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Sample records for functional reach test

  1. Validity of an Interactive Functional Reach Test.

    PubMed

    Galen, Sujay S; Pardo, Vicky; Wyatt, Douglas; Diamond, Andrew; Brodith, Victor; Pavlov, Alex

    2015-08-01

    Videogaming platforms such as the Microsoft (Redmond, WA) Kinect(®) are increasingly being used in rehabilitation to improve balance performance and mobility. These gaming platforms do not have built-in clinical measures that offer clinically meaningful data. We have now developed software that will enable the Kinect sensor to assess a patient's balance using an interactive functional reach test (I-FRT). The aim of the study was to test the concurrent validity of the I-FRT and to establish the feasibility of implementing the I-FRT in a clinical setting. The concurrent validity of the I-FRT was tested among 20 healthy adults (mean age, 25.8±3.4 years; 14 women). The Functional Reach Test (FRT) was measured simultaneously by both the Kinect sensor using the I-FRT software and the Optotrak Certus(®) 3D motion-capture system (Northern Digital Inc., Waterloo, ON, Canada). The feasibility of implementing the I-FRT in a clinical setting was assessed by performing the I-FRT in 10 participants with mild balance impairments recruited from the outpatient physical therapy clinic (mean age, 55.8±13.5 years; four women) and obtaining their feedback using a NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) questionnaire. There was moderate to good agreement between FRT measures made by the two measurement systems. The greatest agreement between the two measurement system was found with the Kinect sensor placed at a distance of 2.5 m [intraclass correlation coefficient (2,k)=0.786; P<0.001] from the participant. Participants with mild balance impairments whose balance was assessed using the I-FRT software scored their experience favorably by assigning lower scores for the Frustration, Mental Demand, and Temporal Demand subscales on the NASA/TLX questionnaire. FRT measures made using the Kinect sensor I-FRT software provides a valid clinical measure that can be used with the gaming platforms.

  2. Real-Time Fall Risk Assessment Using Functional Reach Test

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Brian; Allen, Brandon; True, Hanna; Cho, Jin; Harris, Austin; Fell, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Falls are common and dangerous for survivors of stroke at all stages of recovery. The widespread need to assess fall risk in real time for individuals after stroke has generated emerging requests for a reliable, inexpensive, quantifiable, and remote clinical measure/tool. In order to meet these requests, we explore the Functional Reach Test (FRT) for real-time fall risk assessment and implement the FRT function in mStroke, a real-time and automatic mobile health system for poststroke recovery and rehabilitation. mStroke is designed, developed, and delivered as an Application (App) running on a hardware platform consisting of an iPad and one or two wireless body motion sensors based on different mobile health functions. The FRT function in mStroke is extensively tested on healthy human subjects to verify its concept and feasibility. Preliminary performance will be presented to justify the further exploration of the FRT function in mStroke through clinical trials on individuals after stroke, which may guide its ubiquitous exploitation in the near future. PMID:28167961

  3. Distance Reached in the Anteromedial Reach Test as a Function of Learning and Leg Length

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent, Nicholas P.; Rushton, Alison B.; Wright, Chris C.; Batt, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    The Anteromedial Reach Test (ART) is a new outcome measure for assessing dynamic knee stability in anterior cruciate ligament-injured patients. The effect of learning and leg length on distance reached in the ART was examined. Thirty-two healthy volunteers performed 15 trials of the ART on each leg. There was a moderate correlation (r = 0.44-0.50)…

  4. Distance Reached in the Anteromedial Reach Test as a Function of Learning and Leg Length

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent, Nicholas P.; Rushton, Alison B.; Wright, Chris C.; Batt, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    The Anteromedial Reach Test (ART) is a new outcome measure for assessing dynamic knee stability in anterior cruciate ligament-injured patients. The effect of learning and leg length on distance reached in the ART was examined. Thirty-two healthy volunteers performed 15 trials of the ART on each leg. There was a moderate correlation (r = 0.44-0.50)…

  5. Predictive validity of the UPDRS postural stability score and the Functional Reach Test, when compared with ecologically valid reaching tasks.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, M E; Johnson, A M; Holmes, J D; Stephenson, F F; Spaulding, S J

    2010-07-01

    Balance problems and falls are a common concern among individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Falls frequently occur during daily activities such as reaching into cupboards in the kitchen or bathroom. This study compared the correlation among two standard postural stability tests - the postural stability score on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and the Functional Reach Test (FRT) - and ecologically valid reaching tasks that correspond to reaching at different cupboard heights among 20 individuals with PD and 20 age-matched controls. Both the FRT and the UPDRS postural stability tests are quick measures that can be performed during the clinical examination. The FRT, but not the postural stability score, demonstrated a significant correlation with the ecologically valid reaching tasks, among individuals with PD. Furthermore the FRT scores did not correlate with the UPDRS postural stability scores, indicating that these are measuring different aspects of balance. This study suggests that the FRT score may better predict the risk of postural instability encountered during daily activities among individuals with PD.

  6. Computerized Functional Reach Test to Measure Balance Stability in Elderly Patients With Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Scena, Silvio; Steindler, Roberto; Ceci, Moira; Zuccaro, Stefano Maria; Carmeli, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Background The ability to maintain static and dynamic balance is a prerequisite for safe walking and for obtaining functional mobility. For this reason, a reliable and valid means of screening for risk of falls is needed. The functional reach test (FRT) is used in many countries, yet it does not provide some kinematic parameters such as shoulder or pelvic girdles translation. The purpose was to analyze video records measuring of distance, velocity, time length, arm direction and girdles translation while doing FRT. Methods A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted where the above variables were correlated to the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) for mental status and the Tinetti balance assessment test, which have been validated, in order to computerize the FRT (cFRT) for elderly patients with neurological disorders. Eighty patients were tested and 54 were eligible to serve as experimental group. The patients underwent the MMSE, the Tinetti test and the FRT. LAB view software was used to record the FRT performances and to process the videos. The control group consisted of 51 healthy subjects who had been previously tested. Results The experimental group was not able to perform the tests as well as the healthy control subjects. The video camera provided valuable kinematic results such as bending down while performing the forward reach test. Conclusions Instead of manual measurement, we proposed to use a cheap with fair resolution web camera to accurately estimate the FRT. The kinematic parameters were correlated with Tinetti and MMSE scores. The performance values established in this study indicate that the cFRT is a reliable and valid assessment, which provides more accurate data than “manual” test about functional reach. PMID:27635176

  7. Mobile Functional Reach Test in People Who Suffer Stroke: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Merchán-Baeza, Jose Antonio; González-Sánchez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Postural instability is one of the major complications found in people who survive a stroke. Parameterizing the Functional Reach Test (FRT) could be useful in clinical practice and basic research, as this test is a clinically accepted tool (for its simplicity, reliability, economy, and portability) to measure the semistatic balance of a subject. Objective The aim of this study is to analyze the reliability in the FRT parameterization using inertial sensor within mobile phones (mobile sensors) for recording kinematic variables in patients who have suffered a stroke. Our hypothesis is that the sensors in mobile phones will be reliable instruments for kinematic study of the FRT. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of 7 subjects over 65 years of age who suffered a stroke. During the execution of FRT, the subjects carried two mobile phones: one placed in the lumbar region and the other one on the trunk. After analyzing the data obtained in the kinematic registration by the mobile sensors, a number of direct and indirect variables were obtained. The variables extracted directly from FRT through the mobile sensors were distance, maximum angular lumbosacral/thoracic displacement, time for maximum angular lumbosacral/thoracic displacement, time of return to the initial position, and total time. Using these data, we calculated speed and acceleration of each. A descriptive analysis of all kinematic outcomes recorded by the two mobile sensors (trunk and lumbar) was developed and the average range achieved in the FRT. Reliability measures were calculated by analyzing the internal consistency of the measures with 95% confidence interval of each outcome variable. We calculated the reliability of mobile sensors in the measurement of the kinematic variables during the execution of the FRT. Results The values in the FRT obtained in this study (2.49 cm, SD 13.15) are similar to those found in other studies with this population and with the same age range. Intrasubject

  8. Mobile Functional Reach Test in People Who Suffer Stroke: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Merchán-Baeza, Jose Antonio; González-Sánchez, Manuel; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio

    2015-06-11

    Postural instability is one of the major complications found in people who survive a stroke. Parameterizing the Functional Reach Test (FRT) could be useful in clinical practice and basic research, as this test is a clinically accepted tool (for its simplicity, reliability, economy, and portability) to measure the semistatic balance of a subject. The aim of this study is to analyze the reliability in the FRT parameterization using inertial sensor within mobile phones (mobile sensors) for recording kinematic variables in patients who have suffered a stroke. Our hypothesis is that the sensors in mobile phones will be reliable instruments for kinematic study of the FRT. This is a cross-sectional study of 7 subjects over 65 years of age who suffered a stroke. During the execution of FRT, the subjects carried two mobile phones: one placed in the lumbar region and the other one on the trunk. After analyzing the data obtained in the kinematic registration by the mobile sensors, a number of direct and indirect variables were obtained. The variables extracted directly from FRT through the mobile sensors were distance, maximum angular lumbosacral/thoracic displacement, time for maximum angular lumbosacral/thoracic displacement, time of return to the initial position, and total time. Using these data, we calculated speed and acceleration of each. A descriptive analysis of all kinematic outcomes recorded by the two mobile sensors (trunk and lumbar) was developed and the average range achieved in the FRT. Reliability measures were calculated by analyzing the internal consistency of the measures with 95% confidence interval of each outcome variable. We calculated the reliability of mobile sensors in the measurement of the kinematic variables during the execution of the FRT. The values in the FRT obtained in this study (2.49 cm, SD 13.15) are similar to those found in other studies with this population and with the same age range. Intrasubject reliability values observed in the

  9. Reliability of the Functional Reach Test and the influence of anthropometric characteristics on test results in subjects with hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Martins, Emerson Fachin; de Menezes, Lidiane Teles; de Sousa, Pedro Henrique Côrtes; de Araujo Barbosa, Paulo Henrique Ferreira; Costa, Abraão Souza

    2012-01-01

    First designed as an alternative method of assessing balance and susceptibility to falls among elderly, the Functional Reach Test (FR) has also been used among patients with hemiparesis. Then this study aimed to describe the intra- and inter-rater and the test/re-test reliability of the FR measure in subjects with and without hemiparesis while verifying anthropometric influences on the measurements. The FR was administered to a sample of subjects with hemiparesis and to a control group that was matched by gender and age. A two-way analysis of variance was used to verify the intra-rater reliability. It was calculated using the differences between the averages of the measures obtained during single, double or triple trials. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was utilized and data plotted using the Bland-Altman method. Associations were analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. In general, the intra-rater analysis did not show significant differences between the measures for the single, double or triple trials. Excellent ICC values were observed, and there were no significant associations with anthropometric parameters for the hemiparesis and control subjects. FR showed good reliability for patients with and without hemiparesis and the test measurements were not significantly associated with the anthropometric characteristics of the subjects.

  10. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability of an instrumented functional reaching task using wireless electromyographic sensors.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Rini; Hui-Chan, Christina W Y; Wang, Edward; Bhatt, Tanvi

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the electromyographic and accelerometric data sampled from the prime movers of the dominant arm during an antigravity, within-arm's length stand-reaching task without trunk restraint. Ten healthy young adults participated in two experimental sessions, approximately 7-10days apart. During each session, subjects performed 15 trials of both a flexion- and an abduction-reaching task. Surface EMG and acceleration using wireless sensors were sampled from the anterior and middle deltoid. Reliability was established using Cronbach's alpha, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC 2, k) and standard error of measurements (SEM) for electromyographic reaction time, burst duration and normalized amplitude along with peak acceleration. Results indicated high degrees of inter-trial and test-retest reliability for flexion (Cronbach's α range=0.92-0.99; ICC range=0.82-0.92) as well as abduction (Cronbach's α range=0.94-0.99; ICC range=0.81-0.94) reaching. The SEM associated with response variables for flexion and abduction ranged from 1.55-3.26% and 3.33-3.95% of means, respectively. Findings from this study revealed that electromyographic and accelerometric data collected from prime movers of the arm during the relatively functional stand-reaching task were highly reproducible. Given its high reliability and portability, the proposed test could have applications in clinical and laboratory settings to quantify upper limb function.

  11. Effects of Peripheral Vestibular Dysfunction on Dynamic Postural Stability Measured by the Functional Reach Test and Timed Up and Go Test.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Toshiko; Kamogashira, Teru; Fujimoto, Chisato; Kinoshita, Makoto; Egami, Naoya; Sugasawa, Keiko; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Iwasaki, Shinichi

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the influence of vestibular function on dynamic postural stability assessed by the functional reach test (FRT) and the timed up and go test (TUG). Retrospective study. Tertiary referral center. The FRT and TUG were performed in 399 patients with dizziness. The effects of peripheral vestibular dysfunction assessed by the caloric test and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) to air-conducted sound (500 Hz, tone burst) on the results of FRT and TUG were analyzed. Neither FRT nor TUG scores showed significant differences in relation to the results of the caloric test ( P > .3). The FRT scores in patients who showed abnormal cVEMP responses on both sides were significantly smaller than those in patients who showed normal cVEMP responses ( P < .01). The TUG scores in patients who showed abnormal cVEMP responses on both sides were significantly greater than those in patients who showed normal cVEMP responses ( P < .05). The vestibulo-spinal reflex mediated by the saccule and its afferents is one of the factors that influence the maintenance of dynamic postural stability as measured by FRT and TUG.

  12. Reliability and comparison of trunk and pelvis angles, arm distance and center of pressure in the seated functional reach test with and without foot support in children.

    PubMed

    Radtka, Sandra; Zayac, Jacqueline; Goldberg, Krystyna; Long, Michael; Ixanov, Rustem

    2017-03-01

    This study determined test-retest reliability of trunk and pelvis joint angles, arm distance and center of pressure (COP) excursion for the seated functional reach test (FRT) and compared these variables during the seated FRT with and without foot support. Fifteen typically developing children (age 9.3±4.1years) participated. Trunk and pelvis joint angles, arm distance, and COP excursion were collected on two days using three-dimensional motion analysis and a force plate while subjects reached maximally with and without foot support in the anterior, anterior/lateral, lateral, posterior/lateral directions. Age, weight, height, trunk and arm lengths were correlated (p<0.01) with maximum arm distance reached. Maximum arm distance, trunk and pelvis joint angles, and COP with and without foot support were not significant (p<0.05) for the two test periods. Excellent reliability (ICCs>0.75) was found for maximum arm distance reached in all four directions in the seated FRT with and without foot support. Most trunk and pelvis joint angles and COP excursions during maximum reach in all four directions showed excellent to fair reliability (ICCs>0.40-0.75). Reaching with foot support in all directions was significantly greater (p<0.05) than without foot support; however, most COP excursions and trunk and pelvic angles were not significantly different. Findings support the addition of anterior/lateral and posterior/lateral reaching directions in the seated FRT. Trunk and pelvis movement analysis is important to examine in the seated FRT to determine the specific movement strategies needed for maximum reaching without loss of balance.

  13. Comparison of kinematic variables obtained by inertial sensors among stroke survivors and healthy older adults in the Functional Reach Test: cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Merchán-Baeza, José Antonio; González-Sánchez, Manuel; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio Ignacio

    2015-05-30

    Balance dysfunction is one of the most common problems in people who suffer stroke. To parameterize functional tests standardized by inertial sensors have been promoted in applied medicine. The aim of this study was to compare the kinematic variables of the Functional Reach Test (FRT) obtained by two inertial sensors placed on the trunk and lumbar region between stroke survivors (SS) and healthy older adults (HOA) and to analyze the reliability of the kinematic measurements obtained. Cross-sectional study. Five SS and five HOA over 65. A descriptive analysis of the average range as well as all kinematic variables recorded was developed. The intrasubject and intersubject reliability of the measured variables was directly calculated. In the same intervals, the angular displacement was greater in the HOA group; however, they were completed at similar times for both groups, and HOA conducted the test at a higher speed and greater acceleration in each of the intervals. The SS values were higher than HOA values in the maximum and minimum acceleration in the trunk and in the lumbar region. The SS show less functional reach, a narrower, slower and less accelerated movement during the FRT execution, but with higher peaks of acceleration and speed when they are compared with HOA.

  14. Maximal lateral reaching distance on the affected side using the multi-directional reach test in persons with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Won-Jeong; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Jeon, Seo-Hyun; Chung, Yijung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the relationship between maximal lateral reaching distance on the affected side and weight shifting using the Multi-directional Reach Test in persons with stoke. [Subjects] Fifty-one chronic stroke participants were recruited from two rehabilitation hospitals. This study administered the Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up-and-Go, Trunk Impairment Scale, Modified Barthel Index and measured different maximal reaching distances. [Results] The maximal lateral reaching distance on the affected side was correlated with the BBS (r=0.571), TUG (r=−0.478), TIS (r=0.561), and MBI scores (r=0.499), the lateral reaching distance in all directions on the non-affected side (r=0.785), the maximal backward reaching distance (r=0.723), and the maximal forward reaching distance (r=0.673). The maximal reaching distance on the affected side was also affected by that on the non-affected side, in addition to the maximal backward reaching distance and MBI score. The final step model of stepwise multiple regression was explained 69.5%. [Conclusion] Maximal lateral reaching distance on the affected side as determined by the Multi-directional Reach Test is a good method of assessing functional performance in stroke patients. Data regarding maximal reaching distance on the non-affected side can be used to measure functional impairment on the affected side in clinical settings. PMID:26504275

  15. Integrated testing strategy (ITS) for bioaccumulation assessment under REACH.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Anna; Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Benfentati, Emilio; Nendza, Monika; Segner, Helmut; Fernández, Alberto; Kühne, Ralph; Franco, Antonio; Pauné, Eduard; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2014-08-01

    REACH (registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals) regulation requires that all the chemicals produced or imported in Europe above 1 tonne/year are registered. To register a chemical, physicochemical, toxicological and ecotoxicological information needs to be reported in a dossier. REACH promotes the use of alternative methods to replace, refine and reduce the use of animal (eco)toxicity testing. Within the EU OSIRIS project, integrated testing strategies (ITSs) have been developed for the rational use of non-animal testing approaches in chemical hazard assessment. Here we present an ITS for evaluating the bioaccumulation potential of organic chemicals. The scheme includes the use of all available data (also the non-optimal ones), waiving schemes, analysis of physicochemical properties related to the end point and alternative methods (both in silico and in vitro). In vivo methods are used only as last resort. Using the ITS, in vivo testing could be waived for about 67% of the examined compounds, but bioaccumulation potential could be estimated on the basis of non-animal methods. The presented ITS is freely available through a web tool. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Changes in dynamic trunk/head stability and functional reach after hippotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shurtleff, Tim L; Standeven, John W; Engsberg, Jack R

    2009-07-01

    To determine if hippotherapy (therapy using a horse) improves head/trunk stability and upper extremity (UE) reaching/targeting in children with spastic diplegia cerebral palsy (SDCP). Pre-postoperative follow-up with a 12-week intervention and 12-week washout period after intervention. A human performance laboratory with 6 camera video motion capture systems for testing. Eleven children (age 5-13y, average 8y) with SDCP, 8 children (age 5-13y, average 8y) without disabilities. Hippotherapy intervention performed at 3 therapeutic horseback riding centers. Video motion capture using surface markers collecting data at 60 Hz, a mechanical barrel to challenge trunk and head stability, and functional reach/targeting test on static surface. Significant changes with large effect sizes in head/trunk stability and reaching/targeting, elapsed time, and efficiency (reach/path ratio) after 12 weeks of hippotherapy intervention. Changes were retained after a 12-week washout period. Hippotherapy improves trunk/head stability and UE reaching/targeting. These skills form the foundation for many functional tasks. Changes are maintained after the intervention ceases providing a skill foundation for functional tasks that may also enhance occupational performance and participation.

  17. Synchronization patterns suggest different functional organization in parietal reach region and dorsal premotor cortex.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Shubhodeep; Martinez-Vazquez, Pablo; Gail, Alexander

    2014-12-15

    The parietal reach region (PRR) and dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) form part of the fronto-parietal reach network. While neural selectivity profiles of single-cell activity in these areas can be remarkably similar, other data suggest that both areas serve different computational functions in visually guided reaching. Here we test the hypothesis that different neural functional organizations characterized by different neural synchronization patterns might be underlying the putatively different functional roles. We use cross-correlation analysis on single-unit activity (SUA) and multiunit activity (MUA) to determine the prevalence of synchronized neural ensembles within each area. First, we reliably find synchronization in PRR but not in PMd. Second, we demonstrate that synchronization in PRR is present in different cognitive states, including "idle" states prior to task-relevant instructions and without neural tuning. Third, we show that local field potentials (LFPs) in PRR but not PMd are characterized by an increased power and spike field coherence in the beta frequency range (12-30 Hz), further indicating stronger synchrony in PRR compared with PMd. Finally, we show that neurons with similar tuning properties tend to be correlated in their random spike rate fluctuations in PRR but not in PMd. Our data support the idea that PRR and PMd, despite striking similarity in single-cell tuning properties, are characterized by unequal local functional organization, which likely reflects different network architectures to support different functional roles within the fronto-parietal reach network.

  18. Kidney function tests

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney function tests are common lab tests used to evaluate how well the kidneys are working. Such tests include: ... Oh MS, Briefel G. Evaluation of renal function, water, electrolytes ... and Management by Laboratory Methods . 23rd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  19. Liver function tests

    MedlinePlus

    Liver function tests are common tests that are used to see how well the liver is working. Tests include: ... M, Bowne WB, Bluth MH. Evaluation of liver function. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical ...

  20. Experiences of the REACH testing proposals system to reduce animal testing.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Katy; Stengel, Wolfgang; Casalegno, Carlotta; Andrew, David

    2014-01-01

    In order to reduce animal testing, companies registering chemical substances under the EU REACH legislation must propose rather than conduct certain tests on animals. Third parties can submit 'scientifically valid information' relevant to these proposals to the Agency responsible, the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA), who are obliged to take the information into account. The European Coalition to End Animal Experiments (ECEAE) provided comments on nearly half of the 817 proposals for vertebrate tests on 480 substances published for comment for the first REACH deadline (between 1 August 2009 and 31 July 2012). The paper summarises the response by registrants and the Agency to third party comments and highlights issues with the use of read across, in vitro tests, QSAR and weight of evidence approaches. Use of existing data and evidence that testing is legally or scientifically unjustified remain the most successful comments for third parties to submit. There is a worrying conservatism within the Agency regarding the acceptance of alternative approaches and examples of where registrants have also failed to maximise opportunities to avoid testing.

  1. Neuronal Correlates of Functional Coupling between Reach- and Grasp-Related Components of Muscle Activity

    PubMed Central

    Geed, Shashwati; McCurdy, Martha L.; van Kan, Peter L. E.

    2017-01-01

    Coordinated reach-to-grasp movements require precise spatiotemporal synchrony between proximal forelimb muscles (shoulder, elbow) that transport the hand toward a target during reach, and distal muscles (wrist, digit) that simultaneously preshape and orient the hand for grasp. The precise mechanisms through which the redundant neuromuscular circuitry coordinates reach with grasp, however, remain unclear. Recently, Geed and Van Kan (2016) demonstrated, using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), that limited numbers of global, template-like transport/preshape- and grasp-related muscle components underlie the complexity and variability of intramuscular electromyograms (EMGs) of up to 21 distal and proximal muscles recorded while monkeys performed reach-to-grasp tasks. Importantly, transport/preshape- and grasp-related muscle components showed invariant spatiotemporal coupling, which provides a potential mechanism for coordinating forelimb muscles during reach-to-grasp movements. In the present study, we tested whether ensemble discharges of forelimb neurons in the cerebellar nucleus interpositus (NI) and its target, the magnocellular red nucleus (RNm), a source of rubrospinal fibers, function as neuronal correlates of the transport/preshape- and grasp-related muscle components we identified. EFA applied to single-unit discharges of populations of NI and RNm neurons recorded while the same monkeys that were used previously performed the same reach-to-grasp tasks, revealed neuronal components in the ensemble discharges of both NI and RNm neuronal populations with characteristics broadly similar to muscle components. Subsets of NI and RNm neuronal components were strongly and significantly crosscorrelated with subsets of muscle components, suggesting that similar functional units of reach-to-grasp behavior are expressed by NI and RNm neuronal populations and forelimb muscles. Importantly, like transport/preshape- and grasp-related muscle components, their NI and RNm

  2. Reaching every district - development and testing of a health micro-planning strategy for reaching difficult to reach populations in Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Enkhtuya, B; Badamusuren, T; Dondog, N; Khandsuren, L; Elbegtuya, N; Jargal, G; Surenchimeg, V; Grundy, J

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1990s, Mongolia has undergone a rapid social and economic transition with migration to the urban areas of the national capital Ulaanbaatar. The main reasons for the migration are social sector decline in rural areas and the potential for employment opportunities in urban areas. There are also new internal patterns of migration in rural and remote areas relating to recent developments in the economic sector. Despite recent innovations in health system management in Mongolia, in some urban and rural and remote locations health services are not sufficiently accessed by the most socially and economically disadvantaged populations. These concerns provided the motivation for the Ministry of Health of Mongolia and development partners to attempt to access the most difficult to reach populations through the development of a micro-planning process referred to as the 'Reaching Every District strategy' (RED). This article describes and analyses RED micro-planning processes and content, and highlights the lessons learned. The main source of data for this planning system development was in the development and testing of the micro-planning process in Byanzurkh District, Ulaanbaatar in June 2008. The principal intervention developed and trialed was a health micro-planning strategy for improved access to immunization and maternal and child health services for difficult to reach populations. The planning methodology was a problem-solving approach progressing from health mapping to barrier analysis, to activity planning and costing and finally to monitoring and evaluation. Main success factors in the development of the planning methodology were the use of barrier analysis and mapping approaches for data analysis and problem solving at the local level, and re-orientation of management approaches from 'inspection' to supportive supervision. Additionally, although the RED strategy is intended to be an immunization-specific intervention internationally, evidence from the

  3. Liver Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Liver > Liver Disease Information > Liver Function Tests Liver Function Tests Explore this section to learn more ... including a description and diagnosis. Why is the liver important? The liver is the second largest organ ...

  4. Robot-Assisted Reach Training for Improving Upper Extremity Function of Chronic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ki Hun; Song, Won-Kyung

    2015-10-01

    Stroke, as a major risk factor for chronic impairment of upper limb function, can severely restrict the activities of daily living. Recently, robotic devices have been used to enhance the functional upper extremity movement of stroke patients. The purpose of the current study was to assess whether a robot-assisted reach training program using a whole arm manipulator (WAM) could improve upper extremity kinematic performance and functional movement for chronic stroke patients. Using a single-group design, this study followed 10 people with chronic stroke (6 men, 61.5 years; Mini-Mental State Examination score: 27.0; onset duration: 8.9 years). WAM with seven degrees of freedom for the shoulder, elbow, and wrist joints was used during robot-assisted reach exercises. Subjects participated in the training program for 40 minutes per day, 2 times a week, for 4 weeks. The main outcome measures were upper extremity kinematic performance (movement velocity) for three directions and functional movement (Action Research Arm Test). Upper extremity kinematic performance and functional movement measures were performed three times: at baseline, during intervention (at 2 weeks), and post intervention. Upper extremity kinematic performance and functional movement showed improvement after two weeks (P < 0.05) and four weeks (P < 0.05) of training compared to baseline. The findings of the current study demonstrated the positive effects of short-term robot-assisted reach training on upper extremity kinematic performance as well as functional movement in individuals with chronic stroke. In addition, the findings of the current study may provide valuable information for subsequent randomized controlled trials.

  5. Functional Task Test (FTT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Peters, Brian T.; Rescheke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott; Lawrence, Emily; Koffman, Igor; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Spiering, Barry A.; Feeback, Daniel L.; hide

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Functional Task Test (FTT), an interdisciplinary testing regimen that has been developed to evaluate astronaut postflight functional performance and related physiological changes. The objectives of the project are: (1) to develop a set of functional tasks that represent critical mission tasks for the Constellation Program, (2) determine the ability to perform these tasks after space flight, (3) Identify the key physiological factors that contribute to functional decrements and (4) Use this information to develop targeted countermeasures.

  6. Pancreatic exocrine function testing

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, J.S.

    1981-11-01

    It is important to understand which pancreatic function tests are available and how to interpret them when evaluating patients with malabsorption. Available direct tests are the secretin stimulation test, the Lundh test meal, and measurement of serum or fecal enzymes. Indirect tests assess pancreatic exocrine function by measuring the effect of pancreatic secretion on various nutrients. These include triglycerides labeled with carbon 14, cobalamin labeled with cobalt 57 and cobalt 58, and para-aminobenzoic acid bound to a dipeptide. Of all these tests the secretin stimulation test is the most accurate and reliable if done by experienced personnel. However, the indirect tests are simpler to do and appear to be comparable to the secretin test at detecting pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. These indirect tests are becoming clinically available and clinicians should familiarize themselves with the strengths and weaknesses of each.

  7. A comparison of the spine posture among several sit-and-reach test protocols.

    PubMed

    Miñarro, Pedro A López; Andújar, Pilar Sáinz de Baranda; García, Pedro L Rodríguez; Toro, Enrique Ortega

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the thoracic and lumbar spine posture among different sit-and-reach tests. Fifty-eight men and 47 women were asked to perform three trials of sit-and-reach test (SR), toe-touch test (TT), back-saver sit-and-reach test (BS) right and left, unilateral seated sit-and-reach test (USR) right and left, and V sit-and-reach test (VSR). Thoracic and lumbar angles were assessed with an inclinometer when subjects reached forward maximally. Women had a lower thoracic angle than men on all tests (p<0.05). No differences were found in the lumbar angle between genders. The thoracic angle was the highest in VSR (75.3 degrees in men and 65.8 degrees in women) and the lowest in TT (61.7 degrees in men and 53.1 degrees in women). No differences were found among some pairwise comparisons (SR-BS in both genders, SR-TT, SR-VSR and others in women). The VSR test presented the highest values in lumbar spine when compared to other tests (30.5 degrees in men and 32.0 degrees in women). Unilateral seated sit-and-reach test presented the lowest lumbar angle in men (24.2 degrees for right leg and 23.9 degrees for left leg) and women (23.9 degrees in both legs) and there were significant differences with respect to the other tests. Characteristics and administration procedures of tests, such us uni- or bilateral, sitting or standing, measuring with or without box, parallel or V position, and hip position influence thoracic and lumbar postures.

  8. Pulmonary Function Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ranu, Harpreet; Wilde, Michael; Madden, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests are valuable investigations in the management of patients with suspected or previously diagnosed respiratory disease. They aid diagnosis, help monitor response to treatment and can guide decisions regarding further treatment and intervention. The interpretation of pulmonary functions tests requires knowledge of respiratory physiology. In this review we describe investigations routinely used and discuss their clinical implications. PMID:22347750

  9. Validity of Alternative Cut-Off Scores for the Back-Saver Sit and Reach Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looney, Marilyn A.; Gilbert, Jennie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if currently used FITNESSGRAM[R] cut-off scores for the Back Saver Sit and Reach Test had the best criterion-referenced validity evidence for 6-12 year old children. Secondary analyses of an existing data set focused on the passive straight leg raise and Back Saver Sit and Reach Test flexibility scores of…

  10. Sperm function test

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Pankaj; Hayatnagarkar, Suryakant

    2015-01-01

    With absolute normal semen analysis parameters it may not be necessary to shift to specialized tests early but in cases with borderline parameters or with history of fertilization failure in past it becomes necessary to do a battery of tests to evaluate different parameters of spermatozoa. Various sperm function tests are proposed and endorsed by different researchers in addition to the routine evaluation of fertility. These tests detect function of a certain part of spermatozoon and give insight on the events in fertilization of the oocyte. The sperms need to get nutrition from the seminal plasma in the form of fructose and citrate (this can be assessed by fructose qualitative and quantitative estimation, citrate estimation). They should be protected from the bad effects of pus cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS) (leukocyte detection test, ROS estimation). Their number should be in sufficient in terms of (count), structure normal to be able to fertilize eggs (semen morphology). Sperms should have intact and functioning membrane to survive harsh environment of vagina and uterine fluids (vitality and hypo-osmotic swelling test), should have good mitochondrial function to be able to provide energy (mitochondrial activity index test). They should also have satisfactory acrosome function to be able to burrow a hole in zona pellucida (acrosome intactness test, zona penetration test). Finally, they should have properly packed DNA in the nucleus to be able to transfer the male genes (nuclear chromatic decondensation test) to the oocyte during fertilization. PMID:26157295

  11. Usefulness of the jump-and-reach test in assessment of vertical jump performance.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Hans-Joachim; Chagas, Mauro H; Szmuchrowski, Leszek A; Araujo, Silvia R; Campos, Carlos E; Giannetti, Marcus R

    2010-02-01

    The objective was to estimate the reliability and criterion-related validity of the Jump-and-Reach Test for the assessment of squat, countermovement, and drop jump performance of 32 male Brazilian professional volleyball players. Performance of squat, countermovement, and drop jumps with different dropping heights was assessed on the Jump-and-Reach Test and the measurement of flight time, then compared across different jump trials. The very high reliability coefficients of both assessment methods and the lower correlation coefficients between scores on the assessments indicate a very high consistency of each method but only moderate covariation, which means that they measure partly different items. As a consequence, the Jump-and-Reach Test has good ecological validity in situations when reaching height during the flight phase is critical for performance (e.g., basketball and volleyball) but only limited accuracy for the assessment of vertical impulse production with different jump techniques and conditions.

  12. Pulmonary function tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... measured to estimate the lung volume. To measure diffusion capacity , you breathe a harmless gas, called a ... on your report after pulmonary function tests include: Diffusion capacity to carbon monoxide (DLCO) Expiratory reserve volume ( ...

  13. Cue salience and infant perseverative reaching: tests of the dynamic field theory

    PubMed Central

    Clearfield, Melissa W.; Dineva, Evelina; Smith, Linda B.; Diedrich, Frederick J.; Thelen, Esther

    2010-01-01

    Skilled behavior requires a balance between previously successful behaviors and new behaviors appropriate to the present context. We describe a dynamic field model for understanding this balance in infant perseverative reaching. The model predictions are tested with regard to the interaction of two aspects of the typical perseverative reaching task: the visual cue indicating the target and the memory demand created by the delay imposed between cueing and reaching. The memory demand was manipulated by imposing either a 0- or a 3-second delay, and the salience of the cue to reach was systematically varied. Infants demonstrated fewer perseverative errors at 0-delay versus 3-second delay based on the cue salience, such that a more salient visual cue was necessary to overcome a longer delay. These results have important implications for understanding both the basic perceptual-motor processes that produce reaching in infants and skilled flexible behavior in general. PMID:19120410

  14. Delays in Manual Reaching Are Associated with Impaired Functional Abilities in Early Dementia Patients.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Casper; Pel, Johan J M; van der Steen, Johannes; Mattace-Raso, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that early dementia patients have deficits in manual reaching tasks. It is important to understand the impact of these functional disabilities on their quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate if there is an association between manual reaching and measures of (instrumental) activities of daily living (IADL) in a group of patients with cognitive complaints. The manual reaching performance of 27 patients was assessed in detail with eye and hand tracking devices. Patients were divided into three groups based on self-reported loss of IADL function. Parameters describing hand response and movement times were compared between groups. Patients with loss of IADL function in ≥1 domain had delayed hand response and hand movement times towards visible targets compared to patients with no loss of IADL function. Delays in manual reaching movements are related to the degree of loss of IADL function in early dementia patients. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Leg lateral reach test: The reliability and correlation with thoraco-lumbo-pelvic rotation range.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si-Hyun; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Park, Kyue-Nam; Hwang, Ui-Jae

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the intra- and inter-rater reliabilities of the leg lateral reach test as a screening tool for thoraco-lumbo-pelvic rotation and to assess the relationship between leg lateral reach distance and thoraco-lumbo-pelvic rotation range in a supine position. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-six physically active participants were recruited. The leg lateral reach test was performed over 2 days. In the first session, two testers measured the distance of the leg lateral reach to determine the within-day inter-rater reliability, and one tester repeated the measurement on day 2 to determine the intra-rater reliability between days. The leg lateral reach test was performed three times per leg, and the mean value was used for data analysis. Reliability was determined using the intraclass correlation coefficient, standard error of measurement, and minimal detectable change. The correlation between leg lateral reach distance and thoraco-lumbo-pelvic rotation range was determined using Pearson correlation. Almost perfect intra- and inter-rater reliabilities were shown for the test [intraclass correlation coefficient2,3=0.97 (95% confidence interval=0.914-0.984) and 0.99 (0.974-0.996), respectively]. The within-day inter-rater standard error of measurement was 1.40cm, and the minimal detectable change was 3.87cm. The between-day intra-rater standard error of measurement was 2.66cm, and the minimal detectable change was 7.37cm. The Pearson correlation showed a moderate to good correlation between the leg lateral reach distance and the thoraco-lumbo-pelvic rotation range (r=0.73). The leg lateral reach screening test is reliable for measuring thoraco-lumbo-pelvic rotation range and allows for practical measurement of the thoraco-lumbo-pelvic rotation range in a supine position. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Trunk-Rotation Differences at Maximal Reach of the Star Excursion Balance Test in Participants With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    de la Motte, Sarah; Arnold, Brent L.; Ross, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Functional reach on the Star Excursion Balance Test is decreased in participants with chronic ankle instability (CAI). However, comprehensive 3-dimensional kinematics associated with these deficits have not been reported. Objective: To determine if lower extremity kinematics differed in CAI participants during anteromedial, medial, and posteromedial reach on the Star Excursion Balance Test. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty CAI participants (age = 24.15 ± 3.84 years, height = 168.95 ± 11.57 cm, mass = 68.95 ± 16.29 kg) and 20 uninjured participants (age = 25.65 ± 5.58 years, height = 170.14 ± 8.75 cm, mass = 69.89 ± 10.51 kg) with no history of ankle sprain. We operationally defined CAI as repeated episodes of ankle “giving way” or “rolling over” or both, regardless of neuromuscular deficits or pathologic laxity. All CAI participants scored ≤26 on the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Intervention(s): Star Excursion Balance Test reaches in the anteromedial, medial, and posteromedial directions. The CAI participants used the unstable side as the stance leg. Control participants were sex, height, mass, and side matched to the CAI group. The 3-dimensional kinematics were assessed with a motion-capture system. Main Outcome Measure(s): Group differences on normalized reach distance, trunk, pelvis, and hip-, knee-, and ankle-joint angles at maximum Star Excursion Balance Test reach. Results: No reach-distance differences were detected between CAI and uninjured participants in any of the 3 reach directions. With anteromedial reach, trunk rotation (t1,38 = 3.06, P = .004), pelvic rotation (t1,38 = 3.17, P = .003), and hip flexion (t1,38 = 2.40, P = .002) were greater in CAI participants. With medial reach, trunk flexion (t1,38 = 6.39, P = .05) was greater than for uninjured participants. No differences were seen with posteromedial reach. Conclusions: We did not detect

  17. Pulmonary function testing.

    PubMed

    Ruppel, Gregg L; Enright, Paul L

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary function testing is often considered the basis for diagnosis in many categories of pulmonary disease. Although most of the testing methodologies are well established and widely employed, there are still many questions regarding how tests should be performed, how to ensure that reliable data are produced, what reference values and rules should be used, and how pulmonary function tests (PFTs) should be interpreted to best support clinical decision making. This conference was organized around a set of questions aimed at many of these issues. Each presenter was asked to address a specific topic regarding what tests should be done, how those test should be performed to answer a particular clinical question, and to relate test results to an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the patient. These topics included testing of adults and children, with concentration on important disease entities such as COPD, asthma, and unexplained dyspnea. Special emphasis was given to discussing reference values, lower limits of normal, interpretive strategies to optimize disease classification, and those factors directly affecting data quality. Established techniques for spirometry, lung volumes, diffusing capacity, exercise testing, and bronchial challenges were compared and contrasted with new technologies, and with technologies that might be part of pulmonary function laboratories in the near future.

  18. Local tolerance testing under REACH: Accepted non-animal methods are not on equal footing with animal tests.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Ursula G; Hill, Erin H; Curren, Rodger D; Raabe, Hans A; Kolle, Susanne N; Teubner, Wera; Mehling, Annette; Landsiedel, Robert

    2016-07-01

    In general, no single non-animal method can cover the complexity of any given animal test. Therefore, fixed sets of in vitro (and in chemico) methods have been combined into testing strategies for skin and eye irritation and skin sensitisation testing, with pre-defined prediction models for substance classification. Many of these methods have been adopted as OECD test guidelines. Various testing strategies have been successfully validated in extensive in-house and inter-laboratory studies, but they have not yet received formal acceptance for substance classification. Therefore, under the European REACH Regulation, data from testing strategies can, in general, only be used in so-called weight-of-evidence approaches. While animal testing data generated under the specific REACH information requirements are per se sufficient, the sufficiency of weight-of-evidence approaches can be questioned under the REACH system, and further animal testing can be required. This constitutes an imbalance between the regulatory acceptance of data from approved non-animal methods and animal tests that is not justified on scientific grounds. To ensure that testing strategies for local tolerance testing truly serve to replace animal testing for the REACH registration 2018 deadline (when the majority of existing chemicals have to be registered), clarity on their regulatory acceptance as complete replacements is urgently required. 2016 FRAME.

  19. Platelet Function Tests.

    PubMed

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally developed for diagnosis of bleeding disorders, platelet function assays have become increasingly used in basic research on platelet physiology, in phenotype-genotype associations in bleeding disorders, in drug development as surrogate endpoints of efficacy of new antiplatelet therapy, and to an extent, in the monitoring of antiplatelet therapy in clinical practice to predict thrombotic and bleeding risk. A multiplicity of platelet function assays is available to measure the level of platelet activity in various settings. These include assays that are restricted to a specialized laboratory as well as point-of-care instruments meant to investigate platelet function at patient bedside. Unlike tests that determine a defined quantity or measurement of a clinical biomarker (e.g., cholesterol or blood pressure), platelet function testing assesses the dynamics of living cells, which immediately presents a series of unique problems to any laboratory or clinic. This article presents currently used platelet function assays and discusses important variables to take into account when performing these assays, including preanalytical issues and difficulties in interpreting platelet function test results.

  20. Intrarater and interrater reliability of the Anteromedial Reach Test in healthy participants

    PubMed Central

    Bent, Nicholas P; Rushton, Alison B; Wright, Chris C; Petherick, Emma-Jane; Batt, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    Background The Anteromedial Reach Test is a performance-based outcome measure for evaluating dynamic knee stability in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury. No previously published study has adequately evaluated intrarater or interrater reliability of the Anteromedial Reach Test, so the purpose of this study was to assess these measurement properties in healthy participants prior to their investigation in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Methods Two raters (A and B) tested 39 healthy university staff and students (20 men, 19 women). For the intrarater reliability investigation, rater A tested participants on three separate test occasions (days 1, 2, and 3) at the same time of day. For the interrater reliability investigation, raters A and B independently tested participants on the same test occasion (day 3). Results There was no significant systematic bias between test occasions or raters. Values of the intraclass correlation coefficient (2,1) were 0.96 for intrarater reliability of both the dominant leg and nondominant leg and 0.97 (dominant leg) and 0.98 (nondominant leg) for interrater reliability. Values for the standard error of measurement were 1.46 (dominant leg) and 1.62 (nondominant leg) for the intrarater investigation, and 1.26 (dominant leg) and 1.04 (nondominant leg) for the interrater investigation. At the 90% confidence level, the minimum detectable change was 3.8% and the error in an individual’s score at a given point in time was ±2.7%. Conclusion The Anteromedial Reach Test demonstrated excellent intrarater and interrater reliability in healthy participants. This provides a basis for future investigation of the measurement properties of the Anteromedial Reach Test in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury. PMID:24648776

  1. Modern vestibular function testing.

    PubMed Central

    Baloh, R W; Furman, J M

    1989-01-01

    Current tests of vestibular function concentrate on the horizontal semicircular canal-ocular reflex because it is the easiest reflex to stimulate (calorically and rotationally) and record (using electro-oculography). Tests of the other vestibulo-ocular reflexes (vertical semicircular canal and otolith) and of the vestibulospinal reflexes have yet to be shown useful in the clinical setting. Digital video recording of eye movements and vestibular-evoked responses are promising new technologies that may affect clinical testing in the near future. PMID:2660408

  2. Effects of Resistance Training on the Sit-and-Reach Test in Elderly Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Aline Rodrigues; Santarem Jose Maria; Filho, Wilson Jacob; Marucci, Maria de Fatima Nunes

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of a 10-week resistance training program on older women's flexibility (evaluated through the sit- and-reach test performed before and after the training program). Participants were compared to inactive older women. The training program resulted in significant increases in participants' flexibility, suggesting that weight…

  3. Effects of Resistance Training on the Sit-and-Reach Test in Elderly Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Aline Rodrigues; Santarem Jose Maria; Filho, Wilson Jacob; Marucci, Maria de Fatima Nunes

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of a 10-week resistance training program on older women's flexibility (evaluated through the sit- and-reach test performed before and after the training program). Participants were compared to inactive older women. The training program resulted in significant increases in participants' flexibility, suggesting that weight…

  4. Progressive abduction loading therapy targeting flexion synergy to regain reaching function in chronic stroke: Preliminary results from an RCT.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Michael D; Carmona, Carolina; Drogos, Justin; Traxel, Stuart; Dewald, Julius P A

    2016-08-01

    Reaching function is impaired following stroke due to abnormal coupling of shoulder abduction and elbow flexion. This phenomenon is commonly referred to as flexion synergy, loss of independent joint control, or impaired joint individuation. We have been successful in treating individuals with chronic stroke with moderate to severe motor impairments through the employment of targeted rehabilitation robotics and identified progressive abduction loading as a key element to the rehabilitation of reaching. Here we expand upon the investigation of progressive abduction loading therapy by testing two variants of the exercise in a larger sample and including a 3-month follow-up. Furthermore, we attempt to glean additional insights into the mechanisms underlying improvements by not only assessing reaching distance as a function of abduction loading but, for the first time, assessing peak reaching velocity, a combined measure of dynamic elbow and shoulder strength. Thirty-one participants with severe stroke were randomized to two intervention variants. Preliminary analysis has been performed and results are presented for blinded combined-group data. Following the intervention, there was a significant improvement in both reaching distance and peak reaching velocity. Mechanisms for improvement are briefly discussed.

  5. Testing the concurrent validity of a naturalistic upper extremity reaching task.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, S Y; Hengge, C R

    2016-01-01

    Point-to-point reaching has been widely used to study upper extremity motor control. We have been developing a naturalistic reaching task that adds tool manipulation and object transport to this established paradigm. The purpose of this study was to determine the concurrent validity of a naturalistic reaching task in a sample of healthy adults. This task was compared to the criterion measure of standard point-to-point reaching. Twenty-eight adults performed unconstrained out-and-back movements in three different directions relative to constant start location along midline using their nondominant arm. In the naturalistic task, participants manipulated a tool to transport objects sequentially between physical targets anchored to the planar workspace. In the standard task, participants moved a digital cursor sequentially between virtual targets, veridical to the planar workspace. In both tasks, the primary measure of performance was trial time, which indicated the time to complete 15 reaches (five cycles of three reaches/target). Two other comparator tasks were also designed to test concurrent validity when components of the naturalistic task were added to the standard task. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients indicated minimal relationship between the naturalistic and standard tasks due to differences in progressive task difficulty. Accounting for this yielded a moderate linear relationship, indicating concurrent validity. The comparator tasks were also related to both the standard and naturalistic task. Thus, the principles of motor control and learning that have been established by the wealth of point-to-point reaching studies can still be applied to the naturalistic task to a certain extent.

  6. Testing the concurrent validity of a naturalistic upper extremity reaching task

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, SY; Hengge, CR

    2015-01-01

    Point-to-point reaching has been widely used to study upper extremity motor control. We have been developing a naturalistic reaching task that adds tool manipulation and object transport to this established paradigm. The purpose of this study was to determine the concurrent validity of a naturalistic reaching task in a sample of healthy adults. This task was compared to the criterion measure of standard point-to-point reaching. Twenty-eight adults performed unconstrained out-and-back movements in three different directions relative to constant start location along midline using their nondominant arm. In the naturalistic task, participants manipulated a tool to transport objects sequentially between physical targets anchored to the planar workspace. In the standard task, participants moved a digital cursor sequentially between virtual targets, veridical to the planar workspace. In both tasks, the primary measure of performance was trial time, which indicated the time to complete 15 reaches (five cycles of three reaches/target). Two other comparator tasks were also designed to test concurrent validity when components of the naturalistic task were added to the standard task. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients indicated minimal relationship between the naturalistic and standard tasks due to differences in progressive task difficulty. Accounting for this yielded a moderate linear relationship, indicating concurrent validity. The comparator tasks were also related to both the standard and naturalistic task. Thus, the principles of motor control and learning that have been established by the wealth of point-to-point reaching studies can still be applied to the naturalistic task to a certain extent. PMID:26438508

  7. Passive reach and grasp with functional electrical stimulation and robotic arm support.

    PubMed

    Westerveld, Ard J; Schouten, Alfred C; Veltink, Peter H; van der Kooij, Herman

    2014-01-01

    Rehabilitation of arm and hand function is crucial to increase functional independence of stroke subjects. Here, we investigate the technical feasibility of an integrated training system combining robotics and functional electrical stimulation (FES) to support reach and grasp during functional manipulation of objects. To support grasp and release, FES controlled the thumb and fingers using Model Predictive Control (MPC), while a novel 3D robotic manipulator provided reach support. The system's performance was assessed in both stroke and blindfolded healthy subjects, where the subject's passive arm and hand made functional reach, grasp, move and release movements while manipulating objects. The success rate of complete grasp, move and release tasks with different objects ranged from 33% to 87% in healthy subjects. In severe chronic stroke subjects especially the hand opening had a low success rate (<25%) and no complete movements could be made. We demonstrated that our developed integrated training system can move the passive arm and hand for functional pick and place movements. In the current setup, the positioning accuracy of the robot with respect to the object position was critical for the overall performance. The use of a higher virtual stiffness and including feedback of object position in the robot control would likely improve the relative position accuracy. The system has potential for post-stroke rehabilitation, where support could be reduced based on patient performance which is needed to aid motor relearning of reach, grasp and release.

  8. The effect of foot plantar massage on balance and functional reach in patients with type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tütün Yümin, Eylem; Şimşek, Tülay Tarsuslu; Sertel, Meral; Ankaralı, Handan; Yumin, Murat

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of manual foot plantar massage (classic and friction massage) on functional mobility level, balance, and functional reach in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (T2 DM). A total of 38 subjects diagnosed with T2 DM were included in the study. A healthy control group could not be formed in this study. After the subjects' socio-demographic data were obtained, Timed Up & Go (TUG) Test, functional reach test (FRT), one-leg standing test with eyes open-closed, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) to measure foot pain intensity were performed. The results were also divided and assessed in three groups according to the ages of the individuals (40-54, 55-64, and 65 and over). As a result of statistical analysis, a difference was found in the values obtained from TUG, FRT, and one-leg standing test with eyes open and closed (p < 0.05). Following the massage, TUG values significantly decreased comparison with those before the massage, whereas the values of FRT and one-leg standing test with eyes open and closed significantly increased compared with those before the massage (p > 0.05). According to age groups, there were statistical differences (p < 0.05) between the TUG, one-leg standing test with eyes open and closed test values of the individuals before and after the massage. The results of our study indicated that application of plantar massage to patients with T2 DM caused an improvement in balance, functional mobility, and functional reach values. An increase in body balance and functional mobility may explain the improvement in TUG. Foot massage to be added to rehabilitation exercise programs of DM patients will be important in improving balance and mobility of patients.

  9. Towards optimization of chemical testing under REACH: a Bayesian network approach to Integrated Testing Strategies.

    PubMed

    Jaworska, Joanna; Gabbert, Silke; Aldenberg, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Integrated Testing Strategies (ITSs) are considered tools for guiding resource efficient decision-making on chemical hazard and risk management. Originating in the mid-nineties from research initiatives on minimizing animal use in toxicity testing, ITS development still lacks a methodologically consistent framework for incorporating all relevant information, for updating and reducing uncertainty across testing stages, and for handling conditionally dependent evidence. This paper presents a conceptual and methodological proposal for improving ITS development. We discuss methodological shortcomings of current ITS approaches, and we identify conceptual requirements for ITS development and optimization. First, ITS development should be based on probabilistic methods in order to quantify and update various uncertainties across testing stages. Second, reasoning should reflect a set of logic rules for consistently combining probabilities of related events. Third, inference should be hypothesis-driven and should reflect causal relationships in order to coherently guide decision-making across testing stages. To meet these requirements, we propose an information-theoretic approach to ITS development, the "ITS inference framework", which can be made operational by using Bayesian networks. As an illustration, we examine a simple two-test battery for assessing rodent carcinogenicity. Finally, we demonstrate how running the Bayesian network reveals a quantitative measure of Weight-of-Evidence.

  10. Trunk strength and function using the multidirectional reach distance in individuals with non-traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Gabison, Sharon; Verrier, Molly C.; Nadeau, Sylvie; Gagnon, Dany H.; Roy, Audrey; Flett, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    Context Trunk control is essential to engage in activities of daily living. Measuring trunk strength and function in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) is difficult. Trunk function has not been studied in non-traumatic SCI (NTSCI). Objectives To characterize changes in trunk strength and seated functional reach in individuals with NTSCI during inpatient rehabilitation. To determine if trunk strength and seated reach differ between walkers and wheelchair users. To explore relationships between trunk and hip strength and seated functional reach. Design Observational study. Setting Two SCI rehabilitation facilities. Participants 32 subacute inpatients (mean age 48.0 ± 15.4 years). Outcome measures Isometric strength of trunk and hip and function (Multidirectional Reach Test: MDRT) were assessed at admission and within 2 weeks of discharge. Analysis of variance was conducted for admission measures (MDRT, hip and trunk strength) between walkers and wheelchair users. Changes in MDRT, hip and trunk strength were evaluated using parametric and non-parametric statistics. The level of association between changes in values of MRDT and strength was also examined. Results Significant differences between walkers and wheelchair users were found for strength measures (P < 0.05) but not for MDRT. Left- and right-sided reaches increased in wheelchair users only (P < 0.05). Associations between changes in hip strength, trunk strength, and reach distance were found (R = 0.67–0.73). Conclusion In clinical settings, it is feasible and relevant to assess trunk, hip strength, and MRDT. Future studies require strategies to increase the number of participants assessed, in order to inform clinicians about relevant rehabilitation interventions. PMID:25229736

  11. Plantar Pressure Distribution among Older Persons with Different Types of Foot and Its Correlation with Functional Reach Distance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Changes in biomechanical structures of human foot are common in the older person, which may lead to alteration of foot type and plantar pressure distribution. We aimed to examine how foot type affects the plantar pressure distribution and to determine the relationship between plantar pressure distribution and functional reach distance in older persons. Methods. Fifty community-dwelling older persons (age: 69.98 ± 5.84) were categorized into three groups based on the Foot Posture Index. The plantar pressure (max⁡P) and contact area were analyzed using Footscan® RSScan platform. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the plantar pressure between foot types and Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to correlate plantar pressure with the functional reach distance. Results. There were significant differences of max⁡P in the forefoot area across all foot types. The post hoc analysis found significantly lower max⁡P in the pronated foot compared to the supinated foot. A high linear rank correlation was found between functional reach distance and max⁡P of the rearfoot region of the supinated foot. Conclusions. These findings suggested that types of the foot affect the plantar maximal pressure in older persons with functional reach distance showing some associations. PMID:27980874

  12. Bathhouse distribution of HIV self-testing kits reaches diverse, high-risk population

    PubMed Central

    Woods, William J.; Lippman, Sheri A.; Agnew, Emily; Carroll, Scott; Binson, Diane

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We distributed free OraQuick In-home HIV Test® kits to men at a gay bathhouse. Men were systematically selected to receive a coupon, which could be redeemed that night for an HIV self-testing kit. Those offered the coupon were asked to take an 11-item survey. About 181 men received coupons, of whom 92 (51%) accepted the coupon, and 61 (66%) men redeemed the coupon. Those who redeemed test kits and completed a survey (n = 53) were more ethnically diverse (χ 2 = 100.69, p < .01) than those receiving the coupon. More than half had not tested in the past 6 months (50%) or never tested (7%). Importantly, men who had never tested or who last tested more than 6 months ago were among those most likely to take the free test kit. We found bathhouse distribution could reach a population of men who have sex with men most in need of improved access to HIV testing. Future studies should consider means of improved follow-up and linkage to care for those who test positive. PMID:26883730

  13. A comparison of two Shuttle launch and entry suits - Reach envelope, isokinetic strength, and treadmill tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, Lauren E.; Rajulu, Sudhakar L.; Klute, Glenn K.

    1992-01-01

    A quantification has been conducted of any existing differences between the performance, in operational conditions, of the Space Shuttle crew Launch Entry Suit (LES) and the new Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES). While LES is a partial-pressure suit, the ACES system which is being considered as a replacement for LES is a full-pressure suit. Three tests have been conducted with six subjects to ascertain the suits' reach envelope, strength, and treadmill performance. No significant operational differences were found between the two suit designs.

  14. Postexercise peripheral oxygen saturation after completion of the 6-minute walk test predicts successfully reaching the summit of Aconcagua.

    PubMed

    Lazio, Matthew P; Van Roo, Jon D; Pesce, Carlos; Malik, Sanjeev; Courtney, D Mark

    2010-12-01

    The 6-minute walk test (6MWT) is a single measurement of functional status in patients with cardiovascular disease. It has not been studied at high altitude. We investigate the screening value of 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) and postexercise vital sign (VS) measurements as predictors of successfully reaching the summit or development of acute mountain sickness (AMS) on Aconcagua (6962 m). Prospective observational cohort in Aconcagua Provincial Park, Argentina. Adults climbing the normal route who registered with base camp physicians were included. There were no exclusion criteria. VSs were measured before (resting) and after (postexercise) completion of 6MWT while volunteers acclimatized at Plaza de Mulas base camp (4365 m). Volunteers proceeded towards the summit at their own pace and upon descent returned a questionnaire with maximum altitude reached and Lake Louise AMS Self-report Score (LLSelf). One hundred twenty-four volunteers completed the 6MWT. Sixty-four volunteers (51.6%) completed questionnaires; 56% summited. Median LLSelf was 4 (IQR: 3.0-6.5). There was no association between any resting or postexercise VS measurements and AMS. However, mean postexercise SpO(2) was 80.8% in summiters and 76.4% in nonsummiters, a difference of -4.4% (95% CI: -6.7 to -2.0, p = 0.0005). Postexercise SpO(2) < 75% had 97.2% sensitivity and negative likelihood ratio of 0.086 in predicting the outcome of successfully reaching the summit: only one climber with SpO(2) < 75% successfully reached the summit. This study provides the first published data on 6MWD recorded in the field at high altitude. Postexercise SpO(2) < 75% may be a useful screening test for predicting the outcome of successfully reaching the summit of Aconcagua. Copyright © 2010 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Robot-Assisted and Unassisted Exercise on Functional Reaching in Chronic Hemiparesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    EFFECT OF ROBOT-ASSISTED AND UNASSISTED EXERCISE ON FUNCTIONAL REACHING IN CHRONIC HEMIPARESIS L. E. Kahn1,2, M. L. Zygman1, W. Z. Rymer1,2, D...Abstract – A common therapeutic approach for the rehabilitation of patients with hemiparesis involves repetitive voluntary movements with manual...of subjects with chronic hemiparesis (N = 7) performed the same repetitive exercises without the aid of the robotic device. Each group performed 24

  16. Criterion-Related Validity of Sit-and-Reach Tests for Estimating Hamstring and Lumbar Extensibility: a Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mayorga-Vega, Daniel; Merino-Marban, Rafael; Viciana, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of the present meta-analysis was to examine the scientific literature on the criterion-related validity of sit-and-reach tests for estimating hamstring and lumbar extensibility. For this purpose relevant studies were searched from seven electronic databases dated up through December 2012. Primary outcomes of criterion-related validity were Pearson´s zero-order correlation coefficients (r) between sit-and-reach tests and hamstrings and/or lumbar extensibility criterion measures. Then, from the included studies, the Hunter- Schmidt´s psychometric meta-analysis approach was conducted to estimate population criterion- related validity of sit-and-reach tests. Firstly, the corrected correlation mean (rp), unaffected by statistical artefacts (i.e., sampling error and measurement error), was calculated separately for each sit-and-reach test. Subsequently, the three potential moderator variables (sex of participants, age of participants, and level of hamstring extensibility) were examined by a partially hierarchical analysis. Of the 34 studies included in the present meta-analysis, 99 correlations values across eight sit-and-reach tests and 51 across seven sit-and-reach tests were retrieved for hamstring and lumbar extensibility, respectively. The overall results showed that all sit-and-reach tests had a moderate mean criterion-related validity for estimating hamstring extensibility (rp = 0.46-0.67), but they had a low mean for estimating lumbar extensibility (rp = 0. 16-0.35). Generally, females, adults and participants with high levels of hamstring extensibility tended to have greater mean values of criterion-related validity for estimating hamstring extensibility. When the use of angular tests is limited such as in a school setting or in large scale studies, scientists and practitioners could use the sit-and-reach tests as a useful alternative for hamstring extensibility estimation, but not for estimating lumbar extensibility. Key PointsOverall sit-and-reach

  17. Criterion-Related Validity of Sit-and-Reach Tests for Estimating Hamstring and Lumbar Extensibility: a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mayorga-Vega, Daniel; Merino-Marban, Rafael; Viciana, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of the present meta-analysis was to examine the scientific literature on the criterion-related validity of sit-and-reach tests for estimating hamstring and lumbar extensibility. For this purpose relevant studies were searched from seven electronic databases dated up through December 2012. Primary outcomes of criterion-related validity were Pearson´s zero-order correlation coefficients (r) between sit-and-reach tests and hamstrings and/or lumbar extensibility criterion measures. Then, from the included studies, the Hunter- Schmidt´s psychometric meta-analysis approach was conducted to estimate population criterion- related validity of sit-and-reach tests. Firstly, the corrected correlation mean (rp), unaffected by statistical artefacts (i.e., sampling error and measurement error), was calculated separately for each sit-and-reach test. Subsequently, the three potential moderator variables (sex of participants, age of participants, and level of hamstring extensibility) were examined by a partially hierarchical analysis. Of the 34 studies included in the present meta-analysis, 99 correlations values across eight sit-and-reach tests and 51 across seven sit-and-reach tests were retrieved for hamstring and lumbar extensibility, respectively. The overall results showed that all sit-and-reach tests had a moderate mean criterion-related validity for estimating hamstring extensibility (rp = 0.46-0.67), but they had a low mean for estimating lumbar extensibility (rp = 0. 16-0.35). Generally, females, adults and participants with high levels of hamstring extensibility tended to have greater mean values of criterion-related validity for estimating hamstring extensibility. When the use of angular tests is limited such as in a school setting or in large scale studies, scientists and practitioners could use the sit-and-reach tests as a useful alternative for hamstring extensibility estimation, but not for estimating lumbar extensibility. Key Points Overall sit-and-reach

  18. Thyroid Function Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Irving T.

    1979-01-01

    Describes two tests, T-4 and T-3, for hypothyroid based on the binding of the hormones by proteins. The tests were performed in courses for physicians, clinical chemists, laboratory technicians, and undergraduate science students by the individuals involved and on their own sera. These tests are commercially available in kit form. (GA)

  19. Thyroid Function Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Irving T.

    1979-01-01

    Describes two tests, T-4 and T-3, for hypothyroid based on the binding of the hormones by proteins. The tests were performed in courses for physicians, clinical chemists, laboratory technicians, and undergraduate science students by the individuals involved and on their own sera. These tests are commercially available in kit form. (GA)

  20. Functional electrical stimulation to augment poststroke reach and hand opening in the presence of voluntary effort: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Nathaniel S; Knutson, Jayme S; Chae, John; Crago, Patrick E

    2014-01-01

    Hemiparesis after stroke can severely limit an individual's ability to perform activities of daily living. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) has the potential to generate functional arm and hand movements. We have observed that FES can produce functional hand opening when a stroke patient is relaxed, but the FES-produced hand opening is often overpowered by finger flexor coactivation in response to patient attempts to reach and open the hand. To determine if stimulating both reaching muscles and hand opening muscles makes it possible to achieve useful amounts of simultaneous reach and hand opening even in the presence of submaximal reaching effort. We measured reach and hand opening during a reach-then-open the hand task under different combinations of voluntary effort and FES for both reach and hand opening. As effort was reduced and stimulation generated more movement, a greater amount of reach and hand opening was achieved. For the first time, this study quantified the effect of voluntary effort for reach and hand opening on stimulated hand opening. It also showed variability in the interaction of voluntary effort and stimulation between participants. Additionally, when participants were instructed to reach with partial effort during simultaneous FES, they achieved greater reach and hand opening. Simultaneous reaching and FES hand opening is improved by including FES for reach and reducing voluntary effort. In the future, an upper extremity neuroprosthesis that uses a combination of voluntary effort and FES assistance may enable users to perform activities of daily living.

