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Sample records for fundamental nursing practice

  1. Spiritual care competence for contemporary nursing practice: A quantitative exploration of the guidance provided by fundamental nursing textbooks.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Fiona; Neill, Freda; Murphy, Maryanne; Begley, Thelma; Sheaf, Greg

    2015-11-01

    Spirituality is receiving unprecedented attention in the nursing literature. Both the volume and scope of literature on the topic is expanding, and it is clear that this topic is of interest to nurses. There is consensus that the spiritual required by clients receiving health ought to be an integrated effort across the health care team. Although undergraduate nurses receive some education on the topic, this is ad hoc and inconsistent across universities. Textbooks are clearly a key resource in this area however the extent to which they form a comprehensive guide for nursing students and nurses is unclear. This study provides a hitherto unperformed analysis of core nursing textbooks to ascertain spirituality related content. 543 books were examined and this provides a range of useful information about inclusions and omissions in this field. Findings revealed that spirituality is not strongly portrayed as a component of holistic care and specific direction for the provision of spiritual care is lacking. Fundamental textbooks used by nurses and nursing students ought to inform and guide integrated spiritual care and reflect a more holistic approach to nursing care. The religious and/or spiritual needs of an increasingly diverse community need to be taken seriously within scholarly texts so that this commitment to individual clients' needs can be mirrored in practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Nursing Students' Practices Using Smartphone Videos on Fundamental Nursing Skills, Self-Efficacy, and Learning Satisfaction in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, HyeSun

    2017-01-01

    This is a quasi-experimental study with a non-equivalent group pre-test and post-test designed to investigate the effects of learning with smartphone video recordings in fundamental nursing practice. General "intramuscular injection" practice for sophomore nursing students was given to the experimental and control groups for two weeks.…

  3. Intention in Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Sofhauser, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this column is to explore the meaning of intention in nursing practice and distinguish it from the concept of intentionality. The notion that nurses engage in a purposeful act of setting intention prior to delivery of nursing care is introduced, and nursing implications for setting intention in practice is offered. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. The new fundamentals in nursing: introducing beginning quality and safety education for nurses' competencies.

    PubMed

    Preheim, Gayle J; Armstrong, Gail E; Barton, Amy J

    2009-12-01

    This article describes the redesign of the fundamentals of nursing course using an organizing framework and teaching strategies identified in the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) initiative. Six QSEN competencies (patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics) are essential for nursing practice. Beginning knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) associated with each competency were identified in a preliminary Delphi survey as important to incorporate early in prelicensure nursing curricula. Redesign requires a shift in focus from task-training and psychomotor skills development to incorporation of a systems context, reflecting redefined values and interventions associated with safety, quality, and professional nursing roles. A course revision, based on the QSEN competencies definitions, selected beginning KSAs, exemplar resources, and teaching strategies, is described. The reframing of fundamentals of nursing is essential to prepare new graduates for contemporary practice.

  5. Advanced urology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Helen

    2014-03-01

    Urology nursing has developed as a specialty over the past few decades in response to several factors, workload demands being a prime reason. Nurses are taking on additional roles and activities including procedures such as cystoscopy and prostate biopsy, and running nurse-led clinics for a variety of urological conditions. Audits of advanced urological nursing practice have shown this care to be of a high standard and investigative procedures performed by these nurses match the diagnostic quality of existing services. Professional urological nursing organizations support the professional needs of these nurses, but the provision of education and training for advanced practice activities remains an unaddressed need. A range of confusing advanced urology nursing titles exists, and uncertainty regarding the roles and scope of practice for these nurses remains a concern. Acceptance and support from medical colleagues is required for the success of advanced urological nursing practice, but opinions on these roles remain divided.

  6. Story theory: advancing nursing practice scholarship.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mary Jane; Liehr, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Stories are a fundamental dimension of human experience and nursing practice. Story theory describes a narrative happening that occurs through intentional nurse-person dialogue. Seven inquiry phases are associated with story theory, including gathering the story, reconstructing the story, connecting it to the literature, naming the complicating health challenge, describing the story plot, identifying movement toward resolving, and gathering additional stories. This article describes the use of story theory to advance nursing practice scholarship in both academic and everyday nursing practice.

