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Sample records for functional ubiquitin-proteasome system

  1. Orthopoxviruses Require a Functional Ubiquitin-Proteasome System for Productive Replication▿

    PubMed Central

    Teale, Alastair; Campbell, Stephanie; Van Buuren, Nick; Magee, Wendy C.; Watmough, Kelly; Couturier, Brianne; Shipclark, Robyn; Barry, Michele

    2009-01-01

    Cellular homeostasis depends on an intricate balance of protein expression and degradation. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays a crucial role in specifically targeting proteins tagged with ubiquitin for destruction. This degradation can be effectively blocked by both chemically synthesized and natural proteasome inhibitors. Poxviruses encode a number of proteins that exploit the ubiquitin-proteasome system, including virally encoded ubiquitin molecules and ubiquitin ligases, as well as BTB/kelch proteins and F-box proteins, which interact with cellular ubiquitin ligases. Here we show that poxvirus infection was dramatically affected by a range of proteasome inhibitors, including MG132, MG115, lactacystin, and bortezomib (Velcade). Confocal microscopy demonstrated that infected cells treated with MG132 or bortezomib lacked viral replication factories within the cytoplasm. This was accompanied by the absence of late gene expression and DNA replication; however, early gene expression occurred unabated. Proteasomal inhibition with MG132 or bortezomib also had dramatic effects on viral titers, severely blocking viral replication and propagation. The effects of MG132 on poxvirus infection were reversible upon washout, resulting in the production of late genes and viral replication factories. Significantly, the addition of an ubiquitin-activating enzyme (E1) inhibitor had a similar affect on late and early protein expression. Together, our data suggests that a functional ubiquitin-proteasome system is required during poxvirus infection. PMID:19109393

  2. Ubiquitin-proteasome system and hereditary cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Schlossarek, Saskia; Frey, Norbert; Carrier, Lucie

    2014-06-01

    Adequate protein turnover is essential for cardiac homeostasis. Different protein quality controls are involved in the maintenance of protein homeostasis, including molecular chaperones and co-chaperones, the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). In the last decade, a series of evidence has underlined a major function of the UPS in cardiac physiology and disease. Particularly, recent studies have shown that dysfunctional proteasomal function leads to cardiac disorders. Hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies are the two most prevalent inherited cardiomyopathies. Both are primarily transmitted as an autosomal-dominant trait and mainly caused by mutations in genes encoding components of the cardiac sarcomere, including a relevant striated muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase. A growing body of evidence indicates impairment of the UPS in inherited cardiomyopathies as determined by measurement of the level of ubiquitinated proteins, the activities of the proteasome and/or the use of fluorescent UPS reporter substrates. The present review will propose mechanisms of UPS impairment in inherited cardiomyopathies, summarize the potential consequences of UPS impairment, including activation of the unfolded protein response, and underline some therapeutic options available to restore proteasome function and therefore cardiac homeostasis and function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Protein Quality Control, the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, and Autophagy". Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. How the ubiquitin proteasome system regulates the regulators of transcription.

    PubMed

    Ee, Gary; Lehming, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system plays an important role in transcription. Monoubiquitination of activators is believed to aid their function, while the 26S proteasomal degradation of repressors is believed to restrict their function. What remains controversial is the question of whether the degradation of activators aids or restricts their function.

  4. Role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in nervous system function and disease: using C. elegans as a dissecting tool.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Márcio S; Duarte, Carlos B; Maciel, Patrícia

    2012-08-01

    In addition to its central roles in protein quality control, regulation of cell cycle, intracellular signaling, DNA damage response and transcription regulation, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays specific roles in the nervous system, where it contributes to precise connectivity through development, and later assures functionality by regulating a wide spectrum of neuron-specific cellular processes. Aberrations in this system have been implicated in the etiology of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we provide an updated view on the UPS and highlight recent findings concerning its role in normal and diseased nervous systems. We discuss the advantages of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans as a tool to unravel the major unsolved questions concerning this biochemical pathway and its involvement in nervous system function and dysfunction, and expose the new possibilities, using state-of-the-art techniques, to assess UPS function using this model system.

  5. Ubiquitin proteasome system research in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jia-Ling; Huang, Chang-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is important for the degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It is involved in nearly every cellular process and plays an important role in maintaining body homeostasis. An increasing body of evidence has linked alterations in the UPS to gastrointestinal malignancies, including esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we summarize the current literature detailing the involvement of the UPS in gastrointestinal cancer, highlighting its role in tumor occurrence and development, providing information for therapeutic targets research and anti-gastrointestinal tumor drug design. PMID:26909134

  6. Ubiquitin proteasome system research in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jia-Ling; Huang, Chang-Zhi

    2016-02-15

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is important for the degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It is involved in nearly every cellular process and plays an important role in maintaining body homeostasis. An increasing body of evidence has linked alterations in the UPS to gastrointestinal malignancies, including esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we summarize the current literature detailing the involvement of the UPS in gastrointestinal cancer, highlighting its role in tumor occurrence and development, providing information for therapeutic targets research and anti-gastrointestinal tumor drug design.

  7. Knocking out ubiquitin proteasome system function in vivo and in vitro with genetically encodable tandem ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Y; Isono, E; Shimada, M; Kawahara, H; Yokosawa, H; Toh-E, A

    2005-01-01

    At present, the 26S proteasome-specific inhibitor is not available. We constructed polyubiquitin derivatives that contained a tandem repeat of ubiquitins and were insensitive to ubiquitin hydrolases. When these artificial polyubiquitins (tUbs, tandem ubiquitins) were overproduced in the wild-type yeast strain, growth was strongly inhibited, probably because of inhibition of the 26S proteasome. We also found that several substrates of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway were stabilized by expressing tUbs in vivo. tUbs containing four units or more of the ubiquitin monomer were found to form a complex with the 26S proteasome. We showed that tUb bound to the 26S proteasome inhibited the in vitro degradation of polyubiquitinylated Sic1 by the 26S proteasome. When tUB6 (six-mer) messenger RNA was injected into Xenopus embryos, cell division was inhibited, suggesting that tUb can be used as a versatile inhibitor of the 26S proteasome.

  8. Subnormothermic Perfusion in the Isolated Rat Liver Preserves the Antioxidant Glutathione and Enhances the Function of the Ubiquitin Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Alva, Norma; Sanchez-Nuño, Sergio; Dewey, Shannamar; Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of oxidative stress is suggested to be one of the main mechanisms to explain the benefits of subnormothermic perfusion against ischemic liver damage. In this study we investigated the early cellular mechanisms induced in isolated rat livers after 15 min perfusion at temperatures ranging from normothermia (37°C) to subnormothermia (26°C and 22°C). Subnormothermic perfusion was found to maintain hepatic viability. Perfusion at 22°C raised reduced glutathione levels and the activity of glutathione reductase; however, lipid and protein oxidation still occurred as determined by malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal-protein adducts, and advanced oxidation protein products. In livers perfused at 22°C the lysosomal and ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) were both activated. The 26S chymotrypsin-like (β5) proteasome activity was significantly increased in the 26°C (46%) and 22°C (42%) groups. The increased proteasome activity may be due to increased Rpt6 Ser120 phosphorylation, which is known to enhance 26S proteasome activity. Together, our results indicate that the early events produced by subnormothermic perfusion in the liver can induce oxidative stress concomitantly with antioxidant glutathione preservation and enhanced function of the lysosomal and UPS systems. Thus, a brief hypothermia could trigger antioxidant mechanisms and may be functioning as a preconditioning stimulus. PMID:27800122

  9. Oxidative stress regulates the ubiquitin-proteasome system and immunoproteasome functioning in a mouse model of X-adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Launay, Nathalie; Ruiz, Montserrat; Fourcade, Stéphane; Schlüter, Agatha; Guilera, Cristina; Ferrer, Isidre; Knecht, Erwin; Pujol, Aurora

    2013-03-01

    Oxidative damage is a pivotal aetiopathogenic factor in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. This is a neurometabolic disease characterized by the accumulation of very-long-chain fatty acids owing to the loss of function of the peroxisomal transporter Abcd1. Here, we used the X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy mouse model and patient's fibroblasts to detect malfunctioning of the ubiquitin-proteasome system resulting from the accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins, some involved in bioenergetic metabolism. Furthermore, the immunoproteasome machinery appears upregulated in response to oxidative stress, in the absence of overt inflammation. i-Proteasomes are recruited to mitochondria when fibroblasts are exposed to an excess of very-long-chain fatty acids in response to oxidative stress. Antioxidant treatment regulates proteasome expression, prevents i-proteasome induction and translocation of i-proteasomes to mitochondria. Our findings support a key role of i-proteasomes in quality control in mitochondria during oxidative damage in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and perhaps in other neurodegenerative conditions with similar pathogeneses.

  10. The ubiquitin proteasome system and myocardial ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Calise, Justine

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) has been the subject of intensive research over the past 20 years to define its role in normal physiology and in pathophysiology. Many of these studies have focused in on the cardiovascular system and have determined that the UPS becomes dysfunctional in several pathologies such as familial and idiopathic cardiomyopathies, atherosclerosis, and myocardial ischemia. This review presents a synopsis of the literature as it relates to the role of the UPS in myocardial ischemia. Studies have shown that the UPS is dysfunctional during myocardial ischemia, and recent studies have shed some light on possible mechanisms. Other studies have defined a role for the UPS in ischemic preconditioning which is best associated with myocardial ischemia and is thus presented here. Very recent studies have started to define roles for specific proteasome subunits and components of the ubiquitination machinery in various aspects of myocardial ischemia. Lastly, despite the evidence linking myocardial ischemia and proteasome dysfunction, there are continuing suggestions that proteasome inhibitors may be useful to mitigate ischemic injury. This review presents the rationale behind this and discusses both supportive and nonsupportive studies and presents possible future directions that may help in clarifying this controversy. PMID:23220331

  11. Emerging therapies targeting the ubiquitin proteasome system in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weathington, Nathaniel M.; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is an essential metabolic constituent of cellular physiology that tightly regulates cellular protein concentrations with specificity and precision to optimize cellular function. Inhibition of the proteasome has proven very effective in the treatment of multiple myeloma, and this approach is being tested for utility in other malignancies. New pharmaceuticals targeting the proteasome itself or specific proximal pathways of the UPS are in development as antiproliferatives or immunomodulatory agents. In this article, we discuss the biology of UPS-targeting drugs, their use as therapy for neoplasia, and the state of clinical and preclinical development for emerging therapeutics. PMID:24382383

  12. Dysregulation of Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qiuyang; Huang, Timothy; Zhang, Lishan; Zhou, Ying; Luo, Hong; Xu, Huaxi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is one of the major protein degradation pathways, where abnormal UPS function has been observed in cancer and neurological diseases. Many neurodegenerative diseases share a common pathological feature, namely intracellular ubiquitin-positive inclusions formed by aggregate-prone neurotoxic proteins. This suggests that dysfunction of the UPS in neurodegenerative diseases contributes to the accumulation of neurotoxic proteins and to instigate neurodegeneration. Here, we review recent findings describing various aspects of UPS dysregulation in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. PMID:28018215

  13. Emerging therapies targeting the ubiquitin proteasome system in cancer.

    PubMed

    Weathington, Nathaniel M; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is an essential metabolic constituent of cellular physiology that tightly regulates cellular protein concentrations with specificity and precision to optimize cellular function. Inhibition of the proteasome has proven very effective in the treatment of multiple myeloma, and this approach is being tested for utility in other malignancies. New pharmaceuticals targeting the proteasome itself or specific proximal pathways of the UPS are in development as antiproliferatives or immunomodulatory agents. In this article, we discuss the biology of UPS-targeting drugs, their use as therapy for neoplasia, and the state of clinical and preclinical development for emerging therapeutics.

  14. The ubiquitin proteasome system in neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Norman L

    2009-09-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) orchestrates the turnover of innumerable cellular proteins. In the process of ubiquitination the small protein ubiquitin is attached to a target protein by a peptide bond. The ubiquitinated target protein is subsequently shuttled to a protease complex known as the 26S proteasome and subjected to degradative proteolysis. The UPS facilitates the turnover of proteins in several settings. It targets oxidized, mutant or misfolded proteins for general proteolytic destruction, and allows for the tightly controlled and specific destruction of proteins involved in development and differentiation, cell cycle progression, circadian rhythms, apoptosis, and other biological processes. In neuropathology, alteration of the UPS, or mutations in UPS target proteins may result in signaling abnormalities leading to the initiation or progression of tumors such as astrocytomas, hemangioblastomas, craniopharyngiomas, pituitary adenomas, and medulloblastomas. Dysregulation of the UPS may also contribute to tumor progression by perturbation of DNA replication and mitotic control mechanisms, leading to genomic instability. In neurodegenerative diseases caused by the expression of mutant proteins, the cellular accumulation of these proteins may overload the UPS, indirectly contributing to the disease process, e.g., sporadic Parkinsonism and prion diseases. In other cases, mutation of UPS components may directly cause pathological accumulation of proteins, e.g., autosomal recessive Parkinsonism and spinocerebellar ataxias. Defects or dysfunction of the UPS may also underlie cognitive disorders such as Angelman syndrome, Rett syndrome and autism, and muscle and nerve diseases, e.g., inclusion body myopathy and giant axon neuropathy. This paper describes the basic biochemical mechanisms comprising the UPS and reviews both its theoretical and proven involvement in neuropathological diseases. The potential for the UPS as a target of pharmacological therapy

  15. Functional alterations of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in motor neurons of a mouse model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis†

    PubMed Central

    Cheroni, Cristina; Marino, Marianna; Tortarolo, Massimo; Veglianese, Pietro; De Biasi, Silvia; Fontana, Elena; Zuccarello, Laura Vitellaro; Maynard, Christa J.; Dantuma, Nico P.; Bendotti, Caterina

    2009-01-01

    In familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and in rodent models of the disease, alterations in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) may be responsible for the accumulation of potentially harmful ubiquitinated proteins, leading to motor neuron death. In the spinal cord of transgenic mice expressing the familial ALS superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene mutation G93A (SOD1G93A), we found a decrease in constitutive proteasome subunits during disease progression, as assessed by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. In parallel, an increased immunoproteasome expression was observed, which correlated with a local inflammatory response due to glial activation. These findings support the existence of proteasome modifications in ALS vulnerable tissues. To functionally investigate the UPS in ALS motor neurons in vivo, we crossed SOD1G93A mice with transgenic mice that express a fluorescently tagged reporter substrate of the UPS. In double-transgenic UbG76V-GFP /SOD1G93A mice an increase in UbG76V-GFP reporter, indicative of UPS impairment, was detectable in a few spinal motor neurons and not in reactive astrocytes or microglia, at symptomatic stage but not before symptoms onset. The levels of reporter transcript were unaltered, suggesting that the accumulation of UbG76V-GFP was due to deficient reporter degradation. In some motor neurons the increase of UbG76V-GFP was accompanied by the accumulation of ubiquitin and phosphorylated neurofilaments, both markers of ALS pathology. These data suggest that UPS impairment occurs in motor neurons of mutant SOD1-linked ALS mice and may play a role in the disease progression. PMID:18826962

  16. Poxvirus Exploitation of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Michele; van Buuren, Nicholas; Burles, Kristin; Mottet, Kelly; Wang, Qian; Teale, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitination plays a critical role in many cellular processes. A growing number of viruses have evolved strategies to exploit the ubiquitin-proteasome system, including members of the Poxviridae family. Members of the poxvirus family have recently been shown to encode BTB/kelch and ankyrin/F-box proteins that interact with cullin-3 and cullin-1 based ubiquitin ligases, respectively. Multiple members of the poxvirus family also encode ubiquitin ligases with intrinsic activity. This review describes the numerous mechanisms that poxviruses employ to manipulate the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:21994622

  17. MODULATION OF GROWTH HORMONE RECEPTOR ABUNDANCE AND FUNCTION: ROLES FOR THE UBIQUITIN-PROTEASOME SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Stuart J.; Fuchs, Serge Y.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Growth hormone plays an important role in regulating numerous functions in vertebrates. Several pathways that negatively regulate the magnitude and duration of its signaling (including expression of tyrosine phosphatases, SOCS and PIAS proteins) are shared between signaling induced by growth hormone itself and by other cytokines. Here we overview downregulation of the growth hormone receptor as the most specific and potent mechanism of restricting cellular responses to growth hormone and analyze the role of several proteolytic systems and, specifically, ubiquitin-dependent pathways in this regulation. PMID:18586085

  18. Failure of ubiquitin proteasome system: risk for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chen; Geetha, Thangiah; Babu, Jeganathan Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is the primary proteolytic quality control system in cells and has an essential function in the nervous system. UPS dysfunction has been linked to neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. The pathology of neurodegenerative diseases is characterized by the abnormal accumulation of insoluble protein aggregates or inclusion bodies within neurons. The failure or dysregulation of the UPS prevents the degradation of misfolded/aberrant proteins, leading to deficient synaptic function that eventually affects the nervous system. In this review, we discuss the UPS and its physiological roles in the nervous system, its influence on neuronal function, and how UPS dysfunction contributes to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. The ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates plant hormone signaling

    PubMed Central

    Santner, Aaron; Estelle, Mark

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Plants utilize the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) to modulate nearly every aspect of growth and development. Ubiquitin is covalently attached to target proteins through the action of three enzymes known as E1, E2, and E3. The ultimate outcome of this post-translational modification depends on the nature of the ubiquitin linkage and the extent of polyubiquitination. In most cases, ubiquitination results in degradation of the target protein in the 26S proteasome. During the last 10 years it has become clear that the UPS plays a prominent regulatory role in hormone biology. E3 ubiquitin ligases in particular actively participate in hormone perception, de-repression of hormone signaling pathways, degradation of hormone specific transcription factors, and regulation of hormone biosynthesis. It is certain that additional functions will be discovered as more of the nearly 1200 potential E3s in plants are elucidated. PMID:20409276

  20. Denervation-Induced Activation of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System Reduces Skeletal Muscle Quantity Not Quality.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Cory W; Liu, Haiming M; Thompson, LaDora V

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is activated in response to skeletal muscle wasting and functions to degrade contractile proteins. The loss of these proteins inevitably reduces skeletal muscle size (i.e., quantity). However, it is currently unknown whether activation of this pathway also affects function by impairing the muscle's intrinsic ability to produce force (i.e., quality). Therefore, the purpose of this study was twofold, (1) document how the ubiquitin-proteasome system responds to denervation and (2) identify the physiological consequences of these changes. To induce soleus muscle atrophy, C57BL6 mice underwent tibial nerve transection of the left hindlimb for 7 or 14 days (n = 6-8 per group). At these time points, content of several proteins within the ubiquitin-proteasome system were determined via Western blot, while ex vivo whole muscle contractility was specifically analyzed at day 14. Denervation temporarily increased several key proteins within the ubiquitin-proteasome system, including the E3 ligase MuRF1 and the proteasome subunits 19S, α7 and β5. These changes were accompanied by reductions in absolute peak force and power, which were offset when expressed relative to physiological cross-sectional area. Contrary to peak force, absolute and relative forces at submaximal stimulation frequencies were significantly greater following 14 days of denervation. Taken together, these data represent two keys findings. First, activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is associated with reductions in skeletal muscle quantity rather than quality. Second, shortly after denervation, it appears the muscle remodels to compensate for the loss of neural activity via changes in Ca2+ handling.

  1. The role of allostery in the ubiquitin-proteasome system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Nussinov, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    The Ubiquitin-Proteasome System is involved in many cellular processes including protein degradation. Degradation of a protein via this system involves two successive steps: ubiquitination and degradation. Ubiquitination tags the target protein with ubiquitin-like proteins, such as ubiquitin, SUMO and NEDD8, via a cascade involving three enzymes: activating enzyme E1, conjugating enzyme E2, and E3 ubiquitin ligases. The proteasomes recognize the ubiquitin-like protein tagged substrate proteins and degrade them. Accumulating evidence indicates that allostery is a central player in the regulation of ubiquitination, as well as deubiquitination and degradation. Here, we provide an overview of the key mechanistic roles played by allostery in all steps of these processes, and highlight allosteric drugs targeting them. Throughout the review, we emphasize the crucial mechanistic role played by linkers in allosterically controlling the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System action by biasing the sampling of the conformational space, which facilitate the catalytic reactions of the ubiquitination and degradation. Finally, we propose that allostery may similarly play key roles in the regulation of molecular machines in the cell, and as such allosteric drugs can be expected to be increasingly exploited in therapeutic regimes. PMID:23234564

  2. Protein oxidative modification in the aging organism and the role of the ubiquitin proteasomal system.

    PubMed

    Kastle, Marc; Grune, Tilman

    2011-12-01

    Living in an oxygen containing environment is automatically connected to oxidative stress. Beside lipids and nucleic acids, especially proteins are very susceptible for oxidative modifications. These oxidative modifications comprise alterations of single amino acids, like the formation of protein carbonyls and methionine sulfoxide, or the aggregation of whole proteins. Due to the ongoing accumulation of protein aggregates during the aging process, the cellular protein quality control system becomes more and more overwhelmed. One essential element of the protein quality control machinery is the ubiquitin proteasomal system which plays therefore a crucial part in the aging process, too. Ubiquitination of proteins is a three step mechanism to tag proteins with a polyubiquitin chain for the proteasome. The proteasome is a regulated, barrel-shaped multi-enzyme complex which is responsible for the degradation of proteins. Although there is no drastic loss of all proteasomal subunits during the aging process, there is a functional decline of the proteasome activity in aging organisms. Impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system leads to increasing protein aggregation and cellular death. A lot of age related diseases are closely connected to an inhibition of the proteasome and the formation of large protein aggregates. Especially skin aging, atherosclerosis, age-dependent macula degeneration, cataract formation and several neurodegenerative diseases are directly connected to the decline of proteasome function. This review outlines the connections between aging, oxidative stress and protein oxidation, as well as the influence on the ubiquitin proteasomal system and several associated diseases.

  3. Protein quality control and elimination of protein waste: the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Amm, Ingo; Sommer, Thomas; Wolf, Dieter H

    2014-01-01

    Mistakes are part of our world and constantly occurring. Due to transcriptional and translational failures, genomic mutations or diverse stress conditions like oxidation or heat misfolded proteins are permanently produced in every compartment of the cell. As misfolded proteins in general lose their native function and tend to aggregate several cellular mechanisms have been evolved dealing with such potentially toxic protein species. Misfolded proteins are mostly recognized by chaperones on the basis of their exposed hydrophobic patches and, if unable to refold them to their native state, are targeted to proteolytic pathways. Most prominent are the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagic vacuolar (lysosomal) system, eliminating misfolded proteins from the cellular environment. A major task of this quality control system is the specific recognition and separation of the misfolded from the correctly folded protein species and the folding intermediates, respectively, which are on the way to the correct folded state but exhibit properties of misfolded proteins. In this review we focus on the recognition process and subsequent degradation of misfolded proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the different cell compartments of eukaryotic cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Ubiquitin-Proteasome System. Guest Editors: Thomas Sommer and Dieter H. Wolf. © 2013.

  4. Breast cancer cells: Modulation by melatonin and the ubiquitin-proteasome system--a review.

    PubMed

    Vriend, Jerry; Reiter, Russel J

    2015-12-05

    Melatonin inhibits human breast cancer cells stimulated with estrogen. This antiproliferative action depends on the presence of the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in the human MCF-7 cell line and is strictly dose-dependent. Since researchers concerned with melatonin and breast cancer have not considered the relevance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system to this research in this review we do so. The fact that the first breast cancer susceptibility gene to be identified, Brca1, functions as a ubiquitin ligase indicates that the ubiquitin-proteasome system has a role in regulating susceptibility to breast cancer. While mutations of this gene increase the incidence of breast cancer, the wild type gene suppresses estrogen-dependent transcriptional events relying on the estrogen receptor ERα. Three other ubiquitin ligases, SCF(Skp2), E6AP and APC, interact directly with ERα at the ERE and AP-1 promoters of ERα target genes. Melatonin, like proteasome inhibitors, decreases estrogen-induced gene transcription. Indeed, it has been reported that melatonin specifically inhibits estrogen-induced transcription mediated by ERα at the ERE and AP1 gene promoters. Herein, we present a model in which the inhibitory action of melatonin on MCF-7 cells is mediated, directly or indirectly, by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. In this model ERα, apoptotic proteins, and cell cycle proteins, all influenced by melatonin, are substrates of key ubiquitin ligases including SCF(Skp2), E6AP, and SCF(B-TrCP). Since dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is a risk factor for breast cancer, this model provides a context in which to test the clinical potential, and limitations, of melatonin and proteasome inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Regulation of the retinoblastoma-E2F pathway by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Satyaki; Henry, R William

    2015-10-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (RB) and its related family members p107 and p130 regulate cell proliferation through the transcriptional repression of genes involved in cellular G1 to S phase transition. However, RB proteins are functionally versatile, and numerous genetic and biochemical studies point to expansive roles in cellular growth control, pluripotency, and apoptotic response. For the vast majority of genes, RB family members target the E2F family of transcriptional activators as an integral component of its gene regulatory mechanism. These interactions are regulated via reversible phosphorylation by Cyclin/Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) complexes, a major molecular mechanism that regulates transcriptional output of RB/E2F target genes. Recent studies indicate an additional level of regulation involving the ubiquitin-proteasome system that renders pervasive control over each component of the RB pathway. Disruption of the genetic circuitry for proteasome-mediated targeting of the RB pathway has serious consequences on development and cellular transformation, and is associated with several forms of human cancer. In this review, we discuss the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in proteolytic control of RB-E2F pathway components, and recent data that points to surprising non-proteolytic roles for the ubiquitin-proteasome system in novel transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  6. Human papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis and the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Scheffner, Martin; Whitaker, Noel J

    2003-02-01

    Certain types of human papillomaviruses have been etiologically associated with malignant lesions, most notably with cervical cancer. The major oncoproteins of these cancer-associated viruses are encoded by the viral E6 and E7 genes. Thorough characterization of these oncoproteins and their interaction with cellular proteins has shown that both E6 and E7 exploit the ubiquitin-proteasome system to degrade and, thus, to functionally inactivate negative cell-regulatory proteins including members of the p110(RB) family and p53. This act of piracy is assumed to contribute to both the efficient propagation of HPVs and HPV-induced carcinogenesis.

  7. The ubiquitin proteasome system - implications for cell cycle control and the targeted treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Bassermann, Florian; Eichner, Ruth; Pagano, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Two families of E3 ubiquitin ligases are prominent in cell cycle regulation and mediate the timely and precise ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent degradation of key cell cycle proteins: the SCF (Skp1/Cul1/F-box protein) complex and the APC/C (anaphase promoting complex or cyclosome). While certain SCF ligases drive cell cycle progression throughout the cell cycle, APC/C (in complex with either of two substrate recruiting proteins: Cdc20 and Cdh1) orchestrates exit from mitosis (APC/C(Cdc20)) and establishes a stable G1 phase (APC/C(Cdh1)). Upon DNA damage or perturbation of the normal cell cycle, both ligases are involved in checkpoint activation. Mechanistic insight into these processes has significantly improved over the last ten years, largely due to a better understanding of APC/C and the functional characterization of multiple F-box proteins, the variable substrate recruiting components of SCF ligases. Here, we review the role of SCF- and APC/C-mediated ubiquitylation in the normal and perturbed cell cycle and discuss potential clinical implications of SCF and APC/C functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Ubiquitin-Proteasome System. Guest Editors: Thomas Sommer and Dieter H. Wolf. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Protein Degradation by Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Formation and Labilization of Contextual Conditioning Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fustiñana, María Sol; de la Fuente, Verónica; Federman, Noel; Freudenthal, Ramiro; Romano, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) of protein degradation has been evaluated in different forms of neural plasticity and memory. The role of UPS in such processes is controversial. Several results support the idea that the activation of this system in memory consolidation is necessary to overcome negative constrains for plasticity. In this…

  9. Protein Degradation by Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Formation and Labilization of Contextual Conditioning Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fustiñana, María Sol; de la Fuente, Verónica; Federman, Noel; Freudenthal, Ramiro; Romano, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) of protein degradation has been evaluated in different forms of neural plasticity and memory. The role of UPS in such processes is controversial. Several results support the idea that the activation of this system in memory consolidation is necessary to overcome negative constrains for plasticity. In this…

  10. Atrophy, hypertrophy, and hypoxemia induce transcriptional regulators of the ubiquitin proteasome system in the rat heart

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In skeletal muscle, transcript levels of proteins regulating the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) increase with atrophy and decrease with hypertrophy. Whether the same is true for heart muscle is not known. We set out to characterize the transcriptional profile of regulators of the UPS during atrop...

  11. Carbon and nitrogen metabolism regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takeo; Maekawa, Shugo; Yasuda, Shigetaka; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2011-10-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is a unique protein degradation mechanism conserved in the eukaryotic cell. In addition to the control of protein quality, UPS regulates diverse cellular signal transduction via the fine-tuning of target protein degradation. Protein ubiquitylation and subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome are involved in almost all aspects of plant growth and development and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Recent studies reveal that the UPS plays an essential role in adaptation to carbon and nitrogen availability in plants. Here we highlight ubiquitin ligase ATL31 and the homologue ATL6 target 14-3-3 proteins for ubiquitylation to be degraded, which control signaling for carbon and nitrogen metabolisms and C/N balance response. We also give an overview of the UPS function involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolisms.

  12. The ubiquitin-proteasome system in cardiac proteinopathy: a quality control perspective

    PubMed Central

    Su, Huabo; Wang, Xuejun

    2010-01-01

    Protein quality control (PQC) depends on elegant collaboration between molecular chaperones and targeted proteolysis in the cell. The latter is primarily carried out by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, but recent advances in this area of research suggest a supplementary role for the autophagy-lysosomal pathway in PQC-related proteolysis. The (patho)physiological significance of PQC in the heart is best illustrated in cardiac proteinopathy, which belongs to a family of cardiac diseases caused by expression of aggregation-prone proteins in cardiomyocytes. Cardiac proteasome functional insufficiency (PFI) is best studied in desmin-related cardiomyopathy, a bona fide cardiac proteinopathy. Emerging evidence suggests that many common forms of cardiomyopathy may belong to proteinopathy. This review focuses on examining current evidence, as it relates to the hypothesis that PFI impairs PQC in cardiomyocytes and contributes to the progression of cardiac proteinopathies to heart failure. PMID:19696071

  13. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell fate by the ubiquitin proteasome system

    PubMed Central

    Crusio, Kelly M.; Reavie, Linsey B.; Aifantis, Iannis

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) residing in the bone marrow generate mature blood cells throughout the life of the organism. This is accomplished by careful regulation of HSC activity to balance quiescence, self-renewal and differentiation. Studies of the molecular mechanisms governing HSC maintenance have mostly focused on the role of signaling and transcriptional processes. However, it has recently been demonstrated that protein regulation via the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is crucial for normal HSC function. The loss of which can lead to transformation and leukemogenesis. The effective use of a general and reversible inhibitor of the UPS, Bortezomib, in treating mantle cell lymphoma and multiple myeloma demonstrated that targeting the UPS has therapeutic potential. Thus, understanding the emerging field of how the UPS regulates HSC activity may lead to novel targets for therapy of leukemia. PMID:22349458

  14. Mitochondrial and Ubiquitin Proteasome System Dysfunction in Ageing and Disease: Two Sides of the Same Coin?

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Jaime M.; Olson, Lars; Coppotelli, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system have been described as two hallmarks of the ageing process. Additionally, both systems have been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of many age-related diseases, particularly neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Interestingly, these two systems are closely interconnected, with the ubiquitin proteasome system maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis by regulating organelle dynamics, the proteome, and mitophagy, and mitochondrial dysfunction impairing cellular protein homeostasis by oxidative damage. Here, we review the current literature and argue that the interplay of the two systems should be considered in order to better understand the cellular dysfunction observed in ageing and age-related diseases. Such an approach may provide valuable insights into molecular mechanisms underlying the ageing process, and further discovery of treatments to counteract ageing and its associated diseases. Furthermore, we provide a hypothetical model for the heterogeneity described among individuals during ageing. PMID:26287188

  15. Mitochondrial and Ubiquitin Proteasome System Dysfunction in Ageing and Disease: Two Sides of the Same Coin?

    PubMed

    Ross, Jaime M; Olson, Lars; Coppotelli, Giuseppe

    2015-08-17

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system have been described as two hallmarks of the ageing process. Additionally, both systems have been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of many age-related diseases, particularly neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Interestingly, these two systems are closely interconnected, with the ubiquitin proteasome system maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis by regulating organelle dynamics, the proteome, and mitophagy, and mitochondrial dysfunction impairing cellular protein homeostasis by oxidative damage. Here, we review the current literature and argue that the interplay of the two systems should be considered in order to better understand the cellular dysfunction observed in ageing and age-related diseases. Such an approach may provide valuable insights into molecular mechanisms underlying the ageing process, and further discovery of treatments to counteract ageing and its associated diseases. Furthermore, we provide a hypothetical model for the heterogeneity described among individuals during ageing.

  16. Defective regulation of the ubiquitin/proteasome system in the hypothalamus of obese male mice.

    PubMed

    Ignacio-Souza, Leticia M; Bombassaro, Bruna; Pascoal, Livia B; Portovedo, Mariana A; Razolli, Daniela S; Coope, Andressa; Victorio, Sheila C; de Moura, Rodrigo F; Nascimento, Lucas F; Arruda, Ana P; Anhe, Gabriel F; Milanski, Marciane; Velloso, Licio A

    2014-08-01

    In both human and experimental obesity, inflammatory damage to the hypothalamus plays an important role in the loss of the coordinated control of food intake and energy expenditure. Upon prolonged maintenance of increased body mass, the brain changes the defended set point of adiposity, and returning to normal weight becomes extremely difficult. Here we show that in prolonged but not in short-term obesity, the ubiquitin/proteasome system in the hypothalamus fails to maintain an adequate rate of protein recycling, leading to the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins. This is accompanied by an increased colocalization of ubiquitin and p62 in the arcuate nucleus and reduced expression of autophagy markers in the hypothalamus. Genetic protection from obesity is accompanied by the normal regulation of the ubiquitin/proteasome system in the hypothalamus, whereas the inhibition of proteasome or p62 results in the acceleration of body mass gain in mice exposed for a short period to a high-fat diet. Thus, the defective regulation of the ubiquitin/proteasome system in the hypothalamus may be an important mechanism involved in the progression and autoperpetuation of obesity.

  17. Sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase ablation disrupts presynaptic architecture and function via an ubiquitin- proteasome mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mitroi, Daniel N.; Deutschmann, André U.; Raucamp, Maren; Karunakaran, Indulekha; Glebov, Konstantine; Hans, Michael; Walter, Jochen; Saba, Julie; Gräler, Markus; Ehninger, Dan; Sopova, Elena; Shupliakov, Oleg; Swandulla, Dieter; van Echten-Deckert, Gerhild

    2016-01-01

    The bioactive lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a degradation product of sphingolipids that are particularly abundant in neurons. We have shown previously that neuronal S1P accumulation is toxic leading to ER-stress and an increase in intracellular calcium. To clarify the neuronal function of S1P, we generated brain-specific knockout mouse models in which S1P-lyase (SPL), the enzyme responsible for irreversible S1P cleavage was inactivated. Constitutive ablation of SPL in the brain (SPLfl/fl/Nes) but not postnatal neuronal forebrain-restricted SPL deletion (SPLfl/fl/CaMK) caused marked accumulation of S1P. Hence, altered presynaptic architecture including a significant decrease in number and density of synaptic vesicles, decreased expression of several presynaptic proteins, and impaired synaptic short term plasticity were observed in hippocampal neurons from SPLfl/fl/Nes mice. Accordingly, these mice displayed cognitive deficits. At the molecular level, an activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) was detected which resulted in a decreased expression of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP14 and several presynaptic proteins. Upon inhibition of proteasomal activity, USP14 levels, expression of presynaptic proteins and synaptic function were restored. These findings identify S1P metabolism as a novel player in modulating synaptic architecture and plasticity. PMID:27883090

  18. Nuclear ubiquitin proteasome degradation affects WRKY45 function in the rice defense program.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Akane; Inoue, Haruhiko; Goto, Shingo; Nakayama, Akira; Sugano, Shoji; Hayashi, Nagao; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional activator WRKY45 plays a major role in the salicylic acid/benzothiadiazole-induced defense program in rice. Here, we show that the nuclear ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a role in regulating the function of WRKY45. Proteasome inhibitors induced accumulation of polyubiquitinated WRKY45 and transient up-regulation of WRKY45 target genes in rice cells, suggesting that WRKY45 is constantly degraded by the UPS to suppress defense responses in the absence of defense signals. Mutational analysis of the nuclear localization signal indicated that UPS-dependent WRKY45 degradation occurs in the nuclei. Interestingly, the transcriptional activity of WRKY45 after salicylic acid treatment was impaired by proteasome inhibition. The same C-terminal region in WRKY45 was essential for both transcriptional activity and UPS-dependent degradation. These results suggest that UPS regulation also plays a role in the transcriptional activity of WRKY45. It has been reported that AtNPR1, the central regulator of the salicylic acid pathway in Arabidopsis, is regulated by the UPS. We found that OsNPR1/NH1, the rice counterpart of NPR1, was not stabilized by proteasome inhibition under uninfected conditions. We discuss the differences in post-translational regulation of salicylic acid pathway components between rice and Arabidopsis.

  19. Alterations in the Ubiquitin Proteasome System in Persistent but Not Reversible Proteinuric Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Beeken, Maire; Lindenmeyer, Maja T.; Blattner, Simone M.; Radón, Victoria; Oh, Jun; Meyer, Tobias N.; Hildebrand, Diana; Schlüter, Hartmut; Reinicke, Anna T.; Knop, Jan-Hendrik; Vivekanandan-Giri, Anuradha; Münster, Silvia; Sachs, Marlies; Wiech, Thorsten; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Cohen, Clemens D.; Kretzler, Matthias; Stahl, Rolf A.K.

    2014-01-01

    Podocytes are the key cells affected in nephrotic glomerular kidney diseases, and they respond uniformly to injury with cytoskeletal rearrangement. In nephrotic diseases, such as membranous nephropathy and FSGS, persistent injury often leads to irreversible structural damage, whereas in minimal change disease, structural alterations are mostly transient. The factors leading to persistent podocyte injury are currently unknown. Proteolysis is an irreversible process and could trigger persistent podocyte injury through degradation of podocyte-specific proteins. We, therefore, analyzed the expression and functional consequence of the two most prominent proteolytic systems, the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) and the autophagosomal/lysosomal system, in persistent and transient podocyte injuries. We show that differential upregulation of both proteolytic systems occurs in persistent human and rodent podocyte injury. The expression of specific UPS proteins in podocytes differentiated children with minimal change disease from children with FSGS and correlated with poor clinical outcome. Degradation of the podocyte-specific protein α-actinin-4 by the UPS depended on oxidative modification in membranous nephropathy. Notably, the UPS was overwhelmed in podocytes during experimental glomerular disease, resulting in abnormal protein accumulation and compensatory upregulation of the autophagosomal/lysosomal system. Accordingly, inhibition of both proteolytic systems enhanced proteinuria in persistent nephrotic disease. This study identifies altered proteolysis as a feature of persistent podocyte injury. In the future, specific UPS proteins may serve as new biomarkers or therapeutic targets in persistent nephrotic syndrome. PMID:24722446

  20. The ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy are defective in the taurine-deficient heart.

    PubMed

    Jong, Chian Ju; Ito, Takashi; Schaffer, Stephen W

    2015-12-01

    Taurine depletion leads to impaired mitochondrial function, as characterized by reduced ATP production and elevated superoxide generation. These defects can fundamentally alter cardiomyocyte function and if left unchanged can result in cell death. To protect against these stresses, cardiomyocytes possess quality control processes, such as the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy, which can rejuvenate cells through the degradation of damaged proteins and organelles. Hence, the present study tested the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species generated by damaged mitochondria initiates UPS and autophagy in the taurine-deficient heart. Using transgenic mice lacking the taurine transporter (TauTKO) as a model of taurine deficiency, it was shown that the levels of ubiquitinated protein were elevated, an effect associated with a decrease in ATP-dependent 26S β5 proteasome activity. Treating the TauTKO mouse with the mitochondria-specific antioxidant, mitoTEMPO, largely abolished the increase in ubiquitinated protein content. The TauTKO heart was also associated with impaired autophagy, characterized by an increase in the initiator, Beclin-1, and autophagosome content, but a defect in the generation of active autophagolysosomes. Although mitoTEMPO treatment only restores the oxidative balance within the mitochondria, it appeared to completely disrupt the crosstalk between the damaged mitochondria and the quality control processes. Thus, mitochondrial oxidative stress is the main trigger initiating the quality control systems in the taurine-deficient heart. We conclude that the activation of the UPS and autophagy is another fundamental function of mitochondria.

  1. Insulin alleviates degradation of skeletal muscle protein by inhibiting the ubiquitin-proteasome system in septic rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiyi; Li, Ning; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Weiqin; Tang, Shaoqiu; Yu, Wenkui; Gao, Tao; Zhang, Juanjuan; Li, Jieshou

    2011-06-03

    Hypercatabolism is common under septic conditions. Skeletal muscle is the main target organ for hypercatabolism, and this phenomenon is a vital factor in the deterioration of recovery in septic patients. In skeletal muscle, activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system plays an important role in hypercatabolism under septic status. Insulin is a vital anticatabolic hormone and previous evidence suggests that insulin administration inhibits various steps in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. However, whether insulin can alleviate the degradation of skeletal muscle protein by inhibiting the ubiquitin-proteasome system under septic condition is unclear. This paper confirmed that mRNA and protein levels of the ubiquitin-proteasome system were upregulated and molecular markers of skeletal muscle proteolysis (tyrosine and 3-methylhistidine) simultaneously increased in the skeletal muscle of septic rats. Septic rats were infused with insulin at a constant rate of 2.4 mU.kg-1.min-1 for 8 hours. Concentrations of mRNA and proteins of the ubiquitin-proteasome system and molecular markers of skeletal muscle proteolysis were mildly affected. When the insulin infusion dose increased to 4.8 mU.kg-1.min-1, mRNA for ubiquitin, E2-14 KDa, and the C2 subunit were all sharply downregulated. At the same time, the levels of ubiquitinated proteins, E2-14KDa, and the C2 subunit protein were significantly reduced. Tyrosine and 3-methylhistidine decreased significantly. We concluded that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is important skeletal muscle hypercatabolism in septic rats. Infusion of insulin can reverse the detrimental metabolism of skeletal muscle by inhibiting the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and the effect is proportional to the insulin infusion dose.

  2. The ubiquitin proteasome system in glia and its role in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Anne H. P.; Reits, Eric A. J.; Hol, Elly M.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is crucial for intracellular protein homeostasis and for degradation of aberrant and damaged proteins. The accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s disease, leading to the hypothesis that proteasomal impairment is contributing to these diseases. So far, most research related to the UPS in neurodegenerative diseases has been focused on neurons, while glial cells have been largely disregarded in this respect. However, glial cells are essential for proper neuronal function and adopt a reactive phenotype in neurodegenerative diseases, thereby contributing to an inflammatory response. This process is called reactive gliosis, which in turn affects UPS function in glial cells. In many neurodegenerative diseases, mostly neurons show accumulation and aggregation of ubiquitinated proteins, suggesting that glial cells may be better equipped to maintain proper protein homeostasis. During an inflammatory reaction, the immunoproteasome is induced in glia, which may contribute to a more efficient degradation of disease-related proteins. Here we review the role of the UPS in glial cells in various neurodegenerative diseases, and we discuss how studying glial cell function might provide essential information in unraveling mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25152710

  3. The ubiquitin proteasome system in glia and its role in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Anne H P; Reits, Eric A J; Hol, Elly M

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is crucial for intracellular protein homeostasis and for degradation of aberrant and damaged proteins. The accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease, leading to the hypothesis that proteasomal impairment is contributing to these diseases. So far, most research related to the UPS in neurodegenerative diseases has been focused on neurons, while glial cells have been largely disregarded in this respect. However, glial cells are essential for proper neuronal function and adopt a reactive phenotype in neurodegenerative diseases, thereby contributing to an inflammatory response. This process is called reactive gliosis, which in turn affects UPS function in glial cells. In many neurodegenerative diseases, mostly neurons show accumulation and aggregation of ubiquitinated proteins, suggesting that glial cells may be better equipped to maintain proper protein homeostasis. During an inflammatory reaction, the immunoproteasome is induced in glia, which may contribute to a more efficient degradation of disease-related proteins. Here we review the role of the UPS in glial cells in various neurodegenerative diseases, and we discuss how studying glial cell function might provide essential information in unraveling mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. The ubiquitin-proteasome system in neurodegenerative diseases: precipitating factor, yet part of the solution

    PubMed Central

    Dantuma, Nico P.; Bott, Laura C.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases based on the presence of deposits consisting of ubiquitylated proteins in affected neurons. It has been postulated that aggregation-prone proteins associated with these disorders, such as α-synuclein, β-amyloid peptide, and polyglutamine proteins, compromise UPS function, and delay the degradation of other proteasome substrates. Many of these substrates play important regulatory roles in signaling, cell cycle progression, or apoptosis, and their inadvertent stabilization due to an overloaded and improperly functioning UPS may thus be responsible for cellular demise in neurodegeneration. Over the past decade, numerous studies have addressed the UPS dysfunction hypothesis using various model systems and techniques that differ in their readout and sensitivity. While an inhibitory effect of some disease proteins on the UPS has been demonstrated, increasing evidence attests that the UPS remains operative in many disease models, which opens new possibilities for treatment. In this review, we will discuss the paradigm shift that repositioned the UPS from being a prime suspect in the pathophysiology of neurodegeneration to an attractive therapeutic target that can be harnessed to accelerate the clearance of disease-linked proteins. PMID:25132814

  5. Dendrite development regulated by the schizophrenia-associated gene FEZ1 involves the ubiquitin proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yasuhito; Khodosevich, Konstantin; Monyer, Hannah

    2014-04-24

    Downregulation of the schizophrenia-associated gene DISC1 and its interacting protein FEZ1 positively regulates dendrite growth in young neurons. However, little is known about the mechanism that controls these molecules during neuronal development. Here, we identify several components of the ubiquitin proteasome system and the cell-cycle machinery that act upstream of FEZ1. We demonstrate that the ubiquitin ligase cell division cycle 20/anaphase-promoting complex (Cdc20/APC) controls dendrite growth by regulating the degradation of FEZ1. Furthermore, dendrite growth is modulated by BubR1, whose known function so far has been restricted to control Cdc20/APC activity during the cell cycle. The modulatory function of BubR1 is dependent on its acetylation status. We show that BubR1 is deacetylated by Hdac11, thereby disinhibiting the Cdc20/APC complex. Because dendrite growth is affected both in hippocampal dentate granule cells and olfactory bulb neurons upon modifying expression of these genes, we conclude that the proposed mechanism governs neuronal development in a general fashion.

  6. Cereblon is recruited to aggresome and shows cytoprotective effect against ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sawamura, Naoya; Wakabayashi, Satoru; Matsumoto, Kodai; Yamada, Haruka; Asahi, Toru

    2015-09-04

    Cereblon (CRBN) is encoded by a candidate gene for autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability (ID). The nonsense mutation, R419X, causes deletion of 24 amino acids at the C-terminus of CRBN, leading to mild ID. Although abnormal CRBN function may be associated with ID disease onset, its cellular mechanism is still unclear. Here, we examine the role of CRBN in aggresome formation and cytoprotection. In the presence of a proteasome inhibitor, exogenous CRBN formed perinuclear inclusions and co-localized with aggresome markers. Endogenous CRBN also formed perinuclear inclusions under the same condition. Treatment with a microtubule destabilizer or an inhibitor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of CRBN blocked formation of CRBN inclusions. Biochemical analysis showed CRBN containing inclusions were high-molecular weight, ubiquitin-positive. CRBN overexpression in cultured cells suppressed cell death induced by proteasome inhibitor. Furthermore, knockdown of endogenous CRBN in cultured cells increased cell death induced by proteasome inhibitor, compared with control cells. Our results show CRBN is recruited to aggresome and has functional roles in cytoprotection against ubiquitin-proteasome system impaired condition.

  7. Role of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH).

    PubMed

    Cacciapuoti, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a key compensatory mechanism acting in response to pressure or volume overload, involving some alterations in signaling transduction pathways and transcription factors-regulation. These changes result in enhanced proteins' synthesis leading to Left Ventricular Hypertrophy (LVH). It is known that the main function of Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS) is to prevent accumulation of damaged, misfolded and mutant proteins by proteolysis. But emerging evidences suggest that UPS also attends to the cells' growth, favoring proteins' synthesis, subsequently evolving in LVH. The role of the proteasome in to favor cellular hypertrophy consists in upregulation of the catalytic proteasome subunit, with prevalence of proteins-synthesis on proteins degradation. It is also evident that UPS inhibition may prevent cells' growth opposing to the hypertrophy. In fact in several experimental models, UPS inhibition demonstrated to be able to prevent or reverse cardiac hypertrophy induced by abdominal aortic banding (AAB). That can happen with several proteasome inhibitors acting by multifactorial mechanisms. These evidences induce to hypothesize that, in the future, in patients with the increased volume overload by systemic hypertension, some proteasome-inhibitors could be used to antagonize or prevent LVH without reducing peripheral high blood pressure levels too.

  8. Regulation of the endothelial cell cycle by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Fasanaro, Pasquale; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Martelli, Fabio

    2010-01-15

    Degradation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins by the 26S-proteasome complex represents a crucial quantitative control mechanism. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a pivotal role in the complex molecular network regulating the progression both between and within each cell-cycle phase. Two major complexes are involved: the SKP1-CUL1-F-box-protein complex (SCF) and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Notwithstanding structural similarities, SCF and APC/C display different cellular functions and mechanisms of action. SCF modulates all cell-cycle stages and plays a prominent role at G1/S transition mainly through three regulatory subunits: Skp2, Fbw7, and beta-TRCP. APC/C, regulated by Cdc20 or Cdh1 subunits, has a crucial role in mitosis. In this review, we will describe how the endothelial cell cycle is regulated by the UPS. We will illustrate the principal SCF- and APC/C-dependent molecular mechanisms that modulate cell growth, allowing a unidirectional cell-cycle progression. Then, we will focus our attention on UPS modulation by oxidative stress, a pathogenic stimulus that causes endothelial dysfunction and is involved in numerous cardiovascular diseases.

  9. The interplay between autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome system in cardiac proteotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changhua; Wang, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    Proteotoxicity refers to the detrimental effects of damaged/misfolded proteins on the cell. Cardiac muscle is particularly susceptible to proteotoxicity because sustained and severe proteotoxic stress leads to cell death and cardiac muscle has very limited self-renewal capacity. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and the autophagic-lysosomal pathway (ALP) are two major pathways responsible for degradation of most cellular proteins. Alterations of UPS and ALP functions are associated with the accumulation of proteotoxic species in the heart, a key pathological feature of common forms of heart disease including idiopathic, ischemic, and pressure-overloaded cardiomyopathies and a large subset of congestive heart failure. Emerging evidence suggests proteasome inhibition or impairment activates autophagy and conversely, acute ALP inhibition may sometimes increase intrinsic proteasome peptidase activities but chronic ALP inhibition hinders UPS performance in ubiquitinated protein degradation. The exact molecular basis on which the two degradative pathways interact remains largely undefined. Here we review current understanding of the roles of the UPS and autophagy in the control of cardiac proteotoxicity, with a specific focus on the crosstalk between the two pathways. PMID:25092168

  10. Ubiquitin-Proteasome System Inhibition Promotes Long-Term Depression and Synaptic Tagging/Capture.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Korte, Martin; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2016-06-01

    A balance of protein synthesis and degradation is critical for the dynamic regulation and implementation of long-term memory storage. The role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in regulating the plasticity at potentiated synapses is well studied, but its roles in depressed synaptic populations remain elusive. In this study, we probed the possibility of regulating the UPS by inhibiting the proteasome function during the induction of protein synthesis-independent form of hippocampal long-term depression (early-LTD), an important component of synaptic plasticity. Here, we show that protein degradation is involved in early-LTD induction and interfering with this process facilitates early-LTD to late-LTD. We provide evidence here that under the circumstances of proteasome inhibition brain-derived neurotrophic factor is accumulated as plasticity-related protein and it drives the weakly depressed or potentiated synapses to associativity. Thus, UPS inhibition promotes LTD and establishes associativity between weakly depressed or potentiated synapses through the mechanisms of synaptic tagging/capture or cross-capture.

  11. The ubiquitin proteasome system in Caenorhabditis elegans and its regulation☆

    PubMed Central

    Papaevgeniou, Nikoletta; Chondrogianni, Niki

    2014-01-01

    Protein degradation constitutes a major cellular function that is responsible for maintenance of the normal cellular physiology either through the degradation of normal proteins or through the elimination of damaged proteins. The Ubiquitin–Proteasome System (UPS)1 is one of the main proteolytic systems that orchestrate protein degradation. Given that up- and down- regulation of the UPS system has been shown to occur in various normal (such as ageing) and pathological (such as neurodegenerative diseases) processes, the exogenous modulation of the UPS function and activity holds promise of (a) developing new therapeutic interventions against various diseases and (b) establishing strategies to maintain cellular homeostasis. Since the proteasome genes are evolutionarily conserved, their role can be dissected in simple model organisms, such as the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. In this review, we survey findings on the redox regulation of the UPS in C. elegans showing that the nematode is an instrumental tool in the identification of major players in the UPS pathway. Moreover, we specifically discuss UPS-related genes that have been modulated in the nematode and in human cells and have resulted in similar effects thus further exhibiting the value of this model in the study of the UPS. PMID:24563851

  12. The role of the ubiquitin proteasome system in synapse remodeling and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Mei; Shen, Kang

    2011-01-01

    Summary The ubiquitin proteasome system is a potent regulatory mechanism used to control protein stability in numerous cellular processes, including neural development. Many neurodegenerative diseases are featured by the accumulation of UPS-associated proteins, suggesting the UPS dysfunction may be crucial for pathogenesis. Recent experiments have highlighted the UPS as a key player during synaptic development. Here we summarize recent discoveries centered on the role of the UPS in synapse remodeling and draw attention to the potential link between the synaptic UPS dysfunction and the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:18937340

  13. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome System: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Alzheimer's Disease and Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Gong, Bing; Radulovic, Miroslav; Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E; Cardozo, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is a crucial protein degradation system in eukaryotes. Herein, we will review advances in the understanding of the role of several proteins of the UPS in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). The UPS consists of many factors that include E3 ubiquitin ligases, ubiquitin hydrolases, ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like molecules, and the proteasome itself. An extensive body of work links UPS dysfunction with AD pathogenesis and progression. More recently, the UPS has been shown to have vital roles in recovery of function after SCI. The ubiquitin hydrolase (Uch-L1) has been proposed to increase cellular levels of mono-ubiquitin and hence to increase rates of protein turnover by the UPS. A low Uch-L1 level has been linked with Aβ accumulation in AD and reduced neuroregeneration after SCI. One likely mechanism for these beneficial effects of Uch-L1 is reduced turnover of the PKA regulatory subunit and consequently, reduced signaling via CREB. The neuron-specific F-box protein Fbx2 ubiquitinates β-secretase thus targeting it for proteasomal degradation and reducing generation of Aβ. Both Uch-L1 and Fbx2 improve synaptic plasticity and cognitive function in mouse AD models. The role of Fbx2 after SCI has not been examined, but abolishing ß-secretase reduces neuronal recovery after SCI, associated with reduced myelination. UBB+1, which arises through a frame-shift mutation in the ubiquitin gene that adds 19 amino acids to the C-terminus of ubiquitin, inhibits proteasomal function and is associated with increased neurofibrillary tangles in patients with AD, Pick's disease and Down's syndrome. These advances in understanding of the roles of the UPS in AD and SCI raise new questions but, also, identify attractive and exciting targets for potential, future therapeutic interventions.

  14. Regulation of STIM1 and SOCE by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS).

    PubMed

    Keil, Jeffrey M; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P; Patrick, Gentry N

    2010-10-18

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) mediates the majority of protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. The UPS has recently emerged as a key degradation pathway involved in synapse development and function. In order to better understand the function of the UPS at synapses we utilized a genetic and proteomic approach to isolate and identify novel candidate UPS substrates from biochemically purified synaptic membrane preparations. Using these methods, we have identified Stromal interacting molecule 1 (STIM1). STIM1 is as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium sensor that has been shown to regulate store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE). We have characterized STIM1 in neurons, finding STIM1 is expressed throughout development with stable, high expression in mature neurons. As in non-excitable cells, STIM1 is distributed in a membranous and punctate fashion in hippocampal neurons. In addition, a population of STIM1 was found to exist at synapses. Furthermore, using surface biotinylation and live-cell labeling methods, we detect a subpopulation of STIM1 on the surface of hippocampal neurons. The role of STIM1 as a regulator of SOCE has typically been examined in non-excitable cell types. Therefore, we examined the role of the UPS in STIM1 and SOCE function in HEK293 cells. While we find that STIM1 is ubiquitinated, its stability is not altered by proteasome inhibitors in cells under basal conditions or conditions that activate SOCE. However, we find that surface STIM1 levels and thapsigargin (TG)-induced SOCE are significantly increased in cells treated with proteasome inhibitors. Additionally, we find that the overexpression of POSH (Plenty of SH3's), an E3 ubiquitin ligase recently shown to be involved in the regulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis, leads to decreased STIM1 surface levels. Together, these results provide evidence for previously undescribed roles of the UPS in the regulation of STIM1 and SOCE function.

  15. The ubiquitin-proteasome system: opportunities for therapeutic intervention in solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    The destruction of proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome system is a multi-step, complex process involving polyubiquitination of substrate proteins, followed by proteolytic degradation by the macromolecular 26S proteasome complex. Inhibitors of the proteasome promote the accumulation of proteins that are deleterious to cell survival, and represent promising anti-cancer agents. In multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma, treatment with the first generation proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, or the second generation inhibitor carfilzomib, has demonstrated significant therapeutic benefit in humans. This has prompted US FDA approval of these agents and development of additional second generation compounds with improved properties. There is considerable interest in extending the benefits of proteasome inhibitors to the treatment of solid tumor malignancies. Herein we review progress that has been made in the preclinical development and clinical evaluation of different proteasome inhibitors in solid tumors. In addition, we describe several novel approaches that are currently being pursued for the treatment of solid tumors, including drug combinatorial strategies incorporating proteasome inhibitors, and the targeting of components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system that are distinct from the 26S proteasome complex. PMID:24659480

  16. The ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagic-lysosomal system in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yasuo; Morishima-Kawashima, Maho; Nixon, Ralph

    2012-08-01

    As neurons age, their survival depends on eliminating a growing burden of damaged, potentially toxic proteins and organelles-a capability that declines owing to aging and disease factors. Here, we review the two proteolytic systems principally responsible for protein quality control in neurons and their important contributions to Alzheimer disease pathogenesis. In the first section, the discovery of paired helical filament ubiquitination is described as a backdrop for discussing the importance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in Alzheimer disease. In the second section, we review the prominent involvement of the lysosomal system beginning with pathological endosomal-lysosomal activation and signaling at the very earliest stages of Alzheimer disease followed by the progressive failure of autophagy. These abnormalities, which result in part from Alzheimer-related genes acting directly on these lysosomal pathways, contribute to the development of each of the Alzheimer neuropathological hallmarks and represent a promising therapeutic target.

  17. Targeting the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Heart Disease: The Basis for New Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Novel therapeutic strategies to treat heart failure are greatly needed. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) affects the structure and function of cardiac cells through targeted degradation of signaling and structural proteins. This review discusses both beneficial and detrimental consequences of modulating the UPS in the heart. Recent Advances: Proteasome inhibitors were first used to test the role of the UPS in cardiac disease phenotypes, indicating therapeutic potential. In early cardiac remodeling and pathological hypertrophy with increased proteasome activities, proteasome inhibition prevented or restricted disease progression and contractile dysfunction. Conversely, enhancing proteasome activities by genetic manipulation, pharmacological intervention, or ischemic preconditioning also improved the outcome of cardiomyopathies and infarcted hearts with impaired cardiac and UPS function, which is, at least in part, caused by oxidative damage. Critical Issues: An understanding of the UPS status and the underlying mechanisms for its potential deregulation in cardiac disease is critical for targeted interventions. Several studies indicate that type and stage of cardiac disease influence the dynamics of UPS regulation in a nonlinear and multifactorial manner. Proteasome inhibitors targeting all proteasome complexes are associated with cardiotoxicity in humans. Furthermore, the type and dosage of proteasome inhibitor impact the pathogenesis in nonuniform ways. Future Directions: Systematic analysis and targeting of individual UPS components with established and innovative tools will unravel and discriminate regulatory mechanisms that contribute to and protect against the progression of cardiac disease. Integrating this knowledge in drug design may reduce adverse effects on the heart as observed in patients treated with proteasome inhibitors against noncardiac diseases, especially cancer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2322–2343. PMID:25133688

  18. The Ubiquitin Proteasome System Plays a Role in Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Amaya, Moushimi; Keck, Forrest; Lindquist, Michael; Voss, Kelsey; Scavone, Lauren; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Roberts, Brian; Bailey, Charles; Schmaljohn, Connie; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2015-01-01

    Many viruses have been implicated in utilizing or modulating the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) to enhance viral multiplication and/or to sustain a persistent infection. The mosquito-borne Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) belongs to the Togaviridae family and is an important biodefense pathogen and select agent. There are currently no approved vaccines or therapies for VEEV infections; therefore, it is imperative to identify novel targets for therapeutic development. We hypothesized that a functional UPS is required for efficient VEEV multiplication. We have shown that at non-toxic concentrations Bortezomib, a FDA-approved inhibitor of the proteasome, proved to be a potent inhibitor of VEEV multiplication in the human astrocytoma cell line U87MG. Bortezomib inhibited the virulent Trinidad donkey (TrD) strain and the attenuated TC-83 strain of VEEV. Additional studies with virulent strains of Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) and Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) demonstrated that Bortezomib is a broad spectrum inhibitor of the New World alphaviruses. Time-of-addition assays showed that Bortezomib was an effective inhibitor of viral multiplication even when the drug was introduced many hours post exposure to the virus. Mass spectrometry analyses indicated that the VEEV capsid protein is ubiquitinated in infected cells, which was validated by confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation assays. Subsequent studies revealed that capsid is ubiquitinated on K48 during early stages of infection which was affected by Bortezomib treatment. This study will aid future investigations in identifying host proteins as potential broad spectrum therapeutic targets for treating alphavirus infections. PMID:25927990

  19. Ubiquitin Proteasome System in Parkinson Disease: a keeper or a witness?

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Branco, Diogo; Esteves, Ana R.; Santos, Daniel; Arduino, Daniela M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Oliveira, Catarina R.; Januario, Cristina; Cardoso, Sandra M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this work was to evaluate the role of Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS) on mitochondrial-driven alpha-synuclein (aSN) clearance in in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo Parkinson disease (PD) cellular models. Method We used SH-SY5Y ndufa2 knock-down (KD) cells, PD cybrids and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients meeting the diagnostic criteria for PD. We quantified aSN aggregation, proteasome activity and protein ubiquitination levels. In PBMC of PD patients population we evaluated aSN levels in plasma and the influence of several demographic characteristics in the above mentioned determinations. Results We found that ubiquitin-independent proteasome activity was up-regulated in SH-SY5Y ndufa2 KD cells while a down regulation was observed in PD cybrids and PBMC. Moreover, we observed an increase in protein ubiquitination that correlates with a decrease in ubiquitin-dependent proteasome activity. Accordingly, proteasome inhibition prevented ubiquitin-dependent aSN clearance. Ubiquitin-independent proteasome activity was positively correlated with ubiquitination in PBMC. We also report a negative correlation of chymotrypsin-like activity with age in control and late-onset PD groups. Total ubiquitin content is positively correlated with aSN oligomers levels, which leads to an age-dependent increase of aSN ubiquitination in LOPD. Moreover, aSN levels are increased in the plasma of PD patients. Interpretation aSN oligomers are ubiquitinated and we identified an ubiquitin-dependent clearance insufficiency with accumulation of both aSN and ubiquitin. However, SH-SY5Y ndufa2 KD cells showed a significant up-regulation of ubiquitin-independent proteasomal enzymatic activity that could mean a cell rescue attempt. Moreover, we identified that UPS function is age-dependent in PBMC. PMID:22921536

  20. The ubiquitin proteasome system plays a role in venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Moushimi; Keck, Forrest; Lindquist, Michael; Voss, Kelsey; Scavone, Lauren; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Roberts, Brian; Bailey, Charles; Schmaljohn, Connie; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2015-01-01

    Many viruses have been implicated in utilizing or modulating the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) to enhance viral multiplication and/or to sustain a persistent infection. The mosquito-borne Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) belongs to the Togaviridae family and is an important biodefense pathogen and select agent. There are currently no approved vaccines or therapies for VEEV infections; therefore, it is imperative to identify novel targets for therapeutic development. We hypothesized that a functional UPS is required for efficient VEEV multiplication. We have shown that at non-toxic concentrations Bortezomib, a FDA-approved inhibitor of the proteasome, proved to be a potent inhibitor of VEEV multiplication in the human astrocytoma cell line U87MG. Bortezomib inhibited the virulent Trinidad donkey (TrD) strain and the attenuated TC-83 strain of VEEV. Additional studies with virulent strains of Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) and Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) demonstrated that Bortezomib is a broad spectrum inhibitor of the New World alphaviruses. Time-of-addition assays showed that Bortezomib was an effective inhibitor of viral multiplication even when the drug was introduced many hours post exposure to the virus. Mass spectrometry analyses indicated that the VEEV capsid protein is ubiquitinated in infected cells, which was validated by confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation assays. Subsequent studies revealed that capsid is ubiquitinated on K48 during early stages of infection which was affected by Bortezomib treatment. This study will aid future investigations in identifying host proteins as potential broad spectrum therapeutic targets for treating alphavirus infections.

  1. Melatonin-induced temporal up-regulation of gene expression related to ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Fernanda C; Azevedo, Mauro F; Budu, Alexandre; Chakrabarti, Debopam; Garcia, Célia R S

    2014-12-03

    There is an increasing understanding that melatonin and the ubiquitin/ proteasome system (UPS) interact to regulate multiple cellular functions. Post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination are important modulators of signaling processes, cell cycle and many other cellular functions. Previously, we reported a melatonin-induced upregulation of gene expression related to ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) in Plasmodium falciparum, the human malaria parasite, and that P. falciparum protein kinase 7 influences this process. This implies a role of melatonin, an indolamine, in modulating intraerythrocytic development of the parasite. In this report we demonstrate by qPCR analysis, that melatonin induces gene upregulation in nine out of fourteen genes of the UPS, consisting of the same set of genes previously reported, between 4 to 5 h after melatonin treatment. We demonstrate that melatonin causes a temporally controlled gene expression of UPS members.

  2. Roles of the ubiquitin proteasome system in the effects of drugs of abuse

    PubMed Central

    Massaly, Nicolas; Francès, Bernard; Moulédous, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Because of its ability to regulate the abundance of selected proteins the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays an important role in neuronal and synaptic plasticity. As a result various stages of learning and memory depend on UPS activity. Drug addiction, another phenomenon that relies on neuroplasticity, shares molecular substrates with memory processes. However, the necessity of proteasome-dependent protein degradation for the development of addiction has been poorly studied. Here we first review evidences from the literature that drugs of abuse regulate the expression and activity of the UPS system in the brain. We then provide a list of proteins which have been shown to be targeted to the proteasome following drug treatment and could thus be involved in neuronal adaptations underlying behaviors associated with drug use and abuse. Finally we describe the few studies that addressed the need for UPS-dependent protein degradation in animal models of addiction-related behaviors. PMID:25610367

  3. Remodelling of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in response to interferons.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Ulrike; Krüger, Elke

    2008-10-01

    Peptide generation by the UPS (ubiquitin-proteasome system) is rate-limiting in MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation in response to virus-induced IFNs (interferons). In this process, the role of IFN-induced rapid remodelling of the UPS is less defined. IFN-mediated de novo formation of different proteasome compositions as i20S (immunoproteasomes) or m20S (mixed-type proteasomes) essentially supports the rapid adjustment of the mammalian immune system to pathogens. This adjustment is of particular importance for the immune response to rapidly replicating viruses. In agreement, i20S formation has been shown to be an accelerated and transient response. Moreover, i20S and/or PA28 (proteasome activator 28) are essentially required for the generation of certain viral epitopes. In the present paper, we discuss how IFNs consecutively regulate the UPS at different levels, thereby improving the immune responsiveness of target cells.

  4. Effect of ionizing radiation exposure on Trypanosoma cruzi ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Paula G; Passos-Silva, Danielle G; Vieira-da-Rocha, João P; Mendes, Isabela Cecilia; de Oliveira, Karla A; Oliveira, Camila F B; Vilela, Liza F F; Nagem, Ronaldo A P; Cardoso, Joseane; Nardelli, Sheila C; Krieger, Marco A; Franco, Glória R; Macedo, Andrea M; Pena, Sérgio D J; Schenkman, Sérgio; Gomes, Dawidson A; Guerra-Sá, Renata; Machado, Carlos R

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, proteasome involvement in the damage response induced by ionizing radiation (IR) became evident. However, whether proteasome plays a direct or indirect role in IR-induced damage response still unclear. Trypanosoma cruzi is a human parasite capable of remarkable high tolerance to IR, suggesting a highly efficient damage response system. Here, we investigate the role of T. cruzi proteasome in the damage response induced by IR. We exposed epimastigotes to high doses of gamma ray and we analyzed the expression and subcellular localization of several components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. We show that proteasome inhibition increases IR-induced cell growth arrest and proteasome-mediated proteolysis is altered after parasite exposure. We observed nuclear accumulation of 19S and 20S proteasome subunits in response to IR treatments. Intriguingly, the dynamic of 19S particle nuclear accumulation was more similar to the dynamic observed for Rad51 nuclear translocation than the observed for 20S. In the other hand, 20S increase and nuclear translocation could be related with an increase of its regulator PA26 and high levels of proteasome-mediated proteolysis in vitro. The intersection between the opposed peaks of 19S and 20S protein levels was marked by nuclear accumulation of both 20S and 19S together with Ubiquitin, suggesting a role of ubiquitin-proteasome system in the nuclear protein turnover at the time. Our results revealed the importance of proteasome-mediated proteolysis in T. cruzi IR-induced damage response suggesting that proteasome is also involved in T. cruzi IR tolerance. Moreover, our data support the possible direct/signaling role of 19S in DNA damage repair. Based on these results, we speculate that spatial and temporal differences between the 19S particle and 20S proteasome controls proteasome multiple roles in IR damage response.