  1. Soy protein diet increases skilled forelimb reaching function after stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Cheatwood, Joseph L; Burnet, Derek; Butteiger, Dustie N; Banz, William J

    2011-01-20

    Stroke is a leading cause of lasting disability. Dietary strategies aimed at increasing post-stroke outcomes are lifestyle alterations which could be easily implemented by people at risk of occlusive stroke. Soy diets have been demonstrated to provide some benefits in the short term following stroke, but longer time periods have not been studied. Further, carefully defined diets containing soy protein isolates have not been investigated. In the current study, male Long Evans Hooded rats were fed semi-purified diets containing either sodium caseinate or soy protein isolate. Rats were trained to perform the skilled forelimb reaching task and subsequently underwent unilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) to induce a stroke lesion. After stroke, rats remained on the same diet and were tested daily for a period of 8 weeks to observe their performance on the skilled forelimb reaching task. In the first week following stroke, rats receiving the soy protein-containing diet (SP) demonstrated less severe reaching deficits than rats fed the Na caseinate-containing diet (CAS) (p<0.05). These results suggest that a soy protein-based diet provides significant protection from neurological damage following MCAO stroke in rats.

  2. The Performance of Left-Handed Participants on a Preferential Reaching Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamolo, Carla M.; Roy, Eric A.; Bryden, Pamela J.; Rohr, Linda E.

    2005-01-01

    Previous research in our laboratory has examined the distribution of preferred hand (PH) reaches in working space with right-handed participants. In one study, we examined the effects of tool position and task demands on the frequency of PH reaches with right-handers (Mamolo, Roy, Bryden, & Rohr, 2004). We found that PH reaches were at a maximum…

  3. A critical evaluation of the 2011 ECHA reports on compliance with the REACH and CLP regulations and on the use of alternatives to testing on animals for compliance with the REACH regulation.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, Horst; Sauer, Ursula G; Mekenyan, Ovanes

    2011-10-01

    On 30 June 2011, the European Chemicals Agency published two reports, one on the functioning of the REACH system, the other on the use of alternatives to animal testing in compliance with that system. The data presented are based on information gained during the first registration period under the REACH system, which included high production volume chemicals and substances of very high concern, which have the most extensive information requirements. A total of 25,460 registration dossiers were received, covering 3,400 existing, so-called 'phase-in', substances, and 900 new, so-called 'non-phase-in', substances. Data sharing and the joint submission of data are reported to have worked successfully. In the registration dossiers for these substances, results from new animal tests were included for less than 1% of all the endpoints; testing proposals (required for 'higher-tier' information requirements) were submitted for 711 in vivo tests involving vertebrate animals. The registrants mainly used old, existing experimental data, or options for the adaptation (waiving) of information requirements, before collecting new information. For predicting substance toxicity, 'read-across' was the second most-used approach, followed by 'weight-of-evidence'. In vitro toxicity tests played a minor role, and were only used when the respective test methods had gained the status of regulatory acceptance. All in all, a successful start to the REACH programme was reported, particularly since, in contrast to most predictions, it did not contribute to a significant increase in toxicity testing in animals.

  4. Pulmonary Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... common PFT’s are spirometry (spy-RAH-me-tree), diffusion studies and body plethysmography (ple-thiz-MA-gra- ... blowing and let the staff know. What are diffusion studies? Diffusion tests find out how well the ...

  5. Functional connectivity among multi-channel EEGs when working memory load reaches the capacity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Zhao, Huipo; Bai, Wenwen; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-15

    Evidence from behavioral studies has suggested a capacity existed in working memory. As the concept of functional connectivity has been introduced into neuroscience research in the recent years, the aim of this study is to investigate the functional connectivity in the brain when working memory load reaches the capacity. 32-channel electroencephalographs (EEGs) were recorded for 16 healthy subjects, while they performed a visual working memory task with load 1-6. Individual working memory capacity was calculated according to behavioral results. Short-time Fourier transform was used to determine the principal frequency band (theta band) related to working memory. The functional connectivity among EEGs was measured by the directed transform function (DTF) via spectral Granger causal analysis. The capacity was 4 calculated from the behavioral results. The power was focused in the frontal midline region. The strongest connectivity strengths of EEG theta components from load 1 to 6 distributed in the frontal midline region. The curve of DTF values vs load numbers showed that DTF increased from load 1 to 4, peaked at load 4, then decreased after load 4. This study finds that the functional connectivity between EEGs, described quantitatively by DTF, became less strong when working memory load exceeded the capacity.

  6. The Functions of Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumin, Melvin M.

    1981-01-01

    Admissions testing and its consequences are looked upon as a reflection of the current debate occurring in Western capitalist democracies concerning the optimization of freedom, fairness, and wealth. In dealing with the competition and conflict of values and interests, there can be no factual but political resolution. (Author/AL)

  7. A rapid method to score stream reaches based on the overall performance of their main ecological functions.

    PubMed

    Rowe, David K; Parkyn, Stephanie; Quinn, John; Collier, Kevin; Hatton, Chris; Joy, Michael K; Maxted, John; Moore, Stephen

    2009-06-01

    A method was developed to score the ecological condition of first- to third-order stream reaches in the Auckland region of New Zealand based on the performance of their key ecological functions. Such a method is required by consultants and resource managers to quantify the reduction in ecological condition of a modified stream reach relative to its unmodified state. This is a fundamental precursor for the determination of fair environmental compensation for achieving no-net-loss in overall stream ecological value. Field testing and subsequent use of the method indicated that it provides a useful measure of ecological condition related to the performance of stream ecological functions. It is relatively simple to apply compared to a full ecological study, is quick to use, and allows identification of the degree of impairment of each of the key ecological functions. The scoring system was designed so that future improvements in the measurement of stream functions can be incorporated into it. Although the methodology was specifically designed for Auckland streams, the principles can be readily adapted to other regions and stream types.

  8. Accuracy and Feasibility of Video Analysis for Assessing Hamstring Flexibility and Validity of the Sit-and-Reach Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mier, Constance M.

    2011-01-01

    The accuracy of video analysis of the passive straight-leg raise test (PSLR) and the validity of the sit-and-reach test (SR) were tested in 60 men and women. Computer software measured static hip-joint flexion accurately. High within-session reliability of the PSLR was demonstrated (R greater than 0.97). Test-retest (separate days) reliability for…

  9. Accuracy and Feasibility of Video Analysis for Assessing Hamstring Flexibility and Validity of the Sit-and-Reach Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mier, Constance M.

    2011-01-01

    The accuracy of video analysis of the passive straight-leg raise test (PSLR) and the validity of the sit-and-reach test (SR) were tested in 60 men and women. Computer software measured static hip-joint flexion accurately. High within-session reliability of the PSLR was demonstrated (R greater than 0.97). Test-retest (separate days) reliability for…

  10. Reaching disenfranchised youth and mobile populations in Ghana through voluntary counselling and testing services for HIV.

    PubMed

    Wyss, Susi; Ablordeppey, Joyce; Okrah, Jane; Kyei, Abigail

    2007-08-01

    This paper documents the evaluation of a 20-month project to provide voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) to a mobile population of youth surrounding the Agbogbloshie market in Accra, Ghana. The specific objectives of the evaluation were to determine: 1) to what extent targets for providing VCT services to the specified population were reached; 2) how HIV prevalence among clients compared to that of the general population; 3) to what extent former clients self-reported behaviour change; and 4) whether useful lessons could be drawn regarding fees, hours, and location of services, as well as use of peer educators to increase use of VCT services among the target population. Various methodologies, including questionnaires, focus group discussions, a review of the service statistics and an exit poll of clients were used to evaluate the project. The service statistics demonstrated that the project exceeded the life-of-project target for number of clients by nearly 40%. Prevalence for the VCT client population (aged 15-25) was higher than for the general population (aged 15-24), although the gender differentials were similar. Focus group data suggested that clients may have adopted behaviour changes as a result of VCT. Finally, focus group discussions and VCT service trends showed that the high number of clients was largely influenced by three factors: services being free, location and hours of services being convenient to the target population, and use of peer educators to promote the services. In addition, the evaluation highlighted the importance of the counselling component of VCT, even as counselling can get short-changed at the expense of HIV testing when large numbers of clients are involved. The evaluation stressed the need to appropriately remunerate peer educators for their work whenever possible. Finally, VCT programmes continue to face challenges such as: HIV stigma as a barrier to people coming to be counselled and tested; insufficient availability of

  11. Inhibition in Clark's nutcrackers (Nucifraga columbiana): results of a detour-reaching test.

    PubMed

    Vernouillet, A; Anderson, J; Clary, D; Kelly, D M

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition (i.e. the ability to restrain ineffective responses to a given stimulus) is a good indicator of complex cognitive abilities in animals. Inhibition has been demonstrated in a broad range of mammals with foraging style and social group size identified as potential influences of this ability. Whether these ecological factors also apply to birds has not been well studied. Corvids, a family of birds well known for being able to accomplish difficult cognitive tasks often requiring inhibition, are a good model for studying inhibitory control. During this study, we measured the ability of Clark's nutcrackers (Nucifraga columbiana), a relatively non-social, food specialist corvid to exercise inhibitory control during a detour-reaching test. Individuals had to retrieve a pine nut inserted into a transparent tube through one of the side openings without pecking directly at the nut from the front of the tube. Overall, nutcrackers were able to inhibit pecking directly at the food (i.e. prepotent response), instead detouring to the side to retrieve the reward. However, the nutcrackers first required a learning period before showing inhibitory control. The nutcrackers' ability to inhibit was lower than other corvids studied to date, and we discuss the implications of this result for the role of sociality and dietary breadth for the evolution of inhibitory control.

  12. Validity of the jump-and-reach test in sub-elite adolescent handball players.

    PubMed

    Muehlbauer, Thomas; Pabst, Jan; Granacher, Urs; Büsch, Dirk

    2016-08-18

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine concurrent validity of the jump-and-reach (JaR) test using the Vertec system and a criterion device (i.e., Optojump system). In separate sub-analyses, we investigated the influence of gym floor condition and athletes' sex on the validity of vertical jump height. Four hundred and forty sub-elite adolescent female (n = 222, mean age: 14 ± 1 years, age range: 13-15 years) and male (n = 218, mean age: 15 ± 1 years, age range: 14-16 years) handball players performed the JaR test in gyms with region or point elastic floors. Maximal vertical jump height was simultaneously assessed using the Vertec and the Optojump system. In general, significantly higher jump heights were obtained for the Vertec compared to the Optojump system (11.2 cm, [INCREMENT]31%, Cohen´s d = 2.58). The sub-analyses revealed significantly larger jump heights for the Vertec compared to the Optojump system irrespective of gym floor condition and players' sex. The association between Optojump and Vertec-derived vertical jump height amounted to rP = 0.84, with a coefficient of determination (R) of 0.71. The sub-analyses indicated significantly larger correlations in males (rP = 0.75, R = 0.56) than in females (rP = 0.63, R = 0.40). Yet, correlations were not significantly different between region (rP = 0.83, R = 0.69) as opposed to point elastic floor (rP = 0.87, R = 0.76). Our findings indicate that the two apparatus cannot be used interchangeably. Consequently, gym floor and sex specific regression equations were provided to estimate true (Optojump system) vertical jump height from Vertec-derived data.

  13. Pilot study to test effectiveness of video game on reaching performance in stroke.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Ana Maria; Dewald, Hendrik A; Dewald, Jules P A

    2011-01-01

    Robotic systems currently used in upper-limb rehabilitation following stroke rely on some form of visual feedback as part of the intervention program. We evaluated the effect of a video game environment (air hockey) on reaching in stroke with various levels of arm support. We used the Arm Coordination Training 3D system to provide variable arm support and to control the hockey stick. We instructed seven subjects to reach to one of three targets covering the workspace of the impaired arm during the reaching task and to reach as far as possible while playing the video game. The results from this study showed that across subjects, support levels, and targets, the reaching distances achieved with the reaching task were greater than those covered with the video game. This held even after further restricting the mapped workspace of the arm to the area most affected by the flexion synergy (effectively forcing subjects to fight the synergy to reach the hockey puck). The results from this study highlight the importance of designing video games that include specific reaching targets in the workspace compromised by the expression of the flexion synergy. Such video games would also adapt the target location online as a subject's success rate increases.

  14. Quantitative calculation model of dilution ratio based on reaching standard of water function zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhong; Dong, Zengchuan; Wu, Huixiu; Yang, Lin

    2017-03-01

    Dilution ratio is an important indicator of water quality assessment, and it’s difficult to calculate quantitatively. This paper proposed quantitative calculation model of dilution ratio based on the permissible pollution bearing capacity model of water function zone. The model contains three parameters of concentration. Particularly, the 1-D model has three river characteristics parameters in addition. Applications of the model are based on the national standard of wastewater discharge concentration and reaching standard concentration. The results show the inverse correlation between the dilution ratio and the C P and C 0, and the positive correlation with C s . The quantitative maximum control standard of dilution ratio is 12.50% by 0-D model and 22.96% by 1-D model. Moreover, we propose to choose the minimum parameter and find the invalid pollution bearing capacity.

  15. The Validity and Reliability of the Back Saver Sit-and-Reach Test in Middle School Girls and Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Patricia; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the validity and reliability of the Back Saver Sit-and-Reach test for middle school students. Students completed the test during physical education class. Results indicated that the test was moderately related to hamstring flexibility, but its relationship to lower back flexibility was quite low for both sexes. (SM)

  16. Functional Electrical Stimulation to augment poststroke reach and hand opening in the presence of voluntary effort: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Makowski, Nathaniel S.; Knutson, Jayme S.; Chae, John; Crago, Patrick E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hemiparesis after stroke can severely limit an individual’s ability to perform activities of daily living. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) has the potential to generate functional arm and hand movements. We have observed that FES can produce functional hand opening when a stroke patient is relaxed, but the FES-produced hand opening is often overpowered by finger flexor coactivation in response to patient attempts to reach and open the hand. Objective To determine if stimulating both reaching muscles and hand opening muscles makes it possible to achieve useful amounts of simultaneous reach and hand opening even in the presence of submaximal reaching effort. Methods We measured reach and hand opening during a reach-then-open the hand task under different combinations of voluntary effort and FES for both reach and hand opening. Results As effort was reduced and stimulation generated more movement, a greater amount of reach and hand opening was achieved. For the first time, this study quantified the effect of voluntary effort for reach and hand opening on stimulated hand opening. It also showed variability in the interaction of voluntary effort and stimulation between participants. Additionally, when participants were instructed to reach with partial effort during simultaneous FES, they achieved greater reach and hand opening. Conclusions Simultaneous reaching and FES hand opening is improved by including FES for reach and reducing voluntary effort. In the future, an upper extremity neuroprosthesis that uses a combination of voluntary effort and FES assistance may enable users to perform activities of daily living. PMID:24270058

  17. REPRODUCIBILITY OF THE MODIFIED STAR EXCURSION BALANCE TEST COMPOSITE AND SPECIFIC REACH DIRECTION SCORES

    PubMed Central

    van Lieshout, Remko; Reijneveld, Elja A.E.; van den Berg, Sandra M.; Haerkens, Gijs M.; Koenders, Niek H.; de Leeuw, Arina J.; van Oorsouw, Roel G.; Paap, Davy; Scheffer, Else; Weterings, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The mSEBT is a screening tool used to evaluate dynamic balance. Most research investigating measurement properties focused on intrarater reliability and was done in small samples. To know whether the mSEBT is useful to discriminate dynamic balance between persons and to evaluate changes in dynamic balance, more research into intra- and interrater reliability and smallest detectable change (synonymous with minimal detectable change) is needed. Purpose To estimate intra- and interrater reliability and smallest detectable change of the mSEBT in adults at risk for ankle sprain. Study Design Cross-sectional, test-retest design Methods Fifty-five healthy young adults participating in sports at risk for ankle sprain participated (mean ± SD age, 24.0 ± 2.9 years). Each participant performed three test sessions within one hour and was rated by two physical therapists (session 1, rater 1; session 2, rater 2; session 3, rater 1). Participants and raters were blinded for previous measurements. Normalized composite and reach direction scores for the right and left leg were collected. Analysis of variance was used to calculate intraclass correlation coefficient values for intra- and interrater reliability. Smallest detectable change values were calculated based on the standard error of measurement. Results Intra- and interrater reliability for both legs was good to excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient ranging from 0.87 to 0.94). The intrarater smallest detectable change for the composite score of the right leg was 7.2% and for the left 6.2%. The interrater smallest detectable change for the composite score of the right leg was 6.9% and for the left 5.0%. Conclusion The mSEBT is a reliable measurement instrument to discriminate dynamic balance between persons. Most smallest detectable change values of the mSEBT appear to be large. More research is needed to investigate if the mSEBT is usable for evaluative purposes. Level of Evidence Level 2

  18. Psychosocial child adjustment and family functioning in families reached with an assertive outreach intervention.

    PubMed

    Rots-de Vries, Carin; van de Goor, Ien; Stronks, Karien; Garretsen, Henk

    2011-06-01

    Families who experience a chronic complex of socio-economic and psychosocial problems are hard to reach with mainstream care. Evidence exists that the core of this problem is a problematic interaction between this type of family and current systems of care and services. To improve access to problem families, an assertive outreach intervention was implemented into the field of preventive child health care, The Netherlands. The study aimed to provide a more detailed insight into characteristics of the target group. Although there is consensus about some general features of hard to reach problem families, little is known about their specific characteristics because empirical studies among this group are rarely conducted. Especially, the problems of the children is shed insufficient light on. The studied population consisted of families included in the assertive outreach intervention delivered during one year (N=116). To assess psychosocial adjustment of the children, the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire was filled in by the parents. Furthermore, a Dutch questionnaire on family functioning was completed by professional carers. Descriptive data were calculated. The findings show that by using the assertive outreach intervention, programme staff came into contact with families characterised by a considerably higher than average proportion of single parents and unemployed households receiving social benefits. The families faced a high level of risk and a wide range of severe and multiple difficulties, including a lack of basic child care, an inadequate social network and poor parenting. Children in these families were also facing a number of risks. The proportion of psychosocial problems was well above the (inter)national average. The findings reveal the problem areas of unreached families and a need to improve the access to care for these families. © 2010 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2010 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  19. Braking reaching movements: a test of the constant tau-dot strategy under different viewing conditions.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Brian; Churchill, Andrew; Vogt, Stefan; Rönnqvist, Louise

    2004-03-01

    Following F. Zaal and R. J. Bootsma (1995), the authors studied whether the decelerative phase of a reaching movement could be modeled as a constant tau-dot strategy resulting in a soft collision with the object. Specifically, they investigated whether that strategy is sustained over different viewing conditions. Participants (N = 11) were required to reach for 15- and 50-mm objects at 2 different distances under 3 conditions in which visual availability of the immediate environment and of the reaching hand were varied. Tau-dot estimates and goodness-of-fit were highly similar across the 3 conditions. Only within-participant variability of tau-dot estimates was increased when environmental cues were removed. That finding suggests that the motor system uses a tau-dot strategy involving the intermodal (i.e., visual, proprioceptive, or both) specification of information to regulate the decelerative phase of reaching under restricted viewing conditions. The authors provide recommendations for improving the derivation of tau;(x) estimates and stress the need for further research on how time-to-contact information is used in the regulation of the dynamics of actions such as reaching.

  20. [Responses of functional diversity of aquatic insect community to land use change in middle reach of Qiantang River, East China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lian-Bo; Liu, Dong-Xiao; Liu, Shuo-Ru; Zhang, Yong; Tong, Xiao-Li; Wang, Bei-Xin

    2013-10-01

    Based on the biological traits such as life history, resistance ability against environmental disturbance, and physiological characteristics of aquatic insects, and by using the fourth-corner statistical method, this paper studied the responses of the functional diversity of aquatic insect community to land use change in the middle reach of Qiantang River, Zhejiang Province of East China. For the test aquatic insect community, some of its biological traits were sensitive to land use change, and altered along human disturbance gradients as expected. With the increasing intensity of human disturbance, the maximal insect body length decreased gradually, the dominant respiration pattern evolved from gill respiration to tegument respiration, and the abundance of burrowers increased significantly. At the same time, the functional diversity measured as Rao's quadratic entropy was significantly higher in reference sites than in disturbed sites (P < 0.001), demonstrating that the changes in the functional diversity of the aquatic community were mainly induced by the land use change caused by human activities, which resulted in the decline of stream water quality and habitat quality and the variations of aquatic insect community composition and biological traits. The aquatic insect biological traits and functional diversity could be the potentially effective indicators in the stream health assessment in the future.

  1. Development of microgravity, full body functional reach envelope using 3-D computer graphic models and virtual reality technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Patricia F.

    1994-01-01

    In microgravity conditions mobility is greatly enhanced and body stability is difficult to achieve. Because of these difficulties, optimum placement and accessibility of objects and controls can be critical to required tasks on board shuttle flights or on the proposed space station. Anthropometric measurement of the maximum reach of occupants of a microgravity environment provide knowledge about maximum functional placement for tasking situations. Calculations for a full body, functional reach envelope for microgravity environments are imperative. To this end, three dimensional computer modeled human figures, providing a method of anthropometric measurement, were used to locate the data points that define the full body, functional reach envelope. Virtual reality technology was utilized to enable an occupant of the microgravity environment to experience movement within the reach envelope while immersed in a simulated microgravity environment.

  2. The effect of an active vibration stimulus according to different shoulder joint angles on functional reach and stability of the shoulder joint

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Seong-Gil

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of an active vibration stimulus exercise according to shoulder joint angles on functional reach and stability of the shoulder joint. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy male students participated in this study. Upper limb length of each subject was measured to obtain normalized measurement values. The exercise groups were as follows: group I (n=10, shoulder joint angle of 90°), group II (n=10, shoulder joint angle of 130°), and group III (n=10, shoulder joint angle of 180°). After warm-up, an active vibration stimulus was applied to the subjects with a Flexi-Bar. The Functional Reach Test and Y-balance test were conducted for measurement of shoulder stability. [Results] Analysis of covariance was conducted with values before the intervention as covariates to analyze the differences among the groups in the two tests. There were significant differences among the groups. According to Bonferroni post hoc comparison, group I showed greater improvement than group III in the Functional Reach Test, and group II showed greater improvement than group I and group III in the Y-balance test. [Conclusion] The effect of the exercise with different shoulder joint angles revealed that the shoulder joint has a certain effective joint angle for its functionality and stability. In addition, application of an active vibration stimulus with a Flexi-Bar can be a very effective tool for improvement of functionality and stability of the shoulder joint. PMID:27134352

  3. Correlation of reaching and grasping kinematics and clinical measures of upper extremity function in persons with stroke related hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Rohafza, Maryam; Fluet, Gerard G; Qiu, Qinyin; Adamovich, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Timed measures of standardized functional tasks are commonly used to measure treatment effects in persons with upper extremity (UE) paresis due to stroke. The effectiveness of their ability to measure motor recovery has come into question because of their inability to distinguish between motor recovery and compensations. This paper presents three linear regression models generated from twelve kinematic measures collected during the performance of a two phase reach/grasp and transport /release activity as performed by 21 persons with upper extremity hemiparesis due to chronic stroke. One of these models demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with the subjects' scores on the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT), a battery of fifteen standardized upper extremity functional activities. The second and third models demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with the subjects' WMFT change scores elicited by a two week intensive upper extremity motor rehabilitation intervention. The high correlation suggests that models of kinematic measurements can be used to predict neurologic improvement and the effectiveness of treatment.

  4. Evaluation of the integrated testing strategy for PNEC derivation under REACH.

    PubMed

    May, Martin; Drost, Wiebke; Germer, Sabine; Juffernholz, Tanja; Hahn, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Species sensitivity evaluation represents an approach to avoid chronic toxicity testing of aquatic vertebrates in accordance with the animal welfare concept of the EU chemicals regulation. In this study a data set of chemicals is analysed for relative species sensitivity between Daphnia and fish in chronic testing to evaluate under what condition chronic fish tests can be waived without underestimating the environmental hazard. Chronic fish toxicity is covered in 84% of the evaluated substances by the chronic invertebrate test and an assessment factor of 50. Thus, animal testing can be avoided in environmental hazard assessment for many chemicals. Moreover, it is shown that species sensitivity in chronic testing is associated with species sensitivity in acute testing. The more sensitive species in chronic testing is predicted with a high probability if a species is >5x more sensitive in acute testing. If substances are comparable or more toxic to Daphnia in acute testing than to fish chronic fish toxicity is covered by the chronic Daphnia test and an assessment factor of 50 in about 95% of the evaluated cases. To provide decision support for the regulation of chemicals a categorization scheme on relative sensitivity comparison is presented.

  5. Adapting the Get Yourself Tested Campaign to Reach Black and Latino Sexual-Minority Youth.

    PubMed

    Garbers, Samantha; Friedman, Allison; Martinez, Omar; Scheinmann, Roberta; Bermudez, Dayana; Silva, Manel; Silverman, Jen; Chiasson, Mary Ann

    2016-09-01

    Culturally appropriate efforts are needed to increase sexually transmitted disease (STD) testing and care among Black and Latino sexual-minority youth, who are at high risk for STDs. Get Yourself Tested, a national testing campaign, has demonstrated success among youth, but it has yet to be assessed for relevance or impact among this population. This effort included (1) formative and materials-testing research through focus groups; (2) adaptation of existing Get Yourself Tested campaign materials to be more inclusive of Black and Latino sexual-minority youth; (3) a 3-month campaign in four venues of New York City, promoting STD testing at events and through mobile testing and online and social media platforms; (4) process evaluation of outreach activities; and (5) an outcome evaluation of testing at select campaign venues, using a preexperimental design. During the 3-month campaign period, the number of STD tests conducted at select campaign venues increased from a comparable 3-month baseline period. Although testing uptake through mobile vans remained low in absolute numbers, the van drew a high-prevalence sample, with positivity rates of 26.9% for chlamydia and 11.5% for gonorrhea. This article documents the process and lessons learned from adapting and implementing a local campaign for Black and Latino sexual-minority youth. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  6. Adapting the Get Yourself Tested Campaign to Reach Black and Latino Sexual-Minority Youth

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, Samantha; Friedman, Allison; Martinez, Omar; Scheinmann, Roberta; Bermudez, Dayana; Silva, Manel; Silverman, Jen; Chiasson, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background Culturally appropriate efforts are needed to increase sexually transmitted disease (STD) testing and care among Black and Latino sexual-minority youth, who are at high risk for STDs. Get Yourself Tested, a national testing campaign, has demonstrated success among youth, but it has yet to be assessed for relevance or impact among this population. Method This effort included (1) formative and materials-testing research through focus groups; (2) adaptation of existing Get Yourself Tested campaign materials to be more inclusive of Black and Latino sexual-minority youth; (3) a 3-month campaign in four venues of New York City, promoting STD testing at events and through mobile testing and online and social media platforms; (4) process evaluation of outreach activities; and (5) an outcome evaluation of testing at select campaign venues, using a preexperimental design. Results During the 3-month campaign period, the number of STD tests conducted at select campaign venues increased from a comparable 3-month baseline period. Although testing uptake through mobile vans remained low in absolute numbers, the van drew a high-prevalence sample, with positivity rates of 26.9% for chlamydia and 11.5% for gonorrhea. This article documents the process and lessons learned from adapting and implementing a local campaign for Black and Latino sexual-minority youth. PMID:27225216

  7. On the Generality of the "Sit and Reach" Test: An Analysis of Flexibility Data for an Aging Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shephard, Roy J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study examined head rotation, shoulder extension and rotation, ankle plantar and dorsiflexion, hip flexion, and sit and reach (SR) in 80 adults, aged 45-75, to identify flexibility factors. No single measurement indicates loss of flexibility at all joints, but SR tests are found to be more reliable than others. (SM)

  8. On the Generality of the "Sit and Reach" Test: An Analysis of Flexibility Data for an Aging Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shephard, Roy J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study examined head rotation, shoulder extension and rotation, ankle plantar and dorsiflexion, hip flexion, and sit and reach (SR) in 80 adults, aged 45-75, to identify flexibility factors. No single measurement indicates loss of flexibility at all joints, but SR tests are found to be more reliable than others. (SM)

  9. Functional tests for myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, J.R.; Guiney, T.E.; Boucher, C.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Functional tests for myocardial ischemia are numerous. Most depend upon a combination of either exercise or pharmacologic intervention with analysis of the electrocardiogram, of regional perfusion with radionuclide imaging, or of regional wall motion with radionuclide imaging or echocardiography. While each test has unique features, especially at the research level, they are generally quite similar in clinical practice, so the clinician is advised to concentrate on one or two in which local expertise is high.22 references.

  10. Functional organization of human posterior parietal cortex: grasping- and reaching-related activations relative to topographically organized cortex

    PubMed Central

    Konen, Christina S.; Mruczek, Ryan E. B.; Montoya, Jessica L.

    2013-01-01

    The act of reaching to grasp an object requires the coordination between transporting the arm and shaping the hand. Neurophysiological, neuroimaging, neuroanatomic, and neuropsychological studies in macaque monkeys and humans suggest that the neural networks underlying grasping and reaching acts are at least partially separable within the posterior parietal cortex (PPC). To better understand how these neural networks have evolved in primates, we characterized the relationship between grasping- and reaching-related responses and topographically organized areas of the human intraparietal sulcus (IPS) using functional MRI. Grasping-specific activation was localized to the left anterior IPS, partially overlapping with the most anterior topographic regions and extending into the postcentral sulcus. Reaching-specific activation was localized to the left precuneus and superior parietal lobule, partially overlapping with the medial aspects of the more posterior topographic regions. Although the majority of activity within the topographic regions of the IPS was nonspecific with respect to movement type, we found evidence for a functional gradient of specificity for reaching and grasping movements spanning posterior-medial to anterior-lateral PPC. In contrast to the macaque monkey, grasp- and reach-specific activations were largely located outside of the human IPS. PMID:23515795

  11. HIV Testing and Counselling in Colombia: Local Experience on Two Different Recruitment Strategies to Better Reach Low Socioeconomic Status Communities.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Quintero, Jaime; Mueses-Marin, Hector Fabio; Montaño-Agudelo, David; Pinzón-Fernández, María Virginia; Tello-Bolívar, Inés Constanza; Alvarado-Llano, Beatriz Eugenia; Martinez-Cajas, Jorge Luis

    2014-01-01

    HIV testing rates remain very low in Colombia, with only 20% of individuals at risk ever tested. In order to tackle this issue, the Corporacion de Lucha Contra el Sida (CLS) has implemented a multidisciplinary, provider-initiated, population-based HIV testing/counselling strategy named BAFI. In this report, we describe the experience of CLS at reaching populations from low socioeconomic backgrounds in 2008-2009. Two different approaches were used: one led by CLS and local health care providers (BAFI-1) and the other by CLS and community leaders (BAFI-2). Both approaches included the following: consented HIV screening test, a demographic questionnaire, self-reported HIV knowledge and behaviour questionnaires, pre- and posttest counselling, confirmatory HIV tests, clinical follow-up, access to comprehensive care and antiretroviral treatment. A total of 2085 individuals were enrolled in BAFI-1 and 363 in BAFI-2. The effectiveness indicators for BAFI-1 and BAFI-2, respectively, were HIV positive-confirmed prevalence = 0.29% and 3.86%, return rate for confirmatory results = 62.5% and 93.7%, return rate for comprehensive care = 83.3% and 92.8%, and ART initiation rate = 20% and 76.9%. Although more people were reached with BAFI-1, the community-led BAFI-2 was more effective at reaching individuals with a higher prevalence of behavioural risk factors for HIV infection.

  12. HIV Testing and Counselling in Colombia: Local Experience on Two Different Recruitment Strategies to Better Reach Low Socioeconomic Status Communities

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Quintero, Jaime; Mueses-Marin, Hector Fabio; Montaño-Agudelo, David; Pinzón-Fernández, María Virginia; Tello-Bolívar, Inés Constanza; Alvarado-Llano, Beatriz Eugenia; Martinez-Cajas, Jorge Luis

    2014-01-01

    HIV testing rates remain very low in Colombia, with only 20% of individuals at risk ever tested. In order to tackle this issue, the Corporacion de Lucha Contra el Sida (CLS) has implemented a multidisciplinary, provider-initiated, population-based HIV testing/counselling strategy named BAFI. In this report, we describe the experience of CLS at reaching populations from low socioeconomic backgrounds in 2008-2009. Two different approaches were used: one led by CLS and local health care providers (BAFI-1) and the other by CLS and community leaders (BAFI-2). Both approaches included the following: consented HIV screening test, a demographic questionnaire, self-reported HIV knowledge and behaviour questionnaires, pre- and posttest counselling, confirmatory HIV tests, clinical follow-up, access to comprehensive care and antiretroviral treatment. A total of 2085 individuals were enrolled in BAFI-1 and 363 in BAFI-2. The effectiveness indicators for BAFI-1 and BAFI-2, respectively, were HIV positive-confirmed prevalence = 0.29% and 3.86%, return rate for confirmatory results = 62.5% and 93.7%, return rate for comprehensive care = 83.3% and 92.8%, and ART initiation rate = 20% and 76.9%. Although more people were reached with BAFI-1, the community-led BAFI-2 was more effective at reaching individuals with a higher prevalence of behavioural risk factors for HIV infection. PMID:24592330

  13. The GED Experience: Reaching Out to People. Final Evaluation Report of Iowa's Experimental GED Test Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartwig, John

    This report describes the structure, format, and processes of Iowa's General Educational Development (GED) test center structure and presents the results, conclusions, and recommendations from an evaluation of that structure. The major purposes of the evaluation were to assess the effectiveness of Iowa's new statewide GED structure, determine…

  14. The GED Experience: Reaching Out to People. Final Evaluation Report of Iowa's Experimental GED Test Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartwig, John

    This report describes the structure, format, and processes of Iowa's General Educational Development (GED) test center structure and presents the results, conclusions, and recommendations from an evaluation of that structure. The major purposes of the evaluation were to assess the effectiveness of Iowa's new statewide GED structure, determine…

  15. GALACSI integration and functional tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Penna, P.; Ströbele, S.; Aller Carpentier, E.; Argomedo, J.; Arsenault, R.; Conzelmann, R. D.; Delabre, B.; Donaldson, R.; Duchateau, M.; Fedrigo, E.; Gago, F.; Hubin, N.; Quentin, J.; Jolley, P.; Kiekebusch, M.; Kirchbauer, J. P.; Klein, B.; Kolb, J.; Kuntschner, H.; Le Louarn, M.; Lizon, J. L.; Madec, P.-.; Manescau, A.; Mehrgan, L.; Sedghi, B.; Suarez Valles, M.; Soenke, C.; Tordo, S.; Vernet, J.; Zampieri, S.

    2014-07-01

    GALACSI is the Adaptive Optics (AO) modules of the ESO Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) that will correct the wavefront delivered to the MUSE Integral Field Spectrograph. It will sense with four 40×40 subapertures Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors the AOF 4 Laser Guide Stars (LGS), acting on the 1170 voice-coils actuators of the Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM). GALACSI has two operating modes: in Wide Field Mode (WFM), with the four LGS at 64" off axis, the collected energy in a 0.2"×0.2" pixel will be enhanced by a factor 2 at 750 nm over a Field of View (FoV) of 1'×1' using the Ground Layer AO (GLAO) technique. The other mode, the Narrow Field Mode (NFM), provides an enhanced wavefront correction (Strehl Ratio (SR) of 5% (goal 10%) at 650 nm) but in a smaller FoV (7.5"×7.5"), using Laser Tomography AO (LTAO), with the 4 LGS located closer, at 10" off axis. Before being shipped to Paranal, GALACSI will be first integrated and fully tested in stand-alone, and then moved to a dedicated AOF facility to be tested with the DSM in Europe. At present the module is fully assembled, its main functionalities have been implemented and verified, and AO system tests with the DSM are starting. We present here the main system features and the results of the internal functional tests of GALACSI.

  16. Accuracy and feasibility of video analysis for assessing hamstring flexibility and validity of the sit-and-reach test.

    PubMed

    Mier, Constance M

    2011-12-01

    The accuracy of video analysis of the passive straight-leg raise test (PSLR) and the validity of the sit-and-reach test (SR) were tested in 60 men and women. Computer software measured static hip-joint flexion accurately. High within-session reliability of the PSLR was demonstrated (R > .97). Test-retest (separate days) reliability for SR was high in men (R = .97) and women R = .98) moderate for PSLR in men (R = .79) and women (R = .89). SR validity (PSLR as criterion) was higher in women (Day 1, r = .69; Day 2, r = .81) than men (Day 1, r = .64; Day 2, r = .66). In conclusion, video analysis is accurate and feasible for assessing static joint angles, PSLR and SR tests are very reliable methods for assessing flexibility, and the SR validity for hamstring flexibility was found to be moderate in women and low in men.

  17. [The effect of a warm-up protocol on the sit-and-reach test score in adolescent students].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Soler, María Angeles; Vaquero-Cristóbal, Raquel; Espejo-Antúnez, Luis; López-Miñarro, Pedro Ángel

    2015-06-01

    Introducción: los test lineales son frecuentemente utilizados en las clases de educación física para evaluar la extensibilidad isquiosural del alumnado, sin que haya una estandarización del procedimiento para su realización. Objetivo: analizar la influencia de un protocolo de calentamiento en los resultados obtenidos en el test sit-andreach en estudiantes adolescentes. Metodología: a 47 adolescentes (17 chicos y 30 chicas) se les midió la distancia alcanzada en el test sit-and-reach antes, inmediatamente después de finalizar, así como a los 5 y 10 minutos tras finalizar un protocolo de calentamiento compuesto por una parte de carrera continua, actividades de locomoción y movilidad, además de estiramientos estáticos de cuádriceps, isquiosurales, aductores, psoas ilíaco y gemelos, con una duración total de 8 minutos. Entre las mediciones realizadas tras el calentamiento, los participantes permanecieron en bipedestación sin realizar ejercicio y/o estiramiento alguno. Resultados y discusión: tras el calentamiento hubo una mejora significativa en la distancia alcanzada en el test sit-and-reach (+ 2,15 cm) (p < 0,001), siendo ligeramente mayor a los 5 y 10 minutos (+ 2,49 cm a los 5 minutos y + 2,61 cm a los 10 minutos) (p < 0,001 respecto al pretest). Conclusiones: la realización de un protocolo de calentamiento previo al test sit-and-reach, compuesto por locomoción, movilidad y estiramientos, incrementa de manera significativa la distancia alcanzada en este test, que permanece aumentada, al menos, hasta 10 minutos después de finalizar el calentamiento.

  18. [CRITERION-RELATED VALIDITY OF SIT-AND-REACH TEST AS A MEASURE OF HAMSTRING EXTENSIBILITY IN OLDER WOMEN].

    PubMed

    López-Miñarro, Pedro Ángel; Vaquero-Cristóbal, Raquel; Muyor, José María; Espejo-Antúnez, Luis

    2015-07-01

    Introducción: la disposición del raquis lumbo-sacro y la distancia alcanzada en el test sit-and-reach han sido propuestas para valorar la extensibilidad isquiosural, siendo su validez diferente en función de la población analizada. Objetivo: determinar la validez del ángulo lumbo-horizontal en flexión y la distancia alcanzada en el test sitand- reach como criterio de extensibilidad isquiosural en mujeres mayores. Metodología: un total de 120 mujeres mayores realizaron aleatoriamente los test de elevación de pierna recta (EPR) con ambas piernas y el test sit-and-reach (SR). En este último se valoró la distancia alcanzada y la disposición del raquis lumbo-sacro (L-Hfx) al alcanzar la posición de máxima flexión del tronco. Resultados y discusión: los valores medios en el EPR fueron 81,70 ± 13,83º y 82,10 ± 14,36º en las piernas izquierda y derecha, respectivamente. La media del EPR de ambas piernas fue de 81,90 ± 12,70º. La distancia media en el SR fue de -1,54 ± 8,09 cm. En el L-Hfx, el valor medio fue de 91,08º ± 9,32º. La correlación entre el test EPR medio de ambas piernas respecto a la distancia alcanzada en el test DDP y el ángulo L-Hfx fueron moderados (L-Hfx: r = -0,72, p < 0,01; SR: r = 0,70, p < 0,01). Ambas variables, de forma independiente, explicaron alrededor del 50% de la varianza (L-Hfx: R2 = 0,52; p < 0,001; SR: R2 = 0,49; p < 0,001). Conclusiones: la validez de la disposición del raquis lumbo-sacro en mujeres mayores es moderada, siendo similar a la obtenida por la distancia alcanzada en el test sit-and-reach.

  19. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  20. [Alternative methods to animal experiments. What can they afford in the safety testing of chemical substances under REACH?].

    PubMed

    Lilienblum, Werner

    2008-12-01

    Alternative methods to safety studies using laboratory animals have been accepted by the OECD in areas such as local toxicity and mutagenicity. In more complex important fields, such as systemic single and repeated dose toxicity, toxicokinetics, sensitisation, reproductive toxicity and carcinogenicity, it is expected that the development and validation of computerised methods, testing batteries (in vitro and in silico) and tiered testing systems will need many years and have to overcome many scientific and regulatory obstacles, which makes it extremely difficult to predict the outcome and the time needed. Therefore, the validated alternative methods available will only have a limited impact on reducing the numbers of animals required under REACH. In the midterm, the strategy should be more directed towards the refinement or reduction of in vivo testing because the replacement concerning complex toxicological endpoints is at present not in sight.

  1. Cognitive and Kidney Function: Results from a British Birth Cohort Reaching Retirement Age

    PubMed Central

    Silverwood, Richard J.; Richards, Marcus; Pierce, Mary; Hardy, Rebecca; Sattar, Naveed; Ferro, Charles; Savage, Caroline; Kuh, Diana; Nitsch, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have found associations between cognitive function and chronic kidney disease. We aimed to explore possible explanations for this association in the Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development, a prospective birth cohort representative of the general British population. Methods Cognitive function at age 60–64 years was quantified using five measures (verbal memory, letter search speed and accuracy, simple and choice reaction times) and glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at the same age was estimated using cystatin C. The cross-sectional association between cognitive function and eGFR was adjusted for background confounding factors (socioeconomic position, educational attainment), prior cognition, and potential explanations for any remaining association (smoking, diabetes, hypertension, inflammation, obesity). Results Data on all the analysis variables were available for 1306–1320 study members (depending on cognitive measure). Verbal memory and simple and choice reaction times were strongly associated with eGFR. For example, the lowest quartile of verbal memory corresponded to a 4.1 (95% confidence interval 2.0, 6.2) ml/min/1.73 m2 lower eGFR relative to the highest quartile. Some of this association was explained by confounding due to socioeconomic factors, but very little of it by prior cognition. Smoking, diabetes, hypertension, inflammation and obesity explained some but not all of the remaining association. Conclusions These analyses support the notion of a shared pathophysiology of impaired cognitive and kidney function at older age, which precedes clinical disease. The implications of these findings for clinical care and research are important and under-recognised, though further confirmatory studies are required. PMID:24482683

  2. On the use of in silico tools for prioritising toxicity testing of the low-volume industrial chemicals in REACH.

    PubMed

    Rybacka, Aleksandra; Rudén, Christina; Andersson, Patrik L

    2014-07-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the utility of a selection of commercially and freely available non-testing tools and to analyse how REACH registrants can apply these as prioritisation tool for low-volume chemicals. The analysis was performed on a set of organic industrial chemicals and pesticides with extensive peer-reviewed risk assessment data. Analysed in silico model systems included Derek Nexus, Toxtree, QSAR Toolbox, LAZAR, TEST and VEGA, and results from these were compared with expert-judged risk classification according to the classifying, labelling and packaging (CLP) regulation. The most reliable results were obtained for carcinogenicity; however, less reliable predictions were derived for mutagenicity and reproductive toxicity. A group of compounds frequently predicted as false negatives was identified. These were relatively small molecules with low structural complexity, for example benzene derivatives with hydroxyl-, amino- or aniline-substituents. A rat liver S9 metabolite simulator was applied to illustrate the importance of considering metabolism in the risk assessment procedure. We also discuss outcome of combining predictions from multiple model systems and advise how to apply in silico tools. These models are proposed to be used to prioritise low-volume chemicals for testing within the REACH legislation, and we conclude that further guidance is needed so that industry can select and apply models in a reliable, systematic and transparent way.

  3. Functional Task Test: Data Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita

    2014-01-01

    After space flight there are changes in multiple physiological systems including: Cardiovascular function; Sensorimotor function; and Muscle function. How do changes in these physiological system impact astronaut functional performance?

  4. Do anionic titanium dioxide nano-clusters reach bulk band gap? A density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zheng-Wang; Zhu, Hui

    2010-07-30

    The electronic properties of both neutral and anionic (TiO(2))(n) (n = 1-10) clusters are investigated by extensive density functional theory calculations. The predicted electron detachment energies and excitation gaps of anionic clusters agree well with the original experimental anion photoelectron spectra (APES). It is shown that the old way to analyze APES tends to overestimate vertical excitation gaps (VGA) of large anionic clusters, due to the nature of multiple electronic origins for the higher APES bands. Moreover, the VGA of anionic TiO(2) clusters are evidently smaller than those of neutral clusters, which may also be the case for other metal oxide clusters with high electron affinity.

  5. Influence of the gastrocnemius muscle on the sit-and-reach test assessed by angular kinematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Marcio M; Ambar, Gabriel; Oliveira, Beatriz I R; Boer, Marcela C; Cardoso, Ana P R G; Cardoso, Jefferson R

    2010-01-01

    The sit-and-reach test (SRT) used to measure low back and hamstring flexibility is more adequate when combined with hip joint angle (HJA) measurement. It is supposed that shortening of the gastrocnemius muscle could affect the SRT results. The purposes of the study were to investigate the relationship between the HJA and SRT and to verify the influence of the gastrocnemius. This is a cross-sectional study on healthy subjects. Two hundred subjects took part in the study: 100 males and 100 females aged 21.2 years (SD=1.7). The materials used were a sit-and-reach box with an adapted door to evaluate the influence of the gastrocnemius and a digital camera. Skin markers were positioned on the anterior superior iliac spine and greater trochanter. Two pictures were taken in the final position of the test, one with the door closed (with ankle dorsiflexed - DF) and the other with the door opened (with ankle plantarflexed - PF). Moderate correlation was found between the HJA and SRT for DF and PF (r=0.48 e 0.44). The HJA with DF and PF were 95.5 masculine+/-18.6 masculine and 99.7 masculine+/-18 masculine (P<0.001), respectively. Angular kinematic analysis is a reliable technique to measure the HJA. The results demonstrated the influence of the gastrocnemius; thus we suggest that the SRT be performed with free ankle joint mobility.

  6. 14 CFR 35.40 - Functional test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functional test. 35.40 Section 35.40... STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.40 Functional test. The variable-pitch propeller system must be subjected to the applicable functional tests of this section. The same propeller system used...

  7. 14 CFR 35.40 - Functional test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Functional test. 35.40 Section 35.40... STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.40 Functional test. The variable-pitch propeller system must be subjected to the applicable functional tests of this section. The same propeller system used...

  8. 14 CFR 35.40 - Functional test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Functional test. 35.40 Section 35.40... STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.40 Functional test. The variable-pitch propeller system must be subjected to the applicable functional tests of this section. The same propeller system used...

  9. Multi-directional Reach Test: An Investigation of the Limits of Stability of People Aged between 20-79 Years.

    PubMed

    Tantisuwat, Anong; Chamonchant, Dannaovarat; Boonyong, Sujitra

    2014-06-01

    [Purpose] The multi-directional reach test (MDRT) is a simple, inexpensive, reliable and valid screening tool for assessing the limits of stability in the anterorposterior and mediolateral directions. The aim of this study was to quantify the limits of stability of people aged between 20 and 79 years using the MDRT. [Subjects] One hundred and eighty subjects were divided into the following 6 age groups: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69 and 70-79 years (n=30 per group). [Methods] The MDRT was used to measure the limits of stability in four directions: forward, backward, leftward and rightward. Subjects performed maximal outstretched arm reach in each direction with their feet flat on the floor. [Results] All age groups performed the greatest values of the limit of stability in the forward direction. The 60-79 year group demonstrated significantly lower limits of stability in the forward, leftward and rightward directions compared to the 20-39 year group. [Conclusion] The limits of stability declined with age mainly in the forward, leftward and rightward directions. The MDRT appears to be a useful assessment tool for postural control and balance of those aged 60 years and over.

  10. Classical Testing in Functional Linear Models

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Dehan; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Maity, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    We extend four tests common in classical regression - Wald, score, likelihood ratio and F tests - to functional linear regression, for testing the null hypothesis, that there is no association between a scalar response and a functional covariate. Using functional principal component analysis, we re-express the functional linear model as a standard linear model, where the effect of the functional covariate can be approximated by a finite linear combination of the functional principal component scores. In this setting, we consider application of the four traditional tests. The proposed testing procedures are investigated theoretically for densely observed functional covariates when the number of principal components diverges. Using the theoretical distribution of the tests under the alternative hypothesis, we develop a procedure for sample size calculation in the context of functional linear regression. The four tests are further compared numerically for both densely and sparsely observed noisy functional data in simulation experiments and using two real data applications. PMID:28955155

  11. Biochemical testing of thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Klee, G G; Hay, I D

    1997-12-01

    Various published guidelines recommending serum thyrotropin (TSH)-first thyroid testing are outlined. The entities called "subclinical hypothyroidism" and "subclinical hyperthyroidism" are defined on the basis of abnormal TSH concentrations and normal values of other biochemical thyroid tests. The controversies about follow-up and treatment of these disorders are discussed. The laboratory experience of Mayo Clinic Rochester in using TSH-first thyroid testing and the subsequent implementation of a thyroid test ordering cascade are presented. Finally, recommendations are given for further optimizing laboratory testing for thyroid disorders.

  12. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Inpatients with Psychosis (the REACH Study): Protocol for Treatment Development and Pilot Testing

    PubMed Central

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Davis, Carter H.; Epstein-Lubow, Gary; Johnson, Jennifer E.; Mueser, Kim T.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders frequently require treatment at inpatient hospitals during periods of acute illness for crisis management and stabilization. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), a “third wave” cognitive-behavioral intervention that employs innovative mindfulness-based strategies, has shown initial efficacy in randomized controlled trials for improving acute and post-discharge outcomes in patients with psychosis when studied in acute-care psychiatric hospitals in the U.S. However, the intervention has not been widely adopted in its current form because of its use of an individual-only format and delivery by doctoral-level research therapists with extensive prior experience using ACT. The aim of the Researching the Effectiveness of Acceptance-based Coping during Hospitalization (REACH) Study is to adapt a promising acute-care psychosocial treatment for inpatients with psychosis, and to pilot test its effectiveness in a routine inpatient setting. More specifically, we describe our plans to: (a) further develop and refine the treatment and training protocols, (b) conduct an open trial and make further modifications based on the experience gained, and (c) conduct a pilot randomized controlled trial in preparation for a future fully-powered clinical trial testing the effectiveness of ACT. PMID:28475123

  13. Reaching the hard to reach.

    PubMed

    Bhiwandi, P; Campbell, M; Potts, M

    1994-01-01

    The 1994 International Conference on Population and Development proposed increasing contraceptive couple protection from 550 million in 1995 to 880 million in 2015. The task for family planning (FP) programs is to provide access to services for, sometimes, inaccessible rural populations. FP need based on desire for no more children has ranged from under 20% in Senegal to almost 80% in Peru. Socioeconomic development was found not to be a prerequisite for fertility change. Gender inequalities in education and social autonomy must be changed. FP access is very important among women with a disadvantaged background or among women unsure about FP. Bangladesh is a good example of a country with increased contraceptive prevalence despite low income. The rule of thumb is that contraception increases of 15% contribute to a drop in family size of about one child. Program effectiveness is related to a variety of factors: contraceptive availability at many locations, acceptable price of contraception, delivery of the oral contraceptives without prescriptions, and other strategies. FP is a service not a medical treatment. A range of methods must be promoted and available from a range of facilities. Contraceptive use is dependent on the woman's stage in her lifecycle and is dependent on informed choice. Community-based distribution systems are effective, whereas free distribution by poorly-trained field workers is not always very effective because patient payment of all or part of the cost assures quality and freedom of choice. Effective programs for underprivileged groups involve aggressive, easy to manage programs that can be replicated rapidly. FP serves a useful function in depressing maternal mortality among the poor in Africa, who have no access to quality health services. Social marketing is an effective strategy for reaching remote areas. Political will and robust management are necessary commodities.

  14. Functional Assays for Neurotoxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurobehavioral and pathological evaluations of the nervous system are complementary components of basic research and toxicity testing of pharmaceutical and environmental chemicals. While neuropathological assessments provide insight as to cellular changes in neurons, behavioral ...

  15. Functional Assays for Neurotoxicity Testing*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurobehavioral and pathological evaluations of the nervous system are complementary components of basic research and toxicity testing of pharmaceutical and environmental chemicals. While neuropathological assessments provide insight as to cellular changes in neurons, behavioral ...

  16. Functional Assays for Neurotoxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurobehavioral and pathological evaluations of the nervous system are complementary components of basic research and toxicity testing of pharmaceutical and environmental chemicals. While neuropathological assessments provide insight as to cellular changes in neurons, behavioral ...

  17. Functional Assays for Neurotoxicity Testing*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurobehavioral and pathological evaluations of the nervous system are complementary components of basic research and toxicity testing of pharmaceutical and environmental chemicals. While neuropathological assessments provide insight as to cellular changes in neurons, behavioral ...

  18. What Are Lung Function Tests?

    MedlinePlus

    ... COPD How the Lungs Work Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... the Lungs Work Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Oxygen Therapy Sarcoidosis Stress Testing Rate This Content: Updated: December 9, ...

  19. REACH Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucklee, Joanne

    In an effort to provide support for employees and their families, Red Deer College (RDC) developed the Resources, Employees, Assistance, Counselling, and Health (REACH) program. The program is administered by a committee of five people who represent the five major employee groups at the college (i.e., senior administration, middle administration,…

  20. Monitoring performance, pituitary-adrenal hormones and mood profiles: how to diagnose non-functional over-reaching in male elite junior soccer players.

    PubMed

    Schmikli, Sándor L; de Vries, Wouter R; Brink, Michel S; Backx, Frank Jg

    2012-11-01

    To verify if in male elite junior soccer players a minimum 1-month performance decrease is accompanied by a mood profile and hormone levels typical of non-functional over-reaching (NFOR). A prospective case-control study using a monthly performance monitor with a standardised field test to detect the performance changes. Players with a performance decrease lasting at least 1 month were compared with control players without a performance decrease on mood scores and pre-exercise and postexercise levels of stress hormones. Sporting field and sports medical laboratory. Ninety-four young elite soccer players were monitored during the 2006-2008 seasons. Twenty-one players were invited to the laboratory, seven of whom showed a significant performance decrease. Performance change over time, scores on the profile of mood states and premaximal and postmaximal exercise serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), growth hormone (GH) and cortisol. Players with a performance decrease showed psychological and hormonal changes typical of the non-functional state of over-reaching. Scores were higher on depression and anger, whereas the resting GH levels and ACTH levels after maximal exercise were reduced. ACTH and GH were capable of classifying all but one player correctly as either NFOR or control. Performance-related criteria in field tests are capable of identifying players with worsened mood and adaptations of the endocrine system that fit the definition of NFOR. Performance, mood and hormone levels may therefore be considered as valid instruments to diagnose NFOR in young elite soccer players.

  1. Testing Properties of Boolean Functions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    think of Pno as forming the argument multiset Sno by choosing ` = k − e random columns from Q 103 without replacement, and including an additional e...Rno) ≤ dTV(Syes, Sno ). (10.2) This inequality can be extremely lossy, depending on the function gcore. However, since Theorem 10.1 applies for an...absence of additional restrictions on the class of functions considered, there is no obvious way to bound dTV(Ryes, Rno) except by dTV(Syes, Sno

  2. Feedback Error Learning Controller for Functional Electrical Stimulation Assistance in a Hybrid Robotic System for Reaching Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Resquín, Francisco; Gonzalez-Vargas, Jose; Ibáñez, Jaime; Brunetti, Fernando; Pons, José Luis

    2016-06-13

    Hybrid robotic systems represent a novel research field, where functional electrical stimulation (FES) is combined with a robotic device for rehabilitation of motor impairment. Under this approach, the design of robust FES controllers still remains an open challenge. In this work, we aimed at developing a learning FES controller to assist in the performance of reaching movements in a simple hybrid robotic system setting. We implemented a Feedback Error Learning (FEL) control strategy consisting of a feedback PID controller and a feedforward controller based on a neural network. A passive exoskeleton complemented the FES controller by compensating the effects of gravity. We carried out experiments with healthy subjects to validate the performance of the system. Results show that the FEL control strategy is able to adjust the FES intensity to track the desired trajectory accurately without the need of a previous mathematical model.

  3. Feedback Error Learning Controller for Functional Electrical Stimulation Assistance in a Hybrid Robotic System for Reaching Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Resquín, Francisco; Gonzalez-Vargas, Jose; Ibáñez, Jaime; Brunetti, Fernando; Pons, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid robotic systems represent a novel research field, where functional electrical stimulation (FES) is combined with a robotic device for rehabilitation of motor impairment. Under this approach, the design of robust FES controllers still remains an open challenge. In this work, we aimed at developing a learning FES controller to assist in the performance of reaching movements in a simple hybrid robotic system setting. We implemented a Feedback Error Learning (FEL) control strategy consisting of a feedback PID controller and a feedforward controller based on a neural network. A passive exoskeleton complemented the FES controller by compensating the effects of gravity. We carried out experiments with healthy subjects to validate the performance of the system. Results show that the FEL control strategy is able to adjust the FES intensity to track the desired trajectory accurately without the need of a previous mathematical model. PMID:27990245

  4. Computational models of upper-limb motion during functional reaching tasks for application in FES-based stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Chris; Exell, Tim; Meadmore, Katie; Hallewell, Emma; Hughes, Ann-Marie

    2015-06-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) has been shown to be an effective approach to upper-limb stroke rehabilitation, where it is used to assist arm and shoulder motion. Model-based FES controllers have recently confirmed significant potential to improve accuracy of functional reaching tasks, but they typically require a reference trajectory to track. Few upper-limb FES control schemes embed a computational model of the task; however, this is critical to ensure the controller reinforces the intended movement with high accuracy. This paper derives computational motor control models of functional tasks that can be directly embedded in real-time FES control schemes, removing the need for a predefined reference trajectory. Dynamic models of the electrically stimulated arm are first derived, and constrained optimisation problems are formulated to encapsulate common activities of daily living. These are solved using iterative algorithms, and results are compared with kinematic data from 12 subjects and found to fit closely (mean fitting between 63.2% and 84.0%). The optimisation is performed iteratively using kinematic variables and hence can be transformed into an iterative learning control algorithm by replacing simulation signals with experimental data. The approach is therefore capable of controlling FES in real time to assist tasks in a manner corresponding to unimpaired natural movement. By ensuring that assistance is aligned with voluntary intention, the controller hence maximises the potential effectiveness of future stroke rehabilitation trials.