  7. Nursing Education and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeman, Carol A.

    1989-01-01

    Three issues directly influence the relationship between nurses and physicians: the nature of nursing practice, the education of registered nurses, and the American Medical Association proposal for registered care technicians. Nursing education programs should focus their programs and objectives so as to prepare their graduates for different…

  8. Nursing, knowledge and practice.

    PubMed

    Allen, D

    1997-07-01

    Recent commentators have suggested that academic knowledge is irrelevant to nursing practice and may actually undermine nursing's traditional caring ethos. Furthermore, by making nursing more academic, it is claimed that 'natural' but non-academic carers are prevented from pursuing a career in nursing. Debates about the relationship between nursing, knowledge and practice have a long history and have to be understood in terms of wider political and economic issues relating to nursing, its status within society and the changing role of nurses within the health services division of labour. One crucial issue is nursing's status as women's work. Critics of developments in nurse education draw an ideological equation between nursing work and the traditional female role. From this perspective the qualities that make a good nurse cannot be taught, rather they are founded on 'natural' feminine skills. Irrespective of whether caring is 'natural' or not, it is questionable as to whether, for today's nurses, being caring is sufficient. The shape of nursing jurisdiction is a long way removed from its origins in the Victorian middle-class household. In addition to their traditional caring role, contemporary nurses may also have complex clinical, management and research responsibilities, as well as being crucial coordinators of service provision. It is suggested that these and future developments in health services make the need for an educated nursing workforce even more pressing. In order to adequately prepare nurses for practice, however, it is vital that nurse education reflects the reality of service provision.

  9. Uncovering Racial Bias in Nursing Fundamentals Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Michelle M.

    2001-01-01

    The portrayal of African Americans in nursing fundamentals textbooks was analyzed, resulting in 11 themes in the areas of history, culture, and physical assessment. Few African American leaders were included, and racial bias and stereotyping were apparent. Differences were often discussed using Eurocentric norms, and language tended to minimize…

  10. Implementing fundamental care in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Feo, Rebecca; Conroy, Tiffany; Alderman, Jan; Kitson, Alison

    2017-04-05

    Modern healthcare environments are becoming increasingly complex. Delivering high-quality fundamental care in these environments is challenging for nurses and has been the focus of recent media, policy, academic and public scrutiny. Much of this attention arises from evidence that fundamental care is being neglected or delivered inadequately. There are an increasing number of standards and approaches to the delivery of fundamental care, which may result in confusion and additional documentation for nurses to complete. This article provides nurses with an approach to reframe their thinking about fundamental care, to ensure they meet patients' care needs and deliver holistic, person-centred care.

  11. Spirituality in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Melanie; Wattis, John

    2015-05-27

    Spirituality is an important aspect of holistic care that is frequently overlooked. This is because of difficulties in conceptualising spirituality and confusion about how it should be integrated into nursing care. This article explores what is meant by spirituality and spiritually competent practice. It examines attitudes to spirituality, describes factors that might affect the integration of spirituality into nursing care and offers practical guidance to equip nurses to incorporate spirituality into their practice.

  12. Best nursing practice.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    As part of this year's centenary celebrations, the RCN is showcasing the best nursing practice, focusing on that which often goes unobserved. Nurses, healthcare assistants and nursing students are asked to share ideas and innovations for improving practice and patient care. These will contribute to the development of a library of good practice and the RCN will invest in a small number of the successful projects. The closing date is 31 December.

  13. The answer is questions: accelerated-nursing students report practice questions are fundamental to first-time NCLEX-RN success.

    PubMed

    Blozen, Barbara B

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of anecdotal reports on demographic characteristics and academic success of accelerated-nursing students; yet few empirical studies have examined accelerated-nursing students NCLEX-RN success. Applying Knowles' adult learning theory as a guiding framework, the purpose of this qualitative study was to explore, from the accelerated-nursing students' perspective, the factors reported as contributing to their success on the NCLEX-RN. The research questions aimed to elicit participants' descriptions of their experiences and factors contributing to their success via individual interviews. The most significant finding the participants identified as the factor that contributed to their success was the practicing of NCLEX-RN questions. The findings of this study have several implications for educational policy and practice for universities and schools of nursing as the information gained from this study applies to recruitment and retention as well as curriculum and educational strategies in an accelerated-nursing program.