  5. Genetic and microbial factors modulating the ubiquitin proteasome system in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Cleynen, Isabelle; Vazeille, Emilie; Artieda, Marta; Verspaget, Hein W; Szczypiorska, Magdalena; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Lakatos, Peter L; Seibold, Frank; Parnell, Kirstie; Weersma, Rinse K; Mahachie John, Jestinah M; Morgan-Walsh, Rebecca; Staelens, Dominiek; Arijs, Ingrid; De Hertogh, Gert; Müller, Stefan; Tordai, Atilla; Hommes, Daniel W; Ahmad, Tariq; Wijmenga, Cisca; Pender, Sylvia; Rutgeerts, Paul; Van Steen, Kristel; Lottaz, Daniel; Vermeire, Severine; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2014-08-01

    Altered microbiota composition, changes in immune responses and impaired intestinal barrier functions are observed in IBD. Most of these features are controlled by proteases and their inhibitors to maintain gut homeostasis. Unrestrained or excessive proteolysis can lead to pathological gastrointestinal conditions. The aim was to validate the identified protease IBD candidates from a previously performed systematic review through a genetic association study and functional follow-up. We performed a genetic association study in a large multicentre cohort of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and UC from five European IBD referral centres in a total of 2320 CD patients, 2112 UC patients and 1796 healthy controls. Subsequently, we did an extensive functional assessment of the candidate genes to explore their causality in IBD pathogenesis. Ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genes were significantly associated with CD: CYLD, USP40, APEH and USP3. CYLD was the most significant gene with the intronically located rs12324931 the strongest associated SNP (p(FDR)=1.74e-17, OR=2.24 (1.83 to 2.74)). Five SNPs in four genes were significantly associated with UC: USP40, APEH, DAG1 and USP3. CYLD, as well as some of the other associated genes, is part of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). We therefore determined if the IBD-associated adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) can modulate the UPS functioning. Infection of intestinal epithelial cells with the AIEC LF82 reference strain modulated the UPS turnover by reducing poly-ubiquitin conjugate accumulation, increasing 26S proteasome activities and decreasing protein levels of the NF-κB regulator CYLD. This resulted in IκB-α degradation and NF-κB activation. This activity was very important for the pathogenicity of AIEC since decreased CYLD resulted in increased ability of AIEC LF82 to replicate intracellularly. Our results reveal the UPS, and CYLD specifically, as an important contributor to IBD

  6. Proinflammatory cytokines downregulate connexin 43-gap junctions via the ubiquitin-proteasome system in rat spinal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Morioka, Norimitsu; Kitamura, Tomoya; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2015-09-04

    Astrocytic gap junctions formed by connexin 43 (Cx43) are crucial for intercellular communication between spinal cord astrocytes. Various neurological disorders are associated with dysfunctional Cx43-gap junctions. However, the mechanism modulating Cx43-gap junctions in spinal astrocytes under pathological conditions is not entirely clear. A previous study showed that treatment of spinal astrocytes in culture with pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) decreased both Cx43 expression and gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) via a c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-dependent pathway. The current study further elaborates the intracellular mechanism that decreases Cx43 under an inflammatory condition. Cycloheximide chase analysis revealed that TNF-α (10 ng/ml) alone or in combination with IFN-γ (5 ng/ml) accelerated the degradation of Cx43 protein in cultured spinal astrocytes. The reduction of both Cx43 expression and GJIC induced by a mixture of TNF-α and IFN-γ were blocked by pretreatment with proteasome inhibitors MG132 (0.5 μM) and epoxomicin (25 nM), a mixture of TNF-α and IFN-γ significantly increased proteasome activity and Cx43 ubiquitination. In addition, TNF-α and IFN-γ-induced activation of ubiquitin-proteasome systems was prevented by SP600125, a JNK inhibitor. Together, these results indicate that a JNK-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome system is induced under an inflammatory condition that disrupts astrocytic gap junction expression and function, leading to astrocytic dysfunction and the maintenance of the neuroinflammatory state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. On the linkage between the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Gilad; Udasin, Ronald G; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2016-04-22

    Several metabolic pathways critical for cellular homeostasis occur in the mitochondria. Because of the evolution of mitochondria and their physical separation, these pathways have traditionally been thought to be free from regulation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This perception has recently been challenged by evidence for the presence of ubiquitin system components in the mitochondria. Furthermore, it has been shown that certain mitochondrial proteins are conjugated by ubiquitin, and some of them are degraded by the proteasome. Of particular interest is the finding that some of these proteins are localized to the inner membrane and matrix, which rules out that their targeting is mediated by the cytosolic ubiquitin system. However, the extent of the involvement of the ubiquitin system in mitochondrial regulation is not known. The present study addresses this surprising finding, employing several independent approaches. First, we identified reported ubiquitin conjugates in human and yeast mitochondria and found that a large fraction of the mitochondrial proteome (62% in human) is ubiquitinated, with most proteins localized to the inner membrane and matrix. Next, we searched the literature and found that numerous ubiquitin system components localize to the mitochondria and/or contain mitochondrial targeting sequences. Finally, we identified reported protein-protein interactions between ubiquitin system components and mitochondrial proteins. These unexpected findings suggest that mitochondrial regulation by the ubiquitin system is fundamental and may have broad biomedical implications.

  8. The ubiquitin proteasome system – Implications for cell cycle control and the targeted treatment of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bassermann, Florian; Eichner, Ruth; Pagano, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Two families of E3 ubiquitin ligases are prominent in cell cycle regulation and mediate the timely and precise ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent degradation of key cell cycle proteins: the SCF (Skp1/Cul1/F-box protein) complex and the APC/C (Anaphase Promoting Complex or Cyclosome). While certain SCF ligases drive cell cycle progression throughout the cell cycle, APC/C (in complex with either of two substrate recruiting proteins: Cdc20 and Cdh1) orchestrates exit from mitosis (APC/CCdc20) and establishes a stable G1 phase (APC/CCdh1). Upon DNA damage or perturbation of the normal cell cycle, both ligases are involved in checkpoint activation. Mechanistic insight into these processes has significantly improved over the last ten years, largely due to a better understanding of APC/C and the functional characterization of multiple F-box proteins, the variable substrate recruiting components of SCF ligases. Here, we review the role of SCF- and APC/C-mediated ubiquitylation in the normal and perturbed cell cycle and discuss potential clinical implications of SCF and APC/C functions. PMID:23466868

  9. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein interactions with the ubiquitin proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Minor, Marissa M; Slagle, Betty L

    2014-11-24

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes acute and chronic hepatitis, and the latter is a major risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HBV encodes a 17-kDa regulatory protein, HBx, which is required for virus replication. Although the precise contribution(s) of HBx to virus replication is unknown, many viruses target cellular pathways to create an environment favorable for virus replication. The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is a major conserved cellular pathway that controls several critical processes in the cell by regulating the levels of proteins involved in cell cycle, DNA repair, innate immunity, and other processes. We summarize here the interactions of HBx with components of the UPS, including the CUL4 adaptor DDB1, the cullin regulatory complex CSN, and the 26S proteasome. Understanding how these protein interactions benefit virus replication remains a challenge due to limited models in which to study HBV replication. However, studies from other viral systems that similarly target the UPS provide insight into possible strategies used by HBV.

  10. Atrophy, hypertrophy, and hypoxemia induce transcriptional regulators of the ubiquitin proteasome system in the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Razeghi, Peter; Baskin, Kedryn K; Sharma, Saumya; Young, Martin E; Stepkowski, Stanislaw; Essop, M Faadiel; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2006-04-07

    In skeletal muscle, transcript levels of proteins regulating the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) increase with atrophy and decrease with hypertrophy. Whether the same is true for heart muscle is not known. We set out to characterize the transcriptional profile of regulators of the UPS during atrophy-, hypertrophy-, and hypoxia-induced remodeling of the heart. Cardiac atrophy was induced by heterotopic transplantation of the rat heart. Left ventricular hypertrophy was induced by banding of the ascending aorta in rats. To study the effects of hypoxemia on the left ventricle, rats were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia. Transcript levels of six known regulators of the UPS, ubiquitin B (UbB), the ubiquitin conjugating enzymes UbcH2 and E2-14kDa, the ubiquitin ligases Mafbx/Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, and the proteasomal subunit PSMB4 were measured using quantitative RT-PCR. Unloading-induced atrophy increased mRNA levels of UbB and decreased levels of both ubiquitin ligases. Transcript levels of all UPS genes investigated increased in the hypertrophied and hypoxic heart (with the exception of E2-14kDa). Cardiac atrophy, hypertrophy, and hypoxemia all increase myocardial UbB expression, suggesting that UbB is a transcriptional marker for load-induced and hypoxia-mediated cardiac remodeling.

  11. Measuring activity in the ubiquitin-proteasome system: From large scale discoveries to single cells analysis

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Adam T.; Woss, Gregery S.; Park, Jessica H.; Waters, Marcey L.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is the primary pathway responsible for the recognition and degradation of misfolded, damaged, or tightly regulated proteins in addition to performing essential roles in DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, cell migration, and the immune response. While traditional biochemical techniques have proven useful in the identification of key proteins involved in this pathway, the implementation of novel reporters responsible for measuring enzymatic activity of the UPS have provided valuable insight into the effectiveness of therapeutics and role of the UPS in various human diseases such as multiple myeloma and Huntington’s disease. These reporters, usually consisting of a recognition sequences fused to an analytical handle, are designed to specifically evaluate enzymatic activity of certain members of the UPS including the proteasome, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs). This review highlights the more commonly used reporters employed in a variety of scenarios ranging from high-throughput screening of novel inhibitors to single cell microscopy techniques measuring E3 ligase or proteasome activity. Finally, recent work is presented highlighting the development of novel degron-based substrate designed to overcome the limitations of current reporting techniques in measuring E3 ligase and proteasome activity in patient samples. PMID:23686610

  12. Measuring activity in the ubiquitin-proteasome system: from large scale discoveries to single cells analysis.

    PubMed

    Melvin, Adam T; Woss, Gregery S; Park, Jessica H; Waters, Marcey L; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2013-09-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is the primary pathway responsible for the recognition and degradation of misfolded, damaged, or tightly regulated proteins in addition to performing essential roles in DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, cell migration, and the immune response. While traditional biochemical techniques have proven useful in the identification of key proteins involved in this pathway, the implementation of novel reporters responsible for measuring enzymatic activity of the UPS has provided valuable insight into the effectiveness of therapeutics and role of the UPS in various human diseases such as multiple myeloma and Huntington's disease. These reporters, usually consisting of a recognition sequence fused to an analytical handle, are designed to specifically evaluate enzymatic activity of certain members of the UPS including the proteasome, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and deubiquitinating enzymes. This review highlights the more commonly used reporters employed in a variety of scenarios ranging from high-throughput screening of novel inhibitors to single cell microscopy techniques measuring E3 ligase or proteasome activity. Finally, a recent study is presented highlighting the development of a novel degron-based substrate designed to overcome the limitations of current reporting techniques in measuring E3 ligase and proteasome activity in patient samples.

  13. Proteomic characterization of aggregating proteins after the inhibition of the ubiquitin proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Inga B; Brack, Maria; Winget, Jason M; Mayor, Thibault

    2011-03-04

    Protein aggregation, which is associated with the impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system, is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases. To better understand the contribution of proteasome inhibition in aggregation, we analyzed which proteins may potentially localize in chemically induced aggregates in human neuroblastoma tissue culture cells. We enriched for proteins in high-density structures by using a sucrose gradient in combination with stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). The quantitative analysis allowed us to distinguish which proteins were specifically affected by the proteasome inhibition. We identified 642 potentially aggregating proteins, including the p62/sequestosome 1 and NBR1 ubiquitin-binding proteins involved in aggregation. We also identified the ubiquitin-associated protein 2 like (UBAP2L). We verified that it cofractionated with ubiquitin in the high-density fraction and that it was colocalized in the ubiquitin-containing aggregates after proteasome inhibition. In addition, we identified several chaperone proteins and used data from protein interaction networks to show that they potentially interact with distinct subgroups of proteins within the aggregating structures. Several other proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases, like UCHL1, were identified, further underlining the potential of our analysis to better understand the aggregation process and proteotoxic stress caused by proteasome inhibition.

  14. Novel strategies to target the ubiquitin proteasome system in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Lub, Susanne; Maes, Ken; Menu, Eline; De Bruyne, Elke; Vanderkerken, Karin; Van Valckenborgh, Els

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy characterized by the accumulation of plasma cells in the bone marrow (BM). The success of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in the treatment of MM highlights the importance of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) in this particular cancer. Despite the prolonged survival of MM patients, a significant amount of patients relapse or become resistant to therapy. This underlines the importance of the development and investigation of novel targets to improve MM therapy. The UPS plays an important role in different cellular processes by targeted destruction of proteins. The ubiquitination process consists of enzymes that transfer ubiquitin to proteins targeting them for proteasomal degradation. An emerging and promising approach is to target more disease specific components of the UPS to reduce side effects and overcome resistance. In this review, we will focus on different components of the UPS such as the ubiquitin activating enzyme E1, the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme E2, the E3 ubiquitin ligases, the deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) and the proteasome. We will discuss their role in MM and the implications in drug discovery for the treatment of MM. PMID:26695547

  15. Tripartite degrons confer diversity and specificity on regulated protein degradation in the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Guharoy, Mainak; Bhowmick, Pallab; Sallam, Mohamed; Tompa, Peter

    2016-01-06

    Specific signals (degrons) regulate protein turnover mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here we systematically analyse known degrons and propose a tripartite model comprising the following: (1) a primary degron (peptide motif) that specifies substrate recognition by cognate E3 ubiquitin ligases, (2) secondary site(s) comprising a single or multiple neighbouring ubiquitinated lysine(s) and (3) a structurally disordered segment that initiates substrate unfolding at the 26S proteasome. Primary degron sequences are conserved among orthologues and occur in structurally disordered regions that undergo E3-induced folding-on-binding. Posttranslational modifications can switch primary degrons into E3-binding-competent states, thereby integrating degradation with signalling pathways. Degradation-linked lysines tend to be located within disordered segments that also initiate substrate degradation by effective proteasomal engagement. Many characterized mutations and alternative isoforms with abrogated degron components are implicated in disease. These effects result from increased protein stability and interactome rewiring. The distributed nature of degrons ensures regulation, specificity and combinatorial control of degradation.

  16. Oxidation matters: the ubiquitin proteasome system connects innate immune mechanisms with MHC class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Warnatsch, Annika; Bergann, Theresa; Krüger, Elke

    2013-09-01

    During innate immune responses the delicate balance of protein synthesis, quality control and degradation is severely challenged by production of radicals and/or the massive synthesis of pathogen proteins. The regulated degradation of ubiquitin-tagged proteins by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) represents one major pathway for the maintenance of cellular proteostasis and regulatory processes under these conditions. In addition, MHC class I antigen presentation is strictly dependent on an appropriate peptide supply by the UPS to efficiently prime CD8(+) T cells and to initiate an adaptive immune response. We here discuss recent efforts in defining the link between innate immune mechanisms like cytokine and ROS production, the induction of an efficient adaptive immune response and the specific involvement of the UPS therein. Cytokines and/or infections induce translation and the production of free radicals, which in turn confer oxidative damage to nascent as well as folded proteins. In parallel, the same signaling cascades are able to accelerate the protein turnover by the concomitantly induced ubiquitin conjugation and degradation of such damaged polypeptides by immunoproteasomes. The ability of immunoproteasomes to efficiently degrade such oxidant-damaged ubiquitylated proteins protects cells from accumulating toxic ubiquitin-rich aggregates. At the same time, this innate immune mechanism facilitates a sufficient peptide supply for MHC class I antigen presentation and connects it to initiation of adaptive immunity.

  17. Involvement of protein degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome system in opiate addictive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Massaly, Nicolas; Dahan, Lionel; Baudonnat, Mathieu; Hovnanian, Caroline; Rekik, Khaoula; Solinas, Marcello; David, Vincent; Pech, Stéphane; Zajac, Jean-Marie; Roullet, Pascal; Mouledous, Lionel; Frances, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    Plastic changes in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), a structure occupying a key position in the neural circuitry related to motivation, are among the critical cellular processes responsible for drug addiction. During the last decade, it has been shown that memory formation and related neuronal plasticity may rely not only on protein synthesis but also on protein degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). In this study, we assess the role of protein degradation in the NAcc in opiate-related behaviors. For this purpose, we coupled behavioral experiments to intra-accumbens injections of lactacystin, an inhibitor of the UPS. We show that protein degradation in the NAcc is mandatory for a full range of animal models of opiate addiction including morphine locomotor sensitization, morphine conditioned place preference, intra-ventral tegmental area morphine self-administration and intra-venous heroin self-administration but not for discrimination learning rewarded by highly palatable food. This study provides the first evidence of a specific role of protein degradation by the UPS in addiction.

  18. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for the productive entry of Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaobo; Liu, Haibin; Zu, Xiangyang; Liu, Yang; Chen, Liman; Zhu, Xueqin; Zhang, Leike; Zhou, Zheng; Xiao, Gengfu; Wang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    The host-virus interaction during the cellular entry of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is poorly characterized. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), the major intracellular proteolytic pathway, mediates diverse cellular processes, including endocytosis and signal transduction, which may be involved in the entry of virus. Here, we showed that the proteasome inhibitors, MG132 and lactacystin, impaired the productive entry of JEV by effectively interfering with viral intracellular trafficking at the stage between crossing cell membrane and the initial translation of the viral genome after uncoating. Using confocal microscopy, it was demonstrated that a proportion of the internalized virions were misdirected to lysosomes following treatment with MG132, resulting in non-productive entry. In addition, using specific siRNAs targeting ubiquitin, we verified that protein ubiquitination was involved in the entry of JEV. Overall, our study demonstrated the UPS is essential for the productive entry of JEV and might represent a potential antiviral target for JEV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Tripartite degrons confer diversity and specificity on regulated protein degradation in the ubiquitin-proteasome system

    PubMed Central

    Guharoy, Mainak; Bhowmick, Pallab; Sallam, Mohamed; Tompa, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Specific signals (degrons) regulate protein turnover mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here we systematically analyse known degrons and propose a tripartite model comprising the following: (1) a primary degron (peptide motif) that specifies substrate recognition by cognate E3 ubiquitin ligases, (2) secondary site(s) comprising a single or multiple neighbouring ubiquitinated lysine(s) and (3) a structurally disordered segment that initiates substrate unfolding at the 26S proteasome. Primary degron sequences are conserved among orthologues and occur in structurally disordered regions that undergo E3-induced folding-on-binding. Posttranslational modifications can switch primary degrons into E3-binding-competent states, thereby integrating degradation with signalling pathways. Degradation-linked lysines tend to be located within disordered segments that also initiate substrate degradation by effective proteasomal engagement. Many characterized mutations and alternative isoforms with abrogated degron components are implicated in disease. These effects result from increased protein stability and interactome rewiring. The distributed nature of degrons ensures regulation, specificity and combinatorial control of degradation. PMID:26732515

  20. It Is All about (U)biquitin: Role of Altered Ubiquitin-Proteasome System and UCHL1 in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Tramutola, Antonella; Di Domenico, Fabio; Barone, Eugenio; Perluigi, Marzia; Butterfield, D Allan

    2016-01-01

    Free radical-mediated damage to macromolecules and the resulting oxidative modification of different cellular components are a common feature of aging, and this process becomes much more pronounced in age-associated pathologies, including Alzheimer disease (AD). In particular, proteins are particularly sensitive to oxidative stress-induced damage and these irreversible modifications lead to the alteration of protein structure and function. In order to maintain cell homeostasis, these oxidized/damaged proteins have to be removed in order to prevent their toxic accumulation. It is generally accepted that the age-related accumulation of "aberrant" proteins results from both the increased occurrence of damage and the decreased efficiency of degradative systems. One of the most important cellular proteolytic systems responsible for the removal of oxidized proteins in the cytosol and in the nucleus is the proteasomal system. Several studies have demonstrated the impairment of the proteasome in AD thus suggesting a direct link between accumulation of oxidized/misfolded proteins and reduction of this clearance system. In this review we discuss the impairment of the proteasome system as a consequence of oxidative stress and how this contributes to AD neuropathology. Further, we focus the attention on the oxidative modifications of a key component of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, UCHL1, which lead to the impairment of its activity.

  1. Mechanisms stimulating muscle wasting in chronic kidney disease: the roles of the ubiquitin-proteasome system and myostatin.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sandhya S; Mitch, William E

    2013-04-01

    Catabolic conditions including chronic kidney disease (CKD), cancer, and diabetes cause muscle atrophy. The loss of muscle mass worsens the burden of disease because it is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. To avoid these problems or to develop treatment strategies, the mechanisms leading to muscle wasting must be identified. Specific mechanisms uncovered in CKD generally occur in other catabolic conditions. These include stimulation of protein degradation in muscle arising from activation of caspase-3 and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). These proteases act in a coordinated fashion with caspase-3 initially cleaving the complex structure of proteins in muscle, yielding fragments that are substrates that are degraded by the UPS. Fortunately, the UPS exhibits remarkable specificity for proteins to be degraded because it is the major intracellular proteolytic system. Without a high level of specificity cellular functions would be disrupted. The specificity is accomplished by complex reactions that depend on recognition of a protein substrate by specific E3 ubiquitin ligases. In muscle, the specific ligases are Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, and their expression has characteristics of a biomarker of accelerated muscle proteolysis. Specific complications of CKD (metabolic acidosis, insulin resistance, inflammation, and angiotensin II) activate caspase-3 and the UPS through mechanisms that include glucocorticoids and impaired insulin or IGF-1 signaling. Mediators activate myostatin, which functions as a negative growth factor in muscle. In models of cancer or CKD, strategies that block myostatin prevent muscle wasting, suggesting that therapies that block myostatin could prevent muscle wasting in catabolic conditions.

  2. Protein degradation by ubiquitin-proteasome system in formation and labilization of contextual conditioning memory.

    PubMed

    Sol Fustiñana, María; de la Fuente, Verónica; Federman, Noel; Freudenthal, Ramiro; Romano, Arturo

    2014-09-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) of protein degradation has been evaluated in different forms of neural plasticity and memory. The role of UPS in such processes is controversial. Several results support the idea that the activation of this system in memory consolidation is necessary to overcome negative constrains for plasticity. In this case, the inhibition of the UPS during consolidation impairs memory. Similar results were reported for memory reconsolidation. However, in other cases, the inhibition of UPS had no effect on memory consolidation and reconsolidation but impedes the amnesic action of protein synthesis inhibition after retrieval. The last finding suggests a specific action of the UPS inhibitor on memory labilization. However, another interpretation is possible in terms of the synthesis/degradation balance of positive and negative elements in neural plasticity, as was found in the case of long-term potentiation. To evaluate these alternative interpretations, other reconsolidation-interfering drugs than translation inhibitors should be tested. Here we analyzed initially the UPS inhibitor effect in contextual conditioning in crabs. We found that UPS inhibition during consolidation impaired long-term memory. In contrast, UPS inhibition did not affect memory reconsolidation after contextual retrieval but, in fact, impeded memory labilization, blocking the action of drugs that does not affect directly the protein synthesis. To extend these finding to vertebrates, we performed similar experiments in contextual fear memory in mice. We found that the UPS inhibitor in hippocampus affected memory consolidation and blocked memory labilization after retrieval. These findings exclude alternative interpretations to the requirement of UPS in memory labilization and give evidence of this mechanism in both vertebrates and invertebrates.

  3. Multiple Interactions between Peroxisome Proliferators-Activated Receptors and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System and Implications for Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Genini, Davide; Carbone, Giuseppina M.; Catapano, Carlo V.

    2008-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) α, β/δ, and γ are ligand-activated nuclear receptors involved in a number of physiological processes, including lipid and glucose homeostasis, inflammation, cell growth, differentiation, and death. PPAR agonists are used in the treatment of human diseases, like type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia, and PPARs appear as promising therapeutic targets in other conditions, including cancer. A better understanding of the functions and regulation of PPARs in normal and pathological processes is of primary importance to devise appropriate therapeutic strategies. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays an important role in controlling level and activity of many nuclear receptors and transcription factors. PPARs are subjected to UPS-dependent regulation. Interestingly, the three PPAR isotypes are differentially regulated by the UPS in response to ligand-dependent activation, a phenomenon that may be intrinsically connected to their distinct cellular functions and behaviors. In addition to their effects ongene expression, PPARs appear to affect protein levels and downstream pathways also by modulating the activity of the UPS in target-specific manners. Here we review the current knowledge of the interactions between the UPS and PPARs in light of the potential implications for their effects on cell fate and tumorigenesis. PMID:18551186

  4. Regulation of autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome system by the FoxO transcriptional network during muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Milan, Giulia; Romanello, Vanina; Pescatore, Francesca; Armani, Andrea; Paik, Ji-Hye; Frasson, Laura; Seydel, Anke; Zhao, Jinghui; Abraham, Reimar; Goldberg, Alfred L; Blaauw, Bert; DePinho, Ronald A; Sandri, Marco

    2015-04-10

    Stresses like low nutrients, systemic inflammation, cancer or infections provoke a catabolic state characterized by enhanced muscle proteolysis and amino acid release to sustain liver gluconeogenesis and tissue protein synthesis. These conditions activate the family of Forkhead Box (Fox) O transcription factors. Here we report that muscle-specific deletion of FoxO members protects from muscle loss as a result of the role of FoxOs in the induction of autophagy-lysosome and ubiquitin-proteasome systems. Notably, in the setting of low nutrient signalling, we demonstrate that FoxOs are required for Akt activity but not for mTOR signalling. FoxOs control several stress-response pathways such as the unfolded protein response, ROS detoxification, DNA repair and translation. Finally, we identify FoxO-dependent ubiquitin ligases including MUSA1 and a previously uncharacterised ligase termed SMART (Specific of Muscle Atrophy and Regulated by Transcription). Our findings underscore the central function of FoxOs in coordinating a variety of stress-response genes during catabolic conditions.

  5. Cigarette smoke induces Akt protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Yong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Huh, Jin Won; Ro, Jai Youl; Oh, Yeon-Mock; Lee, Sang-Do; An, Sungkwan; Lee, Yun-Song

    2011-09-16

    Emphysema is one of the characteristic features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which is caused mainly by cigarette smoking. Recent data have suggested that apoptosis and cell cycle arrest may contribute to the development of emphysema. In this study, we addressed the question of whether and how cigarette smoke affected Akt, which plays a critical role in cell survival and proliferation. In normal human lung fibroblasts, cigarette smoke extract (CSE) caused cell death, accompanying degradation of total and phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), which was inhibited by MG132. CSE exposure resulted in preferential ubiquitination of the active Akt (myristoylated), rather than the inactive (T308A/S473A double mutant) Akt. Consistent with cytotoxicity, CSE induced a progressive decrease of phosphorylated human homolog of mouse double minute homolog 2 (p-HDM2) and phosphorylated apoptosis signal regulating kinase 1 (p-ASK1) with concomitant elevation of p53, p21, and phosphorylated p38 MAPK. Forced expression of the active Akt reduced both CSE-induced cytotoxicity and alteration in HDM2/p53/p21 and ASK1/p38 MAPK, compared with the inactive Akt. Of note, CSE induced expression of the tetratrico-peptide repeat domain 3 (TTC3), known as a ubiquitin ligase for active Akt. TTC3 siRNAs suppressed not only CSE-induced Akt degradation but also CSE-induced cytotoxicity. Accordingly, rat lungs exposed to cigarette smoke for 3 months showed elevated TTC3 expression and reduced Akt and p-Akt. Taken together, these data suggest that cigarette smoke induces cytotoxicity, partly through Akt degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system, in which TTC3 acts as a ubiquitin ligase for active Akt.

  6. RAN translation at CGG repeats induces ubiquitin proteasome system impairment in models of fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seok Yoon; He, Fang; Krans, Amy; Frazer, Michelle; Taylor, J. Paul; Paulson, Henry L.; Todd, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CGG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the 5′ UTR of the Fragile X gene, FMR1. FXTAS is thought to arise primarily from an RNA gain-of-function toxicity mechanism. However, recent studies demonstrate that the repeat also elicits production of a toxic polyglycine protein, FMRpolyG, via repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN)-initiated translation. Pathologically, FXTAS is characterized by ubiquitin-positive intranuclear neuronal inclusions, raising the possibility that failure of protein quality control pathways could contribute to disease pathogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we used Drosophila- and cell-based models of CGG-repeat-associated toxicity. In Drosophila, ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) impairment led to enhancement of CGG-repeat-induced degeneration, whereas overexpression of the chaperone protein HSP70 suppressed this toxicity. In transfected mammalian cells, CGG repeat expression triggered accumulation of a UPS reporter in a length-dependent fashion. To delineate the contributions from CGG repeats as RNA from RAN translation-associated toxicity, we enhanced or impaired the production of FMRpolyG in these models. Driving expression of FMRpolyG enhanced induction of UPS impairment in cell models, while prevention of RAN translation attenuated UPS impairment in cells and suppressed the genetic interaction with UPS manipulation in Drosophila. Taken together, these findings suggest that CGG repeats induce UPS impairment at least in part through activation of RAN translation. PMID:25954027

  7. Differential roles of the ubiquitin proteasome system and autophagy in the clearance of soluble and aggregated TDP-43 species

    PubMed Central

    Scotter, Emma L.; Vance, Caroline; Nishimura, Agnes L.; Lee, Youn-Bok; Chen, Han-Jou; Urwin, Hazel; Sardone, Valentina; Mitchell, Jacqueline C.; Rogelj, Boris; Rubinsztein, David C.; Shaw, Christopher E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43, also known as TARDBP) is the major pathological protein in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Large TDP-43 aggregates that are decorated with degradation adaptor proteins are seen in the cytoplasm of remaining neurons in ALS and FTD patients post mortem. TDP-43 accumulation and ALS-linked mutations within degradation pathways implicate failed TDP-43 clearance as a primary disease mechanism. Here, we report the differing roles of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy in the clearance of TDP-43. We have investigated the effects of inhibitors of the UPS and autophagy on the degradation, localisation and mobility of soluble and insoluble TDP-43. We find that soluble TDP-43 is degraded primarily by the UPS, whereas the clearance of aggregated TDP-43 requires autophagy. Cellular macroaggregates, which recapitulate many of the pathological features of the aggregates in patients, are reversible when both the UPS and autophagy are functional. Their clearance involves the autophagic removal of oligomeric TDP-43. We speculate that, in addition to an age-related decline in pathway activity, a second hit in either the UPS or the autophagy pathway drives the accumulation of TDP-43 in ALS and FTD. Therapies for clearing excess TDP-43 should therefore target a combination of these pathways. PMID:24424030

  8. RAN translation at CGG repeats induces ubiquitin proteasome system impairment in models of fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seok Yoon; He, Fang; Krans, Amy; Frazer, Michelle; Taylor, J Paul; Paulson, Henry L; Todd, Peter K

    2015-08-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CGG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the 5' UTR of the Fragile X gene, FMR1. FXTAS is thought to arise primarily from an RNA gain-of-function toxicity mechanism. However, recent studies demonstrate that the repeat also elicits production of a toxic polyglycine protein, FMRpolyG, via repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN)-initiated translation. Pathologically, FXTAS is characterized by ubiquitin-positive intranuclear neuronal inclusions, raising the possibility that failure of protein quality control pathways could contribute to disease pathogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we used Drosophila- and cell-based models of CGG-repeat-associated toxicity. In Drosophila, ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) impairment led to enhancement of CGG-repeat-induced degeneration, whereas overexpression of the chaperone protein HSP70 suppressed this toxicity. In transfected mammalian cells, CGG repeat expression triggered accumulation of a UPS reporter in a length-dependent fashion. To delineate the contributions from CGG repeats as RNA from RAN translation-associated toxicity, we enhanced or impaired the production of FMRpolyG in these models. Driving expression of FMRpolyG enhanced induction of UPS impairment in cell models, while prevention of RAN translation attenuated UPS impairment in cells and suppressed the genetic interaction with UPS manipulation in Drosophila. Taken together, these findings suggest that CGG repeats induce UPS impairment at least in part through activation of RAN translation.

  9. HSF-1 activates the ubiquitin proteasome system to promote non-apoptotic developmental cell death in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Kinet, Maxime J; Malin, Jennifer A; Abraham, Mary C; Blum, Elyse S; Silverman, Melanie R; Lu, Yun; Shaham, Shai

    2016-03-08

    Apoptosis is a prominent metazoan cell death form. Yet, mutations in apoptosis regulators cause only minor defects in vertebrate development, suggesting that another developmental cell death mechanism exists. While some non-apoptotic programs have been molecularly characterized, none appear to control developmental cell culling. Linker-cell-type death (LCD) is a morphologically conserved non-apoptotic cell death process operating in Caenorhabditis elegans and vertebrate development, and is therefore a compelling candidate process complementing apoptosis. However, the details of LCD execution are not known. Here we delineate a molecular-genetic pathway governing LCD in C. elegans. Redundant activities of antagonistic Wnt signals, a temporal control pathway, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase signaling control heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1), a conserved stress-activated transcription factor. Rather than protecting cells, HSF-1 promotes their demise by activating components of the ubiquitin proteasome system, including the E2 ligase LET-70/UBE2D2 functioning with E3 components CUL-3, RBX-1, BTBD-2, and SIAH-1. Our studies uncover design similarities between LCD and developmental apoptosis, and provide testable predictions for analyzing LCD in vertebrates.

  10. HSF-1 activates the ubiquitin proteasome system to promote non-apoptotic developmental cell death in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kinet, Maxime J; Malin, Jennifer A; Abraham, Mary C; Blum, Elyse S; Silverman, Melanie R; Lu, Yun; Shaham, Shai

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a prominent metazoan cell death form. Yet, mutations in apoptosis regulators cause only minor defects in vertebrate development, suggesting that another developmental cell death mechanism exists. While some non-apoptotic programs have been molecularly characterized, none appear to control developmental cell culling. Linker-cell-type death (LCD) is a morphologically conserved non-apoptotic cell death process operating in Caenorhabditis elegans and vertebrate development, and is therefore a compelling candidate process complementing apoptosis. However, the details of LCD execution are not known. Here we delineate a molecular-genetic pathway governing LCD in C. elegans. Redundant activities of antagonistic Wnt signals, a temporal control pathway, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase signaling control heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1), a conserved stress-activated transcription factor. Rather than protecting cells, HSF-1 promotes their demise by activating components of the ubiquitin proteasome system, including the E2 ligase LET-70/UBE2D2 functioning with E3 components CUL-3, RBX-1, BTBD-2, and SIAH-1. Our studies uncover design similarities between LCD and developmental apoptosis, and provide testable predictions for analyzing LCD in vertebrates. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12821.001 PMID:26952214

  11. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway and Synaptic Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegde, Ashok N.

    2010-01-01

    Proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) has emerged as a new molecular mechanism that controls wide-ranging functions in the nervous system, including fine-tuning of synaptic connections during development and synaptic plasticity in the adult organism. In the UPP, attachment of a small protein, ubiquitin, tags the substrates for…

  12. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway and Synaptic Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegde, Ashok N.

    2010-01-01

    Proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) has emerged as a new molecular mechanism that controls wide-ranging functions in the nervous system, including fine-tuning of synaptic connections during development and synaptic plasticity in the adult organism. In the UPP, attachment of a small protein, ubiquitin, tags the substrates for…

  13. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome System: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Alzheimer’s Disease and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Bing; Radulovic, Miroslav; Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E.; Cardozo, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is a crucial protein degradation system in eukaryotes. Herein, we will review advances in the understanding of the role of several proteins of the UPS in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). The UPS consists of many factors that include E3 ubiquitin ligases, ubiquitin hydrolases, ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like molecules, and the proteasome itself. An extensive body of work links UPS dysfunction with AD pathogenesis and progression. More recently, the UPS has been shown to have vital roles in recovery of function after SCI. The ubiquitin hydrolase (Uch-L1) has been proposed to increase cellular levels of mono-ubiquitin and hence to increase rates of protein turnover by the UPS. A low Uch-L1 level has been linked with Aβ accumulation in AD and reduced neuroregeneration after SCI. One likely mechanism for these beneficial effects of Uch-L1 is reduced turnover of the PKA regulatory subunit and consequently, reduced signaling via CREB. The neuron-specific F-box protein Fbx2 ubiquitinates β-secretase thus targeting it for proteasomal degradation and reducing generation of Aβ. Both Uch-L1 and Fbx2 improve synaptic plasticity and cognitive function in mouse AD models. The role of Fbx2 after SCI has not been examined, but abolishing ß-secretase reduces neuronal recovery after SCI, associated with reduced myelination. UBB+1, which arises through a frame-shift mutation in the ubiquitin gene that adds 19 amino acids to the C-terminus of ubiquitin, inhibits proteasomal function and is associated with increased neurofibrillary tangles in patients with AD, Pick’s disease and Down’s syndrome. These advances in understanding of the roles of the UPS in AD and SCI raise new questions but, also, identify attractive and exciting targets for potential, future therapeutic interventions. PMID:26858599

  14. Obestatin controls the ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome systems in glucocorticoid-induced muscle cell atrophy.

    PubMed

    Cid-Díaz, Tania; Santos-Zas, Icía; González-Sánchez, Jessica; Gurriarán-Rodríguez, Uxía; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Casabiell, Xesús; García-Caballero, Tomás; Mouly, Vincent; Pazos, Yolanda; Camiña, Jesús P

    2017-07-03

    Many pathological states characterized by muscle atrophy are associated with an increase in circulating glucocorticoids and poor patient prognosis, making it an important target for treatment. The development of treatments for glucocorticoid-induced and wasting disorder-related skeletal muscle atrophy should be designed based on how the particular transcriptional program is orchestrated and how the balance of muscle protein synthesis and degradation is deregulated. Here, we investigated whether the obestatin/GPR39 system, an autocrine/paracrine signaling system acting on myogenesis and with anabolic effects on the skeletal muscle, could protect against glucocorticoid-induced muscle cell atrophy. In the present study, we have utilized mouse C2C12 myotube cultures to examine whether the obestatin/GPR39 signaling pathways can affect the atrophy induced by the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. We have extended these findings to in vitro effects on human atrophy using human KM155C25 myotubes. The activation of the obestatin/GPR39 system protects from glucocorticoid-induced atrophy by regulation of Akt, PKD/PKCμ, CAMKII and AMPK signaling and its downstream targets in the control of protein synthesis, ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy-lysosome system in mouse cells. We compared mouse and human myotube cells in their response to glucocorticoid and identified differences in both the triggering of the atrophic program and the response to obestatin stimulation. Notably, we demonstrate that specific patterns of post-translational modifications of FoxO4 and FoxO1 play a key role in directing FoxO activity in response to obestatin in human myotubes. Our findings emphasize the function of the obestatin/GPR39 system in coordinating a variety of pathways involved in the regulation of protein degradation during catabolic conditions. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on

  15. Mechanisms Stimulating Muscle Wasting in Chronic Kidney Disease: The Roles of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System and Myostatin

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sandhya S.; Mitch, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Catabolic conditions including chronic kidney disease (CKD), cancer, and diabetes cause muscle atrophy. The loss of muscle mass worsens the burden of disease because it is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. To avoid these problems or to develop treatment strategies, the mechanisms leading to muscle wasting must be identified. Specific mechanisms uncovered in CKD generally occur in other catabolic conditions. These include stimulation of protein degradation in muscle arising from activation of caspase-3 and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). These proteases act in a coordinated fashion with caspase-3 initially cleaving the complex structure of proteins in muscle yielding fragments that are substrates which are degraded by the UPS. Fortunately, the UPS exhibits remarkable specificity for proteins to be degraded because it is the major intracellular proteolytic system. Without a high level of specificity cellular functions would be disrupted. The specificity is accomplished by complex reactions that depend on recognition of a protein substrate by specific E3 ubiquitin ligases. In muscle, the specific ligases are Atrogin-1 and MuRF1 and their expression has characteristics of a biomarker of accelerated muscle proteolysis. Specific complications of CKD (metabolic acidosis, insulin resistance, inflammation, and angiotensin II) activate caspase-3 and the UPS through mechanisms that include glucocorticoids and impaired insulin or IGF-1 signaling. Mediators activate myostatin which functions as a negative growth factor in muscle. In models of cancer or CKD, strategies that block myostatin prevent muscle wasting suggesting that therapies which block myostatin could prevent muscle wasting in catabolic conditions. PMID:23292175

  16. Prefoldin Subunits Are Protected from Ubiquitin-Proteasome System-mediated Degradation by Forming Complex with Other Constituent Subunits*

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, Makoto; Tashiro, Erika; Kitaura, Hirotake; Maita, Hiroshi; Suto, Hiroo; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The molecular chaperone prefoldin (PFD) is a complex comprised of six different subunits, PFD1-PFD6, and delivers newly synthesized unfolded proteins to cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT to facilitate the folding of proteins. PFD subunits also have functions different from the function of the PFD complex. We previously identified MM-1α/PFD5 as a novel c-Myc-binding protein and found that MM-1α suppresses transformation activity of c-Myc. However, it remains unclear how cells regulate protein levels of individual subunits and what mechanisms alter the ratio of their activities between subunits and their complex. In this study, we found that knockdown of one subunit decreased protein levels of other subunits and that transfection of five subunits other than MM-1α into cells increased the level of endogenous MM-1α. We also found that treatment of cells with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, increased the level of transfected/overexpressed MM-1α but not that of endogenous MM-1α, indicating that overexpressed MM-1α, but not endogenous MM-1α, was degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Experiments using other PFD subunits showed that the UPS degraded a monomer of PFD subunits, though extents of degradation varied among subunits. Furthermore, the level of one subunit was increased after co-transfection with the respective subunit, indicating that there are specific combinations between subunits to be stabilized. These results suggest mutual regulation of protein levels among PFD subunits and show how individual subunits form the PFD complex without degradation. PMID:21478150

  17. Prefoldin subunits are protected from ubiquitin-proteasome system-mediated degradation by forming complex with other constituent subunits.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Makoto; Tashiro, Erika; Kitaura, Hirotake; Maita, Hiroshi; Suto, Hiroo; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2011-06-03

    The molecular chaperone prefoldin (PFD) is a complex comprised of six different subunits, PFD1-PFD6, and delivers newly synthesized unfolded proteins to cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT to facilitate the folding of proteins. PFD subunits also have functions different from the function of the PFD complex. We previously identified MM-1α/PFD5 as a novel c-Myc-binding protein and found that MM-1α suppresses transformation activity of c-Myc. However, it remains unclear how cells regulate protein levels of individual subunits and what mechanisms alter the ratio of their activities between subunits and their complex. In this study, we found that knockdown of one subunit decreased protein levels of other subunits and that transfection of five subunits other than MM-1α into cells increased the level of endogenous MM-1α. We also found that treatment of cells with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, increased the level of transfected/overexpressed MM-1α but not that of endogenous MM-1α, indicating that overexpressed MM-1α, but not endogenous MM-1α, was degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Experiments using other PFD subunits showed that the UPS degraded a monomer of PFD subunits, though extents of degradation varied among subunits. Furthermore, the level of one subunit was increased after co-transfection with the respective subunit, indicating that there are specific combinations between subunits to be stabilized. These results suggest mutual regulation of protein levels among PFD subunits and show how individual subunits form the PFD complex without degradation.

  18. Contribution of the autophagy-lysosomal and ubiquitin-proteasomal proteolytic systems to total proteolysis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) myotubes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two major proteolytic systems are thought to (co-) operate in the skeletal muscle of vertebrates, the ubiquitin-proteasomal system (UPS) and the autophagic/lysosomal system (ALS). While their relative contribution to muscle loss has been already well documented in mammals, little is known in fish sp...

  19. Eukaryotic Cells Producing Ribosomes Deficient in Rpl1 Are Hypersensitive to Defects in the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Kerri B.; Bhattacharya, Arpita; Willis, Ian M.; Warner, Jonathan R.

    2011-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the misassembly of ribosomes in eukaryotic cells can have deleterious effects that go far beyond a simple shortage of ribosomes. In this work we find that cells deficient in ribosomal protein L1 (Rpl1; Rpl10a in mammals) produce ribosomes lacking Rpl1 that are exported to the cytoplasm and that can be incorporated into polyribosomes. The presence of such defective ribosomes leads to slow growth and appears to render the cells hypersensitive to lesions in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Several genes that were reasonable candidates for degradation of 60S subunits lacking Rpl1 fail to do so, suggesting that key players in the surveillance of ribosomal subunits remain to be found. Interestingly, in spite of rendering the cells hypersensitive to the proteasome inhibitor MG132, shortage of Rpl1 partially suppresses the stress-invoked temporary repression of ribosome synthesis caused by MG132. PMID:21858174

  20. Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on α-synuclein aggregation and the ubiquitin-proteasome system in dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Xie, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons (PC12 cells) were treated with different doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs), to investigate their effects on α-Synuclein (α-Syn) aggregation and their mechanism of action. Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining were performed. Exposure to TiO2-NPs increased α-Syn expression (p < 0.05) and induced dose-dependent α-Syn aggregation. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine partially inhibited α-Syn expression induced by a 200 μg/ml dose of TiO2-NPs. TiO2-NPs reduced the expressions of parkin and ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase protein, and were associated with oxidative stress in PC12 cells. Dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system also contributed to α-Syn aggregation. The potentially neurotoxic TiO2-NPs may cause Parkinson's disease.

  1. Eukaryotic cells producing ribosomes deficient in Rpl1 are hypersensitive to defects in the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Kerri B; Bhattacharya, Arpita; Willis, Ian M; Warner, Jonathan R

    2011-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the misassembly of ribosomes in eukaryotic cells can have deleterious effects that go far beyond a simple shortage of ribosomes. In this work we find that cells deficient in ribosomal protein L1 (Rpl1; Rpl10a in mammals) produce ribosomes lacking Rpl1 that are exported to the cytoplasm and that can be incorporated into polyribosomes. The presence of such defective ribosomes leads to slow growth and appears to render the cells hypersensitive to lesions in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Several genes that were reasonable candidates for degradation of 60S subunits lacking Rpl1 fail to do so, suggesting that key players in the surveillance of ribosomal subunits remain to be found. Interestingly, in spite of rendering the cells hypersensitive to the proteasome inhibitor MG132, shortage of Rpl1 partially suppresses the stress-invoked temporary repression of ribosome synthesis caused by MG132.

  2. An ethanolic extract of Artemisia dracunculus L. regulates gene expression of ubiquitin-proteasome system enzymes in skeletal muscle: potential role in the treatment of sarcopenic obesity.

    PubMed

    Kirk-Ballard, Heather; Kilroy, Gail; Day, Britton C; Wang, Zhong Q; Ribnicky, David M; Cefalu, William T; Floyd, Z Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is linked to insulin resistance, a primary component of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. The problem of obesity-related insulin resistance is compounded when age-related skeletal muscle loss, called sarcopenia, occurs with obesity. Skeletal muscle loss results from elevated levels of protein degradation and prevention of obesity-related sarcopenic muscle loss will depend on strategies that target pathways involved in protein degradation. An extract from Artemisia dracunculus, termed PMI 5011, improves insulin signaling and increases skeletal muscle myofiber size in a rodent model of obesity-related insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of PMI 5011 on the ubiquitin-proteasome system, a central regulator of muscle protein degradation. Gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis skeletal muscle was obtained from KK-A(y) obese diabetic mice fed a control or 1% (w/w) PMI 5011-supplemented diet. Regulation of genes encoding enzymes of the ubiquitin-proteasome system was determined using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Although MuRF-1 ubiquitin ligase gene expression is consistently down-regulated in skeletal muscle, atrogin-1, Fbxo40, and Traf6 expression is differentially regulated by PMI 5011. Genes encoding other enzymes of the ubiquitin-proteasome system ranging from ubiquitin to ubiquitin-specific proteases are also regulated by PMI 5011. Additionally, expression of the gene encoding the microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3 (LC3), a ubiquitin-like protein pivotal to autophagy-mediated protein degradation, is down-regulated by PMI 5011 in the vastus lateralis. PMI 5011 alters the gene expression of ubiquitin-proteasome system enzymes that are essential regulators of skeletal muscle mass. This suggests that PMI 5011 has therapeutic potential in the treatment of obesity-linked sarcopenia by regulating ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc

  3. Proteomic Profiling of Radiation-Induced Skin Fibrosis in Rats: Targeting the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjie; Luo, Judong; Sheng, Wenjiong; Xue, Jiao; Li, Ming; Ji, Jiang; Liu, Pengfei; Zhang, Xueguang; Cao, Jianping; Zhang, Shuyu

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the molecular changes underlying the pathogenesis of radiation-induced skin fibrosis. Rat skin was irradiated to 30 or 45 Gy with an electron beam. Protein expression in fibrotic rat skin and adjacent normal tissues was quantified by label-free protein quantitation. Human skin cells HaCaT and WS-1 were treated by x-ray irradiation, and the proteasome activity was determined with a fluorescent probe. The effect of proteasome inhibitors on Transforming growth factor Beta (TGF-B) signaling was measured by Western blot and immunofluorescence. The efficacy of bortezomib in wound healing of rat skin was assessed by the skin injury scale. We found that irradiation induced epidermal and dermal hyperplasia in rat and human skin. One hundred ninety-six preferentially expressed and 80 unique proteins in the irradiated fibrotic skin were identified. Through bioinformatic analysis, the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway showed a significant fold change and was investigated in greater detail. In vitro experiments demonstrated that irradiation resulted in a decline in the activity of the proteasome in human skin cells. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib suppressed profibrotic TGF-β downstream signaling but not TGF-β secretion stimulated by irradiation in HaCaT and WS-1 cells. Moreover, bortezomib ameliorated radiation-induced skin injury and attenuated epidermal hyperplasia. Our findings illustrate the molecular changes during radiation-induced skin fibrosis and suggest that targeting the ubiquitin-proteasome system would be an effective countermeasure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Systems in the Biology and Virulence of Protozoan Parasites.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Christian; San Francisco, Juan; Gutiérrez, Bessy; González, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, proteasomes perform crucial roles in many cellular pathways by degrading proteins to enforce quality control and regulate many cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, signal transduction, cell death, immune responses, metabolism, protein-quality control, and development. The catalytic heart of these complexes, the 20S proteasome, is highly conserved in bacteria, yeast, and humans. However, until a few years ago, the role of proteasomes in parasite biology was completely unknown. Here, we summarize findings about the role of proteasomes in protozoan parasites biology and virulence. Several reports have confirmed the role of proteasomes in parasite biological processes such as cell differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, and encystation. Proliferation and cell differentiation are key steps in host colonization. Considering the importance of proteasomes in both processes in many different parasites such as Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Toxoplasma, and Entamoeba, parasite proteasomes might serve as virulence factors. Several pieces of evidence strongly suggest that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is also a viable parasitic therapeutic target. Research in recent years has shown that the proteasome is a valid drug target for sleeping sickness and malaria. Then, proteasomes are a key organelle in parasite biology and virulence and appear to be an attractive new chemotherapeutic target.

  5. Role of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Systems in the Biology and Virulence of Protozoan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Christian; San Francisco, Juan; Gutiérrez, Bessy; González, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, proteasomes perform crucial roles in many cellular pathways by degrading proteins to enforce quality control and regulate many cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, signal transduction, cell death, immune responses, metabolism, protein-quality control, and development. The catalytic heart of these complexes, the 20S proteasome, is highly conserved in bacteria, yeast, and humans. However, until a few years ago, the role of proteasomes in parasite biology was completely unknown. Here, we summarize findings about the role of proteasomes in protozoan parasites biology and virulence. Several reports have confirmed the role of proteasomes in parasite biological processes such as cell differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, and encystation. Proliferation and cell differentiation are key steps in host colonization. Considering the importance of proteasomes in both processes in many different parasites such as Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Toxoplasma, and Entamoeba, parasite proteasomes might serve as virulence factors. Several pieces of evidence strongly suggest that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is also a viable parasitic therapeutic target. Research in recent years has shown that the proteasome is a valid drug target for sleeping sickness and malaria. Then, proteasomes are a key organelle in parasite biology and virulence and appear to be an attractive new chemotherapeutic target. PMID:26090380

  6. Dp71 is regulated by phosphorylation and ubiquitin-proteasome system in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji; Itoh, Kyoko

    2017-10-21

    The Dystrophin (Dp) gene is responsible for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which is characterized by progressive muscular degeneration and variable degrees of cognitive impairment. Although Dp71 is the most abundant among the Dp isoforms in the brain, the regulatory mechanisms of the related expression levels have not been elucidated. In this study, we found that the constitutive expression levels of Dp71 in PC12 cells were sensitive to proteasomal inhibition. The ectopic expression of FLAG-tagged ubiquitin revealed that Dp71 was ubiquitinated intracellularly. Interestingly, proteasomal inhibition was accompanied by a posttranslational accumulation of modified Dp71, which was restored by protein phosphatase treatment in vitro, indicating that phosphorylation is responsible for the modification and affects the proteasome-dependent degradation of Dp71. Proteasomal activity-sensitive phosphorylated Dp71 is closely associated with syntrophin, a well-known binding partner of Dp71, and syntrophin is also regulated by proteasomal activity in a similar way to Dp71, suggesting that the posttranslational regulatory machinery for Dp71 level is coupled with Dp71-syntrophin molecular complex. Taken together, our results indicated that the expression levels of Dp71 are posttranslationally regulated by the phosphorylation-ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway, which may indicate the presence of regulatory mechanisms underlying the proteostasis of both Dp and its molecular complex, which may lead to better therapeutic approaches for the treatment of Dp-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ubiquitin-proteasome system controls ciliogenesis at the initial step of axoneme extension.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kousuke; Kawakami, Yoshitaka; Kiyono, Tohru; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Kawamura, Yoshifumi; Era, Saho; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Goshima, Naoki; Inagaki, Masaki

    2014-10-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based sensory organelles that organize numerous key signals during developments and tissue homeostasis. Ciliary microtubule doublet, named axoneme, is grown directly from the distal end of mother centrioles through a multistep process upon cell cycle exit; however, the instructive signals that initiate these events are poorly understood. Here we show that ubiquitin-proteasome machinery removes trichoplein, a negative regulator of ciliogenesis, from mother centrioles and thereby causes Aurora-A inactivation, leading to ciliogenesis. Ciliogenesis is blocked if centriolar trichoplein is stabilized by treatment with proteasome inhibitors or by expression of non-ubiquitylatable trichoplein mutant (K50/57R). Started from two-stepped global E3 screening, we have identified KCTD17 as a substrate-adaptor for Cul3-RING E3 ligases (CRL3s) that polyubiquitylates trichoplein. Depletion of KCTD17 specifically arrests ciliogenesis at the initial step of axoneme extension through aberrant trichoplein-Aurora-A activity. Thus, CRL3-KCTD17 targets trichoplein to proteolysis to initiate the axoneme extension during ciliogenesis.

  8. Ubiquitin-proteasome pathway components as therapeutic targets for CNS maladies.

    PubMed

    Upadhya, Sudarshan C; Hegde, Ashok N

    2005-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), abnormal deposition of insoluble protein aggregates or inclusion bodies within nerve cells is commonly observed in association with several neurodegenerative diseases. The ubiquitinated protein aggregates are believed to result from malfunction or overload of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway or from structural changes in the protein substrates which prevent their recognition and degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Impaired proteolysis might also contribute to the synaptic dysfunction seen early in neurodegenerative diseases because the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is known to play a role in normal functioning of synapses. Because specificity of the ubiquitin proteasome mediated proteolysis is determined by specific ubiquitin ligases (E3s), identification of specific E3s and their allosteric modulators are likely to provide effective therapeutic targets for the treatment of several CNS disorders. Another unexplored area for the discovery of drug targets is the proteasome. Although many inhibitors of the proteasome are available, no effective drugs exist that can stimulate the proteasome. Since abnormal protein aggregation is a common feature of different neurodegenerative diseases, enhancement of proteasome activity might be an efficient way to remove the aggregates that accumulate in the brain. In this review, we discuss how the components of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway could be potential targets for therapy of CNS diseases and disorders.

  9. Sent to destroy: the ubiquitin proteasome system regulates cell signaling and protein quality control in cardiovascular development and disease.

    PubMed

    Willis, Monte S; Townley-Tilson, W H Davin; Kang, Eunice Y; Homeister, Jonathon W; Patterson, Cam

    2010-02-19

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays a crucial role in biological processes integral to the development of the cardiovascular system and cardiovascular diseases. The UPS prototypically recognizes specific protein substrates and places polyubiquitin chains on them for subsequent destruction by the proteasome. This system is in place to degrade not only misfolded and damaged proteins, but is essential also in regulating a host of cell signaling pathways involved in proliferation, adaptation to stress, regulation of cell size, and cell death. During the development of the cardiovascular system, the UPS regulates cell signaling by modifying transcription factors, receptors, and structural proteins. Later, in the event of cardiovascular diseases as diverse as atherosclerosis, cardiac hypertrophy, and ischemia/reperfusion injury, ubiquitin ligases and the proteasome are implicated in protecting and exacerbating clinical outcomes. However, when misfolded and damaged proteins are ubiquitinated by the UPS, their destruction by the proteasome is not always possible because of their aggregated confirmations. Recent studies have discovered how these ubiquitinated misfolded proteins can be destroyed by alternative "specific" mechanisms. The cytosolic receptors p62, NBR, and histone deacetylase 6 recognize aggregated ubiquitinated proteins and target them for autophagy in the process of "selective autophagy." Even the ubiquitination of multiple proteins within whole organelles that drive the more general macro-autophagy may be due, in part, to similar ubiquitin-driven mechanisms. In summary, the crosstalk between the UPS and autophagy highlight the pivotal and diverse roles the UPS plays in maintaining protein quality control and regulating cardiovascular development and disease.

  10. Regulation of mitochondrial genome inheritance by autophagy and ubiquitin-proteasome system: implications for health, fitness, and fertility.

    PubMed

    Song, Won-Hee; Ballard, John William Oman; Yi, Young-Joo; Sutovsky, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria, the energy-generating organelles, play a role in numerous cellular functions including adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, cellular homeostasis, and apoptosis. Maternal inheritance of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is universally observed in humans and most animals. In general, high levels of mitochondrial heteroplasmy might contribute to a detrimental effect on fitness and disease resistance. Therefore, a disposal of the sperm-derived mitochondria inside fertilized oocytes assures normal preimplantation embryo development. Here we summarize the current research and knowledge concerning the role of autophagic pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent proteolysis in sperm mitophagy in mammals, including humans. Current data indicate that sperm mitophagy inside the fertilized oocyte could occur along multiple degradation routes converging on autophagic clearance of paternal mitochondria. The influence of assisted reproductive therapies (ART) such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), mitochondrial replacement (MR), and assisted fertilization of oocytes from patients of advanced reproductive age on mitochondrial function, inheritance, and fitness and for the development and health of ART babies will be of particular interest to clinical audiences. Altogether, the study of sperm mitophagy after fertilization has implications in the timing of evolution and developmental and reproductive biology and in human health, fitness, and management of mitochondrial disease.

  11. Regulation of Mitochondrial Genome Inheritance by Autophagy and Ubiquitin-Proteasome System: Implications for Health, Fitness, and Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, John William Oman; Yi, Young-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria, the energy-generating organelles, play a role in numerous cellular functions including adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, cellular homeostasis, and apoptosis. Maternal inheritance of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is universally observed in humans and most animals. In general, high levels of mitochondrial heteroplasmy might contribute to a detrimental effect on fitness and disease resistance. Therefore, a disposal of the sperm-derived mitochondria inside fertilized oocytes assures normal preimplantation embryo development. Here we summarize the current research and knowledge concerning the role of autophagic pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent proteolysis in sperm mitophagy in mammals, including humans. Current data indicate that sperm mitophagy inside the fertilized oocyte could occur along multiple degradation routes converging on autophagic clearance of paternal mitochondria. The influence of assisted reproductive therapies (ART) such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), mitochondrial replacement (MR), and assisted fertilization of oocytes from patients of advanced reproductive age on mitochondrial function, inheritance, and fitness and for the development and health of ART babies will be of particular interest to clinical audiences. Altogether, the study of sperm mitophagy after fertilization has implications in the timing of evolution and developmental and reproductive biology and in human health, fitness, and management of mitochondrial disease. PMID:25028670

  12. The Differential Profiling of Ubiquitin-Proteasome and Autophagy Systems in Different Tissues before the Onset of Huntington's Disease Models.

    PubMed

    Her, Lu-Shiun; Lin, Jian-Yu; Fu, Mu-Hui; Chang, Yu-Fan; Li, Chia-Ling; Tang, Ting-Yu; Jhang, Yu-Ling; Chang, Chih-Yi; Shih, Meng-Chi; Cheng, Pei-Hsun; Yang, Shang-Hsun

    2015-07-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic and neurodegenerative disease, leading to motor and cognitive dysfunction in HD patients. At cellular level, this disease is caused by the accumulation of mutant huntingtin (HTT) in different cells, and finally results in the dysfunction of different cells. To clean these mutant proteins, ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy system are two critical pathways in the brain; however, little is known in other peripheral tissues. As mutant HTT affects different tissues progressively and might influence the UPS and autophagy pathways at early stages, we attempted to examine two clearance systems in HD models before the onset. Here, in vitro results showed that the accumulation of UPS signals with time was observed obviously in neuroblastoma and kidney cells, not in other cells. In HD transgenic mice, we observed the impairment of UPS, but not autophagy, over time in the cortex and striatum. In heart and muscle tissues, disturbance of autophagy was observed, whereas dysfunction of UPS was displayed in liver and lung. These results suggest that two protein clearance pathways are disturbed differentially in different tissues before the onset of HD, and enhancement of protein clearance at early stages might provide a potential stratagem to alleviate the progression of HD. © 2014 International Society of Neuropathology.

  13. Design Principles Involving Protein Disorder Facilitate Specific Substrate Selection and Degradation by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System*

    PubMed Central

    Guharoy, Mainak; Bhowmick, Pallab; Tompa, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) regulates diverse cellular pathways by the timely removal (or processing) of proteins. Here we review the role of structural disorder and conformational flexibility in the different aspects of degradation. First, we discuss post-translational modifications within disordered regions that regulate E3 ligase localization, conformation, and enzymatic activity, and also the role of flexible linkers in mediating ubiquitin transfer and reaction processivity. Next we review well studied substrates and discuss that substrate elements (degrons) recognized by E3 ligases are highly disordered: short linear motifs recognized by many E3s constitute an important class of degrons, and these are almost always present in disordered regions. Substrate lysines targeted for ubiquitination are also often located in neighboring regions of the E3 docking motifs and are therefore part of the disordered segment. Finally, biochemical experiments and predictions show that initiation of degradation at the 26S proteasome requires a partially unfolded region to facilitate substrate entry into the proteasomal core. PMID:26851277

  14. Exercise training prevents oxidative stress and ubiquitin-proteasome system overactivity and reverse skeletal muscle atrophy in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Telma F; Bacurau, Aline V N; Moreira, Jose B N; Paixão, Nathalie A; Campos, Juliane C; Ferreira, Julio C B; Leal, Marcelo L; Negrão, Carlos E; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Wisløff, Ulrik; Brum, Patricia C

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is known to lead to skeletal muscle atrophy and dysfunction. However, intracellular mechanisms underlying HF-induced myopathy are not fully understood. We hypothesized that HF would increase oxidative stress and ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) activation in skeletal muscle of sympathetic hyperactivity mouse model. We also tested the hypothesis that aerobic exercise training (AET) would reestablish UPS activation in mice and human HF. Time-course evaluation of plantaris muscle cross-sectional area, lipid hydroperoxidation, protein carbonylation and chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity was performed in a mouse model of sympathetic hyperactivity-induced HF. At the 7(th) month of age, HF mice displayed skeletal muscle atrophy, increased oxidative stress and UPS overactivation. Moderate-intensity AET restored lipid hydroperoxides and carbonylated protein levels paralleled by reduced E3 ligases mRNA levels, and reestablished chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity and plantaris trophicity. In human HF (patients randomized to sedentary or moderate-intensity AET protocol), skeletal muscle chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity was also increased and AET restored it to healthy control subjects' levels. Collectively, our data provide evidence that AET effectively counteracts redox imbalance and UPS overactivation, preventing skeletal myopathy and exercise intolerance in sympathetic hyperactivity-induced HF in mice. Of particular interest, AET attenuates skeletal muscle proteasome activity paralleled by improved aerobic capacity in HF patients, which is not achieved by drug treatment itself. Altogether these findings strengthen the clinical relevance of AET in the treatment of HF.

  15. An Essential Postsynaptic Role for the Ubiquitin Proteasome System in Slow Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jakawich, Sonya K.; Neely, Ryan M.; Djakovic, Stevan N.; Patrick, Gentry N.; Sutton, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic increases or decreases in neuronal activity initiate compensatory changes in synaptic strength that emerge slowly over a 12–24 hr period, but the mechanisms underlying this slow homeostatic response remain poorly understood. Here, we show an essential role for the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) in slow homeostatic plasticity induced by chronic changes in network activity. In cultured hippocampal neurons, UPS inhibitors drive a slow increase in miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) amplitude and synaptic AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 and GluA2 expression that both mirrors and occludes the changes produced by chronic suppression of network activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX). These non-additive effects were similarly observed under conditions of chronic hyperactivation of network activity with bicuculline – the increase in mEPSC amplitude and GluA1/2 expression with chronic UPS inhibition persists during network hyperactivation, which scales synaptic strength and AMPA receptor expression in the opposite direction when UPS activity is intact. Finally, cell-autonomous UPS inhibition (via expression of the ubiquitin chain elongation mutant, UbK48R) enhances mEPSC amplitude in a manner that mimics and occludes changes in network activity, demonstrating a postsynaptic role for the UPS in slow homeostatic plasticity. Taken together, our results suggest that the UPS acts as an integration point for translating sustained changes in network activity into appropriate incremental compensatory changes at synapses. PMID:20888892

  16. Myostatin Activates the Ubiquitin-Proteasome and Autophagy-Lysosome Systems Contributing to Muscle Wasting in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong-Tao; Yang, Ya-Jun; Huang, Ren-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Lin, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Our evidence demonstrated that CKD upregulated the expression of myostatin, TNF-α, and p-IkBa and downregulated the phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, and FoxO3a, which were also associated with protein degradation and muscle atrophy. The autophagosome formation and protein expression of autophagy-related genes were increased in muscle of CKD rats. The mRNA level and protein expression of MAFbx and MuRF-1 were also upregulated in CKD rats, as well as proteasome activity of 26S. Moreover, activation of myostatin elicited by TNF-α induces C2C12 myotube atrophy via upregulating the expression of autophagy-related genes, including MAFbx and MuRF1 and proteasome subunits. Inactivation of FoxO3a triggered by PI3K inhibitor LY294002 prevented the myostatin-induced increase of expression of MuRF1, MAFbx, and LC3-II protein in C2C12 myotubes. The findings were further consolidated by using siRNA interference and overexpression of myostatin. Additionally, expression of myostatin was activated by TNF-α via a NF-κB dependent pathway in C2C12 myotubes, while inhibition of NF-κB activity suppressed myostatin and improved myotube atrophy. Collectively, myostatin mediated CKD-induced muscle catabolism via coordinate activation of the autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome systems. PMID:26448817

  17. Sent to Destroy: The Ubiquitin Proteasome System Regulates Cell Signaling and Protein Quality Control in Cardiovascular Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Monte S.; Townley-Tilson, W.H. Davin; Kang, Eunice Y.; Homeister, Jonathon W.; Patterson, Cam

    2010-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays a crucial role in biological processes integral to the development of the cardiovascular system and cardiovascular diseases. The UPS prototypically recognizes specific protein substrates and places polyubiquitin chains on them for subsequent destruction by the proteasome. This system is in place to degrade not only misfolded and damaged proteins, but is essential also in regulating a host of cell signaling pathways involved in proliferation, adaptation to stress, regulation of cell size, and cell death. During the development of the cardiovascular system, the UPS regulates cell signaling by modifying transcription factors, receptors, and structural proteins. Later, in the event of cardiovascular diseases as diverse as atherosclerosis, cardiac hypertrophy, and ischemia reperfusion injury, ubiquitin ligases and the proteasome are implicated in protecting and exacerbating clinical outcomes. However, when misfolded and damaged proteins are ubiquitinated by the UPS, their destruction by the proteasome is not always possible due to their aggregated confirmations. Recent studies have discovered how these ubiquitinated misfolded proteins can be destroyed by alternative “specific” mechanisms. The cytosolic receptors p62, NBR, and HDAC6 recognize aggregated ubiquitinated proteins and target them for autophagy in the process of “selective autophagy”. Even the ubiquitination of multiple proteins within whole organelles that drive the more general macro-autophagy may be due, in part, to similar ubiquitin-driven mechanisms. In summary, the cross-talk between the UPS and autophagy highlight the pivotal and diverse roles the UPS plays in maintaining protein quality control and regulating cardiovascular development and disease. PMID:20167943

  18. Quantitative assessment of the degradation of aggregated TDP-43 mediated by the ubiquitin proteasome system and macroautophagy.

    PubMed

    Cascella, Roberta; Fani, Giulia; Capitini, Claudia; Rusmini, Paola; Poletti, Angelo; Cecchi, Cristina; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2017-08-25

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions are neurodegenerative disorders that share the cytosolic deposition of TDP-43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) in the CNS. TDP-43 is well known as being actively degraded by both the proteasome and macroautophagy. The well-documented decrease in the efficiency of these clearance systems in aging and neurodegeneration, as well as the genetic evidence that many of the familial forms of TDP-43 proteinopathies involve genes that are associated with them, suggest that a failure of these protein degradation systems is a major factor that contributes to the onset of TDP-43-associated disorders. Here, we inserted preformed human TDP-43 aggregates in the cytosol of murine NSC34 and N2a cells in diffuse form and observed their degradation under conditions in which exogenous TDP-43 is not expressed and endogenous nuclear TDP-43 is not recruited, thereby allowing a time zero to be established in TDP-43 degradation and to observe its disposal kinetically and analytically. TDP-43 degradation was observed in the absence and presence of selective inhibitors and small interfering RNAs against the proteasome and autophagy. We found that cytosolic diffuse aggregates of TDP-43 can be distinguished in 3 different classes on the basis of their vulnerability to degradation, which contributed to the definition-with previous reports-of a total of 6 distinct classes of misfolded TDP-43 species that range from soluble monomer to undegradable macroaggregates. We also found that the proteasome and macroautophagy-degradable pools of TDP-43 are fully distinguishable, rather than in equilibrium between them on the time scale required for degradation, and that a significant crosstalk exists between the 2 degradation processes.-Cascella, R., Fani, G., Capitini, C., Rusmini, P., Poletti, A., Cecchi, C., Chiti, F. Quantitative assessment of the degradation of aggregated TDP-43 mediated by the ubiquitin

  19. Nuclear ubiquitin proteasome degradation affects WRKY45 function in the rice defense program

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Akane; Inoue, Haruhiko; Goto, Shingo; Nakayama, Akira; Sugano, Shoji; Hayashi, Nagao; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional activator WRKY45 plays a major role in the salicylic acid/benzothiadiazole-induced defense program in rice. Here, we show that the nuclear ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) plays a role in regulating the function of WRKY45. Proteasome inhibitors induced accumulation of polyubiquitinated WRKY45 and transient up-regulation of WRKY45 target genes in rice cells, suggesting that WRKY45 is constantly degraded by the UPS to suppress defense responses in the absence of defense signals. Mutational analysis of the nuclear localization signal indicated that UPS-dependent WRKY45 degradation occurs in the nuclei. Interestingly, the transcriptional activity of WRKY45 after salicylic acid treatment was impaired by proteasome inhibition. The same C-terminal region in WRKY45 was essential for both transcriptional activity and UPS-dependent degradation. These results suggest that UPS regulation also plays a role in the transcriptional activity of WRKY45. It has been reported that AtNPR1, the central regulator of the salicylic acid pathway in Arabidopsis, is regulated by the UPS. We found that OsNPR1/NH1, the rice counterpart of NPR1, was not stabilized by proteasome inhibition under uninfected conditions. We discuss the differences in post-translational regulation of salicylic acid pathway components between rice and Arabidopsis. PMID:23013464

  20. Response of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System to Memory Retrieval After Extended-Access Cocaine or Saline Self-Administration.