  5. Iterative Evaluation in a Mobile Counseling and Testing Program to Reach People of Color at Risk for HIV--New Strategies Improve Program Acceptability, Effectiveness, and Evaluation Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberg, Freya; Kurth, Ann; Reidy, William; McKnight, Teka; Dikobe, Wame; Wilson, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This article highlights findings from an evaluation that explored the impact of mobile versus clinic-based testing, rapid versus central-lab based testing, incentives for testing, and the use of a computer counseling program to guide counseling and automate evaluation in a mobile program reaching people of color at risk for HIV. The program's…

  6. Iterative Evaluation in a Mobile Counseling and Testing Program to Reach People of Color at Risk for HIV--New Strategies Improve Program Acceptability, Effectiveness, and Evaluation Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberg, Freya; Kurth, Ann; Reidy, William; McKnight, Teka; Dikobe, Wame; Wilson, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This article highlights findings from an evaluation that explored the impact of mobile versus clinic-based testing, rapid versus central-lab based testing, incentives for testing, and the use of a computer counseling program to guide counseling and automate evaluation in a mobile program reaching people of color at risk for HIV. The program's…

  7. Test-Wiseness: A Cognitive Function?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodley, Katheryn K.

    This paper reports the findings of an attempt to improve test-wiseness (TW) through direct instruction in selected test-taking strategies. TW was defined as "a cognitive function, subject to improvement through both general exposure to a wide variety of test items, and specific training in test-taking skills." The total investigation included:…

  8. Reach-scale stream restoration in agricultural streams of southern Minnesota alters structural and functional responses of macroinvertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolph, Christine L.; Eggert, Susan L.; Magner, Joe; Ferrington, Leonard C.; Vondracek, Bruce C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that stream restoration at the reach scale may not increase stream biodiversity, raising concerns about the utility of this conservation practice. We examined whether reach-scale restoration in disturbed agricultural streams was associated with changes in macroinvertebrate community structure (total macroinvertebrate taxon richness, total macroinvertebrate density, Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera [EPT] taxon richness, % abundance of EPT taxa) or secondary production (macroinvertebrate biomass over time). We collected macroinvertebrate samples over the course of 1 y from restored and unrestored reaches of 3 streams in southern Minnesota and used generalized least-square (GLS) models to assess whether measures of community structure were related to reach type, stream site, or sampling month. After accounting for effects of stream site and time, we found no significant difference in total taxon richness or % abundance of EPT taxa between restored and unrestored reaches. However, the number of EPT taxa and macroinvertebrate density were significantly higher in restored than in unrestored reaches. We compared secondary production estimates among study reaches based on 95th-percentile confidence intervals generated via bootstrapping. In each study stream, secondary production was significantly (2–3×) higher in the restored than in the unrestored reach. Higher productivity in the restored reaches was largely a result of the disproportionate success of a few dominant, tolerant taxa. Our findings suggest that reach-scale restoration may have ecological effects that are not detected by measures of total taxon richness alone.

  9. Gaze-centered coding of proprioceptive reach targets after effector movement: Testing the impact of online information, time of movement, and target distance.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Stefanie; Fiehler, Katja

    2017-01-01

    In previous research, we demonstrated that spatial coding of proprioceptive reach targets depends on the presence of an effector movement (Mueller & Fiehler, Neuropsychologia, 2014, 2016). In these studies, participants were asked to reach in darkness with their right hand to a proprioceptive target (tactile stimulation on the finger tip) while their gaze was varied. They either moved their left, stimulated hand towards a target location or kept it stationary at this location where they received a touch on the fingertip to which they reached with their right hand. When the stimulated hand was moved, reach errors varied as a function of gaze relative to target whereas reach errors were independent of gaze when the hand was kept stationary. The present study further examines whether (a) the availability of proprioceptive online information, i.e. reaching to an online versus a remembered target, (b) the time of the effector movement, i.e. before or after target presentation, or (c) the target distance from the body influences gaze-centered coding of proprioceptive reach targets. We found gaze-dependent reach errors in the conditions which included a movement of the stimulated hand irrespective of whether proprioceptive information was available online or remembered. This suggests that an effector movement leads to gaze-centered coding for both online and remembered proprioceptive reach targets. Moreover, moving the stimulated hand before or after target presentation did not affect gaze-dependent reach errors, thus, indicating a continuous spatial update of positional signals of the stimulated hand rather than the target location per se. However, reaching to a location close to the body rather than farther away (but still within reachable space) generally decreased the influence of a gaze-centered reference frame.

  10. Dealing with Omitted and Not-Reached Items in Competence Tests: Evaluating Approaches Accounting for Missing Responses in Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Steffi; Gräfe, Linda; Rose, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Data from competence tests usually show a number of missing responses on test items due to both omitted and not-reached items. Different approaches for dealing with missing responses exist, and there are no clear guidelines on which of those to use. While classical approaches rely on an ignorable missing data mechanism, the most recently developed…

  11. FSM test: A functional test generation system for sequential circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fummi, Franco

    1993-03-01

    An approach to test pattern generation for Finite State Machines (FSM's) and the relationships with their gate level implementation is presented. The algorithm is based on a functional fault model. A restricted set of transitions of the FSM is analyzed and particular state distinguishing sequences (EUIO's) are adopted to observe their final state. Overlapping and concatenation of test sequences is performed in order to reduce test length. Test length obtained is in most cases shorter than previously published functional approaches and the CPU (Central Processing Unit) time requirements are very low in comparison with the gate level ATPG's. Some polynomial complexity preserving techniques are introduced in order to improve the final fault coverage. A number of experiments on MCNC benchmarks have shown the effectiveness of the test algorithm both at the functional level and at the gate level, where the coverage of single stuck-at faults in most cases achieves 100.

  12. Effects of virtual reality training on functional reaching movements in people with Parkinson's disease: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui-Ing; Hwang, Wen-Juh; Fang, Jing-Jing; Kuo, Jui-Kun; Wang, Ching-Yi; Leong, Iat-Fai; Wang, Tsui-Ying

    2011-10-01

    To investigate whether practising reaching for virtual moving targets would improve motor performance in people with Parkinson's disease. Randomized pretest-posttest control group design. A virtual reality laboratory in a university setting. Thirty-three adults with Parkinson's disease. The virtual reality training required 60 trials of reaching for fast-moving virtual balls with the dominant hand. The control group had 60 practice trials turning pegs with their non-dominant hand. Pretest and posttest required reaching with the dominant hand to grasp real stationary balls and balls moving at different speeds down a ramp. Success rates and kinematic data (movement time, peak velocity and percentage of movement time for acceleration phase) from pretest and posttest were recorded to determine the immediate transfer effects. Compared with the control group, the virtual reality training group became faster (F = 9.08, P = 0.005) and more forceful (F = 9.36, P = 0.005) when reaching for real stationary balls. However, there was no significant difference in success rate or movement kinematics between the two groups when reaching for real moving balls. A short virtual reality training programme improved the movement speed of discrete aiming tasks when participants reached for real stationary objects. However, the transfer effect was minimal when reaching for real moving objects.

  13. Binomial test statistics using Psi functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Kimiko o

    2007-01-01

    For the negative binomial model (probability generating function (p + 1 - pt){sup -k}) a logarithmic derivative is the Psi function difference {psi}(k + x) - {psi}(k); this and its derivatives lead to a test statistic to decide on the validity of a specified model. The test statistic uses a data base so there exists a comparison available between theory and application. Note that the test function is not dominated by outliers. Applications to (i) Fisher's tick data, (ii) accidents data, (iii) Weldon's dice data are included.

  14. Inside anesthesia breathing circuits: time to reach a set sevoflurane concentration in toddlers and newborns: simulation using a test lung.

    PubMed

    Kern, Delphine; Larcher, Claire; Basset, Bertrand; Alacoque, Xavier; Fesseau, Rose; Samii, Kamran; Minville, Vincent; Fourcade, Olivier

    2012-08-01

    We measured the time it takes to reach the desired inspired anesthetic concentration using the Primus (Drägerwerk, AG, Lübeck, Germany) and the Avance (GE Datex-Ohmeda, Munich, Germany) anesthesia machines with toddler and newborn ventilation settings. The time to reach 95% of inspired target sevoflurane concentration was measured during wash-in from 0 to 6 vol% sevoflurane and during wash-out from 6 to 0 vol% with fresh gas flows equal to 1 and 2 times the minute ventilation. The Avance was faster than the Primus (65 seconds [95% confidence interval (CI): 55 to 78] vs 310 seconds [95% CI: 261 to 359]) at 1.5 L/min fresh gas flow, tidal volume of 50 mL, and 30 breaths/min. Times were shorter by the same magnitude at higher fresh gas flows and higher minute ventilation rates. The effect of doubling fresh gas flow was variable and less than expected. The Primus is slower during newborn than toddler ventilation, whereas the Avance's response time was the same for newborn and toddler ventilation. Our data confirm that the time to reach the target-inspired anesthetic concentration depends on breathing circuit volume, fresh gas flow, and minute ventilation.

  15. The Full Function Test Explosive Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Reisman, D B; Javedani, J B; Griffith, L V; Ellsworth, G F; Kuklo, R M; Goerz, D A; White, A D; Tallerico, L J; Gidding, D A; Murphy, M J; Chase, J B

    2009-12-13

    We have conducted three tests of a new pulsed power device called the Full Function Test (FFT). These tests represented the culmination of an effort to establish a high energy pulsed power capability based on high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) technology. This involved an extensive computational modeling, engineering, fabrication, and fielding effort. The experiments were highly successful and a new US record for magnetic energy was obtained.

  16. Request of thyroid function tests from Primary Care in Spain.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Maria; López-Garrigós, Maite; Pomares, Francisco J; Flores, Emilio; Uris, Joaquín; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory tests are crucial for diagnosis and monitoring of thyroid disorders. It is therefore necessary to study the pattern and variability in requests of thyroid function tests. The study objectives were to compare the inter-regional variability in the request of laboratory thyroid tests by general practitioners (GPs) in Spain, and to investigate the potential economic savings if the goals set for some suitability indicators were reached. Test requests per 1,000 inhabitants and test ratios (free thyroxine (FT4)/thyrotropin (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3)/TSH, thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb)/peroxidase antibody (TPOAb)) were compared between the different areas, according to their setting, location, and management. The resulting savings if each department achieved the goals for indicator (0.25 for FT4/TSH, 0.1 for FT3/TSH) were estimated. Seventy-six laboratories covering a population of 17,679,195 inhabitants participated in the study. TSH was requested significantly less in urban-rural areas, and the requests for FT3/1,000 inhabitants, FT3/TSH, and TgAb/TPOAb were higher in departments with private management. The savings generated if specifications for the ratios of related tests were met would be 937,260.5 €. The high variability reported in requests for thyroid function and autoimmunity tests in Spain suggests the need for implementing strategies to improve use of such tests. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Track/train dynamics test report transfer function test. Volume 1: Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigil, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A description is presented of the transfer function test performed on an open hopper freight car loaded with 80 tons of coal. Test data and a post-test update of the requirements document and test procedure are presented. Included are a statement of the test objective, a description of the test configurations, test facilities, test methods, data acquisition/reduction operations, and a chronological test summary. An index to the data for the three test configurations (X, Y, and Z-axis tests) is presented along with test sequence, run number, test reference, and input parameters.

  18. An automated system for pulmonary function testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment to quantitate pulmonary function was accepted for the space shuttle concept verification test. The single breath maneuver and the nitrogen washout are combined to reduce the test time. Parameters are defined from the forced vital capacity maneuvers. A spirometer measures the breath volume and a magnetic section mass spectrometer provides definition of gas composition. Mass spectrometer and spirometer data are analyzed by a PDP-81 digital computer.

  19. Going door-to-door to reach men and young people with HIV testing services to achieve the 90-90-90 treatment targets.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, E; Schell, E; Jere, J; Khozomba, N

    2017-06-21

    Setting: Mulanje District, Malawi. Objective: To examine the effectiveness of door-to-door (DtD) testing in reaching young people and men in a remote, rural area with a high prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Design: This was a retrospective analysis of data collected for a pilot DtD program. HIV testing services (HTS) visited targeted villages for 1-2 weeks. All current residents aged ⩾2 years not known to be HIV-positive were offered testing. Results: Ninety per cent (13 783/15 391) of individuals eligible for testing accepted. Forty-one per cent (n = 5693) of those tested were males and 56% (n = 7752) were aged <20 years. The overall proportion who tested positive was 4% (n = 524), with half as many males as females testing positive (OR 0.49, 95%CI 0.40-0.60, P < 0.001). There was a higher positive yield rate for those aged ⩾20 years (6% for men and 8% for women). Two thirds were first-time testers; males were half as likely as females to have been previously tested (OR 0.43, 95%CI 0.40-0.47, P < 0.001). Conclusion: DtD-HTS can be an effective way to reach populations in remote, rural high-prevalence areas where access to fixed facilities is inadequate. It has the potential to reach young people and men better than facility-based testing or other community strategies, and can identify young HIV-positive children who may have been missed by other methods.

  20. NICMOS Filter Wheel/Mechanisms Mini-Functional Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Glenn

    2001-07-01

    This is an early engineering test to verify the aliveness, functionality, operability, and electro-mechanical calibration of the NICMOS filter wheel motors and assembly. This is the FIRST use of the NICMOS filter wheel mechanisms since they were disabled by ground command in January, 1999. This test has been designed to obviate concerns over possible deformation or breakage of the fitter wheel "soda-straw" shafts due to excess rotational drag torque and/or bending moments which may be imparted due to changes in the dewar metrology from warm-up/cool-down. This test should be executed after the VCS {and filter wheel housing} has reached and approximately equilibrated to its nominal Cycle 11 operating temperature.

  1. Gas Test Loop Functional and Technical Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst; Soli T. Khericha; James L. Jones

    2004-09-01

    This document defines the technical and functional requirements for a gas test loop (GTL) to be constructed for the purpose of providing a high intensity fast-flux irradiation environment for developers of advanced concept nuclear reactors. This capability is needed to meet fuels and materials testing requirements of the designers of Generation IV (GEN IV) reactors and other programs within the purview of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Space nuclear power development programs may also benefit by the services the GTL will offer. The overall GTL technical objective is to provide developers with the means for investigating and qualifying fuels and materials needed for advanced reactor concepts. The testing environment includes a fast-flux neutron spectrum of sufficient intensity to perform accelerated irradiation testing. Appropriate irradiation temperature, gaseous environment, test volume, diagnostics, and access and handling features are also needed. This document serves to identify those requirements as well as generic requirements applicable to any system of this kind.

  2. Analysis of Draize eye irritation testing and its prediction by mining publicly available 2008-2014 REACH data.

    PubMed

    Luechtefeld, Thomas; Maertens, Alexandra; Russo, Daniel P; Rovida, Costanza; Zhu, Hao; Hartung, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Public data from ECHA online dossiers on 9,801 substances encompassing 326,749 experimental key studies and additional information on classification and labeling were made computable. Eye irritation hazard, for which the rabbit Draize eye test still represents the reference method, was analyzed. Dossiers contained 9,782 Draize eye studies on 3,420 unique substances, indicating frequent retesting of substances. This allowed assessment of the test's reproducibility test based on all substances tested more than once. There was a 10% chance of a non-irritant evaluation given after a prior severe-irritant result as given by UN GHS classification criteria. The most reproducible outcomes were the results negative (94% reproducible) and severe eye irritant (73% reproducible). To evaluate whether other GHS categorizations predict eye irritation we built a dataset of 5,629 substances (1,931 'irritant' and 3,698 'non-irritant'). The two best decision trees with up to three other GHS classifications resulted in balanced accuracies of 68% and 73%, i.e., in the rank order of the Draize rabbit eye test itself, but both use inhalation toxicity data ("May cause respiratory irritation"), which is not typically available. Next, a dataset of 929 substances with at least one Draize study was mapped to PubChem to compute chemical similarity using 2D conformational fingerprints and Tanimoto similarity. Using a minimum similarity of 0.7 and simple classification by the closest chemical neighbor resulted in balanced accuracy from 73% over 737 substances to 100% at a threshold of 0.975 over 41 substances. This represents a strong support of read-across and (Q)SAR approaches in this area.

  3. Modifications of the Test Information Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    Two modification formulas are presented for the test information function in order to provide better measures of local accuracies of the estimation of "theta" when maximum likelihood estimation is used to provide the estimate of ability "theta." A minimum bound of any estimator, biased or unbiased, is considered; and Formula 1…

  4. Analysis of Draize Eye Irritation Testing and its Prediction by Mining Publicly Available 2008–2014 REACH Data

    PubMed Central

    Luechtefeld, Thomas; Maertens, Alexandra; Russo, Daniel P.; Rovida, Costanza; Zhu, Hao; Hartung, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Summary Public data from ECHA online dossiers on 9,801 substances encompassing 326,749 experimental key studies and additional information on classification and labeling were made computable. Eye irritation hazard, for which the rabbit Draize eye test still represents the reference method, was analyzed. Dossiers contained 9,782 Draize eye studies on 3,420 unique substances, indicating frequent retesting of substances. This allowed assessment of the test’s reproducibility based on all substances tested more than once. There was a 10% chance of a non-irritant evaluation after a prior severe-irritant result according to UN GHS classification criteria. The most reproducible outcomes were the results negative (94% reproducible) and severe eye irritant (73% reproducible). To evaluate whether other GHS categorizations predict eye irritation, we built a dataset of 5,629 substances (1,931 “irritant” and 3,698 “non-irritant”). The two best decision trees with up to three other GHS classifications resulted in balanced accuracies of 68% and 73%, i.e., in the rank order of the Draize rabbit eye test itself, but both use inhalation toxicity data (“May cause respiratory irritation”), which is not typically available. Next, a dataset of 929 substances with at least one Draize study was mapped to PubChem to compute chemical similarity using 2D conformational fingerprints and Tanimoto similarity. Using a minimum similarity of 0.7 and simple classification by the closest chemical neighbor resulted in balanced accuracy from 73% over 737 substances to 100% at a threshold of 0.975 over 41 substances. This represents a strong support of read-across and (Q)SAR approaches in this area. PMID:26863293

  5. Functional Performance Testing After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Geoffrey D.; Harris, Joshua D.; Gupta, Anil K.; McCormick, Frank M.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Cole, Brian J.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: When to allow an athlete to return to unrestricted sporting activity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction remains controversial. Purpose: To report the results of functional performance testing reported in the literature for individuals at differing time points following ACL reconstruction and to examine differences between graft types. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review of Medline, Scopus, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was performed using PRISMA guidelines. Inclusion criteria were English-language studies that examined any functional rehabilitation test from 6 months to 2 years following ACL reconstruction. All patient-, limb-, and knee-specific demographics were extracted from included investigations. All functional rehabilitation tests were analyzed and compared when applicable. Results: The search term returned a total of 890 potential studies, with 88 meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of 4927 patients were included, of which 66% were male. The mean patient age was 26.5 ± 3.4 years. The predominant graft choices for reconstruction were bone–patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) autograft (59.8%) and hamstring autograft (37.9%). The most commonly reported functional tests were the hop tests. The results of these functional tests, as reported in the Limb Symmetry Index (LSI), improved with increasing time, with nearly all results greater than 90% at 1 year following primary ACL reconstruction. At 6 months postoperatively, a number of isokinetic strength measurements failed to reach 80% LSI, most commonly isokinetic knee extension testing in both BPTB and hamstring autograft groups. The knee flexion strength deficit was significantly less in the BPTB autograft group as compared with those having hamstring autograft at 1 year postoperatively, while no significant differences were found in isokinetic extension strength between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Hop

  6. Platelet function tests: a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Paniccia, Rita; Priora, Raffaella; Liotta, Agatina Alessandrello; Abbate, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    In physiological hemostasis a prompt recruitment of platelets on the vessel damage prevents the bleeding by the rapid formation of a platelet plug. Qualitative and/or quantitative platelet defects promote bleeding, whereas the high residual reactivity of platelets in patients on antiplatelet therapies moves forward thromboembolic complications. The biochemical mechanisms of the different phases of platelet activation - adhesion, shape change, release reaction, and aggregation - have been well delineated, whereas their complete translation into laboratory assays has not been so fulfilled. Laboratory tests of platelet function, such as bleeding time, light transmission platelet aggregation, lumiaggregometry, impedance aggregometry on whole blood, and platelet activation investigated by flow cytometry, are traditionally utilized for diagnosing hemostatic disorders and managing patients with platelet and hemostatic defects, but their use is still limited to specialized laboratories. To date, a point-of-care testing (POCT) dedicated to platelet function, using pertinent devices much simpler to use, has now become available (ie, PFA-100, VerifyNow System, Multiplate Electrode Aggregometry [MEA]). POCT includes new methodologies which may be used in critical clinical settings and also in general laboratories because they are rapid and easy to use, employing whole blood without the necessity of sample processing. Actually, these different platelet methodologies for the evaluation of inherited and acquired bleeding disorders and/or for monitoring antiplatelet therapies are spreading and the study of platelet function is strengthening. In this review, well-tried and innovative platelet function tests and their methodological features and clinical applications are considered.

  7. Platelet function tests: a comparative review

    PubMed Central

    Paniccia, Rita; Priora, Raffaella; Alessandrello Liotta, Agatina; Abbate, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    In physiological hemostasis a prompt recruitment of platelets on the vessel damage prevents the bleeding by the rapid formation of a platelet plug. Qualitative and/or quantitative platelet defects promote bleeding, whereas the high residual reactivity of platelets in patients on antiplatelet therapies moves forward thromboembolic complications. The biochemical mechanisms of the different phases of platelet activation – adhesion, shape change, release reaction, and aggregation – have been well delineated, whereas their complete translation into laboratory assays has not been so fulfilled. Laboratory tests of platelet function, such as bleeding time, light transmission platelet aggregation, lumiaggregometry, impedance aggregometry on whole blood, and platelet activation investigated by flow cytometry, are traditionally utilized for diagnosing hemostatic disorders and managing patients with platelet and hemostatic defects, but their use is still limited to specialized laboratories. To date, a point-of-care testing (POCT) dedicated to platelet function, using pertinent devices much simpler to use, has now become available (ie, PFA-100, VerifyNow System, Multiplate Electrode Aggregometry [MEA]). POCT includes new methodologies which may be used in critical clinical settings and also in general laboratories because they are rapid and easy to use, employing whole blood without the necessity of sample processing. Actually, these different platelet methodologies for the evaluation of inherited and acquired bleeding disorders and/or for monitoring antiplatelet therapies are spreading and the study of platelet function is strengthening. In this review, well-tried and innovative platelet function tests and their methodological features and clinical applications are considered. PMID:25733843

  8. Ecoregional, catchment, and reach-scale environmental factors shape functional-trait structure of stream fish assemblages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Patterns of association between functional traits and environmental gradients can improve understanding of species assemblage structure from local to regional scales, and therefore may be useful for natural resource management. We measured functional traits related to trophic ecology, habitat use, a...

  9. Functional Performance Testing for Power and Return to Sports

    PubMed Central

    Manske, Robert; Reiman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Context: Functional performance testing of athletes can determine physical limitations that may affect sporting activities. Optimal functional performance testing simulates the athlete’s activity. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search from 1960 to 2012 was implemented with the keywords functional testing, functional impairment testing, and functional performance testing in the English language. Each author also undertook independent searches of article references. Conclusion: Functional performance tests can bridge the gap between general physical tests and full, unrestricted athletic activity. PMID:24427396

  10. [Cardiology. Platelet function testing for clinicians].

    PubMed

    Pellaton, Cyril; Eeckhout, Eric; Silvain, Johanne; Montalescot, Gilles; Collet, Jean-Phillipe

    2014-01-15

    Platelet P2YI2 receptor inhibition with clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor plays a key role to prevent recurrent ischaemic events after percutaneous coronary intervention in acute coronary syndromes or elective settings. The degree of platelet inhibition depends on the antiplatelet medication used and is influenced by clinical and genetic factors. A concept of therapeutic window exists. On one side, efficient anti-aggregation is required in order to reduce cardio-vascular events. On the other side, an excessive platelet inhibition represents a risk of bleeding complications. This article describes the current knowledge about some platelet function tests and genetic tests and summarises their role in the clinical practice.

  11. Pulmonary function testing in asthma: nursing applications.

    PubMed

    Conner, Brenda; Meng, Anne

    2003-12-01

    Spirometry has become the most widely used assessment of pulmonary function for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. This article reviews the indications for spirometry in persons who have asthma, the parameters measured, acceptable testing techniques, acceptability, quality assurance criteria, and basic interpretation of results in evaluating the person who has asthma. Understanding basic spirometry is an invaluable aid to the nurse and nurse practitioner who provide care to children and adults who have asthma.

  12. Flow, form, and function: Distinguishing eco-hydraulic controls with relevance beyond the stream reach using synthetic channel morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Belize; Pasternack, Gregory; Sandoval-Solis, Samuel

    2017-04-01

    Rivers are highly complex, dynamic systems that support numerous ecosystem functions including transporting sediment, modulating biogeochemical processes, and regulating habitat availability for native species. The extent and timing of these functions is largely controlled by the interplay of hydrologic dynamics (i.e., flow) and the shape and structure of the river channel (i.e., form). In spite of this, the majority of river restoration studies are limited to the influence of flow on ecosystem function without regard for the role of channel form in modulating eco-hydraulic response. The few studies that have effectively examined the flow-form interface highlight the scientific and management value of such analyses, but are highly resource intensive. This study represents a first attempt to apply synthetic channel design to the evaluation of river flow-form-function linkages, with the aim of improving basic understanding of how the interplay between flow and form affects ecosystem functions across a range of regionally-significant flows and forms with minimal resource requirements. Archetypal Mediterranean-montane channel types were used to guide the design of 3D synthetic morphologies. These morphologies were then used to quantify 2D eco-hydraulic response to different channel configurations under select hydrologic scenarios (distinguished by alteration and water year type). The eco-hydraulic performance of alternative flow-form settings, based on spatiotemporal patterns of depth and velocity, was evaluated with respect to a suite of river ecosystem functions related to geomorphic diversity, aquatic habitat, and riparian habitat. The methods described herein provide a potential design and inventory tool for quantifying river ecosystem functions and management trade-offs of alternative flow-form combinations with minimal resource and data requirements. While addressing specific scientific questions of interest for Mediterranean-montane rivers, the general framework

  13. An Automated Preschool Pulmonary Function Test

    PubMed Central

    Budd, Jeffrey R.; Finkelstein, Stanley M.; Warwick, Warren J.

    1981-01-01

    A non-invasive, non-effort dependent pulmonary function test has been created which can be used on preschool subjects. The integration of a mini-computer system with the test procedure allows extensive analysis of flow and gas concentration data. This analysis not only supplies lung volume measurements but also gas mixing efficiency which quantifies the evenness of gas distribution and alveolar efficiency which indicates the extent of ventilation-perfusion inequalities and diffusion abnormalities. The test has been performed on a sample of control subjects and cystic fibrosis patients aged 1 to 23 years old. The results indicate that the measurements are not only sensitive and specific to lung disease but also that they should prove useful for following the extent of lung disease over time.

  14. Testing visual function in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Westheimer, Gerald

    2010-07-01

    The explosive growth of automatic examination of the eye, in particular for determining refractive corrections, invites an analysis of the strengths and limitations of these devices and their role in clinical decisions. Subjective refraction procedures are based on a patient's visual responses and these embrace many levels of additional optical and neural processing and factors involving the higher-order nervous system and perception. Because the ultimate mission is the maintenance and improvement of a patient's visual experiences, the optometric examination necessarily extends beyond the employment of automatic devices and therefore, should include engaging the patients in tests of their visual functions.

  15. Uses of esophageal function testing: dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Etsuro; Woodland, Philip; Sifrim, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Esophageal function testing should be used for differential diagnosis of dysphagia. Dysphagia can be the consequence of hypermotility or hypomotility of the muscles of the esophagus. Decreased esophageal or esophagogastric junction distensibility can provoke dysphagia. The most well established esophageal dysmotility is achalasia. Other motility disorders can also cause dysphagia. High-resolution manometry (HRM) is the gold standard investigation for esophageal motility disorders. Simultaneous measurement of HRM and intraluminal impedance can be useful to assess motility and bolus transit. Impedance planimetry measures distensibility of the esophageal body and gastroesophageal junction in patients with achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis.

  16. Kinect-based choice reaching and stepping reaction time tests for clinical and in-home assessment of fall risk in older people: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Ejupi, Andreas; Gschwind, Yves J; Brodie, Matthew; Zagler, Wolfgang L; Lord, Stephen R; Delbaere, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Quick protective reactions such as reaching or stepping are important to avoid a fall or minimize injuries. We developed Kinect-based choice reaching and stepping reaction time tests (Kinect-based CRTs) and evaluated their ability to differentiate between older fallers and non-fallers and the feasibility of administering them at home. A total of 94 community-dwelling older people were assessed on the Kinect-based CRTs in the laboratory and were followed-up for falls for 6 months. Additionally, a subgroup (n = 20) conducted the Kinect-based CRTs at home. Signal processing algorithms were developed to extract features for reaction, movement and the total time from the Kinect skeleton data. Nineteen participants (20.2 %) reported a fall in the 6 months following the assessment. The reaction time (fallers: 797 ± 136 ms, non-fallers: 714 ± 89 ms), movement time (fallers: 392 ± 50 ms, non-fallers: 358 ± 51 ms) and total time (fallers: 1189 ± 170 ms, non-fallers: 1072 ± 109 ms) of the reaching reaction time test differentiated well between the fallers and non-fallers. The stepping reaction time test did not significantly discriminate between the two groups in the prospective study. The correlations between the laboratory and in-home assessments were 0.689 for the reaching reaction time and 0.860 for stepping reaction time. The study findings indicate that the Kinect-based CRT tests are feasible to administer in clinical and in-home settings, and thus represents an important step towards the development of sensor-based fall risk self-assessments. With further validation, the assessments may prove useful as a fall risk screen and home-based assessment measures for monitoring changes over time and effects of fall prevention interventions.

  17. [Preoperative lung function tests using impulse oscillometry].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Kumiko

    2010-02-01

    Preoperative lung function tests are useful to evaluate the preoperative pulmonary condition and to detect a high risk of postoperative pulmonary complications. However, maximum expiratory effort by patients is necessary to determine lung function using spirometry and flow-volume curve measurements. When patients are not able to expire completely during the measurement, incorrect data regarding their respiratory system is obtained. On the other hand, respiratory system impedance using an impulse oscillatory system (IOS) can evaluate total airway resistance (R5), large airway resistance (R20), small airway resistance (R5-20) and reactance (X5) under breathing at rest within a few minutes. There are few reports that indicate the standard values for IOS. In addition, the effects of age on IOS value are not clear. In this study preoperative lung functions using IOS were studied to examine the standard value and effect of aging. Subjects were 420 patients aged from 20 to 89 years with normal pulmonary function (%VC > or = 80%, %FEV(1.0) > or = 70%), and scheduled for an elective surgery. Lung function measurements such as IOS, spirometry, maximum expiratory flow-volume curve and single N2 washout were done preoperatively. Subjects were divided into seven groups in decades from 20 to 80. Although there was no statistical change in R5, R20, R5-R20, Z5 and X5 in the decades from 20 to 60, there were statistically significant changes during the 70s and 80s. There were significant differences in IOS parameters between the adult group and the aged group. Changes due to aging were stronger on V25/Ht than those of IOS. This study indicates that there are differences between V25/Ht and IOS values because of the difference in breathing conditions during measurements.

  18. Functional Task Test: 2. Spaceflight-Induced Cardiovascular Change and Recovery During NASA's Functional Task Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Tiffany; Arzeno, Natalia M.; Stenger, Michael; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Platts, Steven H.

    2011-01-01

    The overall objective of the functional task test (FTT) is to correlate spaceflight-induced physiological adaptations with changes in performance of high priority exploration mission-critical tasks. This presentation will focus on the recovery from fall/stand test (RFST), which measures the cardiovascular response to the transition from the prone posture (simulated fall) to standing in normal gravity, as well as heart rate (HR) during 11 functional tasks. As such, this test describes some aspects of spaceflight-induced cardiovascular deconditioning and the course of recovery in Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) astronauts. The sensorimotor and neuromuscular components of the FTT are described in two separate abstracts: Functional Task Test 1 and 3.

  19. The Reliability of a Functional Agility Test for Water Polo

    PubMed Central

    Tucher, Guilherme; de Souza Castro, Flávio Antônio; Garrido, Nuno Domingos; Martins da Silva, António José Rocha

    2014-01-01

    Few functional agility tests for water polo take into consideration its specific characteristics. The preliminary objective of this study was to evaluate the reliability of an agility test for water polo players. Fifteen players (16.3 ± 1.8 years old) with a minimum of two years of competitive experience were evaluated. A Functional Test for Agility Performance (FTAP) was designed to represent the context of this sport. Several trials were performed to familiarize the athlete with the movement. Two experienced coaches measured three repetitions of the FTAP. Descriptive statistics, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), 95% limit of agreement (LOA), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and standard error of measurements (SEM) were used for data analysis. It was considered that certain criteria of reliability measures were met. There was no significant difference between the repetitions, which may be explained by an effect of the evaluator, the ability of the players or fatigue (p > 0.05). The ICC average from evaluators was high (0.88). The SEM varied between 0.13 s and 0.49 s. The CV average considering each individual was near 6–7%. These values depended on the condition of measurement. As the FTAP contains some characteristics that create a degree of unpredictability, the same athlete may reach different performance results, increasing variability. An adjustment in the sample, familiarization and careful selection of subjects help to improve this situation and enhance the reliability of the indicators. PMID:25114745

  20. The reliability of a functional agility test for water polo.

    PubMed

    Tucher, Guilherme; de Souza Castro, Flávio Antônio; Garrido, Nuno Domingos; Martins da Silva, António José Rocha

    2014-06-28

    Few functional agility tests for water polo take into consideration its specific characteristics. The preliminary objective of this study was to evaluate the reliability of an agility test for water polo players. Fifteen players (16.3 ± 1.8 years old) with a minimum of two years of competitive experience were evaluated. A Functional Test for Agility Performance (FTAP) was designed to represent the context of this sport. Several trials were performed to familiarize the athlete with the movement. Two experienced coaches measured three repetitions of the FTAP. Descriptive statistics, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), 95% limit of agreement (LOA), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and standard error of measurements (SEM) were used for data analysis. It was considered that certain criteria of reliability measures were met. There was no significant difference between the repetitions, which may be explained by an effect of the evaluator, the ability of the players or fatigue (p > 0.05). The ICC average from evaluators was high (0.88). The SEM varied between 0.13 s and 0.49 s. The CV average considering each individual was near 6-7%. These values depended on the condition of measurement. As the FTAP contains some characteristics that create a degree of unpredictability, the same athlete may reach different performance results, increasing variability. An adjustment in the sample, familiarization and careful selection of subjects help to improve this situation and enhance the reliability of the indicators.

  1. A computer vision based candidate for functional balance test.

    PubMed

    Nalci, Alican; Khodamoradi, Alireza; Balkan, Ozgur; Nahab, Fatta; Garudadri, Harinath

    2015-08-01

    Balance in humans is a motor skill based on complex multimodal sensing, processing and control. Ability to maintain balance in activities of daily living (ADL) is compromised due to aging, diseases, injuries and environmental factors. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate of the costs of falls among older adults was $34 billion in 2013 and is expected to reach $54.9 billion in 2020. In this paper, we present a brief review of balance impairments followed by subjective and objective tools currently used in clinical settings for human balance assessment. We propose a novel computer vision (CV) based approach as a candidate for functional balance test. The test will take less than a minute to administer and expected to be objective, repeatable and highly discriminative in quantifying ability to maintain posture and balance. We present an informal study with preliminary data from 10 healthy volunteers, and compare performance with a balance assessment system called BTrackS Balance Assessment Board. Our results show high degree of correlation with BTrackS. The proposed system promises to be a good candidate for objective functional balance tests and warrants further investigations to assess validity in clinical settings, including acute care, long term care and assisted living care facilities. Our long term goals include non-intrusive approaches to assess balance competence during ADL in independent living environments.

  2. Integrated Locomotor Function Tests for Countermeasure Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Cohen, H. S.; Landsness, E. C.; Black, F. O.

    2005-01-01

    Following spaceflight crewmembers experience locomotor dysfunction due to inflight adaptive alterations in sensorimotor function. Countermeasures designed to mitigate these postflight gait alterations need to be assessed with a new generation of tests that evaluate the interaction of various sensorimotor sub-systems central to locomotor control. The goal of the present study was to develop new functional tests of locomotor control that could be used to test the efficacy of countermeasures. These tests were designed to simultaneously examine the function of multiple sensorimotor systems underlying the control of locomotion and be operationally relevant to the astronaut population. Traditionally, gaze stabilization has been studied almost exclusively in seated subjects performing target acquisition tasks requiring only the involvement of coordinated eye-head movements. However, activities like walking involve full-body movement and require coordination between lower limbs and the eye-head-trunk complex to achieve stabilized gaze during locomotion. Therefore the first goal of this study was to determine how the multiple, interdependent, full-body sensorimotor gaze stabilization subsystems are functionally coordinated during locomotion. In an earlier study we investigated how alteration in gaze tasking changes full-body locomotor control strategies. Subjects walked on a treadmill and either focused on a central point target or read numeral characters. We measured: temporal parameters of gait, full body sagittal plane segmental kinematics of the head, trunk, thigh, shank and foot, accelerations along the vertical axis at the head and the shank, and the vertical forces acting on the support surface. In comparison to the point target fixation condition, the results of the number reading task showed that compensatory head pitch movements increased, peak head acceleration was reduced and knee flexion at heel-strike was increased. In a more recent study we investigated the

  3. Liver Function Tests Following Open Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The cardiopulmonary bypass may have multiple systemic effects on the body organs as liver. This prospective study was planned to explore further the incidence and significance of this change. Methods: Two hundred patients with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), were randomly selected for the study. Total and indirect bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase were measured preoperatively and at 24, 48 and 72 hours, following coronary artery bypass grafting. Postoperative value of the liver function tests with respect to hypothermia or hypotension were compared by one way analysis of variance for repeated measure and compared with t test. Patient’s characteristics with bilirubin value (≤1.5 mg or >1.5 mg) were compared with t test. Results: A significant increase of total bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase were noted in the third postoperative day. Significant relation was seen between hypotension and alkaline phosphatase, and aspartate aminotransferase change but hypothermia had not affected alanine aminotransferase, total bilirubin and indirect bilirubin change. Pump time, alanine aminotransferase in third postoperative day and direct bilirubin in first and second day of postoperative period had significant relation with pre and post-operative bilirubin change. Conclusion: Transient but not permanent alterations of hepatic enzymes after coronary artery bypass grafting presumably attributed to the decreased hepatic flow, hypoxia, or pump-induced inflammation. PMID:26191391

  4. Diabetic rat testes: morphological and functional alterations.

    PubMed

    Ricci, G; Catizone, A; Esposito, R; Pisanti, F A; Vietri, M T; Galdieri, M

    2009-12-01

    Reproductive dysfunction is a consequence of diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This study investigated the histological and molecular alterations in the testes of rats injected with streptozotocin at prepuperal (SPI rats) and adult age (SAI rats) to understand whether diabetes affects testicular tissue with different severity depending on the age in which this pathological condition starts. The testes of diabetic animals showed frequent abnormal histology, and seminiferous epithelium cytoarchitecture appeared altered as well as the occludin distribution pattern. The early occurrence of diabetes increased the percentage of animals with high number of damaged tubules. The interstitial compartment of the testes was clearly hypertrophic in several portions of the organs both in SPI and SAI rats. Interestingly, fully developed Leydig cells were present in all the treated animals although abnormally distributed. Besides the above-described damages, we found a similar decrease in plasma testosterone levels both in SPI and SAI rats. Oxidative stress (OS) is involved in the pathogenesis of various diabetic complications, and in our experimental models we found that manganese superoxide dismutase was reduced in diabetic animals. We conclude that in STZ-induced diabetes, the altered spermatogenesis, more severe in SPI animals, is possibly due to the effect of OS on Leydig cell function which could cause the testosterone decrease responsible for the alterations found in the seminiferous epithelium of diabetic animals.

  5. A Test for Measuring Gustatory Function

    PubMed Central

    Smutzer, Gregory; Lam, Si; Hastings, Lloyd; Desai, Hetvi; Abarintos, Ray A.; Sobel, Marc; Sayed, Nabil

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study is to determine the usefulness of edible taste strips for measuring human gustatory function. Research Design The physical properties of edible taste strips were examined in order to determine their potential for delivering threshold and suprathreshold amounts of taste stimuli to the oral cavity. Taste strips were then assayed by fluorescence to analyze the uniformity and distribution of bitter tastant in the strips. Finally, taste recognition thresholds for sweet taste were examined in order to determine whether or not taste strips would produce recognition thresholds that were equal to or better than those obtained from aqueous tests. Methodology Edible strips were prepared from pullulan-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose solutions that were dried to a thin film. The maximal amount of a tastant that could be incorporated in a 2.54 × 2.54 cm taste strip was identified by including representative taste stimuli for each class of tastant (sweet, sour, salty, bitter, and umami) during strip formation. Distribution of the bitter tastant quinine hydrochloride in taste strips was assayed by fluorescence emission spectroscopy. The efficacy of taste strips for evaluating human gustatory function was examined by using a single series ascending method of limits protocol. Sucrose taste recognition threshold data from edible strips was then compared to results that were obtained from a standard “sip and spit” recognition threshold test. Results Edible films that formed from a pullulan-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose polymer mixture can be used to prepare clear, thin strips that have essentially no background taste and leave no physical presence after release of tastant. Edible taste strips could uniformly incorporate up to five percent of their composition as tastant. Taste recognition thresholds for sweet taste were over one order of magnitude lower with edible taste strips when compared to an aqueous taste test. Conclusion Edible taste

  6. Reaching into Pictorial Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volcic, Robert; Vishwanath, Dhanraj; Domini, Fulvio

    2014-02-01

    While binocular viewing of 2D pictures generates an impression of 3D objects and space, viewing a picture monocularly through an aperture produces a more compelling impression of depth and the feeling that the objects are "out there", almost touchable. Here, we asked observers to actually reach into pictorial space under both binocular- and monocular-aperture viewing. Images of natural scenes were presented at different physical distances via a mirror-system and their retinal size was kept constant. Targets that observers had to reach for in physical space were marked on the image plane, but at different pictorial depths. We measured the 3D position of the index finger at the end of each reach-to-point movement. Observers found the task intuitive. Reaching responses varied as a function of both pictorial depth and physical distance. Under binocular viewing, responses were mainly modulated by the different physical distances. Instead, under monocular viewing, responses were modulated by the different pictorial depths. Importantly, individual variations over time were minor, that is, observers conformed to a consistent pictorial space. Monocular viewing of 2D pictures thus produces a compelling experience of an immersive space and tangible solid objects that can be easily explored through motor actions.

  7. Formal functional test designs with a test representation language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hops, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    The application of the category-partition method to the test design phase of hardware, software, or system test development is discussed. The method provides a formal framework for reducing the total number of possible test cases to a minimum logical subset for effective testing. An automatic tool and a formal language were developed to implement the method and produce the specification of test cases.

  8. On testing of functionally equivalent components of fault-tolerant software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vouk, Mladen A.; Helsabeck, Michael L.; Tai, Kuo-Chung; Mcallister, David F.

    1986-01-01

    Six functionally equivalent programs were tested with specification based random and extremal/special value (ESV) test cases. Statement and branch coverage were used to measure and compare the attained testing effectiveness. It was observed that both measures reached a nearly steady state value after 25 to 75 random test cases. Coverage saturation curves appear to follow an exponential growth model. However, the steady state values for branch coverage of different components, but the same input cases, differed by as much as 22 percent. The effect is the result of the differences in the detailed structure of the components. Improvement in coverage provided by the random test data, after the ESV cases were executed, was only about 1 percent. Results indicate that extensive random testing can be a process of diminishing returns, and that in the FTS context functional ('black box') testing can provide a very uneven execution coverage of the functionally equivalent software, and therefore should be supplemented by structure based testing.

  9. The cost-effectiveness in the use of HIV counselling and testing-mobile outreaches in reaching men who have sex with men (MSM) in northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ifekandu, Chiedu; Suleiman, Aliyu; Aniekwe, Ogechukwu

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at increased risk of HIV and other STI infections in Nigeria. This is because MSM are afraid to seek medical help because the healthcare workers in various facilities are afraid of the consequences if they provide services for MSM citing the law as a reason not to intervene. MSM in northern states of Nigeria are facing double-jeopardy because the few international partners working in MSM in Nigeria are pulling out of these volatile areas because of the fear of attacks by the Boko Haram and the Nigerian law enforcement agencies. Objectives The intervention was conducted to promote affordable and sustainable HIV care and treatment for MSM in Nigeria. Methods This intervention was conducted in the Boko Haram ravaged cities of Kano and Maiduguri (North-East Nigeria). Twenty MSM-key influencers from the two cities were identified and trained on HIV counselling and testing, caregivers, case managers and on initiation process for ARV treatment for new HIV+MSM as well as ethical considerations. Results The mean age of the key influencers was 24 years +/−SD. Each of the trained 20 key influencers reached 20 MSM-peer with condom promotion, HCT, referral to identified MSM-community health centers and follow-up/caregiving within the space of one month. The project was able to reach 400 MSM in the two cities. 89% of the peers consented to HCT. HIV prevalence among the participants was at 18%. The project recorded ARV-successful referral to healthcare facilities for the respondents that tested positive. The key influencers have been following up for ARV-adherence. Conclusions Use of community members should be promoted for sustainability and ownership. It also helps in eradicating socio-cultural barrier to HIV intervention for MSM. Moreover, this proves to be one of the safest and affordable methods of reaching MSM in Nigeria in this ugly time of legalization of homophobia in the country's constitution. PMID:25394114

  10. Screening Test Items for Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longford, Nicholas T.

    2014-01-01

    A method for medical screening is adapted to differential item functioning (DIF). Its essential elements are explicit declarations of the level of DIF that is acceptable and of the loss function that quantifies the consequences of the two kinds of inappropriate classification of an item. Instead of a single level and a single function, sets of…

  11. Screening Test Items for Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longford, Nicholas T.

    2014-01-01

    A method for medical screening is adapted to differential item functioning (DIF). Its essential elements are explicit declarations of the level of DIF that is acceptable and of the loss function that quantifies the consequences of the two kinds of inappropriate classification of an item. Instead of a single level and a single function, sets of…

  12. STRESS-testing clinical activity and outcomes for a combined prison in-reach and court liaison service: a 3-year observational study of 6177 consecutive male remands.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Conor; Smith, Damian; Caddow, Martin; Duffy, Fergal; Hickey, Philip; Fitzpatrick, Mary; Caddow, Fintan; Cronin, Tom; Joynt, Mark; Azvee, Zetti; Gallagher, Bronagh; Kehoe, Claire; Maddock, Catherine; O'Keeffe, Benjamin; Brennan, Louise; Davoren, Mary; Owens, Elizabeth; Mullaney, Ronan; Keevans, Laurence; Maher, Ronan; Kennedy, Harry G

    2016-01-01

    People with major mental illness are over-represented in prison populations however there are few longitudinal studies of prison in-reach services leading to appropriate healthcare over extended periods. We aimed to examine measures of the clinical efficiency and effectiveness of a prison in-reach, court diversion and liaison service over a 3 year period. Secondly, we aimed to compare rates of identification of psychosis and diversion with rates previously reported for the same setting in the 6 years previously. We adopted a stress testing model for service evaluation. All new male remand committals to Ireland's main remand prison from 2012 to 2014 were screened in two stages. Demographic and clinical variables were recorded along with times to assessment and diversion. The DUNDRUM Toolkit was used to assess level of clinical urgency and level of security required. Binary logistic regression was used to assess factors relevant to diversion. All 6177 consecutive remands were screened of whom 1109 remand episodes (917 individuals) received a psychiatric assessment. 4.1 % (95 % CI 3.6-4.6) had active psychotic symptoms. Levels of self-harm were low. Median time to full assessment was 2 days and median time to admission was 15.0 days for local hospitals and 19.5 days for forensic admissions. Diversion to healthcare settings outside prison was achieved for 5.6 % (349/6177, 95 % CI 5.1-6.3) of all remand episodes and admissions for 2.3 % (95 % CI 1.9-2.7). Both were increased on the previous period reported. Mean DUNDRUM-1 and DUNDRUM-2 Triage Security Scores were appropriate to risk and need. We found that a two-stage screening and referral process followed by comprehensive assessment optimised identification of acute psychosis. The mapping approach described shows that it is possible for a relatively small team to sustainably achieve effective identification of major mental illness and diversion to healthcare in a risk-appropriate manner. The stress-testing

  13. The alteration of profile analysis to accommodate testing functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    The development of a methodology was studied for testing differences among several pilot functions, where the data points represent averages at various frequencies. Topics discussed include: basic assumptions, hypothesis, profile analysis, alteration of profile analysis to accommodate testing functions, test and procedures, and power of tests.

  14. Esophageal function testing: beyond manometry and impedance.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Ravinder K

    2014-10-01

    Manometry and impedance provide only surrogate information regarding longitudinal wall function and are focused on contractile amplitude and lumen content. Ultrasound imaging provides a unique perspective of esophageal function by providing important information regarding longitudinal muscle contraction. Laser Doppler assessment of perfusion may be an important complementary tool to assess abnormal wall blood perfusion as a possible mechanism of pain. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Coaching patients during pulmonary function testing: A practical guide.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Heidi J; Cheung, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests are an important tool to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with respiratory disease. Ensuring that the tests are of acceptable quality is vital. Acceptable pulmonary function test quality requires, among others, optimal patient performance. Optimal patient performance, in turn, requires adequate coaching from registered respiratory therapists (RRTs) and other pulmonary function laboratory personnel. The present article provides techniques and tips to help RRTs coach patients during testing. The authors briefly review the components of pulmonary function testing, then describe factors that may hinder a patient's performance, list common mistakes that patients make during testing, and provide tips that RRTs can use to help patients optimize their performance.

  16. [Pulmonary function testing before ablative methods].

    PubMed

    Ewert, R; Opitz, C

    2004-07-01

    Laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) and radiofrequency thermoablation (RFTA) are increasingly used for pulmonary interventions. Primarily patients with severe functional limitations precluding a surgical approach are selected for these procedures. In this patient group a valid preinterventional risk assessment is of paramount importance. The occurrence of a pneumothorax is one of the most important complications associated with these procedures. Therefore, the functional capacity and pulmonary reserve of these patients should allow for at least short periods of lung collapse. The periinterventional risk of these patients can be estimated from basic lung function studies when certain comorbidities are excluded.

  17. Europe reaches the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-11-01

    A complex package of tests on new technologies was successfully performed during the cruise to the Moon, while the spacecraft was getting ready for the scientific investigations which will come next. These technologies pave the way for future planetary missions. SMART-1 reached its closest point to the lunar surface so far - its first ‘perilune’ - at an altitude of about 5000 kilometres at 18:48 Central European Time (CET) on 15 November. Just hours before that, at 06:24 CET, SMART-1’s solar-electric propulsion system (or ‘ion engine’) was started up and is now being fired for the delicate manoeuvre that will stabilise the spacecraft in lunar orbit. During this crucial phase, the engine will run almost continuously for the next four days, and then for a series of shorter burns, allowing SMART-1 to reach its final operational orbit by making ever-decreasing loops around the Moon. By about mid-January, SMART-1 will be orbiting the Moon at altitudes between 300 kilometres (over the lunar south pole) and 3000 kilometres (over the lunar north pole), beginning its scientific observations. The main purpose of the first part of the SMART-1 mission, concluding with the arrival at the Moon, was to demonstrate new spacecraft technologies. In particular, the solar-electric propulsion system was tested over a long spiralling trip to the Moon of more than 84 million kilometres. This is a distance comparable to an interplanetary cruise. For the first time ever, gravity-assist manoeuvres, which use the gravitational pull of the approaching Moon, were performed by an electrically-propelled spacecraft. The success of this test is important to the prospects for future interplanetary missions using ion engines. SMART-1 has demonstrated new techniques for eventually achieving autonomous spacecraft navigation. The OBAN experiment tested navigation software on ground computers to determine the exact position and velocity of the spacecraft using images of celestial objects taken

  18. Riparian wetlands of the middle reach of the Seine river (France): historical development, investigation and present hydrologic functioning. A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendjoudi, H.; Weng, P.; Guérin, R.; Pastre, J. F.

    2002-06-01

    Along the middle reach of the Seine river, upstream from Paris, riparian wetlands that have been functioning for centuries, first as a result of a succession of sedimentological/hydrological processes and later of continuous management practices where the value of the wetlands has been acknowledged as well as their importance for the ecology. Here, we present the results of a multidisciplinary research programme focused on this system with emphasis on its present hydrological functioning and on the tools used to understand and quantify it. The major hydrological and geochemical processes that are active at present are reviewed, but past processes are also described as well as the potential long-term evolution of the system. This study uses several innovative tools to investigate the wetlands and analyse them in space: thermographic aerial survey and electromagnetic prospecting resulting in a map of clay-layer thickness. Concerning the wetland hydrology, water budgets, established at different time scales (several years, one year, a season) illustrate the exchanges between the watershed, the river and the wetland and water storage in the wetlands during flood events. The results show how the upstream reservoirs, built during the last 20 years, presently control the preservation and functioning of downstream riparian wetlands. Monitoring and modelling of the hydrological functioning of one wetland site have made it possible to identify and quantify exchanges between the wetland (especially in the unsaturated upper layer) and its environment. In situ measurements of denitrification rates in the wetland were used to make initial estimates of its nitrate-elimination capacity.

  19. Visual function tests on the Internet--sense or nonsense?

    PubMed

    Kuchenbecker, J; Lindner, H

    2004-06-01

    The quantitative capability of the visual system can be tested using graphic presentations with defined size, form and color. For presentations, a chart projector or monitor can be used. Today, the number of visual function tests on the Internet is increasing constantly. Options and limitations of visual function tests using the Internet and the authors' own test results are described. Several visual function tests, such as visual acuity tests, the Amsler-Grid, stereo and color vision tests, can already be given via Internet. The variability of the tests ranges from the simple presentation of graphic elements to the laboriously programmed interactive input by the user to specify the test result. Under standardized examination conditions, there was a very high correspondence between the results of the authors' own web-based color vision test and those of luminescence color test plates and conventional pigment color plates. However, the interpretation of the test results is difficult due to the absence of controls during the test as well as the heterogeneity of the hardware. In order to obtain comparable test results, differences in size and resolution as well as in brightness, contrast and color of computer monitors must be taken into consideration. Due to the deficits described in the tests, the value of visual function tests on the Internet is rather limited. Currently, the data of test distributers with respect to the test conditions are all still insufficient. Standards need to be defined for Internet-based visual function tests. However, visual function tests on the Internet can achieve test results comparable to those of conventional visual function tests under standardized examination conditions in clinical practice. Further studies are needed to check the accuracy of web-based screening examinations in ophthalmology.

  20. Simple Test Functions in Meshless Local Petrov-Galerkin Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.

    2016-01-01

    Two meshless local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) methods based on two different trial functions but that use a simple linear test function were developed for beam and column problems. These methods used generalized moving least squares (GMLS) and radial basis (RB) interpolation functions as trial functions. These two methods were tested on various patch test problems. Both methods passed the patch tests successfully. Then the methods were applied to various beam vibration problems and problems involving Euler and Beck's columns. Both methods yielded accurate solutions for all problems studied. The simple linear test function offers considerable savings in computing efforts as the domain integrals involved in the weak form are avoided. The two methods based on this simple linear test function method produced accurate results for frequencies and buckling loads. Of the two methods studied, the method with radial basis trial functions is very attractive as the method is simple, accurate, and robust.

  1. [Tests of hand functionality in upper limb amputation with prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Bazzini, G; Orlandini, D; Moscato, T A; Nicita, D; Panigazzi, M

    2007-01-01

    The need for standardized instruments for clinical measurements has become pressing in the fields of occupational rehabilitation and ergonomics. This is particularly the case for instruments that allow a quantitative evaluation of upper limb function, and especially hand function in patients who have undergone an amputation and then application of an upper limb prosthesis. This study presents a review of the main tests used to evaluate hand function, with a critical analysis of their use in subjects with an upper limb prosthesis. The tests are divided into: tests to evaluate strength, tests to evaluate co-ordination and dexterity, tests of global or overall function, and tests proposed specifically for subjects with an upper limb prosthesis. Of the various tests presented, the authors give their preference to the Bimanual Functional Assessment, Abilhand and/or the ADL Questionnaire, because of the practical usefulness, clinimetric features, simplicity and ease of administration of these tests.

  2. Assessing Differential Item Functioning in Performance Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; And Others

    Although the belief has been expressed that performance assessments are intrinsically more fair than multiple-choice measures, some forms of performance assessment may in fact be more likely than conventional tests to tap construct-irrelevant factors. As performance assessment grows in popularity, it will be increasingly important to monitor the…

  3. First State Fitness Test. A Measurement of Functional Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Timothy; And Others

    This test is designed to measure the functional health of young people. Functional health refers to those factors relating to personal health that can be improved with regular exercise. This test is unique in comparison to other physical fitness tests because of the absence of motor skill items which have no relationship to an individual's…

  4. First State Fitness Test. A Measurement of Functional Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Timothy; And Others

    This test is designed to measure the functional health of young people. Functional health refers to those factors relating to personal health that can be improved with regular exercise. This test is unique in comparison to other physical fitness tests because of the absence of motor skill items which have no relationship to an individual's…

  5. CBOs: Reaching the Hardest to Reach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCEL Newsletter for the Business Community, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The agents most successful in reaching and teaching those most in need of basic skills instruction are the community-based organizations (CBOs). They come into being in response to social and economic problems faced by their constituents--disadvantaged minorities, the poor, the unemployed, and the alienated. Because of their close ties to the…

  6. Functional ground testing - Evaluating the Tomahawk Cruise Missile

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, K.W. )

    1992-01-01

    Flight testing evaluates vehicle performance in a flight environment and, in the case of a weapon system, clearly indicates mission readiness. However, there is a cost-effective alternative method of testing which is capable of indicating weapon system functionality and subsystem success. Functional ground testing of the all-up round Tomahawk Cruise Missile is described. The Tomahawk functional ground test (FGT) cannot make the same conclusive determinations that an operational test launch can. This paper describes the Tomahawk FGT and what makes it unique. It describes the developments and status of this testing methodology, the data acquisition and control, and the engineering challenges encountered. 3 refs.

  7. Practical Aspects of Functional Testing Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    automated information system in the NIAM method. In an existing system an inventory of all the functions (represented by verbs) which the information...with automated systems it is 2) which poses the major problem. 3.5. Ellipsis. Substitution and Informality These processes produce sentence fragments...and Conclusion 97 Appendix System Development Life Cycle 100 Glossary 132 References 135 A7 / 1 t Abstract This document reports an investigation into

  8. Reach Address Database (RAD)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Reach Address Database (RAD) stores the reach address of each Water Program feature that has been linked to the underlying surface water features (streams, lakes, etc) in the National Hydrology Database (NHD). (A reach is the portion of a stream between two points of confluence. A confluence is the location where two or more streams flow together.)

  9. Study Time and Test Performance as a Function of Test Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Ydewalle, Gery; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Study time and test performance change as a function of expecting either open or multiple-choice questions on a history test. Subjects tested in either format were led to expect the same test format on a second test. Subjects expecting open questions studied more and performed better on both test formats. (Author/CM)

  10. An Automated Test of Rat Forelimb Supination Quantifies Motor Function Loss and Recovery After Corticospinal Injury.

    PubMed

    Sindhurakar, Anil; Butensky, Samuel D; Meyers, Eric; Santos, Joshua; Bethea, Thelma; Khalili, Ashley; Sloan, Andrew P; Rennaker, Robert L; Carmel, Jason B

    2017-02-01

    Rodents are the primary animal model of corticospinal injury and repair, yet current behavioral tests do not show the large deficits after injury observed in humans. Forearm supination is critical for hand function and is highly impaired by corticospinal injury in both humans and rats. Current tests of rodent forelimb function do not measure this movement. To determine if quantification of forelimb supination in rats reveals large-scale functional loss and partial recovery after corticospinal injury. We developed a knob supination device that quantifies supination using automated and objective methods. Rats in a reaching box have to grasp and turn a knob in supination in order to receive a food reward. Performance on this task and the single pellet reaching task were measured before and after 2 manipulations of the pyramidal tract: a cut lesion of 1 pyramid and inactivation of motor cortex using 2 different drug doses. A cut lesion of the corticospinal tract produced a large deficit in supination. In contrast, there was no change in pellet retrieval success. Supination function recovered partially over 6 weeks after injury, and a large deficit remained. Motor cortex inactivation produced a dose-dependent loss of knob supination; the effect on pellet reaching was more subtle. The knob supination task reveals in rodents 3 signature hand function changes observed in humans with corticospinal injury: (1) large-scale loss with injury, (2) partial recovery in the weeks after injury, and (3) loss proportional to degree of dysfunction.

  11. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    PubMed Central

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the “golden standard” for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

  12. Thyroid function tests during carbimazole therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, D. L.; Tymms, D. J.; Taylor, M. A.; Chapman, C.

    1980-01-01

    Changes in plasma thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), free thyroxine index (FT4I) and thyroid stimulating hormone were studied in 100 patients with Graves' disease treated with carbimazole. During therapy plasma T3 concentrations were disproportionately high compared to those of T4, the T4 : T3 ratio was low, and many patients were clinically euthyroid with a normal plasma T3 but low T4 concentration. Although there was considerable individual variation in response, the order of response was always the same with plasma T4 falling to normal or low levels before T3. Plasma T3 was the best indicator of clinical status and the best predictor of the impending change; additional information of changes in thyroid status was obtained from plasma T4 and FT4I estimation, especially when these were followed sequentially. Single measurements of T4 or FT4I only are not recommended for assessing thyroid function during carbimazole therapy. PMID:6894979

  13. [Syncope: electrocardiogram and autonomic function tests].

    PubMed

    Uribe, William; Baranchuk, Adrián; Botero, Federico

    2016-12-23

    Syncope represents one of the most frequent reasons for consultation in the emergency department. A proper identification will allow a precise etiologic approach and the optimization of delivery of health resources.
Once knowing the classification of syncope; it is the clinical interrogatory what enables to discriminate which of these patients present with a neurogenic mediated syncope or a cardiac mediated syncope. The use of diagnostic methods such as the tilt test, will clarify what type of neurally mediated syncope predominates in the patient.
The electrocardiogram is the cornerstone in the identification of those patients who had a true episode of self-limited or aborted sudden death as the first manifestation of their syncope, a fact which provides prognostic and therapeutic information that will impact the morbidity and mortality.

  14. 33 CFR 157.12f - Workshop functional test requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CARRYING OIL IN BULK Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.12f Workshop functional test requirements. (a) Each oil content meter and each control section of a monitoring system must be subjected to a... protocol must be received with each unit delivered. (b) A functional test conducted on an oil content meter...