  14. Uncovering racial bias in nursing fundamentals textbooks.

    PubMed

    Byrne, M M

    2001-01-01

    This article describes research that sought to identify and critique selected content areas from three nursing fundamentals textbooks for the presence or absence of racial bias embedded in the portrayal of African Americans. The analyzed content areas were the history of nursing, cultural content, and physical assessment/hygiene parameters. A researcher-developed guide was used for data collection and analysis of textual language, illustrations, linguistics, and references. A thematic analysis resulted in I I themes reflecting the portrayal of African Americans in these sampled textbooks. An interpretive analysis with a lens of Sadker and Sadker's categories of bias, along with other literary and theoretical contexts, were used to explore for the presence or absence of racial bias. Recommendations for nursing education are provided.

  15. Reducing variance in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Kathleen D

    2010-11-01

    Nursing and finance leaders can encourage evidence-based nursing by: Investing in best practice procedure products. Providing continuing education to nursing care teams. Encouraging accountability--and empowerment.

  16. Preparation for Advanced Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frik, Seigina M.; Pollock, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    Lehman College's graduate nursing program uses theory-based courses to prepare advanced nurse practitioners. Students increase scholarly inquiry skills and clinical decision making; use of nursing conceptual models helped them plan and evaluate their practice. (SK)

  17. Fundamentals of Nursing Science: Units 1 through 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einstoss, Esther

    A description is provided of "Fundamentals of Nursing," a two-year college course designed to introduce nursing students to the basic principles of patient care. First, information is presented on the place of the course in the nursing curriculum, in-class time allotments, and course prerequisites. A section on course content includes a statement…

  18. Health Practices of School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petch-Levine, Deborah; Cureton, Virginia Young; Canham, Daryl; Murray, Meg

    2003-01-01

    The health practices of school nurses affect our role as advocates and educators to promote the health of youth. This study describes the health practices of a convenience sample of 388 school nurses who attended the business meeting at an annual school nurse conference. A self-administered, 40-item questionnaire identified health practices of…

  19. TLS from fundamentals to practice

    PubMed Central

    Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Afonine, Pavel V.; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    The Translation-Libration-Screw-rotation (TLS) model of rigid-body harmonic displacements introduced in crystallography by Schomaker & Trueblood (1968) is now a routine tool in macromolecular studies and is a feature of most modern crystallographic structure refinement packages. In this review we consider a number of simple examples that illustrate important features of the TLS model. Based on these examples simplified formulae are given for several special cases that may occur in structure modeling and refinement. The derivation of general TLS formulae from basic principles is also provided. This manuscript describes the principles of TLS modeling, as well as some select algorithmic details for practical application. An extensive list of applications references as examples of TLS in macromolecular crystallography refinement is provided. PMID:25249713

  20. TLS from fundamentals to practice.

    PubMed

    Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Afonine, Pavel V; Adams, Paul D

    2013-07-01

    The Translation-Libration-Screw-rotation (TLS) model of rigid-body harmonic displacements introduced in crystallography by Schomaker & Trueblood (1968) is now a routine tool in macromolecular studies and is a feature of most modern crystallographic structure refinement packages. In this review we consider a number of simple examples that illustrate important features of the TLS model. Based on these examples simplified formulae are given for several special cases that may occur in structure modeling and refinement. The derivation of general TLS formulae from basic principles is also provided. This manuscript describes the principles of TLS modeling, as well as some select algorithmic details for practical application. An extensive list of applications references as examples of TLS in macromolecular crystallography refinement is provided.

  1. Strategic Information Resources Management: Fundamental Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caudle, Sharon L.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses six fundamental information resources management (IRM) practices in successful organizations that can improve government service delivery performance. Highlights include directing changes, integrating IRM decision making into a strategic management process, performance management, maintaining an investment philosophy, using business…

  2. The fundamental values of nurses in Poland.

    PubMed

    Wrońska, Irena; Mariańiski, Janusz

    2002-01-01

    Polish society has found itself at a very important point in its history. The transformation from a traditional to a postmodern pluralistic society involves changes in many spheres of social life. These trends give rise to the question of which way the younger generation of Polish nurses will be going. The main objective of this research was to elucidate the opinions of nurses on life and health as basic values, and on their ethical and religious background regarding their nursing care. The study made use of a questionnaire for collection and interpretation of the data. Although this article shows some lack of consistency, and even contradictions, it is possible to conclude that life and health are cherished with affection by the great majority of nurses as positive factors of human existence.

