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Sample records for functionally related genes

  1. [Structure and function of neural plasticity-related gene products].

    PubMed

    Yamagata, K; Sugiura, H; Suzuki, K

    1998-08-01

    We have isolated novel immediate early genes (IEGs) from the hippocampus by differential cloning techniques. These mRNAs are induced by synaptic activity and translated into proteins that may affect neural function. We have analyzed a variety of "effector" immediate early genes. These mRNAs encode: 1) cytoplasmic proteins, such as cyclooxygenase-2, a small G protein, Rheb, and a cytoskeleton-associated protein, Arc; 2) membrane-bound proteins, such as the cell adhesion protein Arcadlin, and a neurite-outgrowth protein, Neuritin; and 3) a secreted protein, Narp. We hypothesize that physiological stimulation induces "effector" proteins that might strengthen synaptic connections of activated synapses. In contrast, pathological conditions such as epilepsy or drug addiction may accelerate overproduction of these gene products, which cause abnormal synapse formation. Gene targeting and in vivo gene transfer techniques are required to prove this hypothesis. PMID:9866829

  2. Comparative and functional analysis of cardiovascular-related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-09-01

    The ability to detect putative cis-regulatory elements in cardiovascular-related genes has been accelerated by the availability of genomic sequence data from numerous vertebrate species and the recent development of comparative genomic tools. This improvement is anticipated to lead to a better understanding of the complex regulatory architecture of cardiovascular (CV) genes and how genetic variants in these non-coding regions can potentially play a role in cardiovascular disease. This manuscript reviews a recently established database dedicated to the comparative sequence analysis of 250 human CV genes of known importance, 37 of which currently contain sequence comparison data for organisms beyond those of human, mouse and rat. These data have provided a glimpse into the variety of possible insights from deep vertebrate sequence comparisons and the identification of putative gene regulatory elements.

  3. The clustering of functionally related genes contributes to CNV-mediated disease

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Tallulah; Honti, Frantisek; Pfundt, Rolph; de Leeuw, Nicole; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke; de Vries, Bert; Webber, Caleb

    2015-01-01

    Clusters of functionally related genes can be disrupted by a single copy number variant (CNV). We demonstrate that the simultaneous disruption of multiple functionally related genes is a frequent and significant characteristic of de novo CNVs in patients with developmental disorders (P = 1 × 10−3). Using three different functional networks, we identified unexpectedly large numbers of functionally related genes within de novo CNVs from two large independent cohorts of individuals with developmental disorders. The presence of multiple functionally related genes was a significant predictor of a CNV's pathogenicity when compared to CNVs from apparently healthy individuals and a better predictor than the presence of known disease or haploinsufficient genes for larger CNVs. The functionally related genes found in the de novo CNVs belonged to 70% of all clusters of functionally related genes found across the genome. De novo CNVs were more likely to affect functional clusters and affect them to a greater extent than benign CNVs (P = 6 × 10−4). Furthermore, such clusters of functionally related genes are phenotypically informative: Different patients possessing CNVs that affect the same cluster of functionally related genes exhibit more similar phenotypes than expected (P < 0.05). The spanning of multiple functionally similar genes by single CNVs contributes substantially to how these variants exert their pathogenic effects. PMID:25887030

  4. An Unsupervised Approach to Predict Functional Relations between Genes Based on Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md.; Sato, Tetsuo; Ono, Naoaki; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a novel approach to predict functional relations between genes using gene expression data. Genes may have various types of relations between them, for example, regulatory relations, or they may be concerned with the same protein complex or metabolic/signaling pathways and obviously gene expression data should contain some clues to such relations. The present approach first digitizes the log-ratio type gene expression data of S. cerevisiae to a matrix consisting of 1, 0, and −1 indicating highly expressed, no major change, and highly suppressed conditions for genes, respectively. For each gene pair, a probability density mass function table is constructed indicating nine joint probabilities. Then gene pairs were selected based on linear and probabilistic relation between their profiles indicated by the sum of probability density masses in selected points. The selected gene pairs share many Gene Ontology terms. Furthermore a network is constructed by selecting a large number of gene pairs based on FDR analysis and the clustering of the network generates many modules rich with similar function genes. Also, the promoters of the gene sets in many modules are rich with binding sites of known transcription factors indicating the effectiveness of the proposed approach in predicting regulatory relations. PMID:24800208

  5. Systematic Analysis of Integrated Gene Functional Network of Four Chronic Stress-related Lifestyle Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Souvick; Chakraborty, Abhik; Ghosh, Chinmoy; Banerjee, Birendranath

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stress is a term used to define factors involved in changes in the physiological balances resulting in disease conditions. Chronic exposure to stress conditions in modern lifestyles has resulted in a group of disorders called lifestyle disorders. Genetic background and environmental factors are interrelated to lifestyle in determining the health status of individuals. Hence, identification of disease-associated genes is the primary step toward explanations of pathogenesis of these diseases. In functional genomics, large-scale molecular and physiological data are used for the identification of causative genes associated with a disease. Aim: The objective of our study was to find a common set of genes involved in chronic stress-related lifestyle diseases such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), type 2 diabetes (T2D), hypertension (HTN), and obesity. Materials and Methods: In our study, we have performed a systematic analysis of the functional gene network of four chronic stress-related lifestyle diseases by retrieving genes from published databases. We have tried to systematically construct a functional protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. The goals of establishing this network were the functional enrichment study of interacting partners as well as functional disease ontology annotation (FunDO) of the enriched genes. Results: This study enabled the identification of key genes involved in these stress-related lifestyle diseases by prioritizing candidate genes based on their degree of involvement. In this systematic analysis, we have found key genes for these diseases based on their involvement and association at the gene network level and PPI. Conclusion: We have deciphered a group of genes that in combination play a crucial role and may impact the function of the whole genome in the four lifestyle disorders mentioned. PMID:27330735

  6. Functional features, biological pathways, and protein interaction networks of addiction-related genes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingchun; Zhao, Zhongming

    2010-05-01

    Addictions are chronic and common brain disorders affected by many genetic, environmental, and behavioral factors. Recent genome-wide linkage and association studies have revealed several promising genomic regions and multiple genes relating to addictions. To explore the underlying biological processes in the development of addictions, we used 62 genes recently reviewed by Li and Burmeister (2009) as representative addiction-related genes, and then we investigated their features in gene function, pathways, and protein interaction networks. We performed enrichment tests of their Gene Ontology (GO) annotations and of their pathways in the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) system. The tests revealed that these addiction-related genes were highly enriched in neurodevelopment-related processes. Interestingly, we found circadian rhythm signaling in one of the enriched pathways. Moreover, these addiction-related genes tended to have higher connectivity and shorter characteristic shortest-path distances compared to control genes in the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. This investigation is the first of such kind in addiction studies, and it is useful for further addiction candidate-gene prioritization and verification, thus helping us to better understand molecular mechanisms of addictions.

  7. Pretransplant Immune- and Apoptosis-Related Gene Expression Is Associated with Kidney Allograft Function

    PubMed Central

    Kamińska, Dorota; Kościelska-Kasprzak, Katarzyna; Chudoba, Paweł; Mazanowska, Oktawia; Banasik, Mirosław; Żabinska, Marcelina; Boratyńska, Maria; Lepiesza, Agnieszka; Gomółkiewicz, Agnieszka; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Klinger, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplant candidates present immune dysregulation, caused by chronic uremia. The aim of the study was to investigate whether pretransplant peripheral blood gene expression of immune factors affects clinical outcome of renal allograft recipients. Methods. In a prospective study, we analyzed pretransplant peripheral blood gene expression in87 renal transplant candidates with real-time PCR on custom-designed low density arrays (TaqMan). Results. Immediate posttransplant graft function (14-day GFR) was influenced negatively by TGFB1 (P = 0.039) and positively by IL-2 gene expression (P = 0.040). Pretransplant blood mRNA expression of apoptosis-related genes (CASP3, FAS, and IL-18) and Th1-derived cytokine gene IFNG correlated positively with short- (6-month GFR CASP3: P = 0.027, FAS: P = 0.021, and IFNG: P = 0.029) and long-term graft function (24-month GFR CASP3: P = 0.003, FAS: P = 0.033, IL-18: P = 0.044, and IFNG: P = 0.04). Conclusion. Lowered pretransplant Th1-derived cytokine and apoptosis-related gene expressions were a hallmark of subsequent worse kidney function but not of acute rejection rate. The pretransplant IFNG and CASP3 and FAS and IL-18 genes' expression in the recipients' peripheral blood is the possible candidate for novel biomarker of short- and long-term allograft function. PMID:27382192

  8. Dietary n-3 PUFA affect lipid metabolism and tissue function-related genes in bovine muscle.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Beate; Hocquette, Jean-Francois; Cassar-Malek, Isabelle; Nuernberg, Gerd; Nuernberg, Karin

    2012-09-01

    Gene expression profiles of bovine longissimus muscle as affected by dietary n-3 v. n-6 fatty acid (FA) intervention were analysed by microarray pre-screening of >3000 muscle biology/meat quality-related genes as well as subsequent quantitative RT-PCR gene expression validation of genes encoding lipogenesis-related transcription factors (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β, sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 1), key-lipogenic enzymes (acetyl-CoA carboxylase α (ACACA), fatty acid synthase (FASN), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD)), lipid storage-associated proteins (adipose differentiation-related protein (ADFP)) and muscle biology-related proteins (cholinergic receptor, nicotinic, α1, farnesyl diphosphate farnesyl transferase 1, sema domain 3C (SEMA3C)). Down-regulation of ACACA (P = 0·00), FASN (P = 0·09) and SCD (P = 0·02) gene expression upon an n-3 FA intervention directly corresponded to reduced SFA, MUFA and total FA concentrations in longissimus muscle, whereas changes in ADFP (P = 0·00) and SEMA3C (P = 0·05) gene expression indicated improved muscle function via enhanced energy metabolism, vasculogenesis, innervation and mediator synthesis. The present study highlights the significance of dietary n-3 FA intervention on muscle development, maintenance and function, which are relevant for meat quality tailoring of bovine tissues and modulating animal production-relevant physiological processes.

  9. Analysis of functional polymorphisms in apoptosis-related genes in primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Glatz, Wilfried; Schwab, Christoph; El-Shabrawi, Yosuf; Mossböck, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Glaucoma is a disease with high heritability in which the degradation of retinal ganglion cells occurs via apoptosis. Therefore, we investigated the role of four functional apoptosis-related gene variants (Akt1 rs1130233, Bax rs4645878, Fas rs223476, and FasL rs763110) in patients with primary open angle glaucoma. Methods 334 patients with primary open angle glaucoma and 334 controls were recruited for this case–control study. The main outcome measures were genotype distribution and allelic frequencies determined with PCR. Results After adjustment for multiple testing, no significant difference in either the genotype distribution or the allelic frequencies of any investigated gene variant was found. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the investigated gene polymorphisms are unlikely to be major risk factors for primary open angle glaucoma in Caucasian patients. PMID:26788026

  10. Inositol-related gene knockouts mimic lithium's effect on mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Toker, Lilach; Bersudsky, Yuly; Plaschkes, Inbar; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Berry, Gerard T; Buccafusca, Roberto; Moechars, Dieder; Belmaker, R H; Agam, Galila

    2014-01-01

    The inositol-depletion hypothesis proposes that lithium attenuates phosphatidylinositol signaling. Knockout (KO) mice of two genes (IMPA1 or Slc5a3), each encoding for a protein related to inositol metabolism, were studied in comparison with lithium-treated mice. Since we previously demonstrated that these KO mice exhibit a lithium-like neurochemical and behavioral phenotype, here we searched for pathways that may mediate lithium's/the KO effects. We performed a DNA-microarray study searching for pathways affected both by chronic lithium treatment and by the KO of each of the genes. The data were analyzed using three different bioinformatics approaches. We found upregulation of mitochondria-related genes in frontal cortex of lithium-treated, IMPA1 and Slc5a3 KO mice. Three out of seven genes differentially expressed in all three models, Cox5a, Ndufs7, and Ndufab, all members of the mitochondrial electron transfer chain, have previously been associated with bipolar disorder and/or lithium treatment. Upregulation of the expression of these genes was verified by real-time PCR. To further support the link between mitochondrial function and lithium's effect on behavior, we determined the capacity of chronic low-dose rotenone, a mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I inhibitor, to alter lithium-induced behavior as measured by the forced-swim and the amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion paradigms. Rontenone treatment counteracted lithium's effect on behavior, supporting the proposition suggested by the bioinformatics analysis for a mitochondrial function involvement in behavioral effects of lithium mediated by inositol metabolism alterations.The results provide support for the notion that mitochondrial dysfunction is linked to bipolar disorder and can be ameliorated by lithium. The phenotypic similarities between lithium-treated wild-type mice and the two KO models suggest that lithium may affect behavior by altering inositol metabolism.

  11. Transcriptional and functional studies of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans genes related to survival in the presence of copper.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Claudio A; Orellana, Luis H; Mauriaca, Cecilia; Jerez, Carlos A

    2009-10-01

    The acidophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans can resist exceptionally high copper (Cu) concentrations. This property is important for its use in biomining processes, where Cu and other metal levels range usually between 15 and 100 mM. To learn about the mechanisms that allow A. ferrooxidans cells to survive in this environment, a bioinformatic search of its genome showed the presence of at least 10 genes that are possibly related to Cu homeostasis. Among them are three genes coding for putative ATPases related to the transport of Cu (A. ferrooxidans copA1 [copA1(Af)], copA2(Af), and copB(Af)), three genes related to a system of the resistance nodulation cell division family involved in the extraction of Cu from the cell (cusA(Af), cusB(Af), and cusC(Af)), and two genes coding for periplasmic chaperones for this metal (cusF(Af) and copC(Af)). The expression of most of these open reading frames was studied by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR using A. ferrooxidans cells adapted for growth in the presence of high concentrations of Cu. The putative A. ferrooxidans Cu resistance determinants were found to be upregulated when this bacterium was exposed to Cu in the range of 5 to 25 mM. These A. ferrooxidans genes conferred to Escherichia coli a greater Cu resistance than wild-type cells, supporting their functionality. The results reported here and previously published data strongly suggest that the high resistance of the extremophilic A. ferrooxidans to Cu may be due to part or all of the following key elements: (i) a wide repertoire of Cu resistance determinants, (ii) the duplication of some of these Cu resistance determinants, (iii) the existence of novel Cu chaperones, and (iv) a polyP-based Cu resistance system.

  12. Dopaminergic function in relation to genes associated with risk for schizophrenia: translational mutant mouse models.

    PubMed

    Moran, Paula M; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P; Papaleo, Francesco; Waddington, John L

    2014-01-01

    Mutant mice play an increasingly important role in understanding disease processes at multiple levels. In particular, they illuminate the impact of risk genes for disease on such processes. This article reviews recent advances in the application of mutant mice to study the intricacies of dopaminergic (DAergic) function in relation to the putative pathophysiology of psychotic illness, particularly schizophrenia, and antipsychotic drug action. It considers models for understanding the role(s) of risk genes, with a particular focus on DTNBP1 and NRG1, their interactions with environmental factors, and with each other (epistasis). In overview, it considers new schemas for understanding psychotic illness that integrate DAergic pathophysiology with developmental, social, and cognitive processes, and how mutant mouse models can reflect and inform on such schemas.

  13. Possible functional links among brain- and skull-related genes selected in modern humans.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Burraco, Antonio; Boeckx, Cedric

    2015-01-01

    The sequencing of the genomes from extinct hominins has revealed that changes in some brain-related genes have been selected after the split between anatomically-modern humans and Neanderthals/Denisovans. To date, no coherent view of these changes has been provided. Following a line of research we initiated in Boeckx and Benítez-Burraco (2014a), we hypothesize functional links among most of these genes and their products, based on the existing literature for each of the gene discussed. The genes we focus on are found mutated in different cognitive disorders affecting modern populations and their products are involved in skull and brain morphology, and neural connectivity. If our hypothesis turns out to be on the right track, it means that the changes affecting most of these proteins resulted in a more globular brain and ultimately brought about modern cognition, with its characteristic generativity and capacity to form and exploit cross-modular concepts, properties most clearly manifested in language.

  14. Possible functional links among brain- and skull-related genes selected in modern humans

    PubMed Central

    Benítez-Burraco, Antonio; Boeckx, Cedric

    2015-01-01

    The sequencing of the genomes from extinct hominins has revealed that changes in some brain-related genes have been selected after the split between anatomically-modern humans and Neanderthals/Denisovans. To date, no coherent view of these changes has been provided. Following a line of research we initiated in Boeckx and Benítez-Burraco (2014a), we hypothesize functional links among most of these genes and their products, based on the existing literature for each of the gene discussed. The genes we focus on are found mutated in different cognitive disorders affecting modern populations and their products are involved in skull and brain morphology, and neural connectivity. If our hypothesis turns out to be on the right track, it means that the changes affecting most of these proteins resulted in a more globular brain and ultimately brought about modern cognition, with its characteristic generativity and capacity to form and exploit cross-modular concepts, properties most clearly manifested in language. PMID:26136701

  15. SIRT3 Functions in the Nucleus in the Control of Stress-Related Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Iwahara, Toshinori; Bonasio, Roberto; Narendra, Varun

    2012-01-01

    SIRT3 is a member of the Sir2 family of NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases that promotes longevity in many organisms. The processed short form of SIRT3 is a well-established mitochondrial protein whose deacetylase activity regulates various metabolic processes. However, the presence of full-length (FL) SIRT3 in the nucleus and its functional importance remain controversial. Our previous studies demonstrated that nuclear FL SIRT3 functions as a histone deacetylase and is transcriptionally repressive when artificially recruited to a reporter gene. Here, we report that nuclear FL SIRT3 is subjected to rapid degradation under conditions of cellular stress, including oxidative stress and UV irradiation, whereas the mitochondrial processed form is unaffected. FL SIRT3 degradation is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, at least partially through the ubiquitin protein ligase (E3) activity of SKP2. Finally, we show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that some target genes of nuclear SIRT3 are derepressed upon degradation of SIRT3 caused by stress stimuli. Thus, SIRT3 exhibits a previously unappreciated role in the nucleus, modulating the expression of some stress-related and nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. PMID:23045395

  16. Definition of Historical Models of Gene Function and Their Relation to Students' Understanding of Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gericke, Niklas Markus; Hagberg, Mariana

    2007-01-01

    Models are often used when teaching science. In this paper historical models and students' ideas about genetics are compared. The historical development of the scientific idea of the gene and its function is described and categorized into five historical models of gene function. Differences and similarities between these historical models are made…

  17. Functional identification of a Leishmania gene related to the peroxin 2 gene reveals common ancestry of glycosomes and peroxisomes.

    PubMed Central

    Flaspohler, J A; Rickoll, W L; Beverley, S M; Parsons, M

    1997-01-01

    Glycosomes are membrane-bounded microbody organelles that compartmentalize glycolysis as well as other important metabolic processes in trypanosomatids. The compartmentalization of these enzymatic reactions is hypothesized to play a crucial role in parasite physiology. Although the metabolic role of glycosomes differs substantially from that of the peroxisomes that are found in other eukaryotes, similarities in signals targeting proteins to these organelles suggest that glycosomes and peroxisomes may have evolved from a common ancestor. To examine this hypothesis, as well as gain insights into the function of the glycosome, we used a positive genetic selection procedure to isolate the first Leishmania mutant (gim1-1 [glycosome import] mutant) with a defect in the import of glycosomal proteins. The mutant retains glycosomes but mislocalizes a subset glycosomal proteins to the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, the gim1-1 mutant lacks lipid bodies, suggesting a heretofore unknown role of the glycosome. We used genetic approaches to identify a gene, GIM1, that is able to restore import and lipid bodies. A nonsense mutation was found in one allele of this gene in the mutant line. The predicted Gim1 protein is related the peroxin 2 family of integral membrane proteins, which are required for peroxisome biogenesis. The similarities in sequence and function provide strong support for the common origin model of glycosomes and peroxisomes. The novel phenotype of gim1-1 and distinctive role of Leishmania glycosomes suggest that future studies of this system will provide a new perspective on microbody biogenesis and function. PMID:9032236

  18. EvoCor: a platform for predicting functionally related genes using phylogenetic and expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Dittmar, W James; McIver, Lauren; Michalak, Pawel; Garner, Harold R; Valdez, Gregorio

    2014-07-01

    The wealth of publicly available gene expression and genomic data provides unique opportunities for computational inference to discover groups of genes that function to control specific cellular processes. Such genes are likely to have co-evolved and be expressed in the same tissues and cells. Unfortunately, the expertise and computational resources required to compare tens of genomes and gene expression data sets make this type of analysis difficult for the average end-user. Here, we describe the implementation of a web server that predicts genes involved in affecting specific cellular processes together with a gene of interest. We termed the server 'EvoCor', to denote that it detects functional relationships among genes through evolutionary analysis and gene expression correlation. This web server integrates profiles of sequence divergence derived by a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) and tissue-wide gene expression patterns to determine putative functional linkages between pairs of genes. This server is easy to use and freely available at http://pilot-hmm.vbi.vt.edu/.

  19. Quantifying the sequence–function relation in gene silencing by bacterial small RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yue; Zhang, Zhongge J.; Erickson, David W.; Huang, Min; Huang, Yingwu; Li, Junbai; Hwa, Terence; Shi, Hualin

    2011-01-01

    Sequence–function relations for small RNA (sRNA)-mediated gene silencing were quantified for the sRNA RyhB and some of its mRNA targets in Escherichia coli. Numerous mutants of RyhB and its targets were generated and their in vivo functions characterized at various levels of target and RyhB expression. Although a core complementary region is required for repression by RyhB, variations in the complementary sequences of the core region gave rise to a continuum of repression strengths, correlated exponentially with the computed free energy of RyhB-target duplex formation. Moreover, sequence variations in the linker region known to interact with the RNA chaperone Hfq also gave rise to a continuum of repression strengths, correlated exponentially with the computed energy cost of keeping the linker region open. These results support the applicability of the thermodynamic model in predicting sRNA–mRNA interaction and suggest that sequences at these locations may be used to fine-tune the degree of repression. Surprisingly, a truncated RyhB without the Hfq-binding region is found to repress multiple targets of the wild-type RyhB effectively, both in the presence and absence of Hfq, even though the former is required for the activity of wild-type RyhB itself. These findings challenge the commonly accepted model concerning the function of Hfq in gene silencing—both in providing stability to the sRNAs and in catalyzing the target mRNAs to take on active conformations—and raise the intriguing question of why many endogenous sRNAs subject their functions to Hfq-dependences. PMID:21742981

  20. Inhibition of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Function: A Promising Strategy for Treating Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is implicated in the underlying pathology of migraine. Serum levels of CGRP, which are elevated during a migraine attack, have been reported to return to normal with alleviation of pain. In addition, CGRP administration has been shown to cause a migraine-like headache in susceptible individuals. Importantly, CGRP receptors are found on many cell types within the trigeminovascular system that are thought to play important roles in controlling inflammatory and nociceptive processes. Based on these findings, it was proposed that blockage of CGRP receptor function and, hence, the physiological effects of CGRP would be effective in aborting a migraine attack. This review will summarize key preclinical data that support the therapeutic potential of using CGRP receptor antagonists or molecules that bind CGRP within the context of current neurovascular theories on migraine pathology. PMID:18808507

  1. Temperature-Related Reaction Norms of Gene Expression: Regulatory Architecture and Functional Implications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Nolte, Viola; Schlötterer, Christian

    2015-09-01

    The environment has profound effects on the expression of many traits and reaction norms describe the expression dynamics of a trait across a broad range of environmental conditions. Here, we analyze gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster across four different developmental temperatures (13-29 °C). Gene expression is highly plastic with 83.3% of the genes being differentially expressed. We distinguished three components of plasticity: 1) Dynamics of gene expression intensity (sum of change), 2) direction of change, and 3) curvature of the reaction norm (linear vs. quadratic). Studying their regulatory architecture we found that all three plasticity components were most strongly affected by the number of different transcription factors (TFs) binding to the target gene. More TFs were found in genes with less expression changes across temperatures. Although the effect of microRNAs was weaker, we consistently noted a trend in the opposite direction. The most plastic genes were regulated by fewer TFs and more microRNAs than less plastic genes. Different patterns of plasticity were also reflected by their functional characterization based on gene ontology. Our results suggest that reaction norms provide an important key to understand the functional requirements of natural populations exposed to variable environmental conditions.

  2. Functional effects of congenital myopathy-related mutations in gamma-tropomyosin gene.

    PubMed

    Robaszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Dudek, Elżbieta; Kasprzak, Andrzej A; Moraczewska, Joanna

    2012-10-01

    Missense mutations in human TPM3 gene encoding γ-tropomyosin expressed in slow muscle type 1 fibers, were associated with three types of congenital myopathies-nemaline myopathy, cap disease and congenital fiber type disproportion. Functional effects of the following substitutions: Leu100Met, Ala156Thr, Arg168His, Arg168Cys, Arg168Gly, Lys169Glu, and Arg245Gly, were examined in biochemical assays using recombinant tropomyosin mutants and native proteins isolated from skeletal muscle. Most, but not all, mutations decreased the affinity of tropomyosin for actin alone and in complex with troponin (±Ca(2+)). All studied tropomyosin mutants reduced Ca-induced activation but had no effect on the inhibition of actomyosin cross-bridges. Ca(2+)-sensitivity of the actomyosin interactions, as well as cooperativity of myosin-induced activation of the thin filament was affected by individual tropomyosin mutants with various degrees. Decreased motility of the reconstructed thin filaments was a result of combined functional defects caused by myopathy-related tropomyosin mutants. We conclude that muscle weakness and structural abnormalities observed in TPM3-related congenital myopathies result from reduced capability of the thin filament to fully activate actin-myosin cross-bridges. PMID:22749829

  3. Functional divergence of MYB-related genes, WEREWOLF and AtMYB23 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tominaga-Wada, Rumi; Nukumizu, Yuka; Sato, Shusei; Kato, Tomohiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Wada, Takuji

    2012-01-01

    Epidermal cell differentiation in Arabidopsis is studied as a model system to understand the mechanisms that determine the developmental end state of plant cells. MYB-related transcription factors are involved in cell fate determination. To examine the molecular basis of this process, we analyzed the functional relationship of two R2R3-type MYB genes, AtMYB23 (MYB23) and WEREWOLF (WER). MYB23 is involved in leaf trichome formation. WER represses root-hair formation. Swapping domains between MYB23 and WER, we found that a low homology region of MYB23 might be involved in ectopic trichome initiation on hypocotyls. MYB23 and all MYB23-WER (MW) chimeric transgenes rescued the increased root-hair phenotype of the wer-1 mutant. Although WER did not rescue the gl1-1 no-trichome phenotype, MYB23 and all MW chimeric transgenes rescued gl1-1. These results suggest that MYB23 acquired a specific function for trichome differentiation during evolution.

  4. Plasticity-Related Gene 1 Affects Mouse Barrel Cortex Function via Strengthening of Glutamatergic Thalamocortical Transmission.

    PubMed

    Unichenko, Petr; Kirischuk, Sergei; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Baumgart, Jan; Roskoden, Thomas; Schneider, Patrick; Sommer, Angela; Horta, Guilherme; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-07-01

    Plasticity-related gene-1 (PRG-1) is a brain-specific protein that modulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we investigated the functional role of PRG-1 in adolescent and adult mouse barrel cortex both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with wild-type (WT) animals, PRG-1-deficient (KO) mice showed specific behavioral deficits in tests assessing sensorimotor integration and whisker-based sensory discrimination as shown in the beam balance/walking test and sandpaper tactile discrimination test, respectively. At P25-31, spontaneous network activity in the barrel cortex in vivo was higher in KO mice compared with WT littermates, but not at P16-19. At P16-19, sensory evoked cortical responses in vivo elicited by single whisker stimulation were comparable in KO and WT mice. In contrast, at P25-31 evoked responses were smaller in amplitude and longer in duration in WT animals, whereas KO mice revealed no such developmental changes. In thalamocortical slices from KO mice, spontaneous activity was increased already at P16-19, and glutamatergic thalamocortical inputs to Layer 4 spiny stellate neurons were potentiated. We conclude that genetic ablation of PRG-1 modulates already at P16-19 spontaneous and evoked excitability of the barrel cortex, including enhancement of thalamocortical glutamatergic inputs to Layer 4, which distorts sensory processing in adulthood.

  5. Plasticity-Related Gene 1 Affects Mouse Barrel Cortex Function via Strengthening of Glutamatergic Thalamocortical Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Unichenko, Petr; Kirischuk, Sergei; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Baumgart, Jan; Roskoden, Thomas; Schneider, Patrick; Sommer, Angela; Horta, Guilherme; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2016-01-01

    Plasticity-related gene-1 (PRG-1) is a brain-specific protein that modulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we investigated the functional role of PRG-1 in adolescent and adult mouse barrel cortex both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with wild-type (WT) animals, PRG-1-deficient (KO) mice showed specific behavioral deficits in tests assessing sensorimotor integration and whisker-based sensory discrimination as shown in the beam balance/walking test and sandpaper tactile discrimination test, respectively. At P25-31, spontaneous network activity in the barrel cortex in vivo was higher in KO mice compared with WT littermates, but not at P16-19. At P16-19, sensory evoked cortical responses in vivo elicited by single whisker stimulation were comparable in KO and WT mice. In contrast, at P25-31 evoked responses were smaller in amplitude and longer in duration in WT animals, whereas KO mice revealed no such developmental changes. In thalamocortical slices from KO mice, spontaneous activity was increased already at P16-19, and glutamatergic thalamocortical inputs to Layer 4 spiny stellate neurons were potentiated. We conclude that genetic ablation of PRG-1 modulates already at P16-19 spontaneous and evoked excitability of the barrel cortex, including enhancement of thalamocortical glutamatergic inputs to Layer 4, which distorts sensory processing in adulthood. PMID:26980613

  6. Plasticity-Related Gene 1 Affects Mouse Barrel Cortex Function via Strengthening of Glutamatergic Thalamocortical Transmission.

    PubMed

    Unichenko, Petr; Kirischuk, Sergei; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Baumgart, Jan; Roskoden, Thomas; Schneider, Patrick; Sommer, Angela; Horta, Guilherme; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-07-01

    Plasticity-related gene-1 (PRG-1) is a brain-specific protein that modulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we investigated the functional role of PRG-1 in adolescent and adult mouse barrel cortex both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with wild-type (WT) animals, PRG-1-deficient (KO) mice showed specific behavioral deficits in tests assessing sensorimotor integration and whisker-based sensory discrimination as shown in the beam balance/walking test and sandpaper tactile discrimination test, respectively. At P25-31, spontaneous network activity in the barrel cortex in vivo was higher in KO mice compared with WT littermates, but not at P16-19. At P16-19, sensory evoked cortical responses in vivo elicited by single whisker stimulation were comparable in KO and WT mice. In contrast, at P25-31 evoked responses were smaller in amplitude and longer in duration in WT animals, whereas KO mice revealed no such developmental changes. In thalamocortical slices from KO mice, spontaneous activity was increased already at P16-19, and glutamatergic thalamocortical inputs to Layer 4 spiny stellate neurons were potentiated. We conclude that genetic ablation of PRG-1 modulates already at P16-19 spontaneous and evoked excitability of the barrel cortex, including enhancement of thalamocortical glutamatergic inputs to Layer 4, which distorts sensory processing in adulthood. PMID:26980613

  7. MicroRNA prediction and its function in regulating drought-related genes in cowpea.

    PubMed

    Shui, Xiao-Rong; Chen, Zhi-Wen; Li, Jian-Xiong

    2013-09-01

    Cowpea has indigenous drought-tolerant characteristics, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the drought-tolerance are largely unknown. Drought sensitive and resistant cowpea have different responses regarding to drought stress. We applied homology search to predict miRNAs and their corresponding targets. The newly identified cowpea miRNAs were validated by real-time quantitative PCR in the leaves and roots of cowpea plants under drought treatment. Target gene prediction shows that a set of miRNA target genes are involved in the metabolic pathways regarding the physiological changes that are highly related to drought stress. We analyzed the expression levels of some important genes that participate in the physiological responses to drought stress and found that variations in their expression levels correspond well to the different responses of drought sensitive and resistant cowpea to drought stress. The expression levels of the target genes were negatively correlated to those of miRNAs. The same miRNA in different tissues responds differently to drought stress. Our results indicate that miRNAs play important roles in response to drought stress by regulating the expression levels of drought-related genes in cowpea.

  8. Genes Related to Mitochondrial Functions, Protein Degradation, and Chromatin Folding Are Differentially Expressed in Lymphomonocytes of Rett Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Guido; Cervellati, Franco; Canali, Raffaella; Cortelazzo, Alessio; De Felice, Claudio; Ciccoli, Lucia; Hayek, Joussef

    2013-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is mainly caused by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein (MeCP2) gene. By binding to methylated promoters on CpG islands, MeCP2 protein is able to modulate several genes and important cellular pathways. Therefore, mutations in MeCP2 can seriously affect the cellular phenotype. Today, the pathways that MeCP2 mutations are able to affect in RTT are not clear yet. The aim of our study was to investigate the gene expression profiles in peripheral blood lymphomonocytes (PBMC) isolated from RTT patients to try to evidence new genes and new pathways that are involved in RTT pathophysiology. LIMMA (Linear Models for MicroArray) and SAM (Significance Analysis of Microarrays) analyses on microarray data from 12 RTT patients and 7 control subjects identified 482 genes modulated in RTT, of which 430 were upregulated and 52 were downregulated. Functional clustering of a total of 146 genes in RTT identified key biological pathways related to mitochondrial function and organization, cellular ubiquitination and proteosome degradation, RNA processing, and chromatin folding. Our microarray data reveal an overexpression of genes involved in ATP synthesis suggesting altered energy requirement that parallels with increased activities of protein degradation. In conclusion, these findings suggest that mitochondrial-ATP-proteasome functions are likely to be involved in RTT clinical features. PMID:24453408

  9. Functional characterization of an apple apomixis-related MhFIE gene in reproduction development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan-Dan; Dong, Qing-Long; Sun, Chao; Wang, Qing-Lian; You, Chun-Xiang; Yao, Yu-Xin; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2012-04-01

    The products of the FIS genes play important regulatory roles in diverse developmental processes, especially in seed formation after fertilization. In this study, a FIS-class gene MhFIE was isolated from apple. It encoded a predicted protein highly similar to polycomb group (PcG) protein FERTILIZATION-INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE). MhFIE functioned as an Arabidopsis FIE homologue, as indicated by functional complementation experiment using Arabidopsis fie mutant. In addition, BiFC assay showed that MhFIE protein interacted with AtCLF. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis ectopically expressing MhFIE produced less APETALA3 (AtAP3) and AGAMOUS (AtAG) transcripts than WT control, and therefore exhibited abnormal flower, seed development. These results suggested that polycomb complex including FIE and CLF proteins played an important role in reproductive development by regulating the expression of its downstream genes. In addition, it was found that MhFIE constitutively expressed in various tissues tested. Its expression levels were lower in apomictic apple species than the sexual reproductive species, suggested it was possibly involved into apomixis in apple. Furthermore, the hybrids of tea crabapple generated MhFIE transcripts at different levels. The parthenogenesis capacity was negatively correlated with MhFIE expression level in these hybrids. These results suggested that MhFIE was involved into the regulation of flower development and apomixis in apple.

  10. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Paul K.; Bowl, Michael R.; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E.; Simon, Michelle M.; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V.; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E.; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H.; Foster, Russell G.; Jackson, Ian J.; Peirson, Stuart N.; Thakker, Rajesh V.; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M.; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D. M.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss. PMID:27534441

  11. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Potter, Paul K; Bowl, Michael R; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E; Simon, Michelle M; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H; Foster, Russell G; Jackson, Ian J; Peirson, Stuart N; Thakker, Rajesh V; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2016-08-18

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss.

  12. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Potter, Paul K; Bowl, Michael R; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E; Simon, Michelle M; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H; Foster, Russell G; Jackson, Ian J; Peirson, Stuart N; Thakker, Rajesh V; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2016-01-01

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss. PMID:27534441

  13. Genetic analysis of genes related to tight junction function in the Korean population with non-syndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-A; Kim, Ye-Ri; Sagong, Borum; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Bae, Jae Woong; Kim, Jeongho; Lee, Jinwook; Park, Hong-Joon; Choi, Jae Young; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Kim, Un-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are essential components of eukaryotic cells, and serve as paracellular barriers and zippers between adjacent tissues. TJs are critical for normal functioning of the organ of Corti, a part of the inner ear that causes loss of sensorineural hearing when damaged. To investigate the relation between genes involved in TJ function and hereditary loss of sensorineural hearing in the Korean population, we selected the TJP2 and CLDN14 genes as candidates for gene screening of 135 Korean individuals. The TJP2 gene, mutation of which causes autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL), lies at the DFNA51 locus on chromosome 9. The CLDN14 gene, mutation of which causes autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL), lies at the DFNB29 locus on chromosome 21. In the present study, we conducted genetic analyses of the TJP2 and CLDN14 genes in 87 unrelated patients with ADNSHL and 48 unrelated patients with either ARNSHL or potentially sporadic hearing loss. We identified two pathogenic variations, c.334G>A (p.A112T) and c.3562A>G (p.T1188A), and ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the TJP2 gene. We found eight non-pathogenic variations in the CLDN14 gene. These findings indicate that, whereas mutation of the TJP2 gene might cause ADNSHL, CLDN14 is not a major causative gene for ARNSHL in the Korean population studied. Our findings may improve the understanding of the genetic cause of non-syndromic hearing loss in the Korean population.

  14. microRNAs in the Same Clusters Evolve to Coordinately Regulate Functionally Related Genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yirong; Luo, Junjie; Zhang, Hong; Lu, Jian

    2016-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenously expressed small noncoding RNAs. The genomic locations of animal miRNAs are significantly clustered in discrete loci. We found duplication and de novo formation were important mechanisms to create miRNA clusters and the clustered miRNAs tend to be evolutionarily conserved. We proposed a "functional co-adaptation" model to explain how clustering helps newly emerged miRNAs survive and develop functions. We presented evidence that abundance of miRNAs in the same clusters were highly correlated and those miRNAs exerted cooperative repressive effects on target genes in human tissues. By transfecting miRNAs into human and fly cells and extensively profiling the transcriptome alteration with deep-sequencing, we further demonstrated the functional co-adaptation between new and old miRNAs in the miR-17-92 cluster. Our population genomic analysis suggest that positive Darwinian selection might be the driving force underlying the formation and evolution of miRNA clustering. Our model provided novel insights into mechanisms and evolutionary significance of miRNA clustering. PMID:27189568

  15. microRNAs in the Same Clusters Evolve to Coordinately Regulate Functionally Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yirong; Luo, Junjie; Zhang, Hong; Lu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenously expressed small noncoding RNAs. The genomic locations of animal miRNAs are significantly clustered in discrete loci. We found duplication and de novo formation were important mechanisms to create miRNA clusters and the clustered miRNAs tend to be evolutionarily conserved. We proposed a “functional co-adaptation” model to explain how clustering helps newly emerged miRNAs survive and develop functions. We presented evidence that abundance of miRNAs in the same clusters were highly correlated and those miRNAs exerted cooperative repressive effects on target genes in human tissues. By transfecting miRNAs into human and fly cells and extensively profiling the transcriptome alteration with deep-sequencing, we further demonstrated the functional co-adaptation between new and old miRNAs in the miR-17–92 cluster. Our population genomic analysis suggest that positive Darwinian selection might be the driving force underlying the formation and evolution of miRNA clustering. Our model provided novel insights into mechanisms and evolutionary significance of miRNA clustering. PMID:27189568

  16. Brassica GLABRA2 genes: analysis of function related to seed oil content and development of functional markers.

    PubMed

    Chai, Guohua; Bai, Zetao; Wei, Fang; King, Graham J; Wang, Chenggang; Shi, Lei; Dong, Caihua; Chen, Hong; Liu, Shengyi

    2010-05-01

    Regulation of seed oil accumulation in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) has important economic significance. However, few genes have been characterized that affect final seed oil content. Through a mutant identification, the class IV homeodomain-ZIP transcription factor GLABRA2 (GL2) has been found to regulate seed oil accumulation in Arabidopsis, in addition to its role in trichome development. In this study, we isolated four distinct orthologues of GL2 from B. napus (AC-genome), B. rapa (A) and B. oleracea (C), using an overlapping-PCR strategy. The four GL2 orthologues were very similar, with 96.10-99.69% identity in exon regions, 75.45-93.84% in intron regions, 97.34-99.87% in amino acid sequences. Alignments of the four genes revealed that the A-genome sequences of BnaA.GL2.a from B. napus and BraA.GL2.a from B. rapa are more similar than the others, and likewise the C-genome sequences of BnaC.GL2.b from B. napus and BolC.GL2.a from B. oleracea are more similar. BnaA.GL2.a and BraA.GL2.a from the A-genome are highly expressed in roots, whilst BnaC.GL2.b and BolC.GL2.a from the C-genome are preferentially expressed in seeds. Transgenic ectopic overexpression and suppression of BnaC.GL2.b in Arabidopsis allowed further investigation of the effect on seed oil content. Overexpression generated two phenotypes: the wild-type-like and the gl2-mutant-like (an Arabidopsis glabrous mutant of gl2-2), with increases in seed oil content of 3.5-5.0% in the gl2-mutant-like transgenic plants. Suppression resulted in increases of 2.5-6.1% in seed oil content, and reduced trichome number at the leaf margins. These results suggest that BnaC.GL2.b can negatively regulate oil accumulation in Arabidopsis seeds. As a result of comparing the four GL2 genes, three A/C-genome-specific primer sets were developed and a C-genome-specific EcoRV cleavage site was identified, which can be used as functional markers to distinguish these orthologues within Brassica species. The genes identified

  17. Converging evidence for an impact of a functional NOS gene variation on anxiety-related processes.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Manuel; Haaker, Jan; Glotzbach-Schoon, Evelyn; Schümann, Dirk; Andreatta, Marta; Mechias, Marie-Luise; Raczka, Karolina; Gartmann, Nina; Büchel, Christian; Mühlberger, Andreas; Pauli, Paul; Reif, Andreas; Kalisch, Raffael; Lonsdorf, Tina B

    2016-05-01

    Being a complex phenotype with substantial heritability, anxiety and related phenotypes are characterized by a complex polygenic basis. Thereby, one candidate pathway is neuronal nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and accordingly, rodent studies have identified NO synthase (NOS-I), encoded by NOS1, as a strong molecular candidate for modulating anxiety and hippocampus-dependent learning processes. Using a multi-dimensional and -methodological replication approach, we investigated the impact of a functional promoter polymorphism (NOS1-ex1f-VNTR) on human anxiety-related phenotypes in a total of 1019 healthy controls in five different studies. Homozygous carriers of the NOS1-ex1f short-allele displayed enhanced trait anxiety, worrying and depression scores. Furthermore, short-allele carriers were characterized by increased anxious apprehension during contextual fear conditioning. While autonomous measures (fear-potentiated startle) provided only suggestive evidence for a modulatory role of NOS1-ex1f-VNTR on (contextual) fear conditioning processes, neural activation at the amygdala/anterior hippocampus junction was significantly increased in short-allele carriers during context conditioning. Notably, this could not be attributed to morphological differences. In accordance with data from a plethora of rodent studies, we here provide converging evidence from behavioral, subjective, psychophysiological and neuroimaging studies in large human cohorts that NOS-I plays an important role in anxious apprehension but provide only limited evidence for a role in (contextual) fear conditioning. PMID:26746182

  18. Converging evidence for an impact of a functional NOS gene variation on anxiety-related processes.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Manuel; Haaker, Jan; Glotzbach-Schoon, Evelyn; Schümann, Dirk; Andreatta, Marta; Mechias, Marie-Luise; Raczka, Karolina; Gartmann, Nina; Büchel, Christian; Mühlberger, Andreas; Pauli, Paul; Reif, Andreas; Kalisch, Raffael; Lonsdorf, Tina B

    2016-05-01

    Being a complex phenotype with substantial heritability, anxiety and related phenotypes are characterized by a complex polygenic basis. Thereby, one candidate pathway is neuronal nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and accordingly, rodent studies have identified NO synthase (NOS-I), encoded by NOS1, as a strong molecular candidate for modulating anxiety and hippocampus-dependent learning processes. Using a multi-dimensional and -methodological replication approach, we investigated the impact of a functional promoter polymorphism (NOS1-ex1f-VNTR) on human anxiety-related phenotypes in a total of 1019 healthy controls in five different studies. Homozygous carriers of the NOS1-ex1f short-allele displayed enhanced trait anxiety, worrying and depression scores. Furthermore, short-allele carriers were characterized by increased anxious apprehension during contextual fear conditioning. While autonomous measures (fear-potentiated startle) provided only suggestive evidence for a modulatory role of NOS1-ex1f-VNTR on (contextual) fear conditioning processes, neural activation at the amygdala/anterior hippocampus junction was significantly increased in short-allele carriers during context conditioning. Notably, this could not be attributed to morphological differences. In accordance with data from a plethora of rodent studies, we here provide converging evidence from behavioral, subjective, psychophysiological and neuroimaging studies in large human cohorts that NOS-I plays an important role in anxious apprehension but provide only limited evidence for a role in (contextual) fear conditioning.

  19. Expression and functional characterization of two pathogenesis-related protein 10 genes from Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yu-Rong; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Brown, Robert L; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2010-01-15

    A novel PR10 gene (ZmPR10.1) was isolated from maize and its expression and function were compared with the previous ZmPR10. ZmPR10.1 shares 89.8% and 85.7% identity to ZmPR10 at the nucleotide and amino acid sequence level, respectively. ZmPR10 and ZmPR10.1 were mainly expressed in root tissue with low expression in other tissues. ZmPR10.1 had significantly lower expression than ZmPR10 in all tissues examined. The expression of both ZmPR10 and ZmPR10.1 was induced by most abiotic stresses including SA, CuCl(2), H(2)O(2), coldness, darkness and wounding during the 16-h treatments, and biotic stresses such as Erwinia stewartii and Aspergillus flavus infection. However, ZmPR10.1 was induced only 2 HAT and down-regulated thereafter, whereas ZmPR10 remained induced during the 16-h NAA treatment. Also, inoculation with Erwinia chrysanthemi caused about 2-fold induction in ZmPR10.1 expression 60 HAT but not significant changes for ZmPR10. Both ZmPR10.1 and ZmPR10 showed RNase activity in vitro with an optimal pH and temperature of 6.5 and 55 degrees C. Their RNase activities were significantly inhibited by low concentrations (1.0mM) of Cu(2+), Ag(+), Co(2+), SDS, EDTA or DTT. However, ZmPR10.1 possessed significantly higher (8-fold) specific RNase activity than ZmPR10. Also, ZmPR10.1 showed a stronger inhibition against bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in vivo and fungus A. flavus in vitro than ZmPR10, indicating that ZmPR10.1 may also play an important role in host plant defense.

  20. Determining Semantically Related Significant Genes.

    PubMed

    Taha, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    GO relation embodies some aspects of existence dependency. If GO term xis existence-dependent on GO term y, the presence of y implies the presence of x. Therefore, the genes annotated with the function of the GO term y are usually functionally and semantically related to the genes annotated with the function of the GO term x. A large number of gene set enrichment analysis methods have been developed in recent years for analyzing gene sets enrichment. However, most of these methods overlook the structural dependencies between GO terms in GO graph by not considering the concept of existence dependency. We propose in this paper a biological search engine called RSGSearch that identifies enriched sets of genes annotated with different functions using the concept of existence dependency. We observe that GO term xcannot be existence-dependent on GO term y, if x- and y- have the same specificity (biological characteristics). After encoding into a numeric format the contributions of GO terms annotating target genes to the semantics of their lowest common ancestors (LCAs), RSGSearch uses microarray experiment to identify the most significant LCA that annotates the result genes. We evaluated RSGSearch experimentally and compared it with five gene set enrichment systems. Results showed marked improvement.

  1. A common gene signature across multiple studies relate biomarkers and functional regulation in tolerance to renal allograft

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Daniel; Ramstein, Gérard; Chesneau, Mélanie; Echasseriau, Yann; Pallier, Annaick; Paul, Chloé; Degauque, Nicolas; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria P; Sanchez-Fueyo, Alberto; Newell, Kenneth A; Giral, Magali; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Houlgatte, Rémi; Brouard, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Patients tolerant to a kidney graft display a specific blood cell transcriptional pattern but results from five different studies were inconsistent, raising the question of relevance for future clinical application. To resolve this, we sought to identify a common gene signature, specific functional and cellular components, and discriminating biomarkers for tolerance following kidney transplantation. A meta-analysis of studies identified a robust gene signature involving proliferation of B and CD4 T cells, and inhibition of CD14 monocyte related functions among 96 tolerant samples. This signature was further supported through a cross-validation approach, yielding 92.5% accuracy independent of the study of origin. Experimental validation, performed on new tolerant samples and using a selection of the top-20 biomarkers, returned 91.7% of good classification. Beyond the confirmation of B-cell involvement, our data also indicated participation of other cell subsets in tolerance. Thus, the use of the top 20 biomarkers, mostly centered on B cells, may provide a common and standardized tool towards personalized medicine for the monitoring of tolerant or low-risk patients among kidney allotransplant recipients. These data point to a global preservation of genes favoring the maintenance of a homeostatic and ‘healthy' environment in tolerant patients and may contribute to a better understanding of tolerance maintenance mechanisms. PMID:25629549

  2. Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} is essential for the expression of antioxidant protection genes and mitochondrial function

    SciTech Connect

    Rangwala, Shamina M. . E-mail: shamina.rangwala@novartis.com; Li, Xiaoyan; Lindsley, Loren; Wang, Xiaomei; Shaughnessy, Stacey; Daniels, Thomas G.; Szustakowski, Joseph; Nirmala, N.R.; Wu, Zhidan; Stevenson, Susan C.

    2007-05-25

    Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} (ERR{alpha}) is an important mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function. To investigate the transcriptional network controlling these phenomena, we investigated mitochondrial gene expression in embryonic fibroblasts isolated from ERR{alpha} null mice. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) stimulated mitochondrial gene expression program in control cells, but not in the ERR{alpha} null cells. Interestingly, the induction of levels of mitochondrial oxidative stress protection genes in response to increased PGC-1{alpha} levels was dependent on ERR{alpha}. Furthermore, we found that the PGC-1{alpha}-mediated induction of estrogen-related receptor {gamma} and nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), was dependent on the presence of ERR{alpha}. Basal levels of NRF-2 were decreased in the absence of ERR{alpha}. The absence of ERR{alpha} resulted in a decrease in citrate synthase enzyme activity in response to PGC-1{alpha} overexpression. Our results indicate an essential role for ERR{alpha} as a key regulator of oxidative metabolism.

  3. Cognitive Function Related to the Sirh11/Zcchc16 Gene Acquired from an LTR Retrotransposon in Eutherians.

    PubMed

    Irie, Masahito; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Ono, Ryuichi; Iwafune, Hirotaka; Furuse, Tamio; Yamada, Ikuko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yamashita, Yui; Abe, Takaya; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2015-09-01

    Gene targeting of mouse Sushi-ichi-related retrotransposon homologue 11/Zinc finger CCHC domain-containing 16 (Sirh11/Zcchc16) causes abnormal behaviors related to cognition, including attention, impulsivity and working memory. Sirh11/Zcchc16 encodes a CCHC type of zinc-finger protein that exhibits high homology to an LTR retrotransposon Gag protein. Upon microdialysis analysis of the prefrontal cortex region, the recovery rate of noradrenaline (NA) was reduced compared with dopamine (DA) after perfusion of high potassium-containing artificial cerebrospinal fluid in knockout (KO) mice. These data indicate that Sirh11/Zcchc16 is involved in cognitive function in the brain, possibly via the noradrenergic system, in the contemporary mouse developmental systems. Interestingly, it is highly conserved in three out of the four major groups of the eutherians, euarchontoglires, laurasiatheria and afrotheria, but is heavily mutated in xenarthran species such as the sloth and armadillo, suggesting that it has contributed to brain evolution in the three major eutherian lineages, including humans and mice. Sirh11/Zcchc16 is the first SIRH gene to be involved in brain function, instead of just the placenta, as seen in the case of Peg10, Peg11/Rtl1 and Sirh7/Ldoc1.

  4. Cognitive Function Related to the Sirh11/Zcchc16 Gene Acquired from an LTR Retrotransposon in Eutherians.

    PubMed

    Irie, Masahito; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Ono, Ryuichi; Iwafune, Hirotaka; Furuse, Tamio; Yamada, Ikuko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yamashita, Yui; Abe, Takaya; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2015-09-01

    Gene targeting of mouse Sushi-ichi-related retrotransposon homologue 11/Zinc finger CCHC domain-containing 16 (Sirh11/Zcchc16) causes abnormal behaviors related to cognition, including attention, impulsivity and working memory. Sirh11/Zcchc16 encodes a CCHC type of zinc-finger protein that exhibits high homology to an LTR retrotransposon Gag protein. Upon microdialysis analysis of the prefrontal cortex region, the recovery rate of noradrenaline (NA) was reduced compared with dopamine (DA) after perfusion of high potassium-containing artificial cerebrospinal fluid in knockout (KO) mice. These data indicate that Sirh11/Zcchc16 is involved in cognitive function in the brain, possibly via the noradrenergic system, in the contemporary mouse developmental systems. Interestingly, it is highly conserved in three out of the four major groups of the eutherians, euarchontoglires, laurasiatheria and afrotheria, but is heavily mutated in xenarthran species such as the sloth and armadillo, suggesting that it has contributed to brain evolution in the three major eutherian lineages, including humans and mice. Sirh11/Zcchc16 is the first SIRH gene to be involved in brain function, instead of just the placenta, as seen in the case of Peg10, Peg11/Rtl1 and Sirh7/Ldoc1. PMID:26402067

  5. Cognitive Function Related to the Sirh11/Zcchc16 Gene Acquired from an LTR Retrotransposon in Eutherians

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Masahito; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Ono, Ryuichi; Iwafune, Hirotaka; Furuse, Tamio; Yamada, Ikuko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yamashita, Yui; Abe, Takaya; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Gene targeting of mouse S ushi- i chi-related r etrotransposon h omologue 11 / Z inc finger CCHC domain-containing 16 (Sirh11/Zcchc16) causes abnormal behaviors related to cognition, including attention, impulsivity and working memory. Sirh11/Zcchc16 encodes a CCHC type of zinc-finger protein that exhibits high homology to an LTR retrotransposon Gag protein. Upon microdialysis analysis of the prefrontal cortex region, the recovery rate of noradrenaline (NA) was reduced compared with dopamine (DA) after perfusion of high potassium-containing artificial cerebrospinal fluid in knockout (KO) mice. These data indicate that Sirh11/Zcchc16 is involved in cognitive function in the brain, possibly via the noradrenergic system, in the contemporary mouse developmental systems. Interestingly, it is highly conserved in three out of the four major groups of the eutherians, euarchontoglires, laurasiatheria and afrotheria, but is heavily mutated in xenarthran species such as the sloth and armadillo, suggesting that it has contributed to brain evolution in the three major eutherian lineages, including humans and mice. Sirh11/Zcchc16 is the first SIRH gene to be involved in brain function, instead of just the placenta, as seen in the case of Peg10, Peg11/Rtl1 and Sirh7/Ldoc1. PMID:26402067

  6. Effect of +Gz on plasma levels of calcitonin gene related peptide, endothelin and renal function in pilots.

    PubMed

    Dai, Y; Ji, G; Dai, D; Wang, X; Xiao, L

    1998-02-01

    The effect of positive acceleration on plasma levels of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), and endothelin as well as renal function in pilots were observed in this study. 20 pilots were exposed to +2.5 Gz 10 s and +3.0 Gz 10 s with an interval of 5 min without anti-G suits. Samples of plasma and serum were taken 2Omin before and after exposure. Plasma levels of CGRP and endothelin after the exposure were significantly increased (P<0.01), but alkaline phosphatase(AKP), blood levels of beta 2-microglobulin(beta 2-MG), Ca2+ in serum showed no significant change (P>0.05) as compared with those before exposure. There was a correlation between CGRP and endothlin (r=0.772, P<0.01). It is concluded that positive acceleration(+2.5, +3.0Gz) could increase plasma levels of CGRP and endothlin but did not affect renal function.

  7. Isolation and functional analysis of the pathogenicity-related gene VdPR3 from Verticillium dahliae on cotton.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Lin; Li, Zhi-Fang; Feng, Zi-Li; Feng, Hong-Jie; Zhao, Li-Hong; Shi, Yong-Qiang; Hu, Xiao-Ping; Zhu, He-Qin

    2015-11-01

    The fungal plant pathogen Verticillium dahliae is the causal agent of vascular wilt, a disease that can seriously diminish cotton fiber yield. The pathogenicity mechanism and the identity of the genes that interact with cotton during the infection process still remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the low-pathogenic, non-microsclerotium-producing mutant vdpr3 obtained in a previous study from the screening of a T-DNA insertional library of the highly virulent isolate Vd080; the pathogenicity-related gene (VdPR3) in wild-type strain Vd080 was cloned. Knockout mutants (ΔVdPR3) showed lower mycelium growth and obvious reduction in sporulation ability without microsclerotium formation. An evaluation of carbon utilization in mutants and wild-type isolate Vd080 demonstrated that mutants-lacking VdPR3 exhibited decreased cellulase and amylase activities, which was restored in the complementary mutants (ΔVdPR3-C) to levels similar to those of Vd080. ΔVdPR3 postponed infectious events in cotton and showed a significant reduction in pathogenicity. Reintroduction of a functional VdPR3 copy into ΔVdPR3-C restored the ability to infect cotton plants. These results suggest that VdPR3 is a multifunctional gene involved in growth development, extracellular enzyme activity, and virulence of V. dahliae on cotton. PMID:25652159

  8. Isolation and functional analysis of the pathogenicity-related gene VdPR3 from Verticillium dahliae on cotton.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Lin; Li, Zhi-Fang; Feng, Zi-Li; Feng, Hong-Jie; Zhao, Li-Hong; Shi, Yong-Qiang; Hu, Xiao-Ping; Zhu, He-Qin

    2015-11-01

    The fungal plant pathogen Verticillium dahliae is the causal agent of vascular wilt, a disease that can seriously diminish cotton fiber yield. The pathogenicity mechanism and the identity of the genes that interact with cotton during the infection process still remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the low-pathogenic, non-microsclerotium-producing mutant vdpr3 obtained in a previous study from the screening of a T-DNA insertional library of the highly virulent isolate Vd080; the pathogenicity-related gene (VdPR3) in wild-type strain Vd080 was cloned. Knockout mutants (ΔVdPR3) showed lower mycelium growth and obvious reduction in sporulation ability without microsclerotium formation. An evaluation of carbon utilization in mutants and wild-type isolate Vd080 demonstrated that mutants-lacking VdPR3 exhibited decreased cellulase and amylase activities, which was restored in the complementary mutants (ΔVdPR3-C) to levels similar to those of Vd080. ΔVdPR3 postponed infectious events in cotton and showed a significant reduction in pathogenicity. Reintroduction of a functional VdPR3 copy into ΔVdPR3-C restored the ability to infect cotton plants. These results suggest that VdPR3 is a multifunctional gene involved in growth development, extracellular enzyme activity, and virulence of V. dahliae on cotton.

  9. NF-κB oscillations translate into functionally related patterns of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Samuel; De Toma, Ilario; Piffer, Arianna; Bianchi, Marco E; Agresti, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Several transcription factors (TFs) oscillate, periodically relocating between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. NF-κB, which plays key roles in inflammation and cancer, displays oscillations whose biological advantage remains unclear. Recent work indicated that NF-κB displays sustained oscillations that can be entrained, that is, reach a persistent synchronized state through small periodic perturbations. We show here that for our GFP-p65 knock-in cells NF-κB behaves as a damped oscillator able to synchronize to a variety of periodic external perturbations with no memory. We imposed synchronous dynamics to prove that transcription of NF-κB-controlled genes also oscillates, but mature transcript levels follow three distinct patterns. Two sets of transcripts accumulate fast or slowly, respectively. Another set, comprising chemokine and chemokine receptor mRNAs, oscillates and resets at each new stimulus, with no memory of the past. We propose that TF oscillatory dynamics is a means of segmenting time to provide renewing opportunity windows for decision. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09100.001 PMID:26765569

  10. Functional conservation of Toxoplasma gondii virulence genes in its avirulent relative, Hammondia hammondi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous protozoan parasite capable of infecting all warm blooded animals, including humans. Its closest extant relative, Hammondia hammondi, has never been found to infect humans and in contrast to T. gondii is highly attenuated in mice. To better understand the genetic b...

  11. Investigating regulatory signatures of human autophagy related gene 5 (ATG5) through functional in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Vij, Avni; Randhawa, Rohit; Parkash, Jyoti; Changotra, Harish

    2016-09-01

    Autophagy is an essential, homeostatic process which removes damaged cellular proteins and organelles for cellular renewal. ATG5, a part of E3 ubiquitin ligase-like complex (Atg12-Atg5/Atg16L1), is a key regulator involved in autophagosome formation - a crucial phase of autophagy. In this study, we used different in silico methods for comprehensive analysis of ATG5 to investigate its less explored regulatory activity. We have predicted various physico-chemical parameters and two possible transmembrane models that helped in exposing its functional regions. Twenty four PTM sites and 44 TFBS were identified which could be targeted to modulate the autophagy pathway. Furthermore, LD analysis identified 3 blocks of genotyped SNPs and 2 deleterious nsSNPs that may have damaging impact on protein function and thus could be employed for carrying genome-wide association studies. In conclusion, the information obtained in this study could be helpful for better understanding of regulatory roles of ATG5 and provides a base for its implication in population-based studies. PMID:27617225

  12. Modification of the association of bisphenol A with abnormal liver function by polymorphisms of oxidative stress-related genes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Mee-Ri; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2016-05-01

    Some studies suggested oxidative stress as a possible mechanism for the relation between exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) and liver damage. Therefore, we evaluated modification of genetic polymorphisms of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2 or PTGS2), epoxide hydrolase 1 (EPHX1), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2 or MnSOD), which are oxidative stress-related genes, on the relation between exposure to BPA and liver function in the elderly. We assessed the association of visit-to-visit variations in BPA exposure with abnormal liver function by each genotype or haplotype after controlling for age, sex, BMI, alcohol consumption, exercise, urinary cotinine levels, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol using a GLIMMIX model. A significant association of BPA with abnormal liver function was observed only in participants with COX2 GG genotype at rs5277 (odds ratio (OR)=3.04 and p=0.0231), CAT genotype at rs769218 (OR=4.16 and p=0.0356), CAT CT genotype at rs769217 (OR=4.19 and p=0.0348), SOD2 TT genotype at rs4880 (OR=2.59 and p=0.0438), or SOD2 GG genotype at rs2758331 (OR=2.57 and p=0.0457). Moreover, we also found higher OR values in participants with a pair of G-G haplotypes for COX2 (OR=2.81 and p=0.0384), G-C-A haplotype for EPHX1 (OR=4.63 and p=0.0654), A-T haplotype for CAT (OR=4.48 and p=0.0245), or T-G-A haplotype for SOD2 (OR=2.91 and p=0.0491) compared with those with the other pair of haplotypes for each gene. Furthermore, the risk score composed of 4 risky pair of haplotypes showed interactive effect with BPA on abnormal liver function (p=0.0057). Our study results suggest that genetic polymorphisms of COX2, EPHX1, CAT, and SOD2 modify the association of BPA with liver function. PMID:26922413

  13. Cooperation and functional diversification of two closely related galactolipase genes for jasmonate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Youbong; Choi, Sungwook; Hwang, Hyun-Ju; Yu, Jihyeon; Nam, Sang-Jip; Ko, Jaeyoung; Park, Ju-Young; Seo, Young Sam; Kim, Eun Yu; Ryu, Stephen Beungtae; Kim, Woo Taek; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Kang, Heonjoong; Lee, Ilha

    2008-02-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) plays pivotal roles in diverse plant biological processes, including wound response. Chloroplast lipid hydrolysis is a critical step for JA biosynthesis, but the mechanism of this process remains elusive. We report here that DONGLE (DGL), a homolog of DEFECTIVE IN ANTHER DEHISCENCE1 (DAD1), encodes a chloroplast-targeted lipase with strong galactolipase and weak phospholipase A(1) activity. DGL is expressed in the leaves and has a specific role in maintaining basal JA content under normal conditions, and this expression regulates vegetative growth and is required for a rapid JA burst after wounding. During wounding, DGL and DAD1 have partially redundant functions for JA production, but they show different induction kinetics, indicating temporally separated roles: DGL plays a role in the early phase of JA production, and DAD1 plays a role in the late phase of JA production. Whereas DGL and DAD1 are necessary and sufficient for JA production, phospholipase D appears to modulate wound response by stimulating DGL and DAD1 expression.