    PubMed

    Werner, Craig T; Milovanovic, Mike; Christian, Daniel T; Loweth, Jessica A; Wolf, Marina E

    2015-12-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has been implicated in the retrieval-induced destabilization of cocaine- and fear-related memories in Pavlovian paradigms. However, nothing is known about its role in memory retrieval after self-administration of cocaine, an operant paradigm, or how the length of withdrawal from cocaine may influence retrieval mechanisms. Here, we examined UPS activity after an extended-access cocaine self-administration regimen that leads to withdrawal-dependent incubation of cue-induced cocaine craving. Controls self-administered saline. In initial experiments, memory retrieval was elicited via a cue-induced seeking/retrieval test on withdrawal day (WD) 50-60, when craving has incubated. We found that retrieval of cocaine- and saline-associated memories produced similar increases in polyubiquitinated proteins in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), compared with rats that did not undergo a seeking/retrieval test. Measures of proteasome catalytic activity confirmed similar activation of the UPS after retrieval of saline and cocaine memories. However, in a subsequent experiment in which testing was conducted on WD1, proteasome activity in the NAc was greater after retrieval of cocaine memory than saline memory. Analysis of other brain regions confirmed that effects of cocaine memory retrieval on proteasome activity, relative to saline memory retrieval, depend on withdrawal time. These results, combined with prior studies, suggest that the relationship between UPS activity and memory retrieval depends on training paradigm, brain region, and time elapsed between training and retrieval. The observation that mechanisms underlying cocaine memory retrieval change depending on the age of the memory has implications for development of memory destabilization therapies for cue-induced relapse in cocaine addicts.

  1. Metabolomic Quantitative Trait Loci (mQTL) Mapping Implicates the Ubiquitin Proteasome System in Cardiovascular Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, William E.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Stevens, Robert; Craig, Damian; Bain, James R.; Grass, Elizabeth; Haynes, Carol; Kwee, Lydia; Qin, Xuejun; Slentz, Dorothy H.; Krupp, Deidre; Muehlbauer, Michael; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Gregory, Simon G.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Shah, Svati H.

    2015-01-01

    Levels of certain circulating short-chain dicarboxylacylcarnitine (SCDA), long-chain dicarboxylacylcarnitine (LCDA) and medium chain acylcarnitine (MCA) metabolites are heritable and predict cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. Little is known about the biological pathways that influence levels of most of these metabolites. Here, we analyzed genetics, epigenetics, and transcriptomics with metabolomics in samples from a large CVD cohort to identify novel genetic markers for CVD and to better understand the role of metabolites in CVD pathogenesis. Using genomewide association in the CATHGEN cohort (N = 1490), we observed associations of several metabolites with genetic loci. Our strongest findings were for SCDA metabolite levels with variants in genes that regulate components of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress (USP3, HERC1, STIM1, SEL1L, FBXO25, SUGT1) These findings were validated in a second cohort of CATHGEN subjects (N = 2022, combined p = 8.4x10-6–2.3x10-10). Importantly, variants in these genes independently predicted CVD events. Association of genomewide methylation profiles with SCDA metabolites identified two ER stress genes as differentially methylated (BRSK2 and HOOK2). Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) pathway analyses driven by gene variants and SCDA metabolites corroborated perturbations in ER stress and highlighted the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) arm. Moreover, culture of human kidney cells in the presence of levels of fatty acids found in individuals with cardiometabolic disease, induced accumulation of SCDA metabolites in parallel with increases in the ER stress marker BiP. Thus, our integrative strategy implicates the UPS arm of the ER stress pathway in CVD pathogenesis, and identifies novel genetic loci associated with CVD event risk. PMID:26540294

  2. Nuclear protein quality is regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system through the activity of Ubc4 and San1 in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yuzy; Kishimoto, Hayafumi; Tanae, Katsuhiro; Kitamura, Kenji; Katayama, Satoshi; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2011-04-15

    Eukaryotic cells monitor and maintain protein quality through a set of protein quality control (PQC) systems whose role is to minimize the harmful effects of the accumulation of aberrant proteins. Although these PQC systems have been extensively studied in the cytoplasm, nuclear PQC systems are not well understood. The present work shows the existence of a nuclear PQC system mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Asf1-30, a mutant form of the histone chaperone Asf1, was used as a model substrate for the study of the nuclear PQC. A temperature-sensitive Asf1-30 protein localized to the nucleus was selectively degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The Asf1-30 mutant protein was highly ubiquitinated at higher temperatures, and it remained stable in an mts2-1 mutant, which lacks proteasome activity. The E2 enzyme Ubc4 was identified among 11 candidate proteins as the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme in this system, and San1 was selected among 100 candidates as the ubiquitin ligase (E3) targeting Asf1-30 for degradation. San1, but not other nuclear E3s, showed specificity for the mutant nuclear Asf1-30, but did not show activity against wild-type Asf1. These data clearly showed that the aberrant nuclear protein was degraded by a defined set of E1-E2-E3 enzymes through the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The data also show, for the first time, the presence of a nuclear PQC system in fission yeast.

  3. Supplementation with l-carnitine downregulates genes of the ubiquitin proteasome system in the skeletal muscle and liver of piglets.

    PubMed

    Keller, J; Ringseis, R; Koc, A; Lukas, I; Kluge, H; Eder, K

    2012-01-01

    Supplementation of carnitine has been shown to improve performance characteristics such as protein accretion in growing pigs. The molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are largely unknown. Based on recent results from DNA microchip analysis, we hypothesized that carnitine supplementation leads to a downregulation of genes of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). The UPS is the most important system for protein breakdown in tissues, which in turn could be an explanation for increased protein accretion. To test this hypothesis, we fed sixteen male, four-week-old piglets either a control diet or the same diet supplemented with carnitine and determined the expression of several genes involved in the UPS in the liver and skeletal muscle. To further determine whether the effects of carnitine on the expression of genes of the UPS are mediated directly or indirectly, we also investigated the effect of carnitine on the expression of genes of the UPS in cultured C2C12 myotubes and HepG2 liver cells. In the liver of piglets fed the carnitine-supplemented diet, the relative mRNA levels of atrogin-1, E214k and Psma1 were lower than in those of the control piglets (P < 0.05). In skeletal muscle, the relative mRNA levels of atrogin-1, MuRF1, E214k, Psma1 and ubiquitin were lower in piglets fed the carnitine-supplemented diet than that in control piglets (P < 0.05). Incubating C2C12 myotubes and HepG2 liver cells with increasing concentrations of carnitine had no effect on basal and/or hydrocortisone-stimulated mRNA levels of genes of the UPS. In conclusion, this study shows that dietary carnitine decreases the transcript levels of several genes involved in the UPS in skeletal muscle and liver of piglets, whereas carnitine has no effect on the transcript levels of these genes in cultivated HepG2 liver cells and C2C12 myotubes. These data suggest that the inhibitory effect of carnitine on the expression of genes of the UPS is mediated indirectly, probably via modulating

  4. A double-edged sword role for ubiquitin-proteasome system in brain stem cardiovascular regulation during experimental brain death.

    PubMed

    Wu, Carol H Y; Chan, Julie Y H; Chan, Samuel H H; Chang, Alice Y W

    2011-01-01

    Brain stem cardiovascular regulatory dysfunction during brain death is underpinned by an upregulation of nitric oxide synthase II (NOS II) in rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the origin of a life-and-death signal detected from blood pressure of comatose patients that disappears before brain death ensues. Furthermore, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) may be involved in the synthesis and degradation of NOS II. We assessed the hypothesis that the UPS participates in brain stem cardiovascular regulation during brain death by engaging in both synthesis and degradation of NOS II in RVLM. In a clinically relevant experimental model of brain death using Sprague-Dawley rats, pretreatment by microinjection into the bilateral RVLM of proteasome inhibitors (lactacystin or proteasome inhibitor II) antagonized the hypotension and reduction in the life-and-death signal elicited by intravenous administration of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). On the other hand, pretreatment with an inhibitor of ubiquitin-recycling (ubiquitin aldehyde) or ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (UCH-L1) potentiated the elicited hypotension and blunted the prevalence of the life-and-death signal. Real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, electrophoresis mobility shift assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation and co-immunoprecipitation experiments further showed that the proteasome inhibitors antagonized the augmented nuclear presence of NF-κB or binding between NF-κB and nos II promoter and blunted the reduced cytosolic presence of phosphorylated IκB. The already impeded NOS II protein expression by proteasome inhibitor II was further reduced after gene-knockdown of NF-κB in RVLM. In animals pretreated with UCH-L1 inhibitor and died before significant increase in nos II mRNA occurred, NOS II protein expression in RVLM was considerably elevated. We conclude that UPS participates in the defunct and maintained brain stem cardiovascular regulation during experimental

  5. A Double-Edged Sword Role for Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Brain Stem Cardiovascular Regulation During Experimental Brain Death

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Carol H. Y.; Chan, Julie Y. H.; Chan, Samuel H. H.; Chang, Alice Y. W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Brain stem cardiovascular regulatory dysfunction during brain death is underpinned by an upregulation of nitric oxide synthase II (NOS II) in rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the origin of a life-and-death signal detected from blood pressure of comatose patients that disappears before brain death ensues. Furthermore, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) may be involved in the synthesis and degradation of NOS II. We assessed the hypothesis that the UPS participates in brain stem cardiovascular regulation during brain death by engaging in both synthesis and degradation of NOS II in RVLM. Methodology/Principal Findings In a clinically relevant experimental model of brain death using Sprague-Dawley rats, pretreatment by microinjection into the bilateral RVLM of proteasome inhibitors (lactacystin or proteasome inhibitor II) antagonized the hypotension and reduction in the life-and-death signal elicited by intravenous administration of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). On the other hand, pretreatment with an inhibitor of ubiquitin-recycling (ubiquitin aldehyde) or ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (UCH-L1) potentiated the elicited hypotension and blunted the prevalence of the life-and-death signal. Real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, electrophoresis mobility shift assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation and co-immunoprecipitation experiments further showed that the proteasome inhibitors antagonized the augmented nuclear presence of NF-κB or binding between NF-κB and nos II promoter and blunted the reduced cytosolic presence of phosphorylated IκB. The already impeded NOS II protein expression by proteasome inhibitor II was further reduced after gene-knockdown of NF-κB in RVLM. In animals pretreated with UCH-L1 inhibitor and died before significant increase in nos II mRNA occurred, NOS II protein expression in RVLM was considerably elevated. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that UPS participates in the defunct and

  6. The Regulation of Tumor Suppressor p63 by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Stephen R.; Wu, Hong; Wang, Benfan; Abuetabh, Yasser; Sergi, Consolato; Leng, Roger P.

    2016-01-01

    The protein p63 has been identified as a homolog of the tumor suppressor protein p53 and is capable of inducing apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, or senescence. p63 has at least six isoforms, which can be divided into two major groups: the TAp63 variants that contain the N-terminal transactivation domain and the ΔNp63 variants that lack the N-terminal transactivation domain. The TAp63 variants are generally considered to be tumor suppressors involved in activating apoptosis and suppressing metastasis. ΔNp63 variants cannot induce apoptosis but can act as dominant negative inhibitors to block the function of TAp53, TAp73, and TAp63. p63 is rarely mutated in human tumors and is predominately regulated at the post-translational level by phosphorylation and ubiquitination. This review focuses primarily on regulation of p63 by the ubiquitin E-3 ligase family of enzymes via ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation, and introduces a new key regulator of the p63 protein. PMID:27929429

  7. The role of the ubiquitin proteasome system in cerebellar development and medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Vriend, Jerry; Ghavami, Saeid; Marzban, Hassan

    2015-10-17

    Cerebellar granule cells precursors are derived from the upper rhombic lip and migrate tangentially independent of glia along the subpial stream pathway to form the external germinal zone. Postnatally, granule cells migrate from the external germinal zone radially through the Purkinje cell layer, guided by Bergmann glia fibers, to the internal granular cell layer.Medulloblastomas (MBs) are the most common malignant childhood brain tumor. Many of these tumors develop from precursor cells of the embryonic rhombic lips. Four main groups of MB are recognized. The WNT group of MBs arise primarily from the lower rhombic lip and embryonic brainstem. The SHH group of MBs originate from cerebellar granule cell precursors in the external germinal zone of the embryonic cerebellum. The cellular origins of type 3 and type 4 MBs are not clear.Several ubiquitin ligases are revealed to be significant factors in development of the cerebellum as well as in the initiation and maintenance of MBs. Proteasome dysfunction at a critical stage of development may be a major factor in determining whether progenitor cells which are destined to become granule cells differentiate normally or become MB cells. We propose the hypothesis that proteasomal activity is essential to regulate the critical transition between proliferating granule cells and differentiated granule cells and that proteasome dysfunction may lead to MB. Proteasome dysfunction could also account for various mutations in MBs resulting from deficiencies in DNA checkpoint and repair mechanisms prior to development of MBs.Data showing a role for the ubiquitin ligases β-TrCP, FBW7, Huwe1, and SKP2 in MBs suggest the possibility of a classification of MBs based on the expression (over expression or under expression) of specific ubiquitin ligases which function as oncogenes, tumor suppressors or cell cycle regulators.

  8. HIV protease inhibitors and onset of cardiovascular diseases: a central role for oxidative stress and dysregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Reyskens, Kathleen M S E; Essop, M Faadiel

    2014-02-01

    The successful roll-out of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has extended life expectancy and enhanced the overall well-being of HIV-positive individuals. There are, however, increased concerns regarding HAART-mediated metabolic derangements and its potential risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in the long-term. Here certain classes of antiretroviral drugs such as the HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) are strongly implicated in this process. This article largely focuses on the direct PI-linked development of cardio-metabolic complications, and reviews the inter-linked roles of oxidative stress and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) as key mediators driving this process. It is proposed that PIs trigger reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that leads to serious downstream consequences such as cell death, impaired mitochondrial function, and UPS dysregulation. Moreover, we advocate that HIV PIs may also directly lower myocardial UPS function. The attenuation of cardiac UPS can initiate transcriptional changes that contribute to perturbed lipid metabolism, thereby fueling a pro-atherogenic milieu. It may also directly alter ionic channels and interfere with electrical signaling in the myocardium. Therefore HIV PI-induced ROS together with a dysfunctional UPS elicit detrimental effects on the cardiovascular system that will eventually result in the onset of heart diseases. Thus while HIV PIs substantially improve life expectancy and quality of life in HIV-positive patients, its longer-term side-effects on the cardiovascular system should lead to a) greater clinical awareness regarding its benefit-harm paradigm, and b) the development and evaluation of novel co-treatment strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the response of the ligninolytic fungus Trametes versicolor to nitrogen deprivation.

    PubMed

    Staszczak, Magdalena

    2008-03-01

    The white rot fungus Trametes versicolor is an efficient lignin degrader with ecological significance and industrial applications. Lignin-modifying enzymes of white rot fungi are mainly produced during secondary metabolism triggered in these microorganisms by nutrient deprivation. Selective ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated proteolysis is known to play a crucial role in the response of cells to various stresses such as nutrient limitation, heat shock, and heavy metal exposure. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated that proteasomal degradation of intracellular proteins is involved in the regulation of laccase, a major ligninolytic enzyme of T. versicolor, in response to cadmium. In the present study, it was found that the 6-h nitrogen starvation leads to depletion of intracellular free ubiquitin pool in T. versicolor. The difference in the intracellular level of free monomeric ubiquitin observed between the mycelium extract from the nitrogen-deprived and that from the nitrogen-sufficient culture was accompanied by the different pattern of ubiquitin-dependent degradation. Furthermore, it was found that nitrogen deprivation affected 26S proteasome activities of T. versicolor. Proteasome inhibition by lactacystin beta-lactone, a highly specific agent, increased laccase activity in nitrogen-deprived cultures, but not in nitrogen-sufficient cultures. The present study implicates the ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated proteolytic pathway in the response of T. versicolor to nitrogen deprivation.

  10. Cap-dependent mRNA translation and the ubiquitin-proteasome system cooperate to promote ERBB2-dependent esophageal cancer phenotype.

    PubMed

    Issaenko, O A; Bitterman, P B; Polunovsky, V A; Dahlberg, P S

    2012-09-01

    Pathological post-transcriptional control of the proteome composition is a central feature of malignancy. Two steps in this pathway, eIF4F-driven cap-dependent mRNA translation and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), are deregulated in most if not all cancers. We tested a hypothesis that eIF4F is aberrantly activated in human esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and requires elevated rates of protein turnover and proteolysis and thereby activated UPS for its pro-neoplastic function. Here, we show that 80% of tumors and cell lines featuring amplified ERBB2 display an aberrantly activated eIF4F. Direct genetic targeting of the eIF4F in ERBB2-amplified EAC cells with a constitutively active form of the eIF4F repressor 4E-BP1 decreased colony formation and proliferation and triggered apoptosis. In contrast, suppression of m-TOR-kinase activity towards 4E-BP1with rapamycin only modestly inhibited eIF4F-driven cap-dependent translation and EAC malignant phenotype; and promoted feedback activation of other cancer pathways. Our data show that co-treatment with 2 FDA-approved agents, the m-TOR inhibitor rapamycin and the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, leads to strong synergistic growth-inhibitory effects. Moreover, direct targeting of eIF4F with constitutively active 4E-BP1 is significantly more potent in collaboration with bortezomib than rapamycin. These data support the hypothesis that a finely tuned balance between eIF4F-driven protein synthesis and proteasome-mediated protein degradation is required for the maintenance of ERBB2-mediated EAC malignant phenotype. Altogether, our study supports the development of pharmaceuticals to directly target eIF4F as most efficient strategy; and provides a clear rationale for the clinical evaluation of combination therapy with m-TOR inhibitors and bortezomib for EAC treatment.

  11. Proteomic Profiling of Cranial (Superior) Cervical Ganglia Reveals Beta-Amyloid and Ubiquitin Proteasome System Perturbations in an Equine Multiple System Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    McGorum, Bruce C; Pirie, R Scott; Eaton, Samantha L; Keen, John A; Cumyn, Elizabeth M; Arnott, Danielle M; Chen, Wenzhang; Lamont, Douglas J; Graham, Laura C; Llavero Hurtado, Maica; Pemberton, Alan; Wishart, Thomas M

    2015-11-01

    Equine grass sickness (EGS) is an acute, predominantly fatal, multiple system neuropathy of grazing horses with reported incidence rates of ∼2%. An apparently identical disease occurs in multiple species, including but not limited to cats, dogs, and rabbits. Although the precise etiology remains unclear, ultrastructural findings have suggested that the primary lesion lies in the glycoprotein biosynthetic pathway of specific neuronal populations. The goal of this study was therefore to identify the molecular processes underpinning neurodegeneration in EGS. Here, we use a bottom-up approach beginning with the application of modern proteomic tools to the analysis of cranial (superior) cervical ganglion (CCG, a consistently affected tissue) from EGS-affected patients and appropriate control cases postmortem. In what appears to be the proteomic application of modern proteomic tools to equine neuronal tissues and/or to an inherent neurodegenerative disease of large animals (not a model of human disease), we identified 2,311 proteins in CCG extracts, with 320 proteins increased and 186 decreased by greater than 20% relative to controls. Further examination of selected proteomic candidates by quantitative fluorescent Western blotting (QFWB) and subcellular expression profiling by immunohistochemistry highlighted a previously unreported dysregulation in proteins commonly associated with protein misfolding/aggregation responses seen in a myriad of human neurodegenerative conditions, including but not limited to amyloid precursor protein (APP), microtubule associated protein (Tau), and multiple components of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Differentially expressed proteins eligible for in silico pathway analysis clustered predominantly into the following biofunctions: (1) diseases and disorders, including; neurological disease and skeletal and muscular disorders and (2) molecular and cellular functions, including cellular assembly and organization, cell

  12. Proteomic Profiling of Cranial (Superior) Cervical Ganglia Reveals Beta-Amyloid and Ubiquitin Proteasome System Perturbations in an Equine Multiple System Neuropathy*

    PubMed Central

    McGorum, Bruce C.; Pirie, R. Scott; Eaton, Samantha L.; Keen, John A.; Cumyn, Elizabeth M.; Arnott, Danielle M.; Chen, Wenzhang; Lamont, Douglas J.; Graham, Laura C.; Llavero Hurtado, Maica; Pemberton, Alan; Wishart, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Equine grass sickness (EGS) is an acute, predominantly fatal, multiple system neuropathy of grazing horses with reported incidence rates of ∼2%. An apparently identical disease occurs in multiple species, including but not limited to cats, dogs, and rabbits. Although the precise etiology remains unclear, ultrastructural findings have suggested that the primary lesion lies in the glycoprotein biosynthetic pathway of specific neuronal populations. The goal of this study was therefore to identify the molecular processes underpinning neurodegeneration in EGS. Here, we use a bottom-up approach beginning with the application of modern proteomic tools to the analysis of cranial (superior) cervical ganglion (CCG, a consistently affected tissue) from EGS-affected patients and appropriate control cases postmortem. In what appears to be the proteomic application of modern proteomic tools to equine neuronal tissues and/or to an inherent neurodegenerative disease of large animals (not a model of human disease), we identified 2,311 proteins in CCG extracts, with 320 proteins increased and 186 decreased by greater than 20% relative to controls. Further examination of selected proteomic candidates by quantitative fluorescent Western blotting (QFWB) and subcellular expression profiling by immunohistochemistry highlighted a previously unreported dysregulation in proteins commonly associated with protein misfolding/aggregation responses seen in a myriad of human neurodegenerative conditions, including but not limited to amyloid precursor protein (APP), microtubule associated protein (Tau), and multiple components of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Differentially expressed proteins eligible for in silico pathway analysis clustered predominantly into the following biofunctions: (1) diseases and disorders, including; neurological disease and skeletal and muscular disorders and (2) molecular and cellular functions, including cellular assembly and organization, cell

  13. Intracellular Protein Degradation: From a Vague Idea through the Lysosome and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System and onto Human Diseases and Drug Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Ciechanover, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Between the 1950s and 1980s, scientists were focusing mostly on how the genetic code was transcribed to RNA and translated to proteins, but how proteins were degraded had remained a neglected research area. With the discovery of the lysosome by Christian de Duve it was assumed that cellular proteins are degraded within this organelle. Yet, several independent lines of experimental evidence strongly suggested that intracellular proteolysis was largely non-lysosomal, but the mechanisms involved have remained obscure. The discovery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system resolved the enigma. We now recognize that degradation of intracellular proteins is involved in regulation of a broad array of cellular processes, such as cell cycle and division, regulation of transcription factors, and assurance of the cellular quality control. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human disease, such as malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, which led subsequently to an increasing effort to develop mechanism-based drugs. PMID:23908826

  14. PKC?-dependent activation of the ubiquitin proteasome system is responsible for high glucose-induced human breast cancer MCF-7 cell proliferation, migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shan; Yao, Feng; Li, Wen-Huan; Wan, Jin-Nan; Zhang, Yi-Min; Tang, Zhao; Khan, Shahzad; Wang, Chang-Hua; Sun, Sheng-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has contributed to advanced breast cancer development over the past decades. However, the mechanism underlying this contribution is poorly understood. In this study, we determined that high glucose enhanced proteasome activity was accompanied by enhanced proliferation, migration and invasion, as well as suppressed apoptosis, in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (BZM) pretreatment mitigated high glucose-induced MCF-7 cell growth and invasion. Furthermore, high glucose increased protein kinase C delta (PKC?)-phosphorylation. Administration of the specific PKC? inhibitor rottlerin attenuated high glucose-stimulated cancer cell growth and invasion. In addition, PKC? inhibition by both rottlerin and PKC? shRNA significantly suppressed high glucose-induced proteasome activity. Our results suggest that PKC?-dependent ubiquitin proteasome system activation plays an important role in high glucose- induced breast cancer cell growth and metastasis.

  15. A proteomic analysis of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)/ATM-Rad3-related (ATR) substrates identifies the ubiquitin-proteasome system as a regulator for DNA damage checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Mu, Jung-Jung; Wang, Yi; Luo, Hao; Leng, Mei; Zhang, Jinglan; Yang, Tao; Besusso, Dario; Jung, Sung Yun; Qin, Jun

    2007-06-15

    ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated) and ATR (ATM-Rad3-related) are proximal checkpoint kinases that regulate DNA damage response (DDR). Identification and characterization of ATM/ATR substrates hold the keys for the understanding of DDR. Few techniques are available to identify protein kinase substrates. Here, we screened for potential ATM/ATR substrates using phospho-specific antibodies against known ATM/ATR substrates. We identified proteins cross-reacting to phospho-specific antibodies in response to DNA damage by mass spectrometry. We validated a subset of the candidate substrates to be phosphorylated in an ATM/ATR-dependent manner in vivo. Combining with a functional checkpoint screen, we identified proteins that belong to the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) to be required in mammalian DNA damage checkpoint control, particularly the G(1) cell cycle checkpoint, thus revealing protein ubiquitylation as an important regulatory mechanism downstream of ATM/ATR activation for checkpoint control.

  16. Coordinated regulation of nuclear receptor CAR by CCRP/DNAJC7, HSP70 and the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Timsit, Yoav E; Negishi, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    The constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR) plays an important role as a coordinate transcription factor in the regulation of various hepatic metabolic pathways for chemicals such as drugs, glucose, fatty acids, bilirubin, and bile acids. Currently, it is known that in its inactive state, CAR is retained in the cytoplasm in a protein complex with HSP90 and the tetratricopeptide repeat protein cytosoplasmic CAR retention protein (CCRP). Upon activation by phenobarbital (PB) or the PB-like inducer 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]-benzene (TCPOBOP), CAR translocates into the nucleus. We have identified two new components to the cytoplasmic regulation of CAR: ubiquitin-dependent degradation of CCRP and protein-protein interaction with HSP70. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 (5 µM) causes CAR to accumulate in the cytoplasm of transfected HepG2 cells. In the presence of MG132, TCPOBOP increases CCRP ubiquitination in HepG2 cells co-expressing CAR, while CAR ubiquitination was not detected. MG132 treatment of HepG2 also attenuated of TCPOBOP-induced CAR transcriptional activation on reporter constructs which contain CAR-binding DNA elements derived from the human CYP2B6 gene. The elevation of cytoplasmic CAR protein with MG132 correlated with an increase of HSP70, and to a lesser extent HSP60. Both CCRP and CAR were found to interact with endogenous HSP70 in HepG2 cells by immunoprecipitation analysis. Induction of HSP70 levels by heat shock also increased cytoplasmic CAR levels, similar to the effect of MG132. Lastly, heat shock attenuated TCPOBOP-induced CAR transcriptional activation, also similar to the effect of MG132. Collectively, these data suggest that ubiquitin-proteasomal regulation of CCRP and HSP70 are important contributors to the regulation of cytoplasmic CAR levels, and hence the ability of CAR to respond to PB or PB-like inducers.

  17. Coordinated Regulation of Nuclear Receptor CAR by CCRP/DNAJC7, HSP70 and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Timsit, Yoav E.; Negishi, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    The constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR) plays an important role as a coordinate transcription factor in the regulation of various hepatic metabolic pathways for chemicals such as drugs, glucose, fatty acids, bilirubin, and bile acids. Currently, it is known that in its inactive state, CAR is retained in the cytoplasm in a protein complex with HSP90 and the tetratricopeptide repeat protein cytosoplasmic CAR retention protein (CCRP). Upon activation by phenobarbital (PB) or the PB-like inducer 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]-benzene (TCPOBOP), CAR translocates into the nucleus. We have identified two new components to the cytoplasmic regulation of CAR: ubiquitin-dependent degradation of CCRP and protein-protein interaction with HSP70. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 (5 µM) causes CAR to accumulate in the cytoplasm of transfected HepG2 cells. In the presence of MG132, TCPOBOP increases CCRP ubiquitination in HepG2 cells co-expressing CAR, while CAR ubiquitination was not detected. MG132 treatment of HepG2 also attenuated of TCPOBOP-induced CAR transcriptional activation on reporter constructs which contain CAR-binding DNA elements derived from the human CYP2B6 gene. The elevation of cytoplasmic CAR protein with MG132 correlated with an increase of HSP70, and to a lesser extent HSP60. Both CCRP and CAR were found to interact with endogenous HSP70 in HepG2 cells by immunoprecipitation analysis. Induction of HSP70 levels by heat shock also increased cytoplasmic CAR levels, similar to the effect of MG132. Lastly, heat shock attenuated TCPOBOP-induced CAR transcriptional activation, also similar to the effect of MG132. Collectively, these data suggest that ubiquitin-proteasomal regulation of CCRP and HSP70 are important contributors to the regulation of cytoplasmic CAR levels, and hence the ability of CAR to respond to PB or PB-like inducers. PMID:24789201

  18. What do we really know about the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in muscle atrophy?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoe, R. T.; Goldberg, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    Studies of many different rodent models of muscle wasting have indicated that accelerated proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is the principal cause of muscle atrophy induced by fasting, cancer cachexia, metabolic acidosis, denervation, disuse, diabetes, sepsis, burns, hyperthyroidism and excess glucocorticoids. However, our understanding about how muscle proteins are degraded, and how the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is activated in muscle under these conditions, is still very limited. The identities of the important ubiquitin-protein ligases in skeletal muscle, and the ways in which they recognize substrates are still largely unknown. Recent in-vitro studies have suggested that one set of ubquitination enzymes, E2(14K) and E3(alpha), which are responsible for the 'N-end rule' system of ubiquitination, plays an important role in muscle, especially in catabolic states. However, their functional significance in degrading different muscle proteins is still unclear. This review focuses on the many gaps in our understanding of the functioning of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in muscle atrophy, and highlights the strengths and limitations of the different experimental approaches used in such studies.

  19. What do we really know about the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in muscle atrophy?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoe, R. T.; Goldberg, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    Studies of many different rodent models of muscle wasting have indicated that accelerated proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is the principal cause of muscle atrophy induced by fasting, cancer cachexia, metabolic acidosis, denervation, disuse, diabetes, sepsis, burns, hyperthyroidism and excess glucocorticoids. However, our understanding about how muscle proteins are degraded, and how the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is activated in muscle under these conditions, is still very limited. The identities of the important ubiquitin-protein ligases in skeletal muscle, and the ways in which they recognize substrates are still largely unknown. Recent in-vitro studies have suggested that one set of ubquitination enzymes, E2(14K) and E3(alpha), which are responsible for the 'N-end rule' system of ubiquitination, plays an important role in muscle, especially in catabolic states. However, their functional significance in degrading different muscle proteins is still unclear. This review focuses on the many gaps in our understanding of the functioning of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in muscle atrophy, and highlights the strengths and limitations of the different experimental approaches used in such studies.

  20. Overview of Proteasome Inhibitor-Based Anti-cancer Therapies: Perspective on Bortezomib and Second Generation Proteasome Inhibitors versus Future Generation Inhibitors of Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Q. Ping; Zonder, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, proteasome inhibition has emerged as an effective therapeutic strategy for treating multiple myeloma (MM) and some lymphomas. In 2003, Bortezomib (BTZ) became the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). BTZ-based therapies have become a staple for the treatment of MM at all stages of the disease. The survival rate of MM patients has improved significantly since clinical introduction of BTZ and other immunomodulatory drugs. However, BTZ has several limitations. Not all patients respond to BTZ-based therapies and relapse occurs in many patients who initially responded. Solid tumors, in particular, are often resistant to BTZ. Furthermore, BTZ can induce dose-limiting peripheral neuropathy (PN). The second generation proteasome inhibitor Carfizomib (CFZ; U.S. FDA approved in August 2012) induces responses in a minority of MM patients relapsed from or refractory to BTZ. There is less PN compared to BTZ. Four other second-generation proteasome inhibitors (Ixazomib, Delanzomib, Oprozomib and Marizomib) with different pharmacologic properties and broader anticancer activities, have also shown some clinical activity in bortezomib-resistant cancers. While the mechanism of resistance to bortezomib in human cancers still remains to be fully understood, targeting the immunoproteasome, ubiquitin E3 ligases, the 19S proteasome and deubiquitinases in pre-clinical studies represents possible directions for future generation inhibitors of ubiquitin-proteasome system in the treatment of MM and other cancers. PMID:25092212

  1. Pyrrolidine Dithiocarbamate Inhibits Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and 2 Replication, and Its Activity May Be Mediated through Dysregulation of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Min; Chen, Yu; Cheng, Lin; Chu, Ying; Song, Hong-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) is widely used as an antioxidant or an NF-κB inhibitor. It has been reported to inhibit the replication of human rhinoviruses, poliovirus, coxsackievirus, and influenza virus. In this paper, we report that PDTC could inhibit the replication of herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2). PDTC suppressed the expression of HSV-1 and HSV-2 viral immediate early (IE) and late (membrane protein gD) genes and the production of viral progeny. This antiviral property was mediated by the dithiocarbamate moiety of PDTC and required the presence of Zn2+. Although PDTC could potently block reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, it was found that this property did not contribute to its anti-HSV activity. PDTC showed no activity in disrupting the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation induced by viral infection that was vital for the virus's propagation. We found that PDTC modulated cellular ubiquitination and, furthermore, influenced HSV-2-induced IκB-α degradation to inhibit NF-κB activation and enhanced PML stability in the nucleus, resulting in the inhibition of viral gene expression. These results suggested that the antiviral activity of PDTC might be mediated by its dysregulation of the cellular ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). PMID:23740985

  2. Regulation of the Nrf2–Keap1 Antioxidant Response by the Ubiquitin Proteasome System: An Insight into Cullin-Ring Ubiquitin Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Nicole F.; Lau, Alexandria

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Nrf2 is a transcription factor that has emerged as the cell's main defense mechanism against many harmful environmental toxicants and carcinogens. Nrf2 is negatively regulated by Keap1, a substrate adaptor protein for the Cullin3 (Cul3)-containing E3-ligase complex, which targets Nrf2 for ubiquitination and degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Recent evidence suggests that constitutive activation of Nrf2, due to mutations in Keap1 or Nrf2, is prominent in many cancer types and contributes to chemoresistance. Regulation of Nrf2 by the Cul3–Keap1-E3 ligase provides strong evidence that tight regulation of Cullin-ring ligases (CRLs) is imperative to maintain cellular homeostasis. There are seven known Cullin proteins that form various CRL complexes. They are regulated by neddylation/deneddylation, ubiquitination/deubiquitination, CAND1-assisted complex assembly/disassembly, and subunit dimerization. In this review, we will discuss the regulation of each CRL using the Cul3–Keap1-E3 ligase complex as the primary focus. The substrates of CRLs are involved in many signaling pathways. Therefore, deregulation of CRLs affects several cellular processes, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, cell proliferation, senescence, and death, which may lead to many human diseases, including cancer. This makes CRLs a promising target for novel cancer drug therapies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 1699–1712. PMID:20486766

  3. Exposure to Melan-A/MART-126-35 tumor epitope specific CD8(+)T cells reveals immune escape by affecting the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS).

    PubMed

    Ebstein, Frédéric; Keller, Martin; Paschen, Annette; Walden, Peter; Seeger, Michael; Bürger, Elke; Krüger, Elke; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kloetzel, Peter-M; Seifert, Ulrike

    2016-05-04

    Efficient processing of target antigens by the ubiquitin-proteasome-system (UPS) is essential for treatment of cancers by T cell therapies. However, immune escape due to altered expression of IFN-γ-inducible components of the antigen presentation machinery and consequent inefficient processing of HLA-dependent tumor epitopes can be one important reason for failure of such therapies. Here, we show that short-term co-culture of Melan-A/MART-1 tumor antigen-expressing melanoma cells with Melan-A/MART-126-35-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) led to resistance against CTL-induced lysis because of impaired Melan-A/MART-126-35 epitope processing. Interestingly, deregulation of p97/VCP expression, which is an IFN-γ-independent component of the UPS and part of the ER-dependent protein degradation pathway (ERAD), was found to be essentially involved in the observed immune escape. In support, our data demonstrate that re-expression of p97/VCP in Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL-resistant melanoma cells completely restored immune recognition by Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL. In conclusion, our experiments show that impaired expression of IFN-γ-independent components of the UPS can exert rapid immune evasion of tumor cells and suggest that tumor antigens processed by distinct UPS degradation pathways should be simultaneously targeted in T cell therapies to restrict the likelihood of immune evasion due to impaired antigen processing.

  4. Archaeal Tuc1/Ncs6 homolog required for wobble uridine tRNA thiolation is associated with ubiquitin-proteasome, translation, and RNA processing system homologs.

    PubMed

    Chavarria, Nikita E; Hwang, Sungmin; Cao, Shiyun; Fu, Xian; Holman, Mary; Elbanna, Dina; Rodriguez, Suzanne; Arrington, Deanna; Englert, Markus; Uthandi, Sivakumar; Söll, Dieter; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    While cytoplasmic tRNA 2-thiolation protein 1 (Tuc1/Ncs6) and ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (Urm1) are important in the 2-thiolation of 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm5s2U) at wobble uridines of tRNAs in eukaryotes, the biocatalytic roles and properties of Ncs6/Tuc1 and its homologs are poorly understood. Here we present the first report of an Ncs6 homolog of archaea (NcsA of Haloferax volcanii) that is essential for maintaining cellular pools of thiolated tRNA(Lys)UUU and for growth at high temperature. When purified from Hfx. volcanii, NcsA was found to be modified at Lys204 by isopeptide linkage to polymeric chains of the ubiquitin-fold protein SAMP2. The ubiquitin-activating E1 enzyme homolog of archaea (UbaA) was required for this covalent modification. Non-covalent protein partners that specifically associated with NcsA were also identified including UbaA, SAMP2, proteasome activating nucleotidase (PAN)-A/1, translation elongation factor aEF-1α and a β-CASP ribonuclease homolog of the archaeal cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 1 family (aCPSF1). Together, our study reveals that NcsA is essential for growth at high temperature, required for formation of thiolated tRNA(Lys)UUU and intimately linked to homologs of ubiquitin-proteasome, translation and RNA processing systems.

  5. Exposure to Melan-A/MART-126-35 tumor epitope specific CD8+T cells reveals immune escape by affecting the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS)

    PubMed Central

    Ebstein, Frédéric; Keller, Martin; Paschen, Annette; Walden, Peter; Seeger, Michael; Bürger, Elke; Krüger, Elke; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kloetzel, Peter-M.; Seifert, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Efficient processing of target antigens by the ubiquitin-proteasome-system (UPS) is essential for treatment of cancers by T cell therapies. However, immune escape due to altered expression of IFN-γ-inducible components of the antigen presentation machinery and consequent inefficient processing of HLA-dependent tumor epitopes can be one important reason for failure of such therapies. Here, we show that short-term co-culture of Melan-A/MART-1 tumor antigen-expressing melanoma cells with Melan-A/MART-126-35-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) led to resistance against CTL-induced lysis because of impaired Melan-A/MART-126-35 epitope processing. Interestingly, deregulation of p97/VCP expression, which is an IFN-γ-independent component of the UPS and part of the ER-dependent protein degradation pathway (ERAD), was found to be essentially involved in the observed immune escape. In support, our data demonstrate that re-expression of p97/VCP in Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL-resistant melanoma cells completely restored immune recognition by Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL. In conclusion, our experiments show that impaired expression of IFN-γ-independent components of the UPS can exert rapid immune evasion of tumor cells and suggest that tumor antigens processed by distinct UPS degradation pathways should be simultaneously targeted in T cell therapies to restrict the likelihood of immune evasion due to impaired antigen processing. PMID:27143649

  6. Archaeal Tuc1/Ncs6 Homolog Required for Wobble Uridine tRNA Thiolation Is Associated with Ubiquitin-Proteasome, Translation, and RNA Processing System Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Chavarria, Nikita E.; Hwang, Sungmin; Cao, Shiyun; Fu, Xian; Holman, Mary; Elbanna, Dina; Rodriguez, Suzanne; Arrington, Deanna; Englert, Markus; Uthandi, Sivakumar; Söll, Dieter; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    While cytoplasmic tRNA 2-thiolation protein 1 (Tuc1/Ncs6) and ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (Urm1) are important in the 2-thiolation of 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm5s2U) at wobble uridines of tRNAs in eukaryotes, the biocatalytic roles and properties of Ncs6/Tuc1 and its homologs are poorly understood. Here we present the first report of an Ncs6 homolog of archaea (NcsA of Haloferax volcanii) that is essential for maintaining cellular pools of thiolated tRNALysUUU and for growth at high temperature. When purified from Hfx. volcanii, NcsA was found to be modified at Lys204 by isopeptide linkage to polymeric chains of the ubiquitin-fold protein SAMP2. The ubiquitin-activating E1 enzyme homolog of archaea (UbaA) was required for this covalent modification. Non-covalent protein partners that specifically associated with NcsA were also identified including UbaA, SAMP2, proteasome activating nucleotidase (PAN)-A/1, translation elongation factor aEF-1α and a β-CASP ribonuclease homolog of the archaeal cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 1 family (aCPSF1). Together, our study reveals that NcsA is essential for growth at high temperature, required for formation of thiolated tRNALysUUU and intimately linked to homologs of ubiquitin-proteasome, translation and RNA processing systems. PMID:24906001

  7. The regulation of glucose on milk fat synthesis is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lily; Jiang, Li; Ding, Xiang-dong; Liu, Jian-feng; Zhang, Qin

    2015-09-11

    Glucose as one of the nutrition factors plays a vital role in the regulation of milk fat synthesis. Ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is a vital proteolytic pathway in all eukaryotic cells through timely marking, recognizing and degrading the poly-ubiquitinated protein substrates. Previous studies indicated that UPS plays a considerable role in controlling the triglyceride (TG) synthesis. Therefore, the aim of this study is to confirm the link between high-glucose and UPS and its regulation mechanism on milk fat synthesis in BMEC (bovine mammary epithelial cells). We incubated BMEC with normal (17.5 mm/L) and high-glucose (25 mm/L) with and without proteasome inhibitor epoxomicin and found that, compared with the control (normal glucose and without proteasome inhibitor), both high-glucose concentration and proteasome inhibitor epoxomicin could increase the accumulation of TG and poly-ubiquitinated proteins, and reduce significantly three proteasome activities (chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like). In addition, high-glucose concentration combined with proteasome inhibitor further enhanced the increase of the poly-ubiquitinated protein level and the decrease of proteasome activities. Our results suggest that the regulation of high-glucose on milk fat synthesis is mediated by UPS in BMEC, and high-glucose exposure could lead to a hypersensitization of BMEC to UPS inhibition which in turn results in increased milk fat synthesis.

  8. Treatment of Plasmodium chabaudi Parasites with Curcumin in Combination with Antimalarial Drugs: Drug Interactions and Implications on the Ubiquitin/Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Zoraima; Machado, Marta; Lindeza, Ana; do Rosário, Virgílio; Gazarini, Marcos L.; Lopes, Dinora

    2013-01-01

    Antimalarial drug resistance remains a major obstacle in malaria control. Evidence from Southeast Asia shows that resistance to artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is inevitable. Ethnopharmacological studies have confirmed the efficacy of curcumin against Plasmodium spp. Drug interaction assays between curcumin/piperine/chloroquine and curcumin/piperine/artemisinin combinations and the potential of drug treatment to interfere with the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) were analyzed. In vivo efficacy of curcumin was studied in BALB/c mice infected with Plasmodium chabaudi clones resistant to chloroquine and artemisinin, and drug interactions were analyzed by isobolograms. Subtherapeutic doses of curcumin, chloroquine, and artemisinin were administered to mice, and mRNA was collected following treatment for RT-PCR analysis of genes encoding deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs). Curcumin was found be nontoxic in BALB/c mice. The combination of curcumin/chloroquine/piperine reduced parasitemia to 37% seven days after treatment versus the control group's 65%, and an additive interaction was revealed. Curcumin/piperine/artemisinin combination did not show a favorable drug interaction in this murine model of malaria. Treatment of mice with subtherapeutic doses of the drugs resulted in a transient increase in genes encoding DUBs indicating UPS interference. If curcumin is to join the arsenal of available antimalarial drugs, future studies exploring suitable drug partners would be of interest. PMID:23691276

  9. Contribution of the autophagy-lysosomal and ubiquitin-proteasomal proteolytic systems to total proteolysis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) myotubes.

    PubMed

    Seiliez, Iban; Dias, Karine; Cleveland, Beth M

    2014-12-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is recognized as the major contributor to total proteolysis in mammalian skeletal muscle, responsible for 50% or more of total protein degradation in skeletal muscle, whereas the autophagic-lysosome system (ALS) plays a more minor role. While the relative contribution of these systems to muscle loss is well documented in mammals, little is known in fish species. The current study uses myotubes derived from rainbow trout myogenic precursor cells as an in vitro model of white muscle tissue. Cells were incubated in complete or serum-deprived media or media supplemented with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and exposed to selective proteolytic inhibitors to determine the relative contribution of the ALS and UPS to total protein degradation in myotubes in different culture conditions. Results indicate that the ALS is responsible for 30-34% and 50% of total protein degradation in myotubes in complete and serum-deprived media, respectively. The UPS appears to contribute much less to total protein degradation at almost 4% in cells in complete media to nearly 17% in serum-deprived cells. IGF-1 decreases activity of both systems, as it inhibited the upregulation of both proteolytic systems induced by serum deprivation. The combined inhibition of both the ALS and UPS reduced degradation by a maximum of 55% in serum-deprived cells, suggesting an important contribution of other proteolytic systems to total protein degradation. Collectively, these data identify the ALS as a potential target for strategies aimed at improving muscle protein retention and fillet yield through reductions in protein degradation.

  10. The Ubiquitin-associated (UBA) 1 Domain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rhp23 Is Essential for the Recognition of Ubiquitin-proteasome System Substrates Both in Vitro and in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Bethan; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos; Boehringer, Jonas; Sznajder, Anna; Robertson, Morag; Endicott, Jane; Gordon, Colin

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for maintaining a functional cell. Not only does it remove incorrectly folded proteins, it also regulates protein levels to ensure their appropriate spatial and temporal distribution. Proteins marked for degradation by the addition of Lys48-linked ubiquitin (Ub) chains are recognized by shuttle factors and transported to the 26 S proteasome. One of these shuttle factors, Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rhp23, has an unusual domain architecture. It comprises an N-terminal ubiquitin-like domain that can recognize the proteasome followed by two ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains, termed UBA1 and UBA2, which can bind Ub. This architecture is conserved up to humans, suggesting that both domains are important for Rhp23 function. Such an extent of conservation raises the question as to why, in contrast to all other shuttle proteins, does Rhp23 require two UBA domains? We performed in vitro Ub binding assays using domain swap chimeric proteins and mutated domains in isolation as well as in the context of the full-length protein to reveal that the Ub binding properties of the UBA domains are context-dependent. In vivo, the internal Rhp23 UBA1 domain provides sufficient Ub recognition for the protein to function without UBA2. PMID:23038266

  11. The ubiquitin-associated (UBA) 1 domain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rhp23 is essential for the recognition of ubiquitin-proteasome system substrates both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Medina, Bethan; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos; Boehringer, Jonas; Sznajder, Anna; Robertson, Morag; Endicott, Jane; Gordon, Colin

    2012-12-07

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for maintaining a functional cell. Not only does it remove incorrectly folded proteins, it also regulates protein levels to ensure their appropriate spatial and temporal distribution. Proteins marked for degradation by the addition of Lys(48)-linked ubiquitin (Ub) chains are recognized by shuttle factors and transported to the 26 S proteasome. One of these shuttle factors, Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rhp23, has an unusual domain architecture. It comprises an N-terminal ubiquitin-like domain that can recognize the proteasome followed by two ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains, termed UBA1 and UBA2, which can bind Ub. This architecture is conserved up to humans, suggesting that both domains are important for Rhp23 function. Such an extent of conservation raises the question as to why, in contrast to all other shuttle proteins, does Rhp23 require two UBA domains? We performed in vitro Ub binding assays using domain swap chimeric proteins and mutated domains in isolation as well as in the context of the full-length protein to reveal that the Ub binding properties of the UBA domains are context-dependent. In vivo, the internal Rhp23 UBA1 domain provides sufficient Ub recognition for the protein to function without UBA2.

  12. Pesticides that inhibit the ubiquitin-proteasome system: effect measure modification by genetic variation in SKP1 in Parkinson׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Shannon L; Fitzmaurice, Arthur G; Cockburn, Myles; Bronstein, Jeff M; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Ritz, Beate

    2013-10-01

    Cytoplasmic inclusions known as Lewy bodies, a hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD) pathology, may protect against cytotoxic proteins. Since the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) degrades cytotoxic proteins, dysfunction in the UPS may contribute to PD etiology. Our goal in this study was to screen pesticides for proteasome inhibition and investigate (i) whether ambient exposures to pesticides that inhibit the UPS increase PD risk and (ii) whether genetic variation in candidate genes of the UPS pathway modify those increased risks. We assessed 26S UPS activity in SK-N-MC(u) cells by fluorescence. We recruited idiopathic PD cases (n=360) and population-based controls (n=816) from three counties in California with considerable commercial agriculture. We determined ambient pesticide exposure by our validated GIS-based model utilizing residential and workplace address histories. We limited effect measure modification assessment to Caucasians (287 cases, 453 controls). Eleven of 28 pesticides we screened inhibited 26S UPS activity at 10 µM. Benomyl, cyanazine, dieldrin, endosulfan, metam, propargite, triflumizole, and ziram were associated with increased PD risk. We estimated an odds ratio of 2.14 (95% CI: 1.42, 3.22) for subjects with ambient exposure to any UPS-inhibiting pesticide at both residential and workplace addresses; this association was modified by genetic variation in the s-phase kinase-associated protein 1 gene (SKP1; interaction p-value=0.005). Our results provide evidence that UPS-inhibiting pesticides play a role in the etiology of PD and suggest that genetic variation in candidate genes involved in the UPS pathway might exacerbate the toxic effects of pesticide exposures.

  13. Pesticides that Inhibit the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System: Effect Measure Modification by Genetic Variation in SKP1 in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Shannon L.; Fitzmaurice, Arthur G.; Cockburn, Myles; Bronstein, Jeff M.; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Ritz, Beate

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic inclusions known as Lewy bodies, a hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD) pathology, may protect against cytotoxic proteins. Since the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) degrades cytotoxic proteins, dysfunction in the UPS may contribute to PD etiology. Our goal in this study was to screen pesticides for proteasome inhibition and investigate (i) whether ambient exposures to pesticides that inhibit the UPS increase PD risk and (ii) whether genetic variation in candidate genes of the UPS pathway modify those increased risks. We assessed 26S UPS activity in SK-N-MCu cells by fluorescence. We recruited idiopathic PD cases (n=360) and population-based controls (n=816) from three counties in California with considerable commercial agriculture. We determined ambient pesticide exposure by our validated GIS-based model utilizing residential and workplace address histories. We limited effect measure modification assessment to Caucasians (287 cases, 453 controls). 11 of 28 pesticides we screened inhibited 26S UPS activity at 10μM. Benomyl, cyanazine, dieldrin, endosulfan, metam, propargite, triflumizole, and ziram were associated with increased PD risk. We estimated an odds ratio of 2.14 (95%CI: 1.42,3.22) for subjects with ambient exposure to any UPS-inhibiting pesticide at both residential and workplace addresses; this association was modified by genetic variation in the s-phase kinase-associated protein 1 gene (SKP1; interaction p-value=0.005). Our results provide evidence that UPS-inhibiting pesticides play a role in the etiology of PD and suggest that genetic variation in candidate genes involved in the UPS pathway might exacerbate the toxic effects of pesticide exposures. PMID:23988235

  14. The Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway (UPP) in the regulation of cell cycle control and DNA damage repair and its implication in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yaqin; Chen, Cai; Pan, Junru; Xu, Junfa; Zhou, Zhi-Guang; Wang, Cong-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Accumulated evidence supports that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) plays a crucial role in protein metabolism implicated in the regulation of many biological processes such as cell cycle control, DNA damage response, apoptosis, and so on. Therefore, alterations for the ubiquitin proteasome signaling or functional impairments for the ubiquitin proteasome components are involved in the etiology of many diseases, particularly in cancer development. In this minireview, we first give a brief outline for the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, we then discuss with focus for the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in the regulation of cell cycle control and DNA damage response, the relevance for the altered regulation of these signaling pathways in tumorigenesis is also reviewed. We finally assess and summarize the advancement for targeting the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in cancer therapy. A better understanding of the biological functions underlying ubiquitin regulatory mechanisms would provide us a wider prospective on cancer treatment.

  15. Administration of haloperidol with biperiden reduces mRNAs related to the ubiquitin-proteasome system in mice.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Shin-Ichi; Morioka, Hirofumi; Iwabuchi, Mika; Shinohara, Kazuya; Maeda, Maki; Shimizu, Takao; Miyata, Atsuro

    2005-06-15

    In order to find molecules affected by administration of an antipsychotic drug with an antimuscarinic drug, which is a common prescription used to prevent extrapyramidal adverse effects caused by the antipsychotic drugs, gene expression profiling in the frontal cortex was studied in mice. After 14 days of administration with 2 mg/kg haloperidol, a typical antipsychotic drug, and 2 mg/kg biperiden, a high-affinity antagonist for muscarinic receptors in the brain, approximately 500 mRNAs related to synaptic function were investigated. The levels of the mRNAs related to the ubiquitin-related systems were significantly reduced after the combined administration. However, the separate administration of either haloperidol or biperiden had little effect on the levels of the mRNAs. This result suggests that coadministration of haloperidol and biperiden specifically affects the ubiquitin-related system.

  16. Plant ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and its role in gibberellin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Deng, Xing Wang

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in plants, like in other eukaryotes, targets numerous intracellular regulators and thus modulates almost every aspect of growth and development. The well-known and best-characterized outcome of ubiquitination is mediating target protein degradation via the 26S proteasome, which represents the major selective protein degradation pathway conserved among eukaryotes. In this review, we will discuss the molecular composition, regulation and function of plant UPS, with a major focus on how DELLA protein degradation acts as a key in gibberellin signal transduction and its implication in the regulation of plant growth. PMID:21788985

  17. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Ashok N.

    2010-01-01

    Proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) has emerged as a new molecular mechanism that controls wide-ranging functions in the nervous system, including fine-tuning of synaptic connections during development and synaptic plasticity in the adult organism. In the UPP, attachment of a small protein, ubiquitin, tags the substrates for degradation by a multisubunit complex called the proteasome. Linkage of ubiquitin to protein substrates is highly specific and occurs through a series of well-orchestrated enzymatic steps. The UPP regulates neurotransmitter receptors, protein kinases, synaptic proteins, transcription factors, and other molecules critical for synaptic plasticity. Accumulating evidence indicates that the operation of the UPP in neurons is not homogeneous and is subject to tightly managed local regulation in different neuronal subcompartments. Investigations on both invertebrate and vertebrate model systems have revealed local roles for enzymes that attach ubiquitin to substrate proteins, as well as for enzymes that remove ubiquitin from substrates. The proteasome also has been shown to possess disparate functions in different parts of the neuron. Here I give a broad overview of the role of the UPP in synaptic plasticity and highlight the local roles and regulation of the proteolytic pathway in neurons. PMID:20566674

  18. Muscle wasting in chronic kidney disease: the role of the ubiquitin proteasome system and its clinical impact

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Vik R.

    2007-01-01

    Muscle wasting in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and other catabolic diseases (e.g. sepsis, diabetes, cancer) can occur despite adequate nutritional intake. It is now known that complications of these various disorders, including acidosis, insulin resistance, inflammation, and increased glucocorticoid and angiotensin II production, all activate the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) to degrade muscle proteins. The initial step in this process is activation of caspase-3 to cleave the myofibril into its components (actin, myosin, troponin, and tropomyosin). Caspase-3 is required because the UPS minimally degrades the myofibril but rapidly degrades its component proteins. Caspase-3 activity is easily detected because it leaves a characteristic 14kD actin fragment in muscle samples. Preliminary evidence from several experimental models of catabolic diseases, as well as from studies in patients, indicates that this fragment could be a useful biomarker because it correlates well with the degree of muscle degradation in dialysis patients and in other catabolic conditions. PMID:17987322

  19. Mapping the interactome of HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins with the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Poirson, Juline; Biquand, Elise; Straub, Marie-Laure; Cassonnet, Patricia; Nominé, Yves; Jones, Louis; van der Werf, Sylvie; Travé, Gilles; Zanier, Katia; Jacob, Yves; Demeret, Caroline; Masson, Murielle

    2017-08-08

    Protein ubiquitination and its reverse reaction, deubiquitination, regulate protein stability, protein binding activity, and their subcellular localization. These reactions are catalyzed by the enzymes E1, E2, and E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligases and deubiquitinases (DUBs). The Ub-proteasome system (UPS) is targeted by viruses for the sake of their replication and to escape host immune response. To identify novel partners of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E6 and E7 proteins, we assembled and screened a library of 590 cDNAs related to the UPS by using the Gaussia princeps luciferase protein complementation assay. HPV16 E6 was found to bind to the homology to E6AP C terminus-type Ub ligase (E6AP), three really interesting new gene (RING)-type Ub ligases (MGRN1, LNX3, LNX4), and the DUB Ub-specific protease 15 (USP15). Except for E6AP, the binding of UPS factors did not require the LxxLL-binding pocket of HPV16 E6. LNX3 bound preferentially to all high-risk mucosal HPV E6 tested, whereas LNX4 bound specifically to HPV16 E6. HPV16 E7 was found to bind to several broad-complex tramtrack and bric-a-brac domain-containing proteins (such as TNFAIP1/KCTD13) that are potential substrate adaptors of Cullin 3-RING Ub ligases, to RING-type Ub ligases implicated in innate immunity (RNF135, TRIM32, TRAF2, TRAF5), to the substrate adaptor DCAF15 of Cullin 4-RING Ub ligase and to some DUBs (USP29, USP33). The binding to UPS factors did not require the LxCxE motif but rather the C-terminal region of HPV16 E7 protein. The identified UPS factors interacted with most of E7 proteins across different HPV types. This study establishes a strategy for the rapid identification of interactions between host or pathogen proteins and the human ubiquitination system. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  20. Ubiquitin, Proteasomes and Proteolytic Mechanisms Activated by Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Vik; Mitch, William E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) includes 3 enzymes that conjugate ubiquitin to intracellular proteins that are then recognized and degraded in the proteasome. The process participates in the regulation of cell metabolism. In the kidney, the UPS regulates the turnover of transporters and signaling proteins and its activity is down regulated in acidosis-induced proximal tubular cell hypertrophy. In chronic kidney disease (CKD), muscle wasting occurs because complications of CKD including acidosis, insulin resistance, inflammation, and increased angiotensin II levels stimulate the UPS to degrade muscle proteins. This response also includes caspase-3 and calpains which act to cleave muscle proteins to provide substrates for the UPS. For example, caspase-3 degrades actomyosin, leaving a 14kD fragment of actin in muscle. The 14 kD actin fragment is increased in muscle of patient with kidney disease, burn injury and surgery. In addition, acidosis, insulin resistance, inflammation and angiotensin II stimulate glucocorticoid production. Glucocorticoids are also required for the muscle wasting that occurs in CKD. Thus, the UPS is involved in regulating kidney function and participates in highly organized responses that degrade muscle protein in response to loss of kidney function. PMID:18723090

  1. Morphine Induces Ubiquitin-Proteasome Activity and Glutamate Transporter Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liling; Wang, Shuxing; Sung, Backil; Lim, Grewo; Mao, Jianren

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate transporters play a crucial role in physiological glutamate homeostasis, neurotoxicity, and glutamatergic regulation of opioid tolerance. However, how the glutamate transporter turnover is regulated remains poorly understood. Here we show that chronic morphine exposure induced posttranscriptional down-regulation of the glutamate transporter EAAC1 in C6 glioma cells with a concurrent decrease in glutamate uptake and increase in proteasome activity, which were blocked by the selective proteasome inhibitor MG-132 or lactacystin but not the lysosomal inhibitor chloroquin. At the cellular level, chronic morphine induced the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome Ten)-mediated up-regulation of the ubiquitin E3 ligase Nedd4 via cAMP/protein kinase A signaling, leading to EAAC1 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Either Nedd4 or PTEN knockdown with small interfering RNA prevented the morphine-induced EAAC1 degradation and decreased glutamate uptake. These data indicate that cAMP/protein kinase A signaling serves as an intracellular regulator upstream to the activation of the PTEN/Nedd4-mediated ubiquitin-proteasome system activity that is critical for glutamate transporter turnover. Under an in vivo condition, chronic morphine exposure also induced posttranscriptional down-regulation of the glutamate transporter EAAC1, which was prevented by MG-132, and transcriptional up-regulation of PTEN and Nedd4 within the spinal cord dorsal horn. Thus, inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated glutamate transporter degradation may be an important mechanism for preventing glutamate overexcitation and may offer a new strategy for treating certain neurological disorders and improving opioid therapy in chronic pain management. PMID:18539596

  2. Autophagy maintains ubiquitination-proteasomal degradation of Sirt3 to limit oxidative stress in K562 leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Cao, Yan; Xu, Fei; Yan, Lili; Nie, Meilan; Yuan, Na; Zhang, Suping; Zhao, Ruijin; Wang, Hongbin; Wu, Mengyin; Zhang, Xiaoying; Wang, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin protein family member 3 (Sirt3) has been suggested as a positive regulator in alleviating oxidative stress by acting on the mitochondrial antioxidant machinery in solid tumors; however, its role and regulation in hematological malignancies has been poorly understood. Here, we show that contrary to what has been reported in solid tumors, in K562 leukemia cells elevated Sirt3 was associated with mitochondrial stress, and depletion of Sirt3 decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and lipid oxidation, but increased the ratio of reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione (GSSG), suggesting an opposite role of Sirt3 in regulating oxidative stress in the leukemia cells. Notably, loss of autophagy by deletion of autophagy essential gene or by pharmacological inhibition on autophagic degradation caused a significant accumulation of Sirt3. However, induced activation of autophagy did not cause autophagic degradation of Sirt3. Furthermore, inhibiting proteasome activity accumulated Sirt3 in autophagy-intact but not autophagy-defective cells, and disrupting functional autophagy either genetically or pharmacologically caused significantly less ubiquitination of Sirt3. Therefore, our data suggest that basal but not enhanced autophagy activity maintains ubiquitination-proteasomal degradation of Sirt3 to limit lipid oxidative stress, representing an adaptive mechanism by which autophagy, in collaboration with the ubiquitination-proteasomal system, controls oxidative stress by controlling the levels of certain proteins in K562 leukemia cells. PMID:27232755

  3. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway an emerging anticancer strategy for therapeutics: a patent analysis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Chakresh K; Arora, Shivam; Khanna, Aparna; Gupta, Money; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Sharma, Sanjeev K

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of intracellular proteins is targeted by ubiquitin via non-lysosomal proteolytic pathway in the cell system. These ubiquitin molecules have been found to be conserved from yeast to humans. Ubiquitin proteasome machinery utilises ATP and other mechanisms for degrading proteins of cytosol as well as nucleus. This process of ubiquitination is regulated by activating the E3 enzyme ligase, involved in phosphorylation. In humans, proteins which regulate the cell cycle are controlled by ubiquitin; therefore the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway can be targeted for novel anti-cancer strategies. Dysregulation of the components of the ubiquitin system has been linked to many diseases like cancer and inflammation. The primary triggering mechanism (apoptosis) of these diseases can also be induced when TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) binds to its specific receptor DR4 and DR5. In this review, the emerging prospects and importance of ubiquitin proteasome pathway as an evolving anticancer strategy have been discussed. Current challenges in the field of drug discovery have also been discussed on the basis of recent patents on cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  4. Ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and cellular responses to oxidative stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) is the primary cytosolic proteolytic machinery for the selective degradation of various forms of damaged proteins. Thus, the UPP is an important protein quality control mechanism. In the canonical UPP, both ubiquitin and the 26S proteasome are involved. Subs...

  5. Exploring the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Protein Degradation Pathway in Yeast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Tamara J.; McWatters, Melissa K.; McQuade, Kristi L.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory investigating the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in yeast. In this exercise, the enzyme beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) is expressed in yeast under the control of a stress response promoter. Following exposure to heat stress to induce beta-gal expression, cycloheximide is added to halt…

  6. Exploring the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Protein Degradation Pathway in Yeast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Tamara J.; McWatters, Melissa K.; McQuade, Kristi L.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory investigating the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in yeast. In this exercise, the enzyme beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) is expressed in yeast under the control of a stress response promoter. Following exposure to heat stress to induce beta-gal expression, cycloheximide is added to halt…

  7. Recognition and Cleavage of Related to Ubiquitin 1 (Rub1) and Rub1-Ubiquitin Chains by Components of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajesh K.; Zerath, Sylvia; Kleifeld, Oded; Scheffner, Martin; Glickman, Michael H.; Fushman, David

    2012-01-01

    Of all ubiquitin-like proteins, Rub1 (Nedd8 in mammals) is the closest kin of ubiquitin. We show via NMR that structurally, Rub1 and ubiquitin are fundamentally similar as well. Despite these profound similarities, the prevalence of Rub1/Nedd8 and of ubiquitin as modifiers of the proteome is starkly different, and their attachments to specific substrates perform different functions. Recently, some proteins, including p53, p73, EGFR, caspase-7, and Parkin, have been shown to be modified by both Rub1/Nedd8 and ubiquitin within cells. To understand whether and how it might be possible to distinguish among the same target protein modified by Rub1 or ubiquitin or both, we examined whether ubiquitin receptors can differentiate between Rub1 and ubiquitin. Surprisingly, Rub1 interacts with proteasome ubiquitin-shuttle proteins comparably to ubiquitin but binds more weakly to a proteasomal ubiquitin receptor Rpn10. We identified Rub1-ubiquitin heteromers in yeast and Nedd8-Ub heteromers in human cells. We validate that in human cells and in vitro, human Rub1 (Nedd8) forms chains with ubiquitin where it acts as a chain terminator. Interestingly, enzymatically assembled K48-linked Rub1-ubiquitin heterodimers are recognized by various proteasomal ubiquitin shuttles and receptors comparably to K48-linked ubiquitin homodimers. Furthermore, these heterologous chains are cleaved by COP9 signalosome or 26S proteasome. A derubylation function of the proteasome expands the repertoire of its enzymatic activities. In contrast, Rub1 conjugates may be somewhat resilient to the actions of other canonical deubiquitinating enzymes. Taken together, these findings suggest that once Rub1/Nedd8 is channeled into ubiquitin pathways, it is recognized essentially like ubiquitin. PMID:23105008

  8. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway and Proteasome Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jayhyuk; Kim, Kyung Bo

    2008-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has emerged as a central player in the regulation of several diverse cellular processes. Here, we describe the important components of this complex biochemical machinery as well as several important cellular substrates targeted by this pathway and examples of human diseases resulting from defects in various components of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In addition, this review covers the chemistry of synthetic and natural proteasome inhibitors, emphasizing their mode of actions toward the 20S proteasome. Given the importance of proteasome-mediated protein degradation in various intracellular processes, inhibitors of this pathway will continue to serve as both molecular probes of major cellular networks as well as potential therapeutic agents for various human diseases. PMID:11410931

  9. Limiting the power of p53 through the ubiquitin proteasome pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome pathway is critical in restraining the activities of the p53 tumor suppressor. Numerous E3 and E4 ligases regulate p53 levels. Additionally, deubquitinating enzymes that modify p53 directly or indirectly also impact p53 function. When alterations of these proteins result in increased p53 activity, cells arrest in the cell cycle, senesce, or apoptose. On the other hand, alterations that result in decreased p53 levels yield tumor-prone phenotypes. This review focuses on the physiological relevance of these important regulators of p53 and their therapeutic implications. PMID:25128494

  10. Altered ubiquitin-proteasome signaling in right ventricular hypertrophy and failure

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Viswanathan; Zhao, Mingming; Reddy, Sushma; Fajardo, Giovanni; Wang, Xuejun; Dewey, Shannamar; Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) have been described in left ventricular hypertrophy and failure, although results have been inconsistent. The role of the UPS in right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy (RVH) and RV failure (RVF) is unknown. Given the greater percent increase in RV mass associated with RV afterload stress, as present in many congenital heart lesions, we hypothesized that alterations in the UPS could play an important role in RVH/RVF. UPS expression and activity were measured in the RV from mice with RVH/RVF secondary to pulmonary artery constriction (PAC). Epoxomicin and MG132 were used to inhibit the proteasome, and overexpression of the 11S PA28α subunit was used to activate the proteasome. PAC mice developed RVH (109.3% increase in RV weight to body weight), RV dilation with septal shift, RV dysfunction, and clinical RVF. Proteasomal function (26S β5 chymotrypsin-like activity) was decreased 26% (P < 0.05). Protein expression of 19S subunit Rpt5 (P < 0.05), UCHL1 deubiquitinase (P < 0.0001), and Smurf1 E3 ubiquitin ligase (P < 0.01) were increased, as were polyubiquitinated proteins (P < 0.05) and free-ubiquitins (P = 0.05). Pro-apoptotic Bax was increased (P < 0.0001), whereas anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 decreased (P < 0.05), resulting in a sixfold increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Proteasomal inhibition did not accelerate RVF. However, proteasome enhancement by cardiac-specific proteasome overexpression partially improved survival. Proteasome activity is decreased in RVH/RVF, associated with upregulation of key UPS regulators and pro-apoptotic signaling. Enhancement of proteasome function partially attenuates RVF, suggesting that UPS dysfunction contributes to RVF. PMID:23729213

  11. Altered ubiquitin-proteasome signaling in right ventricular hypertrophy and failure.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Viswanathan; Zhao, Mingming; Reddy, Sushma; Fajardo, Giovanni; Wang, Xuejun; Dewey, Shannamar; Gomes, Aldrin V; Bernstein, Daniel

    2013-08-15

    Alterations in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) have been described in left ventricular hypertrophy and failure, although results have been inconsistent. The role of the UPS in right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy (RVH) and RV failure (RVF) is unknown. Given the greater percent increase in RV mass associated with RV afterload stress, as present in many congenital heart lesions, we hypothesized that alterations in the UPS could play an important role in RVH/RVF. UPS expression and activity were measured in the RV from mice with RVH/RVF secondary to pulmonary artery constriction (PAC). Epoxomicin and MG132 were used to inhibit the proteasome, and overexpression of the 11S PA28α subunit was used to activate the proteasome. PAC mice developed RVH (109.3% increase in RV weight to body weight), RV dilation with septal shift, RV dysfunction, and clinical RVF. Proteasomal function (26S β₅ chymotrypsin-like activity) was decreased 26% (P < 0.05). Protein expression of 19S subunit Rpt5 (P < 0.05), UCHL1 deubiquitinase (P < 0.0001), and Smurf1 E3 ubiquitin ligase (P < 0.01) were increased, as were polyubiquitinated proteins (P < 0.05) and free-ubiquitins (P = 0.05). Pro-apoptotic Bax was increased (P < 0.0001), whereas anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 decreased (P < 0.05), resulting in a sixfold increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Proteasomal inhibition did not accelerate RVF. However, proteasome enhancement by cardiac-specific proteasome overexpression partially improved survival. Proteasome activity is decreased in RVH/RVF, associated with upregulation of key UPS regulators and pro-apoptotic signaling. Enhancement of proteasome function partially attenuates RVF, suggesting that UPS dysfunction contributes to RVF.

  12. Monitoring of ubiquitin-proteasome activity in living cells using a Degron (dgn)-destabilized green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based reporter protein.

    PubMed

    Greussing, Ruth; Unterluggauer, Hermann; Koziel, Rafal; Maier, Andrea B; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder

    2012-11-10

    Proteasome is the main intracellular organelle involved in the proteolytic degradation of abnormal, misfolded, damaged or oxidized proteins (1, 2). Maintenance of proteasome activity was implicated in many key cellular processes, like cell's stress response (3), cell cycle regulation and cellular differentiation (4) or in immune system response (5). The dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system has been related to the development of tumors and neurodegenerative diseases (4, 6). Additionally, a decrease in proteasome activity was found as a feature of cellular senescence and organismal aging (7, 8, 9, 10). Here, we present a method to measure ubiquitin-proteasome activity in living cells using a GFP-dgn fusion protein. To be able to monitor ubiquitin-proteasome activity in living primary cells, complementary DNA constructs coding for a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-dgn fusion protein (GFP-dgn, unstable) and a variant carrying a frameshift mutation (GFP-dgnFS, stable (11)) are inserted in lentiviral expression vectors. We prefer this technique over traditional transfection techniques because it guarantees a very high transfection efficiency independent of the cell type or the age of the donor. The difference between fluorescence displayed by the GFP-dgnFS (stable) protein and the destabilized protein (GFP-dgn) in the absence or presence of proteasome inhibitor can be used to estimate ubiquitin-proteasome activity in each particular cell strain. These differences can be monitored by epifluorescence microscopy or can be measured by flow cytometry.