  3. Advanced practice nursing role: nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Pastorino, C

    1998-01-01

    Nurse Practitioners are advanced practice nurses (APNs) who provide primary and acute care to individuals in many settings. The NP diagnoses and treats medical and surgical conditions that require acute, short-term management and chronic, long-term treatment. States vary in regulating processes regarding collaborative agreements, prescriptive authority, medical staff privileges, and insurance/third party reimbursement.

  4. Anything but basic: Nursing's challenge in meeting patients' fundamental care needs.

    PubMed

    Kitson, Alison L; Muntlin Athlin, Asa; Conroy, Tiffany

    2014-09-01

    Nursing has not explored the fundamental aspects of patient care in a systematic, conceptually coherent, scientific way, and this has created a number of ongoing challenges. Each challenge is identified and addressed in the form of a proposition, with evidence provided to support the arguments put forward and defend the proposed actions. The challenges include: the need for an integrated way of thinking about the fundamentals of care from a conceptual, methodological, and practical perspective; the ongoing and unresolved tension in nursing practice between a depersonalized and mechanistic approach (termed a "task and time" driven culture) and the need for consistency around understanding and managing the dynamics of the nurse-patient relationship or encounter (termed a "thinking and linking" approach); and the need for a systematic approach to the fundamentals or basics of care that combines the physical, psychosocial, and relational dimensions of the care encounter within the wider context of the care environment. Pragmatic and practical frameworks are needed to ensure that the basic physical and psychosocial needs of patients are embedded not only in the practice but also in the thinking, reflection, and assessment processes of the nurse. Nursing's challenge to meet patients' basic or fundamental needs is complex. Developing a knowledge base will include identifying researchable questions, using rigorous methodologies, ensuring the relational dimensions are not lost, and ensuring the new knowledge is applied in practice. This requires collaboration on an international scale to achieve improvements in care. To work collaboratively to generate, test, and implement meaningful ways of capturing nursing practice around basic or fundamental care in order to ensure more integrated, holistic patient care nursing practices. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  5. [Selecting methods and awaiting growth: the teaching experience of fundamental nursing practicum instructors].

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Chen; Lin, Chi-Yi; Chien, Tsui-Wei; Liu, Kuei-Fen; Chen, Miao-Yen; Lin, Wen-Chuan

    2013-02-01

    A constellation of factors accounts for teaching efficacy in the fundamental nursing practicum. Teachers play a critical role in terms of designing and executing an appropriate teaching plan, choosing effective methods, and holding appropriate teaching attitudes. It is thus extremely important that clinical teachers master the core characteristics of basic nursing practice. This study aimed to illuminate the core characteristics of basic nursing practice for students for reference by clinical practicum teachers. Qualitative research was used to identify the fundamentals of nursing practice by clinical teacher. Five focus group meetings were convened during the practice period. The researchers presided over group discussions held during the normal weekly teaching schedule and lasting approximately 2-4 hours each. The content analysis was adopted to analyze the data. Three major themes were proposed, including (1) student status: "novices were stymied by problems and thus improved slowly"; (2) teacher awareness: "teachers need to be aware of student capabilities, mood, and discomfort"; and (3) teaching style: "a good choice of methods should support and encourage students. To cultivate professional nursing knowledge and self-confidence for future professional commitment, clinical teachers must first understand the characteristics and motivations of learning of their students and then select the, skills, and attitudes appropriate to provide step-by-step guidance. Communication with staffs and the preparation of atmosphere prior to nursing practice are also essential for students. Results provide insights into the technical college environment with regard to basic-level clinical nursing practice.

