is an increasing need for quantitative analysis of nuclear protein distribution to decipher epigenetic relationships between nuclear structure and cell phenotype, and to unravel the mechanisms linking nuclear structure and function. We have developed imaging methods to quantify the distribution of fluorescently-stained nuclear protein NuMA in different mammary phenotypes obtained using three-dimensional cell culture. Automated image segmentation of DAPI-stained nuclei was generated to isolate thousands of nuclei from three-dimensional confocal images. Prominent features of fluorescently-stained NuMA were detected using a novel local bright feature analysis technique, and their normalized spatial density calculated as a function of the distance from the nuclear perimeter to its center. The results revealed marked changes in the distribution of the density of NuMA bright features as non-neoplastic cells underwent phenotypically normal acinar morphogenesis. In contrast, we did not detect any reorganization of NuMA during the formation of tumor nodules by malignant cells. Importantly, the analysis also discriminated proliferating non-neoplastic cells from proliferating malignant cells, suggesting that these imaging methods are capable of identifying alterations linked not only to the proliferation status but also to the malignant character of cells. We believe that this quantitative analysis will have additional applications for classifying normal and pathological tissues.

  14. Acetylation directs survivin nuclear localization to repress STAT3 oncogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haijuan; Holloway, Michael P; Ma, Li; Cooper, Zachary A; Riolo, Matthew; Samkari, Ayman; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J; Chin, Y Eugene; Altura, Rachel A

    2010-11-12

    The multiple functions of the oncofetal protein survivin are dependent on its selective expression patterns within immunochemically distinct subcellular pools. The mechanism by which survivin localizes to these compartments, however, is only partly understood. Here we show that nuclear accumulation of survivin is promoted by CREB-binding protein (CBP)-dependent acetylation on lysine 129 (129K, Lys-129). We demonstrate a mechanism by which survivin acetylation at this position results in its homodimerization, while deacetylation promotes the formation of survivin monomers that heterodimerize with CRM1 and facilitate its nuclear export. Using proteomic analysis, we identified the oncogenic transcription factor STAT3 as a binding partner of nuclear survivin. We show that acetylated survivin binds to the N-terminal transcriptional activation domain of the STAT3 dimer and represses STAT3 transactivation of target gene promoters. Using multiplex PCR and DNA sequencing, we identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism (A → G) at Lys-129 that exists as a homozygous mutation in a neuroblastoma cell line and corresponds with a defect in survivin nuclear localization. Our results demonstrate that the dynamic equilibrium between survivin acetylation and deacetylation at amino acid 129 determines its interaction with CRM1, its subsequent subcellular localization, and its ability to inhibit STAT3 transactivation, providing a potential route for therapeutic intervention in STAT3-dependent tumors.

  15. Proteolytic cleavage, trafficking, and functions of nuclear receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Kuang; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-10-01

    Intracellular localization has been reported for over three-quarters of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) families in response to environmental stimuli. Internalized RTK may bind to non-canonical substrates and affect various cellular processes. Many of the intracellular RTKs exist as fragmented forms that are generated by γ-secretase cleavage of the full-length receptor, shedding, alternative splicing, or alternative translation initiation. Soluble RTK fragments are stabilized and intracellularly transported into subcellular compartments, such as the nucleus, by binding to chaperone or transcription factors, while membrane-bound RTKs (full-length or truncated) are transported from the plasma membrane to the ER through the well-established Rab- or clathrin adaptor protein-coated vesicle retrograde trafficking pathways. Subsequent nuclear transport of membrane-bound RTK may occur via two pathways, INFS or INTERNET, with the former characterized by release of receptors from the ER into the cytosol and the latter characterized by release of membrane-bound receptor from the ER into the nucleoplasm through the inner nuclear membrane. Although most non-canonical intracellular RTK signaling is related to transcriptional regulation, there may be other functions that have yet to be discovered. In this review, we summarize the proteolytic processing, intracellular trafficking and nuclear functions of RTKs, and discuss how they promote cancer progression, and their clinical implications. © 2015 FEBS.

  16. Actin-related proteins localized in the nucleus: from discovery to novel roles in nuclear organization.

    PubMed

    Oma, Yukako; Harata, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    The actin family consists of conventional actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), and the members show moderate similarity and share the same basal structure. Following the finding of various ARPs in the cytoplasm in the 1990s, multiple subfamilies that are localized predominantly in the nucleus were identified. Consistent with these cytological observations, subsequent biochemical analyses revealed the involvement of the nuclear ARPs in ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling and histone acetyltransferase complexes. In addition to their contribution to chromatin remodeling, recent studies have shown that nuclear ARPs have roles in the organization of the nucleus that are independent of the activity of the above-mentioned complexes. Therefore, nuclear ARPs are recognized as novel key regulators of genome function, and affect not only the remodeling of chromatin but also the spatial arrangement and dynamics of chromatin within the nucleus.

  17. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Shiheido, Hirokazu; Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND356-58, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3.

  18. Nuclear but Not Cytosolic Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Beta Has an Essential Function in Cell Survival ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Redondo-Muñoz, Javier; Perez-García, Vicente; Cortes, Isabel; Chagoyen, Monica; Carrera, Ana C.

    2011-01-01

    Class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are heterodimeric enzymes composed of a p85 regulatory and a p110 catalytic subunit that induce the formation of 3-polyphosphoinositides, which mediate cell survival, division, and migration. There are two ubiquitous PI3K isoforms p110α and p110β that have nonredundant functions in embryonic development and cell division. However, whereas p110α concentrates in the cytoplasm, p110β localizes to the nucleus and modulates nuclear processes such as DNA replication and repair. At present, the structural features that determine p110β nuclear localization remain unknown. We describe here that association with the p85β regulatory subunit controls p110β nuclear localization. We identified a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in p110β C2 domain that mediates its nuclear entry, as well as a nuclear export sequence (NES) in p85β. Deletion of p110β induced apoptosis, and complementation with the cytoplasmic C2-NLS p110β mutant was unable to restore cell survival. These studies show that p110β NLS and p85β NES regulate p85β/p110β nuclear localization, supporting the idea that nuclear, but not cytoplasmic, p110β controls cell survival. PMID:21383062

  19. Karyopherins regulate nuclear pore complex barrier and transport function.

    PubMed

    Kapinos, Larisa E; Huang, Binlu; Rencurel, Chantal; Lim, Roderick Y H

    2017-09-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport is sustained by karyopherins (Kaps) and a Ran guanosine triphosphate (RanGTP) gradient that imports nuclear localization signal (NLS)-specific cargoes (NLS-cargoes) into the nucleus. However, how nuclear pore complex (NPC) barrier selectivity, Kap traffic, and NLS-cargo release are systematically linked and simultaneously regulated remains incoherent. In this study, we show that Kapα facilitates Kapβ1 turnover and occupancy at the NPC in a RanGTP-dependent manner that is directly coupled to NLS-cargo release and NPC barrier function. This is underpinned by the binding affinity of Kapβ1 to phenylalanine-glycine nucleoporins (FG Nups), which is comparable with RanGTP·Kapβ1, but stronger for Kapα·Kapβ1. On this basis, RanGTP is ineffective at releasing standalone Kapβ1 from NPCs. Depleting Kapα·Kapβ1 by RanGTP further abrogates NPC barrier function, whereas adding back Kapβ1 rescues it while Kapβ1 turnover softens it. Therefore, the FG Nups are necessary but insufficient for NPC barrier function. We conclude that Kaps constitute integral constituents of the NPC whose barrier, transport, and cargo release functionalities establish a continuum under a mechanism of Kap-centric control. © 2017 Kapinos et al.

  20. Nuclear import of influenza B virus nucleoprotein: Involvement of an N-terminal nuclear localization signal and a cleavage-protection motif

    SciTech Connect

    Wanitchang, Asawin; Narkpuk, Jaraspim; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2013-08-15

    The nucleoprotein of influenza B virus (BNP) shares several characteristics with its influenza A virus counterpart (ANP), including localization in the host's nucleus. However, while the nuclear localization signal(s) (NLS) of ANP are well characterized, little is known about those of BNP. In this study, we showed that the fusion protein bearing the BNP N-terminus fused with GFP (N70–GFP) is exclusively nuclear, and identified a highly conserved KRXR motif spanning residues 44–47 as a putative NLS. In addition, we demonstrated that residues 3–15 of BNP, though not an NLS, are also crucial for nuclear import. Results from mutational analyses of N70–GFP and the full-length BNP suggest that this region may be required for protection of the N-terminus from proteolytic cleavage. Altogether, we propose that the N-terminal region of BNP contains the NLS and cleavage-protection motif, which together drive its nuclear localization. - Highlights: • The N-terminal region of BNP is required for nuclear accumulation. • The conserved motif at position 44–47 is a putative nuclear localization signal. • The first 15 amino acids of BNP may function as a cleavage-protection motif. • BNP may get access to the nucleus via a mechanism distinct from ANP.

  1. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates the Cytosolic/Nuclear Partitioning of Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase by Enhancing its Nuclear Localization.

    PubMed

    Aroca, Angeles; Schneider, Markus; Scheibe, Renate; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an important signaling molecule comparable with nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide in plants. The underlying mechanism of its action is unknown, although it has been proposed to be S-sulfhydration. This post-translational modification converts the thiol groups of cysteines within proteins to persulfides, resulting in functional changes of the proteins. In Arabidopsis thaliana, S-sulfhydrated proteins have been identified, including the cytosolic isoforms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase GapC1 and GapC2. In this work, we studied the regulation of sulfide on the subcellular localization of these proteins using two different approaches. We generated GapC1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GapC2-GFP transgenic plants in both the wild type and the des1 mutant defective in the l-cysteine desulfhydrase DES1, responsible for the generation of sulfide in the cytosol. The GFP signal was detected in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of epidermal cells, although with reduced nuclear localization in des1 compared with the wild type, and exogenous sulfide treatment resulted in similar signals in nuclei in both backgrounds. The second approach consisted of the immunoblot analysis of the GapC endogenous proteins in enriched nuclear and cytosolic protein extracts, and similar results were obtained. A significant reduction in the total amount of GapC in des1 in comparison with the wild type was determined and exogenous sulfide significantly increased the protein levels in the nuclei in both plants, with a stronger response in the wild type. Moreover, the presence of an S-sulfhydrated cysteine residue on GapC1 was demonstrated by mass spectrometry. We conclude that sulfide enhances the nuclear localization of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Morbillivirus nucleoprotein possesses a novel nuclear localization signal and a CRM1-independent nuclear export signal

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Hiroki; Masuda, Munemitsu; Miura, Ryuichi; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko . E-mail: ckai@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-08-15

    Morbilliviruses, which belong to the Mononegavirales, replicate its RNA genome in the cytoplasm of the host cell. However, they also form characteristic intranuclear inclusion bodies, consisting of nucleoprotein (N), in infected cells. To analyze the mechanisms of nucleocytoplasmic transport of N protein, we characterized the nuclear localization (NLS) and nuclear export (NES) signals of canine distemper virus (CDV) N protein by deletion mutation and alanine substitution of the protein. The NLS has a novel leucine/isoleucine-rich motif (TGILISIL) at positions 70-77, whereas the NES is composed of a leucine-rich motif (LLRSLTLF) at positions 4-11. The NLS and NES of the N proteins of other morbilliviruses, that is, measles virus (MV) and rinderpest virus (RPV), were also analyzed. The NLS of CDV-N protein is conserved at the same position in MV-N protein, whereas the NES of MV-N protein is located in the C-terminal region. The NES of RPV-N protein is also located at the same position as CDV-N protein, whereas the NLS motif is present not only at the same locus as CDV-N protein but also at other sites. Interestingly, the nuclear export of all these N proteins appears to proceed via a CRM1-independent pathway.

  3. A nuclear export signal in the N-terminal regulatory domain of IκBα controls cytoplasmic localization of inactive NF-κB/IκBα complexes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tony T.; Kudo, Nobuaki; Yoshida, Minoru; Miyamoto, Shigeki

    2000-01-01

    Appropriate subcellular localization is crucial for regulation of NF-κB function. Herein, we show that latent NF-κB complexes can enter and exit the nucleus in preinduction states. The nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB) sequestered NF-κB/IκBα complexes in the nucleus. Using deletion and site-directed mutagenesis, we identified a previously uncharacterized nuclear export sequence in residues 45–54 of IκBα that was required for cytoplasmic localization of inactive complexes. This nuclear export sequence also caused nuclear exclusion of heterologous proteins in a LMB-sensitive manner. Importantly, a LMB-insensitive CRM1 mutant (Crm1-K1) abolished LMB-induced nuclear accumulation of the inactive complexes. Moreover, a cell-permeable p50 NF-κB nuclear localization signal peptide also blocked these LMB effects. These results suggest that NF-κB/IκBα complexes shuttle between the cytoplasm and nucleus by a nuclear localization signal-dependent nuclear import and a CRM1-dependent nuclear export. The LMB-induced nuclear complexes could not bind DNA and were inaccessible to signaling events, because LMB inhibited NF-κB activation without affecting the subcellular localization of upstream kinases IKKβ and NIK. Our findings indicate that the dominant nuclear export over nuclear import contributes to the largely cytoplasmic localization of the inactive complexes to achieve efficient NF-κB activation by extracellular signals. PMID:10655476

  4. Structure, dynamics and function of nuclear pore complexes

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, M. A.; Hetzer, M. W.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are large aqueous channels that penetrate the nuclear envelope, connecting the nuclear interior with the cytoplasm. Until recently, these macromolecular complexes were viewed as static structures whose only function was to control the molecular trafficking between the two compartments. It has now become evident that this simplistic scenario is inaccurate and that nuclear pore complexes are highly dynamic multiprotein assemblies involved in diverse cellular processes ranging from the organization of the cytoskeleton to gene expression. In this review, we will discuss the most recent developments in the nuclear pore complex field, focusing in the assembly, disassembly, maintenance and function of this macromolecular structure. PMID:18786826

  5. O-GlcNAc-glycosylation of {beta}-catenin regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sayat, Ria; Leber, Brian; Grubac, Vanja; Wiltshire, Lesley; Persad, Sujata

    2008-09-10

    {beta}-catenin plays a role in intracellular adhesion and regulating gene expression. The latter role is associated with its oncogenic properties. Phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin controls its intracellular expression but mechanism/s that regulates the nuclear localization of {beta}-catenin is unknown. We demonstrate that O-GlcNAc glycosylation (O-GlcNAcylation) of {beta}-catenin negatively regulates its levels in the nucleus. We show that normal prostate cells (PNT1A) have significantly higher amounts of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin compared to prostate cancer (CaP) cells. The total nuclear levels of {beta}-catenin are higher in the CaP cells than PNT1A but only a minimal fraction of the nuclear {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells are O-GlcNAcylated. Increasing the levels of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells with PUGNAc (O- (2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-gluco-pyranosylidene) amino-N-phenylcarbamate) treatment is associated with a progressive decrease in the levels of {beta}-catenin in the nucleus. TOPFlash reporter assay and mRNA expressions of {beta}-catenin's target genes indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of {beta}-catenin results in a decrease in its transcriptional activity. We define a novel modification of {beta}-catenin that regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional function.

  6. [Localization of language function in the brain].

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Kuniyoshi L

    2011-12-01

    Since the first report of an aphasic patient by Paul Broca, the localization of brain function has been disputed for 150 years. In lesion studies, double dissociation has been a key concept to show the localization of particular cognitive functions. The advancement of non-invasive brain imaging methods enables us to investigate the brain activities under well-controlled conditions, further promoting the studies on the localization of the cognitive functions, including language function. Brain imaging studies, together with subtraction and correlation analyses, have accumulated evidence that syntax, phonology, and sentence comprehension are separately processed by modules in different cortical regions. More specifically, it has been clarified that the module for syntax localizes in the left lateral premotor cortex and the opercular/triangular parts of the left inferior frontal gyrus. This modular structure further suggests that aphasia is interpreted as deficits in either syntactic or phonological processing. Therefore, the classical model of contrasting speech production and comprehension should be updated. According to theoretical linguistics, on the other hand, the recursive computation of syntactic structures is an essential feature of human language faculty. One direction of research would be to contrast human beings and animals for the abilities of processing symbolic sequences. Another direction is to clarify that the human brain is indeed specialized in language processing, which can be revealed by well-controlled language tasks and functional imaging techniques. Here we will review recent studies that demonstrate the existence of grammar center in the left frontal cortex. The future studies in the neuroscience of language will eventually elucidate the cortical localization of language function in a more precise way, i.e., what is really computed in the human brain.

  7. Nuclear localization and shuttling of herpes simplex virus tegument protein VP13/14.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, M; Elliott, G

    2001-03-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 gene UL47 encodes the tegument proteins referred to collectively as VP13/14, which are believed to be differentially modified forms of the same protein. Here we show that the major product of the UL47 gene during transient expression is VP14, suggesting that some feature of virus infection is required to produce VP13. We have tagged VP13/14 with green fluorescent protein and have demonstrated that the protein is targeted efficiently to the nucleus, where it often localizes in numerous punctate domains. Furthermore, we show that removal of the N-terminal 127 residues of the protein abrogates nuclear accumulation, and we have identified a 14-amino-acid peptide from this region that is sufficient to function as a nuclear targeting signal and transport a heterologous protein to the nucleus. This short peptide contains two runs of four arginine residues, suggesting that the VP13/14 nuclear localization signal may behave in a manner similar to that of the arginine-rich nuclear localization signals of the retrovirus transactivator proteins Tat, Rev, and Rex. In addition, by using heterokaryon assays, we show that VP13/14 is capable of shuttling between the nucleus and cytoplasm of the cell, a property that may be attributed to three leucine-rich stretches in the C-terminal half of the protein that again bear similarity to the nuclear export signals of Rev and Rex. This is the first demonstration of a tegument protein that is specifically targeted to the nucleus, a feature which may be relevant both during virus entry, when VP13/14 enters the cell as a component of the tegument, and at later times, when large amounts of newly synthesized VP13/14 are present within the cell.

  8. Maximally localized Wannier functions: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzari, Nicola; Mostofi, Arash A.; Yates, Jonathan R.; Souza, Ivo; Vanderbilt, David

    2012-10-01

    The electronic ground state of a periodic system is usually described in terms of extended Bloch orbitals, but an alternative representation in terms of localized “Wannier functions” was introduced by Gregory Wannier in 1937. The connection between the Bloch and Wannier representations is realized by families of transformations in a continuous space of unitary matrices, carrying a large degree of arbitrariness. Since 1997, methods have been developed that allow one to iteratively transform the extended Bloch orbitals of a first-principles calculation into a unique set of maximally localized Wannier functions, accomplishing the solid-state equivalent of constructing localized molecular orbitals, or “Boys orbitals” as previously known from the chemistry literature. These developments are reviewed here, and a survey of the applications of these methods is presented. This latter includes a description of their use in analyzing the nature of chemical bonding, or as a local probe of phenomena related to electric polarization and orbital magnetization. Wannier interpolation schemes are also reviewed, by which quantities computed on a coarse reciprocal-space mesh can be used to interpolate onto much finer meshes at low cost, and applications in which Wannier functions are used as efficient basis functions are discussed. Finally the construction and use of Wannier functions outside the context of electronic-structure theory is presented, for cases that include phonon excitations, photonic crystals, and cold-atom optical lattices.

  9. Multidimensional stochastic approximation using locally contractive functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    A Robbins-Monro type multidimensional stochastic approximation algorithm which converges in mean square and with probability one to the fixed point of a locally contractive regression function is developed. The algorithm is applied to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters for a mixture of multivariate normal distributions.

  10. Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Studies on Local Water Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kaminker, Ilia; Barnes, Ryan; Han, Songi

    2015-01-01

    Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) is an emerging technique for quantifying translational water dynamics in the vicinity (<1 nm) of stable radicals that can be chemically attached to macromolecules of interest. This has led to many in-depth and enlightening studies of hydration water of biomolecules, revolving around the role of solvent dynamics in the structure and function of proteins, nucleic acids, and lipid bilayer membranes. Still to date, a complete and fully automated ODNP instrument is not commercialized. The purpose of this chapter is to share the technical know-how of the hardware, theory, measurement, and data analysis method needed to successfully utilize and disseminate the ODNP technique. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nuclear localization of tricellulin promotes the oncogenic property of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takasawa, Akira; Murata, Masaki; Takasawa, Kumi; Ono, Yusuke; Osanai, Makoto; Tanaka, Satoshi; Nojima, Masanori; Kono, Tsuyoshi; Hirata, Koichi; Kojima, Takashi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that dysregulation of tight junctions (TJs) is involved in tumor development and progression. In this study, we investigated the expression and subcellular distribution of tricellulin, which constitutes tricellular TJs, using human pancreatic adenocarcinomas. In well-differentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma tissues, tricellulin immunostaining was prominent in the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane. In contrast, in poorly differentiated tissues, its immunostaining was predominantly observed in the nuclei and was almost absent in the plasma membrane. The distinct immunostaining of tricellulin successfully distinguished poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma from moderately and well-differentiated adenocarcinomas with high levels of sensitivity and specificity. Nuclear tricellulin expression significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis, lymphatic invasion and poor survival. In pancreatic cancer cell lines, tricellulin localization shifted from the membrane to nucleus with decreasing differentiation status. Nuclear localization of tricellulin promoted cell proliferation and invasiveness possibly in association with MAPK and PKC pathways in pancreatic cancers. Our results provide new insights into the function of tricellulin, and its nuclear localization may become a new prognostic factor for pancreatic cancers. PMID:27641742

  12. Local and Global Comparison of Continuous Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Edelsbrunner, H; Harer, J; Natarajan, V; Pascucci, V

    2004-12-16

    We introduce local and global comparison measures for a collection of k {<=} d real-valued smooth functions on a common d-dimensional Riemannian manifold. For k = d = 2 we relate the measures to the set of critical points of one function restricted to the level sets of the other. The definition of the measures extends to piecewise linear functions for which they are easy to compute. The computation of the measures forms the centerpiece of a software tool which we use to study scientific datasets.

  13. Robust determination of maximally localized Wannier functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancès, Éric; Levitt, Antoine; Panati, Gianluca; Stoltz, Gabriel

    2017-02-01

    We propose an algorithm to determine maximally localized Wannier functions (MLWFs). This algorithm, based on recent theoretical developments, does not require any physical input such as initial guesses for the Wannier functions, unlike popular schemes based on the projection method. We discuss how the projection method can fail on fine grids when the initial guesses are too far from MLWFs. We demonstrate that our algorithm is able to find localized Wannier functions through tests on two-dimensional systems, simplified models of semiconductors, and realistic DFT systems by interfacing with the wannier90 code. We also test our algorithm on the Haldane and Kane-Mele models to examine how it fails in the presence of topological obstructions.

  14. Nuclear localization of Klotho in brain: an anti-aging protein

    PubMed Central

    German, Dwight C.; Khobahy, Ida; Pastor, Johanne; Kuro-o, Makoto; Liu, Xinran

    2011-01-01

    Klotho is a putative age-suppressing gene whose over-expression in mice results in extension of life span. The klotho gene encodes a single-pass transmembrane protein whose extracellular domain is shed and released into blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid, potentially functioning as a humoral factor. The extracellular domain of Klotho has an activity that increases the expression of anti-oxidant enzymes and confers resistance to oxidative stress in cultured cells and in whole animals. The transmembrane form of the Klotho protein directly binds to multiple fibroblast growth factor receptors and modifies their ligand affinity and specificity. The purpose of the present study was to determine the precise cellular localization of Klotho in the mouse brain. Using light microscopic immunohistochemical methods, we found the highest levels of Klotho immunoreactivity in two brain regions: the choroid plexus, and cerebellar Purkinje cells. In the choroid plexus cells, Klotho was found not only on the plasma membrane but also in large amounts near the nuclear membrane. Likewise, in the Purkinje cell Klotho was found throughout the cell including dendrites, axon and soma with large amounts near the nuclear membrane. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we found Klotho in the cell membrane, but the highest concentration was localized in the peripheral portion of the nucleus and the nucleolus in both cell types. This new finding suggests that in addition to Klotho being secreted from cells in brain, it also has a nuclear function. PMID:22245317

  15. Identification and characterization of multiple conserved nuclear localization signals within adenovirus E1A

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Kris S.; Cohen, Michael J.; Fonseca, Greg J.; Todorovic, Biljana; King, Cason R.; Yousef, Ahmed F.; Zhang, Zhiying; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-04-15

    The human adenovirus 5 (HAdV-5) E1A protein has a well defined canonical nuclear localization signal (NLS) located at its C-terminus. We used a genetic assay in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to demonstrate that the canonical NLS is present and functional in the E1A proteins of each of the six HAdV species. This assay also detects a previously described non-canonical NLS within conserved region 3 and a novel active NLS within the N-terminal/conserved region 1 portion of HAdV-5 E1A. These activities were also present in the E1A proteins of each of the other five HAdV species. These results demonstrate that, despite substantial differences in primary sequence, HAdV E1A proteins are remarkably consistent in that they contain one canonical and two non-canonical NLSs. By utilizing independent mechanisms, these multiple NLSs ensure nuclear localization of E1A in the infected cell. - Highlights: • HAdV E1A uses multiple mechanisms for nuclear import. • We identified an additional non-canonical NLS in the N-terminal/CR1 portion of E1A. • The new NLS does not contact importin-alpha directly. • All NLSs are functionally conserved in the E1A proteins of all 6 HAdV species.

  16. Nuclear Pores Regulate Muscle Development and Maintenance by Assembling a Localized Mef2C Complex.

    PubMed

    Raices, Marcela; Bukata, Lucas; Sakuma, Stephen; Borlido, Joana; Hernandez, Leanora S; Hart, Daniel O; D'Angelo, Maximiliano A

    2017-06-05

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are multiprotein channels connecting the nucleus with the cytoplasm. NPCs have been shown to have tissue-specific composition, suggesting that their function can be specialized. However, the physiological roles of NPC composition changes and their impacts on cellular processes remain unclear. Here we show that the addition of the Nup210 nucleoporin to NPCs during myoblast differentiation results in assembly of an Mef2C transcriptional complex required for efficient expression of muscle structural genes and microRNAs. We show that this NPC-localized complex is essential for muscle growth, myofiber maturation, and muscle cell survival and that alterations in its activity result in muscle degeneration. Our findings suggest that NPCs regulate the activity of functional gene groups by acting as scaffolds that promote the local assembly of tissue-specific transcription complexes and show how nuclear pore composition changes can be exploited to regulate gene expression at the nuclear periphery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A highly organized structure mediating nuclear localization of a Myb2 transcription factor in the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chien-Hsin; Chang, Lung-Chun; Hsu, Hong-Ming; Wei, Shu-Yi; Liu, Hsing-Wei; Lee, Yu; Kuo, Chung-Chi; Indra, Dharmu; Chen, Chinpan; Ong, Shiou-Jeng; Tai, Jung-Hsiang

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear proteins usually contain specific peptide sequences, referred to as nuclear localization signals (NLSs), for nuclear import. These signals remain unexplored in the protozoan pathogen, Trichomonas vaginalis. The nuclear import of a Myb2 transcription factor was studied here using immunodetection of a hemagglutinin-tagged Myb2 overexpressed in the parasite. The tagged Myb2 was localized to the nucleus as punctate signals. With mutations of its polybasic sequences, 48KKQK51 and 61KR62, Myb2 was localized to the nucleus, but the signal was diffusive. When fused to a C-terminal non-nuclear protein, the Myb2 sequence spanning amino acid (aa) residues 48 to 143, which is embedded within the R2R3 DNA-binding domain (aa 40 to 156), was essential and sufficient for efficient nuclear import of a bacterial tetracycline repressor (TetR), and yet the transport efficiency was reduced with an additional fusion of a firefly luciferase to TetR, while classical NLSs from the simian virus 40 T-antigen had no function in this assay system. Myb2 nuclear import and DNA-binding activity were substantially perturbed with mutation of a conserved isoleucine (I74) in helix 2 to proline that altered secondary structure and ternary folding of the R2R3 domain. Disruption of DNA-binding activity alone by point mutation of a lysine residue, K51, preceding the structural domain had little effect on Myb2 nuclear localization, suggesting that nuclear translocation of Myb2, which requires an ordered structural domain, is independent of its DNA binding activity. These findings provide useful information for testing whether myriad Mybs in the parasite use a common module to regulate nuclear import.

  18. A nuclear-localized histone-gene binding protein from rice (OsHBP1b) functions in salinity and drought stress tolerance by maintaining chlorophyll content and improving the antioxidant machinery.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Nita; Nutan, Kamlesh K; Das, Priyanka; Anwar, Khalid; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L; Pareek, Ashwani

    2015-03-15

    Plants have evolved a number of molecular strategies and regulatory mechanisms to cope with abiotic stresses. Among the various key factors/regulators, transcription factors (TFs) play critical role(s) towards regulating the gene expression patterns in response to stress conditions. Altering the expression of the key TFs can greatly influence plant stress tolerance. OsHBP1b (accession no. KM096571) is one such TF belonging to bZIP family, localized within the Saltol QTL, whose expression is induced upon salinity treatment in the rice seedlings. qRT-PCR based expression studies for OsHBP1b in seedlings of contrasting genotypes of rice showed its differential regulation in response to salinity stress. A GFP based in vivo study showed that the OsHBP1b protein is nuclear localized and possesses the trans-activation activity. As compared to the WT tobacco plants, the transgenic plants ectopically expressing OsHBP1b showed better survival and favourable osmotic parameters (such as germination and survival rate, membrane stability, K(+)/Na(+) ratio, lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage and proline contents) under salinity and drought stress. Under salinity conditions, the transgenic plants accumulated lower levels of reactive oxygen species as compared to the WT. It was also accompanied by higher activities of antioxidant enzymes (such as ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase), thereby demonstrating that transgenic plants are physiologically better adapted towards the oxidative damage. Taken together, our findings suggest that OsHBP1b contributes to abiotic stress tolerance through multiple physiological pathways and thus, may serve as a useful 'candidate gene' for improving multiple stress tolerance in crop plants.

  19. Inhibition of Thr-55 phosphorylation restores p53 nuclear localization and sensitizes cancer cells to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xin; Liu, Xuan

    2008-11-04

    The p53 tumor suppressor induces cell growth arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damage. Because these functions are achieved largely by the transcriptional properties of p53, nuclear localization of the protein is essential. Indeed, the tumors with aberrant cytoplasmic localization of wild-type p53 often exhibit an impaired response to DNA damage. In this study, we report that Thr-55 phosphorylation induces the association of p53 with the nuclear export factor CRM1, leading to p53 nuclear export. We further show that MDM2 also promotes the CRM1-p53 association and Thr-55 phosphorylation is required for this process. Interestingly, inhibition of Thr-55 phosphorylation by a dietary flavonoid, apigenin, specifically blocks the CRM1-p53 association, restores p53 nuclear localization, and sensitizes tumor cells with cytoplasm localized wild-type p53 to DNA damage. These data provide insights into the regulation of p53 nuclear localization by post-translational modification and suggest an avenue for targeted therapy for cancers caused by aberrant cytoplasm localization of wild-type p53.

  20. Quantification of Uncertainties in Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; McDonnell, J. D.; Higdon, D.; Sarich, J.; Wild, S.

    2015-01-01

    Reliable predictions of nuclear properties are needed as much to answer fundamental science questions as in applications such as reactor physics or data evaluation. Nuclear density functional theory is currently the only microscopic, global approach to nuclear structure that is applicable throughout the nuclear chart. In the past few years, a lot of effort has been devoted to setting up a general methodology to assess theoretical uncertainties in nuclear DFT calculations. In this paper, we summarize some of the recent progress in this direction. Most of the new material discussed here will be be published in separate articles.

  1. Quantification of Uncertainties in Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schunck, N.; McDonnell, J.D.; Higdon, D.; Sarich, J.; Wild, S.

    2015-01-15

    Reliable predictions of nuclear properties are needed as much to answer fundamental science questions as in applications such as reactor physics or data evaluation. Nuclear density functional theory is currently the only microscopic, global approach to nuclear structure that is applicable throughout the nuclear chart. In the past few years, a lot of effort has been devoted to setting up a general methodology to assess theoretical uncertainties in nuclear DFT calculations. In this paper, we summarize some of the recent progress in this direction. Most of the new material discussed here will be be published in separate articles.

  2. On the global and local nuclear stopping in mass asymmetric nuclear collisions using density-dependent symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amandeep, K.; Suneel, K.

    2017-09-01

    The present theoretical calculations have been performed within the framework of IQMD model to study a particular set of mass symmetric and asymmetric reactions (keeping total mass fixed) over a wide range of incident energies and colliding geometries. It has been observed that global as well as local nuclear stopping is influenced by the mass asymmetry of the reaction strongly. Influence of density-dependent symmetry energy has been observed in local nuclear stopping. Global stopping decreases with the increase in colliding geometry. Effect of colliding geometry on nuclear stopping is more at higher energies.

  3. Efficient and dynamic nuclear localization of green fluorescent protein via RNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Akira; Nakayama, Yusaku; Kinjo, Masataka

    2015-07-31

    Classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences have been used for artificial localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus as a positioning marker or for measurement of the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling rate in living cells. However, the detailed mechanism of nuclear retention of GFP-NLS remains unclear. Here, we show that a candidate mechanism for the strong nuclear retention of GFP-NLS is via the RNA-binding ability of the NLS sequence. GFP tagged with a classical NLS derived from Simian virus 40 (GFP-NLS{sup SV40}) localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus, the nuclear subdomain in which ribosome biogenesis takes place. GFP-NLS{sup SV40} in the nucleolus was mobile, and intriguingly, the diffusion coefficient, which indicates the speed of diffusing molecules, was 1.5-fold slower than in the nucleoplasm. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analysis showed that GFP-NLS{sup SV40} formed oligomers via RNA binding, the estimated molecular weight of which was larger than the limit for passive nuclear export into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that the nuclear localization of GFP-NLS{sup SV40} likely results from oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. The analytical technique used here can be applied for elucidating the details of other nuclear localization mechanisms, including those of several types of nuclear proteins. In addition, GFP-NLS{sup SV40} can be used as an excellent marker for studying both the nucleoplasm and nucleolus in living cells. - Highlights: • Nuclear localization signal-tagged GFP (GFP-NLS) showed clear nuclear localization. • The GFP-NLS dynamically localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus. • The nuclear localization of GFP-NLS results from transient oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. • Our NLS-tagging procedure is ideal for use in artificial sequestration of proteins in the nucleus.

  4. Importin α1 Mediates Yorkie Nuclear Import via an N-terminal Non-canonical Nuclear Localization Signal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shimin; Lu, Yi; Yin, Meng-Xin; Wang, Chao; Wu, Wei; Li, Jinhui; Wu, Wenqing; Ge, Ling; Hu, Lianxin; Zhao, Yun; Zhang, Lei

    2016-04-08

    The Hippo signaling pathway controls organ size by orchestrating cell proliferation and apoptosis. When the Hippo pathway was inactivated, the transcriptional co-activator Yorkie translocates into the nucleus and forms a complex with transcription factor Scalloped to promote the expression of Hippo pathway target genes. Therefore, the nuclear translocation of Yorkie is a critical step in Hippo signaling. Here, we provide evidence that the N-terminal 1-55 amino acids of Yorkie, especially Arg-15, were essential for its nuclear localization. By mass spectrometry and biochemical analyses, we found that Importin α1 can directly interact with the Yorkie N terminus and drive Yorkie into the nucleus. Further experiments show that the upstream component Hippo can inhibit Importin α1-mediated Yorkie nuclear import. Taken together, we identified a potential nuclear localization signal at the N-terminal end of Yorkie as well as a critical role for Importin α1 in Yorkie nuclear import.

  5. The Local [CII] Emission Line Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmati, Shoubaneh

    2017-01-01

    I present, for the first time, the local [CII]158 $\\mu$m emission line luminosity function measured using a sample of more than 500 galaxies from the RBGS. [CII] luminosities are measured from the Herschel PACS observations of the LIRGs in the GOALS survey and estimated for the rest of the sample based on the far-IR luminosity and color. The sample covers 91.3% of the sky and is complete at $S_{60\\mu m} > 5.24 Jy$. We calculated the completeness as a function of [CII] line luminosity and distance, based on the far-IR color and flux densities. The [CII] luminosity function is constrained in the range $\\sim 10^{7-9} \\ L_{\\odot}$ from both the 1/Vmax and the STY maximum likelihood methods. The shape of our derived [CII] emission line luminosity function agrees well with the IR luminosity function. For the CO(1-0) and [CII] luminosity functions to agree, we propose a varying ratio of [CII]/CO(1-0) as a function of CO luminosity, with larger ratios for fainter CO luminosities. Limited [CII] high redshift observations as well as estimates based on the IR and UV luminosity functions, are suggestive of an evolution in the [CII] luminosity function similar to the evolution trend of the cosmic star formation rate density. ALMA with full capability will be able to confirm this prediction.

  6. Nuclear F-actin enhances the transcriptional activity of β-catenin by increasing its nuclear localization and binding to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; de Lanerolle, Primal; Harata, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Actin plays multiple roles both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Cytoplasmic actin, in addition to its structural role in the cytoskeleton, also contributes to the subcellular localization of transcription factors by interacting with them or their partners. The transcriptional cofactor β-catenin, which acts as an intracellular transducer of canonical Wnt signaling, indirectly associates with the cytoplasmic filamentous actin (F-actin). Recently, it has been observed that F-actin is transiently formed within the nucleus in response to serum stimulation and integrin signaling, and also during gene reprogramming. Despite these earlier observations, information about the function of nuclear F-actin is poorly defined. Here, by facilitating the accumulation of nuclear actin artificially, we demonstrate that polymerizing nuclear actin enhanced the nuclear accumulation and transcriptional function of β-catenin. Our results also show that the nuclear F-actin colocalizes with β-catenin and enhances the binding of β-catenin to the downstream target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, including the genes for the cell cycle regulators c-myc and cyclin D, and the OCT4 gene. Nuclear F-actin itself also associated with these genes. Since Wnt/β-catenin signaling has important roles in cell differentiation and pluripotency, our observations suggest that nuclear F-actin formed during these biological processes is involved in regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  7. Cell cycle regulation of Greatwall kinase nuclear localization facilitates mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Galan, Jacob A.; Normandin, Karine; Bonneil, Éric; Hickson, Gilles R.; Roux, Philippe P.; Thibault, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Cell division requires the coordination of critical protein kinases and phosphatases. Greatwall (Gwl) kinase activity inactivates PP2A-B55 at mitotic entry to promote the phosphorylation of cyclin B–Cdk1 substrates, but how Gwl is regulated is poorly understood. We found that the subcellular localization of Gwl changed dramatically during the cell cycle in Drosophila. Gwl translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in prophase. We identified two critical nuclear localization signals in the central, poorly characterized region of Gwl, which are required for its function. The Polo kinase associated with and phosphorylated Gwl in this region, promoting its binding to 14-3-3ε and its localization to the cytoplasm in prophase. Our results suggest that cyclin B–Cdk1 phosphorylation of Gwl is also required for its nuclear exclusion by a distinct mechanism. We show that the nucleo-cytoplasmic regulation of Gwl is essential for its functions in vivo and propose that the spatial regulation of Gwl at mitotic entry contributes to the mitotic switch. PMID:23857770

  8. Engineering light-inducible nuclear localization signals for precise spatiotemporal control of protein dynamics in living cells.

    PubMed

    Niopek, Dominik; Benzinger, Dirk; Roensch, Julia; Draebing, Thomas; Wehler, Pierre; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2014-07-14

    The function of many eukaryotic proteins is regulated by highly dynamic changes in their nucleocytoplasmic distribution. The ability to precisely and reversibly control nuclear translocation would, therefore, allow dissecting and engineering cellular networks. Here we develop a genetically encoded, light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) based on the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1. LINuS is a small, versatile tag, customizable for different proteins and cell types. LINuS-mediated nuclear import is fast and reversible, and can be tuned at different levels, for instance, by introducing mutations that alter AsLOV2 domain photo-caging properties or by selecting nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of various strengths. We demonstrate the utility of LINuS in mammalian cells by controlling gene expression and entry into mitosis with blue light.