  13. Colorectal Carcinogenesis, Radiation Quality, and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Fornace, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    Adult colorectal epithelium undergoes continuous renewal and maintains homeostatic balance through regulated cellular proliferation, differentiation, and migration. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway involving the transcriptional co-activator β-catenin is important for colorectal development and normal epithelial maintenance, and deregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Colorectal carcinogenesis has been linked to radiation exposure, and radiation has been demonstrated to alter Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as well as the proteasomal pathway involved in the degradation of the signaling components and thus regulation of β-catenin. The current review discusses recent progresses in our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis in relation to different types of radiation and roles that radiation quality plays in deregulating β-catenin and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) for colorectal cancer initiation and progression. PMID:26819641

  14. The Emerging Role of the Ubiquitin Proteasome in Pulmonary Biology and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weathington, Nathaniel M.; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2013-01-01

    Derangements in normal cellular homeostasis at the protein level can cause or be the consequence of initiation and progression of pulmonary diseases related to genotype, infection, injury, smoking, toxin exposure, or neoplasm. We discuss one of the fundamental mechanisms of protein homeostasis, the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), as it relates to lung disease. The UPS effects selective degradation of ubiquitinated target proteins via ubiquitin ligase activity. Important pathobiological mechanisms relating to the UPS and lung disease have been the focus of research, with inappropriate cellular proteolysis now a validated therapeutic target. We review the contributions of this system in various lung diseases, and discuss the exciting area of UPS-targeting drug development for pulmonary disease. PMID:23713962

  15. Ubiquitin-Proteasome Dependent Regulation of the GOLDEN2-LIKE 1 Transcription Factor in Response to Plastid Signals1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tokumaru, Mitsuaki; Adachi, Fumi; Toda, Makoto; Yazu, Fumiko; Hirosawa, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GOLDEN2-LIKE (GLK) transcription factors promote chloroplast biogenesis by regulating the expression of photosynthesis-related genes. Arabidopsis GLK1 is also known to participate in retrograde signaling from chloroplasts to the nucleus. To elucidate the mechanism by which GLK1 is regulated in response to plastid signals, we biochemically characterized Arabidopsis GLK1 protein. Expression analysis of GLK1 protein indicated that GLK1 accumulates in aerial tissues. Both tissue-specific and Suc-dependent accumulation of GLK1 were regulated primarily at the transcriptional level. In contrast, norflurazon- or lincomycin-treated gun1-101 mutant expressing normal levels of GLK1 mRNA failed to accumulate GLK1 protein, suggesting that plastid signals directly regulate the accumulation of GLK1 protein in a GUN1-independent manner. Treatment of the glk1glk2 mutant expressing functional GFP-GLK1 with a proteasome inhibitor, MG-132, induced the accumulation of polyubiquitinated GFP-GLK1. Furthermore, the level of endogenous GLK1 in plants with damaged plastids was partially restored when those plants were treated with MG-132. Collectively, these data indicate that the ubiquitin-proteasome system participates in the degradation of Arabidopsis GLK1 in response to plastid signals. PMID:27821720

  16. Muscle atrophy, ubiquitin-proteasome, and autophagic pathways in dysferlinopathy.

    PubMed

    Fanin, Marina; Nascimbeni, Anna C; Angelini, Corrado

    2014-09-01

    Muscle fiber atrophy and the molecular pathways underlying this process have not been investigated in dysferlinopathy patients. In 22 muscles from dysferlinopathy patients we investigated fiber atrophy by morphometry and ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagic pathways using protein and/or transcriptional analysis of atrophy- and autophagy-related genes (MuRF1, atrogin1, LC3, p62, Bnip3). Dysferlinopathy showed significant fiber atrophy and higher MuRF-1 protein and mRNA levels, which correlated with fiber size, suggesting activation of the atrophy program by proteasome induction. Some of the MuRF-1 upregulation and proteasome induction may be attributed to the prominent regeneration found. A potential role of impaired autophagy was suggested by p62-positive protein aggregates in atrophic fibers and significantly higher levels of LC3-II and p62 proteins and overexpression of p62 and Bnip3 mRNA. Damaged muscle fibers and prominent inflammatory changes may also enhance autophagy due to the insufficient level of proteasomal degradation of mutant dysferlin. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Ubiquitin-proteasome dependent degradation of GABAAα1 in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    was found in the middle frontal gyrus of ASD subjects. Conclusions SYVN1 plays a critical role as an E3 ligase in the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS)-mediated GABAAα1 degradation. Thus, inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated GABAAα1 degradation may be an important mechanism for preventing GABAAα1 turnover to maintain GABAAα1 levels and GABA signaling in ASD. PMID:25392730

  18. Degradation of the Neurospora circadian clock protein FREQUENCY through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    He, Q; Liu, Y

    2005-11-01

    Phosphorylation of the Neurospora circadian clock protein FREQUENCY (FRQ) promotes its degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Ubiquitination of FRQ requires FWD-1 (F-box/WD-40 repeat-containing protein-1), which is the substrate-recruiting subunit of an SCF (SKP/Cullin/F-box)-type ubiquitin ligase. In the fwd-1 mutant strains, FRQ degradation is defective, resulting in the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated FRQ and the loss of the circadian rhythmicities. The CSN (COP9 signalosome) promotes the function of SCF complexes in vivo. But in vitro, deneddylation of cullins by CSN inhibits SCF activity. In Neurospora, the disruption of the csn-2 subunit impairs FRQ degradation and compromises the normal circadian functions. These defects are due to the dramatically reduced levels of FWD-1 in the csn-2 mutant, a result of its rapid degradation. Other components of the SCF(FWD-1) complex, SKP-1 and CUL-1 are also unstable in the mutant. These results establish important roles for SCF(FWD-1) and CSN in the circadian clock of Neurospora and suggest that they are conserved components of the eukaryotic circadian clocks. In addition, these findings resolve the CSN paradox and suggest that the major function of CSN is to maintain the stability of SCF ubiquitin ligases in vivo.

  19. Neuroinflammation and J2 prostaglandins: linking impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and mitochondria to neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E.; Rockwell, Patricia; Schmidt-Glenewinkel, Thomas; Serrano, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The immune response of the CNS is a defense mechanism activated upon injury to initiate repair mechanisms while chronic over-activation of the CNS immune system (termed neuroinflammation) may exacerbate injury. The latter is implicated in a variety of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, HIV dementia, and prion diseases. Cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2), which are key enzymes in the conversion of arachidonic acid into bioactive prostanoids, play a central role in the inflammatory cascade. J2 prostaglandins are endogenous toxic products of cyclooxygenases, and because their levels are significantly increased upon brain injury, they are actively involved in neuronal dysfunction induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli. In this review, we highlight the mechanisms by which J2 prostaglandins (1) exert their actions, (2) potentially contribute to the transition from acute to chronic inflammation and to the spreading of neuropathology, (3) disturb the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and mitochondrial function, and (4) contribute to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as stroke, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and demyelination in Krabbe disease. We conclude by discussing the therapeutic potential of targeting the J2 prostaglandin pathway to prevent/delay neurodegeneration associated with neuroinflammation. In this context, we suggest a shift from the traditional view that cyclooxygenases are the most appropriate targets to treat neuroinflammation, to the notion that J2 prostaglandin pathways and other neurotoxic prostaglandins downstream from cyclooxygenases, would offer significant benefits as more effective therapeutic targets to treat chronic neurodegenerative diseases, while minimizing adverse side effects. PMID:25628533

  20. New insights to the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) mechanism during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Cong-Cong; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2013-04-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complicated and highly ordered process which begins with the differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells and ends with the formation of mature sperm. After meiosis, several morphological changes occur during spermatogenesis. During spermatogenesis, many proteins and organelles are degraded, and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) plays a key role in the process which facilitates the formation of condensed sperm. UPP contains various indispensable components: ubiquitin, ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2, ubiquitin ligase enzyme E3 and proteasomes. At some key stages of spermatogenesis, such as meiosis, acrosome biogenesis, and spermatozoa maturation, the ubiquitin-related components (including deubiquitination enzymes) exert positive and active functions. Generally speaking, deficient UPP will block spermatogenesis which may induce infertility at various degrees. Although ubiquitination during spermatogenesis has been widely investigated, further detailed aspects such as the mechanism of ubiquitination during the formation of midpiece and acrosome morphogenesis still remains unknown. The present review will overview current progress on ubiquitination during spermatogenesis, and will provide some suggestions for future studies on the functions of UPP components during spermatogenesis.

  1. New insights into the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in the regulation of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cui-Hua; Goldberg, Alfred L; Qiu, Xiao-Bo

    2007-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) is the major system responsible for degradation of intracellular proteins in eukaryotes. By controlling the levels of key proteins, it regulates almost all of the cellular activities, including cell cycle progression, DNA replication and repair, transcription, protein quality control, immune response, and apoptosis. UPP is composed of the ubiquitination system that marks proteins for degradation and the proteasome which degrades the ubiquitinated proteins. The 26S proteasome is a 2400 kDa complex consisting of more than 40 subunits. Following ubiquitination catalyzed by the ubiquitin activating enzyme (El), a ubiquitin-carrier protein (E2), and one of the cell's many ubiquitin-protein ligases (E3s), the protein substrates are targeted to the proteasome for degradation into small peptides. E3s regulate the degradation of protein substrates indirectly by determining both the specificity and timing of substrate ubiquitination, whereas the deubiquitinating enzymes can inhibit this process by releasing ubiquitin from substrates. In this review, we attempt to highlight the recent progress in research on UPP and its role in the regulation of apoptosis by focusing on several of its important components, including the ubiqutin ligase Nrdp 1, which regulates ErbB/EGFR family of receptor tyrosine kinases, the ubiquitin-carrier protein BRUCE/Apollon (an Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein), and the novel proteasome subunit hRpnl3 (a binding site for the deubiquitinating enzyme, UCH37).

  2. Contributions of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and apoptosis to human skeletal muscle wasting with age.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Samantha A; Wacker, Michael J; Richmond, Scott R; Godard, Michael P

    2005-09-01

    The primary mechanism that contributes to decreasing skeletal muscle strength and size with healthy aging is not presently known. This study examined the contribution of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and apoptosis to skeletal muscle wasting in older adults (n = 21; mean age = 72.76 +/- 8.31 years) and young controls (n = 21; mean age = 21.48 +/- 2.93 years). Subjects underwent a percutaneous muscle biopsy of the vastus lateralis to determine: (1) ubiquitin ligase gene expression (MAFbx and MuRF1); (2) frequency of apoptosis; and (3) individual fiber type and cross-sectional area. In addition, a whole muscle strength test was also performed. A one-way ANOVA revealed significant increases in the number of positive TUNEL cells in older adults (87%; p < 0.05), although no significant increase in caspase-3/7 activity was detected. Additionally, ubiquitin ligase gene expression, individual muscle fiber type and CSA were not different between old and young subjects. Muscle strength was also significantly lower in old compared to young subjects (p < 0.05). In conclusion, this study indicates a preferential role for apoptosis contributing to decreases in muscle function with age.

  3. Plant Virus Infection and the Ubiquitin Proteasome Machinery: Arms Race along the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Verchot, Jeanmarie

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is central to plant virus replication, translation, maturation, and egress. Ubiquitin modification of ER associated cellular and viral proteins, alongside the actions of the 26S proteasome, are vital for the regulation of infection. Viruses can arrogate ER associated ubiquitination as well as cytosolic ubiquitin ligases with the purpose of directing the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) to new targets. Such targets include necessary modification of viral proteins which may stabilize certain complexes, or modification of Argonaute to suppress gene silencing. The UPS machinery also contributes to the regulation of effector triggered immunity pattern recognition receptor immunity. Combining the results of unrelated studies, many positive strand RNA plant viruses appear to interact with cytosolic Ub-ligases to provide novel avenues for controlling the deleterious consequences of disease. Viral interactions with the UPS serve to regulate virus infection in a manner that promotes replication and movement, but also modulates the levels of RNA accumulation to ensure successful biotrophic interactions. In other instances, the UPS plays a central role in cellular immunity. These opposing roles are made evident by contrasting studies where knockout mutations in the UPS can either hamper viruses or lead to more aggressive diseases. Understanding how viruses manipulate ER associated post-translational machineries to better manage virus–host interactions will provide new targets for crop improvement. PMID:27869775

  4. Positive Symptoms of Psychosis Correlate With Expression of Ubiquitin Proteasome Genes in Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Bousman, Chad A.; Chana, Gursharan; Glatt, Stephen J.; Chandler, Sharon D.; May, Todd; Lohr, James; Kremen, William S.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Everall, Ian P.

    2015-01-01

    Several brain- and blood-based gene expression studies in patients with psychotic disorders (e.g., schizophrenia) have identified genes in the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) pathway as putative biomarkers. However, to date an examination of the UPS pathway in the broader context of symptom severity in psychosis has not been conducted. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between clinical scores on the Scales for the Assessment of Positive and Negative Symptoms (SAPS–SANS) and expression of 43 highly annotated genes within the UPS pathway in blood from patients with psychosis. A sample of 19 psychotic patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (n = 13) or bipolar disorder (n = 6) were recruited. Pearson's partial correlations, adjusting for gender, ethnicity, age, education, medication, smoking, and past 6-month substance use, were performed between each of the selected UPS genes and both scales. Significant Bonferroni-adjusted positive associations were observed between SAPS scores and two ubiquitin conjugation genes (i.e., UBE2K, SIAH2), while a negative association was observed with one deubiquitination gene (i.e., USP2). No gene expression levels were significantly associated with scores on the SANS after correction for multiple testing. Our findings suggest that dysregulation of the UPS, specifically ubiquitin conjugation and deubiquitination, may point to a possible underlying biological mechanism for severity of positive but not negative symptoms. PMID:20552680

  5. Chemical approaches to targeted protein degradation through modulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Collins, Ian; Wang, Hannah; Caldwell, John J; Chopra, Raj

    2017-03-15

    Manipulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system to achieve targeted degradation of proteins within cells using chemical tools and drugs has the potential to transform pharmacological and therapeutic approaches in cancer and other diseases. An increased understanding of the molecular mechanism of thalidomide and its analogues following their clinical use has unlocked small-molecule modulation of the substrate specificity of the E3 ligase cereblon (CRBN), which in turn has resulted in the advancement of new immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) into the clinic. The degradation of multiple context-specific proteins by these pleiotropic small molecules provides a means to uncover new cell biology and to generate future drug molecules against currently undruggable targets. In parallel, the development of larger bifunctional molecules that bring together highly specific protein targets in complexes with CRBN, von Hippel-Lindau, or other E3 ligases to promote ubiquitin-dependent degradation has progressed to generate selective chemical compounds with potent effects in cells and in vivo models, providing valuable tools for biological target validation and with future potential for therapeutic use. In this review, we survey recent breakthroughs achieved in these two complementary methods and the discovery of new modes of direct and indirect engagement of target proteins with the proteasome. We discuss the experimental characterisation that validates the use of molecules that promote protein degradation as chemical tools, the preclinical and clinical examples disclosed to date, and the future prospects for this exciting area of chemical biology. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Formation of distinct inclusion bodies by inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junho; Yang, Kyu-Hwan; Joe, Cheol O; Kang, Seok-Seong

    2011-01-14

    Accumulation of misfolded proteins is caused by the impairment of protein quality control systems, such as ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) and autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP). In this study, the formation of inclusion bodies was examined after the blockade of UPP and/or ALP in A549 cells. UPP inhibition induced a single and large inclusion body localized in microtubule-organizing center. Interestingly, however, ALP inhibition generated dispersed small inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm. Tuberous sclerosis complex 2 was selectively accumulated in the inclusion bodies of UPP-inhibited cells, but not those of ALP-inhibited cells. Blockade of transcription and translation entirely inhibited the formation of inclusion body induced by UPP inhibition, but partially by ALP inhibition. Moreover, the simultaneous inhibition of two protein catabolic pathways independently developed two distinct inclusion bodies within a single cell. These findings clearly demonstrated that dysfunction of each catabolic pathway induced formation and accumulation of unique inclusion bodies on the basis of morphology, localization and formation process in A549 cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Plant Virus Infection and the Ubiquitin Proteasome Machinery: Arms Race along the Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    PubMed

    Verchot, Jeanmarie

    2016-11-19

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is central to plant virus replication, translation, maturation, and egress. Ubiquitin modification of ER associated cellular and viral proteins, alongside the actions of the 26S proteasome, are vital for the regulation of infection. Viruses can arrogate ER associated ubiquitination as well as cytosolic ubiquitin ligases with the purpose of directing the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) to new targets. Such targets include necessary modification of viral proteins which may stabilize certain complexes, or modification of Argonaute to suppress gene silencing. The UPS machinery also contributes to the regulation of effector triggered immunity pattern recognition receptor immunity. Combining the results of unrelated studies, many positive strand RNA plant viruses appear to interact with cytosolic Ub-ligases to provide novel avenues for controlling the deleterious consequences of disease. Viral interactions with the UPS serve to regulate virus infection in a manner that promotes replication and movement, but also modulates the levels of RNA accumulation to ensure successful biotrophic interactions. In other instances, the UPS plays a central role in cellular immunity. These opposing roles are made evident by contrasting studies where knockout mutations in the UPS can either hamper viruses or lead to more aggressive diseases. Understanding how viruses manipulate ER associated post-translational machineries to better manage virus-host interactions will provide new targets for crop improvement.

  8. Formation of distinct inclusion bodies by inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Junho; Yang, Kyu-Hwan; Joe, Cheol O.; Kang, Seok-Seong

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Distinct inclusion bodies are developed by inhibition of UPP and ALP. {yields} The inclusion bodies differ in morphology, localization and formation process. {yields} The inclusion bodies are distinguishable by the localization of TSC2. {yields} Inhibition of both UPP and ALP simultaneously induces those inclusion bodies. -- Abstract: Accumulation of misfolded proteins is caused by the impairment of protein quality control systems, such as ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) and autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP). In this study, the formation of inclusion bodies was examined after the blockade of UPP and/or ALP in A549 cells. UPP inhibition induced a single and large inclusion body localized in microtubule-organizing center. Interestingly, however, ALP inhibition generated dispersed small inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm. Tuberous sclerosis complex 2 was selectively accumulated in the inclusion bodies of UPP-inhibited cells, but not those of ALP-inhibited cells. Blockade of transcription and translation entirely inhibited the formation of inclusion body induced by UPP inhibition, but partially by ALP inhibition. Moreover, the simultaneous inhibition of two protein catabolic pathways independently developed two distinct inclusion bodies within a single cell. These findings clearly demonstrated that dysfunction of each catabolic pathway induced formation and accumulation of unique inclusion bodies on the basis of morphology, localization and formation process in A549 cells.

  9. Ubiquitin proteasome pathway-mediated degradation of proteins: effects due to site-specific substrate deamidation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The accumulation, aggregation, and precipitation of proteins are etiologic for age-related diseases, particularly cataract, because the precipitates cloud the lens. Deamidation of crystallins is associated with protein precipitation, aging, and cataract. Among the roles of the ubiquitin proteasome p...

  10. Impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in RPE alters the expression of inflammation related genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) plays an important role in regulating gene expression. Retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) are a major source of ocular inflammatory cytokines. In this work we determined the relationship between impairment of the UPP and expression of inflammation-related f...

  11. High-throughput bioluminescence screening of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway inhibitors from chemical and natural sources.

    PubMed

    Ausseil, Frederic; Samson, Arnaud; Aussagues, Yannick; Vandenberghe, Isabelle; Creancier, Laurent; Pouny, Isabelle; Kruczynski, Anna; Massiot, Georges; Bailly, Christian

    2007-02-01

    To discover original inhibitors of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, the authors have developed a cell-based bioluminescent assay and used it to screen collections of plant extracts and chemical compounds. They first established a DLD-1 human colon cancer cell line that stably expresses a 4Ubiquitin-Luciferase (4Ub-Luc) reporter protein, efficiently targeted to the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway. The assay was then adapted to 96- and 384-well plate formats and calibrated with reference proteasome inhibitors. Assay robustness was carefully assessed, particularly cell toxicity, and the statistical Z factor value was calculated to 0.83, demonstrating a good performance level of the assay. A total of 18,239 molecules and 15,744 plant extracts and fractions thereof were screened for their capacity to increase the luciferase activity in DLD-1 4Ub-Luc cells, and 21 molecules and 66 extracts inhibiting the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway were identified. The fractionation of an active methanol extract of Physalis angulata L. aerial parts was performed to isolate 2 secosteroids known as physalin B and C. In a cell-based Western blot assay, the ubiquitinated protein accumulation was confirmed after a physalin treatment confirming the accuracy of the screening process. The method reported here thus provides a robust approach to identify novel ubiquitin-proteasome pathway inhibitors in large collections of chemical compounds and natural products.

  12. The PML-nuclear inclusion of human supraoptic neurons: a new compartment with SUMO-1- and ubiquitin-proteasome-associated domains.

    PubMed

    Villagra, Nuria T; Navascues, Joaquin; Casafont, Iñigo; Val-Bernal, J Fernando; Lafarga, Miguel; Berciano, Maria T

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that the cell nucleus is organized in structural and functional compartments involved in transcription, RNA processing and protein modifications such as conjugation with SUMO-1 and proteolysis. Promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) bodies are dynamic nuclear structures that concentrate PML protein, SUMO-1 and several sumoylated and non-sumoylated protein regulators of nuclear functions. PML bodies and their associated CBP has been involved in neuronal survival. By light and electron microscopy immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization we reported the presence, in non-pathological conditions, of a large PML-nuclear inclusion (PML-NI) in human supraoptic neurons. This inclusion appears as a single nuclear structure composed of a capsule enriched in PML, SUMO-1 and CBP proteins and a central lattice of filaments immunoreactive for class III beta-tubulin, ubiquitinated proteins and proteasomes. Furthermore, the PML-NI concentrates the SUMO-conjugating enzyme E2 (UBC9). The PML-NI may be considered a nuclear factory involved in sumoylation and proteolysis via ubiquitin-proteasome system, two nuclear pathways engaged in the control of the nucleoplasmic concentration of active transcriptional regulators. Interestingly, the structural and molecular organization of the PML-NI is related to the Marinesco bodies, age-associated ubiquitinated intranuclear inclusions, and to the intranuclear rodlets enriched in class III beta-tubulin, which are nuclear structures markedly decreased in Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Heat Shock Protein 70 Regulates Degradation of the Mumps Virus Phosphoprotein via the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Toru; Kita, Shunsuke; Nakatsu, Yuichiro; Aoki, Natsuko; Mori, Yoshio; Maenaka, Katsumi; Takeda, Makoto; Kidokoro, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mumps virus (MuV) infection induces formation of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies (IBs). Growing evidence indicates that IBs are the sites where RNA viruses synthesize their viral RNA. However, in the case of MuV infection, little is known about the viral and cellular compositions and biological functions of the IBs. In this study, pulldown purification and N-terminal amino acid sequencing revealed that stress-inducible heat shock protein 70 (Hsp72) was a binding partner of MuV phosphoprotein (P protein), which was an essential component of the IB formation. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analyses revealed that Hsp72 was colocalized with the P protein in the IBs, and its expression was increased during MuV infection. Knockdown of Hsp72 using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) had little, if any, effect on viral propagation in cultured cells. Knockdown of Hsp72 caused accumulation of ubiquitinated P protein and delayed P protein degradation. These results show that Hsp72 is recruited to IBs and regulates the degradation of MuV P protein through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. IMPORTANCE Formation of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies (IBs) is a common characteristic feature in mononegavirus infections. IBs are considered to be the sites of viral RNA replication and transcription. However, there have been few studies focused on host factors recruited to the IBs and their biological functions. Here, we identified stress-inducible heat shock protein 70 (Hsp72) as the first cellular partner of mumps virus (MuV) phosphoprotein (P protein), which is an essential component of the IBs and is involved in viral RNA replication/transcription. We found that the Hsp72 mobilized to the IBs promoted degradation of the MuV P protein through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Our data provide new insight into the role played by IBs in mononegavirus infection. PMID:25552722

  14. Degradation Signals for Ubiquitin-Proteasome Dependent Cytosolic Protein Quality Control (CytoQC) in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Matthew J; Spear, Eric D; Yu, Allen T; Lee, Evan J; Shahzad, Saba; Michaelis, Susan

    2016-07-07

    Cellular protein quality control (PQC) systems selectively target misfolded or otherwise aberrant proteins for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). How cells discern abnormal from normal proteins remains incompletely understood, but involves in part the recognition between ubiquitin E3 ligases and degradation signals (degrons) that are exposed in misfolded proteins. PQC is compartmentalized in the cell, and a great deal has been learned in recent years about ER-associated degradation (ERAD) and nuclear quality control. In contrast, a comprehensive view of cytosolic quality control (CytoQC) has yet to emerge, and will benefit from the development of a well-defined set of model substrates. In this study, we generated an isogenic "degron library" in Saccharomyces cerevisiae consisting of short sequences appended to the C-terminus of a reporter protein, Ura3 About half of these degron-containing proteins are substrates of the integral membrane E3 ligase Doa10, which also plays a pivotal role in ERAD and some nuclear protein degradation. Notably, some of our degron fusion proteins exhibit dependence on the E3 ligase Ltn1/Rkr1 for degradation, apparently by a mechanism distinct from its known role in ribosomal quality control of translationally paused proteins. Ubr1 and San1, E3 ligases involved in the recognition of some misfolded CytoQC substrates, are largely dispensable for the degradation of our degron-containing proteins. Interestingly, the Hsp70/Hsp40 chaperone/cochaperones Ssa1,2 and Ydj1, are required for the degradation of all constructs tested. Taken together, the comprehensive degron library presented here provides an important resource of isogenic substrates for testing candidate PQC components and identifying new ones. Copyright © 2016 Maurer et al.

  15. Degradation Signals for Ubiquitin-Proteasome Dependent Cytosolic Protein Quality Control (CytoQC) in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Matthew J.; Spear, Eric D.; Yu, Allen T.; Lee, Evan J.; Shahzad, Saba; Michaelis, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Cellular protein quality control (PQC) systems selectively target misfolded or otherwise aberrant proteins for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). How cells discern abnormal from normal proteins remains incompletely understood, but involves in part the recognition between ubiquitin E3 ligases and degradation signals (degrons) that are exposed in misfolded proteins. PQC is compartmentalized in the cell, and a great deal has been learned in recent years about ER-associated degradation (ERAD) and nuclear quality control. In contrast, a comprehensive view of cytosolic quality control (CytoQC) has yet to emerge, and will benefit from the development of a well-defined set of model substrates. In this study, we generated an isogenic “degron library” in Saccharomyces cerevisiae consisting of short sequences appended to the C-terminus of a reporter protein, Ura3. About half of these degron-containing proteins are substrates of the integral membrane E3 ligase Doa10, which also plays a pivotal role in ERAD and some nuclear protein degradation. Notably, some of our degron fusion proteins exhibit dependence on the E3 ligase Ltn1/Rkr1 for degradation, apparently by a mechanism distinct from its known role in ribosomal quality control of translationally paused proteins. Ubr1 and San1, E3 ligases involved in the recognition of some misfolded CytoQC substrates, are largely dispensable for the degradation of our degron-containing proteins. Interestingly, the Hsp70/Hsp40 chaperone/cochaperones Ssa1,2 and Ydj1, are required for the degradation of all constructs tested. Taken together, the comprehensive degron library presented here provides an important resource of isogenic substrates for testing candidate PQC components and identifying new ones. PMID:27172186

  16. Diaphragm muscle fiber weakness and ubiquitin-proteasome activation in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Hooijman, Pleuni E; Beishuizen, Albertus; Witt, Christian C; de Waard, Monique C; Girbes, Armand R J; Spoelstra-de Man, Angelique M E; Niessen, Hans W M; Manders, Emmy; van Hees, Hieronymus W H; van den Brom, Charissa E; Silderhuis, Vera; Lawlor, Michael W; Labeit, Siegfried; Stienen, Ger J M; Hartemink, Koen J; Paul, Marinus A; Heunks, Leo M A; Ottenheijm, Coen A C

    2015-05-15

    The clinical significance of diaphragm weakness in critically ill patients is evident: it prolongs ventilator dependency, and increases morbidity and duration of hospital stay. To date, the nature of diaphragm weakness and its underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesized that diaphragm muscle fibers of mechanically ventilated critically ill patients display atrophy and contractile weakness, and that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is activated in the diaphragm. We obtained diaphragm muscle biopsies from 22 critically ill patients who received mechanical ventilation before surgery and compared these with biopsies obtained from patients during thoracic surgery for resection of a suspected early lung malignancy (control subjects). In a proof-of-concept study in a muscle-specific ring finger protein-1 (MuRF-1) knockout mouse model, we evaluated the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in the development of contractile weakness during mechanical ventilation. Both slow- and fast-twitch diaphragm muscle fibers of critically ill patients had approximately 25% smaller cross-sectional area, and had contractile force reduced by half or more. Markers of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway were significantly up-regulated in the diaphragm of critically ill patients. Finally, MuRF-1 knockout mice were protected against the development of diaphragm contractile weakness during mechanical ventilation. These findings show that diaphragm muscle fibers of critically ill patients display atrophy and severe contractile weakness, and in the diaphragm of critically ill patients the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is activated. This study provides rationale for the development of treatment strategies that target the contractility of diaphragm fibers to facilitate weaning.

  17. Regulating the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway via cAMP-signaling: neuroprotective potential

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Wang, Hu; Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E.

    2013-01-01

    The cAMP-signaling pathway has been under intensive investigation for decades. It is a wonder that such a small simple molecule like cAMP can modulate a vast number of diverse processes in different types of cells. The ubiquitous involvement of cAMP-signaling in a variety of cellular events requires tight spatial and temporal control of its generation, propagation, compartmentalization, and elimination. Among the various steps of the cAMP-signaling pathway, G-protein coupled receptors, adenylate cyclases, phosphodiesterases, the two major cAMP targets, i.e. protein kinase A and exchange protein activated by cAMP, as well as the A-kinase anchoring proteins, are potential targets for drug development. Herein we review the recent progress on the regulation and manipulation of different steps of the cAMP-signaling pathway. We end by focusing on the emerging role of cAMP-signaling in modulating protein degradation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. New discoveries on the regulation of the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway by cAMP-signaling support the development of new therapeutic approaches to prevent proteotoxicity in chronic neurodegenerative disorders and other human disease conditions associated with impaired protein turnover by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and the accumulation of ubiquitin-protein aggregates. PMID:23686612

  18. High Fat Diet-Induced Skeletal Muscle Wasting Is Decreased by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Administration: Implications on Oxidative Stress, Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway Activation, and Myonuclear Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Aravena, Javier; Cabrera, Daniel; Simon, Felipe; Ezquer, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Obesity can lead to skeletal muscle atrophy, a pathological condition characterized by the loss of strength and muscle mass. A feature of muscle atrophy is a decrease of myofibrillar proteins as a result of ubiquitin proteasome pathway overactivation, as evidenced by increased expression of the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. Additionally, other mechanisms are related to muscle wasting, including oxidative stress, myonuclear apoptosis, and autophagy. Stem cells are an emerging therapy in the treatment of chronic diseases such as high fat diet-induced obesity. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a population of self-renewable and undifferentiated cells present in the bone marrow and other mesenchymal tissues of adult individuals. The present study is the first to analyze the effects of systemic MSC administration on high fat diet-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in the tibialis anterior of mice. Treatment with MSCs reduced losses of muscle strength and mass, decreases of fiber diameter and myosin heavy chain protein levels, and fiber type transitions. Underlying these antiatrophic effects, MSC administration also decreased ubiquitin proteasome pathway activation, oxidative stress, and myonuclear apoptosis. These results are the first to indicate that systemically administered MSCs could prevent muscle wasting associated with high fat diet-induced obesity and diabetes. PMID:27579157

  19. High Fat Diet-Induced Skeletal Muscle Wasting Is Decreased by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Administration: Implications on Oxidative Stress, Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway Activation, and Myonuclear Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Abrigo, Johanna; Rivera, Juan Carlos; Aravena, Javier; Cabrera, Daniel; Simon, Felipe; Ezquer, Fernando; Ezquer, Marcelo; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Obesity can lead to skeletal muscle atrophy, a pathological condition characterized by the loss of strength and muscle mass. A feature of muscle atrophy is a decrease of myofibrillar proteins as a result of ubiquitin proteasome pathway overactivation, as evidenced by increased expression of the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. Additionally, other mechanisms are related to muscle wasting, including oxidative stress, myonuclear apoptosis, and autophagy. Stem cells are an emerging therapy in the treatment of chronic diseases such as high fat diet-induced obesity. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a population of self-renewable and undifferentiated cells present in the bone marrow and other mesenchymal tissues of adult individuals. The present study is the first to analyze the effects of systemic MSC administration on high fat diet-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in the tibialis anterior of mice. Treatment with MSCs reduced losses of muscle strength and mass, decreases of fiber diameter and myosin heavy chain protein levels, and fiber type transitions. Underlying these antiatrophic effects, MSC administration also decreased ubiquitin proteasome pathway activation, oxidative stress, and myonuclear apoptosis. These results are the first to indicate that systemically administered MSCs could prevent muscle wasting associated with high fat diet-induced obesity and diabetes.

  20. Reproductive Cytotoxicity Is Predicted by Magnetic Resonance Microscopy and Confirmed by Ubiquitin Proteasome Immunohistochemistry in a Theophylline-Induced Model of Rat Testicular and Epididymal Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tengowski, M. W.; Sutovsky, P.; Hedlund, L. W.; Guyot, D. J.; Burkhardt, J. E.; Thompson, W. E.; Sutovsky, M.; Johnson, G. A.

    2005-08-01

    This study investigated the testicular changes in the rat induced by the nonspecific phosphodiesterase inhibitor, theophylline using magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) and ubiquitin immunostaining techniques. In vivo T1- and T2-weighted images were acquired at 2 T under anesthesia. Increased signal observed in the theophylline-treated rats suggests that leakage of MRM contrast was occurring. In vivo MRM results indicate that day 16 testis displayed an increased T1-weighted water signal in the area of the seminiferous tubule that decreased by day 32. These findings were validated by histopathology, suggesting that in vivo MRM has the sensitivity to predict changes in testis and epididymal tissues. The participation of the ubiquitin system was investigated, using probes for various markers of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. MRM can be used to detect subtle changes in the vascular perfusion of organ systems, and the up-regulation/mobilization of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may be one of the mechanisms used in theophylline-treated epididymis to remove damaged cells before storage in the cauda epididymis. The combined use of in vivo MRM and subsequent tissue or seminal analysis for the presence of ubiquitin in longitudinal studies may become an important biomarker for assessing testis toxicities drug studies.

  1. The acidosis of chronic renal failure activates muscle proteolysis in rats by augmenting transcription of genes encoding proteins of the ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, J L; Wang, X; England, B K; Price, S R; Ding, X; Mitch, W E

    1996-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with negative nitrogen balance and loss of lean body mass. To identify specific proteolytic pathways activated by CRF, protein degradation was measured in incubated epitrochlearis muscles from CRF and sham-operated, pair-fed rats. CRF stimulated muscle proteolysis, and inhibition of lysosomal and calcium-activated proteases did not eliminate this increase. When ATP production was blocked, proteolysis in CRF muscles fell to the same level as that in control muscles. Increased proteolysis was also prevented by feeding CRF rats sodium bicarbonate, suggesting that activation depends on acidification. Evidence that the ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is stimulated by the acidemia of CRF includes the following findings: (a) An inhibitor of the proteasome eliminated the increase in muscle proteolysis; and (b) there was an increase in mRNAs encoding ubiquitin (324%) and proteasome subunits C3 (137%) and C9 (251%) in muscle. This response involved gene activation since transcription of mRNAs for ubiquitin and the C3 subunit were selectively increased in muscle of CRF rats. We conclude that CRF stimulates muscle proteolysis by activating the ATP-ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent pathway. The mechanism depends on acidification and increased expression of genes encoding components of the system. These responses could contribute to the loss of muscle mass associated with CRF. PMID:8617877

  2. Inhibition of PCSK9 transcription by berberine involves down-regulation of hepatic HNF1α protein expression through the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bin; Li, Hai; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Cao, Aiqin; Liu, Jingwen

    2015-02-13

    Our previous in vitro studies have identified hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) as an obligated trans-activator for PCSK9 gene expression and demonstrated its functional involvement in the suppression of PCSK9 expression by berberine (BBR), a natural cholesterol-lowering compound. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of BBR on HNF1α-mediated PCSK9 transcription. Administration of BBR to hyperlipidemic mice and hamsters lowered circulating PCSK9 concentrations and hepatic PCSK9 mRNA levels without affecting the gene expression of HNF1α. However, hepatic HNF1α protein levels were markedly reduced in BBR-treated animals as compared with the control. Using HepG2 cells as a model system, we obtained evidence that BBR treatment let to accelerated degradation of HNF1α protein. By applying inhibitors to selectively block the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy-lysosomal pathway, we show that HNF1α protein content in HepG2 cells was not affected by bafilomycin A1 treatment, but it was dose-dependently increased by UPS inhibitors bortezomib and MG132. Bortezomib treatment elevated HNF1α and PCSK9 cellular levels with concomitant reductions of LDL receptor protein. Moreover, HNF1α protein displayed a multiubiquitination ladder pattern in cells treated with BBR or overexpressing ubiquitin. By expressing GFP-HNF1α fusion protein in cells, we observed that blocking UPS resulted in accumulation of GFP-HNF1α in cytoplasm. Importantly, we show that the BBR reducing effects on HNF1α protein and PCSK9 gene transcription can be eradicated by proteasome inhibitors. Altogether, our studies using BBR as a probe uncovered a new aspect of PCSK9 regulation by ubiquitin-induced proteasomal degradation of HNF1α.

  3. Dieldrin induces ubiquitin-proteasome dysfunction in alpha-synuclein overexpressing dopaminergic neuronal cells and enhances susceptibility to apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Sun, Faneng; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G

    2005-10-01

    Exposure to pesticides is implicated in the etiopathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). The organochlorine pesticide dieldrin is one of the environmental chemicals potentially linked to PD. Because recent evidence indicates that abnormal accumulation and aggregation of alpha-synuclein and ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction can contribute to the degenerative processes of PD, in the present study we examined whether the environmental pesticide dieldrin impairs proteasomal function and subsequently promotes apoptotic cell death in rat mesencephalic dopaminergic neuronal cells overexpressing human alpha-synuclein. Overexpression of wild-type alpha-synuclein significantly reduced the proteasomal activity. Dieldrin exposure dose-dependently (0-70 microM) decreased proteasomal activity, and 30 microM dieldrin inhibited activity by more than 60% in alpha-synuclein cells. Confocal microscopic analysis of dieldrin-treated alpha-synuclein cells revealed that alpha-synuclein-positive protein aggregates colocalized with ubiquitin protein. Further characterization of the aggregates with the autophagosomal marker mondansyl cadaverine and the lysosomal marker and dot-blot analysis revealed that these protein oligomeric aggregates were distinct from autophagosomes and lysosomes. The dieldrin-induced proteasomal dysfunction in alpha-synuclein cells was also confirmed by significant accumulation of ubiquitin protein conjugates in the detergent-insoluble fraction. We found that proteasomal inhibition preceded cell death after dieldrin treatment and that alpha-synuclein cells were more sensitive than vector cells to the toxicity. Furthermore, measurement of caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation confirmed the enhanced sensitivity of alpha-synuclein cells to dieldrin-induced apoptosis. Together, our results suggest that increased expression of alpha-synuclein predisposes dopaminergic cells to proteasomal dysfunction, which can be further exacerbated by environmental exposure to certain

  4. Reactive center loop moiety is essential for the maspin activity on cellular invasion and ubiquitin-proteasome level.

    PubMed

    Khanaree, Chakkrit; Chairatvit, Kongthawat; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Wongnoppavich, Ariyaphong

    2013-01-01

    Maspin, a tumor suppressor (SERPINB5), inhibits cancer migration, invasion, and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. The tumor-suppressing effects of maspin depend in part on its ability to enhance cell adhesion to extracellular matrix. Although the molecular mechanism of maspin's action is still unclear, its functional domain is believed to be located at the reactive center loop (RCL). We have elucidated the role of maspin RCL on adhesion, migration, and invasion by transfecting the highly invasive human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cell line with pcDNA3.1-His/FLAG containing wild-type maspin, ovalbumin, or maspin/ovalbumin RCL chimeric mutants in which maspin RCL is replaced by ovalbumin (MOM) and vice versa (OMO). MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with maspin- or OMO-containing recombinant expression plasmid manifested significant increase in adhesion to fibronectin and reduction in in vitro migration and invasion through Matrigel compared with mock transfection or cells transfected with ovalbumin or MOM. Proteomics analysis of maspin- or OMO-transfected MDA-MB-231 cells revealed reduction in contents of proteins known to promote cancer metastasis and those of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, while those with tumor-suppressing properties were increased. Furthermore, MDA-MB-231 cells containing maspin or OMO transgene have significantly higher levels of ubiquitin and ubiquitinated conjugates, but reduced 20S proteasome chymotrypsin-like activity. These results clearly demonstrate that the tumor-suppressive properties of maspin reside in its RCL domain.

  5. Cancer cell death induced by novel small molecules degrading the TACC3 protein via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Ohoka, N; Nagai, K; Hattori, T; Okuhira, K; Shibata, N; Cho, N; Naito, M

    2014-11-06

    The selective degradation of target proteins with small molecules is a novel approach to the treatment of various diseases, including cancer. We have developed a protein knockdown system with a series of hybrid small compounds that induce the selective degradation of target proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In this study, we designed and synthesized novel small molecules called SNIPER(TACC3)s, which target the spindle regulatory protein transforming acidic coiled-coil-3 (TACC3). SNIPER(TACC3)s induce poly-ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation of TACC3 and reduce the TACC3 protein level in cells. Mechanistic analysis indicated that the ubiquitin ligase APC/C(CDH1) mediates the SNIPER(TACC3)-induced degradation of TACC3. Intriguingly, SNIPER(TACC3) selectively induced cell death in cancer cells expressing a larger amount of TACC3 protein than normal cells. These results suggest that protein knockdown of TACC3 by SNIPER(TACC3) is a potential strategy for treating cancers overexpressing the TACC3 protein.

  6. Skeletal muscle myotubes of the severely obese exhibit altered ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagic/lysosomal proteolytic flux

    PubMed Central

    Bollinger, Lance M.; Powell, Jonathan J. S.; Houmard, Joseph A.; Witczak, Carol A.; Brault, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Whole-body protein metabolism is dysregulated with obesity. Our goal was to determine if activity and expression of major protein degradation pathways are compromised specifically in human skeletal muscle with obesity. Methods We utilized primary Human Skeletal Muscle cell (HSkM) cultures since cellular mechanisms can be studied absent of hormones and contractile activity that could independently influence metabolism. HSkM from 10 lean (BMI ≤ 26.0 kg/m2) and 8 severely obese (BMI ≥ 39.0) women were examined basally and when stimulated to atrophy (serum and amino acid starvation). Results HSkM from obese donors had a lower proportion of type I myosin heavy chain and slower flux through the autophagic/lysosomal pathway. During starvation, flux through the ubiquitin-proteasome system diverged according to obesity status, with a decrease in the lean and an increase in HSkM from obese subjects. HSkMC from the obese also displayed elevated proteasome activity despite no difference in proteasome content. Atrophy-related gene expression and myotube area were similar in myotubes derived from lean and obese individuals under basal and starved conditions. Conclusions Our data indicate that muscle cells of the lean and severely obese have innate differences in management of protein degradation, which may explain their metabolic differences. PMID:26010327

  7. Lack of myotubularin (MTM1) leads to muscle hypotrophy through unbalanced regulation of the autophagy and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways.

    PubMed

    Al-Qusairi, Lama; Prokic, Ivana; Amoasii, Leonela; Kretz, Christine; Messaddeq, Nadia; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Laporte, Jocelyn

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in the phosphoinositide phosphatase myotubularin (MTM1) results in X-linked myotubular/centronuclear myopathy (XLMTM), characterized by a severe decrease in muscle mass and strength in patients and murine models. However, the molecular mechanism involved in the muscle hypotrophy is unclear. Here we show that the IGF1R/Akt pathway is affected in Mtm1-deficient murine muscles, characterized by an increase in IGF1 receptor and Akt levels in both the presymptomatic and symptomatic phases. Moreover, up-regulation of atrogenes was observed in the presymptomatic phase of the myopathy, supporting overactivation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In parallel, the autophagy machinery was affected as indicated by the increase in the number of autophagosomes and of autophagy markers, such as LC3 and P62. However, phosphorylation of FOXO3a and mTOR were abnormal at late but not at early stages of the disease, suggesting that myotubularin acts both upstream in the IGF1R/Akt pathway and downstream on the balance between the autophagy and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways in vivo. Adeno-associated virus-mediated delivery of Mtm1 into Mtm1-null muscles rescued muscle mass and normalized the expression levels of IGF1 receptor, the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, and autophagy markers. These data support the hypothesis that the unbalanced regulation of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway and the autophagy machinery is a primary cause of the XLMTM pathogenesis.

  8. Life and death in the trash heap: The ubiquitin proteasome pathway and UCHL1 in brain aging, neurodegenerative disease and cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Graham, Steven H; Liu, Hao

    2017-03-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) is essential for removing abnormal proteins and preventing accumulation of potentially toxic proteins within the neuron. UPP dysfunction occurs with normal aging and is associated with abnormal accumulation of protein aggregates within neurons in neurodegenerative diseases. Ischemia disrupts UPP function and thus may contribute to UPP dysfunction seen in the aging brain and in neurodegenerative diseases. Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1), an important component of the UPP in the neuron, is covalently modified and its activity inhibited by reactive lipids produced after ischemia. As a result, degradation of toxic proteins is impaired which may exacerbate neuronal function and cell death in stroke and neurodegenerative diseases. Preserving or restoring UCHL1 activity may be an effective therapeutic strategy in stroke and neurodegenerative diseases. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Oxidative stress, NF-κB and the ubiquitin proteasomal pathway in the pathology of calpainopathy.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, Dhanarajan; Alexander, Mathew; Oommen, Anna

    2013-10-01

    The neuromuscular disorder, calpainopathy (LGMD 2A), is a major muscular dystrophy classified under limb girdle muscular dystrophies. Genetic mutations of the enzyme calpain 3 cause LGMD 2A. Calpainopathy is phenotypically observed as progressive muscle wasting and weakness. Pathomechanisms of muscle wasting of calpainopathy remain poorly understood. Oxidative stress, NF-κB and the ubiquitin proteasomal pathway underlie the pathology of several muscle wasting conditions but their role in calpainopathic dystrophy is not known. Oxidative and nitrosative stress, the source of reactive oxygen species, NF-κB signaling and protein ubiquitinylation were studied in 15 calpainopathic and 8 healthy control human muscle biopsies. Oxidative stress and NF-κB/IKK β signaling were increased in calpainopathic muscle and may contribute to increased protein ubiquitinylation and muscle protein loss. Preventing oxidative stress or inhibition of NF-κB signaling could be considered for treatment of LGMD 2A.

  10. A Sporadic Parkinson Disease Model via Silencing of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome/E3 Ligase Component SKP1A*

    PubMed Central

    Fishman-Jacob, Tali; Reznichenko, Lydia; Youdim, Moussa B. H.; Mandel, Silvia A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new model of sporadic Parkinson disease (PD) based on silencing of the SKP1A gene, a component of the ubiquitin-proteasome/E3 ligase complex, Skp1, Cullin 1, F-box protein, which was found to be highly decreased in the substantia nigra of sporadic PD patients. Initially, an embryonic mouse substantia nigra-derived cell line (SN4741 cells) was infected with short hairpin RNA lentiviruses encoding the murine transcript of the SKP1A gene or with scrambled vector. SKP1A silencing resulted in increased susceptibility to neuronal damages induced by the parkinsonism-inducing neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion and serum starvation, in parallel with a decline in the expression of the dopaminergic markers, dopamine transporter and vesicular monoamine transporter-2. SKP1A-deficient cells presented a delay in completion of the cell cycle and the inability to arrest at the G0/G1 phase when induced to differentiate. Instead, the cells progressed through S phase, developing rounded aggregates with characteristics of aggresomes including immunoreactivity for γ-tubulin, α-synuclein, ubiquitin, tyrosine hydroxylase, Hsc-70 (70-kDa heat shock cognate protein), and proteasome subunit, and culminating in a lethal phenotype. Conversely, stably enforced expression of wild type SKP1A duplicated the survival index of naïve SN4741 cells under proteasomal inhibition injury, suggesting a new structural role of SKP1 in dopaminergic neuronal function, besides its E3 ligase activity. These results link, for the first time, SKP1 to dopamine neuronal function and survival, suggesting an essential role in sporadic PD. In summary, this new model has reproduced to a significant extent the molecular alterations described in sporadic PD at the cellular level, implicating Skp1 as a potential modifier in sporadic PD neurodegeneration. PMID:19748892

  11. A sporadic Parkinson disease model via silencing of the ubiquitin-proteasome/E3 ligase component SKP1A.

    PubMed

    Fishman-Jacob, Tali; Reznichenko, Lydia; Youdim, Moussa B H; Mandel, Silvia A

    2009-11-20

    The aim of this study was to develop a new model of sporadic Parkinson disease (PD) based on silencing of the SKP1A gene, a component of the ubiquitin-proteasome/E3 ligase complex, Skp1, Cullin 1, F-box protein, which was found to be highly decreased in the substantia nigra of sporadic PD patients. Initially, an embryonic mouse substantia nigra-derived cell line (SN4741 cells) was infected with short hairpin RNA lentiviruses encoding the murine transcript of the SKP1A gene or with scrambled vector. SKP1A silencing resulted in increased susceptibility to neuronal damages induced by the parkinsonism-inducing neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion and serum starvation, in parallel with a decline in the expression of the dopaminergic markers, dopamine transporter and vesicular monoamine transporter-2. SKP1A-deficient cells presented a delay in completion of the cell cycle and the inability to arrest at the G(0)/G(1) phase when induced to differentiate. Instead, the cells progressed through S phase, developing rounded aggregates with characteristics of aggresomes including immunoreactivity for gamma-tubulin, alpha-synuclein, ubiquitin, tyrosine hydroxylase, Hsc-70 (70-kDa heat shock cognate protein), and proteasome subunit, and culminating in a lethal phenotype. Conversely, stably enforced expression of wild type SKP1A duplicated the survival index of naïve SN4741 cells under proteasomal inhibition injury, suggesting a new structural role of SKP1 in dopaminergic neuronal function, besides its E3 ligase activity. These results link, for the first time, SKP1 to dopamine neuronal function and survival, suggesting an essential role in sporadic PD. In summary, this new model has reproduced to a significant extent the molecular alterations described in sporadic PD at the cellular level, implicating Skp1 as a potential modifier in sporadic PD neurodegeneration.

  12. Regulation of HTLV-1 tax stability, cellular trafficking and NF-κB activation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Lavorgna, Alfonso; Harhaj, Edward William

    2014-10-23

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a complex retrovirus that infects CD4+ T cells and causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in 3%-5% of infected individuals after a long latent period. HTLV-1 Tax is a trans-activating protein that regulates viral gene expression and also modulates cellular signaling pathways to enhance T-cell proliferation and cell survival. The Tax oncoprotein promotes T-cell transformation, in part via constitutive activation of the NF-κB transcription factor; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Ubiquitination is a type of post-translational modification that occurs in a three-step enzymatic cascade mediated by E1, E2 and E3 enzymes and regulates protein stability as well as signal transduction, protein trafficking and the DNA damage response. Emerging studies indicate that Tax hijacks the ubiquitin machinery to activate ubiquitin-dependent kinases and downstream NF-κB signaling. Tax interacts with the E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc13 and is conjugated on C-terminal lysine residues with lysine 63-linked polyubiquitin chains. Tax K63-linked polyubiquitination may serve as a platform for signaling complexes since this modification is critical for interactions with NEMO and IKK. In addition to NF-κB signaling, mono- and polyubiquitination of Tax also regulate its subcellular trafficking and stability. Here, we review recent advances in the diverse roles of ubiquitin in Tax function and how Tax usurps the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to promote oncogenesis.

  13. Small acidic protein 1 and SCF(TIR)(1) ubiquitin proteasome pathway act in concert to induce 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-mediated alteration of actin in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Maho; Umetsu, Kana; Oono, Yutaka; Higaki, Takumi; Blancaflor, Elison B; Rahman, Abidur

    2017-03-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), a functional analogue of auxin, is used as an exogenous source of auxin as it evokes physiological responses like the endogenous auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Previous molecular analyses of the auxin response pathway revealed that IAA and 2,4-D share a common mode of action to elicit downstream physiological responses. However, recent findings with 2,4-D-specific mutants suggested that 2,4-D and IAA might also use distinct pathways to modulate root growth in Arabidopsis. Using genetic and cellular approaches, we demonstrate that the distinct effects of 2,4-D and IAA on actin filament organization partly dictate the differential responses of roots to these two auxin analogues. 2,4-D but not IAA altered the actin structure in long-term and short-term assays. Analysis of the 2,4-D-specific mutant aar1-1 revealed that small acidic protein 1 (SMAP1) functions positively to facilitate the 2,4-D-induced depolymerization of actin. The ubiquitin proteasome mutants tir1-1 and axr1-12, which show enhanced resistance to 2,4-D compared with IAA for inhibition of root growth, were also found to have less disrupted actin filament networks after 2,4-D exposure. Consistently, a chemical inhibitor of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway mitigated the disrupting effects of 2,4-D on the organization of actin filaments. Roots of the double mutant aar1-1 tir1-1 also showed enhanced resistance to 2,4-D-induced inhibition of root growth and actin degradation compared with their respective parental lines. Collectively, these results suggest that the effects of 2,4-D on actin filament organization and root growth are mediated through synergistic interactions between SMAP1 and SCF(TIR)(1) ubiquitin proteasome components.

  14. Degradation of regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1) is mediated by both chaperone-mediated autophagy and ubiquitin proteasome pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Heng; Wang, Pin; Song, Weihong; Sun, Xiulian

    2009-10-01

    Regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1), a gene identified from the critical region of Down syndrome, has been implied in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). RCAN1 expression was shown to be increased in AD brains; however, the mechanism of RCAN1 gene regulation is not well defined. The present study was designed to investigate the molecular mechanism of RCAN1 protein degradation. In addition to being degraded through the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, we found that lysosomal inhibition markedly increased RCAN1 protein expression in a time- and dosage-dependent manner. Inhibition of macroautophagy reduced RCAN1 expression, indicating that RCAN1 degradation is not through a macroautophagy pathway. However, disruption of chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) increased RCAN1 expression. Two CMA recognition motifs were identified in RCAN1 protein to mediate its degradation through a CMA-lysosome pathway. A promoter assay further demonstrated that inhibition of RCAN1 degradation in cells reduced calcineurin-NFAT activity. Dysfunctions of ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, elucidation of RCAN1 degradation by a ubiquitin proteasome pathway and CMA-lysosome pathway in the present study may greatly advance our understanding of AD pathogenesis.

  15. SIRT6 delays cellular senescence by promoting p27Kip1 ubiquitin-proteasome degradation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ganye; Wang, Hui; Xu, Chenzhong; Wang, Pan; Chen, Jun; Wang, Pengfeng; Sun, Zhaomeng; Su, Yuanyuan; Wang, Zhao; Han, Limin; Tong, Tanjun

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin6 (SIRT6) has been implicated as a key factor in aging and aging-related diseases. However, the role of SIRT6 in cellular senescence has not been fully understood. Here, we show that SIRT6 repressed the expression of p27Kip1 (p27) in cellular senescence. The expression of SIRT6 was reduced during cellular senescence, whereas enforced SIRT6 expression promoted cell proliferation and antagonized cellular senescence. In addition, we demonstrated that SIRT6 promoted p27 degradation by proteasome and SIRT6 decreased the acetylation level and protein half-life of p27. p27 acetylation increased its protein stability. Furthermore, SIRT6 directly interacted with p27. Importantly, p27 was strongly acetylated and had a prolonged protein half-life with the reduction of SIRT6 when cells were senescent, compared with those young cells. Finally, SIRT6 markedly rescued senescence induced by p27. Our findings indicate that SIRT6 decreases p27 acetylation, leading to its degradation via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and then delays cellular senescence. PMID:27794562

  16. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and enhanced activity of NF-kappaB in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingfei; Pu, Zejin; Feng, Jialin; Li, Guoping; Zheng, Zhichao; Shen, Wenlv

    2008-04-01

    NF-kappa B, ubiquitin and proteasome have been shown be important factors in oncogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine whether NF-kappa B could be a sensitive biomarker for gastric carcinoma. Tumor and adjacent mucosal tissue specimens in 92 patients with gastric carcinoma were studied. The expression of NF-kappa B was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The expression of I kappa B alpha, ubiquitin in cytoplasm and NF-kappa B in nucleoplasm was assayed by Western blot. DNA binding-activity of NF-kappa B was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Fluorogenic technique was performed to measure the 26S proteasome activity. NF-kappa B positive expression in tumor tissues (82.4%) was significant higher than that in adjacent mucosal tissues (32.7%, P < 0.05). The increase of NF-kappa B activation was accompanied by the increases of ubiqutin, 26S proteasome activation and a degradation of I kappa B alpha but not the ubiquitin-conjugated I kappa B alpha/NF-kappa B complex in gastric carcinoma. NF-kappa B expression was significantly increased in patients with lymph node metastasis, TNM stage III/IV or with the habit of high intake of pickled vegetables. This study demonstrates that the constitutive activation of NF-kappa B is likely due to the activation of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and NF-kappa B can be used as a prognostic biomarker. (Copyright) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Production of Infectious Dengue Virus in Aedes aegypti Is Dependent on the Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Milly M.; Sessions, October M.; Gubler, Duane J.; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) relies on host factors to complete its life cycle in its mosquito host for subsequent transmission to humans. DENV first establishes infection in the midgut of Aedes aegypti and spreads to various mosquito organs for lifelong infection. Curiously, studies have shown that infectious DENV titers peak and decrease thereafter in the midgut despite relatively stable viral genome levels. However, the mechanisms that regulate this decoupling of infectious virion production from viral RNA replication have never been determined. We show here that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) plays an important role in regulating infectious DENV production. Using RNA interference studies, we show in vivo that knockdown of selected UPP components reduced infectious virus production without altering viral RNA replication in the midgut. Furthermore, this decoupling effect could also be observed after RNAi knockdown in the head/thorax of the mosquito, which otherwise showed direct correlation between infectious DENV titer and viral RNA levels. The dependence on the UPP for successful DENV production is further reinforced by the observed up-regulation of key UPP molecules upon DENV infection that overcome the relatively low expression of these genes after a blood meal. Collectively, our findings indicate an important role for the UPP in regulating DENV production in the mosquito vector. PMID:26566123

  18. Regulation of ubiquitin proteasome pathway molecular markers in response to endurance and resistance exercise and training.

    PubMed

    Stefanetti, Renae J; Lamon, Séverine; Wallace, Marita; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Russell, Aaron P; Vissing, Kristian

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge on the effects of divergent exercise on ostensibly protein degradation pathways may be valuable for counteracting muscle wasting and for understanding muscle remodelling. This study examined mRNA and/or protein levels of molecular markers of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP), including FBXO32 (atrogin-1), MURF-1, FBXO40, FOXO1 and FOXO3. Protein substrates of atrogin-1-including EIF3F, MYOG and MYOD1-and of MURF-1-including PKM and MHC-were also measured. Subjects completed 10 weeks of endurance training (ET) or resistance training (RT) followed by a single-bout of endurance exercise (EE) or resistance exercise (RE). Following training, atrogin-1, FBXO40, FOXO1 and FOXO3 mRNA increased independently of exercise mode, whereas MURF-1 mRNA and FOXO3 protein increased following ET only. No change in other target proteins occurred post-training. In the trained state, single-bout EE, but not RE, increased atrogin-1, MURF-1, FBXO40, FOXO1, FOXO3 mRNA and FOXO3 protein. In contrast to EE, FBXO40 mRNA and protein decreased following single-bout RE. MURF-1 and FOXO1 protein levels as well as the protein substrates of atrogin-1 and MURF-1 were unchanged following training and single-bout exercise. This study demonstrates that the intracellular signals elicited by ET and RT result in an upregulation of UPP molecular markers, with a greater increase following ET. However, in the trained state, the expression levels of UPP molecular markers are increased following single-bout EE, but are less responsive to single-bout RE. This suggests that adaptations following endurance exercise training are more reliant on protein UPP degradation processes than adaptations following resistance exercise training.

  19. Analysis of the Protein Kinase A-Regulated Proteome of Cryptococcus neoformans Identifies a Role for the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Capsule Formation

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, J. M. H.; Caza, M.; Croll, D.; Stoynov, N.; Foster, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The opportunistic fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening meningitis in immunocompromised individuals. The expression of virulence factors, including capsule and melanin, is in part regulated by the cyclic-AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) signal transduction pathway. In this study, we investigated the influence of PKA on the composition of the intracellular proteome to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the regulation that underpins virulence. Through quantitative proteomics, enrichment and bioinformatic analyses, and an interactome study, we uncovered a pattern of PKA regulation for proteins associated with translation, the proteasome, metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and virulence-related functions. PKA regulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in C. neoformans showed a striking parallel with connections between PKA and protein degradation in chronic neurodegenerative disorders and other human diseases. Further investigation of proteasome function with the inhibitor bortezomib revealed an impact on capsule production as well as hypersusceptibility for strains with altered expression or activity of PKA. Parallel studies with tunicamycin also linked endoplasmic reticulum stress with capsule production and PKA. Taken together, the data suggest a model whereby expression of PKA regulatory and catalytic subunits and the activation of PKA influence proteostasis and the function of the endoplasmic reticulum to control the elaboration of the polysaccharide capsule. Overall, this study revealed both broad and conserved influences of the cAMP/PKA pathway on the proteome and identified proteostasis as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cryptococcosis. PMID:26758180

  20. Stimulation of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway through the expression of amidohydrolase for N-terminal asparagine (Ntan1) in cultured rat hippocampal neurons exposed to static magnetism.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takao; Taniura, Hideo; Goto, Yasuaki; Ogura, Masato; Sng, Judy C G; Yoneda, Yukio

    2006-03-01

    In order to elucidate mechanisms underlying modulation by static magnetism of the cellular functionality and/or integrity in the brain, we screened genes responsive to brief magnetism in cultured rat hippocampal neurons using differential display analysis. We have for the first time cloned and identified Ntan1 (amidohydrolase for N-terminal asparagine) as a magnetism responsive gene in rat brain. Ntan1 is an essential component of a protein degradation signal, which is a destabilizing N-terminal residue of a protein, in the N-end rule. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed abundant expression of Ntan1 mRNA in hippocampal neurons in vivo. Northern blot analysis showed that Ntan1 mRNA was increased about three-fold after 3 h in response to brief magnetism. Brief magnetism also increased the transcriptional activity of Ntan1 promoter by luciferase reporter assay. Brief magnetism induced degradation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) without affecting cell morphology and viability, which was prevented by a selective inhibitor of 26S proteasome in hippocampal neurons. Overexpression of Ntan1 using recombinant Ntan1 adenovirus vector resulted in a marked decrease in the MAP2 protein expression in hippocampal neurons. Our results suggest that brief magnetism leads to the induction of Ntan1 responsible for MAP2 protein degradation through ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in rat hippocampal neurons.

  1. Progressive skeletal muscle weakness in transgenic mice expressing CTG expansions is associated with the activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Vignaud, Alban; Ferry, Arnaud; Huguet, Aline; Baraibar, Martin; Trollet, Capucine; Hyzewicz, Janek; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Puymirat, Jack; Gourdon, Genevieve; Furling, Denis

    2010-05-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a neuromuscular disease caused by the expansion of a CTG repeat in the DMPK gene and characterised by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting. To investigate the effects of the CTG expansion on the physiological function of the skeletal muscles, we have used a transgenic mouse model carrying the human DM1 region with 550 expanded CTG repeats. Maximal force is reduced in the skeletal muscles of 10-month-old but not in 3-month-old DM1 mice when compared to age-matched non-transgenic littermates. The progressive weakness observed in the DM1 mice is directly related to the reduced muscle mass and muscle fibre size. A significant increase in trypsin-like proteasome activity and Fbxo32 expression is also measured in the DM1 muscles indicating that an atrophic process mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting and weakness in the DM1 mice.

  2. Decreased rate of protein synthesis, caspase-3 activity, and ubiquitin-proteasome proteolysis in soleus muscles from growing rats fed a low-protein, high-carbohydrate diet.

    PubMed

    Batistela, Emanuele; Pereira, Mayara Peron; Siqueira, Juliany Torres; Paula-Gomes, Silvia; Zanon, Neusa Maria; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Navegantes, Luiz Carlos Carvalho; Kettelhut, Isis C; Andrade, Claudia Marlise Balbinotti; Kawashita, Nair Honda; Baviera, Amanda Martins

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the rates of both protein synthesis and breakdown, and the activation of intracellular effectors that control these processes in soleus muscles from growing rats fed a low-protein, high-carbohydrate (LPHC) diet for 15 days. The mass and the protein content, as well as the rate of protein synthesis, were decreased in the soleus from LPHC-fed rats. The availability of amino acids was diminished, since the levels of various essential amino acids were decreased in the plasma of LPHC-fed rats. Overall rate of proteolysis was also decreased, explained by reductions in the mRNA levels of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, ubiquitin conjugates, proteasome activity, and in the activity of caspase-3. Soleus muscles from LPHC-fed rats showed increased insulin sensitivity, with increased levels of insulin receptor and phosphorylation levels of AKT, which probably explains the inhibition of both the caspase-3 activity and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The fall of muscle proteolysis seems to represent an adaptive response that contributes to spare proteins in a condition of diminished availability of dietary amino acids. Furthermore, the decreased rate of protein synthesis may be the driving factor to the lower muscle mass gain in growing rats fed the LPHC diet.

  3. CDK11{sup p58} represses vitamin D receptor-mediated transcriptional activation through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Yayun; Hong, Yi; Zong, Hongliang; Wang, Yanlin; Zou, Weiying; Yang, Junwu; Kong, Xiangfei; Yun, Xiaojing; Gu, Jianxin

    2009-08-28

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and regulates transcription of target genes. In this study, we identified CDK11{sup p58} as a novel protein involved in the regulation of VDR. CDK11{sup p58}, a member of the large family of p34cdc2-related kinases, is associated with cell cycle progression, tumorigenesis, and apoptotic signaling. Our study demonstrated that CDK11{sup p58} interacted with VDR and repressed VDR-dependent transcriptional activation. Furthermore, overexpression of CDK11{sup p58} decreased the stability of VDR through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation. Taken together, these results suggest that CDK11{sup p58} is involved in the negative regulation of VDR.

  4. Protein kinase Cβ activates fat mass and obesity-associated protein by influencing its ubiquitin/proteasome degradation.

    PubMed

    Tai, Haoran; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhou, Jiao; Han, Xiaojuan; Fang, Tingting; Gong, Hui; Huang, Ning; Chen, Honghan; Qin, Jianqiong; Yang, Ming; Wei, Xiawei; Yang, Li; Xiao, Hengyi

    2017-10-01

    Protein kinase Cβ (PKCβ) is a serine-threonine kinase associated with obesity and diabetic complications; its activation contributes to weight gain, and deletion of its gene results in resistance to genetic- and diet-induced obesity. Fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) protein is a recently identified RNA demethylase, and its overexpression in mice leads to increased body weight as well as fat mass. Although sharing some features in anabolism regulation, PKCβ and FTO have not been investigated together; therefore, their relationship has not been established. We report that PKCβ positively regulates FTO on the posttranslation level, evidenced by the facts that PKCβ activation contributes to high-glucose-induced FTO up-regulation, and overexpression of PKCβ suppresses ubiquitin-proteasome degradation of FTO, whereas PKCβ inactivation acts in the opposite manner. It was also found that PKCβ can phosphorylate FTO on threonine, and this phosphorylation requires both catalytic and regulatory domains of PKCβ. Moreover, PKCβ inhibition can suppress 3T3-L1 cell differentiation in normal and FTO-overexpressing cells but not in FTO-silenced or -inhibited cells. We propose that PKCβ acts to suppress the degradation of FTO protein and reveals the associated role of PKCβ and FTO in adipogenesis, suggesting a new pathway that affects the development of obesity and metabolic diseases.-Tai, H., Wang, X., Zhou, J., Han, X., Fang, T., Gong, H., Huang, N., Chen, H., Qin, J., Yang, M., Wei, X., Yang, L., Xiao, H. Protein kinase Cβ activates fat mass and obesity-associated protein by influencing its ubiquitin/proteasome degradation. © FASEB.

  5. Mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and ubiquitin proteasome-related gene expression in 3 different skeletal muscles of colostrum- versus formula-fed calves.

    PubMed

    Sadri, H; Steinhoff-Wagner, J; Hammon, Harald M; Bruckmaier, R M; Görs, S; Sauerwein, H

    2017-09-13

    The rates of protein turnover are higher during the neonatal period than at any other time in postnatal life. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the ubiquitin-proteasome system are key pathways regulating cellular protein turnover. The objectives of this study were (1) to elucidate the effect of feeding colostrum versus milk-based formula on the mRNA abundance of key components of the mTOR pathway and of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in skeletal muscle of neonatal calves and (2) to compare different muscles. German Holstein calves were fed either colostrum (COL; n = 7) or milk-based formula (FOR; n = 7) up to 4 d of life. The nutrient content in formula and colostrum was similar, but formula had lower concentrations of free branched-chain AA (BCAA) and free total AA, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I than colostrum. Blood samples were taken from d 1 to 4 before morning feeding and before and 2 h after the last feeding on d 4. Muscle samples from M. longissimus dorsi (MLD), M. semitendinosus (MST), and M. masseter (MM) were collected after slaughter on d 4 at 2 h after feeding. The preprandial concentrations of free total AA and BCAA, insulin, and IGF-I in plasma changed over time but did not differ between groups. Plasma free total AA and BCAA concentrations decreased in COL, whereas they increased in FOR after feeding, resulting in higher postprandial plasma total AA and BCAA concentrations in FOR than in COL. Plasma insulin concentrations increased after feeding in both groups but were higher in COL than in FOR. Plasma IGF-I concentrations decreased in COL, whereas they remained unchanged in FOR after feeding. The mRNA abundance of mTOR and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) in 3 different skeletal muscles was greater in COL than in FOR, whereas that of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) was unaffected by diet. The mRNA abundance of ubiquitin activating enzyme (UBA1) and ubiquitin conjugating enzyme

  6. Cell-cycle-dependent PC-PLC regulation by APC/C(Cdc20)-mediated ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Fu, Da; Ma, Yushui; Wu, Wei; Zhu, Xuchao; Jia, Chengyou; Zhao, Qianlei; Zhang, Chunyi; Wu, Xing Zhong

    2009-07-01

    Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) is involved in the cell signal transduction, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. The mechanism of its action, however, has not been fully understood, particularly, the role of PC-PLC in the cell cycle. In the present study, we found that cell division cycle 20 homolog (Cdc20) and PC-PLC were co-immunoprecipitated reciprocally by either antibody in rat hepatoma cells CBRH-7919 as well as in rat liver tissue. Using confocal microscopy, we found that PC-PLC and Cdc20 were co-localized in the perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum region (the "juxtanuclear quality control" compartment, JUNQ). The expression level and activities of PC-PLC changed in a cell-cycle-dependent manner and were inversely correlated with the expression of Cdc20. Intriguingly, Cdc20 overexpression altered the subcellular localization and distribution of PC-PLC, and caused PC-PLC degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP). Taken together, our data indicate that PC-PLC regulation in cell cycles is controlled by APC/C(Cdc20)-mediated UPP. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated proteolysis is involved in the response to flooding stress in soybean roots, independent of oxygen limitation.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Yuki; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2012-04-01

    Ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated proteolysis plays an important role in the response to several environmental stresses. Here, we described the relationship of the proteolysis in the flooding stress in soybean (Glycine max L. cultivar Enrei). Immunoblot analyses were performed using antibodies against two subunits of 26S proteasome, Rpt5 and Rpn10, 20S proteasome and two subunits of COP9 signalosome (CSN), CSN4 and CSN5, to compare between flooded and untreated roots. We also examined their protein amounts in the condition of low oxygen. Moreover, crude extracts from flooded or untreated roots incubated with or without a proteasome inhibitor MG132 were analyzed by proteomics technique. We revealed that the amount of ubiquitinated proteins in soybean roots decreased after flooding treatment and increased to levels similar to controls after de-submergence. Both CSN4 and CSN5 accumulated following flooding treatment, although no significant difference was observed in proteasome. Low oxygen had no effect on the amount of ubiquitinated proteins or CSN4. By 2D-PAGE, the amount of 6 proteins changed significantly following MG132 treatment in flooding stressed plants. We conclude that the accumulation of CSN proteins might enhance the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins independent of hypoxia caused by flooding, thereby lowering their abundance during flooding stress.