  6. Empowering Nurses for Professional Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson-Catalano, Judy

    1992-01-01

    Empowering teaching strategies encourage leadership, critical thinking, problem solving, and collegiality and discourage passivity, isolation, and subordination. Empowerment prepares nurses for professional practice in hospitals. (SK)

  7. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    SciTech Connect

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  8. Mentoring practices benefiting pediatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Weese, Meghan M; Jakubik, Louise D; Eliades, Aris B; Huth, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies examining predictors of pediatric nurse protégé mentoring benefits demonstrated that protégé perception of quality was the single best predictor of mentoring benefits. The ability to identify the mentoring practices that predict specific benefits for individual nurses provides a better understanding of how mentoring relationships can be leveraged within health care organizations promoting mutual mentoring benefits. This descriptive correlational, non-experimental study of nurses at a northeast Ohio, Magnet® recognized, free-standing pediatric hospital advances nursing science by demonstrating how mentoring practices benefit pediatric nurse protégés.

  9. Futurism in nursing: Technology, robotics and the fundamentals of care.

    PubMed

    Archibald, Mandy M; Barnard, Alan

    2017-09-21

    To explore the concept of futurism and the emergence of robotics in relation to the fundamentals of care, highlighting how nurses need a more anticipatory and contemporary position towards technology to maintain relevance in the future. The future of nursing in Western countries will soon be linked with the emergence of robotics for efficient and cost effective provision of fundamental care. Their emergence and roles with care of the body and more broadly assisting people with their daily living activities has enormous implications for the profession and health care. Despite this importance, how nursing understands and will respond to technological trends and developments is insufficiently reflected in the professions discourse. A discursive article METHODS: Literature from nursing fundamentals of care / fundamental care, information science, technology, humanities and philosophy informed the arguments in this paper. This paper examines the intersection of futurism and the fundamentals of care and how adopting an anticipatory and post-human perspective towards technological-care integration is necessary amidst a robot revolution in the techno-era. Nurses are currently challenged to understand, prioritize and deliver fundamental care. Health systems are challenged by a lack of care predicated by shortfalls in skilled staff and deficiencies in their mobilization. Both challenges can be compounded or alleviated by further integration of technology, but to maximize benefit requires forethought and understanding. This article can help open needed dialogue around planning for the future and is a call to action for the nursing profession to conceptualize their position on exponential technological growth and fundamental care provision. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Fostering cultural and interdisciplinary awareness with "low-tech" simulation in a fundamentals nursing course to prepare student nurses for critical care clinical rotations.

    PubMed

    Ruth-Sahd, Lisa A; Schneider, Melissa A; Strouse, Abigail

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the advancement of nursing education and practice through implementing "low-tech" simulation in a fundamentals nursing course to foster an awareness of scope of practice and interdisciplinary teamwork and collaboration to prepare student nurses for their critical care clinical experience. The integration of low-tech simulation during the students' first clinical course at 2 different times during the semester was utilized to accomplish this awareness. This article was added to the scant published articles that highlight the benefits of low-tech simulation in a fundamentals of nursing course.

  11. Caring nurse practice in the intrapartum setting: nurses' perspectives on complexity, relationships and safety.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Lori A; Stocker-Schnieder, Julia; McCune, Renee; McClelland, Molly; King, Debbie

    2014-09-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study of nurse perceptions of caring nurse practice in the complex adaptive system of health care. Caring nurse practice encompasses technical skills and caring behaviours. Maternity care in the USA has seen worsening maternal and neonatal outcomes and safety has become a priority. As a result, hospital systems have begun efforts to improve outcomes, initiating safety and quality programmes that standardize care and implementing nursing frameworks that enhance relationships. Qualitative hermeneutic phenomenology. A qualitative design analysed 13 nurses' perspectives on caring practice during the second stage of labour. In June and July of 2012, interviews were conducted with 13 labour and delivery nurses located in a hospital that had adopted a perinatal safety initiative and relationship-focused nursing model. The nurses described caring nurse practice and the factors that affected its provision. Transcripts of audio recordings and notes taken during interviews were analysed for themes and fundamental meanings. Nurses' perspectives about the provision of caring nurse practice was affected by the complexity of the healthcare system, interactions with team members, challenges related to documentation; and respect for natural birth. Nurses at all levels of practice can use these perspectives to identify patterns in the complex adaptive healthcare system to improve quality and safety. Best practices include enhancing teamwork, implementing safety initiatives and promoting a Relationship-Based framework. Continued study of caring nurse practice could lead to establishment of additional safety and quality protocols vital to improving patient outcomes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  13. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  14. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  15. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  16. Nursing practices and lactation amenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Elias, M F; Teas, J; Johnston, J; Bora, C