  14. Loss-of-Function of Constitutive Expresser of Pathogenesis Related Genes5 Affects Potassium Homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Monica; Rus, Ana; Salt, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that the reduction in leaf K+ observed in a mutant previously identified in an ionomic screen of fast neutron mutagenized Arabidopsis thaliana is caused by a loss-of-function allele of CPR5, which we name cpr5-3. This observation establishes low leaf K+ as a new phenotype for loss-of-function alleles of CPR5. We investigate the factors affecting this low leaf K+ in cpr5 using double mutants defective in salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signalling, and by gene expression analysis of various channels and transporters. Reciprocal grafting between cpr5 and Col-0 was used to determine the relative importance of the shoot and root in causing the low leaf K+ phenotype of cpr5. Our data show that loss-of-function of CPR5 in shoots primarily determines the low leaf K+ phenotype of cpr5, though the roots also contribute to a lesser degree. The low leaf K+ phenotype of cpr5 is independent of the elevated SA and JA known to occur in cpr5. In cpr5 expression of genes encoding various Cyclic Nucleotide Gated Channels (CNGCs) are uniquely elevated in leaves. Further, expression of HAK5, encoding the high affinity K+ uptake transporter, is reduced in roots of cpr5 grown with high or low K+ supply. We suggest a model in which low leaf K+ in cpr5 is driven primarily by enhanced shoot-to-root K+ export caused by a constitutive activation of the expression of various CNGCs. This activation may enhance K+ efflux, either indirectly via enhanced cytosolic Ca2+ and/or directly by increased K+ transport activity. Enhanced shoot-to-root K+ export may also cause the reduced expression of HAK5 observed in roots of cpr5, leading to a reduction in uptake of K+. All ionomic data presented is publically available at www.ionomicshub.org. PMID:22046278

  15. Parallel re-modeling of EF-1α function: divergent EF-1α genes co-occur with EFL genes in diverse distantly related eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Elongation factor-1α (EF-1α) and elongation factor-like (EFL) proteins are functionally homologous to one another, and are core components of the eukaryotic translation machinery. The patchy distribution of the two elongation factor types across global eukaryotic phylogeny is suggestive of a ‘differential loss’ hypothesis that assumes that EF-1α and EFL were present in the most recent common ancestor of eukaryotes followed by independent differential losses of one of the two factors in the descendant lineages. To date, however, just one diatom and one fungus have been found to have both EF-1α and EFL (dual-EF-containing species). Results In this study, we characterized 35 new EF-1α/EFL sequences from phylogenetically diverse eukaryotes. In so doing we identified 11 previously unreported dual-EF-containing species from diverse eukaryote groups including the Stramenopiles, Apusomonadida, Goniomonadida, and Fungi. Phylogenetic analyses suggested vertical inheritance of both genes in each of the dual-EF lineages. In the dual-EF-containing species we identified, the EF-1α genes appeared to be highly divergent in sequence and suppressed at the transcriptional level compared to the co-occurring EFL genes. Conclusions According to the known EF-1α/EFL distribution, the differential loss process should have occurred independently in diverse eukaryotic lineages, and more dual-EF-containing species remain unidentified. We predict that dual-EF-containing species retain the divergent EF-1α homologues only for a sub-set of the original functions. As the dual-EF-containing species are distantly related to each other, we propose that independent re-modelling of EF-1α function took place in multiple branches in the tree of eukaryotes. PMID:23800323

  16. Association of variants in genes encoding for macrophage-related functions with clinical outcome in patients with locoregional gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sunakawa, Y.; Stremitzer, S.; Cao, S.; Zhang, W.; Yang, D.; Wakatsuki, T.; Ning, Y.; Yamauchi, S.; Stintzing, S.; Sebio, A.; El-khoueiry, R.; Matsusaka, S.; Parekh, A.; Barzi, A.; Azuma, M.; Watanabe, M.; Koizumi, W.; Lenz, H.-J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and CCL2/CCR2 chemokine axis play a central role in tumor progression such as stimulation of angiogenesis, acceleration of tumor invasion and migration, and suppression of innate immunosurveillance in the macrophage-related functions. There have been few reports regarding association of the macrophage function-related genes with the clinical outcome in gastric cancer. We hypothesized that variants in genes encoding for NF-κB and CCL2/CCR2 axis may predict prognosis in gastric cancer and tested whether the functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) will be associated with clinical outcome in patients with gastric cancer across two independent groups. Patients and methods This study enrolled two cohorts which consisted of 160 Japanese patients and 104 US patients with locoregional gastric cancer. Genomic DNA was analyzed for association of 11 SNPs in NFKB1, RELA, CCL2, and CCR2 with clinical outcome using PCR-based direct DNA sequencing. Results The univariable analysis showed four SNPs had significant association with clinical outcome in the Japanese cohort, NFKB1 rs230510 remained significant upon multivariable analysis. The patients with the A allele of the NFKB1 rs230510 had significantly longer overall survival (OS) compared with those with the T/T genotype in both the Japanese and US cohort in the univariable analysis. In contrast, genotypes with the T allele of CCL2 rs4586 were significantly associated with shorter OS compared with the C/C genotype in the US cohort [hazard ratio (HR) 2.43; P = 0.015] but longer OS in the Japanese cohort (HR 0.58; P = 0.021), resulting in the statistically significant opposite impact on OS (P = 0.001). Conclusions Our study provides the first evidence that the NFKB1 rs230510 and CCL2 rs4586 are significantly associated with the clinical outcome in patients with locoregional gastric cancer. These results also suggest that the genetic predisposition of the host may dictate the

  17. Functional analysis of pyochelin-/enantiopyochelin-related genes from a pathogenicity island of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14.

    PubMed

    Maspoli, Alessandro; Wenner, Nicolas; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Reimmann, Cornelia

    2014-06-01

    Genomic islands are foreign DNA blocks inserted in so-called regions of genomic plasticity (RGP). Depending on their gene content, they are classified as pathogenicity, symbiosis, metabolic, fitness or resistance islands, although a detailed functional analysis is often lacking. Here we focused on a 34-kb pathogenicity island of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 (PA14GI-6), which is inserted at RGP5 and carries genes related to those for pyochelin/enantiopyochelin biosynthesis. These enantiomeric siderophores of P. aeruginosa and certain strains of Pseudomonas protegens are assembled by a thiotemplate mechanism from salicylate and two molecules of cysteine. The biochemical function of several proteins encoded by PA14GI-6 was investigated by a series of complementation analyses using mutants affected in potential homologs. We found that PA14_54940 codes for a bifunctional salicylate synthase/salicyl-AMP ligase (for generation and activation of salicylate), that PA14_54930 specifies a dihydroaeruginoic acid (Dha) synthetase (for coupling salicylate with a cysteine-derived thiazoline ring), that PA14_54910 produces a type II thioesterase (for quality control), and that PA14_54880 encodes a serine O-acetyltransferase (for increased cysteine availability). The structure of the PA14GI-6-specified metabolite was determined by mass spectrometry, thin-layer chromatography, and HPLC as (R)-Dha, an iron chelator with antibacterial, antifungal and antitumor activity. The conservation of this genomic island in many clinical and environmental P. aeruginosa isolates of different geographical origin suggests that the ability for Dha production may confer a selective advantage to its host. PMID:24682869

  18. Molecular Characterization and Functional Analysis of Three Pathogenesis-Related Cytochrome P450 Genes from Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Tylenchida: Aphelenchoidoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Lu; Wu, Xiao-Qin; Ye, Jian-Ren; Huang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, the causal agent of pine wilt disease, causes huge economic losses in pine forests. The high expression of cytochrome P450 genes in B. xylophilus during infection in P. thunbergii indicated that these genes had a certain relationship with the pathogenic process of B. xylophilus. Thus, we attempted to identify the molecular characterization and functions of cytochrome P450 genes in B. xylophilus. In this study, full-length cDNA of three cytochrome P450 genes, BxCYP33C9, BxCYP33C4 and BxCYP33D3 were first cloned from B. xylophilus using 3' and 5' RACE PCR amplification. Sequence analysis showed that all of them contained a highly-conserved cytochrome P450 domain. The characteristics of the three putative proteins were analyzed with bioinformatic methods. RNA interference (RNAi) was used to assess the functions of BxCYP33C9, BxCYP33C4 and BxCYP33D3. The results revealed that these cytochrome P450 genes were likely to be associated with the vitality, dispersal ability, reproduction, pathogenicity and pesticide metabolism of B. xylophilus. This discovery confirmed the molecular characterization and functions of three cytochrome P450 genes from B. xylophilus and provided fundamental information in elucidating the molecular interaction mechanism between B. xylophilus and its host plant. PMID:25756378

  19. Discovery of genes related to formothion resistance in oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis) by a constrained functional genomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuo, T C-Y; Hu, C-C; Chien, T-Y; Chen, M J M; Feng, H-T; Chen, L-F O; Chen, C-Y; Hsu, J-C

    2015-06-01

    Artificial selection can provide insights into how insecticide resistance mechanisms evolve in populations. The underlying basis of such phenomena can involve complex interactions of multiple genes, and the resolution of this complexity first necessitates confirmation that specific genes are involved in resistance mechanisms. Here, we used a novel approach invoking a constrained RNA sequencing analysis to refine the discovery of specific genes involved in insecticide resistance. Specifically, for gene discovery, an additional constraint was added to the traditional comparisons of susceptible vs. resistant flies by the incorporation of a line in which insecticide susceptibility was 'recovered' within a resistant line by the removal of insecticide stress. In our analysis, the criterion for the classification of any gene as related to insecticide resistance was based on evidence for differential expression in the resistant line as compared with both the susceptible and recovered lines. The incorporation of this additional constraint reduced the number of differentially expressed genes putatively involved in resistance to 464, compared with more than 1000 that had been identified previously using this same species. In addition, our analysis identified several key genes involved in metabolic detoxification processes that showed up-regulated expression. Furthermore, the involvement of acetylcholinesterase, a known target for modification in insecticide resistance, was associated with three key nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions within our data. In conclusion, the incorporation of an additional constraint using a 'recovered' line for gene discovery provides a higher degree of confidence in genes identified to be involved in insecticide resistance phenomena.

  20. Expression profiling reveals functionally redundant multiple-copy genes related to zinc, iron and cadmium responses in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Li, Jimeng; Liu, Bo; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu; Aarts, Mark G M; Wu, Jian

    2014-07-01

    Genes underlying environmental adaptability tend to be over-retained in polyploid plant species. Zinc deficiency (ZnD) and iron deficiency (FeD), excess Zn (ZnE) and cadmium exposure (CdE) are major environmental problems for crop cultivation, but little is known about the differential expression of duplicated genes upon these stress conditions. Applying Tag-Seq technology to leaves of Brassica rapa grown under FeD, ZnD, ZnE or CdE conditions, with normal conditions as a control, we examined global gene expression changes and compared the expression patterns of multiple paralogs. We identified 812, 543, 331 and 447 differentially expressed genes under FeD, ZnD, ZnE and CdE conditions, respectively, in B. rapa leaves. Genes involved in regulatory networks centered on the transcription factors bHLH038 or bHLH100 were differentially expressed under (ZnE-induced) FeD. Further analysis revealed that genes associated with Zn, Fe and Cd responses tended to be over-retained in the B. rapa genome. Most of these multiple-copy genes showed the same direction of expression change under stress conditions. We conclude that the duplicated genes involved in trace element responses in B. rapa are functionally redundant, making the regulatory network more complex in B. rapa than in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  1. Integration of genome-wide association studies with biological knowledge identifies six novel genes related to kidney function.

    PubMed

    Chasman, Daniel I; Fuchsberger, Christian; Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Böger, Carsten A; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Gao, Xiaoyi; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C; O'Seaghdha, Conall M; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Smith, Albert V; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Johnson, Andrew D; Gierman, Hinco J; Feitosa, Mary F; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Johansson, Asa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Coassin, Stefan; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Cavalieri, Margherita; Rao, Madhumathi; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S; Freedman, Barry I; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Meisinger, Christa; Gieger, Christian; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Ketkar, Shamika; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Kim, Stuart K; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Siscovick, David S; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Kardia, Sharon L R; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M; Kao, W H Linda; Fox, Caroline S; Köttgen, Anna

    2012-12-15

    In conducting genome-wide association studies (GWAS), analytical approaches leveraging biological information may further understanding of the pathophysiology of clinical traits. To discover novel associations with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), a measure of kidney function, we developed a strategy for integrating prior biological knowledge into the existing GWAS data for eGFR from the CKDGen Consortium. Our strategy focuses on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in genes that are connected by functional evidence, determined by literature mining and gene ontology (GO) hierarchies, to genes near previously validated eGFR associations. It then requires association thresholds consistent with multiple testing, and finally evaluates novel candidates by independent replication. Among the samples of European ancestry, we identified a genome-wide significant SNP in FBXL20 (P = 5.6 × 10(-9)) in meta-analysis of all available data, and additional SNPs at the INHBC, LRP2, PLEKHA1, SLC3A2 and SLC7A6 genes meeting multiple-testing corrected significance for replication and overall P-values of 4.5 × 10(-4)-2.2 × 10(-7). Neither the novel PLEKHA1 nor FBXL20 associations, both further supported by association with eGFR among African Americans and with transcript abundance, would have been implicated by eGFR candidate gene approaches. LRP2, encoding the megalin receptor, was identified through connection with the previously known eGFR gene DAB2 and extends understanding of the megalin system in kidney function. These findings highlight integration of existing genome-wide association data with independent biological knowledge to uncover novel candidate eGFR associations, including candidates lacking known connections to kidney-specific pathways. The strategy may also be applicable to other clinical phenotypes, although more testing will be needed to assess its potential for discovery in general.

  2. Integration of genome-wide association studies with biological knowledge identifies six novel genes related to kidney function

    PubMed Central

    Chasman, Daniel I.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Böger, Carsten A.; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Gao, Xiaoyi; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Smith, Albert V.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Johnson, Andrew D.; Gierman, Hinco J.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Coassin, Stefan; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Cavalieri, Margherita; Rao, Madhumathi; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Meisinger, Christa; Gieger, Christian; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Ketkar, Shamika; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Kim, Stuart K.; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Siscovick, David S.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Kao, W.H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.; Köttgen, Anna

    2012-01-01

    In conducting genome-wide association studies (GWAS), analytical approaches leveraging biological information may further understanding of the pathophysiology of clinical traits. To discover novel associations with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), a measure of kidney function, we developed a strategy for integrating prior biological knowledge into the existing GWAS data for eGFR from the CKDGen Consortium. Our strategy focuses on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in genes that are connected by functional evidence, determined by literature mining and gene ontology (GO) hierarchies, to genes near previously validated eGFR associations. It then requires association thresholds consistent with multiple testing, and finally evaluates novel candidates by independent replication. Among the samples of European ancestry, we identified a genome-wide significant SNP in FBXL20 (P = 5.6 × 10−9) in meta-analysis of all available data, and additional SNPs at the INHBC, LRP2, PLEKHA1, SLC3A2 and SLC7A6 genes meeting multiple-testing corrected significance for replication and overall P-values of 4.5 × 10−4–2.2 × 10−7. Neither the novel PLEKHA1 nor FBXL20 associations, both further supported by association with eGFR among African Americans and with transcript abundance, would have been implicated by eGFR candidate gene approaches. LRP2, encoding the megalin receptor, was identified through connection with the previously known eGFR gene DAB2 and extends understanding of the megalin system in kidney function. These findings highlight integration of existing genome-wide association data with independent biological knowledge to uncover novel candidate eGFR associations, including candidates lacking known connections to kidney-specific pathways. The strategy may also be applicable to other clinical phenotypes, although more testing will be needed to assess its potential for discovery in general. PMID:22962313

  3. Gene expression analysis distinguishes tissue-specific and gender-related functions among adult Ascaris suum tissues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengyuan; Gao, Xin; Martin, John; Yin, Yong; Abubucker, Sahar; Rash, Amy C; Li, Ben-Wen; Nash, Bill; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Jasmer, Douglas P; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2013-06-01

    Over a billion people are infected by Ascaris spp. intestinal parasites. To clarify functional differences among tissues of adult A. suum, we compared gene expression by various tissues of these worms by expression microarray methods. The A. suum genome was sequenced and assembled to allow generation of microarray elements. Expression of over 40,000 60-mer elements was investigated in a variety of tissues from both male and female adult worms. Nearly 50 percent of the elements for which signal was detected exhibited differential expression among different tissues. The unique profile of transcripts identified for each tissue clarified functional distinctions among tissues, such as chitin binding in the ovary and peptidase activity in the intestines. Interestingly, hundreds of gender-specific elements were characterized in multiple non-reproductive tissues of female or male worms, with most prominence of gender differences in intestinal tissue. A. suum genes from the same family were frequently expressed differently among tissues. Transcript abundance for genes specific to A. suum, by comparison to Caenorhabditis elegans, varied to a greater extent among tissues than for genes conserved between A. suum and C. elegans. Analysis using C. elegans protein interaction data identified functional modules conserved between these two nematodes, resulting in identification of functional predictions of essential subnetworks of protein interactions and how these networks may vary among nematode tissues. A notable finding was very high module similarity between adult reproductive tissues and intestine. Our results provide the most comprehensive assessment of gene expression among tissues of a parasitic nematode to date. PMID:23572074

  4. Reciprocal sympatho-sensory control: functional role of nucleotides and calcitonin gene-related peptide in a peripheral neuroeffector junction.

    PubMed

    Donoso, M V; Hermosilla, D; Navarrete, C; Álvarez, P; Lillo, J G; Huidobro-Toro, J P

    2012-02-17

    The rat vas deferens has scattered sensory afferens plus a dense network of sympathetic motor efferens; these fibers are not known to interact functionally. We ascertained whether sensory fibers modulate the release of sympathetic transmitters through the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and reciprocally assessed whether sympathetic transmitters modulate the overflow of ir-CGRP from sensory fibers. The tissue overflow of electrically evoked sympathetic co-transmitters (ATP/metabolites, noradrenaline (NA), and immunoreactive neuropeptide tyrosine (ir-NPY)) and the motor responses elicited were quantified following either exogenous CGRP or capsaicin application to elicit peptide release. Conversely, the outflow of ir-CGRP was examined in the presence of sympathetic transmitters. Exogenous CGRP reduced in a concentration-dependent manner the electrically evoked outflow of ATP/metabolites, NA, and ir-NPY with EC(50) values of 1.3, 0.18, and 1.9 nM, respectively. CGRP also reduced the basal NA overflow. The CGRP-evoked modulation was blocked by CGRP8-37 or H-89. Release of endogenous CGRP by capsaicin significantly reduced the basal overflow of NA, ir-NPY, and the electrically evoked sympathetic transmitter release. ADP, 2-methylthioadenosine-5'-O-diphosphate (2-MeSADP), or UTP decreased the electrically evoked ir-CGRP overflow, whereas clonidine, α,β-methyleneadenosine 5'-triphosphate (α,β-mATP), or adenosine (ADO) were inactive. CGRP acting postjunctionally also reduced the motor responses elicited by exogenous NA, ATP, or electrically evoked contractions. We conclude that CGRP exerts a presynaptic modulator role on sympathetic nerve endings and reciprocally ATP or related nucleotides influence the release of ir-CGRP from sensory fibers, highlighting a dynamic sympatho-sensory control between sensory fibers and sympathetic nerve ending. Postjunctional CGRP receptors further contribute to reduce the tissue sympathetic motor tone implying a pre and

  5. Gene Chips and Functional Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamadeh, Hisham; Afshari, Cynthia

    2000-11-01

    These past few years of scientific discovery will undoubtedly be remembered as the "genomics era," the period in which biologists succeeded in enumerating the sequence of nucleotides making up all, or at least most, of human DNA. And while this achievement has been heralded as a technological feat equal to the moon landing, it is only the first of many advances in DNA technology. Scientists are now faced with the task of understanding the meaning of the DNA sequence. Specifically, they want to learn how the DNA code relates to protein function. An important tool in the study of "functional genomics," is the cDNA microarray—also known as the gene chip. Inspired by computer microchips, gene chips allow scientists to monitor the expression of hundreds, even thousands, of genes in a fraction of the time it used to take to monitor the expression of a single one. By altering the conditions under which a particular tissue expresses genes—say, by exposing it to toxins or growth factors—scientists can determine the suite of genes expressed in different situations and hence start to get a handle on the function of these genes. The authors discuss this important new technology and some of its practical applications.

  6. Equine Chorionic Gonadotropin Modulates the Expression of Genes Related to the Structure and Function of the Bovine Corpus Luteum

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Gabriela Pacheco; Campos, Danila Barreiro; Baruselli, Pietro Sampaio; Papa, Paula de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that stimulatory and superovulatory treatments, using equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG), modulate the expression of genes related to insulin, cellular modelling and angiogenesis signaling pathways in the bovine corpus luteum (CL). Therefore, we investigated: 1—the effect of these treatments on circulating insulin and somatomedin C concentrations and on gene and protein expression of INSR, IGF1 and IGFR1, as well as other insulin signaling molecules; 2—the effects of eCG on gene and protein expression of INSR, IGF1, GLUT4 and NFKB1A in bovine luteal cells; and 3—the effect of stimulatory and superovulatory treatments on gene and protein expression of ANG, ANGPT1, NOS2, ADM, PRSS2, MMP9 and PLAU. Serum insulin did not differ among groups (P = 0.96). However, serum somatomedin C levels were higher in both stimulated and superovulated groups compared to the control (P = 0.01). In stimulated cows, lower expression of INSR mRNA and higher expression of NFKB1A mRNA and IGF1 protein were observed. In superovulated cows, lower INSR mRNA expression, but higher INSR protein expression and higher IGF1, IGFR1 and NFKB1A gene and protein expression were observed. Expression of angiogenesis and cellular modelling pathway-related factors were as follows: ANGPT1 and PLAU protein expression were higher and MMP9 gene and protein expression were lower in stimulated animals. In superovulated cows, ANGPT1 mRNA expression was higher and ANG mRNA expression was lower. PRSS2 gene and protein expression were lower in both stimulated and superovulated animals related to the control. In vitro, eCG stimulated luteal cells P4 production as well as INSR and GLUT4 protein expression. In summary, our results suggest that superovulatory treatment induced ovarian proliferative changes accompanied by increased expression of genes providing the CL more energy substrate, whereas stimulatory treatment increased lipogenic activity, angiogenesis and plasticity of the extracellular

  7. The thermostable direct hemolysin-related hemolysin (trh) gene of Vibrio parahaemolyticus: Sequence variation and implications for detection and function.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, William B; Turner, Jeffrey W

    2016-07-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of bacterial food-related illness associated with the consumption of undercooked seafood. Only a small subset of strains is pathogenic. Most clinical strains encode for the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and/or the TDH-related hemolysin (TRH). In this work, we amplify and sequence the trh gene from over 80 trh+strains of this bacterium and identify thirteen genetically distinct alleles, most of which have not been deposited in GenBank previously. Sequence data was used to design new primers for more reliable detection of trh by endpoint PCR. We also designed a new quantitative PCR assay to target a more conserved gene that is genetically-linked to trh. This gene, ureR, encodes the transcriptional regulator for the urease gene cluster immediately upstream of trh. We propose that this ureR assay can be a useful screening tool as a surrogate for direct detection of trh that circumvents challenges associated with trh sequence variation.

  8. Senescence-related functional nuclear barrier by down-regulation of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Young; Ryu, Sung Jin; Ahn, Hong Ju; Choi, Hae Ri; Kang, Hyun Tae; Park, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    One of the characteristic natures of senescent cells is the hypo- or irresponsiveness not only to growth factors but also to apoptotic stress. In the present study, we confirmed the inhibition of nuclear translocation of activated p-ERK1/2 and NF-kB p50 in response to growth stimuli or LPS in the senescent human diploid fibroblasts. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanism for the senescence-associated hypo-responsiveness, we carried out the comparison study for gene expression profiles through microarray analysis. In consequence, we observed the vast reduction in expression of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking genes in senescent cells, when compared with those in young cells. Expression levels of several nucleoporins, karyopherin {alpha}, karyopherin {beta}, Ran, and Ran-regulating factors were confirmed to be down-regulated in senescent HDFs by using RT-PCR and Western blot methods. Taken together, these data suggest the operation of certain senescence-associated functional nuclear barriers by down-regulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking genes in the senescent cells.

  9. Functional Studies of Heading Date-Related Gene TaPRR73, a Paralog of Ppd1 in Common Wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenping; Zhao, Guangyao; Gao, Lifeng; Kong, Xiuying; Guo, Zhiai; Wu, Bihua; Jia, Jizeng

    2016-01-01

    Photoperiod response-related genes play a crucial role in duration of the plant growth. In this study, we focused on TaPRR73, a paralog of "Green Revolution" gene Ppd1 (TaPRR37). We found that overexpression of the truncated TaPRR73 form lacking part of the N-terminal PR domain in transgenic rice promoted heading under long day conditions. Association analysis in common wheat verified that TaPRR73 was an important agronomic photoperiod response gene that significantly affected heading date and plant height; expression analysis proved that specific alleles of TaPRR73-A1 had highly expressed levels in earlier heading lines; the distribution of haplotypes indicated that one of these alleles had been selected in breeding programs. Our results demonstrated that TaPRR73 contributed to regulation of heading date in wheat and could be useful in wheat breeding and in broadening adaptation of the crop to new regions. PMID:27313595

  10. Functional Studies of Heading Date-Related Gene TaPRR73, a Paralog of Ppd1 in Common Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenping; Zhao, Guangyao; Gao, Lifeng; Kong, Xiuying; Guo, Zhiai; Wu, Bihua; Jia, Jizeng

    2016-01-01

    Photoperiod response-related genes play a crucial role in duration of the plant growth. In this study, we focused on TaPRR73, a paralog of “Green Revolution” gene Ppd1 (TaPRR37). We found that overexpression of the truncated TaPRR73 form lacking part of the N-terminal PR domain in transgenic rice promoted heading under long day conditions. Association analysis in common wheat verified that TaPRR73 was an important agronomic photoperiod response gene that significantly affected heading date and plant height; expression analysis proved that specific alleles of TaPRR73-A1 had highly expressed levels in earlier heading lines; the distribution of haplotypes indicated that one of these alleles had been selected in breeding programs. Our results demonstrated that TaPRR73 contributed to regulation of heading date in wheat and could be useful in wheat breeding and in broadening adaptation of the crop to new regions. PMID:27313595

  11. TinII intron, an enhancer to affect the function of the cytoplasmic male sterility related gene T in Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Jin, ZhuPing; Wu, LingLing; Cao, JiaShu; Chen, ZhuJun; Pei, YanXi

    2013-12-01

    The T gene, which was cloned from the mitochondria of tumorous stem mustard (Brassica juncea var. tumida), is a cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS)-related gene that can produce two transcripts, T1170 and T1243. The latter is transcribed with the uncleaved intron TinII. In our previous study, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants over-expressing the T1243 transcript (OE-T1243) showed a severe male-sterile phenotype, whereas OE-T1170 plants did not. However, the functional mechanism of the T gene in B. Juncea remained unknown. In this study, microscopic analyses of paraffin sections of anthers confirmed that OE-T1243 plants did not produce normal pollen, whereas OE-T1170 plants did. We analyzed the transcription of 15 anther development-related genes and found that transcript levels of nozzle/sporocyteless and barely any meristem 1 and 2 were markedly lower in OE-T1243 plants than those in wild type, while the transcript levels of these genes in OE-T1170 plants were unchanged. To investigate the potential roles of TinII, we inserted the TinII sequence upstream of a minimal region (-60) of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter fused to the 5' end of the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. Analysis of the transgenic plants suggested that TinII acted as an enhancer to significantly increase GUS expression. The potential action mechanism is that the TinII intron acts as an enhancer to affect the function of the CMS-related gene T. PMID:24302291

  12. Analysis of functional polymorphisms in three synaptic plasticity-related genes (BDNF, COMT AND UCHL1) in Alzheimer's disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Forero, Diego A; Benítez, Bruno; Arboleda, Gonzalo; Yunis, Juan J; Pardo, Rodrigo; Arboleda, Humberto

    2006-07-01

    In recent years, it has been proposed that synaptic dysfunction may be an important etiological factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). This hypothesis has important implications for the analysis of AD genetic risk in case-control studies. In the present work, we analyzed common functional polymorphisms in three synaptic plasticity-related genes (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF Val66Met; catechol-O-methyl transferase, COMT Val158; ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydroxylase, UCHL1 S18Y) in a sample of 102 AD cases and 168 age and sex matched controls living in Bogotá, Colombia. There was not association between UCHL1 polymorphism and AD in our sample. We have found an initial association with BDNF polymorphism in familial cases and with COMT polymorphism in male and sporadic patients. These initial associations were lost after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. Unadjusted results may be compatible with the expected functional effect of variations in these genes on pathological memory and cognitive dysfunction, as has been implicated in animal and cell models and also from neuropsychological analysis of normal subjects carriers of the AD associated genotypes. An exploration of functional variants in these and in other synaptic plasticity-related genes (a synaptogenomics approach) in independent larger samples will be important to discover new genes associated with AD.

  13. Loss-of-Function Mutations in a Human Gene Related to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dynein IC78 Result in Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Pennarun, Gaëlle; Escudier, Estelle; Chapelin, Catherine; Bridoux, Anne-Marie; Cacheux, Valère; Roger, Gilles; Clément, Annick; Goossens, Michel; Amselem, Serge; Duriez, Bénédicte

    1999-01-01

    Summary Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a group of heterogeneous disorders of unknown origin, usually inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Its phenotype is characterized by axonemal abnormalities of respiratory cilia and sperm tails leading to bronchiectasis and sinusitis, which are sometimes associated with situs inversus (Kartagener syndrome) and male sterility. The main ciliary defect in PCD is an absence of dynein arms. We have isolated the first gene involved in PCD, using a candidate-gene approach developed on the basis of documented abnormalities of immotile strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which carry axonemal ultrastructural defects reminiscent of PCD. Taking advantage of the evolutionary conservation of genes encoding axonemal proteins, we have isolated a human sequence (DNAI1) related to IC78, a C. reinhardtii gene encoding a dynein intermediate chain in which mutations are associated with the absence of outer dynein arms. DNAI1 is highly expressed in trachea and testis and is composed of 20 exons located at 9p13-p21. Two loss-of-function mutations of DNAI1 have been identified in a patient with PCD characterized by immotile respiratory cilia lacking outer dynein arms. In addition, we excluded linkage between this gene and similar PCD phenotypes in five other affected families, providing a clear demonstration of locus heterogeneity. These data reveal the critical role of DNAI1 in the development of human axonemal structures and open up new means for identification of additional genes involved in related developmental defects. PMID:10577904

  14. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1: Unique tissue-specific functions revealed by selective gene knockout studies

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Anna P.; Van Duyn, Lauren B.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2008-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein (originally called LRP, but now referred to as LRP1) is a large endocytic receptor that is widely expressed in several tissues. LRP1 is a member of the LDL receptor family that plays diverse roles in various biological processes including lipoprotein metabolism, degradation of proteases, activation of lysosomal enzymes and cellular entry of bacterial toxins and viruses. Deletion of the LRP1 gene leads to lethality in mice, revealing a critical, but as of yet, undefined role in development. Tissue-specific gene deletion studies reveal an important contribution of LRP1 in the vasculature, central nervous system, in macrophages and in adipocytes. Three important properties of LRP1 dictate its diverse role in physiology: first, its ability to recognize more than thirty distinct ligands; second, its ability to bind a large number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins via determinants located on its cytoplasmic domain in a phosphorylation-specific manner; and third, its ability to associate with and modulate the activity of other transmembrane receptors such as integrins and receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:18626063

  15. Functional conservation of clock-related genes in flowering plants: overexpression and RNA interference analyses of the circadian rhythm in the monocotyledon Lemna gibba.

    PubMed

    Serikawa, Masayuki; Miwa, Kumiko; Kondo, Takao; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2008-04-01

    Circadian rhythms are found in organisms from cyanobacteria to plants and animals. In flowering plants, the circadian clock is involved in the regulation of various physiological phenomena, including growth, leaf movement, stomata opening, and floral transitions. Molecular mechanisms underlying the circadian clock have been identified using Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana); the functions and genetic networks of a number of clock-related genes, including CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1, LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY), TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1, GIGANTEA (GI), and EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3), have been analyzed. The degree to which clock systems are conserved among flowering plants, however, is still unclear. We previously isolated homologs for Arabidopsis clock-related genes from monocotyledon Lemna plants. Here, we report the physiological roles of these Lemna gibba genes (LgLHYH1, LgLHYH2, LgGIH1, and LgELF3H1) in the circadian system. We studied the effects of overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi) of these genes on the rhythmic expression of morning- and evening-specific reporters. Overexpression of each gene disrupted the rhythmicity of either or both reporters, suggesting that these four homologs can be involved in the circadian system. RNAi of each of the genes except LgLHYH2 affected the bioluminescence rhythms of both reporters. These results indicated that these homologs are involved in the circadian system of Lemna plants and that the structure of the circadian clock is likely to be conserved between monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Interestingly, RNAi of LgGIH1 almost completely abolished the circadian rhythm; because this effect appeared to be much stronger than the phenotype observed in an Arabidopsis gi loss-of-function mutant, the precise role of each clock gene may have diverged in the clock systems of Lemna and Arabidopsis. PMID:18281417

  16. Two Novel AP2/EREBP Transcription Factor Genes TaPARG Have Pleiotropic Functions on Plant Architecture and Yield-Related Traits in Common Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Li, Qiaoru; Mao, Xinguo; Li, Ang; Wang, Jingyi; Chang, Xiaoping; Hao, Chenyang; Zhang, Xueyong; Jing, Ruilian

    2016-01-01

    AP2/EREBPs play significant roles in plant growth and development. A novel, pleiotropic TaPARG (PLANT ARCHITECTURE-RELATED GENE), a member of the AP2/EREBP transcription factor gene family, and its flanking sequences were isolated in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Two TaPARG genes were identified and named as TaPARG-2A and TaPARG-2D. Their amino acid sequences were highly similar especially in the functional domains. TaPARG-2A on chromosome 2A was flanked by markers Xwmc63 and Xgwm372. TaPARG-2D was mapped to chromosome 2D. Subcellular localization revealed that TaPARG-2D was localized in the nucleus. The results of tissue expression pattern, overexpression in rice, association analysis and distinct population verification jointly revealed that TaPARG functions during the entire growth cycle of wheat. Its functions include regulation of plant architecture-related and yield-related traits. Association analysis, geographic distribution and allelic frequencies suggested that favored haplotypes Hap-2A-2 and Hap-2A-3 were selected in Chinese wheat breeding programs. Both favored haplotypes might be caused by a single amino acid substitution (His/Tyr). These results suggest that TaPARG is a regulatory factor in plant growth and development, and that the favored alleles might be useful for improving plant architecture and grain yield of wheat. PMID:27555860

  17. Two Novel AP2/EREBP Transcription Factor Genes TaPARG Have Pleiotropic Functions on Plant Architecture and Yield-Related Traits in Common Wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Li, Qiaoru; Mao, Xinguo; Li, Ang; Wang, Jingyi; Chang, Xiaoping; Hao, Chenyang; Zhang, Xueyong; Jing, Ruilian

    2016-01-01

    AP2/EREBPs play significant roles in plant growth and development. A novel, pleiotropic TaPARG (PLANT ARCHITECTURE-RELATED GENE), a member of the AP2/EREBP transcription factor gene family, and its flanking sequences were isolated in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Two TaPARG genes were identified and named as TaPARG-2A and TaPARG-2D. Their amino acid sequences were highly similar especially in the functional domains. TaPARG-2A on chromosome 2A was flanked by markers Xwmc63 and Xgwm372. TaPARG-2D was mapped to chromosome 2D. Subcellular localization revealed that TaPARG-2D was localized in the nucleus. The results of tissue expression pattern, overexpression in rice, association analysis and distinct population verification jointly revealed that TaPARG functions during the entire growth cycle of wheat. Its functions include regulation of plant architecture-related and yield-related traits. Association analysis, geographic distribution and allelic frequencies suggested that favored haplotypes Hap-2A-2 and Hap-2A-3 were selected in Chinese wheat breeding programs. Both favored haplotypes might be caused by a single amino acid substitution (His/Tyr). These results suggest that TaPARG is a regulatory factor in plant growth and development, and that the favored alleles might be useful for improving plant architecture and grain yield of wheat. PMID:27555860

  18. FunGene: the functional gene pipeline and repository

    PubMed Central

    Fish, Jordan A.; Chai, Benli; Wang, Qiong; Sun, Yanni; Brown, C. Titus; Tiedje, James M.; Cole, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA genes have become the standard molecular markers for microbial community analysis for good reasons, including universal occurrence in cellular organisms, availability of large databases, and ease of rRNA gene region amplification and analysis. As markers, however, rRNA genes have some significant limitations. The rRNA genes are often present in multiple copies, unlike most protein-coding genes. The slow rate of change in rRNA genes means that multiple species sometimes share identical 16S rRNA gene sequences, while many more species share identical sequences in the short 16S rRNA regions commonly analyzed. In addition, the genes involved in many important processes are not distributed in a phylogenetically coherent manner, potentially due to gene loss or horizontal gene transfer. While rRNA genes remain the most commonly used markers, key genes in ecologically important pathways, e.g., those involved in carbon and nitrogen cycling, can provide important insights into community composition and function not obtainable through rRNA analysis. However, working with ecofunctional gene data requires some tools beyond those required for rRNA analysis. To address this, our Functional Gene Pipeline and Repository (FunGene; http://fungene.cme.msu.edu/) offers databases of many common ecofunctional genes and proteins, as well as integrated tools that allow researchers to browse these collections and choose subsets for further analysis, build phylogenetic trees, test primers and probes for coverage, and download aligned sequences. Additional FunGene tools are specialized to process coding gene amplicon data. For example, FrameBot produces frameshift-corrected protein and DNA sequences from raw reads while finding the most closely related protein reference sequence. These tools can help provide better insight into microbial communities by directly studying key genes involved in important ecological processes. PMID:24101916

  19. A genome-wide linkage and association study of musical aptitude identifies loci containing genes related to inner ear development and neurocognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Oikkonen, J; Huang, Y; Onkamo, P; Ukkola-Vuoti, L; Raijas, P; Karma, K; Vieland, V J; Järvelä, I

    2015-02-01

    Humans have developed the perception, production and processing of sounds into the art of music. A genetic contribution to these skills of musical aptitude has long been suggested. We performed a genome-wide scan in 76 pedigrees (767 individuals) characterized for the ability to discriminate pitch (SP), duration (ST) and sound patterns (KMT), which are primary capacities for music perception. Using the Bayesian linkage and association approach implemented in program package KELVIN, especially designed for complex pedigrees, several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near genes affecting the functions of the auditory pathway and neurocognitive processes were identified. The strongest association was found at 3q21.3 (rs9854612) with combined SP, ST and KMT test scores (COMB). This region is located a few dozen kilobases upstream of the GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2) gene. GATA2 regulates the development of cochlear hair cells and the inferior colliculus (IC), which are important in tonotopic mapping. The highest probability of linkage was obtained for phenotype SP at 4p14, located next to the region harboring the protocadherin 7 gene, PCDH7. Two SNPs rs13146789 and rs13109270 of PCDH7 showed strong association. PCDH7 has been suggested to play a role in cochlear and amygdaloid complexes. Functional class analysis showed that inner ear and schizophrenia-related genes were enriched inside the linked regions. This study is the first to show the importance of auditory pathway genes in musical aptitude.

  20. A genome-wide linkage and association study of musical aptitude identifies loci containing genes related to inner ear development and neurocognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Oikkonen, J; Huang, Y; Onkamo, P; Ukkola-Vuoti, L; Raijas, P; Karma, K; Vieland, V J; Järvelä, I

    2015-02-01

    Humans have developed the perception, production and processing of sounds into the art of music. A genetic contribution to these skills of musical aptitude has long been suggested. We performed a genome-wide scan in 76 pedigrees (767 individuals) characterized for the ability to discriminate pitch (SP), duration (ST) and sound patterns (KMT), which are primary capacities for music perception. Using the Bayesian linkage and association approach implemented in program package KELVIN, especially designed for complex pedigrees, several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near genes affecting the functions of the auditory pathway and neurocognitive processes were identified. The strongest association was found at 3q21.3 (rs9854612) with combined SP, ST and KMT test scores (COMB). This region is located a few dozen kilobases upstream of the GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2) gene. GATA2 regulates the development of cochlear hair cells and the inferior colliculus (IC), which are important in tonotopic mapping. The highest probability of linkage was obtained for phenotype SP at 4p14, located next to the region harboring the protocadherin 7 gene, PCDH7. Two SNPs rs13146789 and rs13109270 of PCDH7 showed strong association. PCDH7 has been suggested to play a role in cochlear and amygdaloid complexes. Functional class analysis showed that inner ear and schizophrenia-related genes were enriched inside the linked regions. This study is the first to show the importance of auditory pathway genes in musical aptitude. PMID:24614497

  1. Increased brain size in mammals is associated with size variations in gene families with cell signalling, chemotaxis and immune-related functions.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Monzón-Sandoval, Jimena; Urrutia, Araxi O; Gutiérrez, Humberto

    2014-01-22

    Genomic determinants underlying increased encephalization across mammalian lineages are unknown. Whole genome comparisons have revealed large and frequent changes in the size of gene families, and it has been proposed that these variations could play a major role in shaping morphological and physiological differences among species. Using a genome-wide comparative approach, we examined changes in gene family size (GFS) and degree of encephalization in 39 fully sequenced mammalian species and found a significant over-representation of GFS variations in line with increased encephalization in mammals. We found that this relationship is not accounted for by known correlates of brain size such as maximum lifespan or body size and is not explained by phylogenetic relatedness. Genes involved in chemotaxis, immune regulation and cell signalling-related functions are significantly over-represented among those gene families most highly correlated with encephalization. Genes within these families are prominently expressed in the human brain, particularly the cortex, and organized in co-expression modules that display distinct temporal patterns of expression in the developing cortex. Our results suggest that changes in GFS associated with encephalization represent an evolutionary response to the specific functional requirements underlying increased brain size in mammals.

  2. Calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) and CDPK-related kinase (CRK) gene families in tomato: genome-wide identification and functional analyses in disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Peng; Xu, You-Ping; Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Liu, Tian-Yu; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-04-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) and CDPK-related kinases (CRKs) play multiple roles in plant. Nevertheless, genome-wide identification of these two families is limited to several plant species, and role of CRKs in disease resistance remains unclear. In this study, we identified the CDPK and CRK gene families in genome of the economically important crop tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and analyzed their function in resistance to various pathogens. Twenty-nine CDPK and six CRK genes were identified in tomato genome. Both SlCDPK and SlCRK proteins harbored an STKc_CAMK type protein kinase domain, while only SlCDPKs contained EF-hand type Ca(2+) binding domain(s). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that plant CRK family diverged early from CDPKs, and shared a common ancestor gene with subgroup IV CDPKs. Subgroup IV SlCDPK proteins were basic and their genes contained 11 introns, which were distinguished from other subgroups but similar to CRKs. Subgroup I SlCDPKs generally did not carry an N-terminal myristoylation motif while those of the remaining subgroups and SlCRKs universally did. SlCDPK and SlCRK genes were differently responsive to pathogenic stimuli. Furthermore, silencing analyses demonstrated that SlCDPK18 and SlCDPK10 positively regulated nonhost resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and host resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000, respectively, while SlCRK6 positively regulated resistance to both Pst DC3000 and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in tomato. In conclusion, CRKs apparently evolved from CDPK lineage, SlCDPK and SlCRK genes regulate a wide range of resistance and SlCRK6 is the first CRK gene proved to function in plant disease resistance. PMID:26520101

  3. Long non-coding RNA LINC00628 functions as a gastric cancer suppressor via long-range modulating the expression of cell cycle related genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zi-Zhen; Zhao, Gang; Zhuang, Chun; Shen, Yan-Ying; Zhao, Wen-Yi; Xu, Jia; Wang, Ming; Wang, Chao-Jie; Tu, Lin; Cao, Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    To discover new biomarkers for gastric cancer (GC) diagnose and treatment, we screened the lncRNAs in GC tissues from 5 patients. We found 6 lncRNAs had altered expression, and in the same time, the levels of their neighboring genes (located near 300 kb upstream or downstream of lncRNA locus) were significantly changed. After confirming the results of microarray by qRT-PCR in 82 GC patients, the biological function of LINC00628 was examined through cell proliferation and apoptosis, cell migration and invasion, colony formation assay and cell cycle detection. We confirmed that LINC00628 functions as a GC suppressor through suppressing proliferation, migration and colony formation of cancer cells. Furthermore, LINC00628 can also suppress the tumor size in mouse xenograft models. Although LINC00628 can modulate LRRN2 expression, the GC suppressor function of LINC00628 is not LRRN2 dependent. The result of mRNA microarray indicated that LINC00628 perform GC inhibitor function through long-range modulating cell cycle related genes. Importantly, we confirmed that LINC00628 mainly located in the nucleus and interacted with EZH2, and modulated genes expression by regulating H3K27me3 level. This research shed light on the role of dysregulated LINC00628 during GC process and may serve as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27272474

  4. Functional genomics: Probing plant gene function and expression with transposons

    PubMed Central

    Martienssen, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Transposable elements provide a convenient and flexible means to disrupt plant genes, so allowing their function to be assessed. By engineering transposons to carry reporter genes and regulatory signals, the expression of target genes can be monitored and to some extent manipulated. Two strategies for using transposons to assess gene function are outlined here: First, the PCR can be used to identify plants that carry insertions into specific genes from among pools of heavily mutagenized individuals (site-selected transposon mutagenesis). This method requires that high copy transposons be used and that a relatively large number of reactions be performed to identify insertions into genes of interest. Second, a large library of plants, each carrying a unique insertion, can be generated. Each insertion site then can be amplified and sequenced systematically. These two methods have been demonstrated in maize, Arabidopsis, and other plant species, and the relative merits of each are discussed in the context of plant genome research. PMID:9482828

  5. Yeast Vps55p, a Functional Homolog of Human Obesity Receptor Gene-related Protein, Is Involved in Late Endosome to Vacuole Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Belgareh-Touzé, Naïma; Avaro, Sandrine; Rouillé, Yves; Hoflack, Bernard; Haguenauer-Tsapis, Rosine

    2002-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae VPS55 (YJR044c) gene encodes a small protein of 140 amino acids with four potential transmembrane domains. VPS55 belongs to a family of genes of unknown function, including the human gene encoding the obesity receptor gene-related protein (OB-RGRP). Yeast cells with a disrupted VPS55 present normal vacuolar morphology, but exhibit an abnormal secretion of the Golgi form of the soluble vacuolar carboxypeptidase Y. However, trafficking of the membrane-bound vacuolar alkaline phosphatase remains normal. The endocytosis of uracil permease, used as an endocytic marker, is normal in vps55Δ cells, but its degradation is delayed and this marker transiently accumulates in late endosomal compartments. We also found that Vps55p is mainly localized in the late endosomes. Collectively, these results indicate that Vps55p is involved in late endosome to vacuole trafficking. Finally, we show that human OB-RGRP displays the same distribution as Vps55p and corrects the phenotypic defects of the vps55Δ strain. Therefore, the function of Vps55p has been conserved throughout evolution. This study highlights the importance of the multispanning Vps55p and OB-RGRP in membrane trafficking to the vacuole/lysosome of eukaryotic cells. PMID:12006663

  6. Immunohistochemical localization of the calcitonin gene-related peptide binding site in the primate trigeminovascular system using functional antagonist antibodies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Silke; Liu, Hantao; Warfvinge, Karin; Shi, Licheng; Dovlatyan, Mary; Xu, Cen; Edvinsson, Lars

    2016-07-22

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a potent vasodilator and a neuromodulator implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine. It binds to the extracellular domains of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP) 1 that together form the CGRP receptor. Antagonist antibodies against CGRP and its binding site at the receptor are clinically effective in preventing migraine attacks. The blood-brain barrier penetration of these antagonist antibodies is limited, suggesting that a potential peripheral site of action is sufficient to prevent migraine attacks. To further understand the sites of CGRP-mediated signaling in migraine, we used immunohistochemical staining with recently developed antagonist antibodies specifically recognizing a fusion protein of the extracellular domains of RAMP1 and CLR that comprise the CGRP binding pocket at the CGRP receptor in monkey and man. We confirmed binding of the antagonist antibodies to human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of dural meningeal arteries and neurons in the trigeminal ganglion, both of which are likely sites of action for therapeutic antibodies in migraine patients. We further used one of these antibodies for detailed mapping on cynomolgus monkey tissue and found antagonist antibody binding sites at multiple levels in the trigeminovascular system: in the dura mater VSMCs, in neurons and satellite glial cells in the trigeminal ganglion, and in neurons in the spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis. These data reinforce and clarify our understanding of CGRP receptor localization in a pattern consistent with a role for CGRP receptors in trigeminal sensitization and migraine pathology. PMID:27155150

  7. Age-related alterations in pituitary and testicular functions in long-lived growth hormone receptor gene-disrupted mice.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Varadaraj; Dawson, Christina R; Martin, Eric R; Rocha, Juliana S; Bartke, Andrzej; Kopchick, John J

    2007-12-01

    The somatotropic axis, GH, and IGF-I interact with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in health and disease. GH-resistant GH receptor-disrupted knockout (GHRKO) male mice are fertile but exhibit delayed puberty and decreases in plasma FSH levels, testicular content of LH, and prolactin (PRL) receptors, whereas PRL levels are elevated. Because the lifespan of GHRKO mice is much greater than the lifespan of their normal siblings, it was of interest to compare age-related changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in GHRKO and normal animals. Plasma IGF-I, insulin, PRL, LH, FSH, androstenedione and testosterone levels, and acute responses to GnRH and LH were measured in young (2-4 and 5-6 months of age) and old (18-19 and 23-26 months of age) male GHRKO mice and their normal siblings. Plasma IGF-I was not detectable in GHRKO mice. Plasma PRL levels increased with age in normal mice but declined in GHRKO males, and did not differ in old GHRKO and normal animals. Plasma LH responses to acute GnRH stimulation were attenuated in GHRKO mice but increased with age only in normal mice. Plasma FSH levels were decreased in GHRKO mice regardless of age. Plasma testosterone responses to LH stimulation were attenuated in old mice regardless of genotype, whereas plasma androstenedione responses were reduced with age only in GHRKO mice. Testicular IGF-I mRNA levels were normal in young and increased in old GHRKO mice, whereas testicular concentrations and total IGF-I levels were decreased in these animals. These findings indicate that GH resistance due to targeted disruption of the GH receptor gene in mice leads to suppression of testicular IGF-I levels, and modifies the effects of aging on plasma PRL levels and responses of the pituitary and testes to GnRH and LH stimulation. Plasma testosterone levels declined during aging in normal but not in GHRKO mice, and the age-related increase in the LH responses to exogenous GnRH was absent in GHRKO mice, perhaps reflecting a

  8. Pattern Genes Suggest Functional Connectivity of Organs.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yangmei; Pan, Jianbo; Cai, Meichun; Yao, Lixia; Ji, Zhiliang

    2016-05-26

    Human organ, as the basic structural and functional unit in human body, is made of a large community of different cell types that organically bound together. Each organ usually exerts highly specified physiological function; while several related organs work smartly together to perform complicated body functions. In this study, we present a computational effort to understand the roles of genes in building functional connection between organs. More specifically, we mined multiple transcriptome datasets sampled from 36 human organs and tissues, and quantitatively identified 3,149 genes whose expressions showed consensus modularly patterns: specific to one organ/tissue, selectively expressed in several functionally related tissues and ubiquitously expressed. These pattern genes imply intrinsic connections between organs. According to the expression abundance of the 766 selective genes, we consistently cluster the 36 human organs/tissues into seven functional groups: adipose &gland, brain, muscle, immune, metabolism, mucoid and nerve conduction. The organs and tissues in each group either work together to form organ systems or coordinate to perform particular body functions. The particular roles of specific genes and selective genes suggest that they could not only be used to mechanistically explore organ functions, but also be designed for selective biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  9. Pattern Genes Suggest Functional Connectivity of Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yangmei; Pan, Jianbo; Cai, Meichun; Yao, Lixia; Ji, Zhiliang

    2016-05-01

    Human organ, as the basic structural and functional unit in human body, is made of a large community of different cell types that organically bound together. Each organ usually exerts highly specified physiological function; while several related organs work smartly together to perform complicated body functions. In this study, we present a computational effort to understand the roles of genes in building functional connection between organs. More specifically, we mined multiple transcriptome datasets sampled from 36 human organs and tissues, and quantitatively identified 3,149 genes whose expressions showed consensus modularly patterns: specific to one organ/tissue, selectively expressed in several functionally related tissues and ubiquitously expressed. These pattern genes imply intrinsic connections between organs. According to the expression abundance of the 766 selective genes, we consistently cluster the 36 human organs/tissues into seven functional groups: adipose & gland, brain, muscle, immune, metabolism, mucoid and nerve conduction. The organs and tissues in each group either work together to form organ systems or coordinate to perform particular body functions. The particular roles of specific genes and selective genes suggest that they could not only be used to mechanistically explore organ functions, but also be designed for selective biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  10. Direct conversion of mouse embryonic fibroblasts into functional keratinocytes through transient expression of pluripotency-related genes.

    PubMed

    Iacovides, Demetris; Rizki, Gizem; Lapathitis, Georgios; Strati, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    The insufficient ability of specialized cells such as neurons, cardiac myocytes, and epidermal cells to regenerate after tissue damage poses a great challenge to treat devastating injuries and ailments. Recent studies demonstrated that a diverse array of cell types can be directly derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), or somatic cells by combinations of specific factors. The use of iPSCs and direct somatic cell fate conversion, or transdifferentiation, holds great promise for regenerative medicine as these techniques may circumvent obstacles related to immunological rejection and ethical considerations. However, producing iPSC-derived keratinocytes requires a lengthy two-step process of initially generating iPSCs and subsequently differentiating into skin cells, thereby elevating the risk of cellular damage accumulation and tumor formation. In this study, we describe the reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts into functional keratinocytes via the transient expression of pluripotency factors coupled with directed differentiation. The isolation of an iPSC intermediate is dispensable when using this method. Cells derived with this approach, termed induced keratinocytes (iKCs), morphologically resemble primary keratinocytes. Furthermore they express keratinocyte-specific markers, downregulate mesenchymal markers as well as the pluripotency factors Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4, and they show important functional characteristics of primary keratinocytes. iKCs can be further differentiated by high calcium administration in vitro and are capable of regenerating a fully stratified epidermis in vivo. Efficient conversion of somatic cells into keratinocytes could have important implications for studying genetic skin diseases and designing regenerative therapies to ameliorate devastating skin conditions. PMID:27473056

  11. Age-related changes in cerebellar and hypothalamic function accompany non-microglial immune gene expression, altered synapse organization, and excitatory amino acid neurotransmission deficits

    PubMed Central

    Bonasera, Stephen J.; Arikkath, Jyothi; Boska, Michael D.; Chaudoin, Tammy R.; DeKorver, Nicholas W.; Goulding, Evan H.; Hoke, Traci A.; Mojtahedzedah, Vahid; Reyelts, Crystal D.; Sajja, Balasrinivasa; Schenk, A. Katrin; Tecott, Laurence H.; Volden, Tiffany A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe age-related molecular and neuronal changes that disrupt mobility or energy balance based on brain region and genetic background. Compared to young mice, aged C57BL/6 mice exhibit marked locomotor (but not energy balance) impairments. In contrast, aged BALB mice exhibit marked energy balance (but not locomotor) impairments. Age-related changes in cerebellar or hypothalamic gene expression accompany these phenotypes. Aging evokes upregulation of immune pattern recognition receptors and cell adhesion molecules. However, these changes do not localize to microglia, the major CNS immunocyte. Consistent with a neuronal role, there is a marked age-related increase in excitatory synapses over the cerebellum and hypothalamus. Functional imaging of these regions is consistent with age-related synaptic impairments. These studies suggest that aging reactivates a developmental program employed during embryogenesis where immune molecules guide synapse formation and pruning. Renewed activity in this program may disrupt excitatory neurotransmission, causing significant behavioral deficits. PMID:27689748

  12. Exposure in utero to 2,2',3,3',4,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 132) impairs sperm function and alters testicular apoptosis-related gene expression in rat offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P.-C.; Pan, M.-H.; Li, L.-A.; Chen, C.-J.; Tsai, S.-S.; Guo, Y.L. . E-mail: leonguo@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2007-05-15

    Toxicity of the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) depends on their molecular structure. Mechanisms by prenatal exposure to a non-dioxin-like PCB, 2,2',3,4',5',6-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 132) that may act on reproductive pathways in male offspring are relatively unknown. The purpose was to determine whether epididymal sperm function and expression of apoptosis-related genes were induced or inhibited by prenatal exposure to PCB 132. Pregnant rats were treated with a single dose of PCB 132 at 1 or 10 mg/kg on gestational day 15. Male offspring were killed and the epididymal sperm counts, motility, velocity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, sperm-oocyte penetration rate (SOPR), testicular histopathology, apoptosis-related gene expression and caspase activation were assessed on postnatal day 84. Prenatal exposure to PCB 132 with a single dose of 1 or 10 mg/kg decreased cauda epididymal weight, epididymal sperm count and motile epididymal sperm count in adult offspring. The spermatozoa of PCB 132-exposed offspring produced significantly higher levels of ROS than the controls; ROS induction and SOPR reduction were dose-related. In the low-dose PCB 132 group, p53 was significantly induced and caspase-3 was inhibited. In the high-dose group, activation of caspase-3 and -9 was significantly increased, while the expressions of Fas, Bax, bcl-2, and p53 genes were significantly decreased. Gene expression and caspase activation data may provide insight into the mechanisms by which exposure to low-dose or high-dose PCB 132 affects reproduction in male offspring in rats. Because the doses of PCB 132 administered to the dams were approximately 625-fold in low-dose group and 6250-fold higher in high-dose group than the concentration in human tissue levels, the concentrations are not biologically or environmentally relevant. Further studies using environmentally relevant doses are needed for hazard identification.

  13. The DAVID Gene Functional Classification Tool: a novel biological module-centric algorithm to functionally analyze large gene lists

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Da Wei; Sherman, Brad T; Tan, Qina; Collins, Jack R; Alvord, W Gregory; Roayaei, Jean; Stephens, Robert; Baseler, Michael W; Lane, H Clifford; Lempicki, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    The DAVID Gene Functional Classification Tool uses a novel agglomeration algorithm to condense a list of genes or associated biological terms into organized classes of related genes or biology, called biological modules. This organization is accomplished by mining the complex biological co-occurrences found in multiple sources of functional annotation. It is a powerful method to group functionally related genes and terms into a manageable number of biological modules for efficient interpretation of gene lists in a network context. PMID:17784955

  14. Establishment of Relational Model of Congenital Heart Disease Markers and GO Functional Analysis of the Association between Its Serum Markers and Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Zhao, Luosha; Yuan, Jiaying

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of present study was to construct the best screening model of congenital heart disease serum markers and to provide reference for further prevention and treatment of the disease. Methods. Documents from 2006 to 2014 were collected and meta-analysis was used for screening susceptibility genes and serum markers closely related to the diagnosis of congenital heart disease. Data of serum markers were extracted from 80 congenital heart disease patients and 80 healthy controls, respectively, and then logistic regression analysis and support vector machine were utilized to establish prediction models of serum markers and Gene Ontology (GO) functional annotation. Results. Results showed that NKX2.5, GATA4, and FOG2 were susceptibility genes of congenital heart disease. CRP, BNP, and cTnI were risk factors of congenital heart disease (p < 0.05); cTnI, hs-CRP, BNP, and Lp(a) were significantly close to congenital heart disease (p < 0.01). ROC curve indicated that the accuracy rate of Lp(a) and cTnI, Lp(a) and BNP, and BNP and cTnI joint prediction was 93.4%, 87.1%, and 97.2%, respectively. But the detection accuracy rate of the markers' relational model established by support vector machine was only 85%. GO analysis suggested that NKX2.5, GATA4, and FOG2 were functionally related to Lp(a) and BNP. Conclusions. The combined markers model of BNP and cTnI had the highest accuracy rate, providing a theoretical basis for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease. PMID:27118988

  15. Loss of functional K+ channels encoded by ether-à-go-go-related genes in mouse myometrium prior to labour onset

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, I A; Yeung, S Y; Tribe, R M; Ohya, S

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation that ion channels encoded by the ether-à-go-go-related gene family have a functional impact in smooth muscle in addition to their accepted role in cardiac myocytes and neurones. This study aimed to assess the expression of ERG1–3 (KCNH1–3) genes in the murine myometrium (smooth muscle layer of the uterus) and determine the functional impact of the ion channels encoded by these genes in pregnant and non-pregnant animals. Quantitative RT-PCR did not detect message for ERG2 and 3 in whole myometrial tissue extracts. In contrast, message for two isoforms of mERG1 were readily detected with mERG1a more abundant than mERG1b. In isometric tension studies of non-pregnant myometrium, the ERG channel blockers dofetilide (1 μm), E4031 (1 μm) and Be-KM1 (100 nm) increased spontaneous contractility and ERG activators (PD118057 and NS1643) inhibited spontaneous contractility. In contrast, neither ERG blockade nor activation had any effect on the inherent contractility in myometrium from late pregnant (19 days gestation) animals. Moreover, dofetilide-sensitive K+ currents with distinctive ‘hooked’ kinetics were considerably smaller in uterine myocytes from late pregnant compared to non-pregnant animals. Expression of mERG1 isoforms did not alter throughout gestation or upon delivery, but the expression of genes encoding auxillary subunits (KCNE) were up-regulated considerably. This study provides the first evidence for a regulation of ERG-encoded K+ channels as a precursor to late pregnancy physiological activity. PMID:19332483

  16. ACE and UCP2 gene polymorphisms and their association with baseline and exercise-related changes in the functional performance of older adults.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Justin W L; Palmer, Barry R; Taylor, Denise; Kilding, Andrew E

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining high levels of physical function is an important aspect of successful ageing. While muscle mass and strength contribute to functional performance in older adults, little is known about the possible genetic basis for the heterogeneity of physical function in older adults and in how older adults respond to exercise. Two genes that have possible roles in determining levels of muscle mass, strength and function in young and older adults are angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2). This study examined whether polymorphisms in these two individual genes were associated with baseline functional performance levels and/or the training-related changes following exercise in previously untrained older adults. Five-eight Caucasian older adults (mean age 69.8 years) with no recent history of resistance training enrolled in a 12 week program of resistance, balance and cardiovascular exercises aimed at improving functional performance. Performance in 6 functional tasks was recorded at baseline and after 12 weeks. Genomic DNA was assayed for the ACE intron 16 insertion/deletion (I/D) and the UCP2 G-866A polymorphism. Baseline differences among genotype groups were tested using analysis of variance. Genotype differences in absolute and relative changes in physical function among the exercisers were tested using a general linear model, adjusting for age and gender. The genotype frequencies for each of the studied polymorphisms conformed to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The ACE I/D genotype was significantly associated with mean baseline measures of handgrip strength (II 30.9 ± 3.01 v. ID 31.7 ± 1.48 v. DD 29.3 ± 2.18 kg, p < 0.001), 8ft Up and Go time (II 6.45 ± 0.48 v. ID/DD 4.41 ± 0.19 s, p < 0.001) and 6 min walk distance (II 458 ± 28.7 v. ID/DD 546 ± 12.1m, p = 0.008). The UCP2 G-866A genotype was also associated with baseline 8ft Up and Go time (GG 5.45 ± 0.35 v. GA 4.47 ± 0.26 v. AA 3.89 ± 0.71 s, p = 0

  17. Hammondia hammondi, an avirulent relative of Toxoplasma gondii, has functional orthologs of known T. gondii virulence genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous protozoan parasite capable of infecting all warm-blooded animals, including humans. Its closest extant relative, Hammondia hammondi, has never been found to infect humans and in contrast to T. gondii is highly attenuated in mice. To better understand the genetic bas...

  18. Highly sensitive detection of cancer-related genes based on complete fluorescence restoration of a molecular beacon with a functional overhang.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Zhou, Ying-Ying; Peng, Ting; Xu, Huo; Zhang, Rong-Bo; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Zheng-Yong; Lv, Jian-Xin; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Shen, Zhi-Fa

    2016-07-21

    The accurate detection of cancer-related genes is of great significance for early diagnosis and targeted therapy of cancer. In this contribution, an automatically cycling operation of a functional overhang-containing molecular beacon (OMB)-based sensing system was proposed to perform amplification detection of the p53 gene. Contrary to the common molecular beacon (MB), a target DNA is designated to hybridize with a label-free recognition probe (RP) with a hairpin structure rather than OMB. In the presence of a target DNA of interest, the locked primer in RP opens and triggers the subsequent amplification procedures. The newly-developed OMB is not only capable of accomplishing cyclical nucleic acid strand-displacement polymerization (CNDP) with the help of polymerase and nicking endonuclease, but is also cleaved by restriction endonucleases, removing the quencher away from the fluorophore. Thus, the target DNA at an extremely low concentration is expected to generate a considerable amount of double-stranded and cleaved OMBs, and the quenched fluorescence is completely restored, leading to a dramatic increase in fluorescence intensity. Utilizing this sensing platform, the target gene can be detected down to 8.2 pM in a homogeneous way, and a linear response range of 0.01 to 150 nM could be obtained. More strikingly, the mutant genes can be easily distinguished from the wild-type ones. The proof-of-concept demonstrations reported herein are expected to promote the development of DNA biosensing systems, showing great potential in basic research and clinical diagnosis. PMID:27221763

  19. Highly sensitive detection of cancer-related genes based on complete fluorescence restoration of a molecular beacon with a functional overhang.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Zhou, Ying-Ying; Peng, Ting; Xu, Huo; Zhang, Rong-Bo; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Zheng-Yong; Lv, Jian-Xin; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Shen, Zhi-Fa

    2016-07-21

    The accurate detection of cancer-related genes is of great significance for early diagnosis and targeted therapy of cancer. In this contribution, an automatically cycling operation of a functional overhang-containing molecular beacon (OMB)-based sensing system was proposed to perform amplification detection of the p53 gene. Contrary to the common molecular beacon (MB), a target DNA is designated to hybridize with a label-free recognition probe (RP) with a hairpin structure rather than OMB. In the presence of a target DNA of interest, the locked primer in RP opens and triggers the subsequent amplification procedures. The newly-developed OMB is not only capable of accomplishing cyclical nucleic acid strand-displacement polymerization (CNDP) with the help of polymerase and nicking endonuclease, but is also cleaved by restriction endonucleases, removing the quencher away from the fluorophore. Thus, the target DNA at an extremely low concentration is expected to generate a considerable amount of double-stranded and cleaved OMBs, and the quenched fluorescence is completely restored, leading to a dramatic increase in fluorescence intensity. Utilizing this sensing platform, the target gene can be detected down to 8.2 pM in a homogeneous way, and a linear response range of 0.01 to 150 nM could be obtained. More strikingly, the mutant genes can be easily distinguished from the wild-type ones. The proof-of-concept demonstrations reported herein are expected to promote the development of DNA biosensing systems, showing great potential in basic research and clinical diagnosis.