  9. Engineering light-inducible nuclear localization signals for precise spatiotemporal control of protein dynamics in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Niopek, Dominik; Benzinger, Dirk; Roensch, Julia; Draebing, Thomas; Wehler, Pierre; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The function of many eukaryotic proteins is regulated by highly dynamic changes in their nucleocytoplasmic distribution. The ability to precisely and reversibly control nuclear translocation would, therefore, allow dissecting and engineering cellular networks. Here we develop a genetically encoded, light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) based on the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1. LINuS is a small, versatile tag, customizable for different proteins and cell types. LINuS-mediated nuclear import is fast and reversible, and can be tuned at different levels, for instance, by introducing mutations that alter AsLOV2 domain photo-caging properties or by selecting nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of various strengths. We demonstrate the utility of LINuS in mammalian cells by controlling gene expression and entry into mitosis with blue light. PMID:25019686

  10. Nuclear localization of MBNL1: splicing-mediated autoregulation and repression of repeat-derived aberrant proteins.

    PubMed

    Kino, Yoshihiro; Washizu, Chika; Kurosawa, Masaru; Oma, Yoko; Hattori, Nobutaka; Ishiura, Shoichi; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2015-02-01

    In some neurological diseases caused by repeat expansions such as myotonic dystrophy, the RNA-binding protein muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1) accumulates in intranuclear inclusions containing mutant repeat RNA. The interaction between MBNL1 and mutant RNA in the nucleus is a key event leading to loss of MBNL function, yet the details of this effect have been elusive. Here, we investigated the mechanism and significance of MBNL1 nuclear localization. We found that MBNL1 contains two classes of nuclear localization signal (NLS), a classical bipartite NLS and a novel conformational NLS. Alternative splicing of exon 7 acts as a switch between these NLS types and couples MBNL1 activity and intracellular localization. Depending on its nuclear localization, MBNL1 promoted nuclear accumulation of mutant RNA containing a CUG or CAG repeat, some of which produced proteins containing homopolymeric tracts such as polyglutamine. Furthermore, MBNL1 repressed the expression of these homopolymeric proteins including those presumably produced through repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation. These results suggest that nuclear retention of expanded RNA reflects a novel role of MBNL proteins in repressing aberrant protein expression and may provide pathological and therapeutic implications for a wide range of repeat expansion diseases associated with nuclear RNA retention and/or RAN translation.

  11. Interaction between a plasma membrane-localized ankyrin-repeat protein ITN1 and a nuclear protein RTV1

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Hikaru; Sakata, Keiko; Kusumi, Kensuke; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Iba, Koh

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ITN1, a plasma membrane ankyrin protein, interacts with a nuclear DNA-binding protein RTV1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear transport of RTV1 is partially inhibited by interaction with ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RTV1 can promote the nuclear localization of ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both overexpression of RTV1 and the lack of ITN1 increase salicylic acids sensitivity in plants. -- Abstract: The increased tolerance to NaCl 1 (ITN1) protein is a plasma membrane (PM)-localized protein involved in responses to NaCl stress in Arabidopsis. The predicted structure of ITN1 is composed of multiple transmembrane regions and an ankyrin-repeat domain that is known to mediate protein-protein interactions. To elucidate the molecular functions of ITN1, we searched for interacting partners using a yeast two-hybrid assay, and a nuclear-localized DNA-binding protein, RTV1, was identified as a candidate. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis revealed that RTV1 interacted with ITN1 at the PM and nuclei in vivo. RTV1 tagged with red fluorescent protein localized to nuclei and ITN1 tagged with green fluorescent protein localized to PM; however, both proteins localized to both nuclei and the PM when co-expressed. These findings suggest that RTV1 and ITN1 regulate the subcellular localization of each other.

  12. Local people's understanding of risk from civil nuclear power in the Chinese context.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiang

    2014-04-01

    This paper analyses how people understand civil nuclear risk in the local context in China. The findings of the paper are based on six months of fieldwork research on a potential inland nuclear power project in Dapu townland in 2007 and 2008. Understanding varies greatly depending on local context, with economic, geographic and social factors influencing the way people view risks and benefits. I argue that when local people do not have enough 'scientific knowledge' to understand risk from nuclear power, they can still use their experience of everyday life to reflect rationally on the risks and benefits that they face. I conclude that when local people trust in nuclear technology and 'the government', and are unaware of nuclear risk it is partly because of their over-dependence on institutions and experts. However, despite their lack of agency, local people rationally calculate risk and benefit in accordance with their social identity and geographical location.

  13. Biological Significance of Nuclear Localization of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pmk1 in Fission Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Villar-Tajadura, M. Antonia; Soto, Teresa; Pérez, Pilar; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways play a fundamental role in the response of eukaryotic cells to environmental changes. Also, much evidence shows that the stimulus-dependent nuclear targeting of this class of regulatory kinases is crucial for adequate regulation of distinct cellular events. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the cell integrity MAPK pathway, whose central element is the MAPK Pmk1, regulates multiple processes such as cell wall integrity, vacuole fusion, cytokinesis, and ionic homeostasis. In non-stressed cells Pmk1 is constitutively localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and its localization pattern appears unaffected by its activation status or in response to stress, thus questioning the biological significance of the presence of this MAPK into the nucleus. We have addressed this issue by characterizing mutants expressing Pmk1 versions excluded from the cell nucleus and anchored to the plasma membrane in different genetic backgrounds. Although nuclear Pmk1 partially regulates cell wall integrity at a transcriptional level, membrane-tethered Pmk1 performs many of the biological functions assigned to wild type MAPK like regulation of chloride homeostasis, vacuole fusion, and cellular separation. However, we found that down-regulation of nuclear Pmk1 by MAPK phosphatases induced by the stress activated protein kinase pathway is important for the fine modulation of extranuclear Pmk1 activity. These results highlight the importance of the control of MAPK activity at subcellular level. PMID:22685296

  14. Biological significance of nuclear localization of mitogen-activated protein kinase Pmk1 in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Villar-Tajadura, M Antonia; Soto, Teresa; Pérez, Pilar; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2012-07-27

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways play a fundamental role in the response of eukaryotic cells to environmental changes. Also, much evidence shows that the stimulus-dependent nuclear targeting of this class of regulatory kinases is crucial for adequate regulation of distinct cellular events. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the cell integrity MAPK pathway, whose central element is the MAPK Pmk1, regulates multiple processes such as cell wall integrity, vacuole fusion, cytokinesis, and ionic homeostasis. In non-stressed cells Pmk1 is constitutively localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and its localization pattern appears unaffected by its activation status or in response to stress, thus questioning the biological significance of the presence of this MAPK into the nucleus. We have addressed this issue by characterizing mutants expressing Pmk1 versions excluded from the cell nucleus and anchored to the plasma membrane in different genetic backgrounds. Although nuclear Pmk1 partially regulates cell wall integrity at a transcriptional level, membrane-tethered Pmk1 performs many of the biological functions assigned to wild type MAPK like regulation of chloride homeostasis, vacuole fusion, and cellular separation. However, we found that down-regulation of nuclear Pmk1 by MAPK phosphatases induced by the stress activated protein kinase pathway is important for the fine modulation of extranuclear Pmk1 activity. These results highlight the importance of the control of MAPK activity at subcellular level.

  15. Tissue specificity in the nuclear envelope supports its functional complexity.

    PubMed

    de Las Heras, Jose I; Meinke, Peter; Batrakou, Dzmitry G; Srsen, Vlastimil; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair Rw; Schirmer, Eric C

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear envelope links to inherited disease gave the conundrum of how mutations in near-ubiquitous proteins can yield many distinct pathologies, each focused in different tissues. One conundrum-resolving hypothesis is that tissue-specific partner proteins mediate these pathologies. Such partner proteins may have now been identified with recent proteome studies determining nuclear envelope composition in different tissues. These studies revealed that the majority of the total nuclear envelope proteins are tissue restricted in their expression. Moreover, functions have been found for a number these tissue-restricted nuclear envelope proteins that fit with mechanisms proposed to explain how the nuclear envelope could mediate disease, including defects in mechanical stability, cell cycle regulation, signaling, genome organization, gene expression, nucleocytoplasmic transport, and differentiation. The wide range of functions to which these proteins contribute is consistent with not only their involvement in tissue-specific nuclear envelope disease pathologies, but also tissue evolution.

  16. Tissue specificity in the nuclear envelope supports its functional complexity

    PubMed Central

    de las Heras, Jose I; Meinke, Peter; Batrakou, Dzmitry G; Srsen, Vlastimil; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair RW; Schirmer, Eric C

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear envelope links to inherited disease gave the conundrum of how mutations in near-ubiquitous proteins can yield many distinct pathologies, each focused in different tissues. One conundrum-resolving hypothesis is that tissue-specific partner proteins mediate these pathologies. Such partner proteins may have now been identified with recent proteome studies determining nuclear envelope composition in different tissues. These studies revealed that the majority of the total nuclear envelope proteins are tissue restricted in their expression. Moreover, functions have been found for a number these tissue-restricted nuclear envelope proteins that fit with mechanisms proposed to explain how the nuclear envelope could mediate disease, including defects in mechanical stability, cell cycle regulation, signaling, genome organization, gene expression, nucleocytoplasmic transport, and differentiation. The wide range of functions to which these proteins contribute is consistent with not only their involvement in tissue-specific nuclear envelope disease pathologies, but also tissue evolution. PMID:24213376

  17. Identification of a nuclear localization signal in the retinitis pigmentosa-mutated RP26 protein, ceramide kinase-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki, Yuichi; Mitsutake, Susumu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki . E-mail: yigarash@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp

    2006-05-12

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by degeneration of the retina. A mutation in a new ceramide kinase (CERK) homologous gene, named CERK-like protein (CERKL), was found to cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP26). Here, we show a point mutation of one of two putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences inhibited the nuclear localization of the protein. Furthermore, the tetra-GFP-tagged NLS, which cannot passively enter the nucleus, was observed not only in the nucleus but also in the nucleolus. Our results provide First evidence of the active nuclear import of CERKL and suggest that the identified NLS might be responsible for nucleolar retention of the protein. As recent studies have shown other RP-related proteins are localized in the nucleus or the nucleolus, our identification of NLS in CERKL suggests that CERKL likely plays important roles for retinal functions in the nucleus and the nucleolus.

  18. Kar5p is required for multiple functions in both inner and outer nuclear envelope fusion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jason V; Rose, Mark D

    2014-12-02

    During mating in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two haploid nuclei fuse via two sequential membrane fusion steps. SNAREs (i.e., soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) and Prm3p mediate outer nuclear membrane fusion, but the inner membrane fusogen remains unknown. Kar5p is a highly conserved transmembrane protein that localizes adjacent to the spindle pole body (SPB), mediates nuclear envelope fusion, and recruits Prm3p adjacent to the SPB. To separate Kar5p's functions, we tested localization, Prm3p recruitment, and nuclear fusion efficiency in various kar5 mutants. All domains and the conserved cysteine residues were essential for nuclear fusion. Several kar5 mutant proteins localized properly but did not mediate Prm3p recruitment; other kar5 mutant proteins localized and recruited Prm3p but were nevertheless defective for nuclear fusion, demonstrating additional functions beyond Prm3p recruitment. We identified one Kar5p domain required for SPB localization, which is dependent on the half-bridge protein Mps3p. Electron microscopy revealed a kar5 mutant that arrests with expanded nuclear envelope bridges, suggesting that Kar5p is required after outer nuclear envelope fusion. Finally, a split-GFP assay demonstrated that Kar5p localizes to both the inner and outer nuclear envelope. These insights suggest a mechanism by which Kar5p mediates inner nuclear membrane fusion. Copyright © 2015 Rogers and Rose.

  19. Influence of metallothionein-1 localization on its function.

    PubMed Central

    Levadoux-Martin, M; Hesketh, J E; Beattie, J H; Wallace, H M

    2001-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) have a major role to play in metal metabolism, and may also protect DNA against oxidative damage. MT protein has been found localized in the nucleus during S-phase. The mRNA encoding the MT-1 isoform has a perinuclear localization, and is associated with the cytoskeleton; this targeting, due to signals within the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR), facilitates nuclear localization of MT-1 during S-phase [Levadoux, Mahon, Beattie, Wallace and Hesketh (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 34961-34966]. Using cells transfected with MT gene constructs differing in their 3'-UTRs, the role of MT protein in the nucleus has been studied. Chinese hamster ovary cells were transfected with either the full MT gene (MTMT cells) or with the MT 5'-UTR and coding region linked to the 3'-UTR of glutathione peroxidase (MTGSH cells). Cell survival following exposure to oxidative stress and chemical agents was higher in cells expressing the native MT gene than in cells where MT localization was disrupted, or in untransfected cells. Also, MTMT cells showed less DNA damage than MTGSH cells in response to either hydrogen peroxide or mutagen. After exposure to UV light or mutagen, MTMT cells showed less apoptosis than MTGSH cells, as assessed by DNA fragmentation and flow cytometry. The data indicate that the perinuclear localization of MT mRNA is important for the function of MT in a protective role against DNA damage and apoptosis induced by external stress. PMID:11284736

  20. Conservation of Complex Nuclear Localization Signals Utilizing Classical and Non-Classical Nuclear Import Pathways in LANA Homologs of KSHV and RFHV

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Timothy M.

    2011-01-01

    ORF73 latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is targeted to the nucleus of infected cells where it binds to chromatin and mediates viral episome persistence, interacts with cellular proteins and plays a role in latency and tumorigenesis. A structurally related LANA homolog has been identified in the retroperitoneal fibromatosis herpesvirus (RFHV), the macaque homolog of KSHV. Here, we report the evolutionary and functional conservation of a novel bi-functional nuclear localization signal (NLS) in KSHV and RFHV LANA. N-terminal peptides from both proteins were fused to EGFP or double EGFP fusions to examine their ability to induce nuclear transport of a heterologous protein. In addition, GST-pull down experiments were used to analyze the ability of LANA peptides to interact with members of the karyopherin family of nuclear transport receptors. Our studies revealed that both LANA proteins contain an N-terminal arginine/glycine (RG)-rich domain spanning a conserved chromatin-binding motif, which binds directly to importin β1 in a RanGTP-sensitive manner and serves as an NLS in the importin β1-mediated non-classical nuclear import pathway. Embedded within this domain is a conserved lysine/arginine-(KR)-rich bipartite motif that binds directly to multiple members of the importin α family of nuclear import adaptors in a RanGTP-insensitive manner and serves as an NLS in the classical importin α/β-mediated nuclear import pathway. The positioning of a classical bipartite kr-NLS embedded within a non-classical rg-NLS is a unique arrangement in these viral proteins, whose nuclear localization is critical to their functionality and to the virus life cycle. The ability to interact with multiple import receptors provides alternate pathways for nuclear localization of LANA. Since different import receptors can import cargo to distinct subnuclear compartments, a multifunctional NLS may provide LANA with an increased

  1. Linear response of homogeneous nuclear matter with energy density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, A.; Davesne, D.; Navarro, J.

    2015-03-01

    Response functions of infinite nuclear matter with arbitrary isospin asymmetry are studied in the framework of the random phase approximation. The residual interaction is derived from a general nuclear Skyrme energy density functional. Besides the usual central, spin-orbit and tensor terms it could also include other components as new density-dependent terms or three-body terms. Algebraic expressions for the response functions are obtained from the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the particle-hole propagator. Applications to symmetric nuclear matter, pure neutron matter and asymmetric nuclear matter are presented and discussed. Spin-isospin strength functions are analyzed for varying conditions of density, momentum transfer, isospin asymmetry, and temperature for some representative Skyrme functionals. Particular attention is paid to the discussion of instabilities, either real or unphysical, which could manifest in finite nuclei.

  2. Monodisperse Magnetite Nanoparticles Coupled with Nuclear Localization Signal Peptide for Cell-Nucleus Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chenjie; Xie, Jin; Kohler, Nathan; Walsh, Edward G.; Chin, Y. Eugene; Sun, Shouheng

    2009-01-01

    Functionalization of monodisperse superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles for cell specific targeting is crucial for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Targeted magnetic nanoparticles can be used to enhance the tissue contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to improve the efficiency in anticancer drug delivery, and to eliminate tumor cells by magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Herein we report the nucleus-targeting Fe3O4 nanoparticles functionalized with protein and nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide. These NLS-coated nanoparticles were introduced into the HeLa cell cytoplasm and nucleus, where the particles were monodispersed and non-aggregated. The success of labeling was examined and identified by fluorescence microscopy and MRI. The work demonstrates that monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles can be readily functionalized and stabilized for potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:18080259

  3. Role of zinc finger structure in nuclear localization of transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Tatsuo; Azumano, Makiko; Uwatoko, Chisana; Itoh, Kohji Kuwahara, Jun

    2009-02-27

    Transcription factor Sp1 is localized in the nucleus and regulates gene expression. Our previous study demonstrated that the carboxyl terminal region of Sp1 containing 3-zinc finger region as DNA binding domain can also serve as nuclear localization signal (NLS). However, the nuclear transport mechanism of Sp1 has not been well understood. In this study, we performed a gene expression study on mutant Sp1 genes causing a set of amino acid substitutions in zinc finger domains to elucidate nuclear import activity. Nuclear localization of the GFP-fused mutant Sp1 proteins bearing concomitant substitutions in the first and third zinc fingers was highly inhibited. These mutant Sp1 proteins had also lost the binding ability as to the GC box sequence. The results suggest that the overall tertiary structure formed by the three zinc fingers is essential for nuclear localization of Sp1 as well as dispersed basic amino acids within the zinc fingers region.

  4. Molecular and Functional Characterization of a Trypanosoma cruzi Nuclear Adenylate Kinase Isoform

    PubMed Central

    Cámara, María de los Milagros; Bouvier, León A.; Canepa, Gaspar E.; Miranda, Mariana R.; Pereira, Claudio A.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, is an early divergent eukaryote in which control of gene expression relies mainly in post-transcriptional mechanisms. Transcription levels are globally up and down regulated during the transition between proliferating and non-proliferating life-cycle stages. In this work we characterized a nuclear adenylate kinase isoform (TcADKn) that is involved in ribosome biogenesis. Nuclear adenylate kinases have been recently described in a few organisms, being all related to RNA metabolism. Depending on active transcription and translation, TcADKn localizes in the nucleolus or the cytoplasm. A non-canonical nuclear localization signal was mapped towards the N-terminal of the protein, being the phosphate-binding loop essential for its localization. In addition, TcADKn nuclear exportation depends on the nuclear exportation adapter CRM1. TcADKn nuclear shuttling is governed by nutrient availability, oxidative stress and by the equivalent in T. cruzi of the mammalian TOR (Target of Rapamycin) pathway. One of the biological functions of TcADKn is ribosomal 18S RNA processing by direct interaction with ribosomal protein TcRps14. Finally, TcADKn expression is regulated by its 3′ UTR mRNA. Depending on extracellular conditions, cells modulate protein translation rates regulating ribosome biogenesis and nuclear adenylate kinases are probably key components in these processes. PMID:23409202

  5. Molecular and functional characterization of a Trypanosoma cruzi nuclear adenylate kinase isoform.

    PubMed

    Cámara, María de los Milagros; Bouvier, León A; Canepa, Gaspar E; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, is an early divergent eukaryote in which control of gene expression relies mainly in post-transcriptional mechanisms. Transcription levels are globally up and down regulated during the transition between proliferating and non-proliferating life-cycle stages. In this work we characterized a nuclear adenylate kinase isoform (TcADKn) that is involved in ribosome biogenesis. Nuclear adenylate kinases have been recently described in a few organisms, being all related to RNA metabolism. Depending on active transcription and translation, TcADKn localizes in the nucleolus or the cytoplasm. A non-canonical nuclear localization signal was mapped towards the N-terminal of the protein, being the phosphate-binding loop essential for its localization. In addition, TcADKn nuclear exportation depends on the nuclear exportation adapter CRM1. TcADKn nuclear shuttling is governed by nutrient availability, oxidative stress and by the equivalent in T. cruzi of the mammalian TOR (Target of Rapamycin) pathway. One of the biological functions of TcADKn is ribosomal 18S RNA processing by direct interaction with ribosomal protein TcRps14. Finally, TcADKn expression is regulated by its 3' UTR mRNA. Depending on extracellular conditions, cells modulate protein translation rates regulating ribosome biogenesis and nuclear adenylate kinases are probably key components in these processes.

  6. Specific nuclear localizing sequence directs two myosin isoforms to the cell nucleus in calmodulin-sensitive manner.

    PubMed

    Dzijak, Rastislav; Yildirim, Sukriye; Kahle, Michal; Novák, Petr; Hnilicová, Jarmila; Venit, Tomáš; Hozák, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear myosin I (NM1) was the first molecular motor identified in the cell nucleus. Together with nuclear actin, they participate in crucial nuclear events such as transcription, chromatin movements, and chromatin remodeling. NM1 is an isoform of myosin 1c (Myo1c) that was identified earlier and is known to act in the cytoplasm. NM1 differs from the "cytoplasmic" myosin 1c only by additional 16 amino acids at the N-terminus of the molecule. This amino acid stretch was therefore suggested to direct NM1 into the nucleus. We investigated the mechanism of nuclear import of NM1 in detail. Using over-expressed GFP chimeras encoding for truncated NM1 mutants, we identified a specific sequence that is necessary for its import to the nucleus. This novel nuclear localization sequence is placed within calmodulin-binding motif of NM1, thus it is present also in the Myo1c. We confirmed the presence of both isoforms in the nucleus by transfection of tagged NM1 and Myo1c constructs into cultured cells, and also by showing the presence of the endogenous Myo1c in purified nuclei of cells derived from knock-out mice lacking NM1. Using pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays we identified importin beta, importin 5 and importin 7 as nuclear transport receptors that bind NM1. Since the NLS sequence of NM1 lies within the region that also binds calmodulin we tested the influence of calmodulin on the localization of NM1. The presence of elevated levels of calmodulin interfered with nuclear localization of tagged NM1. We have shown that the novel specific NLS brings to the cell nucleus not only the "nuclear" isoform of myosin I (NM1 protein) but also its "cytoplasmic" isoform (Myo1c protein). This opens a new field for exploring functions of this molecular motor in nuclear processes, and for exploring the signals between cytoplasm and the nucleus.

  7. Specific deletion of CMF1 nuclear localization domain causes incomplete cell cycle withdrawal and impaired differentiation in avian skeletal myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, Ellen . E-mail: ellen.dees@vanderbilt.edu; Robertson, J. Brian; Zhu, Tianli; Bader, David

    2006-10-01

    CMF1 is a protein expressed in embryonic striated muscle with onset of expression preceding that of contractile proteins. Disruption of CMF1 in myoblasts disrupts muscle-specific protein expression. Preliminary studies indicate both nuclear and cytoplasmic distribution of CMF1 protein, suggesting functional roles in both cellular compartments. Here we examine the nuclear function of CMF1, using a newly characterized antibody generated against the CMF1 nuclear localization domain and a CMF1 nuclear localization domain-deleted stable myocyte line. The antibody demonstrates nuclear distribution of the CMF1 protein both in vivo and in cell lines, with clustering of CMF1 protein around chromatin during mitosis. In more differentiated myocytes, the protein shifts to the cytoplasm. The CMF1 NLS-deleted cell lines have markedly impaired capacity to differentiate. Specifically, these cells express less contractile protein than wild-type or full-length CMF1 stably transfected cells, and do not fuse properly into multinucleate syncytia with linear nuclear alignment. In response to low serum medium, a signal to differentiate, CMF1 NLS-deleted cells enter G0, but continue to express proliferation markers and will reenter the cell cycle when stimulated by restoring growth medium. These data suggest that CMF1 is involved in regulation the transition from proliferation to differentiation in embryonic muscle.

  8. Global network influences on local functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Adam C.; Morais, Michael J.; Willis, Cory M.; Smith, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    A central neuroscientific pursuit is understanding neuronal interactions that support computations underlying cognition and behavior. Although neurons interact across disparate scales – from cortical columns to whole-brain networks – research has been restricted to one scale at a time. We measured local interactions through multi-neuronal recordings while accessing global networks using scalp EEG in rhesus macaques. We measured spike count correlation, an index of functional connectivity with computational relevance, and EEG oscillations, which have been linked to various cognitive functions. We found a surprising non-monotonic relationship between EEG oscillation amplitude and spike count correlation, contrary to the intuitive expectation of a direct relationship. With a widely-used network model we replicated these findings by incorporating a private signal targeting inhibitory neurons, a common mechanism proposed for gain modulation. Finally, we report that spike count correlation explains nonlinearities in the relationship between EEG oscillations and response time in a spatial selective attention task. PMID:25799040

  9. Nuclear Employment Planning. Volume 2. Functional Description

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    Acquire, Maintain, And Transmit Information ( Process 1.0.) Section 1 Assess Situation (Process 2.0.) Section 2 Determine Concept Of Nuclear Employment...information concerning the process. 4.1.1.3 Consider Preclusion Information PROCESS DESCRIPTION: To adjust weapon aimpoints and/or yields based on... Information . PROCESS DESCRIPTION: To acquire information by hearing, seeing, reading, or any other method. (ATCCS FD, Vol 111, Book 1, Tab 2, p. 2) INPUTS

  10. Analysis of the localization and topology of nurim, a polytopic protein tightly associated with the inner nuclear membrane.

    PubMed

    Hofemeister, Helmut; O'Hare, Peter

    2005-01-28

    Nurim is an inner nuclear membrane (INM) protein that was first isolated in a visual screen for nuclear envelope-localizing proteins. Nurim lacks an N-terminal domain characteristic of other INM proteins examined to date and may represent a class of proteins that localize to the INM by a distinct mechanism. To further characterize this protein, we constructed nurim-green fluorescent protein fusions and analyzed aspects of localization, biochemistry, and membrane topology. Results from immunoprobing and protease protection assays together with other analyses indicate that nurim (total length of 262 residues) is a six transmembrane-spanning protein and contains a hairpin turn in its C-terminal transmembrane domain, resulting in the N and C termini residing on the same side of the membrane. A loop region between the fourth and fifth transmembrane domains is exposed toward the nucleoplasm and contains a region accessible for site-specific endoproteinase cleavage. In biochemical fractionation, nurim remained extremely tightly bound to nuclear fractions and was released in significant quantities only in the presence of 4 m urea. Under conditions in which nuclear lamins were completely extracted, a significant population of nurim remained resistant to solubilization. This tight binding requires the C-terminal region of the protein. DNase treatment only marginally influenced its retention characteristics in nuclei. Results from consideration of sequence alignments and identification of specific topological features of nurim indicate that it may possess enzymic function. These results are discussed with reference to the retention mechanism and possible nuclear function of nurim.

  11. Functions and operations of nuclear power plant crews

    SciTech Connect

    Kisner, R.A.; Frey, P.R.

    1982-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and its subcontractors to define the functions, operations, and organization of nuclear power plant operating crews. The primary information sources used were ANS and IEEE standards, normal and emergency operating procedures from nuclear power plants, interviews, and literature reviews. The function and organization of operating crews for several plants are discussed genericly. The report covers a wide spectrum of topics including review of standards affecting human factors in the control room, influence of automation on operator functions, classification of operator functions, function of operator at onset of emergency, crew organization, work-induced stress, and operator acceptance of his role.

  12. Nuclear shieldings with the SSB-D functional.

    PubMed

    Armangué, Lluís; Solà, Miquel; Swart, Marcel

    2011-02-24

    The recently reported SSB-D functional [J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 131, 094103] is used to check the performance for obtaining nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants. Four different databases were studied, which contain a diversity of molecules and nuclear shielding constants. The SSB-D functional is compared with its "parent" functionals (PBE, OPBE), the KT2 functional that was designed specially for NMR applications and the coupled cluster CCSD(T) method. The best performance for the experimentally most-used elements ((1)H, (13)C) is obtained for the SSB-D and KT2 functionals.

  13. Golgi α1,4-fucosyltransferase of Arabidopsis thaliana partially localizes at the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Rips, Stephan; Frank, Manuel; Elting, Annegret; Offenborn, Jan Niklas; von Schaewen, Antje

    2017-10-01

    We analyzed plant-derived α1,4-fucosyltransferase (FucTc) homologs by reporter fusions and focused on representatives of the Brassicaceae and Solanaceae. Arabidopsis thaliana AtFucTc-green fluorescent protein (GFP) or tomato LeFucTc-GFP restored Lewis-a formation in a fuctc mutant, confirming functionality in the trans-Golgi. AtFucTc-GFP partly accumulated at the nuclear envelope (NE) not observed for other homologs or truncated AtFucTc lacking the N-terminus or catalytic domain. Analysis of At/LeFucTc-GFP swap constructs with exchanged cytosolic, transmembrane and stalk (CTS), or only the CT regions, revealed that sorting information resides in the membrane anchor. Other domains of AtFuctc also contribute, since amino-acid changes in the CT region strongly reduced but did not abolish NE localization. By contrast, two N-terminal GFP copies did, indicating localization at the inner nuclear membrane (INM). Tunicamycin treatment of AtFucTc-GFP abolished NE localization and enhanced overlap with an endosomal marker, suggesting involvement of N-glycosylation. Yet neither expression in protoplasts of Arabidopsis N-glycosylation mutants nor elimination of the N-glycosylation site in AtFucTc prevented perinuclear accumulation. Disruption of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport by co-expression of Sar1(H74L) trapped tunicamycin-released AtFucTc-GFP in the ER, however, without NE localization. Since recovery after tunicamycin-washout required de novo-protein synthesis, our analyses suggest that AtFucTc localizes to the NE/INM due to interaction with an unknown (glyco)protein. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Functional Characterization of Nuclear Trafficking Signals in Pseudorabies Virus pUL31

    PubMed Central

    Paßvogel, Lars; Klupp, Barbara G.; Granzow, Harald; Fuchs, Walter

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpesviral nuclear egress complex (NEC), consisting of pUL31 and pUL34 homologs, mediates efficient translocation of newly synthesized capsids from the nucleus to the cytosol. The tail-anchored membrane protein pUL34 is autonomously targeted to the nuclear envelope, while pUL31 is recruited to the inner nuclear membrane (INM) by interaction with pUL34. A nuclear localization signal (NLS) in several pUL31 homologs suggests importin-mediated translocation of the protein. Here we demonstrate that deletion or mutation of the NLS in pseudorabies virus (PrV) pUL31 resulted in exclusively cytosolic localization, indicating active nuclear export. Deletion or mutation of a predicted nuclear export signal (NES) in mutant constructs lacking a functional NLS resulted in diffuse nuclear and cytosolic localization, indicating that both signals are functional. pUL31 molecules lacking the complete NLS or NES were not recruited to the INM by pUL34, while site-specifically mutated proteins formed the NEC and partially complemented the defect of the UL31 deletion mutant. Our data demonstrate that the N terminus of pUL31, encompassing the NLS, is required for efficient nuclear targeting but not for pUL34 interaction, while the C terminus, containing the NES but not necessarily the NES itself, is required for complex formation and efficient budding of viral capsids at the INM. Moreover, pUL31-ΔNLS displayed a dominant negative effect on wild-type PrV replication, probably by diverting pUL34 to cytoplasmic membranes. IMPORTANCE The molecular details of nuclear egress of herpesvirus capsids are still enigmatic. Although the key players, homologs of herpes simplex virus pUL34 and pUL31, which interact and form the heterodimeric nuclear egress complex, are well known, the molecular basis of this interaction and the successive budding, vesicle formation, and scission from the INM, as well as capsid release into the cytoplasm, remain largely obscure. Here we show that

  15. Phenosafranin inhibits nuclear localization of transglutaminase 2 without affecting its transamidase activity.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Yutaka; Toguchi, Mariko; Shrestha, Rajan; Kojima, Soichi

    2017-03-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) localizes to the nucleus and induces apoptosis through a crosslinking inactivation of Sp1 in JHH-7 cells treated with acyclic retinoid. We screened an inhibitor suppressing transamidase activity in the nucleus without affecting transamidase activity itself. Phenosafranin was found to inhibit nuclear localization of EGFP-tagged TG2 and dose-dependently reduce nuclear transamidase activity without affecting the activity in a tube. We concluded that phenosafranin was a novel TG2 inhibitor capable of suppressing its nuclear localization.

  16. Relations among several nuclear and electronic density functional reactivity indexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Luis, Josep M.; Duran, Miquel; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Solà, Miquel

    2003-11-01

    An expansion of the energy functional in terms of the total number of electrons and the normal coordinates within the canonical ensemble is presented. A comparison of this expansion with the expansion of the energy in terms of the total number of electrons and the external potential leads to new relations among common density functional reactivity descriptors. The formulas obtained provide explicit links between important quantities related to the chemical reactivity of a system. In particular, the relation between the nuclear and the electronic Fukui functions is recovered. The connection between the derivatives of the electronic energy and the nuclear repulsion energy with respect to the external potential offers a proof for the "Quantum Chemical le Chatelier Principle." Finally, the nuclear linear response function is defined and the relation of this function with the electronic linear response function is given.

  17. Factorized molecular wave functions: Analysis of the nuclear factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, R.

    2015-06-07

    The exact factorization of molecular wave functions leads to nuclear factors which should be nodeless functions. We reconsider the case of vibrational perturbations in a diatomic species, a situation usually treated by combining Born-Oppenheimer products. It was shown [R. Lefebvre, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 074106 (2015)] that it is possible to derive, from the solutions of coupled equations, the form of the factorized function. By increasing artificially the interstate coupling in the usual approach, the adiabatic regime can be reached, whereby the wave function can be reduced to a single product. The nuclear factor of this product is determined by the lowest of the two potentials obtained by diagonalization of the potential matrix. By comparison with the nuclear wave function of the factorized scheme, it is shown that by a simple rectification, an agreement is obtained between the modified nodeless function and that of the adiabatic scheme.

  18. A nuclear localization domain in the hnRNP A1 protein

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The heterogeneous nuclear RNP (hnRNP) A1 protein is one of the major pre-mRNA/mRNA binding proteins in eukaryotic cells and one of the most abundant proteins in the nucleus. It is localized to the nucleoplasm and it also shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The amino acid sequence of A1 contains two RNP motif RNA-binding domains (RBDs) at the amino terminus and a glycine-rich domain at the carboxyl terminus. This configuration, designated 2x RBD-Gly, is representative of perhaps the largest family of hnRNP proteins. Unlike most nuclear proteins characterized so far, A1 (and most 2x RBD-Gly proteins) does not contain a recognizable nuclear localization signal (NLS). We have found that a segment of ca. 40 amino acids near the carboxyl end of the protein (designated M9) is necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization; attaching this segment to the bacterial protein beta- galactosidase or to pyruvate kinase completely localized these otherwise cytoplasmic proteins to the nucleus. The RBDs and another RNA binding motif found in the glycine-rich domain, the RGG box, are not required for A1 nuclear localization. M9 is a novel type of nuclear localization domain as it does not contain sequences similar to classical basic-type NLS. Interestingly, sequences similar to M9 are found in other nuclear RNA-binding proteins including hnRNP A2. PMID:7730395

  19. Atypical nuclear localization of VIP receptors in glioma cell lines and patients

    SciTech Connect

    Barbarin, Alice; Séité, Paule; Godet, Julie; Bensalma, Souheyla; Muller, Jean-Marc; Chadéneau, Corinne

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • The VIP receptor VPAC1 contains a putative NLS signal. • VPAC1 is predominantly nuclear in GBM cell lines but not VPAC2. • Non-nuclear VPAC1/2 protein expression is correlated with glioma grade. • Nuclear VPAC1 is observed in 50% of stage IV glioma (GBM). - Abstract: An increasing number of G protein-coupled receptors, like receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), are found in cell nucleus. As VIP receptors are involved in the regulation of glioma cell proliferation and migration, we investigated the expression and the nuclear localization of the VIP receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 in this cancer. First, by applying Western blot and immunofluorescence detection in three human glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines, we observed a strong nuclear staining for the VPAC1 receptor and a weak nuclear VPAC2 receptor staining. Second, immunohistochemical staining of VPAC1 and VPAC2 on tissue microarrays (TMA) showed that the two receptors were expressed in normal brain and glioma tissues. Expression in the non-nuclear compartment of the two receptors significantly increased with the grade of the tumors. Analysis of nuclear staining revealed a significant increase of VPAC1 staining with glioma grade, with up to 50% of GBM displaying strong VPAC1 nuclear staining, whereas nuclear VPAC2 staining remained marginal. The increase in VPAC receptor expression with glioma grades and the enhanced nuclear localization of the VPAC1 receptors in GBM might be of importance for glioma progression.

  20. Nuclear charge radii: density functional theory meets Bayesian neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utama, R.; Chen, Wei-Chia; Piekarewicz, J.

    2016-11-01

    The distribution of electric charge in atomic nuclei is fundamental to our understanding of the complex nuclear dynamics and a quintessential observable to validate nuclear structure models. The aim of this study is to explore a novel approach that combines sophisticated models of nuclear structure with Bayesian neural networks (BNN) to generate predictions for the charge radii of thousands of nuclei throughout the nuclear chart. A class of relativistic energy density functionals is used to provide robust predictions for nuclear charge radii. In turn, these predictions are refined through Bayesian learning for a neural network that is trained using residuals between theoretical predictions and the experimental data. Although predictions obtained with density functional theory provide a fairly good description of experiment, our results show significant improvement (better than 40%) after BNN refinement. Moreover, these improved results for nuclear charge radii are supplemented with theoretical error bars. We have successfully demonstrated the ability of the BNN approach to significantly increase the accuracy of nuclear models in the predictions of nuclear charge radii. However, as many before us, we failed to uncover the underlying physics behind the intriguing behavior of charge radii along the calcium isotopic chain.

  1. A toolbox of endogenous and heterologous nuclear localization sequences for the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Weninger, Astrid; Glieder, Anton; Vogl, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) are required for the import of proteins in the nucleus of eukaryotes. However many proteins from bacteria or bacteriophages are used for basic studies in molecular biology, to generate synthetic genetic circuits or for genome editing applications. Prokaryotic recombinases, CRISPR-associated proteins such as Cas9 or bacterial and viral polymerases require efficient NLSs to function in eukaryotes. The yeast Pichia pastoris is a widely used expression platform for heterologous protein production, but molecular tools such as NLSs are limited. Here we have characterized a set of 10 NLSs for P. pastoris, including the first endogenous NLSs (derived from P. pastoris proteins) and commonly used heterologous NLSs. The NLSs were evaluated by fusing them in N- and C-terminal position to an enhanced green fluorescent protein showing pronounced differences in fluorescence levels and nuclear targeting. Thereby we provide a set of different NLSs that can be applied to optimize the nuclear import of heterologous proteins in P. pastoris, paving the way for the establishment of intricate synthetic biology applications.

  2. Higher-order oligomerization promotes localization of SPOP to liquid nuclear speckles.

    PubMed

    Marzahn, Melissa R; Marada, Suresh; Lee, Jihun; Nourse, Amanda; Kenrick, Sophia; Zhao, Huaying; Ben-Nissan, Gili; Kolaitis, Regina-Maria; Peters, Jennifer L; Pounds, Stanley; Errington, Wesley J; Privé, Gilbert G; Taylor, J Paul; Sharon, Michal; Schuck, Peter; Ogden, Stacey K; Mittag, Tanja

    2016-06-15

    Membrane-less organelles in cells are large, dynamic protein/protein or protein/RNA assemblies that have been reported in some cases to have liquid droplet properties. However, the molecular interactions underlying the recruitment of components are not well understood. Herein, we study how the ability to form higher-order assemblies influences the recruitment of the speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) to nuclear speckles. SPOP, a cullin-3-RING ubiquitin ligase (CRL3) substrate adaptor, self-associates into higher-order oligomers; that is, the number of monomers in an oligomer is broadly distributed and can be large. While wild-type SPOP localizes to liquid nuclear speckles, self-association-deficient SPOP mutants have a diffuse distribution in the nucleus. SPOP oligomerizes through its BTB and BACK domains. We show that BTB-mediated SPOP dimers form linear oligomers via BACK domain dimerization, and we determine the concentration-dependent populations of the resulting oligomeric species. Higher-order oligomerization of SPOP stimulates CRL3(SPOP) ubiquitination efficiency for its physiological substrate Gli3, suggesting that nuclear speckles are hotspots of ubiquitination. Dynamic, higher-order protein self-association may be a general mechanism to concentrate functional components in membrane-less cellular bodies. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  3. A toolbox of endogenous and heterologous nuclear localization sequences for the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Weninger, Astrid; Glieder, Anton; Vogl, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) are required for the import of proteins in the nucleus of eukaryotes. However many proteins from bacteria or bacteriophages are used for basic studies in molecular biology, to generate synthetic genetic circuits or for genome editing applications. Prokaryotic recombinases, CRISPR-associated proteins such as Cas9 or bacterial and viral polymerases require efficient NLSs to function in eukaryotes. The yeast Pichia pastoris is a widely used expression platform for heterologous protein production, but molecular tools such as NLSs are limited. Here we have characterized a set of 10 NLSs for P. pastoris, including the first endogenous NLSs (derived from P. pastoris proteins) and commonly used heterologous NLSs. The NLSs were evaluated by fusing them in N- and C-terminal position to an enhanced green fluorescent protein showing pronounced differences in fluorescence levels and nuclear targeting. Thereby we provide a set of different NLSs that can be applied to optimize the nuclear import of heterologous proteins in P. pastoris, paving the way for the establishment of intricate synthetic biology applications. PMID:26347503

  4. Nuclear matrix - structure, function and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wasąg, Piotr; Lenartowski, Robert

    2016-12-20

    The nuclear matrix (NM), or nuclear skeleton, is the non-chromatin, ribonucleoproteinaceous framework that is resistant to high ionic strength buffers, nonionic detergents, and nucleolytic enzymes. The NM fulfills a structural role in eukaryotic cells and is responsible for maintaining the shape of the nucleus and the spatial organization of chromatin. Moreover, the NM participates in several cellular processes, such as DNA replication/repair, gene expression, RNA transport, cell signaling and differentiation, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and carcinogenesis. Short nucleotide sequences called scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MAR) anchor the chromatin loops to the NM proteins (NMP). The NMP composition is dynamic and depends on the cell type and differentiation stage or metabolic activity. Alterations in the NMP composition affect anchoring of the S/MARs and thus alter gene expression. This review aims to systematize information about the skeletal structure of the nucleus, with particular emphasis on the organization of the NM and its role in selected cellular processes. We also discuss several diseases that are caused by aberrant NM structure or dysfunction of individual NM elements.