  15. Transfer of function and prior derived-relations testing.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Adam H; Best, Lauren

    2017-10-01

    This experiment assessed transfer of function through equivalence relations with and without prior derived-stimulus-relations (DSR) testing. In a DSR-Testing Group, eight college students learned A-B and A-C discriminations in baseline. They then derived the B-C and C-B equivalence relations before being exposed to a transfer-of-function manipulation and test. Eight participants in a No-DSR Testing Group were exposed to the transfer-of-function manipulation and test immediately after learning the baseline discriminations (i.e., B-C and C-B testing were omitted). In the transfer-of-function manipulation, participants learned to respond differently in the presence of B1 and B2 to avoid money loss. In the transfer-of-function test, responding in the presence of C1 and C2 was measured in the absence of differential consequences. Transfer of function occurred reliably only in the DSR-Testing Group (i.e., participants responding to C1 and C2 in the manner they learned to respond to B1 and B2, respectively). These findings support the notion that prior DSR testing can be critical to observing transfer of function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Reach Out to Enhance Wellness in Older Cancer Survivors (RENEW): Design, Methods and Recruitment Challenges of a Home-based Exercise and Diet Intervention to Improve Physical Function among Long-term Survivors of Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Denise Clutter; Morey, Miriam C.; Sloane, Richard; Stull, Valeda; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Peterson, Bercedis; Pieper, Carl; Hartman, Terryl J.; Miller, Paige E.; Mitchell, Diane C.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Objective Cure rates for cancer are increasing, especially for breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer. Despite positive trends in survivorship, a cancer diagnosis can trigger accelerated functional decline that can threaten independence, reduce quality-of-life and increase health care costs, especially among the elderly who comprise the majority of survivors. Lifestyle interventions may hold promise in reorienting functional decline in older cancer survivors, but few studies have been conducted. Method We describe the design and methods of a randomized controlled trial, RENEW (Reach out to ENhancE Wellness), that tests whether a home-based multi-behavior intervention focused on exercise, and including a low-saturated fat, plant-based diet, would improve physical functioning among 641 older, long-term (≥5 years post-diagnosis) survivors of breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer. Challenges to recruitment are examined. Results 20,015 cases were approached, and screened using a two-step screening process to assure eligibility. This population of long-term, elderly cancer survivors had lower rates of response (∼11%) and higher rates of ineligibility (∼70%) than our previous intervention studies conducted on adults with newly diagnosed cancer. Significantly higher response rates were noted among survivors who were white, younger, and more proximal to diagnosis and breast cancer survivors (p-values < 0.001). Conclusions Older cancer survivors represent a vulnerable population for whom lifestyle interventions may hold promise. RENEW may provide guidance in allocating limited resources in order to maximize recruitment efforts aimed at this needy, but hard-to-reach population. PMID:19117329

  17. Laparoscopic versus open cholecystectomy: effect on pulmonary function tests.

    PubMed

    Coskun, I; Hatipoglu, A R; Topaloglu, A; Yoruk, Y; Yalcinkaya, S; Caglar, T

    2000-01-01

    Operations often cause impairment in respiration due to pain. This study was designed to compare the changes in pulmonary function tests after open and laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Two groups of 35 patients were randomly set up. Each patient had 3 pulmonary function tests performed and 2 postero-anterior grid chest roentgenograms taken. All of these data were evaluated by the same group of investigators. After taking into consideration the difference between pulmonary function tests, values were not significant (P < or = 0.05). All pulmonary function test values decreased significantly on the 1st postoperative day (P < or = 0.05). When postero-anterior chest roentgenograms were compared no clinically evident atelectasis except 3 lineary was seen in the laparoscopic cholecystectomy group, whereas 5 lineary, 7 focal, and 3 segmentary atelectasia were encountered in the open cholecystectomy group (P < or = 0.05). We believe that laparoscopic cholecystectomy has more advantages when speaking of postoperative pulmonary function tests and atelectasia.

  18. A Generalized DIF Effect Variance Estimator for Measuring Unsigned Differential Test Functioning in Mixed Format Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Randall D.; Algina, James

    2006-01-01

    One approach to measuring unsigned differential test functioning is to estimate the variance of the differential item functioning (DIF) effect across the items of the test. This article proposes two estimators of the DIF effect variance for tests containing dichotomous and polytomous items. The proposed estimators are direct extensions of the…

  19. A Generalized DIF Effect Variance Estimator for Measuring Unsigned Differential Test Functioning in Mixed Format Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Randall D.; Algina, James

    2006-01-01

    One approach to measuring unsigned differential test functioning is to estimate the variance of the differential item functioning (DIF) effect across the items of the test. This article proposes two estimators of the DIF effect variance for tests containing dichotomous and polytomous items. The proposed estimators are direct extensions of the…

  20. Significance tests for functional data with complex dependence structure.

    PubMed

    Staicu, Ana-Maria; Lahiri, Soumen N; Carroll, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    We propose an L(2)-norm based global testing procedure for the null hypothesis that multiple group mean functions are equal, for functional data with complex dependence structure. Specifically, we consider the setting of functional data with a multilevel structure of the form groups-clusters or subjects-units, where the unit-level profiles are spatially correlated within the cluster, and the cluster-level data are independent. Orthogonal series expansions are used to approximate the group mean functions and the test statistic is estimated using the basis coefficients. The asymptotic null distribution of the test statistic is developed, under mild regularity conditions. To our knowledge this is the first work that studies hypothesis testing, when data have such complex multilevel functional and spatial structure. Two small-sample alternatives, including a novel block bootstrap for functional data, are proposed, and their performance is examined in simulation studies. The paper concludes with an illustration of a motivating experiment.

  1. Significance tests for functional data with complex dependence structure

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, Soumen N.; Carroll, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    We propose an L2-norm based global testing procedure for the null hypothesis that multiple group mean functions are equal, for functional data with complex dependence structure. Specifically, we consider the setting of functional data with a multilevel structure of the form groups–clusters or subjects–units, where the unit-level profiles are spatially correlated within the cluster, and the cluster-level data are independent. Orthogonal series expansions are used to approximate the group mean functions and the test statistic is estimated using the basis coefficients. The asymptotic null distribution of the test statistic is developed, under mild regularity conditions. To our knowledge this is the first work that studies hypothesis testing, when data have such complex multilevel functional and spatial structure. Two small-sample alternatives, including a novel block bootstrap for functional data, are proposed, and their performance is examined in simulation studies. The paper concludes with an illustration of a motivating experiment. PMID:26023253

  2. Coaching patients during pulmonary function testing: A practical guide

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Heidi J; Cheung, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests are an important tool to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with respiratory disease. Ensuring that the tests are of acceptable quality is vital. Acceptable pulmonary function test quality requires, among others, optimal patient performance. Optimal patient performance, in turn, requires adequate coaching from registered respiratory therapists (RRTs) and other pulmonary function laboratory personnel. The present article provides techniques and tips to help RRTs coach patients during testing. The authors briefly review the components of pulmonary function testing, then describe factors that may hinder a patient’s performance, list common mistakes that patients make during testing, and provide tips that RRTs can use to help patients optimize their performance. PMID:26283871

  3. Effect of Multiple Testing Adjustment in Differential Item Functioning Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jihye; Oshima, T. C.

    2013-01-01

    In a typical differential item functioning (DIF) analysis, a significance test is conducted for each item. As a test consists of multiple items, such multiple testing may increase the possibility of making a Type I error at least once. The goal of this study was to investigate how to control a Type I error rate and power using adjustment…

  4. Effect of Multiple Testing Adjustment in Differential Item Functioning Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jihye; Oshima, T. C.

    2013-01-01

    In a typical differential item functioning (DIF) analysis, a significance test is conducted for each item. As a test consists of multiple items, such multiple testing may increase the possibility of making a Type I error at least once. The goal of this study was to investigate how to control a Type I error rate and power using adjustment…

  5. Evaluation of the Effects of Chromium to Fall Chinook Salmon in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River: Integration of Recent Toxicity Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, Dennis D. ); Patton, Gregory W. ); Poston, Ted M. ); Peterson, Robert E. )

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this report was to summarize results of a series of recent laboratory studies conducted to evaluate the effects of chromium on chinook salmon. Individual studies focused on determining the relationship between exposure concentration and toxicological response for a range of life stages including fertilization, egg through swim-up (early life history), parr health, and avoidance-preference of juveniles. Study designs were representative of possible exposure scenarios in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River.

  6. Reducing measurement errors during functional capacity tests in elders.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Mariane Eichendorf; Orssatto, Lucas Bet da Rosa; Bezerra, Ewertton de Souza; Silva, Diego Augusto Santos; Moura, Bruno Monteiro de; Diefenthaeler, Fernando; Freitas, Cíntia de la Rocha

    2017-08-23

    Accuracy is essential to the validity of functional capacity measurements. To evaluate the error of measurement of functional capacity tests for elders and suggest the use of the technical error of measurement and credibility coefficient. Twenty elders (65.8 ± 4.5 years) completed six functional capacity tests that were simultaneously filmed and timed by four evaluators by means of a chronometer. A fifth evaluator timed the tests by analyzing the videos (reference data). The means of most evaluators for most tests were different from the reference (p < 0.05), except for two evaluators for two different tests. There were different technical error of measurement between tests and evaluators. The Bland-Altman test showed difference in the concordance of the results between methods. Short duration tests showed higher technical error of measurement than longer tests. In summary, tests timed by a chronometer underestimate the real results of the functional capacity. Difference between evaluators' reaction time and perception to determine the start and the end of the tests would justify the errors of measurement. Calculation of the technical error of measurement or the use of the camera can increase data validity.

  7. Formal Functional Test Designs: Bridging the Gap Between Test Requirements and Test Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hops, Jonathan

    1993-01-01

    This presentation describes the testing life cycle, the purpose of the test design phase, and test design methods and gives an example application. Also included is a description of Test Representation Language (TRL), a summary of the language, and an example of an application of TRL. A sample test requirement and sample test design are included.

  8. Adaptive mixed reality rehabilitation improves quality of reaching movements more than traditional reaching therapy following stroke.

    PubMed

    Duff, Margaret; Chen, Yinpeng; Cheng, Long; Liu, Sheng-Min; Blake, Paul; Wolf, Steven L; Rikakis, Thanassis

    2013-05-01

    Adaptive mixed reality rehabilitation (AMRR) is a novel integration of motion capture technology and high-level media computing that provides precise kinematic measurements and engaging multimodal feedback for self-assessment during a therapeutic task. We describe the first proof-of-concept study to compare outcomes of AMRR and traditional upper-extremity physical therapy. Two groups of participants with chronic stroke received either a month of AMRR therapy (n = 11) or matched dosing of traditional repetitive task therapy (n = 10). Participants were right handed, between 35 and 85 years old, and could independently reach to and at least partially grasp an object in front of them. Upper-extremity clinical scale scores and kinematic performances were measured before and after treatment. Both groups showed increased function after therapy, demonstrated by statistically significant improvements in Wolf Motor Function Test and upper-extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scores, with the traditional therapy group improving significantly more on the FMA. However, only participants who received AMRR therapy showed a consistent improvement in kinematic measurements, both for the trained task of reaching to grasp a cone and the untrained task of reaching to push a lighted button. AMRR may be useful in improving both functionality and the kinematics of reaching. Further study is needed to determine if AMRR therapy induces long-term changes in movement quality that foster better functional recovery.

  9. Global reach and engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-09-01

    Popular culture reflects both the interests of and the issues affecting the general public. As concerns regarding climate change and its impacts grow, is it permeating into popular culture and reaching that global audience?

  10. Quartermaster Reach Restoration Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP Quartermaster Reach Restoration Project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  11. Reaching affects saccade trajectories.

    PubMed

    Tipper, S P; Howard, L A; Paul, M A

    2001-01-01

    The pre-motor theory suggests that, when attention is oriented to a location, the motor systems that are involved in achieving current behavioural goals are activated. For example, when a task requires accurate reaching, attention to a location activates the motor circuits controlling saccades and manual reaches. These actions involve separate neural systems for the control of eye and hand, but we believe that the selection processes acting on neural population codes within these systems are similar and can affect each other. The attentional effect can be revealed in the subsequent movement. The present study shows that the path the eye takes as it saccades to a target is affected by whether a reach to the target is also produced. This effect is interpreted as the influence of a hand-centred frame used in reaching on the spatial frame of reference required for the saccade.

  12. Intraday reliability and sensitivity of four functional ability tests in older women.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Susan; Bampouras, Theodoros M

    2014-08-01

    Functional tests are commonly used to evaluate the functional ability of older individuals; however, intraday reliability and sensitivity are required to enable informed decisions on whether repeated trials are necessary and to ensure that the values obtained from a single session are a patient's true score. This study aimed to investigate the intraday reliability and sensitivity of four commonly used functional tests in older individuals. Seventy-one healthy older women (mean [SD]: age, 71.7 [7.3] yrs; body mass, 64.8 [10.2] kg; stature, 1.58 [0.07] m) performed the 6-m maximum walking speed, timed 8-foot up-and-go, chair sit-and-reach, and back scratch tests three times in one single session, with 1 min between trials. Reliability between all trials was examined using intraclass correlation coefficient, and sensitivity was examined using typical error. All tests were highly reliable (intraclass correlation coefficient range, 0.89-0.99), indicating no need for a familiarization trial. Typical error between trials 2 and 1 were 0.06 m·s-1, 0.42 s, 1.13 cm, 0.92 cm for the 6-m maximum walking speed, timed 8-foot up-and-go, chair sit-and-reach, and back scratch tests, respectively. Practitioners should perform two trials to examine whether the difference between them is less than the typical error reported here. These results should help practitioners ensure that scores obtained from an individual from these functional tests are a true reflection of their functional ability rather than measurement error.

  13. Smoke alarm tests may not adequately indicate smoke alarm function.

    PubMed

    Peek-Asa, Corinne; Yang, Jingzhen; Hamann, Cara; Young, Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Smoke alarms are one of the most promoted prevention strategies to reduce residential fire deaths, and they can reduce residential fire deaths by half. Smoke alarm function can be measured by two tests: the smoke alarm button test and the chemical smoke test. Using results from a randomized trial of smoke alarms, we compared smoke alarm response to the button test and the smoke test. The smoke alarms found in the study homes at baseline were tested, as well as study alarms placed into homes as part of the randomized trial. Study alarms were tested at 12 and 42 months postinstallation. The proportion of alarms that passed the button test but not the smoke test ranged from 0.5 to 5.8% of alarms; this result was found most frequently among ionization alarms with zinc or alkaline batteries. These alarms would indicate to the owner (through the button test) that the smoke alarm was working, but the alarm would not actually respond in the case of a fire (as demonstrated by failing the smoke test). The proportion of alarms that passed the smoke test but not the button test ranged from 1.0 to 3.0%. These alarms would appear nonfunctional to the owner (because the button test failed), even though the alarm would operate in response to a fire (as demonstrated by passing the smoke test). The general public is not aware of the potential for inaccuracy in smoke alarm tests, and burn professionals can advocate for enhanced testing methods. The optimal test to determine smoke alarm function is the chemical smoke test.

  14. 33 CFR 157.12f - Workshop functional test requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.12f Workshop functional test requirements... exceed the capacity of the system....

  15. 33 CFR 157.12f - Workshop functional test requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.12f Workshop functional test requirements... exceed the capacity of the system....

  16. 33 CFR 157.12f - Workshop functional test requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.12f Workshop functional test requirements... exceed the capacity of the system....

  17. 33 CFR 157.12f - Workshop functional test requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.12f Workshop functional test requirements... exceed the capacity of the system....

  18. A Semi-Automated Functional Test Data Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Kim, Moosung

    2005-05-01

    The growing interest in commissioning is creating a demand that will increasingly be met by mechanical contractors and less experienced commissioning agents. They will need tools to help them perform commissioning effectively and efficiently. The widespread availability of standardized procedures, accessible in the field, will allow commissioning to be specified with greater certainty as to what will be delivered, enhancing the acceptance and credibility of commissioning. In response, a functional test data analysis tool is being developed to analyze the data collected during functional tests for air-handling units. The functional test data analysis tool is designed to analyze test data, assess performance of the unit under test and identify the likely causes of the failure. The tool has a convenient user interface to facilitate manual entry of measurements made during a test. A graphical display shows the measured performance versus the expected performance, highlighting significant differences that indicate the unit is not able to pass the test. The tool is described as semiautomated because the measured data need to be entered manually, instead of being passed from the building control system automatically. However, the data analysis and visualization are fully automated. The tool is designed to be used by commissioning providers conducting functional tests as part of either new building commissioning or retro-commissioning, as well as building owners and operators interested in conducting routine tests periodically to check the performance of their HVAC systems.

  19. Testing REACH draft technical guidance notes for conducting chemical safety assessments-the experience of a downstream user of a preparation.

    PubMed

    Gade, Anne Lill; Ovrebø, Steinar; Hylland, Ketil

    2008-07-01

    The goal of REACH is the safe use of chemicals. This study examines the efficiency and usefulness of two draft technical guidance notes in the REACH Interim Project 3.2-2 for the development of the chemical safety report and exposure scenarios. A case study was carried out for a paint system for protection of structural steel. The focuses of the study were risk assessment of preparations based on Derived No Effect Level (DNEL) and Predicted No Effect Concentrations (PNEC) and on effective and accurate communication in the supply chain. Exposure scenarios and generic descriptions of uses, risk management measures, and exposure determinants were developed. The study showed that communication formats, software tools, and guidelines for chemical risk assessment need further adjustment to preparations and real-life situations. Web platforms may simplify such communication. The downstream formulator needs basic substance data from the substance manufacturer during the pre-registration phase to develop exposure scenarios for preparations. Default values need to be communicated in the supply chain because these were critical for the derivation of applicable risk management demands. The current guidelines which rely on the available toxicological knowledge are insufficient to advise downstream users on how to develop exposure scenarios for preparations.

  20. Safety and Function Test Report for the SWIFT Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, I.; Hur, J.

    2013-01-01

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. Three turbines where selected for testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of round two of the Small Wind Turbine Independent Testing project. Safety and Function testing is one of up to 5 tests that may be performed on the turbines. Other tests include power performance, duration, noise, and power quality. The results of the testing will provide the manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification.

  1. [Portable lung function parameters testing system based on DSP].

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhanshe; Yuan, Minzhong; Zhou, Hui

    2012-11-01

    Lung function monitoring is a critical technique for clinical medicine. Currently, the lung function testing devices used in our domestic hospitals are both expensive and bulky. A portable and accurate lung function parameters testing system is highly desired and is proposed in this paper. The hardware of the system is based on DSP technology. The breathing passage is designed with an aim suitable for the breathe and signal detection. We use the direct detection method to detect the gas flow, the breathing passage pressure and the breathing time. Thanks to the powerful data processing ability and the high operation speed of the DSP, breathing signals can be easily analyzed. Thus, several lung function parameters of clinical significance can be obtained. Experiments show that the accuracy of the system is better than 3%, and could meet the demand of the lung function testing.

  2. A Functional Test Platform for the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yang; Thornton, Peter E; King, Anthony Wayne; Steed, Chad A; Gu, Lianhong; Schuchart, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    A functional test platform is presented to create direct linkages between site measurements and the process-based ecosystem model within the Community Earth System Models (CESM). The platform consists of three major parts: 1) interactive user interfaces, 2) functional test model and 3) observational datasets. It provides much needed integration interfaces for both field experimentalists and ecosystem modelers to improve the model s representation of ecosystem processes within the CESM framework without large software overhead.

  3. Construct validity of functional capacity tests in healthy workers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Functional Capacity (FC) is a multidimensional construct within the activity domain of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework (ICF). Functional capacity evaluations (FCEs) are assessments of work-related FC. The extent to which these work-related FC tests are associated to bio-, psycho-, or social factors is unknown. The aims of this study were to test relationships between FC tests and other ICF factors in a sample of healthy workers, and to determine the amount of statistical variance in FC tests that can be explained by these factors. Methods A cross sectional study. The sample was comprised of 403 healthy workers who completed material handling FC tests (lifting low, overhead lifting, and carrying) and static work FC tests (overhead working and standing forward bend). The explainable variables were; six muscle strength tests; aerobic capacity test; and questionnaires regarding personal factors (age, gender, body height, body weight, and education), psychological factors (mental health, vitality, and general health perceptions), and social factors (perception of work, physical workloads, sport-, leisure time-, and work-index). A priori construct validity hypotheses were formulated and analyzed by means of correlation coefficients and regression analyses. Results Moderate correlations were detected between material handling FC tests and muscle strength, gender, body weight, and body height. As for static work FC tests; overhead working correlated fair with aerobic capacity and handgrip strength, and low with the sport-index and perception of work. For standing forward bend FC test, all hypotheses were rejected. The regression model revealed that 61% to 62% of material handling FC tests were explained by physical factors. Five to 15% of static work FC tests were explained by physical and social factors. Conclusions The current study revealed that, in a sample of healthy workers, material handling FC tests were

  4. Construct validity of functional capacity tests in healthy workers.

    PubMed

    Lakke, Sandra E; Soer, Remko; Geertzen, Jan H B; Wittink, Harriët; Douma, Rob K W; van der Schans, Cees P; Reneman, Michiel F

    2013-06-08

    Functional Capacity (FC) is a multidimensional construct within the activity domain of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework (ICF). Functional capacity evaluations (FCEs) are assessments of work-related FC. The extent to which these work-related FC tests are associated to bio-, psycho-, or social factors is unknown. The aims of this study were to test relationships between FC tests and other ICF factors in a sample of healthy workers, and to determine the amount of statistical variance in FC tests that can be explained by these factors. A cross sectional study. The sample was comprised of 403 healthy workers who completed material handling FC tests (lifting low, overhead lifting, and carrying) and static work FC tests (overhead working and standing forward bend). The explainable variables were; six muscle strength tests; aerobic capacity test; and questionnaires regarding personal factors (age, gender, body height, body weight, and education), psychological factors (mental health, vitality, and general health perceptions), and social factors (perception of work, physical workloads, sport-, leisure time-, and work-index). A priori construct validity hypotheses were formulated and analyzed by means of correlation coefficients and regression analyses. Moderate correlations were detected between material handling FC tests and muscle strength, gender, body weight, and body height. As for static work FC tests; overhead working correlated fair with aerobic capacity and handgrip strength, and low with the sport-index and perception of work. For standing forward bend FC test, all hypotheses were rejected. The regression model revealed that 61% to 62% of material handling FC tests were explained by physical factors. Five to 15% of static work FC tests were explained by physical and social factors. The current study revealed that, in a sample of healthy workers, material handling FC tests were related to physical factors but not to

  5. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DISEASE USING PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Pulmonary function testing is used routinely in human medicine to objectively define functional deficits in individuals with respiratory disease. Despite the fact that respiratory disease is a common problem in veterinary medicine, evaluation of the small animal pa...

  6. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DISEASE USING PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Pulmonary function testing is used routinely in human medicine to objectively define functional deficits in individuals with respiratory disease. Despite the fact that respiratory disease is a common problem in veterinary medicine, evaluation of the small animal pa...

  7. A Use of the Information Function in Tailored Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    1977-01-01

    Several important implications in latent trait theory, with implications for individualized or tailored testing, are pointed out. A way of using the information function in tailored testing in connection with the standard error estimation of the ability level using maximum likelihood estimation is suggested. (Author/JKS)

  8. Empirical Selection of Anchors for Tests of Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) occurs when items on a test or questionnaire have different measurement properties for one group of people versus another, irrespective of group-mean differences on the construct. Methods for testing DIF require matching members of different groups on an estimate of the construct. Preferably, the estimate is…

  9. Hubble Space Telescope On-orbit Transfer Function Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadlamudi, N.; Blair, M. A.; Clapp, B. R.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the On-orbit Transfer Function Test (TFT) designed for on-orbit vibration testing of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The TFT provides means for extracting accurate on-orbit characteristics of HST flexible body dynamics, making it possible to check periodically the state of the vehicle on-orbit and to assess changes in modal parameters.

  10. Transfer function tests of the Joy longwall shearer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, P. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A series of operational tests was performed on the Joy longwall shearer located at the Bureau of Mines in Bructon, Pennsylvania. The purpose of these tests was to determine the transfer function and operational characteristics of the system. These characteristics will be used to generate a simulation model of the longwall shearer used in the development of the closed-loop vertical control system.

  11. A case study in collaborating with Atlanta-based African-American churches: a promising means for reaching inner-city substance users with rapid HIV testing.

    PubMed

    Whiters, David L; Santibanez, Scott; Dennison, David; Clark, H Westley

    2010-01-01

    This case study examined programmatic data from a federally funded faith-based rapid HIV testing initiative. In 2004, Recovery Consultants of Atlanta, Inc. (RCA, Inc.) began providing rapid HIV testing in collaboration with six Atlanta-based African-American churches. Of the 1,947 persons tested from January 2004 to July 2005, 1,872 (96.1%) were African-American, 1,247 (64%) were male, and 1,612 (82.8%) were between the age of 26 and 56. A total of 85 HIV-infected individuals were identified and 72 were identified as previously undiagnosed cases (positivity rate of 3.7%). This case study highlights and promotes rapid HIV testing offered in partnership with African American churches as a strategy for raising HIV awareness among inner-city substance users.

  12. Is chlamydia screening and testing in Britain reaching young adults at risk of infection? Findings from the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3).

    PubMed

    Woodhall, Sarah C; Soldan, Kate; Sonnenberg, Pam; Mercer, Catherine H; Clifton, Soazig; Saunders, Pamela; da Silva, Filomeno; Alexander, Sarah; Wellings, Kaye; Tanton, Clare; Field, Nigel; Copas, Andrew J; Ison, Catherine A; Johnson, Anne M

    2016-05-01

    In the context of widespread opportunistic chlamydia screening among young adults, we aimed to quantify chlamydia testing and diagnosis among 16-24 year olds in Britain in relation to risk factors for prevalent chlamydia infection. Using data from sexually experienced (≥1 lifetime sexual partner) 16-year-old to 24-year-old participants in Britain's third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (conducted 2010-2012), we explored socio-demographic and behavioural factors associated with prevalent chlamydia infection (detected in urine; n=1832), self-reported testing and self-reported diagnosis in the last year (both n=3115). Chlamydia prevalence was 3.1% (95% CI 2.2% to 4.3%) in women and 2.3% (1.5% to 3.4%) in men. A total of 12.3% of women and 5.3% men had a previous chlamydia diagnosis. Factors associated with prevalent infection were also associated with testing and diagnosis (eg, increasing numbers of sexual partners), with some exceptions. For example, chlamydia prevalence was higher in women living in more deprived areas, whereas testing was not. In men, prevalence was higher in 20-24 than 16-19 year olds but testing was lower. Thirty per cent of women and 53.7% of men with ≥2 new sexual partners in the last year had not recently tested. In 2010-2012 in Britain, the proportion of young adults reporting chlamydia testing was generally higher in those reporting factors associated with chlamydia. However, many of those with risk factors had not been recently tested, leaving potential for undiagnosed infections. Greater screening and prevention efforts among individuals in deprived areas and those reporting risk factors for chlamydia may reduce undiagnosed prevalence and transmission. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Is chlamydia screening and testing in Britain reaching young adults at risk of infection? Findings from the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3)

    PubMed Central

    Woodhall, Sarah C; Soldan, Kate; Sonnenberg, Pam; Mercer, Catherine H; Clifton, Soazig; Saunders, Pamela; da Silva, Filomeno; Alexander, Sarah; Wellings, Kaye; Tanton, Clare; Field, Nigel; Copas, Andrew J; Ison, Catherine A; Johnson, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    Background In the context of widespread opportunistic chlamydia screening among young adults, we aimed to quantify chlamydia testing and diagnosis among 16–24 year olds in Britain in relation to risk factors for prevalent chlamydia infection. Methods Using data from sexually experienced (≥1 lifetime sexual partner) 16-year-old to 24-year-old participants in Britain's third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (conducted 2010–2012), we explored socio-demographic and behavioural factors associated with prevalent chlamydia infection (detected in urine; n=1832), self-reported testing and self-reported diagnosis in the last year (both n=3115). Results Chlamydia prevalence was 3.1% (95% CI 2.2% to 4.3%) in women and 2.3% (1.5% to 3.4%) in men. A total of 12.3% of women and 5.3% men had a previous chlamydia diagnosis. Factors associated with prevalent infection were also associated with testing and diagnosis (eg, increasing numbers of sexual partners), with some exceptions. For example, chlamydia prevalence was higher in women living in more deprived areas, whereas testing was not. In men, prevalence was higher in 20–24 than 16–19 year olds but testing was lower. Thirty per cent of women and 53.7% of men with ≥2 new sexual partners in the last year had not recently tested. Conclusions In 2010–2012 in Britain, the proportion of young adults reporting chlamydia testing was generally higher in those reporting factors associated with chlamydia. However, many of those with risk factors had not been recently tested, leaving potential for undiagnosed infections. Greater screening and prevention efforts among individuals in deprived areas and those reporting risk factors for chlamydia may reduce undiagnosed prevalence and transmission. PMID:26290483

  14. Reaching for the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper-Davis, Sharon

    1999-01-01

    Describes "Reaching for the Stars," a program which develops teaming and mentoring skills in senior physics students. Phase 1 requires student pairs to design a rocket; Phase 2 pairs seniors with gifted second graders who build the rocket from written instructions; and in Phase 3, pairs of seniors create a children's storybook explaining…

  15. REACH. Refrigeration Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Rufus; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of refrigeration. The instructional units focus on refrigeration fundamentals, tubing and pipe, refrigerants, troubleshooting, window air conditioning, and…

  16. REACH. Major Appliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Charles; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of major appliances. The instructional units focus on installation of appliances, troubleshooting washing machines, troubleshooting electric dryers,…

  17. Reaching for the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper-Davis, Sharon

    1999-01-01

    Describes "Reaching for the Stars," a program which develops teaming and mentoring skills in senior physics students. Phase 1 requires student pairs to design a rocket; Phase 2 pairs seniors with gifted second graders who build the rocket from written instructions; and in Phase 3, pairs of seniors create a children's storybook explaining…

  18. "Brown's" Far Reaching Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinn, Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    Although the 1954 "Brown v. Board of Education" U.S. Supreme Court decision changed the face of American education forever, few individuals at that time could have fully realized its far-reaching implications. Certainly, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Legal Director Thurgood Marshall in his arguments was…

  19. Reaching for the Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Dorothy Givens

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Mae Jemison is the world's first woman astronaut of color who continues to reach for the stars. Jemison was recently successful in leading a team that has secured a $500,000 federal grant to make interstellar space travel a reality. The Dorothy Jemison Foundation for Excellence (named after Jemison's mother) was selected in June by the Defense…

  20. "Brown's" Far Reaching Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinn, Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    Although the 1954 "Brown v. Board of Education" U.S. Supreme Court decision changed the face of American education forever, few individuals at that time could have fully realized its far-reaching implications. Certainly, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Legal Director Thurgood Marshall in his arguments was…

  1. REACH. Electricity Units. Secondary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gene; Sappe, Hoyt

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of electricity. The instructional units focus on electricity fundamentals and electric motors. Each unit follows a typical format that includes a unit sheet,…

  2. REACH. Heating Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanfield, Carter; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized units in the area of heating. The instructional units focus on electric heating systems, gas heating systems, and oil burning systems. Each unit follows a typical format that includes a unit…

  3. REACH. Air Conditioning Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Joe; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of air conditioning. The instructional units focus on air conditioning fundamentals, window air conditioning, system and installation, troubleshooting and…

  4. REACH. Electricity Units. Secondary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gene; Sappe, Hoyt

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of electricity. The instructional units focus on electricity fundamentals and electric motors. Each unit follows a typical format that includes a unit sheet,…

  5. REACH. Heating Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanfield, Carter; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized units in the area of heating. The instructional units focus on electric heating systems, gas heating systems, and oil burning systems. Each unit follows a typical format that includes a unit…

  6. REACH. Major Appliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Charles; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of major appliances. The instructional units focus on installation of appliances, troubleshooting washing machines, troubleshooting electric dryers,…

  7. REACH. Air Conditioning Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Joe; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of air conditioning. The instructional units focus on air conditioning fundamentals, window air conditioning, system and installation, troubleshooting and…

  8. Reaching for the Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Dorothy Givens

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Mae Jemison is the world's first woman astronaut of color who continues to reach for the stars. Jemison was recently successful in leading a team that has secured a $500,000 federal grant to make interstellar space travel a reality. The Dorothy Jemison Foundation for Excellence (named after Jemison's mother) was selected in June by the Defense…

  9. Reach and posture hand preferences during arboreal feeding in Sifakas (Propithecus sp.): a test of the postural origins theory of behavioral lateralization.

    PubMed

    Milliken, Garrett W; Ferra, Gina; Kraiter, Kyle S; Ross, Courtney L

    2005-11-01

    Sixteen sifakas (11 Propithecus verreauxi coquereli, 2 Propithecus verreauxi verreauxi form majori, and 3 Propithecus tattersalli) were videotaped as they fed on leaves in an arboreal context. The hand used to feed and the hand used to maintain postural stability was coded. For each subject, the lateral bias of the hand used to feed was opposite the hand used in postural support. Seven sifakas displayed no bias for feeding or posture-related hand use, 7 sifakas displayed significant feeding-related reach preferences for pulling branches to the mouth (5 left- and 2 right-hand preferences), and 9 sifakas exhibited significant hand preferences for postural support (2 left-, 7 right-hand preferent). Although these data do not strongly support the postural origins theory of behavioral lateralization, the modal preference pattern for sifakas that displayed significant hand preferences for posture and feeding involve a left bias for feeding and a right bias for postural support. s reserved). ((c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. An automated miniaturized Haploscope for testing binocular visual function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, T. A.; Williams, R. E.; Kuether, C. L.; Wyman-Cornsweet, D.

    1976-01-01

    A computer-controlled binocular vision testing device has been developed as one part of a system designed for NASA to test the vision of astronauts during spaceflight. The device, called the Mark III Haploscope, utilizes semi-automated psychophysical test procedures to measure visual acuity, stereopsis, phorias, fixation disparity and accommodation/convergence relationships. All tests are self-administered, yield quantitative data and may be used repeatedly without subject memorization. Future applications of this programmable, compact device include its use as a clinical instrument to perform routine eye examinations or vision screening, and as a research tool to examine the effects of environment or work-cycle upon visual function.

  11. Testing for cognitive function in animals in a regulatory context.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Superior cognitive functions have allowed the human species to proliferate in a world of incredible biological diversity. Threats to these essential capacities cannot be ignored, and a strategy is needed to evaluate the hazard posed by exposure to chemical and other agents. Because people exposed to chemicals often complain about confusion and forgetfulness, it is commonly thought that cognitive functions should be sensitive indicators of adverse consequences of chemical exposure. For these reasons, complex tests of cognitive function have been developed and deployed in experimental animal laboratories for decades. However, the results of these tests are rarely used as points of departure for chemical risk assessments. Due to their high cost in time, animals, and equipment, the efficacy and utility of these tests need to be evaluated in relation to cheaper and faster whole-animal screening methods. This review examines evidence for the assertions that cognitive functions represent uniquely sensitive indicators of chemical exposure, and that animal models of these functions are necessary to detect and quantify the neurotoxicity of chemicals. Studies conducted since the early 1980s to compare these approaches to assess the neurotoxicity of chemicals are reviewed for both adult and perinatal exposures in experimental rodents. Forty-one studies of 35 chemicals were found that directly compared acute effects using complex tests (i.e., tests that require training animals) with acute effects using screening tests (i.e., tests that do not require training animals) in adult rodents. Complex tests detected effects of three substances (bitertanol, iso-amyl nitrite, and Pfiesteria toxin) that had no effect on screening tests; for an additional five chemicals (carbaryl, deltamethrin, methyl mercury, tetraethyl tin, and Isopar-C), complex tests identified effects at lower doses than did screening tests. Fewer comparable cases were found for developmental exposures: screening and

  12. Clinical testing of otolith function: perceptual thresholds and myogenic potentials.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Yuri; Bremova, Tatiana; Kremmyda, Olympia; Strupp, Michael; MacNeilage, Paul R

    2013-12-01

    Cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP/oVEMP) tests are widely used clinical tests of otolith function. However, VEMP testing may not be the ideal measure of otolith function given the significant inter-individual variability in responses and given that the stimuli used to elicit VEMPs are not physiological. We therefore evaluated linear motion perceptual threshold testing compared with cVEMP and oVEMP testing as measures of saccular and utricular function, respectively. A multi-axis motion platform was used to measure horizontal (along the inter-aural and naso-occipital axes) and vertical motion perceptual thresholds. These findings were compared with the vibration-evoked oVEMP as a measure of utricular function and sound-evoked cVEMP as a measure of saccular function. We also considered how perceptual threshold and cVEMP/oVEMP testing are each associated with Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) scores. We enrolled 33 patients with bilateral vestibulopathy of different severities and 42 controls to have sufficient variability in otolith function. Subjects with abnormal oVEMP amplitudes had significantly higher (poorer) perceptual thresholds in the inter-aural and naso-occipital axes in age-adjusted analyses; no significant associations were observed for vertical perceptual thresholds and cVEMP amplitudes. Both oVEMP amplitudes and naso-occipital axis perceptual thresholds were significantly associated with DHI scores. These data suggest that horizontal perceptual thresholds and oVEMPs may estimate the same underlying physiological construct: utricular function.

  13. SP-100 nuclear assembly test: Test assembly functional requirements and system arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Fallas, T.T.; Gluck, R.; Motwani, K.; Clay, H.; O'Neill, G. )

    1991-01-10

    This paper describes the functional requirements and the system that will be tested to validate the reactor, flight shield, and flight controller of the SP-100 Generic Flight System (GFS). The Nuclear Assembly Test (NAT) consists of the test article (SP-100 reactor with control devices and the flight shield) and its supporting systems. The NAT test assembly is being designed by GE. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is designing the test cell and vacuum vessel system that will contain the NAT test assembly (Renkey {ital et} {ital al}. 1989). Preliminary design reviews have been completed and the final design is under way.

  14. Increased Uptake of HCV Testing through a Community-Based Educational Intervention in Difficult-to-Reach People Who Inject Drugs: Results from the ANRS-AERLI Study

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Perrine; Rojas Castro, Daniela; Ndiaye, Khadim; Debrus, Marie; Protopopescu, Camélia; Le Gall, Jean-Marie; Haas, Aurélie; Mora, Marion; Spire, Bruno; Suzan-Monti, Marie; Carrieri, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Aims The community-based AERLI intervention provided training and education to people who inject drugs (PWID) about HIV and HCV transmission risk reduction, with a focus on drug injecting practices, other injection-related complications, and access to HIV and HCV testing and care. We hypothesized that in such a population where HCV prevalence is very high and where few know their HCV serostatus, AERLI would lead to increased HCV testing. Methods The national multisite intervention study ANRS-AERLI consisted in assessing the impact of an injection-centered face-to-face educational session offered in volunteer harm reduction (HR) centers (“with intervention”) compared with standard HR centers (“without intervention”). The study included 271 PWID interviewed on three occasions: enrolment, 6 and 12 months. Participants in the intervention group received at least one face-to-face educational session during the first 6 months. Measurements The primary outcome of this analysis was reporting to have been tested for HCV during the previous 6 months. Statistical analyses used a two-step Heckman approach to account for bias arising from the non-randomized clustering design. This approach identified factors associated with HCV testing during the previous 6 months. Findings Of the 271 participants, 127 and 144 were enrolled in the control and intervention groups, respectively. Of the latter, 113 received at least one educational session. For the present analysis, we selected 114 and 88 participants eligible for HCV testing in the control and intervention groups, respectively. In the intervention group, 44% of participants reported having being tested for HCV during the previous 6 months at enrolment and 85% at 6 months or 12 months. In the control group, these percentages were 51% at enrolment and 78% at 12 months. Multivariable analyses showed that participants who received at least one educational session during follow-up were more likely to report HCV testing

  15. Reliability of physical functioning tests in patients with low back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Denteneer, Lenie; Van Daele, Ulrike; Truijen, Steven; De Hertogh, Willem; Meirte, Jill; Stassijns, Gaetane

    2017-09-04

    The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive overview of physical functioning tests in patients with low back pain (LBP) and to investigate their reliability. A systematic computerized search was finalized in four different databases on the 24th of June 2017: Pubmed, Web of Science, Embase and Medline. PRISMA guidelines were followed during all stages of this review. Clinical studies that investigate the reliability of physical functioning tests in patients with LBP were eligible. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed with the use of the COSMIN checklist. To come to final conclusions for reliability of the identified clinical tests, the current review assessed three factors namely outcome assessment, methodological quality and consistency of description. A total of 20 studies were found eligible and 38 clinical tests were identified. Good overall test retest reliability was concluded for the extensor endurance (ICC = .93-.97), flexor endurance (ICC = .90-.97), 5 minute walking (ICC = .89-.99), 50 foot walking (ICC = .76-.96), shuttle walk (ICC = .92-.99), sit to stand (ICC = .91-.99) and the loaded forward reach test (ICC = .74-.98). For interrater reliability, only one test namely the Biering-Sörensen (ICC = .88-.99) test could be concluded to have an overall good interrater reliability. None of the identified clinical tests could be concluded to have a good intrarater reliability. Further investigation should focus on a better overall study methodology and the use of identical protocols for the description of clinical tests. The assessment of reliability is only a first step in the recommendation process for the use of clinical tests. In future research, the identified clinical tests in the current review should be further investigated for validity. Only when these clinimetric properties of a clinical test have been thoroughly investigated, a final conclusion regarding the clinical and scientific use of the identified tests can

  16. Executive function on the Psychology Experiment Building Language tests.

    PubMed

    Piper, Brian J; Li, Victoria; Eiwaz, Massarra A; Kobel, Yuliyana V; Benice, Ted S; Chu, Alex M; Olsen, Reid H J; Rice, Douglas Z; Gray, Hilary M; Mueller, Shane T; Raber, Jacob

    2012-03-01

    The measurement of executive function has a long history in clinical and experimental neuropsychology. The goal of the present report was to determine the profile of behavior across the lifespan on four computerized measures of executive function contained in the recently developed Psychology Experiment Building Language (PEBL) test battery http://pebl.sourceforge.net/ and evaluate whether this pattern is comparable to data previously obtained with the non-PEBL versions of these tests. Participants (N = 1,223; ages, 5-89 years) completed the PEBL Trail Making Test (pTMT), the Wisconsin Card Sort Test (pWCST; Berg, Journal of General Psychology, 39, 15-22, 1948; Grant & Berg, Journal of Experimental Psychology, 38, 404-411, 1948), the Tower of London (pToL), or a time estimation task (Time-Wall). Age-related effects were found over all four tests, especially as age increased from young childhood through adulthood. For several tests and measures (including pToL and pTMT), age-related slowing was found as age increased in adulthood. Together, these findings indicate that the PEBL tests provide valid and versatile new research tools for measuring executive functions.

  17. GROUND-WATER MODEL TESTING: SYSTEMATIC EVALUATION AND TESTING OF CODE FUNCTIONALITY AND PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effective use of ground-water simulation codes as management decision tools requires the establishment of their functionality, performance characteristics, and applicability to the problem at hand. This is accomplished through application of a systematic code-testing protocol and...

  18. GROUND-WATER MODEL TESTING: SYSTEMATIC EVALUATION AND TESTING OF CODE FUNCTIONALITY AND PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effective use of ground-water simulation codes as management decision tools requires the establishment of their functionality, performance characteristics, and applicability to the problem at hand. This is accomplished through application of a systematic code-testing protocol and...

  19. Amiodarone lung toxicity: role of pulmonary function tests.

    PubMed

    Foresti, V; Carini, L; Lovagnini-Scher, C A; Parisio, E; Scolari, N; Pozzi, G; Clini, V

    1987-01-01

    Forty-three patients treated with amiodarone hydrochloride with an average daily dose of 204.7 +/- 79.4 mg/day for a mean period of 37.1 +/- 25.3 months, were studied by clinical examination, chest roentgenograms, pulmonary function tests and blood gas analyses. The habits of cigarette smoking were also recorded and expressed as cigarette pack/years. Pulmonary function tests did not show any differences from control subjects and no correlation was found between exposure to drug and lung function. However, one patient developed abnormalities in the chest X-ray (interstitial type) and a reduction of carbon monoxide diffusion capacity as a possible manifestation of amiodarone lung toxicity. Nine patients (22%) had a 20% decrease from normal in carbon monoxide diffusion capacity and three (7%) had a 15% decrease in total lung capacity. More treated patients had interstitial abnormalities in the chest X-ray (14%) than controls (5.5%). Although pulmonary function test abnormalities could be detected in patients taking amiodarone, they were not usually severe enough to interfere with gas exchange. Our results confirm the rarity of amiodarone lung toxicity when a low dosage is used, and suggest the advisability of periodical monitoring, including clinical examination, chest X-ray and pulmonary function tests in order to detect the earliest signs of amiodarone lung toxicity.

  20. Reaching the Target Audience

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-13

    REACHING THE TARGET AUDIENCE A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College in...partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree MASTER OF MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE General Studies by MARK S. FLITTON, MAJOR, USAR...NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army Command and General Staff College ATTN: ATZL-SWD-GD Fort

  1. Simple tests of renal function using creatinine, phenolsulphonphthalein, and pitressin

    PubMed Central

    Healy, J. K.; Edwards, K. D. G.; Whyte, H. M.

    1964-01-01

    The reciprocals of the blood urea nitrogen and plasma creatinine levels, the maximum specific gravity of the urine after vasopressin, and three modified forms of the phenolsulphonphthalein (P.S.P.) excretion test were found to be directly related to the glomerular filtration rate (G.F.R.) in hospital patients. From 34 to 75 patients were studied for each test, and in 21 patients all tests were performed concurrently. The plasma creatinine level and the 15-minute urinary excretion of P.S.P. were found to be the most useful simple tests of renal function and gave sufficiently accurate estimates of total function (G.F.R.) to justify their more extensive use. The G.F.R. (ml./min./1·73 sq. m. of body surface area) could be calculated from each test, using the following equations:— [Formula: see text] G.F.R. = 3·15 × P.S.P.% + 19, where P.S.P.% is the 15-minute urinary excretion of P.S.P., expressed as a percentage of the administered dose. Satisfactory estimates of G.F.R. were also given by the simplified relationships [Formula: see text]. In the presence of impaired renal function more accurate estimates of G.F.R. were obtained from the plasma creatinine and P.S.P. excretion tests (S.D. of estimate 8 and 13 ml./min. respectively). It was thought that these tests could well replace the commonly used blood urea nitrogen estimation as simple tests of renal function. PMID:14207792

  2. Outcomes of anatomical versus functional testing for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela S; Hoffmann, Udo; Patel, Manesh R; Mark, Daniel B; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R; Cavanaugh, Brendan; Cole, Jason; Dolor, Rowena J; Fordyce, Christopher B; Huang, Megan; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Kosinski, Andrzej S; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Malhotra, Vinay; Picard, Michael H; Udelson, James E; Velazquez, Eric J; Yow, Eric; Cooper, Lawton S; Lee, Kerry L

    2015-04-02

    Many patients have symptoms suggestive of coronary artery disease (CAD) and are often evaluated with the use of diagnostic testing, although there are limited data from randomized trials to guide care. We randomly assigned 10,003 symptomatic patients to a strategy of initial anatomical testing with the use of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) or to functional testing (exercise electrocardiography, nuclear stress testing, or stress echocardiography). The composite primary end point was death, myocardial infarction, hospitalization for unstable angina, or major procedural complication. Secondary end points included invasive cardiac catheterization that did not show obstructive CAD and radiation exposure. The mean age of the patients was 60.8±8.3 years, 52.7% were women, and 87.7% had chest pain or dyspnea on exertion. The mean pretest likelihood of obstructive CAD was 53.3±21.4%. Over a median follow-up period of 25 months, a primary end-point event occurred in 164 of 4996 patients in the CTA group (3.3%) and in 151 of 5007 (3.0%) in the functional-testing group (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.83 to 1.29; P=0.75). CTA was associated with fewer catheterizations showing no obstructive CAD than was functional testing (3.4% vs. 4.3%, P=0.02), although more patients in the CTA group underwent catheterization within 90 days after randomization (12.2% vs. 8.1%). The median cumulative radiation exposure per patient was lower in the CTA group than in the functional-testing group (10.0 mSv vs. 11.3 mSv), but 32.6% of the patients in the functional-testing group had no exposure, so the overall exposure was higher in the CTA group (mean, 12.0 mSv vs. 10.1 mSv; P<0.001). In symptomatic patients with suspected CAD who required noninvasive testing, a strategy of initial CTA, as compared with functional testing, did not improve clinical outcomes over a median follow-up of 2 years. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  3. Outcomes of Anatomical versus Functional Testing for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Pamela S.; Hoffmann, Udo; Patel, Manesh R.; Mark, Daniel B.; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R.; Cavanaugh, Brendan; Cole, Jason; Dolor, Rowena J.; Fordyce, Christopher B.; Huang, Megan; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Kosinski, Andrzej S.; Krucoff, Mitchell W.; Malhotra, Vinay; Picard, Michael H.; Udelson, James E.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Yow, Eric; Cooper, Lawton S.; Lee, Kerry L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many patients have symptoms suggestive of coronary artery disease (CAD) and are often evaluated with the use of diagnostic testing, although there are limited data from randomized trials to guide care. METHODS We randomly assigned 10,003 symptomatic patients to a strategy of initial anatomical testing with the use of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) or to functional testing (exercise electrocardiography, nuclear stress testing, or stress echocardiography). The composite primary end point was death, myocardial infarction, hospitalization for unstable angina, or major procedural complication. Secondary end points included invasive cardiac catheterization that did not show obstructive CAD and radiation exposure. RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 60.8±8.3 years, 52.7% were women, and 87.7% had chest pain or dyspnea on exertion. The mean pretest likelihood of obstructive CAD was 53.3±21.4%. Over a median follow-up period of 25 months, a primary end-point event occurred in 164 of 4996 patients in the CTA group (3.3%) and in 151 of 5007 (3.0%) in the functional-testing group (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.83 to 1.29; P = 0.75). CTA was associated with fewer catheterizations showing no obstructive CAD than was functional testing (3.4% vs. 4.3%, P = 0.02), although more patients in the CTA group underwent catheterization within 90 days after randomization (12.2% vs. 8.1%). The median cumulative radiation exposure per patient was lower in the CTA group than in the functional-testing group (10.0 mSv vs. 11.3 mSv), but 32.6% of the patients in the functional-testing group had no exposure, so the overall exposure was higher in the CTA group (mean, 12.0 mSv vs. 10.1 mSv; P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS In symptomatic patients with suspected CAD who required noninvasive testing, a strategy of initial CTA, as compared with functional testing, did not improve clinical outcomes over a median follow-up of 2 years. (Funded by the

  4. [Cystic fibrosis: how to use pulmonary function tests].

    PubMed

    Counil, F P; Karila, C; Le Bourgeois, M; Matecki, S; Lebras, M N; Couderc, L; Fajac, I; Reynaud-Gaubert, M; Bellet, M; Gauthier, R; Denjean, A

    2007-06-01

    Neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis (CF) leads to early dedicated specialist care for all patients. Pulmonary function tests (PFT) are mandatory for routine monitoring of CF patients. The aim of this article is to review the current guidelines for PFTs in CF, particularly the type of test, the age and the clinical status of the patient. The regular use of spirometry is generally accepted. Many other tests are used but their clinical value in the routine follow-up of CF patients remains to be established. Further efforts should be made to evaluate the value of PFTs in CF, particularly in very young children.

  5. Differential functioning of Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt Test items.

    PubMed

    Sisto, Fermino Fernandes; Dos Santos, Acácia Aparecida Angeli; Noronha, Ana Paula Porto

    2010-02-01

    Differential Item Functioning (DIF) refers to items that do not function the same way for comparable members of different groups. The present study focuses on analyzing and classifying sex-related differential item functioning in the Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt Test. Subjects were 1,052 children attending public schools (513 boys, 539 girls, ages 6-10 years). The protocols were scored using the Bender Graduated Scoring System, which evaluates only the distortion criterion using the Rasch logistic response model. The scoring system fit the Rasch model, although two items were found to be biased by sex. When analyzing differential functioning of items for boys and girls separately, the number of differentially functioning items was equal.

  6. Thyroid Function Testing in Neonates With Maternal History of Disease.

    PubMed

    Underland, Lisa; Kenigsberg, Lisa; Derrick, Kristina M; Crespi, Rebecca; Kaushal, Tara; Lam, Leslie

    2017-09-01

    Maternal history of thyroid disease can cause congenital hypothyroidism due to thyroid-stimulatng hormone (TSH) blocking antibodies. No guidelines exist regarding testing beyond the newborn screen. TSH and T4 levels exhibit significant fluctuations after birth which complicates testing. A total of 561 newborns with thyroid function testing done for maternal history of thyroid disease in the newborn nursery were identified retrospectively via chart review, and thyroid disease status was assessed in 352. Newborn screening data were also obtained. Of these infants, 7 had hypothyroidism with 3 having negative newborn screens. No cases of neonatal graves were identified. The 3 infants with negative newborn screens had TSH levels ranging from 6.58 to 28.4 prior to treatment with levothyroxine. All required treatment beyond age 3 years, despite trial off levothyroxine. Infants with maternal history of thyroid disease may require additional testing beyond the newborn screen. However, providers can consider delaying test until after thyroid levels are more stable.

  7. Prognostic Implications of Non-Invasive Vascular Function Tests in High-Risk Atherosclerosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Kusunose, Kenya; Sato, Mitsuyo; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Saijo, Yoshihito; Bando, Mika; Hirata, Yukina; Nishio, Susumu; Hayashi, Shuji; Sata, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of clinically available vascular function tests as predictors of cardiovascular events and decline in kidney function. One hundred and fourteen patients who had at least 2 cardiovascular risk factors were recruited for vascular function assessment including ankle-brachial blood pressure index (ABI), brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) and flow-mediated vasodilatation (%FMD). During a median period of 51 months, 35 patients reached the primary endpoint (29 cardiovascular events and 6 cardiac deaths), and 30 patients reached the secondary endpoint (decline in kidney function: defined as a 5% per year decline of estimated glomerular filtration rate). In sequential Cox models, a model on the basis of the Framingham risk score, hemoglobin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (chi-squared, 16.6) was improved by the ABI (chi-squared: 21.5; P=0.047). The baPWV (hazard ratio: 1.42 per 1 SD increase; P=0.025) and the CAVI (hazard ratio: 1.52 per 1 SD increase; P=0.040) were associated with the secondary endpoint. The %FMD was only slightly associated with the primary and secondary endpoints. Both ABI and baPWV are significantly associated with future cardiovascular events in high-risk patients with cardiovascular disease. The predictive capabilities of these parameters are greater than that of other parameters in this cohort.

  8. The Functional Task Test (FTT): An Interdisciplinary Testing Protocol to Investigate the Factors Underlying Changes in Astronaut Functional Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Lawrence, E. L.; Arzeno, N. M.; Buxton, R. E.; Feiveson, A. H.; Kofman, I. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Platts. S. H.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to space flight causes adaptations in multiple physiological systems including changes in sensorimotor, cardiovascular, and neuromuscular systems. These changes may affect a crewmember s ability to perform critical mission tasks immediately after landing on a planetary surface. The overall goal of this project is to determine the effects of space flight on functional tests that are representative of high priority exploration mission tasks and to identify the key underlying physiological factors that contribute to decrements in performance. To achieve this goal we developed an interdisciplinary testing protocol (Functional Task Test, FTT) that evaluates both astronaut functional performance and related physiological changes. Functional tests include ladder climbing, hatch opening, jump down, manual manipulation of objects and tool use, seat egress and obstacle avoidance, recovery from a fall and object translation tasks. Physiological measures include assessments of postural and gait control, dynamic visual acuity, fine motor control, plasma volume, orthostatic intolerance, upper- and lower-body muscle strength, power, endurance, control, and neuromuscular drive. Crewmembers perform this integrated test protocol before and after short (Shuttle) and long-duration (ISS) space flight. Data are collected on two sessions before flight, on landing day (Shuttle only) and 1, 6 and 30 days after landing. Preliminary results from both Shuttle and ISS crewmembers indicate decrement in performance of the functional tasks after both short and long-duration space flight. On-going data collection continues to improve the statistical power required to map changes in functional task performance to alterations in physiological systems. The information obtained from this study will be used to design and implement countermeasures that specifically target the physiological systems most responsible for the altered functional performance associated with space flight.

  9. Delayed motor function and results of vestibular function tests in children with inner ear anomalies.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuku, T; Kaga, K

    1992-05-01

    The relation between the results of vestibular function tests and gross motor development was examined in 4 children with inner ear anomalies. CT scans demonstrated the absence of lateral semicircular canals in both ears in all 4 cases. None responded to caloric stimulation using 40 ml of icewater. In contrast, the damped rotation test elicited per-rotatory nystagmus in all cases. Per-rotatory nystagmus was provoked in only two cases by the Bárány rotation test. Development of gross motor function, especially independent walking, was more delayed in the two children in whom the Bárány rotation test failed to elicit per-rotatory nystagmus.

  10. Investigation of Functional Working Memory in the Reading Span Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tirre, William C.; Pena, Carmen M.

    1992-01-01

    Two experiments with approximately 377 newly enlisted Air Force personnel and 182 college students investigated the validity of a reading span test combining a knowledge verification task with a word memorization task. Results support the hypothesis that word recall reflects the amount of working memory functional in reading. (SLD)

  11. Executive Function in Preschool Children: Test-Retest Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Danielle M.; Schaefer, Catherine; Pang, Karen; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that executive function (EF) may distinguish between children who are well- or ill-prepared for kindergarten; however, little is known about the test-retest reliability of measures of EF for children. We aimed to establish a battery of EF measures that are sensitive to both development and individual differences across the…

  12. Effect of Differential Item Functioning on Test Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabasakal, Kübra Atalay; Kelecioglu, Hülya

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effect of differential item functioning (DIF) items on test equating through multilevel item response models (MIRMs) and traditional IRMs. The performances of three different equating models were investigated under 24 different simulation conditions, and the variables whose effects were examined included sample size, test…

  13. Differential Item Functioning: Performance by Sex on Reading Comprehension Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gafni, Naomi

    Items in the verbal (Hebrew and English) sections of the Psychometric Entrance Test (PET) administered for university admission in Israel were studied for differential item functioning (DIF) between the sexes. Analyses were conducted for 4,354 males and 4,901 females taking Form 3 of the PET in April 1984, and 3,786 males and 3,815 females taking…

  14. Executive Function in Preschool Children: Test-Retest Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Danielle M.; Schaefer, Catherine; Pang, Karen; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that executive function (EF) may distinguish between children who are well- or ill-prepared for kindergarten; however, little is known about the test-retest reliability of measures of EF for children. We aimed to establish a battery of EF measures that are sensitive to both development and individual differences across the…

  15. Testing for Differential Item Functioning with Measures of Partial Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) occurs when an item on a test or questionnaire has different measurement properties for one group of people versus another, irrespective of mean differences on the construct. There are many methods available for DIF assessment. The present article is focused on indices of partial association. A family of average…

  16. Aqueous solutions for low-temperature photoannealing of functional oxide films: reaching the 400 °C Si-technology integration barrier.

    PubMed

    De Dobbelaere, Christopher; Calzada, Maria Lourdes; Jiménez, Ricardo; Ricote, Jesús; Bretos, Iñigo; Mullens, Jules; Hardy, An; Van Bael, Marlies K

    2011-08-24

    Functional oxide films were obtained at low temperature by combination of aqueous precursors and a UV-assisted annealing process (aqueous photochemical solution deposition). For a PbTiO(3) model system, functional ferroelectric perovskite films were prepared at only 400 °C, a temperature compatible with the current Si-technology demands. Intrinsically photosensitive and environmentally friendly aqueous precursors can be prepared for most of the functional multimetal oxides, as additionally demonstrated here for multiferroic BiFeO(3), yielding virtually unlimited possibilities for this low-temperature fabrication technology.

  17. Effects of physical activity on exercise tests and respiratory function

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y; Macera, C; Addy, C; Sy, F; Wieland, D; Blair, S

    2003-01-01

    Background: Exercise is an important component of pulmonary rehabilitation for patients with chronic lung disease. Objective: To explore the role of physical activity in maintaining cardiac and respiratory function in healthy people. Methods: Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured by a maximal treadmill test (MTT), and respiratory function was tested by spirometry. The cross sectional study included data from 24 536 healthy persons who were examined at the Cooper Clinic between 1971 and 1995; the longitudinal study included data from 5707 healthy persons who had an initial visit between 1971 and 1995 and a subsequent visit during the next five years. All participants were aged 25–55 years and completed a cardiorespiratory test and a medical questionnaire. Results: In the cross sectional study, after controlling for covariates, being active and not being a recent smoker were associated with better cardiorespiratory fitness and respiratory function in both men and women. In the follow up study, persons who remained or became active had better MTT than persons who remained or became sedentary. Men who remained active had higher forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) than the other groups. Smoking was related to lower cardiorespiratory fitness and respiratory function. Conclusions: Physical activity and non-smoking or smoking cessation is associated with maintenance of cardiorespiratory fitness. Change in physical activity habits is associated with change in cardiorespiratory fitness, but respiratory function contributed little to this association during a five year follow up. PMID:14665592

  18. MUSCULOSKELETAL SCREENING AND FUNCTIONAL TESTING: CONSIDERATIONS FOR BASKETBALL ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Markwick, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Youth participation in basketball is on the rise, with basketball one of the top five participation sports in Australia. With increased participation there is a need for greater awareness of the importance of the pre-participation examination, including musculoskeletal screening and functional performance testing as part of a multidisciplinary approach to reducing the risk for future injuries. As majority of all basketball injuries affect the lower extremities, pre-participation musculoskeletal screening and functional performance testing should assess fundamental movement qualities throughout the kinetic chain with an emphasis on lower extremity force characteristics, specifically eccentric loading tasks. Thus, the purpose of this clinical commentary is to review the existing literature elucidating pre-participation musculoskeletal screening and functional performance tests that can be used as a framework for rehabilitation professionals in assessing basketball athletes’ readiness to safely perform the movement demands of their sport. Methods Relevant articles published between 2000 and 2016 using the search terms ‘musculoskeletal screening’, ‘functional testing’, ‘youth athletes’, and ‘basketball’ were identified using MEDLINE. From a basketball-specific perspective, several relevant musculoskeletal assessments were identified, including: the Functional Hop Test Combination, the Landing Error Scoring System, the Tuck Jump Assessment, the Weight-Bearing Lunge Test, and the Star Excursion Balance Test. Each of these assessments creates movement demands that allow for easy identification of inefficient and/or compensatory movement tendencies. A basic understanding of musculoskeletal deficits including bilateral strength and flexibility imbalances, lower crossed syndrome, and dominance-related factors are key components in determination of injury risk. Discussion Assessment of sport-specific movement demands through

  19. Using Operational Analysis to Improve Access to Pulmonary Function Testing.

    PubMed

    Ip, Ada; Asamoah-Barnieh, Raymond; Bischak, Diane P; Davidson, Warren J; Flemons, W Ward; Pendharkar, Sachin R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Timely pulmonary function testing is crucial to improving diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary diseases. Perceptions of poor access at an academic pulmonary function laboratory prompted analysis of system demand and capacity to identify factors contributing to poor access. Methods. Surveys and interviews identified stakeholder perspectives on operational processes and access challenges. Retrospective data on testing demand and resource capacity was analyzed to understand utilization of testing resources. Results. Qualitative analysis demonstrated that stakeholder groups had discrepant views on access and capacity in the laboratory. Mean daily resource utilization was 0.64 (SD 0.15), with monthly average utilization consistently less than 0.75. Reserved testing slots for subspecialty clinics were poorly utilized, leaving many testing slots unfilled. When subspecialty demand exceeded number of reserved slots, there was sufficient capacity in the pulmonary function schedule to accommodate added demand. Findings were shared with stakeholders and influenced scheduling process improvements. Conclusion. This study highlights the importance of operational data to identify causes of poor access, guide system decision-making, and determine effects of improvement initiatives in a variety of healthcare settings. Importantly, simple operational analysis can help to improve efficiency of health systems with little or no added financial investment.