  8. Protein Phosphatase Methyl-Esterase PME-1 Protects Protein Phosphatase 2A from Ubiquitin/Proteasome Degradation.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Ryotaro; Miura, Akane; Usui, Tatsuya; Mudrak, Ingrid; Ogris, Egon; Ohama, Takashi; Sato, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a conserved essential enzyme that is implicated as a tumor suppressor based on its central role in phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways. Protein phosphatase methyl esterase (PME-1) catalyzes specifically the demethylation of the C-terminal Leu309 residue of PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac). It has been shown that PME-1 affects the activity of PP2A by demethylating PP2Ac, but also by directly binding to the phosphatase active site, suggesting loss of PME-1 in cells would enhance PP2A activity. However, here we show that PME-1 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exhibit lower PP2A activity than wild type MEFs. Loss of PME-1 enhanced poly-ubiquitination of PP2Ac and shortened the half-life of PP2Ac protein resulting in reduced PP2Ac levels. Chemical inhibition of PME-1 and rescue experiments with wild type and mutated PME-1 revealed methyl-esterase activity was necessary to maintain PP2Ac protein levels. Our data demonstrate that PME-1 methyl-esterase activity protects PP2Ac from ubiquitin/proteasome degradation.

  9. Hsp40 regulates the amount of keratin proteins via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Uchiumi, Asato; Katagata, Yohtaro

    2012-02-01

    Keratins represent important structural components of intermediate filament proteins. Their expression profiles are remarkably tissue-specific. Recent data have shown that keratins associate with many proteins including heat shock proteins (HSP). We recently identified cell-specific keratin and HSP expression. We aimed to gain further insight into the regulation of keratins by specific inhibition through knockdown of Hsp40 in human keratinocyte cells. Keratin-HSP interaction in HaCaT cell lysate was evaluated by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blotting. Immunofluorescence, was used to examine the co-localization of keratins and Hsp40. Hsp40 depletion led to an increase in the levels of keratin proteins (K5, K14, K10) and a decrease in keratin ubiquitination without influencing keratin gene expression. Our results demonstrate direct or indirectly association of Hsp40 and imply that expressed keratin proteins were regulated by Hsp40 depending on the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in HaCaT. Furthermore, the K10 differentiation marker was increased by knockdown of Hsp40. The results presented in this study indicate that Hsp40 is related to the differentiation exchange of keratin pairs.

  10. Time course of ubiquitin-proteasome and macroautophagy-lysosome pathways in skeletal muscle in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Naoto; Fujino, Hidemi; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Takegaki, Jyunya; Deie, Masataka

    2015-01-01

    Patients with heart failure have limited exercise capacity due to not only the myocardial dysfunction but also skeletal muscle atrophy. However, the mechanisms and time course of protein degradation in skeletal muscle during heart failure remain unclear, and there is no established standard treatment. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the time course of major protein degradation pathways in skeletal muscle during heart failure. Four-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to heart failure induced by monocrotaline or control groups. At 14 and 21 days after monocrotaline injection, the lungs, heart, and gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were removed and analyzed. There was no significant difference in body weight between the groups at 14 days after monocrotaline injection. Although there were no morphological changes in the skeletal muscle of the monocrotaline group at this time point, ubiquitin-proteasome and macroautophagylysosome pathways were activated in the monocrotaline group. Additionally, the pathways were less strongly activated in the soleus muscle than in the gastrocnemius muscle. These results suggest that physical exercise that shifts to slow muscle characteristics should begin when there is no indication of skeletal muscle atrophy to prevent exercise intolerance with heart failure.

  11. Akt Phosphorylates Wnt Coactivator and Chromatin Effector Pygo2 at Serine 48 to Antagonize Its Ubiquitin/Proteasome-mediated Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiuling; Li, Yuewei; Gu, Bingnan; Fang, Lei; Zhou, Pengbo; Bao, Shilai; Huang, Lan; Dai, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Pygopus 2 (Pygo2/PYGO2) is an evolutionarily conserved coactivator and chromatin effector in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway that regulates cell growth and differentiation in various normal and malignant tissues. Although PYGO2 is highly overexpressed in a number of human cancers, the molecular mechanism underlying its deregulation is largely unknown. Here we report that Pygo2 protein is degraded through the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and is posttranslationally stabilized through phosphorylation by activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling. Specifically, Pygo2 is stabilized upon inhibition of the proteasome, and its intracellular level is regulated by Cullin 4 (Cul4) and DNA damage-binding protein 1 (DDB1), components of the Cul4-DDB1 E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Furthermore, Pygo2 is phosphorylated at multiple residues, and Akt-mediated phosphorylation at serine 48 leads to its decreased ubiquitylation and increased stability. Finally, we provide evidence that Akt and its upstream growth factors act in parallel with Wnt to stabilize Pygo2. Taken together, our findings highlight chromatin regulator Pygo2 as a common node downstream of oncogenic Wnt and Akt signaling pathways and underscore posttranslational modification, particularly phosphorylation and ubiquitylation, as a significant mode of regulation of Pygo2 protein expression. PMID:26170450

  12. A Homozygous Mutation in KCTD7 Links Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis to the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Staropoli, John F.; Karaa, Amel; Lim, Elaine T.; Kirby, Andrew; Elbalalesy, Naser; Romansky, Stephen G.; Leydiker, Karen B.; Coppel, Scott H.; Barone, Rosemary; Xin, Winnie; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Abdenur, Jose E.; Daly, Mark J.; Sims, Katherine B.; Cotman, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) is a genetically heterogeneous group of lysosomal diseases that collectively compose the most common Mendelian form of childhood-onset neurodegeneration. It is estimated that ∼8% of individuals diagnosed with NCL by conservative clinical and histopathologic criteria have been ruled out for mutations in the nine known NCL-associated genes, suggesting that additional genes remain unidentified. To further understand the genetic underpinnings of the NCLs, we performed whole-exome sequencing on DNA samples from a Mexican family affected by a molecularly undefined form of NCL characterized by infantile-onset progressive myoclonic epilepsy (PME), vision loss, cognitive and motor regression, premature death, and prominent NCL-type storage material. Using a recessive model to filter the identified variants, we found a single homozygous variant, c.550C>T in KCTD7, that causes a p.Arg184Cys missense change in potassium channel tetramerization domain-containing protein 7 (KCTD7) in the affected individuals. The mutation was predicted to be deleterious and was absent in over 6,000 controls. The identified variant altered the localization pattern of KCTD7 and abrogated interaction with cullin-3, a ubiquitin-ligase component and known KCTD7 interactor. Intriguingly, murine cerebellar cells derived from a juvenile NCL model (CLN3) showed enrichment of endogenous KCTD7. Whereas KCTD7 mutations have previously been linked to PME without lysosomal storage, this study clearly demonstrates that KCTD7 mutations also cause a rare, infantile-onset NCL subtype designated as CLN14. PMID:22748208

  13. Characteristics of the turnover of uncoupling protein 3 by the ubiquitin proteasome system in isolated mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Mookerjee, Shona A; Brand, Martin D

    2011-11-01

    Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is implicated in mild uncoupling and the regulation of mitochondrial ROS production. We previously showed that UCP3 turns over rapidly in C2C12 myoblasts, with a half-life of 0.5-4h, and that turnover can be reconstituted in vitro. We show here that rapid degradation of UCP3 in vitro in isolated brown adipose tissue mitochondria required the 26S proteasome, ubiquitin, ATP, succinate to generate a high membrane potential, and a pH of 7.4 or less. Ubiquitin containing lysine-48 was both necessary and sufficient to support UCP3 degradation, implying a requirement for polyubiquitylation at this residue. The 20S proteasome did not support degradation. UCP3 degradation was prevented by simultaneously blocking matrix ATP generation and import, showing that ATP in the mitochondrial matrix was required. Degradation did not appear to require a transmembrane pH gradient, but was very sensitive to membrane potential: degradation was halved when membrane potential decreased 10-20mV from its resting value, and was not significant below about 120mV. We propose that matrix ATP and a high membrane potential are needed for UCP3 to be polyubiquitylated through lysine-48 of ubiquitin and exported to the cytosolic 26S proteasome, where it is de-ubiquitylated and degraded.

  14. The ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates focal adhesions at the leading edge of migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Teckchandani, Anjali; Cooper, Jonathan A

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration requires the cyclical assembly and disassembly of focal adhesions. Adhesion induces phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins, including Cas (Crk-associated substrate/p130Cas/BCAR1). However, Cas phosphorylation stimulates adhesion turnover. This raises the question of how adhesion assembly occurs against opposition from phospho-Cas. Here we show that suppressor of cytokine signaling 6 (SOCS6) and Cullin 5, two components of the CRL5SOCS6 ubiquitin ligase, inhibit Cas-dependent focal adhesion turnover at the front but not rear of migrating epithelial cells. The front focal adhesions contain phospho-Cas which recruits SOCS6. If SOCS6 cannot access focal adhesions, or if cullins or the proteasome are inhibited, adhesion disassembly is stimulated. This suggests that the localized targeting of phospho-Cas within adhesions by CRL5SOCS6 and concurrent cullin and proteasome activity provide a negative feedback loop, ensuring that adhesion assembly predominates over disassembly at the leading edge. By this mechanism, ubiquitination provides a new level of spatio-temporal control over cell migration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17440.001 PMID:27656905

  15. Damage control: DNA repair, transcription, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Daulny, Anne; Tansey, William P

    2009-04-05

    The presence of DNA damage within an actively transcribed gene poses an immediate threat to cellular viability. Bulky DNA adducts, such as those induced by ultraviolet light, can profoundly influence patterns of gene expression by causing the irreversible arrest of RNA polymerase II at sites of DNA damage. It is critical that processes exist to either specifically repair transcribed genes or clear stalled RNA polymerase, so that general repair can occur and transcription resume. A growing body of evidence indicates that clearance of stalled polymerase is achieved, in part, by ubiquitin-mediated destruction of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. In this review, we shall discuss how an intimate connection between RNA polymerase II and the ubiquitylation machinery acts to restore normal transcription after DNA damage, and other forms of transcriptional arrest, has occurred.

  16. Ageing has no effect on the regulation of the ubiquitin proteasome-related genes and proteins following resistance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Stefanetti, Renae J.; Zacharewicz, Evelyn; Della Gatta, Paul; Garnham, Andrew; Russell, Aaron P.; Lamon, Séverine

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a critical component of the ageing process. Age-related muscle wasting is due to disrupted muscle protein turnover, a process mediated in part by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP). Additionally, older subjects have been observed to have an attenuated anabolic response, at both the molecular and physiological levels, following a single-bout of resistance exercise (RE). We investigated the expression levels of the UPP-related genes and proteins involved in muscle protein degradation in 10 older (60–75 years) vs. 10 younger (18–30 years) healthy male subjects at basal as well as 2 h after a single-bout of RE. MURF1, atrogin-1 and FBXO40, their substrate targets PKM2, myogenin, MYOD, MHC and EIF3F as well as MURF1 and atrogin-1 transcriptional regulators FOXO1 and FOXO3 gene and/or protein expression levels were measured via real time PCR and western blotting, respectively. At basal, no age-related difference was observed in the gene/protein levels of atrogin-1, MURF1, myogenin, MYOD and FOXO1/3. However, a decrease in FBXO40 mRNA and protein levels was observed in older subjects, while PKM2 protein was increased. In response to RE, MURF1, atrogin-1 and FBXO40 mRNA were upregulated in both the younger and older subjects, with changes observed in protein levels. In conclusion, UPP-related gene/protein expression is comparably regulated in healthy young and old male subjects at basal and following RE. These findings suggest that UPP signaling plays a limited role in the process of age-related muscle wasting. Future studies are required to investigate additional proteolytic mechanisms in conjunction with skeletal muscle protein breakdown (MPB) measurements following RE in older vs. younger subjects. PMID:24550841

  17. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus RTA Promotes Degradation of the Hey1 Repressor Protein through the Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway▿

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Faye; Harrison, Sally M.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) replication and transcription activator (RTA) protein regulates the latent-lytic switch by transactivating a variety of KSHV lytic and cellular promoters. RTA is a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets a number of transcriptional repressor proteins for degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. Herein, we show that RTA interacts with the cellular transcriptional repressor protein Hey1. We demonstrate that Hey1 is a target for RTA-mediated ubiquitination and is subsequently degraded by the proteasome. Moreover, a Cys-plus-His-rich region within RTA is important for RTA-mediated degradation of Hey1. We confirm that Hey1 represses the RTA promoter and, furthermore, show that Hey1 binds to the RTA promoter. An interaction was observed between Hey1 and the corepressor mSin3A, and this interaction was abolished in the presence of RTA. Additionally, mSin3A associated with the RTA promoter in nonreactivated, but not reactivated, BCBL1 cells. Small interfering RNA knockdown of Hey1 in HEK 293T cells latently infected with the recombinant virus rKSHV.219 led to increased levels of RTA expression upon reactivation but was insufficient to induce complete lytic reactivation. These results suggest that other additional transcriptional repressors are also important in maintenance of KSHV latency. Taken together, our results suggest that Hey1 has a contributory role in the maintenance of KSHV latency and that disruption of the Hey1 repressosome by RTA-targeted degradation may be one step in the mechanism to regulate lytic reactivation. PMID:19369342

  18. Proteasomal and Autophagic Degradation Systems.

    PubMed

    Dikic, Ivan

    2017-06-20

    Autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome system are the two major quality control pathways responsible for cellular homeostasis. As such, they provide protection against age-associated changes and a plethora of human diseases. Ubiquitination is utilized as a degradation signal by both systems, albeit in different ways, to mark cargoes for proteasomal and lysosomal degradation. Both systems intersect and communicate at multiple points to coordinate their actions in proteostasis and organelle homeostasis. This review summarizes molecular details of how proteasome and autophagy pathways are functionally interconnected in cells and indicates common principles and nodes of communication that can be therapeutically exploited.

  19. Down-regulation of types I, II and III inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors is mediated by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Oberdorf, J; Webster, J M; Zhu, C C; Luo, S G; Wojcikiewicz, R J

    1999-01-01

    Activation of certain phosphoinositidase-C-linked cell-surface receptors is known to cause an acceleration of the proteolysis of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] receptors and, thus, lead to Ins(1,4,5)P3-receptor down-regulation. In the current study we have sought to determine whether the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway is involved in this adaptive response. The data presented show (i) that activation of phosphoinositidase-C-linked receptors causes Ins(1,4,5)P3-receptor ubiquitination in a range of cell types (AR4-2J cells, INS-1 cells and rat cerebellar granule cells), (ii) that the Ins(1,4,5)P3-receptor down-regulation induced by activation of these receptors is blocked by proteasome inhibitors, (iii) that all known Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptors (types I, II and III) are substrates for ubiquitination, (iv) that ubiquitination occurs while Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptors are membrane-bound, (v) that Ins(1,4, 5)P3-receptor ubiquitination and down-regulation are stimulated only by those agonists that elevate Ins(1,4,5)P3 concentration persistently, and (vi) that a portion of cellular Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptors (those that are not type-I-receptor-associated) can be resistant to ubiquitination and degradation. In total these data indicate that the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway mediates Ins(1,4, 5)P3-receptor down-regulation and suggest that ubiquitination is stimulated by the binding of Ins(1,4,5)P3 to its receptor. PMID:10191279

  20. Muscle wasting in a rat model of long-lasting sepsis results from the activation of lysosomal, Ca2+ -activated, and ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Voisin, L; Breuillé, D; Combaret, L; Pouyet, C; Taillandier, D; Aurousseau, E; Obled, C; Attaix, D

    1996-01-01

    We studied the alterations in skeletal muscle protein breakdown in long lasting sepsis using a rat model that reproduces a sustained and reversible catabolic state, as observed in humans. Rats were injected intravenously with live Escherichia coli; control rats were pair-fed to the intake of infected rats. Rats were studied in an acute septic phase (day 2 postinfection), in a chronic septic phase (day 6), and in a late septic phase (day 10). The importance of the lysosomal, Ca2+ -dependent, and ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic processes was investigated using proteolytic inhibitors in incubated epitrochlearis muscles and by measuring mRNA levels for critical components of these pathways. Protein breakdown was elevated during the acute and chronic septic phases (when significant muscle wasting occurred) and returned to control values in the late septic phase (when wasting was stopped). A nonlysosomal and Ca2+ -independent process accounted for the enhanced proteolysis, and only mRNA levels for ubiquitin and subunits of the 20 S proteasome, the proteolytic core of the 26 S proteasome that degrades ubiquitin conjugates, paralleled the increased and decreased rates of proteolysis throughout. However, increased mRNA levels for the 14-kD ubiquitin conjugating enzyme E2, involved in substrate ubiquitylation, and for cathepsin B and m-calpain were observed in chronic sepsis. These data clearly support a major role for the ubiquitin-proteasome dependent proteolytic process during sepsis but also suggest that the activation of lysosomal and Ca2+ -dependent proteolysis may be important in the chronic phase. PMID:8601625

  1. A leucine-rich diet modulates the tumor-induced down-regulation of the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways and maintains the expression of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in the placental tissue of NMRI mice.

    PubMed

    Viana, Laís Rosa; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra

    2015-02-01

    Placental tissue injury is concomitant with tumor development. We investigated tumor-driven placental damage by tracing certain steps of the protein synthesis and degradation pathways under leucine-rich diet supplementation in MAC16 tumor-bearing mice. Cell signaling and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways were assessed in the placental tissues of pregnant mice, which were distributed into three groups on a control diet (pregnant control, tumor-bearing pregnant, and pregnant injected with MAC-ascitic fluid) and three other groups on a leucine-rich diet (pregnant, tumor-bearing pregnant, and pregnant injected with MAC-ascitic fluid). MAC tumor growth down-regulated the cell-signaling pathways of the placental tissue and decreased the levels of IRS-1, Akt/PKB, Erk/MAPK, mTOR, p70S6K, STAT3, and STAT6 phosphorylated proteins, as assessed by the multiplex Millipore Luminex assay. Leucine supplementation maintained the levels of these proteins within the established cell-signaling pathways. In the tumor-bearing group (MAC) only, the placental tissue showed increased PC5 mRNA expression, as assessed by quantitative RT-PCR, decreased 19S and 20S protein expression, as assessed by Western blot analysis, and decreased placental tyrosine levels, likely reflecting up-regulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Similar effects were found in the pregnant injected with MAC-ascitic fluid group, confirming that the effects of the tumor were mimicked by MAC-ascitic fluid injection. Although tumor progression occurred, the degradation pathway-related protein levels were modulated under leucine-supplementation conditions. In conclusion, tumor evolution reduced the protein expression of the cell-signaling pathway associated with elevated protein degradation, thereby jeopardizing placental activity. Under the leucine-rich diet, the impact of cancer on placental function could be minimized by improving the cell-signaling activity and reducing the proteolytic process.

  2. Impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway by methyl N-(6-phenylsulfanyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)carbamate leads to a potent cytotoxic effect in tumor cells: a novel antiproliferative agent with a potential therapeutic implication.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Nilambra; Mukhopadhyay, Tapas

    2012-08-31

    In recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in proteasome inhibitors as a novel class of anticancer drugs. We report that fenbendazole (FZ) (methyl N-(6-phenylsulfanyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)carbamate) exhibits a potent growth-inhibitory activity against cancer cell lines but not normal cells. We show here, using fluorogenic substrates, that FZ treatment leads to the inhibition of proteasomal activity in the cells. Succinyl-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-methylcoumarinamide (MCA), benzyloxycarbonyl-Leu-Leu-Glu-7-amido-4-MCA, and t-butoxycarbonyl-Gln-Ala-Arg-7-amido-4-MCA fluorescent derivatives were used to assess chymotrypsin-like, post-glutamyl peptidyl-hydrolyzing, and trypsin-like protease activities, respectively. Non-small cell lung cancer cells transiently transfected with an expression plasmid encoding pd1EGFP and treated with FZ showed an accumulation of the green fluorescent protein in the cells due to an increase in its half-life. A number of apoptosis regulatory proteins that are normally degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway like cyclins, p53, and IκBα were found to be accumulated in FZ-treated cells. In addition, FZ induced distinct ER stress-associated genes like GRP78, GADD153, ATF3, IRE1α, and NOXA in these cells. Thus, treatment of human NSCLC cells with fenbendazole induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, reactive oxygen species production, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and cytochrome c release that eventually led to cancer cell death. This is the first report to demonstrate the inhibition of proteasome function and induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress/reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis in human lung cancer cell lines by fenbendazole, which may represent a new class of anticancer agents showing selective toxicity against cancer cells.

  3. Antiepileptic drugs reduce the efficacy of methotrexate chemotherapy through accelerated degradation of the reduced folate carrier by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Halwachs, Sandra; Schaefer, Ingo; Seibel, Peter; Honscha, Walther

    2011-01-01

    Concurrent treatment with methotrexate (MTX) and enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs including phenobarbital (PB) reduces the efficacy of MTX chemotherapy in cancer patients. We have shown that Reduced folate carrier (Rfc1)-mediated uptake of MTX, an essential determinant of MTX chemotherapy, is significantly reduced by PB via protein kinase C (PKC). However, whether PB treatment affects Rfc1 activity through regulation of carrier protein stability and the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Protein turnover assays using hepatocytoma cells demonstrated that Rfc1 is a long-lived protein that is mainly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway under basal conditions. Pretreatment with PB significantly reduced Rfc1-mediated MTX uptake and shortened the carrier protein half-life. This effect was abolished by the specific PKC inhibitor Gö6976. Inhibition of proteasomes with MG-132 significantly elevated Rfc1 protein levels and induced colocalization of Rfc1 and ubiquitin particularly in submembranous cellular compartments. Finally, we demonstrated that PB treatment resulted in enhanced levels of Rfc1 polyubiquitin conjugates. Our results demonstrate that PB treatment causes downregulation of Rfc1 activity through PKC-dependent accelerated degradation of the Rfc1 protein by the ubiqutin-proteasome pathway. This regulatory mechanism may therefore involve clinically relevant drug resistance in patients concurrently receiving MTX and enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway does not protect against ventilator-induced accelerated proteolysis or atrophy in the diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Smuder, Ashley J; Nelson, W Bradley; Hudson, Matthew B; Kavazis, Andreas N; Powers, Scott K

    2014-07-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving intervention in patients with acute respiratory failure. However, prolonged MV results in ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD), a condition characterized by both diaphragm fiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Previous work has shown that calpain, caspase-3, and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) are all activated in the diaphragm during prolonged MV. However, although it is established that both calpain and caspase-3 are important contributors to VIDD, the role that the UPP plays in the development of VIDD remains unknown. These experiments tested the hypothesis that inhibition of the UPP will protect the diaphragm against VIDD. The authors tested this prediction in an established animal model of MV using a highly specific UPP inhibitor, epoxomicin, to prevent MV-induced activation of the proteasome in the diaphragm (n = 8 per group). The results of this study reveal that inhibition of the UPP did not prevent ventilator-induced diaphragm muscle fiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction during 12 h of MV. Also, inhibition of the UPP does not affect MV-induced increases in calpain and caspase-3 activity in the diaphragm. Finally, administration of the proteasome inhibitor did not protect against the MV-induced increases in the expression of the E3 ligases, muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1), and atrogin-1/MaFbx. Collectively, these results indicate that proteasome activation does not play a required role in VIDD development during the first 12 h of MV.

  5. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway does not protect against ventilator-induced accelerated proteolysis or atrophy in the diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Smuder, Ashley J.; Nelson, W. Bradley; Hudson, Matthew B.; Kavazis, Andreas N.; Powers, Scott K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving intervention in patients with acute respiratory failure. However, prolonged MV results in ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD), a condition characterized by both diaphragm fiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Previous work has shown calpain, caspase-3 and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) are all activated in the diaphragm during prolonged MV. However, while it is established that both calpain and caspase-3 are important contributors to VIDD, the role that the UPP plays in VIDD remains unknown. These experiments tested the hypothesis that inhibition of the UPP will protect the diaphragm against VIDD. Methods We tested this prediction in an established animal model of MV using a highly specific UPP inhibitor, epoxomicin, to prevent MV-induced activation of the proteasome in the diaphragm (n = 8/group). Results Our results reveal that inhibition of the UPP did not prevent ventilator-induced diaphragm muscle fiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction during 12 hours of MV. Also, inhibition of the UPP does not impact MV-induced increases in calpain and caspase-3 activity in the diaphragm. Finally, administration of the proteasome inhibitor did not protect against the MV-induced increases in the expression of the E3 ligases, MuRF1 and atrogin-1/MaFbx. Conclusions Collectively, these results indicate that proteasome activation does not play a required role in VIDD during the first 12 hours of MV. PMID:24681580

  6. Dopamine 5 receptor mediates Ang II type 1 receptor degradation via a ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in mice and human cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hewang; Armando, Ines; Yu, Peiying; Escano, Crisanto; Mueller, Susette C; Asico, Laureano; Pascua, Annabelle; Lu, Quansheng; Wang, Xiaoyan; Villar, Van Anthony M; Jones, John E; Wang, Zheng; Periasamy, Ammasi; Lau, Yuen-Sum; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio; Creswell, Karen; Guillemette, Gaétan; Sibley, David R; Eisner, Gilbert; Gildea, John J; Felder, Robin A; Jose, Pedro A

    2008-06-01

    Hypertension is a multigenic disorder in which abnormal counterregulation between dopamine and Ang II plays a role. Recent studies suggest that this counterregulation results, at least in part, from regulation of the expression of both the antihypertensive dopamine 5 receptor (D5R) and the prohypertensive Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R). In this report, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro interaction between these GPCRs. Disruption of the gene encoding D5R in mice increased both blood pressure and AT1R protein expression, and the increase in blood pressure was reversed by AT1R blockade. Activation of D5R increased the degradation of glycosylated AT1R in proteasomes in HEK cells and human renal proximal tubule cells heterologously and endogenously expressing human AT1R and D5R. Confocal microscopy, Förster/fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy revealed that activation of D5R initiated ubiquitination of the glycosylated AT1R at the plasma membrane. The regulated degradation of AT1R via a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway by activation of D5R provides what we believe to be a novel mechanism whereby blood pressure can be regulated by the interaction of 2 counterregulatory GPCRs. Our results therefore suggest that treatments for hypertension might be optimized by designing compounds that can target the AT1R and the D5R.

  7. Dopamine 5 receptor mediates Ang II type 1 receptor degradation via a ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in mice and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hewang; Armando, Ines; Yu, Peiying; Escano, Crisanto; Mueller, Susette C.; Asico, Laureano; Pascua, Annabelle; Lu, Quansheng; Wang, Xiaoyan; Villar, Van Anthony M.; Jones, John E.; Wang, Zheng; Periasamy, Ammasi; Lau, Yuen-Sum; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio; Creswell, Karen; Guillemette, Gaétan; Sibley, David R.; Eisner, Gilbert; Felder, Robin A.; Jose, Pedro A.

    2008-01-01

    Hypertension is a multigenic disorder in which abnormal counterregulation between dopamine and Ang II plays a role. Recent studies suggest that this counterregulation results, at least in part, from regulation of the expression of both the antihypertensive dopamine 5 receptor (D5R) and the prohypertensive Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R). In this report, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro interaction between these GPCRs. Disruption of the gene encoding D5R in mice increased both blood pressure and AT1R protein expression, and the increase in blood pressure was reversed by AT1R blockade. Activation of D5R increased the degradation of glycosylated AT1R in proteasomes in HEK cells and human renal proximal tubule cells heterologously and endogenously expressing human AT1R and D5R. Confocal microscopy, Förster/fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy revealed that activation of D5R initiated ubiquitination of the glycosylated AT1R at the plasma membrane. The regulated degradation of AT1R via a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway by activation of D5R provides what we believe to be a novel mechanism whereby blood pressure can be regulated by the interaction of 2 counterregulatory GPCRs. Our results therefore suggest that treatments for hypertension might be optimized by designing compounds that can target the AT1R and the D5R. PMID:18464932

  8. The mechanism and physiological function of macroautophagy.

    PubMed

    Klionsky, Daniel J; Codogno, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    With regard to cell biology, one area of focus that has shifted back and forth over the years has been the relative emphasis on catabolic versus anabolic processes: the breakdown of glucose, the synthesis of DNA, the oxidation of pyruvate, the biogenesis of membranes, protein degradation, and protein synthesis. Historically, the majority of studies concerned with degradation dealt with the production of energy; however, the analysis of the ubiquitin-proteasome system revealed the importance of protein degradation for controlling various aspects of cell physiology. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is limited primarily to targeting individual proteins for destruction, but cells also have to deal with larger structures that are damaged, potentially toxic or superfluous, and these substrates, including entire organelles, are the purview of autophagy. As a general definition, autophagy encompasses a range of processes in which the cell degrades parts of itself within the lysosome (or the analogous organelle, the vacuole, in yeast and plants), followed by the release and reuse of the breakdown products. Thus, autophagy is in part a mechanism for cellular recycling, but such a definition belies the importance of the different autophagic processes in cell and organismal function and homeostasis. Indeed, defects in autophagy are associated with many human diseases and metabolic disorders. Here, we provide a brief overview of the mechanism of autophagy and some of the physiological roles in which this process is involved.

  9. L166P MUTANT DJ-1, CAUSATIVE FOR RECESSIVE PARKINSON'S DISEASE IS DEGRADED THROUGH THE UBIQUITIN-PROTEASOME SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Mutations in a gene on chromosome 1, DJ-1, have been reported recently to be associated with recessive, early-onset Parkinson's disease. Whilst one mutation is a large deletion that is predicted to produce an effective knockout of the gene, the second is a point ...

  10. Pexophagy-linked degradation of the peroxisomal membrane protein Pex3p involves the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Williams, Chris; van der Klei, Ida J

    2013-08-23

    Peroxisome autophagy, also known as pexophagy, describes the wholesale degradation of peroxisomes via the vacuole, when organelles become damaged or redundant. In the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha, pexophagy is stimulated when cells growing on methanol are exposed to excess glucose. Degradation of the peroxisomal membrane protein Pex3p, a process that does not involve the vacuole, was shown to trigger pexophagy. In this contribution, we have characterised pexophagy-associated Pex3p degradation further. We show that Pex3p breakdown depends on ubiquitin and confirm that Pex3p is a target for ubiquitination. Furthermore, we identify a role for the peroxisomal E3 ligases Pex2p and Pex10p in Pex3p degradation, suggesting the existence of a ubiquitin-dependent pathway involved in removing proteins from the peroxisomal membrane. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. L166P MUTANT DJ-1, CAUSATIVE FOR RECESSIVE PARKINSON'S DISEASE IS DEGRADED THROUGH THE UBIQUITIN-PROTEASOME SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Mutations in a gene on chromosome 1, DJ-1, have been reported recently to be associated with recessive, early-onset Parkinson's disease. Whilst one mutation is a large deletion that is predicted to produce an effective knockout of the gene, the second is a point ...

  12. Fucoidan inhibition of lung cancer in vivo and in vitro : role of the Smurf2-dependent ubiquitin proteasome pathway in TGFβ receptor degradation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Lin, Tung-Yi; Wu, Yu-Chung; Tsao, Shu-Ming; Hwang, Pai-An; Shih, Yu-Wei; Hsu, Jason

    2014-09-15

    Fucoidan, a polysaccharide extracted from brown seaweeds, reduces tumor cell proliferation. In this study, we demonstrate that fucoidan reduces tumor size in LLC1-xenograft male C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, we found that LLC1-bearing mice continuously fed fucoidan showed greater antitumor activity than mice with discontinuous feeding. Fucoidan inhibited the in vitro growth of lung cancer cells. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) receptors (TGFRs) play important roles in the regulation of proliferation and progression, and high TGFRI expression in lung cancer specimens is associated with a worse prognosis. Herein, using lung cancer cells, we found that fucoidan effectively reduces TGFRI and TGFRII protein levels in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, fucoidan reduces TGFR downstream signaling events, including those in Smad2/3 and non-Smad pathways: Akt, Erk1/2, and FAK phosphorylation. Furthermore, fucoidan suppresses lung cancer cell mobility upon TGFβ stimulation. To elucidate how fucoidan decreases TGFR proteins in lung cancer cells, we found that fucoidan enhances the ubiquitination proteasome pathway (UPP)-mediated degradation of TGFRs in A549 and CL1-5 cells. Mechanistically, fucoidan promotes Smurf2 and Smad7 to conjugate TGFRs, resulting in TGF degradation; however, Smurf2-shRNA abolishes fucoidan-enhanced UPP-mediated TGFR degradation. Our study is the first to identify a novel mechanism for the antitumor activity of fucoidan, namely decreasing tumor growth by modulating the TGFR/Smad7/Smurf2-dependent axis, leading to TGFR protein degradation and inhibition of lung cancer cell progression in vitro and in vivo. Our current findings indicate that fucoidan is a potential therapeutic agent or dietary supplementation for lung cancer, acting via the Smurf2-dependent ubiquitin degradation of TGFβ receptors.

  13. New comprehensive studies of a gold(III) Dithiocarbamate complex with proven anticancer properties: Aqueous dissolution with cyclodextrins, pharmacokinetics and upstream inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Tomasello, Marianna F; Nardon, Chiara; Lanza, Valeria; Di Natale, Giuseppe; Pettenuzzo, Nicolò; Salmaso, Stefano; Milardi, Danilo; Caliceti, Paolo; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Fregona, Dolores

    2017-09-29

    The gold(III)-dithiocarbamate complex AuL12 (dibromo [ethyl-N-(dithiocarboxy-kS,kS')-N-methylglycinate] gold(III)), is endowed with promising in vitro/in vivo antitumor activity and toxicological profile. Here, we report our recent strategies to improve its water solubility and stability under physiological conditions along with our efforts for unravelling its tangled mechanism of action. We used three types of α-cyclodextrins (CDs), namely β-CD, Me-β-CD and HP-β-CD to prepare aqueous solutions of AuL12. The ability of these natural oligosaccharide carriers to enhance water solubility of hydrophobic compounds, allowed drug stability of AuL12 to be investigated. Moreover, pharmacokinetic experiments were first carried out for a gold(III) coordination compound, after i.v. injection of the nanoformulation AuL12/HP-β-CD to female mice. The gold content in the blood samples was detected at scheduled times by AAS (atomic absorption spectrometry) analysis, highlighting a fast biodistribution with a tβ1/2 of few minutes and a slow escretion (tα1/2 of 14.3 h). The in vitro cytotoxic activity of AuL12 was compared with the AuL12/HP-β-CD mixture against a panel of three human tumor cell lines (i.e., HeLa, KB and MCF7). Concerning the mechanism of action, we previously reported the proteasome-inhibitory activity of some our gold(III)-based compounds. In this work, we moved from the proteasome target to upstream of the important ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, testing the effects of AuL12 on the polyubiquitination reactions involving the Ub-activating (E1) and -conjugating (E2) enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Activation of the ATP-ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in skeletal muscle of cachectic rats bearing a hepatoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baracos, V. E.; DeVivo, C.; Hoyle, D. H.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Rats implanted with Yoshida ascites hepatoma (YAH) show a rapid and selective loss of muscle protein due mainly to a marked increase (63-95%) in the rate of protein degradation (compared with rates in muscles of pair-fed controls). To define which proteolytic pathways contribute to this increase, epitrochlearis muscles from YAH-bearing and control rats were incubated under conditions that modify different proteolytic systems. Overall proteolysis in either group of rats was not affected by removal of Ca2+ or by blocking the Ca(2+)-dependent proteolytic system. Inhibition of lysosomal function with methylamine reduced proteolysis (-12%) in muscles from YAH-bearing rats, but not in muscles of pair-fed rats. When ATP production was also inhibited, the remaining accelerated proteolysis in muscles of tumor-bearing rats fell to control levels. Muscles of YAH-bearing rats showed increased levels of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins and a 27-kDa proteasome subunit in Western blot analysis. Levels of mRNA encoding components of proteolytic systems were quantitated using Northern hybridization analysis. Although their total RNA content decreased 20-38%, pale muscles of YAH-bearing rats showed increased levels of ubiquitin mRNA (590-880%) and mRNA for multiple subunits of the proteasome (100-215%). Liver, kidney, heart, and brain showed no weight loss and no change in these mRNA species. Muscles of YAH-bearing rats also showed small increases (30-40%) in mRNA for cathepsins B and D, but not for calpain I or heat shock protein 70. Our findings suggest that accelerated muscle proteolysis and muscle wasting in tumor-bearing rats result primarily from activation of the ATP-dependent pathway involving ubiquitin and the proteasome.

  15. Activation of the ATP-ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in skeletal muscle of cachectic rats bearing a hepatoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baracos, V. E.; DeVivo, C.; Hoyle, D. H.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Rats implanted with Yoshida ascites hepatoma (YAH) show a rapid and selective loss of muscle protein due mainly to a marked increase (63-95%) in the rate of protein degradation (compared with rates in muscles of pair-fed controls). To define which proteolytic pathways contribute to this increase, epitrochlearis muscles from YAH-bearing and control rats were incubated under conditions that modify different proteolytic systems. Overall proteolysis in either group of rats was not affected by removal of Ca2+ or by blocking the Ca(2+)-dependent proteolytic system. Inhibition of lysosomal function with methylamine reduced proteolysis (-12%) in muscles from YAH-bearing rats, but not in muscles of pair-fed rats. When ATP production was also inhibited, the remaining accelerated proteolysis in muscles of tumor-bearing rats fell to control levels. Muscles of YAH-bearing rats showed increased levels of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins and a 27-kDa proteasome subunit in Western blot analysis. Levels of mRNA encoding components of proteolytic systems were quantitated using Northern hybridization analysis. Although their total RNA content decreased 20-38%, pale muscles of YAH-bearing rats showed increased levels of ubiquitin mRNA (590-880%) and mRNA for multiple subunits of the proteasome (100-215%). Liver, kidney, heart, and brain showed no weight loss and no change in these mRNA species. Muscles of YAH-bearing rats also showed small increases (30-40%) in mRNA for cathepsins B and D, but not for calpain I or heat shock protein 70. Our findings suggest that accelerated muscle proteolysis and muscle wasting in tumor-bearing rats result primarily from activation of the ATP-dependent pathway involving ubiquitin and the proteasome.

  16. 17-DMAG ameliorates polyglutamine-mediated motor neuron degeneration through well-preserved proteasome function in an SBMA model mouse.

    PubMed

    Tokui, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Waza, Masahiro; Katsuno, Masahisa; Minamiyama, Makoto; Doi, Hideki; Tanaka, Keiji; Hamazaki, Jun; Murata, Shigeo; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Sobue, Gen

    2009-03-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is the principal protein degradation system that tags and targets short-lived proteins, as well as damaged or misfolded proteins, for destruction. In spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), the androgen receptor (AR), an Hsp90 client protein, is such a misfolded protein that tends to aggregate in neurons. Hsp90 inhibitors promote the degradation of Hsp90 client proteins via the UPS. In a transgenic mouse model of SBMA, we examined whether a functioning UPS is preserved, if it was capable of degrading polyglutamine-expanded mutant AR, and what might be the therapeutic effects of 17-(dimethylaminoethylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), an oral Hsp90 inhibitor. Ubiquitin-proteasomal function was well preserved in SBMA mice and was even increased during advanced stages when the mice developed severe phenotypes. Administration of 17-DMAG markedly ameliorated motor impairments in SBMA mice without detectable toxicity and reduced amounts of monomeric and nuclear-accumulated mutant AR. Mutant AR was preferentially degraded in the presence of 17-DMAG in both SBMA cell and mouse models when compared with wild-type AR. 17-DMAG also significantly induced Hsp70 and Hsp40. Thus, 17-DMAG would exert a therapeutic effect on SBMA via preserved proteasome function.

  17. Role of ubiquitin-proteasome in protein quality control and signaling: implication in the pathogenesis of eye diseases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ubiquitin–proteasome pathway (UPP) plays important roles in many cellular functions, such as protein quality control, cell cycle control, and signal transduction. The selective degradation of aberrant proteins by the UPP is essential for the timely removal of potential cytotoxic damaged or other...

  18. Physalin B not only inhibits the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway but also induces incomplete autophagic response in human colon cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi-ming; Han, Wei; Li, Jia; Hu, Li-hong; Zhou, Yu-bo

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of physalin B insolated from Physalis divericata on human colon cancer cells in vitro and its anticancer mechanisms. Methods: Human HCT116 colon cancer cell line was tested. Cell viability and apoptosis were detected, and relevant proteins were measured using Western blot analyses. Autophagosomes were observed in stable GFP-LC3 HCT116 cells. Localization of autophagosomes and lysosomes was evaluated in GFP-LC3/RFP-LAMP1-co-transfected cells. Microtubules and F-actin microfilaments were observed with confocal microscope. Mitochondrial ROS (mito-ROS) was detected with flow cytometry in the cells stained with MitoSox dye. Results: Physalin B inhibited the viability of HCT116 cells with an IC50 value of 1.35 μmol/L. Treatment of the cells with physalin B (2.5–10 μmol/L) induced apoptosis and the cleavage of PARP and caspase-3. Meanwhile, physalin B treatment induced autophagosome formation, and accumulation of LC3-II and p62, but decreased Beclin 1 protein level. Marked changes of microtubules and F-actin microfilaments were observed in physalin B-treated cells, which led to the blockage of co-localization of autophagosomes and lysosomes. Physalin B treatment dose-dependently increased the phosphorylation of p38, ERK and JNK in the cells, whereas the p38 inhibitor SB202190, ERK inhibitor U0126 or JNK inhibitor SP600125 could partially reduce physalin B-induced PARP cleavage and p62 accumulation. Moreover, physalin B treatment dose-dependently increased mito-ROS production in the cells, whereas the ROS scavenger NAC could reverse physalin B-induced effects, including incomplete autophagic response, accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, changes of microtubules and F-actin, activation of p38, ERK and JNK, as well as cell death and apoptosis. Conclusion: Physalin B induces mito-ROS, which not only inhibits the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway but also induces incomplete autophagic response in HCT116 cells in vitro. PMID:25832431

  19. The Stability of Ribosome Biogenesis Factor WBSCR22 Is Regulated by Interaction with TRMT112 via Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Õunap, Kadri; Leetsi, Lilian; Matsoo, Maarja; Kurg, Reet

    2015-01-01

    The human WBSCR22 protein is a 18S rRNA methyltransferase involved in pre-rRNA processing and ribosome 40S subunit biogenesis. Recent studies have shown that the protein function in ribosome synthesis is independent of its enzymatic activity. In this work, we have studied the WBSCR22 protein interaction partners by SILAC-coupled co-immunoprecipitation assay and identified TRMT112 as the interaction partner of WBSCR22. Knock-down of TRMT112 expression decreased the WBSCR22 protein level in mammalian cells, suggesting that the stability of WBSCR22 is regulated through the interaction with TRMT112. The localization of the TRMT112 protein is determined by WBSCR22, and the WBSCR22-TRMT112 complex is localized in the cell nucleus. We provide evidence that the interaction between WBSCR22/Bud23 and TRMT112/Trm112 is conserved between mammals and yeast, suggesting that the function of TRMT112 as a co-activator of methyltransferases is evolutionarily conserved. Finally, we show that the transiently expressed WBSCR22 protein is ubiquitinated and degraded through the proteasome pathway, revealing the tight control of the WBSCR22 protein level in the cells. PMID:26214185

  20. Role of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and some peptidases during seed germination and copper stress in bean cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Karmous, Inès; Chaoui, Abdelilah; Jaouani, Khadija; Sheehan, David; El Ferjani, Ezzedine; Scoccianti, Valeria; Crinelli, Rita

    2014-03-01

    The role of the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway and some endo- and aminopeptidases (EPs and APs, respectively) was studied in cotyledons of germinating bean seeds (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The Ub system appeared to be important both in the early (3 days) and late (9 days) phases of germination. In the presence of copper, an increase in protein carbonylation and a decrease in reduced -SH pool occurred, indicating protein damage. This was associated with an enhancement in accumulation of malondialdehyde, a major product of lipid peroxidation, and an increase in content of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), showing oxidative stress generation. Moreover, copper induced inactivation of the Ub-proteasome (EC 3.4.25) pathway and inhibition of leucine and proline aminopeptidase activities (EC 3.4.11.1 and EC 3.4.11.5, respectively), thus limiting their role in modulating essential metabolic processes, such as the removal of regulatory and oxidatively-damaged proteins. By contrast, total trypsin and chymotrypsin-like activities (EC 3.4.21.4 and EC 3.4.21.1, respectively) increased after copper exposure, in parallel with a decrease in their inhibitor capacities (i.e. trypsin inhibitor and chymotrypsin inhibitor activity), suggesting that these endoproteases are part of the protective mechanisms against copper stress.

  1. [Plasticity of nervous and immune systems in different species: the role of proteasomes].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Nervous and immune systems have many general features in their organization and functioning in various animal species from insects to mammals. These systems are capable to regulate effectively each other by exchange of information through rather small molecules like oligopeptides, cytokines, and neuropeptides. For many such molecules, that function as transmitters or signaling peptides, their origin and receptors are common within nervous and immune systems. Development of nervous and immune systems during ontogenesis and their functions in various species are controlled by the ubiquitous HYPERLINK "http://slovari.yandex.ru/proteolytic/en-ru/Medical/" \\1 "longvo/" proteolytic ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). UPS regulates key biochemical processes in both systems by providing formation of synaptic connections and synaptic plasticity, and governs immune responses. In the review, the molecular mechanisms of functioning and interaction between nervous and immune systems are considered in different species of invertebrats and vertebrats. The role of UPS in these processes in the main subject of this review.

  2. Structural insights into the functional cycle of the ATPase module of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Wehmer, Marc; Rudack, Till; Beck, Florian; Aufderheide, Antje; Pfeifer, Günter; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Förster, Friedrich; Schulten, Klaus; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Sakata, Eri

    2017-02-07

    In eukaryotic cells, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the regulated degradation of intracellular proteins. The 26S holocomplex comprises the core particle (CP), where proteolysis takes place, and one or two regulatory particles (RPs). The base of the RP is formed by a heterohexameric AAA(+) ATPase module, which unfolds and translocates substrates into the CP. Applying single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and image classification to samples in the presence of different nucleotides and nucleotide analogs, we were able to observe four distinct conformational states (s1 to s4). The resolution of the four conformers allowed for the construction of atomic models of the AAA(+) ATPase module as it progresses through the functional cycle. In a hitherto unobserved state (s4), the gate controlling access to the CP is open. The structures described in this study allow us to put forward a model for the 26S functional cycle driven by ATP hydrolysis.

  3. A decade of the anaphase-promoting complex in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ju; Bonni, Azad

    2016-03-15

    Control of protein abundance by the ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for normal brain development and function. Just over a decade ago, the first post-mitotic function of the anaphase-promoting complex, a major cell cycle-regulated E3 ubiquitin ligase, was discovered in the control of axon growth and patterning in the mammalian brain. Since then, a large number of studies have identified additional novel roles for the anaphase-promoting complex in diverse aspects of neuronal connectivity and plasticity in the developing and mature nervous system. In this review, we discuss the functions and mechanisms of the anaphase-promoting complex in neurogenesis, glial differentiation and migration, neuronal survival and metabolism, neuronal morphogenesis, synapse formation and plasticity, and learning and memory. We also provide a perspective on future investigations of the anaphase-promoting complex in neurobiology.

  4. The new function of two ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase isozymes as reciprocal modulators of germ cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jungkee

    2007-04-01

    Ubiquitination is required throughout all developmental stages of mammalian spermatogenesis. The two ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase (UCH) enzymes, UCH-L1 and UCH-L3, deubiquitinate ubiquitin-protein conjugates and control the cellular balance of ubiquitin. These two UCH isozymes have 52% amino acid identity and share significant structural similarity. A new function of these two closely related UCH enzymes during spermatogenesis which is associated with germ cell apoptosis has been analyzed. Apoptosis, in general, is thought to be partly regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. During spermatogenesis, apoptosis controls germ cell numbers and eliminates defective germ cells to facilitate testicular homeostasis. In this paper, I review the distinct function of the two UCH isozymes in the testis of gad and Uchl3 knockout mice, which are strongly but reciprocally expressed during spermatogenesis. In addition, the importance of UCHL1-dependent apoptosis for normal spermatogenesis and sperm quality control is discussed.

  5. Inhibition of ERK1/2 Pathway Suppresses Adiponectin Secretion via Accelerating Protein Degradation by Ubiquitin-Proteasome System: Relevance to Obesity-related Adiponectin Decline

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Dongfang; Wang, Zhigang; Dou, Xiaobing; Zhang, Ximei; Li, Songtao; Vu, Lyndsey; Yao, Tong; Song, Zhenyuan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Predominantly secreted by adipose tissue, adiponectin possesses insulin-sensitizing, anti-atherogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenic properties. Paradoxically, obesity is associated with declined plasma adiponectin levels; however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we investigated the mechanistic involvement of MEK/ERK1/2 pathway in obesity-related adiponectin decrease. Materials/Methods C57 BL/6 mice exposed to a high-fat diet (HFD) were employed as animal obesity model. Both fully-differentiated 3T3-L1 and mouse primary adipocytes were used in the in vitro experiments. Results Obesity and plasma adiponectin decline induced by prolonged HFD exposure was associated with suppressed ERK1/2 activation in adipose tissue. In adipocytes, specific inhibition of MEK/ERK1/2 pathway decreased intracellular and secretory adiponectin levels, whereas adiponectin gene expression was increased, suggesting that MEK/ERK1/2 inhibition may promote adiponectin protein degradation. Cycloheximide (CHX)-chase assay revealed that MEK/ERK1/2 inhibition accelerated adiponectin protein degradation, which was prevented by MG132, a potent proteasome inhibitor. Immunoprecipitation assay showed that intracellular MEK/ERK1/2 activity was negatively associated with ubiqutinated adiponectin protein levels. Consistently, long-term HFD feeing in mice increased ubiquitinated adiponectin levels in the epididymal fat pads. Conclusions Adipose tissue MEK/ERK1/2 activity can differentially regulates adiponectin gene expression and protein abundance and its suppression in obesity may play a mechanistic role in obesity-related plasma adiponectin decline. PMID:23490586

  6. Rapid degradation of mutant SLC25A46 by the ubiquitin-proteasome system results in MFN1/2-mediated hyperfusion of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Janos; Vashisht, Ajay A; Wan, Jijun; Jen, Joanna C; Claypool, Steven M; Wohlschlegel, James A; Koehler, Carla M

    2017-03-01

    SCL25A46 is a mitochondrial carrier protein that surprisingly localizes to the outer membrane and is distantly related to Ugo1. Here we show that a subset of SLC25A46 interacts with mitochondrial dynamics components and the MICOS complex. Decreased expression of SLC25A46 results in increased stability and oligomerization of MFN1 and MFN2 on mitochondria, promoting mitochondrial hyperfusion. A mutation at L341P causes rapid degradation of SLC25A46, which manifests as a rare disease, pontocerebellar hypoplasia. The E3 ubiquitin ligases MULAN and MARCH5 coordinate ubiquitylation of SLC25A46 L341P, leading to degradation by organized activities of P97 and the proteasome. Whereas outer mitochondrial membrane-associated degradation is typically associated with apoptosis or a specialized type of autophagy termed mitophagy, SLC25A46 degradation operates independently of activation of outer membrane stress pathways. Thus SLC25A46 is a new component in mitochondrial dynamics that serves as a regulator for MFN1/2 oligomerization. Moreover, SLC25A46 is selectively degraded from the outer membrane independently of mitophagy and apoptosis, providing a framework for mechanistic studies in the proteolysis of outer membrane proteins.

  7. Quality control of a cytoplasmic protein complex: chaperone motors and the ubiquitin-proteasome system govern the fate of orphan fatty acid synthase subunit Fas2 of yeast.

    PubMed

    Scazzari, Mario; Amm, Ingo; Wolf, Dieter H

    2015-02-20

    For the assembly of protein complexes in the cell, the presence of stoichiometric amounts of the respective protein subunits is of utmost importance. A surplus of any of the subunits may trigger unspecific and harmful protein interactions and has to be avoided. A stoichiometric amount of subunits must finally be reached via transcriptional, translational, and/or post-translational regulation. Synthesis of saturated 16 and 18 carbon fatty acids is carried out by fatty acid synthase: in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a 2.6-MDa molecular mass assembly containing six protomers each of two different subunits, Fas1 (β) and Fas2 (α). The (α)6(β)6 complex carries six copies of all eight enzymatic activities required for fatty acid synthesis. The FAS1 and FAS2 genes in yeast are unlinked and map on two different chromosomes. Here we study the fate of the α-subunit of the complex, Fas2, when its partner, the β-subunit Fas1, is absent. Individual subunits of fatty acid synthase are proteolytically degraded when the respective partner is missing. Elimination of Fas2 is achieved by the proteasome. Here we show that a ubiquitin transfer machinery is required for Fas2 elimination. The major ubiquitin ligase targeting the superfluous Fas2 subunit to the proteasome is Ubr1. The ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes Ubc2 and Ubc4 assist the degradation process. The AAA-ATPase Cdc48 and the Hsp70 chaperone Ssa1 are crucially involved in the elimination of Fas2. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Endophilin-A Deficiency Induces the Foxo3a-Fbxo32 Network in the Brain and Causes Dysregulation of Autophagy and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, John D; Rostosky, Christine M; Gowrisankaran, Sindhuja; Arora, Amandeep S; Soukup, Sandra-Fausia; Vidal, Ramon; Capece, Vincenzo; Freytag, Siona; Fischer, Andre; Verstreken, Patrik; Bonn, Stefan; Raimundo, Nuno; Milosevic, Ira

    2016-10-18

    Endophilin-A, a well-characterized endocytic adaptor essential for synaptic vesicle recycling, has recently been linked to neurodegeneration. We report here that endophilin-A deficiency results in impaired movement, age-dependent ataxia, and neurodegeneration in mice. Transcriptional analysis of endophilin-A mutant mice, complemented by proteomics, highlighted ataxia- and protein-homeostasis-related genes and revealed upregulation of the E3-ubiquitin ligase FBXO32/atrogin-1 and its transcription factor FOXO3A. FBXO32 overexpression triggers apoptosis in cultured cells and neurons but, remarkably, coexpression of endophilin-A rescues it. FBXO32 interacts with all three endophilin-A proteins. Similarly to endophilin-A, FBXO32 tubulates membranes and localizes on clathrin-coated structures. Additionally, FBXO32 and endophilin-A are necessary for autophagosome formation, and both colocalize transiently with autophagosomes. Our results point to a role for endophilin-A proteins in autophagy and protein degradation, processes that are impaired in their absence, potentially contributing to neurodegeneration and ataxia.

  9. Activation of Both the Calpain and Ubiquitin-Proteasome Systems Contributes to Septic Cardiomyopathy through Dystrophin Loss/Disruption and mTOR Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Ana Caroline Silva; Figueiredo, Maria Jose; Campos, Erica Carolina; Soave, Danilo Figueiredo; Ramos, Simone Gusmao; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction caused by the impairment of myocardial contractility has been recognized as an important factor contributing to the high mortality in sepsis. Calpain activation in the heart takes place in response to increased intracellular calcium influx resulting in proteolysis of structural and contractile proteins with subsequent myocardial dysfunction. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that increased levels of calpain in the septic heart leads to disruption of structural and contractile proteins and that administration of calpain inhibitor-1 (N-acetyl-leucinyl-leucinyl-norleucinal (ALLN)) after sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture prevents cardiac protein degradation. We also tested the hypothesis that calpain plays a role in the modulation of protein synthesis/degradation through the activation of proteasome-dependent proteolysis and inhibition of the mTOR pathway. Severe sepsis significantly increased heart calpain-1 levels and promoted ubiquitin and Pa28β over-expression with a reduction in the mTOR levels. In addition, sepsis reduced the expression of structural proteins dystrophin and β-dystroglycan as well as the contractile proteins actin and myosin. ALLN administration prevented sepsis-induced increases in calpain and ubiquitin levels in the heart, which resulted in decreased of structural and contractile proteins degradation and basal mTOR expression levels were re-established. Our results support the concept that increased calpain concentrations may be part of an important mechanism of sepsis-induced cardiac muscle proteolysis. PMID:27880847

  10. Development of a functional food or drug against unloading-mediated muscle atrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikawa, Takeshi; Nakao, Reiko; Kagawa, Sachiko; Yamada, Chiharu; Abe, Manami; Tamura, Seiko; Kohno, Shohei; Sukeno, Akiko; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Okumura, Yuushi; Ishidoh, Kazumi

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is a primary regulator of muscle protein turnover, providing a mechanism for selective degradation of regulatory and structural proteins. This pathway is constitutively active in muscle fibers and mediates both intracellular signaling events and normal muscle protein turnover. However, conditions of decreased muscle use, so called unloading, remarkably stimulate activity of this pathway, resulting in loss of muscle protein. In fact, we previously reported that expression of several ubiquitin ligase genes, such as MuRF-1, Cbl-b, and Siah-1A, which are rate-limiting enzymes of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway, are significantly up-regulated in rat skeletal muscle during spaceflight. Moreover, we found that Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1, an important intermediates of IGF-1 signal transduction, contributes to muscle atrophy during unloading. Therefore, we hypothesized that inhibition of Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1 leads to prevention of muscle atrophy during unloading. In this study, we aimed to evaluate oligopeptide as an inhibitor against ubiquitination of IRS-1 by Cbl-b. We synthesized various oligopeptides that may competitively inhibit the binding of Cbl-b to IRS-1 on the basis of their structures and screened inhibitory effects of these synthesized oligopeptides on Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination of IRS-1 using in vitro ubiquitination systems. We found that two synthetic oligopeptides with specific amino acid sequences effectively inhibited interaction with Cbl-b and IRS-1, resulting in decreased ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1 (Patent pending). In contrast, we also found inhibitory activity against Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination of IRS-1 in soy protein-derived oligopeptides, whereas their inhibitory effects were weaker than those of synthetic oligopeptides. Our results suggest that specific oligopeptides may be available as a functional food against the muscle

  11. cAMP signaling increases histone deacetylase 8 expression by inhibiting JNK-dependent degradation via autophagy and the proteasome system in H1299 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2016-02-05

    This study aimed to investigate the roles of autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the degradation of histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8) and to clarify the mechanism by which cAMP signaling regulates this degradation. cAMP signaling was activated by treating H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cells with isoproterenol or forskolin/3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, and HDAC8 expression was assessed by western blot analysis. The inhibition of autophagy and ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent degradation increased HDAC8 expression. cAMP signaling inhibited JNK activation, which decreased the phosphorylation of Bcl-2, thereby reducing autophagy, and the phosphorylation of Itch, thereby reducing ubiquitination. These results suggest that the HDAC8 protein is degraded via autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome system and that cAMP signaling increases HDAC8 protein levels by reducing JNK-mediated autophagy and ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent degradation of the HDAC8 protein in H1299 lung cancer cells.

  12. Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) May Act as a Substrate and a Recognition Unit for CRL4CRBN and Stub1 E3 Ligases Facilitating Ubiquitination of Proteins Involved in Presynaptic Functions and Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Dolores; Rice, Richard C; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M; D'Adamio, Luciano

    2016-08-12

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP), whose mutations cause Alzheimer disease, plays an important in vivo role and facilitates transmitter release. Because the APP cytosolic region (ACR) is essential for these functions, we have characterized its brain interactome. We found that the ACR interacts with proteins that regulate the ubiquitin-proteasome system, predominantly with the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases Stub1, which binds the NH2 terminus of the ACR, and CRL4(CRBN), which is formed by Cul4a/b, Ddb1, and Crbn, and interacts with the COOH terminus of the ACR via Crbn. APP shares essential functions with APP-like protein-2 (APLP2) but not APP-like protein-1 (APLP1). Noteworthy, APLP2, but not APLP1, interacts with Stub1 and CRL4(CRBN), pointing to a functional pathway shared only by APP and APLP2. In vitro ubiquitination/ubiquitome analysis indicates that these E3 ligases are enzymatically active and ubiquitinate the ACR residues Lys(649/650/651/676/688) Deletion of Crbn reduces ubiquitination of Lys(676) suggesting that Lys(676) is physiologically ubiquitinated by CRL4(CRBN) The ACR facilitated in vitro ubiquitination of presynaptic proteins that regulate exocytosis, suggesting a mechanism by which APP tunes transmitter release. Other dementia-related proteins, namely Tau and apoE, interact with and are ubiquitinated via the ACR in vitro This, and the evidence that CRBN and CUL4B are linked to intellectual disability, prompts us to hypothesize a pathogenic mechanism, in which APP acts as a modulator of E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase(s), shared by distinct neuronal disorders. The well described accumulation of ubiquitinated protein inclusions in neurodegenerative diseases and the link between the ubiquitin-proteasome system and neurodegeneration make this concept plausible. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) May Act as a Substrate and a Recognition Unit for CRL4CRBN and Stub1 E3 Ligases Facilitating Ubiquitination of Proteins Involved in Presynaptic Functions and Neurodegeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP), whose mutations cause Alzheimer disease, plays an important in vivo role and facilitates transmitter release. Because the APP cytosolic region (ACR) is essential for these functions, we have characterized its brain interactome. We found that the ACR interacts with proteins that regulate the ubiquitin-proteasome system, predominantly with the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases Stub1, which binds the NH2 terminus of the ACR, and CRL4CRBN, which is formed by Cul4a/b, Ddb1, and Crbn, and interacts with the COOH terminus of the ACR via Crbn. APP shares essential functions with APP-like protein-2 (APLP2) but not APP-like protein-1 (APLP1). Noteworthy, APLP2, but not APLP1, interacts with Stub1 and CRL4CRBN, pointing to a functional pathway shared only by APP and APLP2. In vitro ubiquitination/ubiquitome analysis indicates that these E3 ligases are enzymatically active and ubiquitinate the ACR residues Lys649/650/651/676/688. Deletion of Crbn reduces ubiquitination of Lys676 suggesting that Lys676 is physiologically ubiquitinated by CRL4CRBN. The ACR facilitated in vitro ubiquitination of presynaptic proteins that regulate exocytosis, suggesting a mechanism by which APP tunes transmitter release. Other dementia-related proteins, namely Tau and apoE, interact with and are ubiquitinated via the ACR in vitro. This, and the evidence that CRBN and CUL4B are linked to intellectual disability, prompts us to hypothesize a pathogenic mechanism, in which APP acts as a modulator of E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase(s), shared by distinct neuronal disorders. The well described accumulation of ubiquitinated protein inclusions in neurodegenerative diseases and the link between the ubiquitin-proteasome system and neurodegeneration make this concept plausible. PMID:27325702

  14. Cyclin G2 Is Degraded through the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway and Mediates the Antiproliferative Effect of Activin Receptor-like Kinase 7

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guoxiong; Bernaudo, Stefanie; Fu, Guodong; Lee, Daniel Y.; Yang, Burton B.

    2008-01-01

    We have previously reported that Nodal, a member of the TGF-β superfamily, acts through activin receptor-like kinase 7 (ALK7) to inhibit ovarian cancer cell proliferation. To determine the mechanism underlying their effects, a cell cycle gene array was performed and cyclin G2 mRNA was found to be strongly up-regulated by Nodal and ALK7. To study the function and regulation of cyclin G2 in ovarian cancer cells, expression constructs were generated. We found that cyclin G2 protein level decreased rapidly after transfection, and this decrease was prevented by 26S proteasome inhibitors. Immunoprecipitation and pull-down studies showed that ubiquitin, Skp1, and Skp2 formed complexes with cyclin G2. Knockdown of Skp2 by siRNA increased, whereas overexpression of Skp2 decreased cyclin G2 levels. Nodal and ALK7 decreased the expression of Skp1 and Skp2 and increased cyclin G2 levels. Overexpression of cyclin G2 inhibited cell proliferation whereas cyclin G2-siRNA reduced the antiproliferative effect of Nodal and ALK7. Taken together, these findings provide strong evidence that cyclin G2 is degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway and that Skp2 plays a role in regulating cyclin G2 levels. Furthermore, our results also demonstrate that the antiproliferative effect of Nodal/ALK7 on ovarian cancer cells is in part mediated by cyclin G2. PMID:18784254

  15. Proteasome functional insufficiency in cardiac pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Zheng, Hanqiao; Su, Huabo; Powell, Saul R.

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the degradation of most cellular proteins. Alterations in cardiac UPS, including changes in the degradation of regulatory proteins and proteasome functional insufficiency, are observed in many forms of heart disease and have been shown to play an important role in cardiac pathogenesis. In the past several years, remarkable progress in understanding the mechanisms that regulate UPS-mediated protein degradation has been achieved. A transgenic mouse model of benign enhancement of cardiac proteasome proteolytic function has been created. This has led to the first demonstration of the necessity of proteasome functional insufficiency in the genesis of important pathological processes. Cardiomyocyte-restricted enhancement of proteasome proteolytic function by overexpression of proteasome activator 28α protects against cardiac proteinopathy and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Additionally, exciting advances have recently been achieved in the search for a pharmacological agent to activate the proteasome. These breakthroughs are expected to serve as an impetus to further investigation into the involvement of UPS dysfunction in molecular pathogenesis and to the development of new therapeutic strategies for combating heart disease. An interplay between the UPS and macroautophagy is increasingly suggested in noncardiac systems but is not well understood in the cardiac system. Further investigations into the interplay are expected to provide a more comprehensive picture of cardiac protein quality control and degradation. PMID:21949118

  16. Chronic contractile activity upregulates the proteasome system in rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ordway, G A; Neufer, P D; Chin, E R; DeMartino, G N

    2000-03-01

    Remodeling of skeletal muscle in response to altered patterns of contractile activity is achieved, in part, by the regulated degradation of cellular proteins. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is a dominant pathway for protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. To test the role of this pathway in contraction-induced remodeling of skeletal muscle, we used a well-established model of continuous motor nerve stimulation to activate tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of New Zealand White rabbits for periods up to 28 days. Western blot analysis revealed marked and coordinated increases in protein levels of the 20S proteasome and two of its regulatory proteins, PA700 and PA28. mRNA of a representative proteasome subunit also increased coordinately in contracting muscles. Chronic contractile activity of TA also increased total proteasome activity in extracts, as measured by the hydrolysis of a proteasome-specific peptide substrate, and the total capacity of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, as measured by the ATP-dependent hydrolysis of an exogenous protein substrate. These results support the potential role of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation in the contraction-induced remodeling of skeletal muscle.

  17. Aging and Immune Function: Molecular Mechanisms to Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Ponnappan, Subramaniam

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The immune system of an organism is an essential component of the defense mechanism aimed at combating pathogenic stress. Age-associated immune dysfunction, also dubbed “immune senescence,” manifests as increased susceptibility to infections, increased onset and progression of autoimmune diseases, and onset of neoplasia. Over the years, extensive research has generated consensus in terms of the phenotypic and functional defects within the immune system in various organisms, including humans. Indeed, age-associated alterations such as thymic involution, T cell repertoire skewing, decreased ability to activate naïve T cells and to generate robust memory responses, have been shown to have a causative role in immune decline. Further, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of proteotoxic stress, DNA damage response, modulation of ubiquitin proteasome pathway, and regulation of transcription factor NFκB activation, in immune decline, have paved the way to delineating signaling pathways that cross-talk and impact immune senescence. Given the role of the immune system in combating infections, its effectiveness with age may well be a marker of health and a predictor of longevity. It is therefore believed that a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying immune senescence will lead to an effective interventional strategy aimed at improving the health span of individuals. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1551–1585. PMID:20812785

  18. Fast axonal transport of the proteasome complex depends on membrane interaction and molecular motor function.

    PubMed

    Otero, Maria G; Alloatti, Matías; Cromberg, Lucas E; Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Encalada, Sandra E; Pozo Devoto, Victorio M; Bruno, Luciana; Goldstein, Lawrence S B; Falzone, Tomás L

    2014-04-01

    Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in neurons depends on the correct delivery of the proteasome complex. In neurodegenerative diseases, aggregation and accumulation of proteins in axons link transport defects with degradation impairments; however, the transport properties of proteasomes remain unknown. Here, using in vivo experiments, we reveal the fast anterograde transport of assembled and functional 26S proteasome complexes. A high-resolution tracking system to follow fluorescent proteasomes revealed three types of motion: actively driven proteasome axonal transport, diffusive behavior in a viscoelastic axonema and proteasome-confined motion. We show that active proteasome transport depends on motor function because knockdown of the KIF5B motor subunit resulted in impairment of the anterograde proteasome flux and the density of segmental velocities. Finally, we reveal that neuronal proteasomes interact with intracellular membranes and identify the coordinated transport of fluorescent proteasomes with synaptic precursor vesicles, Golgi-derived vesicles, lysosomes and mitochondria. Taken together, our results reveal fast axonal transport as a new mechanism of proteasome delivery that depends on membrane cargo 'hitch-hiking' and the function of molecular motors. We further hypothesize that defects in proteasome transport could promote abnormal protein clearance in neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Ubiquitin-Like Proteasome System Represents a Eukaryotic-Like Pathway for Targeted Proteolysis in Archaea

    DOE PAGES

    Fu, Xian; Liu, Rui; Sanchez, Iona; ...