  5. Comparative analyses of nuclear proteome: extending its function

    PubMed Central

    Narula, Kanika; Datta, Asis; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Chakraborty, Subhra

    2013-01-01

    Organeller proteomics is an emerging technology that is critical in determining the cellular signal transduction pathways. Nucleus, the regulatory hub of the eukaryotic cell is a dynamic system and a repository of various macromolecules that serve as modulators of such signaling that dictate cell fate decisions. Nuclear proteins (NPs) are predicted to comprise about 10–20% of the total cellular proteins, suggesting the involvement of the nucleus in a number of diverse functions. Indeed, NPs constitute a highly organized but complex network that plays diverse roles during development and physiological processes. In plants, relatively little is known about the nature of the molecular components and mechanisms involved in coordinating NP synthesis, their action and function. Proteomic study hold promise to understand the molecular basis of nuclear function using an unbiased comparative and differential approach. We identified a few hundred proteins that include classical and non-canonical nuclear components presumably associated with variety of cellular functions impinging on the complexity of nuclear proteome. Here, we review the nuclear proteome based on our own findings, available literature, and databases focusing on detailed comparative analysis of NPs and their functions in order to understand how plant nucleus works. The review also shed light on the current status of plant nuclear proteome and discusses the future prospect. PMID:23637696

  6. Comparative analyses of nuclear proteome: extending its function.

    PubMed

    Narula, Kanika; Datta, Asis; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Chakraborty, Subhra

    2013-01-01

    Organeller proteomics is an emerging technology that is critical in determining the cellular signal transduction pathways. Nucleus, the regulatory hub of the eukaryotic cell is a dynamic system and a repository of various macromolecules that serve as modulators of such signaling that dictate cell fate decisions. Nuclear proteins (NPs) are predicted to comprise about 10-20% of the total cellular proteins, suggesting the involvement of the nucleus in a number of diverse functions. Indeed, NPs constitute a highly organized but complex network that plays diverse roles during development and physiological processes. In plants, relatively little is known about the nature of the molecular components and mechanisms involved in coordinating NP synthesis, their action and function. Proteomic study hold promise to understand the molecular basis of nuclear function using an unbiased comparative and differential approach. We identified a few hundred proteins that include classical and non-canonical nuclear components presumably associated with variety of cellular functions impinging on the complexity of nuclear proteome. Here, we review the nuclear proteome based on our own findings, available literature, and databases focusing on detailed comparative analysis of NPs and their functions in order to understand how plant nucleus works. The review also shed light on the current status of plant nuclear proteome and discusses the future prospect.

  7. Nuclear Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein is localized to Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Dury, Alain Y; El Fatimy, Rachid; Tremblay, Sandra; Rose, Timothy M; Côté, Jocelyn; De Koninck, Paul; Khandjian, Edouard W

    2013-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by loss of function of a single gene encoding the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). This RNA-binding protein, widely expressed in mammalian tissues, is particularly abundant in neurons and is a component of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes present within the translational apparatus. The absence of FMRP in neurons is believed to cause translation dysregulation and defects in mRNA transport essential for local protein synthesis and for synaptic development and maturation. A prevalent model posits that FMRP is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that transports its mRNA targets from the nucleus to the translation machinery. However, it is not known which of the multiple FMRP isoforms, resulting from the numerous alternatively spliced FMR1 transcripts variants, would be involved in such a process. Using a new generation of anti-FMRP antibodies and recombinant expression, we show here that the most commonly expressed human FMRP isoforms (ISO1 and 7) do not localize to the nucleus. Instead, specific FMRP isoforms 6 and 12 (ISO6 and 12), containing a novel C-terminal domain, were the only isoforms that localized to the nuclei in cultured human cells. These isoforms localized to specific p80-coilin and SMN positive structures that were identified as Cajal bodies. The Cajal body localization signal was confined to a 17 amino acid stretch in the C-terminus of human ISO6 and is lacking in a mouse Iso6 variant. As FMRP is an RNA-binding protein, its presence in Cajal bodies suggests additional functions in nuclear post-transcriptional RNA metabolism. Supporting this hypothesis, a missense mutation (I304N), known to alter the KH2-mediated RNA binding properties of FMRP, abolishes the localization of human FMRP ISO6 to Cajal bodies. These findings open unexplored avenues in search for new insights into the pathophysiology of Fragile X Syndrome.

  8. Detection of Endogenous Nuclear Proteins in Plant Cells: Localizing Nuclear Matrix Constituent Proteins (NMCPs), the Plant Analogs of Lamins.

    PubMed

    Ciska, Malgorzata; de la Espina, Susana Moreno Díaz

    2017-01-01

    At present, two complementary approaches are used for in situ protein visualization in plant nuclei. Imaging of transformed fluorescent proteins is the election tool for the analysis of protein movement and interaction. However, this methodology presents several drawbacks for the identification/localization of endogenous nuclear factors, such as over-expression or mislocalization of transformed proteins. In contrast, immunocytochemistry with specific antibodies represents a powerful tool for the localization of endogenous nuclear proteins at their "native" nuclear sub-compartments. In plant cells, the cell wall hampers antibody accessibility during immunocytochemical analysis thereby reducing the effectivity of the technique, particularly in the case of lowly expressed proteins. To overcome this problem in nuclear protein immunodetection, we developed a method based on the in vitro incubation of isolated nuclei with specific antibodies followed by imaging by confocal fluorescence or electron microscopy. Here we describe the application of this methodology to the localization of Nuclear Matrix Constituent Proteins (NMCP), the plant analogs of lamins, of the monocot Allium cepa, using antibodies raised against highly conserved regions of the proteins.

  9. Function of nuclear membrane proteins in shaping the nuclear envelope integrity during closed mitosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui-Ju; Iwamoto, Masaaki; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2017-04-08

    The nuclear envelope (NE) not only protects the genome from being directly accessed by detrimental agents but also regulates genome organization. Breaches in NE integrity threaten genome stability and impede cellular function. Nonetheless, the NE constantly remodels, and NE integrity is endangered in dividing or differentiating cells. Specifically, in unicellular eukaryotes undergoing closed mitosis, the NE expands instead of breaking down during chromosome segregation. The newly assembling nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) penetrate the existing NE in interphase. A peculiar example of NE remodeling during nuclear differentiation in Tetrahymena involves formation of the redundant NE and clustered NPCs. Even under these conditions, the NE remains intact. Many recent studies on unicellular organisms have revealed that nuclear membrane proteins, such as LEM-domain proteins, play a role in maintaining NE integrity. This review summarizes and discusses how nuclear membrane proteins participate in NE integrity.

  10. Identification of an unconventional nuclear localization signal in human ribosomal protein S2

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, M.; Reimers, K.; Wirz, W.; Gressner, A.M.; Mueller, R.; Kiefer, P. . E-Mail: pkiefer@ukaachen.de

    2005-09-16

    Ribosomal proteins must be imported into the nucleus after being synthesized in the cytoplasm. Since the rpS2 amino acid sequence does not contain a typical nuclear localization signal, we used deletion mutant analysis and rpS2-{beta}-galactosidase chimeric proteins to identify the nuclear targeting domains in rpS2. Nuclear rpS2 is strictly localized in the nucleoplasm and is not targeted to the nucleoli. Subcellular localization analysis of deletion mutants of rpS2-{beta}-galactosidase chimeras identified a central domain comprising 72 amino acids which is necessary and sufficient to target the chimeric {beta}-galactosidase to the nucleus. The nuclear targeting domain shares no significant similarity to already characterized nuclear localization signals in ribosomal proteins or other nuclear proteins. Although a Nup153 fragment containing the importin{beta} binding site fused to VP22 blocks nuclear import of rpS2-{beta}-galactosidase fusion proteins, nuclear uptake of rpS2 could be mediated by several import receptors since it binds to importin{alpha}/{beta} and transportin.

  11. Nuclear Localization of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mcm2/Cdc19p Requires MCM Complex Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Pasion, Sally G.; Forsburg, Susan L.

    1999-01-01

    The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins MCM2–MCM7 are conserved eukaryotic replication factors that assemble in a heterohexameric complex. In fission yeast, these proteins are nuclear throughout the cell cycle. In studying the mechanism that regulates assembly of the MCM complex, we analyzed the cis and trans elements required for nuclear localization of a single subunit, Mcm2p. Mutation of any single mcm gene leads to redistribution of wild-type MCM subunits to the cytoplasm, and this redistribution depends on an active nuclear export system. We identified the nuclear localization signal sequences of Mcm2p and showed that these are required for nuclear targeting of other MCM subunits. In turn, Mcm2p must associate with other MCM proteins for its proper localization; nuclear localization of MCM proteins thus requires assembly of MCM proteins in a complex. We suggest that coupling complex assembly to nuclear targeting and retention ensures that only intact heterohexameric MCM complexes remain nuclear. PMID:10588642

  12. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Shiheido, Hirokazu Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND3{sub 56–58}, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3. - Highlights: • BEND3 localizes to the nucleus. • The N-terminal 60 amino acids region of BEND3 contains NLS. • Amino acids located between 56 and 58 of BEND3 (KRK) are part of NLS. • KRK motif is highly conserved among BEND3 homologs.

  13. Relation between nuclear and nucleon structure functions and their moments

    SciTech Connect

    Rinat, A.S.; Taragin, M.F.

    2006-04-15

    Calculations of nuclear structure functions (SFs) F{sub k=1,2}{sup A}(x,Q{sup 2}) routinely exploit a generalized convolution, involving the SFs for nucleons F{sub k}{sup N} and the linking SF f{sup PN,A} of a fictitious nucleus, composed of point particles, with the latter usually expressed in terms of hadronic degrees of freedom. For finite Q{sup 2} the approach seemed to be lacking a solid justification and the same is the case for recently proposed, effective nuclear parton distribution functions, which exactly reproduce the above-mentioned hadronically computed F{sub k}{sup A}. Many years ago Jaffe and West proved the above convolution in the plane-wave impulse approximation for the nuclear components in the convolution. We extend the above proof to include classes of nuclear final-state interactions. One and the same function appears to relate parton distribution functions in nuclei and nucleons and SFs for nuclear targets and for nucleons. That relation is the previously conjectured one, with an entirely different interpretation of f{sup PN,A}. We conclude with an extensive analysis of moments of nuclear SFs based on the generalized convolution. Characteristics of those moments are shown to be quite similar to those for a nucleon. We conclude that the above is evidence of asymptotic freedom of a nucleon in a medium and not the same for a composite nucleus.

  14. Method to characterize local meteorology at nuclear facilities for application to emergency response needs

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, C.G.; Glantz, C.S.

    1986-04-01

    Effluent dispersion is evaluated using computer codes that require various meteorological parameters such as wind and stability data. These data will be based on current conditions at the site in question, and on forecasts of the expected local meteorology for the time period to be simulated. To assist NRC personnel in preparing these forecasts, a weather-typing model was implemented to analyze the characteristic behavior of local meteorology as it responds to various synoptic-scale weather features (e.g., warm fronts, cold fronts, high pressure systems). Historical observations acquired by instrumented towers at several nuclear power plants were analyzed as a function of the prevailing synoptic weather feature, synoptic-scale pressure gradient, and time of year. This study focused on sites located in shoreline and complex terrain environments because of the occurrence of mesoscale circulations, which are the sea/lake-land breeze and valley wind systems. Such circulations produce diurnally changing wind and stability conditions that cannot be readily identified by synoptic-scale weather forecasts. The advantage in analyzing the climatological behavior of local meteorology as it responds to various synoptic weather systems is that certain weather systems will control the local meteorology and produce persistent conditions.

  15. Towards a Density Functional Theory Exchange-Correlation Functional able to describe localization/delocalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Ann E.; Wills, John M.

    2013-03-01

    The inability to computationally describe the physics governing the properties of actinides and their alloys is the poster child of failure of existing Density Functional Theory exchange-correlation functionals. The intricate competition between localization and delocalization of the electrons, present in these materials, exposes the limitations of functionals only designed to properly describe one or the other situation. We will discuss the manifestation of this competition in real materials and propositions on how to construct a functional able to accurately describe properties of these materials. I addition we will discuss both the importance of using the Dirac equation to describe the relativistic effects in these materials, and the connection to the physics of transition metal oxides. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. ERK5 and Cell Proliferation: Nuclear Localization Is What Matters.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Nestor; Erazo, Tatiana; Lizcano, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    ERK5, the last MAP kinase family member discovered, is activated by the upstream kinase MEK5 in response to growth factors and stress stimulation. MEK5-ERK5 pathway has been associated to different cellular processes, playing a crucial role in cell proliferation in normal and cancer cells by mechanisms that are both dependent and independent of its kinase activity. Thus, nuclear ERK5 activates transcription factors by either direct phosphorylation or acting as co-activator thanks to a unique transcriptional activation TAD domain located at its C-terminal tail. Consequently, ERK5 has been proposed as an interesting target to tackle different cancers, and either inhibitors of ERK5 activity or silencing the protein have shown antiproliferative activity in cancer cells and to block tumor growth in animal models. Here, we review the different mechanisms involved in ERK5 nuclear translocation and their consequences. Inactive ERK5 resides in the cytosol, forming a complex with Hsp90-Cdc37 superchaperone. In a canonical mechanism, MEK5-dependent activation results in ERK5 C-terminal autophosphorylation, Hsp90 dissociation, and nuclear translocation. This mechanism integrates signals such as growth factors and stresses that activate the MEK5-ERK5 pathway. Importantly, two other mechanisms, MEK5-independent, have been recently described. These mechanisms allow nuclear shuttling of kinase-inactive forms of ERK5. Although lacking kinase activity, these forms activate transcription by interacting with transcription factors through the TAD domain. Both mechanisms also require Hsp90 dissociation previous to nuclear translocation. One mechanism involves phosphorylation of the C-terminal tail of ERK5 by kinases that are activated during mitosis, such as Cyclin-dependent kinase-1. The second mechanism involves overexpression of chaperone Cdc37, an oncogene that is overexpressed in cancers such as prostate adenocarcinoma, where it collaborates with ERK5 to promote cell proliferation

  17. ERK5 and Cell Proliferation: Nuclear Localization Is What Matters

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Nestor; Erazo, Tatiana; Lizcano, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    ERK5, the last MAP kinase family member discovered, is activated by the upstream kinase MEK5 in response to growth factors and stress stimulation. MEK5-ERK5 pathway has been associated to different cellular processes, playing a crucial role in cell proliferation in normal and cancer cells by mechanisms that are both dependent and independent of its kinase activity. Thus, nuclear ERK5 activates transcription factors by either direct phosphorylation or acting as co-activator thanks to a unique transcriptional activation TAD domain located at its C-terminal tail. Consequently, ERK5 has been proposed as an interesting target to tackle different cancers, and either inhibitors of ERK5 activity or silencing the protein have shown antiproliferative activity in cancer cells and to block tumor growth in animal models. Here, we review the different mechanisms involved in ERK5 nuclear translocation and their consequences. Inactive ERK5 resides in the cytosol, forming a complex with Hsp90-Cdc37 superchaperone. In a canonical mechanism, MEK5-dependent activation results in ERK5 C-terminal autophosphorylation, Hsp90 dissociation, and nuclear translocation. This mechanism integrates signals such as growth factors and stresses that activate the MEK5-ERK5 pathway. Importantly, two other mechanisms, MEK5-independent, have been recently described. These mechanisms allow nuclear shuttling of kinase-inactive forms of ERK5. Although lacking kinase activity, these forms activate transcription by interacting with transcription factors through the TAD domain. Both mechanisms also require Hsp90 dissociation previous to nuclear translocation. One mechanism involves phosphorylation of the C-terminal tail of ERK5 by kinases that are activated during mitosis, such as Cyclin-dependent kinase-1. The second mechanism involves overexpression of chaperone Cdc37, an oncogene that is overexpressed in cancers such as prostate adenocarcinoma, where it collaborates with ERK5 to promote cell proliferation

  18. Hairless is a nuclear receptor corepressor essential for skin function

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    The activity of nuclear receptors is modulated by numerous coregulatory factors. Corepressors can either mediate the ability of nuclear receptors to repress transcription, or can inhibit transactivation by nuclear receptors. As we learn more about the mechanisms of transcriptional repression, the importance of repression by nuclear receptors in development and disease has become clear. The protein encoded by the mammalian Hairless (Hr) gene was shown to be a corepressor by virtue of its functional similarity to the well-established corepressors N-CoR and SMRT. Mutation of the Hr gene results in congenital hair loss in both mice and men. Investigation of Hairless function both in vitro and in mouse models in vivo has revealed a critical role in maintaining skin and hair by regulating the differentiation of epithelial stem cells, as well as a putative role in regulating gene expression via chromatin remodeling. PMID:20087431

  19. Differentiating plant cells switched to proliferation remodel the functional organization of nuclear domains.

    PubMed

    Testillano, P S; González-Melendi, P; Coronado, M J; Seguí-Simarro, J M; Moreno-Risueño, M A; Risueño, M C

    2005-01-01

    The immature pollen grain, the microspore, under stress conditions can switch its developmental program towards proliferation and embryogenesis. The comparison between the gametophytic and sporophytic pathways followed by the microspore permitted us to analyse the nuclear changes in plant differentiating cells when switched to proliferation. The nucleus is highly dynamic, the architecture of its well organised functional domains--condensed chromatin, interchromatin region, nuclear bodies and nucleolus--changing in response to DNA replication, RNA transcription, processing and transport. In the present work, the rearrangements of the nuclear domains during the switch to proliferation have been determined by in situ molecular identification methods for the subcellular localization of chromatin at different functional states, rDNA, elements of the nuclear machinery (PCNA, splicing factors), signalling and stress proteins. The study of the changes in the nuclear domains was determined by a correlative approach at confocal and electron microscopy levels. The results showed that the switch of the developmental program and the activation of the proliferative activity affected the functional organization of the nuclear domains, which accordingly changed their architecture and functional state. A redistribution of components, among them various signalling molecules which targeted structures within the interchromatin region upon translocation from the cytoplasm, was also observed.

  20. Functional renormalization group study of nuclear and neutron matter

    SciTech Connect

    Drews, Matthias; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-01-22

    A chiral model based on nucleons interacting via boson exchange is investigated. Fluctuation effects are included consistently beyond the mean-field approximation in the framework of the functional renormalization group. The liquid-gas phase transition of symmetric nuclear matter is studied in detail. No sign of a chiral restoration transition is found up to temperatures of about 100 MeV and densities of at least three times the density of normal nuclear matter. Moreover, the model is extended to asymmetric nuclear matter and the constraints from neutron star observations are discussed.

  1. Identification of nuclear genes encoding chloroplast-localized proteins required for embryo development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Nicole; Lloyd, Johnny; Sweeney, Colleen; Myouga, Fumiyoshi; Meinke, David

    2011-04-01

    We describe here the diversity of chloroplast proteins required for embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Interfering with certain chloroplast functions has long been known to result in embryo lethality. What has not been reported before is a comprehensive screen for embryo-defective (emb) mutants altered in chloroplast proteins. From a collection of transposon and T-DNA insertion lines at the RIKEN chloroplast function database (http://rarge.psc.riken.jp/chloroplast/) that initially appeared to lack homozygotes and segregate for defective seeds, we identified 23 additional examples of EMB genes that likely encode chloroplast-localized proteins. Fourteen gene identities were confirmed with allelism tests involving duplicate mutant alleles. We then queried journal publications and the SeedGenes database (www.seedgenes.org) to establish a comprehensive dataset of 381 nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins of Arabidopsis associated with embryo-defective (119 genes), plant pigment (121 genes), gametophyte (three genes), and alternate (138 genes) phenotypes. Loci were ranked based on the level of certainty that the gene responsible for the phenotype had been identified and the protein product localized to chloroplasts. Embryo development is frequently arrested when amino acid, vitamin, or nucleotide biosynthesis is disrupted but proceeds when photosynthesis is compromised and when levels of chlorophyll, carotenoids, or terpenoids are reduced. Chloroplast translation is also required for embryo development, with genes encoding chloroplast ribosomal and pentatricopeptide repeat proteins well represented among EMB datasets. The chloroplast accD locus, which is necessary for fatty acid biosynthesis, is essential in Arabidopsis but not in Brassica napus or maize (Zea mays), where duplicated nuclear genes compensate for its absence or loss of function.

  2. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This document contains organization charts for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and for the five offices of the NRC. Function statements are provided delineating the major responsibilities and operations of each office. Organization and function are provided to the branch level. The head of each office, division, and branch is also listed.

  3. New Generation Nuclear Plant -- High Level Functions and Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Ryskamp; E. J. Gorski; E. A. Harvego; S. T. Khericha; G. A. Beitel

    2003-09-01

    This functions and requirements (F&R) document was prepared for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The highest-level functions and requirements for the NGNP preconceptual design are identified in this document, which establishes performance definitions for what the NGNP will achieve. NGNP designs will be developed based on these requirements by commercial vendor(s).

  4. Comparison of nuclear Hamiltonians using spectral function sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, A.; Carbone, A.; Polls, A.

    2017-07-01

    Background: The energy weighted sum rules of the single-particle spectral functions provide a quantitative understanding of the fragmentation of nuclear states due to short-range and tensor correlations. Purpose: The aim of this paper is to compare on a quantitative basis the single-particle spectral function generated by different nuclear Hamiltonians in symmetric nuclear matter using the first three energy-weighted moments. Method: The spectral functions are calculated in the framework of the self-consistent Green's function approach at finite temperature within a ladder resummation scheme. We analyze the first three moments of the spectral function and connect these to the correlations induced by the interactions between the nucleons in symmetric nuclear matter. In particular, the variance of the spectral function is directly linked to the dispersive contribution of the self-energy. The discussion is centered around two- and three-body chiral nuclear interactions, with and without renormalization, but we also provide results obtained with the traditional phase-shift-equivalent CD-Bonn and Av18 potentials. Results: The variance of the spectral function is particularly sensitive to the short-range structure of the force, with hard-core interactions providing large variances. Chiral forces yield variances which are an order of magnitude smaller and, when tamed using the similarity renormalization group, the variance reduces significantly and in proportion to the renormalization scale. The presence of three-body forces does not substantially affect the results. Conclusions: The first three moments of the spectral function are useful tools in analyzing the importance of correlations in nuclear ground states. In particular, the second-order moment provides a direct insight into dispersive contributions to the self-energy and its value is indicative of the fragmentation of single-particle states.

  5. Landau parameters for energy density functionals generated by local finite-range pseudopotentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idini, A.; Bennaceur, K.; Dobaczewski, J.

    2017-06-01

    In Landau theory of Fermi liquids, the particle-hole interaction near the Fermi energy in different spin-isospin channels is probed in terms of an expansion over the Legendre polynomials. This provides a useful and efficient way to constrain properties of nuclear energy density functionals in symmetric nuclear matter and finite nuclei. In this study, we present general expressions for Landau parameters corresponding to a two-body central local regularized pseudopotential. We also show results obtained for two recently adjusted NLO and N2LO parametrizations. Such pseudopotentials will be used to determine mean-field and beyond-mean-field properties of paired nuclei across the entire nuclear chart.

  6. Identification of a classic nuclear localization signal at the N terminus that regulates the subcellular localization of Rbfox2 isoforms during differentiation of NMuMG and P19 cells.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Manuel; Schüle, Martin; Casanovas, Sonia; Strand, Dennis; Strand, Susanne; Winter, Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear localization of the alternative splicing factor Rbfox2 is achieved by a C-terminal nuclear localization signal (NLS) which can be excluded from some Rbfox2 isoforms by alternative splicing. While this predicts nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, Rbfox2 is exclusively nuclear in some cell types. Here, we identify a second NLS in the N terminus of Rbfox2 isoform 1A that is not included in Rbfox2 isoform 1F. Rbfox2 1A isoforms lacking the C-terminal NLS are nuclear, whereas equivalent 1F isoforms are cytoplasmic. A shift in Rbfox2 expression toward cytoplasmic 1F isoforms occurs during epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and could be important in regulating the activity and function of Rbfox2. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Increasing phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate biosynthesis affects plant nuclear lipids and nuclear functions

    PubMed Central

    Dieck, Catherine B.; Wood, Austin; Brglez, Irena; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela; Boss, Wendy F.

    2013-01-01

    In order to characterize the effects of increasing phosphatidylinositol(4,5)bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) on nuclear function, we expressed the human phosphatidylinositol (4)-phosphate 5-kinase (HsPIP5K) 1α in Nicotiana tabacum (NT) cells. The HsPIP5K-expressing (HK) cells had altered nuclear lipids and nuclear functions. HK cell nuclei had 2-fold increased PIP5K activity and increased steady state PtdIns(4,5)P2. HK nuclear lipid classes showed significant changes compared to NT (wild type) nuclear lipid classes including increased phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) and decreased lysolipids. Lipids isolated from protoplast plasma membranes (PM) were also analyzed and compared with nuclear lipids. The lipid profiles revealed similarities and differences in the plasma membrane and nuclei from the NT and transgenic HK cell lines. A notable characteristic of nuclear lipids from both cell types is that PtdIns accounts for a higher mol % of total lipids compared to that of the protoplast PM lipids. The lipid molecular species composition of each lipid class was also analyzed for nuclei and protoplast PM samples. To determine whether expression of HsPIP5K1α affected plant nuclear functions, we compared DNA replication, histone 3 lysine 9 acetylation (H3K9ac) and phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) in NT and HK cells. The HK cells had a measurable decrease in DNA replication, histone H3K9 acetylation and pRB phosphorylation. PMID:22677448

  8. Increasing phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate biosynthesis affects plant nuclear lipids and nuclear functions.

    PubMed

    Dieck, Catherine B; Wood, Austin; Brglez, Irena; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela; Boss, Wendy F

    2012-08-01

    In order to characterize the effects of increasing phosphatidylinositol(4,5)bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P(2)) on nuclear function, we expressed the human phosphatidylinositol (4)-phosphate 5-kinase (HsPIP5K) 1α in Nicotiana tabacum (NT) cells. The HsPIP5K-expressing (HK) cells had altered nuclear lipids and nuclear functions. HK cell nuclei had 2-fold increased PIP5K activity and increased steady state PtdIns(4,5)P(2). HK nuclear lipid classes showed significant changes compared to NT (wild type) nuclear lipid classes including increased phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) and decreased lysolipids. Lipids isolated from protoplast plasma membranes (PM) were also analyzed and compared with nuclear lipids. The lipid profiles revealed similarities and differences in the plasma membrane and nuclei from the NT and transgenic HK cell lines. A notable characteristic of nuclear lipids from both cell types is that PtdIns accounts for a higher mol% of total lipids compared to that of the protoplast PM lipids. The lipid molecular species composition of each lipid class was also analyzed for nuclei and protoplast PM samples. To determine whether expression of HsPIP5K1α affected plant nuclear functions, we compared DNA replication, histone 3 lysine 9 acetylation (H3K9ac) and phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) in NT and HK cells. The HK cells had a measurable decrease in DNA replication, histone H3K9 acetylation and pRB phosphorylation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Lamin-dependent Localization of UNC-84, A Protein Required for Nuclear Migration in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kenneth K.; Starr, Daniel; Cohen, Merav; Liu, Jun; Han, Min; Wilson, Katherine L.; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans unc-84 gene cause defects in nuclear migration and anchoring. We show that endogenous UNC-84 protein colocalizes with Ce-lamin at the nuclear envelope and that the envelope localization of UNC-84 requires Ce-lamin. We also show that during mitosis, UNC-84 remains at the nuclear periphery until late anaphase, similar to known inner nuclear membrane proteins. UNC-84 protein is first detected at the 26-cell stage and thereafter is present in most cells during development and in adults. UNC-84 is properly expressed in unc-83 and anc-1 lines, which have phenotypes similar to unc-84, suggesting that neither the expression nor nuclear envelope localization of UNC-84 depends on UNC-83 or ANC-1 proteins. The envelope localization of Ce-lamin, Ce-emerin, Ce-MAN1, and nucleoporins are unaffected by the loss of UNC-84. UNC-84 is not required for centrosome attachment to the nucleus because centrosomes are localized normally in unc-84 hyp7 cells despite a nuclear migration defect. Models for UNC-84 localization are discussed. PMID:11907270

  10. Multifunctionality of a Picornavirus Polymerase Domain: Nuclear Localization Signal and Nucleotide Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; de la Higuera, Ignacio; Caridi, Flavia; Sánchez-Aparicio, María Teresa; Moreno, Elena; Perales, Celia; Singh, Kamalendra; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Sobrino, Francisco; Domingo, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The N-terminal region of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 3D polymerase contains the sequence MRKTKLAPT (residues 16 to 24) that acts as a nuclear localization signal. A previous study showed that substitutions K18E and K20E diminished the transport to the nucleus of 3D and 3CD and severely impaired virus infectivity. These residues have also been implicated in template binding, as seen in the crystal structures of different 3D-RNA elongation complexes. Here, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of different mutant polymerases harboring substitutions at residues 18 and 20, in particular, K18E, K18A, K20E, K20A, and the double mutant K18A K20A (KAKA). All mutant enzymes exhibit low RNA binding activity, low processivity, and alterations in nucleotide recognition, including increased incorporation of ribavirin monophosphate (RMP) relative to the incorporation of cognate nucleotides compared with the wild-type enzyme. The structural analysis shows an unprecedented flexibility of the 3D mutant polymerases, including both global rearrangements of the closed-hand architecture and local conformational changes at loop β9-α11 (within the polymerase motif B) and at the template-binding channel. Specifically, in 3D bound to RNA, both K18E and K20E induced the opening of new pockets in the template channel where the downstream templating nucleotide at position +2 binds. The comparisons of free and RNA-bound enzymes suggest that the structural rearrangements may occur in a concerted mode to regulate RNA replication, processivity, and fidelity. Thus, the N-terminal region of FMDV 3D that acts as a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and in template binding is also involved in nucleotide recognition and can affect the incorporation of nucleotide analogues. IMPORTANCE The study documents multifunctionality of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) located at the N-terminal region of the foot-and-mouth disease viral polymerase (3D). Amino acid

  11. A-dependence of weak nuclear structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, H.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Simo, I. Ruiz

    2015-05-15

    Effect of nuclear medium on the weak structure functions F{sub 2}{sup A}(x, Q{sup 2}) and F{sub 3}{sup A}(x, Q{sup 2}) have been studied using charged current (anti)neutrino deep inelastic scattering on various nuclear targets. Relativistic nuclear spectral function which incorporate Fermi motion, binding and nucleon correlations are used for the calculations. We also consider the pion and rho meson cloud contributions calculated from a microscopic model for meson-nucleus self-energies. Using these structure functions, F{sub i}{sup A}/F{sub i}{sup proton} and F{sub i}{sup A}/F{sub i}{sup deuteron}(i=2,3, A={sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, CH and H{sub 2}O) are obtained.

  12. The nuclear pore complex: understanding its function through structural insight.

    PubMed

    Beck, Martin; Hurt, Ed

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) fuse the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form channels across the nuclear envelope. They are large macromolecular assemblies with a complex composition and diverse functions. Apart from facilitating nucleocytoplasmic transport, NPCs are involved in chromatin organization, the regulation of gene expression and DNA repair. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying these functions has been hampered by a lack of structural knowledge about the NPC. The recent convergence of crystallographic and biochemical in vitro analysis of nucleoporins (NUPs), the components of the NPC, with cryo-electron microscopic imaging of the entire NPC in situ has provided first pseudo-atomic view of its central core and revealed that an unexpected network of short linear motifs is an important spatial organization principle. These breakthroughs have transformed the way we understand NPC structure, and they provide an important base for functional investigations, including the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying clinically manifested mutations of the nucleocytoplasmic transport system.

  13. To the non-local theory of cold nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Alexeev, Boris V

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we revisit the cold fusion (CF) phenomenon using the generalized Bolzmann kinetics theory which can represent the non-local physics of this CF phenomenon. This approach can identify the conditions when the CF can take place as the soliton creation under the influence of the intensive sound waves. The vast mathematical modelling leads to affirmation that all parts of soliton move with the same velocity and with the small internal change of the pressure. The zone of the high density is shaped on the soliton's front. It means that the regime of the 'acoustic CF' could be realized from the position of the non-local hydrodynamics.

  14. Excitation function calculations for α + 93Nb nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiǧit, M.; Tel, E.; Sarpün, İ. H.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the excitation functions of alpha-induced reactions on the 93Nb target nucleus were calculated by using ALICE-ASH code. The hybrid model, Weisskopf-Ewing model and geometry dependent hybrid model in this code were used to understand the alpha-niobium interaction. The contribution on the nuclear interaction of compound and pre-compound processes, with variation of the incident alpha particle energy, was presented. Furthermore, the reaction cross sections were calculated by using different level density models such as Superfluid nuclear model, Fermi gas model and Kataria-Ramamurthy Fermi gas model. Obtaining a good agreement between the calculated and the measured cross sections, the exciton numbers and the nuclear level density models were varied. Finally, the proper choice of the exciton numbers and the nuclear level density models was found to be quite important in order to obtain the more realistic cross section values.

  15. Nuclear Localization of PRDM9 and Its Role in Meiotic Chromatin Modifications and Homologous Synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fengyun; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Reinholdt, Laura G.; Hu, Jianjun; Saxl, Ruth L.; Baker, Christopher L.; Petkov, Petko M.; Paigen, Kenneth; Handel, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Developmental progress of germ cells through meiotic phases is closely tied to ongoing meiotic recombination. In mammals, recombination preferentially occurs in genomic regions known as hotspots; the protein that activates these hotspots is PRDM9, containing a genetically variable zinc-finger domain and a PR-SET domain with histone H3K4 trimethyltransferase activity. PRDM9 is required for fertility in mice, but little is known about its localization and developmental dynamics. Application of spermatogenic stage-specific markers demonstrates that PRDM9 accumulates in male germ-cell nuclei at pre-leptonema to early leptonema, but is no longer detectable in nuclei by late zygonema. By the pachytene stage, PRDM9-dependent histone H3K4 trimethyl marks on hotspots also disappear. PRDM9 localizes to nuclei concurrently with the deposition of meiotic cohesin complexes, but is not required for incorporation of cohesin complex proteins into chromosomal axial elements, or accumulation of normal numbers of RAD51 foci on meiotic chromatin by late zygonema. Germ cells lacking PRDM9 exhibit inefficient homology recognition and synapsis, with aberrant repair of meiotic DNA double-strand breaks and transcriptional abnormalities characteristic of meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin. Together, these results on the developmental time course for nuclear localization of PRDM9 establish its direct window of function, and demonstrate the independence of chromosome axial element formation from the concurrent PRDM9-mediated activation of recombination hotspots. PMID:25894966

  16. Nuclear localization of PRDM9 and its role in meiotic chromatin modifications and homologous synapsis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fengyun; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Reinholdt, Laura G; Hu, Jianjun; Saxl, Ruth L; Baker, Christopher L; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth; Handel, Mary Ann

    2015-09-01

    Developmental progress of germ cells through meiotic phases is closely tied to ongoing meiotic recombination. In mammals, recombination preferentially occurs in genomic regions known as hotspots; the protein that activates these hotspots is PRDM9, containing a genetically variable zinc finger (ZNF) domain and a PR-SET domain with histone H3K4 trimethyltransferase activity. PRDM9 is required for fertility in mice, but little is known about its localization and developmental dynamics. Application of spermatogenic stage-specific markers demonstrates that PRDM9 accumulates in male germ cell nuclei at pre-leptonema to early leptonema but is no longer detectable in nuclei by late zygonema. By the pachytene stage, PRDM9-dependent histone H3K4 trimethyl marks on hotspots also disappear. PRDM9 localizes to nuclei concurrently with the deposition of meiotic cohesin complexes, but is not required for incorporation of cohesin complex proteins into chromosomal axial elements, or accumulation of normal numbers of RAD51 foci on meiotic chromatin by late zygonema. Germ cells lacking PRDM9 exhibit inefficient homology recognition and synapsis, with aberrant repair of meiotic DNA double-strand breaks and transcriptional abnormalities characteristic of meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin. Together, these results on the developmental time course for nuclear localization of PRDM9 establish its direct window of function and demonstrate the independence of chromosome axial element formation from the concurrent PRDM9-mediated activation of recombination hotspots.

  17. Nuclear correlation functions in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Detmold, William; Orginos, Konstantinos

    2013-06-01

    We consider the problem of calculating the large number of Wick contractions necessary to compute states with the quantum numbers of many baryons in lattice QCD. We consider a constructive approach and a determinant-based approach and show that these methods allow the required contractions to be performed for certain choices of interpolating operators. Examples of correlation functions computed using these techniques are shown for the quantum numbers of the light nuclei, $^4$He, $^8$Be, $^{12}$C, $^{16}$O and $^{28}$Si.

  18. Nuclear cardiology: Myocardial perfusion and function

    SciTech Connect

    Seldin, D.W. )

    1991-08-01

    Myocardial perfusion studies continue to be a major focus of research, with new investigations of the relationship of exercise-redistribution thallium imaging to diagnosis, prognosis, and case management. The redistribution phenomenon, which seemed to be fairly well understood a few years ago, is now recognized to be much more complex than originally thought, and various strategies have been proposed to clarify the meaning of persistent defects. Pharmacologic intervention with dipyridamole and adenosine has become available as an alternative to exercise, and comparisons with exercise imaging and catheterization results have been described. Thallium itself is no longer the sole single-photon perfusion radiopharmaceutical; two new technetium agents are now widely available. In addition to perfusion studies, advances in the study of ventricular function have been made, including reports of studies performed in conjunction with technetium perfusion studies, new insights into cardiac physiology, and the prognostic and case-management information that function studies provide. Finally, work has continued with monoclonal antibodies for the identification of areas of myocyte necrosis. 41 references.

  19. To the non-local theory of cold nuclear fusion

    PubMed Central

    Alexeev, Boris V.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit the cold fusion (CF) phenomenon using the generalized Bolzmann kinetics theory which can represent the non-local physics of this CF phenomenon. This approach can identify the conditions when the CF can take place as the soliton creation under the influence of the intensive sound waves. The vast mathematical modelling leads to affirmation that all parts of soliton move with the same velocity and with the small internal change of the pressure. The zone of the high density is shaped on the soliton's front. It means that the regime of the ‘acoustic CF’ could be realized from the position of the non-local hydrodynamics. PMID:26064528

  20. A tripartite nuclear localization signal in the PDZ-domain protein L-periaxin.

    PubMed

    Sherman, D L; Brophy, P J

    2000-02-18

    The murine Periaxin gene encodes two PDZ-domain proteins in myelin-forming Schwann cells of the vertebrate peripheral nervous system (Dytrych, L., Sherman, D. L., Gillespie, C. S., and Brophy, P. J. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 5794-5800). Here we show that L-periaxin is targeted to the nucleus of embryonic Schwann cells. Subsequently, the protein redistributes to the plasma membrane processes of the myelinating Schwann cell where it is believed to function in a signaling complex. In contrast, L-periaxin remains in the nucleus when expressed ectopically in oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming glia of the central nervous system. The nuclear localization signal (NLS) is basic and tripartite and comprises three signals that act synergistically. Nuclear targeting of L-periaxin is energy-dependent and is inhibited by cell-cell contact. These data show that L-periaxin is a member of a growing family of proteins that can shuttle between the nucleus and cortical signaling/adherence complexes.