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that nursing behavior is an independent underlying factor of importance in duration of amenorrhea. Multivariate analysis is applied to information on frequency and duration of nursing practices, maternal age, and nutritional status assessed by weight for height in a sample of 32 middle-class American women with a wide range of nursing behavior. The mothers were followed for 2 years postpartum, data being collected during 8 home visits by interview and by nursing records kept by the mothers. Amenorrhea lasted 1.3 to 27.1 months in the sample as a whole. Those women who nursed frequently (8/day) during exclusive breastfeeding remained amenorrheic longer than infrequent nursers, introduced supplements later, and did not resume menses as promptly thereafter. They continued an hour or more of night nursing during supplemented nursing. Duration of exclusive nursing and night nursing after supplementation were the major influences on duration of amenorrhea. This strong association favors the hypothesis that the underlying factor is nursing behavior. Mother's age, weight-for-height, and nursing frequency before supplementation showed no significant effect. Those women who introduced supplements late and maintained at least an hour of night nursing had a prolonged period of amenorrhea. The median for this group was 6-10 months longer than that for those who started supplements early and/or reduced subsequent night nursing to less than an hour. The recommendation that women must suckle their babies at least 5 times a day with a total suckling duration of more than 65 minutes per day is not sufficient. The findings reported here suggest that if women nurse exclusively for the 1st half year, maintaining night nursing after introducing supplements is important. If they supplement earlier, then they will lose the contraceptive protection of lactation, irrespective of how they nurse.

  17. Communication in Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kourkouta, Lambrini; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.

    2014-01-01

    Good communication between nurses and patients is essential for the successful outcome of individualized nursing care of each patient. To achieve this, however, nurses must understand and help their patients, demonstrating courtesy, kindness and sincerity. Also they should devote time to the patient to communicate with the necessary confidentiality, and must not forget that this communication includes persons who surround the sick person, which is why the language of communication should be understood by all those involved in it. Good communication also is not only based on the physical abilities of nurses, but also on education and experience. PMID:24757408

  18. Human rights and district nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    2005-02-01

    The main provisions of the European Convention on Human Rights were incorporated into UK law in the Human Rights Act 1998. Human Rights were described by Lord Hoffman in 'Matthews v Ministry of Defence' [2003] as the rights essential to the life and dignity of the individual in a democratic society. The fundamental nature of the rights demand that district nurses must inform their practice with a clear understanding of the main provisions of the Act and how they apply to health care.

  19. Resource requirements for a quality Doctor of Nursing Practice program.

    PubMed

    Frantz, Rita A

    2013-08-01

    Fundamental to planning, implementing, and sustaining a quality Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program is access to the resources needed to foster a learning environment that prepares nurses for advanced practice and leadership in the future redesigned health care system. This creates formidable challenges for schools and colleges of nursing as they endeavor to address the nation's need for an increased supply of advanced practice nurses to provide access to high-quality, cost-effective care for an aging population. This article describes the essential resources needed to support the delivery of a DNP program and the proposed strategies needed to address the resource challenges.

  20. [Nurses' practice in health audit].

    PubMed

    Pinto, Karina Araújo; de Melo, Cristina Maria Meira

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this investigation was to identify nurses' practice in heath audit. The hermeneutic-dialectic method was used for the analysis. The study was performed in three loci: the internal audit service of a hospital; the external audit service of a private health service buyer, and the state audit service of the public health system (SUS, acronym in Portuguese for Sistema Unico de Saúde-Unique Health System), in Bahia. Nine audit nurses were interviewed. In the SUS audit, the nurses report being fulfilled with their practice and with the valorization of their professional role. In the private audit--both inside and outside of health organizations--the nurses' activities are focused on meeting the interests of their contractors, and do not get much involved with the care delivered by the nursing team and with the needs of service users.