  20. Variation at FCGR2A and Functionally Related Genes Is Associated with the Response to Anti-TNF Therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Avila-Pedretti, Gabriela; Tornero, Jesús; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Blanco, Francisco; González-Alvaro, Isidoro; Cañete, Juan D.; Maymó, Joan; Alperiz, Mercedes; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Olivé, Alex; Corominas, Héctor; Erra, Alba; Aterido, Adrià; López Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; Julià, Antonio; Marsal, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Objective Anti-TNF therapies have been highly efficacious in the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but 25–30% of patients do not show a significant clinical response. There is increasing evidence that genetic variation at the Fc receptor FCGR2A is associated with the response to anti-TNF therapy. We aimed to validate this genetic association in a patient cohort from the Spanish population, and also to identify new genes functionally related to FCGR2A that are also associated with anti-TNF response. Methods A total of 348 RA patients treated with an anti-TNF therapy were included and genotyped for FCGR2A polymorphism rs1081274. Response to therapy was determined at 12 weeks, and was tested for association globally and independently for each anti-TNF drug (infliximab, etanercept and adalimumab). Using gene expression profiles from macrophages obtained from synovial fluid of RA patients, we searched for genes highly correlated with FCGR2A expression. Tag SNPs were selected from each candidate gene and tested for association with the response to therapy. Results We found a significant association between FCGR2A and the response to adalimumab (P=0.022). Analyzing the subset of anti-CCP positive RA patients (78%), we also found a significant association between FCGR2A and the response to infliximab (P=0.035). DHX32 and RGS12 were the most consistently correlated genes with FCGR2A expression in RA synovial fluid macrophages (P<0.001). We found a significant association between the genetic variation at DHX32 (rs12356233, corrected P=0.019) and a nominally significant association between RGS12 and the response to adalimumab (rs4690093, uncorrected P=0.040). In the anti-CCP positive group of patients, we also found a nominally significant association between RGS12 and the response to infliximab (rs2857859, uncorrected P=0.042). Conclusions In the present study we have validated the FCGR2A association in an independent population, and we have identified new genes

  1. The number of functional olfactory receptor genes and the relative size of olfactory brain structures are poor predictors of olfactory discrimination performance with enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Laska, Matthias; Genzel, Daria; Wieser, Alexandra

    2005-02-01

    The ability of four squirrel monkeys and three pigtail macaques to distinguish between nine enantiomeric odor pairs sharing an isopropenyl group at the chiral center was investigated in terms of a conditioning paradigm. All animals from both species were able to discriminate between the optical isomers of limonene, carvone, dihydrocarvone, dihydrocarveole and dihydrocarvyl acetate, whereas they failed to distinguish between the (+)- and (-)-forms of perillaaldehyde and limonene oxide. The pigtail macaques, but not the squirrel monkeys, also discriminated between the antipodes of perillaalcohol and isopulegol. A comparison of the across-task patterns of discrimination performance shows a high degree of similarity among the two primate species and also between these nonhuman primates and human subjects tested in an earlier study on the same tasks. These findings suggest that between-species comparisons of the relative size of olfactory brain structures or of the number of functional olfactory receptor genes are poor predictors of olfactory discrimination performance with enantiomers. PMID:15703336

  2. Identification of a Novel Uromodulin-Like Gene Related to Predator-Induced Bulgy Morph in Anuran Tadpoles by Functional Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Tsukasa; Kawachi, Hiroko; Imai, Chiharu; Sugiyama, Manabu; Kurata, Youichi; Kishida, Osamu; Nishimura, Kinya

    2009-01-01

    Tadpoles of the anuran species Rana pirica can undergo predator-specific morphological responses. Exposure to a predation threat by larvae of the salamander Hynobius retardatus results in formation of a bulgy body (bulgy morph) with a higher tail. The tadpoles revert to a normal phenotype upon removal of the larval salamander threat. Although predator-induced phenotypic plasticity is of major interest to evolutionary ecologists, the molecular and physiological mechanisms that control this response have yet to be elucidated. In a previous study, we identified various genes that are expressed in the skin of the bulgy morph. However, it proved difficult to determine which of these were key genes in the control of gene expression associated with the bulgy phenotype. Here, we show that a novel gene plays an important role in the phenotypic plasticity producing the bulgy morph. A functional microarray analysis using facial tissue samples of control and bulgy morph tadpoles identified candidate functional genes for predator-specific morphological responses. A larger functional microarray was prepared than in the previous study and used to analyze mRNAs extracted from facial and brain tissues of tadpoles from induction-reversion experiments. We found that a novel uromodulin-like gene, which we name here pirica, was up-regulated and that keratin genes were down-regulated as the period of exposure to larval salamanders increased. Pirica consists of a 1296 bp open reading frame, which is putatively translated into a protein of 432 amino acids. The protein contains a zona pellucida domain similar to that of proteins that function to control water permeability. We found that the gene was expressed in the superficial epidermis of the tadpole skin. PMID:19529781

  3. Necessity of angiotensin-converting enzyme-related gene for cardiac functions and longevity of Drosophila melanogaster assessed by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Fang-Tsu; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Su, Ming-Tsan; Kuo, Wen-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies have established the necessity of an angiotensin-converting enzyme-related (ACER) gene for heart morphogenesis of Drosophila. Nevertheless, the physiology of ACER has yet to be comprehensively understood. Herein, we employed RNA interference to down-regulate the expression of ACER in Drosophila's heart and swept source optical coherence tomography to assess whether ACER is required for cardiac functions in living adult flies. Several contractile parameters of Drosophila heart, including the heart rate (HR), end-diastolic diameter (EDD), end-systolic diameter (ESD), percent fractional shortening (%FS), and stress-induced cardiac performance, are shown, which are age dependent. These age-dependent cardiac functions declined significantly when ACER was down-regulated. Moreover, the lifespans of ACER knock-down flies were significantly shorter than those of wild-type control flies. Thus, we posit that ACER, the Drosophila ortholog of mammalian angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), is essential for both heart physiology and longevity of animals. Since mammalian ACE2 controls many cardiovascular physiological features and is implicated in cardiomyopathies, our findings that ACER plays conserved roles in genetically tractable animals will pave the way for uncovering the genetic pathway that controls the renin-angiotensin system.

  4. Orphan and gene related CpG Islands follow power-law-like distributions in several genomes: evidence of function-related and taxonomy-related modes of distribution.

    PubMed

    Tsiagkas, Giannis; Nikolaou, Christoforos; Almirantis, Yannis

    2014-12-01

    CpG Islands (CGIs) are compositionally defined short genomic stretches, which have been studied in the human, mouse, chicken and later in several other genomes. Initially, they were assigned the role of transcriptional regulation of protein-coding genes, especially the house-keeping ones, while more recently there is found evidence that they are involved in several other functions as well, which might include regulation of the expression of RNA genes, DNA replication etc. Here, an investigation of their distributional characteristics in a variety of genomes is undertaken for both whole CGI populations as well as for CGI subsets that lie away from known genes (gene-unrelated or "orphan" CGIs). In both cases power-law-like linearity in double logarithmic scale is found. An evolutionary model, initially put forward for the explanation of a similar pattern found in gene populations is implemented. It includes segmental duplication events and eliminations of most of the duplicated CGIs, while a moderate rate of non-duplicated CGI eliminations is also applied in some cases. Simulations reproduce all the main features of the observed inter-CGI chromosomal size distributions. Our results on power-law-like linearity found in orphan CGI populations suggest that the observed distributional pattern is independent of the analogous pattern that protein coding segments were reported to follow. The power-law-like patterns in the genomic distributions of CGIs described herein are found to be compatible with several other features of the composition, abundance or functional role of CGIs reported in the current literature across several genomes, on the basis of the proposed evolutionary model.

  5. Functional microarray analysis of differentially expressed genes in granulosa cells from women with polycystic ovary syndrome related to MAPK/ERK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Chen-Wei; Chen, Mei-Jou; Tai, Kang-Yu; Yu, Danny CW; Yang, Yu-Chieh; Jan, Pey-Shynan; Yang, Yu-Shih; Chen, Hsin-Fu; Ho, Hong-Nerng

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age. Although its aetiology and pathogenesis remain unclear, recent studies suggest that the dysfunction of granulosa cells may partly be responsible. This study aimed to use cDNA microarray technology to compare granulosa cell gene expression profiles in women with and without PCOS to identify genes that may be aetiologically implicated in the pathogenesis of PCOS. The study cohort included 12 women undergoing in vitro fertilization, six with PCOS and six without PCOS. Differential gene expression profiles were classified by post-analyses of microarray data, followed by western blot analyses to confirm the microarray data of selected genes. In total, 243 genes were differentially expressed (125 upregulated and 118 downregulated) between the PCOS and non-PCOS granulosa cells. These genes are involved in reproductive system development, amino acid metabolism and cellular development and proliferation. Comparative analysis revealed genes involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathways. Western blot analyses confirmed that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 4 and phospho-ERK1/2 were decreased in PCOS granulosa cells. This study identified candidate genes involved in MAPK/ERK signaling pathways that may influence the function of granulosa cells in PCOS. PMID:26459919

  6. Diurnal expression of functional and clock-related genes throughout the rat HPA axis: system-wide shifts in response to a restricted feeding schedule.

    PubMed

    Girotti, Milena; Weinberg, Marc S; Spencer, Robert L

    2009-04-01

    The diurnal rhythm of glucocorticoid secretion depends on the suprachiasmatic (SCN) and dorsomedial (putative food-entrainable oscillator; FEO) nuclei of the hypothalamus, two brain regions critical for coordination of physiological responses to photoperiod and feeding cues, respectively. In both cases, time keeping relies upon diurnal oscillations in clock gene (per1, per2, and bmal) expression. Glucocorticoids may play a key role in synchronization of the rest of the body to photoperiod and food availability. Thus glucocorticoid secretion may be both a target and an important effector of SCN and FEO output. Remarkably little, however, is known about the functional diurnal rhythms of the individual components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. We examined the 24-h pattern of hormonal secretion (ACTH and corticosterone), functional gene expression (c-fos, crh, pomc, star), and clock gene expression (per1, per2 and bmal) in each compartment of the HPA axis under a 12:12-h light-dark cycle and compared with relevant SCN gene expression. We found that each anatomic component of the HPA axis has a unique circadian signature of functional and clock gene expression. We then tested the susceptibility of these measures to nonphotic entrainment cues by restricting food availability to only a portion of the light phase of a 12:12-h light-dark cycle. Restricted feeding is a strong zeitgeber that can dramatically alter functional and clock gene expression at all levels of the HPA axis, despite ongoing photoperiod cues and only minor changes in SCN clock gene expression. Thus the HPA axis may be an important mediator of the body entrainment to the FEO.

  7. Genes Related to Fatty Acid β-Oxidation Play a Role in the Functional Decline of the Drosophila Brain with Age

    PubMed Central

    Laranjeira, António; Schulz, Joachim; Dotti, Carlos G.

    2016-01-01

    In living organisms, ageing is widely considered to be the result of a multifaceted process consisting of the progressive accumulation of damage over time, having implications both in terms of function and survival. The study of ageing presents several challenges, from the different mechanisms implicated to the great diversity of systems affected over time. In the current study, we set out to identify genes involved in the functional decline of the brain with age and study its relevance in a tissue dependent manner using Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Here we report the age-dependent upregulation of genes involved in the metabolic process of fatty acid β-oxidation in the nervous tissue of female wild-type flies. Downregulation of CG10814, dHNF4 and lipid mobilizing genes bmm and dAkh rescues the functional decline of the brain with age, both at the cellular and behaviour level, while over-expression worsens performance. Our data proposes the occurrence of a metabolic alteration in the fly brain with age, whereby the process of β-oxidation of fatty acids experiences a genetic gain-of-function. This event proved to be one of the main causes contributing to the functional decline of the brain with age. PMID:27518101

  8. Genes Related to Fatty Acid β-Oxidation Play a Role in the Functional Decline of the Drosophila Brain with Age.

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, António; Schulz, Joachim; Dotti, Carlos G

    2016-01-01

    In living organisms, ageing is widely considered to be the result of a multifaceted process consisting of the progressive accumulation of damage over time, having implications both in terms of function and survival. The study of ageing presents several challenges, from the different mechanisms implicated to the great diversity of systems affected over time. In the current study, we set out to identify genes involved in the functional decline of the brain with age and study its relevance in a tissue dependent manner using Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Here we report the age-dependent upregulation of genes involved in the metabolic process of fatty acid β-oxidation in the nervous tissue of female wild-type flies. Downregulation of CG10814, dHNF4 and lipid mobilizing genes bmm and dAkh rescues the functional decline of the brain with age, both at the cellular and behaviour level, while over-expression worsens performance. Our data proposes the occurrence of a metabolic alteration in the fly brain with age, whereby the process of β-oxidation of fatty acids experiences a genetic gain-of-function. This event proved to be one of the main causes contributing to the functional decline of the brain with age. PMID:27518101

  9. Concepts of relative sample outlier (RSO) and weighted sample similarity (WSS) for improving performance of clustering genes: co-function and co-regulation.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Anindya; Chowdhury, Nirmalya; De, Rajat K

    2015-01-01

    Performance of clustering algorithms is largely dependent on selected similarity measure. Efficiency in handling outliers is a major contributor to the success of a similarity measure. Better the ability of similarity measure in measuring similarity between genes in the presence of outliers, better will be the performance of the clustering algorithm in forming biologically relevant groups of genes. In the present article, we discuss the problem of handling outliers with different existing similarity measures and introduce the concepts of Relative Sample Outlier (RSO). We formulate new similarity, called Weighted Sample Similarity (WSS), incorporated in Euclidean distance and Pearson correlation coefficient and then use them in various clustering and biclustering algorithms to group different gene expression profiles. Our results suggest that WSS improves performance, in terms of finding biologically relevant groups of genes, of all the considered clustering algorithms.

  10. Termites as functional gene resources.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toru; Tokuda, Gaku; Shinzato, Naoya

    2009-01-01

    Termites (Dictyoptera, Isoptera) comprise a complex assemblage of diverse species, roughly divided into so-called lower and higher termites. Lower termites harbor a dense and diverse population of prokaryotes and flagellated protists (single-cell eukaryotes) in their gut. Higher termites comprise only one apical family (Termitidae) but more than three-quarters of all termite species. While they also harbor a dense and diverse array of prokaryotes, higher termites typically lack flagellated protists. Although termites are regarded as harmful because of the ability to decompose cellulosic materials such as houses made of wood. Classical enrichment culture technique and recent metagenomic approach showed that the termites and/or their symbionts are potentially good resource of functional genes for industrial applications. Recent papers and patents showed termites and its symbionts have not only cellulolytic or lignin decomposition activity but also aromatic hydrocarbons degradation. These functions would be useful for biomass utilization, environmental remediation, and fine-chemicals production. In this review, along with the current patents of termite derived biochemical functions, future prospects for practical application based on the recent progress in metagenomic research are discussed.

  11. Functional characterization of the MKC1 gene of Candida albicans, which encodes a mitogen-activated protein kinase homolog related to cell integrity.

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-García, F; Sánchez, M; Pla, J; Nombela, C

    1995-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases represent a group of serine/threonine protein kinases playing a central role in signal transduction processes in eukaryotic cells. Using a strategy based on the complementation of the thermosensitive autolytic phenotype of slt2 null mutants, we have isolated a Candida albicans homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MAP kinase gene SLT2 (MPK1), which is involved in the recently outlined PKC1-controlled signalling pathway. The isolated gene, named MKC1 (MAP kinase from C. albicans), coded for a putative protein, Mkc1p, of 58,320 Da that displayed all the characteristic domains of MAP kinases and was 55% identical to S. cerevisiae Slt2p (Mpk1p). The MKC1 gene was deleted in a diploid Candida strain, and heterozygous and homozygous strains, in both Ura+ and Ura- backgrounds, were obtained to facilitate the analysis of the function of the gene. Deletion of the two alleles of the MKC1 gene gave rise to viable cells that grew at 28 and 37 degrees C but, nevertheless, displayed a variety of phenotypic traits under more stringent conditions. These included a low growth yield and a loss of viability in cultures grown at 42 degrees C, a high sensitivity to thermal shocks at 55 degrees C, an enhanced susceptibility to caffeine that was osmotically remediable, and the formation of a weak cell wall with a very low resistance to complex lytic enzyme preparations. The analysis of the functions downstream of the MKC1 gene should contribute to understanding of the connection of growth and morphogenesis in pathogenic fungi. PMID:7891715

  12. The Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Spt8 Gene Encodes a Very Acidic Protein That Is Functionally Related to Spt3 and Tata-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Eisenmann, D. M.; Chapon, C.; Roberts, S. M.; Dollard, C.; Winston, F.

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SPT8 gene were previously isolated as suppressors of retrotransposon insertion mutations in the 5' regions of the HIS4 and LYS2 genes. Mutations in SPT8 confer phenotypes similar to those caused by particular mutations in SPT15, which encodes the TATA-binding protein (TBP). These phenotypes are also similar to those caused by mutations in the SPT3 gene, which encodes a protein that directly interacts with TBP. We have now cloned and sequenced the SPT8 gene and have shown that it encodes a predicted protein of 602 amino acids with an extremely acidic amino terminus. In addition, the predicted SPT8 amino acid sequence contains one copy of a sequence motif found in multiple copies in a number of other eukaryotic proteins, including the β subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. To investigate further the relationship between SPT8, SPT3 and TBP, we have analyzed the effect of an spt8 null mutation in combination with different spt3 and spt15 mutations. This genetic analysis has shown that an spt8 deletion mutation is suppressed by particular spt3 alleles. Taken together with previous results, these data suggest that the SPT8 protein is required, directly or indirectly, for TBP function at particular promoters and that the role of SPT8 may be to promote a functional interaction between SPT3 and TBP. PMID:8088510

  13. Mediastinal paragangliomas related to SDHx gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ćwikła, Jarosław; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Kwiatek, Paweł; Szperl, Małgorzata; Michalski, Wojciech; Wyrwicz, Lucjan; Kuśmierczyk, Mariusz; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Maciejczyk, Anna; Roszczynko, Marta; Pęczkowska, Mariola

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paragangliomas (PGLs) related to hereditary syndromes are rare mediastinal tumors. Paragangliomas are caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of succinate dehydrogenase enzyme (SDH). Aim To evaluate clinical, anatomical and functional characteristics of mediastinal paragangliomas related to SDHx gene mutations. Material and methods Retrospective analysis of 75 patients with confirmed SDHx gene mutations (24 patients with SDHB, 5 SDHC, 46 with SDHD mutations) was performed. Patients underwent evaluation using computed tomography (CT), somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) (99mTc-[HYNIC,Tyr3]-octreotide), 123I mIBG scintigraphy and urinary excretion of total methoxycatecholamines. Results Out of 75 patients, 16 (21%) patients (1 SDHB, 15 SDHD mutations) had 17 PGLs localized in the mediastinum. Fourteen PGLs were localized in the middle mediastinum (intrapericardial) and 3 PGLs in the posterior mediastinum. The median diameter of paragangliomas measured on the axial slice was 24.3 mm (interquartile range (IQR): 14.7–36.6), and the median volume was 2.78 ml (IQR: 0.87–16.16). Twelve out of 16 patients (75%) underwent SRS, and 11 of them (92.3%) had pathological uptake of the radiotracer. Eleven (68.75%) out of 16 patients underwent 123 I mIBG, with only 3 positive results. Symptoms of catecholamine excretion were observed in 3 patients with PGLs localized in the posterior mediastinum. All PGLs were benign except in 1 patient with the SDHB mutation and PGL detected in the posterior mediastinum, who had a metastatic disease. Conclusions Most mediastinal paragangliomas were related to SDHD gene mutations. They were asymptomatic, localized in the medial mediastinum, intrapericardially. PMID:27785149

  14. Inferring gene expression dynamics via functional regression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Hans-Georg; Chiou, Jeng-Min; Leng, Xiaoyan

    2008-01-01

    Background Temporal gene expression profiles characterize the time-dynamics of expression of specific genes and are increasingly collected in current gene expression experiments. In the analysis of experiments where gene expression is obtained over the life cycle, it is of interest to relate temporal patterns of gene expression associated with different developmental stages to each other to study patterns of long-term developmental gene regulation. We use tools from functional data analysis to study dynamic changes by relating temporal gene expression profiles of different developmental stages to each other. Results We demonstrate that functional regression methodology can pinpoint relationships that exist between temporary gene expression profiles for different life cycle phases and incorporates dimension reduction as needed for these high-dimensional data. By applying these tools, gene expression profiles for pupa and adult phases are found to be strongly related to the profiles of the same genes obtained during the embryo phase. Moreover, one can distinguish between gene groups that exhibit relationships with positive and others with negative associations between later life and embryonal expression profiles. Specifically, we find a positive relationship in expression for muscle development related genes, and a negative relationship for strictly maternal genes for Drosophila, using temporal gene expression profiles. Conclusion Our findings point to specific reactivation patterns of gene expression during the Drosophila life cycle which differ in characteristic ways between various gene groups. Functional regression emerges as a useful tool for relating gene expression patterns from different developmental stages, and avoids the problems with large numbers of parameters and multiple testing that affect alternative approaches. PMID:18226220

  15. Examining emergence of functional gene clustering in a simulated evolution.

    PubMed

    Yerushalmi, Uri; Teicher, Mina

    2007-10-01

    Recent research suggests that rather than being random, gene order may be coupled with gene functionality. These findings may be explained by mechanisms that require physical proximity such as co-expression and co-regulation. Alternatively, they may be due to evolutionary-dynamics forces, as expressed in genetic drift or linkage disequilibrium. This paper proposes a biologically plausible model for evolutionary development. Using the model, which includes natural selection and the development of gene networks and cellular organisms, the co-evolution of recombination rate and gene functionality is examined. The results presented here are compatible with previous biological findings showing that functionally related genes are clustered. These results imply that evolutionary pressure in a complex environment is sufficient for the emergence of gene order that is coupled with functionality. They shed further light on the mechanisms that may cause such gene clusters.

  16. Changes of Nitrogen Transformation Rates and Related Functional Genes Abundance under Different Dissolved Oxygen Levels in sediments form an Urban River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In the nitrogen rich urban river sediments, we investigated the nitrogen transformation rates and nitrogen-cycling genes in response to different dissolved oxygen (DO) supply levels (saturation, DO > 8.00 mg L-1; aerobic, 2.50 mg L-1 gene) abundance by an order, but its influence on anammox (hzsB) was insignificant. Four quantitative response relationships between nitrogen transformation rates, nitrogen functional genes abundances, and nitrogen concentrations were established by stepwise linear regression analysis. These relationships confirmed that different nitrogen transformation processes were coupled at the molecular level (functional genes), especially for the coupling of ammonium oxidation and anammox.

  17. Combining Hierarchical and Associative Gene Ontology Relations with Textual Evidence in Estimating Gene and Gene Product Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Posse, Christian; Gopalan, Banu; Riensche, Roderick M.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Baddeley, Bob L.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2007-03-01

    Gene and gene product similarity is a fundamental diagnostic measure in analyzing biological data and constructing predictive models for functional genomics. With the rising influence of the Gene Ontology, two complementary approaches have emerged where the similarity between two genes or gene products is obtained by comparing Gene Ontology (GO) annotations associated with the genes or gene products. One approach captures GO-based similarity in terms of hierarchical relations within each gene subontology. The other approach identifies GO-based similarity in terms of associative relations across the three gene subontologies. We propose a novel methodology where the two approaches can be merged with ensuing benefits in coverage and accuracy, and demonstrate that further improvements can be obtained by integrating textual evidence extracted from relevant biomedical literature.

  18. Functional classes and equivalence relations

    PubMed Central

    Sidman, Murray; Wynne, Constance K.; Maguire, Russell W.; Barnes, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    Three adult subjects were taught a set of two-choice simultaneous discriminations, with three positive and three negative stimuli; all possible combinations of positive and negative stimuli yielded nine different pairs. The discriminations were repeatedly reversed and rereversed, the former positive stimuli becoming negative and the former negative stimuli becoming positive. With all subjects, a reversal of the contingencies for one pair of stimuli became sufficient to change their responses to all of the other pairs. The reversals had produced functional stimulus classes. Then, all subjects showed conditional discriminations emerging between members of a functional class; given a sample from one class and comparisons from both classes, they selected the comparison that was in the same class as the sample. Next, 2 of the subjects showed that the within-class conditional relations possessed the symmetric and transitive properties of equivalence relations; after having been taught to relate new stimuli to existing class members, the subjects then matched other class members to the new stimuli. Subsequent tests of two-choice discriminations showed that the conditional discriminations had transferred functional class membership to the new stimuli. The 3rd subject, who did not show equivalence relations among functional class members, was also found to have lost the within-class conditional relations after the equivalence tests. PMID:16812597

  19. Genes2FANs: connecting genes through functional association networks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein-protein, cell signaling, metabolic, and transcriptional interaction networks are useful for identifying connections between lists of experimentally identified genes/proteins. However, besides physical or co-expression interactions there are many ways in which pairs of genes, or their protein products, can be associated. By systematically incorporating knowledge on shared properties of genes from diverse sources to build functional association networks (FANs), researchers may be able to identify additional functional interactions between groups of genes that are not readily apparent. Results Genes2FANs is a web based tool and a database that utilizes 14 carefully constructed FANs and a large-scale protein-protein interaction (PPI) network to build subnetworks that connect lists of human and mouse genes. The FANs are created from mammalian gene set libraries where mouse genes are converted to their human orthologs. The tool takes as input a list of human or mouse Entrez gene symbols to produce a subnetwork and a ranked list of intermediate genes that are used to connect the query input list. In addition, users can enter any PubMed search term and then the system automatically converts the returned results to gene lists using GeneRIF. This gene list is then used as input to generate a subnetwork from the user’s PubMed query. As a case study, we applied Genes2FANs to connect disease genes from 90 well-studied disorders. We find an inverse correlation between the counts of links connecting disease genes through PPI and links connecting diseases genes through FANs, separating diseases into two categories. Conclusions Genes2FANs is a useful tool for interpreting the relationships between gene/protein lists in the context of their various functions and networks. Combining functional association interactions with physical PPIs can be useful for revealing new biology and help form hypotheses for further experimentation. Our finding that disease genes in

  20. Biological cluster evaluation for gene function prediction.

    PubMed

    Klie, Sebastian; Nikoloski, Zoran; Selbig, Joachim

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput omics techniques render it possible to decode the function of genes by using the "guilt-by-association" principle on biologically meaningful clusters of gene expression data. However, the existing frameworks for biological evaluation of gene clusters are hindered by two bottleneck issues: (1) the choice for the number of clusters, and (2) the external measures which do not take in consideration the structure of the analyzed data and the ontology of the existing biological knowledge. Here, we address the identified bottlenecks by developing a novel framework that allows not only for biological evaluation of gene expression clusters based on existing structured knowledge, but also for prediction of putative gene functions. The proposed framework facilitates propagation of statistical significance at each of the following steps: (1) estimating the number of clusters, (2) evaluating the clusters in terms of novel external structural measures, (3) selecting an optimal clustering algorithm, and (4) predicting gene functions. The framework also includes a method for evaluation of gene clusters based on the structure of the employed ontology. Moreover, our method for obtaining a probabilistic range for the number of clusters is demonstrated valid on synthetic data and available gene expression profiles from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Finally, we propose a network-based approach for gene function prediction which relies on the clustering of optimal score and the employed ontology. Our approach effectively predicts gene function on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae data set and is also employed to obtain putative gene functions for an Arabidopsis thaliana data set.

  1. Discovery of Tumor Suppressor Gene Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheimer, Steven B.

    1995-01-01

    This is an update of a 1991 review on tumor suppressor genes written at a time when understanding of how the genes work was limited. A recent major breakthrough in the understanding of the function of tumor suppressor genes is discussed. (LZ)

  2. Cross-Ontological Analytics: Combining Associative and Hierarchical Relations in the Gene Ontologies to Assess Gene Product Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Posse, Christian; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Gopalan, Banu; Riensche, Roderick M.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Baddeley, Bob L.

    2006-05-28

    Gene and gene product similarity is a fundamental diagnostic measure in analyzing biological data and constructing predictive models for functional genomics. With the rising influence of the gene ontologies, two complementary approaches have emerged where the similarity between two genes/gene products is obtained by comparing gene ontology (GO) annotations associated with the gene/gene products. One approach captures GO-based similarity in terms of hierarchical relations within each gene ontology. The other approach identifies GO-based similarity in terms of associative relations across the three gene ontologies. We propose a novel methodology where the two approaches can be merged with ensuing benefits in coverage and accuracy.

  3. The Adh-related gene of Drosophila melanogaster is expressed as a functional dicistronic messenger RNA: multigenic transcription in higher organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Brogna, S; Ashburner, M

    1997-01-01

    Essentially all eukaryotic cellular mRNAs are monocistronic, and are usually transcribed individually. Two tandemly arranged Drosophila genes, alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) and Adh-related (Adhr), are transcribed as a dicistronic transcript. From transcripts initiated from the Adh promoter, two classes of mRNA are accumulated, one is monocistronic and encodes Adh alone, the other is dicistronic and includes the open reading frames of both Adh and Adhr. The dicistronic transcript is found in polysomes and the Adhr protein product is detected by antibody staining. We present evidence that the accumulation of the dicistronic mRNA is controlled at the level of the 3' end processing. PMID:9155028

  4. Neofunctionalization of Duplicated Tic40 Genes Caused a Gain-of-Function Variation Related to Male Fertility in Brassica oleracea Lineages1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Dun, Xiaoling; Shen, Wenhao; Hu, Kaining; Zhou, Zhengfu; Xia, Shengqian; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Shen, Jinxiong; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong; Lagercrantz, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication followed by functional divergence in the event of polyploidization is a major contributor to evolutionary novelties. The Brassica genus evolved from a common ancestor after whole-genome triplication. Here, we studied the evolutionary and functional features of Brassica spp. homologs to Tic40 (for translocon at the inner membrane of chloroplasts with 40 kDa). Four Tic40 loci were identified in allotetraploid Brassica napus and two loci in each of three basic diploid Brassica spp. Although these Tic40 homologs share high sequence identities and similar expression patterns, they exhibit altered functional features. Complementation assays conducted on Arabidopsis thaliana tic40 and the B. napus male-sterile line 7365A suggested that all Brassica spp. Tic40 homologs retain an ancestral function similar to that of AtTic40, whereas BolC9.Tic40 in Brassica oleracea and its ortholog in B. napus, BnaC9.Tic40, in addition, evolved a novel function that can rescue the fertility of 7365A. A homologous chromosomal rearrangement placed bnac9.tic40 originating from the A genome (BraA10.Tic40) as an allele of BnaC9.Tic40 in the C genome, resulting in phenotypic variation for male sterility in the B. napus near-isogenic two-type line 7365AB. Assessment of the complementation activity of chimeric B. napus Tic40 domain-swapping constructs in 7365A suggested that amino acid replacements in the carboxyl terminus of BnaC9.Tic40 cause this functional divergence. The distribution of these amino acid replacements in 59 diverse Brassica spp. accessions demonstrated that the neofunctionalization of Tic40 is restricted to B. oleracea and its derivatives and thus occurred after the divergence of the Brassica spp. A, B, and C genomes. PMID:25185122

  5. Neofunctionalization of duplicated Tic40 genes caused a gain-of-function variation related to male fertility in Brassica oleracea lineages.

    PubMed

    Dun, Xiaoling; Shen, Wenhao; Hu, Kaining; Zhou, Zhengfu; Xia, Shengqian; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Shen, Jinxiong; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong; Lagercrantz, Ulf

    2014-11-01

    Gene duplication followed by functional divergence in the event of polyploidization is a major contributor to evolutionary novelties. The Brassica genus evolved from a common ancestor after whole-genome triplication. Here, we studied the evolutionary and functional features of Brassica spp. homologs to Tic40 (for translocon at the inner membrane of chloroplasts with 40 kDa). Four Tic40 loci were identified in allotetraploid Brassica napus and two loci in each of three basic diploid Brassica spp. Although these Tic40 homologs share high sequence identities and similar expression patterns, they exhibit altered functional features. Complementation assays conducted on Arabidopsis thaliana tic40 and the B. napus male-sterile line 7365A suggested that all Brassica spp. Tic40 homologs retain an ancestral function similar to that of AtTic40, whereas BolC9.Tic40 in Brassica oleracea and its ortholog in B. napus, BnaC9.Tic40, in addition, evolved a novel function that can rescue the fertility of 7365A. A homologous chromosomal rearrangement placed bnac9.tic40 originating from the A genome (BraA10.Tic40) as an allele of BnaC9.Tic40 in the C genome, resulting in phenotypic variation for male sterility in the B. napus near-isogenic two-type line 7365AB. Assessment of the complementation activity of chimeric B. napus Tic40 domain-swapping constructs in 7365A suggested that amino acid replacements in the carboxyl terminus of BnaC9.Tic40 cause this functional divergence. The distribution of these amino acid replacements in 59 diverse Brassica spp. accessions demonstrated that the neofunctionalization of Tic40 is restricted to B. oleracea and its derivatives and thus occurred after the divergence of the Brassica spp. A, B, and C genomes.

  6. Central auditory function of deafness genes.

    PubMed

    Willaredt, Marc A; Ebbers, Lena; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2014-06-01

    The highly variable benefit of hearing devices is a serious challenge in auditory rehabilitation. Various factors contribute to this phenomenon such as the diversity in ear defects, the different extent of auditory nerve hypoplasia, the age of intervention, and cognitive abilities. Recent analyses indicate that, in addition, central auditory functions of deafness genes have to be considered in this context. Since reduced neuronal activity acts as the common denominator in deafness, it is widely assumed that peripheral deafness influences development and function of the central auditory system in a stereotypical manner. However, functional characterization of transgenic mice with mutated deafness genes demonstrated gene-specific abnormalities in the central auditory system as well. A frequent function of deafness genes in the central auditory system is supported by a genome-wide expression study that revealed significant enrichment of these genes in the transcriptome of the auditory brainstem compared to the entire brain. Here, we will summarize current knowledge of the diverse central auditory functions of deafness genes. We furthermore propose the intimately interwoven gene regulatory networks governing development of the otic placode and the hindbrain as a mechanistic explanation for the widespread expression of these genes beyond the cochlea. We conclude that better knowledge of central auditory dysfunction caused by genetic alterations in deafness genes is required. In combination with improved genetic diagnostics becoming currently available through novel sequencing technologies, this information will likely contribute to better outcome prediction of hearing devices.

  7. Advances in functional regulation mechanisms of plant aquaporins: their diversity, gene expression, localization, structure and roles in plant soil-water relations (Review).

    PubMed

    Shao, Hong-Bo; Chu, Li-Ye; Shao, Ming-An; Zhao, Chang-Xing

    2008-04-01

    Aquaporins are important molecules that control the moisture level of cells and water flow in plants. Plant aquaporins are present in various tissues, and play roles in water transport, cell differentiation and cell enlargement involved in plant growth and water relations. The insights into aquaporins' diversity, structure, expression, post-translational modification, permeability properties, subcellular location, etc., from considerable studies, can lead to an understanding of basic features of the water transport mechanism and increased illumination into plant water relations. Recent important advances in determining the structure and activity of different aquaporins give further details on the mechanism of functional regulation. Therefore, the current paper mainly focuses on aquaporin structure-function relationships, in order to understand the function and regulation of aquaporins at the cellular level and in the whole plant subjected to various environmental conditions. As a result, the straightforward view is that most aquaporins in plants are to regulate water flow mainly at cellular scale, which is the most widespread general interpretation of the physiological and functional assays in plants.

  8. Antagonistic functional duality of cancer genes.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, A A; Vassetzky, Y S; Kavsan, V M

    2013-10-25

    Cancer evolution is a stochastic process both at the genome and gene levels. Most of tumors contain multiple genetic subclones, evolving in either succession or in parallel, either in a linear or branching manner, with heterogeneous genome and gene alterations, extensively rewired signaling networks, and addicted to multiple oncogenes easily switching with each other during cancer progression and medical intervention. Hundreds of discovered cancer genes are classified according to whether they function in a dominant (oncogenes) or recessive (tumor suppressor genes) manner in a cancer cell. However, there are many cancer "gene-chameleons", which behave distinctly in opposite way in the different experimental settings showing antagonistic duality. In contrast to the widely accepted view that mutant NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases 1/2 (IDH1/2) and associated metabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (R)-enantiomer are intrinsically "the drivers" of tumourigenesis, mutant IDH1/2 inhibited, promoted or had no effect on cell proliferation, growth and tumorigenicity in diverse experiments. Similar behavior was evidenced for dozens of cancer genes. Gene function is dependent on genetic network, which is defined by the genome context. The overall changes in karyotype can result in alterations of the role and function of the same genes and pathways. The diverse cell lines and tumor samples have been used in experiments for proving gene tumor promoting/suppressive activity. They all display heterogeneous individual karyotypes and disturbed signaling networks. Consequently, the effect and function of gene under investigation can be opposite and versatile in cells with different genomes that may explain antagonistic duality of cancer genes and the cell type- or the cellular genetic/context-dependent response to the same protein. Antagonistic duality of cancer genes might contribute to failure of chemotherapy. Instructive examples of unexpected activity of cancer genes and

  9. Functional Gene Networks: R/Bioc package to generate and analyse gene networks derived from functional enrichment and clustering

    PubMed Central

    Aibar, Sara; Fontanillo, Celia; Droste, Conrad; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Functional Gene Networks (FGNet) is an R/Bioconductor package that generates gene networks derived from the results of functional enrichment analysis (FEA) and annotation clustering. The sets of genes enriched with specific biological terms (obtained from a FEA platform) are transformed into a network by establishing links between genes based on common functional annotations and common clusters. The network provides a new view of FEA results revealing gene modules with similar functions and genes that are related to multiple functions. In addition to building the functional network, FGNet analyses the similarity between the groups of genes and provides a distance heatmap and a bipartite network of functionally overlapping genes. The application includes an interface to directly perform FEA queries using different external tools: DAVID, GeneTerm Linker, TopGO or GAGE; and a graphical interface to facilitate the use. Availability and implementation: FGNet is available in Bioconductor, including a tutorial. URL: http://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/FGNet.html Contact: jrivas@usal.es Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25600944

  10. Human Intellectual Disability Genes Form Conserved Functional Modules in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Oortveld, Merel A. W.; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Oti, Martin; Nijhof, Bonnie; Fernandes, Ana Clara; Kochinke, Korinna; Castells-Nobau, Anna; van Engelen, Eva; Ellenkamp, Thijs; Eshuis, Lilian; Galy, Anne; van Bokhoven, Hans; Habermann, Bianca; Brunner, Han G.; Zweier, Christiane; Verstreken, Patrik; Huynen, Martijn A.; Schenck, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual Disability (ID) disorders, defined by an IQ below 70, are genetically and phenotypically highly heterogeneous. Identification of common molecular pathways underlying these disorders is crucial for understanding the molecular basis of cognition and for the development of therapeutic intervention strategies. To systematically establish their functional connectivity, we used transgenic RNAi to target 270 ID gene orthologs in the Drosophila eye. Assessment of neuronal function in behavioral and electrophysiological assays and multiparametric morphological analysis identified phenotypes associated with knockdown of 180 ID gene orthologs. Most of these genotype-phenotype associations were novel. For example, we uncovered 16 genes that are required for basal neurotransmission and have not previously been implicated in this process in any system or organism. ID gene orthologs with morphological eye phenotypes, in contrast to genes without phenotypes, are relatively highly expressed in the human nervous system and are enriched for neuronal functions, suggesting that eye phenotyping can distinguish different classes of ID genes. Indeed, grouping genes by Drosophila phenotype uncovered 26 connected functional modules. Novel links between ID genes successfully predicted that MYCN, PIGV and UPF3B regulate synapse development. Drosophila phenotype groups show, in addition to ID, significant phenotypic similarity also in humans, indicating that functional modules are conserved. The combined data indicate that ID disorders, despite their extreme genetic diversity, are caused by disruption of a limited number of highly connected functional modules. PMID:24204314

  11. Functional characterization of FaNIP1;1 gene, a ripening-related and receptacle-specific aquaporin in strawberry fruit.

    PubMed

    Molina-Hidalgo, Francisco J; Medina-Puche, Laura; Gelis, Samuel; Ramos, José; Sabir, Farzana; Soveral, Graça; Prista, Catarina; Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Caballero, José L; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Blanco-Portales, Rosario

    2015-09-01

    Strawberry fruit (Fragaria × ananassa) is a soft fruit with high water content at ripe stage (more than 90% of its fresh weight). Aquaporins play an important role in plant water homeostasis, through the facilitation of water transport and solutes. We report the role played by FaNIP1;1 in the receptacle ripening process. The analysis by qRT-PCR of FaNIP1;1 showed that this gene is mainly expressed in fruit receptacle and has a ripening-related expression pattern that was accompanied by an increase in both the abscisic acid and water content of the receptacle throughout fruit ripening. Moreover, FaNIP1;1 was induced in situations of water deficit. Additionally, we show that FaNIP1;1 expression was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively regulated by auxins. The water transport capacity of FaNIP1;1 was determined by a stopped-flow spectroscopy in yeast over-expressing FaNIP1;1. Glycerol, H2O2 and boron transport were also demonstrated in yeast. On the other hand, GFP-FaNIP1;1 fusion protein was located in plasma membrane. In conclusion, FaNIP1;1 seems to play an important role increasing the plasma membrane permeability, that allows the water accumulation in the strawberry fruit receptacle throughout the ripening process. PMID:26259188

  12. Functional characterization of FaNIP1;1 gene, a ripening-related and receptacle-specific aquaporin in strawberry fruit.

    PubMed

    Molina-Hidalgo, Francisco J; Medina-Puche, Laura; Gelis, Samuel; Ramos, José; Sabir, Farzana; Soveral, Graça; Prista, Catarina; Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Caballero, José L; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Blanco-Portales, Rosario

    2015-09-01

    Strawberry fruit (Fragaria × ananassa) is a soft fruit with high water content at ripe stage (more than 90% of its fresh weight). Aquaporins play an important role in plant water homeostasis, through the facilitation of water transport and solutes. We report the role played by FaNIP1;1 in the receptacle ripening process. The analysis by qRT-PCR of FaNIP1;1 showed that this gene is mainly expressed in fruit receptacle and has a ripening-related expression pattern that was accompanied by an increase in both the abscisic acid and water content of the receptacle throughout fruit ripening. Moreover, FaNIP1;1 was induced in situations of water deficit. Additionally, we show that FaNIP1;1 expression was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively regulated by auxins. The water transport capacity of FaNIP1;1 was determined by a stopped-flow spectroscopy in yeast over-expressing FaNIP1;1. Glycerol, H2O2 and boron transport were also demonstrated in yeast. On the other hand, GFP-FaNIP1;1 fusion protein was located in plasma membrane. In conclusion, FaNIP1;1 seems to play an important role increasing the plasma membrane permeability, that allows the water accumulation in the strawberry fruit receptacle throughout the ripening process.

  13. GeneMANIA: Fast gene network construction and function prediction for Cytoscape

    PubMed Central

    Montojo, Jason; Zuberi, Khalid; Rodriguez, Harold; Bader, Gary D.; Morris, Quaid

    2014-01-01

    The GeneMANIA Cytoscape app enables users to construct a composite gene-gene functional interaction network from a gene list. The resulting network includes the genes most related to the original list, and functional annotations from Gene Ontology. The edges are annotated with details about the publication or data source the interactions were derived from. The app leverages GeneMANIA’s database of 1800+ networks, containing over 500 million interactions spanning 8 organisms: A. thaliana, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, D. rerio, H. sapiens, M. musculus, R. norvegicus, and S. cerevisiae. Users may also import their own organisms, networks, and expression profiles. The app is compatible with Cytoscape versions 2 and 3. PMID:25254104

  14. Genes and gene networks implicated in aggression related behaviour.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Pain, Oliver; Du Rietz, Ebba; Tosto, Maria Grazia; Paya-Cano, Jose; Sandnabba, Kenneth N; de Boer, Sietse; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Sluyter, Frans

    2014-10-01

    Aggressive behaviour is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Despite of moderate heritability estimates, progress in identifying the genetic factors underlying aggressive behaviour has been limited. There are currently three genetic mouse models of high and low aggression created using selective breeding. This is the first study to offer a global transcriptomic characterization of the prefrontal cortex across all three genetic mouse models of aggression. A systems biology approach has been applied to transcriptomic data across the three pairs of selected inbred mouse strains (Turku Aggressive (TA) and Turku Non-Aggressive (TNA), Short Attack Latency (SAL) and Long Attack Latency (LAL) mice and North Carolina Aggressive (NC900) and North Carolina Non-Aggressive (NC100)), providing novel insight into the neurobiological mechanisms and genetics underlying aggression. First, weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was performed to identify modules of highly correlated genes associated with aggression. Probe sets belonging to gene modules uncovered by WGCNA were carried forward for network analysis using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA). The RankProd non-parametric algorithm was then used to statistically evaluate expression differences across the genes belonging to modules significantly associated with aggression. IPA uncovered two pathways, involving NF-kB and MAPKs. The secondary RankProd analysis yielded 14 differentially expressed genes, some of which have previously been implicated in pathways associated with aggressive behaviour, such as Adrbk2. The results highlighted plausible candidate genes and gene networks implicated in aggression-related behaviour.

  15. Functional requirements driving the gene duplication in 12 Drosophila species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene duplication supplies the raw materials for novel gene functions and many gene families arisen from duplication experience adaptive evolution. Most studies of young duplicates have focused on mammals, especially humans, whereas reports describing their genome-wide evolutionary patterns across the closely related Drosophila species are rare. The sequenced 12 Drosophila genomes provide the opportunity to address this issue. Results In our study, 3,647 young duplicate gene families were identified across the 12 Drosophila species and three types of expansions, species-specific, lineage-specific and complex expansions, were detected in these gene families. Our data showed that the species-specific young duplicate genes predominated (86.6%) over the other two types. Interestingly, many independent species-specific expansions in the same gene family have been observed in many species, even including 11 or 12 Drosophila species. Our data also showed that the functional bias observed in these young duplicate genes was mainly related to responses to environmental stimuli and biotic stresses. Conclusions This study reveals the evolutionary patterns of young duplicates across 12 Drosophila species on a genomic scale. Our results suggest that convergent evolution acts on young duplicate genes after the species differentiation and adaptive evolution may play an important role in duplicate genes for adaption to ecological factors and environmental changes in Drosophila. PMID:23945147

  16. [Research progress in relative crystallin genes of congenital cataract].

    PubMed

    Wang, D D; Yang, H J; Yi, J L

    2016-02-01

    Congenital cataract is the common cause of visual disability in children. Nearly one third of congenital cataract cases may have a related genetic mutation. With the development of molecular genetics, especially gentechnik, more and more genes, such as crystallin genes, membrane protein genes, eytoskeletal protein genes and regulatory protein genes have been confirmed to participate in the process of congenital cataract. Furthermore, crystallin genes account for most of these genes and the crystallin has the highest amount of the whole protein in lens.It has been found that nearly one hundred mutations in crystallin genes are associated with the onset of congenital cataract. Researchers are exploring how these mutations further affect the function of cellular biology and eventually lead to cataract. Although more and more research results gradually reveal the pathogenesis of congenital cataract from the level of gene and protein, the specific pathogenesis is still unclear. The recent progression about inherited congenital cataract related with crysallin genes is summarized in this review.

  17. Clock gene evolution and functional divergence.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Eran; Last, Kim S; Olive, Peter J W; Kyriacou, C P

    2004-10-01

    In considering the impact of the earth's changing geophysical conditions during the history of life, it is surprising to learn that the earth's rotational period may have been as short as 4 h, as recently as 1900 million years ago (or 1.9 billion years ago). The implications of such figures for the origin and evolution of clocks are considerable, and the authors speculate on how this short rotational period might have influenced the development of the "protoclock" in early microorganisms, such as the Cyanobacteria, during the geological periodsin which they arose and flourished. They then discuss the subsequent duplication of clock genes that took place around and after the Cambrian period, 543 million years ago, and its consequences. They compare the relative divergences of the canonical clock genes, which reveal the Per family to be the most rapidly evolving. In addition, the authors use a statistical test to predict which residues within the PER and CRY families may have undergone functional specialization.

  18. Transcriptional wiring of cell wall-related genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mutwil, Marek; Ruprecht, Colin; Giorgi, Federico M; Bringmann, Martin; Usadel, Björn; Persson, Staffan

    2009-09-01

    Transcriptional coordination, or co-expression, of genes may signify functional relatedness of the corresponding proteins. For example, several genes involved in secondary cell wall cellulose biosynthesis are co-expressed with genes engaged in the synthesis of xylan, which is a major component of the secondary cell wall. To extend these types of analyses, we investigated the co-expression relationships of all Carbohydrate-Active enZYmes (CAZy)-related genes for Arabidopsis thaliana. Thus, the intention was to transcriptionally link different cell wall-related processes to each other, and also to other biological functions. To facilitate easy manual inspection, we have displayed these interactions as networks and matrices, and created a web-based interface (http://aranet.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/corecarb) containing downloadable files for all the transcriptional associations.

  19. A translational systems biology approach in both animals and humans identifies a functionally related module of accumbal genes involved in the regulation of reward processing and binge drinking in males

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, David; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Ruggeri, Barbara; Maroteaux, Matthieu; Jia, Tianye; Cattrell, Anna; Nymberg, Charlotte; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bhattacharyya, Sohinee; Band, Hamid; Barker, Gareth; Bokde, Arun; Buchel, Christian; Carvalho, Fabiana; Conrod, Patricia; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Easton, Alanna; Fauth-Buehler, Mira; Fernandez-Medarde, Alberto; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jurgen; Garavanh, Hugh; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Claire; Loth, Eva; Mann, Karl; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Rotter, Andrea; Santos, Eugenio; Smolka, Michael; Sommer, Wolfgang; Mameli, Manuel; Spanagel, Rainer; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Mueller, Christian; Schumann, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    Background The mesolimbic dopamine system, composed primarily of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area that project to striatal structures, is considered to be the key mediator of reinforcement-related mechanisms in the brain. Prompted by a genome-wide association meta-analysis implicating the Ras-specific guanine nucleotide-releasing factor 2 (RASGRF2) gene in the regulation of alcohol intake in men, we have recently shown that male Rasgrf2−/− mice exhibit reduced ethanol intake and preference accompanied by a perturbed mesolimbic dopamine system. We therefore propose that these mice represent a valid model to further elucidate the precise genes and mechanisms regulating mesolimbic dopamine functioning. Methods Transcriptomic data from the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of male Rasgrf2−/− mice and wild-type controls were analyzed by weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA). We performed follow-up genetic association tests in humans using a sample of male adolescents from the IMAGEN study characterized for binge drinking (n = 905) and ventral striatal activation during an fMRI reward task (n = 608). Results The WGCNA analyses using accumbal transcriptomic data revealed 37 distinct “modules,” or functionally related groups of genes. Two of these modules were significantly associated with Rasgrf2 knockout status: M5 (p < 0.001) and M6 (p < 0.001). In follow-up translational analyses we found that human orthologues for the M5 module were significantly (p < 0.01) enriched with genetic association signals for binge drinking in male adolescents. Furthermore, the most significant locus, originating from the EH-domain containing 4 (EHD4) gene (p < 0.001), was also significantly associated with altered ventral striatal activity in male adolescents performing an fMRI reward task (pempirical < 0.001). Limitations It was not possible to determine the extent to which the M5 module was dysregulated in Rasgrf2−/− mice by perturbed mesolimbic

  20. Association of Functional Polymorphisms from Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Serotonin-Related Genes with Depressive Symptoms after a Medical Stressor in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Kerri S.; Dixon, David; Nowotny, Petra; Ricci, William M.; Binder, Ellen F.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Wendleton, Leah; Doré, Peter; Lenze, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in older adults after a disabling medical event and interfere with rehabilitation and recovery from the disability. This prospective study examined the role of genetic polymorphisms implicated in synaptic integrity and stress-associated depression as predictors of depressive symptoms after hip fracture. We recruited healthy comparisons from the community and participants with hip fracture after surgical fixation from Saint Louis, Missouri hospitals. We examined the valine (Val) to methionine (Met) polymorphism in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), serotonin 1A receptor (5HT1a-rs6295) polymorphism, and the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR) interaction with the rs25531 A to G single nucleotide polymorphism (5HTTLPR-rs25531) as predictors of depressive symptoms. We also examined whether depressive symptoms mediate the influence of BDNF genotype on functional recovery. Among 429 participants with hip fracture, BDNF Met/Met carriers developed significantly more depressive symptoms than Val/Val carriers during a four-week period after the fracture (p=.012). BDNF genotype also predicted functional recovery over the ensuing year, mediated by its effects on depressive symptoms (CI: 0.07-3.37). Unlike prior studies of stressful life events, the S′ 5HTTLPR-rs25531 variant did not predict higher levels of depressive symptoms; instead, we report an exploratory finding of an epistatic effect between BDNF and 5HTTLPR-rs25531 whereby the compounded effects of two LA alleles and BDNF Met/Met genotype elevate risk of depressive symptoms after hip fracture (p=.006). No differences between 5HT1a genotypes were found. Our findings suggest plasticity-related genetic factors contribute to the neural mechanisms of mental and functional well-being after a disabling medical stressor. PMID:25781924

  1. Missing gene identification using functional coherence scores

    PubMed Central

    Chitale, Meghana; Khan, Ishita K.; Kihara, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing metabolic and signaling pathways is an effective way of interpreting a genome sequence. A challenge in a pathway reconstruction is that often genes in a pathway cannot be easily found, reflecting current imperfect information of the target organism. In this work, we developed a new method for finding missing genes, which integrates multiple features, including gene expression, phylogenetic profile, and function association scores. Particularly, for considering function association between candidate genes and neighboring proteins to the target missing gene in the network, we used Co-occurrence Association Score (CAS) and PubMed Association Score (PAS), which are designed for capturing functional coherence of proteins. We showed that adding CAS and PAS substantially improve the accuracy of identifying missing genes in the yeast enzyme-enzyme network compared to the cases when only the conventional features, gene expression, phylogenetic profile, were used. Finally, it was also demonstrated that the accuracy improves by considering indirect neighbors to the target enzyme position in the network using a proper network-topology-based weighting scheme. PMID:27552989

  2. Morpholinos: studying gene function in the chick

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Anneliese; Streit, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The use of morpholinos for perturbing gene function in the chick, Gallus gallus, has led to many important discoveries in developmental biology. This technology makes use of in vivo electroporation, which allows gain and loss of function in a temporally, and spatially controlled manner. Using this method, morpholinos can be transfected into embryonic tissues from early to late developmental stages. In this article, we describe the methods currently used in our laboratory to knock down gene function using morpholinos in vivo. We also detail how morpholinos are used to provide consistency of the results, and describe two protocols to visualise the morpholino after electroporation. In addition, we provide guidance on avoiding potential pitfalls, and suggestions for troubleshooting solutions. These revised techniques provide a practical starting point for investigating gene function in the chick. PMID:24184187

  3. Crocin improved locomotor function and mechanical behavior in the rat model of contused spinal cord injury through decreasing calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP).

    PubMed

    Karami, Masoume; Bathaie, S Zahra; Tiraihi, Taqi; Habibi-Rezaei, Mehran; Arabkheradmand, Jalil; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat

    2013-12-15

    Various approaches have been offered to alleviate chronic pain resulting from spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Application of herbs and natural products, with potentially lower adverse effects, to cure diseases has been recommended in both traditional and modern medicines. Here, the effect of crocin on chronic pain induced by spinal cord contusion was investigated in an animal model. Female Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups (5 rats in each); three groups were contused at the L1 level. One group was treated with crocin (150mg/kg) two weeks after spinal cord injury; the second group, control, was treated with vehicle only; and the third group was treated with ketoprofen. Two normal groups were also considered with or without crocin treatment. The mechanical behavioral test, the locomotor recovery test and the thermal behavioral test were applied weekly to evaluate the injury and recovery of rats. Significant improvements (p<0.05) in mechanical behavioral and locomotor recovery tests were seen in the rats treated with crocin. Thermal behavioral test did not show any significant changes due to crocin treatment. Plasma concentration of calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) changed from 780.2±2.3 to 1140.3±4.5pg/ml due to SCI and reached 789.1±2.7pg/ml after crocin treatment. These changes were significant at the level of p<0.05. The present study shows the beneficial effects of crocin treatment on chronic pain induced by SCI, through decreasing CGRP as an important mediator of inflammation and pain.

  4. Studying Functions of All Yeast Genes Simultaneously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Eason, Robert G.; Poumand, Nader; Herman, Zelek S.; Davis, Ronald W.; Anthony Kevin; Jejelowo, Olufisayo

    2006-01-01

    A method of studying the functions of all the genes of a given species of microorganism simultaneously has been developed in experiments on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (commonly known as baker's or brewer's yeast). It is already known that many yeast genes perform functions similar to those of corresponding human genes; therefore, by facilitating understanding of yeast genes, the method may ultimately also contribute to the knowledge needed to treat some diseases in humans. Because of the complexity of the method and the highly specialized nature of the underlying knowledge, it is possible to give only a brief and sketchy summary here. The method involves the use of unique synthetic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences that are denoted as DNA bar codes because of their utility as molecular labels. The method also involves the disruption of gene functions through deletion of genes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a particularly powerful experimental system in that multiple deletion strains easily can be pooled for parallel growth assays. Individual deletion strains recently have been created for 5,918 open reading frames, representing nearly all of the estimated 6,000 genetic loci of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Tagging of each deletion strain with one or two unique 20-nucleotide sequences enables identification of genes affected by specific growth conditions, without prior knowledge of gene functions. Hybridization of bar-code DNA to oligonucleotide arrays can be used to measure the growth rate of each strain over several cell-division generations. The growth rate thus measured serves as an index of the fitness of the strain.

  5. The autophagy-related genes BbATG1 and BbATG8 have different functions in differentiation, stress resistance and virulence of mycopathogen Beauveria bassiana

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Sheng-Hua; Liu, Jing; Chu, Xin-Ling; Xie, Xue-Qin; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy-related proteins play significantly different roles in eukaryotes. In the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana, autophagy is associated with fungal growth and development. BbATG1 (a serine/threonine protein kinase) and BbATG8 (a ubiquitin-like protein) have similar roles in autophagy, but different roles in other processes. Disruption mutants of BbATG1 and BbATG8 had impaired conidial germination under starvation stress. The mutant ΔBbATG8 exhibited enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress, while a ΔBbATG1 mutant did not. BbATG1 and BbATG8 showed different roles in spore differentiation. The blastospore yield was reduced by 70% and 92% in ΔBbATG1 and ΔBbATG8 mutants, respectively, and the double mutant had a reduction of 95%. Conidial yield was reduced by approximately 90% and 50% in ΔBbATG1 and ΔBbATG8 mutants, respectively. A double mutant had a reduction similar to ΔBbATG1. Additionally, both BbATG1 and BbATG8 affected the levels of conidial protein BbCP15p required for conidiation. The virulence of each autophagy-deficient mutant was considerably weakened as indicated in topical and intrahemocoel injection assays, and showed a greater reduction in topical infection. However, BbATG1 and BbATG8 had different effects on fungal virulence. Our data indicate that these autophagy-related proteins have different functions in fungal stress response, asexual development and virulence. PMID:27197558

  6. Developmentally distinct MYB genes encode functionally equivalent proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, M M; Schiefelbein, J

    2001-05-01

    The duplication and divergence of developmental control genes is thought to have driven morphological diversification during the evolution of multicellular organisms. To examine the molecular basis of this process, we analyzed the functional relationship between two paralogous MYB transcription factor genes, WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABROUS1 (GL1), in Arabidopsis. The WER and GL1 genes specify distinct cell types and exhibit non-overlapping expression patterns during Arabidopsis development. Nevertheless, reciprocal complementation experiments with a series of gene fusions showed that WER and GL1 encode functionally equivalent proteins, and their unique roles in plant development are entirely due to differences in their cis-regulatory sequences. Similar experiments with a distantly related MYB gene (MYB2) showed that its product cannot functionally substitute for WER or GL1. Furthermore, an analysis of the WER and GL1 proteins shows that conserved sequences correspond to specific functional domains. These results provide new insights into the evolution of the MYB gene family in Arabidopsis, and, more generally, they demonstrate that novel developmental gene function may arise solely by the modification of cis-regulatory sequences.

  7. The relativity of biological function.

    PubMed

    Laubichler, Manfred D; Stadler, Peter F; Prohaska, Sonja J; Nowick, Katja

    2015-12-01

    Function is a central concept in biological theories and explanations. Yet discussions about function are often based on a narrow understanding of biological systems and processes, such as idealized molecular systems or simple evolutionary, i.e., selective, dynamics. Conflicting conceptions of function continue to be used in the scientific literature to support certain claims, for instance about the fraction of "functional DNA" in the human genome. Here we argue that all biologically meaningful interpretations of function are necessarily context dependent. This implies that they derive their meaning as well as their range of applicability only within a specific theoretical and measurement context. We use this framework to shed light on the current debate about functional DNA and argue that without considering explicitly the theoretical and measurement contexts all attempts to integrate biological theories are prone to fail.

  8. The relativity of biological function.

    PubMed

    Laubichler, Manfred D; Stadler, Peter F; Prohaska, Sonja J; Nowick, Katja

    2015-12-01

    Function is a central concept in biological theories and explanations. Yet discussions about function are often based on a narrow understanding of biological systems and processes, such as idealized molecular systems or simple evolutionary, i.e., selective, dynamics. Conflicting conceptions of function continue to be used in the scientific literature to support certain claims, for instance about the fraction of "functional DNA" in the human genome. Here we argue that all biologically meaningful interpretations of function are necessarily context dependent. This implies that they derive their meaning as well as their range of applicability only within a specific theoretical and measurement context. We use this framework to shed light on the current debate about functional DNA and argue that without considering explicitly the theoretical and measurement contexts all attempts to integrate biological theories are prone to fail. PMID:26449352

  9. Gene Transfers Between Distantly Related Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    2003-01-01

    With the completion of numerous microbial genome sequences, reports of individual gene transfers between distantly related prokaryotes have become commonplace. On the other hand, transfers between prokaryotes and eukaryotes still excite the imagination. Many of these claims may be premature, but some are certainly valid. In this chapter, the kinds of supporting data needed to propose transfers between distantly related organisms and cite some interesting examples are considered.

  10. Structure, expression and functions of MTA genes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Wang, Rui-An

    2016-05-15

    Metastatic associated proteins (MTA) are integrators of upstream regulatory signals with the ability to act as master coregulators for modifying gene transcriptional activity. The MTA family includes three genes and multiple alternatively spliced variants. The MTA proteins neither have their own enzymatic activity nor have been shown to directly interact with DNA. However, MTA proteins interact with a variety of chromatin remodeling factors and complexes with enzymatic activities for modulating the plasticity of nucleosomes, leading to the repression or derepression of target genes or other extra-nuclear and nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD)-complex independent activities. The functions of MTA family members are driven by the steady state levels and subcellular localization of MTA proteins, the dynamic nature of modifying signals and enzymes, the structural features and post-translational modification of protein domains, interactions with binding proteins, and the nature of the engaged and resulting features of nucleosomes in the proximity of target genes. In general, MTA1 and MTA2 are the most upregulated genes in human cancer and correlate well with aggressive phenotypes, therapeutic resistance, poor prognosis and ultimately, unfavorable survival of cancer patients. Here we will discuss the structure, expression and functions of the MTA family of genes in the context of cancer cells. PMID:26869315

  11. Functionalization of a protosynaptic gene expression network

    PubMed Central

    Conaco, Cecilia; Bassett, Danielle S.; Zhou, Hongjun; Arcila, Mary Luz; Degnan, Sandie M.; Degnan, Bernard M.; Kosik, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    Assembly of a functioning neuronal synapse requires the precisely coordinated synthesis of many proteins. To understand the evolution of this complex cellular machine, we tracked the developmental expression patterns of a core set of conserved synaptic genes across a representative sampling of the animal kingdom. Coregulation, as measured by correlation of gene expression over development, showed a marked increase as functional nervous systems emerged. In the earliest branching animal phyla (Porifera), in which a nearly complete set of synaptic genes exists in the absence of morphological synapses, these “protosynaptic” genes displayed a lack of global coregulation although small modules of coexpressed genes are readily detectable by using network analysis techniques. These findings suggest that functional synapses evolved by exapting preexisting cellular machines, likely through some modification of regulatory circuitry. Evolutionarily ancient modules continue to operate seamlessly within the synapses of modern animals. This work shows that the application of network techniques to emerging genomic and expression data can provide insights into the evolution of complex cellular machines such as the synapse. PMID:22723359

  12. Convergence in pigmentation at multiple levels: mutations, genes and function

    PubMed Central

    Manceau, Marie; Domingues, Vera S.; Linnen, Catherine R.; Rosenblum, Erica Bree; Hoekstra, Hopi E.

    2010-01-01

    Convergence—the independent evolution of the same trait by two or more taxa—has long been of interest to evolutionary biologists, but only recently has the molecular basis of phenotypic convergence been identified. Here, we highlight studies of rapid evolution of cryptic coloration in vertebrates to demonstrate that phenotypic convergence can occur at multiple levels: mutations, genes and gene function. We first show that different genes can be responsible for convergent phenotypes even among closely related populations, for example, in the pale beach mice inhabiting Florida's Gulf and Atlantic coasts. By contrast, the exact same mutation can create similar phenotypes in distantly related species such as mice and mammoths. Next, we show that different mutations in the same gene need not be functionally equivalent to produce similar phenotypes. For example, separate mutations produce divergent protein function but convergent pale coloration in two lizard species. Similarly, mutations that alter the expression of a gene in different ways can, nevertheless, result in similar phenotypes, as demonstrated by sister species of deer mice. Together these studies underscore the importance of identifying not only the genes, but also the precise mutations and their effects on protein function, that contribute to adaptation and highlight how convergence can occur at different genetic levels. PMID:20643733

  13. Convergence in pigmentation at multiple levels: mutations, genes and function.

    PubMed

    Manceau, Marie; Domingues, Vera S; Linnen, Catherine R; Rosenblum, Erica Bree; Hoekstra, Hopi E

    2010-08-27

    Convergence--the independent evolution of the same trait by two or more taxa--has long been of interest to evolutionary biologists, but only recently has the molecular basis of phenotypic convergence been identified. Here, we highlight studies of rapid evolution of cryptic coloration in vertebrates to demonstrate that phenotypic convergence can occur at multiple levels: mutations, genes and gene function. We first show that different genes can be responsible for convergent phenotypes even among closely related populations, for example, in the pale beach mice inhabiting Florida's Gulf and Atlantic coasts. By contrast, the exact same mutation can create similar phenotypes in distantly related species such as mice and mammoths. Next, we show that different mutations in the same gene need not be functionally equivalent to produce similar phenotypes. For example, separate mutations produce divergent protein function but convergent pale coloration in two lizard species. Similarly, mutations that alter the expression of a gene in different ways can, nevertheless, result in similar phenotypes, as demonstrated by sister species of deer mice. Together these studies underscore the importance of identifying not only the genes, but also the precise mutations and their effects on protein function, that contribute to adaptation and highlight how convergence can occur at different genetic levels. PMID:20643733

  14. Gain of function mutations for paralogous Hox genes: implications for the evolution of Hox gene function.

    PubMed

    Pollock, R A; Sreenath, T; Ngo, L; Bieberich, C J

    1995-05-01

    To investigate the functions of paralogous Hox genes, we compared the phenotypic consequences of altering the embryonic patterns of expression of Hoxb-8 and Hoxc-8 in transgenic mice. A comparison of the phenotypic consequences of altered expression of the two paralogs in the axial skeletons of newborns revealed an array of common transformations as well as morphological changes unique to each gene. Divergence of function of the two paralogs was clearly evident in costal derivatives, where increased expression of the two genes affected opposite ends of the ribs. Many of the morphological consequences of expanding the mesodermal domain and magnitude of expression of either gene were atavistic, inducing the transformation of axial skeletal structures from a modern to an earlier evolutionary form. We propose that regional specialization of the vertebral column has been driven by regionalization of Hox gene function and that a major aspect of this evolutionary progression may have been restriction of Hox gene expression.