  1. Plasma Membrane and Nuclear Localization of G Protein–coupled Receptor Kinase 6A

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoshan; Benovic, Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) specifically phosphorylate agonist-occupied GPCRs at the inner surface of the plasma membrane (PM), leading to receptor desensitization. Here we show that the C-terminal 30 amino acids of GRK6A contain multiple elements that either promote or inhibit PM localization. Disruption of palmitoylation by individual mutation of cysteine 561, 562, or 565 or treatment of cells with 2-bromopalmitate shifts GRK6A from the PM to both the cytoplasm and nucleus. Likewise, disruption of the hydrophobic nature of a predicted amphipathic helix by mutation of two leucines to alanines at positions 551 and 552 causes a loss of PM localization. Moreover, acidic amino acids in the C-terminus appear to negatively regulate PM localization; mutational replacement of several acidic residues with neutral or basic residues rescues PM localization of a palmitoylation-defective GRK6A. Last, we characterize the novel nuclear localization, showing that nuclear export of nonpalmitoylated GRK6A is sensitive to leptomycin B and that GRK6A contains a potential nuclear localization signal. Our results suggest that the C-terminus of GRK6A contains a novel electrostatic palmitoyl switch in which acidic residues weaken the membrane-binding strength of the amphipathic helix, thus allowing changes in palmitoylation to regulate PM versus cytoplasmic/nuclear localization. PMID:17538017

  2. Plasma membrane and nuclear localization of G protein coupled receptor kinase 6A.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoshan; Benovic, Jeffrey L; Wedegaertner, Philip B

    2007-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) specifically phosphorylate agonist-occupied GPCRs at the inner surface of the plasma membrane (PM), leading to receptor desensitization. Here we show that the C-terminal 30 amino acids of GRK6A contain multiple elements that either promote or inhibit PM localization. Disruption of palmitoylation by individual mutation of cysteine 561, 562, or 565 or treatment of cells with 2-bromopalmitate shifts GRK6A from the PM to both the cytoplasm and nucleus. Likewise, disruption of the hydrophobic nature of a predicted amphipathic helix by mutation of two leucines to alanines at positions 551 and 552 causes a loss of PM localization. Moreover, acidic amino acids in the C-terminus appear to negatively regulate PM localization; mutational replacement of several acidic residues with neutral or basic residues rescues PM localization of a palmitoylation-defective GRK6A. Last, we characterize the novel nuclear localization, showing that nuclear export of nonpalmitoylated GRK6A is sensitive to leptomycin B and that GRK6A contains a potential nuclear localization signal. Our results suggest that the C-terminus of GRK6A contains a novel electrostatic palmitoyl switch in which acidic residues weaken the membrane-binding strength of the amphipathic helix, thus allowing changes in palmitoylation to regulate PM versus cytoplasmic/nuclear localization.

  3. BUILDING A UNIVERSAL NUCLEAR ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONAL (UNEDF)

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    2012-07-01

    The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: First, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties. Second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data. Third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  4. Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation in Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schunck, N.; McDonnell, J. D.; Higdon, D.; Sarich, J.; Wild, S. M.

    2015-12-23

    Nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is one of the main theoretical tools used to study the properties of heavy and superheavy elements, or to describe the structure of nuclei far from stability. While on-going efforts seek to better root nuclear DFT in the theory of nuclear forces (see Duguet et al., this Topical Issue), energy functionals remain semi-phenomenological constructions that depend on a set of parameters adjusted to experimental data in finite nuclei. In this paper, we review recent efforts to quantify the related uncertainties, and propagate them to model predictions. In particular, we cover the topics of parameter estimation for inverse problems, statistical analysis of model uncertainties and Bayesian inference methods. Illustrative examples are taken from the literature.

  5. Nuclear pore function viewed with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Danker, T; Oberleithner, H

    2000-04-01

    In this review we focus on studies using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to describe the function of nuclear pore complexes (NPC). After a short introduction of AFM we follow the route of cargo molecules from the cytosol into the nucleus. AFM visualizes cargo before translocation into the nucleoplasm, cargo docking at the cytoplasmic NPC surface, cargo passing through the NPC and changes in NPC conformation in response to ATP, Calcium and pH. We discuss AFM experiments on nuclear envelopes on the basis of previous data obtained with more conventional techniques such as electron microscopy, confocal microscopy and other imaging techniques. Finally we draw attention to the recently developed nuclear hourglass technique that serves as a new electrophysiological approach to studying the structure-function relationship of NPC in combination with AFM at a molecular level.

  6. Public meetings on nuclear waste management: their function and organization

    SciTech Connect

    Duvernoy, E.G.; Marcus, A.A.; Overcast, T.; Schilling, A.H.

    1981-05-01

    This report focuses on public meetings as a vehicle for public participation in nuclear waste management. The nature of public meetings is reviewed and the functions served by meetings highlighted. The range of participants and their concerns are addressed, including a review of the participants from past nuclear waste management meetings. A sound understanding of the expected participants allows DOE to tailor elements of the meeting, such as notification, format, and agenda to accommodate the attendees. Finally, the report discusses the organization of public meetings on nuclear waste management in order to enhance the DOE's functions for such meetings. Possible structures are suggested for a variety of elements that are relevant prior to, during and after the public meeting. These suggestions are intended to supplement the DOE Public Participation Manual.

  7. Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation in Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schunck, N; McDonnell, J D; Higdon, D; Sarich, J; Wild, S M

    2015-03-17

    Nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is one of the main theoretical tools used to study the properties of heavy and superheavy elements, or to describe the structure of nuclei far from stability. While on-going eff orts seek to better root nuclear DFT in the theory of nuclear forces, energy functionals remain semi-phenomenological constructions that depend on a set of parameters adjusted to experimental data in fi nite nuclei. In this paper, we review recent eff orts to quantify the related uncertainties, and propagate them to model predictions. In particular, we cover the topics of parameter estimation for inverse problems, statistical analysis of model uncertainties and Bayesian inference methods. Illustrative examples are taken from the literature.

  8. Association of Nuclear Localization of a Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 Protein in Breast Tumors with Poor Prognostic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Chris R.; Normart, Robin; Yang, Qifeng; Stevenson, Elizabeth; Haffty, Bruce G.; Ganesan, Shridar; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Levine, Arnold J.; Tang, Laura H.

    2010-01-01

    Within healthy human somatic cells, retrotransposition by long interspersed nuclear element-1 (also known as LINE-1 or L1) is thought to be held in check by a variety of mechanisms, including DNA methylation and RNAi. The expression of L1-ORF1 protein, which is rarely found in normal tissue, was assayed using antibodies with a variety of clinical cancer specimens and cancer cell lines. L1-ORF1p expression was detected in nearly all breast tumors that the authors examined, and the protein was also present in a high percentage of ileal carcinoids, bladder, and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, as well as in a smaller percentage of prostate and colorectal tumors. Tumors generally demonstrated cytoplasmic L1-ORF1p; however, in several breast cancers, L1-ORF1p was nuclear. Patients with breast tumors displaying nuclear L1-ORF1p had a greater incidence of both local recurrence and distal metastases and also showed poorer overall survival when compared with patients with tumors displaying cytoplasmic L1-ORF1p. These data suggest that expression of L1-ORF1p is widespread in many cancers and that redistribution from cytoplasm to nucleus could be a poor prognostic indicator during breast cancer. High expression and nuclear localization of L1-ORF1p may result in a higher rate of L1 retrotransposition, which could increase genomic instability. PMID:20948976

  9. Identification of a nuclear localization motif in the serine/arginine protein kinase PSRPK of physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shide; Zhou, Zhuolong; Lin, Ziyang; Ouyang, Qiuling; Zhang, Jianhua; Tian, Shengli; Xing, Miao

    2009-08-25

    Serine/arginine (SR) protein-specific kinases (SRPKs) are conserved in a wide range of organisms, from humans to yeast. Studies showed that SRPKs can regulate the nuclear import of SR proteins in cytoplasm, and regulate the sub-localization of SR proteins in the nucleus. But no nuclear localization signal (NLS) of SRPKs was found. We isolated an SRPK-like protein PSRPK (GenBank accession No. DQ140379) from Physarum polycephalum previously, and identified a NLS of PSRPK in this study. We carried out a thorough molecular dissection of the different domains of the PSRPK protein involved in its nuclear localization. By truncation of PSRPK protein, deletion of and single amino acid substitution in a putative NLS and transfection of mammalian cells, we observed the distribution of PSRPK fluorescent fusion protein in mammalian cells using confocal microscopy and found that the protein was mainly accumulated in the nucleus; this indicated that the motif contained a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Further investigation with truncated PSPRK peptides showed that the NLS (318PKKGDKYDKTD328) was localized in the alkaline Omega-loop of a helix-loop-helix motif (HLHM) of the C-terminal conserved domain. If the 318PKKGDK322 sequence was deleted from the loop or K320 was mutated to T320, the PSRPK fluorescent fusion protein could not enter and accumulate in the nucleus. This study demonstrated that the 318PKKGDKYDKTD328 peptides localized in the C-terminal conserved domain of PSRPK with the Omega-loop structure could play a crucial role in the NLS function of PSRPK.

  10. Lysine 271 but not lysine 210 of XRCC4 is required for the nuclear localization of XRCC4 and DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Mikoto; Wanotayan, Rujira; Liu, Sicheng; Imamichi, Shoji; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-06-12

    XRCC4 and DNA Ligase IV (LIG4) cooperate to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). However, it is not fully understood how these proteins are localized to the nucleus. Here we created XRCC4(K271R) mutant, as Lys271 lies within the putative nuclear localization signal (NLS), and XRCC4(K210R) mutant, as Lys210 was reported to undergo SUMOylation, implicated in the nuclear localization of XRCC4. Wild-type and mutated XRCC4 with EGFP tag were introduced into HeLa cell, in which endogenous XRCC4 had been knocked down using siRNA directed to 3'-untranslated region, and tested for the nuclear localization function by fluorescence microscopy. XRCC4(K271R) was defective in the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4, whereas XRCC4(K210R) was competent for the nuclear localization with LIG4. To examine DSB repair function, wild-type and mutated XRCC4 were introduced into XRCC4-deficient M10. M10-XRCC4(K271R), but not M10-XRCC4(K210R), showed significantly reduced surviving fraction after 2 Gy γ-ray irradiation as compared to M10-XRCC4(WT). The number of γ-H2AX foci remaining 2 h after 2 Gy γ-ray irradiation was significantly greater in M10-XRCC4(K271R) than in M10-XRCC4(WT), whereas it was only marginally increased in M10-XRCC4(K210R) as compared to M10-XRCC4(WT). The present results collectively indicated that Lys271, but not Lys210, of XRCC4 is required for the nuclear localization of XRCC4 and LIG4 and that the nuclear localizing ability is essential for DSB repair function of XRCC4.

  11. Regulation of expanded polyglutamine protein aggregation and nuclear localization by the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Diamond, M I; Robinson, M R; Yamamoto, K R

    2000-01-18

    Spinobulbar muscular atrophy and Huntington's disease are caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor and huntingtin, respectively, and their pathogenesis has been associated with abnormal nuclear localization and aggregation of truncated forms of these proteins. Here we show, in diverse cell types, that glucocorticoids can up- or down-modulate aggregation and nuclear localization of expanded polyglutamine polypeptides derived from the androgen receptor and huntingtin through specific regulation of gene expression. Wild-type glucocorticoid receptor (GR), as well as C-terminal deletion derivatives, suppressed the aggregation and nuclear localization of these polypeptides, whereas mutations within the DNA binding domain and N terminus of GR abolished this activity. Surprisingly, deletion of a transcriptional regulatory domain within the GR N terminus markedly increased aggregation and nuclear localization of the expanded polyglutamine proteins. Thus, aggregation and nuclear localization of expanded polyglutamine proteins are regulated cellular processes that can be modulated by a well-characterized transcriptional regulator, the GR. Our findings suggest approaches to study the molecular pathogenesis and selective neuronal degeneration of polyglutamine expansion diseases.

  12. Regulation of expanded polyglutamine protein aggregation and nuclear localization by the glucocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Marc I.; Robinson, Melissa R.; Yamamoto, Keith R.

    2000-01-01

    Spinobulbar muscular atrophy and Huntington's disease are caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor and huntingtin, respectively, and their pathogenesis has been associated with abnormal nuclear localization and aggregation of truncated forms of these proteins. Here we show, in diverse cell types, that glucocorticoids can up- or down-modulate aggregation and nuclear localization of expanded polyglutamine polypeptides derived from the androgen receptor and huntingtin through specific regulation of gene expression. Wild-type glucocorticoid receptor (GR), as well as C-terminal deletion derivatives, suppressed the aggregation and nuclear localization of these polypeptides, whereas mutations within the DNA binding domain and N terminus of GR abolished this activity. Surprisingly, deletion of a transcriptional regulatory domain within the GR N terminus markedly increased aggregation and nuclear localization of the expanded polyglutamine proteins. Thus, aggregation and nuclear localization of expanded polyglutamine proteins are regulated cellular processes that can be modulated by a well-characterized transcriptional regulator, the GR. Our findings suggest approaches to study the molecular pathogenesis and selective neuronal degeneration of polyglutamine expansion diseases. PMID:10639135

  13. Nanotopographical Modulation of Cell Function through Nuclear Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Bruce, Allison; Mezan, Ryan; Kadiyala, Anand; Wang, Liying; Dawson, Jeremy; Rojanasakul, Yon; Yang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Although nanotopography has been shown to be a potent modulator of cell behavior, it is unclear how the nanotopographical cue, through focal adhesions, affects the nucleus, eventually influencing cell phenotype and function. Thus, current methods to apply nanotopography to regulate cell behavior are basically empirical. We, herein, engineered nanotopographies of various shapes (gratings and pillars) and dimensions (feature size, spacing and height), and thoroughly investigated cell spreading, focal adhesion organization and nuclear deformation of human primary fibroblasts as the model cell grown on the nanotopographies. We examined the correlation between nuclear deformation and cell functions such as cell proliferation, transfection and extracellular matrix protein type I collagen production. It was found that the nanoscale gratings and pillars could facilitate focal adhesion elongation by providing anchoring sites, and the nanogratings could orient focal adhesions and nuclei along the nanograting direction, depending on not only the feature size but also the spacing of the nanogratings. Compared with continuous nanogratings, discrete nanopillars tended to disrupt the formation and growth of focal adhesions and thus had less profound effects on nuclear deformation. Notably, nuclear volume could be effectively modulated by the height of nanotopography. Further, we demonstrated that cell proliferation, transfection, and type I collagen production were strongly associated with the nuclear volume, indicating that the nucleus serves as a critical mechanosensor for cell regulation. Our study delineated the relationships between focal adhesions, nucleus and cell function and highlighted that the nanotopography could regulate cell phenotype and function by modulating nuclear deformation. This study provides insight into the rational design of nanotopography for new biomaterials and the cell–substrate interfaces of implants and medical devices. PMID:26844365

  14. Localization of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Babakhanian, Karlo; Bendayan, Moise; Bendayan, Reina . E-mail: r.bendayan@utoronto.ca

    2007-09-21

    P-Glycoprotein is a plasma membrane drug efflux protein implicated in extrusion of cytotoxic compounds out of a cell. There is now evidence that suggests expression of this transporter at several subcellular sites, including the nucleus, mitochondria, and Golgi apparatus. This study investigated the localization and expression of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear membrane of rat brain microvessel endothelial (RBE4) and microglial (MLS-9) cell lines. Immunocytochemistry at the light and electron microscope levels using P-glycoprotein monoclonals antibodies demonstrated the localization of the protein at the nuclear envelope of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. Western blot analysis revealed a single band of 170-kDa in purified nuclear membranes prepared from isolated nuclei of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. These findings indicate that P-glycoprotein is expressed at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells and suggest a role in multidrug resistance at this subcellular site.

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW: Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevil, Stephen F.

    2006-08-01

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications.

  16. Goal Direction and Effectiveness, Emotional Maturity, and Nuclear Family Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klever, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Differentiation of self, a cornerstone concept in Bowen theory, has a profound influence over time on the functioning of the individual and his or her family unit. This 5-year longitudinal study tested this hypothesis with 50 developing nuclear families. The dimensions of differentiation of self that were examined were goal direction and…

  17. Goal Direction and Effectiveness, Emotional Maturity, and Nuclear Family Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klever, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Differentiation of self, a cornerstone concept in Bowen theory, has a profound influence over time on the functioning of the individual and his or her family unit. This 5-year longitudinal study tested this hypothesis with 50 developing nuclear families. The dimensions of differentiation of self that were examined were goal direction and…

  18. Functional renormalization group studies of nuclear and neutron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, Matthias; Weise, Wolfram

    2017-03-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) methods applied to calculations of isospin-symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter as well as neutron matter are reviewed. The approach is based on a chiral Lagrangian expressed in terms of nucleon and meson degrees of freedom as appropriate for the hadronic phase of QCD with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry. Fluctuations beyond mean-field approximation are treated solving Wetterich's FRG flow equations. Nuclear thermodynamics and the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition are investigated in detail, both in symmetric matter and as a function of the proton fraction in asymmetric matter. The equations of state at zero temperature of symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter are found to be in good agreement with advanced ab-initio many-body computations. Contacts with perturbative many-body approaches (in-medium chiral perturbation theory) are discussed. As an interesting test case, the density dependence of the pion mass in the medium is investigated. The question of chiral symmetry restoration in nuclear and neutron matter is addressed. A stabilization of the phase with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry is found to persist up to high baryon densities once fluctuations beyond mean-field are included. Neutron star matter including beta equilibrium is discussed under the aspect of the constraints imposed by the existence of two-solar-mass neutron stars.

  19. Towards reconciling structure and function in the nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Aebi, Ueli; Fahrenkrog, Birthe

    2008-01-01

    The spatial separation between the cytoplasm and the cell nucleus necessitates the continuous exchange of macromolecular cargo across the double-membraned nuclear envelope. Being the only passageway in and out of the nucleus, the nuclear pore complex (NPC) has the principal function of regulating the high throughput of nucleocytoplasmic transport in a highly selective manner so as to maintain cellular order and function. Here, we present a retrospective review of the evidence that has led to the current understanding of both NPC structure and function. Looking towards the future, we contemplate on how various outstanding effects and nanoscopic characteristics ought to be addressed, with the goal of reconciling structure and function into a single unified picture of the NPC. PMID:18228033

  20. Nuclear AURKA acquires kinase-independent transactivating function to enhance breast cancer stem cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Feimeng; Yue, Caifeng; Li, Guohui; He, Bin; Cheng, Wei; Wang, Xi; Yan, Min; Long, Zijie; Qiu, Wanshou; Yuan, Zhongyu; Xu, Jie; Liu, Bing; Shi, Qian; Lam, Eric W.-F.; Hung, Mien-Chie; Liu, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Centrosome-localized mitotic Aurora kinase A (AURKA) facilitates G2/M events. Here we show that AURKA translocates to the nucleus and causes distinct oncogenic properties in malignant cells by enhancing breast cancer stem cell (BCSC) phenotype. Unexpectedly, this function is independent of its kinase activity. Instead, AURKA preferentially interacts with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) in the nucleus and acts as a transcription factor in a complex that induces a shift in MYC promoter usage and activates the MYC promoter. Blocking AURKA nuclear localization inhibits this newly discovered transactivating function of AURKA, sensitizing resistant BCSC to kinase inhibition. These findings identify a previously unknown oncogenic property of the spatially deregulated AURKA in tumorigenesis and provide a potential therapeutic opportunity to overcome kinase inhibitor resistance. PMID:26782714

  1. Characterization of the bipartite nuclear localization signal of protein LANA2 from Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Fontela, Cesar; Rodríguez, Estefanía; Nombela, Cesar; Arroyo, Javier; Rivas, Carmen

    2003-01-01

    LANA2 is a nuclear latent protein detected exclusively in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-infected B cells. The protein inhibits p53-dependent transactivation and apoptosis, suggesting an important role in the transforming activity of the virus. To explore the molecular mechanisms of its nuclear localization, fusion proteins of green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and deletion constructs of LANA2 were expressed in HeLa cells. Only the fragment comprising amino acid residues 355-440 of LANA2 localized in the cell nucleus. This fragment contains two closely located basic domains and forms a putative bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). The putative LANA2 NLS was able to target EGFP to the nucleus consistently. Site-directed mutation analyses demonstrated that LANA2 contains a functional bipartite NLS between amino acid positions 367 and 384. In addition, analysis of cells transfected with a cytoplasmic LANA2 mutant revealed that an appropriate subcellular localization may be crucial to regulate p53 activity. PMID:12767255

  2. The N-terminus of porcine circovirus type 2 replication protein is required for nuclear localization and ori binding activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.-L.; Chien, M.-S.; Du, Y.-W.; Wu, P.-C.; Huang Chienjin

    2009-02-20

    Porcine circovirus type 2 possesses a circular, single-stranded DNA genome that requires the replication protein (Rep) for virus replication. To characterize the DNA binding potential and the significant region that confers the nuclear localization of the Rep protein, the defined coding regions of rep gene were cloned and expressed. All of the recombinant proteins except for the N-terminal 110 residues deletion mutant could bind to the double-stranded minimal binding site of replication origin (ori). In addition, the N-terminal deletion mutant lacking 110 residues exhibited mainly cytoplasmic staining in the transfected cells in contrast to the others, which localized dominantly in the nucleus, suggesting that this N-terminal domain is essential for nuclear localization. Furthermore, a series of green fluorescence proteins (GFP) containing potential nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences were tested for their cellular distribution. The ability of the utmost 20 residues of the N-terminal region to target the GFP to the nucleus confirmed its role as a functional NLS.

  3. Lysine 271 but not lysine 210 of XRCC4 is required for the nuclear localization of XRCC4 and DNA ligase IV

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuchi, Mikoto; Wanotayan, Rujira; Liu, Sicheng; Imamichi, Shoji; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-06-12

    XRCC4 and DNA Ligase IV (LIG4) cooperate to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). However, it is not fully understood how these proteins are localized to the nucleus. Here we created XRCC4{sup K271R} mutant, as Lys271 lies within the putative nuclear localization signal (NLS), and XRCC4{sup K210R} mutant, as Lys210 was reported to undergo SUMOylation, implicated in the nuclear localization of XRCC4. Wild-type and mutated XRCC4 with EGFP tag were introduced into HeLa cell, in which endogenous XRCC4 had been knocked down using siRNA directed to 3′-untranslated region, and tested for the nuclear localization function by fluorescence microscopy. XRCC4{sup K271R} was defective in the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4, whereas XRCC4{sup K210R} was competent for the nuclear localization with LIG4. To examine DSB repair function, wild-type and mutated XRCC4 were introduced into XRCC4-deficient M10. M10-XRCC4{sup K271R}, but not M10-XRCC4{sup K210R}, showed significantly reduced surviving fraction after 2 Gy γ-ray irradiation as compared to M10-XRCC4{sup WT}. The number of γ-H2AX foci remaining 2 h after 2 Gy γ-ray irradiation was significantly greater in M10-XRCC4{sup K271R} than in M10-XRCC4{sup WT}, whereas it was only marginally increased in M10-XRCC4{sup K210R} as compared to M10-XRCC4{sup WT}. The present results collectively indicated that Lys271, but not Lys210, of XRCC4 is required for the nuclear localization of XRCC4 and LIG4 and that the nuclear localizing ability is essential for DSB repair function of XRCC4. - Highlights: • XRCC4{sup K271R} is defective in the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4. • XRCC4{sup K210R} is competent for the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4. • XRCC4{sup K271R} is deficient in DSB repair function. • XRCC4{sup K210R} is mostly normal in DSB repair function.

  4. Cell density-dependent nuclear/cytoplasmic localization of NORPEG (RAI14) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kutty, R. Krishnan . E-mail: kuttyk@nei.nih.gov; Chen, Shanyi; Samuel, William; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Duncan, Todd; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Fariss, Robert N.; Carper, Deborah; Jaworski, Cynthia; Wiggert, Barbara

    2006-07-14

    NORPEG (RAI14), a developmentally regulated gene induced by retinoic acid, encodes a 980 amino acid (aa) residue protein containing six ankyrin repeats and a long coiled-coil domain [Kutty et al., J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001), pp. 2831-2840]. We have expressed aa residues 1-287 of NORPEG and used the recombinant protein to produce an anti-NORPEG polyclonal antibody. Confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed that the subcellular localization of NORPEG in retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells varies with cell density, with predominantly nuclear localization in nonconfluent cells, but a cytoplasmic localization, reminiscent of cytoskeleton, in confluent cultures. Interestingly, an evolutionarily conserved putative monopartite nuclear localization signal (P{sup 27}KKRKAP{sup 276}) was identified by analyzing the sequences of NORPEG and its orthologs. GFP-NORPEG (2-287 aa), a fusion protein containing this signal, was indeed localized to nuclei when expressed in ARPE-19 or COS-7 cells. Deletion and mutation analysis indicated that the identified nuclear localization sequence is indispensable for nuclear targeting.

  5. Spin Density Matrices for Nuclear Density Functionals with Parity Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Bruce; Giraud, Bertrand

    2010-11-01

    Within the context of the radial density functional [1], we apply the spin density matrix (SDM) used in atomic and molecular physics [2] to nuclear physics. The vector part of the SDM defines a ``hedgehog'' situation, which exists only if nuclear states contain some amount of parity violation. Thus, looking for the vector profile of the SDM could be used as a test for parity violation in nuclei. The difference between the scalar profile and the vector profile of the SDM will be illustrated by a toy model. [4pt] [1] B. G. Giraud, Phys. Rev. C 78, 014307 (2008).[0pt] [2] A. Goerling, Phys. Rev. A 47, 2783 (1993).

  6. NUCLEAR MODIFICATION TO PARTON DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS AND PARTON SATURATION.

    SciTech Connect

    QIU, J.-W.

    2006-11-14

    We introduce a generalized definition of parton distribution functions (PDFs) for a more consistent all-order treatment of power corrections. We present a new set of modified DGLAP evolution equations for nuclear PDFs, and show that the resummed {alpha}{sub s}A{sup 1/3}/Q{sup 2}-type of leading nuclear size enhanced power corrections significantly slow down the growth of gluon density at small-x. We discuss the relation between the calculated power corrections and the saturation phenomena.

  7. Characterization of a nuclear localization signal in the C-terminus of the adeno-associated virus Rep68/78 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cassell, Geoffrey D.; Weitzman, Matthew D. . E-mail: weitzman@salk.edu

    2004-10-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) replicates in the nucleus of infected cells, and therefore multiple nuclear import events are required for productive infection. We analyzed nuclear import of the viral Rep proteins and characterized a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the C-terminus. We demonstrate that basic residues in this region constitute an NLS that is transferable and mediates interaction with the nuclear import receptor importin {alpha} in vitro. Mutant Rep proteins are predominantly cytoplasmic and are severely compromised for interactions with importin {alpha}, but retain their enzymatic functions in vitro. Interestingly, mutations of the NLS had significantly less effect on importin {alpha} interaction and replication in the context of Rep78 than when incorporated into the Rep68 protein. Together, our results demonstrate that a bipartite NLS exists in the shared part of Rep68 and Rep78, and suggest that an alternate entry mechanism may also contribute to nuclear localization of the Rep78 protein.

  8. The tight junction protein Z O-2 has several functional nuclear export signals

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Mariscal, Lorenza . E-mail: lorenza@fisio.cinvestav.mx; Ponce, Arturo; Alarcon, Lourdes; Jaramillo, Blanca Estela

    2006-10-15

    The tight junction (TJ) protein ZO-2 changes its subcellular distribution according to the state of confluency of the culture. Thus in confluent monolayers, it localizes at the TJ region whereas in sparse cultures it concentrates at the nucleus. The canine sequence of ZO-2 displays four putative nuclear export signals (NES), two at the second PDZ domain (NES-0 and NES-1) and the rest at the GK region (NES-2 and NES-3). The functionality of NES-0 and NES-3 was unknown, hence here we have explored it with a nuclear export assay, injecting into the nucleus of MDCK cells peptides corresponding to the ZO-2 NES sequences chemically coupled to ovalbumin. We show that both NES-0 and NES-3 are functional and sensitive to leptomycin B. We also demonstrate that NES-1, previously characterized as a non functional NES, is rendered capable of nuclear export upon the acquisition of a negative charge at its Ser369 residue. Experiments performed injecting at the nucleus WT and mutated ZO-2-GST fusion proteins revealed the need of both NES-0 and NES-1, and NES-2 and NES-3 for attaining an efficient nuclear exit of the respective amino and middle segments of ZO-2. Moreover, the transfection of MDCK cells with full-length ZO-2 revealed that the mutation of any of the NES present in the molecule was sufficient to induce nuclear accumulation of the protein.

  9. Pseudo-local Theories: A Functional Class Proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taronna, Massimo

    In this article, using the language of jet space, we propose a functional class space for pseudo-local functionals. We test this functional class proposal in a number of examples ranging from string-field-theory to AdS/CFT dualities. Implications of the locality proposal at the quartic order are also discussed.

  10. Enhancing the effectiveness of androgen deprivation in prostate cancer by inducing Filamin A nuclear localization

    PubMed Central

    Mooso, Benjamin A.; Vinall, Ruth L.; Tepper, Clifford G.; Savoy, Rosalinda M.; Cheung, Jean P.; Singh, Sheetal; Siddiqui, Salma; Wang, Yu; Bedolla, Roble G.; Martinez, Anthony; Mudryj, Maria; Kung, Hsing-Jien; deVere White, Ralph W.; Ghosh, Paramita M.

    2013-01-01

    Since prostate cancer (CaP) is regulated by androgen receptor (AR) activity, metastatic CaP is treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Despite initial response, patients on ADT eventually progress to castration-resistant CaP (CRPC), which is currently incurable. We previously showed that cleavage of the 280kDa structural protein Filamin A (FlnA) to a 90kDa fragment, and nuclear localization of the cleaved product, sensitized CRPC cells to ADT. Hence, treatment promoting FlnA nuclear localization would enhance androgen responsiveness. Here, we show that FlnA nuclear localization induced apoptosis in CRPC cells during ADT, identifying it as a treatment tool in advanced CaP. Significantly, the natural product genistein-combined-polysaccharide (GCP) had a similar effect. Investigation of the mechanism of GCP-induced apoptosis showed that GCP induced FlnA cleavage and nuclear localization, and that apoptosis resulting from GCP treatment was mediated by FlnA nuclear localization. Two main components of GCP are genistein and daidzein: the ability of GCP to induce G2 arrest was due to genistein whereas sensitivity to ADT stemmed from daidzein; hence both were needed to mediate GCP's effects. FlnA cleavage is regulated by its phosphorylation; we show that ADT enhanced FlnA phosphorylation, which prevented its cleavage, whereas GCP inhibited FlnA phosphorylation, thereby sensitizing CaP cells to ADT. In a mouse model of CaP recurrence, GCP, but not vehicle, impeded relapse following castration; indicating that GCP, when administered with ADT, interrupted the development of CRPC. These results demonstrate the efficacy of GCP in promoting FlnA nuclear localization and enhancing androgen responsiveness in CaP. PMID:22993077

  11. Enhancing the effectiveness of androgen deprivation in prostate cancer by inducing Filamin A nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Mooso, Benjamin A; Vinall, Ruth L; Tepper, Clifford G; Savoy, Rosalinda M; Cheung, Jean P; Singh, Sheetal; Siddiqui, Salma; Wang, Yu; Bedolla, Roble G; Martinez, Anthony; Mudryj, Maria; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Devere White, Ralph W; Ghosh, Paramita M

    2012-12-01

    As prostate cancer (CaP) is regulated by androgen receptor (AR) activity, metastatic CaP is treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Despite initial response, patients on ADT eventually progress to castration-resistant CaP (CRPC), which is currently incurable. We previously showed that cleavage of the 280 kDa structural protein Filamin A (FlnA) to a 90 kDa fragment, and nuclear localization of the cleaved product, sensitized CRPC cells to ADT. Hence, treatment promoting FlnA nuclear localization would enhance androgen responsiveness. Here, we show that FlnA nuclear localization induced apoptosis in CRPC cells during ADT, identifying it as a treatment tool in advanced CaP. Significantly, the natural product genistein combined polysaccharide (GCP) had a similar effect. Investigation of the mechanism of GCP-induced apoptosis showed that GCP induced FlnA cleavage and nuclear localization and that apoptosis resulting from GCP treatment was mediated by FlnA nuclear localization. Two main components of GCP are genistein and daidzein: the ability of GCP to induce G2 arrest was due to genistein whereas sensitivity to ADT stemmed from daidzein; hence, both were needed to mediate GCP's effects. FlnA cleavage is regulated by its phosphorylation; we show that ADT enhanced FlnA phosphorylation, which prevented its cleavage, whereas GCP inhibited FlnA phosphorylation, thereby sensitizing CaP cells to ADT. In a mouse model of CaP recurrence, GCP, but not vehicle, impeded relapse following castration, indicating that GCP, when administered with ADT, interrupted the development of CRPC. These results demonstrate the efficacy of GCP in promoting FlnA nuclear localization and enhancing androgen responsiveness in CaP.

  12. Building A Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (UNEDF)

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Carlson; Dick Furnstahl; Mihai Horoi; Rusty Lusk; Witek Nazarewicz; Esmond Ng; Ian Thompson; James Vary

    2012-09-30

    During the period of Dec. 1 2006 - Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: first, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties; second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data; third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory. The main physics areas of UNEDF, defined at the beginning of the project, were: ab initio structure; ab initio functionals; DFT applications; DFT extensions; reactions.

  13. Remote Control of Gene Function by Local Translation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hosung; Gkogkas, Christos G.; Sonenberg, Nahum; Holt, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    The subcellular position of a protein is a key determinant of its function. Mounting evidence indicates that RNA localization, where specific mRNAs are transported subcellularly and subsequently translated in response to localized signals, is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to control protein localization. On-site synthesis confers novel signaling properties to a protein and helps to maintain local proteome homeostasis. Local translation plays particularly important roles in distal neuronal compartments, and dysregulated RNA localization and translation cause defects in neuronal wiring and survival. Here, we discuss key findings in this area and possible implications of this adaptable and swift mechanism for spatial control of gene function. PMID:24679524

  14. [Immunochemical study of nuclear matrix proteins localization in the structure of perinucleolar chromatin].

    PubMed

    Murasheva, M I; Chentsov, Iu S

    2014-01-01

    Immunofluorescence labeling of proteins with molecular mass of 27, 38, 40, 50 and 65 kDa obtained from serum of patients with autoimmune disease demonstrated different patterns (small clusters or granules) in interphase nuclei of pig kidney cells. It was remarkable that there was no staining inside the nucleoli, but the proteins immunoreactivity was detected around them in the regions of perinucleolar chromatin. Moreover, expression of nucleolar proteins, such as fibrillarin and B23, was found only in nucleoli. After extraction of DNA, PNA and histones, the proteins with molecular mass 27 and 38 kDa were found in the periphery of residual nucleoli, and proteins with molecular mass 40, 50 and 65 kDa had similar localization and were also present in karyoplasm of cells as small clusters. According to our data, nucleolar protein, fibrillarin, was distributed regularly throughout the whole volume of residual nucleoli. At the same time, B23 protein was revealed only at their periphery, where perinucleolar chromatin had localized before treatment. Thus, it has been revealed that the proteins of nuclear matrix with molecular mass 27, 38, 40, 50 and 65 kDa, as well as nucleolar protein B23 are the parts of perinucleolar chromatin, which could be considered as special chromosomal domain associated with the functioning of the nucleolus.

  15. Dynamic localization of tripartite motif-containing 22 in nuclear and nucleolar bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, Gayathri; Sun, Yang; Tan, Si Kee; Lin, Valerie C.L.

    2009-05-01

    Tripartite motif-containing 22 (TRIM22) exhibits antiviral and growth inhibitory properties, but there has been no study on the localization and dynamics of the endogenous TRIM22 protein. We report here that TRIM22 is dramatically induced by progesterone in MDA-MB-231-derived ABC28 cells and T47D cells. This induction was associated with an increase in TRIM22 nuclear bodies (NB), and an even more prominent increase in nucleolar TRIM22 bodies. Distinct endogenous TRIM22 NB were also demonstrated in several other cell lines including MCF7 and HeLa cells. These TRIM22 NB resemble Cajal bodies, co-localized with these structures and co-immunoprecipitated with p80-coilin. However, IFN{gamma}-induced TRIM22 in HeLa and MCF7 cells did not form NB, implying the forms and distribution of TRIM22 are regulated by specific cellular signals. This notion is also supported by the observation that TRIM22 NB undergoes dynamic cell-cycle dependent changes in distribution such that TRIM22 NB started to form in early G0/G1 but became dispersed in the S-phase. In light of its potential antiviral and antitumor properties, the findings here provide an interesting gateway to study the relationship between the different forms and functions of TRIM22.

  16. Leukocyte protease binding to nucleic acids promotes nuclear localization and cleavage of nucleic acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Marshall P; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron J; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein targets, whereas adding RNA to recombinant RNA binding protein substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Preincubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G. During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps, which bind NE and cathepsin G. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and neutrophil extracellular traps in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high-affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation.

  17. Leukocyte Protease Binding to Nucleic Acids Promotes Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of Nucleic Acid Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Marshall P.; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein (RBP) targets, while adding RNA to recombinant RBP substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Pre-incubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G (CATG). During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which bind NE and CATG. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and NETs in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation. PMID:24771851

  18. The Local Hospital: Functions, Advantages and Difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Wilbush, Joel

    1974-01-01

    The local hospital, where patients can be investigated and treated in their own milieu, affords unique opportunities for managing chronic diseases, easing social pressures and educating patients. Though local country hospitals appear to be a vital social institution, preferred by both patients and staff, they are in danger of disappearing. This is primarily due to shortage of suitable staff, both medical and nursing, reinforced by the accent on highly specialized treatment, which is the present growing trend in medicine. This unfortunate trend may result in irreparable damage to overall health care delivery, which must integrate all factors - physical, psychological and social. PMID:20469088

  19. Cardiac nuclear receptors: architects of mitochondrial structure and function.

    PubMed

    Vega, Rick B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2017-04-03

    The adult heart is uniquely designed and equipped to provide a continuous supply of energy in the form of ATP to support persistent contractile function. This high-capacity energy transduction system is the result of a remarkable surge in mitochondrial biogenesis and maturation during the fetal-to-adult transition in cardiac development. Substantial evidence indicates that nuclear receptor signaling is integral to dynamic changes in the cardiac mitochondrial phenotype in response to developmental cues, in response to diverse postnatal physiologic conditions, and in disease states such as heart failure. A subset of cardiac-enriched nuclear receptors serve to match mitochondrial fuel preferences and capacity for ATP production with changing energy demands of the heart. In this Review, we describe the role of specific nuclear receptors and their coregulators in the dynamic control of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism in the normal and diseased heart.

  20. Importin β2 Mediates the Spatio-temporal Regulation of Anillin through a Noncanonical Nuclear Localization Signal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Anan; Akhshi, Tara K; Lavoie, Brigitte D; Wilde, Andrew

    2015-05-22

    The compartmentalization of cell cycle regulators is a common mechanism to ensure the precise temporal control of key cell cycle events. For instance, many mitotic spindle assembly factors are known to be sequestered in the nucleus prior to mitotic onset. Similarly, the essential cytokinetic factor anillin, which functions at the cell membrane to promote the physical separation of daughter cells at the end of mitosis, is sequestered in the nucleus during interphase. To address the mechanism and role of anillin targeting to the nucleus in interphase, we identified the nuclear targeting motif. Here, we show that anillin is targeted to the nucleus by importin β2 in a Ran-dependent manner through an atypical basic patch PY nuclear localization signal motif. We show that although importin β2 binding does not regulate anillin's function in mitosis, it is required to prevent the cytosolic accumulation of anillin, which disrupts cellular architecture during interphase. The nuclear sequestration of anillin during interphase serves to restrict anillin's function at the cell membrane to mitosis and allows anillin to be rapidly available when the nuclear envelope breaks down to remodel the cellular architecture necessary for successful cell division.

  1. Many-body Green functions in nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speth, J.; Lyutorovich, N.

    Many-body Green functions are a very efficient formulation of the many-body problem. We review the application of this method to nuclear physics problems. The formulas which can be derived are of general applicability, e.g., in self-consistent as well as in nonself-consistent calculations. With the help of the Landau renormalization, one obtains relations without any approximations. This allows to apply conservation laws which lead to important general relations. We investigate the one-body and two-body Green functions as well as the three-body Green function and discuss their connection to nuclear observables. The generalization to systems with pair correlations are also presented. Numerical examples are compared with experimental data.

  2. "Sloppy" nuclear energy density functionals. II. Finite nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikšić, T.; Imbrišak, M.; Vretenar, D.

    2017-05-01

    A study of parameter sensitivity of nuclear energy density functionals, initiated in the first part of this work [Nikšić and Vretenar, Phys. Rev. C 94, 024333 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevC.94.024333], is extended by the inclusion of data on ground-state properties of finite nuclei in the application of the manifold boundary approximation method (MBAM). Density functionals used in self-consistent mean-field calculations, and nuclear structure models based on them, are generally "sloppy" and exhibit an exponential range of sensitivity to parameter variations. Concepts of information geometry are used to identify the presence of effective functionals of lower dimension in parameter space associated with parameter combinations that can be tightly constrained by data. The MBAM is used in an iterative procedure that systematically reduces the complexity and dimension of parameter space of a sloppy functional, with properties of nuclear matter and data on finite nuclei determining not only the values of model parameters but also the optimal functional form of the density dependence.

  3. Living with nuclear power: A Q-method study of local community perceptions.

    PubMed

    Venables, Dan; Pidgeon, Nick; Simmons, Peter; Henwood, Karen; Parkhill, Karen

    2009-08-01

    The issue of new nuclear power is once again high up on the public policy agenda in many countries, and candidate sites for new civilian stations are likely to include those that have existing nuclear facilities. A common assumption is that existing nuclear communities will be more accepting of new build because of the direct economic and other benefits nuclear power already makes to a local area. Surprisingly, there is a dearth of contemporary data on perceptions of the risks, benefits, and values associated with nuclear power within such communities. This study uses Q-methodology to investigate the perspectives on living with nuclear risk among people (n = 84) drawn from communities near to two nuclear power stations in the United Kingdom. Both stations, at Bradwell-on-Sea and Oldbury-on-Severn, had been in operation for over 40 years. The Q-analysis identified four main perspectives, or points of view, accounting for 53% of total variance. These were interpreted as: Beneficial and Safe; Threat and Distrust; Reluctant Acceptance; and There's No Point Worrying. We conclude that the "landscape of beliefs" about nuclear power in such communities is both subtle and complex, avoiding simplistic bipolar dichotomies such as "for" or "against," and that there is a need for extensive and meaningful dialogue with such communities over any new build plans. The usefulness of Q-methodology for investigating the ways in which people live with risk is highlighted, as are the implications of the results for theories of risk and trust.