  20. Using Operational Analysis to Improve Access to Pulmonary Function Testing

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Ada; Asamoah-Barnieh, Raymond; Bischak, Diane P.; Davidson, Warren J.; Flemons, W. Ward; Pendharkar, Sachin R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Timely pulmonary function testing is crucial to improving diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary diseases. Perceptions of poor access at an academic pulmonary function laboratory prompted analysis of system demand and capacity to identify factors contributing to poor access. Methods. Surveys and interviews identified stakeholder perspectives on operational processes and access challenges. Retrospective data on testing demand and resource capacity was analyzed to understand utilization of testing resources. Results. Qualitative analysis demonstrated that stakeholder groups had discrepant views on access and capacity in the laboratory. Mean daily resource utilization was 0.64 (SD 0.15), with monthly average utilization consistently less than 0.75. Reserved testing slots for subspecialty clinics were poorly utilized, leaving many testing slots unfilled. When subspecialty demand exceeded number of reserved slots, there was sufficient capacity in the pulmonary function schedule to accommodate added demand. Findings were shared with stakeholders and influenced scheduling process improvements. Conclusion. This study highlights the importance of operational data to identify causes of poor access, guide system decision-making, and determine effects of improvement initiatives in a variety of healthcare settings. Importantly, simple operational analysis can help to improve efficiency of health systems with little or no added financial investment. PMID:27445545

  1. The Importance of Functional Tests in Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, R. Jay; Lerman, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most prevalent disease mainly in the Western society and becoming the leading cause of death worldwide. Standard methods by which healthcare providers screen for cardiovascular disease have only minimally reduced the burden of disease while exponentially increasing costs. As such, more specific and individualized methods for functionally assessing cardiovascular threats are needed to identify properly those at greatest risk, and appropriately treat these patients so as to avoid a fate such as heart attack, stroke, or death. Currently, endothelial function testing—in both the coronary and peripheral circulation—is well established as being associated with the disease process and future cardiovascular events. Improving such testing can lead to a reduction in the risk of future events. Combining this functional assessment of vascular fitness with other, more personalized, testing methods should serve to identify those at the greatest risk of cardiovascular disease earlier and subsequently reduce the affliction of such diseases worldwide. PMID:23908864

  2. Reach Out to Enhance Wellness Home-Based Diet-Exercise Intervention Promotes Reproducible and Sustainable Long-Term Improvements in Health Behaviors, Body Weight, and Physical Functioning in Older, Overweight/Obese Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Morey, Miriam C.; Sloane, Richard; Snyder, Denise C.; Miller, Paige E.; Hartman, Terryl J.; Cohen, Harvey J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Diet and exercise interventions have been tested in cancer survivors as a means to reduce late effects and comorbidity, but few have assessed adherence and health outcomes long term. Methods Between July 2005 and May 2007, the Reach Out to Enhance Wellness (RENEW) trial accrued 641 locoregionally staged, long-term (≥ 5 years from diagnosis) colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer survivors in the United States (21 states), Canada, and the United Kingdom. All participants were sedentary (< 150 minutes of physical activity [PA] a week), overweight or obese (body mass index, 25 to 40 kg/m2), and over age 65 years. The trial tested a diet-exercise intervention delivered via mailed print materials and telephone counseling. RENEW used a wait-list control, cross-over design (ie, participants received the year-long intervention immediately or after a 1-year delay), which allowed the opportunity to assess program efficacy (previously reported primary outcome), durability, and reproducibility (reported herein). Measures included diet quality (DQ), PA, BMI, and physical function (PF). Results No significant relapse was observed in the immediate-intervention arm for DQ, PA, and BMI; however, rates of functional decline increased when the intervention ceased. From year 1 to year 2, significant improvements were observed in the delayed-intervention arm; mean change scores in behaviors and BMI and PF slopes were as follows: DQ score, 5.2 (95% CI, 3.4 to 7.0); PA, 45.8 min/wk (95% CI, 26.9 to 64.6 min/wk); BMI, −0.56 (95% CI, −0.75 to −0.36); and Short Form-36 PF, −1.02 versus −5.52 (P < .001 for all measures). Overall, both arms experienced significant improvements in DQ, PA, and BMI from baseline to 2-year follow-up (P < .001). Conclusion Older cancer survivors respond favorably to lifestyle interventions and make durable changes in DQ and PA that contribute to sustained weight loss. These changes positively reorient functional decline trajectories during

  3. A derived transfer of functions and the implicit association test.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Catriona; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Smyth, Sinead

    2007-09-01

    Participants were trained in a series of interrelated conditional discriminations that aimed to establish four 4-member equivalence classes (i.e., A1-B1-C1-D1, A2-B2-C2-D2, A3-B3-C3-D3, A4-B4-C4-D4). During this training, the four A stimuli (i.e., A1, A2, A3, and A4) were compounded with pictures containing positive or negative evaluative functions (A1/A2 negative & A3/A4 positive). The transfer of evaluative functions to directly and indirectly related members of the equivalence classes (i.e., B, C, and D stimuli) was measured using an Implicit Association Test (IAT). During consistent test blocks, participants were required to press the same response key for target words that were related to those A stimuli that possessed similar evaluative functions (A1/A2-left key & A3/A4-right key). During inconsistent test blocks, target words that were related to those A stimuli with different evaluative functions were assigned to the same response key (A1/A4-left key & A2/A3-right key). Results showed that all 8 participants, who passed a matching-to-sample equivalence test following the IAT, responded more rapidly on consistent relative to inconsistent test blocks. This typical IAT effect was not observed for those participants who did not pass the equivalence test. The results suggest that the IAT effect may arise from formally untested derived relations, and supports the argument that such relations could provide a valid behavioral model of semantic categories in natural language.

  4. Reaching Low-Income Mothers to Improve Family Fruit and Vegetable Intake: Food Hero Social Marketing Campaign-Research Steps, Development and Testing.

    PubMed

    Tobey, Lauren N; Koenig, Harold F; Brown, Nicole A; Manore, Melinda M

    2016-09-13

    The objective of this study was to create/test a social marketing campaign to increase fruit/vegetable (FV) intake within Oregon Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) eligible families. Focus groups (n = 2) and pre/post campaign phone surveys (n = 2082) were conducted in intervention counties (IC) and one control county. Participants were female (86%-100%) with 1-2 children at home. Mean FV intake/without juice was 3.1 servings/day; >50% preferred the Internet for delivery of healthy eating information. Participants reported time/financial burdens, low household FV variety and desirability of frozen/canned FV, and acceptance of positive messages. A Food Hero (FH) campaign was created/delivered daily August-October 2009 to mothers through multiple channels (e.g., grocery stores, online, educators). Results showed that the IC had better FH name recall (12%) and interpretation of intended messages (60%) vs. control (3%, 23%, respectively). Compared to controls, the IC were less likely to report healthy food preparation as time consuming or a FV rich diet expensive, and it was easier to get their family to eat fruit. Results did not vary based on county/household characteristics. The FH campaign increased FH awareness and positive FV beliefs. A longer campaign with FV assessments will increase understanding of the target audience, and allow for campaign refinement.

  5. Offering Self-Sampling Kits for HPV Testing to Reach Women Who Do Not Attend in the Regular Cervical Cancer Screening Program.

    PubMed

    Arbyn, Marc; Castle, Philip E

    2015-05-01

    In 2016, the Netherlands will switch, as first European country, from cytology-based to HPV-based cervical cancer screening, with cytology triage for those with a positive HPV test. The new Dutch program includes sending self-sampling devices to women who do not respond to an invitation to have a cervical sample taken by their general practitioner. The cost-effectiveness of this additional strategy will depend on its capacity to recruit nonscreened women and in particular those at increased risk of cervical (pre)cancer, the possible switch of previous responders to self-sampling, the accuracy and cost of the HPV assay-self-sampler combination, and the compliance of women being self-sample HPV-positive with further follow-up. Validated PCR-based assays, detecting high-risk HPV DNA, are as accurate on self-samples as on clinician-collected samples. On the contrary, HPV assays, based on signal amplification, are less sensitive and specific on self-samples. The introduction of self-sampling strategies should be carefully prepared and evaluated in pilot studies integrated in well-organized settings before general rollout. Opt-in procedures involving a request for a self-sampler may reduce response rates. Therefore, an affordable device that can be included with the invitation to all nonattendees may yield a stronger effect on participation.

  6. Reaching Low-Income Mothers to Improve Family Fruit and Vegetable Intake: Food Hero Social Marketing Campaign—Research Steps, Development and Testing

    PubMed Central

    Tobey, Lauren N.; Koenig, Harold F.; Brown, Nicole A.; Manore, Melinda M.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to create/test a social marketing campaign to increase fruit/vegetable (FV) intake within Oregon Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) eligible families. Focus groups (n = 2) and pre/post campaign phone surveys (n = 2082) were conducted in intervention counties (IC) and one control county. Participants were female (86%–100%) with 1–2 children at home. Mean FV intake/without juice was 3.1 servings/day; >50% preferred the Internet for delivery of healthy eating information. Participants reported time/financial burdens, low household FV variety and desirability of frozen/canned FV, and acceptance of positive messages. A Food Hero (FH) campaign was created/delivered daily August–October 2009 to mothers through multiple channels (e.g., grocery stores, online, educators). Results showed that the IC had better FH name recall (12%) and interpretation of intended messages (60%) vs. control (3%, 23%, respectively). Compared to controls, the IC were less likely to report healthy food preparation as time consuming or a FV rich diet expensive, and it was easier to get their family to eat fruit. Results did not vary based on county/household characteristics. The FH campaign increased FH awareness and positive FV beliefs. A longer campaign with FV assessments will increase understanding of the target audience, and allow for campaign refinement. PMID:27649233

  7. Autonomic function testing: an important diagnostic test for patients with syncope.

    PubMed

    Jones, Pearl K; Gibbons, Christopher H

    2015-10-01

    Syncope is a common problem with a large differential diagnosis. The initial history and physical examination often provide initial clues; however, some cases warrant further testing to determine the underlying cause. Autonomic function testing is a safe way to evaluate patients with syncope further, and to assess their parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems. Autonomic testing can help to diagnose several conditions, including orthostatic hypotension, delayed orthostatic hypotension, postural tachycardia syndrome and neutrally mediated syncope. Thus, when the cause of syncope is unclear, autonomic testing can help to assess the autonomic nervous system, stratify the risk of future episodes and to guide treatment decisions.

  8. [Neurological lower torso function test. A new assessment].

    PubMed

    Merkert, J; Butz, S; Nieczaj, R; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E; Eckardt, R

    2013-02-01

    The neurological lower torso function test was developed in addition to the Berg Balance Scale as an assessment for diagnosis and follow-up of lower torso stability and functioning in neurological patients, used for example in subjects in the early rehabilitation phase or still showing low motoric recovery after suffering a stroke. Due to the ground effect for changes in severely affected neurological patients, other tests currently available do not provide an adequate level of sensitivity. The neurological function test was integrated into the study "Combined whole body vibration and balance training using Vibrosphere" with 66 inpatient/partial inpatient neurological subjects ≥ 60 years. Based on six tasks, a qualitative assessment of the selective function of movement and posture tone of the lower extremity, the muscular system around the hip, and the lower torso are performed. Analogous to the Berg Balance Scale, a 5 point scale is used. It shows a high degree of reliability and responsiveness and can be performed with little effort of time and personnel.

  9. Examining the Relationship between Differential Item Functioning and Differential Test Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pae, Tae-Il; Park, Gi-Pyo

    2006-01-01

    The present study utilized both the IRT-LR (item response theory likelihood ratio) and a series of CFA (confirmatory factor analysis) multi-sample analyses to systematically examine the relationships between DIF (differential item functioning) and DTF (differential test functioning) with a random sample of 15 000 Korean examinees. Specifically,…

  10. [Interventional neuroradiology. Drug treatment, monitoring and function tests].

    PubMed

    Laurent, A; Gobin, Y P; Launay, F; Aymard, A; Casasco, A; Merland, J J

    1994-04-23

    Specialized monitoring as well as function tests and drug therapy play an ever growing role in neuroradiological procedures. The particular route of administration and the territories involved in neuroradiology require special precautions. Anaesthesia must enable the operators to monitor the central nervous system since the patients must remain totally immobilized for several hours. Catheterization is made safe by careful asepsia and antibiotic prophylaxis and by preventing embolic events, particularly in neuro-cervico-facial interventions where an anticoagulant protocol is important. Arterial spasms can be prevented or cured with calcium inhibitors. The safety of the procedure itself is guaranteed by various function tests including sensitivity to ischaemia using anaesthetic barbiturates, controlled clampings or the lidocaine test. Undesirable effects of both emboli (e.g. toxicity of cyanoacrylate glue) and embolization (e.g. subsequent venous thrombosis) can be prevented by adapted anti-inflammatory drugs. Herein, we describe the routine monitoring conditions, drugs prescribed and function tests performed at the Therapeutic Angiography Department of the Lariboisière Hospital, Paris.

  11. Multiple-Group Noncompensatory Differential Item Functioning in Raju's Differential Functioning of Items and Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oshima, T. C.; Wright, Keith; White, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Raju, van der Linden, and Fleer (1995) introduced a framework for differential functioning of items and tests (DFIT) for unidimensional dichotomous models. Since then, DFIT has been shown to be a quite versatile framework as it can handle polytomous as well as multidimensional models both at the item and test levels. However, DFIT is still limited…

  12. Multiple-Group Noncompensatory Differential Item Functioning in Raju's Differential Functioning of Items and Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oshima, T. C.; Wright, Keith; White, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Raju, van der Linden, and Fleer (1995) introduced a framework for differential functioning of items and tests (DFIT) for unidimensional dichotomous models. Since then, DFIT has been shown to be a quite versatile framework as it can handle polytomous as well as multidimensional models both at the item and test levels. However, DFIT is still limited…

  13. Evaluation of a bedside test of utricular function – the bucket test – in older individuals

    PubMed Central

    SUN, DANIEL Q.; ZUNIGA, M. GERALDINE; DAVALOS-BICHARA, MARCELA; CAREY, JOHN P.; AGRAWAL, YURI

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion As a bedside test of subjective visual vertical (SVV), the ‘bucket test’ has a role as a viable and cost-effective clinical test of unilateral utricular dysfunction in older individuals. Objective To investigate whether the bucket test as a test of the SVV is a valid bedside test of utricular function in older individuals. Methods This was a diagnostic validation study at a tertiary academic medical center. Vestibular function was evaluated using sound-evoked cervical and tap-evoked ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP and oVEMP, respectively) asymmetry ratios, the bucket test of SVV, and the Dizziness Handicap Index (DHI), in 51 older individuals aged 70–95 years. Results Bucket test scores are correlated in both magnitude and direction with utricle-selective tap-evoked oVEMP asymmetry ratios, but not with sound-evoked cVEMP asymmetry ratios, which are saccule-selective, or with the DHI. Receiver operating characteristics analysis suggests that the bucket test is more specific than sensitive for utricular dysfunction, and a bucket test SVV score of 2° may maximize diagnostic yield relative to the currently accepted score of 3. PMID:24460151

  14. Non-invasive pulmonary function test on Morquio patients.

    PubMed

    Kubaski, Francyne; Tomatsu, Shunji; Patel, Pravin; Shimada, Tsutomu; Xie, Li; Yasuda, Eriko; Mason, Robert; Mackenzie, William G; Theroux, Mary; Bober, Michael B; Oldham, Helen M; Orii, Tadao; Shaffer, Thomas H

    2015-08-01

    In clinical practice, respiratory function tests are difficult to perform in Morquio syndrome patients due to their characteristic skeletal dysplasia, small body size and lack of cooperation of young patients, where in some cases, conventional spirometry for pulmonary function is too challenging. To establish feasible clinical pulmonary endpoints and determine whether age impacts lung function in Morquio patients non-invasive pulmonary tests and conventional spirometry were evaluated. The non-invasive pulmonary tests: impulse oscillometry system, pneumotachography, and respiratory inductance plethysmography in conjunction with conventional spirometry were evaluated in twenty-two Morquio patients (18 Morquio A and 4 Morquio B) (7 males), ranging from 3 to 40 years of age. Twenty-two patients were compliant with non-invasive tests (100%) with the exception of IOS (81.8%-18 patients). Seventeen patients (77.3%) were compliant with spirometry testing. All subjects had normal vital signs at rest including >95% oxygen saturation, end tidal CO2 (38-44 mmHg), and age-appropriate heart rate (mean=98.3, standard deviation=19) (two patients were deviated). All patients preserved normal values in the impulse oscillometry system, pneumotachography, and respiratory inductance plethysmography, although predicted forced expiratory total (72.8±6.9 SE%) decreased with age and was below normal; phase angle (35.5±16.5°), %rib cage (41.6±12.7%), resonant frequency, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced expiratory volume total (110.0±3.2 SE%) were normal and not significantly impacted by age. The proposed non-invasive pulmonary function tests are able to cover a greater number of patients (young patients and/or wheel-chair bound), thus providing a new diagnostic approach for the assessment of lung function in Morquio syndrome which in many cases may be difficult to evaluate. Morquio patients studied herein demonstrated no clinical or functional signs of restrictive and

  15. Patient and Societal Value Functions for the Testing Morbidities Index

    PubMed Central

    Swan, John Shannon; Kong, Chung Yin; Lee, Janie M.; Akinyemi, Omosalewa; Halpern, Elkan F.; Lee, Pablo; Vavinskiy, Sergey; Williams, Olubunmi; Zoltick, Emilie S.; Donelan, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Background We developed preference-based and summated scale scoring for the Testing Morbidities Index (TMI) classification, which addresses short-term effects on quality of life from diagnostic testing before, during and after a testing procedure. Methods The two TMI value functions utilize multiattribute value techniques; one is patient-based and the other has a societal perspective. 206 breast biopsy patients and 466 (societal) subjects informed the models. Due to a lack of standard short-term methods for this application, we utilized the visual analog scale (VAS). Waiting trade-off (WTO) tolls provided an additional option for linear transformation of the TMI. We randomized participants to one of three surveys: the first derived weights for generic testing morbidity attributes and levels of severity with the VAS; a second developed VAS values and WTO tolls for linear transformation of the TMI to a death-healthy scale; the third addressed initial validation in a specific test (breast biopsy). 188 patients and 425 community subjects participated in initial validation, comparing direct VAS and WTO values to the TMI. Alternative TMI scoring as a non-preference summated scale was included, given evidence of construct and content validity. Results The patient model can use an additive function, while the societal model is multiplicative. Direct VAS and the VAS-scaled TMI were correlated across modeling groups (r=0.45 to 0.62) and agreement was comparable to the value function validation of the Health Utilities Index 2. Mean Absolute Difference (MAD) calculations showed a range of 0.07–0.10 in patients and 0.11–0.17 in subjects. MAD for direct WTO tolls compared to the WTO-scaled TMI varied closely around one quality-adjusted life day. Conclusions The TMI shows initial promise in measuring short-term testing-related health states. PMID:23689044

  16. Functional diversity, soil features and community functioning: a test in a cerrado site.

    PubMed

    Freitas, J R; Cianciaruso, M V; Batalha, M A

    2012-08-01

    Community functioning may be affected by functional diversity, which measures the extent of complementarity in resource use. We tested whether there was a relationship between functional diversity of woody species and community functioning on a fine scale, using FD as a measure of functional diversity and litter decomposition rate as a surrogate for community functioning. We measured eight functional traits from a woodland cerrado community in southeastern Brazil. Then, we tested the correlation between FD and the decomposition rate taking into account differences in soil features and between decomposition rate and each trait separately. The decomposition rate was related to the aluminium and phosphorus concentration in soil, but not to FD, pointing out that functional diversity was not a good predictor of community functioning. There was a non-significant relationship between FD and the decomposition rate even when we considered each trait separately. Most studies in the relationships between biodiversity and community functioning on fine scales were carried out by experimental manipulation of diversity and in temperate regions. We carried out this fine scale study as a mensurative experiment and in a tropical savanna. Our findings indicated that the relationship between biodiversity and community functioning is not as straightforward as usually assumed.

  17. Validation of Cardiovascular Parameters During NASA's Functional Task Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzeno, N. M.; Stenger, M. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Platts, Steven H.

    2008-01-01

    Microgravity-induced physiological changes, including cardiovascular deconditioning may impair crewmembers f capabilities during exploration missions on the Moon and Mars. The Functional Task Test (FTT), which will be used to assess task performance in short and long duration astronauts, consists of 7 functional tests to evaluate crewmembers f ability to perform activities to be conducted in a partial-gravity environment or following an emergency landing on Earth. The Recovery from Fall/Stand Test (RFST) tests both the subject fs ability to get up from a prone position and orthostatic intolerance. PURPOSE: Crewmembers have never become presyncopal in the first 3 min of quiet stand, yet it is unknown whether 3 min is long enough to cause similar heart rate fluctuations to a 5-min stand. The purpose of this study was to validate and test the reliability of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis of a 3-min quiet stand. METHODS: To determine the validity of using 3 vs. 5-min of standing to assess HRV, 7 healthy subjects remained in a prone position for 2 min, stood up quickly and stood quietly for 6 min. ECG and continuous blood pressure data were recorded. Mean R-R interval and spectral HRV were measured in minutes 0-3 and 0-5 following the heart rate transient due to standing. Significant differences between the segments were determined by a paired t-test. To determine the reliability of the 3-min stand test, 13 healthy subjects completed 3 trials of the complete FTT on separate days, including the RFST with a 3-min stand test. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on the HRV measures. RESULTS: Spectral HRV measures reflecting autonomic activity were not different (p>0.05) during the 0-3 and 0-5 min segment (mean R-R interval: 738+/-74 ms, 728+/-69 ms; low frequency to high frequency ratio: 6.5+/-2.2, 7.7+/-2.7; normalized high frequency: 0.19+/-0.03, 0.18+/-0.04). The average coefficient of variation for mean R-R interval, systolic and diastolic blood pressures

  18. Validation of Cardiovascular Parameters During NASA's Functional Task Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzeno, N. M.; Stenger, M. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Platts, Steven H.

    2008-01-01

    Microgravity-induced physiological changes, including cardiovascular deconditioning may impair crewmembers f capabilities during exploration missions on the Moon and Mars. The Functional Task Test (FTT), which will be used to assess task performance in short and long duration astronauts, consists of 7 functional tests to evaluate crewmembers f ability to perform activities to be conducted in a partial-gravity environment or following an emergency landing on Earth. The Recovery from Fall/Stand Test (RFST) tests both the subject fs ability to get up from a prone position and orthostatic intolerance. PURPOSE: Crewmembers have never become presyncopal in the first 3 min of quiet stand, yet it is unknown whether 3 min is long enough to cause similar heart rate fluctuations to a 5-min stand. The purpose of this study was to validate and test the reliability of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis of a 3-min quiet stand. METHODS: To determine the validity of using 3 vs. 5-min of standing to assess HRV, 7 healthy subjects remained in a prone position for 2 min, stood up quickly and stood quietly for 6 min. ECG and continuous blood pressure data were recorded. Mean R-R interval and spectral HRV were measured in minutes 0-3 and 0-5 following the heart rate transient due to standing. Significant differences between the segments were determined by a paired t-test. To determine the reliability of the 3-min stand test, 13 healthy subjects completed 3 trials of the complete FTT on separate days, including the RFST with a 3-min stand test. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on the HRV measures. RESULTS: Spectral HRV measures reflecting autonomic activity were not different (p>0.05) during the 0-3 and 0-5 min segment (mean R-R interval: 738+/-74 ms, 728+/-69 ms; low frequency to high frequency ratio: 6.5+/-2.2, 7.7+/-2.7; normalized high frequency: 0.19+/-0.03, 0.18+/-0.04). The average coefficient of variation for mean R-R interval, systolic and diastolic blood pressures

  19. Testing the link between functional diversity and ecosystem functioning in a Minnesota grassland experiment.

    PubMed

    Clark, Christopher M; Flynn, Dan F B; Butterfield, Bradley J; Reich, Peter B

    2012-01-01

    The functional diversity of a community can influence ecosystem functioning and reflects assembly processes. The large number of disparate metrics used to quantify functional diversity reflects the range of attributes underlying this concept, generally summarized as functional richness, functional evenness, and functional divergence. However, in practice, we know very little about which attributes drive which ecosystem functions, due to a lack of field-based tests. Here we test the association between eight leading functional diversity metrics (Rao's Q, FD, FDis, FEve, FDiv, convex hull volume, and species and functional group richness) that emphasize different attributes of functional diversity, plus 11 extensions of these existing metrics that incorporate heterogeneous species abundances and trait variation. We assess the relationships among these metrics and compare their performances for predicting three key ecosystem functions (above- and belowground biomass and light capture) within a long-term grassland biodiversity experiment. Many metrics were highly correlated, although unique information was captured in FEve, FDiv, and dendrogram-based measures (FD) that were adjusted by abundance. FD adjusted by abundance outperformed all other metrics in predicting both above- and belowground biomass, although several others also performed well (e.g. Rao's Q, FDis, FDiv). More generally, trait-based richness metrics and hybrid metrics incorporating multiple diversity attributes outperformed evenness metrics and single-attribute metrics, results that were not changed when combinations of metrics were explored. For light capture, species richness alone was the best predictor, suggesting that traits for canopy architecture would be necessary to improve predictions. Our study provides a comprehensive test linking different attributes of functional diversity with ecosystem function for a grassland system.

  20. Testing the Link between Functional Diversity and Ecosystem Functioning in a Minnesota Grassland Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Bradley J.; Reich, Peter B.

    2012-01-01

    The functional diversity of a community can influence ecosystem functioning and reflects assembly processes. The large number of disparate metrics used to quantify functional diversity reflects the range of attributes underlying this concept, generally summarized as functional richness, functional evenness, and functional divergence. However, in practice, we know very little about which attributes drive which ecosystem functions, due to a lack of field-based tests. Here we test the association between eight leading functional diversity metrics (Rao’s Q, FD, FDis, FEve, FDiv, convex hull volume, and species and functional group richness) that emphasize different attributes of functional diversity, plus 11 extensions of these existing metrics that incorporate heterogeneous species abundances and trait variation. We assess the relationships among these metrics and compare their performances for predicting three key ecosystem functions (above- and belowground biomass and light capture) within a long-term grassland biodiversity experiment. Many metrics were highly correlated, although unique information was captured in FEve, FDiv, and dendrogram-based measures (FD) that were adjusted by abundance. FD adjusted by abundance outperformed all other metrics in predicting both above- and belowground biomass, although several others also performed well (e.g. Rao’s Q, FDis, FDiv). More generally, trait-based richness metrics and hybrid metrics incorporating multiple diversity attributes outperformed evenness metrics and single-attribute metrics, results that were not changed when combinations of metrics were explored. For light capture, species richness alone was the best predictor, suggesting that traits for canopy architecture would be necessary to improve predictions. Our study provides a comprehensive test linking different attributes of functional diversity with ecosystem function for a grassland system. PMID:23300787

  1. Test Protocols for Advanced Inverter Interoperability Functions – Main Document

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Ralph, Mark E.; Ellis, Abraham; Broderick, Robert Joseph

    2013-11-01

    Distributed energy resources (DER) such as photovoltaic (PV) systems, when deployed in a large scale, are capable of influencing significantly the operation of power systems. Looking to the future, stakeholders are working on standards to make it possible to manage the potentially complex interactions between DER and the power system. In 2009, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA) initiated a large industry collaborative to identify and standardize definitions for a set of DER grid support functions. While the initial effort concentrated on grid-tied PV inverters and energy storage systems, the concepts have applicability to all DER. A partial product of this on-going effort is a reference definitions document (IEC TR 61850-90-7, Object models for power converters in distributed energy resources (DER) systems) that has become a basis for expansion of related International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards, and is supported by US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Smart Grid Interoperability Panel (SGIP). Some industry-led organizations advancing communications protocols have also embraced this work. As standards continue to evolve, it is necessary to develop test protocols to independently verify that the inverters are properly executing the advanced functions. Interoperability is assured by establishing common definitions for the functions and a method to test compliance with operational requirements. This document describes test protocols developed by SNL to evaluate the electrical performance and operational capabilities of PV inverters and energy storage, as described in IEC TR 61850-90-7. While many of these functions are not currently required by existing grid codes or may not be widely available commercially, the industry is rapidly moving in that direction. Interoperability issues are already

  2. Test Protocols for Advanced Inverter Interoperability Functions - Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Ralph, Mark E.; Ellis, Abraham; Broderick, Robert Joseph

    2013-11-01

    Distributed energy resources (DER) such as photovoltaic (PV) systems, when deployed in a large scale, are capable of influencing significantly the operation of power systems. Looking to the future, stakeholders are working on standards to make it possible to manage the potentially complex interactions between DER and the power system. In 2009, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA) initiated a large industry collaborative to identify and standardize definitions for a set of DER grid support functions. While the initial effort concentrated on grid-tied PV inverters and energy storage systems, the concepts have applicability to all DER. A partial product of this on-going effort is a reference definitions document (IEC TR 61850-90-7, Object models for power converters in distributed energy resources (DER) systems) that has become a basis for expansion of related International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards, and is supported by US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Smart Grid Interoperability Panel (SGIP). Some industry-led organizations advancing communications protocols have also embraced this work. As standards continue to evolve, it is necessary to develop test protocols to independently verify that the inverters are properly executing the advanced functions. Interoperability is assured by establishing common definitions for the functions and a method to test compliance with operational requirements. This document describes test protocols developed by SNL to evaluate the electrical performance and operational capabilities of PV inverters and energy storage, as described in IEC TR 61850-90-7. While many of these functions are not now required by existing grid codes or may not be widely available commercially, the industry is rapidly moving in that direction. Interoperability issues are already apparent as

  3. Testing Changes in Visual Function Due to Orbital Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    describes a device submitted by the AF Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory for inclusion aboard several NASA Shuttle Flights, in an attempt to detect...Duntley Tests ROCET P0BL 4 VISUAL FUNCTION TESTER [ODEL I (VFT-1) 5 Description Usage Critical Fusion Frequency Stereopsis Snellen Acuity Resolution...self-contained, draw no power from the Shuttle, and must meet stringent NASA technical, safety and acceptance standards. This report describes the

  4. Epidemiology and Genetic Epidemiology of the Liver Function Test Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rahmioglu, Nilufer; Andrew, Toby; Cherkas, Lynn; Surdulescu, Gabriela; Swaminathan, Ramasamyiyer; Spector, Tim; Ahmadi, Kourosh R.

    2009-01-01

    Background The liver function test (LFT) is among the most commonly used clinical investigations to assess hepatic function, severity of liver diseases and the effect of therapies, as well as to detect drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Aims To determine the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors as well as test and quantify the effects of sex, age, BMI and alcohol consumption to variation in liver function test proteins - including alanine amino transaminase (ALT), Albumin, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), total bilirubin, total protein, total globulin, aspartate transaminase (AST), and alkaline phosphotase (ALP) - using the classical twin model. Methods Blood samples were collected from a total of 5380 twin pairs from the TwinsUK registry. We measured the expression levels of major proteins associated with the LFT, calculated BMI from measured weight and height and questionnaires were completed for alcohol consumption by the twins. The relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors to variation in the LFT proteins was assessed and quantified using a variance components model fitting approach. Results Our results show that (1) variation in all the LFTs has a significant heritable basis (h2 ranging from 20% to 77%); (2) other than GGT, the LFTs are all affected to some extent by common environmental factors (c2 ranging from 24% to 54%); and (3) a small but significant proportion of the variation in the LFTs was due to confounding effects of age, sex, BMI, and alcohol use. Conclusions Variation in the LFT proteins is under significant genetic and common environmental control although sex, alcohol use, age and BMI also contribute significantly to inter-individual variation in the LFT proteins. Understanding the underlying genetic contribution of liver function tests may help the interpretation of their results and explain wide variation among individuals. PMID:19209234

  5. Calibrating Reach Distance to Visual Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mon-Williams, Mark; Bingham, Geoffrey P.

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated the calibration of reach distance by gradually distorting the haptic feedback obtained when participants grasped visible target objects. The authors found that the modified relationship between visually specified distance and reach distance could be captured by a straight-line mapping function. Thus, the relation could be…

  6. Pulmonary function testing in children with the airflometer.

    PubMed

    Lowdon, B J; Pateman, N A

    1984-01-01

    Use of the airflometer (AFM) as an inexpensive apparatus for routine screening of pulmonary function has been hindered by the lack of established norms of AFM readings for young children. Using both the airflometer and the vitalograph, lung function was measured in 828 children, aged five to 11 years, randomly selected from six schools. Results indicate that girls aged five, 8-11 years have lower Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1, and AFM scores than boys. High correlations were observed between AFM units and FEV1 (0.93), between height and FEV1 (0.88), and between FVC (0.89) and AFM units (0.84). Regression equations are given to enable prediction of AFM from height and from age for boys and girls. Tables indicate scores that should be followed with further pulmonary function testing. A protocol is outlined to enable the airflometer to be used as a first level screening device.

  7. Update of tests of colon and rectal structure and function.

    PubMed

    Bharucha, Adil E

    2006-02-01

    This review deals with the indications, methods, strengths, and limitations of anorectal testing in clinical practice. In chronic constipation, anal manometry and a rectal balloon expulsion test, occasionally supplemented by defecography, are useful to identify a functional defecatory disorder, because symptoms may respond to pelvic floor retraining. In patients with fecal incontinence, diagnostic testing complements the clinical assessment for evaluating the pathophysiology and guiding management. Manometry measures anal resting and squeeze pressures, which predominantly reflect internal and external anal sphincter function, respectively. Defecation may be indirectly assessed by measuring the recto-anal pressure gradient during straining and by the rectal balloon expulsion test. Endoanal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can identify anal sphincter structural pathology, which may be clinically occult, and/or amenable to surgical repair. Only MRI can identify external sphincter atrophy, whereas ultrasound is more sensitive for internal sphincter imaging. By characterizing rectal evacuation and puborectalis contraction, barium defecography may demonstrate an evacuation disorder, excessive perineal descent or a rectocele. Dynamic MRI can provide similar information and also image the bladder and genital organs without radiation exposure. Because the measurement of pudendal nerve latencies suffers from several limitations, anal sphincter electromyography is recommended when neurogenic sphincter weakness is suspected.

  8. Pulmonary physiology: future directions for lung function testing in COPD.

    PubMed

    Brusasco, Vito; Barisione, Giovanni; Crimi, Emanuele

    2015-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a term that encompasses different pathological conditions having excessive airflow limitation in common. A wide body of knowledge has been accumulated over the last century explaining the mechanisms by which airway (chronic bronchitis) and parenchymal (emphysema) diseases lead to an indistinguishable spirometric abnormality. Although the definition of emphysema is anatomical, early studies showed that its presence can be inferred with good approximation from measurements of lung mechanics and gas exchange, in addition to simple spirometry. Studies using tests of ventilation distribution showed that abnormalities are present in smokers with normal spirometry, although these tests were not predictive of development of COPD. At the beginning of the third millennium, new documents and guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of COPD were developed, in which the functional diagnosis of COPD was restricted, for the sake of simplicity, to simple spirometry. In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in separating bronchitic from emphysematous phenotype of COPD. For this purpose, high-resolution computed tomography scanning has been added to diagnostic work-up. At the same time, methods for lung function testing have been refined and seem promising for detection of early small airways abnormalities. Among them are the forced oscillation technique and the nitrogen phase III slope analysis of the multiple-breath washout test, which may provide information on ventilation inhomogeneity. Moreover, the combined assessment of diffusing capacity for nitric oxide and carbon monoxide may be more sensitive than the latter alone for partitioning diffusive components at parenchymal level.

  9. Lower body negative pressure: a test of cardiovascular autonomic function.

    PubMed

    Patel, A R; Engstrom, J E; Tusing, L D; McNeeley, K J; Chelimsky, T C

    2001-04-01

    Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) may provide an alternative test of cardiovascular autonomic function for patients unable to perform the Valsalva maneuver (VM). LBNP at -40 mmHg for 30 s was compared to the VM at 40 mmHg for 15 s with heart rate and blood pressure measured continuously in three age groups: 10-25 years; 26-40 years; and 41-55 years. Heart rate and blood pressure responses were comparable, with moderately diminished changes in blood pressure and heart rate in the LBNP test. When heart response to LBNP was converted to a ratio similar to that calculated for the VM, a high degree of correlation was found (R(2) = 0.5711). The LBNP test shows promise as an alternative test of cardiovascular autonomic function based on studies in normal subjects. The less marked changes may relate to the more passive nature of the applied stress. Future work should improve the device's accessibility and establish values for patients with autonomic disorders. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Functional performance testing in participants with functional ankle instability and in a healthy control group.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Amanda S; Docherty, Carrie L; Schrader, John

    2008-01-01

    Functional ankle instability (FAI) affects a large part of the population. Inconsistent findings have been reported regarding the existence of functional performance deficits in individuals with FAI. To examine functional performance in participants with FAI compared with participants in a control group during 2 hopping tests. Case-control study. Athletic training research laboratory. There were 40 college-aged individuals who participated in our study: 20 with FAI and 20 without FAI. We defined FAI as history of an ankle sprain and residual episodes of "giving way." Participants completed 2 functional performance tests (FPTs): the single-limb hopping and the single-limb hurdle tests. Time to complete each test was recorded. Following each FPT, participants were asked if their ankles felt unstable during the test. We found no difference between participants in the FAI and control groups for the hopping or hurdle tests (P > .05). When asked if their ankles felt unstable during the FPTs, approximately half of the participants in the FAI group and none of the participants in the control group reported a feeling of instability. Subsequently, a secondary analysis of variance was calculated with participants grouped into 3 categories: control participants, FAI participants reporting instability symptoms during FPT (FAI-S), and FAI participants not reporting instability symptoms during FPT (FAI-NS). Results revealed a difference among the 3 groups for the single-limb hopping test (P < .01). Post hoc analysis revealed a difference between the FAI-S participants and both the control and the FAI-NS participants. No difference was identified for the single-limb hurdle test (P = .41). The FAI-S participants had performance deficits during the single-limb hopping test. Therefore, clinicians could use this simple hopping test as an additional method to determine the presence of FAI.

  11. Reaching Beyond The Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Mariah; Rosenthal, L.; Gaughan, A.; Hopkins, E.

    2014-01-01

    Strawbridge Observatory at Haverford College is home to a undergraduate-led public observing program. Our program holds ~once monthly public events throughout the academic year that take advantage of eyepiece observing on our 16-inch and 12-inch telescopes as well as of the classroom, library, and projection system. These resources allow us to organize a variety of astronomy related activities that are engaging for individuals of all ages: accessible student talks, current film screenings and even arts and crafts for the families who attend with young children. These events aim to spark curiosity in others about scientific discovery and about the remarkable nature of the world in which we live. In addition to exciting local families about astronomy, this program has excited Haverford students from a range of disciplines about both science and education. Being entirely student led means that we are able to take the initiative in planning, coordinating and running all events, fostering an atmosphere of collaboration, experimentation and commitment amongst our volunteers. Additionally, this program is one of the few at Haverford that regularly reaches beyond the campus walls to promote and build relationships with the outside community. In light of this, our program presents a distinctive and enlightening opportunity for student volunteers: we get to use our scientific backgrounds to educate a general audience, while also learning from them about how to communicate and inspire in others the excitement we feel about the subject of astronomy. The work on this project has been supported by NSF AST-1151462.

  12. GAP-REACH

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Raggio, Greer A.; Gorritz, Magdaliz; Duan, Naihua; Marcus, Sue; Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Humensky, Jennifer; Becker, Anne E.; Alarcón, Renato D.; Oquendo, María A.; Hansen, Helena; Like, Robert C.; Weiss, Mitchell; Desai, Prakash N.; Jacobsen, Frederick M.; Foulks, Edward F.; Primm, Annelle; Lu, Francis; Kopelowicz, Alex; Hinton, Ladson; Hinton, Devon E.

    2015-01-01

    Growing awareness of health and health care disparities highlights the importance of including information about race, ethnicity, and culture (REC) in health research. Reporting of REC factors in research publications, however, is notoriously imprecise and unsystematic. This article describes the development of a checklist to assess the comprehensiveness and the applicability of REC factor reporting in psychiatric research publications. The 16-itemGAP-REACH© checklist was developed through a rigorous process of expert consensus, empirical content analysis in a sample of publications (N = 1205), and interrater reliability (IRR) assessment (N = 30). The items assess each section in the conventional structure of a health research article. Data from the assessment may be considered on an item-by-item basis or as a total score ranging from 0% to 100%. The final checklist has excellent IRR (κ = 0.91). The GAP-REACH may be used by multiple research stakeholders to assess the scope of REC reporting in a research article. PMID:24080673

  13. Platelet function tests in clinical cardiology: unfulfilled expectations.

    PubMed

    Gorog, Diana A; Fuster, Valentin

    2013-05-28

    This review is a critical evaluation of publications in the past decade on the usefulness of platelet function tests (PFTs) in clinical cardiology, in aiding diagnosis, predicting risk, and monitoring therapy. The ideal PFT should: 1) detect baseline platelet hyperreactivity; 2) allow individualization of antiplatelet medication; 3) predict thrombotic risk; and 4) predict bleeding risk. The practicalities of clinical cardiology demand rapid, accurate, and reliable tests that are simple to operate at the bedside and available 24 h a day, 7 days a week. Point-of-care PFTs most widely evaluated clinically include PFA-100 and VerifyNow. None of these tests can reliably detect platelet hyperreactivity and thus identify a prothrombotic state. Identification of antiplatelet nonresponsiveness or hyporesponsiveness is highly test specific, and does not allow individualization of therapy. The power of PFTs in predicting thrombotic events for a given individual is variable and often modest, and alteration of antithrombotic treatment on the basis of the results of PFTs has not been shown to alter clinical outcome. PFTs in current mainstream use cannot reliably assess bleeding risk. These tests have been in use for over a decade, but the hopes raised by PFTs in clinical practice remain unfulfilled. Although physiologically relevant measurement of platelet function now is more important than ever, a critical reappraisal of available techniques in light of clinical requirements is needed. The use of native blood, global stimulus instead of individual agonists, contribution of thrombin generation by activated platelets to the test results, and establishment of a PFT therapeutic range for each antiplatelet drug should be considered and is discussed.

  14. A review of the status of alternative approaches to animal testing and the development of integrated testing strategies for assessing the toxicity of chemicals under REACH--a summary of a DEFRA-funded project conducted by Liverpool John Moores University and FRAME.

    PubMed

    Grindon, Christina; Combes, Robert; Cronin, Mark T D; Roberts, David W; Garrod, John

    2006-03-01

    Liverpool John Moores University and FRAME were recently awarded a DEFRA tender to conduct a review of the status of alternative approaches to animal testing, and to recommend further research with regard to the forthcoming European Union REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals) system for the safety testing and risk assessment of chemicals. The outcome of the project is summarised, including the prospects for in vitro and in silico testing, areas where reduction and refinement could be applied, and how decision-tree integrated testing strategies could be used to reduce the number of animals needed to fulfil the testing requirements of the REACH system. This paper is a prelude to a series of individual papers on detailed suggestions for applying non-animal methods to each of the major toxicity endpoints in REACH.

  15. Effects of Differential Item Functioning on Examinees' Test Performance and Reliability of Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Zhang, Jinming

    2017-01-01

    Simulations were conducted to examine the effect of differential item functioning (DIF) on measurement consequences such as total scores, item response theory (IRT) ability estimates, and test reliability in terms of the ratio of true-score variance to observed-score variance and the standard error of estimation for the IRT ability parameter. The…

  16. Effects of Differential Item Functioning on Examinees' Test Performance and Reliability of Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Zhang, Jinming

    2017-01-01

    Simulations were conducted to examine the effect of differential item functioning (DIF) on measurement consequences such as total scores, item response theory (IRT) ability estimates, and test reliability in terms of the ratio of true-score variance to observed-score variance and the standard error of estimation for the IRT ability parameter. The…

  17. Atherosclerosis and Liver Function Tests in Coronary Angiography Patients

    PubMed Central

    Doganer, YC; Rohrer, JE; Aydogan, U; Agerter, DC; Cayci, T; Barcin, C

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Elevated aminotransferase levels indicating liver function, even in the normal range, have attracted great concern as potential novel markers of cardiovascular risk assessment. We hypothesized the possibility that liver function test variations in the normal range might be meaningfully associated to coronary artery disease (CAD). Method: Eighty-eight patients were randomly selected from those who underwent coronary angiography from June 2010 to June 2011 after applying to the outpatient cardiology clinic in Gulhane Military Medical Academy. According to the results of angiographies, patients were classified into three groups as normal, non-critical (< 50% involvement in coronaries), and critical (≥ 50% involvement in coronaries). In addition to angiographic intervention, measurements of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) concentrations, albumin and the other serum parameters were performed in all patients. Results: The patient groups of CAD were balanced (28 critical cases, 30 non-critical cases and 30 normal cases). Mean age was 51.93 ± 9.3 (range 32–65) years and 19.3 per cent (n = 17) were females. Multiple linear regression analysis of all three liver function tests explained a significant portion of the variance, but adjusted r-squares were small (AST = 0.174, ALT = 0.242, albumin = 0.124). Albumin was significantly higher for patients with critical CAD than for patients with no CAD (beta = 3.205, p = 0.002). Non-critical CAD was not significantly different from no CAD for any of the dependent variables. Mean AST was significantly higher for patients taking aspirin (beta = 0.218, p = 0.049), as was mean ALT (beta = 0.264, p = 0.015). Conclusion: Alanine aminotransferase and AST may not be associated with angiographically determined coronary atherosclerosis. Albumin may be more sensitive to demonstrate the burden of atherosclerosis. These results indicate that the association between the liver

  18. Thyroid function testing in neonates born to women with hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Matthew; Reyani, Zahra; O'Connor, Pamela; White, Martin; Miletin, Jan

    2016-12-01

    Our aim was to assess the utility of serum thyroxine and thyroid stimulating hormone performed at 10-14 days of life in diagnosing congenital hypothyroidism (CH) in babies born to mothers with hypothyroidism. This was a retrospective study of all babies born in a tertiary referral centre for neonatology over a 12-month period. Infants who had thyroid function testing (TFT) checked at 10-14 days of life because of maternal hypothyroidism during the period of study were included. The results of the newborn bloodspot and day 10-14 TFT were recorded along with whether or not patients were subsequently treated. Of the 319 patients included in the study, only two patients were found to have CH and in both cases the newborn blood spot had been abnormal. No extra cases of CH were detected from the thyroid test at 10-14 days and this practice should be discontinued due to the robust nature of existing newborn screening programmes. What is Known: • Congenital hypothyroidism(CH) is the commonest preventable cause of childhood intellectual impairment. • Family history of hypothyroidism has been implicated as a risk factor for CH. • CH has formed part of newborn screening since the 1970s. What is New: • There is no research recommending thyroid function testing at 10-14 days of life to detect CH in neonates born to mothers with hypothyroidism. • Thyroid function testing at 10-14 days of life does not improve diagnostic yield for CH in babies born to mothers with hypothyroidism. • Newborn blood spot remains the mainstay for accurate and timely diagnosis of CH.

  19. Neural coordination during reach-to-grasp

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Mukta; Kording, Konrad; Saleh, Maryam; Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    When reaching to grasp, we coordinate how we preshape the hand with how we move it. To ask how motor cortical neurons participate in this coordination, we examined the interactions between reach- and grasp-related neuronal ensembles while monkeys reached to grasp a variety of different objects in different locations. By describing the dynamics of these two ensembles as trajectories in a low-dimensional state space, we examined their coupling in time. We found evidence for temporal compensation across many different reach-to-grasp conditions such that if one neural trajectory led in time the other tended to catch up, reducing the asynchrony between the trajectories. Granger causality revealed bidirectional interactions between reach and grasp neural trajectories beyond that which could be attributed to the joint kinematics that were consistently stronger in the grasp-to-reach direction. Characterizing cortical coordination dynamics provides a new framework for understanding the functional interactions between neural populations. PMID:26224773

  20. Conduct disorder and cognitive functioning: testing three causal hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Schonfeld, I S; Shaffer, D; O'Connor, P; Portnoy, S

    1988-08-01

    The sample consisted of black adolescents who were members of the Columbia-Presbyterian chapter of the Collaborative Perinatal Project from birth to age 7. At age 17, subjects and their parents were administered a battery of instruments that included standardized psychiatric diagnostic interviews as part of a call-back study. Results from least-squares and logistic regression analyses were compatible with the hypothesis that deficiencies in cognitive functioning are causally related to adolescent conduct disorder as defined by DSM III. The results suggested that the relation of cognitive functioning to psychiatric status appears to be specific to conduct disorders. The results were incompatible with a "third" variable hypothesis (third factors included neurological status and environmental disadvantage) and the hypothesis that conduct problems lead to deficits in cognitive functioning. The 3 most (and equally) important factors in accounting for age-17 conduct disorder were cognitive functioning, parent psychopathology, and early aggression. A closer look at the data tentatively suggested that a broad deficiency in acculturational learning, rather than narrowly focused social cognitive differences or native endowment, constitutes a key element in the link between cognitive functioning and conduct disorder. Test bias was ruled out as a possible explanation for the results.

  1. Experimental Validation of Depth Cameras for the Parameterization of Functional Balance of Patients in Clinical Tests

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Francisco-Ángel; Merchán-Baeza, José Antonio; González-Sánchez, Manuel; González-Jiménez, Javier; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I.

    2017-01-01

    In clinical practice, patients’ balance can be assessed using standard scales. Two of the most validated clinical tests for measuring balance are the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test and the MultiDirectional Reach Test (MDRT). Nowadays, inertial sensors (IS) are employed for kinematic analysis of functional tests in the clinical setting, and have become an alternative to expensive, 3D optical motion capture systems. In daily clinical practice, however, IS-based setups are yet cumbersome and inconvenient to apply. Current depth cameras have the potential for such application, presenting many advantages as, for instance, being portable, low-cost and minimally-invasive. This paper aims at experimentally validating to what extent this technology can substitute IS for the parameterization and kinematic analysis of the TUG and the MDRT tests. Twenty healthy young adults were recruited as participants to perform five different balance tests while kinematic data from their movements were measured by both a depth camera and an inertial sensor placed on their trunk. The reliability of the camera’s measurements is examined through the Interclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC), whilst the Pearson Correlation Coefficient (r) is computed to evaluate the correlation between both sensor’s measurements, revealing excellent reliability and strong correlations in most cases. PMID:28241455

  2. Experimental Validation of Depth Cameras for the Parameterization of Functional Balance of Patients in Clinical Tests.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Francisco-Ángel; Merchán-Baeza, José Antonio; González-Sánchez, Manuel; González-Jiménez, Javier; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I

    2017-02-22

    In clinical practice, patients' balance can be assessed using standard scales. Two of the most validated clinical tests for measuring balance are the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test and the MultiDirectional Reach Test (MDRT). Nowadays, inertial sensors (IS) are employed for kinematic analysis of functional tests in the clinical setting, and have become an alternative to expensive, 3D optical motion capture systems. In daily clinical practice, however, IS-based setups are yet cumbersome and inconvenient to apply. Current depth cameras have the potential for such application, presenting many advantages as, for instance, being portable, low-cost and minimally-invasive. This paper aims at experimentally validating to what extent this technology can substitute IS for the parameterization and kinematic analysis of the TUG and the MDRT tests. Twenty healthy young adults were recruited as participants to perform five different balance tests while kinematic data from their movements were measured by both a depth camera and an inertial sensor placed on their trunk. The reliability of the camera's measurements is examined through the Interclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC), whilst the Pearson Correlation Coefficient (r) is computed to evaluate the correlation between both sensor's measurements, revealing excellent reliability and strong correlations in most cases.

  3. Assessment of mitochondrial function in vivo with a breath test utilizing alpha-ketoisocaproic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Michaletz, P.A.; Cap, L.; Alpert, E.; Lauterburg, B.H. )

    1989-11-01

    A breath test to assess hepatic mitochondrial function in vivo was evaluated in rats. Following the i.p. administration of (1-{sup 14}C)-alpha-ketoisocaproic acid, {sup 14}CO{sub 2} exhalation reached a peak within 10 to 20 min and then declined exponentially, with a half-life of 14.3 min. Control animals exhaled 38.6% of the administered radioactivity within 1 hr. In functionally anhepatic animals, {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in breath amounted to 23% of that in control animals, indicating that alpha-ketoisocaproic acid decarboxylation reflects mainly hepatic mitochondrial function in vivo. Ethanol (3 gm per kg) significantly decreased alpha-ketoisocaproic acid decarboxylation (21.8% of the dose appearing in breath in 1 hr), probably due to the ethanol-induced shift in the NAD+:NADH ratio. In contrast, an uncoupler of mitochondrial respiration, sodium salicylate (375 mg per kg), increased the decarboxylation of alpha-ketoisocaproic acid (56.3% of the dose recovered as {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in 1 hr). Mitochondrial damage induced by 4-pentenoic acid decreased the decarboxylation of alpha-ketoisocaproic acid but did not affect the microsomal metabolism of antipyrine. The present data indicate that the alpha-ketoisocaproic acid breath test provides a noninvasive estimate of hepatic mitochondrial function in vivo which, when applied to man, might yield clinically useful information.

  4. Automated optical function testing of diffractive beam shapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.; Ohar, Orest P.

    2006-08-01

    Function testing of diffractive optics is a straight forward procedure when dealing with single elements or discrete systems of optics on an optical bread board. As the volumes of a particular diffractive optical device increase to production levels approaching hundreds to thousands of optics, the testing task can quickly become arduous and mind-numbing. At this level of production, data collection and quality monitoring is required to close the feedback loop to the manufacturing process. In this paper, a description of a prototype semi-automated diffractive optics testing platform used to measure performance, map quality and confirm working distances of a two element diffractive beam shaper system will be given. The testing system architecture and operation will be outlined and each subsystem will be described including software. A wafer map, consisting of data from an array of beam shapers, representing performance and etch depth from each diffractive optic within the wafer will be presented. An example of how data is compiled from a tested wafer and then interlaced with external sources of topographic data for ease of analysis and interrogation will be explained. Methods for beam analysis will be disclosed including multiple profilometer techniques. Further information will be shown on how the data from the system can be interpreted to identify defects on specific optics, manufacturing defects and non-linearity effects due to grayscale lithography and etch processes.

  5. Comparative Transcriptomics of Malaria Mosquito Testes: Function, Evolution, and Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Cassone, Bryan J.; Kay, Raissa G. G.; Daugherty, Matthew P.; White, Bradley J.

    2017-01-01

    Testes-biased genes evolve rapidly and are important in the establishment, solidification, and maintenance of reproductive isolation between incipient species. The Anopheles gambiae complex, a group of at least eight isomorphic mosquito species endemic to Sub-Saharan Africa, is an excellent system to explore the evolution of testes-biased genes. Within this group, the testes are an important tissue in the diversification process because hybridization between species results in sterile hybrid males, but fully fertile females. We conducted RNA sequencing of A. gambiae and A. merus carcass and testes to explore tissue- and species-specific patterns of gene expression. Our data provides support for transcriptional repression of X-linked genes in the male germline, which likely drives demasculinization of the X chromosome. Testes-biased genes predominately function in cellular differentiation and show a number of interesting patterns indicative of their rapid evolution, including elevated dN/dS values, low evolutionary conservation, poor annotation in existing reference genomes, and a high likelihood of differential expression between species. PMID:28159865

  6. Standards for thyroid laboratory testing, and cognitive functions after menopause

    PubMed Central

    Bejga, Przemysław; Witczak, Mariusz; Łyszcz, Robert; Makara-Studzinska, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study is to analyze the relationship between normative and non-normative thyroid tests (TSH, TT4, TT3, FT3, FT4, anti-TPO, anti-Tg, AB-TSHR) and the level of cognitive functions in postmenopausal women. Material and methods The study group consisted of 383 women from south-eastern Poland, aged 50-65 years. The cognitive functions were evaluated using a diagnostic instrument – Central Nervous System – Vital Signs (CNS-VS). Blood was collected for determination of the following parameters: TSH, TT4, TT3, FT3, FT4, anti-TPO, anti-Tg, AB-TSHR. Results There were significant differences in NCI, executive functions, psychomotor speed, reaction time, complex attention and cognitive flexibility, depending on the normative and non-normative level of TSH. Women whose level of FT3 was at the lower limit of the normal range obtained poorer results in psychomotor speed, while subjects with levels of FT4 below the standard achieved significantly lower scores for this function. The relationship between NCI and cognitive functions, and the normative and non-normative anti-TPO results, showed significant differences in verbal memory, visual memory, processing speed and reaction time. The level of AB-TSHR reported as normal or above the norm significantly differentiated from the results of NCI, processing speed, executive functions, psychomotor speed, complex attention and cognitive flexibility. Conclusions Concentrations of laboratory parameters assessing the thyroid function located within the upper limits of the normal range showed a different relationship with the cognitive performance than concentrations located within the lower limits of the standard. PMID:26327860

  7. Platelet function testing in hirudin and BAPA anticoagulated blood.

    PubMed

    Mani, Helen; Hellis, Mirna; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard

    2011-03-01

    Sodium citrate is the most commonly used anticoagulant for platelet function testing. However, the use of citrated blood for platelet function analysis has been criticized due to creation of a non-physiological milieu. Moreover, platelet function measurements performed with citrated blood need to be completed within 4 h after blood collection. Alternatively, hirudin and recently, a dual thrombin/factor Xa inhibitor benzylsulfonyl-D-Arg-Pro-4-amidinobenzylamide (BAPA), can be used to improve the reactivity after prolonged storage of platelets. The present study investigated platelet function tests using hirudin and BAPA anticoagulated blood. Blood was obtained from 30 healthy individuals and 20 patients on aspirin or clopidogrel therapy, and stored for 2, 12, 24 or 48 h. Light transmission aggregometry and impedance platelet aggregometry were performed using adenosine 5-diphosphate (ADP) and arachidonic acid as agonists. The vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation assay was evaluated. Platelet aggregation measurements of healthy individuals and patients showed stable platelet aggregation values induced by arachidonic acid, after 24 h, when hirudin or BAPA anticoagulated blood was used. However, citrated blood resulted in significantly reduced platelet response after 12 h. ADP-induced light transmission aggregation of healthy individuals and patients exhibited unchanged platelet aggregation after 12 h using hirudin or BAPA anticoagulated blood, while significantly reduced platelet response was observed after 12 h when using citrated blood. In contrast, measurement of ADP-induced aggregation by use of impedance aggregometry resulted in reduced stability over 12 h using hirudin or BAPA anticoagulated blood. The VASP assay exhibited no significant changes in results over a storage period of 48 h, independent of the anticoagulants used. Use of hirudin or BAPA anticoagulated blood resulted in improvement of stability of platelet function measurements.

  8. Validation of Cardiovascular Parameters during NASA's Functional Task Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzeno, N. M.; Stenger, M. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Platts, S. H.

    2009-01-01

    Microgravity exposure causes physiological deconditioning and impairs crewmember task performance. The Functional Task Test (FTT) is designed to correlate these physiological changes to performance in a series of operationally-relevant tasks. One of these, the Recovery from Fall/Stand Test (RFST), tests both the ability to recover from a prone position and cardiovascular responses to orthostasis. PURPOSE: Three minutes were chosen for the duration of this test, yet it is unknown if this is long enough to induce cardiovascular responses similar to the operational 5 min stand test. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity and reliability of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis of a 3 min stand and to examine the effect of spaceflight on these measures. METHODS: To determine the validity of using 3 vs. 5 min of standing to assess HRV, ECG was collected from 7 healthy subjects who participated in a 6 min RFST. Mean R-R interval (RR) and spectral HRV were measured in minutes 0-3 and 0-5 following the heart rate transient due to standing. Significant differences between the segments were determined by a paired t-test. To determine the reliability of the 3-min stand test, 13 healthy subjects completed 3 trials of the FTT on separate days, including the RFST with a 3 min stand. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on the HRV measures. One crewmember completed the FTT before a 14-day mission, on landing day (R+0) and one (R+1) day after returning to Earth. RESULTS VALIDITY: HRV measures reflecting autonomic activity were not significantly different during the 0-3 and 0-5 min segments. RELIABILITY: The average coefficient of variation for RR, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures during the RFST were less than 8% for the 3 sessions. ANOVA results yielded a greater inter-subject variability (p<0.006) than inter-session variability (p>0.05) for HRV in the RFST. SPACEFLIGHT: Lower RR and higher SBP were observed on R+0 in rest and stand. On R+1

  9. Validation of Cardiovascular Parameters during NASA's Functional Task Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzeno, N. M.; Stenger, M. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Platts, S. H.