  15. A novel method to quantify gene set functional association based on gene ontology.

    PubMed

    Lv, Sali; Li, Yan; Wang, Qianghu; Ning, Shangwei; Huang, Teng; Wang, Peng; Sun, Jie; Zheng, Yan; Liu, Weisha; Ai, Jing; Li, Xia

    2012-05-01

    Numerous gene sets have been used as molecular signatures for exploring the genetic basis of complex disorders. These gene sets are distinct but related to each other in many cases; therefore, efforts have been made to compare gene sets for studies such as those evaluating the reproducibility of different experiments. Comparison in terms of biological function has been demonstrated to be helpful to biologists. We improved the measurement of semantic similarity to quantify the functional association between gene sets in the context of gene ontology and developed a web toolkit named Gene Set Functional Similarity (GSFS; http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/GSFS). Validation based on protein complexes for which the functional associations are known demonstrated that the GSFS scores tend to be correlated with sequence similarity scores and that complexes with high GSFS scores tend to be involved in the same functional catalogue. Compared with the pairwise method and the annotation method, the GSFS shows better discrimination and more accurately reflects the known functional catalogues shared between complexes. Case studies comparing differentially expressed genes of prostate tumour samples from different microarray platforms and identifying coronary heart disease susceptibility pathways revealed that the method could contribute to future studies exploring the molecular basis of complex disorders.

  16. Cost benefit theory and optimal design of gene regulation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisky, Tomer; Dekel, Erez; Alon, Uri

    2007-12-01

    Cells respond to the environment by regulating the expression of genes according to environmental signals. The relation between the input signal level and the expression of the gene is called the gene regulation function. It is of interest to understand the shape of a gene regulation function in terms of the environment in which it has evolved and the basic constraints of biological systems. Here we address this by presenting a cost-benefit theory for gene regulation functions that takes into account temporally varying inputs in the environment and stochastic noise in the biological components. We apply this theory to the well-studied lac operon of E. coli. The present theory explains the shape of this regulation function in terms of temporal variation of the input signals, and of minimizing the deleterious effect of cell-cell variability in regulatory protein levels. We also apply the theory to understand the evolutionary tradeoffs in setting the number of regulatory proteins and for selection of feed-forward loops in genetic circuits. The present cost-benefit theory can be used to understand the shape of other gene regulatory functions in terms of environment and noise constraints.

  17. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of three genes encoding polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins from Capsicum annuum, and their relation to increased resistance to two fungal pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are plant cell wall glycoproteins that can inhibit fungal endopolygalacturonases (PGs). Inhibiting by PGIPs directly reduces potential PG activity in specific plant pathogenic fungi, reducing their aggressiveness. Here, we isolated and functionally chara...

  18. Review of Literature: Genes Related to Postaxial Polydactyly

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Prashant Kumar; El-Harouni, Ashraf A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postaxial polydactyly (PAP) is one of the commonest congenital malformations and usually is associated to several syndromes. There is no primary investigational strategy for PAP cases with single gene disorder in literature. PAP cases with single gene disorder can be classified according to common pathways and molecular basis. Molecular classification may help in diagnostic approach. Materials and Methods: All single gene disorders associated with PAP reported on PubMed and OMIM are analyzed and classified according to molecular basis. Results: Majority of genes related to cilia structure and functions are associated with PAP, so we classified them as ciliopathies and non-ciliopathies groups. Genes related to Shh–Gli3 pathway was the commonest group in non-ciliopathies. Conclusion: Genes related to cilia are most commonly related to PAP due to their indirect relationship to Shh–Gli3 signaling pathway. Initially, PAP may be the only clinical finding with ciliopathies so those cases need follow up. Proper diagnosis is helpful for management and genetic counseling. Molecular approach may help to define pleiotropy. PMID:25717468

  19. Annotation of gene function in citrus using gene expression information and co-expression networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Citrus encompasses major cultivated plants such as sweet orange, mandarin, lemon and grapefruit, among the world’s most economically important fruit crops. With increasing volumes of transcriptomics data available for these species, Gene Co-expression Network (GCN) analysis is a viable option for predicting gene function at a genome-wide scale. GCN analysis is based on a “guilt-by-association” principle whereby genes encoding proteins involved in similar and/or related biological processes may exhibit similar expression patterns across diverse sets of experimental conditions. While bioinformatics resources such as GCN analysis are widely available for efficient gene function prediction in model plant species including Arabidopsis, soybean and rice, in citrus these tools are not yet developed. Results We have constructed a comprehensive GCN for citrus inferred from 297 publicly available Affymetrix Genechip Citrus Genome microarray datasets, providing gene co-expression relationships at a genome-wide scale (33,000 transcripts). The comprehensive citrus GCN consists of a global GCN (condition-independent) and four condition-dependent GCNs that survey the sweet orange species only, all citrus fruit tissues, all citrus leaf tissues, or stress-exposed plants. All of these GCNs are clustered using genome-wide, gene-centric (guide) and graph clustering algorithms for flexibility of gene function prediction. For each putative cluster, gene ontology (GO) enrichment and gene expression specificity analyses were performed to enhance gene function, expression and regulation pattern prediction. The guide-gene approach was used to infer novel roles of genes involved in disease susceptibility and vitamin C metabolism, and graph-clustering approaches were used to investigate isoprenoid/phenylpropanoid metabolism in citrus peel, and citric acid catabolism via the GABA shunt in citrus fruit. Conclusions Integration of citrus gene co-expression networks

  20. Sucrose metabolism gene families and their biological functions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Chi, Yun-Hua; Wang, Ji-Zhou; Zhou, Jun-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Song; Zhang, Bao-Lan; Ma, Ali; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2015-11-30

    Sucrose, as the main product of photosynthesis, plays crucial roles in plant development. Although studies on general metabolism pathway were well documented, less information is available on the genome-wide identification of these genes, their expansion and evolutionary history as well as their biological functions. We focused on four sucrose metabolism related gene families including sucrose synthase, sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. These gene families exhibited different expansion and evolutionary history as their host genomes experienced differentiated rates of the whole genome duplication, tandem and segmental duplication, or mobile element mediated gene gain and loss. They were evolutionarily conserved under purifying selection among species and expression divergence played important roles for gene survival after expansion. However, we have detected recent positive selection during intra-species divergence. Overexpression of 15 sorghum genes in Arabidopsis revealed their roles in biomass accumulation, flowering time control, seed germination and response to high salinity and sugar stresses. Our studies uncovered the molecular mechanisms of gene expansion and evolution and also provided new insight into the role of positive selection in intra-species divergence. Overexpression data revealed novel biological functions of these genes in flowering time control and seed germination under normal and stress conditions.

  1. Sucrose metabolism gene families and their biological functions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Chi, Yun-Hua; Wang, Ji-Zhou; Zhou, Jun-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Song; Zhang, Bao-Lan; Ma, Ali; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Sucrose, as the main product of photosynthesis, plays crucial roles in plant development. Although studies on general metabolism pathway were well documented, less information is available on the genome-wide identification of these genes, their expansion and evolutionary history as well as their biological functions. We focused on four sucrose metabolism related gene families including sucrose synthase, sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. These gene families exhibited different expansion and evolutionary history as their host genomes experienced differentiated rates of the whole genome duplication, tandem and segmental duplication, or mobile element mediated gene gain and loss. They were evolutionarily conserved under purifying selection among species and expression divergence played important roles for gene survival after expansion. However, we have detected recent positive selection during intra-species divergence. Overexpression of 15 sorghum genes in Arabidopsis revealed their roles in biomass accumulation, flowering time control, seed germination and response to high salinity and sugar stresses. Our studies uncovered the molecular mechanisms of gene expansion and evolution and also provided new insight into the role of positive selection in intra-species divergence. Overexpression data revealed novel biological functions of these genes in flowering time control and seed germination under normal and stress conditions. PMID:26616172

  2. Molecular and Functional Characterization of Broccoli EMBRYONIC FLOWER 2 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long-Fang O.; Lin, Chun-Hung; Lai, Ying-Mi; Huang, Jia-Yuan; Sung, Zinmay Renee

    2012-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins regulate major developmental processes in Arabidopsis. EMBRYONIC FLOWER 2 (EMF2), the VEFS domain-containing PcG gene, regulates diverse genetic pathways and is required for vegetative development and plant survival. Despite widespread EMF2-like sequences in plants, little is known about their function other than in Arabidopsis and rice. To study the role of EMF2 in broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica cv. Elegance) development, we identified two broccoli EMF2 (BoEMF2) genes with sequence homology to and a similar gene expression pattern to that in Arabidopsis (AtEMF2). Reducing their expression in broccoli resulted in aberrant phenotypes and gene expression patterns. BoEMF2 regulates genes involved in diverse developmental and stress programs similar to AtEMF2 in Arabidopsis. However, BoEMF2 differs from AtEMF2 in the regulation of flower organ identity, cell proliferation and elongation, and death-related genes, which may explain the distinct phenotypes. The expression of BoEMF2.1 in the Arabidopsis emf2 mutant (Rescued emf2) partially rescued the mutant phenotype and restored the gene expression pattern to that of the wild type. Many EMF2-mediated molecular and developmental functions are conserved in broccoli and Arabidopsis. Furthermore, the restored gene expression pattern in Rescued emf2 provides insights into the molecular basis of PcG-mediated growth and development. PMID:22537758

  3. High presence/absence gene variability in defense-related gene clusters of Cucumis melo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Changes in the copy number of DNA sequences are one of the main mechanisms generating genome variability in eukaryotes. These changes are often related to phenotypic effects such as genetic disorders or novel pathogen resistance. The increasing availability of genome sequences through the application of next-generation massive sequencing technologies has allowed the study of genomic polymorphisms at both the interspecific and intraspecific levels, thus helping to understand how species adapt to changing environments through genome variability. Results Data on gene presence/absence variation (PAV) in melon was obtained by resequencing a cultivated accession and an old-relative melon variety, and using previously obtained resequencing data from three other melon cultivars, among them DHL92, on which the current draft melon genome sequence is based. A total of 1,697 PAV events were detected, involving 4.4% of the predicted melon gene complement. In all, an average 1.5% of genes were absent from each analyzed cultivar as compared to the DHL92 reference genome. The most populated functional category among the 304 PAV genes of known function was that of stress response proteins (30% of all classified PAVs). Our results suggest that genes from multi-copy families are five times more likely to be affected by PAV than singleton genes. Also, the chance of genes present in the genome in tandem arrays being affected by PAV is double that of isolated genes, with PAV genes tending to be in longer clusters. The highest concentration of PAV events detected in the melon genome was found in a 1.1 Mb region of linkage group V, which also shows the highest density of melon stress-response genes. In particular, this region contains the longest continuous gene-containing PAV sequence so far identified in melon. Conclusions The first genome-wide report of PAV variation among several melon cultivars is presented here. Multi-copy and clustered genes, especially those with

  4. Cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes in human and mouse as annotated in the gene ontology.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Mohamed; Ismael, Siba; Paulsen, Martina; Helms, Volkhard

    2012-01-01

    By analyzing the cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes as annotated in the Gene Ontology for human and mouse, we found that imprinted genes are often involved in developmental, transport and regulatory processes. In the human, paternally expressed genes are enriched in GO terms related to the development of organs and of anatomical structures. In the mouse, maternally expressed genes regulate cation transport as well as G-protein signaling processes. Furthermore, we investigated if imprinted genes are regulated by common transcription factors. We identified 25 TF families that showed an enrichment of binding sites in the set of imprinted genes in human and 40 TF families in mouse. In general, maternally and paternally expressed genes are not regulated by different transcription factors. The genes Nnat, Klf14, Blcap, Gnas and Ube3a contribute most to the enrichment of TF families. In the mouse, genes that are maternally expressed in placenta are enriched for AP1 binding sites. In the human, we found that these genes possessed binding sites for both, AP1 and SP1. PMID:23226257

  5. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  6. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  7. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-08-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  8. Functional gene diversity of oolitic sands from Great Bahama Bank.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M R; Van Norstrand, J D; Eberli, G P; Piggot, A M; Zhou, J; Klaus, J S

    2014-05-01

    Despite the importance of oolitic depositional systems as indicators of climate and reservoirs of inorganic C, little is known about the microbial functional diversity, structure, composition, and potential metabolic processes leading to precipitation of carbonates. To fill this gap, we assess the metabolic gene carriage and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) development in microbial communities associated with oolitic carbonate sediments from the Bahamas Archipelago. Oolitic sediments ranging from high-energy 'active' to lower energy 'non-active' and 'microbially stabilized' environments were examined as they represent contrasting depositional settings, mostly influenced by tidal flows and wave-generated currents. Functional gene analysis, which employed a microarray-based gene technology, detected a total of 12,432 of 95,847 distinct gene probes, including a large number of metabolic processes previously linked to mineral precipitation. Among these, gene-encoding enzymes for denitrification, sulfate reduction, ammonification, and oxygenic/anoxygenic photosynthesis were abundant. In addition, a broad diversity of genes was related to organic carbon degradation, and N2 fixation implying these communities has metabolic plasticity that enables survival under oligotrophic conditions. Differences in functional genes were detected among the environments, with higher diversity associated with non-active and microbially stabilized environments in comparison with the active environment. EPS showed a gradient increase from active to microbially stabilized communities, and when combined with functional gene analysis, which revealed genes encoding EPS-degrading enzymes (chitinases, glucoamylase, amylases), supports a putative role of EPS-mediated microbial calcium carbonate precipitation. We propose that carbonate precipitation in marine oolitic biofilms is spatially and temporally controlled by a complex consortium of microbes with diverse physiologies, including

  9. Gene function analysis in osteosarcoma based on microarray gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Jinghua; Tan, Hongyu; Wang, Weidong; Liu, Yilin; Song, Ruipeng; Wang, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Osteosa rcoma is an aggressive malignant neoplasm that exhibits osteoblastic differentiation and produces malignant osteoid. The aim of this study was to find feature genes associated with osteosarcoma and correlative gene functions which can distinguish cancer tissues from non-tumor tissues. Gene expression profile GSE14359 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, including 10 osteosarcoma samples and 2 normal samples. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between osteosarcoma and normal specimens were identified using limma package of R. DAVID was applied to mine osteosarcoma associated genes and analyze the GO enrichment on gene functions and KEGG pathways. Then, corresponding protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of DEGs was constructed based on the data collected from STRING datasets. Principal component of top10 DEGs and PPI network of top 20 DEGs were further analyzed. Finally, transcription factors were predicted by uploading the two groups of DEGs to TfactS database. A total of 437 genes, including 114 up-regulated genes and 323 down-regulated genes, were filtered as DEGs, of which 46 were associated with osteosarcoma by Disease Module. GO and KEGG pathway enrichment analysis showed that genes mainly affected the process of immune response and the development of skeletal and vascular system. The PPI network analysis elucidated that hemoglobin and histocompatibility proteins and enzymes, which were associated with immune response, were closely associated with osteosarcoma. Transcription factors MYC and SP1 were predicted to be significantly related to osteosarcoma. The discovery of gene functions and transcription factors has the potential to use in clinic for diagnosis of osteosarcoma in future. In addition, it will pave the way to studying mechanism and effective therapies for osteosarcoma. PMID:26379830

  10. Cloning of the Epstein-Barr virus-related rhesus lymphocryptovirus as a bacterial artificial chromosome: a loss-of-function mutation of the rhBARF1 immune evasion gene.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Makoto; Orlova, Nina; Quink, Carol; Wang, Fred

    2011-02-01

    Rhesus macaques are naturally infected with a gammaherpesvirus which is in the same lymphocryptovirus (LCV) genus as and closely related to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The rhesus macaque LCV (rhLCV) contains a repertoire of genes identical to that of EBV, and experimental rhLCV infection of naive rhesus macaques accurately models acute and persistent EBV infection of humans. We cloned the LCL8664 rhLCV strain as a bacterial artificial chromosome to create recombinant rhLCV for investigation in this animal model system. A recombinant rhLCV (clone 16 rhLCV) carrying a mutation in the putative immune evasion gene rhBARF1 was created along with a rescued wild-type (rWT) rhLCV in which the rhBARF1 open reading frame (ORF) was repaired. The rWT rhLCV molecular clone demonstrated viral replication and B-cell immortalization properties comparable to those of the naturally derived LCL8664 rhLCV. Qualitatively, clone 16 rhLCV carrying a mutated rhBARF1 was competent for viral replication and B-cell immortalization, but quantitative assays showed that clone 16 rhLCV immortalized B cells less efficiently than LCL8664 and rWT rhLCV. Functional studies showed that rhBARF1 could block CSF-1 cytokine signaling as well as EBV BARF1, whereas the truncated rhBARF1 from clone 16 rhLCV was a loss-of-function mutant. These recombinant rhLCV can be used in the rhesus macaque animal model system to better understand how a putative viral immune evasion gene contributes to the pathogenesis of acute and persistent EBV infection. The development of a genetic system for making recombinant rhLCV constitutes a major advance in the study of EBV pathogenesis in the rhesus macaque animal model.

  11. Evolution and function of de novo originated genes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2013-05-01

    De novo origination has recently been appreciated to be an important mechanism contributing to the origin of genes. Evidence indicates that de novo originated genes can evolve important and even essential functions rapidly. We present an "adaptation following neutrality" process to explain the evolution of essential function of new genes. How new de novo originated genes become involved in pathways and interact with other old genes, and the exact functions of these new genes, however, remains largely undocumented. Examinations of the function of de novo origin and the function of noncoding RNA genes should become more frequent and appreciated in the future studies.

  12. The systematic functional characterisation of Xq28 genes prioritises candidate disease genes

    PubMed Central

    Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Mehrle, Alexander; Bechtel, Stephanie; Simpson, Jeremy C; Kioschis, Petra; Wiemann, Stefan; Wellenreuther, Ruth; Poustka, Annemarie

    2006-01-01

    Background Well known for its gene density and the large number of mapped diseases, the human sub-chromosomal region Xq28 has long been a focus of genome research. Over 40 of approximately 300 X-linked diseases map to this region, and systematic mapping, transcript identification, and mutation analysis has led to the identification of causative genes for 26 of these diseases, leaving another 17 diseases mapped to Xq28, where the causative gene is still unknown. To expedite disease gene identification, we have initiated the functional characterisation of all known Xq28 genes. Results By using a systematic approach, we describe the Xq28 genes by RNA in situ hybridisation and Northern blotting of the mouse orthologs, as well as subcellular localisation and data mining of the human genes. We have developed a relational web-accessible database with comprehensive query options integrating all experimental data. Using this database, we matched gene expression patterns with affected tissues for 16 of the 17 remaining Xq28 linked diseases, where the causative gene is unknown. Conclusion By using this systematic approach, we have prioritised genes in linkage regions of Xq28-mapped diseases to an amenable number for mutational screens. Our database can be queried by any researcher performing highly specified searches including diseases not listed in OMIM or diseases that might be linked to Xq28 in the future. PMID:16503986

  13. Physicochemical evolution and molecular adaptation of the cetacean osmoregulation-related gene UT-A2 and implications for functional studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingzhen; Yu, Xueying; Hu, Bo; Zheng, Jinsong; Xiao, Wuhan; Hao, Yujiang; Liu, Wenhua; Wang, Ding

    2015-01-01

    Cetaceans have an enigmatic evolutionary history of re-invading aquatic habitats. One of their essential adaptabilities that has enabled this process is their homeostatic strategy adjustment. Here, we investigated the physicochemical evolution and molecular adaptation of the cetacean urea transporter UT-A2, which plays an important role in urine concentration and water homeostasis. First, we cloned UT-A2 from the freshwater Yangtze finless porpoise, after which bioinformatics analyses were conducted based on available datasets (including freshwater baiji and marine toothed and baleen whales) using MEGA, PAML, DataMonkey, TreeSAAP and Consurf. Our findings suggest that the UT-A2 protein shows folding similar to that of dvUT and UT-B, whereas some variations occurred in the functional So and Si regions of the selectivity filter. Additionally, several regions of the cetacean UT-A2 protein have experienced molecular adaptations. We suggest that positive-destabilizing selection could contribute to adaptations by influencing its biochemical and conformational character. The conservation of amino acid residues within the selectivity filter of the urea conduction pore is likely to be necessary for urea conduction, whereas the non-conserved amino acid replacements around the entrance and exit of the conduction pore could potentially affect the activity, which could be interesting target sites for future mutagenesis studies.

  14. Physicochemical Evolution and Molecular Adaptation of the Cetacean Osmoregulation-related Gene UT-A2 and Implications for Functional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingzhen; Yu, Xueying; Hu, Bo; Zheng, Jinsong; Xiao, Wuhan; Hao, Yujiang; Liu, Wenhua; Wang, Ding

    2015-01-01

    Cetaceans have an enigmatic evolutionary history of re-invading aquatic habitats. One of their essential adaptabilities that has enabled this process is their homeostatic strategy adjustment. Here, we investigated the physicochemical evolution and molecular adaptation of the cetacean urea transporter UT-A2, which plays an important role in urine concentration and water homeostasis. First, we cloned UT-A2 from the freshwater Yangtze finless porpoise, after which bioinformatics analyses were conducted based on available datasets (including freshwater baiji and marine toothed and baleen whales) using MEGA, PAML, DataMonkey, TreeSAAP and Consurf. Our findings suggest that the UT-A2 protein shows folding similar to that of dvUT and UT-B, whereas some variations occurred in the functional So and Si regions of the selectivity filter. Additionally, several regions of the cetacean UT-A2 protein have experienced molecular adaptations. We suggest that positive-destabilizing selection could contribute to adaptations by influencing its biochemical and conformational character. The conservation of amino acid residues within the selectivity filter of the urea conduction pore is likely to be necessary for urea conduction, whereas the non-conserved amino acid replacements around the entrance and exit of the conduction pore could potentially affect the activity, which could be interesting target sites for future mutagenesis studies. PMID:25762239

  15. Human Cells Display Reduced Apoptotic Function Relative to Chimpanzee Cells

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Previously published gene expression analyses suggested that apoptotic function may be reduced in humans relative to chimpanzees and led to the hypothesis that this difference may contribute to the relatively larger size of the human brain and the increased propensity of humans to develop cancer. In this study, we sought to further test the hypothesis that humans maintain a reduced apoptotic function relative to chimpanzees by conducting a series of apoptotic function assays on human, chimpanzee and macaque primary fibroblastic cells. Human cells consistently displayed significantly reduced apoptotic function relative to the chimpanzee and macaque cells. These results are consistent with earlier findings indicating that apoptotic function is reduced in humans relative to chimpanzees. PMID:23029431

  16. AKT1 as the PageRank hub gene is associated with melanoma and its functional annotation is highly related to the estrogen signaling pathway that may regulate the growth of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingjing; Zeng, Xue; Song, Ping; Wu, Xiaohong; Shi, Hongbo

    2016-10-01

    In order to detect the disease-associated genes and their gene interaction function and association with melanoma mechanisms, we identified a total of 1,310 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) from the Gene Expression Omnibus database GSE3189 with FDR <0.01 and |logFC| >2 using the R package. After constructing the gene interaction network by STRING with the selected DEGs, we applied a statistical approach to identify the topological hub genes with PageRank score. Forty-four genes were identified in this network and AKT1 was selected as the most important hub gene. The AKT1 gene encodes a serine‑threonine protein kinase (AKT). High expression of AKT is involved in the resistance of cell apoptosis as well as adaptive resistance to treatment in melanoma. Our results indicated that AKT1 with a higher expression in melanoma showed enriched binding sites in the negative regulation of response to external stimulus, which enables cells to adapt to changes in external stimulation for survival. Another finding was that AKT regulated the lipid metabolic process and may be involved in melanoma progression and promotion of tumor growth through gene enrichment function analysis. Two highlighted pathways were detected in our study: i) the estrogen signaling pathway modulates the immune tolerance and resistance to cell apoptosis, which contributes to the growth of melanoma and ii) the RAP1 signaling pathway which regulates focal adhesion (FA) negative feedback to cell migration and invasion in melanoma. Our studies highlighted the top differentially expressed gene AKT1 and its correlation with the estrogen signaling and RAP1 signaling pathways to alter the proliferation and apoptosis of melanoma cells. Analysis of the enrichment functions of genes associated with melanoma will help us find the exact mechanism of melanoma and advance the full potential of newly targeted cancer therapy. PMID:27573172

  17. A widespread class of reverse transcriptase-related cellular genes.

    PubMed

    Gladyshev, Eugene A; Arkhipova, Irina R

    2011-12-20

    Reverse transcriptases (RTs) polymerize DNA on RNA templates. They fall into several structurally related but distinct classes and form an assemblage of RT-like enzymes that, in addition to RTs, also includes certain viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRP) synthesizing RNA on RNA templates. It is generally believed that most RT-like enzymes originate from retrotransposons or viruses and have no specific function in the host cell, with telomerases being the only notable exception. Here we report on the discovery and properties of a unique class of RT-related cellular genes collectively named rvt. We present evidence that rvts are not components of retrotransposons or viruses, but single-copy genes with a characteristic domain structure that may contain introns in evolutionarily conserved positions, occur in syntenic regions, and evolve under purifying selection. These genes can be found in all major taxonomic groups including protists, fungi, animals, plants, and even bacteria, although they exhibit patchy phylogenetic distribution in each kingdom. We also show that the RVT protein purified from one of its natural hosts, Neurospora crassa, exists in a multimeric form and has the ability to polymerize NTPs as well as dNTPs in vitro, with a strong preference for NTPs, using Mn(2+) as a cofactor. The existence of a previously unknown class of single-copy RT-related genes calls for reevaluation of the current views on evolution and functional roles of RNA-dependent polymerases in living cells.

  18. A widespread class of reverse transcriptase-related cellular genes

    PubMed Central

    Gladyshev, Eugene A.; Arkhipova, Irina R.

    2011-01-01

    Reverse transcriptases (RTs) polymerize DNA on RNA templates. They fall into several structurally related but distinct classes and form an assemblage of RT-like enzymes that, in addition to RTs, also includes certain viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRP) synthesizing RNA on RNA templates. It is generally believed that most RT-like enzymes originate from retrotransposons or viruses and have no specific function in the host cell, with telomerases being the only notable exception. Here we report on the discovery and properties of a unique class of RT-related cellular genes collectively named rvt. We present evidence that rvts are not components of retrotransposons or viruses, but single-copy genes with a characteristic domain structure that may contain introns in evolutionarily conserved positions, occur in syntenic regions, and evolve under purifying selection. These genes can be found in all major taxonomic groups including protists, fungi, animals, plants, and even bacteria, although they exhibit patchy phylogenetic distribution in each kingdom. We also show that the RVT protein purified from one of its natural hosts, Neurospora crassa, exists in a multimeric form and has the ability to polymerize NTPs as well as dNTPs in vitro, with a strong preference for NTPs, using Mn2+ as a cofactor. The existence of a previously unknown class of single-copy RT-related genes calls for reevaluation of the current views on evolution and functional roles of RNA-dependent polymerases in living cells. PMID:21876125

  19. Microbial Functional Gene Diversity with a Shift of Subsurface Redox Conditions during In Situ Uranium Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yuting; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; N′Guessan, Lucie A.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Deng, Ye; Long, Philip E.; Resch, C. Tom; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Li, Guanghe; Hazen, Terry C.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    To better understand the microbial functional diversity changes with subsurface redox conditions during in situ uranium bioremediation, key functional genes were studied with GeoChip, a comprehensive functional gene microarray, in field experiments at a uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) site (Rifle, CO). The results indicated that functional microbial communities altered with a shift in the dominant metabolic process, as documented by hierarchical cluster and ordination analyses of all detected functional genes. The abundance of dsrAB genes (dissimilatory sulfite reductase genes) and methane generation-related mcr genes (methyl coenzyme M reductase coding genes) increased when redox conditions shifted from Fe-reducing to sulfate-reducing conditions. The cytochrome genes detected were primarily from Geobacter sp. and decreased with lower subsurface redox conditions. Statistical analysis of environmental parameters and functional genes indicated that acetate, U(VI), and redox potential (Eh) were the most significant geochemical variables linked to microbial functional gene structures, and changes in microbial functional diversity were strongly related to the dominant terminal electron-accepting process following acetate addition. The study indicates that the microbial functional genes clearly reflect the in situ redox conditions and the dominant microbial processes, which in turn influence uranium bioreduction. Microbial functional genes thus could be very useful for tracking microbial community structure and dynamics during bioremediation. PMID:22327592

  20. Insights into SAGA function during gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana

    2009-01-01

    Histone modifications are a crucial source of epigenetic control. SAGA (Spt–Ada–Gcn5 acetyltransferase) is a chromatin-modifying complex that contains two distinct enzymatic activities, Gcn5 and Ubp8, through which it acetylates and deubiquitinates histone residues, respectively, thereby enforcing a pattern of modifications that is decisive in regulating gene expression. Here, I discuss the latest contributions to understanding the roles of the SAGA complex, highlighting the characterization of the SAGA-deubiquitination module, and emphasizing the functions newly ascribed to SAGA during transcription elongation and messenger-RNA export. These findings suggest that a crosstalk exists between chromatin remodelling, transcription and messenger-RNA export, which could constitute a checkpoint for accurate gene expression. I focus particularly on the new components of human SAGA, which was recently discovered and confirms the conservation of the SAGA complex throughout evolution. PMID:19609321

  1. ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE: From Gene to Function.

    PubMed

    Vanlerberghe, Greg C.; McIntosh, Lee

    1997-06-01

    Plants, some fungi, and protists contain a cyanide-resistant, alternative mitochondrial respiratory pathway. This pathway branches at the ubiquinone pool and consists of an alternative oxidase encoded by the nuclear gene Aox1. Alternative pathway respiration is only linked to proton translocation at Complex 1 (NADH dehydrogenase). Alternative oxidase expression is influenced by stress stimuli-cold, oxidative stress, pathogen attack-and by factors constricting electron flow through the cytochrome pathway of respiration. Control is exerted at the levels of gene expression and in response to the availability of carbon and reducing potential. Posttranslational control involves reversible covalent modification of the alternative oxidase and activation by specific carbon metabolites. This dynamic system of coarse and fine control may function to balance upstream respiratory carbon metabolism and downstream electron transport when these coupled processes become imbalanced as a result of changes in the supply of, or demand for, carbon, reducing power, and ATP.

  2. Minor Lesion Mutational Spectrum of the Entire NF1 Gene Does Not Explain Its High Mutability but Points to a Functional Domain Upstream of the GAP-Related Domain

    PubMed Central

    Fahsold, Raimund; Hoffmeyer, Sven; Mischung, Claudia; Gille, Christoph; Ehlers, Christian; Kücükceylan, Nazan; Abdel-Nour, Maher; Gewies, Andreas; Peters, Hartmut; Kaufmann, Dieter; Buske, Annegret; Tinschert, Sigrid; Nürnberg, Peter

    2000-01-01

    More than 500 unrelated patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) were screened for mutations in the NF1 gene. For each patient, the whole coding sequence and all splice sites were studied for aberrations, either by the protein truncation test (PTT), temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) of genomic PCR products, or, most often, by direct genomic sequencing (DGS) of all individual exons. A total of 301 sequence variants, including 278 bona fide pathogenic mutations, were identified. As many as 216 or 183 of the genuine mutations, comprising 179 or 161 different ones, can be considered novel when compared to the recent findings of Upadhyaya and Cooper, or to the NNFF mutation database. Mutation-detection efficiencies of the various screening methods were similar: 47.1% for PTT, 53.7% for TGGE, and 54.9% for DGS. Some 224 mutations (80.2%) yielded directly or indirectly premature termination codons. These mutations showed even distribution over the whole gene from exon 1 to exon 47. Of all sequence variants determined in our study, <20% represent C→T or G→A transitions within a CpG dinucleotide, and only six different mutations also occur in NF1 pseudogenes, with five being typical C→T transitions in a CpG. Thus, neither frequent deamination of 5-methylcytosines nor interchromosomal gene conversion may account for the high mutation rate of the NF1 gene. As opposed to the truncating mutations, the 28 (10.1%) missense or single-amino-acid-deletion mutations identified clustered in two distinct regions, the GAP-related domain (GRD) and an upstream gene segment comprising exons 11–17. The latter forms a so-called cysteine/serine-rich domain with three cysteine pairs suggestive of ATP binding, as well as three potential cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) recognition sites obviously phosphorylated by PKA. Coincidence of mutated amino acids and those conserved between human and Drosophila strongly suggest significant functional relevance of this region

  3. Inference of gene regulation functions from dynamic transcriptome data

    PubMed Central

    Hillenbrand, Patrick; Maier, Kerstin C; Cramer, Patrick; Gerland, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    To quantify gene regulation, a function is required that relates transcription factor binding to DNA (input) to the rate of mRNA synthesis from a target gene (output). Such a ‘gene regulation function’ (GRF) generally cannot be measured because the experimental titration of inputs and simultaneous readout of outputs is difficult. Here we show that GRFs may instead be inferred from natural changes in cellular gene expression, as exemplified for the cell cycle in the yeast S. cerevisiae. We develop this inference approach based on a time series of mRNA synthesis rates from a synchronized population of cells observed over three cell cycles. We first estimate the functional form of how input transcription factors determine mRNA output and then derive GRFs for target genes in the CLB2 gene cluster that are expressed during G2/M phase. Systematic analysis of additional GRFs suggests a network architecture that rationalizes transcriptional cell cycle oscillations. We find that a transcription factor network alone can produce oscillations in mRNA expression, but that additional input from cyclin oscillations is required to arrive at the native behaviour of the cell cycle oscillator. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12188.001 PMID:27652904

  4. Warming Alters Expressions of Microbial Functional Genes Important to Ecosystem Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Kai; Xie, Jianping; Zhou, Aifen; Liu, Feifei; Li, Dejun; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Luo, Yiqi; Zhou, Jizhong

    2016-01-01

    Soil microbial communities play critical roles in ecosystem functioning and are likely altered by climate warming. However, so far, little is known about effects of warming on microbial functional gene expressions. Here, we applied functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0) to analyze cDNA reversely transcribed from total RNA to assess expressed functional genes in active soil microbial communities after nine years of experimental warming in a tallgrass prairie. Our results showed that warming significantly altered the community wide gene expressions. Specifically, expressed genes for degrading more recalcitrant carbon were stimulated by warming, likely linked to the plant community shift toward more C4 species under warming and to decrease the long-term soil carbon stability. In addition, warming changed expressed genes in labile C degradation and N cycling in different directions (increase and decrease), possibly reflecting the dynamics of labile C and available N pools during sampling. However, the average abundances of expressed genes in phosphorus and sulfur cycling were all increased by warming, implying a stable trend of accelerated P and S processes which might be a mechanism to sustain higher plant growth. Furthermore, the expressed gene composition was closely related to both dynamic (e.g., soil moisture) and stable environmental attributes (e.g., C4 leaf C or N content), indicating that RNA analyses could also capture certain stable trends in the long-term treatment. Overall, this study revealed the importance of elucidating functional gene expressions of soil microbial community in enhancing our understanding of ecosystem responses to warming. PMID:27199978

  5. Warming Alters Expressions of Microbial Functional Genes Important to Ecosystem Functioning.

    PubMed

    Xue, Kai; Xie, Jianping; Zhou, Aifen; Liu, Feifei; Li, Dejun; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Luo, Yiqi; Zhou, Jizhong

    2016-01-01

    Soil microbial communities play critical roles in ecosystem functioning and are likely altered by climate warming. However, so far, little is known about effects of warming on microbial functional gene expressions. Here, we applied functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0) to analyze cDNA reversely transcribed from total RNA to assess expressed functional genes in active soil microbial communities after nine years of experimental warming in a tallgrass prairie. Our results showed that warming significantly altered the community wide gene expressions. Specifically, expressed genes for degrading more recalcitrant carbon were stimulated by warming, likely linked to the plant community shift toward more C4 species under warming and to decrease the long-term soil carbon stability. In addition, warming changed expressed genes in labile C degradation and N cycling in different directions (increase and decrease), possibly reflecting the dynamics of labile C and available N pools during sampling. However, the average abundances of expressed genes in phosphorus and sulfur cycling were all increased by warming, implying a stable trend of accelerated P and S processes which might be a mechanism to sustain higher plant growth. Furthermore, the expressed gene composition was closely related to both dynamic (e.g., soil moisture) and stable environmental attributes (e.g., C4 leaf C or N content), indicating that RNA analyses could also capture certain stable trends in the long-term treatment. Overall, this study revealed the importance of elucidating functional gene expressions of soil microbial community in enhancing our understanding of ecosystem responses to warming.

  6. Sex steroid-related candidate genes in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Westberg, Lars; Eriksson, Elias

    2008-07-01

    Sex steroids readily pass the blood-brain barrier, and receptors for them are abundant in brain areas important for the regulation of emotions, cognition and behaviour. Animal experiments have revealed both important early effects of these hormones on brain development and their ongoing influence on brain morphology and neurotransmission in the adult organism. The important effects of sex steroids on human behaviour are illustrated by, for example, the effect of reduced levels of these hormones on sexual drive and conditions such as premenstrual dysphoric disorder, perimenopausal dysphoria, postpartum depression, postpartum psychosis, dysphoria induced by oral contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and anabolic steroid-induced aggression. The fact that men and women (as groups) differ with respect to the prevalence of several psychiatric disorders, certain aspects of cognitive function and certain personality traits may possibly also reflect an influence of sex steroids on human behaviour. The heritability of most behavioural traits, including personality, cognitive abilities and susceptibility to psychiatric illness, is considerable, but as yet, only few genes of definite importance in this context have been identified. Given the important role of sex steroids for brain function, it is unfortunate that relatively few studies so far have addressed the possible influence of sex steroid-related genes on interindividual differences with respect to personality, cognition and susceptibility to psychiatric disorders. To facilitate further research in this area, this review provides information on several such genes and summarizes what is currently known with respect to their possible influence on brain function.

  7. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP)

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that manifests as a debilitating headache associated with altered sensory perception. The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is now firmly established as a key player in migraine. Clinical trials carried out during the past decade have proved that CGRP receptor antagonists are effective for treating migraine, and antibodies to the receptor and CGRP are currently under investigation. Despite this progress in the clinical arena, the mechanisms by which CGRP triggers migraine remain uncertain. This review discusses mechanisms whereby CGRP enhances sensitivity to sensory input at multiple levels in both the periphery and central nervous system. Future studies on epistatic and epigenetic regulators of CGRP actions are expected to shed further light on CGRP actions in migraine. In conclusion, targeting CGRP represents an approachable therapeutic strategy for migraine. PMID:25340934

  8. Analysis of gene functions in Maize chlorotic mottle virus.

    PubMed

    Scheets, Kay

    2016-08-15

    Gene functions of strains of Maize chlorotic mottle virus, which comprises the monotypic genus Machlomovirus, have not been previously identified. In this study mutagenesis of the seven genes encoded in maize chlorotic mottle virus (MCMV) showed that the genes with positional and sequence similarity to their homologs in viruses of related tombusvirid genera had similar functions. p50 and its readthrough protein p111 are the only proteins required for replication in maize protoplasts, and they function at a low level in trans. Two movement proteins, p7a and p7b, and coat protein, encoded on subgenomic RNA1, are required for cell-to-cell movement in maize, and p7a and p7b function in trans. A unique protein, p31, expressed as a readthrough extension of p7a, is required for efficient systemic infection. The 5' proximal MCMV gene encodes a unique 32kDa protein that is not required for replication or movement. Transcripts lacking p32 expression accumulate to about 1/3 the level of wild type transcripts in protoplasts and produce delayed, mild infections in maize plants. Additional studies on p32, p31 and the unique amino-terminal region of p50 are needed to further characterize the life cycle of this unique tombusvirid. PMID:27242072

  9. Combinatorial gene regulation by modulation of relative pulse timing

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yihan; Sohn, Chang Ho; Dalal, Chiraj K.; Cai, Long; Elowitz, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of individual living cells have revealed that many transcription factors activate in dynamic, and often stochastic, pulses within the same cell. However, it has remained unclear whether cells might modulate the relative timing of these pulses to control gene expression. Here, using quantitative single-cell time-lapse imaging of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that the pulsatile transcription factors Msn2 and Mig1 combinatorially regulate their target genes through modulation of their relative pulse timing. The activator Msn2 and repressor Mig1 pulsed in either a temporally overlapping or non-overlapping manner during their transient response to different inputs, with only the non-overlapping dynamics efficiently activating target gene expression. Similarly, under constant environmental conditions, where Msn2 and Mig1 exhibit sporadic pulsing, glucose concentration modulated the temporal overlap between pulses of the two factors. Together, these results reveal a time-based mode of combinatorial gene regulation. Regulation through relative signal timing is common in engineering and neurobiology, and these results suggest that it could also function broadly within the signaling and regulatory systems of the cell. PMID:26466562

  10. Functional cloning and characterization of antibiotic resistance genes from the chicken gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Ying; Lin, Jun

    2012-04-01

    Culture-independent sampling in conjunction with a functional cloning approach identified diverse antibiotic resistance genes for different classes of antibiotics in gut microbiomes from both conventionally raised and free-range chickens. Many of the genes are phylogenetically distant from known resistance genes. Two unique genes that conferred ampicillin and spectinomycin resistance were also functional in Campylobacter, a distant relative of the Escherichia coli host used to generate the genomic libraries.

  11. Characterization of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) spleen transcriptome and identification of immune-related genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance against specific diseases is affecting profitability in fish production systems including rainbow trout. Limited information is known about functions and mechanisms of the immune gene pathways in teleosts. Immunogenomics are powerful tools to determine immune-related genes/gene pathways a...

  12. Characterization and expression analysis of a Retinoblastoma-related gene from Chinese wild Vitis pseudoreticulata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Retinoblastoma-related (RBR) genes, a conserved gene family in higher eukaryotes, plays an important role in cell differentiation, development and mammalian cell death in animals; however, little is known about its function in plants. In this study, an RBR gene was isolated from the Chinese wild gr...

  13. Genome-Wide Gene Expression in relation to Age in Large Laboratory Cohorts of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Kimberly A.; Gardner, Kylee; Pashaj, Anjeza; Carlson, Darby J.; Yu, Fang; Eudy, James D.; Zhang, Chi; Harshman, Lawrence G.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a complex process characterized by a steady decline in an organism's ability to perform life-sustaining tasks. In the present study, two cages of approximately 12,000 mated Drosophila melanogaster females were used as a source of RNA from individuals sampled frequently as a function of age. A linear model for microarray data method was used for the microarray analysis to adjust for the box effect; it identified 1,581 candidate aging genes. Cluster analyses using a self-organizing map algorithm on the 1,581 significant genes identified gene expression patterns across different ages. Genes involved in immune system function and regulation, chorion assembly and function, and metabolism were all significantly differentially expressed as a function of age. The temporal pattern of data indicated that gene expression related to aging is affected relatively early in life span. In addition, the temporal variance in gene expression in immune function genes was compared to a random set of genes. There was an increase in the variance of gene expression within each cohort, which was not observed in the set of random genes. This observation is compatible with the hypothesis that D. melanogaster immune function genes lose control of gene expression as flies age. PMID:26090231

  14. Quantum affine algebras and universal functional relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirov, Kh S.; Razumov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    By the universal integrability objects we mean certain monodromy-type and transfer- type operators, where the representation in the auxiliary space is properly fixed, while the representation in the quantum space is not. This notion is actually determined by the structure of the universal R-matrix. We call functional relations between such universal integrability objects, and so, being independent of the representation in the quantum space, the universal functional relations. We present a short review of the universal functional relations for the quantum integrable systems associated with the quantum groups of loop Lie algebras.

  15. Identification of Autophagy in the Pine Wood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and the Molecular Characterization and Functional Analysis of Two Novel Autophagy-Related Genes, BxATG1 and BxATG8

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Li-Na; Wu, Xiao-Qin; Ye, Jian-Ren; Xue, Qi

    2016-01-01

    The pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, causes huge economic losses in pine forests, has a complex life cycle, and shows the remarkable ability to survive under unfavorable and changing environmental conditions. This ability may be related to autophagy, which is still poorly understood in B. xylophilus and no autophagy-related genes have been previously characterized. In this study, transmission electron microscopy was used to confirm that autophagy exists in B. xylophilus. The full-length cDNAs of BxATG1 and BxATG8 were first cloned from B. xylophilus, and BxATG1 and BxATG8 were characterized using bioinformatics methods. The expression pattern of the autophagy marker BxATG8 was investigated using in situ hybridization (ISH). BxATG8 was expressed in esophageal gland and hypodermal seam cells. We tested the effects of RNA interference (RNAi) on BxATG1 and BxATG8. The results revealed that BxATG1 and BxATG8 were likely associated with propagation of nematodes on fungal mats. This study confirmed the molecular characterization and functions of BxATG1 and BxATG8 in B. xylophilus and provided fundamental information between autophagy and B. xylophilus. PMID:26950119

  16. Relating equivalence relations to equivalence relations: A relational framing model of complex human functioning

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Dermot; Hegarty, Neil; Smeets, Paul M.

    1997-01-01

    The current study aimed to develop a behavior-analytic model of analogical reasoning. In Experiments 1 and 2 subjects (adults and children) were trained and tested for the formation of four, three-member equivalence relations using a delayed matching-to-sample procedure. All subjects (Experiments 1 and 2) were exposed to tests that examined relations between equivalence and non-equivalence relations. For example, on an equivalence-equivalence relation test, the complex sample B1/C1 and the two complex comparisons B3/C3 and B3/C4 were used, and on a nonequivalence-nonequivalence relation test the complex sample B1/C2 was presented with the same two comparisons. All subjects consistently related equivalence relations to equivalence relations and nonequivalence relations to nonequivalence relations (e.g., picked B3/C3 in the presence of B1/C1 and picked B3/C4 in the presence of B1/C2). In Experiment 3, the equivalence responding, the equivalence-equivalence responding, and the nonequivalence-nonequivalence responding was successfully brought under contextual control. Finally, it was shown that the contextual cues could function successfully as comparisons, and the complex samples and comparisons could function successfully as contextual cues and samples, respectively. These data extend the equivalence paradigm and contribute to a behaviour-analytic interpretation of analogical reasoning and complex human functioning, in general. PMID:22477120

  17. Bacterial Genes in the Aphid Genome: Absence of Functional Gene Transfer from Buchnera to Its Host

    PubMed Central

    Nikoh, Naruo; McCutcheon, John P.; Kudo, Toshiaki; Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Moran, Nancy A.; Nakabachi, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Genome reduction is typical of obligate symbionts. In cellular organelles, this reduction partly reflects transfer of ancestral bacterial genes to the host genome, but little is known about gene transfer in other obligate symbioses. Aphids harbor anciently acquired obligate mutualists, Buchnera aphidicola (Gammaproteobacteria), which have highly reduced genomes (420–650 kb), raising the possibility of gene transfer from ancestral Buchnera to the aphid genome. In addition, aphids often harbor other bacteria that also are potential sources of transferred genes. Previous limited sampling of genes expressed in bacteriocytes, the specialized cells that harbor Buchnera, revealed that aphids acquired at least two genes from bacteria. The newly sequenced genome of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, presents the first opportunity for a complete inventory of genes transferred from bacteria to the host genome in the context of an ancient obligate symbiosis. Computational screening of the entire A. pisum genome, followed by phylogenetic and experimental analyses, provided strong support for the transfer of 12 genes or gene fragments from bacteria to the aphid genome: three LD–carboxypeptidases (LdcA1, LdcA2,ψLdcA), five rare lipoprotein As (RlpA1-5), N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (AmiD), 1,4-beta-N-acetylmuramidase (bLys), DNA polymerase III alpha chain (ψDnaE), and ATP synthase delta chain (ψAtpH). Buchnera was the apparent source of two highly truncated pseudogenes (ψDnaE and ψAtpH). Most other transferred genes were closely related to genes from relatives of Wolbachia (Alphaproteobacteria). At least eight of the transferred genes (LdcA1, AmiD, RlpA1-5, bLys) appear to be functional, and expression of seven (LdcA1, AmiD, RlpA1-5) are highly upregulated in bacteriocytes. The LdcAs and RlpAs appear to have been duplicated after transfer. Our results excluded the hypothesis that genome reduction in Buchnera has been accompanied by gene transfer to the host

  18. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament related genes identification using microarray gene expression profiling and bioinformatics analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Hailong; Mao, Lingzhou; Xu, Peng; Xi, Yanhai; Xu, Ning; Xue, Mingtao; Yu, Jiangming; Ye, Xiaojian

    2014-01-10

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is a kind of disease with physical barriers and neurological disorders. The objective of this study was to explore the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in OPLL patient ligament cells and identify the target sites for the prevention and treatment of OPLL in clinic. Gene expression data GSE5464 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus; then DEGs were screened by limma package in R language, and changed functions and pathways of OPLL cells compared to normal cells were identified by DAVID (The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery); finally, an interaction network of DEGs was constructed by string. A total of 1536 DEGs were screened, with 31 down-regulated and 1505 up-regulated genes. Response to wounding function and Toll-like receptor signaling pathway may involve in the development of OPLL. Genes, such as PDGFB, PRDX2 may involve in OPLL through response to wounding function. Toll-like receptor signaling pathway enriched genes such as TLR1, TLR5, and TLR7 may involve in spine cord injury in OPLL. PIK3R1 was the hub gene in the network of DEGs with the highest degree; INSR was one of the most closely related genes of it. OPLL related genes screened by microarray gene expression profiling and bioinformatics analysis may be helpful for elucidating the mechanism of OPLL.

  19. Universal R-matrix and functional relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boos, Herman; Göhmann, Frank; Klümper, Andreas; Nirov, Khazret S.; Razumov, Alexander V.

    2014-06-01

    We collect and systematize general definitions and facts on the application of quantum groups to the construction of functional relations in the theory of integrable systems. As an example, we reconsider the case of the quantum group Uq({L}({sl}_2)) related to the six-vertex model. We prove the full set of the functional relations in the form independent of the representation of the quantum group in the quantum space and specialize them to the case of the six-vertex model.

  20. A Systematic Investigation into Aging Related Genes in Brain and Their Relationship with Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Meng, Guofeng; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Mei, Hongkang

    2016-01-01

    Aging, as a complex biological process, is accompanied by the accumulation of functional loses at different levels, which makes age to be the biggest risk factor to many neurological diseases. Even following decades of investigation, the process of aging is still far from being fully understood, especially at a systematic level. In this study, we identified aging related genes in brain by collecting the ones with sustained and consistent gene expression or DNA methylation changes in the aging process. Functional analysis with Gene Ontology to these genes suggested transcriptional regulators to be the most affected genes in the aging process. Transcription regulation analysis found some transcription factors, especially Specificity Protein 1 (SP1), to play important roles in regulating aging related gene expression. Module-based functional analysis indicated these genes to be associated with many well-known aging related pathways, supporting the validity of our approach to select aging related genes. Finally, we investigated the roles of aging related genes on Alzheimer's Disease (AD). We found that aging and AD related genes both involved some common pathways, which provided a possible explanation why aging made the brain more vulnerable to Alzheimer's Disease.

  1. A Systematic Investigation into Aging Related Genes in Brain and Their Relationship with Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Meng, Guofeng; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Mei, Hongkang

    2016-01-01

    Aging, as a complex biological process, is accompanied by the accumulation of functional loses at different levels, which makes age to be the biggest risk factor to many neurological diseases. Even following decades of investigation, the process of aging is still far from being fully understood, especially at a systematic level. In this study, we identified aging related genes in brain by collecting the ones with sustained and consistent gene expression or DNA methylation changes in the aging process. Functional analysis with Gene Ontology to these genes suggested transcriptional regulators to be the most affected genes in the aging process. Transcription regulation analysis found some transcription factors, especially Specificity Protein 1 (SP1), to play important roles in regulating aging related gene expression. Module-based functional analysis indicated these genes to be associated with many well-known aging related pathways, supporting the validity of our approach to select aging related genes. Finally, we investigated the roles of aging related genes on Alzheimer's Disease (AD). We found that aging and AD related genes both involved some common pathways, which provided a possible explanation why aging made the brain more vulnerable to Alzheimer's Disease. PMID:26937969

  2. Phenotype-based clustering of glycosylation-related genes by RNAi-mediated gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Hino, Miki; Yoshida, Hideki; Ichimiya, Tomomi; Sakamura, Sho; Maeda, Megumi; Kimura, Yoshinobu; Sasaki, Norihiko; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Kinoshita-Toyoda, Akiko; Toyoda, Hidenao; Ueda, Ryu; Nishihara, Shoko; Goto, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    Glycan structures are synthesized by a series of reactions conducted by glycosylation-related (GR) proteins such as glycosyltransferases, glycan-modifying enzymes, and nucleotide-sugar transporters. For example, the common core region of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is sequentially synthesized by peptide-O-xylosyltransferase, β1,4-galactosyltransferase I, β1,3-galactosyltransferase II, and β1,3-glucuronyltransferase. This raises the possibility that functional impairment of GR proteins involved in synthesis of the same glycan might result in the same phenotypic abnormality. To examine this possibility, comprehensive silencing of genes encoding GR and proteoglycan core proteins was conducted in Drosophila. Drosophila GR candidate genes (125) were classified into five functional groups for synthesis of GAGs, N-linked, O-linked, Notch-related, and unknown glycans. Spatiotemporally regulated silencing caused a range of malformed phenotypes that fell into three types: extra veins, thick veins, and depigmentation. The clustered phenotypes reflected the biosynthetic pathways of GAGs, Fringe-dependent glycan on Notch, and glycans placed at or near nonreducing ends (herein termed terminal domains of glycans). Based on the phenotypic clustering, CG33145 was predicted to be involved in formation of terminal domains. Our further analysis showed that CG33145 exhibited galactosyltransferase activity in synthesis of terminal N-linked glycans. Phenotypic clustering, therefore, has potential for the functional prediction of novel GR genes. PMID:25940448

  3. Phenotype-based clustering of glycosylation-related genes by RNAi-mediated gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto-Hino, Miki; Yoshida, Hideki; Ichimiya, Tomomi; Sakamura, Sho; Maeda, Megumi; Kimura, Yoshinobu; Sasaki, Norihiko; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Kinoshita-Toyoda, Akiko; Toyoda, Hidenao; Ueda, Ryu; Nishihara, Shoko; Goto, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Glycan structures are synthesized by a series of reactions conducted by glycosylation-related (GR) proteins such as glycosyltransferases, glycan-modifying enzymes, and nucleotide-sugar transporters. For example, the common core region of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is sequentially synthesized by peptide-O-xylosyltransferase, β1,4-galactosyltransferase I, β1,3-galactosyltransferase II, and β1,3-glucuronyltransferase. This raises the possibility that functional impairment of GR proteins involved in synthesis of the same glycan might result in the same phenotypic abnormality. To examine this possibility, comprehensive silencing of genes encoding GR and proteoglycan core proteins was conducted in Drosophila. Drosophila GR candidate genes (125) were classified into five functional groups for synthesis of GAGs, N-linked, O-linked, Notch-related, and unknown glycans. Spatiotemporally regulated silencing caused a range of malformed phenotypes that fell into three types: extra veins, thick veins, and depigmentation. The clustered phenotypes reflected the biosynthetic pathways of GAGs, Fringe-dependent glycan on Notch, and glycans placed at or near nonreducing ends (herein termed terminal domains of glycans). Based on the phenotypic clustering, CG33145 was predicted to be involved in formation of terminal domains. Our further analysis showed that CG33145 exhibited galactosyltransferase activity in synthesis of terminal N-linked glycans. Phenotypic clustering, therefore, has potential for the functional prediction of novel GR genes. PMID:25940448

  4. Non-functional genes repaired at the RNA level.

    PubMed

    Burger, Gertraud

    2016-01-01

    Genomes and genes continuously evolve. Gene sequences undergo substitutions, deletions or nucleotide insertions; mobile genetic elements invade genomes and interleave in genes; chromosomes break, even within genes, and pieces reseal in reshuffled order. To maintain functional gene products and assure an organism's survival, two principal strategies are used - either repair of the gene itself or of its product. I will introduce common types of gene aberrations and how gene function is restored secondarily, and then focus on systematically fragmented genes found in a poorly studied protist group, the diplonemids. Expression of their broken genes involves restitching of pieces at the RNA-level, and substantial RNA editing, to compensate for point mutations. I will conclude with thoughts on how such a grotesquely unorthodox system may have evolved, and why this group of organisms persists and thrives since tens of millions of years.

  5. PoplarGene: poplar gene network and resource for mining functional information for genes from woody plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Ding, Changjun; Chu, Yanguang; Chen, Jiafei; Zhang, Weixi; Zhang, Bingyu; Huang, Qinjun; Su, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Poplar is not only an important resource for the production of paper, timber and other wood-based products, but it has also emerged as an ideal model system for studying woody plants. To better understand the biological processes underlying various traits in poplar, e.g., wood development, a comprehensive functional gene interaction network is highly needed. Here, we constructed a genome-wide functional gene network for poplar (covering ~70% of the 41,335 poplar genes) and created the network web service PoplarGene, offering comprehensive functional interactions and extensive poplar gene functional annotations. PoplarGene incorporates two network-based gene prioritization algorithms, neighborhood-based prioritization and context-based prioritization, which can be used to perform gene prioritization in a complementary manner. Furthermore, the co-functional information in PoplarGene can be applied to other woody plant proteomes with high efficiency via orthology transfer. In addition to poplar gene sequences, the webserver also accepts Arabidopsis reference gene as input to guide the search for novel candidate functional genes in PoplarGene. We believe that PoplarGene (http://bioinformatics.caf.ac.cn/PoplarGene and http://124.127.201.25/PoplarGene) will greatly benefit the research community, facilitating studies of poplar and other woody plants. PMID:27515999

  6. PoplarGene: poplar gene network and resource for mining functional information for genes from woody plants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Ding, Changjun; Chu, Yanguang; Chen, Jiafei; Zhang, Weixi; Zhang, Bingyu; Huang, Qinjun; Su, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Poplar is not only an important resource for the production of paper, timber and other wood-based products, but it has also emerged as an ideal model system for studying woody plants. To better understand the biological processes underlying various traits in poplar, e.g., wood development, a comprehensive functional gene interaction network is highly needed. Here, we constructed a genome-wide functional gene network for poplar (covering ~70% of the 41,335 poplar genes) and created the network web service PoplarGene, offering comprehensive functional interactions and extensive poplar gene functional annotations. PoplarGene incorporates two network-based gene prioritization algorithms, neighborhood-based prioritization and context-based prioritization, which can be used to perform gene prioritization in a complementary manner. Furthermore, the co-functional information in PoplarGene can be applied to other woody plant proteomes with high efficiency via orthology transfer. In addition to poplar gene sequences, the webserver also accepts Arabidopsis reference gene as input to guide the search for novel candidate functional genes in PoplarGene. We believe that PoplarGene (http://bioinformatics.caf.ac.cn/PoplarGene and http://124.127.201.25/PoplarGene) will greatly benefit the research community, facilitating studies of poplar and other woody plants. PMID:27515999

  7. Genome-wide approaches reveal functional vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-inducible nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c1 binding to angiogenesis-related genes in the endothelium.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Jun-ichi; Kanki, Yasuharu; Makihara, Chihiro; Schadler, Keri; Miura, Mai; Manabe, Yuuka; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Minami, Takashi

    2014-10-17

    VEGF is a key regulator of endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and inflammation, which leads to activation of several signaling cascades, including the calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) pathway. NFAT is not only important for immune responses but also for cardiovascular development and the pathogenesis of Down syndrome. By using Down syndrome model mice and clinical patient samples, we showed recently that the VEGF-calcineurin-NFAT signaling axis regulates tumor angiogenesis and tumor metastasis. However, the connection between genome-wide views of NFAT-mediated gene regulation and downstream gene function in the endothelium has not been studied extensively. Here we performed comprehensive mapping of genome-wide NFATc1 binding in VEGF-stimulated primary cultured endothelial cells and elucidated the functional consequences of VEGF-NFATc1-mediated phenotypic changes. A comparison of the NFATc1 ChIP sequence profile and epigenetic histone marks revealed that predominant NFATc1-occupied peaks overlapped with promoter-associated histone marks. Moreover, we identified two novel NFATc1 regulated genes, CXCR7 and RND1. CXCR7 knockdown abrogated SDF-1- and VEGF-mediated cell migration and tube formation. siRNA treatment of RND1 impaired vascular barrier function, caused RhoA hyperactivation, and further stimulated VEGF-mediated vascular outgrowth from aortic rings. Taken together, these findings suggest that dynamic NFATc1 binding to target genes is critical for VEGF-mediated endothelial cell activation. CXCR7 and RND1 are NFATc1 target genes with multiple functions, including regulation of cell migration, tube formation, and barrier formation in endothelial cells.

  8. Association of tissue lineage and gene expression: conservatively and differentially expressed genes define common and special functions of tissues

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Embryogenesis is the process by which the embryo is formed, develops, and establishes developmental hierarchies of tissues. The recent advance in microarray technology made it possible to investigate the tissue specific patterns of gene expression and their relationship with tissue lineages. This study is focused on how tissue specific functions, tissue lineage, and cell differentiation are correlated, which is essential to understand embryonic development and organism complexity. Results We performed individual gene and gene set based analysis on multiple tissue expression data, in association with the classic topology of mammalian fate maps of embryogenesis. For each sub-group of tissues on the fate map, conservatively, differentially and correlatively expressed genes or gene sets were identified. Tissue distance was found to correlate with gene expression divergence. Tissues of the ectoderm or mesoderm origins from the same segments on the fate map shared more similar expression pattern than those from different origins. Conservatively expressed genes or gene sets define common functions in a tissue group and are related to tissue specific diseases, which is supported by results from Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analysis. Gene expression divergence is larger in certain human tissues than in the mouse homologous tissues. Conclusion The results from tissue lineage and gene expression analysis indicate that common function features of neighbor tissue groups were defined by the conservatively expressed genes and were related to tissue specific diseases, and differentially expressed genes contribute to the functional divergence of tissues. The difference of gene expression divergence in human and mouse homologous tissues reflected the organism complexity, i.e. distinct neural development levels and different body sizes. PMID:21172044

  9. Functional Gene Group Summarization by Clustering MEDLINE Abstract Sentences

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianji; Cohen, Aaron M.; Hersh, William R.

    2006-01-01

    Tools to automatically summarize functional gene group information from the biomedical literature will help genomics researchers both better interpret gene expression data and understand biological pathways. In this study, we built a system that takes in a set of genes and MEDLINE records and outputs clusters of genes along with summaries of each cluster by sentence extraction from MEDLINE abstracts. Our preliminary use-case evaluation shows that this approach can identify gene clusters similar to manually generated groupings. PMID:17238770

  10. [Genes related with male gonadal morphogenesis in mammals].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Wang, Feng

    2008-04-01

    Gene expressions are sex-specific in the sex development of mammals. Different genes express in different phases and tend to change with the time. The functions of some genes, such as SRY, SOX9, SOX8, DAX1, and FGF9, have already been defined in male gonadal morphogenesis. This paper presents a review of the genes involved in the formation of the male gonad in mammals. PMID:18481432

  11. A Comprehensive, CRISPR-based Functional Analysis of Essential Genes in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jason M; Colavin, Alexandre; Shi, Handuo; Czarny, Tomasz L; Larson, Matthew H; Wong, Spencer; Hawkins, John S; Lu, Candy H S; Koo, Byoung-Mo; Marta, Elizabeth; Shiver, Anthony L; Whitehead, Evan H; Weissman, Jonathan S; Brown, Eric D; Qi, Lei S; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gross, Carol A

    2016-06-01

    Essential gene functions underpin the core reactions required for cell viability, but their contributions and relationships are poorly studied in vivo. Using CRISPR interference, we created knockdowns of every essential gene in Bacillus subtilis and probed their phenotypes. Our high-confidence essential gene network, established using chemical genomics, showed extensive interconnections among distantly related processes and identified modes of action for uncharacterized antibiotics. Importantly, mild knockdown of essential gene functions significantly reduced stationary-phase survival without affecting maximal growth rate, suggesting that essential protein levels are set to maximize outgrowth from stationary phase. Finally, high-throughput microscopy indicated that cell morphology is relatively insensitive to mild knockdown but profoundly affected by depletion of gene function, revealing intimate connections between cell growth and shape. Our results provide a framework for systematic investigation of essential gene functions in vivo broadly applicable to diverse microorganisms and amenable to comparative analysis. PMID:27238023

  12. Odd-skipped related 2 regulates genes related to proliferation and development

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Shinji; Abiko, Yoshimitsu; Amano, Atsuo

    2010-07-23

    Cell proliferation is a biological process in which chromosomes replicate in one cell and equally divide into two daughter cells. Our previous findings suggested that Odd-skipped related 2 (Osr2) plays an important role in cellular quiescence and proliferation under epigenetic regulation. However, the mechanism used by Osr2 to establish and maintain proliferation is unknown. To examine the functional role of Osr2 in cell proliferation, we analyzed its downstream target genes using microarray analysis following adenovirus-induced overexpression of Osr2 as well as knockdown with Osr2 siRNA, which showed that Osr2 regulates a multitude of genes involved in proliferation and the cell cycle, as well as development. Additional proliferation assays also indicated that Osr2 likely functions to elicit cell proliferation. Together, these results suggest that Osr2 plays important roles in proliferation and development.

  13. Genes related to immunity, as expressed in the alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata, during pathogen challenge.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; James, R

    2009-11-01

    Virtually nothing is known about disease resistance in solitary bees, so expressed sequence tag (EST) databases were developed to search for immune response genes in the alfalfa leafcutting bee. We identified 104 putative immunity-related genes from both healthy and pathogen-challenged bee larvae, and 12 more genes using PCR amplification. The genes identified coded for proteins with a wide variety of innate immune response functions, including pathogen recognition, phagocytosis, the prophenoloxidase cascade, melanization, coagulation and several signalling pathways. Some immune response genes were highly conserved with honey bee genes, and more distantly related to other insects. The data presented provides the first analysis of immune function in a solitary bee and provides a foundation for the further analysis of gene expression patterns in bees. PMID:19863668

  14. Functional-network-based gene set analysis using gene-ontology.

    PubMed

    Chang, Billy; Kustra, Rafal; Tian, Weidong

    2013-01-01

    To account for the functional non-equivalence among a set of genes within a biological pathway when performing gene set analysis, we introduce GOGANPA, a network-based gene set analysis method, which up-weights genes with functions relevant to the gene set of interest. The genes are weighted according to its degree within a genome-scale functional network constructed using the functional annotations available from the gene ontology database. By benchmarking GOGANPA using a well-studied P53 data set and three breast cancer data sets, we will demonstrate the power and reproducibility of our proposed method over traditional unweighted approaches and a competing network-based approach that involves a complex integrated network. GOGANPA's sole reliance on gene ontology further allows GOGANPA to be widely applicable to the analysis of any gene-ontology-annotated genome. PMID:23418449

  15. Relations between Prosodic Variables and Communicative Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flax, Judy; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Three children were observed interacting with their mothers before the onset of single words, when vocabulary consisted of 10 words, and when it consisted of 50 words. Relations between communicative functions and acoustic analysis of prosodic variables were studied. Considerable variability was found in the number of rises produced overall and…

  16. Transport of Magnesium by a Bacterial Nramp-Related Gene

    PubMed Central

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Freedman, Benjamin G.; Senger, Ryan S.; Winkler, Wade C.