    2016-05-17

    The molecular mechanisms of targeted proteolysis in archaea are poorly understood, yet they may have deep evolutionary roots shared with the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrate in archaea that TBP2, a TATA-binding protein (TBP) modified by ubiquitin-like isopeptide bonds, is phosphorylated and targeted for degradation by proteasomes. Rapid turnover of TBP2 required the functions of UbaA (the E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog of archaea), AAA ATPases (Cdc48/p97 and Rpt types), a type 2 JAB1/MPN/MOV34 metalloenzyme (JAMM/MPN+) homolog (JAMM2), and 20S proteasomes. The ubiquitin-like protein modifier small archaeal modifier protein 2 (SAMP2) stimulated the degradation of TBP2, but SAMP2 itself wasmore » not degraded. Analysis of the TBP2 fractions that were not modified by ubiquitin-like linkages revealed that TBP2 had multiple N termini, including Met1-Ser2, Ser2, and Met1-Ser2(p) [where (p) represents phosphorylation]. The evidence suggested that the Met1-Ser2(p) form accumulated in cells that were unable to degrade TBP2. We propose a model in archaea in which the attachment of ubiquitin-like tags can target proteins for degradation by proteasomes and be controlled by N-terminal degrons. In support of a proteolytic mechanism that is energy dependent and recycles the ubiquitin-like protein tags, we find that a network of AAA ATPases and a JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease are required, in addition to 20S proteasomes, for controlled intracellular proteolysis. IMPORTANCEThis study advances the fundamental knowledge of signal-guided proteolysis in archaea and sheds light on components that are related to the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotes. In archaea, the ubiquitin-like proteasome system is found to require function of an E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog, a type 2 JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease, and a network of AAA ATPases for the targeted destruction of proteins. We provide evidence that the attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein is controlled by an N

  20. Ubiquitin-Like Proteasome System Represents a Eukaryotic-Like Pathway for Targeted Proteolysis in Archaea

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Xian; Liu, Rui; Sanchez, Iona; Silva-Sanchez, Cecilia; Hepowit, Nathaniel L.; Cao, Shiyun; Chen, Sixue; Maupin-Furlow, Julie

    2016-05-17

    The molecular mechanisms of targeted proteolysis in archaea are poorly understood, yet they may have deep evolutionary roots shared with the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrate in archaea that TBP2, a TATA-binding protein (TBP) modified by ubiquitin-like isopeptide bonds, is phosphorylated and targeted for degradation by proteasomes. Rapid turnover of TBP2 required the functions of UbaA (the E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog of archaea), AAA ATPases (Cdc48/p97 and Rpt types), a type 2 JAB1/MPN/MOV34 metalloenzyme (JAMM/MPN+) homolog (JAMM2), and 20S proteasomes. The ubiquitin-like protein modifier small archaeal modifier protein 2 (SAMP2) stimulated the degradation of TBP2, but SAMP2 itself was not degraded. Analysis of the TBP2 fractions that were not modified by ubiquitin-like linkages revealed that TBP2 had multiple N termini, including Met1-Ser2, Ser2, and Met1-Ser2(p) [where (p) represents phosphorylation]. The evidence suggested that the Met1-Ser2(p) form accumulated in cells that were unable to degrade TBP2. We propose a model in archaea in which the attachment of ubiquitin-like tags can target proteins for degradation by proteasomes and be controlled by N-terminal degrons. In support of a proteolytic mechanism that is energy dependent and recycles the ubiquitin-like protein tags, we find that a network of AAA ATPases and a JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease are required, in addition to 20S proteasomes, for controlled intracellular proteolysis.

    IMPORTANCEThis study advances the fundamental knowledge of signal-guided proteolysis in archaea and sheds light on components that are related to the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotes. In archaea, the ubiquitin-like proteasome system is found to require function of an E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog, a type 2 JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease, and a network of AAA ATPases for the targeted destruction of proteins. We provide evidence that the attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein is controlled

  1. Ubiquitin-Like Proteasome System Represents a Eukaryotic-Like Pathway for Targeted Proteolysis in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xian; Liu, Rui; Sanchez, Iona; Silva-Sanchez, Cecilia; Hepowit, Nathaniel L; Cao, Shiyun; Chen, Sixue; Maupin-Furlow, Julie

    2016-05-17

    The molecular mechanisms of targeted proteolysis in archaea are poorly understood, yet they may have deep evolutionary roots shared with the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrate in archaea that TBP2, a TATA-binding protein (TBP) modified by ubiquitin-like isopeptide bonds, is phosphorylated and targeted for degradation by proteasomes. Rapid turnover of TBP2 required the functions of UbaA (the E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog of archaea), AAA ATPases (Cdc48/p97 and Rpt types), a type 2 JAB1/MPN/MOV34 metalloenzyme (JAMM/MPN+) homolog (JAMM2), and 20S proteasomes. The ubiquitin-like protein modifier small archaeal modifier protein 2 (SAMP2) stimulated the degradation of TBP2, but SAMP2 itself was not degraded. Analysis of the TBP2 fractions that were not modified by ubiquitin-like linkages revealed that TBP2 had multiple N termini, including Met1-Ser2, Ser2, and Met1-Ser2(p) [where (p) represents phosphorylation]. The evidence suggested that the Met1-Ser2(p) form accumulated in cells that were unable to degrade TBP2. We propose a model in archaea in which the attachment of ubiquitin-like tags can target proteins for degradation by proteasomes and be controlled by N-terminal degrons. In support of a proteolytic mechanism that is energy dependent and recycles the ubiquitin-like protein tags, we find that a network of AAA ATPases and a JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease are required, in addition to 20S proteasomes, for controlled intracellular proteolysis. This study advances the fundamental knowledge of signal-guided proteolysis in archaea and sheds light on components that are related to the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotes. In archaea, the ubiquitin-like proteasome system is found to require function of an E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog, a type 2 JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease, and a network of AAA ATPases for the targeted destruction of proteins. We provide evidence that the attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein is controlled by an N-terminal degron and

  2. UNC-89 (obscurin) binds to MEL-26, a BTB-domain protein, and affects the function of MEI-1 (katanin) in striated muscle of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kristy J; Qadota, Hiroshi; Mains, Paul E; Benian, Guy M

    2012-07-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system is involved in degradation of old or damaged sarcomeric proteins. Most E3 ubiquitin ligases are associated with cullins, which function as scaffolds for assembly of the protein degradation machinery. Cullin 3 uses an adaptor to link to substrates; in Caenorhabditis elegans, one of these adaptors is the BTB-domain protein MEL-26 (maternal effect lethal). Here we show that MEL-26 interacts with the giant sarcomeric protein UNC-89 (obscurin). MEL-26 and UNC-89 partially colocalize at sarcomeric M-lines. Loss of function or gain of function of mel-26 results in disorganization of myosin thick filaments similar to that found in unc-89 mutants. It had been reported that in early C. elegans embryos, a target of the CUL-3/MEL-26 ubiquitylation complex is the microtubule-severing enzyme katanin (MEI-1). Loss of function or gain of function of mei-1 also results in disorganization of thick filaments similar to unc-89 mutants. Genetic data indicate that at least some of the mel-26 loss-of-function phenotype in muscle can be attributed to increased microtubule-severing activity of MEI-1. The level of MEI-1 protein is reduced in an unc-89 mutant, suggesting that the normal role of UNC-89 is to inhibit the CUL-3/MEL-26 complex toward MEI-1.

  3. UNC-89 (obscurin) binds to MEL-26, a BTB-domain protein, and affects the function of MEI-1 (katanin) in striated muscle of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kristy J.; Qadota, Hiroshi; Mains, Paul E.; Benian, Guy M.

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system is involved in degradation of old or damaged sarcomeric proteins. Most E3 ubiquitin ligases are associated with cullins, which function as scaffolds for assembly of the protein degradation machinery. Cullin 3 uses an adaptor to link to substrates; in Caenorhabditis elegans, one of these adaptors is the BTB-domain protein MEL-26 (maternal effect lethal). Here we show that MEL-26 interacts with the giant sarcomeric protein UNC-89 (obscurin). MEL-26 and UNC-89 partially colocalize at sarcomeric M-lines. Loss of function or gain of function of mel-26 results in disorganization of myosin thick filaments similar to that found in unc-89 mutants. It had been reported that in early C. elegans embryos, a target of the CUL-3/MEL-26 ubiquitylation complex is the microtubule-severing enzyme katanin (MEI-1). Loss of function or gain of function of mei-1 also results in disorganization of thick filaments similar to unc-89 mutants. Genetic data indicate that at least some of the mel-26 loss-of-function phenotype in muscle can be attributed to increased microtubule-severing activity of MEI-1. The level of MEI-1 protein is reduced in an unc-89 mutant, suggesting that the normal role of UNC-89 is to inhibit the CUL-3/MEL-26 complex toward MEI-1. PMID:22621901

  4. Sirtuins and Proteolytic Systems: Implications for Pathogenesis of Synucleinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Ludovico, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Insoluble and fibrillar forms of α-synuclein are the major components of Lewy bodies, a hallmark of several sporadic and inherited neurodegenerative diseases known as synucleinopathies. α-Synuclein is a natural unfolded and aggregation-prone protein that can be degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasomal system and the lysosomal degradation pathways. α-Synuclein is a target of the main cellular proteolytic systems, but it is also able to alter their function further, contributing to the progression of neurodegeneration. Aging, a major risk for synucleinopathies, is associated with a decrease activity of the proteolytic systems, further aggravating this toxic looping cycle. Here, the current literature on the basic aspects of the routes for α-synuclein clearance, as well as the consequences of the proteolytic systems collapse, will be discussed. Finally, particular focus will be given to the sirtuins’s role on proteostasis regulation, since their modulation emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy to rescue cells from α-synuclein toxicity. The controversial reports on the potential role of sirtuins in the degradation of α-synuclein will be discussed. Connection between sirtuins and proteolytic systems is definitely worth of further studies to increase the knowledge that will allow its proper exploration as new avenue to fight synucleinopathies. PMID:25946078

  5. DNA damage in germ cells induces an innate immune response that triggers systemic stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Ermolaeva, Maria A; Segref, Alexandra; Dakhovnik, Alexander; Ou, Hui-Ling; Schneider, Jennifer I; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Hoppe, Thorsten; Schumacher, Björn

    2013-09-19

    DNA damage responses have been well characterized with regard to their cell-autonomous checkpoint functions leading to cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis. In contrast, systemic responses to tissue-specific genome instability remain poorly understood. In adult Caenorhabditis elegans worms germ cells undergo mitotic and meiotic cell divisions, whereas somatic tissues are entirely post-mitotic. Consequently, DNA damage checkpoints function specifically in the germ line, whereas somatic tissues in adult C. elegans are highly radio-resistant. Some DNA repair systems such as global-genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) remove lesions specifically in germ cells. Here we investigated how genome instability in germ cells affects somatic tissues in C. elegans. We show that exogenous and endogenous DNA damage in germ cells evokes elevated resistance to heat and oxidative stress. The somatic stress resistance is mediated by the ERK MAP kinase MPK-1 in germ cells that triggers the induction of putative secreted peptides associated with innate immunity. The innate immune response leads to activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in somatic tissues, which confers enhanced proteostasis and systemic stress resistance. We propose that elevated systemic stress resistance promotes endurance of somatic tissues to allow delay of progeny production when germ cells are genomically compromised.

  6. Nopaline-type Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium encodes a VirF-like functional F-box protein.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Benoît; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2015-11-20

    During Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of plants, several bacterial virulence (Vir) proteins are translocated into the host cell to facilitate infection. One of the most important of such translocated factors is VirF, an F-box protein produced by octopine strains of Agrobacterium, which presumably facilitates proteasomal uncoating of the invading T-DNA from its associated proteins. The presence of VirF also is thought to be involved in differences in host specificity between octopine and nopaline strains of Agrobacterium, with the current dogma being that no functional VirF is encoded by nopaline strains. Here, we show that a protein with homology to octopine VirF is encoded by the Ti plasmid of the nopaline C58 strain of Agrobacterium. This protein, C58VirF, possesses the hallmarks of functional F-box proteins: it contains an active F-box domain and specifically interacts, via its F-box domain, with SKP1-like (ASK) protein components of the plant ubiquitin/proteasome system. Thus, our data suggest that nopaline strains of Agrobacterium have evolved to encode a functional F-box protein VirF.

  7. Modulation of protein quality control systems by food phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Akira

    2013-05-01

    There is compelling evidence showing that dietary phytochemicals have exhibited pronounced bioactivities in a number of experimental models. In addition, a variety of epidemiological surveys have demonstrated that frequent ingestion of vegetables and fruits, which contain abundant phytochemicals, lowers the risk of onset of some diseases. However, the action mechanisms by which dietary phytochemicals show bioactivity remain to be fully elucidated and a fundamental question is why this class of chemicals has great potential for regulating health. Meanwhile, maintenance and repair of biological proteins by molecular chaperones, such as heat shock proteins, and clearance of abnormal proteins by the ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy play central roles in health, some disease prevention, and longevity. Interestingly, several recent studies have revealed that phytochemicals, including curcumin (yellow pigment in turmeric), resveratrol (phytoalexin in grapes), quercetin (general flavonol in onions and others), and isothiocyanates (preferentially present in cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli and cabbage), are remarkable regulators of protein quality control systems, suggesting that their physiological and biological functions are exerted, at least in part, through activation of such unique mechanisms. This review article highlights recent findings regarding the effects of representative phytochemicals on protein quality control systems and their possible molecular mechanisms.

  8. Localization of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 in mouse ova and its function in the plasma membrane to block polyspermy.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Kwon, Jungkee; Yoshida, Etsuko; Hamasaki, Hiroko; Ichinose, Shizuko; Hideshima, Makoto; Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Takahashi, Akio; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Kyuwa, Shigeru; Wada, Keiji; Yoshikawa, Yasuhiro

    2006-11-01

    Protein degradation is essential for oogenesis and embryogenesis. The ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates many cellular processes via the rapid degradation of specific proteins. Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is exclusively expressed in neurons, testis, ovary, and placenta, each of which has unique biological activities. However, the functional role of UCH-L1 in mouse oocytes remains unknown. Here, we report the expression pattern of UCH-L1 and its isozyme UCH-L3 in mouse ovaries and embryos. Using immunocytochemistry, UCH-L1 was selectively detected on the plasma membrane, whereas UCH-L3 was mainly detected in the cytoplasm, suggesting that these isozymes have distinct functions in mouse eggs. To further investigate the functional role of UCH-L1 in mouse eggs, we analyzed the fertilization rate of UCH-L1-deficient ova of gad female mice. Female gad mice had a significantly increased rate of polyspermy in in vitro fertilization assays, although the rate of fertilization did not differ significantly from wild-type mice. In addition, the litter size of gad female mice was significantly reduced compared with wild-type mice. These results may identify UCH-L1 as a candidate for a sperm-oocyte interactive binding or fusion protein on the plasma membrane that functions during the block to polyspermy in mouse oocytes.

  9. Acetaminophen induces accumulation of functional rat CYP3A via polyubiquitination dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Santoh, Masataka; Sanoh, Seigo; Takagi, Masashi; Ejiri, Yoko; Kotake, Yaichiro; Ohta, Shigeru

    2016-02-22

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is extensively used as an analgesic and antipyretic drug. APAP is partly metabolized to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, a reactive metabolite, by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, 2E1 and 3A4. Some reports have indicated that CYP3A protein production and its metabolic activity are induced by APAP in rats in vivo. The CYP3A subfamily is believed to be transcriptionally regulated by chemical compounds. However, the mechanism underlying these responses is not completely understood. To clarify these mechanisms, we assessed the effects of APAP on CYP3A1/23 protein levels according to mRNA synthesis and protein degradation in rat hepatocyte spheroids, a model of liver tissue, in vivo. APAP induced CYP3A1/23 protein levels and metabolic activity. However, no change in CYP3A1/23 mRNA levels was observed. Moreover, APAP prolonged the half-life of CYP3A1/23 protein. CYP3A is known to be degraded via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. APAP significantly was found to decrease levels of polyubiquitinated CYP3A1/23 and glycoprotein 78, an E3 ligase of CYP3A1/23. These findings demonstrate that APAP induces accumulation of functional CYP3A protein via inhibition of protein degradation. Our findings may lead to the determination of novel drug-drug interactions with APAP.

  10. Structure, function and networks of transcription factors involved in abiotic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Lindemose, Søren; O'Shea, Charlotte; Jensen, Michael Krogh; Skriver, Karen

    2013-03-13

    Transcription factors (TFs) are master regulators of abiotic stress responses in plants. This review focuses on TFs from seven major TF families, known to play functional roles in response to abiotic stresses, including drought, high salinity, high osmolarity, temperature extremes and the phytohormone ABA. Although ectopic expression of several TFs has improved abiotic stress tolerance in plants, fine-tuning of TF expression and protein levels remains a challenge to avoid crop yield loss. To further our understanding of TFs in abiotic stress responses, emerging gene regulatory networks based on TFs and their direct targets genes are presented. These revealed components shared between ABA-dependent and independent signaling as well as abiotic and biotic stress signaling. Protein structure analysis suggested that TFs hubs of large interactomes have extended regions with protein intrinsic disorder (ID), referring to their lack of fixed tertiary structures. ID is now an emerging topic in plant science. Furthermore, the importance of the ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation systems and modification by sumoylation is also apparent from the interactomes. Therefore; TF interaction partners such as E3 ubiquitin ligases and TF regions with ID represent future targets for engineering improved abiotic stress tolerance in crops.

  11. Structure, Function and Networks of Transcription Factors Involved in Abiotic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lindemose, Søren; O’Shea, Charlotte; Jensen, Michael Krogh; Skriver, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are master regulators of abiotic stress responses in plants. This review focuses on TFs from seven major TF families, known to play functional roles in response to abiotic stresses, including drought, high salinity, high osmolarity, temperature extremes and the phytohormone ABA. Although ectopic expression of several TFs has improved abiotic stress tolerance in plants, fine-tuning of TF expression and protein levels remains a challenge to avoid crop yield loss. To further our understanding of TFs in abiotic stress responses, emerging gene regulatory networks based on TFs and their direct targets genes are presented. These revealed components shared between ABA-dependent and independent signaling as well as abiotic and biotic stress signaling. Protein structure analysis suggested that TFs hubs of large interactomes have extended regions with protein intrinsic disorder (ID), referring to their lack of fixed tertiary structures. ID is now an emerging topic in plant science. Furthermore, the importance of the ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation systems and modification by sumoylation is also apparent from the interactomes. Therefore; TF interaction partners such as E3 ubiquitin ligases and TF regions with ID represent future targets for engineering improved abiotic stress tolerance in crops. PMID:23485989

  12. Functional Characterization of a Novel Mutation in NKX2-5 Associated with Congenital Heart Disease and Adult-Onset Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Mauro W.; Guo, Guanglan; Wolstein, Orit; Vale, Molly; Castro, M. Leticia; Wang, Libin; Otway, Robyn; Riek, Peter; Cochrane, Natalie; Furtado, Milena; Semsarian, Christopher; Weintraub, Robert G.; Yeoh, Thomas; Hayward, Christopher; Keogh, Anne; Macdonald, Peter; Feneley, Michael; Graham, Robert M.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Rosenthal, Nadia; Fatkin, Diane; Harvey, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Background The transcription factor NKX2-5 is crucial for heart development and mutations in this gene have been implicated in diverse congenital heart diseases (CHD) and conduction defects (CD) in mouse models and humans. Whether NKX2-5 mutations have a role in adult-onset heart disease is unknown. Methods and Results Mutation screening was performed in 220 probands with adult-onset dilated cardiomypathy (DCM). Six NKX2-5 coding sequence variants were identified, including 3 non-synonymous variants. A novel heterozygous mutation, I184M, located within the NKX2-5 homeodomain (HD), was identified in one family. A subset of family members had CHD, but there was an unexpectedly high prevalence of DCM. Functional analysis of I184M in vitro demonstrated a striking increase in protein expression when transfected into COS-7 cells or HL-1 cardiomyocytes, due to reduced degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). In functional assays, DNA binding activity of I184M was reduced, resulting in impaired activation of target genes, despite increased expression levels of mutant protein. Conclusions Certain NKX2-5 HD mutations show abnormal protein degradation via the UPS and partially impaired transcriptional activity. We propose that this class of mutation can impair heart development and mature heart function, and contribute to NKX2-5-related cardiomyopathies with graded severity. PMID:23661673

  13. Oxidative stress sensor Keap1 functions as an adaptor for Cul3-based E3 ligase to regulate proteasomal degradation of Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Akira; Kang, Moon-Il; Okawa, Hiromi; Ohtsuji, Makiko; Zenke, Yukari; Chiba, Tomoki; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2004-08-01

    Transcription factor Nrf2 is a major regulator of genes encoding phase 2 detoxifying enzymes and antioxidant stress proteins in response to electrophilic agents and oxidative stress. In the absence of such stimuli, Nrf2 is inactive owing to its cytoplasmic retention by Keap1 and rapid degradation through the proteasome system. We examined the contribution of Keap1 to the rapid turnover of Nrf2 (half-life of less than 20 min) and found that a direct association between Keap1 and Nrf2 is required for Nrf2 degradation. In a series of domain function analyses of Keap1, we found that both the BTB and intervening-region (IVR) domains are crucial for Nrf2 degradation, implying that these two domains act to recruit ubiquitin-proteasome factors. Indeed, Cullin 3 (Cul3), a subunit of the E3 ligase complex, was found to interact specifically with Keap1 in vivo. Keap1 associates with the N-terminal region of Cul3 through the IVR domain and promotes the ubiquitination of Nrf2 in cooperation with the Cul3-Roc1 complex. These results thus provide solid evidence that Keap1 functions as an adaptor of Cul3-based E3 ligase. To our knowledge, Nrf2 and Keap1 are the first reported mammalian substrate and adaptor, respectively, of the Cul3-based E3 ligase system.

  14. [Role of intracellular degradation system in regulation of innate immune response].

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Innate immunity is induced after sensing microbial components by pattern-recognition receptors and functions as a first line of host defense against microbes. However, innate immunity is also induced after sensing host-derived stimulatory substances such as monosodium urate crystals and causes the development of inflammatory diseases, such as gout. Therefore, a better understanding of innate immunity is required for the development of effective therapeutic treatments for infectious and inflammatory diseases. This paper summarizes recent findings on regulation of the innate immune response. Accumulating evidence has shown that the intracellular degradation system is critically involved in various cellular processes. We focused on the intracellular degradation system and have revealed the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of the innate immune response. Ubiquitin-proteasome, autophagy and phagocyte-specific proteases most certainly regulate the innate immune response induced by infection of microbes and exposure to host-derived stimulatory substances. Therefore, intracellular degradation systems would be attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of immune-related diseases.

  15. Negatively charged metal oxide nanoparticles interact with the 20S proteasome and differentially modulate its biologic functional effects.

    PubMed

    Falaschetti, Christine A; Paunesku, Tatjana; Kurepa, Jasmina; Nanavati, Dhaval; Chou, Stanley S; De, Mrinmoy; Song, MinHa; Jang, Jung-tak; Wu, Aiguo; Dravid, Vinayak P; Cheon, Jinwoo; Smalle, Jan; Woloschak, Gayle E

    2013-09-24

    The multicatalytic ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) carries out proteolysis in a highly orchestrated way and regulates a large number of cellular processes. Deregulation of the UPS in many disorders has been documented. In some cases, such as carcinogenesis, elevated proteasome activity has been implicated in disease development, while the etiology of other diseases, such as neurodegeneration, includes decreased UPS activity. Therefore, agents that alter proteasome activity could suppress as well as enhance a multitude of diseases. Metal oxide nanoparticles, often developed as diagnostic tools, have not previously been tested as modulators of proteasome activity. Here, several types of metal oxide nanoparticles were found to adsorb to the proteasome and show variable preferential binding for particular proteasome subunits with several peptide binding "hotspots" possible. These interactions depend on the size, charge, and concentration of the nanoparticles and affect proteasome activity in a time-dependent manner. Should metal oxide nanoparticles increase proteasome activity in cells, as they do in vitro, unintended effects related to changes in proteasome function can be expected.

  16. Negatively Charged Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Interact with the 20S Proteasome and Differentially Modulate Its Biologic Functional Effects

    PubMed Central

    Falaschetti, Christine A.; Paunesku, Tatjana; Kurepa, Jasmina; Nanavati, Dhaval; Chou, Stanley S.; De, Mrinmoy; Song, MinHa; Jang, Jung-tak; Wu, Aiguo; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Cheon, Jinwoo; Smalle, Jan; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2013-01-01

    The multicatalytic ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) carries out proteolysis in a highly orchestrated way and regulates a large number of cellular processes. Deregulation of the UPS in many disorders has been documented. In some cases, e.g. carcinogenesis, elevated proteasome activity has been implicated in disease development, while the etiology of other diseases, e.g. neurodegeneration, includes decreased UPS activity. Therefore, agents that alter proteasome activity could suppress as well as enhance a multitude of diseases. Metal oxide nanoparticles, often developed as diagnostic tools, have not previously been tested as modulators of proteasome activity. Here, several types of metal oxide nanoparticles were found to adsorb to the proteasome and show variable preferential binding for particular proteasome subunits with several peptide binding “hotspots” possible. These interactions depend on the size, charge, and concentration of the nanoparticles and affect proteasome activity in a time-dependent manner. Should metal oxide nanoparticles increase proteasome activity in cells, as they do in vitro, unintended effects related to changes in proteasome function can be expected. PMID:23930940

  17. Drugging the undruggables: exploring the ubiquitin system for drug development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaodong; Dixit, Vishva M

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic modulation of protein levels is tightly controlled in response to physiological cues. In mammalian cells, much of the protein degradation is carried out by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Similar to kinases, components of the ubiquitin system are often dysregulated, leading to a variety of diseases, including cancer and neurodegeneration, making them attractive drug targets. However, so far there are only a handful of drugs targeting the ubiquitin system that have been approved by the FDA. Here, we review possible therapeutic intervention nodes in the ubiquitin system, analyze the challenges, and highlight the most promising strategies to target the UPS. PMID:27002218

  18. The F-box protein Fbp1 functions in the invasive growth and cell wall integrity mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Rojas, Cristina; Hera, Concepcion

    2016-01-01

    F-box proteins determine substrate specificity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Previous work has demonstrated that the F-box protein Fbp1, a component of the SCF(Fbp1) E3 ligase complex, is essential for invasive growth and virulence of the fungal plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. Here, we show that, in addition to invasive growth, Fbp1 also contributes to vegetative hyphal fusion and fungal adhesion to tomato roots. All of these functions have been shown previously to require the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Fmk1. We found that Fbp1 is required for full phosphorylation of Fmk1, indicating that Fbp1 regulates virulence and invasive growth via the Fmk1 pathway. Moreover, the Δfbp1 mutant is hypersensitive to sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and calcofluor white (CFW) and shows reduced phosphorylation levels of the cell wall integrity MAPK Mpk1 after SDS treatment. Collectively, these results suggest that Fbp1 contributes to both the invasive growth and cell wall integrity MAPK pathways of F. oxysporum. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  19. Destabilizing LSD1 by Jade-2 promotes neurogenesis: an antibraking system in neural development.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao; Gui, Bin; Xiong, Cong; Zhao, Linnan; Liang, Jing; Sun, Luyang; Yang, Xiaohan; Yu, Wenhua; Si, Wenzhe; Yan, Ruorong; Yi, Xia; Zhang, Di; Li, Wanjin; Li, Lifang; Yang, Jianguo; Wang, Yan; Sun, Yi Eve; Zhang, Dai; Meng, Anming; Shang, Yongfeng

    2014-08-07

    Histone H3K4 demethylase LSD1 plays an important role in stem cell biology, especially in the maintenance of the silencing of differentiation genes. However, how the function of LSD1 is regulated and the differentiation genes are derepressed are not understood. Here, we report that elimination of LSD1 promotes embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation toward neural lineage. We showed that the destabilization of LSD1 occurs posttranscriptionally via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway by an E3 ubiquitin ligase, Jade-2. We demonstrated that Jade-2 is a major LSD1 negative regulator during neurogenesis in vitro and in vivo in both mouse developing cerebral cortices and zebra fish embryos. Apparently, Jade-2-mediated degradation of LSD1 acts as an antibraking system and serves as a quick adaptive mechanism for re-establishing epigenetic landscape without more laborious transcriptional regulations. As a potential anticancer strategy, Jade-2-mediated LSD1 degradation could potentially be used in neuroblastoma cells to induce differentiation toward postmitotic neurons.

  20. Phosphorylation of ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50) by Akt promotes stability and mitogenic function of S-phase kinase-associated protein-2 (Skp2).

    PubMed

    Song, Gyun Jee; Leslie, Kristen L; Barrick, Stacey; Mamonova, Tatyana; Fitzpatrick, Jeremy M; Drombosky, Kenneth W; Peyser, Noah; Wang, Bin; Pellegrini, Maria; Bauer, Philip M; Friedman, Peter A; Mierke, Dale F; Bisello, Alessandro

    2015-01-30

    The regulation of the cell cycle by the ubiquitin-proteasome system is dependent on the activity of E3 ligases. Skp2 (S-phase kinase associated protein-2) is the substrate recognition subunit of the E3 ligase that ubiquitylates the cell cycle inhibitors p21(cip1) and p27(kip1) thus promoting cell cycle progression. Increased expression of Skp2 is frequently observed in diseases characterized by excessive cell proliferation, such as cancer and neointima hyperplasia. The stability and cellular localization of Skp2 are regulated by Akt, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects remain only partly understood. The scaffolding protein Ezrin-Binding Phosphoprotein of 50 kDa (EBP50) contains two PDZ domains and plays a critical role in the development of neointimal hyperplasia. Here we report that EBP50 directly binds Skp2 via its first PDZ domain. Moreover, EBP50 is phosphorylated by Akt on Thr-156 within the second PDZ domain, an event that allosterically promotes binding to Skp2. The interaction with EBP50 causes cytoplasmic localization of Skp2, increases Skp2 stability and promotes proliferation of primary vascular smooth muscle cells. Collectively, these studies define a novel regulatory mechanism contributing to aberrant cell growth and highlight the importance of scaffolding function of EBP50 in Akt-dependent cell proliferation.

  1. Altered social behavior and neuronal development in mice lacking the Uba6-Use1 ubiquitin transfer system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Peter C W; Dodart, Jean-Cosme; Aron, Liviu; Finley, Lydia W; Bronson, Roderick T; Haigis, Marcia C; Yankner, Bruce A; Harper, J Wade

    2013-04-25

    The Uba6 (E1)-Use1 (E2) ubiquitin transfer cascade is a poorly understood alternative arm of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) and is required for mouse embryonic development, independent of the canonical Uba1-E2-E3 pathway. Loss of neuronal Uba6 during embryonic development results in altered patterning of neurons in the hippocampus and the amygdala, decreased dendritic spine density, and numerous behavioral disorders. The levels of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ube3a (E6-AP) and Shank3, both linked with dendritic spine function, are elevated in the amygdala of Uba6-deficient mice, while levels of the Ube3a substrate Arc are reduced. Uba6 and Use1 promote proteasomal turnover of Ube3a in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) and catalyze Ube3a ubiquitylation in vitro. These activities occur in parallel with an independent pathway involving Uba1-UbcH7, but in a spatially distinct manner in MEFs. These data reveal an unanticipated role for Uba6 in neuronal development, spine architecture, mouse behavior, and turnover of Ube3a. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Altered social behavior and neuronal development in mice lacking the Uba6-Use1 ubiquitin transfer system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Peter C. W.; Dodart, Jean-Cosme; Aron, Liviu; Finley, Lydia W.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Haigis, Marcia C.; Yankner, Bruce A.; Harper, J. Wade

    2013-01-01

    The Uba6 (E1)-Use1 (E2) ubiquitin transfer cascade is a poorly understood alternative arm of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) required for mouse embryonic development, independent of the canonical Uba1-E2-E3 pathway. Loss of neuronal Uba6 during embryonic development results in altered patterning of neurons in the hippocampus and the amygdala, decreased dendritic spine density, and numerous behavioral disorders. The levels of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ube3a (E6-AP) and Shank3, both linked with dendritic spine function, are elevated in the amygdala of Uba6-deficient mice, while levels of the Ube3a substrate Arc are reduced. Uba6 and Use1 promote proteasomal turnover of Ube3a in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) and catalyze Ube3a ubiquitylation in vitro. These activities occur in parallel with an independent pathway involving Uba1-UbcH7, but in a spatially distinct manner in MEFs. These data reveal an unanticipated role for Uba6 in neuronal development, spine architecture, mouse behavior, and turnover of Ube3a. PMID:23499007

  3. Functional asymmetries of proteasome translocase pore.

    PubMed

    Erales, Jenny; Hoyt, Martin A; Troll, Fabian; Coffino, Philip

    2012-05-25

    Degradation by proteasomes involves coupled translocation and unfolding of its protein substrates. Six distinct but paralogous proteasome ATPase proteins, Rpt1 to -6, form a heterohexameric ring that acts on substrates. An axially positioned loop (Ar-Φ loop) moves in concert with ATP hydrolysis, engages substrate, and propels it into a proteolytic chamber. The aromatic (Ar) residue of the Ar-Φ loop in all six Rpts of S. cerevisiae is tyrosine; this amino acid is thought to have important functional contacts with substrate. Six yeast strains were constructed and characterized in which Tyr was individually mutated to Ala. The mutant cells were viable and had distinct phenotypes. rpt3, rpt4, and rpt5 Tyr/Ala mutants, which cluster on one side of the ATPase hexamer, were substantially impaired in their capacity to degrade substrates. In contrast, rpt1, rpt2, and rpt6 mutants equaled or exceeded wild type in degradation activity. However, rpt1 and rpt6 mutants had defects that limited cell growth or viability under conditions that stressed the ubiquitin proteasome system. In contrast, the rpt3 mutant grew faster than wild type and to a smaller size, a defect that has previously been associated with misregulation of G1 cyclins. This rpt3 phenotype probably results from altered degradation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. Finally, mutation of five of the Rpt subunits increased proteasome ATPase activity, implying bidirectional coupling between the Ar-Φ loop and the ATP hydrolysis site. The present observations assign specific functions to individual Rpt proteins and provide insights into the diverse roles of the axial loops of individual proteasome ATPases.

  4. Cardiac proteasome functional insufficiency plays a pathogenic role in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Ma, Wenxia; Yue, Guihua; Tang, Yaoliang; Kim, Il-Man; Weintraub, Neal L; Wang, Xuejun; Su, Huabo

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a major risk factor in diabetic patients but its pathogenesis remains poorly understood. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) facilitates protein quality control by degrading unnecessary and damaged proteins in eukaryotic cells, and dysfunction of UPS is implicated in various cardiac diseases. However, the overall functional status of the UPS and its pathophysiological role in diabetic cardiomyopathy have not been determined. Type I diabetes was induced in wild-type and transgenic mice expressing a UPS functional reporter (GFPdgn) by injections of streptozotocin (STZ). STZ-induced diabetes progressively impaired cardiac UPS function as evidenced by the accumulation of GFPdgn proteins beginning two weeks after diabetes induction, and by a buildup of total and lysine (K) 48-linked polyubiquitinated proteins in the heart. To examine the functional role of the UPS in diabetic cardiomyopathy, cardiac overexpression of PA28α (PA28αOE) was used to enhance proteasome function in diabetic mouse hearts. PA28αOE diabetic mice displayed exhibited restoration of cardiac UPS function, as demonstrated by the diminished accumulation of GFPdgn and polyubiquitinated proteins. Moreover, PA28αOE diabetic mice exhibited reduced myocardial collagen deposition, decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and improved cardiac systolic and diastolic function. Impairment of cardiac UPS function is an early event in STZ-induced diabetes. Overexpression of PA28α attenuates diabetes-induced proteotoxic stress and cardiomyopathy, suggesting a potential therapeutic role for enhancement of cardiac proteasome function in this disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Proteasome proteolysis supports stimulated platelet function and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nilaksh; Li, Wei; Willard, Belinda; Silverstein, Roy L; McIntyre, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitors used in the treatment of hematologic cancers also reduce thrombosis. Whether the proteasome participates in platelet activation or function is unclear because little is known of the proteasome in these terminally differentiated cells. Platelets displayed all 3 primary proteasome protease activities, which MG132 and bortezomib (Velcade) inhibited. Proteasome substrates are marked by ubiquitin, and platelets contained a functional ubiquitination system that modified the proteome by monoubiquitination and polyubiquitination. Systemic MG132 strongly suppressed the formation of occlusive, platelet-rich thrombi in FeCl3-damaged carotid arteries. Transfusion of platelets treated ex vivo with MG132 and washed before transfusion into thrombocytopenic mice also reduced carotid artery thrombosis. Proteasome inhibition reduced platelet aggregation by low thrombin concentrations and ristocetin-stimulated agglutination through the glycoprotein Ib-IX-V complex. This receptor was not appropriately internalized after proteasome inhibition in stimulated platelets, and spreading and clot retraction after MG132 exposure also were decreased. The effects of proteasome inhibitors were not confined to a single receptor as MG132 suppressed thrombin-stimulated, ADP-stimulated, and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated microparticle shedding. Proteasome inhibition increased ubiquitin decoration of cytoplasmic proteins, including the cytoskeletal proteins Filamin A and Talin-1. Mass spectrometry revealed a single MG132-sensitive tryptic cleavage after R1745 in an extended Filamin A loop, which would separate its actin-binding domain from its carboxy terminal glycoprotein Ibα-binding domain. Platelets contain a ubiquitin/proteasome system that marks cytoskeletal proteins for proteolytic modification to promote productive platelet-platelet and platelet-wall interactions.

  6. Posttranslational regulation of coordinated enzyme activities in the Pup-proteasome system

    PubMed Central

    Elharar, Yifat; Roth, Ziv; Hecht, Nir; Rotkopf, Ron; Khalaila, Isam; Gur, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    The proper functioning of any biological system depends on the coordinated activity of its components. Regulation at the genetic level is, in many cases, effective in determining the cellular levels of system components. However, in cases where regulation at the genetic level is insufficient for attaining harmonic system function, posttranslational regulatory mechanisms are often used. Here, we uncover posttranslational regulatory mechanisms in the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup)-proteasome system (PPS), the bacterial equivalent of the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome system. Pup, a ubiquitin analog, is conjugated to proteins through the activities of two enzymes, Dop (deamidase of Pup) and PafA (proteasome accessory factor A), the Pup ligase. As Dop also catalyzes depupylation, it was unclear how PPS function could be maintained without Dop and PafA canceling the activity of the other, and how the two activities of Dop are balanced. We report that tight Pup binding and the limited degree of Dop interaction with high-molecular-weight pupylated proteins results in preferred Pup deamidation over protein depupylation by this enzyme. Under starvation conditions, when accelerated protein pupylation is required, this bias is intensified by depletion of free Dop molecules, thereby minimizing the chance of depupylation. We also find that, in contrast to Dop, PafA presents a distinct preference for high-molecular-weight protein substrates. As such, PafA and Dop act in concert, rather than canceling each other's activity, to generate a high-molecular-weight pupylome. This bias in pupylome molecular weight distribution is consistent with the proposed nutritional role of the PPS under starvation conditions. PMID:26951665

  7. The Mammalian Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation System

    PubMed Central

    Olzmann, James A.; Kopito, Ron R.; Christianson, John C.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the site of synthesis for nearly one-third of the eukaryotic proteome and is accordingly endowed with specialized machinery to ensure that proteins deployed to the distal secretory pathway are correctly folded and assembled into native oligomeric complexes. Proteins failing to meet this conformational standard are degraded by ER-associated degradation (ERAD), a complex process through which folding-defective proteins are selected and ultimately degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. ERAD proceeds through four tightly coupled steps involving substrate selection, dislocation across the ER membrane, covalent conjugation with polyubiquitin, and proteasomal degradation. The ERAD machinery shows a modular organization with central ER membrane-embedded ubiquitin ligases linking components responsible for recognition in the ER lumen to the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the cytoplasm. The core ERAD machinery is highly conserved among eukaryotes and much of our basic understanding of ERAD organization has been derived from genetic and biochemical studies of yeast. In this article we discuss how the core ERAD machinery is organized in mammalian cells. PMID:23232094

  8. Current topics of functional links between primary cilia and cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Ichiro; Goto, Hidemasa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Inagaki, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia, microtubule-based sensory structures, orchestrate various critical signals during development and tissue homeostasis. In view of the rising interest into the reciprocal link between ciliogenesis and cell cycle, we discuss here several recent advances to understand the molecular link between the individual step of ciliogenesis and cell cycle control. At the onset of ciliogenesis (the transition from centrosome to basal body), distal appendage proteins have been established as components indispensable for the docking of vesicles at the mother centriole. In the initial step of axonemal extension, CP110, Ofd1, and trichoplein, key negative regulators of ciliogenesis, are found to be removed by a kinase-dependent mechanism, autophagy, and ubiquitin-proteasome system, respectively. Of note, their disposal functions as a restriction point to decide that the axonemal nucleation and extension begin. In the elongation step, Nde1, a negative regulator of ciliary length, is revealed to be ubiquitylated and degraded by CDK5-SCF(Fbw7) in a cell cycle-dependent manner. With regard to ciliary length control, it has been uncovered in flagellar shortening of Chlamydomonas that cilia itself transmit a ciliary length signal to cytoplasm. At the ciliary resorption step upon cell cycle re-entry, cilia are found to be disassembled not only by Aurora A-HDAC6 pathway but also by Nek2-Kif24 and Plk1-Kif2A pathways through their microtubule-depolymerizing activity. On the other hand, it is becoming evident that the presence of primary cilia itself functions as a structural checkpoint for cell cycle re-entry. These data suggest that ciliogenesis and cell cycle intimately link each other, and further elucidation of these mechanisms will contribute to understanding the pathology of cilia-related disease including cancer and discovering targets of therapeutic interventions.

  9. Cross-functional systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Many companies, including Xerox and Texas Instruments, are using cross functional systems to deal with the increasingly complex and competitive business environment. However, few firms within the aerospace industry appear to be aware of the significant benefits that cross functional systems can provide. Those benefits are examined and a flexible methodology is discussed that companies can use to identify and develop cross functional systems that will help improve organizational performance. In addition, some of the managerial issues are addressed that cross functional systems may raise and specific examples are used to explore networking's contributions to cross functional systems.

  10. Functional characterization of Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) E3 ubiquitin ligases in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinfang; Wan, Lixin; Dai, Xiangpeng; Sun, Yi; Wei, Wenyi

    2014-04-01

    The Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) is a multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligase that primarily governs cell cycle progression. APC/C is composed of at least 14 core subunits and recruits its substrates for ubiquitination via one of the two adaptor proteins, Cdc20 or Cdh1, in M or M/early G1 phase, respectively. Furthermore, recent studies have shed light on crucial functions for APC/C in maintaining genomic integrity, neuronal differentiation, cellular metabolism and tumorigenesis. To gain better insight into the in vivo physiological functions of APC/C in regulating various cellular processes, particularly development and tumorigenesis, a number of mouse models of APC/C core subunits, coactivators or inhibitors have been established and characterized. However, due to their essential role in cell cycle regulation, most of the germline knockout mice targeting the APC/C pathway are embryonic lethal, indicating the need for generating conditional knockout mouse models to assess the role in tumorigenesis for each APC/C signaling component in specific tissues. In this review, we will first provide a brief introduction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and the biochemical activities and cellular functions of the APC/C E3 ligase. We will then focus primarily on characterizing genetic mouse models used to understand the physiological roles of each APC/C signaling component in embryogenesis, cell proliferation, development and carcinogenesis. Finally, we discuss future research directions to further elucidate the physiological contributions of APC/C components during tumorigenesis and validate their potentials as a novel class of anti-cancer targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Protein-protein interactions involving voltage-gated sodium channels: Post-translational regulation, intracellular trafficking and functional expression.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dongmin; Okuse, Kenji; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2009-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), classically known to play a central role in excitability and signalling in nerves and muscles, have also been found to be expressed in a range of 'non-excitable' cells, including lymphocytes, fibroblasts and endothelia. VGSC abnormalities are associated with various diseases including epilepsy, long-QT syndrome 3, Brugada syndrome, sudden infant death syndrome and, more recently, various human cancers. Given their pivotal role in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, regulation of functional VGSC expression has been the subject of intense study. An emerging theme is post-translational regulation and macro-molecular complexing by protein-protein interactions and intracellular trafficking, leading to changes in functional VGSC expression in plasma membrane. This partially involves endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation and ubiquitin-proteasome system. Several proteins have been shown to associate with VGSCs. Here, we review the interactions involving VGSCs and the following proteins: p11, ankyrin, syntrophin, beta-subunit of VGSC, papin, ERM and Nedd4 proteins. Protein kinases A and C, as well as Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent kinase II that have also been shown to regulate intracellular trafficking of VGSCs by changing the balance of externalization vs. internalization, and an effort is made to separate these effects from the short-term phosphorylation of mature proteins in plasma membrane. Two further modulatory mechanisms are reciprocal interactions with the cytoskeleton and, late-stage, activity-dependent regulation. Thus, the review gives an updated account of the range of post-translational molecular mechanisms regulating functional VGSC expression. However, many details of VGSC subtype-specific regulation and pathophysiological aspects remain unknown and these are highlighted throughout for completeness.

  12. Mitochondria, metabolic disturbances, oxidative stress and the kynurenine system, with focus on neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Sas, Katalin; Robotka, Hermina; Toldi, József; Vécsei, László

    2007-06-15

    normal protein homeostasis of the cell. In the event of a dysfunction of the endoplasmic reticulum, unfolded proteins aggregate in it, forming potentially toxic deposits which tend to be resistant to degradation. Cells possess adaptive mechanisms with which to avoid the accumulation of incorrectly folded proteins. These involve molecular chaperones that fold proteins correctly, and the ubiquitin proteasome system which degrades misfolded, unwanted proteins. Both the endoplasmic reticulum and the ubiquitin proteasome system fulfill cellular protein quality control functions. The kynurenine system: Tryptophan is metabolized via several pathways, the main one being the kynurenine pathway. A central compound of the pathway is kynurenine (KYN), which can be metabolized in two separate ways: one branch furnishing kynurenic acid, and the other 3-hydroxykynurenine and quinolinic acid, the precursors of NAD. An important feature of kynurenic acid is the fact that it is one of the few known endogenous excitatory amino acid receptor blockers with a broad spectrum of antagonistic properties in supraphysiological concentrations. One of its recently confirmed sites of action is the alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and interestingly, a more recently identified one is a higher affinity positive modulatory binding site at the AMPA receptor. Kynurenic acid has proven to be neuroprotective in several experimental settings. On the other hand, quinolinic acid is a specific agonist at the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, and a potent neurotoxin with an additional and marked free radical-producing property. There are a number of neurodegenerative disorders whose pathogenesis has been demonstrated to involve multiple imbalances of the kynurenine pathway metabolism. These changes may disturb normal brain function and can add to the pathomechanisms of the diseases. In certain disorders, there is a quinolinic acid overproduction, while in others the alterations in brain kynurenic acid levels

  13. p62 links the autophagy pathway and the ubiqutin-proteasome system upon ubiquitinated protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei Jing; Ye, Lin; Huang, Wei Fang; Guo, Lin Jie; Xu, Zi Gan; Wu, Hong Luan; Yang, Chen; Liu, Hua Feng

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy are two distinct and interacting proteolytic systems. They play critical roles in cell survival under normal conditions and during stress. An increasing body of evidence indicates that ubiquitinated cargoes are important markers of degradation. p62, a classical receptor of autophagy, is a multifunctional protein located throughout the cell and involved in many signal transduction pathways, including the Keap1-Nrf2 pathway. It is involved in the proteasomal degradation of ubiquitinated proteins. When the cellular p62 level is manipulated, the quantity and location pattern of ubiquitinated proteins change with a considerable impact on cell survival. Altered p62 levels can even lead to some diseases. The proteotoxic stress imposed by proteasome inhibition can activate autophagy through p62 phosphorylation. A deficiency in autophagy may compromise the ubiquitin-proteasome system, since overabundant p62 delays delivery of the proteasomal substrate to the proteasome despite proteasomal catalytic activity being unchanged. In addition, p62 and the proteasome can modulate the activity of HDAC6 deacetylase, thus influencing the autophagic degradation.

  14. Newborn mouse lens proteome and its alteration by lysine 6 mutant ubiquitin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ubiquitin is a tag that often initiates degradation of proteins by the proteasome in the ubiquitin proteasome system. Targeted expression of K6W mutant ubiquitin (K6W-Ub) in the lens results in defects in lens development and cataract formation, suggesting critical functions for ubiquitin in lens. T...

  15. Identification and functional analysis of Joka2, a tobacco member of the family of selective autophagy cargo receptors.

    PubMed

    Zientara-Rytter, Katarzyna; Lukomska, Jolanta; Moniuszko, Grzegorz; Gwozdecki, Rafał; Surowiecki, Przemysław; Lewandowska, Małgorzata; Liszewska, Frantz; Wawrzyńska, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2011-10-01

    Two main mechanisms of protein turnover exist in eukaryotic cells: the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. Autophagy is an emerging important constituent of many physiological and pathological processes, such as response to nutrient deficiency, programmed cell death and innate immune response. In mammalian cells the selectivity of autophagy is ensured by the presence of cargo receptors, such as p62/SQSTM1 and NBR1, responsible for sequestration of the ubiquitinated proteins. In plants no selective cargo receptors have been identified yet. The present report indicates that structural and functional homologs of p62 and NBR1 proteins exist in plants. The tobacco protein, named Joka2, has been identified in yeast two-hybrid search as a binding partner of a small coiled-coil protein, a member of UP9/LSU family of unknown function, encoded by the UP9C gene strongly and specifically induced during sulfur deficiency. The typical domains of p62 and NBR1 are conserved in Joka2. Similarly to p62, Joka2-YFP has dual localization (cytosolic speckles and the nucleus); it forms homodimers and interacts with a member of the ATG8 family. Increased expression of Joka2 and ATG8f was observed in roots of tobacco plants grown for two days in nutrient-deficient conditions. Constitutive ectopic expression of Joka2-YFP in tobacco resulted in attenuated response (manifested by lesser yellowing of the leaves) to nutrient deficiency. In conclusion, Joka2, and presumably the process of selective autophagy, might constitute an important part of plant response to environmental stresses.

  16. Identification and functional analysis of Joka2, a tobacco member of the family of selective autophagy cargo receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zientara-Rytter, Katarzyna; Łukomska, Jolanta; Moniuszko, Grzegorz; Gwozdecki, Rafał; Surowiecki, Przemysław; Lewandowska, Małgorzata; Liszewska, Frantz; Wawrzyńska, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Two main mechanisms of protein turnover exist in eukaryotic cells: the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. Autophagy is an emerging important constituent of many physiological and pathological processes, such as response to nutrient deficiency, programmed cell death and innate immune response. In mammalian cells the selectivity of autophagy is ensured by the presence of cargo receptors, such as p62/SQSTM1 and NBR1, responsible for sequestration of the ubiquitinated proteins. In plants no selective cargo receptors have been identified yet. The present report indicates that structural and functional homologs of p62 and NBR1 proteins exist in plants. The tobacco protein, named Joka2, has been identified in yeast two-hybrid search as a binding partner of a small coiled-coil protein, a member of UP9/LSU family of unknown function, encoded by the UP9C gene strongly and specifically induced during sulfur deficiency. The typical domains of p62 and NBR1 are conserved in Joka2. Similarly to p62, Joka2-YFP has dual localization (cytosolic speckles and the nucleus); it forms homodimers and interacts with a member of the ATG8 family. Increased expression of Joka2 and ATG8f was observed in roots of tobacco plants grown for two days in nutrient-deficient conditions. Constitutive ectopic expression of Joka2-YFP in tobacco resulted in attenuated response (manifested by lesser yellowing of the leaves) to nutrient deficiency. In conclusion, Joka2, and presumably the process of selective autophagy, might constitute an important part of plant response to environmental stresses. PMID:21670587

  17. Roles for ATF6 and the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum protein quality control system in the heart.

    PubMed

    Glembotski, Christopher C

    2014-06-01

    The hypertrophic growth of cardiac myocytes is a highly dynamic process that underlies physiological and pathological adaptation of the heart. Accordingly, a better understanding of the molecular underpinnings of cardiac myocyte hypertrophy is required in order to fully appreciate the causes and functional consequences of the changes in the size of the healthy and diseased heart. Hypertrophy is driven by increases in cardiac myocyte protein, which must be balanced by cellular ability to maintain protein quality in order to avoid maladaptive accumulation of toxic misfolded proteins. Recent studies have shown that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which, in cardiac myocytes, comprises the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER), is the site of most protein synthesis. Thus, the protein quality control machinery located at the SR/ER is likely to be an important determinant of whether the heart responds adaptively to hypertrophic growth stimuli. The SR/ER-transmembrane protein, ATF6, serves a critical protein quality control function as a first responder to the accumulation of potentially toxic, misfolded proteins. Misfolded proteins transform ATF6 into a transcription factor that regulates a gene program that is partly responsible for enhancing protein quality control. Two ATF6-inducible genes that have been studied in the heart and shown to be adaptive are RCAN1 and Derl3, which encode proteins that decrease protein-folding demand, and enhance degradation of misfolded proteins, respectively. Thus, the ATF6-regulated SR/ER protein quality control system is important for maintaining protein quality during growth, making ATF6, and other components of the system, potentially attractive targets for the therapeutic management pathological cardiac hypertrophy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Protein Quality Control, the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, and Autophagy". © 2013.

  18. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase A (MsrA) and Its Function in Ubiquitin-Like Protein Modification in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xian; Adams, Zachary; Liu, Rui; Hepowit, Nathaniel L; Wu, Yifei; Bowmann, Connor F; Moskovitz, Jackob; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A

    2017-09-05

    Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) is an antioxidant enzyme found in all domains of life that catalyzes the reduction of methionine-S-sulfoxide (MSO) to methionine in proteins and free amino acids. We demonstrate that archaeal MsrA has a ubiquitin-like (Ubl) protein modification activity that is distinct from its stereospecific reduction of MSO residues. MsrA catalyzes this Ubl modification activity, with the Ubl-activating E1 UbaA, in the presence of the mild oxidant dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and in the absence of reductant. In contrast, the MSO reductase activity of MsrA is inhibited by DMSO and requires reductant. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis reveals that MsrA-dependent Ubl conjugates are associated with DNA replication, protein remodeling, and oxidative stress and include the Ubl-modified MsrA, Orc3 (Orc1/Cdc6), and Cdc48d (Cdc48/p97 AAA+ ATPase). Overall, we found archaeal MsrA to have opposing MSO reductase and Ubl modifying activities that are associated with oxidative stress responses and controlled by exposure to mild oxidant.IMPORTANCE Proteins that are damaged by oxidative stress are often targeted for proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). The mechanisms that control this response are poorly understood, especially under conditions of mild oxidative stress when protein damage is modest. Here, we discovered a novel function of archaeal MsrA in guiding the Ubl modification of target proteins in the presence of mild oxidant. This newly reported activity of MsrA is distinct from its stereospecific reduction of methionine-S-sulfoxide to methionine residues. Our results are significant steps forward, first, in elucidating a protein factor that guides Ubl modification in archaea, and second, in providing an insight into oxidative stress responses that can trigger Ubl modification in a cell. Copyright © 2017 Fu et al.

  19. Gene therapy by proteasome activator, PA28γ, improves motor coordination and proteasome function in Huntington's disease YAC128 mice.

    PubMed

    Jeon, J; Kim, W; Jang, J; Isacson, O; Seo, H

    2016-06-02

    Huntington's disease (HD) is neurologically characterized by involuntary movements, associated with degeneration of the medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs) and ubiquitin-positive neuronal intranuclear inclusions (NIIs). It has been reported that the proteolytic activities of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) are generally inhibited in HD patient's brain. We previously discovered that a proteasome activator (PA), PA28γ enhances proteasome activities and cell survival in in vitro HD model. In this study, we aimed to find whether PA28γ gene transfer improves the proteasome activities and pathological symptoms in in vivo HD model. We stereotaxically injected lenti-PA28γ virus into the striatum of mutant (MT) YAC128 HD mice and littermate (LM) controls at 14-18months of age, and validated their behavioral and biochemical changes at 12weeks after the injection. YAC128 mice showed a significant increase in their peptidyl-glutamyl preferring hydrolytic (PGPH) proteasome activity and the mRNA or protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and pro-BDNF after lenti-PA28γ injection. The number of ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies was reduced in the striatum of YAC128 mice after lenti-PA28γ injection. YAC128 mice showed significant improvement of latency to fall on the rota-rod test after lenti-PA28γ injection. These data demonstrate that the gene therapy with PA, PA28γ can improve UPS function as well as behavioral abnormalities in HD model mice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Antigravitational Functional System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorogovtsev, V. N.

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is the description of the main components and basic functioning principles of the antigravitational functional system (AFS). Methods: literary review and theoretical analysis of the neurogenic regulation functional system. The concept of a functional system was formulated in the beginning of the 20th century. Functional system was described as dynamic, self-organizing, central-peripheral functional integration structures of the nervous system whose activity was aiming at achieving adaptive useful results. The main difference between functional system and proposed regulating principles is the physiological mechanism presence of the prospective result prediction (action result acceptor). Action is programmed for defined result receiving. This is anticipatory regulation principle. Using this principle AFS provides timely cardiovascular system preparing for its impending functional conditions changes. It seems that gravity intolerance in the beginning and after space flight is related with AFS regulation peculiarities. There is a necessity for the AFS advanced study. It is very important to create safe and comfort conditions for astronauts adaptation during gravitational loading changes as well as for certain diseases prophylaxis on the Earth.

  1. Roles of ER, Src-1, and CBP Phosphorylation in Estrogen Receptor-Regulated Gene Expression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    subserves an independent function in the ubiquitin- proteasome protein degradation pathway . E6-AP was able to coactivate the estrogen receptor (ER...part of the ubiquitin- proteasome protein degradation pathway (see below), unlike the other coactivators mentioned above. Corepressors such as N-Cor...long term tamoxifen therapy. The potential for E6-AP to mediate its coactivator function through the ubiquitin- proteasome protein degradation pathway

  2. Highly purified calf hemodialysate (Actovegin®) may improve endothelial function by activation of proteasomes: A hypothesis explaining the possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Stelmakh, Andriy; Abrahamovych, Orest; Cherkas, Andriy

    2016-10-01

    Highly purified calf hemodialysate (HPCH) known as Actovegin® or Solcoseryl® is one of the most controversial drugs currently marketed worldwide. It is not registered as drug in some countries and therefore its medical use there is illegal, while in others it is often among the top 10 of the best-selling medications. It could be also found in the list of the "most useless drugs" and was banned for short time by World Anti-Doping Agency as performance enhancer. However, the degree of its usefulness or uselessness remains unclear and there is not enough convincing data to make reliable conclusions. HPCH is claimed to have wound/muscular injuries healing, neuroprotective and antioxidant properties, to enhance glucose uptake and oxygen consumption, and possibly to improve performance of athletes. Since HPCH consists of over 200 naturally occurring substances which potentially may exert some pharmacological effects, it is extremely difficult to perform pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamical studies. In this paper we have analyzed the available literature concerning clinical evidence, in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo effects of HPCH. Based on these data we suggest that the main target of the drug may be endothelium and improvement of endothelial function may be responsible for numerous largely nonspecific effects. We also propose the improvement of protein quality control by the means of activation of ubiquitin-proteasomal system as the most important biochemical mechanism responsible for its effects. The role of sphingolipids as potential proteasome-activators is extensively discussed. The effects of HPCH may also include direct or indirect ones on NF-kB-, Nrf2- and FOXO-mediated regulation of metabolic processes in the cells, which result in improved protein quality control, enhanced energy metabolism and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Proteomic Analysis of the Ubiquitin Landscape in the Drosophila Embryonic Nervous System and the Adult Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Juanma; Martinez, Aitor; Lectez, Benoit; Lee, So Young; Franco, Maribel; Barrio, Rosa; Dittmar, Gunnar; Mayor, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    Background Ubiquitination is known to regulate physiological neuronal functions as well as to be involved in a number of neuronal diseases. Several ubiquitin proteomic approaches have been developed during the last decade but, as they have been mostly applied to non-neuronal cell culture, very little is yet known about neuronal ubiquitination pathways in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Using an in vivo biotinylation strategy we have isolated and identified the ubiquitinated proteome in neurons both for the developing embryonic brain and for the adult eye of Drosophila melanogaster. Bioinformatic comparison of both datasets indicates a significant difference on the ubiquitin substrates, which logically correlates with the processes that are most active at each of the developmental stages. Detection within the isolated material of two ubiquitin E3 ligases, Parkin and Ube3a, indicates their ubiquitinating activity on the studied tissues. Further identification of the proteins that do accumulate upon interference with the proteasomal degradative pathway provides an indication of the proteins that are targeted for clearance in neurons. Last, we report the proof-of-principle validation of two lysine residues required for nSyb ubiquitination. Conclusions/Significance These data cast light on the differential and common ubiquitination pathways between the embryonic and adult neurons, and hence will contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms by which neuronal function is regulated. The in vivo biotinylation methodology described here complements other approaches for ubiquitome study and offers unique advantages, and is poised to provide further insight into disease mechanisms related to the ubiquitin proteasome system. PMID:26460970

  4. Ubiquitin-Like Proteasome System Represents a Eukaryotic-Like Pathway for Targeted Proteolysis in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xian; Liu, Rui; Sanchez, Iona; Silva-Sanchez, Cecilia; Hepowit, Nathaniel L.; Cao, Shiyun; Chen, Sixue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The molecular mechanisms of targeted proteolysis in archaea are poorly understood, yet they may have deep evolutionary roots shared with the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrate in archaea that TBP2, a TATA-binding protein (TBP) modified by ubiquitin-like isopeptide bonds, is phosphorylated and targeted for degradation by proteasomes. Rapid turnover of TBP2 required the functions of UbaA (the E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog of archaea), AAA ATPases (Cdc48/p97 and Rpt types), a type 2 JAB1/MPN/MOV34 metalloenzyme (JAMM/MPN+) homolog (JAMM2), and 20S proteasomes. The ubiquitin-like protein modifier small archaeal modifier protein 2 (SAMP2) stimulated the degradation of TBP2, but SAMP2 itself was not degraded. Analysis of the TBP2 fractions that were not modified by ubiquitin-like linkages revealed that TBP2 had multiple N termini, including Met1-Ser2, Ser2, and Met1-Ser2(p) [where (p) represents phosphorylation]. The evidence suggested that the Met1-Ser2(p) form accumulated in cells that were unable to degrade TBP2. We propose a model in archaea in which the attachment of ubiquitin-like tags can target proteins for degradation by proteasomes and be controlled by N-terminal degrons. In support of a proteolytic mechanism that is energy dependent and recycles the ubiquitin-like protein tags, we find that a network of AAA ATPases and a JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease are required, in addition to 20S proteasomes, for controlled intracellular proteolysis. PMID:27190215

  5. Functional diversity and structural disorder in the human ubiquitination pathway.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Pallab; Pancsa, Rita; Guharoy, Mainak; Tompa, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a central role in cellular regulation and protein quality control (PQC). The system is built as a pyramid of increasing complexity, with two E1 (ubiquitin activating), few dozen E2 (ubiquitin conjugating) and several hundred E3 (ubiquitin ligase) enzymes. By collecting and analyzing E3 sequences from the KEGG BRITE database and literature, we assembled a coherent dataset of 563 human E3s and analyzed their various physical features. We found an increase in structural disorder of the system with multiple disorder predictors (IUPred - E1: 5.97%, E2: 17.74%, E3: 20.03%). E3s that can bind E2 and substrate simultaneously (single subunit E3, ssE3) have significantly higher disorder (22.98%) than E3s in which E2 binding (multi RING-finger, mRF, 0.62%), scaffolding (6.01%) and substrate binding (adaptor/substrate recognition subunits, 17.33%) functions are separated. In ssE3s, the disorder was localized in the substrate/adaptor binding domains, whereas the E2-binding RING/HECT-domains were structured. To demonstrate the involvement of disorder in E3 function, we applied normal modes and molecular dynamics analyses to show how a disordered and highly flexible linker in human CBL (an E3 that acts as a regulator of several tyrosine kinase-mediated signalling pathways) facilitates long-range conformational changes bringing substrate and E2-binding domains towards each other and thus assisting in ubiquitin transfer. E3s with multiple interaction partners (as evidenced by data in STRING) also possess elevated levels of disorder (hubs, 22.90% vs. non-hubs, 18.36%). Furthermore, a search in PDB uncovered 21 distinct human E3 interactions, in 7 of which the disordered region of E3s undergoes induced folding (or mutual induced folding) in the presence of the partner. In conclusion, our data highlights the primary role of structural disorder in the functions of E3 ligases that manifests itself in the substrate/adaptor binding functions as well

  6. Functional Diversity and Structural Disorder in the Human Ubiquitination Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmick, Pallab; Pancsa, Rita; Guharoy, Mainak; Tompa, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a central role in cellular regulation and protein quality control (PQC). The system is built as a pyramid of increasing complexity, with two E1 (ubiquitin activating), few dozen E2 (ubiquitin conjugating) and several hundred E3 (ubiquitin ligase) enzymes. By collecting and analyzing E3 sequences from the KEGG BRITE database and literature, we assembled a coherent dataset of 563 human E3s and analyzed their various physical features. We found an increase in structural disorder of the system with multiple disorder predictors (IUPred – E1: 5.97%, E2: 17.74%, E3: 20.03%). E3s that can bind E2 and substrate simultaneously (single subunit E3, ssE3) have significantly higher disorder (22.98%) than E3s in which E2 binding (multi RING-finger, mRF, 0.62%), scaffolding (6.01%) and substrate binding (adaptor/substrate recognition subunits, 17.33%) functions are separated. In ssE3s, the disorder was localized in the substrate/adaptor binding domains, whereas the E2-binding RING/HECT-domains were structured. To demonstrate the involvement of disorder in E3 function, we applied normal modes and molecular dynamics analyses to show how a disordered and highly flexible linker in human CBL (an E3 that acts as a regulator of several tyrosine kinase-mediated signalling pathways) facilitates long-range conformational changes bringing substrate and E2-binding domains towards each other and thus assisting in ubiquitin transfer. E3s with multiple interaction partners (as evidenced by data in STRING) also possess elevated levels of disorder (hubs, 22.90% vs. non-hubs, 18.36%). Furthermore, a search in PDB uncovered 21 distinct human E3 interactions, in 7 of which the disordered region of E3s undergoes induced folding (or mutual induced folding) in the presence of the partner. In conclusion, our data highlights the primary role of structural disorder in the functions of E3 ligases that manifests itself in the substrate/adaptor binding functions as well

  7. Role of Ubiquitin-Mediated Degradation System in Plant Biology.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhaskar; Joshi, Deepti; Yadav, Pawan K; Gupta, Aditya K; Bhatt, Tarun K

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation is an important mechanism to control protein load in the cells. Ubiquitin binds to a protein on lysine residue and usually promotes its degradation through 26S proteasome system. Abnormal proteins and regulators of many processes, are targeted for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. It allows cells to maintain the response to cellular level signals and altered environmental conditions. The ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation system plays a key role in the plant biology, including abiotic stress, immunity, and hormonal signaling by interfering with key components of these pathways. The involvement of the ubiquitin system in many vital processes led scientists to explore more about the ubiquitin machinery and most importantly its targets. In this review, we have summarized recent discoveries of the plant ubiquitin system and its involvement in critical processes of plant biology.

  8. Therapeutic intervention at cellular quality control systems in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Arduino, Daniela M; Esteves, A Raquel; Silva, Diana F F; Martins-Branco, Diogo; Santos, Daniel; Pimentel, Diana F Gomes; Cardoso, Sandra M

    2011-01-01

    Cellular homeostasis relies on quality control systems so that damaged biologic structures are either repaired or degraded and entirely replaced by newly formed proteins or even organelles. The clearance of dysfunctional cellular structures in long-lived postmitotic cells, like neurons, is essential to eliminate, per example, defective mitochondria, lipofuscin-loaded lysosomes and oxidized proteins. Short-lived proteins are degraded mainly by proteases and proteasomes whether most long-lived proteins and all organelles are digested by autophagy in the lysosomes. Recently, it an interplay was established between the ubiquitin-proteasome system and macroautophagy, so that both degradative mechanisms compensate for each other. In this article we describe each of these clearance systems and their contribution to neuronal quality control. We will highlight some of the findings that provide evidence for the dysfunction of these systems in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Ultimately, we provide an outline on potential therapeutic interventions based on the modulation of cellular degradative systems.

  9. Formation of nucleoplasmic protein aggregates impairs nuclear function in response to SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Min; Mikecz, Anna von . E-mail: mikecz@uni-duesseldorf.de

    2005-04-15

    Despite of their exponentially growing use, little is known about cell biological effects of nanoparticles. Here, we report uptake of silica (SiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles to the cell nucleus where they induce aberrant clusters of topoisomerase I (topo I) in the nucleoplasm that additionally contain signature proteins of nuclear domains, and protein aggregation such as ubiquitin, proteasomes, cellular glutamine repeat (polyQ) proteins, and huntingtin. Formation of intranuclear protein aggregates (1) inhibits replication, transcription, and cell proliferation; (2) does not significantly alter proteasomal activity or cell viability; and (3) is reversible by Congo red and trehalose. Since SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles trigger a subnuclear pathology resembling the one occurring in expanded polyglutamine neurodegenerative disorders, we suggest that integrity of the functional architecture of the cell nucleus should be used as a read out for cytotoxicity and considered in the development of safe nanotechnology.

  10. Endolysosomal trafficking of viral G protein-coupled receptor functions in innate immunity and control of viral oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaonan; Cheng, Adam; Zou, Zhongju; Yang, Yih-Sheng; Sumpter, Rhea M; Huang, Chou-Long; Bhagat, Govind; Virgin, Herbert W; Lira, Sergio A; Levine, Beth

    2016-03-15

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system degrades viral oncoproteins and other microbial virulence factors; however, the role of endolysosomal degradation pathways in these processes is unclear. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, and a constitutively active viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) contributes to the pathogenesis of KSHV-induced tumors. We report that a recently discovered autophagy-related protein, Beclin 2, interacts with KSHV GPCR, facilitates its endolysosomal degradation, and inhibits vGPCR-driven oncogenic signaling. Furthermore, monoallelic loss of Becn2 in mice accelerates the progression of vGPCR-induced lesions that resemble human Kaposi's sarcoma. Taken together, these findings indicate that Beclin 2 is a host antiviral molecule that protects against the pathogenic effects of KSHV GPCR by facilitating its endolysosomal degradation. More broadly, our data suggest a role for host endolysosomal trafficking pathways in regulating viral pathogenesis and oncogenic signaling.

  11. The proteasome and the degradation of oxidized proteins: Part III—Redox regulation of the proteasomal system

    PubMed Central

    Höhn, Tobias Jung Annika; Grune, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Here, we review shortly the current knowledge on the regulation of the proteasomal system during and after oxidative stress. After addressing the components of the proteasomal system and the degradation of oxidatively damaged proteins in part I and II of this series, we address here which changes in activity undergo the proteasome and the ubiquitin-proteasomal system itself under oxidative conditions. While several components of the proteasomal system undergo direct oxidative modification, a number of redox-regulated events are modulating the proteasomal activity in a way it can address the major tasks in an oxidative stress situation: the removal of oxidized proteins and the adaptation of the cellular metabolism to the stress situation. PMID:24563857

  12. THE RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM AND THE BIOLOGY OF SKELETAL MUSCLE: MECHANISMS OF MUSCLE WASTING IN CHRONIC DISEASE STATES.

    PubMed

    Delafontaine, Patrice; Yoshida, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia and cachexia are muscle-wasting syndromes associated with aging and with many chronic diseases such as congestive heart failure, diabetes, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and renal failure. While mechanisms are complex, these conditions are often accompanied by elevated angiotensin II (Ang II). We found that Ang II infusion in rodents leads to skeletal muscle wasting via alterations in insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling, increased apoptosis, enhanced muscle protein breakdown via the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and decreased appetite resulting from downregulation of hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptides orexin and neuropeptide Y. Furthermore, Ang II inhibits skeletal muscle stem cell proliferation, leading to lowered muscle regenerative capacity. Distinct stem cell Ang II receptor subtypes are critical for regulation of muscle regeneration. In ischemic mouse congestive heart failure model skeletal muscle wasting and attenuated muscle regeneration are Ang II dependent. These data suggest that the renin-angiotensin system plays a critical role in mechanisms underlying cachexia in chronic disease states.