    2009-01-01

    Microgravity exposure causes physiological deconditioning and impairs crewmember task performance. The Functional Task Test (FTT) is designed to correlate these physiological changes to performance in a series of operationally-relevant tasks. One of these, the Recovery from Fall/Stand Test (RFST), tests both the ability to recover from a prone position and cardiovascular responses to orthostasis. PURPOSE: Three minutes were chosen for the duration of this test, yet it is unknown if this is long enough to induce cardiovascular responses similar to the operational 5 min stand test. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity and reliability of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis of a 3 min stand and to examine the effect of spaceflight on these measures. METHODS: To determine the validity of using 3 vs. 5 min of standing to assess HRV, ECG was collected from 7 healthy subjects who participated in a 6 min RFST. Mean R-R interval (RR) and spectral HRV were measured in minutes 0-3 and 0-5 following the heart rate transient due to standing. Significant differences between the segments were determined by a paired t-test. To determine the reliability of the 3-min stand test, 13 healthy subjects completed 3 trials of the FTT on separate days, including the RFST with a 3 min stand. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on the HRV measures. One crewmember completed the FTT before a 14-day mission, on landing day (R+0) and one (R+1) day after returning to Earth. RESULTS VALIDITY: HRV measures reflecting autonomic activity were not significantly different during the 0-3 and 0-5 min segments. RELIABILITY: The average coefficient of variation for RR, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures during the RFST were less than 8% for the 3 sessions. ANOVA results yielded a greater inter-subject variability (p<0.006) than inter-session variability (p>0.05) for HRV in the RFST. SPACEFLIGHT: Lower RR and higher SBP were observed on R+0 in rest and stand. On R+1

  10. Functional redundancy as a tool for bioassessment: A test using riparian vegetation.

    PubMed

    Bruno, D; Gutiérrez-Cánovas, C; Velasco, J; Sánchez-Fernández, D

    2016-10-01

    There is an urgent need to track how natural systems are responding to global change in order to better guide management efforts. Traditionally, taxonomically based metrics have been used as indicators of ecosystem integrity and conservation status. However, functional approaches offer promising advantages that can improve bioassessment performance. In this study, we aim to test the applicability of functional redundancy (FR), a functional feature related to the stability, resistance and resilience of ecosystems, as a tool for bioassessment, looking at woody riparian communities in particular. We used linear mixed-effect models to investigate the response of FR and other traditional biomonitoring indices to natural (drought duration) and anthropogenic stress gradients (flow regulation and agriculture) in a Mediterranean basin. Such indices include species richness, a taxonomic index, and the Riparian Quality Index, which is an index of ecological status. Then, we explored the ability of FR and the other indices to discriminate between different intensities of human alteration. FR showed higher explanatory capacity in response to multiple stressors, although we found significant negative relationships between all the biological indices (taxonomic, functional and ecological quality) and stress gradients. In addition, FR was the most accurate index to discriminate among different categories of human alteration in both perennial and intermittent river reaches, which allowed us to set threshold values to identify undisturbed (reference condition), moderately disturbed and highly disturbed reaches in the two types of river. Using these thresholds and the best-fitting model, we generated a map of human impact on the functional redundancy of riparian communities for all the stretches of the river network. Our results demonstrate that FR presents clear advantages over traditional methods, which suggests that it should be part of the biomonitoring toolbox used for

  11. Towards tests of quark-hadron duality with functional analysis and spectral function data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boito, Diogo; Caprini, Irinel

    2017-04-01

    The presence of terms that violate quark-hadron duality in the expansion of QCD Green's functions is a generally accepted fact. Recently, a new approach was proposed for the study of duality violations (DVs), which exploits the existence of a rigorous lower bound on the functional distance, measured in a certain norm, between a "true" correlator and its approximant calculated theoretically along a contour in the complex energy plane. In the present paper, we pursue the investigation of functional-analysis-based tests towards their application to real spectral function data. We derive a closed analytic expression for the minimal functional distance based on the general weighted L2 norm and discuss its relation with the distance measured in the L∞ norm. Using fake data sets obtained from a realistic toy model in which we allow for covariances inspired from the publicly available ALEPH spectral functions, we obtain, by Monte Carlo simulations, the statistical distribution of the strength parameter that measures the magnitude of the DV term added to the usual operator product expansion. The results show that, if the region with large errors near the end point of the spectrum in τ decays is excluded, the functional-analysis-based tests using either L2 or L∞ norms are able to detect, in a statistically significant way, the presence of DVs in realistic spectral function pseudodata.

  12. Measurement of Function Post Hip Fracture: Testing a Comprehensive Measurement Model of Physical Function.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Barbara; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L; Hicks, Gregory; Ostir, Glen; Klinedinst, N Jennifer; Orwig, Denise; Magaziner, Jay

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of physical function post hip fracture has been conceptualized using multiple different measures. This study tested a comprehensive measurement model of physical function. This was a descriptive secondary data analysis including 168 men and 171 women post hip fracture. Using structural equation modeling, a measurement model of physical function which included grip strength, activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, and performance was tested for fit at 2 and 12 months post hip fracture, and among male and female participants. Validity of the measurement model of physical function was evaluated based on how well the model explained physical activity, exercise, and social activities post hip fracture. The measurement model of physical function fit the data. The amount of variance the model or individual factors of the model explained varied depending on the activity. Decisions about the ideal way in which to measure physical function should be based on outcomes considered and participants. The measurement model of physical function is a reliable and valid method to comprehensively measure physical function across the hip fracture recovery trajectory. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  13. Development of additional tasks for the executive function performance test.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Bridget; Baum, Carolyn; Moore, Jennifer; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Spoeri, Susan; Doherty, Meghan; Wolf, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The Executive Function Performance Test (EFPT) is a reliable and valid performance-based assessment of executive function for people with stroke. The objective of this study was to enhance the clinical utility of the EFPT by developing and testing additional tasks for the EFPT in the Alternate EFPT (aEFPT). METHOD. We performed a cross-sectional study with poststroke participants (n = 25) and healthy control participants (n = 25). All participants completed a neuropsychological assessment battery and both the EFPT and the aEFPT. RESULTS. No statistically significant differences were found between the EFPT and the aEFPT when examining total scores, construct scores, and two overall task scores. Correlations between the aEFPT and the neuropsychological measures were adequate to strong (r2s = .59-.83). CONCLUSION. The aEFPT tasks are comparable to the original EFPT tasks, providing occupational therapy practitioners with additional tasks that can be used clinically to identify performance-based executive function deficits in people with stroke.

  14. PTSD and cognitive functioning: importance of including performance validity testing.

    PubMed

    Wisdom, Nick M; Pastorek, Nicholas J; Miller, Brian I; Booth, Jane E; Romesser, Jennifer M; Linck, John F; Sim, Anita H

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have observed an association between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and cognitive deficits across several domains including memory, attention, and executive functioning. The inclusion of response bias measures in these studies, however, remains largely unaddressed. The purpose of this study was to identify possible cognitive impairments correlated with PTSD in returning OEF/OIF/OND veterans after excluding individuals failing a well-validated performance validity test. Participants included 126 men and 8 women with a history of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) referred for a comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation as part of a consortium of five Veterans Affairs hospitals. The PTSD CheckList (PCL) and Word Memory Test (WMT) were used to establish symptoms of PTSD and invalid performance, respectively. Groups were categorized as follows: Control (PCL < 50, pass WMT), PTSD-pass (PCL ≥ 50, pass WMT), and PTSD-fail (PCL ≥ 50, fail WMT). As hypothesized, failure on the WMT was associated with significantly poorer performance on almost all cognitive tests administered; however, no significant differences were detected between individuals with and without PTSD symptoms after separating out veterans failing the WMT. These findings highlight the importance of assessing respondent validity in future research examining cognitive functioning in psychiatric illness and warrant further consideration of prior studies reporting PTSD-associated cognitive deficits.

  15. [Pulmonary function testing in Japan: present status and new developments].

    PubMed

    Tojo, Naoko

    2012-09-01

    In 2004, the Japanese Respiratory Society issued an initial set of recommendations on the standardized measurement of the most frequently used tests for pulmonary function, i.e., tests to assess slow vital capacity, forced vital capacity, and single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity. This statement has not been updated, and the prediction equations for pulmonary function testing are not fully established. Thus, the guidelines will need to be periodically updated in accordance with new developments in this rapidly evolving field. Nitric oxide (NO) is now recognized as a biological mediator in animals and humans. The human lung produces NO and exhales it in breath. The fractional nitric oxide (NO) concentration in exhaled breath (FE(NO)) can be quantitatively measured by a simple, safe, and noninvasive procedure as a complementary tool for assessing airway inflammation in airway diseases such as asthma. While the measurement of exhaled NO is standardized for clinical use, FE(NO) measurement is not approved or covered under the public health insurance system in Japan.

  16. Study on Noncontact Pulmonary Function Test Using Pattern Light Projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Hirooki; Koshiji, Kohji

    The pulmonary function test by spirometer is generally conducted. The test subjects, especially children, women and older people, feel uncomfortable as the mouthpiece and nasal plug must be attached to the face of them. We have studied the nonrestraint pulmonary function test using the dot matrix pattern projection in order to decrease the burden to the examinee. In our proposed system, the pattern light projector illuminates the thorax with the dot matrix pattern light. And the CCD camera takes a series of images of the dot matrix pattern. The three dimensional shape of the thorax surface can be calculated by the distribution of light dots. And the respiratory waveform is calculated by the time-series change of the three dimensional shape. The respiratory waveform of our system was similar to one of spirometer. Therefore, we clarified that our proposed system can equivalently measure the respiration with spirometer. And we compared the volume change of the three dimensional shape calculated by our system with the expired tidal volume measured by the expiration gas analyzer. And we examined the relationship between the expired tidal volume and the volume change of the thorax surface.

  17. Seated reach capabilities for ergonomic design and evaluation with consideration of reach difficulties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qun; Ren, Jindong; Zhang, Qian; Hua, Meng

    2017-03-01

    This paper aimed to identify the reach capabilities of 26 seated subjects considering the reach difficulty, orientation and other potential factors, and to find a method to model the minimum reach capability surfaces for fixed and adjustable seats. The reach capability radius was used as a measure of the reach capability and theoretically modeled. Based on the test data of seated reach, the distribution of the reach capability radius was analyzed. The strategy to select the minimum reach envelopes was constructed to accommodate a sufficient percentage of the target population for both fixed and adjustable seats. For adjustable seats, a method was developed to derive the reach capability data from the tested individual reach capability data by introducing seating position models to re-position the individual reach capability data. An application case was realized based on the cab packaging data of a mini-van, and the minimum reach envelopes of different difficulties were created and validated to accommodate 90% of the target population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Autonomic function testing aboard the ISS using “PNEUMOCARD”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baevsky, R. M.; Funtova, I. I.; Diedrich, A.; Chernikova, A. G.; Drescher, J.; Baranov, V. M.; Tank, J.

    2009-10-01

    Investigations of blood pressure, heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV) during long term space flights on board the "ISS" have shown characteristic changes of autonomic cardiovascular control. Therefore, alterations of the autonomic nervous system occurring during spaceflight may be responsible for in- and post-flight disturbances. The device "Pneumocard" was developed to further investigate autonomic cardiovascular and respiratory function aboard the ISS. The hard-software diagnostic complex "Pneumocard" was used during in-flight experiment aboard ISS for autonomic function testing. ECG, photoplethysmography, respiration, transthoracic bioimpedance and seismocardiography were assessed in one male cosmonaut (flight lengths six month). Recordings were made prior to the flight, late during flight, and post-flight during spontaneous respiration and controlled respiration at different rates. HR remained stable during flight. The values were comparable to supine measurements on earth. Respiratory frequency and blood pressure decreased during flight. Post flight HR and BP values increased compared to in-flight data exceeding pre-flight values. Cardiac time intervals did not change dramatically during flight. Pulse wave transit time decreased during flight. The maximum of the first time derivative of the impedance cardiogram, which is highly correlated with stroke volume was not reduced in-flight. Our results demonstrate that autonomic function testing aboard the ISS using "Pneumocard" is feasible and generates data of good quality. Despite the decrease in BP, pulse wave transit time was found reduced in space as shown earlier. However, cardiac output did not decrease profoundly in the investigated cosmonaut. Autonomic testing during space flight detects individual changes in cardiovascular control and may add important information to standard medical control. The recent plans to support a flight to Mars, makes these kinds of observations all the more relevant

  19. Test-specific control conditions for functional analyses.

    PubMed

    Fahmie, Tara A; Iwata, Brian A; Querim, Angie C; Harper, Jill M

    2013-01-01

    Most functional analyses of problem behavior include a common condition (play or noncontingent reinforcement) as a control for both positive and negative reinforcement. However, test-specific conditions that control for each potential source of reinforcement may be beneficial occasionally. We compared responding during alone, ignore, play, and differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) control conditions for individuals whose problem behavior was maintained by positive or negative reinforcement. Results showed that all of the conditions were effective controls for problem behavior maintained by positive reinforcement; however, the DRO condition was consistently ineffective as a control for problem behavior maintained by negative reinforcement. Implications for the design of functional analyses and future research are discussed. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  20. Limitation of liver function tests in metastatic carcinoid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Moinuddin, M.; Dean, P.; Vander Zwaag, R.; Dragutsky, M.

    1987-04-01

    To evaluate the utility of liver function tests (LFT) as indicators of metastatic carcinoid tumors, a retrospective study was performed. The LFT results of 17 patients with carcinoid tumors metastatic to the liver were compared with 17 patients with other malignant tumors. In the noncarcinoid group, 82.4% of the patients had elevated alkaline phosphatase (AP) or gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP), whereas only 28.6% of carcinoid patients had abnormal enzymes. The medians of all LFT values were significantly higher in noncarcinoid patients than in the carcinoid group, except for glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT). Our data indicate that LFT are helpful in screening for liver metastases in patients with noncarcinoid tumors, but are unreliable in carcinoid tumors. Imaging tests should be used to rule out liver metastases in carcinoid tumors, irrespective of LFT results.

  1. Executive Function in Preschool Children: Test-Retest Reliability

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Danielle M.; Schaefer, Catherine; Pang, Karen; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that executive function (EF) may distinguish between children who are well- or ill-prepared for kindergarten, however, little is known about the test-retest reliability of measures of EF for children. We aimed to establish a battery of EF measures that are sensitive to both development and individual differences across the preschool period using Conflict and Delay subtests that had a cool (abstract) or hot (extrinsic reward) focus. Results from 151 children in three age groups (2.5, 3.5, and 4.5) suggested acceptable same-day test-retest reliability on all but Delay-Cool subtasks. These findings will inform appropriate measurement selection and development for future studies. PMID:21643523

  2. Testing Visual Functions in Patients with Visual Prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, Robert; Bach, Michael; Wilhelm, Barbara; Durst, Wilhelm; Trauzettel-Klosinski, Susanne; Zrenner, Eberhart

    A number of different technical devices for restoring vision in blind patients have been proposed to date. They employ different strategies for the acquisition of optical information, image processing, and electrical stimulation. Devices with external cameras or with integrated components for light detection have been developed and are designed to stimulate such different sites as the retina, optic nerve, and cortex. First clinical trials for these devices are being planned or already underway. As vision with these artificial vision devices (AVDs) may differ considerably from natural vision and as it may not be possible to predict visual functions provided by such devices on the basis of technical specifications alone, novel test strategies are needed to comprehensively describe visual performance. We propose a battery of tests for standardized well-controlled investigations in these patients that allow for objective assessment of efficacy of these devices.

  3. Microcomputer based instrument for measuring a novel pulmonary function test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craine, Brian L.; Craine, Eric R.

    1996-08-01

    The design of a prototype instrument for measuring the end-tidal concentration of carbon monoxide during human respiration is presented. The instrument automatically samples the final sixty cubic centimeters of exhaled breath, from successive breathing cycles, by coordinating a pump and the breathing cycle with a set of vacuum and pressure sensors. The concentration of carbon monoxide is measured using a nondispersive infrared spectrophotometer. The amount of carbon monoxide present is measured relative to the source air concentration eliminating the need for calibrating the instrument. The testing protocol and measurements can be controlled by a microcomputer connected to the instrument through a standard RS-232 serial interface. When at equilibrium, the end-tidal concentration of CO can be measured in a simple and reproducible fashion. This simplified technology allows for the construction of a small, portable, easy to use instrument that will allow the application of this new pulmonary function test at the point of contact with patients.

  4. TRL - A FORMAL TEST REPRESENTATION LANGUAGE AND TOOL FOR FUNCTIONAL TEST DESIGNS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hops, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    A Formal Test Representation Language and Tool for Functional Test Designs (TRL) is an automatic tool and a formal language that is used to implement the Category-Partition Method and produce the specification of test cases in the testing phase of software development. The Category-Partition Method is particularly useful in defining the inputs, outputs and purpose of the test design phase and combines the benefits of choosing normal cases with error exposing properties. Traceability can be maintained quite easily by creating a test design for each objective in the test plan. The effort to transform the test cases into procedures is simplified by using an automatic tool to create the cases based on the test design. The method allows the rapid elimination of undesired test cases from consideration, and easy review of test designs by peer groups. The first step in the category-partition method is functional decomposition, in which the specification and/or requirements are decomposed into functional units that can be tested independently. A secondary purpose of this step is to identify the parameters that affect the behavior of the system for each functional unit. The second step, category analysis, carries the work done in the previous step further by determining the properties or sub-properties of the parameters that would make the system behave in different ways. The designer should analyze the requirements to determine the features or categories of each parameter and how the system may behave if the category were to vary its value. If the parameter undergoing refinement is a data-item, then categories of this data-item may be any of its attributes, such as type, size, value, units, frequency of change, or source. After all the categories for the parameters of the functional unit have been determined, the next step is to partition each category's range space into mutually exclusive values that the category can assume. In choosing partition values, all possible kinds

  5. TRL - A FORMAL TEST REPRESENTATION LANGUAGE AND TOOL FOR FUNCTIONAL TEST DESIGNS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hops, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    A Formal Test Representation Language and Tool for Functional Test Designs (TRL) is an automatic tool and a formal language that is used to implement the Category-Partition Method and produce the specification of test cases in the testing phase of software development. The Category-Partition Method is particularly useful in defining the inputs, outputs and purpose of the test design phase and combines the benefits of choosing normal cases with error exposing properties. Traceability can be maintained quite easily by creating a test design for each objective in the test plan. The effort to transform the test cases into procedures is simplified by using an automatic tool to create the cases based on the test design. The method allows the rapid elimination of undesired test cases from consideration, and easy review of test designs by peer groups. The first step in the category-partition method is functional decomposition, in which the specification and/or requirements are decomposed into functional units that can be tested independently. A secondary purpose of this step is to identify the parameters that affect the behavior of the system for each functional unit. The second step, category analysis, carries the work done in the previous step further by determining the properties or sub-properties of the parameters that would make the system behave in different ways. The designer should analyze the requirements to determine the features or categories of each parameter and how the system may behave if the category were to vary its value. If the parameter undergoing refinement is a data-item, then categories of this data-item may be any of its attributes, such as type, size, value, units, frequency of change, or source. After all the categories for the parameters of the functional unit have been determined, the next step is to partition each category's range space into mutually exclusive values that the category can assume. In choosing partition values, all possible kinds

  6. Effect of exercise test on pulmonary function of obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Faria, Alethéa Guimarães; Ribeiro, Maria Angela G O; Marson, Fernando Augusto Lima; Schivinski, Camila Isabel S; Severino, Silvana Dalge; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Barros Filho, Antônio A

    2014-01-01

    to investigate the pulmonary response to exercise of non-morbidly obese adolescents, considering the gender. a prospective cross-sectional study was conducted with 92 adolescents (47 obese and 45 eutrophic), divided in four groups according to obesity and gender. Anthropometric parameters, pulmonary function (spirometry and oxygen saturation [SatO2]), heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), respiratory rate (RR), and respiratory muscle strength were measured. Pulmonary function parameters were measured before, during, and after the exercise test. BP and HR were higher in obese individuals during the exercise test (p = 0.0001). SatO2 values decreased during exercise in obese adolescents (p = 0.0001). Obese males had higher levels of maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressures (p = 0.0002) when compared to obese and eutrophic females. Obese males showed lower values of maximum voluntary ventilation, forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume in the first second when compared to eutrophic males, before and after exercise (p = 0.0005). Obese females had greater inspiratory capacity compared to eutrophic females (p = 0.0001). Expiratory reserve volume was lower in obese subjects when compared to controls (p ≤ 0,05). obese adolescents presented changes in pulmonary function at rest and these changes remained present during exercise. The spirometric and cardiorespiratory values were different in the four study groups. The present data demonstrated that, in spite of differences in lung growth, the model of fat distribution alters pulmonary function differently in obese female and male adolescents. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. A virtual shopping test for realistic assessment of cognitive function

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cognitive dysfunction caused by brain injury often prevents a patient from achieving a healthy and high quality of life. By now, each cognitive function is assessed precisely by neuropsychological tests. However, it is also important to provide an overall assessment of the patients’ ability in their everyday life. We have developed a Virtual Shopping Test (VST) using virtual reality technology. The objective of this study was to clarify 1) the significance of VST by comparing VST with other conventional tests, 2) the applicability of VST to brain-damaged patients, and 3) the performance of VST in relation to age differences. Methods The participants included 10 patients with brain damage, 10 age-matched healthy subjects for controls, 10 old healthy subjects, and 10 young healthy subjects. VST and neuropsychological tests/questionnaires about attention, memory and executive function were conducted on the patients, while VST and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were conducted on the controls and healthy subjects. Within the VST, the participants were asked to buy four items in the virtual shopping mall quickly in a rational way. The score for evaluation included the number of items bought correctly, the number of times to refer to hints, the number of movements between shops, and the total time spent to complete the shopping. Results Some variables on VST correlated with the scores of conventional assessment about attention and everyday memory. The mean number of times referring to hints and the mean number of movements were significantly larger for the patients with brain damage, and the mean total time was significantly longer for the patients than for the controls. In addition, the mean total time was significantly longer for the old than for the young. Conclusions The results suggest that VST is able to evaluate the ability of attention and everyday memory in patients with brain damage. The time of VST is increased by age. PMID:23777412

  8. A virtual shopping test for realistic assessment of cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Okahashi, Sayaka; Seki, Keiko; Nagano, Akinori; Luo, Zhiwei; Kojima, Maki; Futaki, Toshiko

    2013-06-18

    Cognitive dysfunction caused by brain injury often prevents a patient from achieving a healthy and high quality of life. By now, each cognitive function is assessed precisely by neuropsychological tests. However, it is also important to provide an overall assessment of the patients' ability in their everyday life. We have developed a Virtual Shopping Test (VST) using virtual reality technology. The objective of this study was to clarify 1) the significance of VST by comparing VST with other conventional tests, 2) the applicability of VST to brain-damaged patients, and 3) the performance of VST in relation to age differences. The participants included 10 patients with brain damage, 10 age-matched healthy subjects for controls, 10 old healthy subjects, and 10 young healthy subjects. VST and neuropsychological tests/questionnaires about attention, memory and executive function were conducted on the patients, while VST and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were conducted on the controls and healthy subjects. Within the VST, the participants were asked to buy four items in the virtual shopping mall quickly in a rational way. The score for evaluation included the number of items bought correctly, the number of times to refer to hints, the number of movements between shops, and the total time spent to complete the shopping. Some variables on VST correlated with the scores of conventional assessment about attention and everyday memory. The mean number of times referring to hints and the mean number of movements were significantly larger for the patients with brain damage, and the mean total time was significantly longer for the patients than for the controls. In addition, the mean total time was significantly longer for the old than for the young. The results suggest that VST is able to evaluate the ability of attention and everyday memory in patients with brain damage. The time of VST is increased by age.

  9. Grammar tests increase the ability to lateralize language function in the Wada test.

    PubMed

    Połczyńska, Monika; Curtiss, Susan; Walshaw, Particia; Siddarth, Prabha; Benjamin, Chris; Moseley, Brian D; Vigil, Celia; Jones, Michael; Eliashiv, Dawn; Bookheimer, Susan

    2014-12-01

    Grammar is a core component of the language system, yet it is rarely assessed during the Wada (intracarotid amobarbital) test. It is hypothesized that adding grammar tests to the recovery phase of the Wada test will increase our ability to lateralize language function. Sixteen individuals (nine females, fifteen right-handed, mean age 38.4 years, SD=10.7) with medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy participated in the study. On EEG ten patients had seizures originating in the left hemisphere (LH), five in the right hemisphere (RH), and one was insufficiently lateralized. We included only patients who were LH-dominant on the standard test in the encoding phase of the Wada test. In the recovery phase of Wada testing the participants underwent evaluation with a standard language and a new test of grammar, the CYCLE-N. Ten patients underwent bilateral injections, six unilateral (one RH, five LH). As expected, injection in the LH decreased language performance to a greater extent than injection to the RH on both tests. However, the CYCLE-N produced more profound language deficits in the injected LH compared to the RH (p=0.01), whereas the standard tests did not cause such pronounced differences (p=0.2). The results suggest that the standard tests did not significantly differentiate the effects of the injections and the CYCLE-N, for the most part, did. Our results are of particular relevance to patients who are too obtunded to speak in the encoding phase. In sum, the CYCLE-N may be helpful in assessing hemispheric dominance for language. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Highly adaptive tests for group differences in brain functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghi; Pan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and other technologies have been offering evidence and insights showing that altered brain functional networks are associated with neurological illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease. Exploring brain networks of clinical populations compared to those of controls would be a key inquiry to reveal underlying neurological processes related to such illnesses. For such a purpose, group-level inference is a necessary first step in order to establish whether there are any genuinely disrupted brain subnetworks. Such an analysis is also challenging due to the high dimensionality of the parameters in a network model and high noise levels in neuroimaging data. We are still in the early stage of method development as highlighted by Varoquaux and Craddock (2013) that "there is currently no unique solution, but a spectrum of related methods and analytical strategies" to learn and compare brain connectivity. In practice the important issue of how to choose several critical parameters in estimating a network, such as what association measure to use and what is the sparsity of the estimated network, has not been carefully addressed, largely because the answers are unknown yet. For example, even though the choice of tuning parameters in model estimation has been extensively discussed in the literature, as to be shown here, an optimal choice of a parameter for network estimation may not be optimal in the current context of hypothesis testing. Arbitrarily choosing or mis-specifying such parameters may lead to extremely low-powered tests. Here we develop highly adaptive tests to detect group differences in brain connectivity while accounting for unknown optimal choices of some tuning parameters. The proposed tests combine statistical evidence against a null hypothesis from multiple sources across a range of plausible tuning parameter values reflecting uncertainty with the unknown truth. These highly adaptive tests are not only

  11. Highly adaptive tests for group differences in brain functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghi; Pan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and other technologies have been offering evidence and insights showing that altered brain functional networks are associated with neurological illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease. Exploring brain networks of clinical populations compared to those of controls would be a key inquiry to reveal underlying neurological processes related to such illnesses. For such a purpose, group-level inference is a necessary first step in order to establish whether there are any genuinely disrupted brain subnetworks. Such an analysis is also challenging due to the high dimensionality of the parameters in a network model and high noise levels in neuroimaging data. We are still in the early stage of method development as highlighted by Varoquaux and Craddock (2013) that “there is currently no unique solution, but a spectrum of related methods and analytical strategies” to learn and compare brain connectivity. In practice the important issue of how to choose several critical parameters in estimating a network, such as what association measure to use and what is the sparsity of the estimated network, has not been carefully addressed, largely because the answers are unknown yet. For example, even though the choice of tuning parameters in model estimation has been extensively discussed in the literature, as to be shown here, an optimal choice of a parameter for network estimation may not be optimal in the current context of hypothesis testing. Arbitrarily choosing or mis-specifying such parameters may lead to extremely low-powered tests. Here we develop highly adaptive tests to detect group differences in brain connectivity while accounting for unknown optimal choices of some tuning parameters. The proposed tests combine statistical evidence against a null hypothesis from multiple sources across a range of plausible tuning parameter values reflecting uncertainty with the unknown truth. These highly adaptive tests are not

  12. Testing alternative temporal aftershock decay functions in an ETAS framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainzl, S.; Christophersen, A.

    2017-08-01

    ) is still best fit by a power law. Out of all the tested decay functions, the one based on the rate-state friction model is the only one that performs in a majority of cases better than the Omori-Utsu law for fixed parameters. This suggests that it could be a potential candidate to replace the unlimited Omori-Utsu law in ETAS-model-based earthquake forecasts.

  13. Effect of soft and semirigid ankle orthoses on Star Excursion Balance Test performance in patients with functional ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Hadadi, Mohammad; Mousavi, Mohammad Ebrahim; Fardipour, Shima; Vameghi, Roshanak; Mazaheri, Masood

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of soft and semirigid ankle orthoses on dynamic balance assessed using Star Excursion Balance Test in patients with functional ankle instability compared with healthy individuals. Non-experimental, observational study with multiple-factor design, including group (functional ankle instability and healthy) as the between-subjects factor and orthotics condition (no orthosis, soft orthosis and semirigid orthosis) as the within-subjects factor. Sixteen unilateral functional ankle instability patients and a group of 16 healthy control individuals, matched for age, height and weight, participated in the study. Dynamic balance was tested with and without wearing ankle orthosis. Reach distance of participants in 3 bracing conditions were measured in anteromedial, medial and posteromedial directions of Star Excursion Balance Test. Average of 3 trials in 3 measured directions, normalized to leg length of each participant, was used for statistical analysis. There were no differences among orthotics conditions in healthy people. However, normalized reach distance increased from no-orthosis to semirigid to soft orthoses in FAI patients. Differences were significant between soft and no-orthosis (13% in anteromedial, 14% in medial and 15% in posteromedial direction p=0.01) and between semirigid and no-orthosis (10% in anteromedial, 8.5% in medial and 8.5% in posteromedial direction, p=0.01) conditions in all 3 measured directions. The difference between soft and semirigid orthoses was significant (6% difference, p<0.05) only in PM direction. Ankle orthoses improve reach distance in functional ankle instability patients in various reach directions. Soft orthosis has a more pronounced effect on dynamic balance, especially in posteromedial direction, compared with semirigid orthosis. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Europe reaches the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-11-01

    During the long cruise, consisting of a spiralling orbit around the Earth that brought the spacecraft close to the lunar capture point, SMART-1 achieved all the technology demonstration goals of the first part of the mission. The exciting final manoeuvres to enter a stable lunar orbit, the challenges of the journey and the results of the SMART-1 technology tests paving the way for future interplanetary missions, will be presented at a press conference on 16 November at ESA/ESOC in Darmstadt (Germany), starting at 08h00. Media representatives can also follow the press conference by videoconference from ESA/HQ in Paris, France, ESA/ESTEC (Noordwijk - the Netherlands) and ESA/ESRIN (Frascati - Italy). Please return the attached accreditation form to the establishment of your choice.

  15. [Lung function testing in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Escribano, P Martín; Sánchez, M A Gómez; de Atauri, M J Díaz; Frade, J Palomera; García, I Martín

    2005-07-01

    The main objective was to describe the results of lung function testing in a series of 120 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, and the secondary objective was to compare these findings with hemodynamic variables. This was a descriptive study of lung function in 120 patients with stable pulmonary arterial hypertension (Evian/Venice groups 1 and 4) studied until January 2002 in the Pulmonary Hypertension and Lung Transplant Working Group attached to the Cardiology Department of the Hospital Universtario 12 de Octubre in Madrid, Spain. Data were collected retrospectively for the first 47 patients (1981 to 1995) and prospectively thereafter for the remaining 73 patients. The diagnosis was idiopathic arterial hypertension or hypertension associated with collagenosis, chronic pulmonary embolism, cardiac shunt, or toxic oil syndrome (30 cases). In the group as a whole, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and total lung capacity were normal; mean (SD) values revealed low carbon dioxide diffusing capacity (67.6% [23.2%]), and moderate hypoxemia (65.8 [15.4] mm Hg). No significant associations were observed between lung function and hemodynamic parameters. Mean age in the toxic oil syndrome group was lower (33.7 [11.4] years), and these patients had higher mean scores on the New York Heart Association scale (3.3 [0.5]) and for pulmonary vascular resistance (20.3 [8.1] kPa.L(-1).s). Lung function was studied in a series of 120 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (Evian/ Venice groups 1 and 4), 30 of whom had toxic oil syndrome. No significant associations were found between lung function and hemodynamic parameters.

  16. Contaminated aerosol recovery from pulmonary function testing equipment.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, T; Miles, J; Okeson, G C

    1999-02-01

    Clinically, the spread of infectious agents between subjects undergoing spirometry is quite uncommon. There is almost no documentation in the medical literature on this subject. We studied the retrieval of nonpathogenic Escherichia coli after aerosolizing organisms into standard pulmonary function tubing of a type that is frequently used by volume-sensing spirometers. The arrival of the aerosol at the distal end of the tubing was documented by culture. After delays of 0, 1, 5, and 10 min, respectively, air was forcibly withdrawn from the proximal end of the tubing through a special petri plate assembly. The plates were cultured and the colonies were counted. Immediately after insufflation of organisms, air withdrawn from the proximal tubing had counts similar to the air sampled at the distal end. After a 1-min delay, the proximal samples contained only rare organisms. No organisms were recovered from proximal air samples after a delay of 5 or 10 min after insufflation of organisms. The absence of detectable aerosolized E. coli after delays of 5 and 10 min after insufflation of organisms into spirometry tubing supports the hypothesis that a significant transfer of aerosolized organisms does not occur during routine pulmonary function testing as long as an interval of 5 min or more is allowed between tests.

  17. Thyroid function testing in elephant seals in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Yochem, Pamela K; Gulland, Frances M D; Stewart, Brent S; Haulena, Martin; Mazet, Jonna A K; Boyce, Walter M

    2008-02-01

    Northern Elephant Seal Skin Disease (NESSD) is a severe, ulcerative, skin condition of unknown cause affecting primarily yearling northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris); it has been associated with decreased levels of circulating thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). Abnormalities of the thyroid gland that result in decreased hormone levels (hypothyroidism) can result in hair loss, scaling and secondary skin infections. However, concurrent illness (including skin ailments) can suppress basal levels of thyroid hormones and mimic hypothyroidism; when this occurs in animals with normal thyroid glands it is called "sick euthyroid syndrome". The two conditions (true hypothyroidism vs. "sick euthyroid") can be distinguished in dogs by testing the response of the thyroid gland to exogenous thyrotropin (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone, TSH). To determine whether hypothyroidism is involved in the etiology of NESSD, we tested thyroid function of stranded yearling elephant seals in the following categories: healthy seals (rehabilitated and ready for release; N=9), seals suffering from NESSD (N=16) and seals with other illnesses (e.g., lungworm pneumonia; N=10). Levels of T4 increased significantly for all three categories of elephant seals following TSH stimulation, suggesting that seals with NESSD are "sick euthyroid" and that the disease is not associated with abnormal thyroid gland function.

  18. SOFIA Telescope Functional Integration and Performance Test Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waddell, P.; Haas, M. R.; Dunham, E. W.; Bremers, E.; Harms, F.; Keas, P. J.; Lattner, K.; Lillienthal, D.; Meyer, A. W.; Wolf, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a 2.7-m telescope installed in a Boeing 747SP. Collaborators developing the SOFIA telescope and observatory completed an intense period of activation between mid-June and mid-August, 2004. The integration activities included a preliminary modal survey; alignment of the Wide Field, Fine Field, and Focal Plane Imagers; installation of the secondary and tertiary mirrors; and their alignment relative to the primary mirror. Once these preliminaries were completed, SOFIA was rolled out of its hangar for a series of ground-based, on-sky tests using HIPO, the first science instrument to be installed on the telescope. First light was achieved observing Polaris on August 18, 2004. The on-sky test period encompassed 12 nights in late August and early September and included telescope step function response and first-order pointing control, image quality and optical tracking stability measurements, evaluation of the tracking imagers, gravity deformation studies, gyro alignment and bias rate measurement and correction, and performance tests of the secondary mirror Focus Centering Mechanism and Tilt Chopping Mechanism. It also included tests of the complete telescope command set, including Image Quality Compensation (IQC), quasi-static Flexible Body Compensation (FBC), reference frame transformations and trajectory estimation algorithms. This poster summarizes the results and describes the expected performance of SOFIA at the start of science observations. SOFIA is jointly funded by NASA and DLR and is managed by USRA and DSI. The successful, on-schedule completion of these tests involved close coordination by these three parties, CSA Engineering, CSEM, Kayser-Threde, L-3 Communications, Lowell Observatory, MAN-Technologies, Orbital Sciences, and others.

  19. Rationalizing thyroid function testing: which TSH cut-offs are optimal for testing free T4?

    PubMed

    Henze, Meg; Brown, Suzanne J; Hadlow, Narelle C; Walsh, John P

    2017-08-30

    Thyroid function testing often utilizes TSH measurement first, then reflex testing for free T4 if TSH is outside reference range limits. The utility of different TSH cut-offs for reflex testing is unknown. To examine different TSH cut-offs for reflex free T4 testing. We analyzed concurrent TSH and free T4 results from 120 403 individuals from a single laboratory in Western Australia (clinical cohort) and 4568 Busselton Health Study participants (community cohort). In the clinical cohort, restricting free T4 measurement to individuals with TSH below 0.3 or above 5.0 mU/L resulted in a 22% reduction in free T4 testing compared with TSH reference range limits of 0.4 and 4.0 mU/L; using TSH cut-offs of 0.2 and 6.0 mU/L resulted in a 34% reduction in free T4 testing. In the community cohort, the impact was less: 3.3% and 4.8% reductions in free T4 testing respectively. In the clinical cohort, using TSH cut-offs of 0.2 and 6.0 mU/L, elevated free T4 would go undetected in 4.2% of individuals with TSH 0.2-0.4 mU/L; in most, free T4 was marginally elevated, and unlikely to indicate clinically relevant hyperthyroidism. Low free T4 would go undetected in 2.5% of individuals with TSH 4-6 mU/L; in 94%, free T4 was marginally reduced and unlikely to indicate clinically relevant hypothyroidism. Setting TSH cut-offs 0.1-0.2 mU/L below and 1-2 mU/L above reference range limits for reflex testing of free T4 reduces the need for free T4 testing, with minimal impact on case-finding.

  20. Infection control in the pulmonary function test laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Rasam, Shweta Amol; Apte, Komalkirti Keshavkiran; Salvi, Sundeep Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary function testing plays a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with lung diseases. Cases of cross infection acquired from the pulmonary function laboratory, although rare, have been reported from various countries. It is therefore imperative to identify the risks and potential organisms implicated in cross infections in a pulmonary function test (PFT) laboratory and implement better and more effective infection control procedures, which will help in preventing cross infections. The infrastructure, the daily patient flow, and the prevalent disinfection techniques used in a PFT laboratory, all play a significant role in transmission of infections. Simple measures to tackle the cross infection potential in a PFT laboratory can help reduce this risk to a bare minimum. Use of specialized techniques and equipment can also be of much use in a set up that has a high turnover of patients. This review aims at creating awareness about the possible pathogens and situations commonly encountered in a PFT laboratory. We have attempted to suggest some relevant and useful infection control measures with regard to disinfection, sterilization, and patient planning and segregation to help minimize the risk of cross infections in a PFT laboratory. The review also highlights the lacuna in the current scenario of PFT laboratories in India and the need to develop newer and better methods of infection control, which will be more user-friendly and cost effective. Further studies to study the possible pathogens in a PFT laboratory and evaluate the prevalent infection control strategies will be needed to enable us to draw more precious conclusions, which can lead to more relevant, contextual recommendations for cross infections control in PFT lab in India. PMID:26180386

  1. Oncolytic virotherapy reaches adolescence.

    PubMed

    Hammill, Adrienne M; Conner, Joseph; Cripe, Timothy P

    2010-12-15

    Lytic viruses kill cells as a consequence of their normal replication life cycle. The idea of harnessing viruses to kill cancer cells arose over a century ago, before viruses were even discovered, from medical case reports of infections associated with cancer remissions. Since then, there has been no shortage of hype, hope, or fear regarding the prospect of oncolytic virotherapy for cancer. Early developments in the field included encouraging antitumor efficacy both in animal studies in the 1920s-1940s and in human clinical trials in the 1950s-1970s. Despite its long-standing history, oncolytic virotherapy was an idea ahead of its time. Without needed advances in molecular biology, virology, immunology, and clinical research ethics, early clinical trials resulted in infectious complications and were fraught with controversial research conduct, so that enthusiasm in the medical community waned. Oncolytic virotherapy is now experiencing a major growth spurt, having sustained numerous laboratory advances and undergone multiple encouraging adult clinical trials, and is now witnessing the emergence of pediatric trials. Here we review the history and salient biology of the field, including preclinical and clinical data, with a special emphasis on those agents now being tested in pediatric cancer patients.

  2. Visual function with acupuncture tested by visual evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Sagara, Yoshiko; Fuse, Nobuo; Seimiya, Motohiko; Yokokura, Syunji; Watanabe, Kei; Nakazawa, Toru; Kurusu, Masayuki; Seki, Takashi; Tamai, Makoto

    2006-07-01

    Visual evoked potential (VEP) testing is used frequently and is an important ophthalmologic physiological test to examine visual functions objectively. The VEP is a complicated waveform consisting of negative waveform named N75 and N135, and positive waveform named P100. Delayed P100 latency and greatly attenuated amplitude on VEP are known characteristics for diagnosing optic nerve disease. Acupuncture has been used to treat wide clinical symptoms with minimal side effects. The confirmation of the efficacy of acupuncture generally relies on subjective symptoms. There is not much scientific evidence supporting the acupuncture treatments for eye diseases up to today. However, the VEP test can evaluate objectively and numerically the efficacy of the treatment by the acupuncture. We analyzed 19 healthy subjects (38 eyes). The P100 latencies in the group of less than 101.7 msec (total average) before acupuncture stimulations were not different than those after treatment (98.2 +/- 3.0 msec, 98.2 +/- 4.0 msec, respectively, p = 0.88, n = 17), but the latencies in those subjects with longer or equal to 101.7 msec were statistically different after acupuncture (104.6 +/- 2.8 msec, 101.9 +/- 3.7 msec, respectively, p = 0.006, n = 21). These results show that the acupuncture stimulation contributes to the P100 latencies of pattern reversal (PR)-VEP to some subjects who have delayed latencies, and this electrophysiological method is a valuable technique in monitoring the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy in the improvements of visual functions. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the physiological effects by acupuncture stimulations using PR-VEP in normal subjects.

  3. Functional testing methods for the antiplatelet effects of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Schrör, Karsten; Huber, Kurt; Hohlfeld, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    At antiplatelet doses of 75-325 mg/day, aspirin irreversibly inhibits the platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1-dependent thromboxane A(2) (TXA(2)) formation. This is the pharmacological mode of action of aspirin, and it can be predicted that if aspirin does not inhibit COX-1 sufficiently, patients will not benefit from its antiplatelet effects. A pharmacodynamic failure of aspirin occurs in 1-2% of patients. The vast majority of atherothrombotic events in patients treated with aspirin result from mechanisms that are dependent on residual (non-COX-1-dependent) platelet reactivity. Global tests of platelet activation in vitro may identify patients with high residual platelet reactivity but are not sufficiently specific to test the pharmacological effect of aspirin. A further problem is the absence of standardized normal ranges for many assays and the fact that different equipment measures different signals, which are also influenced by the agonist and the anticoagulant used. Similar considerations apply for the determination of platelet-derived biomarkers such as circulating P-selectin, soluble CD40 ligand and others. The direct measurement of inhibition of thromboxane-forming capacity is the most specific pharmacological assay for aspirin. However, there is no linear correlation between inhibition of TXA(2) formation and inhibition of platelet function. Measurement of urinary levels of the TXB(2) metabolite, 11-dehydro-thromboxane B(2), represents an index of TXA(2) biosynthesis in vivo, but is also sensitive to other cellular sources of TXA(2). One general problem of all assays is the relationship with clinical outcome, which is still unclear. Monitoring aspirin treatment by testing platelet function or measuring biomarkers in clinical practice should not be recommended until a clear relationship for the predictive value of these assays for clinical outcome has been established.

  4. Spatial weighting functions: transient hydraulic tests and heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Molz, Fred J; Guan, Jianyong; Wang, Jinjun

    2005-01-01

    To improve understanding of property measurements in heterogeneous media, an energy-based weighting function concept is developed. In (assumed) homogeneous media, the instrument spatial weighting function (ISWF) depends only on the energy dissipation distribution set up by the measurement procedure and it reduces to simply inverse sample volume (uniform weighting) for 1-D parallel flow case (ideal permeameter). For 1-D transient flow in homogeneous media, such as with slug tests, the ISWF varies with position and time, with 95% of the total weighting contained within 115 well radii, even late in the test. In the heterogeneous case, the determination of the ISWF is connected to the problem of determining an equivalent hydraulic conductivity (K), where the criterion for equivalence is based on equal energy dissipation rate rather than equal volume discharge. The discharge-based equivalent K (K(E)) and the energy-based equivalent K in heterogeneous media (K(eh)) are not equal in general, with K(eh) typically above the nodal arithmetic mean K. The possibly more fundamental problem is that as one makes K measurements in heterogeneous media at different locations or on different cores of heterogeneous materials, the ISWF will be heterogeneity dependent, implying that the averaging process resulting in the equivalent K value also varies with position. If the testing procedure is transient, then the averaging process varies with time. This suggests a fundamental ambiguity in the interpretation of hydraulic conductivity measurements in heterogeneous media that may impact how we approach modeling and prediction in a practical sense (Molz 2003). Further research is suggested.

  5. Testing galaxy formation models with galaxy stellar mass functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S. H.; Mo, H. J.; Lan, T.-W.; Ménard, B.

    2017-01-01

    We compare predictions of a number of empirical models and numerical simulations of galaxy formation to the conditional stellar mass functions of galaxies in groups of different masses obtained recently by Lan et al. to test how well different models accommodate the data. The observational data clearly prefer a model in which star formation in low-mass haloes changes behaviour at a characteristic redshift zc ˜ 2. There is also tentative evidence that this characteristic redshift depends on environment, becoming zc ˜ 4 in regions that eventually evolve into rich clusters of galaxies. The constrained model is used to understand how galaxies form and evolve in dark matter haloes, and to make predictions for other statistical properties of the galaxy population, such as the stellar mass functions of galaxies at high z, the star formation, and stellar mass assembly histories in dark matter haloes. A comparison of our model predictions with those of other empirical models shows that different models can make vastly different predictions, even though all of them are tuned to match the observed stellar mass functions of galaxies.

  6. Functional toxicology: tools to advance the future of toxicity testing

    PubMed Central

    Gaytán, Brandon D.; Vulpe, Chris D.

    2014-01-01

    The increased presence of chemical contaminants in the environment is an undeniable concern to human health and ecosystems. Historically, by relying heavily upon costly and laborious animal-based toxicity assays, the field of toxicology has often neglected examinations of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of toxicity for the majority of compounds—information that, if available, would strengthen risk assessment analyses. Functional toxicology, where cells or organisms with gene deletions or depleted proteins are used to assess genetic requirements for chemical tolerance, can advance the field of toxicity testing by contributing data regarding chemical mechanisms of toxicity. Functional toxicology can be accomplished using available genetic tools in yeasts, other fungi and bacteria, and eukaryotes of increased complexity, including zebrafish, fruit flies, rodents, and human cell lines. Underscored is the value of using less complex systems such as yeasts to direct further studies in more complex systems such as human cell lines. Functional techniques can yield (1) novel insights into chemical toxicity; (2) pathways and mechanisms deserving of further study; and (3) candidate human toxicant susceptibility or resistance genes. PMID:24847352

  7. The modified total body rotation test: a rapid, reliable assessment of physical function in older adults.

    PubMed

    Stanziano, Damian C; Signorile, Joseph F; Mow, Sara; Davidson, Erin E; Ouslander, Joseph G; Roos, Bernard A

    2010-10-01

    To describe a quick, modified measure of total body rotation with performance rankings for elderly persons and to highlight the importance of total body rotational ability for overall physical performance. Scores were collected during the same testing session and were compared with other measures using a Pearson correlation. Community-based senior centers. One hundred forty-five participants aged 79.6±7.2 were recruited using flyers distributed at health fairs, senior centers, and lifelong learning programs. The modified total body rotation test (MTBR), the back-scratch test, the modified sit-and-reach test, the 30-second chair-stand test, the Short Physical Performance Battery, and the short version of the Continuous-Scale Physical Functional Performance Test. The MBTR significantly correlated to all standard measures of physical performance. Norms are reported for all participants, and reliability analyses were conducted using data from 18 participants. Data were divided into quintiles to create cutoffs for physical performance rankings that can be used when reporting results to the general public. Many evaluations measure isolated components of physical performance, but few examine whole body movements that allow all components necessary for independence and function to work in harmony as needed considering the task and the individual's movement strategy. The current study offers the MTBR as a quick, easy, and cost-effective evaluation method to quantify the degree of impairment or injury and the rate of improvement with treatment or training. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010, The American Geriatrics Society.

  8. Reaching for the Unreachable: Reorganization of Reaching with Walking

    PubMed Central

    Grzyb, Beata J.; Smith, Linda B.; del Pobil, Angel P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research suggests that reaching and walking behaviors may be linked developmentally as reaching changes at the onset of walking. Here we report new evidence on an apparent loss of the distinction between the reachable and nonreachable distances as children start walking. The experiment compared nonwalkers, walkers with help, and independent walkers in a reaching task to targets at varying distances. Reaching attempts, contact, leaning, and communication behaviors were recorded. Most of the children reached for the unreachable objects the first time it was presented. Nonwalkers, however, reached less on the subsequent trials showing clear adjustment of their reaching decisions with the failures. On the contrary, walkers consistently attempted reaches to targets at unreachable distances. We suggest that these reaching errors may result from inappropriate integration of reaching and locomotor actions, attention control and near/far visual space. We propose a reward-mediated model implemented on a NAO humanoid robot that replicates the main results from our study showing an increase in reaching attempts to nonreachable distances after the onset of walking. PMID:26110046

  9. The Reach Address Database (RAD)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Reach Address Database (RAD) stores reach address information for each Water Program feature that has been linked to the underlying surface water features (streams, lakes, etc) in the National Hydrology Database (NHD) Plus dataset.

  10. Tuboimpedance: A New Test of Eustachian Tube Function.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew E; Zou, Charlie C; Blythe, Andrew J C; Tysome, James R

    2017-04-01

    Objective Eustachian tube (ET) dysfunction is most frequently caused by a failure of the ET to adequately open; however, there is currently no reliable method of assessing this. Tubomanometry has recently shown good interindividual repeatability as a measure of ET function by measuring middle ear pressure after the application of regulated nasopharyngeal pressures during swallowing. We present the first reports of a novel test: middle ear impedance measurements during standard nasopharyngeal pressure application (tuboimpedance). We assess repeatability in healthy ears and any advantages over tubomanometry. Study Design Exploratory cohort diagnosis study. Setting Tertiary referral center. Subjects Twenty screened, healthy ears (10 volunteers). Methods Tubomanometry and tuboimpedance tests were performed while individuals swallowed with applied nasopharyngeal pressures of 20, 30, 40, and 50 mbar. Eustachian tube opening detection rate and test repeatability (measured by intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]) for immediate and delayed repeats at each pressure were compared. Results ET opening was detected more frequently using tuboimpedance, with a 100% detection rate using a nasopharyngeal pressure of 30 mbar or more, compared to 88% to 96% with tubomanometry. Detection of ET opening at 20 mbar was possible with tuboimpedance. Repeatability of both tests was mostly strong (ICC >0.7) for both immediate and delayed repeats. Repeatability for the tubomanometry R value was only fair to moderate. Conclusion Tuboimpedance may provide a repeatable measure of ET opening that is easier to perform due to lower nasopharyngeal pressures required and fewer issues with poor ear-probe sealing. Further assessment in patients with different forms of ET dysfunction is required.

  11. Pain on Functional Movement Screen Tests and Injury Risk.

    PubMed

    Bushman, Timothy T; Grier, Tyson L; Canham-Chervak, Michelle C; Anderson, Morgan K; North, William J; Jones, Bruce H

    2015-11-01

    The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) is a tool intended to evaluate limitations or asymmetries of movement to detect individuals at risk for exercise- and sports-related injury. The purpose was to determine the association and predictive value of specific FMS tests with injury risk in physically active men. Soldiers aged 18-57 years completed the FMS (n = 2,476). Demographic and fitness data were collected by survey. Medical record data for any, overuse, and traumatic injury 6 months after the assessment were obtained. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value were calculated along with receiver operator characteristics to determine area under the curve (AUC). Risks, risk ratios, odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals were calculated to assess injury risks. Multivariate logistic regression identified that pain on 5 of the 7 tests was associated with greater risk for any injury (OR = 1.50-3.51): deep squat, hurdle step, in-line lunge, trunk stability push-up, and rotary stability. However, FMS registered low sensitivity, PPV, and AUC for all 7 tests for the 3 injury types (2-24% sensitivity, 16-74% PPV, and 50-58% AUC). Although the presence of pain was associated with a higher risk of injury on 5 tests, a low sensitivity, PPV, and AUC were displayed. Therefore, caution is advised when implementing the FMS as a screening tool in an Army or similarly active population as it could lead to prevention and treatment resources being directed toward individuals who are not at greater risk for injury.

  12. A NEW CLINICAL MUSCLE FUNCTION TEST FOR ASSESSMENT OF HIP EXTERNAL ROTATION STRENGTH: AUGUSTSSON STRENGTH TEST

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction Dynamic clinical tests of hip strength applicable on patients, non–athletes and athletes alike, are lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to develop and evaluate the reliability of a dynamic muscle function test of hip external rotation strength, using a novel device. A second aim was to determine if gender differences exist in absolute and relative hip strength using the new test. Methods Fifty–three healthy sport science students (34 women and 19 men) were tested for hip external rotation strength using a device that consisted of a strap connected in series with an elastic resistance band loop, and a measuring tape connected in parallel with the elastic resistance band. The test was carried out with the subject side lying, positioned in 45 ° of hip flexion and the knees flexed to 90 ° with the device firmly fastened proximally across the knees. The subject then exerted maximal concentric hip external rotation force against the device thereby extending the elastic resistance band. The displacement achieved by the subject was documented by the tape measure and the corresponding force production was calculated. Both right and left hip strength was measured. Fifteen of the subjects were tested on repeated occasions to evaluate test–retest reliability. Results No significant test–retest differences were observed. Intra–class correlation coefficients ranged 0.93–0.94 and coefficients of variation 2.76–4.60%. In absolute values, men were significantly stronger in hip external rotation than women (right side 13.2 vs 11.0 kg, p = 0.001, left side 13.2 vs 11.5 kg, p = 0.002). There were no significant differences in hip external rotation strength normalized for body weight (BW) between men and women (right side 0.17 kg/BW vs 0.17 kg/BW, p = 0.675, left side 0.17 kg/BW vs 0.18 kg/BW, p = 0.156). Conclusions The new muscle function test showed high reliability and thus could be useful for measuring dynamic hip

  13. Functional Testing Differences in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Patients Released Versus Not Released to Return to Sport.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Stephanie W; Queen, Robin M; Taylor, Dean; Moorman, Claude T; Toth, Allison P; Garrett, William E; Butler, Robert J

    2015-07-01

    No standardized return-to-activity or sport guidelines currently exist after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Isokinetic testing and unilateral hop testing, which have construct validity, are often used to make the determination of when a patient is ready to return to sport. Neither of these measures has been reported to be predictive of subsequent injuries. To compare the performance on 2 functional tests of ACL reconstruction patients released to return to activity versus those who have not been released based on clinical impairment measures. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 98 patients were examined by the treating orthopaedic surgeon 6 months after ACL reconstruction for traditional impairment measures, including swelling, range of motion, strength, and graft stability. After this examination, all subjects completed the functional testing, consisting of the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and the Lower Quarter Y Balance Test (YBT-LQ), by an experienced tester who was blinded to the results of the clinical examination. On the basis of the clinical examination, all patients were grouped as being ready to return to sport or not being ready. Performance on the functional tests, as measured by overall performance and side-to-side asymmetry, was compared between the 2 groups using independent-samples t tests (P < .05). No difference existed between the groups with regard to the descriptive characteristics, with the exception that the group not cleared was younger (21.0 ± 7.4 years) than the group that was cleared (25.6 ± 13.2 years). Performance on the YBT-LQ revealed that no differences existed between groups when examining reach symmetry for any of the reach directions. In addition, no differences were found between groups when looking at the average reach score normalized to limb length for either the surgical or nonsurgical leg. Patients in the cleared group exhibited a similar score on the FMS (12.7 ± 2.9) compared with the

  14. Functionally graded bioactive coatings: From fabrication to testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foppiano, Silvia

    Every year about half a million Americans undergo total joint replacement surgery of some kind. This number is expected to steadily increase in the future. About 20% of these patients will need a revision surgery because of implant failure, with a significant increase in health care cost. Current implant materials for load bearing applications must be strong enough to support the loads involved in daily activities, and bioinert, to limit reactivity in the body that may cause inflammatory and other adverse reactions. Metal alloys are typically used as materials for load bearing implants and rely on mechanical interlocking to achieve fixation which can be improved by using bone cements. To improve implant osteointegration, metal implants have been coated with a bone-like mineral: hydroxyapatite (HA). The plasma spray technique is commonly used to apply the HA coating. Such implants do not require the use of bone cement. Plasma sprayed HA coated implants are FDA approved and currently on the market, but their properties are not reproducible or reliable. Thus, coating delamination can occur. Our research group developed a novel family of bioactive glasses which were enameled onto titanium alloy using a functionally graded approach. We stratified the coating with different glass compositions to fulfill different functions. We coupled a first glass layer, with a good CTE match to the alloy, with a second layer of bioactive glass obtaining a functionally graded bioactive coating (FGC). In this thesis for the first time the cytocompatibility of novel bioactive glasses, and their functionally graded coatings on Ti6Al4V, was studied with an in vitro bone model (MC3T3-E1.4 mouse preosteblast cells). The novel bioactive glasses are cytocompatible and no compositional change is required. The fabrication process is reproducible, introduces a small (average 6 vol%) amount of crystallization, which does not significantly affect bioactivity in SBF as tested. The coatings are

  15. Functional Task Test: 1. Sensorimotor changes Associated with Postflight Alterations in Astronaut Functional Task Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Arzeno, N. H.; Buxton, R. E.; Feiveson, A. H.; Kofman, I. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; Miller, C. A.; Mulavara, A. P.; Platts, S. H.; Peters, B. T.; Phillips, T.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Reschke, M. F.; Ryder, J. W.; Spiering, B. A.; Stenger, M. B.; Taylor, L. C.; Wickwire, P. J.; Wood, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    Space flight is known to cause alterations in multiple physiological systems including changes in sensorimotor, cardiovascular, and neuromuscular systems. These changes may affect a crewmember s ability to perform critical mission tasks immediately after landing on a planetary surface. The overall goal of this project is to determine the effects of space flight on functional tests that are representative of high priority exploration mission tasks and to identify the key underlying physiological factors that contribute to decrements in performance. This presentation will focus on the sensorimotor contributions to postflight functional performance.

  16. Gestation specific reference intervals for thyroid function tests in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Akarsu, Süleyman; Akbiyik, Filiz; Karaismailoglu, Eda; Dikmen, Zeliha Gunnur

    2016-08-01

    Thyroid function tests are frequently assessed during pregnancy to evaluate thyroid dysfunction or to monitor pre-existing thyroid disease. However, using non-pregnant reference intervals can lead to misclassification. International guidelines recommended that institutions should calculate their own pregnancy-specific reference intervals for free thyroxine (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). The objective of this study is to establish gestation-specific reference intervals (GRIs) for thyroid function tests in pregnant Turkish women and to compare these with the age-matched non-pregnant women. Serum samples were collected from 220 non-pregnant women (age: 18-48), and 2460 pregnant women (age: 18-45) with 945 (39%) in the first trimester, 1120 (45%) in the second trimester, and 395 (16%) in the third trimester. TSH, FT4 and FT3 were measured using the Abbott Architect i2000SR analyzer. GRIs of TSH, FT4 and FT3 for first trimester pregnancies were 0.49-2.33 mIU/L, 10.30-18.11 pmol/L and 3.80-5.81 pmol/L, respectively. GRIs for second trimester pregnancies were 0.51-3.44 mIU/L, 10.30-18.15 pmol/L and 3.69-5.90 pmol/L. GRIs for third trimester pregnancies were 0.58-4.31 mIU/L, 10.30-17.89 pmol/L and 3.67-5.81 pmol/L. GRIs for TSH, FT4 and FT3 were different from non-pregnant normal reference intervals. TSH levels showed an increasing trend from the first trimester to the third trimester, whereas both FT4 and FT3 levels were uniform throughout gestation. GRIs may help in the diagnosis and appropriate management of thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy which will prevent both maternal and fetal complications.

  17. Liver Function Tests: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Foundation) Liver Panel (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Diagnosis and Tests Bilirubin Blood Test (National Library ... Spanish Specifics Albumin Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase) Test (American Association for Clinical ...

  18. Reach preparation enhances visual performance and appearance.

    PubMed

    Rolfs, Martin; Lawrence, Bonnie M; Carrasco, Marisa

    2013-10-19

    We investigated the impact of the preparation of reach movements on visual perception by simultaneously quantifying both an objective measure of visual sensitivity and the subjective experience of apparent contrast. Using a two-by-two alternative forced choice task, observers compared the orientation (clockwise or counterclockwise) and the contrast (higher or lower) of a Standard Gabor and a Test Gabor, the latter of which was presented during reach preparation, at the reach target location or the opposite location. Discrimination performance was better overall at the reach target than at the opposite location. Perceived contrast increased continuously at the target relative to the opposite location during reach preparation, that is, after the onset of the cue indicating the reach target. The finding that performance and appearance do not evolve in parallel during reach preparation points to a distinction with saccade preparation, for which we have shown previously there is a parallel temporal evolution of performance and appearance. Yet akin to saccade preparation, this study reveals that overall reach preparation enhances both visual performance and appearance.