  4. Local control of nuclear calcium signaling in cardiac myocytes by perinuclear microdomains of sarcolemmal insulin-like growth factor 1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Cristian; Vicencio, Jose M; Estrada, Manuel; Lin, Yingbo; Rocco, Paola; Rebellato, Paola; Munoz, Juan P; Garcia-Prieto, Jaime; Quest, Andrew F G; Chiong, Mario; Davidson, Sean M; Bulatovic, Ivana; Grinnemo, Karl-Henrik; Larsson, Olle; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Uhlén, Per; Jaimovich, Enrique; Lavandero, Sergio

    2013-01-18

    The ability of a cell to independently regulate nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling is currently attributed to the differential distribution of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor channel isoforms in the nucleoplasmic versus the endoplasmic reticulum. In cardiac myocytes, T-tubules confer the necessary compartmentation of Ca(2+) signals, which allows sarcomere contraction in response to plasma membrane depolarization, but whether there is a similar structure tunneling extracellular stimulation to control nuclear Ca(2+) signals locally has not been explored. To study the role of perinuclear sarcolemma in selective nuclear Ca(2+) signaling. We report here that insulin-like growth factor 1 triggers a fast and independent nuclear Ca(2+) signal in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes, human embryonic cardiac myocytes, and adult rat cardiac myocytes. This fast and localized response is achieved by activation of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor signaling complexes present in perinuclear invaginations of the plasma membrane. The perinuclear insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor pool connects extracellular stimulation to local activation of nuclear Ca(2+) signaling and transcriptional upregulation through the perinuclear hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production, nuclear Ca(2+) release, and activation of the transcription factor myocyte-enhancing factor 2C. Genetically engineered Ca(2+) buffers--parvalbumin--with cytosolic or nuclear localization demonstrated that the nuclear Ca(2+) handling system is physically and functionally segregated from the cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling machinery. These data reveal the existence of an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent nuclear Ca(2+) toolkit located in direct apposition to the cell surface, which allows the local control of rapid and independent activation of nuclear Ca(2+) signaling in response to an extracellular ligand.

  5. Local representation of the electronic dielectric response function

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Deyu; Ge, Xiaochuan

    2015-12-11

    We present a local representation of the electronic dielectric response function, based on a spatial partition of the dielectric response into contributions from each occupied Wannier orbital using a generalized density functional perturbation theory. This procedure is fully ab initio, and therefore allows us to rigorously define local metrics, such as “bond polarizability,” on Wannier centers. We show that the locality of the bare response function is determined by the locality of three quantities: Wannier functions of the occupied manifold, the density matrix, and the Hamiltonian matrix. Furthermore, in systems with a gap, the bare dielectric response is exponentially localized,more » which supports the physical picture of the dielectric response function as a collection of interacting local responses that can be captured by a tight-binding model.« less

  6. Local representation of the electronic dielectric response function

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Deyu; Ge, Xiaochuan

    2015-12-11

    We present a local representation of the electronic dielectric response function, based on a spatial partition of the dielectric response into contributions from each occupied Wannier orbital using a generalized density functional perturbation theory. This procedure is fully ab initio, and therefore allows us to rigorously define local metrics, such as “bond polarizability,” on Wannier centers. We show that the locality of the bare response function is determined by the locality of three quantities: Wannier functions of the occupied manifold, the density matrix, and the Hamiltonian matrix. Furthermore, in systems with a gap, the bare dielectric response is exponentially localized, which supports the physical picture of the dielectric response function as a collection of interacting local responses that can be captured by a tight-binding model.

  7. Nuclear vs Cytoplasmic localization of Filamin A in Prostate Cancer: Immunohistochemical Correlation with Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bedolla, Roble G.; Wang, Yu; Asuncion, Alfredo; Chamie, Karim; Siddiqui, Salma; Mudryj, Maria M.; Prihoda, Thomas J.; Siddiqui, Javed; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Mehra, Rohit; deVereWhite, Ralph W.; Ghosh, Paramita M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We previously showed that nuclear localization of the actin-binding protein FilaminA (FlnA) corresponded to hormone-dependence in prostate cancer (Oncogene, 2007, 26:6061-6070). Intact FlnA (280kDa, cytoplasmic) cleaved to a 90kDa fragment which translocated to the nucleus in hormone-naïve cells, whereas in hormone-refractory cells, FlnA was phosphorylated, preventing its cleavage and nuclear translocation. We now examined whether FlnA localization determines a propensity to metastasis in advanced androgen independent prostate cancer. Experimental Design We examined, by immunohistochemistry, FlnA localization in paraffin-embedded human prostate tissue representing different stages of progression. Results were correlated with in vitro studies in a cell model of prostate cancer. Results Nuclear FlnA was significantly higher in benign prostate (0.6612±0.5888), PIN (0.6024±0.4620) and clinically localized cancers (0.69134±0.5686), compared to metastatic prostate cancers (0.3719±0.4992, p=0.0007). Cytoplasmic FlnA increased from benign prostate (0.0833±0.2677), PIN (0.1409±0.2293), localized cancers (0.3008±0.3762, p=0.0150), to metastases (0.7632±0.4414, p<0.00001). Logistic regression of metastatic vs non-metastatic tissue yielded the area-under-ROC curve as 0.67 for nuclear-FlnA, 0.79 for cytoplasmic-FlnA and 0.82 for both, indicating that metastasis correlates with cytoplasmic-to-nuclear translocation. In vitro studies showed that cytoplasmic localization of FlnA induced cell invasion whereas nuclear translocation of the protein inhibited it. FlnA dephosphorylation with the PKA inhibitor H-89 facilitated FlnA nuclear translocation, resulting in decreased invasiveness and AR transcriptional activity, and induced sensitivity to androgen withdrawal in hormone-refractory cells. Conclusions The data presented in this study indicate that in prostate cancer, metastasis correlates with cytoplasmic localization of FlnA and may be prevented by cleavage and

  8. Nuclear versus cytoplasmic localization of filamin A in prostate cancer: immunohistochemical correlation with metastases.

    PubMed

    Bedolla, Roble G; Wang, Yu; Asuncion, Alfredo; Chamie, Karim; Siddiqui, Salma; Mudryj, Maria M; Prihoda, Thomas J; Siddiqui, Javed; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Mehra, Rohit; de Vere White, Ralph W; Ghosh, Paramita M

    2009-02-01

    We previously showed that nuclear localization of the actin-binding protein, filamin A (FlnA), corresponded to hormone-dependence in prostate cancer. Intact FlnA (280 kDa, cytoplasmic) cleaved to a 90 kDa fragment which translocated to the nucleus in hormone-naïve cells, whereas in hormone-refractory cells, FlnA was phosphorylated, preventing its cleavage and nuclear translocation. We have examined whether FlnA localization determines a propensity to metastasis in advanced androgen-independent prostate cancer. We examined, by immunohistochemistry, FlnA localization in paraffin-embedded human prostate tissue representing different stages of progression. Results were correlated with in vitro studies in a cell model of prostate cancer. Nuclear FlnA was significantly higher in benign prostate (0.6612 +/- 0.5888), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN; 0.6024 +/- 0.4620), and clinically localized cancers (0.69134 +/- 0.5686) compared with metastatic prostate cancers (0.3719 +/- 0.4992, P = 0.0007). Cytoplasmic FlnA increased from benign prostate (0.0833 +/- 0.2677), PIN (0.1409 +/- 0.2293), localized cancers (0.3008 +/- 0.3762, P = 0.0150), to metastases (0.7632 +/- 0.4414, P < 0.00001). Logistic regression of metastatic versus nonmetastatic tissue yielded the area under the receiver operating curve as 0.67 for nuclear-FlnA, 0.79 for cytoplasmic-FlnA, and 0.82 for both, indicating that metastasis correlates with cytoplasmic to nuclear translocation. In vitro studies showed that cytoplasmic localization of FlnA induced cell invasion whereas nuclear translocation of the protein inhibited it. FlnA dephosphorylation with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 facilitated FlnA nuclear translocation, resulting in decreased invasiveness and AR transcriptional activity, and induced sensitivity to androgen withdrawal in hormone-refractory cells. The data presented in this study indicate that in prostate cancer, metastasis correlates with cytoplasmic localization of FlnA and may

  9. Mutations within the nuclear localization signal of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nucleocapsid protein attenuate virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Changhee; Hodgins, Douglas; Calvert, Jay G.; Welch, Siao-Kun W.; Jolie, Rika; Yoo, Dongwan . E-mail: dyoo@uoguelph.ca

    2006-03-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an RNA virus replicating in the cytoplasm, but the nucleocapsid (N) protein is specifically localized to the nucleus and nucleolus in virus-infected cells. A 'pat7' motif of 41-PGKK(N/S)KK has previously been identified in the N protein as the functional nuclear localization signal (NLS); however, the biological consequences of N protein nuclear localization are unknown. In the present study, the role of N protein nuclear localization during infection was investigated in pigs using an NLS-null mutant virus. When two lysines at 43 and 44 at the NLS locus were substituted to glycines, the modified NLS with 41-PGGGNKK restricted the N protein to the cytoplasm. This NLS-null mutation was introduced into a full-length infectious cDNA clone of PRRSV. Upon transfection of cells, the NLS-null full-length clone induced cytopathic effects and produced infectious progeny. The NLS-null virus grew to a titer 100-fold lower than that of wild-type virus. To examine the response to NLS-null PRRSV in the natural host, three groups of pigs, consisting of seven animals per group, were intranasally inoculated with wild-type, placebo, or NLS-null virus, and the animals were maintained for 4 weeks. The NLS-null-infected pigs had a significantly shorter mean duration of viremia than wild-type-infected pigs but developed significantly higher titers of neutralizing antibodies. Mutations occurred at the NLS locus in one pig during viremia, and four types of mutations were identified: 41-PGRGNKK, 41-PGGRNKK, and 41-PGRRNKK, and 41-PGKKSKK. Both wild-type and NLS-null viruses persisted in the tonsils for at least 4 weeks, and the NLS-null virus persisting in the tonsils was found to be mutated to either 41-PGRGNKK or 41-PGGRNKK in all pigs. No other mutation was found in the N gene. All types of reversions which occurred during viremia and persistence were able to translocate the mutated N proteins to the nucleus, indicating a

  10. Time-dependent density-functional description of nuclear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi; Matsuo, Masayuki; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2016-10-01

    The basic concepts and recent developments in the time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) for describing nuclear dynamics at low energy are presented. The symmetry breaking is inherent in nuclear energy density functionals, which provides a practical description of important correlations at the ground state. Properties of elementary modes of excitation are strongly influenced by the symmetry breaking and can be studied with TDDFT. In particular, a number of recent developments in the linear response calculation have demonstrated their usefulness in the description of collective modes of excitation in nuclei. Unrestricted real-time calculations have also become available in recent years, with new developments for quantitative description of nuclear collision phenomena. There are, however, limitations in the real-time approach; for instance, it cannot describe the many-body quantum tunneling. Thus, the quantum fluctuations associated with slow collective motions are explicitly treated assuming that time evolution of densities is determined by a few collective coordinates and momenta. The concept of collective submanifold is introduced in the phase space associated with the TDDFT and used to quantize the collective dynamics. Selected applications are presented to demonstrate the usefulness and quality of the new approaches. Finally, conceptual differences between nuclear and electronic TDDFT are discussed, with some recent applications to studies of electron dynamics in the linear response and under a strong laser field.

  11. Nanoscale invaginations of the nuclear envelope: Shedding new light on wormholes with elusive function.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Ingmar; Aires, Lina; Ries, Jonas; Vogel, Viola

    2017-07-07

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy have opened up new possibilities to investigate chromosomal and nuclear 3D organization on the nanoscale. We here discuss their potential for elucidating topographical details of the nuclear lamina. Single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) in combination with immunostainings of lamina proteins readily reveals tube-like invaginations with a diameter of 100-500 nm. Although these invaginations have been established as a frequent and general feature of interphase nuclei across different cell types, their formation mechanism and function have remained largely elusive. We critically review the current state of research, propose possible connections to lamina associated domains (LADs), and revisit the discussion about the potential role of these invaginations for accelerating mRNA nuclear export. Illustrative studies using 3D super-resolution imaging are shown and will be instrumental to decipher the physiological role of these nanoscale invaginations.

  12. SURFACE SYMMETRY ENERGY OF NUCLEAR ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONALS

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolov, N; Schunck, N; Nazarewicz, W; Bender, M; Pei, J

    2010-12-20

    We study the bulk deformation properties of the Skyrme nuclear energy density functionals. Following simple arguments based on the leptodermous expansion and liquid drop model, we apply the nuclear density functional theory to assess the role of the surface symmetry energy in nuclei. To this end, we validate the commonly used functional parametrizations against the data on excitation energies of superdeformed band-heads in Hg and Pb isotopes, and fission isomers in actinide nuclei. After subtracting shell effects, the results of our self-consistent calculations are consistent with macroscopic arguments and indicate that experimental data on strongly deformed configurations in neutron-rich nuclei are essential for optimizing future nuclear energy density functionals. The resulting survey provides a useful benchmark for further theoretical improvements. Unlike in nuclei close to the stability valley, whose macroscopic deformability hangs on the balance of surface and Coulomb terms, the deformability of neutron-rich nuclei strongly depends on the surface-symmetry energy; hence, its proper determination is crucial for the stability of deformed phases of the neutron-rich matter and description of fission rates for r-process nucleosynthesis.

  13. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Canister Storage Building Functions and Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    KLEM, M.J.

    2000-10-18

    In 1998, a major change in the technical strategy for managing Multi Canister Overpacks (MCO) while stored within the Canister Storage Building (CSB) occurred. The technical strategy is documented in Baseline Change Request (BCR) No. SNF-98-006, Simplified SNF Project Baseline (MCO Sealing) (FDH 1998). This BCR deleted the hot conditioning process initially adopted for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) as documented in WHC-SD-SNF-SP-005, Integrated Process Strategy for K Basins Spent Nuclear Fuel (WHC 199.5). In summary, MCOs containing Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from K Basins would be placed in interim storage following processing through the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) facility. With this change, the needs for the Hot Conditioning System (HCS) and inerting/pressure retaining capabilities of the CSB storage tubes and the MCO Handling Machine (MHM) were eliminated. Mechanical seals will be used on the MCOs prior to transport to the CSB. Covers will be welded on the MCOs for the final seal at the CSB. Approval of BCR No. SNF-98-006, imposed the need to review and update the CSB functions and requirements baseline documented herein including changing the document title to ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Canister Storage Building Functions and Requirements.'' This revision aligns the functions and requirements baseline with the CSB Simplified SNF Project Baseline (MCO Sealing). This document represents the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Subproject technical baseline. It establishes the functions and requirements baseline for the implementation of the CSB Subproject. The document is organized in eight sections. Sections 1.0 Introduction and 2.0 Overview provide brief introductions to the document and the CSB Subproject. Sections 3.0 Functions, 4.0 Requirements, 5.0 Architecture, and 6.0 Interfaces provide the data described by their titles. Section 7.0 Glossary lists the acronyms and defines the terms used in this document. Section 8.0 References lists the

  14. Optogenetic Control of Nuclear Protein Import in Living Cells Using Light-Inducible Nuclear Localization Signals (LINuS).

    PubMed

    Wehler, Pierre; Niopek, Dominik; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2016-06-02

    Many biological processes are regulated by the timely import of specific proteins into the nucleus. The ability to spatiotemporally control the nuclear import of proteins of interest therefore allows study of their role in a given biological process as well as controlling this process in space and time. The light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) was developed based on a natural plant photoreceptor that reversibly triggers the import of proteins of interest into the nucleus with blue light. Each LINuS is a small, genetically encoded domain that is fused to the protein of interest at the N or C terminus. These protocols describe how to carry out initial microscopy-based screening to assess which LINuS variant works best with a protein of interest. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Sorghum DW1 positively regulates brassinosteroid signaling by inhibiting the nuclear localization of BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 2.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Ko; Kawamura, Mayuko; Araki-Nakamura, Satoko; Fujimoto, Haruka; Ohmae-Shinohara, Kozue; Yamaguchi, Miki; Fujii, Akihiro; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Kasuga, Shigemitsu; Sazuka, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    Semi-dwarf traits have been widely introgressed into cereal crops to improve lodging resistance. In sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench), four major unlinked dwarfing genes, Dw1-Dw4, have been introduced to reduce plant height, and among them, Dw3 and Dw1 have been cloned. Dw3 encodes a gene involved in auxin transport, whereas, Dw1 was recently isolated and identified as a gene encoding a protein of unknown function. In this study, we show that DW1 is a novel component of brassinosteroid (BR) signaling. Sorghum possessing the mutated allele of Dw1 (dw1), showed similar phenotypes to rice BR-deficient mutants, such as reduced lamina joint bending, attenuated skotomorphogenesis, and insensitivity against feedback regulation of BR-related genes. Furthermore, DW1 interacted with a negative regulator of BR signaling, BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 2 (BIN2), and inhibited its nuclear localization, indicating that DW1 positively regulates BR signaling by inhibiting the function of BIN2. In contrast to rice and wheat breeding which used gibberellin (GA) deficiency to reduce plant height, sorghum breeding modified auxin and BR signaling. This difference may result from GA deficiency in rice and wheat does not cause deleterious side effects on plant morphology, whereas in sorghum it leads to abnormal culm bending.

  16. Local-basis-function approach to computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, K. M.; Wecksung, G. W.

    1985-12-01

    In the local basis-function approach, a reconstruction is represented as a linear expansion of basis functions, which are arranged on a rectangular grid and possess a local region of support. The basis functions considered here are positive and may overlap. It is found that basis functions based on cubic B-splines offer significant improvements in the calculational accuracy that can be achieved with iterative tomographic reconstruction algorithms. By employing repetitive basis functions, the computational effort involved in these algorithms can be minimized through the use of tabulated values for the line or strip integrals over a single-basis function. The local nature of the basis functions reduces the difficulties associated with applying local constraints on reconstruction values, such as upper and lower limits. Since a reconstruction is specified everywhere by a set of coefficients, display of a coarsely represented image does not require an arbitrary choice of an interpolation function.

  17. Local hybrid functionals: an assessment for thermochemical kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kaupp, Martin; Bahmann, Hilke; Arbuznikov, Alexei V

    2007-11-21

    Local hybrid functionals with position-dependent exact-exchange admixture are a new class of exchange-correlation functionals in density functional theory that promise to advance the available accuracy in many areas of application. Local hybrids with different local mixing functions (LMFs) governing the position dependence are validated for the heats of formation of the extended G3/99 set, and for two sets of barriers of hydrogen-transfer and heavy-atom transfer reactions (HTBH38 and NHTBH38 databases). A simple local hybrid Lh-SVWN with only Slater and exact exchange plus local correlation and a one-parameter LMF, g(r)=b(tau(W)(r)tau(r)), performs best and provides overall mean absolute errors for thermochemistry and kinetics that are a significant improvement over standard state-of-the-art global hybrid functionals. In particular, this local hybrid functional does not suffer from the systematic deterioration that standard functionals exhibit for larger molecules. In contrast, local hybrids based on generalized gradient approximation exchange tend to give rise to nonintuitive LMFs, and no improved functionals have been obtained along this route. The LMF is a real-space function and thus can be analyzed in detail. We use, in particular, graphical analyses to rationalize the performance of different local hybrids for thermochemistry and reaction barriers.

  18. Local hybrid functionals: An assessment for thermochemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kaupp, Martin; Bahmann, Hilke; Arbuznikov, Alexei V.

    2007-11-21

    Local hybrid functionals with position-dependent exact-exchange admixture are a new class of exchange-correlation functionals in density functional theory that promise to advance the available accuracy in many areas of application. Local hybrids with different local mixing functions (LMFs) governing the position dependence are validated for the heats of formation of the extended G3/99 set, and for two sets of barriers of hydrogen-transfer and heavy-atom transfer reactions (HTBH38 and NHTBH38 databases). A simple local hybrid Lh-SVWN with only Slater and exact exchange plus local correlation and a one-parameter LMF, g(r)=b({tau}{sub W}(r)/{tau}(r)), performs best and provides overall mean absolute errors for thermochemistry and kinetics that are a significant improvement over standard state-of-the-art global hybrid functionals. In particular, this local hybrid functional does not suffer from the systematic deterioration that standard functionals exhibit for larger molecules. In contrast, local hybrids based on generalized gradient approximation exchange tend to give rise to nonintuitive LMFs, and no improved functionals have been obtained along this route. The LMF is a real-space function and thus can be analyzed in detail. We use, in particular, graphical analyses to rationalize the performance of different local hybrids for thermochemistry and reaction barriers.

  19. Specific Nuclear Localizing Sequence Directs Two Myosin Isoforms to the Cell Nucleus in Calmodulin-Sensitive Manner

    PubMed Central

    Dzijak, Rastislav; Yildirim, Sukriye; Kahle, Michal; Novák, Petr; Hnilicová, Jarmila; Venit, Tomáš; Hozák, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Background Nuclear myosin I (NM1) was the first molecular motor identified in the cell nucleus. Together with nuclear actin, they participate in crucial nuclear events such as transcription, chromatin movements, and chromatin remodeling. NM1 is an isoform of myosin 1c (Myo1c) that was identified earlier and is known to act in the cytoplasm. NM1 differs from the “cytoplasmic” myosin 1c only by additional 16 amino acids at the N-terminus of the molecule. This amino acid stretch was therefore suggested to direct NM1 into the nucleus. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the mechanism of nuclear import of NM1 in detail. Using over-expressed GFP chimeras encoding for truncated NM1 mutants, we identified a specific sequence that is necessary for its import to the nucleus. This novel nuclear localization sequence is placed within calmodulin-binding motif of NM1, thus it is present also in the Myo1c. We confirmed the presence of both isoforms in the nucleus by transfection of tagged NM1 and Myo1c constructs into cultured cells, and also by showing the presence of the endogenous Myo1c in purified nuclei of cells derived from knock-out mice lacking NM1. Using pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays we identified importin beta, importin 5 and importin 7 as nuclear transport receptors that bind NM1. Since the NLS sequence of NM1 lies within the region that also binds calmodulin we tested the influence of calmodulin on the localization of NM1. The presence of elevated levels of calmodulin interfered with nuclear localization of tagged NM1. Conclusions/Significance We have shown that the novel specific NLS brings to the cell nucleus not only the “nuclear” isoform of myosin I (NM1 protein) but also its “cytoplasmic” isoform (Myo1c protein). This opens a new field for exploring functions of this molecular motor in nuclear processes, and for exploring the signals between cytoplasm and the nucleus. PMID:22295092

  20. Localization and function of three monothiol glutaredoxins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Roe, Jung-Hye . E-mail: jhroe@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-05-06

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains two dithiol glutaredoxins (Grx1 and Grx2) and genes for three putative monothiol glutaredoxins (grx3, 4, and 5). We investigated the expression, sub-cellular localization, and functions of the three monothiol glutaredoxins. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that Grx3 is targeted to nuclear rim and endoplasmic reticulum, Grx4 primarily to the nucleus, and Grx5 to mitochondria. Null mutation of grx3 did not significantly affect growth and resistance against various oxidants, whereas grx5 mutation caused slow growth and sensitivity toward oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide, paraquat, and diamide. The grx2grx5 double mutation, deficient in all mitochondrial glutaredoxins, caused further retardation in growth and severe sensitivity toward all the oxidants tested. The grx4 mutation was not viable, suggesting a critical role of Grx4 for the physiology of S. pombe. Overproduction of Grx3 and Grx5, but not the truncated form of Grx5 without mitochondrial target sequence, severely retarded growth as Grx2 did, supporting the idea that Grx2, 3, and 5 are targeted to organellar compartments. Our results propose a distinct role for each glutaredoxin to maintain thiol redox balance, and hence the growth and stress resistance, of the fission yeast.

  1. Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of STAT6 Is Induced by Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus for Viral Latency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Zhu, Caixia; Wei, Fang; Gao, Shujun; Zhang, Liming; Li, Yuhong; Feng, Yanling; Tong, Yin; Xu, Jianqing; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Zhenghong; Robertson, Erle S; Cai, Qiliang

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence implies that STAT6 plays an important role in both the adaptive and innate immune responses to virus infection. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic γ-herpesvirus agent associated with several human malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphomas (PELs). Previously, we demonstrated that KSHV blocks IL-4-induced STAT6 phosphorylation and retains a basal IL-13/STAT6 constitutive activation for cell survival and proliferation. However, the mechanism by which KSHV regulates STAT6 remains largely unknown. Here, we found that KSHV-encoded LANA interacts with STAT6 and promotes nuclear localization of STAT6 independent of the tyrosine 641-phosphorylation state. Moreover, nuclear localization of STAT6 is also dramatically increased in KS tissue. The latent antigen LANA induces serine protease-mediated cleavage of STAT6 in the nucleus, where the cleaved STAT6 lacking transactivation domain functions as a dominant-negative regulator to repress transcription of Replication and Transcription Activator (RTA) and in turn shut off viral lytic replication. Blockade of STAT6 by small interference RNA dramatically enhances expression of RTA, and in turn reduces KSHV-infected endothelial cell growth and colony formation. Taken together, these results suggest that nuclear localization and cleavage of STAT6 is important for modulating the viral latency and pathogenesis of KSHV.

  2. Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of STAT6 Is Induced by Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus for Viral Latency

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liming; Li, Yuhong; Feng, Yanling; Xu, Jianqing; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Zhenghong; Robertson, Erle S.; Cai, Qiliang

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence implies that STAT6 plays an important role in both the adaptive and innate immune responses to virus infection. Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic γ-herpesvirus agent associated with several human malignancies, including Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphomas (PELs). Previously, we demonstrated that KSHV blocks IL-4-induced STAT6 phosphorylation and retains a basal IL-13/STAT6 constitutive activation for cell survival and proliferation. However, the mechanism by which KSHV regulates STAT6 remains largely unknown. Here, we found that KSHV-encoded LANA interacts with STAT6 and promotes nuclear localization of STAT6 independent of the tyrosine 641-phosphorylation state. Moreover, nuclear localization of STAT6 is also dramatically increased in KS tissue. The latent antigen LANA induces serine protease-mediated cleavage of STAT6 in the nucleus, where the cleaved STAT6 lacking transactivation domain functions as a dominant-negative regulator to repress transcription of Replication and Transcription Activator (RTA) and in turn shut off viral lytic replication. Blockade of STAT6 by small interference RNA dramatically enhances expression of RTA, and in turn reduces KSHV-infected endothelial cell growth and colony formation. Taken together, these results suggest that nuclear localization and cleavage of STAT6 is important for modulating the viral latency and pathogenesis of KSHV. PMID:28099521

  3. "Sloppy" nuclear energy density functionals: Effective model reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikšić, Tamara; Vretenar, Dario

    2016-08-01

    Concepts from information geometry are used to analyze parameter sensitivity for a nuclear energy density functional, representative of a class of semiempirical functionals that start from a microscopically motivated ansatz for the density dependence of the energy of a system of protons and neutrons. It is shown that such functionals are "sloppy," namely, characterized by an exponential range of sensitivity to parameter variations. Responsive to only a few stiff parameter combinations, sloppy functionals exhibit an exponential decrease of sensitivity to variations of the remaining soft parameters. By interpreting the space of model predictions as a manifold embedded in the data space, with the parameters of the functional as coordinates on the manifold, it is also shown that the exponential distribution of model manifold widths corresponds to the range of parameter sensitivity. Using the manifold boundary approximation method, we illustrate how to systematically construct effective nuclear density functionals of successively lower dimension in parameter space until sloppiness is eventually eliminated and the resulting functional contains only stiff combinations of parameters.

  4. Neutralizing Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) Induces β-Cell Survival by Maintaining PDX1 Protein Nuclear Localization*

    PubMed Central

    Ardestani, Amin; Sauter, Nadine S.; Paroni, Federico; Dharmadhikari, Gitanjali; Cho, Jae-Hyoung; Lupi, Roberto; Marchetti, Piero; Oberholzer, José; Conte, Julie Kerr; Maedler, Kathrin

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor PDX1 plays a critical role during β-cell development and in glucose-induced insulin gene transcription in adult β-cells. Acute glucose exposure leads to translocalization of PDX1 to the nucleoplasm, whereas under conditions of oxidative stress, PDX1 shuttles from the nucleus to the cytosol. Here we show that cytosolic PDX1 expression correlated with β-cell failure in diabetes. In isolated islets from patients with type 2 diabetes and from diabetic mice, we found opposite regulation of insulin and PDX1 mRNA; insulin was decreased in diabetes, but PDX1 was increased. This suggests that elevated PDX1 mRNA levels may be insufficient to regulate insulin. In diabetic islets, PDX1 protein was localized in the cytosol, whereas in non-diabetic controls, PDX1 was in the nucleus. In contrast, overexpression of either IL-1 receptor antagonist or shuttling-deficient PDX1 restored β-cell survival and function and PDX1 nuclear localization. Our results show that nuclear localization of PDX1 is essential for a functional β-cell and provides a novel mechanism of the protective effect of IL-1 receptor antagonist on β-cell survival and function. PMID:21393239

  5. Nuclear localization of the dehydrin OpsDHN1 is determined by histidine-rich motif

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Sánchez, Itzell E.; Maruri-López, Israel; Ferrando, Alejandro; Carbonell, Juan; Graether, Steffen P.; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    The cactus OpsDHN1 dehydrin belongs to a large family of disordered and highly hydrophilic proteins known as Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins, which accumulate during the late stages of embryogenesis and in response to abiotic stresses. Herein, we present the in vivo OpsDHN1 subcellular localization by N-terminal GFP translational fusion; our results revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of the GFP::OpsDHN1 protein in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells. In addition, dimer assembly of OpsDHN1 in planta using a Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) approach was demonstrated. In order to understand the in vivo role of the histidine-rich motif, the OpsDHN1-ΔHis version was produced and assayed for its subcellular localization and dimer capability by GFP fusion and BiFC assays, respectively. We found that deletion of the OpsDHN1 histidine-rich motif restricted its localization to cytoplasm, but did not affect dimer formation. In addition, the deletion of the S-segment in the OpsDHN1 protein affected its nuclear localization. Our data suggest that the deletion of histidine-rich motif and S-segment show similar effects, preventing OpsDHN1 from getting into the nucleus. Based on these results, the histidine-rich motif is proposed as a targeting element for OpsDHN1 nuclear localization. PMID:26442018

  6. Nuclear localization of the dehydrin OpsDHN1 is determined by histidine-rich motif.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Sánchez, Itzell E; Maruri-López, Israel; Ferrando, Alejandro; Carbonell, Juan; Graether, Steffen P; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    The cactus OpsDHN1 dehydrin belongs to a large family of disordered and highly hydrophilic proteins known as Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins, which accumulate during the late stages of embryogenesis and in response to abiotic stresses. Herein, we present the in vivo OpsDHN1 subcellular localization by N-terminal GFP translational fusion; our results revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of the GFP::OpsDHN1 protein in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells. In addition, dimer assembly of OpsDHN1 in planta using a Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) approach was demonstrated. In order to understand the in vivo role of the histidine-rich motif, the OpsDHN1-ΔHis version was produced and assayed for its subcellular localization and dimer capability by GFP fusion and BiFC assays, respectively. We found that deletion of the OpsDHN1 histidine-rich motif restricted its localization to cytoplasm, but did not affect dimer formation. In addition, the deletion of the S-segment in the OpsDHN1 protein affected its nuclear localization. Our data suggest that the deletion of histidine-rich motif and S-segment show similar effects, preventing OpsDHN1 from getting into the nucleus. Based on these results, the histidine-rich motif is proposed as a targeting element for OpsDHN1 nuclear localization.

  7. Structural basis for the regulation of nuclear import of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) by phosphorylation of the nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Ryohei; Hirano, Hidemi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2017-02-26

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is expressed in every EBV-positive tumor and is essential for the maintenance, replication, and transcription of the EBV genome in the nucleus of host cells. EBNA1 is a serine phosphoprotein, and it has been shown that phosphorylation of S385 in the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of EBNA1 increases the binding affinity to the nuclear import adaptor importin-α1 as well as importin-α5, and stimulates nuclear import of EBNA1. To gain insights into how phosphorylation of the EBNA1 NLS regulates nuclear import, we have determined the crystal structures of two peptide complexes of importin-α1: one with S385-phosphorylated EBNA1 NLS peptide, determined at 2.0 Å resolution, and one with non-phosphorylated EBNA1 NLS peptide, determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The structures show that EBNA1 NLS binds to the major and minor NLS-binding sites of importin-α1, and indicate that the binding affinity of the EBNA1 NLS to the minor NLS-binding site could be enhanced by phosphorylation of S385 through electrostatic interaction between the phosphate group of phospho-S385 and K392 of importin-α1 (corresponding to R395 of importin-α5) on armadillo repeat 8.

  8. Nucleosome functions in spindle assembly and nuclear envelope formation

    PubMed Central

    Zierhut, Christian; Funabiki, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    Summary Chromosomes are not only carriers of the genetic material, but also actively regulate the assembly of complex intracellular architectures. During mitosis, chromosome-induced microtubule polymerisation ensures spindle assembly in cells without centrosomes and plays a supportive role in centrosome-containing cells. Chromosomal signals also mediate post-mitotic nuclear envelope (NE) re-formation. Recent studies using novel approaches to manipulate histones in oocytes, where functions can be analysed in the absence of transcription, have established that nucleosomes, but not DNA alone, mediate the chromosomal regulation of spindle assembly and NE formation. Both processes require the generation of RanGTP by RCC1 recruited to nucleosomes but nucleosomes also acquire cell cycle stage specific regulators, Aurora B in mitosis and ELYS, the initiator of nuclear pore complex assembly, at mitotic exit. Here, we review the mechanisms by which nucleosomes control assembly and functions of the spindle and the NE, and discuss their implications for genome maintenance. PMID:26222742

  9. Cultivation and differentiation change nuclear localization of chromosome centromeres in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Voldgorn, Yana I; Adilgereeva, Elmira P; Nekrasov, Evgeny D; Lavrov, Alexander V

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome arrangement in the interphase nucleus is not accidental. Strong evidences support that nuclear localization is an important mechanism of epigenetic regulation of gene expression. The purpose of this research was to identify differences in the localization of centromeres of chromosomes 6, 12, 18 and X in human mesenchymal stem cells depending on differentiation and cultivating time. We analyzed centromere positions in more than 4000 nuclei in 19 mesenchymal stem cell cultures before and after prolonged cultivation and after differentiation into osteogenic and adipogenic directions. We found a centromere reposition of HSAX at late passages and after differentiation in osteogenic direction as well as of HSA12 and HSA18 after adipogenic differentiation. The observed changes of the nuclear structure are new nuclear characteristics of the studied cells which may reflect regulatory changes of gene expression during the studied processes.

  10. Cultivation and Differentiation Change Nuclear Localization of Chromosome Centromeres in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Voldgorn, Yana I.; Adilgereeva, Elmira P.; Nekrasov, Evgeny D.; Lavrov, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome arrangement in the interphase nucleus is not accidental. Strong evidences support that nuclear localization is an important mechanism of epigenetic regulation of gene expression. The purpose of this research was to identify differences in the localization of centromeres of chromosomes 6, 12, 18 and X in human mesenchymal stem cells depending on differentiation and cultivating time. We analyzed centromere positions in more than 4000 nuclei in 19 mesenchymal stem cell cultures before and after prolonged cultivation and after differentiation into osteogenic and adipogenic directions. We found a centromere reposition of HSAX at late passages and after differentiation in osteogenic direction as well as of HSA12 and HSA18 after adipogenic differentiation. The observed changes of the nuclear structure are new nuclear characteristics of the studied cells which may reflect regulatory changes of gene expression during the studied processes. PMID:25775427

  11. Relative source comparison of the NPE to underground nuclear explosions at local distances

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.T.

    1994-12-31

    The Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) provides an opportunity to compare broadband characteristics of chemical to nuclear explosions at a group of local stations (4 to 40 km distant). The locations for these stations were established on bedrock to record a small partially decoupled nuclear explosion and two nearby nuclear experiments, all shots within {open_quotes}N{close_quotes} Tunnel on Rainier Mesa, Area 12. These sites were also occupied to record aftershocks from the Little Skull Mountain earthquake and chemical explosions from the USGS Sierra Experiment. To minimize calibration errors during this period, redundant instrumentation were used for each event. THe analysis emphasizes the source characteristics of the different explosions. The 300-lb chemical calibration explosion allows removal of path effects from each explosion. The NPE and nearby experiments produce very similar waveforms. The decoupled nuclear explosion and the 300-lb chemical calibration explosion show higher frequency content consistent with a higher corner frequency for the sources.

  12. The tobamovirus Turnip Vein Clearing Virus 30-kilodalton movement protein localizes to novel nuclear filaments to enhance virus infection.

    PubMed

    Levy, Amit; Zheng, Judy Y; Lazarowitz, Sondra G

    2013-06-01

    Plant viruses overcome the barrier of the plant cell wall by encoding cell-to-cell movement proteins (MPs), which direct newly replicated viral genomes to, and across, the wall. The paradigm for how a single MP regulates and coordinates these activities is the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) 30-kDa protein (MP(TMV)). Detailed studies demonstrate that TMV multiplies exclusively in the cytoplasm and have documented associations of MP(TMV) with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, microtubules, and plasmodesmata throughout the course of infection. As TMV poorly infects Arabidopsis thaliana, Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV) is the tobamovirus of choice for studies in this model plant. A key problem, which has contributed to confusion in the field, is the unproven assumption that the TVCV and TMV life cycles are identical. We engineered an infectious TVCV replicon that expressed a functional fluorescence-tagged MP(TVCV) and report here the unexpected discovery that MP(TVCV), beyond localizing to ER membrane and plasmodesmata, targeted to the nucleus in a nuclear localization signal (NLS)-dependent manner, where it localized to novel F-actin-containing filaments that associated with chromatin. The MP(TVCV) NLS appeared to be conserved in the subgroup 3 tobamoviruses, and our mutational analyses showed that nuclear localization of MP(TVCV) was necessary for efficient TVCV cell-to-cell movement and systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana. Our studies identify a novel nuclear stage in TVCV infection and suggest that nuclear MP encoded by TVCV and other subgroup 3 tobamoviruses interacts with F-actin and chromatin to modulate host defenses or cellular physiology to favor virus movement and infection.

  13. Local synthesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins in the presynaptic nerve terminal.

    PubMed

    Gioio, A E; Eyman, M; Zhang, H; Lavina, Z S; Giuditta, A; Kaplan, B B

    2001-06-01

    One of the central tenets in neuroscience has been that the protein constituents of distal compartments of the neuron (e.g., the axon and nerve terminal) are synthesized in the nerve cell body and are subsequently transported to their ultimate sites of function. In contrast to this postulate, we have established previously that a heterogeneous population of mRNAs and biologically active polyribosomes exist in the giant axon and presynaptic nerve terminals of the photoreceptor neurons in squid. We report that these mRNA populations contain mRNAs for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins to include: cytochrome oxidase subunit 17, propionyl-CoA carboxylase (EC 6.4.1.3), dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (EC 1.8.1.4), and coenzyme Q subunit 7. The mRNA for heat shock protein 70, a chaperone protein known to be involved in the import of proteins into mitochondria, has also been identified. Electrophoretic gel analysis of newly synthesized proteins in the synaptosomal fraction isolated from the squid optic lobe revealed that the large presynaptic terminals of the photoreceptor neuron contain a cytoplasmic protein synthetic system. Importantly, a significant amount of the cycloheximide resistant proteins locally synthesized in the terminal becomes associated with mitochondria. PCR analysis of RNA from synaptosomal polysomes establishes that COX17 and CoQ7 mRNAs are being actively translated. Taken together, these findings indicate that proteins required for the maintenance of mitochondrial function are synthesized locally in the presynaptic nerve terminal, and call attention to the intimacy of the relationship between the terminal and its energy generating system. J. Neurosci. Res. 64:447-453, 2001. Published 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Towards the improvement of spin-isospin properties in nuclear energy density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Liang, H. Z.; Meng, J.; Ring, P.; Sagawa, H.; Zhao, P. W.

    2016-06-01

    We address the problem of improving existing nuclear Energy Density Functionals (EDFs) in the spin-isospin channel. For that, we propose two different ways. The first one is to carefully take into account in the fitting protocol some of the key ground state properties for an accurate description of the most studied spin-isospin resonances: the Gamow-Teller Resonance (GTR) [1]. The second consists in providing a strategy to build local covariant EDF keeping the main features from their non-local counterparts [2]. The RHF model based on a Lagrangian where heavy mesons carry the nuclear effective interaction have been shown to be successful in the description of spin-isospin resonances [3].