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5–2.0 mM). Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes. PMID:24968120

  17. Circadian rhythm-related genes: implication in autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lebailly, B; Boitard, C; Rogner, U C

    2015-09-01

    Recent gene association and functional studies have proven the implication of several circadian rhythm-related genes in diabetes. Diabetes has been related to variation in central circadian regulation and peripheral oscillation. Different transcriptional regulators have been identified. Circadian genes are clearly implicated in metabolic pathways, pancreatic function and in type 2 diabetes. Much less evidence has been shown for the link between circadian regulation and type 1 diabetes. The hypothesis that circadian genes are involved in type 1 diabetes is reinforced by findings that the immune system undergoes circadian variation and that several autoimmune diseases are associated with circadian genes. Recent findings in the non-obese diabetic mouse model pinpoint to specific mechanisms controlling type 1 diabetes by the clock-related gene Arntl2 in the immune system.

  18. Gene delivery by functional inorganic nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Loh, Xian Jun; Lee, Tung-Chun

    2012-08-01

    Gene delivery into cells to elicit cellular response has received a great attention recently. Viruses, lipids, peptides, cationic polymers and certain inorganic nanomaterials have been reported as gene delivery vectors. In this review, we focus on the recent literature on gene delivery using inorganic nanoparticles. This emerging field of study is concisely summarized and illustrated by selected examples and recent patents. New approaches and directions towards the practical use of multifunctional nanocarriers are highlighted.

  19. Characterization of the functional gene and several processed pseudogenes in the human triosephosphate isomerase gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J R; Daar, I O; Krug, J R; Maquat, L E

    1985-01-01

    The functional gene and three intronless pseudogenes for human triosephosphate isomerase were isolated from a recombinant DNA library and characterized in detail. The functional gene spans 3.5 kilobase pairs and is split into seven exons. Its promoter contains putative TATA and CCAAT boxes and is extremely rich in G and C residues (76%). The pseudogenes share a high degree of homology with the functional gene but contain mutations that preclude the synthesis of an active triosephosphate isomerase enzyme. Sequence divergence calculations indicate that these pseudogenes arose approximately 18 million years ago. We present evidence that there is a single functional gene in the human triosephosphate isomerase gene family. Images PMID:4022011

  20. Dissecting the Gene Network of Dietary Restriction to Identify Evolutionarily Conserved Pathways and New Functional Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wuttke, Daniel; Connor, Richard; Vora, Chintan; Craig, Thomas; Li, Yang; Wood, Shona; Vasieva, Olga; Shmookler Reis, Robert; Tang, Fusheng; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), limiting nutrient intake from diet without causing malnutrition, delays the aging process and extends lifespan in multiple organisms. The conserved life-extending effect of DR suggests the involvement of fundamental mechanisms, although these remain a subject of debate. To help decipher the life-extending mechanisms of DR, we first compiled a list of genes that if genetically altered disrupt or prevent the life-extending effects of DR. We called these DR–essential genes and identified more than 100 in model organisms such as yeast, worms, flies, and mice. In order for other researchers to benefit from this first curated list of genes essential for DR, we established an online database called GenDR (http://genomics.senescence.info/diet/). To dissect the interactions of DR–essential genes and discover the underlying lifespan-extending mechanisms, we then used a variety of network and systems biology approaches to analyze the gene network of DR. We show that DR–essential genes are more conserved at the molecular level and have more molecular interactions than expected by chance. Furthermore, we employed a guilt-by-association method to predict novel DR–essential genes. In budding yeast, we predicted nine genes related to vacuolar functions; we show experimentally that mutations deleting eight of those genes prevent the life-extending effects of DR. Three of these mutants (OPT2, FRE6, and RCR2) had extended lifespan under ad libitum, indicating that the lack of further longevity under DR is not caused by a general compromise of fitness. These results demonstrate how network analyses of DR using GenDR can be used to make phenotypically relevant predictions. Moreover, gene-regulatory circuits reveal that the DR–induced transcriptional signature in yeast involves nutrient-sensing, stress responses and meiotic transcription factors. Finally, comparing the influence of gene expression changes during DR on the interactomes of multiple

  1. Dissecting the gene network of dietary restriction to identify evolutionarily conserved pathways and new functional genes.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Daniel; Connor, Richard; Vora, Chintan; Craig, Thomas; Li, Yang; Wood, Shona; Vasieva, Olga; Shmookler Reis, Robert; Tang, Fusheng; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), limiting nutrient intake from diet without causing malnutrition, delays the aging process and extends lifespan in multiple organisms. The conserved life-extending effect of DR suggests the involvement of fundamental mechanisms, although these remain a subject of debate. To help decipher the life-extending mechanisms of DR, we first compiled a list of genes that if genetically altered disrupt or prevent the life-extending effects of DR. We called these DR-essential genes and identified more than 100 in model organisms such as yeast, worms, flies, and mice. In order for other researchers to benefit from this first curated list of genes essential for DR, we established an online database called GenDR (http://genomics.senescence.info/diet/). To dissect the interactions of DR-essential genes and discover the underlying lifespan-extending mechanisms, we then used a variety of network and systems biology approaches to analyze the gene network of DR. We show that DR-essential genes are more conserved at the molecular level and have more molecular interactions than expected by chance. Furthermore, we employed a guilt-by-association method to predict novel DR-essential genes. In budding yeast, we predicted nine genes related to vacuolar functions; we show experimentally that mutations deleting eight of those genes prevent the life-extending effects of DR. Three of these mutants (OPT2, FRE6, and RCR2) had extended lifespan under ad libitum, indicating that the lack of further longevity under DR is not caused by a general compromise of fitness. These results demonstrate how network analyses of DR using GenDR can be used to make phenotypically relevant predictions. Moreover, gene-regulatory circuits reveal that the DR-induced transcriptional signature in yeast involves nutrient-sensing, stress responses and meiotic transcription factors. Finally, comparing the influence of gene expression changes during DR on the interactomes of multiple organisms led

  2. Meta-analysis of age-related gene expression profiles identifies common signatures of aging

    PubMed Central

    de Magalhães, João Pedro; Curado, João; Church, George M.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Numerous microarray studies of aging have been conducted, yet given the noisy nature of gene expression changes with age, elucidating the transcriptional features of aging and how these relate to physiological, biochemical and pathological changes remains a critical problem. Results: We performed a meta-analysis of age-related gene expression profiles using 27 datasets from mice, rats and humans. Our results reveal several common signatures of aging, including 56 genes consistently overexpressed with age, the most significant of which was APOD, and 17 genes underexpressed with age. We characterized the biological processes associated with these signatures and found that age-related gene expression changes most notably involve an overexpression of inflammation and immune response genes and of genes associated with the lysosome. An underexpression of collagen genes and of genes associated with energy metabolism, particularly mitochondrial genes, as well as alterations in the expression of genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle and cellular senescence biomarkers, were also observed. By employing a new method that emphasizes sensitivity, our work further reveals previously unknown transcriptional changes with age in many genes, processes and functions. We suggest these molecular signatures reflect a combination of degenerative processes but also transcriptional responses to the process of aging. Overall, our results help to understand how transcriptional changes relate to the process of aging and could serve as targets for future studies. Availability: http://genomics.senescence.info/uarrays/signatures.html Contact: jp@senescence.info Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19189975

  3. Leptin regulates gallbladder genes related to absorption and secretion.

    PubMed

    Swartz-Basile, Deborah A; Lu, Debao; Basile, David P; Graewin, Shannon J; Al-Azzawi, Hayder; Kiely, James M; Mathur, Abhishek; Yancey, Kyle; Pitt, Henry A

    2007-07-01

    Dysregulation of gallbladder ion and water absorption and/or secretion has been linked to cholesterol crystal and gallstone formation. We have recently demonstrated that obese, leptin-deficient (Lep(ob)) mice have enlarged gallbladder volumes and decreased gallbladder contractility and that leptin administration to these mice normalizes gallbladder function. However, the effect of leptin on gallbladder absorption/secretion is not known. Therefore, we sought to determine whether leptin would alter the expression of genes involved in water and ion transport across the gallbladder epithelium. Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays representing 39,000 transcripts were used to compare gallbladder gene-expression profiles from 12-wk-old control saline-treated Lep(ob) and from leptin-treated Lep(ob) female mice. Leptin administration to Lep(ob) mice decreased gallbladder volume, bile sodium concentration, and pH. Leptin repletion upregulated the expression of aquaporin 1 water channel by 1.3-fold and downregulated aquaporin 4 by 2.3-fold. A number of genes involved in sodium transport were also influenced by leptin replacement. Epithelial sodium channel-alpha and sodium hydrogen exchangers 1 and 3 were moderately downregulated by 2.0-, 1.6-, and 1.3-fold, respectively. Carbonic anhydrase-IV, which plays a role in the acidification of bile, was upregulated 3.7-fold. In addition, a number of inflammatory cytokines that are known to influence gallbladder epithelial cell absorption and secretion were upregulated. Thus leptin, an adipocyte-derived cytokine involved with satiety and energy balance, influences gallbladder bile volume, sodium, and pH as well as multiple inflammatory cytokine genes and genes related to water, sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate transport.

  4. Functional analysis of 1440 Escherichia coli genes using the combination of knock-out library and phenotype microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mikito; Baba, Tomoya; Mori, Hirotada; Mori, Hideo

    2005-07-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the best elucidated organisms. However, about 40% of E. coli genes have not been assigned to their function yet. We analyzed 1440 single gene knock-out mutants using the GN2-MicroPlate, which permits assay of 95 carbon-source utilizations simultaneously. In the knock-out library there are 1044 of so called y-genes with no apparent function. The raw dataset was analyzed and genes were interrelated by the clustering method of the GeneSpring software. In the resulted dendrogram of genes, a group of genes with known and related function tended to be assembled into a cluster. Our clustering method would be useful for functional assignment of so called y-genes with no apparent function, since the resulted dendrogram could connect y-genes to phenotype and function of well-studied genes.

  5. Relating Stomatal Conductance to Leaf Functional Traits

    PubMed Central

    Kröber, Wenzel; Plath, Isa; Heklau, Heike; Bruelheide, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Leaf functional traits are important because they reflect physiological functions, such as transpiration and carbon assimilation. In particular, morphological leaf traits have the potential to summarize plants strategies in terms of water use efficiency, growth pattern and nutrient use. The leaf economics spectrum (LES) is a recognized framework in functional plant ecology and reflects a gradient of increasing specific leaf area (SLA), leaf nitrogen, phosphorus and cation content, and decreasing leaf dry matter content (LDMC) and carbon nitrogen ratio (CN). The LES describes different strategies ranging from that of short-lived leaves with high photosynthetic capacity per leaf mass to long-lived leaves with low mass-based carbon assimilation rates. However, traits that are not included in the LES might provide additional information on the species' physiology, such as those related to stomatal control. Protocols are presented for a wide range of leaf functional traits, including traits of the LES, but also traits that are independent of the LES. In particular, a new method is introduced that relates the plants’ regulatory behavior in stomatal conductance to vapor pressure deficit. The resulting parameters of stomatal regulation can then be compared to the LES and other plant functional traits. The results show that functional leaf traits of the LES were also valid predictors for the parameters of stomatal regulation. For example, leaf carbon concentration was positively related to the vapor pressure deficit (vpd) at the point of inflection and the maximum of the conductance-vpd curve. However, traits that are not included in the LES added information in explaining parameters of stomatal control: the vpd at the point of inflection of the conductance-vpd curve was lower for species with higher stomatal density and higher stomatal index. Overall, stomata and vein traits were more powerful predictors for explaining stomatal regulation than traits used in the LES

  6. Relating Stomatal Conductance to Leaf Functional Traits.

    PubMed

    Kröber, Wenzel; Plath, Isa; Heklau, Heike; Bruelheide, Helge

    2015-10-12

    Leaf functional traits are important because they reflect physiological functions, such as transpiration and carbon assimilation. In particular, morphological leaf traits have the potential to summarize plants strategies in terms of water use efficiency, growth pattern and nutrient use. The leaf economics spectrum (LES) is a recognized framework in functional plant ecology and reflects a gradient of increasing specific leaf area (SLA), leaf nitrogen, phosphorus and cation content, and decreasing leaf dry matter content (LDMC) and carbon nitrogen ratio (CN). The LES describes different strategies ranging from that of short-lived leaves with high photosynthetic capacity per leaf mass to long-lived leaves with low mass-based carbon assimilation rates. However, traits that are not included in the LES might provide additional information on the species' physiology, such as those related to stomatal control. Protocols are presented for a wide range of leaf functional traits, including traits of the LES, but also traits that are independent of the LES. In particular, a new method is introduced that relates the plants' regulatory behavior in stomatal conductance to vapor pressure deficit. The resulting parameters of stomatal regulation can then be compared to the LES and other plant functional traits. The results show that functional leaf traits of the LES were also valid predictors for the parameters of stomatal regulation. For example, leaf carbon concentration was positively related to the vapor pressure deficit (vpd) at the point of inflection and the maximum of the conductance-vpd curve. However, traits that are not included in the LES added information in explaining parameters of stomatal control: the vpd at the point of inflection of the conductance-vpd curve was lower for species with higher stomatal density and higher stomatal index. Overall, stomata and vein traits were more powerful predictors for explaining stomatal regulation than traits used in the LES.

  7. Gene-environment interaction and male reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, Jonatan; Bonde, Jens Peter; Giwercman, Yvonne L; Rylander, Lars; Giwercman, Aleksander

    2010-05-01

    As genetic factors can hardly explain the changes taking place during short time spans, environmental and lifestyle-related factors have been suggested as the causes of time-related deterioration of male reproductive function. However, considering the strong heterogeneity of male fecundity between and within populations, genetic variants might be important determinants of the individual susceptibility to the adverse effects of environment or lifestyle. Although the possible mechanisms of such interplay in relation to the reproductive system are largely unknown, some recent studies have indicated that specific genotypes may confer a larger risk of male reproductive disorders following certain exposures. This paper presents a critical review of animal and human evidence on how genes may modify environmental effects on male reproductive function. Some examples have been found that support this mechanism, but the number of studies is still limited. This type of interaction studies may improve our understanding of normal physiology and help us to identify the risk factors to male reproductive malfunction. We also shortly discuss other aspects of gene-environment interaction specifically associated with the issue of reproduction, namely environmental and lifestyle factors as the cause of sperm DNA damage. It remains to be investigated to what extent such genetic changes, by natural conception or through the use of assisted reproductive techniques, are transmitted to the next generation, thereby causing increased morbidity in the offspring.

  8. Computing Partial Transposes and Related Entanglement Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziero, Jonas

    2016-10-01

    The partial transpose (PT) is an important function for entanglement testing and quantification and also for the study of geometrical aspects of the quantum state space. In this article, considering general bipartite and multipartite discrete systems, explicit formulas ready for the numerical implementation of the PT and of related entanglement functions are presented and the Fortran code produced for that purpose is described. What is more, we obtain an analytical expression for the Hilbert-Schmidt entanglement of two-qudit systems and for the associated closest separable state. In contrast to previous works on this matter, we only use the properties of the PT, not applying Lagrange multipliers.

  9. PANTHER in 2013: modeling the evolution of gene function, and other gene attributes, in the context of phylogenetic trees.

    PubMed

    Mi, Huaiyu; Muruganujan, Anushya; Thomas, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    The data and tools in PANTHER-a comprehensive, curated database of protein families, trees, subfamilies and functions available at http://pantherdb.org-have undergone continual, extensive improvement for over a decade. Here, we describe the current PANTHER process as a whole, as well as the website tools for analysis of user-uploaded data. The main goals of PANTHER remain essentially unchanged: the accurate inference (and practical application) of gene and protein function over large sequence databases, using phylogenetic trees to extrapolate from the relatively sparse experimental information from a few model organisms. Yet the focus of PANTHER has continually shifted toward more accurate and detailed representations of evolutionary events in gene family histories. The trees are now designed to represent gene family evolution, including inference of evolutionary events, such as speciation and gene duplication. Subfamilies are still curated and used to define HMMs, but gene ontology functional annotations can now be made at any node in the tree, and are designed to represent gain and loss of function by ancestral genes during evolution. Finally, PANTHER now includes stable database identifiers for inferred ancestral genes, which are used to associate inferred gene attributes with particular genes in the common ancestral genomes of extant species.

  10. Genes for Plant Autophagy: Functions and Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soon-Hee; Kwon, Chian; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Taijoon

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy, or self-consuming of cytoplasmic constituents in a lytic compartment, plays a crucial role in nutrient recycling, development, cell homeostasis, and defense against pathogens and toxic products. Autophagy in plant cells uses a conserved machinery of core Autophagy-related (Atg) proteins. Recently, research on plant autophagy has been expanding and other components interacting with the core Atg proteins are being revealed. In addition, growing evidence suggests that autophagy communicates with other cellular pathways such as the ubiquitin-proteasome system, protein secretory pathway, and endocytic pathway. An increase in our understanding of plant autophagy will undoubtedly help test the hypothesized functions of plant autophagy in programmed cell death, vacuole biogenesis, and responses to biotic, abiotic, and nutritional stresses. In this review, we summarize recent progress on these topics and suggest topics for future research, after inspecting common phenotypes of current Arabidopsis atg mutants. PMID:22772908

  11. Mouse histone H2A and H2B genes: four functional genes and a pseudogene undergoing gene conversion with a closely linked functional gene.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, T J; Liu, L; Marzluff, W F

    1987-01-01

    The sequence of five mouse histone genes, two H2a and three H2b genes on chromosome 13 has been determined. The three H2b genes all code for different proteins, each differing in two amino acids from the others. The H2b specific elements present 5' to H2b genes from other species are present in all three mouse H2b genes. All three H2b genes are expressed in the same relative amounts in three different mouse cell lines and fetal mice. The H2b gene with the H2b specific sequence closest to the TATAA sequence is expressed in the highest amount. One of the H2a genes lacks the first 9 amino acids, the promoter region, the last 3 amino acids and contains an altered 3' end sequence. Despite these multiple defects, there is only one nucleotide change between the two H2a genes from codon 9 to 126. This indicates that a recent gene conversion has occurred between these two genes. The similarity of the nucleotide sequences in the coding regions of mouse histone genes is probably due to gene conversion events targeted precisely at the coding region. Images PMID:3562244

  12. Identification of Hub Genes Related to the Recovery Phase of Irradiation Injury by Microarray and Integrated Gene Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Yang, Yue; Wang, Yin; Zhang, Jinyuan; Wang, Zejian; Yin, Ming; Shen, Xudong

    2011-01-01

    Background Irradiation commonly causes long-term bone marrow injury charactertized by defective HSC self-renewal and a decrease in HSC reserve. However, the effect of high-dose IR on global gene expression during bone marrow recovery remains unknown. Methodology Microarray analysis was used to identify differentially expressed genes that are likely to be critical for bone marrow recovery. Multiple bioinformatics analyses were conducted to identify key hub genes, pathways and biological processes. Principal Findings 1) We identified 1302 differentially expressed genes in murine bone marrow at 3, 7, 11 and 21 days after irradiation. Eleven of these genes are known to be HSC self-renewal associated genes, including Adipoq, Ccl3, Ccnd1, Ccnd2, Cdkn1a, Cxcl12, Junb, Pten, Tal1, Thy1 and Tnf; 2) These 1302 differentially expressed genes function in multiple biological processes of immunity, including hematopoiesis and response to stimuli, and cellular processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and signaling; 3) Dynamic Gene Network analysis identified a subgroup of 25 core genes that participate in immune response, regulation of transcription and nucleosome assembly; 4) A comparison of our data with known irradiation-related genes extracted from literature showed 42 genes that matched the results of our microarray analysis, thus demonstrated consistency between studies; 5) Protein-protein interaction network and pathway analyses indicated several essential protein-protein interactions and signaling pathways, including focal adhesion and several immune-related signaling pathways. Conclusions Comparisons to other gene array datasets indicate that global gene expression profiles of irradiation damaged bone marrow show significant differences between injury and recovery phases. Our data suggest that immune response (including hematopoiesis) can be considered as a critical biological process in bone marrow recovery. Several critical hub genes that are

  13. Evolutionary analysis of the jacalin-related lectin family genes in 11 fishes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Lv, Yueqing

    2016-09-01

    Jacalin-related lectins are a type of carbohydrate-binding proteins, which are distributed across a wide variety of organisms and involved in some important biological processes. The evolution of this gene family in fishes is unknown. Here, 47 putative jacalin genes in 11 fish species were identified and divided into 4 groups through phylogenetic analysis. Conserved gene organization and motif distribution existed in each group, suggesting their functional conservation. Some fishes have eleven jacalin genes, while others have only one or zero gene in their genomes, suggesting dynamic changes in the number of jacalin genes during the evolution of fishes. Intragenic recombination played a key role in the evolution of jacalin genes. Synteny analyses of jacalin genes in some fishes implied conserved and dynamic evolution characteristics of this gene family and related genome segments. Moreover, a few functional divergence sites were identified within each group pairs. Divergent expression profiles of the zebra fish jacalin genes were further investigated in different stresses. The results provided a foundation for exploring the characterization of the jacalin genes in fishes and will offer insights for additional functional studies. PMID:27514782

  14. Evolution of new functions de novo and from preexisting genes.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Dan I; Jerlström-Hultqvist, Jon; Näsvall, Joakim

    2015-06-01

    How the enormous structural and functional diversity of new genes and proteins was generated (estimated to be 10(10)-10(12) different proteins in all organisms on earth [Choi I-G, Kim S-H. 2006. Evolution of protein structural classes and protein sequence families. Proc Natl Acad Sci 103: 14056-14061] is a central biological question that has a long and rich history. Extensive work during the last 80 years have shown that new genes that play important roles in lineage-specific phenotypes and adaptation can originate through a multitude of different mechanisms, including duplication, lateral gene transfer, gene fusion/fission, and de novo origination. In this review, we focus on two main processes as generators of new functions: evolution of new genes by duplication and divergence of pre-existing genes and de novo gene origination in which a whole protein-coding gene evolves from a noncoding sequence. PMID:26032716

  15. A Genome-Wide Screen Indicates Correlation between Differentiation and Expression of Metabolism Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Akhilesh; Singh, Anupama; Meena, Anil; Ghosal, Ritika; Ranganathan, Madhav; Bandyopadhyay, Amitabha

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated tissues may be considered as materials with distinct properties. The differentiation program of a given tissue ensures that it acquires material properties commensurate with its function. It may be hypothesized that some of these properties are acquired through production of tissue-specific metabolites synthesized by metabolic enzymes. To establish correlation between metabolism and organogenesis we have carried out a genome-wide expression study of metabolism related genes by RNA in-situ hybridization. 23% of the metabolism related genes studied are expressed in a tissue-restricted but not tissue-exclusive manner. We have conducted the screen on whole mount chicken (Gallus gallus) embryos from four distinct developmental stages to correlate dynamic changes in expression patterns of metabolic enzymes with spatio-temporally unique developmental events. Our data strongly suggests that unique combinations of metabolism related genes, and not specific metabolic pathways, are upregulated during differentiation. Further, expression of metabolism related genes in well established signaling centers that regulate different aspects of morphogenesis indicates developmental roles of some of the metabolism related genes. The database of tissue-restricted expression patterns of metabolism related genes, generated in this study, should serve as a resource for systematic identification of these genes with tissue-specific functions during development. Finally, comprehensive understanding of differentiation is not possible unless the downstream genes of a differentiation cascade are identified. We propose, metabolic enzymes constitute a significant portion of these downstream target genes. Thus our study should help elucidate different aspects of tissue differentiation. PMID:23717462

  16. SNP in starch biosynthesis genes associated with nutritional and functional properties of rice

    PubMed Central

    Kharabian-Masouleh, Ardashir; Waters, Daniel L. E.; Reinke, Russell F.; Ward, Rachelle; Henry, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Starch is a major component of human diets. The relative contribution of variation in the genes of starch biosynthesis to the nutritional and functional properties of the rice was evaluated in a rice breeding population. Sequencing 18 genes involved in starch synthesis in a population of 233 rice breeding lines discovered 66 functional SNPs in exonic regions. Five genes, AGPS2b, Isoamylase1, SPHOL, SSIIb and SSIVb showed no polymorphism. Association analysis found 31 of the SNP were associated with differences in pasting and cooking quality properties of the rice lines. Two genes appear to be the major loci controlling traits under human selection in rice, GBSSI (waxy gene) and SSIIa. GBSSI influenced amylose content and retrogradation. Other genes contributing to retrogradation were GPT1, SSI, BEI and SSIIIa. SSIIa explained much of the variation in cooking characteristics. Other genes had relatively small effects. PMID:22870386

  17. BRONCO: Biomedical entity Relation ONcology COrpus for extracting gene-variant-disease-drug relations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyubum; Lee, Sunwon; Park, Sungjoon; Kim, Sunkyu; Kim, Suhkyung; Choi, Kwanghun; Tan, Aik Choon; Kang, Jaewoo

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of genomic variants in a biological context is key for precision medicine. As next-generation sequencing technologies improve, the amount of literature containing genomic variant data, such as new functions or related phenotypes, rapidly increases. Because numerous articles are published every day, it is almost impossible to manually curate all the variant information from the literature. Many researchers focus on creating an improved automated biomedical natural language processing (BioNLP) method that extracts useful variants and their functional information from the literature. However, there is no gold-standard data set that contains texts annotated with variants and their related functions. To overcome these limitations, we introduce a Biomedical entity Relation ONcology COrpus (BRONCO) that contains more than 400 variants and their relations with genes, diseases, drugs and cell lines in the context of cancer and anti-tumor drug screening research. The variants and their relations were manually extracted from 108 full-text articles. BRONCO can be utilized to evaluate and train new methods used for extracting biomedical entity relations from full-text publications, and thus be a valuable resource to the biomedical text mining research community. Using BRONCO, we quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated the performance of three state-of-the-art BioNLP methods. We also identified their shortcomings, and suggested remedies for each method. We implemented post-processing modules for the three BioNLP methods, which improved their performance.Database URL:http://infos.korea.ac.kr/bronco. PMID:27074804

  18. BRONCO: Biomedical entity Relation ONcology COrpus for extracting gene-variant-disease-drug relations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyubum; Lee, Sunwon; Park, Sungjoon; Kim, Sunkyu; Kim, Suhkyung; Choi, Kwanghun; Tan, Aik Choon; Kang, Jaewoo

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of genomic variants in a biological context is key for precision medicine. As next-generation sequencing technologies improve, the amount of literature containing genomic variant data, such as new functions or related phenotypes, rapidly increases. Because numerous articles are published every day, it is almost impossible to manually curate all the variant information from the literature. Many researchers focus on creating an improved automated biomedical natural language processing (BioNLP) method that extracts useful variants and their functional information from the literature. However, there is no gold-standard data set that contains texts annotated with variants and their related functions. To overcome these limitations, we introduce a Biomedical entity Relation ONcology COrpus (BRONCO) that contains more than 400 variants and their relations with genes, diseases, drugs and cell lines in the context of cancer and anti-tumor drug screening research. The variants and their relations were manually extracted from 108 full-text articles. BRONCO can be utilized to evaluate and train new methods used for extracting biomedical entity relations from full-text publications, and thus be a valuable resource to the biomedical text mining research community. Using BRONCO, we quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated the performance of three state-of-the-art BioNLP methods. We also identified their shortcomings, and suggested remedies for each method. We implemented post-processing modules for the three BioNLP methods, which improved their performance. Database URL: http://infos.korea.ac.kr/bronco PMID:27074804

  19. From phenotype to gene: detecting disease-specific gene functional modules via a text-based human disease phenotype network construction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihua; Zhang, Shi-Hua; Wu, Chao; Li, Xia; Chen, Xi; Jiang, Wei; Gong, Bin-Sheng; Li, Jiang; Yan, Yu-Qing

    2010-08-20

    Currently, some efforts have been devoted to the text analysis of disease phenotype data, and their results indicated that similar disease phenotypes arise from functionally related genes. These related genes work together, as a functional module, to perform a desired cellular function. We constructed a text-based human disease phenotype network and detected 82 disease-specific gene functional modules, each corresponding to a different phenotype cluster, by means of graph-based clustering and mapping from disease phenotype to gene. Since genes in such gene functional modules are functionally related and cause clinically similar diseases, they may share common genetic origin of their associated disease phenotypes. We believe the investigation may facilitate the ultimate understanding of the common pathophysiologic basis of associated diseases.

  20. Reconstruction of a Functional Human Gene Network, with an Application for Prioritizing Positional Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Lude; Bakel, Harm van; Fokkens, Like; de Jong, Edwin D.; Egmont-Petersen, Michael; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2006-01-01

    Most common genetic disorders have a complex inheritance and may result from variants in many genes, each contributing only weak effects to the disease. Pinpointing these disease genes within the myriad of susceptibility loci identified in linkage studies is difficult because these loci may contain hundreds of genes. However, in any disorder, most of the disease genes will be involved in only a few different molecular pathways. If we know something about the relationships between the genes, we can assess whether some genes (which may reside in different loci) functionally interact with each other, indicating a joint basis for the disease etiology. There are various repositories of information on pathway relationships. To consolidate this information, we developed a functional human gene network that integrates information on genes and the functional relationships between genes, based on data from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, the Biomolecular Interaction Network Database, Reactome, the Human Protein Reference Database, the Gene Ontology database, predicted protein-protein interactions, human yeast two-hybrid interactions, and microarray coexpressions. We applied this network to interrelate positional candidate genes from different disease loci and then tested 96 heritable disorders for which the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database reported at least three disease genes. Artificial susceptibility loci, each containing 100 genes, were constructed around each disease gene, and we used the network to rank these genes on the basis of their functional interactions. By following up the top five genes per artificial locus, we were able to detect at least one known disease gene in 54% of the loci studied, representing a 2.8-fold increase over random selection. This suggests that our method can significantly reduce the cost and effort of pinpointing true disease genes in analyses of disorders for which numerous loci have been reported but for which

  1. Prediction of nitrogen metabolism-related genes in Anabaena by kernel-based network analysis.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Shinobu; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro; Ehira, Shigeki; Kawashima, Shuichi; Tonomura, Koichiro; Kanehisa, Minoru

    2007-03-01

    Prediction of molecular interaction networks from large-scale datasets in genomics and other omics experiments is an important task in terms of both developing bioinformatics methods and solving biological problems. We have applied a kernel-based network inference method for extracting functionally related genes to the response of nitrogen deprivation in cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 integrating three heterogeneous datasets: microarray data, phylogenetic profiles, and gene orders on the chromosome. We obtained 1348 predicted genes that are somehow related to known genes in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. While this dataset contained previously known genes related to the nitrogen deprivation condition, it also contained additional genes. Thus, we attempted to select any relevant genes using the constraints of Pfam domains and NtcA-binding sites. We found candidates of nitrogen metabolism-related genes, which are depicted as extensions of existing KEGG pathways. The prediction of functional relationships between proteins rather than functions of individual proteins will thus assist the discovery from the large-scale datasets.

  2. Bipolar disorder: Functional neuroimaging markers in relatives.

    PubMed

    Piguet, Camille; Fodoulian, Leon; Aubry, Jean-Michel; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Houenou, Josselin

    2015-10-01

    Neural models of anatomical and functional alterations have been proposed for bipolar disorders (BD). However, studies in affected patients do not allow disentangling alterations linked to the liability to BD from those associated with the evolution, medication and comorbidities of BD. Explorations in high risk subjects allow the study of these risk markers. We reported and summarized all functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies focusing on first-degree relatives of BD patients. We found 29 studies reporting neural correlates of working memory (WM), emotional processing, executive functions and resting state in relatives of BD patients, compared to healthy subjects. Overall, the same regions that have been involved in patients, such as the inferior frontal gyrus and limbic areas, seem to be functionally altered in high-risk subjects. We conclude that the same brain regions already implicated in the pathophysiology of the disease such as the amygdala are also associated with the risk of BD. However longitudinal studies are required to understand their implication in the transition to BD.

  3. HTLV-1 subgroups associated with the risk of HAM/TSP are related to viral and host gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, independent of the transactivation functions of the viral factors.

    PubMed

    Yasuma, Keiko; Matsuzaki, Toshio; Yamano, Yoshihisa; Takashima, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Masao; Saito, Mineki

    2016-08-01

    Among human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected individuals, the risk of developing HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) across lifetime differs between ethnic groups. There is an association between HTLV-1 tax gene subgroups (subgroup-A or subgroup-B) and the risk of HAM/TSP in the Japanese population. In this study, we investigated the full-length proviral genome sequences of various HTLV-1-infected cell lines and patient samples. The functional differences in the viral transcriptional regulators Tax and HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) between each subgroup and the relationships between subgroups and the clinical and laboratory characteristics of HAM/TSP patients were evaluated. The results of these analyses indicated the following: (1) distinct nucleotide substitutions corresponding to each subgroup were associated with nucleotide substitutions in viral structural, regulatory, and accessory genes; (2) the HBZ messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in HTLV-1-infected cells was significantly higher in HAM/TSP patients with subgroup-B than in those with subgroup-A; (3) a positive correlation was observed between the expression of HBZ mRNA and its target Foxp3 mRNA in HAM/TSP patients with subgroup-B, but not in patients with subgroup-A; (4) no clear differences were noted in clinical and laboratory characteristics between HAM/TSP patients with subgroup-A and subgroup-B; and (5) no functional differences were observed in Tax and HBZ between each subgroup based on reporter gene assays. Our results indicate that although different HTLV-1 subgroups are characterized by different patterns of viral and host gene expression in HAM/TSP patients via independent mechanisms of direct transcriptional regulation, these differences do not significantly affect the clinical and laboratory characteristics of HAM/TSP patients. PMID:26635027

  4. Prefrontal executive function associated coupling relates to Huntington's disease stage.

    PubMed

    Unschuld, Paul G; Liu, Xinyang; Shanahan, Megan; Margolis, Russell L; Bassett, Susan S; Brandt, Jason; Schretlen, David J; Redgrave, Graham W; Hua, Jun; Hock, Christoph; Reading, Sarah A; van Zijl, Peter C M; Pekar, James J; Ross, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG)-repeat expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. Early changes that may precede clinical manifestation of movement disorder include executive dysfunction. The aim of this study was to identify functional network correlates of impaired higher cognitive functioning in relation to HD stage. Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional-magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and structural-MRI were performed in 53 subjects with the HD-mutation (41 prodromals, 12 early affected) and 52 controls. Disease stage was estimated for each subject with HD-mutation based on age, length of the CAG-repeat expansion mutation and also putaminal atrophy. The Tower of London test was administered with three levels of complexity during fMRI as a challenge of executive function. Functional brain networks of interest were identified based on cortical gray matter voxel-clusters with significantly enhanced task-related functional coupling to the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) area. While prodromal HD-subjects showed similar performance levels as controls, multivariate analysis of task-related functional coupling to the MPFC identified reduced connectivity in prodromal and early manifest HD-subjects for a cluster including mainly parts of the left premotor area. Secondary testing indicated a significant moderator effect for task complexity on group differences and on the degree of correlation to measures of HD stage. Our data suggest that impaired premotor-MPFC coupling reflects HD stage related dysfunction of cognitive systems involved in executive function and may be present in prodromal HD-subjects that are still cognitively normal. Additional longitudinal studies may reveal temporal relationships between impaired task-related premotor-MPFC coupling and other brain changes in HD.

  5. Reproduction-related genes in the pearl oyster genome.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Toshie; Masaoka, Tetsuji; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yoji; Satoh, Nori; Awaji, Masahiko

    2013-10-01

    Molluscan reproduction has been a target of biological research because of the various reproductive strategies that have evolved in this phylum. It has also been studied for the development of fisheries technologies, particularly aquaculture. Although fundamental processes of reproduction in other phyla, such as vertebrates and arthropods, have been well studied, information on the molecular mechanisms of molluscan reproduction remains limited. The recently released draft genome of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata provides a novel and powerful platform for obtaining structural information on the genes and proteins involved in bivalve reproduction. In the present study, we analyzed the pearl oyster draft genome to screen reproduction-related genes. Analysis was mainly conducted for genes reported from other molluscs for encoding orthologs of reproduction-related proteins in other phyla. The gene search in the P. fucata gene models (version 1.1) and genome assembly (version 1.0) were performed using Genome Browser and BLAST software. The obtained gene models were then BLASTP searched against a public database to confirm the best-hit sequences. As a result, more than 40 gene models were identified with high accuracy to encode reproduction-related genes reported for P. fucata and other molluscs. These include vasa, nanos, doublesex- and mab-3-related transcription factor, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors, vitellogenin, estrogen receptor, and others. The set of reproduction-related genes of P. fucata identified in the present study constitute a new tool for research on bivalve reproduction at the molecular level.

  6. Symbiosis-related pea genes modulate fungal and plant gene expression during the arbuscule stage of mycorrhiza with Glomus intraradices.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Elena; Seddas-Dozolme, Pascale M A; Arnould, Christine; Tollot, Marie; van Tuinen, Diederik; Borisov, Alexey; Gianinazzi, Silvio; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne

    2010-08-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhiza association results from a successful interaction between genomes of the plant and fungal symbiotic partners. In this study, we analyzed the effect of inactivation of late-stage symbiosis-related pea genes on symbiosis-associated fungal and plant molecular responses in order to gain insight into their role in the functional mycorrhizal association. The expression of a subset of ten fungal and eight plant genes, previously reported to be activated during mycorrhiza development, was compared in Glomus intraradices-inoculated wild-type and isogenic genotypes of pea mutated for the PsSym36, PsSym33, and PsSym40 genes where arbuscule formation is inhibited or fungal turnover modulated, respectively. Microdissection was used to corroborate arbuscule-related fungal gene expression. Molecular responses varied between pea genotypes and with fungal development. Most of the fungal genes were downregulated when arbuscule formation was defective, and several were upregulated with more rapid fungal development. Some of the plant genes were also affected by inactivation of the PsSym36, PsSym33, and PsSym40 loci, but in a more time-dependent way during root colonization by G. intraradices. Results indicate a role of the late-stage symbiosis-related pea genes not only in mycorrhiza development but also in the symbiotic functioning of arbuscule-containing cells.

  7. When natural selection gives gene function the cold shoulder.

    PubMed

    Cutter, Asher D; Jovelin, Richard

    2015-11-01

    It is tempting to invoke organismal selection as perpetually optimizing the function of any given gene. However, natural selection can drive genic functional change without improvement of biochemical activity, even to the extinction of gene activity. Detrimental mutations can creep in owing to linkage with other selectively favored loci. Selection can promote functional degradation, irrespective of genetic drift, when adaptation occurs by loss of gene function. Even stabilizing selection on a trait can lead to divergence of the underlying molecular constituents. Selfish genetic elements can also proliferate independent of any functional benefits to the host genome. Here we review the logic and evidence for these diverse processes acting in genome evolution. This collection of distinct evolutionary phenomena - while operating through easily understandable mechanisms - all contribute to the seemingly counterintuitive notion that maintenance or improvement of a gene's biochemical function sometimes do not determine its evolutionary fate. PMID:26411745

  8. When natural selection gives gene function the cold shoulder.

    PubMed

    Cutter, Asher D; Jovelin, Richard

    2015-11-01

    It is tempting to invoke organismal selection as perpetually optimizing the function of any given gene. However, natural selection can drive genic functional change without improvement of biochemical activity, even to the extinction of gene activity. Detrimental mutations can creep in owing to linkage with other selectively favored loci. Selection can promote functional degradation, irrespective of genetic drift, when adaptation occurs by loss of gene function. Even stabilizing selection on a trait can lead to divergence of the underlying molecular constituents. Selfish genetic elements can also proliferate independent of any functional benefits to the host genome. Here we review the logic and evidence for these diverse processes acting in genome evolution. This collection of distinct evolutionary phenomena - while operating through easily understandable mechanisms - all contribute to the seemingly counterintuitive notion that maintenance or improvement of a gene's biochemical function sometimes do not determine its evolutionary fate.

  9. Functionalized organic nanotubes as tubular nonviral gene transfer vector.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wuxiao; Wada, Momoyo; Kameta, Naohiro; Minamikawa, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Toshimi; Masuda, Mitsutoshi

    2011-11-30

    Tubular nanomaterials are expected to represent a novel nonviral gene transfer vectors due to the unique morphology and potential biological functionalities. Here we rationally constructed functionalized organic nanotubes (ONTs) for gene delivery through the co-assembly of bipolar glycolipid, arginine-lipid and PEG-lipid. The arginine- and PEG-functionalized ONTs efficiently formed complexes with plasmid DNA without aggregation, and protect DNA from enzymatic degradation; while the arginine-functionalized ONTs aggregated with DNA as large bundles. Long ONTs exceeding 1μm in length was rarely taken up into the cells, while those with a length of 400-800nm could effectively deliver plasmid DNA into cells and induce high transgene expression of green fluorescense protein. This study demonstrated the usefulness of functionalized ONT in gene delivery, and the functionalized ONT represents a novel type of tubular nonviral gene transfer vector.

  10. Laughter up-regulates the genes related to NK cell activity in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takashi; Tsujii, Satoru; Iburi, Tadao; Tamanaha, Tamiko; Yamagami, Keiko; Ishibashi, Rieko; Hori, Miyo; Sakamoto, Shigeko; Ishii, Hitoshi; Murakami, Kazuo

    2007-12-01

    To elucidate the sustainable effects of laughter on gene expression, we recruited type 2 diabetic patients who were in-patient for receiving self-management education and examined time-dependent regulation for gene expression by laughter. Two-day experiment was performed. On one day, the patients watched comic video and laughed together with hospital staffs. On the other day, they participated in an inpatient diabetes educational program. Blood samples were collected before and 1.5, 4 h after watching comic video or spending lecture time, and changes in gene expression were comprehensively analyzed by microarray technique. Of the 41,000 genes analyzed, the laughter relatively up-regulated 39 genes, among which, 27 genes were relatively increased in the expression for all the observation period after watching comic video. By functional classification of these genes, 14 genes were found to be related to natural killer cell activity. No genes were included that are directly involved in blood glucose regulation, though successive suppression of postprandial blood glucose levels was observed. These results suggest that the laughter influences the expression of many genes classified into immune responses, and may contribute to amelioration of postprandial blood glucose elevation through a modulation of NK cell activity caused by up-regulation of relating genes.

  11. Function does not follow form in gene regulatory circuits

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Joshua L.; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Gene regulatory circuits are to the cell what arithmetic logic units are to the chip: fundamental components of information processing that map an input onto an output. Gene regulatory circuits come in many different forms, distinct structural configurations that determine who regulates whom. Studies that have focused on the gene expression patterns (functions) of circuits with a given structure (form) have examined just a few structures or gene expression patterns. Here, we use a computational model to exhaustively characterize the gene expression patterns of nearly 17 million three-gene circuits in order to systematically explore the relationship between circuit form and function. Three main conclusions emerge. First, function does not follow form. A circuit of any one structure can have between twelve and nearly thirty thousand distinct gene expression patterns. Second, and conversely, form does not follow function. Most gene expression patterns can be realized by more than one circuit structure. And third, multifunctionality severely constrains circuit form. The number of circuit structures able to drive multiple gene expression patterns decreases rapidly with the number of these patterns. These results indicate that it is generally not possible to infer circuit function from circuit form, or vice versa. PMID:26290154

  12. Fruit growth-related genes in tomato.

    PubMed

    Azzi, Lamia; Deluche, Cynthia; Gévaudant, Frédéric; Frangne, Nathalie; Delmas, Frédéric; Hernould, Michel; Chevalier, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill.) represents a model species for all fleshy fruits due to its biological cycle and the availability of numerous genetic and molecular resources. Its importance in human nutrition has made it one of the most valuable worldwide commodities. Tomato fruit size results from the combination of cell number and cell size, which are determined by both cell division and expansion. As fruit growth is mainly driven by cell expansion, cells from the (fleshy) pericarp tissue become highly polyploid according to the endoreduplication process, reaching a DNA content rarely encountered in other plant species (between 2C and 512C). Both cell division and cell expansion are under the control of complex interactions between hormone signalling and carbon partitioning, which establish crucial determinants of the quality of ripe fruit, such as the final size, weight, and shape, and organoleptic and nutritional traits. This review describes the genes known to contribute to fruit growth in tomato.

  13. Horizontal functional gene transfer from bacteria to fishes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bao-Fa; Li, Tong; Xiao, Jin-Hua; Jia, Ling-Yi; Liu, Li; Zhang, Peng; Murphy, Robert W.; He, Shun-Min; Huang, Da-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Invertebrates can acquire functional genes via horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from bacteria but fishes are not known to do so. We provide the first reliable evidence of one HGT event from marine bacteria to fishes. The HGT appears to have occurred after emergence of the teleosts. The transferred gene is expressed and regulated developmentally. Its successful integration and expression may change the genetic and metabolic repertoire of fishes. In addition, this gene contains conserved domains and similar tertiary structures in fishes and their putative donor bacteria. Thus, it may function similarly in both groups. Evolutionary analyses indicate that it evolved under purifying selection, further indicating its conserved function. We document the first likely case of HGT of functional gene from prokaryote to fishes. This discovery certifies that HGT can influence vertebrate evolution. PMID:26691285

  14. Amplification of a Gene Related to Mammalian mdr Genes in Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Craig M.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Wasley, Annemarie; Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Shankar, Anuraj H.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    1989-06-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains at least two genes related to the mammalian multiple drug resistance genes, and at least one of the P. falciparum genes is expressed at a higher level and is present in higher copy number in a strain that is resistant to multiple drugs than in a strain that is sensitive to the drugs.

  15. Discovery of New Candidate Genes Related to Brain Development Using Protein Interaction Information

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Chu, Chen; Kong, Xiangyin; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Human brain development is a dramatic process composed of a series of complex and fine-tuned spatiotemporal gene expressions. A good comprehension of this process can assist us in developing the potential of our brain. However, we have only limited knowledge about the genes and gene functions that are involved in this biological process. Therefore, a substantial demand remains to discover new brain development-related genes and identify their biological functions. In this study, we aimed to discover new brain-development related genes by building a computational method. We referred to a series of computational methods used to discover new disease-related genes and developed a similar method. In this method, the shortest path algorithm was executed on a weighted graph that was constructed using protein-protein interactions. New candidate genes fell on at least one of the shortest paths connecting two known genes that are related to brain development. A randomization test was then adopted to filter positive discoveries. Of the final identified genes, several have been reported to be associated with brain development, indicating the effectiveness of the method, whereas several of the others may have potential roles in brain development. PMID:25635857

  16. Saliva Microbiota Carry Caries-Specific Functional Gene Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xingzhi; Yuan, Xiao; Tu, Qichao; Yuan, Tong; Deng, Ye; Hemme, Christopher L.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Cui, Xinping; He, Zhili; Chen, Zhenggang; Guo, Dawei; Yu, Jiangbo; Zhang, Yue; Zhou, Jizhong; Xu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Human saliva microbiota is phylogenetically divergent among host individuals yet their roles in health and disease are poorly appreciated. We employed a microbial functional gene microarray, HuMiChip 1.0, to reconstruct the global functional profiles of human saliva microbiota from ten healthy and ten caries-active adults. Saliva microbiota in the pilot population featured a vast diversity of functional genes. No significant distinction in gene number or diversity indices was observed between healthy and caries-active microbiota. However, co-presence network analysis of functional genes revealed that caries-active microbiota was more divergent in non-core genes than healthy microbiota, despite both groups exhibited a similar degree of conservation at their respective core genes. Furthermore, functional gene structure of saliva microbiota could potentially distinguish caries-active patients from healthy hosts. Microbial functions such as Diaminopimelate epimerase, Prephenate dehydrogenase, Pyruvate-formate lyase and N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase were significantly linked to caries. Therefore, saliva microbiota carried disease-associated functional signatures, which could be potentially exploited for caries diagnosis. PMID:24533043

  17. Characterization and Functional Analysis of PEBP Family Genes in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Wang, Congcong; Pang, Chaoyou; Wei, Hengling; Wang, Hantao; Song, Meizhen; Fan, Shuli; Yu, Shuxun

    2016-01-01

    Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is a naturally occurring photoperiod-sensitive perennial plant species. However, sensitivity to the day length was lost during domestication. The phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) gene family, of which three subclades have been identified in angiosperms, functions to promote and suppress flowering in photoperiod pathway. Recent evidence indicates that PEBP family genes play an important role in generating mobile flowering signals. We isolated homologues of the PEBP gene family in upland cotton and examined their regulation and function. Nine PEBP-like genes were cloned and phylogenetic analysis indicated the genes belonged to four subclades (FT, MFT, TFL1 and PEBP). Cotton PEBP-like genes showed distinct expression patterns in relation to different cotton genotypes, photoperiod responsive and cultivar maturity. The GhFT gene expression of a semi-wild race of upland cotton were strongly induced under short day condition, whereas the GhPEBP2 gene expression was induced under long days. We also elucidated that GhFT but not GhPEBP2 interacted with FD-like bZIP transcription factor GhFD and promote flowering under both long- and short-day conditions. The present result indicated that GhPEBP-like genes may perform different functions. This work corroborates the involvement of PEBP-like genes in photoperiod response and regulation of flowering time in different cotton genotypes, and contributes to an improved understanding of the function of PEBP-like genes in cotton. PMID:27552108

  18. Characterization and Functional Analysis of PEBP Family Genes in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Wang, Congcong; Pang, Chaoyou; Wei, Hengling; Wang, Hantao; Song, Meizhen; Fan, Shuli; Yu, Shuxun

    2016-01-01

    Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is a naturally occurring photoperiod-sensitive perennial plant species. However, sensitivity to the day length was lost during domestication. The phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) gene family, of which three subclades have been identified in angiosperms, functions to promote and suppress flowering in photoperiod pathway. Recent evidence indicates that PEBP family genes play an important role in generating mobile flowering signals. We isolated homologues of the PEBP gene family in upland cotton and examined their regulation and function. Nine PEBP-like genes were cloned and phylogenetic analysis indicated the genes belonged to four subclades (FT, MFT, TFL1 and PEBP). Cotton PEBP-like genes showed distinct expression patterns in relation to different cotton genotypes, photoperiod responsive and cultivar maturity. The GhFT gene expression of a semi-wild race of upland cotton were strongly induced under short day condition, whereas the GhPEBP2 gene expression was induced under long days. We also elucidated that GhFT but not GhPEBP2 interacted with FD-like bZIP transcription factor GhFD and promote flowering under both long- and short-day conditions. The present result indicated that GhPEBP-like genes may perform different functions. This work corroborates the involvement of PEBP-like genes in photoperiod response and regulation of flowering time in different cotton genotypes, and contributes to an improved understanding of the function of PEBP-like genes in cotton.

  19. Characterization and Functional Analysis of PEBP Family Genes in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congcong; Pang, Chaoyou; Wei, Hengling; Wang, Hantao; Song, Meizhen; Fan, Shuli; Yu, Shuxun

    2016-01-01

    Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is a naturally occurring photoperiod-sensitive perennial plant species. However, sensitivity to the day length was lost during domestication. The phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) gene family, of which three subclades have been identified in angiosperms, functions to promote and suppress flowering in photoperiod pathway. Recent evidence indicates that PEBP family genes play an important role in generating mobile flowering signals. We isolated homologues of the PEBP gene family in upland cotton and examined their regulation and function. Nine PEBP-like genes were cloned and phylogenetic analysis indicated the genes belonged to four subclades (FT, MFT, TFL1 and PEBP). Cotton PEBP-like genes showed distinct expression patterns in relation to different cotton genotypes, photoperiod responsive and cultivar maturity. The GhFT gene expression of a semi-wild race of upland cotton were strongly induced under short day condition, whereas the GhPEBP2 gene expression was induced under long days. We also elucidated that GhFT but not GhPEBP2 interacted with FD-like bZIP transcription factor GhFD and promote flowering under both long- and short-day conditions. The present result indicated that GhPEBP-like genes may perform different functions. This work corroborates the involvement of PEBP-like genes in photoperiod response and regulation of flowering time in different cotton genotypes, and contributes to an improved understanding of the function of PEBP-like genes in cotton. PMID:27552108

  20. Effective Boolean dynamics analysis to identify functionally important genes in large-scale signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Hung-Cuong; Kwon, Yung-Keun

    2015-11-01

    Efficiently identifying functionally important genes in order to understand the minimal requirements of normal cellular development is challenging. To this end, a variety of structural measures have been proposed and their effectiveness has been investigated in recent literature; however, few studies have shown the effectiveness of dynamics-based measures. This led us to investigate a dynamic measure to identify functionally important genes, and the effectiveness of which was verified through application on two large-scale human signaling networks. We specifically consider Boolean sensitivity-based dynamics against an update-rule perturbation (BSU) as a dynamic measure. Through investigations on two large-scale human signaling networks, we found that genes with relatively high BSU values show slower evolutionary rate and higher proportions of essential genes and drug targets than other genes. Gene-ontology analysis showed clear differences between the former and latter groups of genes. Furthermore, we compare the identification accuracies of essential genes and drug targets via BSU and five well-known structural measures. Although BSU did not always show the best performance, it effectively identified the putative set of genes, which is significantly different from the results obtained via the structural measures. Most interestingly, BSU showed the highest synergy effect in identifying the functionally important genes in conjunction with other measures. Our results imply that Boolean-sensitive dynamics can be used as a measure to effectively identify functionally important genes in signaling networks.

  1. Evolutionary Fates and Dynamic Functionalization of Young Duplicate Genes in Arabidopsis Genomes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Tao, Feng; Marowsky, Nicholas C.; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication is a primary means to generate genomic novelties, playing an essential role in speciation and adaptation. Particularly in plants, a high abundance of duplicate genes has been maintained for significantly long periods of evolutionary time. To address the manner in which young duplicate genes were derived primarily from small-scale gene duplication and preserved in plant genomes and to determine the underlying driving mechanisms, we generated transcriptomes to produce the expression profiles of five tissues in Arabidopsis thaliana and the closely related species Arabidopsis lyrata and Capsella rubella. Based on the quantitative analysis metrics, we investigated the evolutionary processes of young duplicate genes in Arabidopsis. We determined that conservation, neofunctionalization, and specialization are three main evolutionary processes for Arabidopsis young duplicate genes. We explicitly demonstrated the dynamic functionalization of duplicate genes along the evolutionary time scale. Upon origination, duplicates tend to maintain their ancestral functions; but as they survive longer, they might be likely to develop distinct and novel functions. The temporal evolutionary processes and functionalization of plant duplicate genes are associated with their ancestral functions, dynamic DNA methylation levels, and histone modification abundances. Furthermore, duplicate genes tend to be initially expressed in pollen and then to gain more interaction partners over time. Altogether, our study provides novel insights into the dynamic retention processes of young duplicate genes in plant genomes. PMID:27485883

  2. Evolutionary Fates and Dynamic Functionalization of Young Duplicate Genes in Arabidopsis Genomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Tao, Feng; Marowsky, Nicholas C; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2016-09-01

    Gene duplication is a primary means to generate genomic novelties, playing an essential role in speciation and adaptation. Particularly in plants, a high abundance of duplicate genes has been maintained for significantly long periods of evolutionary time. To address the manner in which young duplicate genes were derived primarily from small-scale gene duplication and preserved in plant genomes and to determine the underlying driving mechanisms, we generated transcriptomes to produce the expression profiles of five tissues in Arabidopsis thaliana and the closely related species Arabidopsis lyrata and Capsella rubella Based on the quantitative analysis metrics, we investigated the evolutionary processes of young duplicate genes in Arabidopsis. We determined that conservation, neofunctionalization, and specialization are three main evolutionary processes for Arabidopsis young duplicate genes. We explicitly demonstrated the dynamic functionalization of duplicate genes along the evolutionary time scale. Upon origination, duplicates tend to maintain their ancestral functions; but as they survive longer, they might be likely to develop distinct and novel functions. The temporal evolutionary processes and functionalization of plant duplicate genes are associated with their ancestral functions, dynamic DNA methylation levels, and histone modification abundances. Furthermore, duplicate genes tend to be initially expressed in pollen and then to gain more interaction partners over time. Altogether, our study provides novel insights into the dynamic retention processes of young duplicate genes in plant genomes. PMID:27485883

  3. Myelination-related genes are associated with decreased white matter integrity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chavarria-Siles, Ivan; White, Tonya; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Goudriaan, Andrea; Lips, Esther; Ehrlich, Stefan; Turner, Jessica A; Calhoun, Vince D; Gollub, Randy L; Magnotta, Vincent A; Ho, Beng-Choon; Smit, August B; Verheijen, Mark H G; Posthuma, Danielle

    2016-03-01

    Disruptions in white matter (WM) tract structures have been implicated consistently in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Global WM integrity--as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA)--is highly heritable and may provide a good endophenotype for genetic studies of schizophrenia. WM abnormalities in schizophrenia are not localized to one specific brain region but instead reflect global low-level decreases in FA coupled with focal abnormalities. In this study, we sought to investigate whether functional gene sets associated with schizophrenia are also associated with WM integrity. We analyzed FA and genetic data from the Mind Research Network Clinical Imaging Consortium to study the effect of multiple oligodendrocyte gene sets on schizophrenia and WM integrity using a functional gene set analysis in 77 subjects with schizophrenia and 104 healthy controls. We found that a gene set involved in myelination was significantly associated with schizophrenia and FA. This gene set includes 17 genes that are expressed in oligodendrocytes and one neuronal gene (NRG1) that is known to regulate myelination. None of the genes within the gene set were associated with schizophrenia or FA individually, suggesting that no single gene was driving the association of the gene set. Our findings support the hypothesis that multiple genetic variants in myelination-related genes contribute to the observed correlation between schizophrenia and decreased WM integrity as measured by FA.

  4. A yeast functional screen predicts new candidate ALS disease genes

    PubMed Central

    Couthouis, Julien; Hart, Michael P.; Shorter, James; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Erion, Renske; Oristano, Rachel; Liu, Annie X.; Ramos, Daniel; Jethava, Niti; Hosangadi, Divya; Epstein, James; Chiang, Ashley; Diaz, Zamia; Nakaya, Tadashi; Ibrahim, Fadia; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Solski, Jennifer A.; Williams, Kelly L.; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Ingre, Caroline; Boylan, Kevin; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Clay-Falcone, Dana; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Greene, Robert; Kalb, Robert G.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Ludolph, Albert; Robberecht, Wim; Andersen, Peter M.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Blair, Ian P.; King, Oliver D.; Bonini, Nancy M.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Rademakers, Rosa; Mourelatos, Zissimos; Gitler, Aaron D.

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating and universally fatal neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in two related RNA-binding proteins, TDP-43 and FUS, that harbor prion-like domains, cause some forms of ALS. There are at least 213 human proteins harboring RNA recognition motifs, including FUS and TDP-43, raising the possibility that additional RNA-binding proteins might contribute to ALS pathogenesis. We performed a systematic survey of these proteins to find additional candidates similar to TDP-43 and FUS, followed by bioinformatics to predict prion-like domains in a subset of them. We sequenced one of these genes, TAF15, in patients with ALS and identified missense variants, which were absent in a large number of healthy controls. These disease-associated variants of TAF15 caused formation of cytoplasmic foci when expressed in primary cultures of spinal cord neurons. Very similar to TDP-43 and FUS, TAF15 aggregated in vitro and conferred neurodegeneration in Drosophila, with the ALS-linked variants having a more severe effect than wild type. Immunohistochemistry of postmortem spinal cord tissue revealed mislocalization of TAF15 in motor neurons of patients with ALS. We propose that aggregation-prone RNA-binding proteins might contribute very broadly to ALS pathogenesis and the genes identified in our yeast functional screen, coupled with prion-like domain prediction analysis, now provide a powerful resource to facilitate ALS disease gene discovery. PMID:22065782

  5. Gene expression profile analysis of testis and ovary of oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, reveals candidate reproduction-related genes.

    PubMed

    Qiao, H; Xiong, Y W; Jiang, S F; Fu, H T; Sun, S M; Jin, S B; Gong, Y S; Zhang, W Y

    2015-01-01

    This study utilized high-throughput RNA sequencing technology to identify reproduction- and development-related genes of Macrobrachium nipponense by analyzing gene expression profiles of testis and ovary. More than 20 million 1 x 51-bp reads were obtained by Illumina sequencing, generating more than 7.7 and 11.7 million clean reads in the testis and ovary library, respectively. As a result, 10,018 unitags were supposed to be differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between ovary and testis. Compared to the ovary library, 4563 (45.5%) of these DEGs exhibited at least 6-fold upregulated expression, while 5455 (54.5%) DEGs exhibited at least 2-fold downregulated expression in the testis. The Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis showed that 113 GO terms had potential molecular functions in reproduction. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes results revealed that the most important pathways may be relevant to reproduction and included 7 pathways. Forty-two genes were identified as reproduction-, development-, and sex-related genes based on GO classification and sequence comparison with other publications, including male reproductive-related LIM protein, spermatogenesis-associated protein, gametocyte-specific factor 1, VASA-like protein, vitellogenin, sex-determining protein fem-1, and other potential candidates. These results will advance research in the field of molecular genetics in M. nipponense and offer a valuable resource for further research related to reproduction in crustaceans. PMID:25867350

  6. Gene expression profile analysis of testis and ovary of oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, reveals candidate reproduction-related genes.

    PubMed

    Qiao, H; Xiong, Y W; Jiang, S F; Fu, H T; Sun, S M; Jin, S B; Gong, Y S; Zhang, W Y

    2015-03-20

    This study utilized high-throughput RNA sequencing technology to identify reproduction- and development-related genes of Macrobrachium nipponense by analyzing gene expression profiles of testis and ovary. More than 20 million 1 x 51-bp reads were obtained by Illumina sequencing, generating more than 7.7 and 11.7 million clean reads in the testis and ovary library, respectively. As a result, 10,018 unitags were supposed to be differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between ovary and testis. Compared to the ovary library, 4563 (45.5%) of these DEGs exhibited at least 6-fold upregulated expression, while 5455 (54.5%) DEGs exhibited at least 2-fold downregulated expression in the testis. The Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis showed that 113 GO terms had potential molecular functions in reproduction. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes results revealed that the most important pathways may be relevant to reproduction and included 7 pathways. Forty-two genes were identified as reproduction-, development-, and sex-related genes based on GO classification and sequence comparison with other publications, including male reproductive-related LIM protein, spermatogenesis-associated protein, gametocyte-specific factor 1, VASA-like protein, vitellogenin, sex-determining protein fem-1, and other potential candidates. These results will advance research in the field of molecular genetics in M. nipponense and offer a valuable resource for further research related to reproduction in crustaceans.

  7. Identification of Immunity Related Genes to Study the Physalis peruviana – Fusarium oxysporum Pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    Enciso-Rodríguez, Felix E.; González, Carolina; Rodríguez, Edwin A.; López, Camilo E.; Landsman, David; Barrero, Luz Stella; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    The Cape gooseberry (Physalisperuviana L) is an Andean exotic fruit with high nutritional value and appealing medicinal properties. However, its cultivation faces important phytosanitary problems mainly due to pathogens like Fusarium oxysporum, Cercosporaphysalidis and Alternaria spp. Here we used the Cape gooseberry foliar transcriptome to search for proteins that encode conserved domains related to plant immunity including: NBS (Nucleotide Binding Site), CC (Coiled-Coil), TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor). We identified 74 immunity related gene candidates in P. peruviana which have the typical resistance gene (R-gene) architecture, 17 Receptor like kinase (RLKs) candidates related to PAMP-Triggered Immunity (PTI), eight (TIR-NBS-LRR, or TNL) and nine (CC–NBS-LRR, or CNL) candidates related to Effector-Triggered Immunity (ETI) genes among others. These candidate genes were categorized by molecular function (98%), biological process (85%) and cellular component (79%) using gene ontology. Some of the most interesting predicted roles were those associated with binding and transferase activity. We designed 94 primers pairs from the 74 immunity-related genes (IRGs) to amplify the corresponding genomic regions on six genotypes that included resistant and susceptible materials. From these, we selected 17 single band amplicons and sequenced them in 14 F. oxysporum resistant and susceptible genotypes. Sequence polymorphisms were analyzed through preliminary candidate gene association, which allowed the detection of one SNP at the PpIRG-63 marker revealing a nonsynonymous mutation in the predicted LRR domain suggesting functional roles for resistance. PMID:23844210

  8. Combining many interaction networks to predict gene function and analyze gene lists.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Sara; Morris, Quaid

    2012-05-01

    In this article, we review how interaction networks can be used alone or in combination in an automated fashion to provide insight into gene and protein function. We describe the concept of a "gene-recommender system" that can be applied to any large collection of interaction networks to make predictions about gene or protein function based on a query list of proteins that share a function of interest. We discuss these systems in general and focus on one specific system, GeneMANIA, that has unique features and uses different algorithms from the majority of other systems.