  19. The database for reaching experiments and models.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ben; Kording, Konrad

    2013-01-01

    Reaching is one of the central experimental paradigms in the field of motor control, and many computational models of reaching have been published. While most of these models try to explain subject data (such as movement kinematics, reaching performance, forces, etc.) from only a single experiment, distinct experiments often share experimental conditions and record similar kinematics. This suggests that reaching models could be applied to (and falsified by) multiple experiments. However, using multiple datasets is difficult because experimental data formats vary widely. Standardizing data formats promises to enable scientists to test model predictions against many experiments and to compare experimental results across labs. Here we report on the development of a new resource available to scientists: a database of reaching called the Database for Reaching Experiments And Models (DREAM). DREAM collects both experimental datasets and models and facilitates their comparison by standardizing formats. The DREAM project promises to be useful for experimentalists who want to understand how their data relates to models, for modelers who want to test their theories, and for educators who want to help students better understand reaching experiments, models, and data analysis.

  20. Functional assessment in older adults: should we use timed up and go or gait speed test?

    PubMed

    Kubicki, Alexandre

    2014-08-08

    In order to assess functional skills of older adults, both timed up and go (TUG) test and gait speed (GS) test are well validated concerning their predictive capacities. However, the question remains unclear which one of these tests represents better the whole physical performance of older adults. The aim of this study is to determine the more representative test, between TUG and GS, of the whole motor control quality. To study links between locomotion capacities and arm function, we measured, in a population of frail aged patients, the locomotion tests and the mean arm maximal velocity developed during a speed-accuracy trade-off. This arm movement consisted in reaching the hand toward a target in a virtual game scene. We plotted the different couples of variables obtained on graphs, and calculate Pearson correlation coefficients between each couple. The Pearson correlation between GS and hand maximal velocity was significant (r=0.495; p=0.046). Interestingly, we found a non significant Pearson correlation between timed up and go score (TUG) and hand maximal velocity (r=-0.139; p=0.243). Our results suggest that GS score is more representative of the whole motor ability of frail patients than the TUG. We propose that the relative complexity of the TUG motor sequence could be involved in this difference. For a few patients with motor automatisms deficiencies, this motor sequence complexity could leads to a dual task perturbation. In this way, we conclude that GS should be preferred over the TUG with older adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Above-Level Test Item Functioning across Examinee Age Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warne, Russell T.; Doty, Kristine J.; Malbica, Anne Marie; Angeles, Victor R.; Innes, Scott; Hall, Jared; Masterson-Nixon, Kelli

    2016-01-01

    "Above-level testing" (also called "above-grade testing," "out-of-level testing," and "off-level testing") is the practice of administering to a child a test that is designed for an examinee population that is older or in a more advanced grade. Above-level testing is frequently used to help educators design…

  2. Above-Level Test Item Functioning across Examinee Age Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warne, Russell T.; Doty, Kristine J.; Malbica, Anne Marie; Angeles, Victor R.; Innes, Scott; Hall, Jared; Masterson-Nixon, Kelli

    2016-01-01

    "Above-level testing" (also called "above-grade testing," "out-of-level testing," and "off-level testing") is the practice of administering to a child a test that is designed for an examinee population that is older or in a more advanced grade. Above-level testing is frequently used to help educators design…

  3. Deep Bed Adsorption Testing using Silver-Functionalized Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

    2012-06-01

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products and activation products, some of which tend to be volatile during used fuel reprocessing and evolve in gaseous species into the reprocessing facility off-gas systems. Analyses have shown that I129, due to its radioactivity, high potential mobility in the environment, and high longevity (half life of 15.7 million years), can require control efficiencies of up to 1,000x or higher to meet regulatory emission limits. Two Aerogel sorption tests that have been performed this fiscal year. The maximum iodine decontamination factor (DF) was measured to be over 10,000, above the 1,000-10,000 target DF range. The mass transfer zone may be as short as 0.5 inches under the sorption conditions of the first test. Only a small fraction of the iodine sorbed on Bed 1 was desorbed during the purge periods. The silver-functionalized Aerogel appears to have potential to be a very effective and efficient iodine sorbent.

  4. Multiloop Integral System Test (MIST): MIST Facility Functional Specification

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, T F; Koksal, C G; Moskal, T E; Rush, G C; Gloudemans, J R

    1991-04-01

    The Multiloop Integral System Test (MIST) is part of a multiphase program started in 1983 to address small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) specific to Babcock and Wilcox designed plants. MIST is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Babcock Wilcox Owners Group, the Electric Power Research Institute, and Babcock and Wilcox. The unique features of the Babcock and Wilcox design, specifically the hot leg U-bends and steam generators, prevented the use of existing integral system data or existing integral facilities to address the thermal-hydraulic SBLOCA questions. MIST was specifically designed and constructed for this program, and an existing facility -- the Once Through Integral System (OTIS) -- was also used. Data from MIST and OTIS are used to benchmark the adequacy of system codes, such as RELAP5 and TRAC, for predicting abnormal plant transients. The MIST Functional Specification documents as-built design features, dimensions, instrumentation, and test approach. It also presents the scaling basis for the facility and serves to define the scope of work for the facility design and construction. 13 refs., 112 figs., 38 tabs.

  5. Astronaut Owen Garriott - Test Subject - Human Vestibular Function Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-08-09

    S73-34171 (9 Aug. 1973) --- Scientist-astronaut Owen K. Garriott, Skylab 3 science pilot, serves as test subject for the Skylab ?Human Vestibular Function? M131 Experiment, as seen in this photographic reproduction taken from a television transmission made by a color TV camera aboard the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The objectives of the Skylab M131 experiment are to obtain data pertinent to establishing the validity of measurements of specific behavioral/physiological responses influenced by vestibular activity under one-g and zero-g conditions; to determine man?s adaptability to unusual vestibular conditions and predict habitability of future spacecraft conditions involving reduced gravity and Coriollis forces; and to measure the accuracy and variability in man?s judgment of spatial coordinates based on atypical gravity receptor cues and inadequate visual cures. Dr. Garriott is seated in the experiment?s litter chair which can rotate the test subject at predetermined rotational velocity or programmed acceleration/decelerational profile. Photo credit: NASA

  6. Cosmological tests with the FSRQ gamma-ray luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Houdun; Melia, Fulvio; Zhang, Li

    2016-11-01

    The extensive catalogue of gamma-ray selected flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) produced by Fermi during a four-year survey has generated considerable interest in determining their gamma-ray luminosity function (GLF) and its evolution with cosmic time. In this paper, we introduce the novel idea of using this extensive database to test the differential volume expansion rate predicted by two specific models, the concordance Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) and Rh = ct cosmologies. For this purpose, we use two well-studied formulations of the GLF, one based on pure luminosity evolution (PLE) and the other on a luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE). Using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test on one-parameter cumulative distributions (in luminosity, redshift, photon index and source count), we confirm the results of earlier works showing that these data somewhat favour LDDE over PLE; we show that this is the case for both ΛCDM and Rh = ct. Regardless of which GLF one chooses, however, we also show that model selection tools very strongly favour Rh = ct over ΛCDM. We suggest that such population studies, though featuring a strong evolution in redshift, may none the less be used as a valuable independent check of other model comparisons based solely on geometric considerations.

  7. Vestibular Function Tests for Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Implication of Video Head Impulse and Caloric Tests

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang Hun; Yang, Chan Joo; Ahn, Joong Ho; Chung, Jong Woo; Park, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patients were assessed by the video head impulse test (vHIT), caloric test, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), and sensory organization test (SOT) at the initial visit and then evaluated for symptomatic improvement after 6 months. Complete response (CR) was defined as no need for continued medication, partial response (PR) as improved symptoms but need for continued medication, and no response (NR) as no symptomatic improvement and requiring increased dosage or change in medications. At the initial evaluation, 9 of 81 patients (11%) exhibited abnormal vHIT results, 14 of 73 (19%) exhibited abnormal caloric test results, 25 of 65 (38%) exhibited abnormal SOT results, 8 of 75 (11%) exhibited abnormal cervical VEMP results, and 20 of 75 (27%) exhibited abnormal ocular VEMP results. Six months later, 63 of 81 patients (78%) no longer required medication (CR), while 18 (22%) still required medication, including 7 PR and 11 NR patients. Abnormal vHIT gain and abnormal caloric results were significantly related to the necessity for continued medication at 6-month follow-up (OR = 5.67 and 4.36, respectively). Abnormal vHIT and caloric test results revealed semicircular canal dysfunction in VM patients and predicted prolonged preventive medication requirement. These results suggest that peripheral vestibular abnormalities are closely related to the development of vertigo in VM patients. PMID:27746761

  8. Vestibular Function Tests for Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Implication of Video Head Impulse and Caloric Tests.

    PubMed

    Kang, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang Hun; Yang, Chan Joo; Ahn, Joong Ho; Chung, Jong Woo; Park, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patients were assessed by the video head impulse test (vHIT), caloric test, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), and sensory organization test (SOT) at the initial visit and then evaluated for symptomatic improvement after 6 months. Complete response (CR) was defined as no need for continued medication, partial response (PR) as improved symptoms but need for continued medication, and no response (NR) as no symptomatic improvement and requiring increased dosage or change in medications. At the initial evaluation, 9 of 81 patients (11%) exhibited abnormal vHIT results, 14 of 73 (19%) exhibited abnormal caloric test results, 25 of 65 (38%) exhibited abnormal SOT results, 8 of 75 (11%) exhibited abnormal cervical VEMP results, and 20 of 75 (27%) exhibited abnormal ocular VEMP results. Six months later, 63 of 81 patients (78%) no longer required medication (CR), while 18 (22%) still required medication, including 7 PR and 11 NR patients. Abnormal vHIT gain and abnormal caloric results were significantly related to the necessity for continued medication at 6-month follow-up (OR = 5.67 and 4.36, respectively). Abnormal vHIT and caloric test results revealed semicircular canal dysfunction in VM patients and predicted prolonged preventive medication requirement. These results suggest that peripheral vestibular abnormalities are closely related to the development of vertigo in VM patients.

  9. Reliability and validity of the sequential weight-shifting test: a new functional approach to the assessment of the sitting balance of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ken Y. T.; Hui-Chan, Christina W.Y.; Tsang, William W. N.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The evaluation of sitting balance is important for the prevention of falls in older adults, especially those who have a disability involving the lower extremities. However, no studies have been designed to assess a patient’s dynamic sitting balance using a sequential protocol. The objective of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the sequential weight-shifting (SWS) test. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three older adults who were physically dependent with regard to ambulation were recruited by convenience sampling. In study 1, 10 participants performed the SWS test and repeated the procedure 1 week later. In study 2, 23 participants were assessed using the SWS test, forward and lateral reach tests in a sitting position, tests of shoulder flexor and hand grip strength, an eye-hand coordination test, mobility tests, and pulmonary function tests. The test-retest reliability of the SWS test and its correlations with the different physical dimensions were examined. [Results] The intraclass correlation coefficient (3,1) of the SWS test was 0.67. The results of the SWS test correlated significantly with forward reach in the sitting position, arm muscle strength, eye-hand coordination, mobility, and pulmonary function (all p<0.05). [Conclusion] The SWS test demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties and can be considered a useful functional approach for the measurement of sitting balance. PMID:28174470

  10. Reliability and validity of the sequential weight-shifting test: a new functional approach to the assessment of the sitting balance of older adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ken Y T; Hui-Chan, Christina W Y; Tsang, William W N

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The evaluation of sitting balance is important for the prevention of falls in older adults, especially those who have a disability involving the lower extremities. However, no studies have been designed to assess a patient's dynamic sitting balance using a sequential protocol. The objective of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the sequential weight-shifting (SWS) test. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three older adults who were physically dependent with regard to ambulation were recruited by convenience sampling. In study 1, 10 participants performed the SWS test and repeated the procedure 1 week later. In study 2, 23 participants were assessed using the SWS test, forward and lateral reach tests in a sitting position, tests of shoulder flexor and hand grip strength, an eye-hand coordination test, mobility tests, and pulmonary function tests. The test-retest reliability of the SWS test and its correlations with the different physical dimensions were examined. [Results] The intraclass correlation coefficient (3,1) of the SWS test was 0.67. The results of the SWS test correlated significantly with forward reach in the sitting position, arm muscle strength, eye-hand coordination, mobility, and pulmonary function (all p<0.05). [Conclusion] The SWS test demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties and can be considered a useful functional approach for the measurement of sitting balance.

  11. Transient changes in thyroid functions tests after zoledronic acid infusion.

    PubMed

    Karga, Helen; Giagourta, Irene; Papaioannou, Garyphallia; Katsichti, Paraskevi; Pardalakis, Argyris; Kassi, Georgia; Zagoreou, Apostolia; Triantaphyllopoulou, Maria; Zerva, Cherry

    2011-01-01

    Zoledronic acid (ZA) induces an acute phase response in association with elevation of serum cytokines, which possibly alter the 3 types of iodothyronine deiodinase activity. We therefore studied the possible alteration in thyroid function tests by ZA. We investigated the acute changes in serum thyroid hormones, TSH, cortisol, white blood cells, CRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), before (0) and 1, 2 and 3 days after iv infusion of 5 mg ZA in 24 asymptomatic postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (ZA group) in comparison with a placebo group. In the majority of patients the ZA infusion was associated with acute phase response and fever within 24h after infusion which became attenuated on day three. Concurrently with increase in serum cortisol, CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α, on day 1 and 2, total serum T3 (TT3), free T3 (fT3), total T4 (TT4) and fT4 decreased with a nadir on day 2 in association with an increase in the fT4/fT3 ratio and reverse T3 (rT3) levels. All thyroid function changes returned to the baseline levels on day 3, with cytokines still at higher levels, although lower than those on day 2. Serum TSH remained essentially unchanged throughout the study. The changes in thyroid hormones were at least in part explained by the increased TNF-α, but not by IL-6. ZA induces short term changes in thyroid hormones, characteristic of nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS), in association with an increase in TNF-α and IL-6.

  12. Measurement of global functional performance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using rheumatology function tests

    PubMed Central

    Escalante, Agustín; Haas, Roy W; del Rincón, Inmaculada

    2004-01-01

    Outcome assessment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) includes measurement of physical function. We derived a scale to quantify global physical function in RA, using three performance-based rheumatology function tests (RFTs). We measured grip strength, walking velocity, and shirt button speed in consecutive RA patients attending scheduled appointments at six rheumatology clinics, repeating these measurements after a median interval of 1 year. We extracted the underlying latent variable using principal component factor analysis. We used the Bayesian information criterion to assess the global physical function scale's cross-sectional fit to criterion standards. The criteria were joint tenderness, swelling, and deformity, pain, physical disability, current work status, and vital status at 6 years after study enrolment. We computed Guyatt's responsiveness statistic for improvement according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) definition. Baseline functional performance data were available for 777 patients, and follow-up data were available for 681. Mean ± standard deviation for each RFT at baseline were: grip strength, 14 ± 10 kg; walking velocity, 194 ± 82 ft/min; and shirt button speed, 7.1 ± 3.8 buttons/min. Grip strength and walking velocity departed significantly from normality. The three RFTs loaded strongly on a single factor that explained ≥70% of their combined variance. We rescaled the factor to vary from 0 to 100. Its mean ± standard deviation was 41 ± 20, with a normal distribution. The new global scale had a stronger fit than the primary RFT to most of the criterion standards. It correlated more strongly with physical disability at follow-up and was more responsive to improvement defined according to the ACR20 and ACR50 definitions. We conclude that a performance-based physical function scale extracted from three RFTs has acceptable distributional and measurement properties and is responsive to clinically meaningful change. It

  13. Out of your hand's reach, out of my eyes' reach.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Marcello; Ambrosini, Ettore; Sinigaglia, Corrado

    2012-01-01

    When witnessing another's action, people recruit the same motor resources that enable them to efficiently perform that action, thus gazing at its target well before the agent's hand. But just to what extent does this recruitment help people in grabbing another's action target? If the latter seems to be out of the agent's reach, will this impact on people's gaze behaviour? We recorded proactive eye movements while participants witnessed someone else trying to reach for and grasp objects located either within or outside his reach. Proactivity of gaze was impaired when the targets were just out of the agent's reach. This effect is likely to be due to an interpersonal bodily space representation that allows one to map another's reaching space, thus prompting proactive eye movements towards the target just in case the agent is in the position to act upon it.

  14. Timed Sollerman hand function test for analysis of hand function in normal volunteers.

    PubMed

    Singh, H P; Dias, J J; Thompson, J R

    2015-03-01

    This study describes the development and application of the timed Sollerman hand function test in normal volunteers and the effect of age, gender, dominance and handedness on hand function. A total of 100 volunteers (50 men and 50 women) aged between 20 to 70 years were asked to complete the Sollerman hand function test. We measured the time taken to complete the 20 tasks using seven grips. Volunteers completed the tasks a mean of 20 seconds quicker with the dominant than with the nondominant hand. Individuals who are strongly right-handed showed a pronounced difference taking less time with the dominant hand. Women took less time to complete all tasks in age groups 30 to 40 years, than women in age groups 20 to 30 years and beyond 40 years using the dominant hand. Men also showed worsening performance with age. The centile curves of the total time taken to complete all 20 Sollerman tasks between the ages of 20 to 70 years will allow investigators to adjust their findings for age before attributing observed differences to disease or its treatment. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Newton force from wave function collapse: speculation and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diósi, Lajos

    2014-04-01

    The Diosi-Penrose model of quantum-classical boundary postulates gravity-related spontaneous wave function collapse of massive degrees of freedom. The decoherence effects of the collapses are in principle detectable if not masked by the overwhelming environmental decoherence. But the DP (or any other, like GRW, CSL) spontaneous collapses are not detectable themselves, they are merely the redundant formalism of spontaneous decoherence. To let DP collapses become testable physics, recently we extended the DP model and proposed that DP collapses are responsible for the emergence of the Newton gravitational force between massive objects. We identified the collapse rate, possibly of the order of 1/ms, with the rate of emergence of the Newton force. A simple heuristic emergence (delay) time was added to the Newton law of gravity. This non-relativistic delay is in peaceful coexistence with Einstein's relativistic theory of gravitation, at least no experimental evidence has so far surfaced against it. We derive new predictions of such a 'lazy' Newton law that will enable decisive laboratory tests with available technologies. The simple equation of 'lazy' Newton law deserves theoretical and experimental studies in itself, independently of the underlying quantum foundational considerations.

  16. Abnormalities of thyroid function tests in hospital inpatients.

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, M. C.; Ramsden, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    Results of thyroid function tests were analysed in 199 clinically euthyroid inpatients with normal serum thyroid stimulating hormone values. Serum total triiodothyronine was less than 1.25 nmol/l in 61.8% of samples, free triiodothyronine less than 3.9 pmol/l in 57.8%, total thyroxine less than 63 nmol/l in 21.1% and free thyroxine less than 9.5 pmol/l in 17.6%. In contrast, thyroxine binding globulin ratio was below normal (less than 5) in only 5 samples. A significant positive correlation (P less than 0.001) of serum free thyroxine with total thyroxine, thyroxine/thyroxine binding globulin ratio and free triiodothyronine was present as well as a significant negative correlation (P less than 0.001) with serum thyroid stimulating hormone. There was no correlation of free thyroxine measurements with serum albumin or non-esterified fatty acid concentrations. Although serum free thyroxine is low in a number of patients with non-thyroidal illnesses, this does not appear to be due to a rise in non-esterified fatty acids or a fall in albumin as has been proposed. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone measurements are essential to confirm the diagnosis of hypothyroidism in such subjects. PMID:4070117

  17. 13C-methionine breath tests for mitochondrial liver function assessment.

    PubMed

    Candelli, M; Miele, L; Armuzzi, A; Nista, E C; Pignataro, G; Fini, L; Cazzato, I A; Zocco, M A; Bartolozzi, F; Gasbarrini, G; Grieco, A; Gasbarrini, A

    2008-01-01

    13C-methionine breath test has been proposed as a non-invasive tool for the assessment of human hepatic mithocondrial function. Two methionine breath labeled with 13C in differents point of his molecular structure have been used for breath test analisys. Aim of this study was to compare two differently 13C-labeled methionines in the evaluation of mitochondrial oxidation in basal conditions and after an acute oxidative stress. 15 healthy male subjects (mean age 30.5 +/- 3.1) received [methyl-13C]-methionine dissolved in water. Breath samples were taken at baseline and and 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105 and 120 minutes after the ingestion of the labeled substrate. Forthy-eight hours later, subjects underwent the same test 30 minutes after ethanol ingestion (0,3 g/kg of body weight). Seven-day later, subjects underwent breath test using (L-methionine-1-13COOH) as substrate, in basal condition and after ethanol ingestion. At basal condition, the cumulative percentage of 13CO2 recovered in breath during the test period (%cum-dose) was higher using L-methionine-1-13COOH than [methyl-13C]-methionine (10.25 +/- 1.0 vs 4.07 +/- 0.8; p < 0.01). After ethanol ingestion, % cum dose was significantly decreased at 60 and 120 minutes with both methionines (120 min: 10.25 +/- 1.0 vs 5.03% +/- 1.8; < 0.01 and 4.07 +/- 0.8 vs 2.16% +/- 0.9; p < 0.01, respectively). However, %cum-dose during L-methionine-1-13C-breath test was significantly lower than that observed during methyl-13C-methionine breath test (120 minutes: 5.03% +/- 1.8 vs 2.16% +/- 0.9; p < 0.01). In conclusion, breath test based on L-methionine-1-13COOH seems to show a greater reliability when compared to [methyl-13C]-methionine to assess mitochondrial function because a larger amount of labeled carbon that reaches the Krebs' cicle.

  18. Kinematic motion analysis and muscle activation patterns of continuous reaching in survivors of stroke.

    PubMed

    Massie, Crystal L; Malcolm, Matthew P; Greene, David P; Browning, Raymond C

    2012-01-01

    Coordinated reaching requires continuous interaction between the efferent motor output and afferent feedback; this interaction may be significantly compromised following a stroke. The authors sought to characterize how survivors of stroke generate continuous, goal-directed reaching. Sixteen survivors of stroke completed functional testing of the stroke-affected side and a continuous reaching task between 2 targets with both sides. Motion analysis and electromyography data were collected to determine segmental contributions to reach (e.g., amount of compensatory trunk), spatiotemporal parameters (e.g., peak velocities), and muscle activation patterns (MAP). Repeated measures analyses of variance compared how survivors of stroke reach with the stroke-affected versus less affected sides. Correlations were determined between kinematic outcomes and functional ability. Participants used significantly more trunk movement and less shoulder flexion and elbow extension when reaching with the stroke-affected side. This corresponded with less muscle activity in the proximal musculature including the anterior, middle, and posterior deltoid on the stroke-affected side. There were significant correlations between the segmental contributions to reach, functional ability, and MAPs. Survivors of stroke generate reduced MAPs in the stroke-affected side corresponding to altered segmental kinematics and function ability. These findings suggest that impairments in the ability to generate sufficient MAPs may contribute to the difficulty in generating continuous reaching motions.

  19. An Efficient Functional Test Generation Method For Processors Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, Ján; Gramatová, Elena

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents a new functional test generation method for processors testing based on genetic algorithms and evolutionary strategies. The tests are generated over an instruction set architecture and a processor description. Such functional tests belong to the software-oriented testing. Quality of the tests is evaluated by code coverage of the processor description using simulation. The presented test generation method uses VHDL models of processors and the professional simulator ModelSim. The rules, parameters and fitness functions were defined for various genetic algorithms used in automatic test generation. Functionality and effectiveness were evaluated using the RISC type processor DP32.

  20. Assessment of platelet function in healthy sedated cats using three whole blood platelet function tests.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kimberly K; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony C G; Wood, R Darren; O'Sullivan, M Lynne; Kirby, Gordon M; Blois, Shauna L

    2015-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish feline references intervals for 3 commercial whole blood platelet function test analyzer systems: Multiplate analyzer (MP; Roche Diagnostics International Ltd., Rotkreuz, Switzerland), Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PF: Siemens Canada, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada), and Plateletworks Combo-25 kit (PW; Helena Laboratories, Beaumont, TX). Venipuncture was performed on 55 healthy sedated cats, and platelet aggregation in response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen (COL), and arachidonic acid (AA; MP only) was assessed using citrated blood. For the MP analyzer, median (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) area under curve (Units) for ADP, COL, and AA agonists were 87 (11-176), 81 (32-129), and 91 (59-129), respectively. For the PF analyzer, median (95% CIs) closure time, using COL-ADP cartridges, was 69 (46-89) sec. For the PW assay, median (95% CIs) percent aggregations for ADP and COL agonists were 71 (18-92) and 49 (9-96), respectively, using impedance hematology analyzer platelet counts, and 94 (25-98) and 68 (14-119), respectively, using flow cytometry hematology analyzer platelet counts. There were low correlations between the PF analyzer (COL-ADP cartridge) and MP analyzer (COL agonist; ρ = 0.11), and between the PF analyzer (COL-ADP cartridge) and PW assay (COL agonist using impedance platelet counts; ρ = 0.14). The PW assay percent aggregations using impedance and flow cytometric platelet counts were correlated for both ADP (ρ = 0.64) and COL (ρ = 0.64) agonists. Platelet function testing using these tests are feasible in cats, but 95% CIs are wide, so single results may be difficult to interpret. Platelet counting by impedance or flow cytometry may be used for the PW assay but are not interchangeable.

  1. Unique hue judgments as a function of test size in the fovea and at 20-deg temporal eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerger, Janice L.; Volbrecht, Vicki J.; Ayde, Corey J.

    1995-06-01

    Unique hue loci were measured for four observers in the fovea and at 20-deg temporal eccentricity as a function of test size. Eccentric measurements were made on the cone plateau following a rod bleach. The results indicate that unique yellow remains approximately invariant with respect to test size and retinal eccentricity, whereas unique blue and unique green shift to longer wavelengths with increasing test size. The locus of unique blue in the periphery reaches an asymptote at approximately the same wavelength as that from the foveal measurements, whereas unique green measured in the periphery is consistently at shorter wavelengths than in the fovea. In general, the data are best described by a model in which the short-wavelength-sensitive cone input to the two opponent-color channels decreases with decreasing test size and increasing retinal eccentricity.

  2. Potential Functional Embedding Theory at the Correlated Wave Function Level. 2. Error Sources and Performance Tests.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jin; Yu, Kuang; Libisch, Florian; Dieterich, Johannes M; Carter, Emily A

    2017-03-14

    Quantum mechanical embedding theories partition a complex system into multiple spatial regions that can use different electronic structure methods within each, to optimize trade-offs between accuracy and cost. The present work incorporates accurate but expensive correlated wave function (CW) methods for a subsystem containing the phenomenon or feature of greatest interest, while self-consistently capturing quantum effects of the surroundings using fast but less accurate density functional theory (DFT) approximations. We recently proposed two embedding methods [for a review, see: Acc. Chem. Res. 2014 , 47 , 2768 ]: density functional embedding theory (DFET) and potential functional embedding theory (PFET). DFET provides a fast but non-self-consistent density-based embedding scheme, whereas PFET offers a more rigorous theoretical framework to perform fully self-consistent, variational CW/DFT calculations [as defined in part 1, CW/DFT means subsystem 1(2) is treated with CW(DFT) methods]. When originally presented, PFET was only tested at the DFT/DFT level of theory as a proof of principle within a planewave (PW) basis. Part 1 of this two-part series demonstrated that PFET can be made to work well with mixed Gaussian type orbital (GTO)/PW bases, as long as optimized GTO bases and consistent electron-ion potentials are employed throughout. Here in part 2 we conduct the first PFET calculations at the CW/DFT level and compare them to DFET and full CW benchmarks. We test the performance of PFET at the CW/DFT level for a variety of types of interactions (hydrogen bonding, metallic, and ionic). By introducing an intermediate CW/DFT embedding scheme denoted DFET/PFET, we show how PFET remedies different types of errors in DFET, serving as a more robust type of embedding theory.

  3. Pulmonary Function Testing After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Bishawi, Muath; Kim, Bong; Moore, William H.; Bilfinger, Thomas V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical resection remains the standard of care for operable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, some patients are not fit for surgery because of comorbidites such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other medical conditions. We aimed to evaluate pulmonary function and tumor volume before and after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with and without COPD in early-stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A review of prospectively collected data of Stage I and II lung cancers, all treated with SBRT, was performed. The total SBRT treatment was 60 Gy administered in three 20 Gy fractions. The patients were analyzed based on their COPD status, using their pretreatment pulmonary function test cutoffs as established by the American Thoracic Society guidelines (forced expiratory volume [FEV]% {<=}50% predicted, FEV%/forced vital capacity [FVC]% {<=}70%). Changes in tumor volume were also assessed by computed tomography. Results: Of a total of 30 patients with Stage I and II lung cancer, there were 7 patients in the COPD group (4 men, 3 women), and 23 in t he No-COPD group (9 men, 14 women). At a mean follow-up time of 4 months, for the COPD and No-COPD patients, pretreatment and posttreatment FEV% was similar: 39 {+-} 5 vs. 40 {+-} 9 (p = 0.4) and 77 {+-} 0.5 vs. 73 {+-} 24 (p = 0.9), respectively. The diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DL{sub CO}) did significantly increase for the No-COPD group after SBRT treatment: 60 {+-} 24 vs. 69 {+-} 22 (p = 0.022); however, DL{sub CO} was unchanged for the COPD group: 49 {+-} 13 vs. 50 {+-} 14 (p = 0.8). Although pretreatment tumor volume was comparable for both groups, tumor volume significantly shrank in the No-COPD group from 19 {+-} 24 to 9 {+-} 16 (p < 0.001), and there was a trend in the COPD patients from 12 {+-} 9 to 6 {+-} 5 (p = 0.06). Conclusion: SBRT did not seem to have an effect on FEV{sub 1} and FVC, but it shrank tumor volume and

  4. NASA's Functional Task Test: Informing the Design of an Integrated Countermeasure System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Batson, C. D.; Buxton, R. E.; Feiveson, A. H.; Kofman, I. S.; Laurie, S.; Lee, S. M. C.; Miller, C. A.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Platts, S. H.; Reschke, M. F.

    2015-01-01

    The goals of the Functional Task Test (FTT) study were to determine the effects of spaceflight on functional tests that are representative of critical exploration mission tasks and to identify the key physiological factors that contribute to decrements in performance.

  5. Test of nuclear wave functions for pseudospin symmetry.

    PubMed

    Ginocchio, J N; Leviatan, A

    2001-08-13

    Using the fact that pseudospin is an approximate symmetry of the Dirac Hamiltonian with realistic scalar and vector mean fields, we derive the wave functions of the pseudospin partners of eigenstates of a realistic Dirac Hamiltonian and compare these wave functions with the wave functions of the Dirac eigenstates.

  6. Prediction of functional aerobic capacity without exercise testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. S.; Blair, S. N.; Mahar, M. T.; Wier, L. T.; Ross, R. M.; Stuteville, J. E.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop functional aerobic capacity prediction models without using exercise tests (N-Ex) and to compare the accuracy with Astrand single-stage submaximal prediction methods. The data of 2,009 subjects (9.7% female) were randomly divided into validation (N = 1,543) and cross-validation (N = 466) samples. The validation sample was used to develop two N-Ex models to estimate VO2peak. Gender, age, body composition, and self-report activity were used to develop two N-Ex prediction models. One model estimated percent fat from skinfolds (N-Ex %fat) and the other used body mass index (N-Ex BMI) to represent body composition. The multiple correlations for the developed models were R = 0.81 (SE = 5.3 ml.kg-1.min-1) and R = 0.78 (SE = 5.6 ml.kg-1.min-1). This accuracy was confirmed when applied to the cross-validation sample. The N-Ex models were more accurate than what was obtained from VO2peak estimated from the Astrand prediction models. The SEs of the Astrand models ranged from 5.5-9.7 ml.kg-1.min-1. The N-Ex models were cross-validated on 59 men on hypertensive medication and 71 men who were found to have a positive exercise ECG. The SEs of the N-Ex models ranged from 4.6-5.4 ml.kg-1.min-1 with these subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  7. Prediction of functional aerobic capacity without exercise testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. S.; Blair, S. N.; Mahar, M. T.; Wier, L. T.; Ross, R. M.; Stuteville, J. E.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop functional aerobic capacity prediction models without using exercise tests (N-Ex) and to compare the accuracy with Astrand single-stage submaximal prediction methods. The data of 2,009 subjects (9.7% female) were randomly divided into validation (N = 1,543) and cross-validation (N = 466) samples. The validation sample was used to develop two N-Ex models to estimate VO2peak. Gender, age, body composition, and self-report activity were used to develop two N-Ex prediction models. One model estimated percent fat from skinfolds (N-Ex %fat) and the other used body mass index (N-Ex BMI) to represent body composition. The multiple correlations for the developed models were R = 0.81 (SE = 5.3 ml.kg-1.min-1) and R = 0.78 (SE = 5.6 ml.kg-1.min-1). This accuracy was confirmed when applied to the cross-validation sample. The N-Ex models were more accurate than what was obtained from VO2peak estimated from the Astrand prediction models. The SEs of the Astrand models ranged from 5.5-9.7 ml.kg-1.min-1. The N-Ex models were cross-validated on 59 men on hypertensive medication and 71 men who were found to have a positive exercise ECG. The SEs of the N-Ex models ranged from 4.6-5.4 ml.kg-1.min-1 with these subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  8. Development of the EpiOcular(TM) eye irritation test for hazard identification and labelling of eye irritating chemicals in response to the requirements of the EU cosmetics directive and REACH legislation.

    PubMed

    Kaluzhny, Yulia; Kandárová, Helena; Hayden, Patrick; Kubilus, Joseph; d'Argembeau-Thornton, Laurence; Klausner, Mitchell

    2011-09-01

    The recently implemented 7th Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive and the EU REACH legislation have heightened the need for in vitro ocular test methods. To address this need, the EpiOcular(TM) eye irritation test (EpiOcular-EIT), which utilises the normal (non-transformed) human cell-based EpiOcular tissue model, has been developed. The EpiOcular-EIT prediction model is based on an initial training set of 39 liquid and 21 solid test substances and uses a single exposure period and a single cut-off in tissue viability, as determined by the MTT assay. A chemical is classified as an irritant (GHS Category 1 or 2), if the tissue viability is ≤ 60%, and as a non-irritant (GHS unclassified), if the viability is > 60%. EpiOcular-EIT results for the training set, along with results for an additional 52 substances, which included a range of alcohols, hydrocarbons, amines, esters, and ketones, discriminated between ocular irritants and non-irritants with 98.1% sensitivity, 72.9% specificity, and 84.8% accuracy. To ensure the long-term commercial viability of the assay, EpiOcular tissues produced by using three alternative cell culture inserts were evaluated in the EpiOcular-EIT with 94 chemicals. The assay results obtained with the initial insert and the three alternative inserts were very similar, as judged by correlation coefficients (r²) that ranged from 0.82 to 0.96. The EpiOcular-EIT was pre-validated in 2007/2008, and is currently involved in a formal, multi-laboratory validation study sponsored by the European Cosmetics Association (COLIPA) under the auspices of the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM). The EpiOcular-EIT, together with EpiOcular's long history of reproducibility and proven utility for ultra-mildness testing, make EpiOcular a useful model for addressing current legislation related to animal use in the testing of potential ocular irritants. 2011 FRAME.

  9. Test Experience Effects in Longitudinal Comparisons of Adult Cognitive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salthouse, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    It is widely recognized that experience with cognitive tests can influence estimates of cognitive change. Prior research has estimated experience effects at the level of groups by comparing the performance of a group of participants tested for the second time with the performance of a different group of participants at the same age tested for the…

  10. Test Experience Effects in Longitudinal Comparisons of Adult Cognitive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salthouse, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    It is widely recognized that experience with cognitive tests can influence estimates of cognitive change. Prior research has estimated experience effects at the level of groups by comparing the performance of a group of participants tested for the second time with the performance of a different group of participants at the same age tested for the…

  11. Quantitative Pilomotor Axon-Reflex Test – A Novel Test of Pilomotor Function

    PubMed Central

    Siepmann, T.; Gibbons, C. H.; Illigens, B. M.; Lafo, J. A.; Brown, C. M.; Freeman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cutaneous autonomic function can be quantified by the assessment of sudomotor and vasomotor responses. Although piloerector muscles are innervated by the sympathetic nervous system, there are, at present, no methods to quantify pilomotor function. This study aims to quantify piloerection using phenylephrine in humans. Design Pilot study. Setting Hospital based study. Participants Twenty-two healthy volunteers (18 males, 4 females) aged 24–48 years participated in several studies. Interventions Piloerection was stimulated by iontophoresis of 1% phenylephrine. Silicone impressions of piloerection were quantified by number and area. The direct and indirect response to phenylephrine iontophoresis was compared on both forearms, after pretreatment to topical and subcutaneous lidocaine and iontophoresis of normal saline. Results Iontophoresis of phenylephrine induced piloerection in both the direct and axon-reflex mediated regions with similar responses in both arms. Topical lidocaine blocked axon-reflex mediated piloerection post-iontophoresis (control 66.6±19.2 impressions vs. lidocaine 7.2±4.3 impressions; P<0.001). Subcutaneous lidocaine completely blocked piloerection. The area of axon-reflex mediated piloerection was also attenuated in the lidocaine treated region post-iontophoresis (46.2±16.1 cm2 vs. 7.2±3.9 cm2, P<0.0001). Piloerection was delayed in the axon-reflex region compared to the direct region. Normal saline did not cause piloerection. Conclusions Phenylephrine provokes piloerection directly and indirectly through an axon-reflex mediated response that is attenuated by lidocaine. Piloerection is not stimulated by iontophoresis of normal saline alone. The quantitative pilomotor axon-reflex test (QPART) may complement other measures of cutaneous autonomic nerve fiber function. PMID:22868966

  12. Quantitative pilomotor axon reflex test: a novel test of pilomotor function.

    PubMed

    Siepmann, Timo; Gibbons, Christopher H; Illigens, Ben M; Lafo, Jacob A; Brown, Christopher M; Freeman, Roy

    2012-11-01

    Cutaneous autonomic function can be quantified by the assessment of sudomotor and vasomotor responses. Although piloerector muscles are innervated by the sympathetic nervous system, there are at present no methods to quantify pilomotor function. To quantify piloerection using phenylephrine hydrochloride in humans. Pilot study. Hospital-based study. Twenty-two healthy volunteers (18 males,4 females) aged 24 to 48 years participated in 6 studies. Piloerection was stimulated by iontophoresis of 1% phenylephrine. Silicone impressions of piloerection were quantified by number and area. The direct and indirect responses to phenylephrine iontophoresis were compared on both forearms after pre treatment to topical and subcutaneous lidocaine and iontophoresis of normal saline. Iontophoresis of phenylephrine induced piloerection in both the direct and axon reflex–mediated regions, with similar responses in both arms. Topical lidocaine blocked axon reflex–mediated piloerection post-iontophoresis (mean [SD], 66.6 [19.2] for control impressions vs 7.2 [4.3] for lidocaine impressions;P.001). Subcutaneous lidocaine completely blocked piloerection.The area of axon reflex–mediated piloerection was also attenuated in the lidocaine-treated region postiontophoresis (mean [SD], 46.2 [16.1]cm2 vs 7.2 [3.9]cm2; P.001). Piloerection was delayed in the axon reflex region compared with the direct region. Normal saline did not cause piloerection. Phenylephrine provoked piloerection directly and indirectly through an axon reflex–mediated response that is attenuated by lidocaine. Piloerection is not stimulated by iontophoresis of normal saline alone.The quantitative pilomotor axon reflex test (QPART) may complement other measures of cutaneous autonomic nerve fiber function.

  13. Test-Retest Cross-Reliability of Tests to Assess Neuromuscular Function as a Multidimensional Concept.

    PubMed

    Bernecke, Vaida; Pukenas, Kazimieras; Imbrasiene, Daiva; Mickeviciene, Dalia; Baranauskiene, Neringa; Eimantas, Nerijus; Brazaitis, Marius

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to estimate the test-retest cross-reliability of peripheral and central changes with respect to nonlinear and linear measures of a surface electromyography (EMG) signal measured during isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) combined with superimposed electrical stimulation during a brief and fatiguing task involving the ankle plantar flexors over 2 follicular phases of menstrual cycle. Ten healthy female adults underwent 1 familiarization session and 5 identical test-retest sessions. The results showed that the decrease in plantar flexor EMG components (root mean square [RMS], mean frequency [MnF], wavelet packet entropy [WPE]) for soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, central activation ratio (CAR) and MVC, and contractile properties (P20, P100, PTT-100, and half-relaxation time) of the plantar flexor muscles at the end of 2-minute MVC were similar (time effect; p < 0.001, η(p)² > 0.7, statistical power [SP] > 99%) and exhibited high stability over 5 trials (trial effect; p > 0.05; η(p)² < 0.2, SP < 30%). High reliability between trials was found for 5-second MVC (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] > 0.82, p < 0.001) and meaningful reliability for 2-minute MVC (ICC > 0.66, p < 0.01). In conclusion, in young healthy women, measurements of neuromuscular function, such as RMS, MnF, and WPE of a surface EMG signal, MVC, and CAR from a brief and sustained MVC of the ankle plantar flexors, are reliable, and multidimensional stability was found with respect to both high and low correlation outcomes across the 5 identical test-retest trials of any 2 properties measured during brief and sustained MVC.

  14. Cervical cancer screening in rural Bhutan with the careHPV test on self-collected samples: an ongoing cross-sectional, population-based study (REACH-Bhutan).

    PubMed

    Baussano, Iacopo; Tshering, Sangay; Choden, Tashi; Lazzarato, Fulvio; Tenet, Vanessa; Plummer, Martyn; Franceschi, Silvia; Clifford, Gary M; Tshomo, Ugyen

    2017-07-19

    The Bhutanese Screening Programme recommends a Pap smear every 3 years for women aged 25-65 years, and coverage ranges from 20% to 60%, being especially challenging in rural settings. The 'REACH-Bhutan' study was conducted to assess the feasibility and outcomes of a novel approach to cervical cancer screening in rural Bhutan. Cross-sectional, population-based study of cervical cancer screening based on the careHPV test on self-collected samples. Women were recruited in rural primary healthcare centres, that is, Basic Health Units (BHU), across Bhutan. Overall, 3648 women aged 30-60 were invited from 15 BHUs differing in accessibility, size and ethnic composition of the population. Participants provided a self-collected cervicovaginal sample and were interviewed. Samples were tested using careHPV in Thimphu (the Bhutanese capital) referral laboratory. Screening participation by geographic area, centre, age and travelling time. Previous screening history and careHPV positivity by selected characteristics of the participants. In April/May 2016, 2590 women (median age: 41) were enrolled. Study participation was 71% and significantly heterogeneous by BHU (range: 31%-96%). Participation decreased with increase in age (81% in women aged 30-39 years; 59% in ≥50 years) and travelling time (90% in women living <30 min from the BHU vs 62% among those >6 hours away). 50% of participants reported no previous screening, with the proportion of never-screened women varying significantly by BHU (range: 2%-72%). 265 women (10%; 95% CI 9% to 11%) were careHPV positive, with a significant variation by BHU (range: 5%-19%) and number of sexual partners (prevalence ratio for ≥3 vs 0-1, 1.55; 95% CI 1.05 to 2.27). Community-based cervical cancer screening by testing self-collected samples for human papillomavirus (HPV) can achieve high coverage in rural Bhutan. However, solutions to bring self-collection, HPV testing and precancer treatment closer to the remotest

  15. Testing the functional significance of microbial community composition.

    Treesearch

    Michael S. Strickland; Christian Lauber; Noah Fierer; Mark A. Bradford

    2009-01-01

    A critical assumption underlying terrestrial ecosystem models is that soil microbial communities, when placed in a common environment, will function in an identical manner regardless of the composition...

  16. A Bayesian geostatistical transfer function approach to tracer test analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienen, Michael N.; Luo, Jian; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2006-07-01

    Reactive transport modeling is often used in support of bioremediation and chemical treatment planning and design. There remains a pressing need for practical and efficient models that do not require (or assume attainable) the high level of characterization needed by complex numerical models. We focus on a linear systems or transfer function approach to the problem of reactive tracer transport in a heterogeneous saprolite aquifer. Transfer functions are obtained through the Bayesian geostatistical inverse method applied to tracer injection histories and breakthrough curves. We employ nonparametric transfer functions, which require minimal assumptions about shape and structure. The resulting flexibility empowers the data to determine the nature of the transfer function with minimal prior assumptions. Nonnegativity is enforced through a reflected Brownian motion stochastic model. The inverse method enables us to quantify uncertainty and to generate conditional realizations of the transfer function. Complex information about a hydrogeologic system is distilled into a relatively simple but rigorously obtained function that describes the transport behavior of the system between two wells. The resulting transfer functions are valuable in reactive transport models based on traveltime and streamline methods. The information contained in the data, particularly in the case of strong heterogeneity, is not overextended but is fully used. This is the first application of Bayesian geostatistical inversion to transfer functions in hydrogeology but the methodology can be extended to any linear system.

  17. Raju's Differential Functioning of Items and Tests (DFIT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oshima, T. C.; Morris, S. B.

    2008-01-01

    Nambury S. Raju (1937-2005) developed two model-based indices for differential item functioning (DIF) during his prolific career in psychometrics. Both methods, Raju's area measures (Raju, 1988) and Raju's DFIT (Raju, van der Linden, & Fleer, 1995), are based on quantifying the gap between item characteristic functions (ICFs). This approach…

  18. Test Review: Barkley Deficits in Executive Functioning Scale (BDEFS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allee-Smith, Paula J.; Winters, Rebecca R.; Drake, Amanda; Joslin, Amanda K.

    2013-01-01

    The Barkley Deficits in Executive Functioning Scale (BDEFS), authored by Russell A. Barkley and published by Guilford in 2011, is an individually administered assessment tool that may be used to evaluate adults ages 18 to 81. The purpose of this measure is to screen those who may be experiencing executive functioning (EF) deficits in…

  19. Test Review: Barkley Deficits in Executive Functioning Scale (BDEFS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allee-Smith, Paula J.; Winters, Rebecca R.; Drake, Amanda; Joslin, Amanda K.

    2013-01-01

    The Barkley Deficits in Executive Functioning Scale (BDEFS), authored by Russell A. Barkley and published by Guilford in 2011, is an individually administered assessment tool that may be used to evaluate adults ages 18 to 81. The purpose of this measure is to screen those who may be experiencing executive functioning (EF) deficits in…

  20. Testing and Functions of the J2X Gas Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    The Ares I, NASA s new solid rocket based crew launch vehicle, is a two stage in line rocket that has made its waytothe forefront of NASA s endeavors. The Ares I s Upper Stage (US) will be propelled by a J-2X engine which is fueled by liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen. The J-2X is a variation based on two of its predecessor s, the J-2 and J-2S engines. ET50 is providing the design support for hardware required to run tests on the J-2X Gas Generator (GG) that increases the delivery pressure of the supplied combustion fuels that the engine burns. The test area will be running a series of tests using different lengths and curved segments of pipe and different sized nozzles to determine the configuration that best satisfies the thrust, heat, and stability requirements for the engine. I have had to research the configurations that are being tested and gain an understanding of the purpose of the tests. I then had to research the parts that would be used in the test configurations. I was taken to see parts similar to the ones used in the test configurations and was allowed to review drawings and dimensions used for those parts. My job over this summer has been to use the knowledge I have gained to design, model, and create drawings for the un-fabricated parts that are necessary for the J-2X Workhorse Gas Generator Phase IIcTest.

  1. J-integral testing as a function of rate

    SciTech Connect

    Salzbrenner, R.; VanDenAvyle, J.A.; Lutz, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    The essentials of J-integral elastic-plastic fracture toughness measurements are reviewed. Extending these methods to higher rates (K approx. = 10/sup 5/ ksi ..sqrt..in/s) requires improved measurements of load, load line displacement, and crack length. Two test methods developed here and under contract are presented along with results from tests on ductile cast iron at several rates and temperatures. The ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) for the cast iron alloy increased with test rate, as is typical of ferritic steel alloys. Upper shelf toughness was higher at intermediate rates but decreased at the highest test rate. This work demonstrates two useful J-integral test methodologies to measure high rate fracture toughness.

  2. Interrater reliability of the Wolf Motor Function Test-Functional Ability Scale: why it matters.

    PubMed

    Duff, Susan V; He, Jiaxiu; Nelsen, Monica A; Lane, Christianne J; Rowe, Veronica T; Wolf, Steve L; Dromerick, Alexander W; Winstein, Carolee J

    2015-06-01

    One important objective for clinical trialists in rehabilitation is determining efficacy of interventions to enhance motor behavior. In part, limitation in the precision of measurement presents a challenge. The few valid, low-cost observational tools available to assess motor behavior cannot escape the variability inherent in test administration and scoring. This is especially true when there are multiple evaluators and raters, as in the case of multisite randomized controlled trials (RCTs). One way to enhance reliability and reduce variability is to implement rigorous quality control (QC) procedures. This article describes a systematic QC process used to refine the administration and scoring procedures for the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT)-Functional Ability Scale (FAS). The QC process, a systematic focus-group collaboration, was developed and used for a phase III RCT, which enlisted multiple evaluators and an experienced WMFT-FAS rater panel. After 3 staged refinements to the administration and scoring instructions, we achieved a sufficiently high interrater reliability (weighted κ = 0.8). A systematic focus-group process was shown to be an effective method to improve reliability of observational assessment tools for motor behavior in neurorehabilitation. A reduction in noise-related variability in performance assessments will increase power and potentially lower the number needed to treat. Improved precision of measurement can lead to more cost-effective and efficient clinical trials. Finally, we suggest that improved precision in measures of motor behavior may provide more insight into recovery mechanisms than a single measure of movement time alone. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Discharge of primate magnocellular red nucleus neurons during reaching to grasp in different spatial locations.

    PubMed

    van Kan, Peter L E; McCurdy, Martha L

    2002-01-01

    Reaching to grasp is of fundamental importance to primate motor behavior. One descending motor pathway that contributes to the control of this behavior is the rubrospinal tract. An important source of origin of the rubrospinal tract is the magnocellular red nucleus (RNm). Forelimb RNm neurons discharge vigorously during reach-to-grasp movements. RNm discharge is important for hand use, as coordinated whole-limb movements without hand use are not associated with strong discharge. Because RNm is functionally linked to muscles of the entire forelimb, RNm discharge may also contribute to use of the proximal limb that accompanies hand use. If RNm contributes to proximal limb use, we predict discharge to differ for reaches that differ in proximal limb involvement but require the same grasp. We tested this prediction by measuring discharge of individual RNm neurons while monkeys reached to grasp objects in four spatial locations in front of them. The animals reached from the waist to locations to the left, right, above, and below the shoulder of the "reaching" limb. RNm neurons of our sample were activated strongly during reach-to-grasp, and discharge of a third of the neurons tested depended on the spatial location of the object grasped. Discharge of RNm neurons and EMG activity of many of the distal and proximal forelimb muscles we tested were larger for reaching to grasp in the upper and/or right than lower and left target locations. Based on comparisons of each individual neuron's discharge patterns during reaches with and without preshaping the hand, we conclude that target location-dependent modulations in discharge rate of the majority of RNm neurons whose discharge differed for reaching to grasp in the four target locations contributed to aspects of hand preshaping that covaried with reach direction.

  4. The Functional Test for Agility Performance is a Reliable Quick Decision-Making Test for Skilled Water Polo Players.

    PubMed

    Tucher, Guilherme; de Souza Castro, Flávio Antônio; da Silva, António José Rocha Martins; Garrido, Nuno Domingos

    2015-06-27

    The reliability of the Functional Test for Agility Performance has only been evaluated in water polo players in a small group of novice athletes. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the Functional Test for Agility Performance in skilled water polo players. Forty-two athletes (17.81 ± 3.24 years old) with a minimum of 5 years of competitive experience (7.05 ± 2.84 years) and playing at the national or international level were evaluated. The Functional Test for Agility Performance is characterized as a specific open decision-making test where a tested player moves as quickly as possible in accordance to a pass made by another player. The time spent in the test was measured by two experienced coaches. Descriptive statistics, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), 95% limit of agreement (LOA), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and standard error of measurements (SEM) were used for data analysis. Athletes completed the Functional Test for Agility Performance in 4.15 0.47 s. The ICC value was 0.87 (95% IC = 0.80-0.92). The SEM varied between 0.24 and 0.38 s. The LOA was 1.20 s and the CV average considering each individual trial was 6%. The Functional Test for Agility Performance was shown to be a reliable quick decision-making test for skilled water polo players.

  5. Posterior cortical atrophy: visuomotor deficits in reaching and grasping

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Benjamin P.; Shelton, Paul; Marotta, Jonathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA) is a rare clinical syndrome characterized by the predominance of higher-order visual disturbances such as optic ataxia, a characteristic of Balint's syndrome. Deficits result from progressive neurodegeneration of occipito-temporal and occipito-parietal cortices. The current study sought to explore the visuomotor functioning of four individuals with PCA by testing their ability to reach out and grasp real objects under various viewing conditions. Experiment 1 had participants reach out and grasp simple, rectangular blocks under visually- and memory-guided conditions. Experiment 2 explored participants' abilities to accurately reach for objects located in their visual periphery. This investigation revealed that PCA patients demonstrate many of the same deficits that have been previously reported in other individuals with optic ataxia, such as “magnetic misreaching”—a pathological reaching bias toward the point of visual fixation when grasping peripheral targets. Unlike many other individuals with optic ataxia, however, the patients in the current study also show symptoms indicative of damage to the more perceptual stream of visual processing, including abolished grip scaling during memory-guided grasping and deficits in face and object identification. These investigations are the first to perform a quantitative analysis of the visuomotor deficits exhibited by patients with PCA. Critically, this study helps characterize common symptoms of PCA, a vital first step for generating effective diagnostic criteria and therapeutic strategies for this understudied neurodegenerative disorder. PMID:23801956

  6. Functional Testing Protocols for Commercial Building Efficiency Baseline Modeling Software

    SciTech Connect

    Jump, David; Price, Phillip N.; Granderson, Jessica; Sohn, Michael

    2013-09-06

    This document describes procedures for testing and validating proprietary baseline energy modeling software accuracy in predicting energy use over the period of interest, such as a month or a year. The procedures are designed according to the methodology used for public domain baselining software in another LBNL report that was (like the present report) prepared for Pacific Gas and Electric Company: ?Commercial Building Energy Baseline Modeling Software: Performance Metrics and Method Testing with Open Source Models and Implications for Proprietary Software Testing Protocols? (referred to here as the ?Model Analysis Report?). The test procedure focuses on the quality of the software?s predictions rather than on the specific algorithms used to predict energy use. In this way the software vendor is not required to divulge or share proprietary information about how their software works, while enabling stakeholders to assess its performance.

  7. Motion Plan Changes Predictably in Dyadic Reaching

    PubMed Central

    Burdet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Parents can effortlessly assist their child to walk, but the mechanism behind such physical coordination is still unknown. Studies have suggested that physical coordination is achieved by interacting humans who update their movement or motion plan in response to the partner’s behaviour. Here, we tested rigidly coupled pairs in a joint reaching task to observe such changes in the partners’ motion plans. However, the joint reaching movements were surprisingly consistent across different trials. A computational model that we developed demonstrated that the two partners had a distinct motion plan, which did not change with time. These results suggest that rigidly coupled pairs accomplish joint reaching movements by relying on a pre-programmed motion plan that is independent of the partner’s behaviour. PMID:27911938

  8. Inhibitory control of reaching movements in humans.

    PubMed

    Mirabella, Giovanni; Pani, Pierpaolo; Paré, Martin; Ferraina, Stefano

    2006-09-01

    Behavioral flexibility provides a very large repertoire of actions and strategies, however, it carries a cost: a potential interference between different options. The voluntary control of behavior starts exactly with the ability of deciding between alternatives. Certainly inhibition plays a key role in this process. Here we examined the inhibitory control of reaching arm movements with the countermanding paradigm. Right-handed human subjects were asked to perform speeded reaching movements toward a visual target appearing either on the same or opposite side of the reaching arm (no-stop trials), but to withhold the commanded movement whenever an infrequent stop signal was presented (stop trials). As the delay between go and stop signals increased, subjects increasingly failed to inhibit the movement. From this inhibitory function and the reaction times of movements in no-stop trials, we estimated the otherwise unobservable duration of the stopping process, the stop signal reaction time (SSRT). We found that the SSRT for reaching movements was, on average, 206 ms and that it varied with the reaching arm and the target position even though the stop signal was a central stimulus. In fact, subjects were always faster to withhold reaching movements toward visual targets appearing on the same side of the reaching arm. This behavior strictly parallels the course of the reaction times of no-stop trials. These data show that the stop and go processes interacting in this countermanding task are independent, but most likely influenced by a common factor when under the control of the same hemisphere. In addition, we show that the point beyond which the response cannot be inhibited, the so-called point-of-no-return that divides controlled and ballistic phases of movement processing, lies after the inter-hemispheric transfer.

  9. Penalty function model on the automatic testing of form errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xue-lin

    1993-09-01

    In this paper ,a principle and a way of searching form errors by using a penalty function model in dynamic measureement is introduced. Roundness and straightenss errors measurement for typical example are taken in paper ,it is grounded on relevant definitions of the Chinese National Standard(GB1 183 -80)to set up target function mm (x ,y) = Rmax (x , y)-Rmin (x ,y) , and to establish feasible collective "S" of desing the tolerance for variable x ,y . Namely (x ,y) E S is restraint condition. Is grounded on as started above,the model of punitive function and the punitive factors have been established. Then , an optimigation search of measurement process is undertaken. Then the points out of feasible collective can be rejected .Last the value form error is got. An example according to the theory can be run in a computer.

  10. Test functions for the moment method which yield the minimum mean square error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamansky, H.; Yang, C.

    1991-01-01

    The method of moments has found extensive applications in the solution of a wide class of electromagnetic problems. Additionally, there are a number of basis functions which have found favor and with them different types of testing methods. This work examines the selection of test functions, given a selected set of basis functions, which serve to minimize the mean square error. These test functions will guarantee equal or lesser error compared with any other test function. Additionally, these test functions provide a monotonic improvement of the approximation as the increase in the order of the system. Hence while these test functions require the application of the differential or integral operator one additional time, they provide an absolute lower bound to the mean square error in the approximation and a means to systematically improve accuracy with each increase in the order of the unknowns.

  11. Clinical color vision testing and correlation with visual function.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiawei; Davé, Sarita B; Wang, Jiangxia; Subramanian, Prem S

    2015-09-01

    To determine if Hardy-Rand-Rittler (H-R-R) and Ishihara testing are accurate estimates of color vision in subjects with acquired visual dysfunction. Assessment of diagnostic tools. Twenty-two subjects with optic neuropathy (aged 18-65) and 18 control subjects were recruited prospectively from an outpatient clinic. Individuals with visual acuity (VA) <20/200 or with congenital color blindness were excluded. All subjects underwent a comprehensive eye examination including VA, color vision, and contrast sensitivity testing. Color vision was assessed using H-R-R and Ishihara plates and Farnsworth D-15 (D-15) discs. D-15 is the accepted standard for detecting and classifying color vision deficits. Contrast sensitivity was measured using Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity charts. No relationship was found between H-R-R and D-15 scores (P = .477). H-R-R score and contrast sensitivity were positively correlated (P = .003). On multivariate analysis, contrast sensitivity (β = 8.61, P < .001) and VA (β = 2.01, P = .022) both showed association with H-R-R scores. Similar to H-R-R, Ishihara score did not correlate with D-15 score (P = .973), but on multivariate analysis was related to contrast sensitivity (β = 8.69, P < .001). H-R-R and Ishihara scores had an equivalent relationship with contrast sensitivity (P = .069). Neither H-R-R nor Ishihara testing appears to assess color identification in patients with optic neuropathy. Both H-R-R and Ishihara testing are correlated with contrast sensitivity, and these tests may be useful clinical surrogates for contrast sensitivity testing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Diagnosing and monitoring diabetic macular edema: structural and functional tests.

    PubMed

    Midena, Edoardo; Vujosevic, Stela

    2015-10-01

    Diabetic macular edema remains a major cause of visual impairment in adults despite the use of intensive glycemic control, photocoagulation therapy and new intravitreal drugs in the treatment of this disease. Although early diagnosis and treatment lead to better results, we still have patients who become legally blind. Therefore, better structural and functional characterization of this disease is necessary in order to customize treatment.

  13. Testing for Cognitive Function in Animals in a Regulatory Context

    EPA Science Inventory

    Superior cognitive functions have allowed the human species to dominate a world of incredible biological diversity. Threats to these essential capacities cannot be ignored, and a strategy is needed to evaluate the hazard posed by exposure to chemical and other agents. Because peo...

  14. Testing for Cognitive Function in Animals in a Regulatory Context

    EPA Science Inventory

    Superior cognitive functions have allowed the human species to dominate a world of incredible biological diversity. Threats to these essential capacities cannot be ignored, and a strategy is needed to evaluate the hazard posed by exposure to chemical and other agents. Because peo...

  15. An Effect Size Measure for Raju's Differential Functioning for Items and Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Keith D.; Oshima, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    This study established an effect size measure for differential functioning for items and tests' noncompensatory differential item functioning (NCDIF). The Mantel-Haenszel parameter served as the benchmark for developing NCDIF's effect size measure for reporting moderate and large differential item functioning in test items. The effect size of…

  16. An Effect Size Measure for Raju's Differential Functioning for Items and Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Keith D.; Oshima, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    This study established an effect size measure for differential functioning for items and tests' noncompensatory differential item functioning (NCDIF). The Mantel-Haenszel parameter served as the benchmark for developing NCDIF's effect size measure for reporting moderate and large differential item functioning in test items. The effect size of…

  17. Differential Item Functioning Amplification and Cancellation in a Reading Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bao, Han; Dayton, C. Mitchell; Hendrickson, Amy B.