  13. Oxidative Stress and Protein Quality Control Systems in the Aged Canine Brain as a Model for Human Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aged dogs are considered the most suitable spontaneous animal model for studying normal aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Elderly canines naturally develop cognitive dysfunction and neuropathological hallmarks similar to those seen in humans, especially Alzheimer's disease-like pathology. Pet dogs also share similar living conditions and diets to humans. Oxidative damage accumulates in the canine brain during aging, making dogs a valid model for translational antioxidant treatment/prevention studies. Evidence suggests the presence of detective protein quality control systems, involving ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs), in the aged canine brain. Further studies on the canine model are needed to clarify the role of age-related changes in UPS activity and HSP expression in neurodegeneration in order to design novel treatment strategies, such as HSP-based therapies, aimed at improving chaperone defences against proteotoxic stress affecting brain during aging. PMID:26078824

  14. Characterization of the 26S proteasome network in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihui; Delahunty, Claire; Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Rahlfs, Stefan; Helena Prieto, Judith; Yates, John R; Becker, Katja

    2015-12-07

    In eukaryotic cells, the ubiquitin-proteasome system as a key regulator of protein quality control is an excellent drug target. We therefore aimed to analyze the 26S proteasome complex in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, which still threatens almost half of the world's population. First, we established an affinity purification protocol allowing for the isolation of functional 26S proteasome complexes from the parasite. Subunit composition of the proteasome and component stoichiometry were studied and physiologic interacting partners were identified via in situ protein crosslinking. Furthermore, intrinsic ubiquitin receptors of the plasmodial proteasome were determined and their roles in proteasomal substrate recognition were analyzed. Notably, PfUSP14 was characterized as a proteasome-associated deubiquitinase resulting in the concept that targeting proteasomal deubiquitinating activity in P. falciparum may represent a promising antimalarial strategy. The data provide insights into a profound network orchestrated by the plasmodial proteasome and identified novel drug target candidates in the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress caused by aggregate-prone proteins containing homopolymeric amino acids.

    PubMed

    Uchio, Naohiro; Oma, Yoko; Toriumi, Kazuya; Sasagawa, Noboru; Tanida, Isei; Fujita, Eriko; Kouroku, Yoriko; Kuroda, Reiko; Momoi, Takashi; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2007-11-01

    Many human proteins have homopolymeric amino acid (HPAA) tracts, but their physiological functions or cellular effects are not well understood. Previously, we expressed 20 HPAAs in mammalian cells and showed characteristic intracellular localization, in that hydrophobic HPAAs aggregated strongly and caused high cytotoxicity in proportion to their hydrophobicity. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of these aggregate-prone hydrophobic HPAAs, assuming that the ubiquitin proteasome system is impaired in the same manner as other well-known aggregate-prone polyglutamine-containing proteins. Some highly hydrophobic HPAAs caused a deficiency in the ubiquitin proteasome system and excess endoplasmic reticulum stress, leading to apoptosis. These results indicate that the property of causing excess endoplasmic reticulum stress by proteasome impairment may contribute to the strong cytotoxicity of highly hydrophobic HPAAs, and proteasome impairment and the resulting excess endoplasmic reticulum stress is not a common cytotoxic effect of aggregate-prone proteins such as polyglutamine.

  16. Coxsackievirus B5 induced apoptosis of HeLa cells: Effects on p53 and SUMO

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, Rogerio; Guerra-Sa, Renata; Arruda, Eurico

    2010-01-20

    Coxsackievirus B5 (CVB5), a human enterovirus of the family Picornaviridae, is a frequent cause of acute and chronic human diseases. The pathogenesis of enteroviral infections is not completely understood, and the fate of the CVB5-infected cell has a pivotal role in this process. We have investigated the CVB5-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells and found that it happens by the intrinsic pathway by a mechanism dependent on the ubiquitin-proteasome system, associated with nuclear aggregation of p53. Striking redistribution of both SUMO and UBC9 was noted at 4 h post-infection, simultaneously with a reduction in the levels of the ubiquitin-ligase HDM2. Taken together, these results suggest that CVB5 infection of HeLa cells elicit the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis by MDM2 degradation and p53 activation, destabilizing protein sumoylation, by a mechanism that is dependent on a functional ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  17. Assessing Respiratory System Mechanical Function.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Ruben D; Serrato, Diana M; Adasme, Rodrigo

    2016-12-01

    The main goals of assessing respiratory system mechanical function are to evaluate the lung function through a variety of methods and to detect early signs of abnormalities that could affect the patient's outcomes. In ventilated patients, it has become increasingly important to recognize whether respiratory function has improved or deteriorated, whether the ventilator settings match the patient's demand, and whether the selection of ventilator parameters follows a lung-protective strategy. Ventilator graphics, esophageal pressure, intra-abdominal pressure, and electric impedance tomography are some of the best-known monitoring tools to obtain measurements and adequately evaluate the respiratory system mechanical function.

  18. NEDD8 protein is involved in ubiquitinated inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Dil Kuazi, Afroz; Kito, Katsumi; Abe, Yasuhito; Shin, Ryong-Woon; Kamitani, Tetsu; Ueda, Norifumi

    2003-02-01

    Proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system is considered to play a pathological role in several degenerative diseases that involve ubiquitinated inclusion bodies. In recent years, several ubiquitin-like proteins have been isolated, but it is uncertain whether their roles are associated with protein degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome system. NEDD8 (neural precursor cell-expressed and developmentally down-regulated gene), which consists of 81 amino acid residues, possesses the highest sequence similarity to ubiquitin. Recent studies have indicated that NEDD8 is covalently ligated to cullin family proteins, which are components of certain ubiquitin E3 ligases, by a pathway analogous to that of ubiquitin. Thus, by focusing on the structural and functional association between NEDD8 and ubiquitin, it would be of interest to know whether the NEDD8 system is involved in pathological disorders of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This study has examined the immunohistochemical distribution of NEDD8 protein by using a highly purified antibody in normal tissues and in tissues known to contain ubiquitinated inclusions. NEDD8 protein expression was widely observed in most types of tissues. Furthermore, accumulation of the NEDD8 protein was commonly observed in ubiquitinated inclusion bodies, including Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease, Mallory bodies in alcoholic liver disease, and Rosenthal fibres in astrocytoma. Two of ten cases of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques from patients with Alzheimer's disease showed intense staining for NEDD8 as well as for ubiquitin. These findings suggest the possibility that the NEDD8 system is involved in the metabolism of these inclusion bodies via the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  19. Apigenin: Selective CK2 inhibitor increases Ikaros expression and improves T cell homeostasis and function in murine pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Nadine; Szekeres, Karoly; Iclozan, Cristina; Rivera, Ivannie Ortiz; McGill, Andrew; Johnson, Gbemisola; Nwogu, Onyekachi

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) evades immune destruction by favoring the development of regulatory T cells (Tregs) that inhibit effector T cells. The transcription factor Ikaros is critical for lymphocyte development, especially T cells. We have previously shown that downregulation of Ikaros occurs as a result of its protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in our Panc02 tumor-bearing (TB) mouse model. Mechanistically, we observed a deregulation in the balance between Casein Kinase II (CK2) and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), which suggested that increased CK2 activity is responsible for regulating Ikaros’ stability in our model. We also showed that this loss of Ikaros expression is associated with a significant decrease in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell percentages but increased CD4+CD25+ Tregs in TB mice. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the dietary flavonoid apigenin (API), on Ikaros expression and T cell immune responses. Treatment of splenocytes from naïve mice with (API) stabilized Ikaros expression and prevented Ikaros downregulation in the presence of murine Panc02 cells in vitro, similar to the proteasome inhibitor MG132. In vivo treatment of TB mice with apigenin (TB-API) improved survival, reduced tumor weights and prevented splenomegaly. API treatment also restored protein expression of some Ikaros isoforms, which may be attributed to its moderate inhibition of CK2 activity from splenocytes of TB-API mice. This partial restoration of Ikaros expression was accompanied by a significant increase in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell percentages and a reduction in Treg percentages in TB-API mice. In addition, CD8+ T cells from TB-API mice produced more IFN-γ and their splenocytes were better able to prime allogeneic CD8+ T cell responses compared to TB mice. These results provide further evidence that Ikaros is regulated by CK2 in our pancreatic cancer model. More importantly, our findings suggest that API may be a possible therapeutic agent for stabilizing Ikaros

  20. Apigenin: Selective CK2 inhibitor increases Ikaros expression and improves T cell homeostasis and function in murine pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nadine; Szekeres, Karoly; Iclozan, Cristina; Rivera, Ivannie Ortiz; McGill, Andrew; Johnson, Gbemisola; Nwogu, Onyekachi; Ghansah, Tomar

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) evades immune destruction by favoring the development of regulatory T cells (Tregs) that inhibit effector T cells. The transcription factor Ikaros is critical for lymphocyte development, especially T cells. We have previously shown that downregulation of Ikaros occurs as a result of its protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in our Panc02 tumor-bearing (TB) mouse model. Mechanistically, we observed a deregulation in the balance between Casein Kinase II (CK2) and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), which suggested that increased CK2 activity is responsible for regulating Ikaros' stability in our model. We also showed that this loss of Ikaros expression is associated with a significant decrease in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell percentages but increased CD4+CD25+ Tregs in TB mice. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the dietary flavonoid apigenin (API), on Ikaros expression and T cell immune responses. Treatment of splenocytes from naïve mice with (API) stabilized Ikaros expression and prevented Ikaros downregulation in the presence of murine Panc02 cells in vitro, similar to the proteasome inhibitor MG132. In vivo treatment of TB mice with apigenin (TB-API) improved survival, reduced tumor weights and prevented splenomegaly. API treatment also restored protein expression of some Ikaros isoforms, which may be attributed to its moderate inhibition of CK2 activity from splenocytes of TB-API mice. This partial restoration of Ikaros expression was accompanied by a significant increase in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell percentages and a reduction in Treg percentages in TB-API mice. In addition, CD8+ T cells from TB-API mice produced more IFN-γ and their splenocytes were better able to prime allogeneic CD8+ T cell responses compared to TB mice. These results provide further evidence that Ikaros is regulated by CK2 in our pancreatic cancer model. More importantly, our findings suggest that API may be a possible therapeutic agent for stabilizing Ikaros

  1. CD4 Glycoprotein Degradation Induced by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vpu Protein Requires the Function of Proteasomes and the Ubiquitin-Conjugating Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Ulrich; Antón, Luis C.; Bačík, Igor; Cox, Josephine H.; Bour, Stéphane; Bennink, Jack R.; Orlowski, Marian; Strebel, Klaus; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    1998-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vpu gene encodes a type I anchored integral membrane phosphoprotein with two independent functions. First, it regulates virus release from a post-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) compartment by an ion channel activity mediated by its transmembrane anchor. Second, it induces the selective down regulation of host cell receptor proteins (CD4 and major histocompatibility complex class I molecules) in a process involving its phosphorylated cytoplasmic tail. In the present work, we show that the Vpu-induced proteolysis of nascent CD4 can be completely blocked by peptide aldehydes that act as competitive inhibitors of proteasome function and also by lactacystin, which blocks proteasome activity by covalently binding to the catalytic β subunits of proteasomes. The sensitivity of Vpu-induced CD4 degradation to proteasome inhibitors paralleled the inhibition of proteasome degradation of a model ubiquitinated substrate. Characterization of CD4-associated oligosaccharides indicated that CD4 rescued from Vpu-induced degradation by proteasome inhibitors is exported from the ER to the Golgi complex. This finding suggests that retranslocation of CD4 from the ER to the cytosol may be coupled to its proteasomal degradation. CD4 degradation mediated by Vpu does not require the ER chaperone calnexin and is dependent on an intact ubiquitin-conjugating system. This was demonstrated by inhibition of CD4 degradation (i) in cells expressing a thermally inactivated form of the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 or (ii) following expression of a mutant form of ubiquitin (Lys48 mutated to Arg48) known to compromise ubiquitin targeting by interfering with the formation of polyubiquitin complexes. CD4 degradation was also prevented by altering the four Lys residues in its cytosolic domain to Arg, suggesting a role for ubiquitination of one or more of these residues in the process of degradation. The results clearly demonstrate a role for the cytosolic

  2. [Features of immune proteasome expression in the development of rat central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Orlova, A Sh; Liupina, Iu V; Abaturova, S B; Sharova, N P

    2014-01-01

    Formation of the central nervous system in ontogeny and function in adult mammals are controlled by universal ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic system. The aim of this work was to study the dynamics of expression of immune proteasomes in comparison with the dynamics of ChLA and CLA proteasome and expression of the transcription factor Zif268 in the structures of the brain (cortex, hippocampus, and brainstem) in embryonic (E19, E21 days of embryonic development) and early postnatal (P1, P3, P4, P5, P7, P15 days of post-natal development) development in rats. ChLA and CLA in clarified homogenates of rat brain structures were determined by hydrolysis of fluorogenic commercial oligopeptides Suc-LLVY-AMC and Z-LLG-AMC, respectively. In the cortex and hippocampus of the brain was observed upregulation of immune subunits LMP7 during the active formation of biochemical mediatory structure and efferent neuronal projections at the period P7-P15. In the cerebral cortex during this period ChLA and CLA also are increased. In all structures of the brain the LMP2 immune subunits content was significantly increased at the period P7-P15. Contents of proteolytic constitutive subunit β1 in all structures decreased by P4 compare to P1 levels and was increased on P15 relative to the P1 levels. However, the level of expression of proteolytic constitutive subunit β5 increased in cortex, hippocampus and brainstem from E21 and reached maximum values on P3, P5 and P1, respectively with a sharp decrease to P7 in all studied structures. In all structures expression of LM P2 immune subunits and β1 constitutive subunits increased simultaneously with LMP7 immune subunits and sharply on P15. Also shown a positive correlation of increased expression regulator PA28 and constitutive β5 subunits in the hippocampus during the period P3-P5 and in the brainstem at the period P1-P5. The peculiarity of the studied brain regions during P7-P15 of rat early development is a correlation of expression of

  3. Ubiquitin-proteasome-rich cytoplasmic structures in neutrophils of patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome.

    PubMed

    Necchi, Vittorio; Minelli, Antonella; Sommi, Patrizia; Vitali, Agostina; Caruso, Roberta; Longoni, Daniela; Frau, Maria Rita; Nasi, Cristina; De Gregorio, Fabiola; Zecca, Marco; Ricci, Vittorio; Danesino, Cesare; Solcia, Enrico

    2012-07-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder in which severe bone marrow dysfunction causes neutropenia and an increased risk of leukemia. Recently, novel particulate cytoplasmic structures, rich in ubiquitinated and proteasomal proteins, have been detected in epithelial cells and neutrophils from patients with Helicobacter pylori gastritis and several epithelial neoplasms. Blood neutrophils from 13 cases of Shwachman-Diamond syndrome - ten with and three without SBDS gene mutation - and ten controls were investigated by confocal microscopy and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry using antibodies against ubiquitinated proteins, proteasomes, p62 protein, and Helicobacter pylori VacA, urease and outer membrane proteins. Many extensively disseminated particulate cytoplasmic structures, accounting for 22.78 ± 5.57% (mean ± standard deviation) of the total cytoplasm, were found in blood neutrophils from mutated Shwachman-Diamond syndrome patients. The particulate cytoplasmic structures showed immunoreactivity for polyubiquitinated proteins and proteasomes, but no reactivity for Helicobacter pylori products, which are present in particulate cytoplasmic structures of Helicobacter pylori-positive gastritis. Neutrophils from patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome frequently showed p62-positive autophagic vacuoles and apoptotic changes in 5% of cells. No particulate cytoplasmic structures were observed in most control neutrophils; however, in a few cells from two cases we noted focal development of minute particulate cytoplasmic structures, accounting for 0.74 ± 0.56% of the total cytoplasm (P<0.001 versus particulate cytoplasmic structures from mutated Shwachman-Diamond syndrome patients). Neutrophils from non-mutated Shwachman-Diamond-syndrome-like patients resembled controls in two cases, and a third case showed particulate cytoplasmic structure patterns intermediate between those in controls and those in mutated Shwachman-Diamond syndrome patients. Particulate cytoplasmic structures are a prominent feature of neutrophils from patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. They may help us to understand the mechanism of granulocyte dysfunction and the neoplastic risk of the disease.

  4. A nuclear ubiquitin-proteasome pathway targets the inner nuclear membrane protein Asi2 for degradation.

    PubMed

    Boban, Mirta; Pantazopoulou, Marina; Schick, Anna; Ljungdahl, Per O; Foisner, Roland

    2014-08-15

    The nuclear envelope consists of inner and outer nuclear membranes. Whereas the outer membrane is an extension of the endoplasmic reticulum, the inner nuclear membrane (INM) represents a unique membranous environment containing specific proteins. The mechanisms of integral INM protein degradation are unknown. Here, we investigated the turnover of Asi2, an integral INM protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report that Asi2 is degraded by the proteasome independently of the vacuole and that it exhibited a half-life of ∼45 min. Asi2 exhibits enhanced stability in mutants lacking the E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes Ubc6 or Ubc7, or the E3 ubiquitin ligase Doa10. Consistent with these data, Asi2 is post-translationally modified by poly-ubiquitylation in a Ubc7- and Doa10-dependent manner. Importantly Asi2 degradation is significantly reduced in a sts1-2 mutant that fails to accumulate proteasomes in the nucleus, indicating that Asi2 is degraded in the nucleus. Our results reveal a molecular pathway that affects the stability of integral proteins of the inner nuclear membrane and indicate that Asi2 is subject to protein quality control in the nucleus. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. The Role of the Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway in Keratin Intermediate Filament Protein Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Rogel, Micah R.; Jaitovich, Ariel; Ridge, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    Lung injury, whether caused by hypoxic or mechanical stresses, elicits a variety of responses at the cellular level. Alveolar epithelial cells respond and adapt to such injurious stimuli by reorganizing the cellular cytoskeleton, mainly accomplished through modification of the intermediate filament (IF) network. The structural and mechanical integrity in epithelial cells is maintained through this adaptive reorganization response. Keratin, the predominant IF expressed in epithelial cells, displays highly dynamic properties in response to injury, sometimes in the form of degradation of the keratin IF network. Post-translational modification, such as phosphorylation, targets keratin proteins for degradation in these circumstances. As with other structural and regulatory proteins, turnover of keratin is regulated by the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway. The degradation process begins with activation of Ub by the Ub-activating enzyme (E1), followed by the exchange of Ub to the Ub-conjugating enzyme (E2). E2 shuttles the Ub molecule to the substrate-specific Ub ligase (E3), which then delivers the Ub to the substrate protein, thereby targeting it for degradation. In some cases of injury and IF-related disease, aggresomes form in epithelial cells. The mechanisms that regulate aggresome formation are currently unknown, although proteasome overload may play a role. Therefore, a more complete understanding of keratin degradation—causes, mechanisms, and consequences—will allow for a greater understanding of epithelial cell biology and lung pathology alike. PMID:20160151

  6. The effect of temperature adaptation on the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in notothenioid fishes.

    PubMed

    Todgham, Anne E; Crombie, Timothy A; Hofmann, Gretchen E

    2017-02-01

    There is an accumulating body of evidence suggesting that the sub-zero Antarctic marine environment places physiological constraints on protein homeostasis. Levels of ubiquitin (Ub)-conjugated proteins, 20S proteasome activity and mRNA expression of many proteins involved in both the Ub tagging of damaged proteins as well as the different complexes of the 26S proteasome were measured to examine whether there is thermal compensation of the Ub-proteasome pathway in Antarctic fishes to better understand the efficiency of the protein degradation machinery in polar species. Both Antarctic (Trematomus bernacchii, Pagothenia borchgrevinki) and non-Antarctic (Notothenia angustata, Bovichtus variegatus) notothenioids were included in this study to investigate the mechanisms of cold adaptation of this pathway in polar species. Overall, there were significant differences in the levels of Ub-conjugated proteins between the Antarctic notothenioids and B. variegatus, with N. angustata possessing levels very similar to those of the Antarctic fishes. Proteasome activity in the gills of Antarctic fishes demonstrated a high degree of temperature compensation such that activity levels were similar to activities measured in their temperate relatives at ecologically relevant temperatures. A similar level of thermal compensation of proteasome activity was not present in the liver of two Antarctic fishes. Higher gill proteasome activity is likely due in part to higher cellular levels of proteins involved in the Ub-proteasome pathway, as evidenced by high mRNA expression of relevant genes. Reduced activity of the Ub-proteasome pathway does not appear to be the mechanism responsible for elevated levels of denatured proteins in Antarctic fishes, at least in the gills.

  7. Direct interaction of menin leads to ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation of β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byungho; Song, Tae-Yang; Jung, Kwan Young; Kim, Seul Gi; Cho, Eun-Jung

    2017-10-07

    Menin, encoded by the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) gene, is a tumor suppressor and transcription regulator. Menin interacts with various proteins as a scaffold protein and is proposed to play important roles in multiple physiological and pathological processes by controlling gene expression, proliferation, and apoptosis. The mechanisms underlying menin's suppression of tumorigenesis are largely elusive. In this study, we showed that menin was essential for the regulation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cultured cells. The C-terminal domain of menin was able to directly interact with and promote ubiquitin-mediated degradation of β-catenin. We further revealed that overexpression of menin down-regulated the transcriptional activity of β-catenin and target gene expression. Moreover, menin efficiently inhibited β-catenin protein levels, transcriptional activity, and proliferation of human renal carcinoma cells with an activated β-catenin pathway. Taken together, our results provide novel molecular insights into the tumor suppressor activity of menin, which is partly mediated by proteasomal degradation of β-catenin and inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Transcriptomics of the interaction between the monopartite phloem-limited geminivirus tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus and Solanum lycopersicum highlights a role for plant hormones, autophagy and plant immune system fine tuning during infection.

    PubMed

    Miozzi, Laura; Napoli, Chiara; Sardo, Luca; Accotto, Gian Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV), a DNA virus belonging to the genus Begomovirus, causes severe losses in tomato crops. It infects only a limited number of cells in the vascular tissues, making difficult to detect changes in host gene expression linked to its presence. Here we present the first microarray study of transcriptional changes induced by the phloem-limited geminivirus TYLCSV infecting tomato, its natural host. The analysis was performed on the midrib of mature leaves, a material naturally enriched in vascular tissues. A total of 2206 genes were up-regulated and 1398 were down-regulated in infected plants, with an overrepresentation of genes involved in hormone metabolism and responses, nucleic acid metabolism, regulation of transcription, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and autophagy among those up-regulated, and in primary and secondary metabolism, phosphorylation, transcription and methylation-dependent chromatin silencing among those down-regulated. Our analysis showed a series of responses, such as the induction of GA- and ABA-responsive genes, the activation of the autophagic process and the fine tuning of the plant immune system, observed only in TYLCSV-tomato compatible interaction so far. On the other hand, comparisons with transcriptional changes observed in other geminivirus-plant interactions highlighted common host responses consisting in the deregulation of biotic stress responsive genes, key enzymes in the ethylene biosynthesis and methylation cycle, components of the ubiquitin proteasome system and DNA polymerases II. The involvement of conserved miRNAs and of solanaceous- and tomato-specific miRNAs in geminivirus infection, investigated by integrating differential gene expression data with miRNA targeting data, is discussed.

  9. Human nervous system function emulator.

    PubMed

    Frenger, P

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a modular, extensible, open-systems design for a multiprocessor network which emulates the major functions of the human nervous system. Interchangeable hardware/software components, a socketed software bus with plug-and-play capability and self diagnostics are included. The computer hardware is based on IEEE P996.1 bus cards. Its operating system utilizes IEEE 1275 standard software. Object oriented design techniques and programming are featured. A machine-independent high level script-based command language was created for this project. Neural anatomical structures which were emulated include the cortex, brainstem, cerebellum, spinal cord, autonomic and peripheral nervous systems. Motor, sensory, autoregulatory, and higher cognitive artificial intelligence, behavioral and emotional functions are provided. The author discusses how he has interfaced this emulator to machine vision, speech recognition/speech synthesis, an artificial neural network and a dexterous hand to form an android robotic platform.

  10. Isoform-Specific SCFFbw7 Ubiquitination Mediates Differential Regulation of PGC-1α

    PubMed Central

    Trausch-Azar, Julie S.; Abed, Mona; Orian, Amir; Schwartz, Alan L.

    2015-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase and tumor suppressor SCFFbw7 exists as three isoforms that govern the degradation of a host of critical cell regulators, including c-Myc, cyclin E, and PGC-1α. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is a transcriptional coactivator with broad effects on cellular energy metabolism. Cellular PGC-1α levels are tightly controlled in a dynamic state by the balance of synthesis and rapid degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Yet, isoform-specific functions of SCFFbw7 are yet to be determined. Here, we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase, SCFFbw7, regulates cellular PGC-1α levels via two independent, isoform specific, mechanisms. The cytoplasmic isoform (SCFFbw7β) reduces cellular PGC-1α levels via accelerated ubiquitin-proteasome degradation. In contrast, the nuclear isoform (SCFFbw7α) increases cellular PGC-1α levels and protein stability via inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation. When nuclear Fbw7α proteins are redirected to the cytoplasm, cellular PGC-1α protein levels are reduced through accelerated ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation. We find that SCFFbw7β catalyzes high molecular weight PGC-1α-ubiquitin conjugation, whereas SCFFbw7α produces low molecular weight PGC-1α-ubiquitin conjugates that are not effective degradation signals. Thus, selective ubiquitination by specific Fbw7 isoforms represents a novel mechanism that tightly regulates cellular PGC-1α levels. Fbw7 isoforms mediate degradation of a host of regulatory proteins. The E3 ubiquitin ligase, Fbw7, mediates PGC-1α levels via selective isoform-specific ubiquitination. Fbw7β reduces cellular PGC-1α via ubiquitin-mediated degradation, whereas Fbw7α increases cellular PGC-1α via ubiquitin-mediated stabilization. PMID:25204433

  11. Disordered holographic systems: Functional renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Allan; Yaida, Sho

    2015-12-01

    We study quenched disorder in strongly correlated systems via holography, focusing on the thermodynamic effects of mild electric disorder. Disorder is introduced through a random potential which is assumed to self-average on macroscopic scales. Studying the flow of this distribution with energy scale leads us to develop a holographic functional renormalization scheme. We test this scheme by computing thermodynamic quantities and confirming that the Harris criterion for relevance, irrelevance, or marginality of quenched disorder holds.

  12. Caspase activation inhibits proteasome function during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Ming; Butterworth, Michael; MacFarlane, Marion; Dubiel, Wolfgang; Ciechanover, Aaron; Cohen, Gerald M

    2004-04-09

    The ubiquitin/proteasome system regulates protein turnover by degrading polyubiquitinated proteins. To date, all studies on the relationship of apoptosis and the proteasome have emphasized the key role of the proteasome in the regulation of apoptosis, by virtue of its ability to degrade regulatory molecules involved in apoptosis. We now demonstrate how induction of apoptosis may regulate the activity of the proteasome. During apoptosis, caspase activation results in the cleavage of three specific subunits of the 19S regulatory complex of the proteasome: S6' (Rpt5) and S5a (Rpn10), whose role is to recognize polyubiquitinated substrates of the proteasome, and S1 (Rpn2), which with S5a and S2 (Rpn1) holds together the lid and base of the 19S regulatory complex. This caspase-mediated cleavage inhibits the proteasomal degradation of ubiquitin-dependent and -independent cellular substrates, including proapoptotic molecules such as Smac, so facilitating the execution of the apoptotic program by providing a feed-forward amplification loop.

  13. SUMOylation at K707 of DGCR8 controls direct function of primary microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changhong; Chen, Cheng; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Hailong; Zhao, Xian; Deng, Rong; Dou, Jinzhuo; Jin, Hui; Chen, Ran; Xu, Ming; Chen, Qin; Wang, Yanli; Yu, Jianxiu

    2015-01-01

    DGCR8 (DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 8) is essential for primary microRNA (pri-miRNA) processing in the cell nucleus. It specifically combines with Drosha, a nuclear RNase III enzyme, to form the Microprocessor complex (MC) that cleaves pri-miRNA to precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA), which is further processed to mature miRNA by Dicer, a cytoplasmic RNase III enzyme. Increasing evidences suggest that pri-/pre-miRNAs have direct functions in regulation of gene expression, however the underlying mechanism how it is fine-tuned remains unclear. Here we find that DGCR8 is modified by SUMO1 at the major site K707, which can be promoted by its ERK-activated phosphorylation. SUMOylation of DGCR8 enhances the protein stability by preventing the degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. More importantly, SUMOylation of DGCR8 does not alter its association with Drosha, the MC activity and miRNA biogenesis, but rather influences its affinity with pri-miRNAs. This altered affinity of DGCR8 with pri-miRNAs seems to control the direct functions of pri-miRNAs in recognition and repression of the target mRNAs, which is evidently linked to the DGCR8 function in regulation of tumorigenesis and cell migration. Collectively, our data suggest a novel mechanism that SUMOylation of DGCR8 controls direct functions of pri-miRNAs in gene silencing. PMID:26202964

  14. Functional Microgels and Microgel Systems.

    PubMed

    Plamper, Felix A; Richtering, Walter

    2017-02-21

    Microgels are macromolecular networks swollen by the solvent in which they are dissolved. They are unique systems that are distinctly different from common colloids, such as, e.g., rigid nanoparticles, flexible macromolecules, micelles, or vesicles. The size of the microgel networks is in the range of several micrometers down to nanometers (then sometimes called "nanogels"). In a collapsed state, they might resemble hard colloids but they can still contain significant amounts of solvent. When swollen, they are soft and have a fuzzy surface with dangling chains. The presence of cross-links provides structural integrity, in contrast to linear and (hyper)branched polymers. Obviously, the cross-linker content will allow control of whether microgels behave more "colloidal" or "macromolecular". The combination of being soft and porous while still having a stable structure through the cross-linked network allows for designing microgels that have the same total chemical composition, but different properties due to a different architecture. Microgels based, e.g., on two monomers but have either statistical spatial distribution, or a core-shell or hollow-two-shell morphology will display very different properties. Microgels provide the possibility to introduce chemical functionality at different positions. Combining architectural diversity and compartmentalization of reactive groups enables thus short-range coexistence of otherwise instable combinations of chemical reactivity. The open microgel structure is beneficial for uptake-release purposes of active substances. In addition, the openness allows site-selective integration of active functionalities like reactive groups, charges, or markers by postmodification processes. The unique ability of microgels to retain their colloidal stability and swelling degree both in water and in many organic solvents allows use of different chemistries for the modification of microgel structure. The capability of microgels to adjust both

  15. Fukui function and response function for nonlocal and fractional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Degao; Yang, Weitao

    2013-05-01

    We present extensions to our previous work on Fukui functions and linear-response functions [W. Yang, A. J. Cohen, F. D. Proft, and P. Geerlings, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 144110 (2012), 10.1063/1.3701562]. Viewed as energy derivatives with respect to the number of electrons and the external potential, all second-order derivatives (the linear-response function, the Fukui function, and the chemical hardness) are extended to fractional systems, and all third-order derivatives (the second-order response function, the Fukui response function, the dual descriptor, and the hyperhardness) for integer systems are also obtained. These analytical derivatives are verified by finite difference numerical derivatives. In the context of the exact linearity condition and the constancy condition, these analytical derivatives enrich greatly the information of the exact conditions on the energy functional through establishing real-space dependency. The introduction of an external nonlocal potential defines the nonlocal Fukui function and the nonlocal linear-response function. The nonlocal linear-response function so defined also provides the precise meaning for the time-dependent linear-response density-functional theory calculations with generalized Kohn-Sham functionals. These extensions will be useful to conceptual density-functional theory and density functional development.

  16. Phytochrome from Green Plants: Properties and biological Function

    SciTech Connect

    Quail, Peter H.

    2014-07-25

    Pfr conformer reverses this activity upon initial light exposure, inducing the switch to photomorphogenic development. This reversal involves light-triggered translocation of the photoactivated phy molecule into the nucleus where it interacts with PIF-family members, inducing rapid phosphorylation and degradation of the PIFs via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This degradation in turn elicits rapid alterations in gene expression that drive the deetiolation transition. This project has made considerable progress in defining phy-PIF signaling activity in controlling the SAR. The biological functions of the multiple PIF-family members in controlling the SAR, including dissection of the relative contributions of the individual PIFs to this process, as well as to diurnal growth-control oscillations, have been investigated using higher-order pif-mutant combinations. Using microarray analysis of a quadruple pif mutant we have defined the shade-induced, PIF-regulated transcriptional network genome-wide. This has revealed that a dynamic antagonism between the phys and PIFs generates selective reciprocal responses during deetiolation and the SAR in a rapidly light-responsive transcriptional network. Using integrated RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analysis of higher order pif-mutant combinations, we have defined the direct gene-targets of PIF transcriptional regulation, and have obtained evidence that this regulation involves differential direct targeting of rapidly light-responsive genes by the individual PIF-family members. This project has provided significant advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which the phy-PIF photosensory signaling pathway regulates an important bioenergy-related plant response to the light environment. The identification of molecular targets in the primary transcriptional-regulatory circuitry of this pathway has the potential to enable genetic or reverse-genetic manipulation of the partitioning of carbon between reproductive and

  17. Software Systems: Consequence versus Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Ray; Winter, Victor L.

    1999-08-05

    The purpose of this panel is to present different perspectives and opinions regarding the issues surrounding why software should or shouldn't be entrusted with critical (high consequence) functionality.

  18. Dss1 associating with the proteasome functions in selective nuclear mRNA export in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Mannen, Taro; Andoh, Tomoko; Tani, Tokio

    2008-01-25

    Dss1p is an evolutionarily conserved small protein that interacts with BRCA2, a tumor suppressor protein, in humans. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain lacking the dss1{sup +} gene ({delta}dss1) shows a temperature-sensitive growth defect and accumulation of bulk poly(A){sup +} RNA in the nucleus at a nonpermissive temperature. In situ hybridization using probes for several specific mRNAs, however, revealed that the analyzed mRNAs were exported normally to the cytoplasm in {delta}dss1, suggesting that Dss1p is required for export of some subsets of mRNAs. We identified the pad1{sup +} gene, which encodes a component of the 26S proteasome, as a suppressor for the ts{sup -} phenotype of {delta}dss1. Unexpectedly, overexpression of Pad1p could suppress neither the defect in nuclear mRNA export nor a defect in proteasome function. In addition, loss of proteasome functions does not cause defective nuclear mRNA export. Dss1p seems to be a multifunctional protein involved in nuclear export of specific sets of mRNAs and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in fission yeast.

  19. Berberine bioisostere Q8 compound stimulates osteoblast differentiation and function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Han, Younho; Jin, Yifeng; Lee, Sung Ho; Khadka, Daulat Bikram; Cho, Won-Jea; Lee, Kwang Youl

    2017-03-07

    The Q8 compound is a unique derivative of berberine. The present study investigated the functional role of Q8 to evaluate its potential for use in bone regeneration, especially in osteoblast differentiation. The safe concentration of Q8 increased BMP4-induced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and induced RNA expression of ALP, bone sialoprotein (BSP), and osteocalcin (OC). The activities of ALP-, BSP- and OC-luciferase reporters were also increased by Q8. During osteoblast differentiation, Q8 stabilized the Runx2 and Osterix protein abundance by blocking the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, which in turn promoted Runx2 and Osterix induced transcriptional activity and subsequently increased the osteoblast differentiation. Meanwhile, depletion of Runx2 and Osterix markedly abolished the bone anabolic effect of Q8 on osteoblast differentiation. To evaluate the signal transduction pathway involved in the Q8-mediated regulation of Runx2 and Osterix, we examined the reporter assay using various kinase inhibitors. Treatment with a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89 inhibited the Q8-mediated regulation of Runx2 and Osterix. Based on these findings, this study demonstrates that Q8 promotes the osteoblast differentiation by stabilization of Runx2/Osterix through the increased activation of PKA signaling. The enhancement of osteoblast function by Q8 may contribute to the prevention for osteoporosis.

  20. [Functional anatomy of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Krainik, A; Feydy, A; Colombani, J M; Hélias, A; Menu, Y

    2003-03-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has a particular regional functional anatomy. The morphological support of cognitive functions can now be depicted using functional imaging. Lesions of the central nervous system may be responsible of specific symptoms based on their location. Current neuroimaging techniques are able to show and locate precisely macroscopic lesions. Therefore, the knowledge of functional anatomy of the central nervous system is useful to link clinical disorders to symptomatic lesions. Using radio-clinical cases, we present the functional neuro-anatomy related to common cognitive impairments.

  1. Transfer function characteristics of super resolving systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milster, Tom D.; Curtis, Craig H.

    1992-01-01

    Signal quality in an optical storage device greatly depends on the optical system transfer function used to write and read data patterns. The problem is similar to analysis of scanning optical microscopes. Hopkins and Braat have analyzed write-once-read-many (WORM) optical data storage devices. Herein, transfer function analysis of magnetooptic (MO) data storage devices is discussed with respect to improving transfer-function characteristics. Several authors have described improving the transfer function as super resolution. However, none have thoroughly analyzed the MO optical system and effects of the medium. Both the optical system transfer function and effects of the medium of this development are discussed.

  2. Iterated Function Systems on Functions of Bounded Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Torre, Davide; Mendivil, Franklin; Vrscay, Edward R.

    2016-04-01

    We show that under certain hypotheses, an iterated function system on mappings (IFSM) is a contraction on the complete space of functions of bounded variation (BV). It then possesses a unique attractor of BV. Some BV-based inverse problems based on the Collage Theorem for contraction maps are considered.

  3. Control of cell growth by the SCF and APC/C ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, Jeffrey R.; Pagano, Michele

    2009-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays key roles in the control of cell growth. The cell cycle in particular is highly regulated by the functions of the SCF and APC/C ubiquitin ligases, and perturbation of their function can result in tumorigenesis. Although the SCF and APC/C complexes are well-established in growth control pathways, many aspects of their function remain unknown. Recent studies have shed light on the mechanism of SCF-mediated ubiquitination and new functions for the SCF complex and APC/C. Our expanding understanding of the roles of the SCF and APC/C complexes highlight the potential for targeted molecular therapies. PMID:19775879

  4. Functional roles of PC-PLC and Cdc20 in the cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiwei; Yu, Yongfeng; Fu, Da; Li, Ziming; Niu, Xiaoming; Liao, Meilin; Lu, Shun

    2010-06-01

    Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) is the major enzyme in the Phosphatidylcholine (PC) cycle and is involved in many long-term cellular responses such as activation, proliferation, and differentiation events. Cell division cycle 20 homolog (Cdc20) is an essential cell-cycle regulator required for the completion of mitosis. Our previous studies identified the interaction between PC-PLC and Cdc20. Through the interaction, Cdc20 could mediate the degradation of PC-PLC by Cdc20-mediated ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP). In this study, we found that PC-PLC might not be involved in cancer metastasis. Inhibition of PC-PLC by D609 could cause cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis inhibition in CBRH-7919 cells. Inhibition of PC-PLC could also influence the cell cycle by arresting the cells in G1 phase, and Cdc20 might be involved in these processes. Taken together, in this report, we provided new evidence for the functional roles of PC-PLC and Cdc20 in the cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptosis in CBRH-7919 cells.

  5. Writing to Persuade: A Systemic Functional View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulze, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    This study explores how a genre-based approach to writing instruction influenced by both genre theory and systemic functional linguistics supported the academic writing development of English language learners (ELLs) transitioning to middle school. Drawing on Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL) as a tool for pedagogy and linguistic analysis, the…

  6. Extracellular Matrix: Functions in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Claudia S.; Franco, Santos J.; Müller, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    An astonishing number of extracellular matrix glycoproteins are expressed in dynamic patterns in the developing and adult nervous system. Neural stem cells, neurons, and glia express receptors that mediate interactions with specific extracellular matrix molecules. Functional studies in vitro and genetic studies in mice have provided evidence that the extracellular matrix affects virtually all aspects of nervous system development and function. Here we will summarize recent findings that have shed light on the specific functions of defined extracellular matrix molecules on such diverse processes as neural stem cell differentiation, neuronal migration, the formation of axonal tracts, and the maturation and function of synapses in the peripheral and central nervous system. PMID:21123393

  7. Functional Risk Modeling for Lunar Surface Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Fraser; Mathias, Donovan; Go, Susie; Nejad, Hamed

    2010-01-01

    We introduce an approach to risk modeling that we call functional modeling , which we have developed to estimate the capabilities of a lunar base. The functional model tracks the availability of functions provided by systems, in addition to the operational state of those systems constituent strings. By tracking functions, we are able to identify cases where identical functions are provided by elements (rovers, habitats, etc.) that are connected together on the lunar surface. We credit functional diversity in those cases, and in doing so compute more realistic estimates of operational mode availabilities. The functional modeling approach yields more realistic estimates of the availability of the various operational modes provided to astronauts by the ensemble of surface elements included in a lunar base architecture. By tracking functional availability the effects of diverse backup, which often exists when two or more independent elements are connected together, is properly accounted for.

  8. Automated Dental Epidemiology System. II. Systems Analysis and Functional Design,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    A"D-n134 803 AUTOMATED DENTAL EPIDEMIOLOGY SYSTEM II SYSTEMSi/ ANALYSIS AND FUNCTIONAL DE5IGN(U) NAVAnL DENTAL RESERRCH INST GREAT LAKES IL M C DIEHL... DENTAL EPIDEMIOLOGY SYSTEM: II. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND FUNCTIONAL DESIGN M. C. DIEHL DTICSELECTEOCT 218 D >- NAVAL 8DENTAL RESEARCH ’INSTITUTE Naval...NAVAL DENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE NAVAL BASE, BUILDING I-H GREAT LAKES, ILLINOIS 60088 AUTOMATED DENTAL EPIDEMIOLOGY SYSTEM: II. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

  9. The Keap1-Nrf2 system and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Uruno, Akira; Yagishita, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-01-15

    Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) plays a key role in the protection of vertebrates against environmental stress by contributing to the inducible expression of detoxification and antioxidant enzymes. Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1) is a sensor for oxidative and electrophilic stresses. Keap1 also acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase substrate-recognition subunit that specifically targets Nrf2. Keap1 causes Nrf2 to be degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and thus ensures that Nrf2 is constitutively suppressed under unstressed conditions. Upon exposure to oxidative or electrophilic stress, Keap1 loses its ability to ubiquitinate Nrf2. Many lines of evidence have recently clarified that the Keap1-Nrf2 system also plays critical roles in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. One of the most salient examples is the contribution of Keap1-Nrf2 to metabolic and energy-balance regulation. In particular, how the Keap1-Nrf2 system protects the body against diabetes mellitus and how perturbations in this system provoke the disease condition are now under intense investigation. This review will summarize the recent progress made in this area.

  10. Function Analysis and Decomposistion using Function Analysis Systems Technique

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. Wixson

    1999-06-01

    The "Father of Value Analysis", Lawrence D. Miles, was a design engineer for General Electric in Schenectady, New York. Miles developed the concept of function analysis to address difficulties in satisfying the requirements to fill shortages of high demand manufactured parts and electrical components during World War II. His concept of function analysis was further developed in the 1960s by Charles W. Bytheway, a design engineer at Sperry Univac in Salt Lake City, Utah. Charles Bytheway extended Mile's function analysis concepts and introduced the methodology called Function Analysis Systems Techniques (FAST) to the Society of American Value Engineers (SAVE) at their International Convention in 1965 (Bytheway 1965). FAST uses intuitive logic to decompose a high level, or objective function into secondary and lower level functions that are displayed in a logic diagram called a FAST model. Other techniques can then be applied to allocate functions to components, individuals, processes, or other entities that accomplish the functions. FAST is best applied in a team setting and proves to be an effective methodology for functional decomposition, allocation, and alternative development.

  11. Function Analysis and Decomposistion using Function Analysis Systems Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wixson, James Robert

    1999-06-01

    The "Father of Value Analysis", Lawrence D. Miles, was a design engineer for General Electric in Schenectady, New York. Miles developed the concept of function analysis to address difficulties in satisfying the requirements to fill shortages of high demand manufactured parts and electrical components during World War II. His concept of function analysis was further developed in the 1960s by Charles W. Bytheway, a design engineer at Sperry Univac in Salt Lake City, Utah. Charles Bytheway extended Mile's function analysis concepts and introduced the methodology called Function Analysis Systems Technique (FAST) to the Society of American Value Engineers (SAVE) at their International Convention in 1965 (Bytheway 1965). FAST uses intuitive logic to decompose a high level, or objective function into secondary and lower level functions that are displayed in a logic diagram called a FAST model. Other techniques can then be applied to allocate functions to components, individuals, processes, or other entities that accomplish the functions. FAST is best applied in a team setting and proves to be an effective methodology for functional decomposition, allocation, and alternative development.

  12. The Nervous System and Gastrointestinal Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altaf, Muhammad A.; Sood, Manu R.

    2008-01-01

    The enteric nervous system is an integrative brain with collection of neurons in the gastrointestinal tract which is capable of functioning independently of the central nervous system (CNS). The enteric nervous system modulates motility, secretions, microcirculation, immune and inflammatory responses of the gastrointestinal tract. Dysphagia,…

  13. The Nervous System and Gastrointestinal Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altaf, Muhammad A.; Sood, Manu R.

    2008-01-01

    The enteric nervous system is an integrative brain with collection of neurons in the gastrointestinal tract which is capable of functioning independently of the central nervous system (CNS). The enteric nervous system modulates motility, secretions, microcirculation, immune and inflammatory responses of the gastrointestinal tract. Dysphagia,…

  14. Spinocerebellar ataxia-13 Kv3.3 potassium channels: arginine-to-histidine mutations affect both functional and protein expression on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Zhu, Jing; Thornhill, William B

    2013-09-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv3.3 is the causative gene of SCA13 (spinocerebellar ataxia type 13), an autosomal dominant neurological disorder. The four dominant mutations identified to date cause Kv3.3 channels to be non-functional or have altered gating properties in Xenopus oocytes. In the present paper, we report that SCA13 mutations affect functional as well as protein expression of Kv3.3 channels in a mammalian cell line. The reduced protein level of SCA13 mutants is caused by a shorter protein half-life, and blocking the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway increases the total protein of SCA13 mutants more than wild-type. SCA13 mutated amino acids are highly conserved, and the side chains of these residues play a critical role in the stable expression of Kv3.3 proteins. In addition, we show that mutant Kv3.3 protein levels could be partially rescued by treatment with the chemical chaperone TMAO (trimethylamine N-oxide) and to a lesser extent with co-expression of Kv3.1b. Thus our results suggest that amino acid side chains of SCA13 positions affect the protein half-life and/or function of Kv3.3, and the adverse effect on protein expression cannot be fully rescued.

  15. Form and function in systems neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Kristan, William B; Katz, Paul

    2006-10-10

    'Form follows function' is an architectural philosophy attributed to the great American architect Louis Sullivan, and later taken up by the Bauhaus movement. It stresses that the form of a building should reflect its function. Neuroscientists have used the converse of this dictum to learn the functions of neural circuits, believing that if we study neural architecture, it will lead us to an understanding of how neural systems function. New tools for studying the structure of neural circuits are being developed, so it is important to discuss what the old techniques have taught us about how to derive function from the form of a neural circuit.

  16. A pragmatic approach to biochemical systems theory applied to an alpha-synuclein-based model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sass, Matthew B; Lorenz, Alyson N; Green, Robert L; Coleman, Randolph A

    2009-04-15

    This paper presents a detailed systems model of Parkinson's disease (PD), developed utilizing a pragmatic application of biochemical systems theory (BST) intended to assist experimentalists in the study of system behavior. This approach utilizes relative values as a reasonable initial estimate for BST and provides a theoretical means of applying numerical solutions to qualitative and semi-quantitative understandings of cellular pathways and mechanisms. The approach allows for the simulation of human disease through its ability to organize and integrate existing information about metabolic pathways without having a full quantitative description of those pathways, so that hypotheses about individual processes may be tested in a systems environment. Incorporating this method, the PD model describes alpha-synuclein aggregation as mediated by dopamine metabolism, the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and lysosomal degradation, allowing for the examination of dynamic pathway interactions and the evaluation of possible toxic mechanisms in the aggregation process. Four system perturbations: elevated alpha-synuclein aggregation, impaired dopamine packaging, increased neurotoxins, and alpha-synuclein overexpression, were analyzed for correlation to qualitative PD system hypotheses present in the literature, with the model demonstrating a high level of agreement with these hypotheses. Additionally, various PD treatment methods, including levadopa and monoamine oxidase inhibition (MAOI) therapy, were applied to the disease models to examine their effects on the system. Future additions and refinements to the model may further the understanding of the emergent behaviors of the disease, helping in the identification of system sensitivities and possible therapeutic targets.

  17. Electrostatic camera system functional design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botticelli, R. A.; Cook, F. J.; Moore, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A functional design study for an electrostatic camera system for application to planetary missions is presented. The electrostatic camera can produce and store a large number of pictures and provide for transmission of the stored information at arbitrary times after exposure. Preliminary configuration drawings and circuit diagrams for the system are illustrated. The camera system's size, weight, power consumption, and performance are characterized. Tradeoffs between system weight, power, and storage capacity are identified.

  18. Functional Translational Readthrough: A Systems Biology Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Schueren, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Translational readthrough (TR) has come into renewed focus because systems biology approaches have identified the first human genes undergoing functional translational readthrough (FTR). FTR creates functional extensions to proteins by continuing translation of the mRNA downstream of the stop codon. Here we review recent developments in TR research with a focus on the identification of FTR in humans and the systems biology methods that have spurred these discoveries. PMID:27490485

  19. Functional Translational Readthrough: A Systems Biology Perspective.

    PubMed

    Schueren, Fabian; Thoms, Sven

    2016-08-01

    Translational readthrough (TR) has come into renewed focus because systems biology approaches have identified the first human genes undergoing functional translational readthrough (FTR). FTR creates functional extensions to proteins by continuing translation of the mRNA downstream of the stop codon. Here we review recent developments in TR research with a focus on the identification of FTR in humans and the systems biology methods that have spurred these discoveries.

  20. Human Systems Integration: Requirements and Functional Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berson, Barry; Gershzohn, Gary; Boltz, Laura; Wolf, Russ; Schultz, Mike

    2005-01-01

    This deliverable was intended as an input to the Access 5 Policy and Simulation Integrated Product Teams. This document contains high-level pilot functionality for operations in the National Airspace System above FL430. Based on the derived pilot functions the associated pilot information and control requirements are given.

  1. Design of membrane proteins: toward functional systems.

    PubMed

    Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2009-12-01

    Over the years, membrane-soluble peptides have provided a convenient model system to investigate the folding and assembly of integral membrane proteins. Recent advances in experimental and computational methods are now being translated into the design of functional membrane proteins. Applications include artificial modulators of membrane protein function, inhibitors of protein-protein interactions, and redox membrane proteins.

  2. Wireless distributed functional electrical stimulation system.

    PubMed

    Jovičić, Nenad S; Saranovac, Lazar V; Popović, Dejan B

    2012-08-09

    The control of movement in humans is hierarchical and distributed and uses feedback. An assistive system could be best integrated into the therapy of a human with a central nervous system lesion if the system is controlled in a similar manner. Here, we present a novel wireless architecture and routing protocol for a distributed functional electrical stimulation system that enables control of movement. The new system comprises a set of miniature battery-powered devices with stimulating and sensing functionality mounted on the body of the subject. The devices communicate wirelessly with one coordinator device, which is connected to a host computer. The control algorithm runs on the computer in open- or closed-loop form. A prototype of the system was designed using commercial, off-the-shelf components. The propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves and the distributed nature of the system were considered during the development of a two-hop routing protocol, which was implemented in the prototype's software. The outcomes of this research include a novel system architecture and routing protocol and a functional prototype based on commercial, off-the-shelf components. A proof-of-concept study was performed on a hemiplegic subject with paresis of the right arm. The subject was tasked with generating a fully functional palmar grasp (closing of the fingers). One node was used to provide this movement, while a second node controlled the activation of extensor muscles to eliminate undesired wrist flexion. The system was tested with the open- and closed-loop control algorithms. The system fulfilled technical and application requirements. The novel communication protocol enabled reliable real-time use of the system in both closed- and open-loop forms. The testing on a patient showed that the multi-node system could operate effectively to generate functional movement.

  3. Functional characterization of EI24-induced autophagy in the degradation of RING-domain E3 ligases

    PubMed Central

    Devkota, Sushil; Jeong, Hyobin; Kim, Yunmi; Ali, Muhammad; Roh, Jae-il; Hwang, Daehee; Lee, Han-Woong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Historically, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy pathways were believed to be independent; however, recent data indicate that these pathways engage in crosstalk. To date, the players mediating this crosstalk have been elusive. Here, we show experimentally that EI24 (EI24, autophagy associated transmembrane protein), a key component of basal macroautophagy/autophagy, degrades 14 physiologically important E3 ligases with a RING (really interesting new gene) domain, whereas 5 other ligases were not degraded. Based on the degradation results, we built a statistical model that predicts the RING E3 ligases targeted by EI24 using partial least squares discriminant analysis. Of 381 RING E3 ligases examined computationally, our model predicted 161 EI24 targets. Those targets are primarily involved in transcription, proteolysis, cellular bioenergetics, and apoptosis and regulated by TP53 and MTOR signaling. Collectively, our work demonstrates that EI24 is an essential player in UPS-autophagy crosstalk via degradation of RING E3 ligases. These results indicate a paradigm shift regarding the fate of E3 ligases. PMID:27541728

  4. Zinc ionophores pyrithione inhibits herpes simplex virus replication through interfering with proteasome function and NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Min; Chen, Yu; Chu, Ying; Song, Siwei; Yang, Na; Gao, Jie; Wu, Zhiwei

    2013-10-01

    Pyrithione (PT), known as a zinc ionophore, is effective against several pathogens from the Streptococcus and Staphylococcus genera. The antiviral activity of PT was also reported against a number of RNA viruses. In this paper, we showed that PT could effectively inhibit herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2). PT inhibited HSV late gene (Glycoprotein D, gD) expression and the production of viral progeny, and this action was dependent on Zn(2+). Further studies showed that PT suppressed the expression of HSV immediate early (IE) gene, the infected cell polypeptide 4 (ICP4), but had less effect on another regulatory IE protein, ICP0. It was found that PT treatment could interfere with cellular ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), leading to the inhibition of HSV-2-induced IκB-α degradation to inhibit NF-κB activation and enhanced promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) stability in nucleus. However, PT did not show direct inhibition of 26S proteasome activity. Instead, it induced Zn(2+) influx, which facilitated the dysregulation of UPS and the accumulation of intracellular ubiquitin-conjugates. UPS inhibition by PT caused disruption of IκB-α degradation and NF-κB activation thus leading to marked reduction of viral titer.

  5. An siRNA-based functional genomics screen for the identification of regulators of ciliogenesis and ciliopathy genes

    PubMed Central

    Racher, Hilary; Phelps, Ian G.; Toedt, Grischa; Kennedy, Julie; Wunderlich, Kirsten A.; Sorusch, Nasrin; Abdelhamed, Zakia A.; Natarajan, Subaashini; Herridge, Warren; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Horn, Nicola; Boldt, Karsten; Parry, David A.; Letteboer, Stef J.F.; Roosing, Susanne; Adams, Matthew; Bell, Sandra M.; Bond, Jacquelyn; Higgins, Julie; Morrison, Ewan E.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; Slaats, Gisela G.; van Dam, Teunis J. P.; Huang, Lijia; Kessler, Kristin; Giessl, Andreas; Logan, Clare V.; Boyle, Evan A.; Shendure, Jay; Anazi, Shamsa; Aldahmesh, Mohammed; Al Hazzaa, Selwa; Hegele, Robert A.; Ober, Carole; Frosk, Patrick; Mhanni, Aizeddin A.; Chodirker, Bernard N.; Chudley, Albert E.; Lamont, Ryan; Bernier, Francois P.; Beaulieu, Chandree L.; Gordon, Paul; Pon, Richard T.; Donahue, Clem; Barkovich, A. James; Wolf, Louis; Toomes, Carmel; Thiel, Christian T.; Boycott, Kym M.; McKibbin, Martin; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Stewart, Fiona; Omran, Heymut; Huynen, Martijn A.; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; Parboosingh, Jillian S.; Innes, A Micheil; Willoughby, Colin E.; Giles, Rachel H.; Webster, Andrew R.; Ueffing, Marius; Blacque, Oliver; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Wolfrum, Uwe; Beales, Philip L.; Gibson, Toby

    2015-01-01

    Defects in primary cilium biogenesis underlie the ciliopathies, a growing group of genetic disorders. We describe a whole genome siRNA-based reverse genetics screen for defects in biogenesis and/or maintenance of the primary cilium, obtaining a global resource. We identify 112 candidate ciliogenesis and ciliopathy genes, including 44 components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, 12 G-protein-coupled receptors, and three pre-mRNA processing factors (PRPF6, PRPF8 and PRPF31) mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. The PRPFs localise to the connecting cilium, and PRPF8- and PRPF31-mutated cells have ciliary defects. Combining the screen with exome sequencing data identified recessive mutations in PIBF1/CEP90 and C21orf2/LRRC76 as causes of the ciliopathies Joubert and Jeune syndromes. Biochemical approaches place C21orf2 within key ciliopathy-associated protein modules, offering an explanation for the skeletal and retinal involvement observed in individuals with C21orf2-variants. Our global, unbiased approaches provide insights into ciliogenesis complexity and identify roles for unanticipated pathways in human genetic disease. PMID:26167768

  6. An Introduction to Systemic Functional Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggins, Suzanne

    The introduction to systemic functional linguistics explores the social semiotic approach to language most closely associated with the work of Michael Halliday and his colleagues. An approach that views language as a strategic, meaning-making resource, systemic linguistics focuses on the analysis of authentic, everyday texts and asks both how…

  7. Functional stability of cerebral circulatory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskalenko, Y. Y.

    1980-01-01

    The functional stability of the cerebral circulation system seems to be based on the active mechanisms and on those stemming from specific of the biophysical structure of the system under study. This latter parameter has some relevant criteria for its quantitative estimation. The data obtained suggest that the essential part of the mechanism for active responses of cerebral vessels which maintains the functional stability of this portion of the vascular system, consists of a neurogenic component involving central nervous structures localized, for instance, in the medulla oblongata.

  8. Small molecule therapeutics targeting F-box proteins in cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2016-02-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays vital roles in maintaining protein equilibrium mainly through proteolytic degradation of targeted substrates. The archetypical SCF ubiquitin E3 ligase complex contains a substrate recognition subunit F-box protein that recruits substrates to the catalytic ligase core for its polyubiquitylation and subsequent proteasomal degradation. Several well-characterized F-box proteins have been demonstrated that are tightly linked to neoplasia. There is mounting information characterizing F-box protein-substrate interactions with the rationale to develop unique therapeutics for cancer treatment. Here we review that how F-box proteins function in cancer and summarize potential small molecule inhibitors for cancer therapy.

  9. Quality Control of Mitochondrial Proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Michael J.; Tatsuta, Takashi; Langer, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A decline in mitochondrial activity has been associated with aging and is a hallmark of many neurological diseases. Surveillance mechanisms acting at the molecular, organellar, and cellular level monitor mitochondrial integrity and ensure the maintenance of mitochondrial proteostasis. Here we will review the central role of mitochondrial chaperones and proteases, the cytosolic ubiquitin-proteasome system, and the mitochondrial unfolded response in this interconnected quality control network, highlighting the dual function of some proteases in protein quality control within the organelle and for the regulation of mitochondrial fusion and mitophagy. PMID:21628427

  10. Cereblon inhibits proteasome activity by binding to the 20S core proteasome subunit beta type 4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Min; Lee, Jongwon; Park, Chul-Seung

    2012-10-26

    In humans, mutations in the gene encoding cereblon (CRBN) are associated with mental retardation. Although CRBN has been investigated in several cellular contexts, its function remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CRBN plays a role in regulating the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Heterologous expression of CRBN inhibited proteasome activity in a human neuroblastoma cell line. Furthermore, proteasome subunit beta type 4 (PSMB4), the β7 subunit of the 20S core complex, was identified as a direct binding partner of CRBN. These findings suggest that CRBN may modulate proteasome activity by directly interacting with the β7 subunit.

  11. Cullin 5: A Destabilizing Force for Some Oncogenes | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer can result when cellular processes such as proliferation and cell death go haywire. Among the many mechanisms in place to regulate these critical processes are molecular chaperones, which help proteins attain their proper functional shape and also regulate protein degradation through the cell’s recycling program, called the ubiquitin/proteasome system. One molecular chaperone, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), is of particular interest to cancer researchers because many of its target proteins—sometimes called client proteins—have been implicated in the maintenance and progression of a number of cancers.

  12. Small molecule therapeutics targeting F-Box proteins in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays vital roles in maintaining protein equilibrium mainly through proteolytic degradation of targeted substrates. The archetypical SCF ubiquitin E3 ligase complex contains a substrate recognition subunit F-box protein that recruits substrates to the catalytic ligase core for its polyubiquitylation and subsequent proteasomal degradation. Several well characterized F-box proteins have been demonstrated that are tightly linked to neoplasia. There is mounting information characterizing F-box protein-substrate interactions with the rationale to develop unique therapeutics for cancer treatment. Here we review that how F-box proteins function in cancer and summarize potential small molecule inhibitors for cancer therapy. PMID:26427329

  13. Relations among Functional Systems in Behavior Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Travis

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes that an organism's integrated repertoire of operant behavior has the status of a biological system, similar to other biological systems, like the nervous, cardiovascular, or immune systems. Evidence from a number of sources indicates that the distinctions between biological and behavioral events is often misleading, engendering counterproductive explanatory controversy. A good deal of what is viewed as biological (often thought to be inaccessible or hypothetical) can become publicly measurable variables using currently available and developing technologies. Moreover, such endogenous variables can serve as establishing operations, discriminative stimuli, conjoint mediating events, and maintaining consequences within a functional analysis of behavior and need not lead to reductionistic explanation. I suggest that explanatory misunderstandings often arise from conflating different levels of analysis and that behavior analysis can extend its reach by identifying variables operating within a functional analysis that also serve functions in other biological systems. PMID:17575907

  14. APC/C and retinoblastoma interaction: cross-talk of retinoblastoma protein with the ubiquitin proteasome pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ramanujan, Ajeena; Tiwari, Swati

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin (Ub) ligase anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and the tumour suppressor retinoblastoma protein (pRB) play key roles in cell cycle regulation. APC/C is a critical regulator of mitosis and G1-phase of the cell cycle whereas pRB keeps a check on proliferation by inhibiting transition to the S-phase. APC/C and pRB interact with each other via the co-activator of APC/C, FZR1, providing an alternative pathway of regulation of G1 to S transition by pRB using a post-translational mechanism. Both pRB and FZR1 have complex roles and are implicated not only in regulation of cell proliferation but also in differentiation, quiescence, apoptosis, maintenance of chromosomal integrity and metabolism. Both are also targeted by transforming viruses. We discuss recent advances in our understanding of the involvement of APC/C and pRB in cell cycle based decisions and how these insights will be useful for development of anti-cancer and anti-viral drugs. PMID:27402801

  15. Foxp3 enhances HIF-1α target gene expression in human bladder cancer through decreasing its ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chang-Te; Tung, Chun-Liang; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Tsai, Hsin-Tzu; Yang, Wen-Horng; Chang, Hung-I; Chen, Syue-Yi; Tzai, Tzong-Shin

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) can control a transcriptional factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) protein expression in T lymphocyte differentiation through proteasome-mediated degradation. In this study, we unveil a reverse regulatory mechanism contributing to bladder cancer progression; Foxp3 expression attenuates HIF-1α degradation. We first demonstrated that Foxp3 expression positively correlates with the metastatic potential in T24 cells and can increase the expression of HIF-1α-target genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and glucose transporter (GLUT). Foxp3 protein can bind with HIF-1α, particularly under hypoxia. In vivo ubiquination assay demonstrated that Foxp3 can decrease HIF-1α degradation in a dose-dependent manner. Knocking-down of Foxp3 expression blocks in vivo tumor growth in mice and prolongs mice's survival, which is associated with von Willebrand factor expression. Thirty-three of 145 (22.8 %) bladder tumors exhibit Foxp3 expression. Foxp3 expression is an independent predictor for disease progression in superficial bladder cancer patients (p = 0.032), associated with less number of intratumoral CD8+ lymphocyte. The metaanalysis from 2 published datasets showed Foxp3 expression is positively associated with GLUT−4, −9, and VEGF-A, B-, D expression. This reverse post-translational regulation of HIF-1α protein by Foxp3 provides a new potential target for developing new therapeutic strategy for bladder cancer. PMID:27557492

  16. The PUB domain: a putative protein-protein interaction domain implicated in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Park, H; Till, E A; Lennarz, W J

    2001-10-12

    Cytoplasmic peptide:N-glycanase (PNGase) is a de-N-glycosylating enzyme which may be involved in the proteasome-dependent pathway for degradation of misfolded glycoproteins formed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that are exported into the cytoplasm. A cytoplasmic PNGase found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Png1p, is widely distributed in higher eukaryotes as well as in yeast (Suzuki, T., et al. J. Cell Biol. 149, 1039-1051, 2000). The recently uncovered complete genome sequence of Arabidopsis thaliana prompted us to search for the protein homologue of Png1p in this organism. Interestingly, when the mouse Png1p homologue sequence was used as a query, not only a Png1p homologue containing a transglutaminase-like domain that is believed to contain a catalytic triad for PNGase activity, but also four proteins which had a domain of 46 amino acids in length that exhibited significant similarity to the N-terminus of mouse Png1p were identified. Moreover, three of these homologous proteins were also found to possess a UBA or UBX domain, which are found in various proteins involved in the ubiquitin-related pathway. We name this newly found homologous region the PUB (Peptide:N-glycanase/UBA or UBX-containing proteins) domain and propose that this domain may mediate protein-protein interactions.

  17. Potent activity of carfilzomib, a novel, irreversible inhibitor of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, against preclinical models of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Deborah J.; Chen, Qing; Voorhees, Peter M.; Strader, John S.; Shenk, Kevin D.; Sun, Congcong M.; Demo, Susan D.; Bennett, Mark K.; van Leeuwen, Fijs W. B.; Chanan-Khan, Asher A.

    2007-01-01

    The proteasome has emerged as an important target for cancer therapy with the approval of bortezomib, a first-in-class, reversible proteasome inhibitor, for relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM). However, many patients have disease that does not respond to bortezomib, whereas others develop resistance, suggesting the need for other inhibitors with enhanced activity. We therefore evaluated a novel, irreversible, epoxomicin-related proteasome inhibitor, carfilzomib. In models of MM, this agent potently bound and specifically inhibited the chymotrypsin-like proteasome and immunoproteasome activities, resulting in accumulation of ubiquitinated substrates. Carfilzomib induced a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of proliferation, ultimately leading to apoptosis. Programmed cell death was associated with activation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, release of cytochrome c, and activation of both intrinsic and extrinsic caspase pathways. This agent also inhibited proliferation and activated apoptosis in patient-derived MM cells and neoplastic cells from patients with other hematologic malignancies. Importantly, carfilzomib showed increased efficacy compared with bortezomib and was active against bortezomib-resistant MM cell lines and samples from patients with clinical bortezomib resistance. Carfilzomib also overcame resistance to other conventional agents and acted synergistically with dexamethasone to enhance cell death. Taken together, these data provide a rationale for the clinical evaluation of carfilzomib in MM. PMID:17591945

  18. Representational Issues in Systemic Functional Grammar and Systemic Grammar and Functional Unification Grammar. ISI Reprint Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthiessen, Christian; Kasper, Robert

    Consisting of two separate papers, "Representational Issues in Systemic Functional Grammar," by Christian Matthiessen and "Systemic Grammar and Functional Unification Grammar," by Robert Kasper, this document deals with systemic aspects of natural language processing and linguistic theory and with computational applications of…

  19. Functional Properties of the Mitochondrial Carrier System.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Eric B

    2017-09-01

    The mitochondrial carrier system (MCS) transports small molecules between mitochondria and the cytoplasm. It is integral to the core mitochondrial function to regulate cellular chemistry by metabolism. The mammalian MCS comprises the transporters of the 53-member canonical SLC25A family and a lesser number of identified noncanonical transporters. The recent discovery and investigations of the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) illustrate the diverse effects a single mitochondrial carrier may exert on cellular function. However, the transport selectivities of many carriers remain unknown, and most have not been functionally investigated in mammalian cells. The mechanisms coordinating their function as a unified system remain undefined. Increased accessibility to molecular genetic and metabolomic technologies now greatly enables investigation of the MCS. Continued investigation of the MCS may reveal how mitochondria encode complex regulatory information within chemical thermodynamic gradients. This understanding may enable precision modulation of cellular chemistry to counteract the dysmetabolism inherent in disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermal enclosure system functional simulation user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. Terry

    1994-01-01

    A form and function simulation of the thermal enclosure system (TES) for a microgravity protein crystal growth experiment has been developed as part of an investigation of the benefits and limitations of intravehicular telerobotics to aid in microgravity science and production. A user can specify the time, temperature, and sample rate profile for a given experiment, and menu options and status are presented on an LCD display. This report describes the features and operational procedures for the functional simulation.

  1. Transfer Function Control for Biometric Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmiel, Alan J. (Inventor); Humphreys, Bradley T. (Inventor); Grodinsky, Carlos M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A modular apparatus for acquiring biometric data may include circuitry operative to receive an input signal indicative of a biometric condition, the circuitry being configured to process the input signal according to a transfer function thereof and to provide a corresponding processed input signal. A controller is configured to provide at least one control signal to the circuitry to programmatically modify the transfer function of the modular system to facilitate acquisition of the biometric data.

  2. Dynamic Responsive Systems for Catalytic Function.

    PubMed

    Vlatković, Matea; Collins, Beatrice S L; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-11-21

    Responsive systems have recently gained much interest in the scientific community in attempts to mimic dynamic functions in biological systems. One of the fascinating potential applications of responsive systems lies in catalysis. Inspired by nature, novel responsive catalytic systems have been built that show analogy with allosteric regulation of enzymes. The design of responsive catalytic systems allows control of catalytic activity and selectivity. In this Review, advances in the field over the last four decades are discussed and a comparison is made amongst the dynamic responsive systems based on the principles underlying their catalytic mechanisms. The catalyst systems are sorted according to the triggers used to achieve control of the catalytic activity and the distinct catalytic reactions illustrated. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. In-vehicle information system functions

    SciTech Connect

    Tufano, D.R.; Spelt, P.F.; Knee, H.E.

    1997-04-01

    This paper describes the functional requirement for an In-Vehicle Information System (IVIS), which will manage and display all driving-related information from many sources. There are numerous information systems currently being fielded or developed (e.g., routing and navigation, collision avoidance). However, without a logical integration of all of the possible on-board information, there is a potential for overwhelming the driver. The system described in this paper will filter and prioritize information across all sources, and present it to the driver in a timely manner, within a unified interface. To do this, IVIS will perform three general functions: (1) interact with other, on-board information subsystems and the vehicle; (2) manage the information by filtering, prioritizing, and integrating it; and (3) interact with the driver, both in terms of displaying information to the driver and allowing the driver to input requests, goals and preferences. The functional requirements described in this paper have either been derived from these three high-level functions or are directly mandated by the overriding requirements for modularity and flexibility. IVIS will have to be able to accommodate different types of information subsystems, of varying level of sophistication. The system will also have to meet the diverse needs of different types of drivers (private, commercial, transit), who may have very different levels of expertise in using information systems.