  15. An insertion in the methyltransferase domain of P. falciparum trimethylguanosine synthase harbors a classical nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Babar, Prasad H; Dey, Vishakha; Jaiswar, Praveen; Patankar, Swati

    Many Plasmodium falciparum proteins do not share homology with, and are generally longer than their respective orthologs. This, to some extent, can be attributed to insertions. Here, we studied a P. falciparum RNA hypermethylase, trimethylguanosine synthase (PfTGS1) that harbors a 76 amino acid insertion in its methyltransferase domain. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that this insertion was present in TGS1 orthologs from other Plasmodium species as well. Interestingly, a classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) was predicted in the insertions of primate parasite TGS1 proteins. To check whether these predicted NLS are functional, we developed an in vivo heterologous system using S. cerevisiae. The predicted NLS when fused to dimeric GFP were able to localize the fusion protein to the nucleus in yeast indicating that it is indeed recognized by the yeast nuclear import machinery. We further showed that the PfTGS1 NLS binds to P. falciparum importin-α in vitro, confirming that the NLS is also recognized by the P. falciparum classical nuclear import machinery. Thus, in this study we report a novel function of the insertion in PfTGS1.

  16. Parameterized local hybrid functionals from density-matrix similarity metrics.

    PubMed

    Janesko, Benjamin G; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2008-02-28

    We recently proposed a real-space similarity metric comparing the Kohn-Sham one-particle density matrix to the local spin-density approximation model density matrix [Janesko and Scuseria, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 164117 (2007)]. This metric provides a useful ingredient for constructing local hybrid density functionals that locally mix exact exchange and semilocal density functional theory exchange. Here we present two lines of inquiry: An approximate similarity metric comparing exact versus generalized gradient approximation (GGA), exchange and parameterized mixing functions using these similarity metrics. This approach yields significantly improved thermochemistry, including GGA local hybrids whose thermochemical performance approaches GGA global hybrids.

  17. The N-terminal domain of the androgen receptor drives its nuclear localization in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Javid A.; Masoodi, Khalid Z.; Eisermann, Kurtis; Isharwal, Sudhir; Ai, Junkui; Pascal, Laura E.; Nelson, Joel B.; Wang, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Androgen-independent nuclear localization is required for androgen receptor (AR) transactivation in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and should be a key step leading to castration resistance. However, mechanism(s) leading to androgen-independent AR nuclear localization are poorly understood. Since the N-terminal domain (NTD) of AR plays a role in transactivation under androgen-depleted conditions, we investigated the role of NTD in AR nuclear localization in CRPC. Deletion mutagenesis was used to identify amino acid sequences in the NTD essential for its androgen-independent nuclear localization in C4-2, a widely used CRPC cell line. Deletion mutants of AR tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) at the 5`-end were generated and their signal distribution was investigated in C4-2 cells by fluorescent microscopy. Our results showed that the region of a.a. 294–556 was required for androgen-independent AR nuclear localization whereas a.a. 1–293 mediates Hsp90 regulation of AR nuclear localization in CRPC cells. Although a.a. 294–556 does not contain a nuclear import signal, it was able to enhance DHT-induced import of the ligand binding domain (LBD). Also, transactivation of the NTD could be uncoupled from its modulation of AR nuclear localization in C4-2 cells. These observations suggest an important role of NTD in AR intracellular trafficking and androgen-independent AR nuclear localization in CRPC cells. PMID:24662325

  18. Description of induced nuclear fission with Skyrme energy functionals. II. Finite temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; Duke, D.; Carr, H.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of induced nuclear fission for a broad range of neutron energies could help resolve fundamental science issues, such as the formation of elements in the universe, but could have also a large impact on societal applications in energy production or nuclear waste management. The goal of this paper is to set up the foundations of a microscopic theory to study the static aspects of induced fission as a function of the excitation energy of the incident neutron, from thermal to fast neutrons. To account for the high excitation energy of the compound nucleus, we employ a statistical approach based on finite temperature nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy densities, which we benchmark on the 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction. We compute the evolution of the least-energy fission pathway across multidimensional potential energy surfaces with up to five collective variables as a function of the nuclear temperature and predict the evolution of both the inner and the outer fission barriers as a function of the excitation energy of the compound nucleus. We show that the coupling to the continuum induced by the finite temperature is negligible in the range of neutron energies relevant for many applications of neutron-induced fission. We prove that the concept of quantum localization introduced recently can be extended to T >0 , and we apply the method to study the interaction energy and total kinetic energy of fission fragments as a function of the temperature for the most probable fission. While large uncertainties in theoretical modeling remain, we conclude that a finite temperature nuclear density functional may provide a useful framework to obtain accurate predictions of fission fragment properties.

  19. The absence of p53 during Human Cytomegalovirus infection leads to decreased UL53 expression, disrupting UL50 localization to the inner nuclear membrane, and thereby inhibiting capsid nuclear egress.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Man I; O'Dowd, John M; Fortunato, Elizabeth A

    2016-10-01

    Our electron microscopy study (Kuan et al., 2016) found HCMV nuclear capsid egress was significantly reduced in p53 knockout cells (p53KOs), correlating with inhibited formation of infoldings of the inner nuclear membrane (IINMs). Molecular examination of these phenomena has found p53KOs expressed UL97 and phosphorylated lamins, however the lamina failed to remodel. The nuclear egress complex (NEC) protein UL50 was expressed in almost all cells. UL50 re-localized to the inner nuclear membrane (INM) in ~90% of wt cells, but only ~35% of p53KOs. UL53 expression was significantly reduced in p53KOs, and cells lacking UL50 nuclear staining, expressed no UL53. Re-introduction of p53 into p53KOs largely recovered UL53 positivity and UL50 nuclear re-localization. Nuclear rim located UL50/53 puncta, which co-localized with the major capsid protein, were largely absent in p53KOs. We believe these puncta were IINMs. In the absence of p53, UL53 expression was inhibited, disrupting formation of the NEC/IINMs, and reducing functional virion secretion.

  20. A conserved C-terminal domain of the Aspergillus fumigatus developmental regulator MedA is required for nuclear localization, adhesion and virulence.

    PubMed

    Al Abdallah, Qusai; Choe, Se-In; Campoli, Paolo; Baptista, Stefanie; Gravelat, Fabrice N; Lee, Mark J; Sheppard, Donald C

    2012-01-01

    MedA is a developmental regulator that is conserved in the genome of most filamentous fungi. In the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus MedA regulates conidiogenesis, adherence to host cells, and pathogenicity. The mechanism by which MedA governs these phenotypes remains unknown. Although the nuclear import of MedA orthologues has been reported in other fungi, no nuclear localization signal, DNA-binding domain or other conserved motifs have been identified within MedA. In this work, we performed a deletion analysis of MedA and identified a novel domain within the C-terminal region of the protein, designated MedA(346-557), that is necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization of MedA. We further demonstrate that MedA nuclear localization is required for the function of MedA. Surprisingly, expression of the minimal nuclear localization fragment MedA(346-557) alone was sufficient to restore conidogenesis, biofilm formation and virulence to the medA mutant strain. Collectively these results suggest that MedA functions in the regulation of transcription, and that the MedA(346-557) domain is both necessary and sufficient to mediate MedA function.

  1. A Conserved C-Terminal Domain of the Aspergillus fumigatus Developmental Regulator MedA Is Required for Nuclear Localization, Adhesion and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Al Abdallah, Qusai; Choe, Se-In; Campoli, Paolo; Baptista, Stefanie; Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Lee, Mark J.; Sheppard, Donald C.

    2012-01-01

    MedA is a developmental regulator that is conserved in the genome of most filamentous fungi. In the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus MedA regulates conidiogenesis, adherence to host cells, and pathogenicity. The mechanism by which MedA governs these phenotypes remains unknown. Although the nuclear import of MedA orthologues has been reported in other fungi, no nuclear localization signal, DNA-binding domain or other conserved motifs have been identified within MedA. In this work, we performed a deletion analysis of MedA and identified a novel domain within the C-terminal region of the protein, designated MedA346–557, that is necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization of MedA. We further demonstrate that MedA nuclear localization is required for the function of MedA. Surprisingly, expression of the minimal nuclear localization fragment MedA346–557 alone was sufficient to restore conidogenesis, biofilm formation and virulence to the medA mutant strain. Collectively these results suggest that MedA functions in the regulation of transcription, and that the MedA346–557 domain is both necessary and sufficient to mediate MedA function. PMID:23185496

  2. Mutational analysis of Mdm1p function in nuclear and mitochondrial inheritance.

    PubMed

    Fisk, H A; Yaffe, M P

    1997-08-11

    Nuclear and mitochondrial transmission to daughter buds of Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on Mdm1p, an intermediate filament-like protein localized to numerous punctate structures distributed throughout the yeast cell cytoplasm. These structures disappear and organelle inheritance is disrupted when mdm1 mutant cells are incubated at the restrictive temperature. To characterize further the function of Mdm1p, new mutant mdm1 alleles that confer temperature-sensitive growth and defects in organelle inheritance but produce stable Mdm1p structures were isolated. Microscopic analysis of the new mdm1 mutants revealed three phenotypic classes: Class I mutants showed defects in both mitochondrial and nuclear transmission; Class II alleles displayed defective mitochondrial inheritance but had no effect on nuclear movement; and Class III mutants showed aberrant nuclear inheritance but normal mitochondrial distribution. Class I and II mutants also exhibited altered mitochondrial morphology, possessing primarily small, round mitochondria instead of the extended tubular structures found in wild-type cells. Mutant mdm1 alleles affecting nuclear transmission were of two types: Class Ia and IIIa mutants were deficient for nuclear movement into daughter buds, while Class Ib and IIIb mutants displayed a complete transfer of all nuclear DNA into buds. The mutations defining all three allelic classes mapped to two distinct domains within the Mdm1p protein. Genetic crosses of yeast strains containing different mdm1 alleles revealed complex genetic interactions including intragenic suppression, synthetic phenotypes, and intragenic complementation. These results support a model of Mdm1p function in which a network comprised of multimeric assemblies of the protein mediates two distinct cellular processes.

  3. Elevated copper impairs hepatic nuclear receptor function in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wooton-Kee, Clavia Ruth; Jain, Ajay K; Wagner, Martin; Grusak, Michael A; Finegold, Milton J; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Moore, David D

    2015-09-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in accumulation of copper in the liver as a consequence of mutations in the gene encoding the copper-transporting P-type ATPase (ATP7B). WD is a chronic liver disorder, and individuals with the disease present with a variety of complications, including steatosis, cholestasis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. Similar to patients with WD, Atp7b⁻/⁻ mice have markedly elevated levels of hepatic copper and liver pathology. Previous studies have demonstrated that replacement of zinc in the DNA-binding domain of the estrogen receptor (ER) with copper disrupts specific binding to DNA response elements. Here, we found decreased binding of the nuclear receptors FXR, RXR, HNF4α, and LRH-1 to promoter response elements and decreased mRNA expression of nuclear receptor target genes in Atp7b⁻/⁻ mice, as well as in adult and pediatric WD patients. Excessive hepatic copper has been described in progressive familial cholestasis (PFIC), and we found that similar to individuals with WD, patients with PFIC2 or PFIC3 who have clinically elevated hepatic copper levels exhibit impaired nuclear receptor activity. Together, these data demonstrate that copper-mediated nuclear receptor dysfunction disrupts liver function in WD and potentially in other disorders associated with increased hepatic copper levels.

  4. The black hole mass function derived from local spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Berrier, Joel C.; Shields, Douglas W.; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia; Seigar, Marc S.; Lacy, Claud H. S.; Hartley, Matthew T.

    2014-07-10

    We present our determination of the nuclear supermassive black hole (SMBH) mass function for spiral galaxies in the local universe, established from a volume-limited sample consisting of a statistically complete collection of the brightest spiral galaxies in the southern (δ < 0°) hemisphere. Our SMBH mass function agrees well at the high-mass end with previous values given in the literature. At the low-mass end, inconsistencies exist in previous works that still need to be resolved, but our work is more in line with expectations based on modeling of black hole evolution. This low-mass end of the spectrum is critical to our understanding of the mass function and evolution of black holes since the epoch of maximum quasar activity. The sample is defined by a limiting luminosity (redshift-independent) distance, D{sub L} = 25.4 Mpc (z = 0.00572) and a limiting absolute B-band magnitude, M{sub B}=−19.12. These limits define a sample of 140 spiral galaxies, with 128 measurable pitch angles to establish the pitch angle distribution for this sample. This pitch-angle distribution function may be useful in the study of the morphology of late-type galaxies. We then use an established relationship between the logarithmic spiral arm pitch angle and the mass of the central SMBH in a host galaxy in order to estimate the mass of the 128 respective SMBHs in this volume-limited sample. This result effectively gives us the distribution of mass for SMBHs residing in spiral galaxies over a lookback time, t{sub L} ≤ 82.1 h{sub 67.77}{sup −1} Myr and contained within a comoving volume, V{sub C} = 3.37 × 10{sup 4} h{sub 67.77}{sup −3} Mpc{sup 3}. We estimate that the density of SMBHs residing in spiral galaxies in the local universe is ρ=5.54{sub −2.73}{sup +6.55} × 10{sup 4} h{sub 67.77}{sup 3} M{sub ☉} Mpc{sup –3}. Thus, our derived cosmological SMBH mass density for spiral galaxies is Ω{sub BH}=4.35{sub −2.15}{sup +5.14} × 10{sup –7} h{sub 67.77}. Assuming that

  5. Surface localization of the nuclear receptor CAR in influenza A virus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Moriyama, Yusuke; Ikari, Akira; Sugatani, Junko; Suzuki, Takashi; Miwa, Masao

    2008-04-11

    Constitutive active/androstane receptor CAR is a member of the nuclear receptors which regulate transcription of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes. CAR is usually localized in the cytosol and nucleus. Here, we found that CAR was localized at the cell surface of influenza A virus (IAV)-infected cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that expression of a viral envelope glycoprotein, either hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA), but not viral nucleoprotein (NP), was responsible for this localization. This report is the first demonstration of CAR at the surface of tissue culture cells, and suggests that CAR may exert the IAV infection mechanism.

  6. Do nuclear collisions create a locally equilibrated quark–gluon plasma?

    DOE PAGES

    Romatschke, P.

    2017-01-10

    Experimental results on azimuthal correlations in high energy nuclear collisions (nucleus–nucleus, proton–nucleus, and proton–proton) seem to be well described by viscous hydrodynamics. It is often argued that this agreement implies either local thermal equilibrium or at least local isotropy. In this note, I present arguments why this is not the case. Neither local near-equilibrium nor near-isotropy are required in order for hydrodynamics to offer a successful and accurate description of experimental results. However, I predict the breakdown of hydrodynamics at momenta of order seven times the temperature, corresponding to a smallest possible QCD liquid drop size of 0.15 fm.

  7. Distinct functions of the Drosophila Nup153 and Nup214 FG domains in nuclear protein transport.

    PubMed

    Sabri, Nafiseh; Roth, Peggy; Xylourgidis, Nikos; Sadeghifar, Fatemeh; Adler, Jeremy; Samakovlis, Christos

    2007-08-13

    The phenylanine-glycine (FG)-rich regions of several nucleoporins both bind to nuclear transport receptors and collectively provide a diffusion barrier to the nuclear pores. However, the in vivo roles of FG nucleoporins in transport remain unclear. We have inactivated 30 putative nucleoporins in cultured Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells by RNA interference and analyzed the phenotypes on importin alpha/beta-mediated import and CRM1-dependent protein export. The fly homologues of FG nucleoporins Nup358, Nup153, and Nup54 are selectively required for import. The FG repeats of Nup153 are necessary for its function in transport, whereas the remainder of the protein maintains pore integrity. Inactivation of the CRM1 cofactor RanBP3 decreased the nuclear accumulation of CRM1 and protein export. We report a surprisingly antagonistic relationship between RanBP3 and the Nup214 FG region in determining CRM1 localization and its function in protein export. Our data suggest that peripheral metazoan FG nucleoporins have distinct functions in nuclear protein transport events.

  8. Nuclear localization of Rad51B is independent of BRCA2

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K A; Hinz, J M; Yamada, A; Thompson, L H; Albala, J S

    2005-06-28

    Human Rad51 is critical for the maintenance of genome stability through its role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Rad51B (Rad51L1/hRec2) is one of the five known paralogs of human Rad51 found in a multi-protein complex with three other Rad51 paralogs, Rad51C, Rad51D and Xrcc2. Examination of EGFP-Rad51B fusion protein in HeLa S3 cells and immunofluorescence in several human cell lines confirms the nuclear localization of Rad51B. This is the first report to detail putative interactions of a Rad51 paralog protein with BRCA2. Utilization of a BRCA2 mutant cell line, CAPAN-1 suggests that Rad51B localizes to the nucleus independent of BRCA2. Although both Rad51B and BRCA2 are clearly involved in the homologous recombinational repair pathway, Rad51B and BRCA2 do not appear to associate directly. Furthermore, mutations in the KKLK motif of Rad51B, amino acid residues 4-7, mislocalizes Rad51B to the cytoplasm suggesting that this is the nuclear localization signal for the Rad51B protein. Examination of wild-type EGFP-Rad51B fusion protein in mammalian cells deficient in Rad51C showed that Rad51B localizes to the nucleus independent of Rad51C; further suggesting that Rad51B, like Rad51C, contains its own nuclear localization signal.

  9. Nuclear charge and neutron radii and nuclear matter: Trend analysis in Skyrme density-functional-theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Radii of charge and neutron distributions are fundamental nuclear properties. They depend on both nuclear interaction parameters related to the equation of state of infinite nuclear matter and on quantal shell effects, which are strongly impacted by the presence of nuclear surface. Purpose: In this work, by studying the correlation of charge and neutron radii, and neutron skin, with nuclear matter parameters, we assess different mechanisms that drive nuclear sizes. Method: We apply nuclear density functional theory using a family of Skyrme functionals obtained by means of optimization protocols, which do not include any radius information. By performing the Monte Carlo sampling of reasonable functionals around the optimal parametrization, we scan all correlations between nuclear matter properties and observables characterizing charge and neutron distributions of spherical closed-shell nuclei 48Ca,208Pb, and 298Fl. Results: By considering the influence of various nuclear matter properties on charge and neutron radii in a multidimensional parameter space of Skyrme functionals, we demonstrate the existence of two strong relationships: (i) between the nuclear charge radii and the saturation density of symmetric nuclear matter ρ0, and (ii) between the neutron skins and the slope of the symmetry energy L . The impact of other nuclear matter properties on nuclear radii is weak or nonexistent. For functionals optimized to experimental binding energies only, proton and neutron radii are found to be weakly correlated due to canceling trends from different nuclear matter characteristics. Conclusion: The existence of only two strong relations connecting nuclear radii with nuclear matter properties has important consequences. First, by requiring that the nuclear functional reproduces the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter practically fixes the charge (or proton) radii, and vice versa. This explains the recent results of ab initio calculations

  10. A novel bipartite nuclear localization signal with an atypically long linker in DOF transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Jonas; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Ruzicic, Slobodan

    2010-05-01

    Large molecules require a nuclear localization signal (NLS) for translocation into the nucleus. Classical NLSs are rich in basic amino acids and they represent three groups, based on their structural features: SV40 T-antigen-type, yeast mating factor Matalpha-2-type, and bipartite NLSs. DNA-binding-with-one-finger (DOF) transcription factors play important roles in plants, and although their nuclear localization has been demonstrated in several cases, public protein localization prediction tools fail to detect NLS motifs in these proteins. Here, we demonstrate that an atypical bipartite NLS with a 17 amino acid long linker between its flanking basic regions directs Arabidopsis thaliana DOF proteins to the cell nucleus. The novel bipartite NLS is highly conserved in plant DOF transcription factors, including the single DOF protein in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  11. Characterization of a nuclear localization signal of canine parvovirus capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Vihinen-Ranta, M; Kakkola, L; Kalela, A; Vilja, P; Vuento, M

    1997-12-01

    We investigated the abilities of synthetic peptides mimicking the potential nuclear localization signal of canine parvovirus (CPV) capsid proteins to translocate a carrier protein to the nucleus following microinjection into the cytoplasm of A72 cells. Possible nuclear localization sequences were chosen for synthesis from CPV capsid protein sequences (VP1, VP2) on the basis of the presence of clustered basic residues, which is a common theme in most of the previously identified targeting peptides. Nuclear targeting activity was found within the N-terminal residues 4-13 (PAKRARRGYK) of the VP1 capsid protein. While replacement of Arg10 with glycine did not affect the activity, replacement of Lys6, Arg7, or Arg9 with glycine abolished it. The targeting activity was found to residue in a cluster of basic residues, Lys5, Arg7, and Arg9. Nuclear import was saturated by excess of unlabelled peptide conjugates (showing that it was a receptor-mediated process). Transport into the nucleus was an energy-dependent and temperature-dependent process actively mediated by the nuclear pores and inhibited by wheat germ agglutinin.

  12. Visualization of nuclear localization of transcription factors with cyan and green fluorescent proteins in the red alga Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Uji, Toshiki; Takahashi, Megumu; Saga, Naotsune; Mikami, Koji

    2010-04-01

    Transcription factors play a central role in expression of genomic information in all organisms. The objective of our study is to analyze the function of transcription factors in red algae. One way to analyze transcription factors in eukaryotic cells is to study their nuclear localization, as reported for land plants and green algae using fluorescent proteins. There is, however, no report documenting subcellular localization of transcription factors from red algae. In the present study, using the marine red alga Porphyra yezoensis, we confirmed for the first time successful expression of humanized fluorescent proteins (ZsGFP and ZsYFP) from a reef coral Zoanthus sp. and land plant-adapted sGFP(S65T) in gametophytic cells comparable to expression of AmCFP. Following molecular cloning and characterization of transcription factors DP-E2F-like 1 (PyDEL1), transcription elongation factor 1 (PyElf1) and multiprotein bridging factor 1 (PyMBF1), we then demonstrated that ZsGFP and AmCFP can be used to visualize nuclear localization of PyElf1 and PyMBF1. This is the first report to perform visualization of subcellular localization of transcription factors as genome-encoded proteins in red algae.

  13. Characterization of the nuclear localization signal of high risk HPV16 E2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Klucevsek, Kristin; Wertz, Mary; Lucchi, John; Leszczynski, Anna; Moroianu, Junona . E-mail: moroianu@bc.edu

    2007-03-30

    The E2 protein of high risk human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) contains an amino-terminal (N) domain, a hinge (H) region and a carboxyl-terminal (C) DNA-binding domain. Using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusions with full length E2 and E2 domains in transfection assays in HeLa cells, we found that the C domain is responsible for the nuclear localization of E2 in vivo, whereas the N and H domains do not contain additional nuclear localization signals (NLSs). Deletion analysis of EGFP-E2 and EGFP-cE2 determined that the C domain contains an {alpha} helix cNLS that overlaps with the DNA-binding region. Mutational analysis revealed that the arginine and lysine residues in this cNLS are essential for nuclear localization of HPV16 E2. Interestingly, these basic amino acid residues are well conserved among the E2 proteins of BPV-1 and some high risk HPV types but not in the low risk HPV types, suggesting that there are differences between the NLSs and corresponding nuclear import pathways between these E2 proteins.

  14. Distinctive Properties of the Nuclear Localization Signals of Inner Nuclear Membrane Proteins Heh1 and Heh2

    SciTech Connect

    Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Hapsari, Rizqiya A.; van Rheenen, Mathilde; Pumroy, Ruth A.; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Steen, Anton; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Cingolani, Gino

    2015-06-04

    Targeting of ER-synthesized membrane proteins to the inner nuclear membrane (INM) has long been explained by the diffusion-retention model. However, several INM proteins contain non-classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences, which, in a few instances, have been shown to promote importin α/β- and Ran-dependent translocation to the INM. Here, using structural and biochemical methods, we show that yeast INM proteins Heh2 and Src1/Heh1 contain bipartite import sequences that associate intimately with the minor NLS-binding pocket of yeast importin α and unlike classical NLSs efficiently displace the IBB domain in the absence of importin β. In vivo, the intimate interactions at the minor NLS-binding pocket make the h2NLS highly efficient at recruiting importin α at the ER and drive INM localization of endogenous Heh2. Thus, h1/h2NLSs delineate a novel class of super-potent, IBB-like membrane protein NLSs, distinct from classical NLSs found in soluble cargos and of general interest in biology.

  15. Distinctive Properties of the Nuclear Localization Signals of Inner Nuclear Membrane Proteins Heh1 and Heh2.

    PubMed

    Lokareddy, Ravi K; Hapsari, Rizqiya A; van Rheenen, Mathilde; Pumroy, Ruth A; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Steen, Anton; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M; Cingolani, Gino

    2015-07-07

    Targeting of ER-synthesized membrane proteins to the inner nuclear membrane (INM) has long been explained by the diffusion-retention model. However, several INM proteins contain non-classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences, which, in a few instances, have been shown to promote importin α/β- and Ran-dependent translocation to the INM. Here, using structural and biochemical methods, we show that yeast INM proteins Heh2 and Src1/Heh1 contain bipartite import sequences that associate intimately with the minor NLS-binding pocket of yeast importin α and unlike classical NLSs efficiently displace the IBB domain in the absence of importin β. In vivo, the intimate interactions at the minor NLS-binding pocket make the h2NLS highly efficient at recruiting importin α at the ER and drive INM localization of endogenous Heh2. Thus, h1/h2NLSs delineate a novel class of super-potent, IBB-like membrane protein NLSs, distinct from classical NLSs found in soluble cargos and of general interest in biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Localization of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II Tax protein is dependent upon a nuclear localization determinant in the N-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Turci, Marco; Romanelli, Maria Grazia; Lorenzi, Pamela; Righi, Paola; Bertazzoni, Umberto

    2006-01-03

    Human T-cell lymphotropic viruses (HTLV) types I and II are closely related oncogenic retroviruses that have been associated with lymphoproliferative and neurological disorders. The proviral genome encodes a trans-regulatory Tax protein that activates viral genes and upregulates various cellular genes involved in both cell growth and transformation. Tax proteins of HTLV-I (Tax-I) and HTLV-II (Tax-II) exhibit more than 77% aa homology and expression of either Tax-I or Tax-II is sufficient for immortalization of cultured T lymphocytes. Tax-I shuttles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and accumulates within the nucleus, whereas Tax-II is found mainly in the cytoplasm. In the present study we have used recombinant vectors to analyze the size and structure of the nuclear localization domain within the Tax-II protein sequence. The Tax-II protein was expressed in HeLa cells either as the complete protein, or regions thereof, that were individually fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Immunoblot analysis of the fused Tax-II products confirmed their expression and size. Fluorescence microscopy studies indicated that the complete Tax-II as well as N-truncated forms presented a punctuate cytoplasmic distribution and that a nuclear localization determinant is confined to within the first 60 aa of Tax-II. Accordingly, site directed mutagenesis and deletion of specific sequences within the first 60 aa showed that the nuclear determinant lies within the first 41 residues of Tax-II. These results point to a direct involvement of the amino-terminal residues of Tax-II protein in determining its nuclear functionality.

  17. Functional coupling between the extracellular matrix and nuclear lamina by Wnt signaling in progeria.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Lidia; Roux, Kyle J; Wong, Esther Sook Miin; Mounkes, Leslie C; Mutalif, Rafidah; Navasankari, Raju; Rai, Bina; Cool, Simon; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Wang, Honghe; Lee, Hyun-Shik; Kozlov, Serguei; Grunert, Martin; Keeble, Thomas; Jones, C Michael; Meta, Margarita D; Young, Stephen G; Daar, Ira O; Burke, Brian; Perantoni, Alan O; Stewart, Colin L

    2010-09-14

    The segmental premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGPS) is caused by a truncated and farnesylated form of Lamin A. In a mouse model for HGPS, a similar Lamin A variant causes the proliferative arrest and death of postnatal, but not embryonic, fibroblasts. Arrest is due to an inability to produce a functional extracellular matrix (ECM), because growth on normal ECM rescues proliferation. The defects are associated with inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling, due to reduced nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of Lef1, but not Tcf4, in both mouse and human progeric cells. Defective Wnt signaling, affecting ECM synthesis, may be critical to the etiology of HGPS because mice exhibit skeletal defects and apoptosis in major blood vessels proximal to the heart. These results establish a functional link between the nuclear envelope/lamina and the cell surface/ECM and may provide insights into the role of Wnt signaling and the ECM in aging.

  18. A Minimal Nuclear Localization Signal (NLS) in Human Phospholipid Scramblase 4 That Binds Only the Minor NLS-binding Site of Importin α1*

    PubMed Central

    Lott, Kaylen; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Sims, Peter J.; Cingolani, Gino

    2011-01-01

    Importin α1 can bind classical nuclear localization signals (NLSs) in two NLS-binding sites, known as “major” and “minor.” The major site is located between ARM repeats 2–4, whereas the minor site spans ARM 7–8. In this study, we have characterized the cellular localization of human phospholipid scramblase 4 (hPLSCR4), a member of the phospholipid scramblase protein family. We identified a minimal NLS in hPLSCR4 (273GSIIRKWN280) that contains only two basic amino acids. This NLS is both necessary for nuclear localization of hPLSCR4 in transfected HeLa cells and sufficient for nuclear import of a non-diffusible cargo in permeabilized cells. Mutation of only one of the two basic residues, Arg277, correlates with loss of nuclear localization, suggesting this amino acid plays a key role in nuclear transport. Crystallographic analysis of mammalian importin α1 in complex with the hPLSCR4-NLS reveals this minimal NLS binds specifically and exclusively to the minor binding site of importin α. These data provide the first structural and functional evidence of a novel NLS-binding mode in importin α1 that uses only the minor groove as the exclusive site for nuclear import of nonclassical cargos. PMID:21690087

  19. Functional localization of the supplementary motor area.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Satoru; Anei, Ryogo; Murakami, Noboru; Kamada, Kyousuke

    2014-01-01

    The supplementary motor area (SMA) is a key structure involved in behavioral planning and execution. Although many reports have indicated that SMA is organized somatotopically, its exact organization remains still unclear. This study aimed to functionally map SMA using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and validate the fMRI-SMA by electrocortical stimulation (ECS) and postsurgical symptoms. Total 32 healthy volunteers and 24 patients participated in this study. Motor tasks were right and left finger tapping and language tasks included simple reading, lexical decision for presented words, and verb generating tasks. SPM8 was used to conduct individual and group analyses. In all subjects, the lexical decision task induced the greatest number of active fMRI pixels in SMA. fMRI during the language tasks showed anterior part of SMA compared to finger tapping tasks. We found an overlap spot with all different tasks in posterior part of SMA, which we termed SMA core. Six patients underwent awake craniotomy for ECS mapping for primary regions and SMA. During awake craniotomy, ECS to posterior part of SMA, which might involve the possible SMA core consistently, evoked both speech arrest and flaccid hemiparesis. The SMA mapping suggested posterior part of SMA might play more important roles in any executions, which might involve the SMA core.

  20. EGFR Signaling Regulates Maspin/SerpinB5 Phosphorylation and Nuclear Localization in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reina, Jeffrey; Morais Freitas, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Maspin (SerpinB5) is a non-inhibitory serpin (serine protease inhibitor) with very diverse biological activities including regulation of cell adhesion, migration, death, control of gene expression and oxidative stress response. Initially described as a tumor and metastasis suppressor, clinical data brought controversies to the field, as some studies reported no correlation between SerpinB5 expression and prognosis value. These data underscore the importance of understanding SerpinB5 function in a normal physiological context and the molecular mechanism involved. Several SerpinB5 phosphoforms have been detected in different cell lines, but the signaling pathways involved and the biological significance of this post-translational modification in vivo remains to be explored. In this study we investigated SerpinB5 expression, subcellular localization and phosphorylation in different stages of the mouse mammary gland development and the signaling pathway involved. Here we show that SerpinB5 is first detected in late pregnancy, reaches its highest levels in lactation and remains at constant levels during post-lactational regression (involution). Using high resolution isoelectric focusing followed but immunoblot, we found at least 8 different phosphoforms of SerpinB5 during lactation, which decreases steadily at the onset of involution. In order to investigate the signaling pathway involved in SerpinB5 phosphorylation, we took advantage of the non-transformed MCF-10A model system, as we have previously observed SerpinB5 phosphorylation in these cells. We detected basal levels of SerpinB5 phosphorylation in serum- and growth factor-starved cells, which is due to amphiregulin autocrine activity on MCF-10A cells. EGF and TGF alpha, two other EGFR ligands, promote important SerpinB5 phosphorylation. Interestingly, EGF treatment is followed by SerpinB5 nuclear accumulation. Altogether, these data indicate that SerpinB5 expression and phosphorylation are developmentally

  1. Nuclear chiral and magnetic rotation in covariant density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jie; Zhao, Pengwei

    2016-05-01

    Excitations of chiral rotation observed in triaxial nuclei and magnetic and/or antimagnetic rotations (AMR) seen in near-spherical nuclei have attracted a lot of attention. Unlike conventional rotation in well-deformed or superdeformed nuclei, here the rotational axis is not necessary coinciding with any principal axis of the nuclear density distribution. Thus, tilted axis cranking (TAC) is mandatory to describe these excitations self-consistently in the framework of covariant density functional theory (CDFT). We will briefly introduce the formalism of TAC-CDFT and its application for magnetic and AMR phenomena. Configuration-fixed CDFT and its predictions for nuclear chiral configurations and for favorable triaxial deformation parameters are also presented, and the discoveries of the multiple chiral doublets in 133Ce and 103Rh are discussed.

  2. Emerging functional roles of nuclear receptors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Doan, Tram B; Graham, J Dinny; Clarke, Christine L

    2017-04-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) have been targets of intensive drug development for decades due to their roles as key regulators of multiple developmental, physiological and disease processes. In breast cancer, expression of the estrogen and progesterone receptor remains clinically important in predicting prognosis and determining therapeutic strategies. More recently, there is growing evidence supporting the involvement of multiple nuclear receptors other than the estrogen and progesterone receptors, in the regulation of various processes important to the initiation and progression of breast cancer. We review new insights into the mechanisms of action of NRs made possible by recent advances in genomic technologies and focus on the emerging functional roles of NRs in breast cancer biology, including their involvement in circadian regulation, metabolic reprogramming and breast cancer migration and metastasis.

  3. Nuclear localization of the tight junction protein ZO-2 in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Islas, Socorro; Vega, Jesús; Ponce, Lissette; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2002-03-10

    The tight junction constitutes the major barrier to solute and water flow through the paracellular space of epithelia and endothelia. It is formed by transmembrane proteins and submembranous molecules such as the MAGUKs ZOs. We have previously found that several MAGUKs, including those of the tight (ZO-1, ZO-2, and ZO-3) and septate junction (tamou and Dlg), contain one or two nuclear sorting signals located at their first PDZ and GK domains. Now we show that these proteins also contain a nuclear export signal and focus our study on the nuclear membrane shuttling of ZO-2. In sparse cultures this molecule concentrates at the nucleus in clusters, where it partially colocalizes with splicing factor SC35. Nuclear staining diminishes as the monolayer acquires confluence through a process sensitive to the nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B. Nuclear localization can be induced by impairing cell-cell contacts, by mechanical injury. ZO-2 that shuttles from the cell periphery into the nucleus is not newly synthesized but originates from a preexistent pool. The movement of this protein is mediated by the actin cytoskeleton.

  4. Production of ABA responses requires both the nuclear and cytoplasmic functional involvement of PYR1.

    PubMed

    Park, EunJoo; Kim, Tae-Houn

    2017-02-26

    Abscisic acid (ABA) enhances stress tolerant responses in plants against unfavorable environmental conditions. In Arabidopsis, ABA promotes interactions between PYR/PYL/RCARs and PP2C, thereby allowing SnRK2s to phosphorylate downstream components required for the regulation of gene expression or for gating ion channels. Because PYR1 is known to localize to nucleus and cytoplasm it is a question whether nuclear or cytoplasmic PYR1 confer different functions to the ABA signaling pathway, as has been previously shown for regulatory proteins. In order to answer this question, transgenic lines expressing nuclear PYR1 were generated in an ABA insensitive mutant background. Enforced nuclear expression of PYR1 was examined by confocal microscopy and western blot analysis. Physiological analyses of the transgenic lines demonstrated that nuclear PYR1 is sufficient to generate ABA responses, such as, the inhibition of seed germination, root growth inhibition, the induction of gene expression, and stomatal closing movement. However, for the full recovery of ABA responses in the mutant background cytoplasmic PYR1 was required. The study suggests both nuclear and cytoplasmic PYR1 participate in the control of ABA signal transduction.

  5. Characterization of the subcellular localization and nuclear import molecular mechanisms of herpes simplex virus 1 UL2.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mingsheng; Huang, Zebin; Liao, Zongmin; Chen, Tao; Wang, Ping; Jiang, Si; Chen, Daixiong; Peng, Tao; Bian, Yun; Hong, Gengde; Yang, Hang; Zeng, Zhancheng; Li, Xiaowei; Li, Meili

    2017-04-01

    As a crucial protein, the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL2 protein has been shown to take part in various stages of viral infection, nonetheless, its exact subcellular localization and transport molecular determinants are not well known thus far. In the present study, by using live cells fluorescent microscopy assay, UL2 tagged with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein was transiently expressed in live cells and showed a completely nuclear accumulation without the presence of other HSV-1 proteins. Moreover, the nuclear transport of UL2 was characterized to be assisted by multiple transport pathways through Ran-, importin α1-, α5-, α7-, β1- and transportin-1 cellular transport receptors. Consequently, these results will improve understanding of UL2-mediated biological functions in HSV-1 infection cycles.

  6. Oscillator strengths, first-order properties, and nuclear gradients for local ADC(2)

    SciTech Connect

    Schütz, Martin

    2015-06-07

    We describe theory and implementation of oscillator strengths, orbital-relaxed first-order properties, and nuclear gradients for the local algebraic diagrammatic construction scheme through second order. The formalism is derived via time-dependent linear response theory based on a second-order unitary coupled cluster model. The implementation presented here is a modification of our previously developed algorithms for Laplace transform based local time-dependent coupled cluster linear response (CC2LR); the local approximations thus are state specific and adaptive. The symmetry of the Jacobian leads to considerable simplifications relative to the local CC2LR method; as a result, a gradient evaluation is about four times less expensive. Test calculations show that in geometry optimizations, usually very similar geometries are obtained as with the local CC2LR method (provided that a second-order method is applicable). As an exemplary application, we performed geometry optimizations on the low-lying singlet states of chlorophyllide a.

  7. Oscillator strengths, first-order properties, and nuclear gradients for local ADC(2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütz, Martin

    2015-06-01

    We describe theory and implementation of oscillator strengths, orbital-relaxed first-order properties, and nuclear gradients for the local algebraic diagrammatic construction scheme through second order. The formalism is derived via time-dependent linear response theory based on a second-order unitary coupled cluster model. The implementation presented here is a modification of our previously developed algorithms for Laplace transform based local time-dependent coupled cluster linear response (CC2LR); the local approximations thus are state specific and adaptive. The symmetry of the Jacobian leads to considerable simplifications relative to the local CC2LR method; as a result, a gradient evaluation is about four times less expensive. Test calculations show that in geometry optimizations, usually very similar geometries are obtained as with the local CC2LR method (provided that a second-order method is applicable). As an exemplary application, we performed geometry optimizations on the low-lying singlet states of chlorophyllide a.

  8. Semiconductor band gap localization via Gaussian function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, B.; Brown, G. J.; Xi, H.

    2012-10-01

    To determine the band gap of bulk semiconductors with transmission spectroscopy alone is considered as an extremely difficult task because in the higher energy range, approaching and exceeding the band gap energy, the material is opaque yielding no useful data to be recorded. In this paper, by investigating the transmission of industrial GaSb wafers with a thickness of 500 µm, we demonstrate how these obstacles of transmission spectroscopy can be overcome. The key is the transmission spectrums’ derivative, which coincides with the Gaussian function. This understanding can be used to transfer Beers’ law in an integral form opening the pathway of band gap determinations based on mathematical parameters only. The work also emphasizes the correlation between the thermal band gap variation and Debye temperature.

  9. Identification of a novel nuclear localization signal and speckle-targeting sequence of tuftelin-interacting protein 11, a splicing factor involved in spliceosome disassembly

    SciTech Connect

    Tannukit, Sissada; Crabb, Tara L.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Wen, Xin; Jans, David A.; Paine, Michael L.