    2009-01-01

    When testlet effects and item idiosyncratic features are both considered to be the reasons of DIF in educational tests using testlets (Wainer & Kiely, 1987) or item bundles (Rosenbaum, 1988), it is interesting to investigate the phenomena of DIF amplification and cancellation due to the interactive effects of these two factors. This research…

  18. Reaching the "iBored"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauleke, Debra S.; Herrmann, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    As teachers, they are always looking for creative ways to engage their students. They start the school year determined to bring to the classroom creative projects that generate student interest and foster critical thinking skills. Reaching today's Gen M student is challenging and changing the way they teach. The idea of using music to teach…

  19. Reaching the "iBored"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauleke, Debra S.; Herrmann, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    As teachers, they are always looking for creative ways to engage their students. They start the school year determined to bring to the classroom creative projects that generate student interest and foster critical thinking skills. Reaching today's Gen M student is challenging and changing the way they teach. The idea of using music to teach…

  20. Microgravity Science Glovebox - Interior Reach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photo shows the interior reach in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) being developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Scientists will use the MSG to carry out multidisciplinary studies in combustion science, fluid physics and materials science. The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Photo Credit: NASA/MSFC

  1. Schools Reaching Out: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heleen, Owen

    1990-01-01

    Introduces an issue devoted to the Schools Reaching Out projects at David A. Ellis School in Roxbury (MA) and Adolph S. Ochs School in New York City. Projects attempt to link the schools with parents and their communities to promote the students' academic and social success. (DM)

  2. Reaching All Students with Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Gilbert, Ed.; Driscoll, Mark, Ed.

    The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics'"Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics" and "Professional Standards for Teaching Mathematics" reflect the belief that all students can learn a significant core of high-quality mathematics. Recognizing the magnitude of the task of reaching all students, this…

  3. Asperger syndrome: tests of right hemisphere functioning and interhemispheric communication.

    PubMed

    Gunter, Helen L; Ghaziuddin, Mohammad; Ellis, Hadyn D

    2002-08-01

    The primary aim of this investigation was to assess to what extent Rourke's (1989, 1995) nonverbal learning disabilities syndrome (NLD) model resembles the pattern of assets and deficits seen in people with Asperger syndrome (AS). NLD can be characterized by a cluster of deficits primarily affecting nonverbal aspects of functioning, in the presence of proficiency in single word reading and a superior verbal memory. The neurological underpinnings of this syndrome may be dysfunction of white matter affecting right hemisphere functioning and interhemispheric communication. To explore this hypothesis, eight participants with AS (ages 10 to 41 years) were assessed in the following areas: the pragmatics of language and communication, verbal and visual memory, visual-spatial abilities, and bimanual motor skills. Results confirmed the close similarity in the neuropsychologic profiles of NLD and AS.

  4. Pulmonary function test in traffic police personnel in Pondicherry.

    PubMed

    Pal, Pravati; John, Robert A; Dutta, T K; Pal, G K

    2010-01-01

    Traffic policemen working in the busy traffic signal areas get exposed to the vehicular emissions for years together. The fumes, chemicals and particles present in the emission are reported to be damaging to the lung functions of these individuals. Since there were no data available on the PFT parameters of traffic police personnel of Pondicherry, this study was taken up to assess the effect of traffic air pollution on their pulmonary functions. PFT parameters were recorded in age- and BMI-matched 30 traffic police personnel (study group) and 30 general police personnel (control group) of male gender. As chronic smoking is known to be a critical factor in altering lung function, PFT parameters were compared between the smokers as well as nonsmokers of both the groups. In nonsmokers, there was significant decrease in VC (P < 0.05), FEV1 (P < 0.01), FEF-25 (P < 0.05) and PIF (P < 0.05) in study group compared to the control group. In smokers, there was significant decrease in VC (P < 0.05), FEV1 (P <00001), PEF (P < 0.0001), MVV (P < 0.0001), FEF-25 (P < 0.0001), and PIF (P < 0.01) in study group compared to the control group. These changes indicate restriction to the lung expansion, obstruction and narrowing of the airways in traffic police personnel compared to the general police personnel. This may be due to exposure to vehicular pollution for several hours in a day for many years causing decreased functional capacity of the lungs and chronic smoking worsens the condition.

  5. Computer Adaptive Language Tests (CALT) Offer a Great Potential for Functional Testing. Yet Why Don't They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meunier, Lydie E.

    1994-01-01

    Computer adaptive language testing (CALT) offers a variety of advantages; however, since CALT cannot test the multidimensional nature of language, it does not assess communicative/functional language. This article proposes to replace multiple choice and cloze formats and to apply CALT to live-action simulations. (18 references) (LB)

  6. A new guide for commissioning air handling systems: Using a model functional test

    SciTech Connect

    Haasl, Tudi; Sellers, David; Friedman, Hannah; Piette, Mary Ann; Bourassa, Norman; Gillespie, Ken

    2002-05-01

    Functional tests are a set of detailed instructions for building commissioning that demand extensive HVAC system knowledge to write and perform. Understanding the energy use implications and theory behind the test procedures, estimating the costs and benefits of doing a particular test, implementing the tests correctly, and resolving problems require years of field experience. As part of a large research project now underway, a practical guide is being developed that communicates this knowledge. This paper presents the components and intended use of the Functional Testing Guide and Model Functional Test for Air Handling Systems. A series of model functional tests, starting at the outdoor air intake section and proceeding through the air handling unit, distribution system, and terminal equipment and ending at the exhaust air discharge point, are provided for many commonly installed air handling system configurations. The model functional tests contain advice for tailoring the test procedures to specific system configurations, desirable and undesirable testing outcomes, a calculation appendix, references to other resources, and examples of completed test forms. The guide is an educational resource, with background information that clarifies the principles behind testing configurations and results. The functional tests have been selected from an extensive commissioning test protocol library compiled by Pacific Gas and Electric in 2001. The guide also includes a design guideline for the selection of control and monitoring points and a design intent documentation form.

  7. ATE/ICEPM Development Report and Function Demonstration Test.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    Ignitor Probe TEST & in adjustment if required and to Intake Mianifold Vacuum ADJST check advance mechanism 20 SPEED Tachometer Ignitor Probe DIS- PLAY...effects of ignition, com- pression, starter and air/fuel system faults in terms of measureable parameters - engine speed , ignition and starter...interruption technique as a means of evaluating engine horsepower and the correlation between variation in instantaneous engine speed and idle quality

  8. The Video Head Impulse Test in a Case of Suspected Bilateral Loss of Vestibular Function

    PubMed Central

    Albernaz, Pedro L. Mangabeira; Cusin, Flavia Salvaterra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A patient who had no symptoms suggestive of bilateral loss of vestibular function presented no responses in rotational and caloric tests. Objectives To demonstrate the importance of the video head impulse test in neuro-otologic diagnosis. Resumed Report This patient had a neuro-otologic evaluation and presented no responses in torsion swing tests, caloric tests, and rotational tests in a Bárány chair. The video head impulse test elicited responses in four of the six semicircular canals. Conclusion Absent responses in caloric and rotatory tests alone are not sufficient to diagnose bilateral loss of vestibular function. PMID:26722351

  9. The Video Head Impulse Test in a Case of Suspected Bilateral Loss of Vestibular Function.

    PubMed

    Albernaz, Pedro L Mangabeira; Cusin, Flavia Salvaterra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A patient who had no symptoms suggestive of bilateral loss of vestibular function presented no responses in rotational and caloric tests. Objectives To demonstrate the importance of the video head impulse test in neuro-otologic diagnosis. Resumed Report This patient had a neuro-otologic evaluation and presented no responses in torsion swing tests, caloric tests, and rotational tests in a Bárány chair. The video head impulse test elicited responses in four of the six semicircular canals. Conclusion Absent responses in caloric and rotatory tests alone are not sufficient to diagnose bilateral loss of vestibular function.

  10. Designing and Testing Functional RNA Nanoparticles | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have generated excitement that nanomaterials may provide novel approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of deadly diseases, such as cancer. However, the use of synthetic materials to generate nanoparticles can present challenges with endotoxin content, sterility, or biocompatibility. Employing biological materials may overcome these issues with RNA being particularly attractive given the clinical applications of RNA interference and the abundance of functional RNAs, including aptamers and ribozymes. RNA can form stable three-dimensional nanoparticle structures that can be decorated with other nucleic acids, small molecules, or proteins, potentially increasing local concentrations of therapeutic agents and acting synergistically when combined.

  11. Effect of yoga on pulmonary function tests of hypothyroid patients.

    PubMed

    Swami, Gaurav; Singh, Savita; Singh, K P; Gupta, Manish

    2010-01-01

    Aim of this study was to see any effect on respiratory functions in hypothyroid patients after pranayama (yoga). The subjects for the study were 20 hypothyroid females, 39.70 +/- 8.27 years of mean age referred from medicine department of UCMS & G.T.B. Hospital. Spiro metric recordings were taken with hypair (version-1.28). Baseline (first) recordings were taken when patient came for the first time. Patients came to yoga lab in physiology department for 21 days continuously where they were trained by the yoga instructors and then told to do pranayama at home and called at regular intervals after 7 days to see the compliance. The breathing exercises were done for 45 minutes everyday. After 6 months of pranayama second recording was taken and compared with the baseline. There were significant improvement in forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1), Maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) and Inspiratory Capacity(IC). Thus Pranayama and meditation has beneficial effect on pulmonary functions of hypothyroid patients along with conventional treatment.

  12. Functional testing of the space station plasma contactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Hamley, John A.; Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Soulas, George C.

    1995-03-01

    A plasma contactor system has been baselined for the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) to control the electrical potentials of surfaces to eliminate/mitigate damaging interactions with the space environment. The system represents a dual-use technology which is a direct outgrowth of the NASA electric propulsion program and, in particular, the technology development effort on ion thruster systems. The plasma contactor subsystems include a hollow cathode assembly, a power electronics unit, and an expellant management unit. Under a pre-flight development program these subsystems are being developed to the level of maturity appropriate for transfer to U.S. industry for final development. Development efforts for the hollow cathode assembly include design selection and refinement, validating its required lifetime, and quantifying the cathode performance and interface specifications. To date, cathode components have demonstrated over 10,000 hours lifetime, and a hollow cathode assembly has demonstrated over 3,000 ignitions. Additionally, preliminary integration testing of a hollow cathode assembly with a breadboard power electronics unit has been completed. This paper discusses test results and the development status of the plasma contactor subsystems for ISSA, and in particular, the hollow cathode assembly.

  13. Design, synthesis, and functional testing of recombinant cell penetrating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widyaningtyas, S. T.; Soebandrio, A.; Ibrahim, F.; Bela, B.

    2017-08-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) are one of the most attractive DNA delivery systems currently in development. In this research, in silico CPP development was performed based on a literature study to look for peptides that induce endosome escape, have the ability to bind DNA, and pass through cell membranes and/or nuclear membranes with a final goal of creating a new CPP to be used as a DNA delivery system. We report herein the successful isolation of three candidate CPP molecules, which have all been successfully expressed and purified by NiNTA. One of the determinants of CPP success as a DNA carrier is the ability of the CPP to bind and protect DNA from the effects of nucleases. The DNA binding test results show that all three CPPs can bind to DNA and protect it from the effects of serum nucleases. These three CPP candidates designed in silico and synthesized in the prokaryote system are eligible candidates for further testing of their ability to deliver DNA in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Drawing Test Performance of Black and White Preschoolers as a Function of Biracial Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratusnik, David L.; Koenigsknecht, Roy A

    Six speech and language clinicians, 3 black and 3 white, administered the Goodenough Drawing Test (1926) to 144 preschoolers. The 4 groups, lower-socioeconomic black and white and middle-socioeconomic black and white, were equally divided by sex. The biracial clinical setting was shown to influence test scores in black preschool age children.…

  15. The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : FY08 testing for functionality, model validation, and technology readiness.

    SciTech Connect

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Blecke, Jill; Baker, Michael Sean; Clemens, Rebecca C.; Mitchell, John Anthony; Brake, Matthew Robert; Epp, David S.; Wittwer, Jonathan W.

    2008-10-01

    This report summarizes the functional, model validation, and technology readiness testing of the Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor in FY08. Functional testing of a large number of revision 4 parts showed robust and consistent performance. Model validation testing helped tune the models to match data well and identified several areas for future investigation related to high frequency sensitivity and thermal effects. Finally, technology readiness testing demonstrated the integrated elements of the sensor under realistic environments.

  16. Relationship between force platform and two functional tests for measuring balance in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Gil, André W O; Oliveira, Marcio R; Coelho, Vinícius A; Carvalho, Carlos E; Teixeira, Denilson C; da Silva, Rubens A

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and laboratory methods have been developed to assess the different dimensions of postural control with the aim to increase the clinical relevance of decisions about balance deficit. The purpose of this study was to correlate the force platform measurements with two functional tests used to evaluate balance in elderly. A total of 124 physically independent elderly volunteers participated in this study. Subjects performed the following three tests: 1) a traditional functional balance test, named the one-leg standing test, which measures the time in seconds at this position; 2) a functional agility/dynamic balance test, which quantifies the total time in seconds that a subject can stand up from a chair and move as quickly as possible around two cones; and 3) an unipodal balance test on a force platform. The one-leg standing test yielded a mean of 12 seconds (SD=9 s), while the mean time observed in the functional agility/dynamic balance test was 26 seconds (SD=6 s). The correlations between the balance parameters of force platform and two functional tests varied between -0.28 and 0.20, which shows a weak association between them. Our results support the idea that these functional tests do not necessarily furnish the same information regarding balance mechanisms as the force platform. This study contributes to the evaluation of balance in elderly and suggests that functional tests should be used with caution especially in regards to the purposes of the research and when conducting clinical assessments of the elderly.

  17. W-charge asymmetry at CDF, tests of structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Budd, H.S.

    1994-09-01

    The charge asymmetry of W-bosons produced in p{bar p} collisions has been measured using 19,039 W {yields} e{nu} and W {yields} {mu}{nu} decays recorded by the CDF detector during the 1992-93 Tevatron collider run. The asymmetry is sensitive to the slope of the proton`s d/u quark distribution ratio down to x < 0.01 at Q{sup 2} {approx} M{sub W}{sup 2}, where nonperturbative QCD effects are minimal. Of recent parton distribution functions, those of Martin, Roberts and Stirling are favored over those of the CTEQ collaboration. This difference is seen even though both sets agree, at the level of the nuclear shadowing corrections, with the recent NMC measurements of F{sub 2}{sup {mu}n}/F{sub 2}{sup {mu}p}.

  18. W-charge asymmetry at CDF, tests of structure functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budd, H. S.

    1994-09-01

    The charge asymmetry of W-bosons produced in p(bar p) collisions has been measured using 19,039 W (yields) e(nu) and W (yields) (mu)(nu) decays recorded by the CDF detector during the 1992-93 Tevatron collider run. The asymmetry is sensitive to the slope of the proton's d/u quark distribution ratio down to x less than 0.01 at Q(sup 2) (approx) M(sub W, sup 2), where nonperturbative QCD effects are minimal. Of recent parton distribution functions, those of Martin, Roberts and Stirling are favored over those of the CTEQ collaboration. This difference is seen even though both sets agree, at the level of the nuclear shadowing corrections, with the recent NMC measurements of F(sub 2, sup (mu)n)/F(sub 2, sup (mu)p).

  19. W Lepton Charge Asymmetry - Test of Structure Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qun

    1996-05-01

    The lepton charge asymmetry as a function of lepton rapidity |y_l| has been measured at √s=1.8 TeV, using the W decays to electrons and muons recorded by the CDF detector during the 1992-93 run (≈ 20 pb-1 of integrated luminosity), and the 1994-95 run (≈ 90 pb-1). The asymmetry is sensitive to the ratio of the d to u quark momentum distributions in the proton. The measurement probes the quark distributions to x<0.01 at Q^2 ≈ M_W^2, where nonperturbative effects are minimal. These precise data provide discrimination between sets of modern parton distributions. It is found that the most recent parton distributions, which included the 1992-93 W asymmetry data in their fits (MRSA and CTEQ3M) are in better agreement with the more precise data from the 1994-95 run.

  20. Pulmonary function testing and chest tomography in patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the gradual improvement in treatment procedures and cure rates of acromegaly, a steady increase in the mortality rate due to respiratory disease has been documented in recent decades. In this study, our objectives were to describe the abnormalities in lung structure and function that occur in acromegalic patients and to correlate these changes with hormonal levels. Methods This cross-sectional study included 20 acromegalic patients and 20 age-and height-matched control subjects, all non-smokers. All subjects underwent spirometry, whole body plethysmography, carbon monoxide diffusing capacity, and respiratory muscle strength. Acromegalic patients also performed high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Results Most patients were female (65%), with a mean age of 52.5 ± 13 years. Acromegalic patients showed lower values of maximum expiratory pressure (55.9 ± 17.1 vs. 103.7 ± 19.2%; p < 0.001) and maximum inspiratory pressure (71.4 ± 27.8 vs. 85.3 ± 24.1%; p = 0.005) compared to control subjects. The values of forced vital capacity (107.1 ± 15.9 vs. 98.9 ± 21.4%; p = 0.028), total lung capacity – TLC (107.3 ± 12.9 vs. 93.7 ± 7.60%; p = 0.002), residual volume (114.1 ± 22.7 vs. 90.0 ± 14.6%; p < 0.001), and airways’ resistance (3.82 vs. 2.31 cmH2O/L/s; p = 0.039) were greater in acromegalic patients than in control subjects. The difference between the TLC measured by plethysmography and the VA (alveolar volume) measured during the DLCO maneuver was higher in acromegalic patients than in control subjects (0.69 ± 0.46 vs. 0.19 ± 0.61 L; p = 0.021). The main findings in HRCT in acromegalic patients were air trapping, airway calcification and bronchiectasis, which were observed in 60%, 40% and 35% of cases, respectively. There was no significant correlation between the levels of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor I, the lung function and the air trapping. Conclusions

  1. Evaluation of liver function tests in scleroderma patients.

    PubMed

    Salem, Gehan Ibrahim Abdelrazek; Abdulrahman, Awni Ali

    2012-08-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a clinically heterogeneous, systemic disorder which affects the connective tissue of the skin, internal organs, and the walls of blood vessels. It is characterized by alterations of the microvasculature, disturbances of the immune system and by massive deposition of collagen and other matrix substances in the connective tissue. This study was done to evaluate the frequency of liver disease in patients with scleroderma and, secondarily, to study the frequency of infection of hepatitis B and C virus in these patients and determine frequency of serum auto-antibodies in this disease. We studied patients with scleroderma, localized or systemic, in the outpatient clinic of rheumatology and dermatology departments, at King Khalid University Hospital. As for a comparison, healthy persons coming to the clinic with the same mean age were considered as control group. Forty patients with the diagnosis of scleroderma included in this work, 35% had elevated gamma-glutamyl-transferase (γ-GT), 30% had elevated alkaline phosphatase (AP) and in 17.5%, the alanine-amino-transferase (ALT) was above the reference values. The ALT had changed to be more in scleroderma patients than in controls. Twenty percent (20%) of the patients tested positive for anti-smooth muscle antibodies (anti-SMA) and only one patient had anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA). There was no statistical difference between the two groups regarding antibody testing. Anti-HCV antibodies were observed in one patient, and HBsAg was detected in another scleroderma patient. There was no patient with clinically significant hepatic disease. In this study, although changes in liver enzymes in patients with scleroderma were not uncommon, there was no scleroderma patient with clinical manifestations of liver disease.

  2. [Correlations between cognition and function in Alzheimer's disease: based on the abbreviated Barcelona Test (a-BT)].

    PubMed

    Peña-Casanova, J; Monllau, A; Böhm, P; Blesa González, R; Aguilar Barberà, M; Sol, J M; Hernández, G

    2005-01-01

    The objective is to establish the existence of possible correlations between cognitive measures using the a-BT, and functional measures in a population of normal to moderately severe demented subjects. A sample of 107 subjects (42 healthy controls, 19 subjects with mild cognitive impairment and 46 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease) were included in the present study. The instruments of the cognitive measure used was the abbreviated Barcelona Test (a-BT), a test of general cognitive function. Apart from that, the following functional scales, evaluating activities of daily living, were used: Rapid Disability Rating Scale-2 (RDRS-2), Blessed Dementia Rating Scale (BDRS), and Interview for Deterioration in Daily living in Dementia (IDDD). The statistical procedures were the correlations between cognitive and functional measures using Pearson's correlation coefficient. The correlations obtained between the cognitive and all functional measures were all highly significant (p < 0.0001) and consistently high, with correlations ranging between 0.72 and 0.80. Correlations between the a-BT and functional measures of more basic activities of daily living (RDRS-2, BDRS) were lower than those that included instrumental and some advanced activities of daily living (IDDD). The present paper establishes the existence of satisfactory correlations between the functional measures studied and the global scores of the a-BT. These correlations are applicable for groups of subjects with cognitive impairment that does not reach the threshold of a diagnosis of dementia as well as subjects suffering from Alzheimer's disease, at least up to moderately severe cases. The global score of the a-BT allows for some degree of prediction of the functional status of a subject with suspected Alzheimer's disease pathology evaluated.

  3. Test-retest reliability and minimal detectable change scores of twelve functional fitness tests in adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boer, P H; Moss, S J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the test-retest reliability and minimal detectable change of selected functional fitness test items in adults with Down syndrome. Forty-three adults with Down syndrome (24 men and 19 women) aged 18-50 years completed a battery of tests twice in a two-week period. The battery of tests consisted of two balance items, two flexibility items, five muscular strength and endurance items, two aerobic items, and one functional task. All items were considered valid and reliable tests in a general elderly or intellectually disabled population. The test-retest relative reliability for all repeated tests was assessed with intraclass correlation coefficient performing one-way analysis of variance. The test-retest absolute variability was measured by using the standard error of measurement (SEM) to calculate the minimal detectable change at the 90% confidence interval (MDC90). Reliability data was visualised with a Bland-Altman plot. All tests showed excellent intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC's>0.9). All SEM values demonstrated acceptable measurement precision (SEMtests. The analyses indicated that there was no major systematic bias in the plots. The scatter around the Bland-Altman was distributed randomly. All twelve functional fitness tests demonstrated adequate feasibility and relative and absolute test-retest reliability in adults with Down syndrome in South Africa. Information of this nature will help to monitor performance alterations over time and success of training interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Test-retest reliability of a dichotic digits test for assessing central auditory function in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Strouse, A L; Hall, J W

    1995-01-01

    Test-retest reliability for the dichotic digits test was measured in 10 subjects diagnosed with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease and a control group of 10 subjects with no evidence of dementia, matched for age, gender and average degree of hearing loss. Although initial scores among the Alzheimer group were more variable, test-retest reliability over a month period was reasonably high for both subject groups. Results are in agreement with previous reports on dichotic digits showing good sensitivity, ease in administration and time efficiency. Use of the dichotic digits test for screening of central auditory function in the Alzheimer population is supported.

  5. Domain-specific functional software testing: A progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonnenmann, Uwe

    1992-01-01

    Software Engineering is a knowledge intensive activity that involves defining, designing, developing, and maintaining software systems. In order to build effective systems to support Software Engineering activities, Artificial Intelligence techniques are needed. The application of Artificial Intelligence technology to Software Engineering is called Knowledge-based Software Engineering (KBSE). The goal of KBSE is to change the software life cycle such that software maintenance and evolution occur by modifying the specifications and then rederiving the implementation rather than by directly modifying the implementation. The use of domain knowledge in developing KBSE systems is crucial. Our work is mainly related to one area of KBSE that is called automatic specification acquisition. One example is the WATSON prototype on which our current work is based. WATSON is an automatic programming system for formalizing specifications for telephone switching software mainly restricted to POTS, i.e., plain old telephone service. Our current approach differentiates itself from other approaches in two antagonistic ways. On the one hand, we address a large and complex real-world problem instead of a 'toy domain' as in many research prototypes. On the other hand, to allow such scaling, we had to relax the ambitious goal of complete automatic programming, to the easier task of automatic testing.

  6. Passive expiration as a test of lung function.

    PubMed Central

    Ashutosh, K; Keighley, J F

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-five normal subjects, 14 non-smokers and 11 smokers, passively expired into a spirometer after a maximal active inspiration, and after a passive inflation of the chest by a pressure cycled intermittent positive-pressure breathing (IPPB) machine. Acceptable passive expirations could be performed by all subjects after a passive inspiration but by only 12 after an active inspiration. Expired volume was found to change exponentially with time (r greater than 0.98), and the time constant of passive expiration (Tp) was obtained. There was no significant difference between the smokers and non-smokers in age, sex, forced vital capacity, FEV1 FEV1/FVC%, maximum mid-expiratory flow rate, maximum expiratory flow at 50% and 25% of the vital capacity, or the magnitude of the fall in the dynamic compliance with increasing frequency of breathing (Cdyn/f). Tp in smokers (1.06 +/- 0.47 SD) was significantly longer than in the non-smokers (0.65 +/- 0.25 SD P less than 0.02). Tp had a significant correlation with Cdyn/f(Tp = 0.6 + 161.81 Cdyn/f +/- 0.38 SE, r = 0.49, P less than 0.02). We conclude that satisfactory passive expiratory spirograms can be easily obtained after a mechanically assisted passive inspiration. Tp thus obtained is determined by the intrinsic properties of the respiratory system (lung plus thorax), and is significantly prolonged in smokers compared with non-smokers when other studies of pulmonary function including frequency dependence of compliance are unchanged. PMID:371059

  7. [Tests of liver function in obese school children].

    PubMed

    Angulo, Nerkis; de Szarvas, Sobeida Barbella; Guevara, Harold; González, Dora; Hernández, Ana

    2015-03-01

    The non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) manifests with liver damage and it is associated with obesity. The objective of this work was to detect the risk of obese school students of developing NAFLD, through an analytical, observational study, comparing their liver function with that of a control group, and its relationship with physical activity, dietary, biochemical and anthropometric variables. One hundred and sixty school students (ages 7-11) were evaluated according to their socio-economic status; nutritional status by the body mass index (BMI) and mid-upper arm fat area (MUAC) (Project Venezuela 1994); body fat percentage by anthropometry (% BF), waist circumference (WC); and metabolism by oral glucose tolerance, basal insulin and post-load glucose, total cholesterol (TC), cLDL, cVLDL, cHDL, triglycerides (TG), glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), gamma glutamil transpeptidasa (GGTP) and albumin. Their diet was analyzed by the 24-hour recall and their physical activity by a clinical trial. Mean levels of GPT (p < 0.05), greater frequencies of elevated GOT and GPT (p < 0.05) and lower albumin levels (p < 0.05) were observed in 88 obese school students when compared to controls. The GPT correlated significantly with the BMI, MUAC, % BF, WC, basal insulin and post-load glucose, HOMA, cVLDL, cHDL and TG, while the GOT correlated with MUAC and the GGTP with MUAC, basal insulin, HOMA and cLDL. Albumin was negatively correlated with BMI, MUAC, % BF and WC. TGP reflected better the hepatic compromise of obesity. To assess the risk of NAFLD, the TGO/TGP values should be standardized according to age, gender and race.

  8. Predicting functional capacity during treadmill testing independent of exercise protocol.

    PubMed

    Foster, C; Crowe, A J; Daines, E; Dumit, M; Green, M A; Lettau, S; Thompson, N N; Weymier, J

    1996-06-01

    Clinically useful estimates of VO2max from treadmill tests (GXT) may be made using protocol-specific equations. In many cases, GXT may proceed more effectively if the clinician is free to adjust speed and grade independent of a specific protocol. We sought to determine whether VO2max could be predicted from the estimated steady-state VO2 of the terminal exercise stage. Seventy clinically stable individuals performed GXT with direct measurement of VO2. Exercise was incremented each minute to optimize clinical examination. Measured VO2max was compared to the estimated steady-state VO2 of the terminal stage based on ACSM equations. Equations for walking or running were used based on the patient's observed method of ambulation. The measured VO2max was always less than the ACSM estimate, with a regular relationship between measured and estimated VO2max. No handrail support: VO2max = 0.869.ACSM -0.07; R2 = 0.955, SEE = 4.8 ml.min-1.kg-1 (N = 30). With handrail support: VO2max = 0.694.ACSM + 3.33; R2 = 0.833, SEE = 4.4 ml.min-1.kg-1 (N = 40). The equations were cross-validated with 20 patients. The correlation between predicted and observed values was r = 0.98 and 0.97 without and with handrail support, respectively. The mean absolute prediction error (3.1 and 4.1 ml.min-1.kg-1) were similar to protocol-specific equations. We conclude that VO2max can be predicted independent of treadmill protocol with approximately the same error as protocol-specific equations.

  9. TESTING BASAL GANGLIA MOTOR FUNCTIONS THROUGH REVERSIBLE INACTIVATIONS IN THE POSTERIOR INTERNAL GLOBUS PALLIDUS

    PubMed Central

    Desmurget, M.; Turner, R.S.

    2010-01-01

    To test current hypotheses on the contribution of the basal ganglia (BG) to motor control, we examined the effects of muscimol-induced inactivations in the skeletomotor region of the internal globus pallidus (sGPi) on visually-directed reaching. Injections were made in 2 monkeys trained to perform four out-and-back reaching movements in quick succession toward four randomly-selected target locations. Following sGPi inactivations: (1) Peak velocity and acceleration were decreased in nearly all sessions whereas movement duration lengthened inconsistently. (2) Reaction times were unaffected on average, although minor changes were observed in several individual sessions. (3) Outward reaches showed a substantial hypometria that correlated closely with bradykinesia, but directional accuracy was unaffected. (4) End-point accuracy was preserved for the slow visually-guided return movements. (5) No impairments were found in the rapid chaining of out-and-back movements, in the selection or initiation of four independent reaches in quick succession, or in the quick on-line correction of initially mis-directed reaches. (6) Inactivation-induced reductions in the magnitude of movement-related muscle activity (EMG) correlated with the severity of slowing and hypometria. There was no evidence for inactivation-induced alterations in the relative timing of EMG bursts, excessive co-contraction, or impaired suppression of antagonist EMG. Therefore, disconnecting the BG motor pathway consistently produced bradykinesia and hypometria, but seldom affected movement initiation time, feedback-mediated guidance, the capacity to produce iterative reaches, or the ability to abruptly reverse movement direction. These results are discussed with reference to the idea that the BG motor loop may regulate energetic expenditures during movement (i.e., movement “vigor”). PMID:18077663

  10. [Interpretation and use of routine pulmonary function tests: Spirometry, static lung volumes, lung diffusion, arterial blood gas, methacholine challenge test and 6-minute walk test].

    PubMed

    Bokov, P; Delclaux, C

    2016-02-01

    Resting pulmonary function tests (PFT) include the assessment of ventilatory capacity: spirometry (forced expiratory flows and mobilisable volumes) and static volume assessment, notably using body plethysmography. Spirometry allows the potential definition of obstructive defect, while static volume assessment allows the potential definition of restrictive defect (decrease in total lung capacity) and thoracic hyperinflation (increase in static volumes). It must be kept in mind that this evaluation is incomplete and that an assessment of ventilatory demand is often warranted, especially when facing dyspnoea: evaluation of arterial blood gas (searching for respiratory insufficiency) and measurement of the transfer coefficient of the lung, allowing with the measurement of alveolar volume to calculate the diffusing capacity of the lung for CO (DLCO: assessment of alveolar-capillary wall and capillary blood volume). All these pulmonary function tests have been the subject of an Americano-European Task force (standardisation of lung function testing) published in 2005, and translated in French in 2007. Interpretative strategies for lung function tests have been recommended, which define abnormal lung function tests using the 5th and 95th percentiles of predicted values (lower and upper limits of normal values). Thus, these recommendations need to be implemented in all pulmonary function test units. A methacholine challenge test will only be performed in the presence of an intermediate pre-test probability for asthma (diagnostic uncertainty), which is an infrequent setting. The most convenient exertional test is the 6-minute walk test that allows the assessment of walking performance, the search for arterial desaturation and the quantification of dyspnoea complaint.

  11. PEP Run Report for Simulant Shakedown/Functional Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, Gary B.; Geeting, John GH; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.

    2009-12-29

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes." The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP; and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP-1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3-8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP-2, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration

  12. Classroom-Based Strategies to Incorporate Hypothesis Testing in Functional Behavior Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Blair P.; Weaver, Emily S.; Staubitz, Johanna L.

    2017-01-01

    When results of descriptive functional behavior assessments are unclear, hypothesis testing can help school teams understand how the classroom environment affects a student's challenging behavior. This article describes two hypothesis testing strategies that can be used in classroom settings: structural analysis and functional analysis. For each…

  13. A physical function test for use in the intensive care unit: validity, responsiveness, and predictive utility of the physical function ICU test (scored).

    PubMed

    Denehy, Linda; de Morton, Natalie A; Skinner, Elizabeth H; Edbrooke, Lara; Haines, Kimberley; Warrillow, Stephen; Berney, Sue

    2013-12-01

    Several tests have recently been developed to measure changes in patient strength and functional outcomes in the intensive care unit (ICU). The original Physical Function ICU Test (PFIT) demonstrates reliability and sensitivity. The aims of this study were to further develop the original PFIT, to derive an interval score (the PFIT-s), and to test the clinimetric properties of the PFIT-s. A nested cohort study was conducted. One hundred forty-four and 116 participants performed the PFIT at ICU admission and discharge, respectively. Original test components were modified using principal component analysis. Rasch analysis examined the unidimensionality of the PFIT, and an interval score was derived. Correlations tested validity, and multiple regression analyses investigated predictive ability. Responsiveness was assessed using the effect size index (ESI), and the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) was calculated. The shoulder lift component was removed. Unidimensionality of combined admission and discharge PFIT-s scores was confirmed. The PFIT-s displayed moderate convergent validity with the Timed "Up & Go" Test (r=-.60), the Six-Minute Walk Test (r=.41), and the Medical Research Council (MRC) sum score (rho=.49). The ESI of the PFIT-s was 0.82, and the MCID was 1.5 points (interval scale range=0-10). A higher admission PFIT-s score was predictive of: an MRC score of ≥48, increased likelihood of discharge home, reduced likelihood of discharge to inpatient rehabilitation, and reduced acute care hospital length of stay. Scoring of sit-to-stand assistance required is subjective, and cadence cutpoints used may not be generalizable. The PFIT-s is a safe and inexpensive test of physical function with high clinical utility. It is valid, responsive to change, and predictive of key outcomes. It is recommended that the PFIT-s be adopted to test physical function in the ICU.

  14. Simultaneous neural control of simple reaching and grasping with the modular prosthetic limb using intracranial EEG.

    PubMed

    Fifer, Matthew S; Hotson, Guy; Wester, Brock A; McMullen, David P; Wang, Yujing; Johannes, Matthew S; Katyal, Kapil D; Helder, John B; Para, Matthew P; Vogelstein, R Jacob; Anderson, William S; Thakor, Nitish V; Crone, Nathan E

    2014-05-01

    Intracranial electroencephalographic (iEEG) signals from two human subjects were used to achieve simultaneous neural control of reaching and grasping movements with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab (JHU/APL) Modular Prosthetic Limb (MPL), a dexterous robotic prosthetic arm. We performed functional mapping of high gamma activity while the subject made reaching and grasping movements to identify task-selective electrodes. Independent, online control of reaching and grasping was then achieved using high gamma activity from a small subset of electrodes with a model trained on short blocks of reaching and grasping with no further adaptation. Classification accuracy did not decline (p < 0.05, one-way ANOVA) over three blocks of testing in either subject. Mean classification accuracy during independently executed overt reach and grasp movements for (Subject 1, Subject 2) were (0.85, 0.81) and (0.80, 0.96), respectively, and during simultaneous execution they were (0.83, 0.88) and (0.58, 0.88), respectively. Our models leveraged knowledge of the subject's individual functional neuroanatomy for reaching and grasping movements, allowing rapid acquisition of control in a time-sensitive clinical setting. We demonstrate the potential feasibility of verifying functionally meaningful iEEG-based control of the MPL prior to chronic implantation, during which additional capabilities of the MPL might be exploited with further training.

  15. Simultaneous Neural Control of Simple Reaching and Grasping with the Modular Prosthetic Limb using Intracranial EEG

    PubMed Central

    Fifer, Matthew S.; Hotson, Guy; Wester, Brock A.; McMullen, David; Wang, Yujing; Johannes, Matthew S.; Katyal, Kapil D.; Helder, John B.; Para, Matthew P.; Vogelstein, R. Jacob; Anderson, William S.; Thakor, Nitish V.; Crone, Nathan E.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial electroencephalographic (iEEG) signals from two human subjects were used to achieve simultaneous neural control of reaching and grasping movements with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab (JHU/APL) Modular Prosthetic Limb (MPL), a dexterous robotic prosthetic arm. We performed functional mapping of high gamma activity while the subject made reaching and grasping movements to identify task-selective electrodes. Independent, online control of reaching and grasping was then achieved using high gamma activity from a small subset of electrodes with a model trained on short blocks of reaching and grasping with no further adaptation. Classification accuracy did not decline (p<0.05, one-way ANOVA) over three blocks of testing in either subject. Mean classification accuracy during independently executed overt reach and grasp movements for (Subject 1, Subject 2) were (0.85, 0.81) and (0.80, 0.96) respectively, and during simultaneous execution they were (0.83, 0.88) and (0.58, 0.88) respectively. Our models leveraged knowledge of the subject's individual functional neuroanatomy for reaching and grasping movements, allowing rapid acquisition of control in a time-sensitive clinical setting. We demonstrate the potential feasibility of verifying functionally meaningful iEEG-based control of the MPL prior to chronic implantation, during which additional capabilities of the MPL might be exploited with further training. PMID:24235276

  16. ALMA Telescope Reaches New Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    The ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) astronomical observatory took another step forward and upward, as one of its state-of-the-art antennas was carried for the first time to Chile's 16,500-foot-high plateau of Chajnantor on the back of a giant, custom-built transporter. The 40-foot-diameter antenna, weighing about 100 tons, was moved to ALMA's high-altitude Array Operations Site, where the extremely dry and rarefied air is ideal for observing the Universe. The conditions at the Array Operations Site on Chajnantor, while excellent for astronomy, are also very harsh. Only about half as much oxygen is available as at sea level, making it very difficult to work there. This is why ALMA's antennas are assembled and tested at the lower 9,500-foot altitude of the ALMA Operations Support Facility (OSF). It was from this relatively hospitable base camp that the ALMA antenna began its journey to the high Chajnantor site. "The successful transport of the first ALMA Antenna to the high site marks the start of the next phase of the project. Now that we are starting to move the ALMA antennas to the high site, the real work begins and the exciting part is just beginning," said Adrian Russell, North American ALMA Project Manager. The antenna's trip began when one of the two ALMA transporters lifted the antenna onto its back, carrying its heavy load along the 17-mile road from the Operations Support Facility up to the Array Operations Site. While the transporter is capable of speeds of up to 8 miles per hour when carrying an antenna, this first journey was made more slowly to ensure that everything worked as expected, taking about seven hours. The ALMA antennas use state-of-the-art technology, and are the most advanced submillimeter-wavelength antennas ever made. They are designed to operate fully exposed in the harsh conditions of the Array Operations Site, to survive strong winds and extreme temperatures, to point precisely enough that they could pick out a golf

  17. ALMA telescope reaches new heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    The ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) astronomical observatory has taken another step forward - and upwards. One of its state-of-the-art antennas was carried for the first time to the 5000m plateau of Chajnantor, in the Chilean Andes, on the back of a custom-built giant transporter. The antenna, which weighs about 100 tons and has a diameter of 12 metres, was transported up to the high-altitude Array Operations Site, where the extremely dry and rarefied air is ideal for ALMA's observations of the Universe. The conditions at the Array Operations Site on Chajnantor, while excellent for astronomy, are also very harsh. Only half as much oxygen is available as at sea level, making it very difficult to work there. This is why ALMA's antennas are assembled and tested at the lower 2900 m altitude of the ALMA Operations Support Facility. It was from this relatively hospitable base camp that the ALMA antenna began its journey to the high Chajnantor site. "This is an important moment for ALMA. We are very happy that the first transport of an antenna to the high site went flawlessly. This achievement was only possible through contributions from all international ALMA partners: this particular antenna is provided by Japan, the heavy-lift transporter by Europe, and the receiving electronics inside the antenna by North America, Europe, and Asia", said Wolfgang Wild, European ALMA Project Manager. The trip began when one of the two ALMA transporters, named Otto, lifted the antenna onto its back. It then carried its heavy load along the 28 km road from the Operations Support Facility up to the Array Operations Site. While the transporter is capable of speeds of up to 12 km/hour when carrying an antenna, this first journey was made more slowly to ensure that everything worked as expected, taking about seven hours. The ALMA antennas are the most advanced submillimetre-wavelength antennas ever made. They are designed to operate fully exposed in the harsh conditions

  18. Quantum tests for the linearity and permutation invariance of Boolean functions

    SciTech Connect

    Hillery, Mark; Andersson, Erika

    2011-12-15

    The goal in function property testing is to determine whether a black-box Boolean function has a certain property or is {epsilon}-far from having that property. The performance of the algorithm is judged by how many calls need to be made to the black box in order to determine, with high probability, which of the two alternatives is the case. Here we present two quantum algorithms, the first to determine whether the function is linear and the second to determine whether it is symmetric (invariant under permutations of the arguments). Both require order {epsilon}{sup -2/3} calls to the oracle, which is better than known classical algorithms. In addition, in the case of linearity testing, if the function is linear, the quantum algorithm identifies which linear function it is. The linearity test combines the Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm and amplitude amplification, while the test to determine whether a function is symmetric uses projective measurements and amplitude amplification.

  19. Vestibular feedback maintains reaching accuracy during body movement.

    PubMed

    Smith, Craig P; Reynolds, Raymond F

    2017-02-15

    Reaching movements can be perturbed by vestibular input, but the function of this response is unclear. Here, we applied galvanic vestibular stimulation concurrently with real body movement while subjects maintained arm position either fixed in space or fixed with respect to their body. During the fixed-in-space conditions, galvanic vestibular stimulation caused large changes in arm trajectory consistent with a compensatory response to maintain upper-limb accuracy in the face of body movement. Galvanic vestibular stimulation responses were absent during the body-fixed task, demonstrating task dependency in vestibular control of the upper limb. The results suggest that the function of vestibular-evoked arm movements is to maintain the accuracy of the upper limb during unpredictable body movement, but only when reaching in an earth-fixed reference frame. When using our arms to interact with the world, unintended body motion can introduce movement error. A mechanism that could detect and compensate for such motion would be beneficial. Observations of arm movements evoked by vestibular stimulation provide some support for this mechanism. However, the physiological function underlying these artificially evoked movements is unclear from previous research. For such a mechanism to be functional, it should operate only when the arm is being controlled in an earth-fixed rather than a body-fixed reference frame. In the latter case, compensation would be unnecessary and even deleterious. To test this hypothesis, subjects were gently rotated in a chair while being asked to maintain their outstretched arm pointing towards either earth-fixed or body-fixed memorized targets. Galvanic vestibular stimulation was applied concurrently during rotation to isolate the influence of vestibular input, uncontaminated by inertial factors. During the earth-fixed task, galvanic vestibular stimulation produced large polarity-dependent corrections in arm position. These corrections mimicked those

  20. Vestibular feedback maintains reaching accuracy during body movement

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Raymond F.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Reaching movements can be perturbed by vestibular input, but the function of this response is unclear.Here, we applied galvanic vestibular stimulation concurrently with real body movement while subjects maintained arm position either fixed in space or fixed with respect to their body.During the fixed‐in‐space conditions, galvanic vestibular stimulation caused large changes in arm trajectory consistent with a compensatory response to maintain upper‐limb accuracy in the face of body movement.Galvanic vestibular stimulation responses were absent during the body‐fixed task, demonstrating task dependency in vestibular control of the upper limb.The results suggest that the function of vestibular‐evoked arm movements is to maintain the accuracy of the upper limb during unpredictable body movement, but only when reaching in an earth‐fixed reference frame. Abstract When using our arms to interact with the world, unintended body motion can introduce movement error. A mechanism that could detect and compensate for such motion would be beneficial. Observations of arm movements evoked by vestibular stimulation provide some support for this mechanism. However, the physiological function underlying these artificially evoked movements is unclear from previous research. For such a mechanism to be functional, it should operate only when the arm is being controlled in an earth‐fixed rather than a body‐fixed reference frame. In the latter case, compensation would be unnecessary and even deleterious. To test this hypothesis, subjects were gently rotated in a chair while being asked to maintain their outstretched arm pointing towards either earth‐fixed or body‐fixed memorized targets. Galvanic vestibular stimulation was applied concurrently during rotation to isolate the influence of vestibular input, uncontaminated by inertial factors. During the earth‐fixed task, galvanic vestibular stimulation produced large polarity‐dependent corrections in arm

  1. Differential Item Functioning (DIF) among Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners (ELLs) in State Science Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilich, Maria O.

    2013-01-01

    Psychometricians and test developers evaluate standardized tests for potential bias against groups of test-takers by using differential item functioning (DIF). English language learners (ELLs) are a diverse group of students whose native language is not English. While they are still learning the English language, they must take their standardized…

  2. Identifying Differential Item Functioning in Multi-Stage Computer Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis; Li, Johnson

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of CATSIB (Computer Adaptive Testing-Simultaneous Item Bias Test) for detecting differential item functioning (DIF) when items in the matching and studied subtest are administered adaptively in the context of a realistic multi-stage adaptive test (MST). MST was simulated using a 4-item…

  3. Identifying Differential Item Functioning in Multi-Stage Computer Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis; Li, Johnson

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of CATSIB (Computer Adaptive Testing-Simultaneous Item Bias Test) for detecting differential item functioning (DIF) when items in the matching and studied subtest are administered adaptively in the context of a realistic multi-stage adaptive test (MST). MST was simulated using a 4-item…

  4. The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and the Cognitive Assessment of Prefrontal Executive Functions: A Critical Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyhus, Erika; Barcelo, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    For over four decades the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) has been one of the most distinctive tests of prefrontal function. Clinical research and recent brain imaging have brought into question the validity and specificity of this test as a marker of frontal dysfunction. Clinical studies with neurological patients have confirmed that, in its…

  5. On testing an unspecified function through a linear mixed effects model with multiple variance components

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanjia; Chen, Huaihou

    2012-01-01

    Summary We examine a generalized F-test of a nonparametric function through penalized splines and a linear mixed effects model representation. With a mixed effects model representation of penalized splines, we imbed the test of an unspecified function into a test of some fixed effects and a variance component in a linear mixed effects model with nuisance variance components under the null. The procedure can be used to test a nonparametric function or varying-coefficient with clustered data, compare two spline functions, test the significance of an unspecified function in an additive model with multiple components, and test a row or a column effect in a two-way analysis of variance model. Through a spectral decomposition of the residual sum of squares, we provide a fast algorithm for computing the null distribution of the test, which significantly improves the computational efficiency over bootstrap. The spectral representation reveals a connection between the likelihood ratio test (LRT) in a multiple variance components model and a single component model. We examine our methods through simulations, where we show that the power of the generalized F-test may be higher than the LRT, depending on the hypothesis of interest and the true model under the alternative. We apply these methods to compute the genome-wide critical value and p-value of a genetic association test in a genome-wide association study (GWAS), where the usual bootstrap is computationally intensive (up to 108 simulations) and asymptotic approximation may be unreliable and conservative. PMID:23020801

  6. Injury History, Sex, and Performance on the Functional Movement Screen and Y Balance Test

    PubMed Central

    Chimera, Nicole J.; Smith, Craig A.; Warren, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    Context: Research is limited regarding the effects of injury or surgery history and sex on the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and Y Balance Test (YBT). Objective: To determine if injury or surgery history or sex affected results on the FMS and YBT. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Athletic training facilities. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 200 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I female (n = 92; age = 20.0 ± 1.4 years, body mass index = 22.8 ± 3.1 kg/m2) and male (n = 108; age = 20.0 ± 1.5 years, body mass index = 27.0 ± 4.6 kg/m2) athletes were screened; 170 completed the FMS, and 190 completed the YBT. Intervention(s): A self-reported questionnaire identified injury or surgery history and sex. The FMS assessed movement during the patterns of deep squat, hurdle step, in-line lunge, shoulder mobility, impingement-clearing test, straight-leg raise, trunk stability push-up, press-up clearing test, rotary stability, and posterior-rocking clearing test. The YBT assessed balance while participants reached in anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral directions. Main Outcome Measure(s): The FMS composite score (CS; range, 0–21) and movement pattern score (range, 0–3), the YBT CS (% lower extremity length), and YBT anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral asymmetry (difference between limbs in centimeters). Independent-samples t tests established differences in mean FMS CS, YBT CS, and YBT asymmetry. The Mann-Whitney U test identified differences in FMS movement patterns. Results: We found lower overall FMS CSs for the following injuries or surgeries: hip (injured = 12.7 ± 3.1, uninjured = 14.4 ± 2.3; P = .005), elbow (injured = 12.1 ± 2.8, uninjured = 14.3 ± 2.4; P = .02), and hand (injured = 12.3 ± 2.9, uninjured = 14.3 ± 2.3; P = .006) injuries and shoulder surgery (surgery = 12.0 ± 1.0, no surgery = 14.3 ± 2.4; P < .001). We observed worse FMS movement pattern performance for knee surgery (rotary stability: P

  7. Web services and model-data comparison for the Functional Test Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krassovski, Misha; Wang, Dali

    2015-04-01

    Web services and model-data comparison for the Functional Test Platform. The realistic representation of key biogeophysical and biogeochemical function is the fundamental on process based ecosystem models. A Functional Test Platform is designed to create direct linkages between site measurements and process-based ecosystem model within the Community Earth System Models (CESM). The platform consists of three major parts: 1) interactive user interfaces, 2) functional test models and 3) observational datasets. The purpose of the observational datasets is to provide an interactive search and visualization capability for direct model-data comparison. The proposed presentation is going to show how web services can be used to feed model-data comparison using AmeriFlux data collection provided by Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the way it is coupled with Functional Test Platform for the Community Land Model.

  8. Spiking and LFP activity in PRR during symbolically instructed reaches.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eun Jung; Andersen, Richard A

    2012-02-01

    The spiking activity in the parietal reach region (PRR) represents the spatial goal of an impending reach when the reach is directed toward or away from a visual object. The local field potentials (LFPs) in this region also represent the reach goal when the reach is directed to a visual object. Thus PRR is a candidate area for reading out a patient's intended reach goals for neural prosthetic applications. For natural behaviors, reach goals are not always based on the location of a visual object, e.g., playing the piano following sheet music or moving following verbal directions. So far it has not been directly tested whether and how PRR represents reach goals in such cognitive, nonlocational conditions, and knowing the encoding properties in various task conditions would help in designing a reach goal decoder for prosthetic applications. To address this issue, we examined the macaque PRR under two reach conditions: reach goal determined by the stimulus location (direct) or shape (symbolic). For the same goal, the spiking activity near reach onset was indistinguishable between the two tasks, and thus a reach goal decoder trained with spiking activity in one task performed perfectly in the other. In contrast, the LFP activity at 20-40 Hz showed small but significantly enhanced reach goal tuning in the symbolic task, but its spatial preference remained the same. Consequently, a decoder trained with LFP activity performed worse in the other task than in the same task. These results suggest that LFP decoders in PRR should take into account the task context (e.g., locational vs. nonlocational) to be accurate, while spike decoders can robustly provide reach goal information regardless of the task context in various prosthetic applications.

  9. Spiking and LFP activity in PRR during symbolically instructed reaches

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    The spiking activity in the parietal reach region (PRR) represents the spatial goal of an impending reach when the reach is directed toward or away from a visual object. The local field potentials (LFPs) in this region also represent the reach goal when the reach is directed to a visual object. Thus PRR is a candidate area for reading out a patient's intended reach goals for neural prosthetic applications. For natural behaviors, reach goals are not always based on the location of a visual object, e.g., playing the piano following sheet music or moving following verbal directions. So far it has not been directly tested whether and how PRR represents reach goals in such cognitive, nonlocational conditions, and knowing the encoding properties in various task conditions would help in designing a reach goal decoder for prosthetic applications. To address this issue, we examined the macaque PRR under two reach conditions: reach goal determined by the stimulus location (direct) or shape (symbolic). For the same goal, the spiking activity near reach onset was indistinguishable between the two tasks, and thus a reach goal decoder trained with spiking activity in one task performed perfectly in the other. In contrast, the LFP activity at 20–40 Hz showed small but significantly enhanced reach goal tuning in the symbolic task, but its spatial preference remained the same. Consequently, a decoder trained with LFP activity performed worse in the other task than in the same task. These results suggest that LFP decoders in PRR should take into account the task context (e.g., locational vs. nonlocational) to be accurate, while spike decoders can robustly provide reach goal information regardless of the task context in various prosthetic applications. PMID:22072511

  10. Diagnostic Dilemma in Discordant Thyroid Function Tests Due to Thyroid Hormone Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Srichomkwun, Panudda; Scherberg, Neal H.; Jakšić, Jasminka; Refetoff, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Assay interference could be the cause of abnormal thyroid function tests. Early recognition prevents inappropriate patient management. The objective of this report is to present a case with discordant thyroid function tests in different thyroid assay platforms due to thyroid autoantibodies. Methods We present a case her family, laboratory data and methods that investigate immunoassay interference. Results A 21-year-old woman with autoimmune thyroid disease was treated for hypothyroidism with levothyroxine and noted to have elevated total and free thyroxine, free triiodothyronine but normal thyroid-stimulating hormone. Repeat thyroid function tests using different platforms revealed discrepant results. Further investigation showed that the patient had positive thyroid hormone autoantibodies (THAAbs). Conclusion We demonstrates abnormal thyroid function tests caused by THAAbs. The latter were the cause of interference with assays resulting in discrepant test results inconsistent with the clinical presentation. Early recognition would prevent inappropriate patient management. PMID:28078322

  11. To develop behavioral tests of vestibular functioning in the Wistar rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    Two tests of vestibular functioning in the rat were developed. The first test was the water maze. In the water maze the rat does not have the normal proprioceptive feedback from its limbs to help it maintain its orientation, and must rely primarily on the sensory input from its visual and vestibular systems. By altering lighting conditions and visual cues the vestibular functioning without visual cues was assessed. Whether there was visual compensation for some vestibular dysfunction was determined. The second test measured vestibular functioning of the rat's behavior on a parallel swing. In this test the rat's postural adjustments while swinging on the swing with the otoliths being stimulated were assessed. Less success was achieved in developing the parallel swing as a test of vestibular functioning than with the water maze. The major problem was incorrect initial assumptions of what the rat's probable behavior on the parallel swing would be.

  12. Functional and structural failure mode overpressurization tests of 1:4-scale prestressed concrete containment vessel model.

    SciTech Connect

    Costello, James F. (United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Shibata, Satoru (Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation, Tokyo, Japan); Hessheimer, Michael F.

    2003-02-01

    A 1:4-scale model of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV), representative of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant in Japan, was constructed by NUPEC at Sandia National Laboratories from January 1997 through June, 2000. Concurrently, Sandia instrumented the model with nearly 1500 transducers to measure strain, displacement and forces in the model from prestressing through the pressure testing. The limit state test of the PCCV model, culminating in functional failure (i.e. leakage by cracking and liner tearing) was conducted in September, 2000 at Sandia National Laboratories. After inspecting the model and the data after the limit state test, it became clear that, other than liner tearing and leakage, structural damage was limited to concrete cracking and the overall structural response (displacements, rebar and tendon strains, etc.) was only slightly beyond yield. (Global hoop strains at the mid-height of the cylinder only reached 0.4%, approximately twice the yield strain in steel.) In order to provide additional structural response data, for comparison with inelastic response conditions, the PCCV model filled nearly full with water and pressurized to 3.6 times the design pressure, when a catastrophic rupture occurred preceded only briefly by successive tensile failure of several hoop tendons. This paper summarizes the results of these tests.

  13. Quantifying the adsorption of ionic silver and functionalized nanoparticles during ecotoxicity testing: Test container effects and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Ryo; Khurana, Kanupriya; Vasilev, Krasimir; Lombi, Enzo; Donner, Erica

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) are used in a wide variety of products, prompting concerns regarding their potential environmental impacts. To accurately determine the toxicity of Ag-NPs it is necessary to differentiate between the toxicity of the nanoparticles themselves and the toxicity of ionic silver (Ag) released from them. This is not a trivial task given the reactive nature of Ag in solution, and its propensity for both adsorption and photoreduction. In the experiments reported here, we quantified the loss of silver from test solutions during standard ecotoxicity testing conducted using a variety of different test container materials and geometries. This sensitive (110m)Ag isotope tracing method revealed a substantial underestimation of the toxicity of dissolved Ag to the green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata when calculated only on the basis of the initial test concentrations. Furthermore, experiments with surface-functionalized Ag-NPs under standard algal growth inhibition test conditions also demonstrated extensive losses of Ag-NPs from the solution due to adsorption to the container walls, and the extent of loss was dependent on Ag-NP surface-functionality. These results hold important messages for researchers engaged in both environmental and human nanotoxicology testing, not only for Ag-NPs but also for other NPs with various tailored surface chemistries, where these phenomena are recognized but are also frequently disregarded in the experimental design and reporting.

  14. The Synthesis of Structural Responses Using Experimentally Measured Frequency Response Functions and Field Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    CAP,JEROME S.; NELSON,CURTIS F.

    2000-11-17

    This paper presents an analysis technique used to generate the structural response at locations not measured during the ejection of a captive-carried store. The ejection shock event is complicated by the fact that forces may be imparted to the store at eight distinct locations. The technique derives forcing functions by combining the initial field test data for a limited number of measurement locations with Frequency Response Functions (FRFs) measured using a traditional modal-type impact (tap) test at the same locations. The derived forcing functions were then used with tap test FRFs measured at additional locations of interest to produce the desired response data.

  15. Olefins and chemical regulation in Europe: REACH.

    PubMed

    Penman, Mike; Banton, Marcy; Erler, Steffen; Moore, Nigel; Semmler, Klaus

    2015-11-05

    REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals) is the European Union's chemical regulation for the management of risk to human health and the environment (European Chemicals Agency, 2006). This regulation entered into force in June 2007 and required manufacturers and importers to register substances produced in annual quantities of 1000 tonnes or more by December 2010, with further deadlines for lower tonnages in 2013 and 2018. Depending on the type of registration, required information included the substance's identification, the hazards of the substance, the potential exposure arising from the manufacture or import, the identified uses of the substance, and the operational conditions and risk management measures applied or recommended to downstream users. Among the content developed to support this information were Derived No-Effect Levels or Derived Minimal Effect Levels (DNELs/DMELs) for human health hazard assessment, Predicted No Effect Concentrations (PNECs) for environmental hazard assessment, and exposure scenarios for exposure and risk assessment. Once registered, substances may undergo evaluation by the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) or Member State authorities and be subject to requests for additional information or testing as well as additional risk reduction measures. To manage the REACH registration and related activities for the European olefins and aromatics industry, the Lower Olefins and Aromatics REACH Consortium was formed in 2008 with administrative and technical support provided by Penman Consulting. A total of 135 substances are managed by this group including 26 individual chemical registrations (e.g. benzene, 1,3-butadiene) and 13 categories consisting of 5-26 substances. This presentation will describe the content of selected registrations prepared for 2010 in addition to the significant post-2010 activities. Beyond REACH, content of the registrations may also be relevant to other European activities, for

  16. Modifications to the Standard Sit-and-Reach Flexibility Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Laurence E.; Burke, Darren G.; Pelham, Thomas W.

    1999-01-01

    Describes several modifications of the standard sit-and-reach flexibility protocol using a new device called the multitest flexometer (MTF). Using the MTF, researchers could take six flexibility measures beyond the stand-and-reach test. The modified protocol allowed the indirect assessment of the influence of the four major muscle groups that…

  17. Infants' Predictive Reaching for Moving Objects in the Dark.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robin, Daniel J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Thirteen infants were presented with a moving object under two lighting conditions to investigate the role of vision in early reaching. Infants were tested twice, at 5 and 7.5 months of age. The results suggest that proprioceptive feedback and sight of the target allowed for successful reaching with limited visual information, even in relatively…

  18. An Association Between Functional Polymorphisms of the Interleukin 1 Gene Complex and Schizophrenia Using Transmission Disequilibrium Test.

    PubMed

    Kapelski, Pawel; Skibinska, Maria; Maciukiewicz, Malgorzata; Pawlak, Joanna; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Szczepankiewicz, Aleksandra; Zaremba, Dorota; Twarowska-Hauser, Joanna

    2016-12-01

    IL1 gene complex has been implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia. To assess whether IL1 gene complex is associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia in Polish population we conducted family-based study. Functional polymorphisms from IL1A (rs1800587, rs17561, rs11677416), IL1B (rs1143634, rs1143643, rs16944, rs4848306, rs1143623, rs1143633, rs1143627) and IL1RN (rs419598, rs315952, rs9005, rs4251961) genes were genotyped in 143 trio with schizophrenia. Statistical analysis was performed using transmission disequilibrium test. We have found a trend toward an association of rs1143627, rs16944, rs1143623 in IL1B gene with the risk of schizophrenia. Our results show a protective effect of allele T of rs4251961 in IL1RN against schizophrenia. We also performed haplotype analysis of IL1 gene complex and found a trend toward an association with schizophrenia of GAGG haplotype (rs1143627, rs16944, rs1143623, rs4848306) in IL1B gene, haplotypes: TG (rs315952, rs9005) and TT (rs4251961, rs419598) in IL1RN. Haplotype CT (rs4251961, rs419598) in IL1RN was found to be associated with schizophrenia. After correction for multiple testing associations did not reach significance level. Our results might support theory that polymorphisms of interleukin 1 complex genes (rs1143627, rs16944, rs1143623, rs4848306 in IL1B gene and rs4251961, rs419598, rs315952, rs9005 in IL1RN gene) are involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, however, none of the results reach significance level after correction for multiple testing.

  19. Performance Comparison of Student-Athletes and General College Students on the Functional Movement Screen and the Y Balance Test.

    PubMed

    Engquist, Katherine D; Smith, Craig A; Chimera, Nicole J; Warren, Meghan

    2015-08-01

    Although various studies have assessed performance of athletes on the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and the Y Balance Test (YBT), no study to date has directly evaluated a comparison of performance between athletes and members of the general population. Thus, to better understand the application of the FMS and the YBT to general college students, this study examined whether or not general college students performed similarly to student-athletes on the FMS (composite and movement pattern scores) and the YBT (composite and reach directions). This study evaluated 167 Division I student-athletes and 103 general college students from the same university on the FMS and the YBT. No difference was found in FMS composite scores between student-athletes and general college students. For FMS movement patterns, female student-athletes scored higher than general college students in the deep squat. No difference was found for men in any FMS movement pattern. Female student-athletes scored higher than female general college students in YBT composite scores; no difference was found for men in YBT composite scores. In analysis of YBT reach directions, female student-athletes scored higher than female general college students in all reach directions, whereas no difference was found in men. Existing research on the FMS composite score in athletic populations may apply to a general college population for the purposes of preparticipation screening, injury prediction, etc. Existing research on the YBT in male athletic populations