  9. Characterizing Milk Production Related Genes in Holstein Using RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Minseok; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Kwondo; Caetano-Anolles, Kelsey; Jeong, Jin Young; Park, Sungkwon; Oh, Young Kyun; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Heebal

    2016-01-01

    Although the chemical, physical, and nutritional properties of bovine milk have been extensively studied, only a few studies have attempted to characterize milk-synthesizing genes using RNA-seq data. RNA-seq data was collected from 21 Holstein samples, along with group information about milk production ability; milk yield; and protein, fat, and solid contents. Meta-analysis was employed in order to generally characterize genes related to milk production. In addition, we attempted to investigate the relationship between milk related traits, parity, and lactation period. We observed that milk fat is highly correlated with lactation period; this result indicates that this effect should be considered in the model in order to accurately detect milk production related genes. By employing our developed model, 271 genes were significantly (false discovery rate [FDR] adjusted p-value<0.1) detected as milk production related differentially expressed genes. Of these genes, five (albumin, nitric oxide synthase 3, RNA-binding region (RNP1, RRM) containing 3, secreted and transmembrane 1, and serine palmitoyltransferase, small subunit B) were technically validated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in order to check the accuracy of RNA-seq analysis. Finally, 83 gene ontology biological processes including several blood vessel and mammary gland development related terms, were significantly detected using DAVID gene-set enrichment analysis. From these results, we observed that detected milk production related genes are highly enriched in the circulation system process and mammary gland related biological functions. In addition, we observed that detected genes including caveolin 1, mammary serum amyloid A3.2, lingual antimicrobial peptide, cathelicidin 4 (CATHL4), cathelicidin 6 (CATHL6) have been reported in other species as milk production related gene. For this reason, we concluded that our detected 271 genes would be strong candidates for

  10. Two Drosophila melanogaster tropomyosin genes: structural and functional aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Karlik, C C; Fyrberg, E A

    1986-01-01

    We compared the structure and function of the two Drosophila melanogaster tropomyosin genes. The most striking structural aspect was their size disparity. Codons 1 through 257 of gene 2 occupied 833 nucleotides and contained only one intron, whereas the corresponding region of gene 1 occupied 17.5 kilobases and was interrupted by eight introns. The intron-exon arrangement of gene 1 reflected evolutionary expansion of tropomyosin via 42- and 49-residue duplications, which are probably actin-binding domains. Functionally, gene 1 was considerably more complex than gene 2; it was active in both muscle and nonmuscle cell lineages, had at least five variable exons, and specified a minimum of five developmentally regulated isoforms. Two of these isoforms, which accumulated only in flight muscles, were unprecedented fusion proteins in which the tropomyosin sequence was joined to a carboxy-terminal proline-rich domain. Images PMID:3097506

  11. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Russell, F. A.; King, R.; Smillie, S.-J.; Kodji, X.; Brain, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino acid neuropeptide. Discovered 30 years ago, it is produced as a consequence of alternative RNA processing of the calcitonin gene. CGRP has two major forms (α and β). It belongs to a group of peptides that all act on an unusual receptor family. These receptors consist of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) linked to an essential receptor activity modifying protein (RAMP) that is necessary for full functionality. CGRP is a highly potent vasodilator and, partly as a consequence, possesses protective mechanisms that are important for physiological and pathological conditions involving the cardiovascular system and wound healing. CGRP is primarily released from sensory nerves and thus is implicated in pain pathways. The proven ability of CGRP antagonists to alleviate migraine has been of most interest in terms of drug development, and knowledge to date concerning this potential therapeutic area is discussed. Other areas covered, where there is less information known on CGRP, include arthritis, skin conditions, diabetes, and obesity. It is concluded that CGRP is an important peptide in mammalian biology, but it is too early at present to know if new medicines for disease treatment will emerge from our knowledge concerning this molecule. PMID:25287861

  12. DING proteins: numerous functions, elusive genes, a potential for health.

    PubMed

    Bernier, François

    2013-09-01

    DING proteins, named after their conserved N-terminus, form an overlooked protein family whose members were generally discovered through serendipity. It is characterized by an unusually high sequence conservation, even between distantly related species, and by an outstanding diversity of activities and ligands. They all share a demonstrated capacity to bind phosphate with high affinity or at least a predicted phosphate-binding site. However, DING protein genes are conspicuously absent from databases. The many novel family members identified in recent years have confirmed that DING proteins are ubiquitous not only in animals and plants but probably also in prokaryotes. At the functional level, there is increasing evidence that they participate in many health-related processes such as cancers as well as bacterial (Pseudomonas) and viral (HIV) infections, by mechanisms that are now beginning to be understood. They thus represent potent targets for the development of novel therapeutic approaches, especially against HIV. The few genomic sequences that are now available are starting to give some clues on why DING protein genes and mRNAs are well conserved and difficult to clone. This could open a new era of research, of both fundamental and applied importance. PMID:23743708

  13. Relating significance and relations of differentially expressed genes in response to Aspergillus flavus infection in maize.

    PubMed

    Asters, Matthew C; Williams, W Paul; Perkins, Andy D; Mylroie, J Erik; Windham, Gary L; Shan, Xueyan

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a pathogenic fungus infecting maize and producing aflatoxins that are health hazards to humans and animals. Characterizing host defense mechanism and prioritizing candidate resistance genes are important to the development of resistant maize germplasm. We investigated methods amenable for the analysis of the significance and relations among maize candidate genes based on the empirical gene expression data obtained by RT-qPCR technique from maize inbred lines. We optimized a pipeline of analysis tools chosen from various programs to provide rigorous statistical analysis and state of the art data visualization. A network-based method was also explored to construct the empirical gene expression relational structures. Maize genes at the centers in the network were considered as important candidate genes for maize DNA marker studies. The methods in this research can be used to analyze large RT-qPCR datasets and establish complex empirical gene relational structures across multiple experimental conditions. PMID:24770700

  14. Relating significance and relations of differentially expressed genes in response to Aspergillus flavus infection in maize

    PubMed Central

    Asters, Matthew C.; Williams, W. Paul; Perkins, Andy D.; Mylroie, J. Erik; Windham, Gary L.; Shan, Xueyan

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a pathogenic fungus infecting maize and producing aflatoxins that are health hazards to humans and animals. Characterizing host defense mechanism and prioritizing candidate resistance genes are important to the development of resistant maize germplasm. We investigated methods amenable for the analysis of the significance and relations among maize candidate genes based on the empirical gene expression data obtained by RT-qPCR technique from maize inbred lines. We optimized a pipeline of analysis tools chosen from various programs to provide rigorous statistical analysis and state of the art data visualization. A network-based method was also explored to construct the empirical gene expression relational structures. Maize genes at the centers in the network were considered as important candidate genes for maize DNA marker studies. The methods in this research can be used to analyze large RT-qPCR datasets and establish complex empirical gene relational structures across multiple experimental conditions. PMID:24770700

  15. Spaceflight effects on T lymphocyte distribution, function and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Gridley, Daila S.; Slater, James M.; Luo-Owen, Xian; Rizvi, Asma; Chapes, Stephen K.; Stodieck, Louis S.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Pecaut, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The immune system is highly sensitive to stressors present during spaceflight. The major emphasis of this study was on the T lymphocytes in C57BL/6NTac mice after return from a 13-day space shuttle mission (STS-118). Spleens and thymuses from flight animals (FLT) and ground controls similarly housed in animal enclosure modules (AEM) were evaluated within 3–6 h after landing. Phytohemagglutinin-induced splenocyte DNA synthesis was significantly reduced in FLT mice when based on both counts per minute and stimulation indexes (P < 0.05). Flow cytometry showed that CD3+ T and CD19+ B cell counts were low in spleens from the FLT group, whereas the number of NK1.1+ natural killer (NK) cells was increased (P < 0.01 for all three populations vs. AEM). The numerical changes resulted in a low percentage of T cells and high percentage of NK cells in FLT animals (P < 0.05). After activation of spleen cells with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, interleukin-2 (IL-2) was decreased, but IL-10, interferon-γ, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α were increased in FLT mice (P < 0.05). Analysis of cancer-related genes in the thymus showed that the expression of 30 of 84 genes was significantly affected by flight (P < 0.05). Genes that differed from AEM controls by at least 1.5-fold were Birc5, Figf, Grb2, and Tert (upregulated) and Fos, Ifnb1, Itgb3, Mmp9, Myc, Pdgfb, S100a4, Thbs, and Tnf (downregulated). Collectively, the data show that T cell distribution, function, and gene expression are significantly modified shortly after return from the spaceflight environment. PMID:18988762

  16. Drosophila duplicate genes evolve new functions on the fly.

    PubMed

    Assis, Raquel

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication is thought to play a key role in phenotypic innovation. While several processes have been hypothesized to drive the retention and functional evolution of duplicate genes, their genomic contributions have never been determined. We recently developed the first genome-wide method to classify these processes by comparing distances between expression profiles of duplicate genes and their ancestral single-copy orthologs. Application of our approach to spatial gene expression profiles in two Drosophila species revealed that a majority of young duplicate genes possess new functions, and that new functions are acquired rapidly-often within a few million years. Surprisingly, new functions tend to arise in younger copies of duplicate gene pairs. Moreover, we found that young duplicates are often specifically expressed in testes, whereas old duplicates are broadly expressed across several tissues, providing strong support for the hypothetical "out-of-testes" origin of new genes. In this Extra View, I discuss our findings in the context of theoretical predictions about gene duplication, with a particular emphasis on the importance of natural selection in the evolution of novel phenotypes.

  17. Efflux Pump Control Alters Synthetic Gene Circuit Function.

    PubMed

    Diao, Junchen; Charlebois, Daniel A; Nevozhay, Dmitry; Bódi, Zoltán; Pál, Csaba; Balázsi, Gábor

    2016-07-15

    Synthetic biology aims to design new biological systems for predefined purposes, such as the controlled secretion of biofuels, pharmaceuticals, or other chemicals. Synthetic gene circuits regulating an efflux pump from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family could achieve this. However, ABC efflux pumps can also drive out intracellular inducer molecules that control the gene circuits. This will introduce an implicit feedback that could alter gene circuit function in ways that are poorly understood. Here, we used two synthetic gene circuits inducible by tetracycline family molecules to regulate the expression of a yeast ABC pump (Pdr5p) that pumps out the inducer. Pdr5p altered the dose-responses of the original gene circuits substantially in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While one aspect of the change could be attributed to the efflux pumping function of Pdr5p, another aspect remained unexplained. Quantitative modeling indicated that reduced regulator gene expression in addition to efflux pump function could fully explain the altered dose-responses. These predictions were validated experimentally. Overall, we highlight how efflux pumps can alter gene circuit dynamics and demonstrate the utility of mathematical modeling in understanding synthetic gene circuit function in new circumstances.

  18. RNA interference can be used to disrupt gene function in tardigrades

    PubMed Central

    Tenlen, Jennifer R.; McCaskill, Shaina; Goldstein, Bob

    2012-01-01

    How morphological diversity arises is a key question in evolutionary developmental biology. As a long-term approach to address this question, we are developing the water bear Hypsibius dujardini (Phylum Tardigrada) as a model system. We expect that using a close relative of two well-studied models, Drosophila (Phylum Arthropoda) and Caenorhabditis elegans (Phylum Nematoda), will facilitate identifying genetic pathways relevant to understanding the evolution of development. Tardigrades are also valuable research subjects for investigating how organisms and biological materials can survive extreme conditions. Methods to disrupt gene activity are essential to each of these efforts, but no such method yet exists for the Phylum Tardigrada. We developed a protocol to disrupt tardigrade gene functions by double-stranded RNA-mediated RNA interference (RNAi). We show that targeting tardigrade homologs of essential developmental genes by RNAi produced embryonic lethality, whereas targeting green fluorescent protein did not. Disruption of gene functions appears to be relatively specific by two criteria: targeting distinct genes resulted in distinct phenotypes that were consistent with predicted gene functions, and by RT-PCR, RNAi reduced the level of a target mRNA and not a control mRNA. These studies represent the first evidence that gene functions can be disrupted by RNAi in the phylum Tardigrada. Our results form a platform for dissecting tardigrade gene functions for understanding the evolution of developmental mechanisms and survival in extreme environments. PMID:23187800

  19. RNA interference can be used to disrupt gene function in tardigrades.

    PubMed

    Tenlen, Jennifer R; McCaskill, Shaina; Goldstein, Bob

    2013-05-01

    How morphological diversity arises is a key question in evolutionary developmental biology. As a long-term approach to address this question, we are developing the water bear Hypsibius dujardini (Phylum Tardigrada) as a model system. We expect that using a close relative of two well-studied models, Drosophila (Phylum Arthropoda) and Caenorhabditis elegans (Phylum Nematoda), will facilitate identifying genetic pathways relevant to understanding the evolution of development. Tardigrades are also valuable research subjects for investigating how organisms and biological materials can survive extreme conditions. Methods to disrupt gene activity are essential to each of these efforts, but no such method yet exists for the Phylum Tardigrada. We developed a protocol to disrupt tardigrade gene functions by double-stranded RNA-mediated RNA interference (RNAi). We showed that targeting tardigrade homologs of essential developmental genes by RNAi produced embryonic lethality, whereas targeting green fluorescent protein did not. Disruption of gene functions appears to be relatively specific by two criteria: targeting distinct genes resulted in distinct phenotypes that were consistent with predicted gene functions and by RT-PCR, RNAi reduced the level of a target mRNA and not a control mRNA. These studies represent the first evidence that gene functions can be disrupted by RNAi in the phylum Tardigrada. Our results form a platform for dissecting tardigrade gene functions for understanding the evolution of developmental mechanisms and survival in extreme environments.

  20. RNA interference can be used to disrupt gene function in tardigrades.

    PubMed

    Tenlen, Jennifer R; McCaskill, Shaina; Goldstein, Bob

    2013-05-01

    How morphological diversity arises is a key question in evolutionary developmental biology. As a long-term approach to address this question, we are developing the water bear Hypsibius dujardini (Phylum Tardigrada) as a model system. We expect that using a close relative of two well-studied models, Drosophila (Phylum Arthropoda) and Caenorhabditis elegans (Phylum Nematoda), will facilitate identifying genetic pathways relevant to understanding the evolution of development. Tardigrades are also valuable research subjects for investigating how organisms and biological materials can survive extreme conditions. Methods to disrupt gene activity are essential to each of these efforts, but no such method yet exists for the Phylum Tardigrada. We developed a protocol to disrupt tardigrade gene functions by double-stranded RNA-mediated RNA interference (RNAi). We showed that targeting tardigrade homologs of essential developmental genes by RNAi produced embryonic lethality, whereas targeting green fluorescent protein did not. Disruption of gene functions appears to be relatively specific by two criteria: targeting distinct genes resulted in distinct phenotypes that were consistent with predicted gene functions and by RT-PCR, RNAi reduced the level of a target mRNA and not a control mRNA. These studies represent the first evidence that gene functions can be disrupted by RNAi in the phylum Tardigrada. Our results form a platform for dissecting tardigrade gene functions for understanding the evolution of developmental mechanisms and survival in extreme environments. PMID:23187800

  1. Comparison of Envelope-Related Genes in Unicellular and Filamentous Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu; Qin, Song; Zhao, Fangqing; Chi, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Xiaowen

    2007-01-01

    To elucidate the evolution of cyanobacterial envelopes and the relation between gene content and environmental adaptation, cell envelope structures and components of unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria were analyzed in comparative genomics. Hundreds of envelope biogenesis genes were divided into 5 major groups and annotated according to their conserved domains and phylogenetic profiles. Compared to unicellular species, the gene numbers of filamentous cyanobacteria expanded due to genome enlargement effect, but only few gene families amplified disproportionately, such as those encoding waaG and glycosyl transferase 2. Comparison of envelope genes among various species suggested that the significant variance of certain cyanobacterial envelope biogenesis genes should be the response to their environmental adaptation, which might be also related to the emergence of filamentous shapes with some new functions. PMID:18253473

  2. Rare disease relations through common genes and protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Novo, Sara; Pazos, Florencio; Chagoyen, Monica

    2016-06-01

    ODCs (Orphan Disease Connections), available at http://csbg.cnb.csic.es/odcs, is a novel resource to explore potential molecular relations between rare diseases. These molecular relations have been established through the integration of disease susceptibility genes and human protein-protein interactions. The database currently contains 54,941 relations between 3032 diseases.

  3. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html.

  4. Ventromedial hypothalamic lesions change the expression of cell proliferation-related genes and morphology-related genes in rat pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Kiba, Takayoshi; Ishigaki, Yasuhito

    2014-01-01

    Studies in normal rats and ob/ob mice indicated that islet neogenesis does not occur in the intact rodent pancreas. We previously reported that ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) lesions stimulated cell proliferation of rat pancreatic islet B and acinar cells primarily through a cholinergic receptor mechanism and examined how gene families involved in cell proliferation in total pancreatic tissue are regulated after VMH lesions formation. This study examined how gene families involved in cell proliferation in pancreatic islets alone are regulated after VMH lesions formation. Pancreatic islet RNA was extracted, and differences in gene expression profiles between rats at day 3 after VMH lesioning and sham-VMH-lesioned rats were investigated using DNA microarray and real-time polymerase chain reaction. VMH lesions regulated genes that were involved in functions related to cell cycle and differentiation, growth, binding, apoptosis and morphology in pancreas islets. Real-time polymerase chain reaction also confirmed that gene expression of polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) and topoisomerase (DNA) II α 170 kDa (Top2a), and stanniocalcin 1 (Stc1) were upregulated at day 3 after the VMH lesions. Ventromedial hypothalamic lesions may change the expression of cell proliferation-related genes and morphology-related genes in rat pancreatic islets. PMID:25658146

  5. Zebrafish Hoxa and Evx-2 genes: cloning, developmental expression and implications for the functional evolution of posterior Hox genes.

    PubMed

    Sordino, P; Duboule, D; Kondo, T

    1996-10-01

    Vertebrate Hox genes are required for the establishment of regional identities along body axes. This gene family is strongly conserved among vertebrates, even in bony fish which display less complex ranges of axial morphologies. We have analysed the structural organization and expression of Abd-B related zebrafish HoxA cluster genes (Hoxa-9, Hoxa-10, Hoxa-11 and Hoxa-13) as well as of Evx-2, a gene closely linked to the HoxD complex. We show that the genomic organization of Hoxa genes in fish resembles that of tetrapods albeit intergenic distances are shorter. During development of the fish trunk, Hoxa genes are coordinately expressed, whereas in pectoral fins, they display transcript domains similar to those observed in developing tetrapod limbs. Likewise, the Evx-2 gene seems to respond to both Hox- and Evx-types of regulation. During fin development, this latter gene is expressed as the neighbouring Hox genes, in contrast to its expression in the central nervous system which does not comply with colinearity and extends up to anterior parts of the brain. These results are discussed in the context of the functional evolution of Hoxa versus Hoxd genes and their different roles in building up paired appendages. PMID:8951794

  6. Gene Overexpression Resources in Cereals for Functional Genomics and Discovery of Useful Genes

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Kiyomi; Ichikawa, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Identification and elucidation of functions of plant genes is valuable for both basic and applied research. In addition to natural variation in model plants, numerous loss-of-function resources have been produced by mutagenesis with chemicals, irradiation, or insertions of transposable elements or T-DNA. However, we may be unable to observe loss-of-function phenotypes for genes with functionally redundant homologs and for those essential for growth and development. To offset such disadvantages, gain-of-function transgenic resources have been exploited. Activation-tagged lines have been generated using obligatory overexpression of endogenous genes by random insertion of an enhancer. Recent progress in DNA sequencing technology and bioinformatics has enabled the preparation of genomewide collections of full-length cDNAs (fl-cDNAs) in some model species. Using the fl-cDNA clones, a novel gain-of-function strategy, Fl-cDNA OvereXpressor gene (FOX)-hunting system, has been developed. A mutant phenotype in a FOX line can be directly attributed to the overexpressed fl-cDNA. Investigating a large population of FOX lines could reveal important genes conferring favorable phenotypes for crop breeding. Alternatively, a unique loss-of-function approach Chimeric REpressor gene Silencing Technology (CRES-T) has been developed. In CRES-T, overexpression of a chimeric repressor, composed of the coding sequence of a transcription factor (TF) and short peptide designated as the repression domain, could interfere with the action of endogenous TF in plants. Although plant TFs usually consist of gene families, CRES-T is effective, in principle, even for the TFs with functional redundancy. In this review, we focus on the current status of the gene-overexpression strategies and resources for identifying and elucidating novel functions of cereal genes. We discuss the potential of these research tools for identifying useful genes and phenotypes for application in crop breeding. PMID

  7. T-cell receptor gene expression by human gamma delta T-cell clones from peripheral blood and reproductive tissues in relation to non-MHC-restricted cytotoxic function.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E

    1991-06-01

    T-cell receptor gamma and delta gene expression was determined using V-region-specific monoclonal antibodies in conjunction with Southern blot analysis in panels of gamma delta T-cell clones from human peripheral blood (n = 77) and reproductive tissue (n = 9). Whereas 53 out of 77 (69%) clones from peripheral blood expressed V gamma 9 and V delta 2J1, only 2 out of 9 (22%) from reproductive tissues expressed V delta 2J1. Two out of eight decidual clones expressed both V gamma 9 and V delta 1J1, while this configuration was rare in clones from peripheral blood. The majority of clones from the peripheral blood of one donor expressed V gamma 8 and V delta 3J1. Clones were identified which expressed V delta 1J1 in the disulphide-linked C gamma 1 form of the receptor and which expressed a gene other than V delta 1 in the non-disulphide-linked C gamma 2 form, indicating incomplete concordance between expression of V delta 1 and C gamma 2. V delta 3 could be expressed in the disulphide-linked or non-disulphide-linked form of the receptor. At least 5 out of 77 peripheral clones were expressing V delta genes other than V delta 1, V delta 2, or V delta 3 in conjunction with C gamma 1 or C gamma 2. There was a strong but incomplete correlation between high non-NHC-restricted cytotoxic function and C gamma 1 expression. Clones from the same donor expressing both V gamma 9JPC gamma 1 and V delta 2J1 showed either high or negligible cytotoxicity, and cytotoxic clones expressing C gamma 2 were found. Thus no complete correlation between cytotoxic function and expression of a particular form of the gamma delta heterodimer was identified. The results also suggest that gamma delta T cells from reproductive tissues are less likely to express V delta 2J1 than those from peripheral blood.

  8. Measuring semantic similarities by combining gene ontology annotations and gene co-function networks

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Jiajie; Uygun, Sahra; Kim, Taehyong; Wang, Yadong; Rhee, Seung Y.; Chen, Jin

    2015-02-14

    Background: Gene Ontology (GO) has been used widely to study functional relationships between genes. The current semantic similarity measures rely only on GO annotations and GO structure. This limits the power of GO-based similarity because of the limited proportion of genes that are annotated to GO in most organisms. Results: We introduce a novel approach called NETSIM (network-based similarity measure) that incorporates information from gene co-function networks in addition to using the GO structure and annotations. Using metabolic reaction maps of yeast, Arabidopsis, and human, we demonstrate that NETSIM can improve the accuracy of GO term similarities. We also demonstrate that NETSIM works well even for genomes with sparser gene annotation data. We applied NETSIM on large Arabidopsis gene families such as cytochrome P450 monooxygenases to group the members functionally and show that this grouping could facilitate functional characterization of genes in these families. Conclusions: Using NETSIM as an example, we demonstrated that the performance of a semantic similarity measure could be significantly improved after incorporating genome-specific information. NETSIM incorporates both GO annotations and gene co-function network data as a priori knowledge in the model. Therefore, functional similarities of GO terms that are not explicitly encoded in GO but are relevant in a taxon-specific manner become measurable when GO annotations are limited.

  9. Measuring semantic similarities by combining gene ontology annotations and gene co-function networks

    DOE PAGES

    Peng, Jiajie; Uygun, Sahra; Kim, Taehyong; Wang, Yadong; Rhee, Seung Y.; Chen, Jin

    2015-02-14

    Background: Gene Ontology (GO) has been used widely to study functional relationships between genes. The current semantic similarity measures rely only on GO annotations and GO structure. This limits the power of GO-based similarity because of the limited proportion of genes that are annotated to GO in most organisms. Results: We introduce a novel approach called NETSIM (network-based similarity measure) that incorporates information from gene co-function networks in addition to using the GO structure and annotations. Using metabolic reaction maps of yeast, Arabidopsis, and human, we demonstrate that NETSIM can improve the accuracy of GO term similarities. We also demonstratemore » that NETSIM works well even for genomes with sparser gene annotation data. We applied NETSIM on large Arabidopsis gene families such as cytochrome P450 monooxygenases to group the members functionally and show that this grouping could facilitate functional characterization of genes in these families. Conclusions: Using NETSIM as an example, we demonstrated that the performance of a semantic similarity measure could be significantly improved after incorporating genome-specific information. NETSIM incorporates both GO annotations and gene co-function network data as a priori knowledge in the model. Therefore, functional similarities of GO terms that are not explicitly encoded in GO but are relevant in a taxon-specific manner become measurable when GO annotations are limited.« less

  10. Function Annotation of an SBP-box Gene in Arabidopsis Based on Analysis of Co-expression Networks and Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Hu, Zongli; Yang, Yuxin; Chen, Xuqing; Chen, Guoping

    2009-01-01

    The SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN–LIKE (SPL) gene family is an SBP-box transcription family in Arabidopsis. While several physiological responses to SPL genes have been reported, their biological role remains elusive. Here, we use a combined analysis of expression correlation, the interactome, and promoter content to infer the biological role of the SPL genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Analysis of the SPL-correlated gene network reveals multiple functions for SPL genes. Network analysis shows that SPL genes function by controlling other transcription factor families and have relatives with membrane protein transport activity. The interactome analysis of the correlation genes suggests that SPL genes also take part in metabolism of glucose, inorganic salts, and ATP production. Furthermore, the promoters of the correlated genes contain a core binding cis-element (GTAC). All of these analyses suggest that SPL genes have varied functions in Arabidopsis. PMID:19333437

  11. Genome-Wide Comparative Analysis of Flowering-Related Genes in Arabidopsis, Wheat, and Barley

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Fred Y.; Hu, Zhiqiu; Yang, Rong-Cai

    2015-01-01

    Early flowering is an important trait influencing grain yield and quality in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) in short-season cropping regions. However, due to large and complex genomes of these species, direct identification of flowering genes and their molecular characterization remain challenging. Here, we used a bioinformatic approach to predict flowering-related genes in wheat and barley from 190 known Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.) flowering genes. We identified 900 and 275 putative orthologs in wheat and barley, respectively. The annotated flowering-related genes were clustered into 144 orthologous groups with one-to-one, one-to-many, many-to-one, and many-to-many orthology relationships. Our approach was further validated by domain and phylogenetic analyses of flowering-related proteins and comparative analysis of publicly available microarray data sets for in silico expression profiling of flowering-related genes in 13 different developmental stages of wheat and barley. These further analyses showed that orthologous gene pairs in three critical flowering gene families (PEBP, MADS, and BBX) exhibited similar expression patterns among 13 developmental stages in wheat and barley, suggesting similar functions among the orthologous genes with sequence and expression similarities. The predicted candidate flowering genes can be confirmed and incorporated into molecular breeding for early flowering wheat and barley in short-season cropping regions. PMID:26435710

  12. Targeting Fungal Genes by Diced siRNAs: A Rapid Tool to Decipher Gene Function in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Kalleda, Natarajaswamy; Naorem, Aruna; Manchikatla, Rajam V.

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene silencing triggered by chemically synthesized small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) has become a powerful tool for deciphering gene function in many eukaryotes. However, prediction and validation of a single siRNA duplex specific to a target gene is often ineffective. RNA interference (RNAi) with synthetic siRNA suffers from lower silencing efficacy, off-target effects and is cost-intensive, especially for functional genomic studies. With the explosion of fungal genomic information, there is an increasing need to analyze gene function in a rapid manner. Therefore, studies were performed in order to investigate the efficacy of gene silencing induced by RNase III-diced-siRNAs (d-siRNA) in model filamentous fungus, Aspergillus nidulans. Methodology/Principal Findings Stable expression of heterologous reporter gene in A. nidulans eases the examination of a new RNAi-induction route. Hence, we have optimized Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT) of A. nidulans for stable expression of sGFP gene. This study demonstrates that the reporter GFP gene stably introduced into A. nidulans can be effectively silenced by treatment of GFP-d-siRNAs. We have shown the down-regulation of two endogenous genes, AnrasA and AnrasB of A. nidulans by d-siRNAs. We have also elucidated the function of an uncharacterized Ras homolog, rasB gene, which was found to be involved in hyphal growth and development. Further, silencing potency of d-siRNA was higher as compared to synthetic siRNA duplex, targeting AnrasA. Silencing was shown to be sequence-specific, since expression profiles of other closely related Ras family genes in d-siRNA treated AnrasA and AnrasB silenced lines exhibited no change in gene expression. Conclusions/Significance We have developed and applied a fast, specific and efficient gene silencing approach for elucidating gene function in A. nidulans using d-siRNAs. We have also optimized an efficient AMT in A. nidulans, which is useful for stable

  13. Family business: the multidrug-resistance related protein (MRP) ABC transporter genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kolukisaoglu, H Uner; Bovet, Lucien; Klein, Markus; Eggmann, Thomas; Geisler, Markus; Wanke, Dierk; Martinoia, Enrico; Schulz, Burkhard

    2002-11-01

    Despite the completion of the sequencing of the entire genome of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., the exact determination of each single gene and its function remains an open question. This is especially true for multigene families. An approach that combines analysis of genomic structure, expression data and functional genomics to ascertain the role of the members of the multidrug-resistance-related protein ( MRP) gene family, a subfamily of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters from Arabidopsis is presented. We used cDNA sequencing and alignment-based re-annotation of genomic sequences to define the exact genic structure of all known AtMRP genes. Analysis of promoter regions suggested different induction conditions even for closely related genes. Expression analysis for the entire gene family confirmed these assumptions. Phylogenetic analysis and determination of segmental duplication in the regions of AtMRP genes revealed that the evolution of the extraordinarily high number of ABC transporter genes in plants cannot solely be explained by polyploidisation during the evolution of the Arabidopsis genome. Interestingly MRP genes from Oryza sativa L. (rice; OsMRP) show very similar genomic structures to those from Arabidopsis. Screening of large populations of T-DNA-mutagenised lines of A. thaliana resulted in the isolation of AtMRP insertion mutants. This work opens the way for the defined analysis of a multigene family of important membrane transporters whose broad variety of functions expands their traditional role as cellular detoxifiers. PMID:12430019

  14. Functional microarray analysis of nitrogen and carbon cycling genes across an Antarctic latitudinal transect.

    PubMed

    Yergeau, Etienne; Kang, Sanghoon; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Kowalchuk, George A

    2007-06-01

    Soil-borne microbial communities were examined via a functional gene microarray approach across a southern polar latitudinal gradient to gain insight into the environmental factors steering soil N- and C-cycling in terrestrial Antarctic ecosystems. The abundance and diversity of functional gene families were studied for soil-borne microbial communities inhabiting a range of environments from 51 degrees S (cool temperate-Falkland Islands) to 72 degrees S (cold rock desert-Coal Nunatak). The recently designed functional gene array used contains 24,243 oligonucleotide probes and covers >10,000 genes in >150 functional groups involved in nitrogen, carbon, sulfur and phosphorus cycling, metal reduction and resistance and organic contaminant degradation (He et al. 2007). The detected N- and C-cycle genes were significantly different across different sampling locations and vegetation types. A number of significant trends were observed regarding the distribution of key gene families across the environments examined. For example, the relative detection of cellulose degradation genes was correlated with temperature, and microbial C-fixation genes were more present in plots principally lacking vegetation. With respect to the N-cycle, denitrification genes were linked to higher soil temperatures, and N2-fixation genes were linked to plots mainly vegetated by lichens. These microarray-based results were confirmed for a number of gene families using specific real-time PCR, enzymatic assays and process rate measurements. The results presented demonstrate the utility of an integrated functional gene microarray approach in detecting shifts in functional community properties in environmental samples and provide insight into the forces driving important processes of terrestrial Antarctic nutrient cycling. PMID:18043626

  15. Functional microarray analysis of nitrogen and carbon cycling genes across an Antarctic latitudinal transect.

    PubMed

    Yergeau, Etienne; Kang, Sanghoon; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Kowalchuk, George A

    2007-06-01

    Soil-borne microbial communities were examined via a functional gene microarray approach across a southern polar latitudinal gradient to gain insight into the environmental factors steering soil N- and C-cycling in terrestrial Antarctic ecosystems. The abundance and diversity of functional gene families were studied for soil-borne microbial communities inhabiting a range of environments from 51 degrees S (cool temperate-Falkland Islands) to 72 degrees S (cold rock desert-Coal Nunatak). The recently designed functional gene array used contains 24,243 oligonucleotide probes and covers >10,000 genes in >150 functional groups involved in nitrogen, carbon, sulfur and phosphorus cycling, metal reduction and resistance and organic contaminant degradation (He et al. 2007). The detected N- and C-cycle genes were significantly different across different sampling locations and vegetation types. A number of significant trends were observed regarding the distribution of key gene families across the environments examined. For example, the relative detection of cellulose degradation genes was correlated with temperature, and microbial C-fixation genes were more present in plots principally lacking vegetation. With respect to the N-cycle, denitrification genes were linked to higher soil temperatures, and N2-fixation genes were linked to plots mainly vegetated by lichens. These microarray-based results were confirmed for a number of gene families using specific real-time PCR, enzymatic assays and process rate measurements. The results presented demonstrate the utility of an integrated functional gene microarray approach in detecting shifts in functional community properties in environmental samples and provide insight into the forces driving important processes of terrestrial Antarctic nutrient cycling.

  16. Monitoring Murine Skeletal Muscle Function for Muscle Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Chady H.; Li, Dejia; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    The primary function of skeletal muscle is to generate force. Muscle force production is compromised in various forms of acquired and/or inherited muscle diseases. An important goal of muscle gene therapy is to recover muscle strength. Genetically engineered mice and spontaneous mouse mutants are readily available for preclinical muscle gene therapy studies. In this chapter, we outlined the methods commonly used for measuring murine skeletal muscle function. These include ex vivo and in situ analysis of the contractile profile of a single intact limb muscle (the extensor digitorium longus for ex vivo assay and the tibialis anterior muscle for in situ assay), grip force analysis, and downhill treadmill exercise. Force measurement in a single muscle is extremely useful for pilot testing of new gene therapy protocols by local gene transfer. Grip force and treadmill assessments offer body-wide evaluation following systemic muscle gene therapy. PMID:21194022

  17. Surrogate splicing for functional analysis of sesquiterpene synthase genes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuiqin; Schoenbeck, Mark A; Greenhagen, Bryan T; Takahashi, Shunji; Lee, Sungbeom; Coates, Robert M; Chappell, Joseph

    2005-07-01

    A method for the recovery of full-length cDNAs from predicted terpene synthase genes containing introns is described. The approach utilizes Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression coupled with a reverse transcription-polydeoxyribonucleotide chain reaction assay to facilitate expression cloning of processed transcripts. Subsequent expression of intronless cDNAs in a suitable prokaryotic host provides for direct functional testing of the encoded gene product. The method was optimized by examining the expression of an intron-containing beta-glucuronidase gene agroinfiltrated into petunia (Petunia hybrida) leaves, and its utility was demonstrated by defining the function of two previously uncharacterized terpene synthases. A tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) terpene synthase-like gene containing six predicted introns was characterized as having 5-epi-aristolochene synthase activity, while an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) gene previously annotated as a terpene synthase was shown to possess a novel sesquiterpene synthase activity for alpha-barbatene, thujopsene, and beta-chamigrene biosynthesis. PMID:15965019

  18. Functions of the gene products of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M

    1993-01-01

    A list of currently identified gene products of Escherichia coli is given, together with a bibliography that provides pointers to the literature on each gene product. A scheme to categorize cellular functions is used to classify the gene products of E. coli so far identified. A count shows that the numbers of genes concerned with small-molecule metabolism are on the same order as the numbers concerned with macromolecule biosynthesis and degradation. One large category is the category of tRNAs and their synthetases. Another is the category of transport elements. The categories of cell structure and cellular processes other than metabolism are smaller. Other subjects discussed are the occurrence in the E. coli genome of redundant pairs and groups of genes of identical or closely similar function, as well as variation in the degree of density of genetic information in different parts of the genome. PMID:7508076

  19. Ranking, selecting, and prioritising genes with desirability functions.

    PubMed

    Lazic, Stanley E

    2015-01-01

    In functional genomics experiments, researchers often select genes to follow-up or validate from a long list of differentially expressed genes. Typically, sharp thresholds are used to bin genes into groups such as significant/non-significant or fold change above/below a cut-off value, and ad hoc criteria are also used such as favouring well-known genes. Binning, however, is inefficient and does not take the uncertainty of the measurements into account. Furthermore, p-values, fold-changes, and other outcomes are treated as equally important, and relevant genes may be overlooked with such an approach. Desirability functions are proposed as a way to integrate multiple selection criteria for ranking, selecting, and prioritising genes. These functions map any variable to a continuous 0-1 scale, where one is maximally desirable and zero is unacceptable. Multiple selection criteria are then combined to provide an overall desirability that is used to rank genes. In addition to p-values and fold-changes, further experimental results and information contained in databases can be easily included as criteria. The approach is demonstrated with a breast cancer microarray data set. The functions and an example data set can be found in the desiR package on CRAN (https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/desiR/) and the development version is available on GitHub (https://github.com/stanlazic/desiR). PMID:26644980

  20. A complementation method for functional analysis of mammalian genes

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Santos, Juana Maria; Cao, Huibi; Wang, Anan; Koehler, David R.; Martin, Bernard; Navab, Roya; Hu, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Our progress in understanding mammalian gene function has lagged behind that of gene identification. New methods for mammalian gene functional analysis are needed to accelerate the process. In yeast, the powerful genetic shuffle system allows deletion of any chromosomal gene by homologous recombination and episomal expression of a mutant allele in the same cell. Here, we report a method for mammalian cells, which employs a helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vector to synthesize small hairpin (sh) RNAs to knock-down the expression of an endogenous gene by targeting untranslated regions (UTRs). The vector simultaneously expresses an exogenous version of the same gene (wild-type or mutant allele) lacking the UTRs for functional analysis. We demonstrated the utility of the method by using PRPF3, which encodes the human RNA splicing factor Hprp3p. Recently, missense mutations in PRPF3 were found to cause autosomal-dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa, a form of genetic eye diseases affecting the retina. We knocked-down endogenous PRPF3 in multiple cell lines and rescued the phenotype (cell death) with exogenous PRPF3 cDNA, thereby creating a genetic complementation method. Because Ad vectors can efficiently transduce a wide variety of cell types, and many tissues in vivo, this method could have a wide application for gene function studies. PMID:15944448

  1. Ranking, selecting, and prioritising genes with desirability functions.

    PubMed

    Lazic, Stanley E

    2015-01-01

    In functional genomics experiments, researchers often select genes to follow-up or validate from a long list of differentially expressed genes. Typically, sharp thresholds are used to bin genes into groups such as significant/non-significant or fold change above/below a cut-off value, and ad hoc criteria are also used such as favouring well-known genes. Binning, however, is inefficient and does not take the uncertainty of the measurements into account. Furthermore, p-values, fold-changes, and other outcomes are treated as equally important, and relevant genes may be overlooked with such an approach. Desirability functions are proposed as a way to integrate multiple selection criteria for ranking, selecting, and prioritising genes. These functions map any variable to a continuous 0-1 scale, where one is maximally desirable and zero is unacceptable. Multiple selection criteria are then combined to provide an overall desirability that is used to rank genes. In addition to p-values and fold-changes, further experimental results and information contained in databases can be easily included as criteria. The approach is demonstrated with a breast cancer microarray data set. The functions and an example data set can be found in the desiR package on CRAN (https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/desiR/) and the development version is available on GitHub (https://github.com/stanlazic/desiR).

  2. Relating Perturbation Magnitude to Temporal Gene Expression in Biological Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Callister, Stephen J.; Parnell, John J.; Pfrender, Michael E.; Hashsham, Syed

    2009-03-19

    A method to quantitatively relate stress to response at the level of gene expression is described using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism. Stress was defined as the magnitude of perturbation and strain was defined as the magnitude of cumulative response in terms of gene expression. Expression patterns of sixty genes previously reported to be significantly impacted by osmotic shock or belonging to the high-osmotic glycerol, glycerolipid metabolism, and glycolysis pathways were determined following perturbations of increasing sodium chloride concentrations (0, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, 1.5, and 1.4 M). Expression of these genes was quantified temporally using reverse transcriptase real time polymerase chain reaction. The magnitude of cumulative response was obtained by calculating the total moment of area of the temporal response envelope for all the 60 genes, either together or for the set of genes related to each pathway. A non-linear relationship between stress and response was observed for the range of stress studied. This study examines a quantitative approach to quantify the strain at the level of gene expression to relate stress to strain in biological systems. The approach should be generally applicable to quantitatively evaluate the response of organisms to environmental change.

  3. Gene mining in halophytes: functional identification of stress tolerance genes in Lepidium crassifolium.

    PubMed

    Rigó, Gábor; Valkai, Ildikó; Faragó, Dóra; Kiss, Edina; Van Houdt, Sara; Van de Steene, Nancy; Hannah, Matthew A; Szabados, László

    2016-09-01

    Extremophile plants are valuable sources of genes conferring tolerance traits, which can be explored to improve stress tolerance of crops. Lepidium crassifolium is a halophytic relative of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and displays tolerance to salt, osmotic and oxidative stresses. We have employed the modified Conditional cDNA Overexpression System to transfer a cDNA library from L. crassifolium to the glycophyte A. thaliana. By screening for salt, osmotic and oxidative stress tolerance through in vitro growth assays and non-destructive chlorophyll fluorescence imaging, 20 Arabidopsis lines were identified with superior performance under restrictive conditions. Several cDNA inserts were cloned and confirmed to be responsible for the enhanced tolerance by analysing independent transgenic lines. Examples include full-length cDNAs encoding proteins with high homologies to GDSL-lipase/esterase or acyl CoA-binding protein or proteins without known function, which could confer tolerance to one or several stress conditions. Our results confirm that random gene transfer from stress tolerant to sensitive plant species is a valuable tool to discover novel genes with potential for biotechnological applications. PMID:27343166

  4. The use of gene clusters to infer functional coupling.

    SciTech Connect

    Overbeek, R.; Fonstein, M.; D'Souza, M.; Pusch, G. D.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Integrated Genomics; Univ. of Chicago

    1999-03-01

    Previously, we presented evidence that it is possible to predict functional coupling between genes based on conservation of gene clusters between genomes. With the rapid increase in the availability of prokaryotic sequence data, it has become possible to verify and apply the technique. In this paper, we extend our characterization of the parameters that determine the utility of the approach, and we generalize the approach in a way that supports detection of common classes of functionally coupled genes (e.g., transport and signal transduction clusters). Now that the analysis includes over 30 complete or nearly complete genomes, it has become clear that this approach will play a significant role in supporting efforts to assign functionality to the remaining uncharacterized genes in sequenced genomes.

  5. The Use of Gene Clusters to Infer Functional Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overbeek, Ross; Fonstein, Michael; D'Souza, Mark; Pusch, Gordon D.; Maltsev, Natalia

    1999-03-01

    Previously, we presented evidence that it is possible to predict functional coupling between genes based on conservation of gene clusters between genomes. With the rapid increase in the availability of prokaryotic sequence data, it has become possible to verify and apply the technique. In this paper, we extend our characterization of the parameters that determine the utility of the approach, and we generalize the approach in a way that supports detection of common classes of functionally coupled genes (e.g., transport and signal transduction clusters). Now that the analysis includes over 30 complete or nearly complete genomes, it has become clear that this approach will play a significant role in supporting efforts to assign functionality to the remaining uncharacterized genes in sequenced genomes.

  6. Molecular Basis of Klotho: From Gene to Function in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuechi

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of the Klotho (KL) gene, which was originally identified as a putative aging-suppressor gene, has generated tremendous interest and has advanced understanding of the aging process. In mice, the overexpression of the KL gene extends the life span, whereas mutations to the KL gene shorten the life span. The human KL gene encodes the α-Klotho protein, which is a multifunctional protein that regulates the metabolism of phosphate, calcium, and vitamin D. α-Klotho also may function as a hormone, although the α-Klotho receptor(s) has not been found. Point mutations of the KL gene in humans are associated with hypertension and kidney disease, which suggests that α-Klotho may be essential to the maintenance of normal renal function. Three α-Klotho protein types with potentially different functions have been identified: a full-length transmembrane α-Klotho, a truncated soluble α-Klotho, and a secreted α-Klotho. Recent evidence suggests that α-Klotho suppresses the insulin and Wnt signaling pathways, inhibits oxidative stress, and regulates phosphatase and calcium absorption. In this review, we provide an update on recent advances in the understanding of the molecular, genetic, biochemical, and physiological properties of the KL gene. Specifically, this review focuses on the structure of the KL gene and the factors that regulate KL gene transcription, the key sites in the regulation of α-Klotho enzyme activity, the α-Klotho signaling pathways, and the molecular mechanisms that underlie α-Klotho function. This current understanding of the molecular biology of the α-Klotho protein may offer new insights into its function and role in aging. PMID:25695404

  7. Predicting Gene-Regulation Functions: Lessons from Temperate Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Teif, Vladimir B.

    2010-01-01

    Gene-regulation functions (GRF) provide a unique characteristic of a cis-regulatory module (CRM), relating the concentrations of transcription factors (input) to the promoter activities (output). The challenge is to predict GRFs from the sequence. Here we systematically consider the lysogeny-lysis CRMs of different temperate bacteriophages such as the Lactobacillus casei phage A2, Escherichia coli phages λ, and 186 and Lactococcal phage TP901-1. This study allowed explaining a recent experimental puzzle on the role of Cro protein in the lambda switch. Several general conclusions have been drawn: 1), long-range interactions, multilayer assembly and DNA looping may lead to complex GRFs that cannot be described by linear functions of binding site occupancies; 2), in general, GRFs cannot be described by the Boolean logic, whereas a three-state non-Boolean logic suffices for the studied examples; 3), studied CRMs of the intact phages seemed to have a similar GRF topology (the number of plateaus and peaks corresponding to different expression regimes); we hypothesize that functionally equivalent CRMs might have topologically equivalent GRFs for a larger class of genetic systems; and 4) within a given GRF class, a set of mechanistic-to-mathematical transformations has been identified, which allows shaping the GRF before carrying out a system-level analysis. PMID:20371324

  8. Enantioselective Degradation Mechanism of Beta-Cypermethrin in Soil From the Perspective of Functional Genes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Hua; Ji, Guo-Dong

    2015-12-01

    The behavior and mechanisms of the enantioselective degradation of beta-cypermethrin were studied in soil. The four isomers were degraded at different rates, and the enantiomer fractions of alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin exceeded 0.5. Moreover, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid, phenol, and protocatechuic acid were detected; based on the presence of these metabolites, we predicted the degradation pathway and identified the functional genes that are related to this degradation process. We established quantitative relationships between the data on degradation kinetics and functional genes; we found that the quantitative relationships between different enantiomers differed even under the same conditions, and the genes pobA and pytH played key roles in limiting the degradation rate. Data obtained using path analysis revealed that the same gene had different direct and indirect effects on the degradation of different isomers. A mechanism was successfully proposed to explain the selective degradation of chiral compounds based on the perspective of functional genes.

  9. Calreticulin: one protein, one gene, many functions.

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, M; Corbett, E F; Mesaeli, N; Nakamura, K; Opas, M

    1999-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a critical role in the synthesis and chaperoning of membrane-associated and secreted proteins. The membrane is also an important site of Ca(2+) storage and release. Calreticulin is a unique ER luminal resident protein. The protein affects many cellular functions, both in the ER lumen and outside of the ER environment. In the ER lumen, calreticulin performs two major functions: chaperoning and regulation of Ca(2+) homoeostasis. Calreticulin is a highly versatile lectin-like chaperone, and it participates during the synthesis of a variety of molecules, including ion channels, surface receptors, integrins and transporters. The protein also affects intracellular Ca(2+) homoeostasis by modulation of ER Ca(2+) storage and transport. Studies on the cell biology of calreticulin revealed that the ER membrane is a very dynamic intracellular compartment affecting many aspects of cell physiology. PMID:10567207

  10. An integrated genomic analysis of gene-function correlation on schizophrenia susceptibility genes.

    PubMed

    Chu, Tearina T; Liu, Ying

    2010-05-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly complex inheritable disease characterized by numerous genetic susceptibility elements, each contributing a modest increase in risk for the disease. Although numerous linkage or association studies have identified a large set of schizophrenia-associated loci, many are controversial. In addition, only a small portion of these loci overlaps with the large cumulative pool of genes that have shown changes of expression in schizophrenia. Here, we applied a genomic gene-function approach to identify susceptibility loci that show direct effect on gene expression, leading to functional abnormalities in schizophrenia. We carried out an integrated analysis by cross-examination of the literature-based susceptibility loci with the schizophrenia-associated expression gene list obtained from our previous microarray study (Journal of Human Genetics (2009) 54: 665-75) using bioinformatic tools, followed by confirmation of gene expression changes using qPCR. We found nine genes (CHGB, SLC18A2, SLC25A27, ESD, C4A/C4B, TCP1, CHL1 and CTNNA2) demonstrate gene-function correlation involving: synapse and neurotransmission; energy metabolism and defense mechanisms; and molecular chaperone and cytoskeleton. Our findings further support the roles of these genes in genetic influence and functional consequences on the development of schizophrenia. It is interesting to note that four of the nine genes are located on chromosome 6, suggesting a special chromosomal vulnerability in schizophrenia.

  11. Characterization of MAT gene functions in the life cycle of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum reveals a lineage-specific MAT gene functioning in apothecium morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Doughan, Benjamin; Rollins, Jeffrey A

    2016-09-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary is a phytopathogenic fungus that relies on the completion of the sexual cycle to initiate aerial infections. The sexual cycle produces apothecia required for inoculum dispersal. In this study, insight into the regulation of apothecial multicellular development was pursued through functional characterization of mating-type genes. These genes are hypothesized to encode master regulatory proteins required for aspects of sexual development ranging from fertilization through fertile fruiting body development. Experimentally, loss-of-function mutants were created for the conserved core mating-type genes (MAT1-1-1, and MAT1-2-1), and the lineage-specific genes found only in S. sclerotiorum and closely related fungi (MAT1-1-5, and MAT1-2-4). The MAT1-1-1, MAT1-1-5, and MAT1-2-1 mutants are able to form ascogonia but are blocked in all aspects of apothecium development. These mutants also exhibit defects in secondary sexual characters including lower numbers of spermatia. The MAT1-2-4 mutants are delayed in carpogenic germination accompanied with altered disc morphogenesis and ascospore production. They too produce lower numbers of spermatia. All four MAT gene mutants showed alterations in the expression of putative pheromone precursor (Ppg-1) and pheromone receptor (PreA, PreB) genes. Our findings support the involvement of MAT genes in sexual fertility, gene regulation, meiosis, and morphogenesis in S. sclerotiorum. PMID:27567717

  12. An improved chemically inducible gene switch that functions in the monocotyledonous plant sugar cane.

    PubMed

    Kinkema, Mark; Geijskes, R Jason; Shand, Kylie; Coleman, Heather D; De Lucca, Paulo C; Palupe, Anthony; Harrison, Mark D; Jepson, Ian; Dale, James L; Sainz, Manuel B

    2014-03-01

    Chemically inducible gene switches can provide precise control over gene expression, enabling more specific analyses of gene function and expanding the plant biotechnology toolkit beyond traditional constitutive expression systems. The alc gene expression system is one of the most promising chemically inducible gene switches in plants because of its potential in both fundamental research and commercial biotechnology applications. However, there are no published reports demonstrating that this versatile gene switch is functional in transgenic monocotyledonous plants, which include some of the most important agricultural crops. We found that the original alc gene switch was ineffective in the monocotyledonous plant sugar cane, and describe a modified alc system that is functional in this globally significant crop. A promoter consisting of tandem copies of the ethanol receptor inverted repeat binding site, in combination with a minimal promoter sequence, was sufficient to give enhanced sensitivity and significantly higher levels of ethanol inducible gene expression. A longer CaMV 35S minimal promoter than was used in the original alc gene switch also substantially improved ethanol inducibility. Treating the roots with ethanol effectively induced the modified alc system in sugar cane leaves and stem, while an aerial spray was relatively ineffective. The extension of this chemically inducible gene expression system to sugar cane opens the door to new opportunities for basic research and crop biotechnology.

  13. An improved chemically inducible gene switch that functions in the monocotyledonous plant sugar cane.

    PubMed

    Kinkema, Mark; Geijskes, R Jason; Shand, Kylie; Coleman, Heather D; De Lucca, Paulo C; Palupe, Anthony; Harrison, Mark D; Jepson, Ian; Dale, James L; Sainz, Manuel B

    2014-03-01

    Chemically inducible gene switches can provide precise control over gene expression, enabling more specific analyses of gene function and expanding the plant biotechnology toolkit beyond traditional constitutive expression systems. The alc gene expression system is one of the most promising chemically inducible gene switches in plants because of its potential in both fundamental research and commercial biotechnology applications. However, there are no published reports demonstrating that this versatile gene switch is functional in transgenic monocotyledonous plants, which include some of the most important agricultural crops. We found that the original alc gene switch was ineffective in the monocotyledonous plant sugar cane, and describe a modified alc system that is functional in this globally significant crop. A promoter consisting of tandem copies of the ethanol receptor inverted repeat binding site, in combination with a minimal promoter sequence, was sufficient to give enhanced sensitivity and significantly higher levels of ethanol inducible gene expression. A longer CaMV 35S minimal promoter than was used in the original alc gene switch also substantially improved ethanol inducibility. Treating the roots with ethanol effectively induced the modified alc system in sugar cane leaves and stem, while an aerial spray was relatively ineffective. The extension of this chemically inducible gene expression system to sugar cane opens the door to new opportunities for basic research and crop biotechnology. PMID:24142380

  14. Brain functions after sports-related concussion: insights from event-related potentials and functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Nadia; Saluja, Rajeet Singh; Chen, Jen-Kai; Bottari, Carolina; Johnston, Karen; Ptito, Alain

    2010-10-01

    The high incidence of concussions in contact sports and their impact on brain functions are a major cause for concern. To improve our understanding of brain functioning after sports-related concussion, advanced functional assessment techniques, namely event-related potentials (ERPs) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), have been recently used in research studies. Contrary to neuropsychological tests that measure verbal and/or motor responses, ERPs and fMRI assess the neural activities associated with cognitive/behavioral demands, and thus provide access to better comprehension of brain functioning. In fact, ERPs have excellent temporal resolution, and fMRI identifies the involved structures during a task. This article describes ERP and fMRI techniques and reviews the results obtained with these tools in sports-related concussion. Although these techniques are not yet readily available, they offer a unique clinical approach, particularly for complex cases (ie, athletes with multiple concussions, chronic symptoms) and objective measures that provide valuable information to guide management and return-to-play decision making.

  15. The Structure of a Gene Co-Expression Network Reveals Biological Functions Underlying eQTLs

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Vialaneix, Nathalie; Liaubet, Laurence; Laurent, Thibault; Cherel, Pierre; Gamot, Adrien; SanCristobal, Magali

    2013-01-01

    What are the commonalities between genes, whose expression level is partially controlled by eQTL, especially with regard to biological functions? Moreover, how are these genes related to a phenotype of interest? These issues are particularly difficult to address when the genome annotation is incomplete, as is the case for mammalian species. Moreover, the direct link between gene expression and a phenotype of interest may be weak, and thus difficult to handle. In this framework, the use of a co-expression network has proven useful: it is a robust approach for modeling a complex system of genetic regulations, and to infer knowledge for yet unknown genes. In this article, a case study was conducted with a mammalian species. It showed that the use of a co-expression network based on partial correlation, combined with a relevant clustering of nodes, leads to an enrichment of biological functions of around 83%. Moreover, the use of a spatial statistics approach allowed us to superimpose additional information related to a phenotype; this lead to highlighting specific genes or gene clusters that are related to the network structure and the phenotype. Three main results are worth noting: first, key genes were highlighted as a potential focus for forthcoming biological experiments; second, a set of biological functions, which support a list of genes under partial eQTL control, was set up by an overview of the global structure of the gene expression network; third, pH was found correlated with gene clusters, and then with related biological functions, as a result of a spatial analysis of the network topology. PMID:23577081

  16. The structure of a gene co-expression network reveals biological functions underlying eQTLs.

    PubMed

    Villa-Vialaneix, Nathalie; Liaubet, Laurence; Laurent, Thibault; Cherel, Pierre; Gamot, Adrien; SanCristobal, Magali

    2013-01-01

    What are the commonalities between genes, whose expression level is partially controlled by eQTL, especially with regard to biological functions? Moreover, how are these genes related to a phenotype of interest? These issues are particularly difficult to address when the genome annotation is incomplete, as is the case for mammalian species. Moreover, the direct link between gene expression and a phenotype of interest may be weak, and thus difficult to handle. In this framework, the use of a co-expression network has proven useful: it is a robust approach for modeling a complex system of genetic regulations, and to infer knowledge for yet unknown genes. In this article, a case study was conducted with a mammalian species. It showed that the use of a co-expression network based on partial correlation, combined with a relevant clustering of nodes, leads to an enrichment of biological functions of around 83%. Moreover, the use of a spatial statistics approach allowed us to superimpose additional information related to a phenotype; this lead to highlighting specific genes or gene clusters that are related to the network structure and the phenotype. Three main results are worth noting: first, key genes were highlighted as a potential focus for forthcoming biological experiments; second, a set of biological functions, which support a list of genes under partial eQTL control, was set up by an overview of the global structure of the gene expression network; third, pH was found correlated with gene clusters, and then with related biological functions, as a result of a spatial analysis of the network topology. PMID:23577081

  17. Selecting causal genes from genome-wide association studies via functionally-coherent subnetworks

    PubMed Central

    Taşan, Murat; Musso, Gabriel; Hao, Tong; Vidal, Marc; MacRae, Calum A.; Roth, Frederick P.

    2015-01-01

    While genome-wide association (GWA) studies have linked thousands of loci to human diseases, the causal genes and variants at these loci generally remain unknown. Although investigators typically focus on genes closest to the associated polymorphisms, the causal gene is often more distal. Relying on the literature to help prioritize additional candidate genes at associated loci can draw attention away from less-characterized causal genes. Here we describe a strategy that uses genome-scale ‘co-function’ networks to identify sets of mutually functionally related genes spanning multiple GWA loci. Using associations from ~100 GWA studies covering ten cancer types, this approach outperforms the common alternative strategy in ranking known cancer genes. The strategy’s power grows with more GWA loci, offering an increasing opportunity to elucidate causes of complex human disease. PMID:25532137

  18. Using Immediate-Early Genes to Map Hippocampal Subregional Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubik, Stepan; Miyashita, Teiko; Guzowski, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Different functions have been suggested for the hippocampus and its subdivisions along both transversal and longitudinal axes. Expression of immediate-early genes (IEGs) has been used to map specific functions onto neuronal activity in different areas of the brain including the hippocampus (IEG imaging). Here we review IEG studies on hippocampal…

  19. Locational distribution of gene functional classes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Michael C; Clare, Amanda; King, Ross D

    2007-01-01

    Background We are interested in understanding the locational distribution of genes and their functions in genomes, as this distribution has both functional and evolutionary significance. Gene locational distribution is known to be affected by various evolutionary processes, with tandem duplication thought to be the main process producing clustering of homologous sequences. Recent research has found clustering of protein structural families in the human genome, even when genes identified as tandem duplicates have been removed from the data. However, this previous research was hindered as they were unable to analyse small sample sizes. This is a challenge for bioinformatics as more specific functional classes have fewer examples and conventional statistical analyses of these small data sets often produces unsatisfactory results. Results We have developed a novel bioinformatics method based on Monte Carlo methods and Greenwood's spacing statistic for the computational analysis of the distribution of individual functional classes of genes (from GO). We used this to make the first comprehensive statistical analysis of the relationship between gene functional class and location on a genome. Analysis of the distribution of all genes except tandem duplicates on the five chromosomes of A. thaliana reveals that the distribution on chromosomes I, II, IV and V is clustered at P = 0.001. Many functional classes are clustered, with the degree of clustering within an individual class generally consistent across all five chromosomes. A novel and surprising result was that the locational distribution of some functional classes were significantly more evenly spaced than would be expected by chance. Conclusion Analysis of the A. thaliana genome reveals evidence of unexplained order in the locational distribution of genes. The same general analysis method can be applied to any genome, and indeed any sequential data involving classes. PMID:17397552

  20. Finding New Order in Biological Functions from the Network Structure of Gene Annotations

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Kimberly; Girvan, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) provides biologists with a controlled terminology that describes how genes are associated with functions and how functional terms are related to one another. These term-term relationships encode how scientists conceive the organization of biological functions, and they take the form of a directed acyclic graph (DAG). Here, we propose that the network structure of gene-term annotations made using GO can be employed to establish an alternative approach for grouping functional terms that captures intrinsic functional relationships that are not evident in the hierarchical structure established in the GO DAG. Instead of relying on an externally defined organization for biological functions, our approach connects biological functions together if they are performed by the same genes, as indicated in a compendium of gene annotation data from numerous different sources. We show that grouping terms by this alternate scheme provides a new framework with which to describe and predict the functions of experimentally identified sets of genes. PMID:26588252

  1. Identification of brassinosteroid-related genes by means of transcript co-response analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lisso, Janina; Steinhauser, Dirk; Altmann, Thomas; Kopka, Joachim; Müssig, Carsten

    2005-01-01

    The comprehensive systems-biology database (CSB.DB) was used to reveal brassinosteroid (BR)-related genes from expression profiles based on co-response analyses. Genes exhibiting simultaneous changes in transcript levels are candidates of common transcriptional regulation. Combining numerous different experiments in data matrices allows ruling out outliers and conditional changes of transcript levels. CSB.DB was queried for transcriptional co-responses with the BR-signalling components BRI1 and BAK1: 301 out of 9694 genes represented in the nasc0271 database showed co-responses with both genes. As expected, these genes comprised pathway-involved genes (e.g. 72 BR-induced genes), because the BRI1 and BAK1 proteins are required for BR-responses. But transcript co-response takes the analysis a step further compared with direct approaches because BR-related non BR-responsive genes were identified. Insights into networks and the functional context of genes are provided, because factors determining expression patterns are reflected in correlations. Our findings demonstrate that transcript co-response analysis presents a valuable resource to uncover common regulatory patterns of genes. Different data matrices in CSB.DB allow examination of specific biological questions. All matrices are publicly available through CSB.DB. This work presents one possible roadmap to use the CSB.DB resources. PMID:15891113

  2. COMT gene locus: new functional variants.

    PubMed

    Meloto, Carolina B; Segall, Samantha K; Smith, Shad; Parisien, Marc; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M; Gauthier, Josée; Tsao, Douglas; Convertino, Marino; Piltonen, Marjo H; Slade, Gary Dmitri; Fillingim, Roger B; Greenspan, Joel D; Ohrbach, Richard; Knott, Charles; Maixner, William; Zaykin, Dmitri; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Reenilä, Ilkka; Männistö, Pekka T; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-10-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholaminergic neurotransmitters. Numerous studies have linked COMT to pivotal brain functions such as mood, cognition, response to stress, and pain. Both nociception and risk of clinical pain have been associated with COMT genetic variants, and this association was shown to be mediated through adrenergic pathways. Here, we show that association studies between COMT polymorphic markers and pain phenotypes in 2 independent cohorts identified a functional marker, rs165774, situated in the 3' untranslated region of a newfound splice variant, (a)-COMT. Sequence comparisons showed that the (a)-COMT transcript is highly conserved in primates, and deep sequencing data demonstrated that (a)-COMT is expressed across several human tissues, including the brain. In silico analyses showed that the (a)-COMT enzyme features a distinct C-terminus structure, capable of stabilizing substrates in its active site. In vitro experiments demonstrated not only that (a)-COMT is catalytically active but also that it displays unique substrate specificity, exhibiting enzymatic activity with dopamine but not epinephrine. They also established that the pain-protective A allele of rs165774 coincides with lower COMT activity, suggesting contribution to decreased pain sensitivity through increased dopaminergic rather than decreased adrenergic tone, characteristic of reference isoforms. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of the (a)-COMT isoform in nociceptive signaling and suggest that genetic variations in (a)-COMT isoforms may contribute to individual variability in pain phenotypes. PMID:26207649

  3. COMT gene locus: new functional variants

    PubMed Central

    Meloto, Carolina B.; Segall, Samantha K.; Smith, Shad; Parisien, Marc; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M.; Gauthier, Josée; Tsao, Douglas; Convertino, Marino; Piltonen, Marjo H.; Slade, Gary Dmitri; Fillingim, Roger B.; Greenspan, Joel D.; Ohrbach, Richard; Knott, Charles; Maixner, William; Zaykin, Dmitri; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Reenilä, Ilkka; Männistö, Pekka T.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholaminergic neurotransmitters. Numerous studies have linked COMT to pivotal brain functions such as mood, cognition, response to stress, and pain. Both nociception and risk of clinical pain have been associated with COMT genetic variants, and this association was shown to be mediated through adrenergic pathways. Here, we show that association studies between COMT polymorphic markers and pain phenotypes in 2 independent cohorts identified a functional marker, rs165774, situated in the 3′ untranslated region of a newfound splice variant, (a)-COMT. Sequence comparisons showed that the (a)-COMT transcript is highly conserved in primates, and deep sequencing data demonstrated that (a)-COMT is expressed across several human tissues, including the brain. In silico analyses showed that the (a)-COMT enzyme features a distinct C-terminus structure, capable of stabilizing substrates in its active site. In vitro experiments demonstrated not only that (a)-COMT is catalytically active but also that it displays unique substrate specificity, exhibiting enzymatic activity with dopamine but not epinephrine. They also established that the pain-protective A allele of rs165774 coincides with lower COMT activity, suggesting contribution to decreased pain sensitivity through increased dopaminergic rather than decreased adrenergic tone, characteristic of reference isoforms. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of the (a)-COMT isoform in nociceptive signaling and suggest that genetic variations in (a)-COMT isoforms may contribute to individual variability in pain phenotypes. PMID:26207649

  4. Gene evolution and functions of extracellular matrix proteins in teeth

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizaki, Keigo; Yamada, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) not only provides physical support for tissues, but it is also critical for tissue development, homeostasis and disease. Over 300 ECM molecules have been defined as comprising the “core matrisome” in mammals through the analysis of whole genome sequences. During tooth development, the structure and functions of the ECM dynamically change. In the early stages, basement membranes (BMs) separate two cell layers of the dental epithelium and the mesenchyme. Later in the differentiation stages, the BM layer is replaced with the enamel matrix and the dentin matrix, which are secreted by ameloblasts and odontoblasts, respectively. The enamel matrix genes and the dentin matrix genes are each clustered in two closed regions located on human chromosome 4 (mouse chromosome 5), except for the gene coded for amelogenin, the major enamel matrix protein, which is located on the sex chromosomes. These genes for enamel and dentin matrix proteins are derived from a common ancestral gene, but as a result of evolution, they diverged in terms of their specific functions. These matrix proteins play important roles in cell adhesion, polarity, and differentiation and mineralization of enamel and dentin matrices. Mutations of these genes cause diseases such as odontogenesis imperfect (OI) and amelogenesis imperfect (AI). In this review, we discuss the recently defined terms matrisome and matrixome for ECMs, as well as focus on genes and functions of enamel and dentin matrix proteins. PMID:23539364

  5. A complex network analysis of hypertension-related genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huan; Xu, Chuan-Yun; Hu, Jing-Bo; Cao, Ke-Fei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a network of hypertension-related genes is constructed by analyzing the correlations of gene expression data among the Dahl salt-sensitive rat and two consomic rat strains. The numerical calculations show that this sparse and assortative network has small-world and scale-free properties. Further, 16 key hub genes (Col4a1, Lcn2, Cdk4, etc.) are determined by introducing an integrated centrality and have been confirmed by biological/medical research to play important roles in hypertension.