    2009-12-18

    Tuftelin-interacting protein 11 (TFIP11) is a protein component of the spliceosome complex that promotes the release of the lariat-intron during late-stage splicing through a direct recruitment and interaction with DHX15/PRP43. Expression of TFIP11 is essential for cell and organismal survival. TFIP11 contains a G-patch domain, a signature motif of RNA-processing proteins that is responsible for TFIP11-DHX15 interactions. No other functional domains within TFIP11 have been described. TFIP11 is localized to distinct speckled regions within the cell nucleus, although excluded from the nucleolus. In this study sequential C-terminal deletions and mutational analyses have identified two novel protein elements in mouse TFIP11. The first domain covers amino acids 701-706 (VKDKFN) and is an atypical nuclear localization signal (NLS). The second domain is contained within amino acids 711-735 and defines TFIP11's distinct speckled nuclear localization. The identification of a novel TFIP11 nuclear speckle-targeting sequence (TFIP11-STS) suggests that this domain directly interacts with additional spliceosomal components. These data help define the mechanism of nuclear/nuclear speckle localization of the splicing factor TFIP11, with implications for it's function.

  10. A Novel Nuclear Trafficking Module Regulates the Nucleocytoplasmic Localization of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist, P Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Oksayan, Sibil; Wiltzer, Linda; Rowe, Caitlin L.; Blondel, Danielle; Jans, David A.; Moseley, Gregory W.

    2012-01-01

    Regulated nucleocytoplasmic transport of proteins is central to cellular function and dysfunction during processes such as viral infection. Active protein trafficking into and out of the nucleus is dependent on the presence within cargo proteins of intrinsic specific modular signals for nuclear import (nuclear localization signals, NLSs) and export (nuclear export signals, NESs). Rabies virus (RabV) phospho (P) protein, which is largely responsible for antagonising the host anti-viral response, is expressed as five isoforms (P1–P5). The subcellular trafficking of these isoforms is thought to depend on a balance between the activities of a dominant N-terminal NES (N-NES) and a distinct C-terminal NLS (C-NLS). Specifically, the N-NES-containing isoforms P1 and P2 are cytoplasmic, whereas the shorter P3–P5 isoforms, which lack the N-NES, are believed to be nuclear through the activity of the C-NLS. Here, we show for the first time that RabV P contains an additional strong NLS in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), which, intriguingly, overlaps with the N-NES. This arrangement represents a novel nuclear trafficking module where the N-NLS is inactive in P1 but becomes activated in P3, concomitant with truncation of the N-NES, to become the principal targeting signal conferring nuclear accumulation. Understanding this unique switch arrangement of overlapping, co-regulated NES/NLS sequences is vital to delineating the critical role of RabV P protein in viral infection. PMID:22700958

  11. Novel Nuclear Localization of Fatty Acid Synthase Correlates with Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, Allison A.; Rycyna, Kevin J.; Parwani, Anil V.; Datiri, Yeipyeng J.; Basudan, Ahmed M.; Sobek, Kathryn M.; Cummings, Jessica L.; Basse, Per H.; Bacich, Dean J.; O'Keefe, Denise S.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase is up-regulated in a variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. Up-regulation of fatty acid synthase not only increases production of fatty acids in tumors but also contributes to the transformed phenotype by conferring growth and survival advantages. In addition, increased fatty acid synthase expression in prostate cancer correlates with poor prognosis, although the mechanism(s) by which this occurs are not completely understood. Because fatty acid synthase is expressed at low levels in normal cells, it is currently a major target for anticancer drug design. Fatty acid synthase is normally found in the cytosol; however, we have discovered that it also localizes to the nucleus in a subset of prostate cancer cells. Analysis of the fatty acid synthase protein sequence indicated the presence of a nuclear localization signal, and subcellular fractionation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells, as well as immunofluorescent confocal microscopy of patient prostate tumor tissue and LNCaPs confirmed nuclear localization of this protein. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis of prostate cancer tissue indicated that nuclear localization of fatty acid synthase correlates with Gleason grade, implicating a potentially novel role in prostate cancer progression. Possible clinical implications include improving the accuracy of prostate biopsies in the diagnosis of low- versus intermediate-risk prostate cancer and the uncovering of novel metabolic pathways for the therapeutic targeting of androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID:24907642

  12. The Homothorax homeoprotein activates the nuclear localization of another homeoprotein, Extradenticle, and suppresses eye development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Chi-Yun; Kuo, Tung-Sheng; Jaw, Thomas J.; Kurant, Estee; Chen, Cheng-Tse; Bessarab, Dmitri A.; Salzberg, Adi; Sun, Y. Henry

    1998-01-01

    The Extradenticle (Exd) protein in Drosophila acts as a cofactor to homeotic proteins. Its nuclear localization is regulated. We report the cloning of the Drosophila homothorax (hth) gene, a homolog of the mouse Meis1 proto-oncogene that has a homeobox related to that of exd. Comparison with Meis1 finds two regions of high homology: a novel MH domain and the homeodomain. In imaginal discs, hth expression coincides with nuclear Exd. hth and exd also have virtually identical, mutant clonal phenotypes in adults. These results suggest that hth and exd function in the same pathway. We show that hth acts upstream of exd and is required and sufficient for Exd protein nuclear localization. We also show that hth and exd are both negative regulators of eye development; their mutant clones caused ectopic eye formation. Targeted expression of hth, but not of exd, in the eye disc abolished eye development completely. We suggest that hth acts with exd to delimit the eye field and prevent inappropriate eye development. PMID:9450936

  13. Casein kinase 2 (CK2) phosphorylates the deubiquitylase OTUB1 at Ser16 to trigger its nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Herhaus, Lina; Perez-Oliva, Ana B; Cozza, Giorgio; Gourlay, Robert; Weidlich, Simone; Campbell, David G; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Sapkota, Gopal P

    2015-04-14

    The deubiquitylating enzyme OTUB1 is present in all tissues and targets many substrates, in both the cytosol and nucleus. We found that casein kinase 2 (CK2) phosphorylated OTUB1 at Ser(16) to promote its nuclear accumulation in cells. Pharmacological inhibition or genetic ablation of CK2 blocked the phosphorylation of OTUB1 at Ser(16), causing its nuclear exclusion in various cell types. Whereas we detected unphosphorylated OTUB1 mainly in the cytosol, we detected Ser(16)-phosphorylated OTUB1 only in the nucleus. In vitro, Ser(16)-phosphorylated OTUB1 and nonphosphorylated OTUB1 exhibited similar catalytic activity, bound K63-linked ubiquitin chains, and interacted with the E2 enzyme UBE2N. CK2-mediated phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear localization of OTUB1 promoted the formation of 53BP1 (p53-binding protein 1) DNA repair foci in the nucleus of osteosarcoma cells exposed to ionizing radiation. Our findings indicate that the activity of CK2 is necessary for the nuclear translocation and subsequent function of OTUB1 in DNA damage repair. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Local-hybrid functional based on the correlation length

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Erin R.

    2014-09-28

    Local-hybrid functionals involve position-dependent mixing of Hartree-Fock and density-functional exchange, which should allow improved performance relative to conventional hybrids by reducing the inherent delocalization error and improving the long-range behaviour. Herein, the same-spin correlation length, obtained from the Fermi-hole radius, is used as the mixing parameter. The performance of the resulting local-hybrid functional is assessed for standard thermochemical and kinetics benchmarks. The local hybrid is shown to perform significantly better than the corresponding global hybrid in almost all cases.

  15. Identification of a Functional, CRM-1-Dependent Nuclear Export Signal in Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Andrea; Maillard, Patrick; Minisini, Rosalba; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Roohvand, Farzin; Pecheur, Eve-Isabelle; Pirisi, Mario; Budkowska, Agata

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. HCV core protein is involved in nucleocapsid formation, but it also interacts with multiple cytoplasmic and nuclear molecules and plays a crucial role in the development of liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. The core protein is found mostly in the cytoplasm during HCV infection, but also in the nucleus in patients with hepatocarcinoma and in core-transgenic mice. HCV core contains nuclear localization signals (NLS), but no nuclear export signal (NES) has yet been identified. We show here that the aa(109–133) region directs the translocation of core from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by the CRM-1-mediated nuclear export pathway. Mutagenesis of the three hydrophobic residues (L119, I123 and L126) in the identified NES or in the sequence encoding the mature core aa(1–173) significantly enhanced the nuclear localisation of the corresponding proteins in transfected Huh7 cells. Both the NES and the adjacent hydrophobic sequence in domain II of core were required to maintain the core protein or its fragments in the cytoplasmic compartment. Electron microscopy studies of the JFH1 replication model demonstrated that core was translocated into the nucleus a few minutes after the virus entered the cell. The blockade of nucleocytoplasmic export by leptomycin B treatment early in infection led to the detection of core protein in the nucleus by confocal microscopy and coincided with a decrease in virus replication. Our data suggest that the functional NLS and NES direct HCV core protein shuttling between the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments, with at least some core protein transported to the nucleus. These new properties of HCV core may be essential for virus multiplication and interaction with nuclear molecules, influence cell signaling and the pathogenesis of HCV infection. PMID:22039426

  16. Functional Conservation of the Transportin Nuclear Import Pathway in Divergent Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Siomi, Mikiko C.; Fromont, Micheline; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Wan, Lili; Wang, Fan; Legrain, Pierre; Dreyfuss, Gideon

    1998-01-01

    Human transportin1 (hTRN1) is the nuclear import receptor for a group of pre-mRNA/mRNA-binding proteins (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins [hnRNP]) represented by hnRNP A1, which shuttle continuously between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. hTRN1 interacts with the M9 region of hnRNP A1, a 38-amino-acid domain rich in Gly, Ser, and Asn, and mediates the nuclear import of M9-bearing proteins in vitro. Saccharomyces cerevisiae transportin (yTRN; also known as YBR017c or Kap104p) has been identified and cloned. To understanding the nuclear import mediated by yTRN, we searched with a yeast two-hybrid system for proteins that interact with it. In an exhaustive screen of the S. cerevisiae genome, the most frequently selected open reading frame was the nuclear mRNA-binding protein, Nab2p. We delineated a ca.-50-amino-acid region in Nab2p, termed NAB35, which specifically binds yTRN and is similar to the M9 motif. NAB35 also interacts with hTRN1 and functions as a nuclear localization signal in mammalian cells. Interestingly, yTRN can also mediate the import of NAB35-bearing proteins into mammalian nuclei in vitro. We also report on additional substrates for TRN as well as sequences of Drosophila melanogaster, Xenopus laevis, and Schizosaccharomyces pombe TRNs. Together, these findings demonstrate that both the M9 signal and the nuclear import machinery utilized by the transportin pathway are conserved in evolution. PMID:9632798

  17. Identification of a functional, CRM-1-dependent nuclear export signal in hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Andrea; Maillard, Patrick; Minisini, Rosalba; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Roohvand, Farzin; Pecheur, Eve-Isabelle; Pirisi, Mario; Budkowska, Agata

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. HCV core protein is involved in nucleocapsid formation, but it also interacts with multiple cytoplasmic and nuclear molecules and plays a crucial role in the development of liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. The core protein is found mostly in the cytoplasm during HCV infection, but also in the nucleus in patients with hepatocarcinoma and in core-transgenic mice. HCV core contains nuclear localization signals (NLS), but no nuclear export signal (NES) has yet been identified.We show here that the aa(109-133) region directs the translocation of core from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by the CRM-1-mediated nuclear export pathway. Mutagenesis of the three hydrophobic residues (L119, I123 and L126) in the identified NES or in the sequence encoding the mature core aa(1-173) significantly enhanced the nuclear localisation of the corresponding proteins in transfected Huh7 cells. Both the NES and the adjacent hydrophobic sequence in domain II of core were required to maintain the core protein or its fragments in the cytoplasmic compartment. Electron microscopy studies of the JFH1 replication model demonstrated that core was translocated into the nucleus a few minutes after the virus entered the cell. The blockade of nucleocytoplasmic export by leptomycin B treatment early in infection led to the detection of core protein in the nucleus by confocal microscopy and coincided with a decrease in virus replication.Our data suggest that the functional NLS and NES direct HCV core protein shuttling between the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments, with at least some core protein transported to the nucleus. These new properties of HCV core may be essential for virus multiplication and interaction with nuclear molecules, influence cell signaling and the pathogenesis of HCV infection.

  18. Long isoform of ErbB3 binding protein, p48, mediates protein kinase B/Akt-dependent HDM2 stabilization and nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chung Kwon; Lee, Sang Bae; Nguyen, Truong L.X.; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Um, Sung Hee; Kim, Jihoe; Ahn, Jee-Yin

    2012-01-15

    p48 is a long isoform of the ErbB3 binding protein that has oncogenic functions including promotion of carcinogenesis and induction of malignant transformation through negative regulation of tumor suppressor p53. Here, we show that high level of p48 protein expression leads to enhance HDM2 phosphorylation by Akt and inhibits the self-ubiquitination of HDM2 by up-regulation of Akt activity, thereby promoting its protein stability. Moreover, p48 expression leads to accumulated nuclear localization of HDM2, whereas p48 depletion disturbs its nuclear localization. Hence, higher expression of p48 in cancer cells reduces p53 levels through modulation of HDM2 nuclear localization and protein stability via regulation of its Akt-mediated phosphorylation.

  19. A functional NR4A nuclear receptor DNA-binding domain is required for organ development in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Heard, Melissa; Maina, Claude V; Morehead, Benjamin E; Hoener, Marius C; Nguyen, Tri Q; Williams, Christopher C; Rowan, Brian G; Gissendanner, Chris R

    2010-08-01

    NR4A nuclear receptors are a diverse group of orphan nuclear receptors with critical roles in regulating cell proliferation and cell differentiation. The ortholog of the NR4A nuclear receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans, NHR-6, also has a role in cell proliferation and cell differentiation during organogenesis of the spermatheca. Here we show that NHR-6 is able to bind the canonical NR4A monomer response element and can transactivate from this site in mammalian HEK293 cells. Using a functional GFP-tagged NHR-6 fusion, we also demonstrate that NHR-6 is nuclear localized during development of the spermatheca. Mutation of the DNA-binding domain of NHR-6 abolishes its activity in genetic rescue assays, demonstrating a requirement for the DNA-binding domain. This study represents the first genetic demonstration of an in vivo requirement for an NR4A nuclear receptor DNA-binding domain in a whole organism.

  20. Bipartite nuclear localization signal of matrin 3 is essential for vertebrate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hisada-Ishii, Shoji; Ebihara, Mizuki; Kobayashi, Nao; Kitagawa, Yasuo . E-mail: yasuok@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2007-03-02

    Matrin 3, a nuclear matrix protein has potential (1) to withhold promiscuously edited RNAs within the nucleus in cooperation with p54{sup nrb} and PSF (2) to mediate NMDA-induced neuronal death, and (3) to modulate promoter activity of genes proximal to matrix/scaffold attachment region (MAR/SAR). We identified a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) of chicken matrin 3 (cmatr3) at residues 583-602. By expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to the NLS mutant in chicken DT40 cells, we showed an essential role of the NLS for cell proliferation. Furthermore, we showed that both clusters of basic amino acids and a linker of the bipartite NLS were essential and sufficient for the nuclear import of GFP. Exogenous cmatr3 rescued the HeLa cells where human matrin 3 was suppressed by RNA interference, but cmatr3 containing deletions at either of the basic amino acid clusters or the linker could not.

  1. Characterization of the nuclear localization signal of the hepatitis delta virus antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Carolina; Freitas, Natalia; Cunha, Celso

    2008-01-05

    The delta antigen (HDAg) is the only protein encoded by the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) RNA genome. The HDAg contains an RNA binding domain, a dimerization domain, and a nuclear localization signal (NLS). The nuclear import of HDV RNPs is thought to be one of the first tasks of the HDAg during the HDV replication cycle. Using c-myc-PK fusions with several regions of the HDAg in transfection assays in Huh7 cells, we found that the HDAg NLS consists of a single stretch of 10 amino acids, EGAPPAKRAR, located in positions 66-75. Deletion and mutation analysis of this region showed that both the acidic glutamic acid residue at position 66 and the basic arginine residue at position 75 are essential for promoting nuclear import.

  2. Nuclear pore proteins are involved in the biogenesis of functional tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Simos, G; Tekotte, H; Grosjean, H; Segref, A; Sharma, K; Tollervey, D; Hurt, E C

    1996-01-01

    Los1p and Pus1p, which are involved in tRNA biogenesis, were found in a genetic screen for components interacting with the nuclear pore protein Nsp1p. LOS1, PUS1 and NSP1 interact functionally, since the combination of mutations in the three genes causes synthetic lethality. Pus1p is an intranuclear protein which exhibits a nucleotide-specific and intron-dependent tRNA pseudouridine synthase activity. Los1p was shown previously to be required for efficient pre-tRNA splicing; we report here that Los1p localizes to the nuclear pores and is linked functionally to several components of the tRNA biogenesis machinery including Pus1p and Tfc4p. When the formation of functional tRNA was analyzed by an in vivo assay, the los1(-) pus1(-) double mutant, as well as several thermosensitive nucleoporin mutants including nsp1, nup116, nup133 and nup85, exhibited loss of suppressor tRNA activity even at permissive temperatures. These data suggest that nuclear pore proteins are required for the biogenesis of functional tRNA. Images PMID:8641292

  3. Functional renal imaging: new trends in radiology and nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Durand, Emmanuel; Chaumet-Riffaud, Philippe; Grenier, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to compare the characteristics of various techniques for functional renal imaging, with a focus on nuclear medicine and magnetic resonance imaging. Even with low spatial resolution and rather poor signal-to-noise ratio, classical nuclear medicine has the advantage of linearity and good sensitivity. It remains the gold standard technique for renal relative functional assessment. Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-labeled diethylenetriamine penta-acetate remains the reference glomerular tracer. Tubular tracers have been improved: (123)I- or (131)I-hippuran, (99m)Tc-MAG3 and, recently, (99m)Tc-nitrilotriacetic acid. However, advancement in molecular imaging has not produced a groundbreaking tracer. Renal magnetic resonance imaging with classical gadolinated tracers probably has potential in this domain but has a lack of linearity and, therefore, its value still needs evaluation. Moreover, the advent of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis has delayed its expansion. Other developments, such as diffusion or blood oxygen level-dependent imaging, may have a role in the future. The other modalities have a limited role in clinical practice for functional renal imaging.

  4. Nuclear matter properties from local chiral interactions with Δ isobar intermediate states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logoteta, Domenico; Bombaci, Ignazio; Kievsky, Alejandro

    2016-12-01

    Using two-nucleon and three-nucleon interactions derived in the framework of chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) with and without the explicit Δ isobar contributions, we calculate the energy per particle of symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter in the framework of the microscopic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach. In particular, we present for the first time nuclear matter calculations using the new fully local in coordinate-space two-nucleon interaction at the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-order (N3LO) of ChPT with Δ isobar intermediate states (N 3 LO Δ ) recently developed by Piarulli et al. [arXiv:1606.06335]. We find that using this N 3 LO Δ potential, supplemented with a local N2LO three-nucleon interaction with explicit Δ isobar degrees of freedom, it is possible to obtain a satisfactory saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter. For this combination of two- and three-nucleon interactions we also calculate the nuclear symmetry energy and we compare our results with the empirical constraints on this quantity obtained using the excitation energies to isobaric analog states in nuclei and using experimental data on the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei, finding a very good agreement in all the considered nucleonic density range. In addition, we find that the explicit inclusion of Δ isobars diminishes the strength of the three-nucleon interactions needed to get a good saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter. We also compare the results of our calculations with those obtained by other research groups using chiral nuclear interactions with different many-body methods, finding in many cases a very satisfactory agreement.

  5. Nuclear localization and secretion competence are conserved among henipavirus matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    McLinton, Elisabeth C; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Lee, Alexander; Moseley, Gregory W; Marsh, Glenn A; Wang, Lin-Fa; Jans, David A; Lieu, Kim G; Netter, Hans J

    2017-04-01

    Viruses of the genus Henipavirus of the family Paramyxoviridae are zoonotic pathogens, which have emerged in Southeast Asia, Australia and Africa. Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus are highly virulent pathogens transmitted from bats to animals and humans, while the henipavirus Cedar virus seems to be non-pathogenic in infection studies. The full replication cycle of the Paramyxoviridae occurs in the host cell's cytoplasm, where viral assembly is orchestrated by the matrix (M) protein. Unexpectedly, the NiV-M protein traffics through the nucleus as an essential step to engage the plasma membrane in preparation for viral budding/release. Comparative studies were performed to assess whether M protein nuclear localization is a common feature of the henipaviruses, including the recently sequenced (although not yet isolated) Ghanaian bat henipavirus (Kumasi virus, GH-M74a virus) and Mojiang virus. Live-cell confocal microscopy revealed that nuclear translocation of GFP-fused M protein is conserved between henipaviruses in both human- and bat-derived cell lines. However, the efficiency of M protein nuclear localization and virus-like particle budding competency varied. Additionally, Cedar virus-, Kumasi virus- and Mojiang virus-M proteins were mutated in a bipartite nuclear localization signal, indicating that a key lysine residue is essential for nuclear import, export and induction of budding events, as previously reported for NiV-M. The results of this study suggest that the M proteins of henipaviruses may utilize a similar nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathway as an essential step during viral replication in both humans and bats.

  6. Visualizing cell structure and function with point-localization superresolution imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Prabuddha; Van Engelenburg, Schuyler; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental to the success of cell and developmental biology is the ability to tease apart molecular organization in cells and tissues by localizing specific proteins with respect to one another in a native cellular context. However, many key cellular structures (from mitochondrial cristae to nuclear pores) lie below the diffraction limit of visible light, precluding analysis of their organization by conventional approaches. Point-localization superresolution microscopy techniques, such as PALM and STORM, are poised to resolve, with unprecedented clarity, the organizational principles of macromolecular complexes within cells, thus leading to deeper insights into cellular function in both health and disease. PMID:23237943

  7. Augmented Lagrangian method for constrained nuclear density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszczak, A.; Stoitsov, M.; Baran, A.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2010-10-01

    The augmented Lagrangiam method (ALM), widely used in quantum chemistry constrained optimization problems, is applied in the context of the nuclear Density Functional Theory (DFT) in the self-consistent constrained Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (CHFB) variant. The ALM allows precise calculations of multi-dimensional energy surfaces in the space of collective coordinates that are needed to, e.g., determine fission pathways and saddle points; it improves the accuracy of computed derivatives with respect to collective variables that are used to determine collective inertia; and is well adapted to supercomputer applications.

  8. Nuclear export of RNA: Different sizes, shapes and functions.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tobias; Ngo, Linh H; Wickramasinghe, Vihandha O

    2017-09-01

    Export of protein-coding and non-coding RNA molecules from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is critical for gene expression. This necessitates the continuous transport of RNA species of different size, shape and function through nuclear pore complexes via export receptors and adaptor proteins. Here, we provide an overview of the major RNA export pathways in humans, highlighting the similarities and differences between each. Its importance is underscored by the growing appreciation that deregulation of RNA export pathways is associated with human diseases like cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Nuclear clustering in the energy density functional approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ebran, J.-P.; Khan, E.; Nikšić, T.; Vretenar, D.

    2015-10-15

    Nuclear Energy Density Functionals (EDFs) are a microscopic tool of choice extensively used over the whole chart to successfully describe the properties of atomic nuclei ensuing from their quantum liquid nature. In the last decade, they also have proved their ability to deal with the cluster phenomenon, shedding a new light on its fundamental understanding by treating on an equal footing both quantum liquid and cluster aspects of nuclei. Such a unified microscopic description based on nucleonic degrees of freedom enables to tackle the question pertaining to the origin of the cluster phenomenon and emphasizes intrinsic mechanisms leading to the emergence of clusters in nuclei.

  10. Local field distribution near corrugated interfaces: Green's function formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, K. W.; Wan, Jones T. K.

    2001-12-01

    We have developed a Green's function formalism to compute the local field distribution near an interface separating two media of different dielectric constants. The Maxwell's equations are converted into a surface integral equation; thus it greatly simplifies the solutions and yields accurate results for interfaces of arbitrary shape. The integral equation is solved and the local field distribution is obtained for a periodic interface.

  11. Local negotiation on compensation siting of the spent nuclear fuel repository in Finland

    SciTech Connect

    Kojo, Matti

    2007-07-01

    The aim of the paper is to analyse the local negotiation process between the Municipality of Eurajoki and the nuclear power company Teollisuuden Voima (TVO) and the nuclear waste management company Posiva Oy. The aim of the negotiations was to find an acceptable form of compensation for siting a spent nuclear fuel repository in Olkiluoto, Finland. The paper includes background information on the siting process in Finland, the local political setting in the Municipality of Eurajoki and a description of the negotiation process. The analysis of the negotiations on compensation is important for better understanding the progress of the Finnish siting process. The paper describes the picture of the contest to host the spent nuclear fuel repository. It also provides more information on the relationship between the Municipality of Eurajoki and the power company TVO. The negotiations on compensation and the roles of various players in the negotiations have not been studied in detail because the minutes of the Vuojoki liaison group were not available before the decision of the Supreme Administrative Court in May 2006. (author)

  12. Characterization of the nuclear localization signal of the mouse TET3 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Peng; Zhou, Xiao-long; Zhang, Hong-xiao; Xiong, Kai; Teng, Yun; Huang, Xian-ju; Cao, Rui; Wang, Yi; Liu, Hong-lin

    2013-09-27

    Highlights: •Amino acid sequence KKRK is responsible for nuclear localization of TET3. •Amino acid sequence KKRK are capable of targeting the cytoplasmic proteins to the nucleus. •Amino acid sequence KKRK are conserved in TET3 orthologs. -- Abstract: DNA demethylation is associated with gene activation and is mediated by a family of ten-eleven translocation (TET) dioxygenase. The TET3 protein is a 1668-amino-acid DNA demethylase that is predicted to possess five nuclear localization signals (NLSs). In this paper, we used a series of green fluorescent protein-tagged and mutation constructs to identify a conserved NLS (KKRK) embedded between amino acid 1615 and 1618 of mouse TET3. The KKRK sequence facilitates the cytoplasmic protein’s translocation into the nucleus. Additionally TET3 may be imported into the nucleus by importin-α and importin-β.

  13. Nuclear localization of Rad52 is pre-requisite for its sumoylation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohuchi, Takashi; Seki, Masayuki Enomoto, Takemi

    2008-07-18

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad52 plays major roles in several types of homologous recombination. Here, we found that rad52-K200R mutation greatly reduced sumoylation of Rad52. The rad52-K200R mutant exhibited defects in various types of recombination, such as intrachromosomal recombination and mating-type switching. The K200 residue of Rad52 is part of the nuclear localization signal (NLS), which is important for transport into the nucleus. Indeed, the addition of a SV40 NLS to Rad52-K200R suppressed the sumoylation defect of Rad52-K200R. These findings indicate that nuclear localization of Rad52 is pre-requisite for its sumoylation.

  14. Functional Domains of Murine Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Egress Protein M53/p38†

    PubMed Central

    Lötzerich, Mark; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.

    2006-01-01

    Two conserved herpes simplex virus 1 proteins, UL31 and UL34, form a complex at the inner nuclear membrane which governs primary envelopment and nuclear egress of the herpesvirus nucleocapsids. In mouse cytomegalovirus, a member of the betaherpesvirus subfamily, the homologous proteins M53/p38 and M50/p35 form the nuclear egress complex (NEC). Since the interaction of these proteins is essential for functionality, the definition of the mutual binding sites is a prerequisite for further analysis. Using a comprehensive random mutagenesis procedure, we have mapped the M53/p38 binding site of M50/p35 (A. Bubeck, M. Wagner, Z. Ruzsics, M. Lötzerich, M. Iglesias, I. R. Singh, and U. H. Koszinowski, J. Virol. 78:8026-8035). Here we describe a corresponding analysis for the UL31 homolog M53/p38. A total of 72 individual mutants were reinserted into the genome to test the complementation of the lethal M53 null phenotype. The mutants were also studied for colocalization and for coprecipitation with M50/p35. The analysis revealed that the nonconserved N-terminal one-third of M53/p38 provides the nuclear localization signal as an essential function. The collective results for many mutants localized the binding site for M50/p35 to amino acids (aa) 112 to 137. No single aa exchange for alanine could destroy NEC formation, but virus attenuation revealed a major role for aa K128, Y129, and L130. The lethal phenotype of several insertion and stop mutants indicated the functional importance of the C terminus of the protein. PMID:16352532

  15. Functional domains of murine cytomegalovirus nuclear egress protein M53/p38.

    PubMed

    Lötzerich, Mark; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Koszinowski, Ulrich H

    2006-01-01

    Two conserved herpes simplex virus 1 proteins, UL31 and UL34, form a complex at the inner nuclear membrane which governs primary envelopment and nuclear egress of the herpesvirus nucleocapsids. In mouse cytomegalovirus, a member of the betaherpesvirus subfamily, the homologous proteins M53/p38 and M50/p35 form the nuclear egress complex (NEC). Since the interaction of these proteins is essential for functionality, the definition of the mutual binding sites is a prerequisite for further analysis. Using a comprehensive random mutagenesis procedure, we have mapped the M53/p38 binding site of M50/p35 (A. Bubeck, M. Wagner, Z. Ruzsics, M. Lötzerich, M. Iglesias, I. R. Singh, and U. H. Koszinowski, J. Virol. 78:8026-8035). Here we describe a corresponding analysis for the UL31 homolog M53/p38. A total of 72 individual mutants were reinserted into the genome to test the complementation of the lethal M53 null phenotype. The mutants were also studied for colocalization and for coprecipitation with M50/p35. The analysis revealed that the nonconserved N-terminal one-third of M53/p38 provides the nuclear localization signal as an essential function. The collective results for many mutants localized the binding site for M50/p35 to amino acids (aa) 112 to 137. No single aa exchange for alanine could destroy NEC formation, but virus attenuation revealed a major role for aa K128, Y129, and L130. The lethal phenotype of several insertion and stop mutants indicated the functional importance of the C terminus of the protein.

  16. Nuclear localization signal sequence is required for VACM-1/CUL5-dependent regulation of cellular growth.

    PubMed

    Willis, Angelica N; Dean, Shirley E Bradley; Habbouche, Joe A; Kempers, Brian T; Ludwig, Megan L; Sayfie, Aaron D; Lewis, Steven P; Harrier, Stephanie; DeBruine, Zachary J; Garrett, Richard; Burnatowska-Hledin, Maria A

    2017-04-01

    VACM-1/CUL5 is a member of the cullin family of proteins involved in the E3 ligase-dependent degradation of diverse proteins that regulate cellular proliferation. The ability of VACM-1/CUL5 to inhibit cellular growth is affected by its posttranslational modifications and its localization to the nucleus. Since the mechanism of VACM-1/CUL5 translocation to the nucleus is not clear, the goal of this project was to determine the role that the putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) we identified in the VACM-1/CUL5 ((640)PKLKRQ(646)) plays in the cellular localization of VACM-1/CUL5 and its effect on cellular growth. We used site-directed mutagenesis to change Lys642 and Lys644 to Gly and the mutated cDNA constructs were transfected into COS-1 cells. Mutation of the NLS in VACM-1/CUL5 significantly reduced its localization to the nucleus and compromised its effect on cellular growth. We have shown previously that the antiproliferative effect of VACM-1/CUL5 could be reversed by mutation of PKA-specific phosphorylation sequence ((S730A)VACM-1/CUL5), which was associated with its increased nuclear localization and modification by NEDD8. Thus, we examined whether these properties can be controlled by the NLS. The mutation of NLS in (S730A)VACM-1/CUL5 cDNA compromised its proliferative effect and reduced its localization to the nucleus. The immunocytochemistry results showed that, in cells transfected with the mutant cDNAs, the nuclear NEDD8 signal was decreased. Western blot analysis of total cell lysates, however, showed that VACM-1/CUL5 neddylation was not affected. Together, these results suggest that the presence of the NLS, both in VACM-1/CUL5 and in (S730A)VACM-1/CUL5 sequences, is critical for their control of cell proliferation.

  17. fMRI alignment based on local functional connectivity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Di; Du, Yuhui; Cheng, Hewei; Jiang, Tianzi; Fan, Yong

    2012-02-01

    In functional neuroimaging studies, the inter-subject alignment of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data is a necessary precursor to improve functional consistency across subjects. Traditional structural MRI based registration methods cannot achieve accurate inter-subject functional consistency in that functional units are not necessarily consistently located relative to anatomical structures due to functional variability across subjects. Although spatial smoothing commonly used in fMRI data preprocessing can reduce the inter-subject functional variability, it may blur the functional signals and thus lose the fine-grained information. In this paper we propose a novel functional signal based fMRI image registration method which aligns local functional connectivity patterns of different subjects to improve the inter-subject functional consistency. Particularly, the functional connectivity is measured using Pearson correlation. For each voxel of an fMRI image, its functional connectivity to every voxel in its local spatial neighborhood, referred to as its local functional connectivity pattern, is characterized by a rotation and shift invariant representation. Based on this representation, the spatial registration of two fMRI images is achieved by minimizing the difference between their corresponding voxels' local functional connectivity patterns using a deformable image registration model. Experiment results based on simulated fMRI data have demonstrated that the proposed method is more robust and reliable than the existing fMRI image registration methods, including maximizing functional correlations and minimizing difference of global connectivity matrices across different subjects. Experiment results based on real resting-state fMRI data have further demonstrated that the proposed fMRI registration method can statistically significantly improve functional consistency across subjects.

  18. Nuclear localization of nucleoside diphosphate kinase type B (nm23-H2) in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Kraeft, S K; Traincart, F; Mesnildrey, S; Bourdais, J; Véron, M; Chen, L B

    1996-08-25

    Nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinases are metabolic enzymes found ubiquitously in cells. Recently, two known human isoforms of NDP kinase (A and B), identical to the protein products of the genes nm23-H1 and nm23-H2, respectively, have been implicated in cancer metastasis and transcriptional regulation. To date, NDP kinase has been studied extensively in tissue sections and its cellular localization was described as being cytoplasmic. However, the recently discovered role of the nm23-H2 gene product in transcriptional activation of the c-myc proto-oncogene also suggests a nuclear localization of the protein. In this study, we used isoform-specific antibodies against NDPK-B to examine the subcellular localization of the nm23-H2 gene product. The cytoplasmic fluorescence is intense and homogeneous with pronounced labeling in the centromere region. The distribution of NDPK-B in interphase nuclei exhibits a pattern of numerous uniformly dispersed fine dots with reduced staining of the nucleoli. To further characterize the nuclear localization of NDPK-B, in situ sequential extraction of nuclear components was performed. Brief exposure to Triton X-100 and subsequent treatment with RNase A do not change the nuclear staining pattern of NDPK-B. In contrast, treatment of Triton X-100-permeabilized nuclei with DNase I results in a significant loss of fluorescence. In mitotic prophase cells, the protein segregates from forming chromosomes and reappears in newly formed daughter nuclei after cell division. Taken together, the results indicate an association of NDPK-B with chromatin in interphase nuclei, supporting its proposed role in transcription.

  19. Nuclear 11.3 μm PAH emission in local active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Esquej, P.; Roche, P. F.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Hönig, S. F.; González-Martín, O.; Aretxaga, I.; Mason, R. E.; Packham, C.; Levenson, N. A.; Rodríguez Espinosa, J. M.; Siebenmorgen, R.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Colina, L.; Alvarez, C.; Telesco, C. M.

    2014-09-01

    We present Gran Telescopio CANARIAS CanariCam 8.7 μm imaging and 7.5-13 μm spectroscopy of six local systems known to host an active galactic nucleus (AGN) and have nuclear star formation. Our main goal is to investigate whether the molecules responsible for the 11.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) feature are destroyed in the close vicinity of an AGN. We detect 11.3 μm PAH feature emission in the nuclear regions of the galaxies as well as extended PAH emission over a few hundred parsecs. The equivalent width (EW) of the feature shows a minimum at the nucleus but increases with increasing radial distances, reaching typical star-forming values a few hundred parsecs away from the nucleus. The reduced nuclear EWs are interpreted as due to increased dilution from the AGN continuum rather than destruction of the PAH molecules. We conclude that at least those molecules responsible for the 11.3 μm PAH feature survive in the nuclear environments as close as 10 pc from the AGN and for Seyfert-like AGN luminosities. We propose that material in the dusty tori, nuclear gas discs, and/or host galaxies of AGN is likely to provide the column densities necessary to protect the PAH molecules from the AGN radiation field.

  20. Revival of the Intermolecular Nuclear Overhauser Effect for Mapping Local Protein Hydration Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Braun, Daniel; Schmollngruber, Michael; Steinhauser, Othmar

    2017-07-20

    The highly heterogeneous hydration dynamics of protein-water interfaces is considered important for protein stability and dynamics, protein folding, enzymatic activity, and even drug design. The nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) between protein and water protons is the only experimental observable which, in principle, can provide a map of locally resolved hydration dynamics. However, its utility was questioned in various theoretical studies that emphasized the contributions of long-range NOE interactions. We show by a detailed analysis based on molecular dynamics simulations that, contrary to recent claims, the protein-water NOE is an excellent observable to map local hydration dynamics at the protein surface.

  1. Nuclear materials transportation workshops: USDOE outreach to local governments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-28

    To provide direct outreach to local governments, the Transportation Management Division of the United States Department of Energy asked the Urban Consortium and its Energy Task Force to assemble representatives for two workshops focusing on the transport of nuclear materials. The first session, for jurisdictions east of the Mississippi River, was held in New Orleans on May 5--6, 1988; the second was conducted on June 6--7, 1988 in Denver for jurisdictions to the west. Twenty local government professionals with management or operational responsibility for hazardous materials transportation within their jurisdictions were selected to attend each workshop. The discussions identified five major areas of concern to local government professionals; coordination; training; information resources; marking and placarding; and responder resources. Integrated federal, state, and local levels of government emerged as a priority coordination issue along with the need for expanded availability of training and training resources for first-reponders.

  2. Local function conservation in sequence and structure space.

    PubMed

    Weinhold, Nils; Sander, Oliver; Domingues, Francisco S; Lengauer, Thomas; Sommer, Ingolf

    2008-07-04

    We assess the variability of protein function in protein sequence and structure space. Various regions in this space exhibit considerable difference in the local conservation of molecular function. We analyze and capture local function conservation by means of logistic curves. Based on this analysis, we propose a method for predicting molecular function of a query protein with known structure but unknown function. The prediction method is rigorously assessed and compared with a previously published function predictor. Furthermore, we apply the method to 500 functionally unannotated PDB structures and discuss selected examples. The proposed approach provides a simple yet consistent statistical model for the complex relations between protein sequence, structure, and function. The GOdot method is available online (http://godot.bioinf.mpi-inf.mpg.de).

  3. Transcription-dependent nuclear localization of DAZAP1 requires an N-terminal signal

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yi-Tzu; Wen, Wan-Ching; Yen, Pauline H.

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when the nuclear transcription is inhibited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1's transcription-dependent nuclear localization requires N-terminal N42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SLIRP binds to N42 and may be involved in the process. -- Abstract: Deleted in Azoospermia Associated Protein 1 (DAZAP1) is a ubiquitous hnRNP protein required for normal development and spermatogenesis. It resides predominantly in the nucleus and moves between the nucleus and the cytoplasm via a ZNS shuttling signal at its C-terminus. DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when RNA polymerase II activity is inhibited by actinomycin D. Here we report the mapping of a 42-amino acid segment (N42) at the N-terminus of DAZAP1 that is both necessary and sufficient for its transcription-dependent nuclear localization. In addition, using a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified SLIRP as a N42-binding protein which may regulate DAZAP1 subcellular localization.

  4. A set of enhanced green fluorescent protein concatemers for quantitative determination of nuclear localization signal strength.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Jennifer; Thavaraja, Ramya; Giehler, Susanne; Nalaskowski, Marcus M

    2017-09-15

    Regulated transport of proteins between nucleus and cytoplasm is an important process in the eukaryotic cell. In most cases, active nucleo-cytoplasmic protein transport is mediated by nuclear localization signal (NLS) and/or nuclear export signal (NES) motifs. In this study, we developed a set of vectors expressing enhanced GFP (EGFP) concatemers ranging from 2 to 12 subunits (2xEGFP to 12xEGFP) for analysis of NLS strength. As shown by in gel GFP fluorescence analysis and αGFP Western blotting, EGFP concatemers are expressed as fluorescent full-length proteins in eukaryotic cells. As expected, nuclear localization of concatemeric EGFPs decreases with increasing molecular weight. By oligonucleotide ligation this set of EGFP concatemers can be easily fused to NLS motifs. After determination of intracellular localization of EGFP concatemers alone and fused to different NLS motifs we calculated the size of a hypothetic EGFP concatemer showing a defined distribution of EGFP fluorescence between nucleus and cytoplasm (n/c ratio = 2). Clear differences of the size of the hypothetic EGFP concatemer depending on the fused NLS motif were observed. Therefore, we propose to use the size of this hypothetic concatemer as quantitative indicator for comparing strength of different NLS motifs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Vinculin promotes nuclear localization of TAZ to inhibit ECM stiffness-dependent differentiation into adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Mito; Wada, Hiroki; Kimura, Yasuhisa; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Kioka, Noriyuki

    2017-03-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness regulates the lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Although cells sense ECM stiffness through focal adhesions, how cells sense ECM stiffness and regulate ECM stiffness-dependent differentiation remains largely unclear. In this study, we show that the cytoskeletal focal adhesion protein vinculin plays a critical role in the ECM stiffness-dependent adipocyte differentiation of MSCs. ST2 mouse MSCs differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts in an ECM stiffness-dependent manner. We find that a rigid ECM increases the amount of cytoskeleton-associated vinculin and promotes the nuclear localization and activity of the transcriptional coactivator paralogs Yes-associated protein (YAP, also known as YAP1) and transcriptional coactivator with a PDZ-binding motif (TAZ, also known as WWTR1) (hereafter YAP/TAZ). Vinculin is necessary for enhanced nuclear localization and activity of YAP/TAZ on the rigid ECM but it does not affect the phosphorylation of the YAP/TAZ kinase LATS1. Furthermore, vinculin depletion promotes differentiation into adipocytes on rigid ECM, while it inhibits differentiation into osteoblasts. Finally, TAZ knockdown was less effective at promoting adipocyte differentiation in vinculin-depleted cells than in control cells. These results suggest that vinculin promotes the nuclear localization of transcription factor TAZ to inhibit the adipocyte differentiation on rigid ECM.