  1. Moral instability: the upsides for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Joan

    2010-04-01

    This article briefly outlines some of the key problems with the way in which the moral realm has traditionally been understood and analysed. I propose two alternative views of what is morally interesting and applicable to nursing practice and I indicate that instability has its upsides. I begin with a moral tale - a 'Good Samaritan' story - which raises fairly usual questions about the nature of morality but also the more philosophically fundamental question about the relationship between subjectivity and moral agency. I then consider this relationship from the perspectives of two twentieth century philosophers: Emmanuel Levinas and Michel Foucault. Levinas' basic point is that the experience of ethical subjectivity is made possible through others: the demand to respond to the existence of others is the basic social structure that precedes individual freedom. If Levinas posits intersubjectivity as a fundamental or primitive feature of the moral realm, Foucault poses an even more basic question: how have moral subjects and relations of obligation been constituted? The aim of ethical inquiry, for Foucault, is to describe the network of discourses, institutions, relations, and practices through which certain kinds of subjects are constituted and constitute themselves, e.g. as a kind of person who can act morally. Finally, I consider some recent research in philosophy of nursing which illustrates how Levinasian and/or Foucauldian perspectives can deepen understanding of nurses' moral practices, specifically, the work of Norwegian public health nurses, Canadian pediatric nurses, and Irish midwives. I suggest that in spite of the instability of morality in general and the particular ethical challenges that face nurses, there are grounds for hope and possible strategies for living in unstable times.

  2. Practice nursing: the pitfalls and the potential.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-03-16

    A survey by the Queen's Nursing Institute has confirmed that practice nursing is facing major pressures, with one third of practice nurses due to retire by 2020, patchy access to training and widespread discrepancies in pay. But there is also cause for optimism, as new initiatives aim to ensure practice nurses are better supported and rewarded.

  3. Nursing: Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... LPNs) and licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) provide basic nursing care. They work under the direction of registered ... licensed vocational nurses work in many settings, including nursing homes and extended care facilities, hospitals, physicians’ offices, ...

  4. Nursing Home Registered Nurses' and Licensed Practical Nurses' Knowledge of Causes of Falls.

    PubMed

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; de Cordova, Pamela B; Crane, Giles L; Quigley, Patricia; Ratcliffe, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Reducing falls in nursing homes requires a knowledgeable nursing workforce. To test knowledge, 8 validated vignettes representing multifactorial fall causes were administered to 47 nurses from 3 nursing homes. Although licensed practical nurses scored higher than registered nurses in individual categories of falls, when we computed the average score of all 8 categories between groups of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, registered nurses scored higher (F = 4.106; P < .05) in identifying 8 causal reasons for older adults to fall.

  5. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender health: fundamentals for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Lim, Fidelindo A; Brown, Donald V; Jones, Henrietta

    2013-04-01

    As the health care needs of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) population become increasingly important, health care professionals require appropriate academic and clinical training in preparation for the increased demand for culturally competent care. Nurses are of particular interest, as they are the core direct caregivers in many health care settings. This article explores the national climate around LGBT individuals and their related health needs. Educators and administrators who work with future nurses should strive to ensure they foster the development of knowledgeable practitioners who will be able to implement best practices in LGBT patient care. Attention should be paid to providing students with diverse clinical placements, access to LGBT interest groups, and clear expectations for LGBT-sensitive nursing care plans and course outcomes selection that promote cultural competence. Recommendations for nursing education and curricular reform are discussed.

  6. Conceptualizing clinical nurse leader practice: an interpretive synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bender, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's Future of Nursing report identifies the clinical nurse leader as an innovative new role for meeting higher health-care quality standards. However, specific clinical nurse leader practices influencing documented quality outcomes remain unclear. Lack of practice clarity limits the ability to articulate, implement and measure clinical nurse leader-specific practice and quality outcomes. Interpretive synthesis design and grounded theory analysis were used to develop a theoretical understanding of clinical nurse leader practice that can facilitate systematic and replicable implementation across health-care settings. The core phenomenon of clinical nurse leader practice is continuous clinical leadership, which involves four fundamental activities: facilitating effective ongoing communication; strengthening intra and interprofessional relationships; building and sustaining teams; and supporting staff engagement. Clinical nurse leaders continuously communicate and develop relationships within and across professions to promote and sustain information exchange, engagement, teamwork and effective care processes at the microsystem level. Clinical nurse leader-integrated care delivery systems highlight the benefits of nurse-led models of care for transforming health-care quality. Managers can use this study's findings to frame an implementation strategy that addresses theoretical domains of clinical nurse leader practice to help ensure practice success. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. An ontological view of advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia; Hicks, Frank D; Whall, Ann L; Algase, Donna L