  6. Transferred interbacterial antagonism genes augment eukaryotic innate immune function.

    PubMed

    Chou, Seemay; Daugherty, Matthew D; Peterson, S Brook; Biboy, Jacob; Yang, Youyun; Jutras, Brandon L; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K; Ferrin, Michael A; Harding, Brittany N; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine; Yang, X Frank; Vollmer, Waldemar; Malik, Harmit S; Mougous, Joseph D

    2015-02-01

    Horizontal gene transfer allows organisms to rapidly acquire adaptive traits. Although documented instances of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to eukaryotes remain rare, bacteria represent a rich source of new functions potentially available for co-option. One benefit that genes of bacterial origin could provide to eukaryotes is the capacity to produce antibacterials, which have evolved in prokaryotes as the result of eons of interbacterial competition. The type VI secretion amidase effector (Tae) proteins are potent bacteriocidal enzymes that degrade the cell wall when delivered into competing bacterial cells by the type VI secretion system. Here we show that tae genes have been transferred to eukaryotes on at least six occasions, and that the resulting domesticated amidase effector (dae) genes have been preserved for hundreds of millions of years through purifying selection. We show that the dae genes acquired eukaryotic secretion signals, are expressed within recipient organisms, and encode active antibacterial toxins that possess substrate specificity matching extant Tae proteins of the same lineage. Finally, we show that a dae gene in the deer tick Ixodes scapularis limits proliferation of Borrelia burgdorferi, the aetiologic agent of Lyme disease. Our work demonstrates that a family of horizontally acquired toxins honed to mediate interbacterial antagonism confers previously undescribed antibacterial capacity to eukaryotes. We speculate that the selective pressure imposed by competition between bacteria has produced a reservoir of genes encoding diverse antimicrobial functions that are tailored for co-option by eukaryotic innate immune systems. PMID:25470067

  7. A graphic method for identification of novel glioma related genes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Fei; Shu, Yang; Yang, Lei; He, Yi-Chun; Li, Li-Peng; Huang, GuaHua; Li, Hai-Peng; Jiang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Glioma, as the most common and lethal intracranial tumor, is a serious disease that causes many deaths every year. Good comprehension of the mechanism underlying this disease is very helpful to design effective treatments. However, up to now, the knowledge of this disease is still limited. It is an important step to understand the mechanism underlying this disease by uncovering its related genes. In this study, a graphic method was proposed to identify novel glioma related genes based on known glioma related genes. A weighted graph was constructed according to the protein-protein interaction information retrieved from STRING and the well-known shortest path algorithm was employed to discover novel genes. The following analysis suggests that some of them are related to the biological process of glioma, proving that our method was effective in identifying novel glioma related genes. We hope that the proposed method would be applied to study other diseases and provide useful information to medical workers, thereby designing effective treatments of different diseases.

  8. Consequences of recurrent gene flow from crops to wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Haygood, Ralph; Ives, Anthony R; Andow, David A

    2003-09-22

    Concern about gene flow from crops to wild relatives has become widespread with the increasing cultivation of transgenic crops. Possible consequences of such gene flow include genetic assimilation, wherein crop genes replace wild ones, and demographic swamping, wherein hybrids are less fertile than their wild parents, and wild populations shrink. Using mathematical models of a wild population recurrently receiving pollen from a genetically fixed crop, we find that the conditions for genetic assimilation are not stringent, and progress towards replacement can be fast, even for disfavoured crop genes. Demographic swamping and genetic drift relax the conditions for genetic assimilation and speed progress towards replacement. Genetic assimilation can involve thresholds and hysteresis, such that a small increase in immigration can lead to fixation of a disfavoured crop gene that had been maintained at a moderate frequency, even if the increase in immigration is cancelled before the gene fixes. Demographic swamping can give rise to 'migrational meltdown', such that a small increase in immigration can lead to not only fixation of a disfavoured crop gene but also drastic shrinkage of the wild population. These findings suggest that the spread of crop genes in wild populations should be monitored more closely. PMID:14561300

  9. Consequences of recurrent gene flow from crops to wild relatives.

    PubMed Central

    Haygood, Ralph; Ives, Anthony R; Andow, David A

    2003-01-01

    Concern about gene flow from crops to wild relatives has become widespread with the increasing cultivation of transgenic crops. Possible consequences of such gene flow include genetic assimilation, wherein crop genes replace wild ones, and demographic swamping, wherein hybrids are less fertile than their wild parents, and wild populations shrink. Using mathematical models of a wild population recurrently receiving pollen from a genetically fixed crop, we find that the conditions for genetic assimilation are not stringent, and progress towards replacement can be fast, even for disfavoured crop genes. Demographic swamping and genetic drift relax the conditions for genetic assimilation and speed progress towards replacement. Genetic assimilation can involve thresholds and hysteresis, such that a small increase in immigration can lead to fixation of a disfavoured crop gene that had been maintained at a moderate frequency, even if the increase in immigration is cancelled before the gene fixes. Demographic swamping can give rise to 'migrational meltdown', such that a small increase in immigration can lead to not only fixation of a disfavoured crop gene but also drastic shrinkage of the wild population. These findings suggest that the spread of crop genes in wild populations should be monitored more closely. PMID:14561300

  10. Consequences of recurrent gene flow from crops to wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Haygood, Ralph; Ives, Anthony R; Andow, David A

    2003-09-22

    Concern about gene flow from crops to wild relatives has become widespread with the increasing cultivation of transgenic crops. Possible consequences of such gene flow include genetic assimilation, wherein crop genes replace wild ones, and demographic swamping, wherein hybrids are less fertile than their wild parents, and wild populations shrink. Using mathematical models of a wild population recurrently receiving pollen from a genetically fixed crop, we find that the conditions for genetic assimilation are not stringent, and progress towards replacement can be fast, even for disfavoured crop genes. Demographic swamping and genetic drift relax the conditions for genetic assimilation and speed progress towards replacement. Genetic assimilation can involve thresholds and hysteresis, such that a small increase in immigration can lead to fixation of a disfavoured crop gene that had been maintained at a moderate frequency, even if the increase in immigration is cancelled before the gene fixes. Demographic swamping can give rise to 'migrational meltdown', such that a small increase in immigration can lead to not only fixation of a disfavoured crop gene but also drastic shrinkage of the wild population. These findings suggest that the spread of crop genes in wild populations should be monitored more closely.

  11. Functional and regulatory interactions between Hox and extradenticle genes

    PubMed Central

    Azpiazu, Natalia; Morata, Ginés

    1998-01-01

    The homeobox gene extradenticle (exd) acts as a cofactor of Hox function both in Drosophila and vertebrates. It has been shown that the distribution of the Exd protein is developmentally regulated at the post-translational level; in the regions where exd is not functional Exd is present only in the cell cytoplasm, whereas it accumulates in the nuclei of cells requiring exd function. We show that the subcellular localization of Exd is regulated by the BX-C genes and that each BX-C gene can prevent or reduce nuclear translocation of Exd to different extents. In spite of this negative regulation, two BX-C genes, Ultrabithorax and abdominal-A, require exd activity for their maintenance and function. We propose that mutual interactions between Exd and BX-C proteins ensure the correct amounts of interacting molecules. As the Hoxd10 gene has the same properties as Drosophila BX-C genes, we suggest that the control mechanism of subcellular distribution of Exd found in Drosophila probably operates in other organisms as well. PMID:9436985

  12. Additive functions in boolean models of gene regulatory network modules.

    PubMed

    Darabos, Christian; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Tomassini, Marco; Moore, Jason H; Provero, Paolo; Giacobini, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Gene-on-gene regulations are key components of every living organism. Dynamical abstract models of genetic regulatory networks help explain the genome's evolvability and robustness. These properties can be attributed to the structural topology of the graph formed by genes, as vertices, and regulatory interactions, as edges. Moreover, the actual gene interaction of each gene is believed to play a key role in the stability of the structure. With advances in biology, some effort was deployed to develop update functions in boolean models that include recent knowledge. We combine real-life gene interaction networks with novel update functions in a boolean model. We use two sub-networks of biological organisms, the yeast cell-cycle and the mouse embryonic stem cell, as topological support for our system. On these structures, we substitute the original random update functions by a novel threshold-based dynamic function in which the promoting and repressing effect of each interaction is considered. We use a third real-life regulatory network, along with its inferred boolean update functions to validate the proposed update function. Results of this validation hint to increased biological plausibility of the threshold-based function. To investigate the dynamical behavior of this new model, we visualized the phase transition between order and chaos into the critical regime using Derrida plots. We complement the qualitative nature of Derrida plots with an alternative measure, the criticality distance, that also allows to discriminate between regimes in a quantitative way. Simulation on both real-life genetic regulatory networks show that there exists a set of parameters that allows the systems to operate in the critical region. This new model includes experimentally derived biological information and recent discoveries, which makes it potentially useful to guide experimental research. The update function confers additional realism to the model, while reducing the complexity

  13. Additive Functions in Boolean Models of Gene Regulatory Network Modules

    PubMed Central

    Darabos, Christian; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Tomassini, Marco; Moore, Jason H.; Provero, Paolo; Giacobini, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Gene-on-gene regulations are key components of every living organism. Dynamical abstract models of genetic regulatory networks help explain the genome's evolvability and robustness. These properties can be attributed to the structural topology of the graph formed by genes, as vertices, and regulatory interactions, as edges. Moreover, the actual gene interaction of each gene is believed to play a key role in the stability of the structure. With advances in biology, some effort was deployed to develop update functions in Boolean models that include recent knowledge. We combine real-life gene interaction networks with novel update functions in a Boolean model. We use two sub-networks of biological organisms, the yeast cell-cycle and the mouse embryonic stem cell, as topological support for our system. On these structures, we substitute the original random update functions by a novel threshold-based dynamic function in which the promoting and repressing effect of each interaction is considered. We use a third real-life regulatory network, along with its inferred Boolean update functions to validate the proposed update function. Results of this validation hint to increased biological plausibility of the threshold-based function. To investigate the dynamical behavior of this new model, we visualized the phase transition between order and chaos into the critical regime using Derrida plots. We complement the qualitative nature of Derrida plots with an alternative measure, the criticality distance, that also allows to discriminate between regimes in a quantitative way. Simulation on both real-life genetic regulatory networks show that there exists a set of parameters that allows the systems to operate in the critical region. This new model includes experimentally derived biological information and recent discoveries, which makes it potentially useful to guide experimental research. The update function confers additional realism to the model, while reducing the complexity

  14. Expression of fibrosis-related genes in canine chronic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Kanemoto, H; Ohno, K; Sakai, M; Nakashima, K; Takahashi, M; Fujino, Y; Tsujimoto, H

    2011-07-01

    Molecular regulation of fibrosis in chronic canine hepatitis is poorly understood. The authors employed quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to determine the expression levels of genes reported to be related to fibrosis in other species (human, mouse, and rat) and to elucidate the relationship of these genes with the degree of fibrosis and the presence or absence of ascites and/or jaundice in dogs with hepatitis. Nine fibrosis-related genes were assayed: PDGFB, PDGFD, MMP2, TIMP1, THBS1, COL1A1, COL3A1, TGFB1, and TGFB2. Liver samples of 15 dogs with chronic hepatitis and 4 healthy control dogs were obtained via laparoscopic biopsy and subjected to histologic and quantitative PCR analyses. The expression of all 9 genes showed significant positive correlation (P<.01, r>.70) with the degree of fibrosis. Furthermore, the expression levels of all genes except TGFB1 were significantly higher (P<.05) in dogs with hepatic failure-related symptoms (ascites/jaundice). Results suggest that these 9 genes are integral to the development of fibrosis in canine chronic hepatitis.

  15. Gene Expression in Relation to Exhaled Nitric Oxide Identifies Novel Asthma Phenotypes with Unique Biomolecular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Modena, Brian D.; Tedrow, John R.; Milosevic, Jadranka; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Wu, Wei; Bar-Joseph, Ziv; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Gaston, Benjamin M.; Busse, William W.; Jarjour, Nizar N.; Kaminski, Naftali

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Although asthma is recognized as a heterogeneous disease associated with clinical phenotypes, the molecular basis of these phenotypes remains poorly understood. Although genomic studies have successfully broadened our understanding in diseases such as cancer, they have not been widely used in asthma studies. Objectives To link gene expression patterns to clinical asthma phenotypes. Methods We used a microarray platform to analyze bronchial airway epithelial cell gene expression in relation to the asthma biomarker fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) in 155 subjects with asthma and healthy control subjects from the Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP). Measurements and Main Results We first identified a diverse set of 549 genes whose expression correlated with FeNO. We used k-means to cluster the patient samples according to the expression of these genes, identifying five asthma clusters/phenotypes with distinct clinical, physiological, cellular, and gene transcription characteristics—termed “subject clusters” (SCs). To then investigate differences in gene expression between SCs, a total of 1,384 genes were identified that highly differentiated the SCs at an unadjusted P value < 10−6. Hierarchical clustering of these 1,384 genes identified nine gene clusters or “biclusters,” whose coexpression suggested biological characteristics unique to each SC. Although genes related to type 2 inflammation were present, novel pathways, including those related to neuronal function, WNT pathways, and actin cytoskeleton, were noted. Conclusions These findings show that bronchial epithelial cell gene expression, as related to the asthma biomarker FeNO, can identify distinct asthma phenotypes, while also suggesting the presence of underlying novel gene pathways relevant to these phenotypes. PMID:25338189

  16. Using PPI network autocorrelation in hierarchical multi-label classification trees for gene function prediction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ontologies and catalogs of gene functions, such as the Gene Ontology (GO) and MIPS-FUN, assume that functional classes are organized hierarchically, that is, general functions include more specific ones. This has recently motivated the development of several machine learning algorithms for gene function prediction that leverages on this hierarchical organization where instances may belong to multiple classes. In addition, it is possible to exploit relationships among examples, since it is plausible that related genes tend to share functional annotations. Although these relationships have been identified and extensively studied in the area of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks, they have not received much attention in hierarchical and multi-class gene function prediction. Relations between genes introduce autocorrelation in functional annotations and violate the assumption that instances are independently and identically distributed (i.i.d.), which underlines most machine learning algorithms. Although the explicit consideration of these relations brings additional complexity to the learning process, we expect substantial benefits in predictive accuracy of learned classifiers. Results This article demonstrates the benefits (in terms of predictive accuracy) of considering autocorrelation in multi-class gene function prediction. We develop a tree-based algorithm for considering network autocorrelation in the setting of Hierarchical Multi-label Classification (HMC). We empirically evaluate the proposed algorithm, called NHMC (Network Hierarchical Multi-label Classification), on 12 yeast datasets using each of the MIPS-FUN and GO annotation schemes and exploiting 2 different PPI networks. The results clearly show that taking autocorrelation into account improves the predictive performance of the learned models for predicting gene function. Conclusions Our newly developed method for HMC takes into account network information in the learning phase: When

  17. NHR-23 dependent collagen and hedgehog-related genes required for molting

    SciTech Connect

    Kouns, Nathaniel A.; Nakielna, Johana; Behensky, Frantisek; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouch, Zdenek; Kostrouchova, Marta

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} NHR-23 is a critical regulator of nematode development and molting. {yields} The manuscript characterizes the loss-of-function phenotype of an nhr-23 mutant. {yields} Whole genome expression analysis identifies new potential targets of NHR-23. {yields} Hedgehog-related genes are identified as NHR-23 dependent genes. {yields} New link between sterol mediated signaling and regulation by NHR-23 is found. -- Abstract: NHR-23, a conserved member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, is required for normal development in Caenorhabditis elegans where it plays a critical role in growth and molting. In a search for NHR-23 dependent genes, we performed whole genome comparative expression microarrays on both control and nhr-23 inhibited synchronized larvae. Genes that decreased in response to nhr-23 RNAi included several collagen genes. Unexpectedly, several hedgehog-related genes were also down-regulated after nhr-23 RNAi. A homozygous nhr-23 deletion allele was used to confirm the RNAi knockdown phenotypes and the changes in gene expression. Our results indicate that NHR-23 is a critical co-regulator of functionally linked genes involved in growth and molting and reveal evolutionary parallels among the ecdysozoa.

  18. Age-related macular degeneration: Evidence of a major gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, S.; Warren, C.; Yang, H.

    1994-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a major cause of blindness in developing countries. It remains a very poorly understood disorder. Although environmental and genetic factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, none have been firmly implicated. The purpose of this study was to use pedigree analysis to evaluate the possible role of a major gene as a determinant of familial aggregation. Information was collected regarding occupation, smoking, sun exposure, associated medical problems and family history. 50 probands with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and 39 age, race and sex-matched controls were included in the study. In the ARMD group 15/50 (30%) of probands reported a positive family history; 22 out of 222 first degree relatives over age 60 were reported to be affected. In the control groups, none of the 138 first degree relatives over age 50 had a history of ARMD. This difference is statistically significant (p = 0.0003), indicating that genetic factors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of ARMD. In the ARMD group more siblings as compared to parents (16/127 vs. 5/82) were affected. 5/50 (10%) of the ARMD probands also gave a history of a second degree relative affected with ARMD, compared to none known among the relatives of controls. Data from 50 pedigrees were analyzed by complex segregation analysis under a class A regressive logistic model using the REGD program implemented in the SAGE package. Preliminary results allow rejection of a polygenic model and suggest there is a major gene for ARMD in these families. The inheritance model most compatible with the observed familial aggregation is autosomal recessive. In conclusion, these results are suggestive of a major gene effect in the etiology of ARMD. Identification of a major gene effect is a first step to further pursue linkage analysis and to search for the gene(s) involved in the causation of ARMD.

  19. Functional network analysis of genes differentially expressed during xylogenesis in soc1ful woody Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Davin, Nicolas; Edger, Patrick P; Hefer, Charles A; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Schuetz, Mathias; Smets, Erik; Myburg, Alexander A; Douglas, Carl J; Schranz, Michael E; Lens, Frederic

    2016-06-01

    Many plant genes are known to be involved in the development of cambium and wood, but how the expression and functional interaction of these genes determine the unique biology of wood remains largely unknown. We used the soc1ful loss of function mutant - the woodiest genotype known in the otherwise herbaceous model plant Arabidopsis - to investigate the expression and interactions of genes involved in secondary growth (wood formation). Detailed anatomical observations of the stem in combination with mRNA sequencing were used to assess transcriptome remodeling during xylogenesis in wild-type and woody soc1ful plants. To interpret the transcriptome changes, we constructed functional gene association networks of differentially expressed genes using the STRING database. This analysis revealed functionally enriched gene association hubs that are differentially expressed in herbaceous and woody tissues. In particular, we observed the differential expression of genes related to mechanical stress and jasmonate biosynthesis/signaling during wood formation in soc1ful plants that may be an effect of greater tension within woody tissues. Our results suggest that habit shifts from herbaceous to woody life forms observed in many angiosperm lineages could have evolved convergently by genetic changes that modulate the gene expression and interaction network, and thereby redeploy the conserved wood developmental program. PMID:26952251

  20. Chromosome substitution strains: gene discovery functional analysis and systems studies

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Joseph H.; Forejt, Jiri; Takada, Toyoyuki; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory mice are valuable in biomedical research in part because of the extraordinary diversity of genetic resources that are available for studies of complex genetic traits and as models for human biology and disease. Chromosome substitution strains (CSSs) are important in this resource portfolio because of their demonstrated use for gene discovery, genetic and epigenetic studies, functional characterizations, and systems analysis. CSSs are made by replacing a single chromosome in a host strain with the corresponding chromosome from a donor strain. A complete CSS panel involves a total of 22 engineered inbred strains, one for each of the 19 autosomes, one each for the X and Y chromosomes, and one for mitochondria. A genome survey simply involves comparing each phenotype for each of the CSSs with the phenotypes of the host strain. The CSS panels that are available for laboratory mice have been used to dissect a remarkable variety of phenotypes and to characterize an impressive array of disease models. These surveys have revealed considerable phenotypic diversity even among closely related progenitor strains, evidence for strong epistasis and for heritable epigenetic changes. Perhaps most importantly, and presumably because of their unique genetic constitution, CSSs, and congenic strains derived from them, the genetic variants underlying quantitative trait loci (QTLs) are readily identified and functionally characterized. Together these studies show that CSSs are important resource for laboratory mice. PMID:22961226

  1. Evolution of the glutamine synthetase gene, one of the oldest existing and functioning genes.

    PubMed Central

    Kumada, Y; Benson, D R; Hillemann, D; Hosted, T J; Rochefort, D A; Thompson, C J; Wohlleben, W; Tateno, Y

    1993-01-01

    We performed molecular phylogenetic analyses of glutamine synthetase (GS) genes in order to investigate their evolutionary history. The analyses were done on 30 DNA sequences of the GS gene which included both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Two types of GS genes are known at present: the GSI gene found so far only in prokaryotes and the GSII gene found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Our study has shown that the two types of GS gene were produced by a gene duplication which preceded, perhaps by > 1000 million years, the divergence of eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The results are consistent with the facts that (i) GS is a key enzyme of nitrogen metabolism found in all extant life forms and (ii) the oldest biological fossils date back 3800 million years. Thus, we suggest that GS genes are one of the oldest existing and functioning genes in the history of gene evolution and that GSI genes should also exist in eukaryotes. Furthermore, our study may stimulate investigation on the evolution of "preprokaryotes," by which we mean the organisms that existed during the era between the origin of life and the divergence of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PMID:8096645

  2. Functional analysis of the BIN 2 genes of cotton.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Allen, Randy D

    2005-08-01

    Brassinosteroids (BR) promote the elongation of cotton fibers and may be a factor in determining their final length. To begin to understand the role of BR-mediated responses in the development of cotton fibers we have characterized the BIN 2 genes of cotton. BIN 2 is a member of the shaggy-like protein kinase family that has been identified as a negative regulator of BR signaling in Arabidopsis. Sequence analyses indicate that the tetraploid cotton genome includes four genes with strong sequence similarity to BIN 2. These genes fall into two distinct subclasses based on sequence and expression patterns. Sequence comparisons with corresponding genes from cotton species that have the diploid A and D genomes, respectively, shows that each pair of genes comprises homeologs derived from the A and D sub-genomes. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants that express these cotton BIN 2 cDNAs show reduced growth and similar phenotypes to the semi-dominant bin 2 mutant plants. These results indicate that the cotton BIN 2 genes encode functional BIN 2 isoforms that can inhibit BR signaling. Further analyses of the function of BIN 2 genes and their possible roles in determining fiber yield and quality are underway. PMID:15973517

  3. Function and expression pattern of nonsyndromic deafness genes

    PubMed Central

    Hilgert, Nele; Smith, Richard J.H.; Van Camp, Guy

    2010-01-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder, present in 1 of every 500 newborns. To date, 46 genes have been identified that cause nonsyndromic hearing loss, making it an extremely heterogeneous trait. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the inner ear function and expression pattern of these genes. In general, they are involved in hair bundle morphogenesis, form constituents of the extracellular matrix, play a role in cochlear ion homeostasis or serve as transcription factors. During the past few years, our knowledge of genes involved in hair bundle morphogenesis has increased substantially. We give an up-to-date overview of both the nonsyndromic and Usher syndrome genes involved in this process, highlighting proteins that interact to form macromolecular complexes. For every gene, we also summarize its expression pattern and impact on hearing at the functional level. Gene-specific cochlear expression is summarized in a unique table by structure/cell type and is illustrated on a cochlear cross-section, which is available online via the Hereditary Hearing Loss Homepage. This review should provide auditory scientists the most relevant information for all identified nonsyndromic deafness genes. PMID:19601806

  4. Breaking restricted taxonomic functionality by dual resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Narusaka, Mari; Kubo, Yasuyuki; Hatakeyama, Katsunori; Imamura, Jun; Ezura, Hiroshi; Nanasato, Yoshihiko; Tabei, Yutaka; Takano, Yoshitaka; Shirasu, Ken; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2013-06-01

    NB-LRR-type disease resistance (R) genes have been used in traditional breeding programs for crop protection. However, functional transfer of NB-LRR-type R genes to plants in taxonomically distinct families to establish pathogen resistance has not been successful. Here we demonstrate that a pair of Arabidopsis (Brassicaceae) NB-LRR-type R genes, RPS4 and RRS1, properly function in two other Brassicaceae, Brassica rapa and B. napus, but also in two Solanaceae, Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The solanaceous plants transformed with RPS4/RRS1 confer bacterial effector-specific immunity responses. Furthermore, RPS4 and RRS1, which confer resistance to a fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum in Brassicaceae, also protect against Colletotrichum orbiculare in cucumber (Cucurbitaceae). Thus the successful transfer of two R genes at the family level overcomes restricted taxonomic functionality. This implies that the downstream components of R genes must be highly conserved and interfamily utilization of R genes can be a powerful strategy to combat pathogens.

  5. Relating Functional Groups to the Periodic Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struyf, Jef

    2009-01-01

    An introduction to organic chemistry functional groups and their ionic variants is presented. Functional groups are ordered by the position of their specific (hetero) atom in the periodic table. Lewis structures are compared with their corresponding condensed formulas. (Contains 5 tables.)

  6. Gamma and Related Functions Generalized for Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollerton, R. L.

    2008-01-01

    Given a sequence g[subscript k] greater than 0, the "g-factorial" product [big product][superscript k] [subscript i=1] g[subscript i] is extended from integer k to real x by generalizing properties of the gamma function [Gamma](x). The Euler-Mascheroni constant [gamma] and the beta and zeta functions are also generalized. Specific examples include…

  7. Loss of gene function and evolution of human phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hye Ji; Choi, Dongjin; Goh, Chul Jun; Hahn, Yoonsoo

    2015-01-01

    Humans have acquired many distinct evolutionary traits after the human-chimpanzee divergence. These phenotypes have resulted from genetic changes that occurred in the human genome and were retained by natural selection. Comparative primate genome analyses reveal that loss-of-function mutations are common in the human genome. Some of these gene inactivation events were revealed to be associated with the emergence of advantageous phenotypes and were therefore positively selected and fixed in modern humans (the “less-ismore” hypothesis). Representative cases of human gene inactivation and their functional implications are presented in this review. Functional studies of additional inactive genes will provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying acquisition of various human-specific traits. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(7): 373-379] PMID:25887751

  8. Haploid Strategies for Functional Validation of Plant Genes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yaou; Pan, Guangtang; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Increasing knowledge of plant genome sequences requires the development of more reliable and efficient genetic approaches for genotype-phenotype validation. Functional identification of plant genes is generally achieved by a combination of creating genetic modifications and observing the according phenotype, which begins with forward-genetic methods represented by random physical and chemical mutagenesis and move towards reverse-genetic tools as targeted genome editing. A major bottleneck is time need to produce modified homozygous genotypes that can actually be used for phenotypic validation. Herein, we comprehensively address and compare available experimental approaches for functional validation of plant genes, and propose haploid strategies to reduce the time needed and cost consumed for establishing gene function. PMID:26409779

  9. Targeted capture and resequencing of 1040 genes reveal environmentally driven functional variation in grey wolves.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Rena M; Robinson, Jacqueline; Harrigan, Ryan; Silva, Pedro; Galverni, Marco; Musiani, Marco; Green, Richard E; Novembre, John; Wayne, Robert K

    2016-01-01

    In an era of ever-increasing amounts of whole-genome sequence data for individuals and populations, the utility of traditional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) array-based genome scans is uncertain. We previously performed a SNP array-based genome scan to identify candidate genes under selection in six distinct grey wolf (Canis lupus) ecotypes. Using this information, we designed a targeted capture array for 1040 genes, including all exons and flanking regions, as well as 5000 1-kb nongenic neutral regions, and resequenced these regions in 107 wolves. Selection tests revealed striking patterns of variation within candidate genes relative to noncandidate regions and identified potentially functional variants related to local adaptation. We found 27% and 47% of candidate genes from the previous SNP array study had functional changes that were outliers in sweed and bayenv analyses, respectively. This result verifies the use of genomewide SNP surveys to tag genes that contain functional variants between populations. We highlight nonsynonymous variants in APOB, LIPG and USH2A that occur in functional domains of these proteins, and that demonstrate high correlation with precipitation seasonality and vegetation. We find Arctic and High Arctic wolf ecotypes have higher numbers of genes under selection, which highlight their conservation value and heightened threat due to climate change. This study demonstrates that combining genomewide genotyping arrays with large-scale resequencing and environmental data provides a powerful approach to discern candidate functional variants in natural populations. PMID:26562361

  10. Applications and advantages of virus-induced gene silencing for gene function studies in plants.

    PubMed

    Burch-Smith, Tessa M; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Martin, Gregory B; Dinesh-Kumar, S P

    2004-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a recently developed gene transcript suppression technique for characterizing the function of plant genes. The approach involves cloning a short sequence of a targeted plant gene into a viral delivery vector. The vector is used to infect a young plant, and in a few weeks natural defense mechanisms of the plant directed at suppressing virus replication also result in specific degradation of mRNAs from the endogenous plant gene that is targeted for silencing. VIGS is rapid (3-4 weeks from infection to silencing), does not require development of stable transformants, allows characterization of phenotypes that might be lethal in stable lines, and offers the potential to silence either individual or multiple members of a gene family. Here we briefly review the discoveries that led to the development of VIGS and what is known about the experimental requirements for effective silencing. We describe the methodology of VIGS and how it can be optimized and used for both forward and reverse genetics studies. Advantages and disadvantages of VIGS compared with other loss-of-function approaches available for plants are discussed, along with how the limitations of VIGS might be overcome. Examples are reviewed where VIGS has been used to provide important new insights into the roles of specific genes in plant development and plant defense responses. Finally, we examine the future prospects for VIGS as a powerful tool for assessing and characterizing the function of plant genes. PMID:15315635

  11. Identification of mycoparasitism-related genes in Clonostachys rosea 67-1 active against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhan-Bin; Sun, Man-Hong; Li, Shi-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Clonostachys rosea is a mycoparasite that has shown great potential in controlling various plant fungal pathogens. In order to find mycoparasitism-related genes in C. rosea, the transcriptome of the efficient isolate 67-1 in association with sclerotia of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was sequenced and analysed. The results identified 26,351 unigenes with a mean length of 1,102 nucleotides, among which 18,525 were annotated in one or more databases of NR, KEGG, Swiss-Prot, GO and COG. Differentially expressed genes at 8 h, 24 h and 48 h after sclerotial induction were analysed, and 6,890 unigenes were upregulated compared with the control without sclerotia. 713, 1,008 and 1,929 genes were specifically upregulated expressed, while 1,646, 283 and 529 genes were specifically downregulated, respectively. Gene ontology terms analysis indicated that these genes were mainly involved in metabolism of biological process, catalysis of molecular function and cellular component. The expression levels of 12 genes that were upregulated after encountering with S. sclerotiorum were monitored using real-time PCR. The results indicated that the quantitative detection was consistent with the transcriptome analysis. The study provides transcriptional gene expression information on C. rosea parasitizing S. sclerotiorum and forms the basis for further investigation of mycoparasitism-related genes of C. rosea. PMID:26657839

  12. Identification of mycoparasitism-related genes in Clonostachys rosea 67-1 active against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhan-Bin; Sun, Man-Hong; Li, Shi-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Clonostachys rosea is a mycoparasite that has shown great potential in controlling various plant fungal pathogens. In order to find mycoparasitism-related genes in C. rosea, the transcriptome of the efficient isolate 67-1 in association with sclerotia of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was sequenced and analysed. The results identified 26,351 unigenes with a mean length of 1,102 nucleotides, among which 18,525 were annotated in one or more databases of NR, KEGG, Swiss-Prot, GO and COG. Differentially expressed genes at 8 h, 24 h and 48 h after sclerotial induction were analysed, and 6,890 unigenes were upregulated compared with the control without sclerotia. 713, 1,008 and 1,929 genes were specifically upregulated expressed, while 1,646, 283 and 529 genes were specifically downregulated, respectively. Gene ontology terms analysis indicated that these genes were mainly involved in metabolism of biological process, catalysis of molecular function and cellular component. The expression levels of 12 genes that were upregulated after encountering with S. sclerotiorum were monitored using real-time PCR. The results indicated that the quantitative detection was consistent with the transcriptome analysis. The study provides transcriptional gene expression information on C. rosea parasitizing S. sclerotiorum and forms the basis for further investigation of mycoparasitism-related genes of C. rosea. PMID:26657839

  13. A Systematic Investigation into Aging Related Genes in Brain and Their Relationship with Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Guofeng; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Mei, Hongkang

    2016-01-01

    Aging, as a complex biological process, is accompanied by the accumulation of functional loses at different levels, which makes age to be the biggest risk factor to many neurological diseases. Even following decades of investigation, the process of aging is still far from being fully understood, especially at a systematic level. In this study, we identified aging related genes in brain by collecting the ones with sustained and consistent gene expression or DNA methylation changes in the aging process. Functional analysis with Gene Ontology to these genes suggested transcriptional regulators to be the most affected genes in the aging process. Transcription regulation analysis found some transcription factors, especially Specificity Protein 1 (SP1), to play important roles in regulating aging related gene expression. Module-based functional analysis indicated these genes to be associated with many well-known aging related pathways, supporting the validity of our approach to select aging related genes. Finally, we investigated the roles of aging related genes on Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). We found that aging and AD related genes both involved some common pathways, which provided a possible explanation why aging made the brain more vulnerable to Alzheimer’s Disease. PMID:26937969

  14. PHYLOGENOMICS - GUIDED VALIDATION OF FUNCTION FOR CONSERVED UNKNOWN GENES

    SciTech Connect

    V, DE CRECY-LAGARD; D, HANSON A

    2012-01-03

    Identifying functions for all gene products in all sequenced organisms is a central challenge of the post-genomic era. However, at least 30-50% of the proteins encoded by any given genome are of unknown function, or wrongly or vaguely annotated. Many of these 'unknown' proteins are common to prokaryotes and plants. We accordingly set out to predict and experimentally test the functions of such proteins. Our approach to functional prediction is integrative, coupling the extensive post-genomic resources available for plants with comparative genomics based on hundreds of microbial genomes, and functional genomic datasets from model microorganisms. The early phase is computer-assisted; later phases incorporate intellectual input from expert plant and microbial biochemists. The approach thus bridges the gap between automated homology-based annotations and the classical gene discovery efforts of experimentalists, and is much more powerful than purely computational approaches to identifying gene-function associations. Among Arabidopsis genes, we focused on those (2,325 in total) that (i) are unique or belong to families with no more than three members, (ii) are conserved between plants and prokaryotes, and (iii) have unknown or poorly known functions. Computer-assisted selection of promising targets for deeper analysis was based on homology .. independent characteristics associated in the SEED database with the prokaryotic members of each family, specifically gene clustering and phyletic spread, as well as availability of functional genomics data, and publications that could link candidate families to general metabolic areas, or to specific functions. In-depth comparative genomic analysis was then performed for about 500 top candidate families, which connected ~55 of them to general areas of metabolism and led to specific functional predictions for a subset of ~25 more. Twenty predicted functions were experimentally tested in at least one prokaryotic organism via reverse

  15. History of a prolific family: the Hes/Hey-related genes of the annelid Platynereis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Hes superfamily or Hes/Hey-related genes encompass a variety of metazoan-specific bHLH genes, with somewhat fuzzy phylogenetic relationships. Hes superfamily members are involved in a variety of major developmental mechanisms in metazoans, notably in neurogenesis and segmentation processes, in which they often act as direct effector genes of the Notch signaling pathway. Results We have investigated the molecular and functional evolution of the Hes superfamily in metazoans using the lophotrochozoan Platynereis dumerilii as model. Our phylogenetic analyses of more than 200 Metazoan Hes/Hey-related genes revealed the presence of five families, three of them (Hes, Hey and Helt) being pan-metazoan. Those families were likely composed of a unique representative in the last common metazoan ancestor. The evolution of the Hes family was shaped by many independent lineage specific tandem duplication events. The expression patterns of 13 of the 15 Hes/Hey-related genes in Platynereis indicate a broad functional diversification. Nevertheless, a majority of these genes are involved in two crucial developmental processes in annelids: neurogenesis and segmentation, resembling functions highlighted in other animal models. Conclusions Combining phylogenetic and expression data, our study suggests an unusual evolutionary history for the Hes superfamily. An ancestral multifunctional annelid Hes gene may have undergone multiples rounds of duplication-degeneration-complementation processes in the lineage leading to Platynereis, each gene copies ensuring their maintenance in the genome by subfunctionalisation. Similar but independent waves of duplications are at the origin of the multiplicity of Hes genes in other metazoan lineages. PMID:25250171

  16. Integrative data-mining tools to link gene and function.

    PubMed

    El Yacoubi, Basma; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Information derived from genomic and post-genomic data can be efficiently used to link gene and function. Several web-based platforms have been developed to mine these types of data by integrating different tools. This method paper is designed to allow the user to navigate these platforms in order to make functional predictions. The main focus is on phylogenetic distribution and physical clustering tools, but other tools such as pathway reconstruction, gene fusions, and analysis of high-throughput experimental data are also surveyed.

  17. Tandem riboswitch architectures exhibit complex gene control functions.

    PubMed

    Sudarsan, Narasimhan; Hammond, Ming C; Block, Kirsten F; Welz, Rüdiger; Barrick, Jeffrey E; Roth, Adam; Breaker, Ronald R

    2006-10-13

    Riboswitches are structured RNAs typically located in the 5' untranslated regions of bacterial mRNAs that bind metabolites and control gene expression. Most riboswitches sense one metabolite and function as simple genetic switches. However, we found that the 5' region of the Bacillus clausii metE messenger RNA includes two riboswitches that respond to S-adenosylmethionine and coenzyme B12. This tandem arrangement yields a composite gene control system that functions as a two-input Boolean NOR logic gate. These findings and the discovery of additional tandem riboswitch architectures reveal how simple RNA elements can be assembled to make sophisticated genetic decisions without involving protein factors. PMID:17038623

  18. Detecting Horizontal Gene Transfer between Closely Related Taxa.

    PubMed

    Adato, Orit; Ninyo, Noga; Gophna, Uri; Snir, Sagi

    2015-10-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the transfer of genetic material between organisms, is crucial for genetic innovation and the evolution of genome architecture. Existing HGT detection algorithms rely on a strong phylogenetic signal distinguishing the transferred sequence from ancestral (vertically derived) genes in its recipient genome. Detecting HGT between closely related species or strains is challenging, as the phylogenetic signal is usually weak and the nucleotide composition is normally nearly identical. Nevertheless, there is a great importance in detecting HGT between congeneric species or strains, especially in clinical microbiology, where understanding the emergence of new virulent and drug-resistant strains is crucial, and often time-sensitive. We developed a novel, self-contained technique named Near HGT, based on the synteny index, to measure the divergence of a gene from its native genomic environment and used it to identify candidate HGT events between closely related strains. The method confirms candidate transferred genes based on the constant relative mutability (CRM). Using CRM, the algorithm assigns a confidence score based on "unusual" sequence divergence. A gene exhibiting exceptional deviations according to both synteny and mutability criteria, is considered a validated HGT product. We first employed the technique to a set of three E. coli strains and detected several highly probable horizontally acquired genes. We then compared the method to existing HGT detection tools using a larger strain data set. When combined with additional approaches our new algorithm provides richer picture and brings us closer to the goal of detecting all newly acquired genes in a particular strain. PMID:26439115

  19. Logic programming: Functions, relations and equations

    SciTech Connect

    DeGroot, D.

    1985-01-01

    This collection of articles describes and explains the major approaches used to combine logic programming and functional programming. It examines both theory and details of implementations, emphasizing relationships, and prospects for fruitful combination in the future. It introduces functional syntax and semantics, and equational theories, using a variety of methods. It provides several actual program codes, to allow readers to begin experimenting immediately using standard Prolog-language interpreters.

  20. Age related diastolic function in amateur athletes.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Amato; Alvino, Federico; Antonelli, Giovanni; Cassano, Francesco Emmanuel; De Vito, Raffaella; Cameli, Matteo; Mondillo, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    Diastolic function get worse with increasing age. Aim of this study was to investigate the impact of aerobic training on diastolic function with increasing age with speckle tracking echocardiography. We enrolled 125 amateur swimmers (AG), divided in three groups at increasing age: young athletes, adult athletes (AG2), old athletes (AG3). We enrolled 95 sedentary controls (SG) age-matched with athletes and divided into three groups: young sedentary group, adult sedentary group (SG2) and old sedentary group (SG3). AG had better diastolic function than SG. AG showed lower left ventricular twist than controls. E/A ratio got worse at increasing of age in all population (r = -0.34; p < 0.001); particularly in SG2 and SG3 there was a worsening of diastolic function respect to diastolic function of AG2 and AG3; in fact E/A ratio decreased with aging. Furthermore in SG E/A ratio showed a linear correlation with age (r = -0.54; p < 0.001); in AG this correlation was lost. Therefore the training and age were independent predictor of E/A (respectively β = -0.27; p = 0.004; β = -0.24, p = 0.008). Regular and aerobic training may minimize aging changes of diastolic function. This training-effect may play a key role to preserve diastolic filling in older athletes. PMID:25795025

  1. Identifying and prioritizing disease-related genes based on the network topological features.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhan-Chao; Lai, Yan-Hua; Chen, Li-Li; Xie, Yun; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiao-Yong

    2014-12-01

    Identifying and prioritizing disease-related genes are the most important steps for understanding the pathogenesis and discovering the therapeutic targets. The experimental examination of these genes is very expensive and laborious, and usually has a higher false positive rate. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop computational methods for the identification and prioritization of disease-related genes. In this study, we develop a powerful method to identify and prioritize candidate disease genes. The novel network topological features with local and global information are proposed and adopted to characterize genes. The performance of these novel features is verified based on the 10-fold cross-validation test and leave-one-out cross-validation test. The proposed features are compared with the published features, and fused strategy is investigated by combining the current features with the published features. And, these combination features are also utilized to identify and prioritize Parkinson's disease-related genes. The results indicate that identified genes are highly related to some molecular process and biological function, which provides new clues for researching pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. The source code of Matlab is freely available on request from the authors. PMID:25183318

  2. Mapping and annotating obesity-related genes in pig and human genomes.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Pier Luigi; Fontanesi, Luca; Piovesan, Damiano; Fariselli, Piero; Casadio, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Background. Obesity is a major health problem in both developed and emerging countries. Obesity is a complex disease whose etiology involves genetic factors in strong interplay with environmental determinants and lifestyle. The discovery of genetic factors and biological pathways underlying human obesity is hampered by the difficulty in controlling the genetic background of human cohorts. Animal models are then necessary to further dissect the genetics of obesity. Pig has emerged as one of the most attractive models, because of the similarity with humans in the mechanisms regulating the fat deposition. Results. We collected the genes related to obesity in humans and to fat deposition traits in pig. We localized them on both human and pig genomes, building a map useful to interpret comparative studies on obesity. We characterized the collected genes structurally and functionally with BAR+ and mapped them on KEGG pathways and on STRING protein interaction network. Conclusions. The collected set consists of 361 obesity related genes in human and pig genomes. All genes were mapped on the human genome, and 54 could not be localized on the pig genome (release 2012). Only for 3 human genes there is no counterpart in pig, confirming that this animal is a good model for human obesity studies. Obesity related genes are mostly involved in regulation and signaling processes/pathways and relevant connection emerges between obesity-related genes and diseases such as cancer and infectious diseases.

  3. Functional analysis and nucleotide sequence of the promoter region of the murine hck gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lock, P; Stanley, E; Holtzman, D A; Dunn, A R

    1990-01-01

    The structure and function of the promoter region and exon 1 of the murine hck gene have been characterized in detail. RNase protection analysis has established that hck transcripts initiate from heterogeneous start sites located within the hck gene. Fusion gene constructs containing hck 5'-flanking sequences and the bacterial Neor gene have been introduced into the hematopoietic cell lines FDC-P1 and WEHI-265 by using a self-inactivating retroviral vector. The transcriptional start sites of the fusion gene are essentially identical to those of the endogenous hck gene. Analysis of infected WEHI-265 cell lines treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reveals a 3- to 5-fold elevation in the levels of endogenous hck mRNA and a 1.4- to 2.6-fold increase in the level of Neor fusion gene transcripts, indicating that hck 5'-flanking sequences are capable of conferring LPS responsiveness on the Neor gene. The 5'-flanking region of the hck gene contains sequences similar to an element which is thought to be involved in the LPS responsiveness of the class II major histocompatibility gene A alpha k. A subset of these sequences are also found in the 5'-flanking regions of other LPS-responsive genes. Moreover, this motif is related to the consensus binding sequence of NF-kappa B, a transcription factor which is known to be regulated by LPS. Images PMID:2388619

  4. Characterization of a Vibrio alginolyticus strain, isolated from Alaskan oysters, carrying a hemolysin gene similar to the thermostable direct hemolysin-related hemolysin gene (trh) of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    González-Escalona, Narjol; Blackstone, George M; DePaola, Angelo

    2006-12-01

    A Vibrio strain isolated from Alaskan oysters and classified by its biochemical characteristics as Vibrio alginolyticus possessed a thermostable direct hemolysin-related hemolysin (trh) gene previously reported only in Vibrio parahaemolyticus. This trh-like gene was cloned and sequenced and was 98% identical to the trh2 gene of V. parahaemolyticus. This gene seems to be functional since it was transcriptionally active in early-stationary-phase growing cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of V. alginolyticus possessing a trh gene.

  5. The function and evolution of Wnt genes in arthropods.

    PubMed

    Murat, Sophie; Hopfen, Corinna; McGregor, Alistair P

    2010-11-01

    Wnt signalling is required for a wide range of developmental processes, from cleavage to patterning and cell migration. There are 13 subfamilies of Wnt ligand genes and this diverse repertoire appeared very early in metazoan evolution. In this review, we first summarise the known Wnt gene repertoire in various arthropods. Insects appear to have lost several Wnt subfamilies, either generally, such as Wnt3, or in lineage specific patterns, for example, the loss of Wnt7 in Anopheles. In Drosophila and Acyrthosiphon, only seven and six Wnt subfamilies are represented, respectively; however, the finding of nine Wnt genes in Tribolium suggests that arthropods had a larger repertoire ancestrally. We then discuss what is currently known about the expression and developmental function of Wnt ligands in Drosophila and other insects in comparison to other arthropods, such as the spiders Achaearanea and Cupiennius. We conclude that studies of Wnt genes have given us much insight into the developmental roles of some of these ligands. However, given the frequent loss of Wnt genes in insects and the derived development of Drosophila, further studies of these important genes are required in a broader range of arthropods to fully understand their developmental function and evolution.

  6. Relations among Functional Systems in Behavior Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Travis

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes that an organism's integrated repertoire of operant behavior has the status of a biological system, similar to other biological systems, like the nervous, cardiovascular, or immune systems. Evidence from a number of sources indicates that the distinctions between biological and behavioral events is often misleading, engendering counterproductive explanatory controversy. A good deal of what is viewed as biological (often thought to be inaccessible or hypothetical) can become publicly measurable variables using currently available and developing technologies. Moreover, such endogenous variables can serve as establishing operations, discriminative stimuli, conjoint mediating events, and maintaining consequences within a functional analysis of behavior and need not lead to reductionistic explanation. I suggest that explanatory misunderstandings often arise from conflating different levels of analysis and that behavior analysis can extend its reach by identifying variables operating within a functional analysis that also serve functions in other biological systems. PMID:17575907

  7. Elucidation of gene function using C-5 propyne antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, W M; Su, L L; Wagner, R W

    1996-09-01

    Identification of human disease-causing genes continues to be an intense area of research. While cloning of genes may lead to diagnostic tests, development of a cure requires an understanding of the gene's function in both normal and diseased cells. Thus, there exists a need for a reproducible and simple method to elucidate gene function. We evaluate C-5 propyne pyrimidine modified phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides (ONs) targeted against two human cell cycle proteins that are aberrantly expressed in breast cancer: p34cdc2 kinase and cyclin B1. Dose-dependent, sequence-specific, and gene-specific inhibition of both proteins was achieved at nanomolar concentrations of ONs in normal and breast cancer cells. Precise binding of the antisense ONs to their target RNA was absolutely required for antisense activity. Four or six base-mismatched ONs eliminated antisense activity confirming the sequence specificity of the antisense ONs. Antisense inhibition of p34cdc2 kinase resulted in a significant accumulation of cells in the Gap2/mitosis phase of the cell cycle in normal cells, but caused little effect on cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. These data demonstrate the potency, specificity, and utility of C-5 propyne modified antisense ONs as biological tools and illustrate the redundancy of cell cycle protein function that can occur in cancer cells. PMID:9631067

  8. Motifs emerge from function in model gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Burda, Z.; Krzywicki, A.; Martin, O. C.; Zagorski, M.

    2011-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks allow the control of gene expression patterns in living cells. The study of network topology has revealed that certain subgraphs of interactions or “motifs” appear at anomalously high frequencies. We ask here whether this phenomenon may emerge because of the functions carried out by these networks. Given a framework for describing regulatory interactions and dynamics, we consider in the space of all regulatory networks those that have prescribed functional capabilities. Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling is then used to determine how these functional networks lead to specific motif statistics in the interactions. In the case where the regulatory networks are constrained to exhibit multistability, we find a high frequency of gene pairs that are mutually inhibitory and self-activating. In contrast, networks constrained to have periodic gene expression patterns (mimicking for instance the cell cycle) have a high frequency of bifan-like motifs involving four genes with at least one activating and one inhibitory interaction. PMID:21960444

  9. Involvement of Trichoderma Trichothecenes in the Biocontrol Activity and Induction of Plant Defense-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Malmierca, M. G.; Cardoza, R. E.; Alexander, N. J.; McCormick, S. P.; Hermosa, R.; Monte, E.

    2012-01-01

    Trichoderma species produce trichothecenes, most notably trichodermin and harzianum A (HA), by a biosynthetic pathway in which several of the involved proteins have significant differences in functionality compared to their Fusarium orthologues. In addition, the genes encoding these proteins show a genomic organization differing from that of the Fusarium tri clusters. Here we describe the isolation of Trichoderma arundinaceum IBT 40837 transformants which have a disrupted or silenced tri4 gene, a gene encoding a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase that oxygenates trichodiene to give rise to isotrichodiol, and the effect of tri4 gene disruption and silencing on the expression of other tri genes. Our results indicate that the tri4 gene disruption resulted in a reduced antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea and Rhizoctonia solani and also in a reduced ability to induce the expression of tomato plant defense-related genes belonging to the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonate (JA) pathways against B. cinerea, in comparison to the wild-type strain, indicating that HA plays an important function in the sensitization of Trichoderma-pretreated plants against this fungal pathogen. Additionally, the effect of the interaction of T. arundinaceum with B. cinerea or R. solani and with tomato seedlings on the expressions of the tri genes was studied. PMID:22562989

  10. Evolution of the vertebrate paralemmin gene family: ancient origin of gene duplicates suggests distinct functions.

    PubMed

    Hultqvist, Greta; Ocampo Daza, Daniel; Larhammar, Dan; Kilimann, Manfred W

    2012-01-01

    Paralemmin-1 is a protein implicated in plasma membrane dynamics, the development of filopodia, neurites and dendritic spines, as well as the invasiveness and metastatic potential of cancer cells. However, little is known about its mode of action, or about the biological functions of the other paralemmin isoforms: paralemmin-2, paralemmin-3 and palmdelphin. We describe here evolutionary analyses of the paralemmin gene family in a broad range of vertebrate species. Our results suggest that the four paralemmin isoform genes (PALM1, PALM2, PALM3 and PALMD) arose by quadruplication of an ancestral gene in the two early vertebrate genome duplications. Paralemmin-1 and palmdelphin were further duplicated in the teleost fish specific genome duplication. We identified a unique sequence motif common to all paralemmins, consisting of 11 highly conserved residues of which four are invariant. A single full-length paralemmin homolog with this motif was identified in the genome of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus and an isolated putative paralemmin motif could be detected in the genome of the lancelet Branchiostoma floridae. This allows us to conclude that the paralemmin gene family arose early and has been maintained throughout vertebrate evolution, suggesting functional diversification and specific biological roles of the paralemmin isoforms. The paralemmin genes have also maintained specific features of gene organisation and sequence. This includes the occurrence of closely linked downstream genes, initially identified as a readthrough fusion protein with mammalian paralemmin-2 (Palm2-AKAP2). We have found evidence for such an arrangement for paralemmin-1 and -2 in several vertebrate genomes, as well as for palmdelphin and paralemmin-3 in teleost fish genomes, and suggest the name paralemmin downstream genes (PDG) for this new gene family. Thus, our findings point to ancient roles for paralemmins and distinct biological functions of the gene duplicates. PMID:22855693

  11. A novel gene: sawD related to the differentiation of streptomyces ansochromogenes.

    PubMed

    Gang, L; Wei, C; Yuqing, T; Huarong, T; Chater, K F; Buttner, M J

    1999-01-01

    A 1.3 kb DNA fragment was cloned from a total DNA library of Streptomyces ansochromogenes using Southern hybridization. Nucleotide sequencing analysis indicated that the 1320 bp DNA fragment contained a complete open reading frame (ORF). In search of databases, the deduced product of ORF containing 213 amino acids is homologous to the serine protease of Caulobacter cresceatus, and a conserved serine-catalytic active site (GPSAG) exists. The gene was designated as sawD. The function of this gene was studied with the strategy of gene disruption, and the result showed that the sawD may be related to sporulation and especially to the spore septation in Streptomyces ansochromogenes. The preliminary result indicated that sawD mutant could produce abundant pigment in contrast with the wild type, it seems that sawD gene may be involved in pigment biosynthesis, and this gene is also dispensable for biosynthesis of nikkomycin in Streptomyces ansochromogenes.

  12. Accelerated alcoholic fermentation caused by defective gene expression related to glucose derepression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Naoya; Mizuno, Megumi; Zhou, Yan; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Sake yeast strains maintain high fermentation rates, even after the stationary growth phase begins. To determine the molecular mechanisms underlying this advantageous brewing property, we compared the gene expression profiles of sake and laboratory yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the stationary growth phase. DNA microarray analysis revealed that the sake yeast strain examined had defects in expression of the genes related to glucose derepression mediated by transcription factors Adr1p and Cat8p. Furthermore, deletion of the ADR1 and CAT8 genes slightly but statistically significantly improved the fermentation rate of a laboratory yeast strain. We also identified two loss-of-function mutations in the ADR1 gene of existing sake yeast strains. Taken together, these results indicate that the gene expression program associated with glucose derepression for yeast acts as an impediment to effective alcoholic fermentation under glucose-rich fermentative conditions.

  13. Gene-environment interactions of circadian-related genes for cardiometabolic traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common circadian-related gene variants associate with increased risk for metabolic alterations including type 2 diabetes. However, little is known about whether diet and sleep could modify associations between circadian-related variants (CLOCK-rs1801260, CRY2-rs11605924, MTNR1B-rs1387153, MTNR1B-rs1...

  14. Identification of gene function and functional pathways by systemic plasmid-based ribozyme targeting in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed; Liu, Yong; Fong, Sylvia; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Liu, Shuqing; Tu, Guanghuan; Nosrati, Mehdi; Handumrongkul, Chakkrapong; Liggitt, Denny; Thor, Ann D.; Debs, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    To date, functional genomic studies have been confined to either cell-based assays or germline mutations, using transgenic or knockout animals. However, these approaches are often unable either to recapitulate complex biologic phenotypes, such as tumor metastasis, or to identify the specific genes and functional pathways that produce serious diseases in adult animals. Although the transcription factor NF-κB transactivates many metastasis-related genes in cells, the precise genes and functional-pathways through which NF-κB regulates metastasis in tumor-bearing hosts are poorly understood. Here, we show that the systemic delivery of plasmid-based ribozymes targeting NF-κB in adult, tumor-bearing mice suppressed NF-κB expression in metastatic melanoma cells, as well as in normal cell types, and significantly reduced metastatic spread. Plasmid-based ribozymes suppressed target-gene expression with sequence specificity not achievable by using synthetic oligonucleotide-based approaches. NF-κB seemed to regulate tumor metastasis through invasion-related, rather than angiogenesis-, cell-cycle- or apoptosis-related pathways in tumor-bearing mice. Furthermore, ribozymes targeting either of the NF-κB-regulated genes, integrin β3 or PECAM-1 (a ligand-receptor pair linked to cell adhesion), reduced tumor metastasis at a level comparable to NF-κB. These studies demonstrate the utility of gene targeting by means of systemic, plasmid-based ribozymes to dissect out the functional genomics of complex biologic phenotypes, including tumor metastasis. PMID:11891271

  15. Functional annotation of rare gene aberration drivers of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Yiu Huen; Dogruluk, Turgut; Tedeschi, Philip M; Wardwell-Ozgo, Joanna; Lu, Hengyu; Espitia, Maribel; Nair, Nikitha; Minelli, Rosalba; Chong, Zechen; Chen, Fengju; Chang, Qing Edward; Dennison, Jennifer B; Dogruluk, Armel; Li, Min; Ying, Haoqiang; Bertino, Joseph R; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Ittmann, Michael; Kerrigan, John; Chen, Ken; Creighton, Chad J; Eterovic, Karina; Mills, Gordon B; Scott, Kenneth L

    2016-01-01

    As we enter the era of precision medicine, characterization of cancer genomes will directly influence therapeutic decisions in the clinic. Here we describe a platform enabling functionalization of rare gene mutations through their high-throughput construction, molecular barcoding and delivery to cancer models for in vivo tumour driver screens. We apply these technologies to identify oncogenic drivers of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). This approach reveals oncogenic activity for rare gene aberrations in genes including NAD Kinase (NADK), which regulates NADP(H) homeostasis and cellular redox state. We further validate mutant NADK, whose expression provides gain-of-function enzymatic activity leading to a reduction in cellular reactive oxygen species and tumorigenesis, and show that depletion of wild-type NADK in PDAC cell lines attenuates cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. These data indicate that annotating rare aberrations can reveal important cancer signalling pathways representing additional therapeutic targets. PMID:26806015

  16. Functional annotation of rare gene aberration drivers of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Yiu Huen; Dogruluk, Turgut; Tedeschi, Philip M.; Wardwell-Ozgo, Joanna; Lu, Hengyu; Espitia, Maribel; Nair, Nikitha; Minelli, Rosalba; Chong, Zechen; Chen, Fengju; Chang, Qing Edward; Dennison, Jennifer B.; Dogruluk, Armel; Li, Min; Ying, Haoqiang; Bertino, Joseph R.; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Ittmann, Michael; Kerrigan, John; Chen, Ken; Creighton, Chad J.; Eterovic, Karina; Mills, Gordon B.; Scott, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    As we enter the era of precision medicine, characterization of cancer genomes will directly influence therapeutic decisions in the clinic. Here we describe a platform enabling functionalization of rare gene mutations through their high-throughput construction, molecular barcoding and delivery to cancer models for in vivo tumour driver screens. We apply these technologies to identify oncogenic drivers of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). This approach reveals oncogenic activity for rare gene aberrations in genes including NAD Kinase (NADK), which regulates NADP(H) homeostasis and cellular redox state. We further validate mutant NADK, whose expression provides gain-of-function enzymatic activity leading to a reduction in cellular reactive oxygen species and tumorigenesis, and show that depletion of wild-type NADK in PDAC cell lines attenuates cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. These data indicate that annotating rare aberrations can reveal important cancer signalling pathways representing additional therapeutic targets. PMID:26806015

  17. PRODH gene is associated with executive function in schizophrenic families.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Ma, Xiaohong; Hu, Xun; Wang, Yingcheng; Yan, Chengying; Meng, Huaqing; Liu, Xiehe; Toulopoulou, Timothea; Murray, Robin M; Collier, David A

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between polymorphisms in the PRODH and COMT genes and selected neurocognitive functions. Six SNPs in PRODH and two SNPs in COMT were genotyped in 167 first-episode schizophrenic families who had been assessed by a set of 14 neuropsychological tests. Neuropsychological measures were selected as quantitative traits for association analysis. The haplotype of SNPs PRODH 1945T/C and PRODH 1852G/A was associated with impaired performance on the Tower of Hanoi, a problem-solving task mainly reflecting planning capacity. There was no significant evidence for association with any other neuropsychological traits for other SNPs or haplotypes of paired SNPs in the two genes. This study takes previous findings of association between PRODH and schizophrenia further by associating variation within the gene with performance on a neurocognitive trait characteristic of the illness. It fails to confirm previous reports of an association between COMT and cognitive function. PMID:18163391

  18. Glutamate-related gene expression changes with age in the mouse auditory midbrain.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Sherif F; D'Souza, Mary; Zettel, Martha L; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Waxmonsky, Nicole C; Frisina, Robert D

    2007-01-01

    Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in both the peripheral and central auditory systems. Changes of glutamate and glutamate-related genes with age may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of age-related hearing loss-presbycusis. In this study, changes in glutamate-related mRNA gene expression in the CBA mouse inferior colliculus with age and hearing loss were examined and correlations were sought between these changes and functional hearing measures, such as the auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). Gene expression of 68 glutamate-related genes was investigated using both genechip microarray and real-time PCR (qPCR) molecular techniques for four different age/hearing loss CBA mouse subject groups. Two genes showed consistent differences between groups for both the genechip and qPCR. Pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase enzyme (Pycs) showed down-regulation with age and a high-affinity glutamate transporter (Slc1a3) showed up-regulation with age and hearing loss. Since Pycs plays a role in converting glutamate to proline, its deficiency in old age may lead to both glutamate increases and proline deficiencies in the auditory midbrain, playing a role in the subsequent inducement of glutamate toxicity and loss of proline neuroprotective effects. The up-regulation of Slc1a3 gene expression may reflect a cellular compensatory mechanism to protect against age-related glutamate or calcium excitoxicity.

  19. Macular xanthophylls, lipoprotein-related genes, and age-related macular degeneration1234

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Euna; Neuringer, Martha; SanGiovanni, John Paul

    2014-01-01

    Plant-based macular xanthophylls (MXs; lutein and zeaxanthin) and the lutein metabolite meso-zeaxanthin are the major constituents of macular pigment, a compound concentrated in retinal areas that are responsible for fine-feature visual sensation. There is an unmet need to examine the genetics of factors influencing regulatory mechanisms and metabolic fates of these 3 MXs because they are linked to processes implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this work we provide an overview of evidence supporting a molecular basis for AMD-MX associations as they may relate to DNA sequence variation in AMD- and lipoprotein-related genes. We recognize a number of emerging research opportunities, barriers, knowledge gaps, and tools offering promise for meaningful investigation and inference in the field. Overviews on AMD- and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)–related genes encoding receptors, transporters, and enzymes affecting or affected by MXs are followed with information on localization of products from these genes to retinal cell types manifesting AMD-related pathophysiology. Evidence on the relation of each gene or gene product with retinal MX response to nutrient intake is discussed. This information is followed by a review of results from mechanistic studies testing gene-disease relations. We then present findings on relations of AMD with DNA sequence variants in MX-associated genes. Our conclusion is that AMD-associated DNA variants that influence the actions and metabolic fates of HDL system constituents should be examined further for concomitant influence on MX absorption, retinal tissue responses to MX intake, and the capacity to modify MX-associated factors and processes implicated in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:24829491

  20. Gene expression profiles of autophagy-related genes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Igci, Mehri; Baysan, Mehmet; Yigiter, Remzi; Ulasli, Mustafa; Geyik, Sirma; Bayraktar, Recep; Bozgeyik, İbrahim; Bozgeyik, Esra; Bayram, Ali; Cakmak, Ecir Ali

    2016-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an imflammatory disease of central nervous system caused by genetic and environmental factors that remain largely unknown. Autophagy is the process of degradation and recycling of damaged cytoplasmic organelles, macromolecular aggregates, and long-lived proteins. Malfunction of autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of neurological diseases, and autophagy genes may modulate the T cell survival. We aimed to examine the expression levels of autophagy-related genes. The blood samples of 95 unrelated patients (aged 17-65years, 37 male, 58 female) diagnosed as MS and 95 healthy controls were used to extract the RNA samples. After conversion to single stranded cDNA using polyT priming: the targeted genes were pre-amplified, and 96×78 (samples×primers) qRT-PCR reactions were performed for each primer pair on each sample on a 96.96 array of Fluidigm BioMark™. Compared to age- and sex-matched controls, gene expression levels of ATG16L2, ATG9A, BCL2, FAS, GAA, HGS, PIK3R1, RAB24, RGS19, ULK1, FOXO1, HTT were significantly altered (false discovery rate<0.05). Thus, altered expression levels of several autophagy related genes may affect protein levels, which in turn would influence the activity of autophagy, or most probably, those genes might be acting independent of autophagy and contributing to MS pathogenesis as risk factors. The indeterminate genetic causes leading to alterations in gene expressions require further analysis. PMID:27125224

  1. Gene expression profiles of autophagy-related genes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Igci, Mehri; Baysan, Mehmet; Yigiter, Remzi; Ulasli, Mustafa; Geyik, Sirma; Bayraktar, Recep; Bozgeyik, İbrahim; Bozgeyik, Esra; Bayram, Ali; Cakmak, Ecir Ali

    2016-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an imflammatory disease of central nervous system caused by genetic and environmental factors that remain largely unknown. Autophagy is the process of degradation and recycling of damaged cytoplasmic organelles, macromolecular aggregates, and long-lived proteins. Malfunction of autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of neurological diseases, and autophagy genes may modulate the T cell survival. We aimed to examine the expression levels of autophagy-related genes. The blood samples of 95 unrelated patients (aged 17-65years, 37 male, 58 female) diagnosed as MS and 95 healthy controls were used to extract the RNA samples. After conversion to single stranded cDNA using polyT priming: the targeted genes were pre-amplified, and 96×78 (samples×primers) qRT-PCR reactions were performed for each primer pair on each sample on a 96.96 array of Fluidigm BioMark™. Compared to age- and sex-matched controls, gene expression levels of ATG16L2, ATG9A, BCL2, FAS, GAA, HGS, PIK3R1, RAB24, RGS19, ULK1, FOXO1, HTT were significantly altered (false discovery rate<0.05). Thus, altered expression levels of several autophagy related genes may affect protein levels, which in turn would influence the activity of autophagy, or most probably, those genes might be acting independent of autophagy and contributing to MS pathogenesis as risk factors. The indeterminate genetic causes leading to alterations in gene expressions require further analysis.

  2. Massive Expansion of Ubiquitination-Related Gene Families within the Chlamydiae

    PubMed Central

    Domman, Daryl; Collingro, Astrid; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Gehre, Lena; Weinmaier, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Subtil, Agathe; Horn, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Gene loss, gain, and transfer play an important role in shaping the genomes of all organisms; however, the interplay of these processes in isolated populations, such as in obligate intracellular bacteria, is less understood. Despite a general trend towards genome reduction in these microbes, our phylogenomic analysis of the phylum Chlamydiae revealed that within the family Parachlamydiaceae, gene family expansions have had pronounced effects on gene content. We discovered that the largest gene families within the phylum are the result of rapid gene birth-and-death evolution. These large gene families are comprised of members harboring eukaryotic-like ubiquitination-related domains, such as F-box and BTB-box domains, marking the largest reservoir of these proteins found among bacteria. A heterologous type III secretion system assay suggests that these proteins function as effectors manipulating the host cell. The large disparity in copy number of members in these families between closely related organisms suggests that nonadaptive processes might contribute to the evolution of these gene families. Gene birth-and-death evolution in concert with genomic drift might represent a previously undescribed mechanism by which isolated bacterial populations diversify. PMID:25069652

  3. The evolution of cancer-related genes in hominoids.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lin; Michalak, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of cancer suppression is essential for the maintenance of multicellularity. The lack of correlation between body size and cancer risk across species, known as Peto's paradox, suggests that genetic variation in cancer resistance is sufficient to compensate for increases of cell numbers in bigger animals. To assess evolutionary dynamics of cancer-related genes, we analyzed Ka, Ks,and Ka/Ks values in 120 oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSG) among seven hominoid species, including two extinct species, Neanderthal and Denisovan. Ka/Ks of tumor suppressor genes tended to be higher relative to that of oncogenes, consistent with relaxed purifying selection acting on the former. Ka/Ks values were positively correlated with TSG scores, but negatively correlated with oncogene scores, suggesting opposing selection pressures operating on the two groups of cancer-related genes. Additionally, we found 108 species-divergent substitutions that were prevalent germline genotypes in some species but in humans appeared only as somatic cancerous mutations. Better understanding the resistance to cancer may lead to new methods of cancer prevention in humans.