  6. Computational identification of post-translational modification-based nuclear import regulations by characterizing nuclear localization signal-import receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jhih-Rong; Liu, Zhonghao; Hu, Jianjun

    2014-10-01

    The binding affinity between a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and its import receptor is closely related to corresponding nuclear import activity. PTM-based modulation of the NLS binding affinity to the import receptor is one of the most understood mechanisms to regulate nuclear import of proteins. However, identification of such regulation mechanisms is challenging due to the difficulty of assessing the impact of PTM on corresponding nuclear import activities. In this study we proposed NIpredict, an effective algorithm to predict nuclear import activity given its NLS, in which molecular interaction energy components (MIECs) were used to characterize the NLS-import receptor interaction, and the support vector regression machine (SVR) was used to learn the relationship between the characterized NLS-import receptor interaction and the corresponding nuclear import activity. Our experiments showed that nuclear import activity change due to NLS change could be accurately predicted by the NIpredict algorithm. Based on NIpredict, we developed a systematic framework to identify potential PTM-based nuclear import regulations for human and yeast nuclear proteins. Application of this approach has identified the potential nuclear import regulation mechanisms by phosphorylation of two nuclear proteins including SF1 and ORC6.

  7. Interaction of nucleosome assembly proteins abolishes nuclear localization of DGK{zeta} by attenuating its association with importins

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Masashi; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Ichimura, Tohru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Takahashi, Nobuya; Iseki, Ken; Yagisawa, Hitoshi; Shinkawa, Takashi; Isobe, Toshiaki; Goto, Kaoru

    2011-12-10

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) is involved in the regulation of lipid-mediated signal transduction through the metabolism of a second messenger diacylglycerol. Of the DGK family, DGK{zeta}, which contains a nuclear localization signal, localizes mainly to the nucleus but translocates to the cytoplasm under pathological conditions. However, the detailed mechanism of translocation and its functional significance remain unclear. To elucidate these issues, we used a proteomic approach to search for protein targets that interact with DGK{zeta}. Results show that nucleosome assembly protein (NAP) 1-like 1 (NAP1L1) and NAP1-like 4 (NAP1L4) are identified as novel DGK{zeta} binding partners. NAP1Ls constitutively shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in transfected HEK293 cells. The molecular interaction of DGK{zeta} and NAP1Ls prohibits nuclear import of DGK{zeta} because binding of NAP1Ls to DGK{zeta} blocks import carrier proteins, Qip1 and NPI1, to interact with DGK{zeta}, leading to cytoplasmic tethering of DGK{zeta}. In addition, overexpression of NAP1Ls exerts a protective effect against doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that NAP1Ls are involved in a novel molecular basis for the regulation of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of DGK{zeta} and provide a clue to examine functional significance of its translocation under pathological conditions.

  8. How do electron localization functions describe π-electron delocalization?

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Stephan N; Mo, Yirong; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2011-12-14

    Scalar fields provide an intuitive picture of chemical bonding. In particular, the electron localization function (ELF) has proven to be highly valuable in interpreting a broad range of bonding patterns. The discrimination between enhanced or reduced electron (de)localization within cyclic π-conjugated systems remains, however, challenging for ELF. In order to clearly distinguish between the local properties of ten highly and weakly π-(de)localized prototype systems, we compare the ELFs of both the canonical wave functions and electron-localized states (diabatic) with those of two closely related scalar fields: the electron localizability indicator (ELI-D) and the localized orbital locator (LOL). The simplest LOL function distinguishes enhanced from weak π-(de)localization in an insightful and reliable manner. LOL offers the finest contrast between annulenes with 4n/4n + 2 π electrons and their inorganic analogues as well as between hyperconjugated cyclopentadiene derivatives. LOL(π) also gives an appealing and intuitive picture of the π-bond. In contrast, the most popular ELF fails to capture subtle contrasting local electronic properties and suffers from the arbitrariness of the σ/π dissection. The orbital separation of the most recent ELI-D is clear-cut but the interpretations sometime less straightforward in the present context.

  9. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lynne M. Stevens

    2010-07-01

    Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

  10. Global NLO Analysis of Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, M.; Kumano, S.; Nagai, T.-H.

    2008-02-21

    Nuclear parton distribution functions (NPDFs) are determined by a global analysis of experimental measurements on structure-function ratios F{sub 2}{sup A}/F{sub 2}{sup A{sup '}} and Drell-Yan cross section ratios {sigma}{sub DY}{sup A}/{sigma}{sub DY}{sup A{sup '}}, and their uncertainties are estimated by the Hessian method. The NPDFs are obtained in both leading order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO) of {alpha}{sub s}. As a result, valence-quark distributions are relatively well determined, whereas antiquark distributions at x>0.2 and gluon distributions in the whole x region have large uncertainties. The NLO uncertainties are slightly smaller than the LO ones; however, such a NLO improvement is not as significant as the nucleonic case.

  11. Selected Interventions in Nuclear Medicine: Gastrointestinal Motor Functions

    PubMed Central

    Odunsi, Suwebatu T.; Camilleri, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of gastrointestinal functions by scintigraphy is established in clinical practice and research. The most commonly used test is the gastric emptying test. This is acknowledged as the gold standard and is conducted according to a consensus statement from the national nuclear medicine and motility societies. Other techniques are somewhat more esoteric (e.g. measurement of gastric accommodation with SPECT) or the scintigraphic approach is not the acknowledged gold standard (e.g. colonic transit, recto-anal angle and emptying, esophageal transit). The performance characteristics of many of the scintigraphic measurements have been published and the pros and cons established in the literature. Gastrointestinal scintigraphy is an integral and important component of the assessment of gastrointestinal function. PMID:19341838

  12. A Local and Global Function Model of the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hesheng; Feng, Mary; Jackson, Andrew; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Purposes To develop a local and global function model in the liver based upon regional and organ function measurements to support individualized adaptive radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials A local and global model for liver function was developed to include both functional volume and the effect of functional variation of subunits. Adopting the assumption of parallel architecture in the liver, the global function was composed of a sum of local function probabilities of subunits, varying between 0 and 1. The model was fit to 59 datasets of liver regional and organ function measures from 23 patients obtained prior to, during and 1 month after RT. The local function probabilities of subunits were modeled by a sigmoid function in relating to MRI-derived portal venous perfusion values. The global function was fitted to a logarithm of an indocyanine green retention rate at 15 min (an overall liver function measure). Cross-validation was performed by leave-m-out tests. The model was further evaluated by fitting to the data divided based upon whether the patients had hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or not. Results The liver function model showed that 1) a perfusion value of 68.6 ml/(100g·min) yielded a local function probability of 0.5; 2) the probability reached 0.9 at a perfusion value of 98 ml/(100g·min), and 3) at a probability of 0.03 (corresponding perfusion of 38 ml/(100g·min)) or lower, the contribution to global function was lost. Cross-validations showed that the model parameters were stable. The model fitted to the data from the patients with HCC indicated that the same amount of portal venous perfusion was translated into less local function probability than the patients with non-HCC tumors. Conclusions The developed liver function model could provide a means to better assess individual and regional dose responses of hepatic functions, and provide guidance for individualized treatment planning of RT. PMID:26700712

  13. Construction of Lyapunov functions by the localization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishchenko, A. P.; Kanatnikov, A. N.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we examine the problem of construction of Lyapunov functions for asymptotically stable equilibrium points. We exploit conditions of asymptotic stability in terms of compact invariant sets and positively invariant sets. Our results are methods of verification of these conditions and construction of Lyapunov functions by the localization method of compact invariant sets. These results are illustrated by an example.

  14. Local fracture properties and dissimilar weld integrity in nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guozhen; Wang, Haitao; Xuan, Fuzhen; Tu, Shantung; Liu, Changjun

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the local fracture properties in a Alloy52M dissimilar metal welded joint (DMWJ) between A508 ferritic steel and 316 L stainless steel in nuclear power plants were investigated by using the single-edge notched bend (SENB) specimens, and their use in integrity assessment of DMWJ structures was analyzed. The results show that the local fracture resistance in the DMWJ is determined by local fracture mechanism, and which is mainly related to the microstructures and local strength mismatches of materials at the crack locations. The initial cracks always grow towards the materials with lower strength, and the crack path deviation is mainly controlled by the local strength mismatch. If the local fracture properties could not be used for cracks in the heat affected zones (HAZs), interface and near interface zones, the use of the fracture properties ( J-resistance curves) of base metals or weld metals following present codes will unavoidably produce non-conservative (unsafe) or excessive conservative assessment results. In most cases, the assessment results will be potentially unsafe. Therefore, it is recommended to obtain and use local mechanical and fracture properties in the integrity assessment of DMWJs.

  15. Alimentary tract absorption (f1 values) for radionuclides in local and regional fallout from nuclear tests.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Shawki A; Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents gastrointestinal absorption fractions (f1 values) for estimating internal doses from local and regional fallout radionuclides due to nuclear tests. The choice of f1 values are based on specific circumstances of weapons test conditions and a review of reported f1 values for elements in different physical and chemical states. Special attention is given to fallout from nuclear tests conducted at the Marshall Islands. We make a distinction between the f1 values for intakes of radioactive materials immediately after deposition (acute intakes) and intakes that occur in the course of months and years after deposition, following incorporation into terrestrial and aquatic foodstuffs (chronic intakes). Multiple f1 values for different circumstances where persons are exposed to radioactive fallout (e.g., local vs. regional fallout and coral vs. continental tests) are presented when supportive information is available. In some cases, our selected f1 values are similar to those adopted by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) (e.g., iodine and most actinides). However, f1 values for cesium and strontium derived from urine bioassay data of the Marshallese population are notably lower than the generic f1 values recommended by ICRP, particularly for acute intakes from local fallout (0.4 and 0.05 for Cs and Sr, respectively). The f1 values presented here form the first complete set of values relevant to realistic dose assessments for exposure to local or regional radioactive fallout.

  16. Alimentary Tract Absorption (f1 Values) for Radionuclides in Local and Regional Fallout from Nuclear Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Shawki; Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents gastrointestinal absorption fractions (f1 values) for estimating internal doses from local and regional fallout radionuclides due to nuclear tests. The choice of f1 values are based on specific circumstances of weapons test conditions and a review of reported f1 values for elements in different physical and chemical states. Special attention is given to fallout from nuclear tests conducted at the Marshall Islands. We make a distinction between the f1 values for intakes of radioactive materials immediately after deposition (acute intakes) and intakes that occur in the course of months and years after deposition, following incorporation into terrestrial and aquatic foodstuffs (chronic intakes). Multiple f1 values for different circumstances where persons are exposed to radioactive fallout (e.g. local vs. regional fallout and coral vs. continental tests) are presented when supportive information is available. In some cases, our selected f1 values are similar to those adopted by the ICRP (e.g. iodine and most actinides). However, f1 values for cesium and strontium derived from urine bioassay data of the Marshallese population are notably lower than the generic f1 values recommended by ICRP, particularly for acute intakes from local fallout (0.4 and 0.05 for Cs and Sr, respectively. The f1 values presented here form the first complete set of values relevant to realistic dose assessments for exposure to local or regional radioactive fallout. PMID:20622554

  17. Effect of the linkers between the zinc fingers in zinc finger protein 809 on gene silencing and nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Ichida, Yu Utsunomiya, Yuko; Onodera, Masafumi

    2016-03-18

    Zinc finger protein 809 (ZFP809) belongs to the Kruppel-associated box-containing zinc finger protein (KRAB-ZFP) family and functions in repressing the expression of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV). ZFP809 binds to the primer-binding site (PBS)located downstream of the MoMLV-long terminal repeat (LTR) and induces epigenetic modifications at integration sites, such as repressive histone modifications and de novo DNA methylation. KRAB-ZFPs contain consensus TGEKP linkers between C2H2 zinc fingers. The phosphorylation of threonine residues within linkers leads to the inactivation of zinc finger binding to target sequences. ZFP809 also contains consensus linkers between zinc fingers. However, the function of ZFP809 linkers remains unknown. In the present study, we constructed ZFP809 proteins containing mutated linkers and examined their ability to silence transgene expression driven by MLV, binding ability to MLV PBS, and cellular localization. The results of the present study revealed that the linkers affected the ability of ZFP809 to silence transgene expression. Furthermore, this effect could be partly attributed to changes in the localization of ZFP809 proteins containing mutated linkers. Further characterization of ZFP809 linkers is required for understanding the functions and features of KRAB-ZFP-containing linkers. - Highlights: • ZFP809 has three consensus linkers between the zinc fingers. • Linkers are required for ZFP809 to silence transgene expression driven by MLV-LTR. • Linkers affect the precise nuclear localization of ZFP809.

  18. CRM1-dependent nuclear export and dimerization with hMSH5 contribute to the regulation of hMSH4 subcellular localization

    SciTech Connect

    Neyton, Sophie; Lespinasse, Francoise; Lahaye, Francois; Staccini, Pascal; Paquis-Flucklinger, Veronique; Santucci-Darmanin, Sabine

    2007-10-15

    MSH4 and MSH5 are members of the MutS homolog family, a conserved group of proteins involved in DNA mismatch correction and homologous recombination. Although several studies have provided compelling evidences suggesting that MSH4 and MSH5 could act together in early and late stages of meiotic recombination, their precise roles are poorly understood and recent findings suggest that the human MSH4 protein may also exert a cytoplasmic function. Here we show that MSH4 is present in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of both testicular cells and transfected somatic cells. Confocal studies on transfected cells provide the first evidence that the subcellular localization of MSH4 is regulated, at least in part, by an active nuclear export pathway dependent on the exportin CRM1. We used deletion mapping and mutagenesis to define two functional nuclear export sequences within the C-terminal part of hMSH4 that mediate nuclear export through the CRM1 pathway. Our results suggest that CRM1 is also involved in MSH5 nuclear export. In addition, we demonstrate that dimerization of MSH4 and MSH5 facilitates their nuclear localization suggesting that dimerization may regulate the intracellular trafficking of these proteins. Our findings suggest that nucleocytoplasmic traffic may constitute a regulatory mechanism for MSH4 and MSH5 functions.

  19. The R35 residue of the influenza A virus NS1 protein has minimal effects on nuclear localization but alters virus replication through disrupting protein dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Lalime, Erin N.; Pekosz, Andrew

    2014-06-15

    The influenza A virus NS1 protein has a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the amino terminal region. This NLS overlaps sequences that are important for RNA binding as well as protein dimerization. To assess the significance of the NS1 NLS on influenza virus replication, the NLS amino acids were individually mutated to alanines and recombinant viruses encoding these mutations were rescued. Viruses containing NS1 proteins with mutations at R37, R38 and K41 displayed minimal changes in replication or NS1 protein nuclear localization. Recombinant viruses encoding NS1 R35A were not recovered but viruses containing second site mutations at position D39 in addition to the R35A mutation were isolated. The mutations at position 39 were shown to partially restore NS1 protein dimerization but had minimal effects on nuclear localization. These data indicate that the amino acids in the NS1 NLS region play a more important role in protein dimerization compared to nuclear localization. - Highlights: • Mutations were introduced into influenza NS1 NLS1. • NS1 R37A, R38A, K41A viruses had minimal changes in replication and NS1 localization. • Viruses from NS1 R35A rescue all contained additional mutations at D39. • NS1 R35A D39X mutations recover dimerization lost in NS1 R35A mutations. • These results reaffirm the importance of dimerization for NS1 protein function.

  20. The N-terminal domain of the androgen receptor drives its nuclear localization in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dar, Javid A; Masoodi, Khalid Z; Eisermann, Kurtis; Isharwal, Sudhir; Ai, Junkui; Pascal, Laura E; Nelson, Joel B; Wang, Zhou

    2014-09-01

    Androgen-independent nuclear localization is required for androgen receptor (AR) transactivation in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and should be a key step leading to castration resistance. However, mechanism(s) leading to androgen-independent AR nuclear localization are poorly understood. Since the N-terminal domain (NTD) of AR plays a role in transactivation under androgen-depleted conditions, we investigated the role of the NTD in AR nuclear localization in CRPC. Deletion mutagenesis was used to identify amino acid sequences in the NTD essential for its androgen-independent nuclear localization in C4-2, a widely used CRPC cell line. Deletion mutants of AR tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) at the 5'-end were generated and their signal distribution was investigated in C4-2 cells by fluorescent microscopy. Our results showed that the region of a.a. 294-556 was required for androgen-independent AR nuclear localization whereas a.a. 1-293 mediates Hsp90 regulation of AR nuclear localization in CRPC cells. Although the region of a.a. 294-556 does not contain a nuclear import signal, it was able to enhance DHT-induced import of the ligand binding domain (LBD). Also, transactivation of the NTD could be uncoupled from its modulation of AR nuclear localization in C4-2 cells. These observations suggest an important role of the NTD in AR intracellular trafficking and androgen-independent AR nuclear localization in CRPC cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular mechanism by which acyclic retinoid induces nuclear localization of transglutaminase 2 in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, R; Tatsukawa, H; Shrestha, R; Ishibashi, N; Matsuura, T; Kagechika, H; Kose, S; Hitomi, K; Imamoto, N; Kojima, S

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear accumulation of transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is an important step in TG2-dependent cell death. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for nuclear translocation of TG2 are still poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that acyclic retinoid (ACR) induced nuclear accumulation of TG2 in JHH-7 cells, a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) leading to their apoptosis. We further demonstrated molecular mechanism in nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of TG2 and an effect of ACR on it. We identified a novel 14-amino acid nuclear localization signal (NLS) 466AEKEETGMAMRIRV479 in the ‘C' domain and a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) 657LHMGLHKL664 in the ‘D' domain that allowed TG2 to shuttle between the nuclear and cytosolic milieu. Increased nuclear import of GAPDH myc-HIS fused with the identified NLS was observed, confirming its nuclear import ability. Leptomycin B, an inhibitor of exportin-1 as well as point mutation of all leucine residues to glutamine residues in the NES of TG2 demolished its nuclear export. TG2 formed a trimeric complex with importin-α and importin-β independently from transamidase activity which strongly suggested the involvement of a NLS-based translocation of TG2 to the nucleus. ACR accelerated the formation of the trimeric complex and that may be at least in part responsible for enhanced nuclear localization of TG2 in HCC cells treated with ACR. PMID:26633708

  2. Radiation doses to local populations near nuclear weapons test sites worldwide.

    PubMed

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André

    2002-05-01

    Nuclear weapons testing was conducted in the atmosphere at numerous sites worldwide between 1946 and 1980, which resulted in exposures to local populations as a consequence of fallout of radioactive debris. The nuclear tests were conducted by five nations (United States, Soviet Union, United Kingdom, France, and China) primarily at 16 sites. The 16 testing sites, located in nine different countries on five continents (plus Oceania) contributed nearly all of the radioactive materials released to the environment by atmospheric testing; only small amounts were released at a fewother minor testing sites. The 16 sites discussed here are Nevada Test Site, USA (North American continent), Bikini and Enewetak, Marshall Islands (Oceania); Johnston Island, USA (Oceania), Christmas and Malden Island, Kiribati (Oceania); Emu Field, Maralinga, and Monte Bello Islands, Australia (Australian continent); Mururoa and Fangataufa, French Polynesia (Oceania), Reggane, Algeria (Africa), Novaya Zemlya and Kapustin Yar, Russia (Europe), Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan (Asia), and Lop Nor, China (Asia). There were large differences in the numbers of tests conducted at each location and in the total explosive yields. Those factors, as well as differences in population density, lifestyle, environment, and climate at each site, led to large differences in the doses received by local populations. In general, the tests conducted earliest led to the highest individual and population exposures, although the amount of information available for a few of these sites is insufficient to provide any detailed evaluation of radiation exposures. The most comprehensive information for any site is for the Nevada Test Site. The disparities in available information add difficulty to determining the radiation exposures of local populations at each site. It is the goal of this paper to summarize the available information on external and internal doses received by the public living in the regions near each of the

  3. Divergent Evolution of Nuclear Localization Signal Sequences in Herpesvirus Terminase Subunits.

    PubMed

    Sankhala, Rajeshwer S; Lokareddy, Ravi K; Cingolani, Gino

    2016-05-20

    The tripartite terminase complex of herpesviruses assembles in the cytoplasm of infected cells and exploits the host nuclear import machinery to gain access to the nucleus, where capsid assembly and genome-packaging occur. Here we analyzed the structure and conservation of nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences previously identified in herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) large terminase and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) small terminase. We found a monopartite NLS at the N terminus of large terminase, flanking the ATPase domain, that is conserved only in α-herpesviruses. In contrast, small terminase exposes a classical NLS at the far C terminus of its helical structure that is conserved only in two genera of the β-subfamily and absent in α- and γ-herpesviruses. In addition, we predicted a classical NLS in the third terminase subunit that is partially conserved among herpesviruses. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that both location and potency of NLSs in terminase subunits evolved more rapidly than the rest of the amino acid sequence despite the selective pressure to keep terminase gene products active and localized in the nucleus. We propose that swapping NLSs among terminase subunits is a regulatory mechanism that allows different herpesviruses to regulate the kinetics of terminase nuclear import, reflecting a mechanism of virus:host adaptation.

  4. REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Takashi; Chavan, Rohit; Fonseca Costa, Sara S.; Brenna, Andrea; Ripperger, Jürgen A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT REV-ERBα (encoded by Nr1d1) is a nuclear receptor that is part of the circadian clock mechanism and regulates metabolism and inflammatory processes. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR, encoded by Nr3c1) influences similar processes, but is not part of the circadian clock, although glucocorticoid signaling affects resetting of the circadian clock in peripheral tissues. Because of their similar impact on physiological processes, we studied the interplay between these two nuclear receptors. We found that REV-ERBα binds to the C-terminal portion and GR to the N-terminal portion of HSP90α and HSP90β, a chaperone responsible for the activation of proteins to ensure survival of a cell. The presence of REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of GR by an unknown mechanism, thereby affecting expression of GR target genes, such as IκBα (Nfkbia) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1). Our findings highlight an important interplay between two nuclear receptors that influence the transcriptional potential of each other. This indicates that the transcriptional landscape is strongly dependent on dynamic processes at the protein level. PMID:27686098

  5. REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Takashi; Chavan, Rohit; Fonseca Costa, Sara S; Brenna, Andrea; Ripperger, Jürgen A; Albrecht, Urs

    2016-11-01

    REV-ERBα (encoded by Nr1d1) is a nuclear receptor that is part of the circadian clock mechanism and regulates metabolism and inflammatory processes. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR, encoded by Nr3c1) influences similar processes, but is not part of the circadian clock, although glucocorticoid signaling affects resetting of the circadian clock in peripheral tissues. Because of their similar impact on physiological processes, we studied the interplay between these two nuclear receptors. We found that REV-ERBα binds to the C-terminal portion and GR to the N-terminal portion of HSP90α and HSP90β, a chaperone responsible for the activation of proteins to ensure survival of a cell. The presence of REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of GR by an unknown mechanism, thereby affecting expression of GR target genes, such as IκBα (Nfkbia) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1). Our findings highlight an important interplay between two nuclear receptors that influence the transcriptional potential of each other. This indicates that the transcriptional landscape is strongly dependent on dynamic processes at the protein level. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Structure and Function of Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Verma, S. C.; Lan, K.

    2011-01-01

    Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) encoded by open reading frame 73 (ORF73) is the major latent protein expressed in all forms of KSHV-associated malignancies. LANA is a large (222–234 kDa) nuclear protein that interacts with various cellular as well as viral proteins. LANA has been classified as an oncogenic protein as it dysregulates various cellular pathways including tumor suppressor pathways associated with pRb and p53 and can transform primary rat embryo fibroblasts in cooperation with the cellular oncogene Hras. It associates with GSK-3β, an important modulator of Wnt signaling pathway leading to the accumulation of cytoplasmic β-catenin, which upregulates Tcf/Lef regulated genes after entering into the nucleus. LANA also blocks the expression of RTA, the reactivation transcriptional activator, which is critical for the latency to lytic switch, and thus helps in maintaining viral latency. LANA tethers the viral episomal DNA to the host chromosomes by directly binding to its cognate binding sequence within the TR region of the genome through its C terminus and to the nucleosomes through the N terminus of the molecule. Tethering to the host chromosomes helps in efficient partitioning of the viral episomes in the dividing cells. Disruptions of LANA expression led to reduction in the episomal copies of the viral DNA, supporting its role in persistence of the viral DNA. The functions known so far suggest that LANA is a key player in KSHV-mediated pathogenesis. PMID:17089795

  7. Understanding nuclear receptor form and function using structural biology.

    PubMed

    Rastinejad, Fraydoon; Huang, Pengxiang; Chandra, Vikas; Khorasanizadeh, Sepideh

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a major transcription factor family whose members selectively bind small-molecule lipophilic ligands and transduce those signals into specific changes in gene programs. For over two decades, structural biology efforts were focused exclusively on the individual ligand-binding domains (LBDs) or DNA-binding domains of NRs. These analyses revealed the basis for both ligand and DNA binding and also revealed receptor conformations representing both the activated and repressed states. Additionally, crystallographic studies explained how NR LBD surfaces recognize discrete portions of transcriptional coregulators. The many structural snapshots of LBDs have also guided the development of synthetic ligands with therapeutic potential. Yet, the exclusive structural focus on isolated NR domains has made it difficult to conceptualize how all the NR polypeptide segments are coordinated physically and functionally in the context of receptor quaternary architectures. Newly emerged crystal structures of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ-retinoid X receptor α (PPARγ-RXRα) heterodimer and hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4α homodimer have recently revealed the higher order organizations of these receptor complexes on DNA, as well as the complexity and uniqueness of their domain-domain interfaces. These emerging structural advances promise to better explain how signals in one domain can be allosterically transmitted to distal receptor domains, also providing much better frameworks for guiding future drug discovery efforts.

  8. The nuclear localization of low risk HPV11 E7 protein mediated by its zinc binding domain is independent of nuclear import receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Piccioli, Zachary; McKee, Courtney H.; Leszczynski, Anna; Onder, Zeynep; Hannah, Erin C.; Mamoor, Shahan; Crosby, Lauren; Moroianu, Junona

    2010-11-10

    We investigated the nuclear import of low risk HPV11 E7 protein using 1) transfection assays in HeLa cells with EGFP fusion plasmids containing 11E7 and its domains and 2) nuclear import assays in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells with GST fusion proteins containing 11E7 and its domains. The EGFP-11E7 and EGFP-11cE7{sub 39-98} localized mostly to the nucleus. The GST-11E7 and GST-11cE7{sub 39-98} were imported into the nuclei in the presence of either Ran-GDP or RanG19V-GTP mutant and in the absence of nuclear import receptors. This suggests that 11E7 enters the nucleus via a Ran-dependent pathway, independent of nuclear import receptors, mediated by a nuclear localization signal located in its C-terminal domain (cNLS). This cNLS contains the zinc binding domain consisting of two copies of Cys-X-X-Cys motif. Mutagenesis of Cys residues in these motifs changed the localization of the EGFP-11cE7/-11E7 mutants to cytoplasmic, suggesting that the zinc binding domain is essential for nuclear localization of 11E7.

  9. Nuclear localization of amyloid-β precursor protein-binding protein Fe65 is dependent on regulated intramembrane proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Koistinen, Niina A.; Edlund, Anna K.; Menon, Preeti K.; Ivanova, Elena V.; Bacanu, Smaranda

    2017-01-01

    Fe65 is an adaptor protein involved in both processing and signaling of the Alzheimer-associated amyloid-β precursor protein, APP. Here, the subcellular localization was further investigated using TAP-tagged Fe65 constructs expressed in human neuroblastoma cells. Our results indicate that PTB2 rather than the WW domain is important for the nuclear localization of Fe65. Electrophoretic mobility shift of Fe65 caused by phosphorylation was not detected in the nuclear fraction, suggesting that phosphorylation could restrict nuclear localization of Fe65. Furthermore, both ADAM10 and γ-secretase inhibitors decreased nuclear Fe65 in a similar way indicating an important role also of α-secretase in regulating nuclear translocation. PMID:28323844

  10. HuR and GRSF1 modulate the nuclear export and mitochondrial localization of the lncRNA RMRP

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Ji Heon; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Panda, Amaresh C.; Munk, Rachel; Kim, Jiyoung; Curtis, Jessica; Moad, Christopher A.; Wohler, Christina M.; Indig, Fred E.; de Paula, Wilson; Dudekula, Dawood B.; De, Supriyo; Piao, Yulan; Yang, Xiaoling; Martindale, Jennifer L.; de Cabo, Rafael; Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Some mitochondrial long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are encoded by nuclear DNA, but the mechanisms that mediate their transport to mitochondria are poorly characterized. Using affinity RNA pull-down followed by mass spectrometry analysis, we found two RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), HuR (human antigen R) and GRSF1 (G-rich RNA sequence-binding factor 1), that associated with the nuclear DNA-encoded lncRNA RMRP and mobilized it to mitochondria. In cultured human cells, HuR bound RMRP in the nucleus and mediated its CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-dependent export to the cytosol. After RMRP was imported into mitochondria, GRSF1 bound RMRP and increased its abundance in the matrix. Loss of GRSF1 lowered the mitochondrial levels of RMRP, in turn suppressing oxygen consumption rates and modestly reducing mitochondrial DNA replication priming. Our findings indicate that RBPs HuR and GRSF1 govern the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial localization of the lncRNA RMRP, which is encoded by nuclear DNA but has key functions in mitochondria. PMID:27198227

  11. hnRNP M interacts with PSF and p54{sup nrb} and co-localizes within defined nuclear structures

    SciTech Connect

    Marko, Marija; Leichter, Michael; Patrinou-Georgoula, Meropi; Guialis, Apostolia

    2010-02-01

    The abundant heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNP M) is able to associate with early spliceosomes and to influence splicing patterns of specific pre-mRNAs. Here, by a combination of immunoprecipitation and pull-down assays, we have identified PSF (polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor) and p54{sup nrb}, two highly related proteins involved in transcription and RNA processing, as new binding partners of hnRNP M. HnRNP M was found to co-localize with PSF within a subset of nuclear paraspeckles and to largely co-fractionate with PSF and p54{sup nrb} in biochemical nuclear matrix preparations. In cells transfected with an alternatively spliced preprotachykinin (PPT) minigene expression of hnRNP M promoted exon skipping while expression of PSF favours exon inclusion. The latter effect was reverted specifically by co-expressing the full length hnRNP M or a deletion mutant capable of interaction with PSF and p54{sup nrb}. Together our data provide new insights and some functional implications on the hnRNP M network of interactions.

  12. Mutations causing Greenberg dysplasia but not Pelger anomaly uncouple enzymatic from structural functions of a nuclear membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Peter; Fischer, Björn; Mann, Anuska; Mansour, Sahar; Rossier, Eva; Veen, Markus; Lang, Christine; Baasanjav, Sevjidmaa; Kieslich, Moritz; Brossuleit, Katja; Gravemann, Sophia; Schnipper, Nele; Karbasyian, Mohsen; Demuth, Ilja; Zwerger, Monika; Vaya, Amparo; Utermann, Gerd; Mundlos, Stefan; Stricker, Sigmar; Sperling, Karl; Hoffmann, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    The lamin B receptor (LBR) is an inner nuclear membrane protein with a structural function interacting with chromatin and lamins, and an enzymatic function as a sterol reductase. Heterozygous LBR mutations cause nuclear hyposegmentation in neutrophils (Pelger anomaly), while homozygous mutations cause prenatal death with skeletal defects and abnormal sterol metabolism (Greenberg dysplasia). It has remained unclear whether the lethality in Greenberg dysplasia is due to cholesterol defects or altered nuclear morphology.To answer this question we characterized two LBR missense mutations and showed that they cause Greenberg dysplasia. Both mutations affect residues that are evolutionary conserved among sterol reductases. In contrast to wildtype LBR, both mutations failed to rescue C14 sterol reductase deficient yeast, indicating an enzymatic defect. We found no Pelger anomaly in the carrier parent excluding marked effects on nuclear structure. We studied Lbr in mouse embryos and demonstrate expression in skin and the developing skeletal system consistent with sites of histological changes in Greenberg dysplasia. Unexpectedly we found in disease-relevant cell types not only nuclear but also cytoplasmatic LBR localization. The cytoplasmatic LBR staining co-localized with ER-markers and is thus consistent with the sites of endogeneous sterol synthesis. We conclude that LBR missense mutations can abolish sterol reductase activity, causing lethal Greenberg dysplasia but not Pelger anomaly. The findings separate the metabolic from the structural function and indicate that the sterol reductase activity is essential for human intrauterine development.

  13. Mutations causing Greenberg dysplasia but not Pelger anomaly uncouple enzymatic from structural functions of a nuclear membrane protein

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Anuska; Mansour, Sahar; Rossier, Eva; Veen, Markus; Lang, Christine; Baasanjav, Sevjidmaa; Kieslich, Moritz; Brossuleit, Katja; Gravemann, Sophia; Schnipper, Nele; Karbasyian, Mohsen; Demuth, Ilja; Zwerger, Monika; Vaya, Amparo; Utermann, Gerd; Mundlos, Stefan; Stricker, Sigmar; Sperling, Karl

    2010-01-01

    The lamin B receptor (LBR) is an inner nuclear membrane protein with a structural function interacting with chromatin and lamins, and an enzymatic function as a sterol reductase. Heterozygous LBR mutations cause nuclear hyposegmentation in neutrophils (Pelger anomaly), while homozygous mutations cause prenatal death with skeletal defects and abnormal sterol metabolism (Greenberg dysplasia). It has remained unclear whether the lethality in Greenberg dysplasia is due to cholesterol defects or altered nuclear morphology. To answer this question we characterized two LBR missense mutations and showed that they cause Greenberg dysplasia. Both mutations affect residues that are evolutionary conserved among sterol reductases. In contrast to wildtype LBR, both mutations failed to rescue C14 sterol reductase deficient yeast, indicating an enzymatic defect. We found no Pelger anomaly in the carrier parent excluding marked effects on nuclear structure. We studied Lbr in mouse embryos and demonstrate expression in skin and the developing skeletal system consistent with sites of histological changes in Greenberg dysplasia. Unexpectedly we found in disease-relevant cell types not only nuclear but also cytoplasmatic LBR localization. The cytoplasmatic LBR staining co-localized with ER-markers and is thus consistent with the sites of endogeneous sterol synthesis. We conclude that LBR missense mutations can abolish sterol reductase activity, causing lethal Greenberg dysplasia but not Pelger anomaly. The findings separate the metabolic from the structural function and indicate that the sterol reductase activity is essential for human intrauterine development. PMID:21327084

  14. Crystal structure of importin-α3 bound to the nuclear localization signal of Ran-binding protein 3.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Masako; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2017-09-23

    Ran-binding protein 3 (RanBP3) is a primarily nuclear Ran-binding protein that functions as an accessory factor in the Ran GTPase system. RanBP3 associates with Ran-specific nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 and enhances its catalytic activity towards Ran. RanBP3 also promotes CRM1-mediated nuclear export as well as CRM1-independent nuclear export of β-catenin, Smad2, and Smad3. Nuclear import of RanBP3 is dependent on the nuclear import adaptor protein importin-α and, RanBP3 is imported more efficiently by importin-α3 than by other members of the importin-α family. Protein kinase signaling pathways control nucleocytoplasmic transport through phosphorylation of RanBP3 at Ser58, immediately C-terminal to the nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the N-terminal region of RanBP3. Here we report the crystal structure of human importin-α3 bound to an N-terminal fragment of human RanBP3 containing the NLS sequence that is necessary and sufficient for nuclear import. The structure reveals that RanBP3 binds to importin-α3 residues that are strictly conserved in all seven isoforms of human importin-α at the major NLS-binding site, indicating that the region of importin-α outside the NLS-binding site, possibly the autoinhibotory importin-β1-binding domain, may be the key determinant for the preferential binding of RanBP3 to importin-α3. Computational docking simulation indicates that phosphorylation of RanBP3 at Ser58 could potentially stabilize the association of RanBP3 with importin-α through interactions between the phosphate moiety of phospho-Ser58 of RanBP3 and a cluster of basic residues (Arg96 and Lys97 in importin-α3) on armadillo repeat 1 of importin-α. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nuclear localization and transactivation by Vitis CBF transcription factors are regulated by combinations of conserved amino acid domains.

    PubMed

    Carlow, Chevonne E; Faultless, J Trent; Lee, Christine; Siddiqua, Mahbuba; Edge, Alison; Nassuth, Annette

    2017-09-01

    The highly conserved CBF pathway is crucial in the regulation of plant responses to low temperatures. Extensive analysis of Arabidopsis CBF proteins revealed that their functions rely on several conserved amino acid domains although the exact function of each domain is disputed. The question was what functions similar domains have in CBFs from other, overwintering woody plants such as Vitis, which likely have a more involved regulation than the model plant Arabidopsis. A total of seven CBF genes were cloned and sequenced from V. riparia and the less frost tolerant V. vinifera. The deduced species-specific amino acid sequences differ in only a few amino acids, mostly in non-conserved regions. Amino acid sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis showed two distinct groups of Vitis CBFs. One group contains CBF1, CBF2, CBF3 and CBF8 and the other group contains CBF4, CBF5 and CBF6. Transient transactivation assays showed that all Vitis CBFs except CBF5 activate via a CRT or DRE promoter element, whereby Vitis CBF3 and 4 prefer a CRT element. The hydrophobic domains in the C-terminal end of VrCBF6 were shown to be important for how well it activates. The putative nuclear localization domain of Vitis CBF1 was shown to be sufficient for nuclear localization, in contrast to previous reports for AtCBF1, and also important for transactivation. The latter highlights the value of careful analysis of domain functions instead of reliance on computer predictions and published data for other related proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Nuclear transportation of diacylglycerol kinase gamma and its possible function in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Takehiro; Shirai, Yasuhito; Miyasaka, Kei; Murakami, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Yasuto; Ueyama, Takehiko; Kai, Masahiro; Sakane, Fumio; Kanoh, Hideo; Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Kamada, Shinji; Kikkawa, Ushio; Saito, Naoaki

    2006-03-10

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) convert diacylglycerol (DG) to phosphatidic acid, and both lipids are known to play important roles in lipid signal transduction. Thereby, DGKs are considered to be a one of the key players in lipid signaling, but its physiological function remains to be solved. In an effort to investigate one of nine subtypes, we found that DGKgamma came to be localized in the nucleus with time in all cell lines tested while seen only in the cytoplasm at the early stage of culture, indicating that DGKgamma is transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The nuclear transportation of DGKgamma didn't necessarily need DGK activity, but its C1 domain was indispensable, suggesting that the C1 domain of DGKgamma acts as a nuclear transport signal. Furthermore, to address the function of DGKgamma in the nucleus, we produced stable cell lines of wild-type DGKgamma and mutants, including kinase negative, and investigated their cell size, growth rate, and cell cycle. The cells expressing the kinase-negative mutant of DGKgamma were larger in size and showed slower growth rate, and the S phase of the cells was extended. These findings implicate that nuclear DGKgamma regulates cell cycle.

  17. Correlated electron-nuclear dynamics with conditional wave functions.

    PubMed

    Albareda, Guillermo; Appel, Heiko; Franco, Ignacio; Abedi, Ali; Rubio, Angel

    2014-08-22

    The molecular Schrödinger equation is rewritten in terms of nonunitary equations of motion for the nuclei (or electrons) that depend parametrically on the configuration of an ensemble of generally defined electronic (or nuclear) trajectories. This scheme is exact and does not rely on the tracing out of degrees of freedom. Hence, the use of trajectory-based statistical techniques can be exploited to circumvent the calculation of the computationally demanding Born-Oppenheimer potential-energy surfaces and nonadiabatic coupling elements. The concept of the potential-energy surface is restored by establishing a formal connection with the exact factorization of the full wave function. This connection is used to gain insight from a simplified form of the exact propagation scheme.

  18. The regulation and functions of the nuclear RNA exosome complex.

    PubMed

    Kilchert, Cornelia; Wittmann, Sina; Vasiljeva, Lidia

    2016-04-01

    The RNA exosome complex is the most versatile RNA-degradation machine in