  4. Energy landscapes and functions of supramolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantakitti, Faifan; Boekhoven, Job; Wang, Xin; Kazantsev, Roman V.; Yu, Tao; Li, Jiahe; Zhuang, Ellen; Zandi, Roya; Ortony, Julia H.; Newcomb, Christina J.; Palmer, Liam C.; Shekhawat, Gajendra S.; de La Cruz, Monica Olvera; Schatz, George C.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2016-04-01

    By means of two supramolecular systems--peptide amphiphiles engaged in hydrogen-bonded β-sheets, and chromophore amphiphiles driven to assemble by π-orbital overlaps--we show that the minima in the energy landscapes of supramolecular systems are defined by electrostatic repulsion and the ability of the dominant attractive forces to trap molecules in thermodynamically unfavourable configurations. These competing interactions can be selectively switched on and off, with the order of doing so determining the position of the final product in the energy landscape. Within the same energy landscape, the peptide-amphiphile system forms a thermodynamically favoured product characterized by long bundled fibres that promote biological cell adhesion and survival, and a metastable product characterized by short monodisperse fibres that interfere with adhesion and can lead to cell death. Our findings suggest that, in supramolecular systems, functions and energy landscapes are linked, superseding the more traditional connection between molecular design and function.

  5. Demonstration Advanced Avionics System (DAAS) function description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, A. J.; Bailey, D. G.; Gaabo, R. J.; Lahn, T. G.; Larson, J. C.; Peterson, E. M.; Schuck, J. W.; Rodgers, D. L.; Wroblewski, K. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Demonstration Advanced Avionics System, DAAS, is an integrated avionics system utilizing microprocessor technologies, data busing, and shared displays for demonstrating the potential of these technologies in improving the safety and utility of general aviation operations in the late 1980's and beyond. Major hardware elements of the DAAS include a functionally distributed microcomputer complex, an integrated data control center, an electronic horizontal situation indicator, and a radio adaptor unit. All processing and display resources are interconnected by an IEEE-488 bus in order to enhance the overall system effectiveness, reliability, modularity and maintainability. A detail description of the DAAS architecture, the DAAS hardware, and the DAAS functions is presented. The system is designed for installation and flight test in a NASA Cessna 402-B aircraft.

  6. Energy landscapes and functions of supramolecular systems.

    PubMed

    Tantakitti, Faifan; Boekhoven, Job; Wang, Xin; Kazantsev, Roman V; Yu, Tao; Li, Jiahe; Zhuang, Ellen; Zandi, Roya; Ortony, Julia H; Newcomb, Christina J; Palmer, Liam C; Shekhawat, Gajendra S; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera; Schatz, George C; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-04-01

    By means of two supramolecular systems--peptide amphiphiles engaged in hydrogen-bonded β-sheets, and chromophore amphiphiles driven to assemble by π-orbital overlaps--we show that the minima in the energy landscapes of supramolecular systems are defined by electrostatic repulsion and the ability of the dominant attractive forces to trap molecules in thermodynamically unfavourable configurations. These competing interactions can be selectively switched on and off, with the order of doing so determining the position of the final product in the energy landscape. Within the same energy landscape, the peptide-amphiphile system forms a thermodynamically favoured product characterized by long bundled fibres that promote biological cell adhesion and survival, and a metastable product characterized by short monodisperse fibres that interfere with adhesion and can lead to cell death. Our findings suggest that, in supramolecular systems, functions and energy landscapes are linked, superseding the more traditional connection between molecular design and function.

  7. Systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer: common driver of pulmonary cachexia?

    PubMed

    Ceelen, Judith J M; Langen, Ramon C J; Schols, Annemie M W J

    2014-12-01

    In this article, a putative role of systemic inflammation as a driver of pulmonary cachexia induced by either chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or nonsmall cell lung cancer is reviewed. Gaps in current translational research approaches are discussed and alternative strategies are proposed to provide new insights. Activation of the ubiquitin proteasome system has generally been considered a cause of pulmonary cachexia, but current animal models lack specificity and evidence is lacking in nonsmall cell lung cancer and conflicting in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Recent studies have shown activation of the autophagy-lysosome pathway in both nonsmall cell lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Myonuclear loss, as a consequence of increased apoptotic events in myofibers, has been suggested in cancer-cachexia-associated muscle atrophy. Plasma transfer on myotube cultures can be used to detect early inflammatory signals in patients and presence of atrophy-inducing activity within the circulation. Comparative clinical research between nonsmall cell lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in different disease stages is useful to unravel disease-specific versus common denominators of pulmonary cachexia.

  8. Molecular pathogenesis of protein misfolding diseases: pathological molecular environments versus quality control systems against misfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Naiki, Hironobu; Nagai, Yoshitaka

    2009-12-01

    Diverse human diseases, including various neurodegenerative disorders and amyloidoses, are thought to result from the misfolding and aggregation of disease-causative proteins, and thus are collectively called protein misfolding diseases. Natively folded disease-causative proteins generally undergo a beta-sheet conformational transition through an energetically unfavourable process, and further polymerize into amyloid fibrils. In the case of beta(2)-microglobulin-related amyloidosis, an extracellular protein misfolding disease, many kinds of biological molecules including glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and lipids partially unfold beta(2)-microglobulin and catalyse its subsequent nucleus formation. After amyloid fibrils are formed, these biological molecules stabilize the beta(2)-microglobulin fibrils. In the polyglutamine neurodegenerative diseases, an intracellular protein misfolding disease, molecular chaperones as well as the ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome protein degradation systems, which are called the protein quality control systems, strictly regulate protein misfolding, aggregation and disease progression. A family of extracellular chaperones also binds to misfolded proteins and inhibit amyloid fibril formation in the extracellular space. Protein misfolding and aggregation may be an ideal therapeutic target for protein misfolding diseases in general.

  9. Dysregulation of the Autophagy-Endolysosomal System in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Related Motor Neuron Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Otomo, Asako; Pan, Lei; Hadano, Shinji

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a heterogeneous group of incurable motor neuron diseases (MNDs) characterized by a selective loss of upper and lower motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Most cases of ALS are sporadic, while approximately 5–10% cases are familial. More than 16 causative genes for ALS/MNDs have been identified and their underlying pathogenesis, including oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, neural inflammation, protein misfolding and accumulation, dysfunctional intracellular trafficking, abnormal RNA processing, and noncell-autonomous damage, has begun to emerge. It is currently believed that a complex interplay of multiple toxicity pathways is implicated in disease onset and progression. Among such mechanisms, ones that are associated with disturbances of protein homeostasis, the ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy, have recently been highlighted. Although it remains to be determined whether disease-associated protein aggregates have a toxic or protective role in the pathogenesis, the formation of them results from the imbalance between generation and degradation of misfolded proteins within neuronal cells. In this paper, we focus on the autophagy-lysosomal and endocytic degradation systems and implication of their dysfunction to the pathogenesis of ALS/MNDs. The autophagy-endolysosomal pathway could be a major target for the development of therapeutic agents for ALS/MNDs. PMID:22852081

  10. Influence of exposure to pesticides on telomere length in tobacco farmers: A biology system approach.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Vivian Francília Silva; da Silva, Juliana; da Silva, Fernanda Rabaioli

    Various pesticides in the form of mixtures must be used to keep tobacco crops pest-free. Recent studies have shown a link between occupational exposure to pesticides in tobacco crops and increased damage to the DNA, mononuclei, nuclear buds and binucleated cells in buccal cells as well as micronuclei in lymphocytes. Furthermore, pesticides used specifically for tobacco crops shorten telomere length (TL) significantly. However, the molecular mechanism of pesticide action on telomere length is not fully understood. Our study evaluated the interaction between a complex mixture of chemical compounds (tobacco cultivation pesticides plus nicotine) and proteins associated with maintaining TL, as well as the biological processes involved in this exposure by System Biology tools to provide insight regarding the influence of pesticide exposure on TL maintenance in tobacco farmers. Our analysis showed that one cluster was associated with TL proteins that act in bioprocesses such as (i) telomere maintenance via telomere lengthening; (ii) senescence; (iii) age-dependent telomere shortening; (iv) DNA repair (v) cellular response to stress and (vi) regulation of proteasome ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolic process. We also describe how pesticides and nicotine regulate telomere length. In addition, pesticides inhibit the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) and consequently increase proteins of the shelterin complex, avoiding the access of telomerase in telomere and, nicotine activates UPS mechanisms and promotes the degradation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), decreasing telomerase activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Quality Function Deployment for Large Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1992-01-01

    Quality Function Deployment (QFD) is typically applied to small subsystems. This paper describes efforts to extend QFD to large scale systems. It links QFD to the system engineering process, the concurrent engineering process, the robust design process, and the costing process. The effect is to generate a tightly linked project management process of high dimensionality which flushes out issues early to provide a high quality, low cost, and, hence, competitive product. A pre-QFD matrix linking customers to customer desires is described.

  12. Disassembly of Lys11 and Mixed Linkage Polyubiquitin Conjugates Provides Insights into Function of Proteasomal Deubiquitinases Rpn11 and Ubp6*

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Wissam; Nakasone, Mark A.; von Delbrück, Maximilian; Yu, Zanlin; Krutauz, Daria; Reis, Noa; Kleifeld, Oded; Sommer, Thomas; Fushman, David; Glickman, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Protein homeostasis is largely dependent on proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Diverse polyubiquitin modifications are reported to target cellular proteins to the proteasome. At the proteasome, deubiquitination is an essential preprocessing event that contributes to degradation efficiency. We characterized the specificities of two proteasome-associated deubiquitinases (DUBs), Rpn11 and Ubp6, and explored their impact on overall proteasome DUB activity. This was accomplished by constructing a panel of well defined ubiquitin (Ub) conjugates, including homogeneous linkages of varying lengths as well as a heterogeneously modified target. Rpn11 and Ubp6 processed Lys11 and Lys63 linkages with comparable efficiencies that increased with chain length. In contrast, processing of Lys48 linkages by proteasome was inversely correlated to chain length. Fluorescently labeled tetra-Ub chains revealed endo-chain preference for Ubp6 acting on Lys48 and random action for Rpn11. Proteasomes were more efficient at deconjugating identical substrates than their constituent DUBs by roughly 2 orders of magnitude. Incorporation into proteasomes significantly enhanced enzymatic efficiency of Rpn11, due in part to alleviation of the autoinhibitory role of its C terminus. The broad specificity of Rpn11 could explain how proteasomes were more effective at disassembling a heterogeneously modified conjugate compared with homogeneous Lys48-linked chains. The reduced ability to disassemble homogeneous Lys48-linked chains longer than 4 Ub units may prolong residency time on the proteasome. PMID:25389291

  13. c.A2456C-substitution in Pck1 changes the enzyme kinetic and functional properties modifying fat distribution in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Pedro; Burgos, Carmen; Hidalgo, Jorge; Varona, Luis; Carrodeguas, José Alberto; López-Buesa, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, PCK1, is one of the main regulatory enzymes of gluconeogenesis and glyceroneogenesis. The substitution of a single amino acid (Met139Leu) in PCK1 as a consequence of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), c.A2456C, is associated in the pig to a negative phenotype characterized by reduced intramuscular fat content, enhanced backfat thickness and lower meat quality. The p.139L enzyme shows reduced kcat values in the glyceroneogenic direction and enhanced ones in the anaplerotic direction. Accordingly, the expression of the p.139L isoform results in about 30% lower glucose and 9% lower lipid production in cell cultures. Moreover, the ability of this isoform to be acetylated is also compromised, what would increase its susceptibility to be degraded in vivo by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The high frequency of the c.2456C allele in modern pig breeds implies that the benefits of including c.A2456C SNP in selection programs could be considerable. PMID:26792594

  14. An siRNA-based functional genomics screen for the identification of regulators of ciliogenesis and ciliopathy genes.

    PubMed

    Wheway, Gabrielle; Schmidts, Miriam; Mans, Dorus A; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Nguyen, Thanh-Minh T; Racher, Hilary; Phelps, Ian G; Toedt, Grischa; Kennedy, Julie; Wunderlich, Kirsten A; Sorusch, Nasrin; Abdelhamed, Zakia A; Natarajan, Subaashini; Herridge, Warren; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Horn, Nicola; Boldt, Karsten; Parry, David A; Letteboer, Stef J F; Roosing, Susanne; Adams, Matthew; Bell, Sandra M; Bond, Jacquelyn; Higgins, Julie; Morrison, Ewan E; Tomlinson, Darren C; Slaats, Gisela G; van Dam, Teunis J P; Huang, Lijia; Kessler, Kristin; Giessl, Andreas; Logan, Clare V; Boyle, Evan A; Shendure, Jay; Anazi, Shamsa; Aldahmesh, Mohammed; Al Hazzaa, Selwa; Hegele, Robert A; Ober, Carole; Frosk, Patrick; Mhanni, Aizeddin A; Chodirker, Bernard N; Chudley, Albert E; Lamont, Ryan; Bernier, Francois P; Beaulieu, Chandree L; Gordon, Paul; Pon, Richard T; Donahue, Clem; Barkovich, A James; Wolf, Louis; Toomes, Carmel; Thiel, Christian T; Boycott, Kym M; McKibbin, Martin; Inglehearn, Chris F; Stewart, Fiona; Omran, Heymut; Huynen, Martijn A; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Innes, A Micheil; Willoughby, Colin E; Giles, Rachel H; Webster, Andrew R; Ueffing, Marius; Blacque, Oliver; Gleeson, Joseph G; Wolfrum, Uwe; Beales, Philip L; Gibson, Toby; Doherty, Dan; Mitchison, Hannah M; Roepman, Ronald; Johnson, Colin A

    2015-08-01

    Defects in primary cilium biogenesis underlie the ciliopathies, a growing group of genetic disorders. We describe a whole-genome siRNA-based reverse genetics screen for defects in biogenesis and/or maintenance of the primary cilium, obtaining a global resource. We identify 112 candidate ciliogenesis and ciliopathy genes, including 44 components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, 12 G-protein-coupled receptors, and 3 pre-mRNA processing factors (PRPF6, PRPF8 and PRPF31) mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. The PRPFs localize to the connecting cilium, and PRPF8- and PRPF31-mutated cells have ciliary defects. Combining the screen with exome sequencing data identified recessive mutations in PIBF1, also known as CEP90, and C21orf2, also known as LRRC76, as causes of the ciliopathies Joubert and Jeune syndromes. Biochemical approaches place C21orf2 within key ciliopathy-associated protein modules, offering an explanation for the skeletal and retinal involvement observed in individuals with C21orf2 variants. Our global, unbiased approaches provide insights into ciliogenesis complexity and identify roles for unanticipated pathways in human genetic disease.

  15. About orthogonality one system of functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmenkov, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    For the modeling of physical processes is proposed to use representation of functions by a special trigonometric system. We present a method for constructing full orthogonal sequences of this type depending on the parameter. This parameter can be selected optimally based on specification of modeling task.

  16. A Functional Cartography of Cognitive Systems.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Marcelo G; Cole, Michael W; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L; Bassett, Danielle S

    2015-12-01

    One of the most remarkable features of the human brain is its ability to adapt rapidly and efficiently to external task demands. Novel and non-routine tasks, for example, are implemented faster than structural connections can be formed. The neural underpinnings of these dynamics are far from understood. Here we develop and apply novel methods in network science to quantify how patterns of functional connectivity between brain regions reconfigure as human subjects perform 64 different tasks. By applying dynamic community detection algorithms, we identify groups of brain regions that form putative functional communities, and we uncover changes in these groups across the 64-task battery. We summarize these reconfiguration patterns by quantifying the probability that two brain regions engage in the same network community (or putative functional module) across tasks. These tools enable us to demonstrate that classically defined cognitive systems-including visual, sensorimotor, auditory, default mode, fronto-parietal, cingulo-opercular and salience systems-engage dynamically in cohesive network communities across tasks. We define the network role that a cognitive system plays in these dynamics along the following two dimensions: (i) stability vs. flexibility and (ii) connected vs. isolated. The role of each system is therefore summarized by how stably that system is recruited over the 64 tasks, and how consistently that system interacts with other systems. Using this cartography, classically defined cognitive systems can be categorized as ephemeral integrators, stable loners, and anything in between. Our results provide a new conceptual framework for understanding the dynamic integration and recruitment of cognitive systems in enabling behavioral adaptability across both task and rest conditions. This work has important implications for understanding cognitive network reconfiguration during different task sets and its relationship to cognitive effort, individual

  17. On the entropy function in sociotechnical systems.

    PubMed

    Montroll, E W

    1981-12-01

    The entropy function H = -Sigmap(j) log p(j) (p(j) being the probability of a system being in state j) and its continuum analogue H = integralp(x) log p(x) dx are fundamental in Shannon's theory of information transfer in communication systems. It is here shown that the discrete form of H also appears naturally in single-lane traffic flow theory. In merchandising, goods flow from a whole-saler through a retailer to a customer. Certain features of the process may be deduced from price distribution functions derived from Sears Roebuck and Company catalogues. It is found that the dispersion in logarithm of catalogue prices of a given year has remained about constant, independently of the year, for over 75 years. From this it may be inferred that the continuum entropy function for the variable logarithm of price had inadvertently, through Sears Roebuck policies, been maximized for that firm subject to the observed dispersion.

  18. Function representation with circle inversion map systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreland, Bryson; Kunze, Herb

    2017-01-01

    The fractals literature develops the now well-known concept of local iterated function systems (using affine maps) with grey-level maps (LIFSM) as an approach to function representation in terms of the associated fixed point of the so-called fractal transform. While originally explored as a method to achieve signal (and 2-D image) compression, more recent work has explored various aspects of signal and image processing using this machinery. In this paper, we develop a similar framework for function representation using circle inversion map systems. Given a circle C with centre õ and radius r, inversion with respect to C transforms the point p˜ to the point p˜', such that p˜ and p˜' lie on the same radial half-line from õ and d(õ, p˜)d(õ, p˜') = r2, where d is Euclidean distance. We demonstrate the results with an example.

  19. On the entropy function in sociotechnical systems

    PubMed Central

    Montroll, Elliott W.

    1981-01-01

    The entropy function H = -Σpj log pj (pj being the probability of a system being in state j) and its continuum analogue H = ∫p(x) log p(x) dx are fundamental in Shannon's theory of information transfer in communication systems. It is here shown that the discrete form of H also appears naturally in single-lane traffic flow theory. In merchandising, goods flow from a whole-saler through a retailer to a customer. Certain features of the process may be deduced from price distribution functions derived from Sears Roebuck and Company catalogues. It is found that the dispersion in logarithm of catalogue prices of a given year has remained about constant, independently of the year, for over 75 years. From this it may be inferred that the continuum entropy function for the variable logarithm of price had inadvertently, through Sears Roebuck policies, been maximized for that firm subject to the observed dispersion. PMID:16593136

  20. The Teleost Octavolateralis System: Structure and Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popper, Arthur N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper considers the detection of vibrational signals (including sound) by the two components of the octavolateralis system, the ear and mechanosensory lateral line. Together, these systems provide fishes with a good deal of information about their surrounding environment, and enable fishes to detect both predators and prey. While the mechanisms by which fishes and zooplankton produce and detect signals may differ, it is clear that the physical principles underlying the signals themselves are identical, no matter whether we are dealing with fish or zooplankton. Thus, an understanding of signal production and detection mechanisms by fishes can be of significant help in understanding how similar systems would function in zooplankton.

  1. Proteolytic systems and AMP-activated protein kinase are critical targets of acute myeloid leukemia therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Olga; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Paiva, Artur; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Castro, Isabel; Ludovico, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic strategies against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have hardly been modified over four decades. Although resulting in a favorable outcome in young patients, older individuals, the most affected population, do not respond adequately to therapy. Intriguingly, the mechanisms responsible for AML cells chemoresistance/susceptibility are still elusive. Mounting evidence has shed light on the relevance of proteolytic systems (autophagy and ubiquitin-proteasome system, UPS), as well as the AMPK pathway, in AML biology and treatment, but their exact role is still controversial. Herein, two AML cell lines (HL-60 and KG-1) were exposed to conventional chemotherapeutic agents (cytarabine and/or doxorubicin) to assess the relevance of autophagy and UPS on AML cells’ response to antileukemia drugs. Our results clearly showed that the antileukemia agents target both proteolytic systems and the AMPK pathway. Doxorubicin enhanced UPS activity while drugs’ combination blocked autophagy specifically on HL-60 cells. In contrast, KG-1 cells responded in a more subtle manner to the drugs tested consistent with the higher UPS activity of these cells. In addition, the data demonstrates that autophagy may play a protective role depending on AML subtype. Specific modulators of autophagy and UPS are, therefore, promising targets for combining with standard therapeutic interventions in some AML subtypes. PMID:25537507

  2. Evolution of functional subnetworks in complex systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Menghui; Wang, Xingang; Lai, Choy-Heng

    2010-12-01

    Links in a realistic network may have different functions, which makes the network virtually a combination of some small-size functional subnetworks. Here, by a model of coupled phase oscillators, we investigate how such functional subnetworks are evolved and developed according to the network structure and dynamics. In particular, we study the case of evolutionary clustered networks in which the function type of each link (attractive or repulsive coupling) is adaptively updated according to the local network dynamics. It is found that during the process of system evolution, the network is gradually stabilized into a particular form in which the attractive (repulsive) subnetwork consists only of the intralinks (interlinks). Based on the observed properties of subnetwork evolution, we also propose a new algorithm for network partition which, compared with the conventional algorithms, is distinguished by its convenient operation and fast computing speed. © 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Functional Network Dynamics of the Language System

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Lucy R.; Mattar, Marcelo G.; Blank, Idan Asher; Fedorenko, Evelina; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2016-01-01

    During linguistic processing, a set of brain regions on the lateral surfaces of the left frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices exhibit robust responses. These areas display highly correlated activity while a subject rests or performs a naturalistic language comprehension task, suggesting that they form an integrated functional system. Evidence suggests that this system is spatially and functionally distinct from other systems that support high-level cognition in humans. Yet, how different regions within this system might be recruited dynamically during task performance is not well understood. Here we use network methods, applied to fMRI data collected from 22 human subjects performing a language comprehension task, to reveal the dynamic nature of the language system. We observe the presence of a stable core of brain regions, predominantly located in the left hemisphere, that consistently coactivate with one another. We also observe the presence of a more flexible periphery of brain regions, predominantly located in the right hemisphere, that coactivate with different regions at different times. However, the language functional ROIs in the angular gyrus and the anterior temporal lobe were notable exceptions to this trend. By highlighting the temporal dimension of language processing, these results suggest a trade-off between a region's specialization and its capacity for flexible network reconfiguration. PMID:27550868

  4. Adaptive functional systems: learning with chaos.

    PubMed

    Komarov, M A; Osipov, G V; Burtsev, M S

    2010-12-01

    We propose a new model of adaptive behavior that combines a winnerless competition principle and chaos to learn new functional systems. The model consists of a complex network of nonlinear dynamical elements producing sequences of goal-directed actions. Each element describes dynamics and activity of the functional system which is supposed to be a distributed set of interacting physiological elements such as nerve or muscle that cooperates to obtain certain goal at the level of the whole organism. During "normal" behavior, the dynamics of the system follows heteroclinic channels, but in the novel situation chaotic search is activated and a new channel leading to the target state is gradually created simulating the process of learning. The model was tested in single and multigoal environments and had demonstrated a good potential for generation of new adaptations.

  5. Variational functions in driven open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Matthias; Stenholm, Stig

    2003-03-01

    We consider the Lindblad-type master equation of an open system. We address the question how to construct a functional of the quantum state which displays a monotonic behavior in time. This thus defines uniquely the direction of time in the system. As the generator of time evolution is not a Hermitian operator, the theory requires the considerations of right and left eigenstates. In this paper we assume them to form two complete bases, which allows us to construct the desired quantity. This can be interpreted as a generalized entropy functional. We show how the construction is carried out in the general case, and we illustrate the theory by solving the case of an externally driven and damped two-level system. The treatment is related to earlier work in the field, and its possible relation to time inversion is discussed.

  6. Skeletal muscle wasting: new role of nonclassical renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Rivera, Juan C; Garcia, Dominga

    2017-05-01

    Skeletal muscle can be affected by many physiological and pathological conditions that contribute to the development of muscle weakness, including skeletal muscle loss, inflammatory processes, or fibrosis. Therefore, research into therapeutic treatment alternatives or alleviation of these effects on skeletal muscle is of great importance. Recent studies have shown that angiotensin (1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] - a vasoactive peptide of the nonclassical axis in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) - and its Mas receptor are expressed in skeletal muscle. Ang-(1-7), through its Mas receptor, prevents or diminishes deleterious effects induced by skeletal muscle disease or injury. Specifically, the Ang-(1-7)-Mas receptor axis modulates molecular mechanisms involved in muscle mass regulation, such as the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, the insulin-like growth factor type 1/Akt (protein kinase B) pathway, or myonuclear apoptosis, and also inflammation and fibrosis pathways. Although further research into this topic and the possible side effects of Ang-(1-7) is necessary, these findings are promising, and suggest that the Ang-(1-7)-Mas axis can be considered a possible therapeutic target for treating patients with muscular disorders.

  7. Sialyltransferase regulates nervous system function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Repnikova, Elena; Koles, Kate; Nakamura, Michiko; Pitts, Jared; Li, Haiwen; Ambavane, Apoorva; Zoran, Mark J.; Panin, Vladislav M.

    2012-01-01

    In vertebrates, sialylated glycans participate in a wide range of biological processes and affect nervous system’s development and function. While the complexity of glycosylation and the functional redundancy among sialyltransferases provide obstacles for revealing biological roles of sialylation in mammals, Drosophila possesses a sole vertebrate-type sialyltransferase, DSiaT, with significant homology to its mammalian counterparts, suggesting that Drosophila could be a suitable model to investigate the function of sialylation. To explore this possibility and investigate the role of sialylation in Drosophila, we inactivated DSiaT in vivo by gene targeting and analyzed phenotypes of DSiaT mutants using a combination of behavioural, immunolabeling, electrophysiological and pharmacological approaches. Our experiments demonstrated that DSiaT expression is restricted to a subset of CNS neurons throughout development. We found that DSiaT mutations result in significantly decreased life span, locomotor abnormalities, temperature-sensitive paralysis and defects of neuromuscular junctions. Our results indicate that DSiaT regulates neuronal excitability and affects the function of a voltage-gated sodium channel. Finally, we showed that sialyltransferase activity is required for DSiaT function in vivo, which suggests that DSiaT mutant phenotypes result from a defect in sialylation of N-glycans. This work provided the first evidence that sialylation has an important biological function in protostomes, while also revealing a novel, nervous system-specific function of α2,6 sialylation. Thus, our data shed light on one of the most ancient functions of sialic acids in metazoan organisms and suggest a possibility that this function is evolutionarily conserved between flies and mammals. PMID:20445073

  8. A Functional Cartography of Cognitive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mattar, Marcelo G.; Cole, Michael W.; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most remarkable features of the human brain is its ability to adapt rapidly and efficiently to external task demands. Novel and non-routine tasks, for example, are implemented faster than structural connections can be formed. The neural underpinnings of these dynamics are far from understood. Here we develop and apply novel methods in network science to quantify how patterns of functional connectivity between brain regions reconfigure as human subjects perform 64 different tasks. By applying dynamic community detection algorithms, we identify groups of brain regions that form putative functional communities, and we uncover changes in these groups across the 64-task battery. We summarize these reconfiguration patterns by quantifying the probability that two brain regions engage in the same network community (or putative functional module) across tasks. These tools enable us to demonstrate that classically defined cognitive systems—including visual, sensorimotor, auditory, default mode, fronto-parietal, cingulo-opercular and salience systems—engage dynamically in cohesive network communities across tasks. We define the network role that a cognitive system plays in these dynamics along the following two dimensions: (i) stability vs. flexibility and (ii) connected vs. isolated. The role of each system is therefore summarized by how stably that system is recruited over the 64 tasks, and how consistently that system interacts with other systems. Using this cartography, classically defined cognitive systems can be categorized as ephemeral integrators, stable loners, and anything in between. Our results provide a new conceptual framework for understanding the dynamic integration and recruitment of cognitive systems in enabling behavioral adaptability across both task and rest conditions. This work has important implications for understanding cognitive network reconfiguration during different task sets and its relationship to cognitive effort, individual

  9. Functional assessment of the stomatognathic system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Linping; Monahan, Richard

    2007-07-01

    Clinically objective assessment of the occlusal function remains largely, even today, in the research laboratory instead of in the clinical setting, as part of the routine assessment along with the morphologic documentation. Functional outcomes of the stomatognathic system can be measured in terms of occlusal contact area, maximal voluntary bite force, maximal voluntary excursions, masticatory force, masticatory cycle pattern and masticatory performance. It should be emphasized, however, that many of these measures remain to be standardized and validated as tools relevant for assessment of patients who have dentofacial skeletal deformities. This remains a promising area of active research.

  10. Distinct types of protease systems are involved in homeostasis regulation of mitochondrial morphology via balanced fusion and fission.

    PubMed

    Saita, Shotaro; Ishihara, Takaya; Maeda, Maki; Iemura, Shun-Ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Mihara, Katsuyoshi; Ishihara, Naotada

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial morphology is dynamically regulated by fusion and fission. Several GTPase proteins control fusion and fission, and posttranslational modifications of these proteins are important for the regulation. However, it has not been clarified how the fusion and fission is balanced. Here, we report the molecular mechanism to regulate mitochondrial morphology in mammalian cells. Ablation of the mitochondrial fission, by repression of Drp1 or Mff, or by over-expression of MiD49 or MiD51, results in a reduction in the fusion GTPase mitofusins (Mfn1 and Mfn2) in outer membrane and long form of OPA1 (L-OPA1) in inner membrane. RNAi- or CRISPR-induced ablation of Drp1 in HeLa cells enhanced the degradation of Mfns via the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). We further found that UPS-related protein BAT3/BAG6, here we identified as Mfn2-interacting protein, was implicated in the turnover of Mfns in the absence of mitochondrial fission. Ablation of the mitochondrial fission also enhanced the proteolytic cleavage of L-OPA1 to soluble S-OPA1, and the OPA1 processing was reversed by inhibition of the inner membrane protease OMA1 independent on the mitochondrial membrane potential. Our findings showed that the distinct degradation systems of the mitochondrial fusion proteins in different locations are enhanced in response to the mitochondrial morphology. © 2016 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Y-632 inhibits heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) function by disrupting the interaction between Hsp90 and Hsp70/Hsp90 organizing protein, and exerts antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenqian; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Zhixin; Xie, Chengying; Xu, Yongping; Hu, Youhong; Quan, Haitian; Lou, Liguang

    2016-06-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) stabilizes a variety of proteins required for cancer cell survival and has been identified as a promising drug target for cancer treatment. To date, several Hsp90 inhibitors have entered into clinical trials, but none has been approved for cancer therapy yet. Thus, exploring new Hsp90 inhibitors with novel mechanisms of action is urgent. In the present study, we show that Y-632, a novel pyrimidine derivative, inhibited Hsp90 in a different way from the conventional Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin. Y-632 induced degradation of diverse Hsp90 client proteins through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, as geldanamycin did; however, it neither directly bound to Hsp90 nor inhibited Hsp90 ATPase activity. Y-632 inhibited Hsp90 function mainly through inducing intracellular thiol oxidation, which led to disruption of the Hsp90-Hsp70/Hsp90 organizing protein complex and further induced cell adhesion inhibition, G0 /G1 cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Moreover, Y-632 efficiently overcame imatinib resistance mediated by Bcr-Abl point mutations both in vitro and in vivo. We believe that Y-632, acting as a novel small-molecule inhibitor of the Hsp90-Hsp70/Hsp90 organizing protein complex, has great potential to be a promising Hsp90 inhibitor for cancer therapy, such as for imatinib-resistant leukemia. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  12. Internal density functional theory of molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalewajski, Roman F.

    1984-08-01

    A thermodynamiclike theory of internal equilibrium and constrained equilibrium states of individual molecular systems is formulated, based on the Legendre transformed density functional theory (LT DFT). The molecular system (nonrelativistic, field free, Born-Oppenheimer or non-Born-Oppenheimer) is treated as the closed composite thermodynamic system, consisting of very small, rigid (open) subsystems (simple systems) containing a multi-(m)-component charged fluid in the presence of an external field. The generalized Levy constrained search construction of various ``thermodynamic'' potentials of LT DFT is given and the local Maxwell relations are derived. The reduction of various second-order partial functional derivatives (system sensitivities) in terms of few independent, basic kernels is described, using the Jacobian determinants technique. The qualitative implications for the basic kernels of the theory, from the Maxwell relations and stability criteria (generalized Le Châtelier and Le Châtelier-Braun principles) are systematically examined. Finally, possible applications of the general formalism in the thermodynamic analysis of the chemical bond, molecular stability, and chemical reactivity are identified.

  13. Function of obestatin in the digestive system.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yue-Xian; Yang, Liu; Kuang, Hong-Yu; Gao, Xin-Yuan; Liu, Hao-Ling

    2017-02-01

    Physical health has a direct relationship with digestive function. Any abnormalities in the link may cause malnutrition, endocrine disorders, and the decline of organ functions. Obestatin, a biologically active peptide, is encoded by the ghrelin gene. Most studies suggest that obestatin is a pleiotropic peptide, which acts by suppressing the motility of the gastrointestinal tract, regulating the secretion of insulin, reducing inflammation and apoptosis, and promoting proliferation. These characteristics suggest that obestatin may represent an efficient way to prevent the occurrence and development of some digestive diseases. However, the functions of obestatin are not clear, and even appear to be contradictory. The aim of this review was to discuss the close relationship between obestatin and the digestive system, and to provide a unique perspective for the future development of obestatin relative to digestive diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Chaos automata: iterated function systems with memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashlock, Dan; Golden, Jim

    2003-07-01

    Transforming biological sequences into fractals in order to visualize them is a long standing technique, in the form of the traditional four-cornered chaos game. In this paper we give a generalization of the standard chaos game visualization for DNA sequences. It incorporates iterated function systems that are called under the control of a finite state automaton, yielding a DNA to fractal transformation system with memory. We term these fractal visualizers chaos automata. The use of memory enables association of widely separated sequence events in the drawing of the fractal, finessing the “forgetfulness” of other fractal visualization methods. We use a genetic algorithm to train chaos automata to distinguish introns and exons in Zea mays (corn). A substantial issue treated here is the creation of a fitness function that leads to good visual separation of distinct data types.

  15. Functional integral for non-Lagrangian systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kochan, Denis

    2010-02-15

    A functional integral formulation of quantum mechanics for non-Lagrangian systems is presented. The approach, which we call ''stringy quantization,'' is based solely on classical equations of motion and is free of any ambiguity arising from Lagrangian and/or Hamiltonian formulation of the theory. The functionality of the proposed method is demonstrated on several examples. Special attention is paid to the stringy quantization of systems with a general A-power friction force -{kappa}q{sup A}. Results for A=1 are compared with those obtained in the approaches by Caldirola-Kanai, Bateman, and Kostin. Relations to the Caldeira-Leggett model and to the Feynman-Vernon approach are discussed as well.

  16. The serotonergic system and cognitive function

    PubMed Central

    Pivac, Nela; Mück-Šeler, Dorotea

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Symptoms of cognitive dysfunction like memory loss, poor concentration, impaired learning and executive functions are characteristic features of both schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The neurobiological mechanisms underlying cognition in healthy subjects and neuropsychiatric patients are not completely understood. Studies have focused on serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) as one of the possible cognitionrelated biomarkers. The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the current literature on the role of the serotonergic (5-HTergic) system in cognitive function, particularly in AD and schizophrenia. The role of the 5-HTergic system in cognition is modulated by the activity and function of 5-HT receptors (5-HTR) classified into seven groups, which differ in structure, action, and localization. Many 5-HTR are located in the regions linked to various cognitive processes. Preclinical studies using animal models of learning and memory, as well as clinical in vivo (neuroimaging) and in vitro (post-mortem) studies in humans have shown that alterations in 5-HTR activity influence cognitive performance. The current evidence implies that reduced 5-HT neurotransmission negatively influences cognitive functions and that normalization of 5-HT activity may have beneficial effects, suggesting that 5-HT and 5-HTR represent important pharmacological targets for cognition enhancement and restoration of impaired cognitive performance in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:28123820

  17. General Green's function formalism for layered systems: Wave function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu-Hui; Yang, Wen; Chang, Kai

    2017-02-01

    The single-particle Green's function (GF) of mesoscopic structures plays a central role in mesoscopic quantum transport. The recursive GF technique is a standard tool to compute this quantity numerically, but it lacks physical transparency and is limited to relatively small systems. Here we present a numerically efficient and physically transparent GF formalism for a general layered structure. In contrast to the recursive GF that directly calculates the GF through the Dyson equations, our approach converts the calculation of the GF to the generation and subsequent propagation of a scattering wave function emanating from a local excitation. This viewpoint not only allows us to reproduce existing results in a concise and physically intuitive manner, but also provides analytical expressions of the GF in terms of a generalized scattering matrix. This identifies the contributions from each individual scattering channel to the GF and hence allows this information to be extracted quantitatively from dual-probe STM experiments. The simplicity and physical transparency of the formalism further allows us to treat the multiple reflection analytically and derive an analytical rule to construct the GF of a general layered system. This could significantly reduce the computational time and enable quantum transport calculations for large samples. We apply this formalism to perform both analytical analysis and numerical simulation for the two-dimensional conductance map of a realistic graphene p -n junction. The results demonstrate the possibility of observing the spatially resolved interference pattern caused by negative refraction and further reveal a few interesting features, such as the distance-independent conductance and its quadratic dependence on the carrier concentration, as opposed to the linear dependence in uniform graphene.

  18. Functional relationship-based alarm processing system

    DOEpatents

    Corsberg, Daniel R.

    1989-01-01

    A functional relationship-based alarm processing system and method analyzes each alarm as it is activated and determines its relative importance with other currently activated alarms and signals in accordance with the functional relationships that the newly activated alarm has with other currently activated alarms. Once the initial level of importance of the alarm has been determined, that alarm is again evaluated if another related alarm is activated or deactivated. Thus, each alarm's importance is continuously updated as the state of the process changes during a scenario. Four hierarchical relationships are defined by this alarm filtering methodology: (1) level precursor (usually occurs when there are two alarm settings on the same parameter); (2) direct precursor (based on causal factors between two alarms); (3) required action (system response or action expected within a specified time following activation of an alarm or combination of alarms and process signals); and (4) blocking condition (alarms that are normally expected and are not considered important). The alarm processing system and method is sensitive to the dynamic nature of the process being monitored and is capable of changing the relative importance of each alarm as necessary.

  19. Functional relationship-based alarm processing system

    DOEpatents

    Corsberg, D.R.

    1988-04-22

    A functional relationship-based alarm processing system and method analyzes each alarm as it is activated and determines its relative importance with other currently activated alarms and signals in accordance with the functional relationships that the newly activated alarm has with other currently activated alarms. Once the initial level of importance of the alarm has been determined, that alarm is again evaluated if another related alarm is activated or deactivated. Thus, each alarm's importance is continuously updated as the state of the process changes during a scenario. Four hierarchical relationships are defined by this alarm filtering methodology: (1) level precursor (usually occurs when there are two alarm settings on the same parameter); (2) direct precursor (based on causal factors between two alarms); (3) required action (system response or action expected within a specified time following activation of an alarm or combination of alarms and process signals); and (4) blocking condition (alarms that are normally expected and are not considered important). The alarm processing system and method is sensitive to the dynamic nature of the process being monitored and is capable of changing the relative importance of each alarm as necessary. 12 figs.

  20. CEBAF NEW DIGITAL LLRF SYSTEM EXTENDED FUNCTIONALITY

    SciTech Connect

    T. Allison; K. Davis; H. Dong; C. Hovater; L. King; J. Musson; T. Plawski

    2007-06-18

    The new digital LLRF system for the CEBAF 12GeV accelerator will perform a variety of tasks, beyond field control [1]. In this paper we present the superconducting cavity resonance control system designed to minimize RF power during gradient ramp and to minimize RF power during steady state operation. Based on the calculated detuning angle, which represents the difference between reference and cavity resonance frequency, the cavity length will be adjusted with a mechanical tuner. The tuner has two mechanical driving devices, a stepper motor and a piezo-tuner, to yield a combination of coarse and fine control. Although LLRF piezo processing speed can achieve 10 kHz bandwidth, only 10 Hz speed is needed for 12 GeV upgrade. There will be a number of additional functions within the LLRF system; heater controls to maintain cryomodule's heat load balance, ceramic window temperature monitoring, waveguide vacuum interlocks, ARC detector interlock and quench detection. The additional functions will be divided between the digital board, incorporating an Altera FPGA and an embedded EPICS IOC. This paper will also address hardware evolution and test results performed with different SC cavities.

  1. Emerging Mechanistic Insights into AAA Complexes Regulating Proteasomal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Friedrich; Schuller, Jan M.; Unverdorben, Pia; Aufderheide, Antje

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is an integral element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and, as such, responsible for regulated degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It consists of the core particle, which catalyzes the proteolysis of substrates into small peptides, and the regulatory particle, which ensures specificity for a broad range of substrates. The heart of the regulatory particle is an AAA-ATPase unfoldase, which is surrounded by non-ATPase subunits enabling substrate recognition and processing. Cryo-EM-based studies revealed the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome and its conformational rearrangements, providing insights into substrate recognition, commitment, deubiquitylation and unfolding. The cytosol proteasomal degradation of polyubiquitylated substrates is tuned by various associating cofactors, including deubiquitylating enzymes, ubiquitin ligases, shuttling ubiquitin receptors and the AAA-ATPase Cdc48/p97. Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors function upstream of the 26S proteasome, and their modular organization exhibits some striking analogies to the regulatory particle. In archaea PAN, the closest regulatory particle homolog and Cdc48 even have overlapping functions, underscoring their intricate relationship. Here, we review recent insights into the structure and dynamics of the 26S proteasome and its associated machinery, as well as our current structural knowledge on the Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors that function in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). PMID:25102382

  2. Emerging mechanistic insights into AAA complexes regulating proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Förster, Friedrich; Schuller, Jan M; Unverdorben, Pia; Aufderheide, Antje

    2014-08-06

    The 26S proteasome is an integral element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system(UPS) and, as such, responsible for regulated degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells.It consists of the core particle, which catalyzes the proteolysis of substrates into small peptides, and the regulatory particle, which ensures specificity for a broad range of substrates.The heart of the regulatory particle is an AAA-ATPase unfoldase, which is surrounded by non-ATPase subunits enabling substrate recognition and processing. Cryo-EM-based studies revealed the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome and its conformational rearrangements, providing insights into substrate recognition, commitment, deubiquitylation and unfolding. The cytosol proteasomal degradation of polyubiquitylated substrates is tuned by various associating cofactors, including deubiquitylating enzymes, ubiquitin ligases,shuttling ubiquitin receptors and the AAA-ATPase Cdc48/p97. Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors function upstream of the 26S proteasome, and their modular organization exhibits some striking analogies to the regulatory particle. In archaea PAN, the closest regulatory particle homolog and Cdc48 even have overlapping functions, underscoring their intricate relationship.Here, we review recent insights into the structure and dynamics of the 26S proteasome and its associated machinery, as well as our current structural knowledge on the Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors that function in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS).

  3. Neurochemistry changes associated with mutations in familial Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Siddique, M M; Tan, E K

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a common neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by the progressive loss of dopamine neurons and the accumulation of Lewy bodies and neurites. The exact role of genetic and environmental factors in the pathogenesis of PD has frequently been debated. The association of MPTP (methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6- tetrahydropyridine) and toxins (such as rotenone) with parkinsonism highlights the potential etiologic role of environmental toxins in disease causation. The recent discoveries of monogenic (such as α-synuclein, Parkin, UCHL1, PINK1, DJ-1, LRRK2) forms of PD have provided considerable insights into its pathophysiology. Parkin, an ubiquitin protein ligase assists in the degradation of toxic substrates via the ubiquitin proteasome system. It can also mediate a nondegradative form of ubiquitination. PINK1 and LRRK2 are possibly involved in the phosphorylation of substrates important for various cellular functions. Some toxins could interact with α-synuclein, an endogenous protein that is implicated in pathology of PD. Increasing in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that deficits in mitochondrial function, oxidative and nitrosative stress, the accumulation of aberrant or misfolded proteins, and ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction underpin the pathogenesis of sporadic and familial forms of PD. Elucidation of the functions of the proteins encoded by the diseasecausing genes will provide an opportunity for identification of specific pathways that could be targeted in neurotherapeutics.

  4. [The vestibular system: from structure to function].

    PubMed

    Collard, M

    1994-02-01

    The two vestibular receptors, right and left, hidden in the petrous part of the temporal bone with the cochlear receptors, receive information from angular and linear movements of the head and transform them into a nerve message sent to the nuclei of the brainstem, which are connected directly on the one hand to the oculomotor nuclei, at the origin of the oculovestibular reflex (induction of nystagmus), and on the other hand, to the spinal motor neurons, at the origin of the vestibulospinal reflex. These reflexes are associated with responses to visual and somaesthetic information for maintenance or return to the standing position, which characterises the function of equilibrium. Vertigo and disorders of balance reflect a conflict of information between these two labyrinths, or between the vestibular apparatus and the messages issued by other captors, and sometimes also dysfunction of central nervous system treatment of information or a lesion of the effector motor systems.

  5. Infrared Imaging System for Studying Brain Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Frederick; Mintz, Frederick; Gunapala, Sarath

    2007-01-01

    A proposed special-purpose infrared imaging system would be a compact, portable, less-expensive alternative to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) systems heretofore used to study brain function. Whereas a typical fMRI system fills a large room, and must be magnetically isolated, this system would fit into a bicycle helmet. The system would include an assembly that would be mounted inside the padding in a modified bicycle helmet or other suitable headgear. The assembly would include newly designed infrared photodetectors and data-acquisition circuits on integrated-circuit chips on low-thermal-conductivity supports in evacuated housings (see figure) arranged in multiple rows and columns that would define image coordinates. Each housing would be spring-loaded against the wearer s head. The chips would be cooled by a small Stirling Engine mounted contiguous to, but thermally isolated from, the portions of the assembly in thermal contact with the wearer s head. Flexible wires or cables for transmitting data from the aforementioned chips would be routed to an integrated, multichannel transmitter and thence through the top of the assembly to a patch antenna on the outside of the helmet. The multiple streams of data from the infrared-detector chips would be sent to a remote site, where they would be processed, by software, into a three-dimensional display of evoked potentials that would represent firing neuronal bundles and thereby indicate locations of neuronal activity associated with mental or physical activity. The 3D images will be analogous to current fMRI images. The data would also be made available, in real-time, for comparison with data in local or internationally accessible relational databases that already exist in universities and research centers. Hence, this system could be used in research on, and for the diagnosis of response from the wearer s brain to physiological, psychological, and environmental changes in real time. The images would also be

  6. N-Myristoylation of the Rpt2 subunit of the yeast 26S proteasome is implicated in the subcellular compartment-specific protein quality control system.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Ayuko; Kurata, Yoichi; Nakabayashi, Jun; Kagawa, Hiroyuki; Hirano, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination is the posttranslational modification of a protein by covalent attachment of ubiquitin. Controlled proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome system (\\UPS) alleviates cellular stress by clearing misfolded proteins. In budding yeast, UPS within the nucleus degrades the nuclear proteins as well as proteins imported from the cytoplasm. While the predominantly nuclear localization of the yeast proteasome is maintained by the importin-mediated transport, N-myristoylation of the proteasome subunit Rpt2 was indicated to cause dynamic nucleo-cytoplasmic localization of proteasomes. Here, we quantitatively analyzed the ubiquitinated peptides using anti-K-ε-GG antibody in yeast cell lines with or without a mutation in the N-myristoylation site of Rpt2 and detected upregulated ubiquitination of proteins with nucleo-cytoplasmic localizations in the mutant strains. Moreover, both the protein and ubiquitinated peptide levels of two Hsp70 family chaperones involved in the nuclear import of misfolded proteins, Ssa and Sse1, were elevated in the mutant strains, whereas levels of an Hsp70 family chaperone involved in the nuclear export, Ssb, were reduced. Taken together, our results indicate that N-myristoylation of Rpt2 is involved in controlled proteolysis via regulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic localization of the yeast proteasome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. New controller for functional electrical stimulation systems.

    PubMed

    Fisekovic, N; Popovic, D B

    2001-07-01

    A novel, self-contained controller for functional electrical stimulation systems has been designed. The development was motivated by the need to have a general purpose, easy to use controller capable of stimulating many muscle groups, thus restoring complex motor functions (e.g. standing, walking, reaching, and grasping). The designed controller can regulate the frequency, pulse duration, and charge balance on up to 16 channels, and execute pre-programmed and sensory-driven control operations. The controller supports up to eight analog and six digital sensors, and comprises a memory block for including history of the sensory data (time series). Five independent timers provide the basis for the multi-modal and multi-level control of movement. The PC compatible interface is realised via an IR serial communication channel. The PC based software is user friendly and fully menu driven. This paper also presents a case study where the controller was implemented to restore walking in a paraplegic subject. The assistive system comprised the novel controller, the power and output stages of an eight-channel FES system (IEEE Trans Rehabil Eng, TRE-2 (1994) 234), ankle-foot orthoses, and a rolling walker. Stimulation was applied with surface electrodes positioned over the motoneurons that innervate muscles responsible for the hip and knee flexion and extension. The sensory system included goniometers at knee and hip joints, force-sensing resistors built in the shoe insoles, and digital accelerometers at the hips. A rule-based control algorithm was generated following a two-step procedure: (1) simulation and (2) machine learning as described in earlier studies (IEEE Trans Rehab Eng, TRE-7 (1999) 69). The paraplegic subject walked faster, and with less physiological effort, when automatic control was applied as compared to hand-control. This case study, as well as a previous one for assisting grasping (The design and testing of a new programmable electronic stimulator. N

  8. Ubiquitination and proteolysis in limb and respiratory muscles of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Debigaré, Richard; Côté, Claude H; Maltais, François

    2010-02-01

    Peripheral muscle dysfunction associated with chronic diseases is undeniably a growing problem as one of its main causes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), progresses. Among others, muscle atrophy is one component building the concept of muscle dysfunction. Muscle atrophy has a significant impact on patient clinical status, independent of the impairment in lung function. A lot of effort has been devoted lately to increasing our understanding of the relationship between COPD and the initiation and the development of muscle atrophy. A growing body of evidence is showing that the ubiquitin-proteasome system, an ATP-dependent proteolytic pathway, is playing a crucial role in the cascade leading to degradation of contractile proteins, thus promoting the development of muscle atrophy. Interestingly, this system is also involved in essential cellular processes such as response to hypoxemia and muscle tissue regeneration. In this review, existing evidence linking the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the cellular events taking place in respiratory and peripheral muscles of patients with COPD are reported. Based on this information, the reader should be able to understand the essential role of this pathway in the context of muscle homeostasis and to picture the coming research in this area.

  9. New suggestive genetic loci and biological pathways for attention function in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Alemany, Silvia; Ribasés, Marta; Vilor-Tejedor, Natàlia; Bustamante, Mariona; Sánchez-Mora, Cristina; Bosch, Rosa; Richarte, Vanesa; Cormand, Bru; Casas, Miguel; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep A; Sunyer, Jordi

    2015-09-01

    Attention deficit is one of the core symptoms of the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the specific genetic variants that may be associated with attention function in adult ADHD remain largely unknown. The present study aimed to identifying SNPs associated with attention function in adult ADHD and tested whether these associations were enriched for specific biological pathways. Commissions, hit-reaction time (HRT), the standard error of HRT (HRTSE), and intraindividual coefficient variability (ICV) of the Conners Continuous Performance Test (CPT-II) were assessed in 479 unmedicated adult ADHD individuals. A Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) was conducted for each outcome and, subsequently, gene set enrichment analyses were performed. Although no SNPs reached genome-wide significance (P < 5E-08), 27 loci showed suggestive evidence of association with the CPT outcomes (P < E-05). The most relevant associated SNP was located in the SORCS2 gene (P = 3.65E-07), previously associated with bipolar disorder (BP), Alzheimer disease (AD), and brain structure in elderly individuals. We detected other genes suggested to be involved in synaptic plasticity, cognitive function, neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, and smoking behavior such as NUAK1, FGF20, NETO1, BTBD9, DLG2, TOP3B, and CHRNB4. Also, several of the pathways nominally associated with the CPT outcomes are relevant for ADHD such as the ubiquitin proteasome, neurodegenerative disorders, axon guidance, and AD amyloid secretase pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first GWAS and pathway analysis of attention function in patients with persistent ADHD. Overall, our findings reinforce the conceptualization of attention function as a potential endophenotype for studying the molecular basis of adult ADHD. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A dynamical system view of cerebellar function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, James D.

    1990-06-01

    First some previous theories of cerebellar function are reviewed, and deficiencies in how they map onto the neurophysiological structure are pointed out. I hypothesize that the cerebellar cortex builds an internal model, or prediction, of the dynamics of the animal. A class of algorithms for doing prediction based on local reconstruction of attractors are described, and it is shown how this class maps very well onto the structure of the cerebellar cortex. I hypothesize that the climbing fibers multiplex between different trajectories corresponding to different modes of operation. Then the vestibulo-ocular reflex is examined, and experiments to test the proposed model are suggested. The purpose of the presentation here is twofold: (1) To enlighten physiologists to the mathematics of a class of prediction algorithms that map well onto cerebellar architecture. (2) To enlighten dynamical system theorists to the physiological and anatomical details of the cerebellum.

  11. A developmental systems approach to executive function.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ulrich; Baker, Lesley; Yeung, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    According to recent claims from behavior genetics, executive function (EF) is almost entirely heritable. The implications of this claim are significant, given the importance of EF in academic, social, and psychological domains. This paper critically examines the behavior genetics approach to explaining individual differences in EF and proposes a relational developmental systems model that integrates both biological and social factors in the development of EF and the emergence of individual differences in EF. Problems inherent to behavioral genetics research are discussed, as is neuroscience research that emphasizes the plasticity of the prefrontal cortex. Empirical evidence from research on stress, social interaction, and intervention and training demonstrates that individual differences in EF are experience-dependent. Taken together, these findings challenge the claim that EF is almost entirely genetic but are consistent with an approach that considers biological differences in the context of social interaction.

  12. Function analysis for waste information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, J.L.; Neal, C.T.; Heath, T.C.; Starling, C.D.

    1996-04-01

    This study has a two-fold purpose. It seeks to identify the functional requirements of a waste tracking information system and to find feasible alternatives for meeting those requirements on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and the Portsmouth (PORTS) and Paducah (PGDP) facilities; identify options that offer potential cost savings to the US government and also show opportunities for improved efficiency and effectiveness in managing waste information; and, finally, to recommend a practical course of action that can be immediately initiated. In addition to identifying relevant requirements, it also identifies any existing requirements that are currently not being completely met. Another aim of this study is to carry out preliminary benchmarking by contacting representative companies about their strategic directions in waste information. The information obtained from representatives of these organizations is contained in an appendix to the document; a full benchmarking effort, however, is beyond the intended scope of this study.

  13. Visual analyzer as anticipatory system (functional organization)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirvelis, Dobilas

    2000-05-01

    Hypothetical functional organization of the visual analyzer is presented. The interpretation of visual perception, anatomic and morphological structure of visual systems of animals, neuro-physiological, psychological and psycho-physiological data in the light of a number of the theoretical solutions of image recognition and visual processes simulation enable active information processing. The activities in special areas of cortex are as follows: focused attention, prediction with analysis of visual scenes and synthesis, predictive mental images. In the projection zone of visual cortex Area Streata or V1 a "sensory" screen (SS) and "reconstruction" screen (RS) are supposed to exist. The functional structure of visual analyzer consist of: analysis of visual scenes projected onto SS; "tracing" of images; preliminary recognition; reversive image reconstruction onto RS; comparison of images projected onto SS with images reconstructed onto RS; and "correction" of preliminary recognition. Special attention is paid to the quasiholographical principles of the neuronal organization within the brain, of the image "tracing," and of reverse image reconstruction. Tachistoscopic experiments revealed that the duration of one such hypothesis-testing cycle of the human visual analyzers is about 8-10 milliseconds.

  14. Aerobic Exercise Recovers Disuse-induced Atrophy Through the Stimulus of the LRP130/PGC-1α Complex in Aged Rats.

    PubMed

    Vechetti-Junior, Ivan J; Bertaglia, Raquel S; Fernandez, Geysson J; de Paula, Tassiana G; de Souza, Rodrigo W A; Moraes, Leonardo N; Mareco, Edson A; de Freitas, Carlos E A; Aguiar, Andreo F; Carvalho, Robson F; Dal-Pai-Silva, Maeli

    2016-05-01

    Physical training has been shown to be important to the control of muscle mass during aging, through the activation of several pathways including, IGF1-AKT and PGC-1α. Also, it was demonstrated that LRP130, a component of the PGC-1α complex, is important for the PGC-1α-dependent transcription of several mitochondrial genes in vivo. To explore the role of physical training during aging, we investigated the effects on muscle recovery after short-term immobilization followed by 3 or 7 days with aerobic or resistance training. Using morphological (myofibrillar adenosine triphosphatase activity, to assess the total muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) and the frequency of specific fiber types), biochemical (myosin heavy chain), and molecular analyses (quantitative real-time PCR, functional pathways analyses, and Western blot), our results indicated that after an atrophic stimulus, only animals subjected to aerobic training showed entire recovery of cross-sectional area; aerobic training reduced the ubiquitin-proteasome system components involved in muscle atrophy after 3 days of recovery, and the upregulation in PGC-1α expression enhanced the process of muscle recovery by inhibiting the FoxO pathway, with the possible involvement of LRP130. These results suggest that aerobic training enhanced the muscle regeneration process after disuse-induced atrophy in aged rats possibly through of the LRP130/PGC-1α complex by inhibiting the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  15. The Evolutionarily Conserved C-terminal Domains in the Mammalian Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor Family Serve as Dual Regulators of Protein Stability and Transcriptional Potency*

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Satyaki; Lingnurkar, Raj; Carey, Timothy S.; Pomaville, Monica; Kar, Parimal; Feig, Michael; Wilson, Catherine A.; Knott, Jason G.; Arnosti, David N.; Henry, R. William

    2015-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor and related family of proteins play critical roles in development through their regulation of genes involved in cell fate. Multiple regulatory pathways impact RB function, including the ubiquitin-proteasome system with deregulated RB destruction frequently associated with pathogenesis. With the current study we explored the mechanisms connecting proteasome-mediated turnover of the RB family to the regulation of repressor activity. We find that steady state levels of all RB family members, RB, p107, and p130, were diminished during embryonic stem cell differentiation concomitant with their target gene acquisition. Proteasome-dependent turnover of the RB family is mediated by distinct and autonomously acting instability elements (IE) located in their C-terminal regulatory domains in a process that is sensitive to cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK4) perturbation. The IE regions include motifs that contribute to E2F-DP transcription factor interaction, and consistently, p107 and p130 repressor potency was reduced by IE deletion. The juxtaposition of degron sequences and E2F interaction motifs appears to be a conserved feature across the RB family, suggesting the potential for repressor ubiquitination and specific target gene regulation. These findings establish a mechanistic link between regulation of RB family repressor potency and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:25903125

  16. Proteasomal and lysosomal protein degradation and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuejun; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2014-06-01

    In the cell, the proteasome and lysosomes represent the most important proteolytic machineries, responsible for the protein degradation in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy, respectively. Both the UPS and autophagy are essential to protein quality and quantity control. Alterations in cardiac proteasomal and lysosomal degradation are remarkably associated with most heart disease in humans and are implicated in the pathogenesis of congestive heart failure. Studies carried out in animal models and in cell culture have begun to establish both sufficiency and, in some cases, the necessity of proteasomal functional insufficiency or lysosomal insufficiency as a major pathogenic factor in the heart. This review article highlights some recent advances in the research into proteasome and lysosome protein degradation in relation to cardiac pathology and examines the emerging evidence for enhancing degradative capacities of the proteasome and/or lysosome as a new therapeutic strategy for heart disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Protein Quality Control, the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, and Autophagy". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Density functional theory of charged colloidal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Derek Y. C.

    2001-06-01

    The phase behavior of charged colloidal systems has been studied recently by the density functional theory formalism (DFT) [R. van Roij, M. Dijkstra, and J. P. Hansen, Phys. Rev. E >59, 2010 (1999)]. A key feature of this approach is the appearance of a density and temperature-dependent effective Hamiltonian between the charged colloids. Under certain approximations, the effective Hamiltonian is made up only of a sum of position-independent one-body or volume terms and two-body colloid-separation dependent terms. In the limit of low colloidal densities, the DFT results do not reduce to the familiar Debye-Huckel limiting law nor do the results agree with previous work based on an identical approach but were developed using traditional statistical-mechanical methods [B. Beresford-Smith, D. Y. C. Chan, and D. J. Mitchell J. Colloid Interface Sci. >105, 216 (1985)]. This paper provides a reconciliation of these differences and comments on the significance of the one-body volume terms in the effective Hamiltonian of a system of charged colloids in determining thermodynamics and phase behavior.

  18. The Role of the Protein Quality Control System in SBMA.

    PubMed

    Rusmini, Paola; Crippa, Valeria; Cristofani, Riccardo; Rinaldi, Carlo; Cicardi, Maria Elena; Galbiati, Mariarita; Carra, Serena; Malik, Bilal; Greensmith, Linda; Poletti, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) or Kennedy's disease is an X-linked disease associated with the expansion of the CAG triplet repeat present in exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. This results in the production of a mutant AR containing an elongated polyglutamine tract (polyQ) in its N-terminus. Interestingly, the ARpolyQ becomes toxic only after its activation by the natural androgenic ligands, possibly because of aberrant androgen-induced conformational changes of the ARpolyQ, which generate misfolded species. These misfolded ARpolyQ species must be cleared from motoneurons and muscle cells, and this process is mediated by the protein quality control (PQC) system. Experimental evidence suggested that failure of the PQC pathways occurs in disease, leading to ARpolyQ accumulation and toxicity in the target cells. In this review, we summarized the overall impact of mutant and misfolded ARpolyQ on the PQC system and described how molecular chaperones and the degradative pathways (ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP), and the unfolded protein response (UPR), which activates the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD)) are differentially affected in SBMA. We also extensively and critically reviewed several molecular and pharmacological approaches proposed to restore a global intracellular activity of the PQC system. Collectively, these data suggest that the fine and delicate equilibrium existing among the different players of the PQC system could be restored in a therapeutic perspective by the synergic/additive activities of compounds designed to tackle sequential or alternative steps of the intracellular defense mechanisms triggered against proteotoxic misfolded species.

  19. Role of the ubiquitin-selective CDC48UFD1/NPL4 chaperone (segregase) in ERAD of OLE1 and other substrates

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Sigurd; Matuschewski, Kai; Rape, Michael; Thoms, Sven; Jentsch, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    The OLE pathway of yeast regulates the abundance of the ER-bound enzyme Δ-9 fatty acid desaturase OLE1, thereby controlling unsaturated fatty acid pools and membrane fluidity. Previously, we showed that this pathway is exquisitely regulated by the ubiquitin/proteasome system. Activation of the pathway involves proteasomal processing of a membrane-bound transcription factor and the subsequent mobilization of the cleaved, ubiquitylated transcription factor from its partner molecule by CDC48UFD1/NPL4, a ubiquitin-selective chaperone-like enzyme. Here we report that the OLE1 protein itself is naturally short-lived and is degraded by ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent ER-associated degradation (ERAD). We found that CDC48UFD1/NPL4 plays a second role in the OLE pathway by mediating ERAD of OLE1. Intriguingly, other ERAD substrates also require CDC48UFD1/NPL4 for degradation, indicating that this enzyme is a novel, constitutive component of the ERAD machinery. We propose that CDC48UFD1/NPL4 functions as a segregase that liberates ubiquitylated proteins from non-modified partners. PMID:11847109

  20. Cancer stem-like cell related protein CD166 degrades through E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meng; Yan, Ming; Zhang, Jianjun; Xu, Qin; Qi, Shengcai; Wang, Xu; Chen, Wantao

    2017-04-01

    Our previous studies have identified that CD166 works as a cancer stem-like cell (CSC) marker in epithelial cancers with a large repertoire of cellular functions. However, the post-translational regulatory mechanisms underlying CD166 turnover remain elusive. Several independent studies have reported that E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP revealed significant biological effects through ubiquitin proteasome pathway on some kinds of malignant tumors. With analyzing the effects of CHIP expressions on stem-like cell populations, we found that CHIP represses CSC characteristics mainly targeting the CSC related protein CD166 in head and neck cancer (HNC). To investigate the role and relationship between CD166 and CHIP, HNC tissues and cell lines were used in this study. A significant negative correlation was observed between the expression levels of CHIP and CD166 in HNC patient samples. We also found that CHIP directly regulates the stability of CD166 protein through the ubiquitin proteasome system, which was also identified participating in the regulation of CSC behaviors in HNCs. Our findings demonstrate that CHIP-CD166-proteasome axis participates in regulating CSC properties in HNCs, suggesting that the regulation of CD166 by CHIP could provide new options for diagnosing and treating in the patients with HNCs.

  1. FBG1 Is the Final Arbitrator of A1AT-Z Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, John H.; Wen, Hsiang; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N.; Glenn, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is the leading cause of childhood liver failure and one of the most common lethal genetic diseases. The disease-causing mutant A1AT-Z fails to fold correctly and accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the liver, resulting in hepatic fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in a subset of patients. Furthermore, A1AT-Z sequestration in hepatocytes leads to a reduction in A1AT secretion into the serum, causing panacinar emphysema in adults. The purpose of this work was to elucidate the details by which A1AT-Z is degraded in hepatic cell lines. We identified the ubiquitin ligase FBG1, which has been previously shown to degrade proteins by both the ubiquitin proteasome pathway and autophagy, as being key to A1AT-Z degradation. Using chemical and genetic approaches we show that FBG1 degrades A1AT-Z through both the ubiquitin proteasome system and autophagy. Overexpression of FBG1 decreases the half-life of A1AT-Z and knocking down FBG1 in a hepatic cell line, and in mice results in an increase in ATAT. Finally, we show that FBG1 degrades A1AT-Z through a Beclin1-dependent arm of autophagy. In our model, FBG1 acts as a safety ubiquitin ligase, whose function is to re-ubiquitinate ER proteins that have previously undergone de-ubiquitination to ensure they are degraded. PMID:26295339

  2. The role of histone ubiquitination during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Kai; Liang, Xiaotong; Huang, Sizhou; Xu, Wenming

    2014-01-01

    Protein ubiquitin-proteasome (ubiquitin-proteasome) system is the major mechanism responsible for protein degradation in eukaryotic cell. During spermatogenesis, the replacement of histone by protamine is vital for normal sperm formation, which is involved in ubiquitination enzymes expressed in testis. Recently, histone ubiquitin ligases have been shown to play critical roles in several aspects of spermatogenesis, such as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), DNA damage response, and spermiogenesis. In this review, we highlight recent progress in the discovery of several histone ubiquitin ligases and elaborate mechanisms of how these enzymes are involved in these processes through knockout mouse model. Using Huwe1, UBR2, and RNF8 as examples, we emphasized the diverse functions for each enzyme and the broad involvement of these enzymes in every stage, from spermatogonia differentiation and meiotic division to spermiogenesis; thus histone ubiquitin ligases represent a class of enzymes, which play important roles in spermatogenesis through targeting histone for ubiquitination and therefore are involved in transcription regulation, epigenetic modification, and other processes essential for normal gametes formation.

  3. Acute ER stress regulates amyloid precursor protein processing through ubiquitin-dependent degradation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eun Sun; Hong, HyunSeok; Kim, Chaeyoung; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2015-03-05

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ), a major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP) through sequential cleavage by β-secretase and γ-secretase enzymes. APP is an integral membrane protein, and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of AD; however, the biological function of APP is still unclear. The present study shows that APP is rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in the CHO cell line in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, such as calcium ionophore, A23187, induced calcium influx. Increased levels of intracellular calcium by A23187 induces polyubiquitination of APP, causing its degradation. A23187-induced reduction of APP is prevented by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Furthermore, an increase in levels of the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) marker, E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1, proteasome activity, and decreased levels of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP25 were observed during ER stress. In addition, we found that APP interacts with USP25. These findings suggest that acute ER stress induces degradation of full-length APP via the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway.

  4. Regulation of proteolysis by cytokines in the human intestinal epithelial cell line HCT-8: role of IFNgamma.

    PubMed

    Leblond, Jonathan; Hubert-Buron, Aurélie; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Ducrotté, Philippe; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2006-07-01

    Protein metabolism contributes in the regulation of gut barrier function, which may be altered during inflammatory states. There are three major proteolytic pathways in mammalian cells: lysosomal, Ca(2+)-activated and ubiquitin-proteasome. The regulation of proteolytic activities during inflammation remains unknown in intestine. Intestinal epithelial cells, HCT-8, were stimulated by IL-1beta, IFNgamma and TNFalpha each alone or in combination (Cytomix). Proteolytic activities were assessed using fluorogenic substrates and specific inhibitors, protein expressions by Western blot. Lysosomal and Ca(2+)-activated pathways were not significantly altered by any treatment. In contrast, the activity of ubiquitin-proteasome system was stimulated by IFNgamma and Cytomix (155, 160 versus 100, P<0.05, respectively) but remained unaffected by IL-1beta and TNFalpha. Free ubiquitin expression, but not ubiquitinated proteins, was enhanced by IFNgamma and Cytomix. The expression of proteasome 20S alpha1 subunit, a constitutive proteasome 20S subunit, was not altered, beta5 subunit expression was weakly decreased by Cytomix and inducible beta5i subunit expression was markedly increased in response to IFNgamma and to Cytomix (202, 206 versus 100, P<0.05, respectively). In conclusion, lysosomal, Ca(2+)-activated and constitutive proteasome activities were not affected by IL-1beta, IFNgamma and TNFalpha alone or in combination, in HCT-8 cells. These results suggest that IFNgamma, but not IL-1beta and TNFalpha, increases immunoproteasome, which might contribute to enhanced antigen presentation during inflammatory bowel diseases.

  5. Functional Nanomaterials Useful for Magnetic Refrigeration Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslani, Amir

    Magnetic refrigeration is an emerging energy efficient and environmentally friendly refrigeration technology. The principle of magnetic refrigeration is based on the effect of varying a magnetic field on the temperature change of a magnetocaloric material (refrigerant). By applying a magnetic field, the magnetic moments of a magnetic material tend to align parallel to it, and the thermal energy released in this process heats the material. Reversibly, the magnetic moments become randomly oriented when the magnetic field is removed, and the material cools down. The heating and the cooling of a refrigerant in response to a changing magnetic field is similar to the heating and the cooling of a gaseous medium in response to an adiabatic compression and expansion in a conventional refrigeration system. One requirement to make a practical magnetic refrigerator is to have a large temperature change per unit of applied magnetic field, with sufficiently wide operating temperature. So far, no commercially viable magnetic refrigerator has been built primarily due to the low temperature change of bulk refrigerants, the added burden of hysteresis, and the system's low cooling capacity. The purpose of this dissertation is to explore magnetic refrigeration system. First, the Active Magnetic Regenerator (AMR) system built by Shir et al at the GWU's Institute for Magnetics Research (IMR) is optimized by tuning the heat transfer medium parameters and system's operating conditions. Next, by reviewing literature and works done so far on refrigerants, a number of materials that may be suitable to be used in magnetic refrigeration technology were identified. Theoretical work by Bennett et al showed an enhancement in magnetocaloric effect of magnetic nanoparticles. Research was performed on functional magnetic nanoparticles and their use in magnetic refrigeration technology. Different aspects such as the size, shape, chemical composition, structure and interaction of the nanoparticle with

  6. [Mechanisms underlying physiological functions of food factors via non-specific interactions with biological proteins].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Akira

    2015-01-01

      We previously reported that zerumbone, a sesquiterpene found in Zingiber zerumbet SMITH, showed notable cancer preventive effects in various organs of experimental rodents. This agent up-regulated nuclear factor-E2-related factor (Nrf2)-dependent expressions