  4. Titanium nanotubes activate genes related to bone formation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pozio, Alfonso; Palmieri, Annalisa; Girardi, Ambra; Cura, Francesca; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background: Titanium is used worldwide to make osseointegrable devices, thanks to its favorable characteristics as mechanical proprieties and biocompatibility, demonstrated by in vivo studies with animal models and clinical trials over a forty-year period. However, the exact genetic effect of the titanium layer on cells is still not well characterized. Materials and Methods: To investigate how titanium nanotubes stimulate osteoblasts differentiation and proliferation, some osteoblast genes (SP7, RUNX2, COL3A1, COL1A1, ALPL, SPP1 and FOSL1) were analyzed by quantitative Real Time RT- PCR. Results: After 15 days, osteoblasts cultivated on titanium naotube showed the up-regulation of bone related genes SP7, ENG, FOSL1 and SPP1 and the down-regulation of RUNX2, COL3A1, COL1A1, and ALPL. After 30 days of treatment, the bone related genes SP7, ENG, FOSL1 and RUNX2 were up-regulated while COL3A1, COL1A1, ALPL and SPP1 were down-regulated. Conclusions: Our results, demonstrates that titanium nanotubes can lead to osteoblast differentiation and extracellular matrix deposition and mineralization in dental pulp stem cells by the activation of osteoblast related genes SPP1, FOSL1 and RUNX2. PMID:23814577

  5. Differential gene expression in mouse retina related to regional differences in vulnerability to hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Natoli, Riccardo; Valter, Krisztina; Stone, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In the C57BL/6J mouse retina, hyperoxia-induced degeneration of photoreceptors shows strong regional variation, beginning at a locus ~0.5 mm inferior to the optic disc. To identify gene expression differences that might underlie this variability in vulnerability, we have used microarray techniques to describe regional (superior-inferior) variations in gene expression in the retina. Methods Young adult C57BL/6J mice raised in dim cyclic illumination (12 h at 5 lx and 12 h in darkness) were exposed to hyperoxia (75% oxygen for two weeks). Retinas were collected from hyperoxia-exposed and control animals without fixation and divided into superior and inferior halves. RNA was extracted from each sample, purified, and hybridized to Mouse Gene 1.0 ST arrays (Affymetrix). The consistency of the microarray results was assessed using quantitative PCR for selected genes. Expression data were analyzed to identify genes and ncRNAs whose differential expression between the superior and inferior retina could be associated with relative vulnerability to hyperoxia. Results In control retinas, only two genes showed a fold difference in expression >2 between the superior and inferior retina; another 25 showed a fold difference of 1.5–2.0. Of these 27, the functions of six genes, including ventral anterior homeobox containing gene 2 (Vax2) and T-box 5 (Tbox5), are related to parameters of anatomic development and the functions of five are related to sensory perception. Among the latter, short-wave-sensitive cone opsin (Opn1sw) was more strongly expressed in the inferior retina and medium-wave-sensitive cone opsin (Opn1mw) in the superior retina. This is consistent with known differences in S- and M-cone distribution, confirming our separation of retinal regions. The highest fold difference was reported for membrane metalloendopeptidase (Mme), a member from the metallothionein group of cytoprotective proteins. To identify genes whose regulation by hyperoxia was

  6. Cost-benefit theory and optimal design of gene regulation functions.

    PubMed

    Kalisky, Tomer; Dekel, Erez; Alon, Uri

    2007-11-01

    Cells respond to the environment by regulating the expression of genes according to environmental signals. The relation between the input signal level and the expression of the gene is called the gene regulation function. It is of interest to understand the shape of a gene regulation function in terms of the environment in which it has evolved and the basic constraints of biological systems. Here we address this by presenting a cost-benefit theory for gene regulation functions that takes into account temporally varying inputs in the environment and stochastic noise in the biological components. We apply this theory to the well-studied lac operon of E. coli. The present theory explains the shape of this regulation function in terms of temporal variation of the input signals, and of minimizing the deleterious effect of cell-cell variability in regulatory protein levels. We also apply the theory to understand the evolutionary tradeoffs in setting the number of regulatory proteins and for selection of feed-forward loops in genetic circuits. The present cost-benefit theory can be used to understand the shape of other gene regulatory functions in terms of environment and noise constraints. PMID:17991990

  7. Using riboswitches to regulate gene expression and define gene function in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Van Vlack, Erik R; Seeliger, Jessica C

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria include both environmental species and many pathogenic species such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an intracellular pathogen that is the causative agent of tuberculosis in humans. Inducible gene expression is a powerful tool for examining gene function and essentiality, both in in vitro culture and in host cell infections. The theophylline-inducible artificial riboswitch has recently emerged as an alternative to protein repressor-based systems. The riboswitch is translationally regulated and is combined with a mycobacterial promoter that provides transcriptional control. We here provide methods used by our laboratory to characterize the riboswitch response to theophylline in reporter strains, recombinant organisms containing riboswitch-regulated endogenous genes, and in host cell infections. These protocols should facilitate the application of both existing and novel artificial riboswitches to the exploration of gene function in mycobacteria. PMID:25605389

  8. The PMP22 Gene and Its Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Parker, Brett; Martyn, Colin; Natarajan, Chandramohan; Guo, Jiasong

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) is primarily expressed in the compact myelin of the peripheral nervous system. Levels of PMP22 have to be tightly regulated since alterations of PMP22 levels by mutations of the PMP22 gene are responsible for >50% of all patients with inherited peripheral neuropathies, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth type-1A (CMT1A) with trisomy of PMP22, hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) with heterozygous deletion of PMP22, and CMT1E with point mutations of PMP22. While over-expression and point-mutations of the PMP22 gene may produce gain-of-function phenotypes, deletion of PMP22 results in a loss-of-function phenotype that reveals the normal physiological functions of the PMP22 protein. In this article, we will review the basic genetics, biochemistry and molecular structure of PMP22, followed by discussion of the current understanding of pathogenic mechanisms involving in the inherited neuropathies with mutations in PMP22 gene. PMID:23224996

  9. Age Related Changes in Autonomic Functions

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Mohammed; Pakhare, Abhijit; Rathi, Preeti; Chaudhary, Lalita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) imbalance may trigger or enhance pathology in different organ systems that varies in different age groups hence objective of present study was to evaluate association of different Age-groups with autonomic functions. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 62 healthy volunteers in Department of Physiology LLRM Medical College Meerut, India. Volunteers were divided into three groups as younger (15-45 years), middle (45-60) and elder age (above 60), Autonomic functions were tested in three domains viz. Cardio-vagal, adrenergic and sudomotor functions. Numerical data was summarized as mean and standard deviation and categorical data as count and percentage. ANOVA and Chi-square test were used to find difference among groups, p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Mean ± standard deviation OHT(Orthostatic Hypotension Test) among of younger, middle and elder age groups were 8.80±2.28, 13.40±4.64 and 21.82±6.04 respectively which represent decrease in sympathetic functions with age (p<0.001). Cardio-vagal or parasympathetic responses indicated by DBT (Deep Breathing Test) Valsalva and 30:15 ratio of HR response to standing tests has shown statistically significant (p<0.001) decrease in mean response with increasing age. Sudomotor response appeared normal in younger and middle group but was interrupted in more than half of elderly people (p<0.001). Conclusion Sympathetic responses & para-sympathetic responses have shown the significant decline with increasing age group. Sudomotor responses were partially interrupted in elderly age group. PMID:27134865

  10. X-linked intellectual disability related genes disrupted by balanced X-autosome translocations.

    PubMed

    Moysés-Oliveira, Mariana; Guilherme, Roberta Santos; Meloni, Vera Ayres; Di Battista, Adriana; de Mello, Claudia Berlim; Bragagnolo, Silvia; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Liehr, Thomas; Carvalheira, Gianna Maria; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Detailed molecular characterization of chromosomal rearrangements involving X-chromosome has been a key strategy in identifying X-linked intellectual disability-causing genes. We fine-mapped the breakpoints in four women with balanced X-autosome translocations and variable phenotypes, in order to investigate the corresponding genetic contribution to intellectual disability. We addressed the impact of the gene interruptions in transcription and discussed the consequences of their functional impairment in neurodevelopment. Three patients presented with cognitive impairment, reinforcing the association between the disrupted genes (TSPAN7-MRX58, KIAA2022-MRX98, and IL1RAPL1-MRX21/34) and intellectual disability. While gene expression analysis showed absence of TSPAN7 and KIAA2022 expression in the patients, the unexpected expression of IL1RAPL1 suggested a fusion transcript ZNF611-IL1RAPL1 under the control of the ZNF611 promoter, gene disrupted at the autosomal breakpoint. The X-chromosomal breakpoint definition in the fourth patient, a woman with normal intellectual abilities, revealed disruption of the ZDHHC15 gene (MRX91). The expression assays did not detect ZDHHC15 gene expression in the patient, thus questioning its involvement in intellectual disability. Revealing the disruption of an X-linked intellectual disability-related gene in patients with balanced X-autosome translocation is a useful tool for a better characterization of critical genes in neurodevelopment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26290131

  11. RNA silencing of genes involved in Alzheimer's disease enhances mitochondrial function and synaptic activity.

    PubMed

    Manczak, Maria; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2013-12-01

    An age-dependent increase in mRNA levels of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), the microtubule-associated protein Tau, and voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) genes are reported to be toxic to neurons affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the underlying toxic nature of these genes is not completely understood. The purpose of our study was to determine the effects of RNA silencing of APP, Tau, and VDAC1 genes in AD pathogenesis. Using human neuroblastoma (SHSY5Y) cells, we first silenced RNA for APP, Tau, and VDAC1 genes, and then performed real-time RT-PCR analysis to measure mRNA levels of 34 genes that are involved in AD pathogenesis. Using biochemical assays, we also assessed mitochondrial function by measuring levels of H2O2 production, lipid peroxidation, cytochrome c oxidase activity, ATP production, and GTPase enzymatic activity. We found that increased mRNA expression of synaptic function and mitochondrial fission genes, and reduced levels of mitochondrial fusion genes in RNA silenced the SHSY5Y cells for APP, Tau and VDAC1 genes relative to the control SHSY5Y cells. In addition, RNA-silenced APP, Tau, and VDAC1 genes in SHSY5Y cells showed reduced levels of H2O2 production, lipid peroxidation, fission-linked GTPase activity, and increased cytochrome oxidase activity and ATP production. These findings suggest that a reduction of human APP, Tau, and VDAC1 may enhance synaptic activity, may improve mitochondrial maintenance and function, and may protect against toxicities of AD-related genes. Thus, these findings also suggest that the reduction of APP, Tau, and VDAC1 mRNA expressions may have therapeutic value for patients with AD.

  12. Gene-Diet Interactions in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Sheldon; Taylor, Allen

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a prevalent blinding disease, accounting for roughly 50 % of blindness in developed nations. Very significant advances have been made in terms of discovering genetic susceptibilities to AMD as well as dietary risk factors. To date, nutritional supplementation is the only available treatment option for the dry form of the disease known to slow progression of AMD. Despite an excellent understanding of genes and nutrition in AMD, there is remarkably little known about gene-diet interactions that may identify efficacious approaches to treat individuals. This review will summarize our current understanding of gene-diet interactions in AMD with a focus on animal models and human epidemiological studies.

  13. RGFinder: a system for determining semantically related genes using GO graph minimum spanning tree.

    PubMed

    Taha, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Biologists often need to know the set S' of genes that are the most functionally and semantically related to a given set S of genes. For determining the set S', most current gene similarity measures overlook the structural dependencies among the Gene Ontology (GO) terms annotating the set S, which may lead to erroneous results. We introduce in this paper a biological search engine called RGFinder that considers the structural dependencies among GO terms by employing the concept of existence dependency. RGFinder assigns a weight to each edge in GO graph to represent the degree of relatedness between the two GO terms connected by the edge. The value of the weight is determined based on the following factors: 1) type of the relation represented by the edge (e.g., an "is-a" relation is assigned a different weight than a "part-of" relation), 2) the functional relationship between the two GO terms connected by the edge, and 3) the string-substring relationship between the names of the two GO terms connected by the edge. RGFinder then constructs a minimum spanning tree of GO graph based on these weights. In the framework of RGFinder, the set S' is annotated to the GO terms located at the lowest convergences of the subtree of the minimum spanning tree that passes through the GO terms annotating set S. We evaluated RGFinder experimentally and compared it with four gene set enrichment systems. Results showed marked improvement.

  14. A patient with PMP22-related hereditary neuropathy and DBH-gene-related dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Bartoletti-Stella, Anna; Chiaro, Giacomo; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Contin, Manuela; Scaglione, Cesa; Barletta, Giorgio; Cecere, Annagrazia; Garagnani, Paolo; Tieri, Paolo; Ferrarini, Alberto; Piras, Silvia; Franceschi, Claudio; Delledonne, Massimo; Cortelli, Pietro; Capellari, Sabina

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent focal neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is a relatively frequent autosomal-dominant demyelinating neuropathy linked to peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene deletions. The combination of PMP22 gene mutations with other genetic variants is known to cause a more severe phenotype than expected. We present the case of a patient with severe orthostatic hypotension since 12 years of age, who inherited a PMP22 gene deletion from his father. Genetic double trouble was suspected because of selective sympathetic autonomic disturbances. Through exome-sequencing analysis, we identified two novel mutations in the dopamine beta hydroxylase gene. Moreover, with interactome analysis, we excluded a further influence on the origin of the disease by variants in other genes. This case increases the number of unique patients presenting with dopamine-β-hydroxylase deficiency and of cases with genetically proven double trouble. Finding the right, complete diagnosis is crucial to obtain adequate medical care and appropriate genetic counseling. PMID:26410747

  15. Presence and Functionality of Mating Type Genes in the Supposedly Asexual Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Ryuta; Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Yamaguchi, Haruka; Yamamoto, Nanase; Wagu, Yutaka; Paoletti, Mathieu; Archer, David B.; Dyer, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    The potential for sexual reproduction in Aspergillus oryzae was assessed by investigating the presence and functionality of MAT genes. Previous genome studies had identified a MAT1-1 gene in the reference strain RIB40. We now report the existence of a complementary MAT1-2 gene and the sequencing of an idiomorphic region from A. oryzae strain AO6. This allowed the development of a PCR diagnostic assay, which detected isolates of the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 genotypes among 180 strains assayed, including industrial tane-koji isolates. Strains used for sake and miso production showed a near-1:1 ratio of the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 mating types, whereas strains used for soy sauce production showed a significant bias toward the MAT1-2 mating type. MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 isogenic strains were then created by genetic manipulation of the resident idiomorph, and gene expression was compared by DNA microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) methodologies under conditions in which MAT genes were expressed. Thirty-three genes were found to be upregulated more than 10-fold in either the MAT1-1 host strain or the MAT1-2 gene replacement strain relative to each other, showing that both the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 genes functionally regulate gene expression in A. oryzae in a mating type-dependent manner, the first such report for a supposedly asexual fungus. MAT1-1 expression specifically upregulated an α-pheromone precursor gene, but the functions of most of the genes affected were unknown. The results are consistent with a heterothallic breeding system in A. oryzae, and prospects for the discovery of a sexual cycle are discussed. PMID:22327593

  16. Fenton-treated functionalized diamond nanoparticles as gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Martín, Roberto; Alvaro, Mercedes; Herance, José Raúl; García, Hermenegildo

    2010-01-26

    When raw diamond nanoparticles (Dnp, 7 nm average particle size) obtained from detonation are submitted to harsh Fenton-treatment, the resulting material becomes free of amorphous soot matter and the process maintains the crystallinity, reduces the particle size (4 nm average particle size), increases the surface OH population, and increases water solubility. All these changes are beneficial for subsequent Dnp covalent functionalization and for the ability of Dnp to cross cell membranes. Fenton-treated Dnps have been functionalized with thionine and the resulting sample has been observed in HeLa cell nuclei. A triethylammonium-functionalized Dnp pairs electrostatically with a plasmid having the green fluorescent protein gene and acts as gene delivery system permitting the plasmid to cross HeLa cell membrane, something that does not occur for the plasmid alone without assistance of polycationic Dnp. PMID:20047335

  17. Towards revealing the functions of all genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Seung Yon; Mutwil, Marek

    2014-04-01

    The great recent progress made in identifying the molecular parts lists of organisms revealed the paucity of our understanding of what most of the parts do. In this review, we introduce computational and statistical approaches and omics data used for inferring gene function in plants, with an emphasis on network-based inference. We also discuss caveats associated with network-based function predictions such as performance assessment, annotation propagation, the guilt-by-association concept, and the meaning of hubs. Finally, we note the current limitations and possible future directions such as the need for gold standard data from several species, unified access to data and tools, quantitative comparison of data and tool quality, and high-throughput experimental validation platforms for systematic gene function elucidation in plants.

  18. Nucleotide substitutions revealing specific functions of Polycomb group genes.

    PubMed

    Bajusz, Izabella; Sipos, László; Pirity, Melinda K

    2015-04-01

    POLYCOMB group (PCG) proteins belong to the family of epigenetic regulators of genes playing important roles in differentiation and development. Mutants of PcG genes were isolated first in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, resulting in spectacular segmental transformations due to the ectopic expression of homeotic genes. Homologs of Drosophila PcG genes were also identified in plants and in vertebrates and subsequent experiments revealed the general role of PCG proteins in the maintenance of the repressed state of chromatin through cell divisions. The past decades of gene targeting experiments have allowed us to make significant strides towards understanding how the network of PCG proteins influences multiple aspects of cellular fate determination during development. Being involved in the transmission of specific expression profiles of different cell lineages, PCG proteins were found to control wide spectra of unrelated epigenetic processes in vertebrates, such as stem cell plasticity and renewal, genomic imprinting and inactivation of X-chromosome. PCG proteins also affect regulation of metabolic genes being important for switching programs between pluripotency and differentiation. Insight into the precise roles of PCG proteins in normal physiological processes has emerged from studies employing cell culture-based systems and genetically modified animals. Here we summarize the findings obtained from PcG mutant fruit flies and mice generated to date with a focus on PRC1 and PRC2 members altered by nucleotide substitutions resulting in specific alleles. We also include a compilation of lessons learned from these models about the in vivo functions of this complex protein family. With multiple knockout lines, sophisticated approaches to study the consequences of peculiar missense point mutations, and insights from complementary gain-of-function systems in hand, we are now in a unique position to significantly advance our understanding of the molecular basis of

  19. Plant Ion Channels: Gene Families, Physiology, and Functional Genomics Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ward, John M.; Mäser, Pascal; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    Distinct potassium, anion, and calcium channels in the plasma membrane and vacuolar membrane of plant cells have been identified and characterized by patch clamping. Primarily owing to advances in Arabidopsis genetics and genomics, and yeast functional complementation, many of the corresponding genes have been identified. Recent advances in our understanding of ion channel genes that mediate signal transduction and ion transport are discussed here. Some plant ion channels, for example, ALMT and SLAC anion channel subunits, are unique. The majority of plant ion channel families exhibit homology to animal genes; such families include both hyperpolarization-and depolarization-activated Shaker-type potassium channels, CLC chloride transporters/channels, cyclic nucleotide–gated channels, and ionotropic glutamate receptor homologs. These plant ion channels offer unique opportunities to analyze the structural mechanisms and functions of ion channels. Here we review gene families of selected plant ion channel classes and discuss unique structure-function aspects and their physiological roles in plant cell signaling and transport. PMID:18842100

  20. Use of functional gene arrays for elucidating in situ biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    Nostrand, Joy D. Van; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays have revolutionized the study of microbiology by providing a high-throughput method for examining thousands of genes with a single test and overcome the limitations of many culture-independent approaches. Functional gene arrays (FGA) probe a wide range of genes involved in a variety of functions of interest to microbial ecology (e.g., carbon degradation, N fixation, metal resistance) from many different microorganisms, cultured and uncultured. The most comprehensive FGA to date is the GeoChip array, which targets tens of thousands of genes involved in the geochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur, metal resistance and reduction, energy processing, antibiotic resistance and contaminant degradation as well as phylogenetic information (gyrB). Since the development of GeoChips, many studies have been performed using this FGA and have shown it to be a powerful tool for rapid, sensitive, and specific examination of microbial communities in a high-throughput manner. As such, the GeoChip is well-suited for linking geochemical processes with microbial community function and structure. This technology has been used successfully to examine microbial communities before, during, and after in situ bioremediation at a variety of contaminated sites. These studies have expanded our understanding of biodegradation and bioremediation processes and the associated microorganisms and environmental conditions responsible. This review provides an overview of FGA development with a focus on the GeoChip and highlights specific GeoChip studies involving in situ bioremediation. PMID:23049526

  1. Colorectal cancer risk genes are functionally enriched in regulatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xi; Cao, Mingming; Han, Su; Yang, Youlin; Zhou, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common complex disease caused by the combination of genetic variants and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been performed and reported some novel CRC susceptibility variants. However, the potential genetic mechanisms for newly identified CRC susceptibility variants are still unclear. Here, we selected 85 CRC susceptibility variants with suggestive association P < 1.00E-05 from the National Human Genome Research Institute GWAS catalog. To investigate the underlying genetic pathways where these newly identified CRC susceptibility genes are significantly enriched, we conducted a functional annotation. Using two kinds of SNP to gene mapping methods including the nearest upstream and downstream gene method and the ProxyGeneLD, we got 128 unique CRC susceptibility genes. We then conducted a pathway analysis in GO database using the corresponding 128 genes. We identified 44 GO categories, 17 of which are regulatory pathways. We believe that our results may provide further insight into the underlying genetic mechanisms for these newly identified CRC susceptibility variants. PMID:27146020

  2. Colorectal cancer risk genes are functionally enriched in regulatory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xi; Cao, Mingming; Han, Su; Yang, Youlin; Zhou, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common complex disease caused by the combination of genetic variants and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been performed and reported some novel CRC susceptibility variants. However, the potential genetic mechanisms for newly identified CRC susceptibility variants are still unclear. Here, we selected 85 CRC susceptibility variants with suggestive association P < 1.00E-05 from the National Human Genome Research Institute GWAS catalog. To investigate the underlying genetic pathways where these newly identified CRC susceptibility genes are significantly enriched, we conducted a functional annotation. Using two kinds of SNP to gene mapping methods including the nearest upstream and downstream gene method and the ProxyGeneLD, we got 128 unique CRC susceptibility genes. We then conducted a pathway analysis in GO database using the corresponding 128 genes. We identified 44 GO categories, 17 of which are regulatory pathways. We believe that our results may provide further insight into the underlying genetic mechanisms for these newly identified CRC susceptibility variants. PMID:27146020

  3. Functional optimization of gene clusters by combinatorial design and assembly.

    PubMed

    Smanski, Michael J; Bhatia, Swapnil; Zhao, Dehua; Park, YongJin; B A Woodruff, Lauren; Giannoukos, Georgia; Ciulla, Dawn; Busby, Michele; Calderon, Johnathan; Nicol, Robert; Gordon, D Benjamin; Densmore, Douglas; Voigt, Christopher A

    2014-12-01

    Large microbial gene clusters encode useful functions, including energy utilization and natural product biosynthesis, but genetic manipulation of such systems is slow, difficult and complicated by complex regulation. We exploit the modularity of a refactored Klebsiella oxytoca nitrogen fixation (nif) gene cluster (16 genes, 103 parts) to build genetic permutations that could not be achieved by starting from the wild-type cluster. Constraint-based combinatorial design and DNA assembly are used to build libraries of radically different cluster architectures by varying part choice, gene order, gene orientation and operon occupancy. We construct 84 variants of the nifUSVWZM operon, 145 variants of the nifHDKY operon, 155 variants of the nifHDKYENJ operon and 122 variants of the complete 16-gene pathway. The performance and behavior of these variants are characterized by nitrogenase assay and strand-specific RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), and the results are incorporated into subsequent design cycles. We have produced a fully synthetic cluster that recovers 57% of wild-type activity. Our approach allows the performance of genetic parts to be quantified simultaneously in hundreds of genetic contexts. This parallelized design-build-test-learn cycle, which can access previously unattainable regions of genetic space, should provide a useful, fast tool for genetic optimization and hypothesis testing.

  4. Comparative genomics of Geobacter chemotaxis genes reveals diverse signaling function

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Hoa T; Krushkal, Julia; Antommattei, Frances M; Lovley, Derek R; Weis, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    Background Geobacter species are δ-Proteobacteria and are often the predominant species in a variety of sedimentary environments where Fe(III) reduction is important. Their ability to remediate contaminated environments and produce electricity makes them attractive for further study. Cell motility, biofilm formation, and type IV pili all appear important for the growth of Geobacter in changing environments and for electricity production. Recent studies in other bacteria have demonstrated that signaling pathways homologous to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli chemotaxis can regulate type IV pili-dependent motility, the synthesis of flagella and type IV pili, the production of extracellular matrix material, and biofilm formation. The classification of these pathways by comparative genomics improves the ability to understand how Geobacter thrives in natural environments and better their use in microbial fuel cells. Results The genomes of G. sulfurreducens, G. metallireducens, and G. uraniireducens contain multiple (~70) homologs of chemotaxis genes arranged in several major clusters (six, seven, and seven, respectively). Unlike the single gene cluster of E. coli, the Geobacter clusters are not all located near the flagellar genes. The probable functions of some Geobacter clusters are assignable by homology to known pathways; others appear to be unique to the Geobacter sp. and contain genes of unknown function. We identified large numbers of methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP) homologs that have diverse sensing domain architectures and generate a potential for sensing a great variety of environmental signals. We discuss mechanisms for class-specific segregation of the MCPs in the cell membrane, which serve to maintain pathway specificity and diminish crosstalk. Finally, the regulation of gene expression in Geobacter differs from E. coli. The sequences of predicted promoter elements suggest that the alternative sigma factors σ28 and σ54 play a role

  5. System Review about Function Role of ESCC Driver Gene KDM6A by Network Biology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Jihua; Li, Hui; Li, Huiwu

    2016-01-01

    Background. KDM6A (Lysine (K)-Specific Demethylase 6A) is the driver gene related to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). In order to provide more biological insights into KDM6A, in this paper, we treat PPI (protein-protein interaction) network derived from KDM6A as a conceptual framework and follow it to review its biological function. Method. We constructed a PPI network with Cytoscape software and performed clustering of network with Clust&See. Then, we evaluate the pathways, which are statistically involved in the network derived from KDM6A. Lastly, gene ontology analysis of clusters of genes in the network was conducted. Result. The network includes three clusters that consist of 74 nodes connected via 453 edges. Fifty-five pathways are statistically involved in the network and most of them are functionally related to the processes of cell cycle, gene expression, and carcinogenesis. The biology themes of clusters 1, 2, and 3 are chromatin modification, regulation of gene expression by transcription factor complex, and control of cell cycle, respectively. Conclusion. The PPI network presents a panoramic view which can facilitate for us to understand the function role of KDM6A. It is a helpful way by network approach to perform system review on a certain gene. PMID:27294188

  6. Functionally relevant diversity of closely related Nitrospira in activated sludge

    PubMed Central

    Gruber-Dorninger, Christiane; Pester, Michael; Kitzinger, Katharina; Savio, Domenico F; Loy, Alexander; Rattei, Thomas; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Nitrospira are chemolithoautotrophic nitrite-oxidizing bacteria that catalyze the second step of nitrification in most oxic habitats and are important for excess nitrogen removal from sewage in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). To date, little is known about their diversity and ecological niche partitioning within complex communities. In this study, the fine-scale community structure and function of Nitrospira was analyzed in two full-scale WWTPs as model ecosystems. In Nitrospira-specific 16S rRNA clone libraries retrieved from each plant, closely related phylogenetic clusters (16S rRNA identities between clusters ranged from 95.8% to 99.6%) within Nitrospira lineages I and II were found. Newly designed probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed the specific detection of several of these clusters, whose coexistence in the WWTPs was shown for prolonged periods of several years. In situ ecophysiological analyses based on FISH, relative abundance and spatial arrangement quantification, as well as microautoradiography revealed functional differences of these Nitrospira clusters regarding the preferred nitrite concentration, the utilization of formate as substrate and the spatial coaggregation with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria as symbiotic partners. Amplicon pyrosequencing of the nxrB gene, which encodes subunit beta of nitrite oxidoreductase of Nitrospira, revealed in one of the WWTPs as many as 121 species-level nxrB operational taxonomic units with highly uneven relative abundances in the amplicon library. These results show a previously unrecognized high diversity of Nitrospira in engineered systems, which is at least partially linked to niche differentiation and may have important implications for process stability. PMID:25148481

  7. Functionally relevant diversity of closely related Nitrospira in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Gruber-Dorninger, Christiane; Pester, Michael; Kitzinger, Katharina; Savio, Domenico F; Loy, Alexander; Rattei, Thomas; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2015-03-01

    Nitrospira are chemolithoautotrophic nitrite-oxidizing bacteria that catalyze the second step of nitrification in most oxic habitats and are important for excess nitrogen removal from sewage in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). To date, little is known about their diversity and ecological niche partitioning within complex communities. In this study, the fine-scale community structure and function of Nitrospira was analyzed in two full-scale WWTPs as model ecosystems. In Nitrospira-specific 16S rRNA clone libraries retrieved from each plant, closely related phylogenetic clusters (16S rRNA identities between clusters ranged from 95.8% to 99.6%) within Nitrospira lineages I and II were found. Newly designed probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed the specific detection of several of these clusters, whose coexistence in the WWTPs was shown for prolonged periods of several years. In situ ecophysiological analyses based on FISH, relative abundance and spatial arrangement quantification, as well as microautoradiography revealed functional differences of these Nitrospira clusters regarding the preferred nitrite concentration, the utilization of formate as substrate and the spatial coaggregation with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria as symbiotic partners. Amplicon pyrosequencing of the nxrB gene, which encodes subunit beta of nitrite oxidoreductase of Nitrospira, revealed in one of the WWTPs as many as 121 species-level nxrB operational taxonomic units with highly uneven relative abundances in the amplicon library. These results show a previously unrecognized high diversity of Nitrospira in engineered systems, which is at least partially linked to niche differentiation and may have important implications for process stability. PMID:25148481

  8. g:Profiler-a web server for functional interpretation of gene lists (2016 update).

    PubMed

    Reimand, Jüri; Arak, Tambet; Adler, Priit; Kolberg, Liis; Reisberg, Sulev; Peterson, Hedi; Vilo, Jaak

    2016-07-01

    Functional enrichment analysis is a key step in interpreting gene lists discovered in diverse high-throughput experiments. g:Profiler studies flat and ranked gene lists and finds statistically significant Gene Ontology terms, pathways and other gene function related terms. Translation of hundreds of gene identifiers is another core feature of g:Profiler. Since its first publication in 2007, our web server has become a popular tool of choice among basic and translational researchers. Timeliness is a major advantage of g:Profiler as genome and pathway information is synchronized with the Ensembl database in quarterly updates. g:Profiler supports 213 species including mammals and other vertebrates, plants, insects and fungi. The 2016 update of g:Profiler introduces several novel features. We have added further functional datasets to interpret gene lists, including transcription factor binding site predictions, Mendelian disease annotations, information about protein expression and complexes and gene mappings of human genetic polymorphisms. Besides the interactive web interface, g:Profiler can be accessed in computational pipelines using our R package, Python interface and BioJS component. g:Profiler is freely available at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gprofiler/.

  9. g:Profiler-a web server for functional interpretation of gene lists (2016 update).

    PubMed

    Reimand, Jüri; Arak, Tambet; Adler, Priit; Kolberg, Liis; Reisberg, Sulev; Peterson, Hedi; Vilo, Jaak

    2016-07-01

    Functional enrichment analysis is a key step in interpreting gene lists discovered in diverse high-throughput experiments. g:Profiler studies flat and ranked gene lists and finds statistically significant Gene Ontology terms, pathways and other gene function related terms. Translation of hundreds of gene identifiers is another core feature of g:Profiler. Since its first publication in 2007, our web server has become a popular tool of choice among basic and translational researchers. Timeliness is a major advantage of g:Profiler as genome and pathway information is synchronized with the Ensembl database in quarterly updates. g:Profiler supports 213 species including mammals and other vertebrates, plants, insects and fungi. The 2016 update of g:Profiler introduces several novel features. We have added further functional datasets to interpret gene lists, including transcription factor binding site predictions, Mendelian disease annotations, information about protein expression and complexes and gene mappings of human genetic polymorphisms. Besides the interactive web interface, g:Profiler can be accessed in computational pipelines using our R package, Python interface and BioJS component. g:Profiler is freely available at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gprofiler/. PMID:27098042

  10. g:Profiler—a web server for functional interpretation of gene lists (2016 update)

    PubMed Central

    Reimand, Jüri; Arak, Tambet; Adler, Priit; Kolberg, Liis; Reisberg, Sulev; Peterson, Hedi; Vilo, Jaak

    2016-01-01

    Functional enrichment analysis is a key step in interpreting gene lists discovered in diverse high-throughput experiments. g:Profiler studies flat and ranked gene lists and finds statistically significant Gene Ontology terms, pathways and other gene function related terms. Translation of hundreds of gene identifiers is another core feature of g:Profiler. Since its first publication in 2007, our web server has become a popular tool of choice among basic and translational researchers. Timeliness is a major advantage of g:Profiler as genome and pathway information is synchronized with the Ensembl database in quarterly updates. g:Profiler supports 213 species including mammals and other vertebrates, plants, insects and fungi. The 2016 update of g:Profiler introduces several novel features. We have added further functional datasets to interpret gene lists, including transcription factor binding site predictions, Mendelian disease annotations, information about protein expression and complexes and gene mappings of human genetic polymorphisms. Besides the interactive web interface, g:Profiler can be accessed in computational pipelines using our R package, Python interface and BioJS component. g:Profiler is freely available at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gprofiler/. PMID:27098042

  11. GeneWeaver: a web-based system for integrative functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Baker, Erich J; Jay, Jeremy J; Bubier, Jason A; Langston, Michael A; Chesler, Elissa J

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput genome technologies have produced a wealth of data on the association of genes and gene products to biological functions. Investigators have discovered value in combining their experimental results with published genome-wide association studies, quantitative trait locus, microarray, RNA-sequencing and mutant phenotyping studies to identify gene-function associations across diverse experiments, species, conditions, behaviors or biological processes. These experimental results are typically derived from disparate data repositories, publication supplements or reconstructions from primary data stores. This leaves bench biologists with the complex and unscalable task of integrating data by identifying and gathering relevant studies, reanalyzing primary data, unifying gene identifiers and applying ad hoc computational analysis to the integrated set. The freely available GeneWeaver (http://www.GeneWeaver.org) powered by the Ontological Discovery Environment is a curated repository of genomic experimental results with an accompanying tool set for dynamic integration of these data sets, enabling users to interactively address questions about sets of biological functions and their relations to sets of genes. Thus, large numbers of independently published genomic results can be organized into new conceptual frameworks driven by the underlying, inferred biological relationships rather than a pre-existing semantic framework. An empirical 'ontology' is discovered from the aggregate of experimental knowledge around user-defined areas of biological inquiry.

  12. Interspecies variations in Bordetella catecholamine receptor gene regulation and function.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Timothy J; Suhadolc, Ryan J; Armstrong, Sandra K

    2015-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins. PMID:26371128

  13. Interspecies Variations in Bordetella Catecholamine Receptor Gene Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, Timothy J.; Suhadolc, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins. PMID:26371128

  14. Interspecies variations in Bordetella catecholamine receptor gene regulation and function.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Timothy J; Suhadolc, Ryan J; Armstrong, Sandra K

    2015-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins.

  15. Gene annotation and functional analysis of a newly sequenced Synechococcus strain.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Rao, N N; Yang, Y; Zhang, Y; Gu, Y N

    2015-10-16

    Synechococcus sp PCC 7336 represents a newly sequenced strain, and its genome is obviously different from that of other Synechococcus strains. In this analysis, local alignment and annotation databases were constructed and combined with various bioinformatic tools to carry out gene annotation and functional analysis of this strain. From this analysis, we identified 5096 protein-coding genes and 47 RNA genes. Of these, 116 genes that were classified into 9 categories were associated with photosynthesis, and type V polymerase proteins that were identified are unique for this strain. An additional 107 genes were closely related to signal transduction pathways, which primarily comprised parts of two-component regulatory systems. Gene ontogeny analysis showed that 2377 genes were annotated with a total number of 9791 functional categories, and specifically that 41 genes distributed in 4 protein complexes were involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Clusters of orthologous groups classification showed that there were 1463 homologous proteins associated with 17 specific metabolic pathways, and that most of the proteins participated in primary metabolic processes such as binding and catalysis. The phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA sequences indicated that Synechococcus PCC 7336 is highly likely to represent a new branch.

  16. Expression profiling of functional genes in prenatal skeletal muscle tissue in Duroc and Pietrain pigs.

    PubMed

    Davoli, R; Braglia, S; Russo, V; Varona, L; te Pas, M F W

    2011-02-01

    In livestock, skeletal muscle is a tissue of major economic importance for meat production and muscle mass is largely determined during the prenatal period by the number and the size of muscle fibres. The understanding of gene expression changes during prenatal pig muscle development is still limited. In this study, genes identified as differentially expressed in a previous microarray research and chosen for the function of the coded protein as putative candidate involved in myogenesis were considered to analyse their expression profile during foetal growth of Duroc and Pietrain pigs. The eleven genes were considered by real-time PCR for a time-course evaluation of the transcription level at six stages of prenatal longissimus dorsi development. The results suggest that the most relevant variations in mRNA levels of the analysed genes seem to follow temporal waves of gene expression. Significant changes of transcription were observed at 21-35 and 63-91 days, the two main phases of skeletal muscle development. During the early phases of Pietrain embryos' development, 10 of the 11 genes showed an induction. In Duroc embryos, a second phase of gene up-regulation can be identified in the phase 63-77 days. These results provide new data on developmental changes of expression profile of 11 genes involved in different functional pathways related to prenatal myogenic processes in Duroc and Pietrain pigs.

  17. Inference of gene function based on gene fusion events: the rosetta-stone method.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Karsten

    2007-01-01

    The method described in this chapter can be used to infer putative functional links between two proteins. The basic idea is based on the principle of "guilt by association." It is assumed that two proteins, which are found to be transcribed by a single transcript in one (or several) genomes are likely to be functionally linked, for example by acting in a same metabolic pathway or by forming a multiprotein complex. This method is of particular interest for studying genes that exhibit no, or only remote, homologies with already well-characterized proteins. Combined with other non-homology based methods, gene fusion events may yield valuable information for hypothesis building on protein function, and may guide experimental characterization of the target protein, for example by suggesting potential ligands or binding partners. This chapter uses the FusionDB database (http://www.igs.cnrs-mrs.fr/FusionDB/) as source of information. FusionDB provides a characterization of a large number of gene fusion events at hand of multiple sequence alignments. Orthologous genes are included to yield a comprehensive view of the structure of a gene fusion event. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction is provided to evaluate the history of a gene fusion event, and three-dimensional protein structure information is used, where available, to further characterize the nature of the gene fusion. For genes that are not comprised in FusionDB, some instructions are given as how to generate a similar type of information, based solely on publicly available web tools that are listed here.

  18. Baculoviruses deficient in ie1 gene function abrogate viral gene expression in transduced mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Efrose, Rodica; Swevers, Luc; Iatrou, Kostas

    2010-10-25

    One of the newest niches for baculoviruses-based technologies is their use as vectors for mammalian cell transduction and gene therapy applications. However, an outstanding safety issue related to such use is the residual expression of viral genes in infected mammalian cells. Here we show that infectious baculoviruses lacking the major transcriptional regulator, IE1, can be produced in insect host cells stably transformed with IE1 expression constructs lacking targets of homologous recombination that could promote the generation of wt-like revertants. Such ie1-deficient baculoviruses are unable to direct viral gene transcription to any appreciable degree and do not replicate in normal insect host cells. Most importantly, the residual viral gene expression, which occurs in mammalian cells infected with wt baculoviruses is reduced 10 to 100 fold in cells infected with ie1-deficient baculoviruses. Thus, ie1-deficient baculoviruses offer enhanced safety features to baculovirus-based vector systems destined for use in gene therapy applications.

  19. Guidelines for the functional annotation of microRNAs using the Gene Ontology.

    PubMed

    Huntley, Rachael P; Sitnikov, Dmitry; Orlic-Milacic, Marija; Balakrishnan, Rama; D'Eustachio, Peter; Gillespie, Marc E; Howe, Doug; Kalea, Anastasia Z; Maegdefessel, Lars; Osumi-Sutherland, David; Petri, Victoria; Smith, Jennifer R; Van Auken, Kimberly; Wood, Valerie; Zampetaki, Anna; Mayr, Manuel; Lovering, Ruth C

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNA regulation of developmental and cellular processes is a relatively new field of study, and the available research data have not been organized to enable its inclusion in pathway and network analysis tools. The association of gene products with terms from the Gene Ontology is an effective method to analyze functional data, but until recently there has been no substantial effort dedicated to applying Gene Ontology terms to microRNAs. Consequently, when performing functional analysis of microRNA data sets, researchers have had to rely instead on the functional annotations associated with the genes encoding microRNA targets. In consultation with experts in the field of microRNA research, we have created comprehensive recommendations for the Gene Ontology curation of microRNAs. This curation manual will enable provision of a high-quality, reliable set of functional annotations for the advancement of microRNA research. Here we describe the key aspects of the work, including development of the Gene Ontology to represent this data, standards for describing the data, and guidelines to support curators making these annotations. The full microRNA curation guidelines are available on the GO Consortium wiki (http://wiki.geneontology.org/index.php/MicroRNA_GO_annotation_manual).

  20. Guidelines for the functional annotation of microRNAs using the Gene Ontology

    PubMed Central

    D'Eustachio, Peter; Smith, Jennifer R.; Zampetaki, Anna

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA regulation of developmental and cellular processes is a relatively new field of study, and the available research data have not been organized to enable its inclusion in pathway and network analysis tools. The association of gene products with terms from the Gene Ontology is an effective method to analyze functional data, but until recently there has been no substantial effort dedicated to applying Gene Ontology terms to microRNAs. Consequently, when performing functional analysis of microRNA data sets, researchers have had to rely instead on the functional annotations associated with the genes encoding microRNA targets. In consultation with experts in the field of microRNA research, we have created comprehensive recommendations for the Gene Ontology curation of microRNAs. This curation manual will enable provision of a high-quality, reliable set of functional annotations for the advancement of microRNA research. Here we describe the key aspects of the work, including development of the Gene Ontology to represent this data, standards for describing the data, and guidelines to support curators making these annotations. The full microRNA curation guidelines are available on the GO Consortium wiki (http://wiki.geneontology.org/index.php/MicroRNA_GO_annotation_manual). PMID:26917558

  1. Guidelines for the functional annotation of microRNAs using the Gene Ontology.

    PubMed

    Huntley, Rachael P; Sitnikov, Dmitry; Orlic-Milacic, Marija; Balakrishnan, Rama; D'Eustachio, Peter; Gillespie, Marc E; Howe, Doug; Kalea, Anastasia Z; Maegdefessel, Lars; Osumi-Sutherland, David; Petri, Victoria; Smith, Jennifer R; Van Auken, Kimberly; Wood, Valerie; Zampetaki, Anna; Mayr, Manuel; Lovering, Ruth C

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNA regulation of developmental and cellular processes is a relatively new field of study, and the available research data have not been organized to enable its inclusion in pathway and network analysis tools. The association of gene products with terms from the Gene Ontology is an effective method to analyze functional data, but until recently there has been no substantial effort dedicated to applying Gene Ontology terms to microRNAs. Consequently, when performing functional analysis of microRNA data sets, researchers have had to rely instead on the functional annotations associated with the genes encoding microRNA targets. In consultation with experts in the field of microRNA research, we have created comprehensive recommendations for the Gene Ontology curation of microRNAs. This curation manual will enable provision of a high-quality, reliable set of functional annotations for the advancement of microRNA research. Here we describe the key aspects of the work, including development of the Gene Ontology to represent this data, standards for describing the data, and guidelines to support curators making these annotations. The full microRNA curation guidelines are available on the GO Consortium wiki (http://wiki.geneontology.org/index.php/MicroRNA_GO_annotation_manual). PMID:26917558

  2. Identifying novel genes and chemicals related to nasopharyngeal cancer in a heterogeneous network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhandong; An, Lifeng; Li, Hao; Wang, ShaoPeng; Zhou, You; Yuan, Fei; Li, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal cancer or nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is the most common cancer originating in the nasopharynx. The factors that induce nasopharyngeal cancer are still not clear. Additional information about the chemicals or genes related to nasopharyngeal cancer will promote a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this cancer and the factors that induce it. Thus, a computational method NPC-RGCP was proposed in this study to identify the possible relevant chemicals and genes based on the presently known chemicals and genes related to nasopharyngeal cancer. To extensively utilize the functional associations between proteins and chemicals, a heterogeneous network was constructed based on interactions of proteins and chemicals. The NPC-RGCP included two stages: the searching stage and the screening stage. The former stage is for finding new possible genes and chemicals in the heterogeneous network, while the latter stage is for screening and removing false discoveries and selecting the core genes and chemicals. As a result, five putative genes, CXCR3, IRF1, CDK1, GSTP1, and CDH2, and seven putative chemicals, iron, propionic acid, dimethyl sulfoxide, isopropanol, erythrose 4-phosphate, β-D-Fructose 6-phosphate, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, were identified by NPC-RGCP. Extensive analyses provided confirmation that the putative genes and chemicals have significant associations with nasopharyngeal cancer. PMID:27149165

  3. Expression of mitochondria-related genes is elevated in overfeeding-induced goose fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Osman, Rashid H; Shao, Dan; Liu, Long; Xia, Lili; Sun, Xiaoxian; Zheng, Yun; Wang, Laidi; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Yihui; Zhang, Jun; Gong, Daoqing; Geng, Tuoyu

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrion, the power house of the cell, is an important organelle involving in energy homeostasis. Change in mitochondrial mass and function may lead to metabolic disorders. Previous studies indicate that mitochondrial mass loss and dysfunction are associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in human and mouse. However, it is unclear whether mitochondrial genes are involved in the development of goose fatty liver. To address this, we determined the response of goose mitochondrial genes to overfeeding and other fatty liver-related factors (e.g., hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and hyperlipidemia). We first employed RNA-seq technology to determine the differentially expressed genes in the livers from normally-fed vs. overfed geese, followed by bioinformatics analysis and quantitative PCR validation. Data indicated that a majority of mitochondrial genes in the liver were induced by overfeeding. To understand how these genes are regulated in the context of fatty liver, we treated goose primary hepatocytes with high levels of glucose, fatty acids and insulin. The results indicated that these factors had an influence on the expression of some mitochondria related genes. Together, these findings suggest that the induction of mitochondrial gene expression by overfeeding is required for the development of goose fatty liver, and this induction is partially attributable to hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and hyperinsulinemia.

  4. Transcriptional regulation of genes related to progesterone production.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Tetsuya; Ishikane, Shin; Kawabe, Shinya; Umezawa, Akihiro; Miyamoto, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormones are synthesized from cholesterol in various tissues, mainly in the adrenal glands and gonads. Because these lipid-soluble steroid hormones immediately diffuse through the cells in which they are produced, their secretion directly reflects the activity of the genes related to their production. Progesterone is important not only for luteinization and maintenance of pregnancy, but also as a substrate for most other steroids. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ(5)-Δ(4) isomerase (3β-HSD) are well-known proteins essential for progesterone production. In addition to them, glutathione S-transferase A1-1 and A3-3 are shown to exert Δ(5)-Δ(4) isomerization activity to produce progesterone in a cooperative fashion with 3β-HSD. 5-Aminolevulinic acid synthase 1, ferredoxin 1, and ferredoxin reductase also play a role in steroidogenesis as accessory factors. Members of the nuclear receptor 5A (NR5A) family (steroidogenic factor 1 and liver receptor homolog 1) play a crucial role in the transcriptional regulation of these genes. The NR5A family activates these genes by binding to NR5A responsive elements present within their promoter regions, as well as to the elements far from their promoters. In addition, various NR5A-interacting proteins including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 1 (DAX-1), and CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP) are involved in the transcription of NR5A target genes and regulate the transcription either positively or negatively under both basal and tropic hormone-stimulated conditions. In this review, we describe the transcriptional regulation of genes related to progesterone production. PMID:26135521

  5. The Spatial Distribution of Nitrogen Removal Functional Genes in Multimedia Constructed Wetlands for Wastewater Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ji, Guodong; He, Chunguang; Tan, Yufei; Yang, Zhonghua

    2015-11-01

    The real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantitatively evaluate distribution patterns and nitrogen removal pathways of the amoA, nxrA, narG, napA, nirK, qnorB, nosZ, nas, and nifH genes and 16S rRNA in anaerobic ammonia oxidation bacteria in four multimedia constructed wetlands for rural wastewater treatment. The results indicated that the abundance of functional genes for nitrogen removal in the rhizosphere layer (0 to 30 cm), water distribution layer (30 to 50 cm), multime filler layer (50 to 130 cm), and catchment layer (130 to 170 cm) of the constructed wetlands were closely related. The rhizosphere layer was conducive to the absolute enrichment of dominant genes. The other three layers were favorable to the relative enrichment of rare genes. PMID:26564582

  6. The Spatial Distribution of Nitrogen Removal Functional Genes in Multimedia Constructed Wetlands for Wastewater Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ji, Guodong; He, Chunguang; Tan, Yufei; Yang, Zhonghua

    2015-11-01

    The real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantitatively evaluate distribution patterns and nitrogen removal pathways of the amoA, nxrA, narG, napA, nirK, qnorB, nosZ, nas, and nifH genes and 16S rRNA in anaerobic ammonia oxidation bacteria in four multimedia constructed wetlands for rural wastewater treatment. The results indicated that the abundance of functional genes for nitrogen removal in the rhizosphere layer (0 to 30 cm), water distribution layer (30 to 50 cm), multime filler layer (50 to 130 cm), and catchment layer (130 to 170 cm) of the constructed wetlands were closely related. The rhizosphere layer was conducive to the absolute enrichment of dominant genes. The other three layers were favorable to the relative enrichment of rare genes.

  7. Fungal genes related to calcium homeostasis and signalling are upregulated in symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhiza interactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne; Arnould, Christine; Wipf, Daniel; Zhao, Bin; van Tuinen, Diederik

    2013-01-01

    Fluctuations in intracellular calcium levels generate signalling events and regulate different cellular processes. Whilst the implication of Ca(2+) in plant responses during arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) interactions is well documented, nothing is known about the regulation or role of this secondary messenger in the fungal symbiont. The spatio-temporal expression pattern of putatively Ca(2+)-related genes of Glomus intraradices BEG141 encoding five proteins involved in membrane transport and one nuclear protein kinase, was investigated during the AM symbiosis. Expression profiles related to successful colonization of host roots were observed in interactions of G. intraradices with roots of wild-type Medicago truncatula (line J5) compared to the mycorrhiza-defective mutant dmi3/Mtsym13. Symbiotic fungal activity was monitored using stearoyl-CoA desaturase and phosphate transporter genes. Laser microdissection based-mapping of fungal gene expression in mycorrhizal root tissues indicated that the Ca(2+)-related genes were differentially upregulated in arbuscules and/or in intercellular hyphae. The spatio-temporal variations in gene expression suggest that the encoded proteins may have different functions in fungal development or function during symbiosis development. Full-length cDNA obtained for two genes with interesting expression profiles confirmed a close similarity with an endoplasmic reticulum P-type ATPase and a Vcx1-like vacuolar Ca(2+) ion transporter functionally characterized in other fungi and involved in the regulation of cell calcium pools. Possible mechanisms are discussed in which Ca(2+)-related proteins G. intraradices BEG141 may play a role in mobilization and perception of the intracellular messenger by the AM fungus during symbiotic interactions with host roots.

  8. Family expansion and gene rearrangements contributed to the functional specialization of PRDM genes in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Fumasoni, Irene; Meani, Natalia; Rambaldi, Davide; Scafetta, Gaia; Alcalay, Myriam; Ciccarelli, Francesca D

    2007-01-01

    Background Progressive diversification of paralogs after gene expansion is essential to increase their functional specialization. However, mode and tempo of this divergence remain mostly unclear. Here we report the comparative analysis of PRDM genes, a family of putative transcriptional regulators involved in human tumorigenesis. Results Our analysis assessed that the PRDM genes originated in metazoans, expanded in vertebrates and further duplicated in primates. We experimentally showed that fast-evolving paralogs are poorly expressed, and that the most recent duplicates, such as primate-specific PRDM7, acquire tissue-specificity. PRDM7 underwent major structural rearrangements that decreased the number of encoded Zn-Fingers and modified gene splicing. Through internal duplication and activation of a non-canonical splice site (GC-AG), PRDM7 can acquire a novel intron. We also detected an alternative isoform that can retain the intron in the mature transcript and that is predominantly expressed in human melanocytes. Conclusion Our findings show that (a) molecular evolution of paralogs correlates with their expression pattern; (b) gene diversification is obtained through massive genomic rearrangements; and (c) splicing modification contributes to the functional specialization of novel genes. PMID:17916234

  9. HuMiChip: Development of a Functional Gene Array for the Study of Human Microbiomes

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Q.; Deng, Ye; Lin, Lu; Hemme, Chris L.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Microbiomes play very important roles in terms of nutrition, health and disease by interacting with their hosts. Based on sequence data currently available in public domains, we have developed a functional gene array to monitor both organismal and functional gene profiles of normal microbiota in human and mouse hosts, and such an array is called human and mouse microbiota array, HMM-Chip. First, seed sequences were identified from KEGG databases, and used to construct a seed database (seedDB) containing 136 gene families in 19 metabolic pathways closely related to human and mouse microbiomes. Second, a mother database (motherDB) was constructed with 81 genomes of bacterial strains with 54 from gut and 27 from oral environments, and 16 metagenomes, and used for selection of genes and probe design. Gene prediction was performed by Glimmer3 for bacterial genomes, and by the Metagene program for metagenomes. In total, 228,240 and 801,599 genes were identified for bacterial genomes and metagenomes, respectively. Then the motherDB was searched against the seedDB using the HMMer program, and gene sequences in the motherDB that were highly homologous with seed sequences in the seedDB were used for probe design by the CommOligo software. Different degrees of specific probes, including gene-specific, inclusive and exclusive group-specific probes were selected. All candidate probes were checked against the motherDB and NCBI databases for specificity. Finally, 7,763 probes covering 91.2percent (12,601 out of 13,814) HMMer confirmed sequences from 75 bacterial genomes and 16 metagenomes were selected. This developed HMM-Chip is able to detect the diversity and abundance of functional genes, the gene expression of microbial communities, and potentially, the interactions of microorganisms and their hosts.

  10. Combinatorial Gene Regulatory Functions Underlie Ultraconserved Elements in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Warnefors, Maria; Hartmann, Britta; Thomsen, Stefan; Alonso, Claudio R.

    2016-01-01

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) are discrete genomic elements conserved across large evolutionary distances. Although UCEs have been linked to multiple facets of mammalian gene regulation their extreme evolutionary conservation remains largely unexplained. Here, we apply a computational approach to investigate this question in Drosophila, exploring the molecular functions of more than 1,500 UCEs shared across the genomes of 12 Drosophila species. Our data indicate that Drosophila UCEs are hubs for gene regulatory functions and suggest that UCE sequence invariance originates from their combinatorial roles in gene control. We also note that the gene regulatory roles of intronic and intergenic UCEs (iUCEs) are distinct from those found in exonic UCEs (eUCEs). In iUCEs, transcription factor (TF) and epigenetic factor binding data strongly support iUCE roles in transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. In contrast, analyses of eUCEs indicate that they are two orders of magnitude more likely than the expected to simultaneously include protein-coding sequence, TF-binding sites, splice sites, and RNA editing sites but have reduced roles in transcriptional or epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, we use a Drosophila cell culture system and transgenic Drosophila embryos to validate the notion of UCE combinatorial regulatory roles using an eUCE within the Hox gene Ultrabithorax and show that its protein-coding region also contains alternative splicing regulatory information. Taken together our experiments indicate that UCEs emerge as a result of combinatorial gene regulatory roles and highlight common features in mammalian and insect UCEs implying that similar processes might underlie ultraconservation in diverse animal taxa. PMID:27247329

  11. Combinatorial Gene Regulatory Functions Underlie Ultraconserved Elements in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Warnefors, Maria; Hartmann, Britta; Thomsen, Stefan; Alonso, Claudio R

    2016-09-01

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) are discrete genomic elements conserved across large evolutionary distances. Although UCEs have been linked to multiple facets of mammalian gene regulation their extreme evolutionary conservation remains largely unexplained. Here, we apply a computational approach to investigate this question in Drosophila, exploring the molecular functions of more than 1,500 UCEs shared across the genomes of 12 Drosophila species. Our data indicate that Drosophila UCEs are hubs for gene regulatory functions and suggest that UCE sequence invariance originates from their combinatorial roles in gene control. We also note that the gene regulatory roles of intronic and intergenic UCEs (iUCEs) are distinct from those found in exonic UCEs (eUCEs). In iUCEs, transcription factor (TF) and epigenetic factor binding data strongly support iUCE roles in transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. In contrast, analyses of eUCEs indicate that they are two orders of magnitude more likely than the expected to simultaneously include protein-coding sequence, TF-binding sites, splice sites, and RNA editing sites but have reduced roles in transcriptional or epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, we use a Drosophila cell culture system and transgenic Drosophila embryos to validate the notion of UCE combinatorial regulatory roles using an eUCE within the Hox gene Ultrabithorax and show that its protein-coding region also contains alternative splicing regulatory information. Taken together our experiments indicate that UCEs emerge as a result of combinatorial gene regulatory roles and highlight common features in mammalian and insect UCEs implying that similar processes might underlie ultraconservation in diverse animal taxa. PMID:27247329

  12. Transcription Profile of Aging and Cognition-Related Genes in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ianov, Lara; Rani, Asha; Beas, Blanca S.; Kumar, Ashok; Foster, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive function depends on transcription; however, there is little information linking altered gene expression to impaired prefrontal cortex function during aging. Young and aged F344 rats were characterized on attentional set shift and spatial memory tasks. Transcriptional differences associated with age and cognition were examined using RNA sequencing to construct transcriptomic profiles for the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), white matter, and region CA1 of the hippocampus. The results indicate regional differences in vulnerability to aging. Age-related gene expression in the mPFC was similar to, though less robust than, changes in the dorsolateral PFC of aging humans suggesting that aging processes may be similar. Importantly, the pattern of transcription associated with aging did not predict cognitive decline. Rather, increased mPFC expression of genes involved in regulation of transcription, including transcription factors that regulate the strength of excitatory and inhibitory inputs, and neural activity-related immediate-early genes was observed in aged animals that exhibit delayed set shift behavior. The specificity of impairment on a mPFC-dependent task, associated with a particular mPFC transcriptional profile indicates that impaired executive function involves altered transcriptional regulation and neural activity/plasticity processes that are distinct from that described for impaired hippocampal function. PMID:27242522

  13. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Gene E.; Jakobsson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for social organization

  14. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Robinson, Gene E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for social organization

  15. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Robinson, Gene E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for social organization.

  16. Functional conservation of the promoter regions of vertebrate tyrosinase genes.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Tanaka, M; Miura, H; Ikeo, K; Gojobori, T; Takeuchi, T; Yamamoto, H

    2001-11-01

    Tyrosinase is the key enzyme for synthesizing melanin pigments, which primarily determine mammalian skin coloration. Considering the important roles of pigments in the evolution and the adaptation of vertebrates, phylogenetic changes in the coding and flanking regulatory sequences of the tyrosinase gene are particularly intriguing. We have now cloned cDNA encoding tyrosinase from Japanese quail and snapping turtle. These nonmammalian cDNA are highly homologous to those of the mouse and human tyrosinases, whereas the 5' flanking sequences are far less conserved except for a few short sequence motifs. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that the 5' flanking sequences from the quail or turtle tyrosinase genes are capable of directing the expression of a fused mouse tyrosinase cDNA when introduced into cultured mouse albino melanocytes. This experimental method, which reveals the functional conservation of regulatory sequences in one cell type (the melanocyte), may be utilized to evaluate phylogenetic differences in mechanisms controlling specific gene expression in many other types of cells. We also provide evidence that the 5' flanking sequences from these nonmammalian genes are functional in vivo by producing transgenic mice. Phylogenetic changes of vertebrate tyrosinase promoters and the possible involvement of conserved sequence motifs in melanocyte-specific expression of tyrosinase are discussed. PMID:11764277

  17. Expression and interaction analysis of Arabidopsis Skp1-related genes.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoki; Kuroda, Hirofumi; Kuromori, Takashi; Hirayama, Takashi; Seki, Motoaki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Shimada, Hiroaki; Matsui, Minami

    2004-01-01

    Specific protein degradation has been observed in several aspects of development and differentiation in many organisms. One example of such proteolysis is regulated by protein polyubiquitination that is promoted by the SCF complex consisting of Skp1, cullin, and an F-box protein. We examined the activities of the Arabidopsis Skp1-related proteins (ASKs). Among 19 annotated ASK genes, we isolated 16 of the corresponding cDNAs (ASK1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19), and examined their gene products for interactions with 24 representatives of F-box proteins carrying various classes of the C-terminal domains using the yeast two-hybrid system. As a result, we found diverse binding specificities: ASK1, ASK2, ASK11 and ASK12 interacted well with COI1, FKF1, UFO-like protein, LRR-containing F-box proteins, and other F-box proteins with unknown C-terminal motifs. We also observed specific interaction between F-box proteins and ASK3, ASK9, ASK13, ASK14, ASK16 and ASK18. In contrast, we detected no interaction between any of the 12 ASK proteins and F-box proteins containing CRFA, CRFB or CRFC domains. Both histochemical and RT-PCR analysis of eight ASK genes expression revealed unique expression patterns for the respective genes. PMID:14749489

  18. Relating protein adduction to gene expression changes: a systems approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bing; Shi, Zhiao; Duncan, Dexter T; Prodduturi, Naresh; Marnett, Lawrence J; Liebler, Daniel C

    2013-01-01

    Modification of proteins by reactive electrophiles such as the 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) plays a critical role in oxidant-associated human diseases. However, little is known about protein adduction and the mechanism by which protein damage elicits adaptive effects and toxicity. We developed a systems approach for relating protein adduction to gene expression changes through the integration of protein adduction, gene expression, protein-DNA interaction, and protein-protein interaction data. Using a random walk strategy, we expanded a list of responsive transcription factors inferred from gene expression studies to upstream signaling networks, which in turn allowed overlaying protein adduction data on the network for the prediction of stress sensors and their associated regulatory mechanisms. We demonstrated the general applicability of transcription factor-based signaling network inference using 103 known pathways. Applying our workflow on gene expression and protein adduction data from HNE-treatment not only rediscovered known mechanisms of electrophile stress but also generated novel hypotheses regarding protein damage sensors. Although developed for analyzing protein adduction data, the framework can be easily adapted for phosphoproteomics and other types of protein modification data. PMID:21594272

  19. Molecular cloning of allelopathy related genes and their relation to HHO in Eupatorium adenophorum.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huiming; Pei, Xixiang; Wan, Fanghao; Cheng, Hongmei

    2011-10-01

    In this study, conserved sequence regions of HMGR, DXR, and CHS (encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase and chalcone synthase, respectively) were amplified by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR from Eupatorium adenophorum. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the expression of CHS was related to the level of HHO, an allelochemical isolated from E. adenophorum. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that there was no significant difference in expression of genes among three different tissues, except for CHS. Southern blotting indicated that at least three CHS genes are present in the E. adenophorum genome. A full-length cDNA from CHS genes (named EaCHS1, GenBank ID: FJ913888) was cloned. The 1,455 bp cDNA contained an open reading frame (1,206 bp) encoding a protein of 401 amino acids. Preliminary bioinformatics analysis of EaCHS1 revealed that EaCHS1 was a member of CHS family, the subcellular localization predicted that EaCHS1 was a cytoplasmic protein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of conserved sequences of these genes and of a full-length EaCHS1 gene in E. adenophorum. The results indicated that CHS gene is related to allelopathy of E. adenophorum.

  20. Gene-Specific Function Prediction for Non-Synonymous Mutations in Monogenic Diabetes Genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quan; Liu, Xiaoming; Gibbs, Richard A.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Polychronakos, Constantin; Qu, Hui-Qi

    2014-01-01

    The rapid progress of genomic technologies has been providing new opportunities to address the need of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) molecular diagnosis. However, whether a new mutation causes MODY can be questionable. A number of in silico methods have been developed to predict functional effects of rare human mutations. The purpose of this study is to compare the performance of different bioinformatics methods in the functional prediction of nonsynonymous mutations in each MODY gene, and provides reference matrices to assist the molecular diagnosis of MODY. Our study showed that the prediction scores by different methods of the diabetes mutations were highly correlated, but were more complimentary than replacement to each other. The available in silico methods for the prediction of diabetes mutations had varied performances across different genes. Applying gene-specific thresholds defined by this study may be able to increase the performance of in silico prediction of disease-causing mutations. PMID:25136813

  1. Ascorbate peroxidase-related (APx-R) is not a duplicable gene

    PubMed Central

    Dunand, Christophe; Mathé, Catherine; Lazzarotto, Fernanda; Margis, Rogério; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    Phylogenetic, genomic and functional analyses have allowed the identification of a new class of putative heme peroxidases, so called APx-R (APx-Related). These new class, mainly present in the green lineage (including green algae and land plants), can also be detected in other unicellular chloroplastic organisms. Except for recent polyploid organisms, only single-copy of APx-R gene was detected in each genome, suggesting that the majority of the APx-R extra-copies were lost after chromosomal or segmental duplications. In a similar way, most APx-R co-expressed genes in Arabidopsis genome do not have conserved extra-copies after chromosomal duplications and are predicted to be localized in organelles, as are the APx-R. The member of this gene network can be considered as unique gene, well conserved through the evolution due to a strong negative selection pressure and a low evolution rate. PMID:22231200