    2005-01-01

    Identifying, developing, and incorporating nursing's unique ontological and epistemological perspective into advanced practice nursing practice places priority on delivering care based on research-derived knowledge. Without a clear distinction of our metatheoretical space, we risk blindly adopting the practice values of other disciplines, which may not necessarily reflect those of nursing. A lack of focus may lead current advanced practice nursing curricula and emerging doctorate of nursing practice programs to mirror the logical positivist paradigm and perspective of medicine. This article presents an ontological perspective for advanced practice nursing education, practice, and research.

  8. National agenda for advanced practice nursing: the practice doctorate.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Patricia; Sperhac, Arlene M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide the background and rationale for the practice doctorate in nursing. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing's Position Statement on the Practice Doctorate in Nursing, approved in October 2004, will be discussed. Outlined are some of the changes that will be needed in education, regulation, and advanced practice. Common questions and concerns that advanced practice nurses have, including titling, salary, and transitioning to the doctor of nursing practice degree, will be addressed.

  9. Nursing practice environment and outcomes for oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jingjing; Friese, Christopher R; Wu, Evan; Aiken, Linda H

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that oncology nurses experience high job-related burnout and high turnover because their work involves inherent stressors such as caring for patients with serious and often life-threatening illness. The objectives of this study were to examine the differences in outcomes such as job dissatisfaction and burnout between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses, and to identify factors that affect oncology nurse outcomes. A secondary analysis of nurse survey data collected in 2006 including 4047 nurses from 282 hospitals in 3 states was performed; t test and χ2 test compared differences between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses in nurse outcomes and their assessments of nurse practice environment, as measured by the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Logistic regression models estimated the effect of nurse practice environment on 4 nurse-reported outcomes: burnout, job dissatisfaction, intention to leave the current position, and perceived quality of care. Oncology nurses reported favorable practice environments and better outcomes than did medical-surgical nurses. All 4 subscales of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index studied were significantly associated with outcomes. Specifically, nurses who reported favorable nursing foundations for quality of care (eg, active in-service or preceptorship programs) were less likely to report burnout and leave their current position. Better practice environments, including nurse foundations for quality care, can help to achieve optimal nurse outcomes. Improving hospital practice environments holds significant potential to improve nurse well-being, retention, and quality of care. Specifically, hospitals should consider preceptor programs and continuing education and increase nurses' participation in hospital decision making.

  10. Editing a nursing practice book.

    PubMed

    Nolan, M T; Augustine, S M

    1997-01-01

    Publishing a nursing practice book can be an exciting challenge for the critical care nurse who identifies a gap in the literature. This article provides information on how to produce an edited book from the starting point to successful publication. Identifying a book idea, selecting chapter authors, finding a publisher, writing a prospectus, the editing process, production, and marketing the book are discussed. Examples drawn from the authors' experiences in editing a transplantation nursing book are provided, as well as comments from other book editors.

  11. Nursing Practice Environment and Outcomes for Oncology Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jingjing; Friese, Christopher R.; Wu, Evan; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Background It is commonly assumed that oncology nurses experience high job-related burnout and high turnover because their work involves inherent stressors such as caring for patients with serious and often life-threatening illness. Objectives The objectives of this study were to examine the differences in outcomes such as job dissatisfaction and burnout between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses, and to identify factors that affect oncology nurse outcomes. Methods A secondary analysis of nurse survey data collected in 2006 including 4047 nurses from 282 hospitals in 3 states was performed; t test and χ2 test compared differences between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses in nurse outcomes and their assessments of nurse practice environment, as measured by the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Logistic regression models estimated the effect of nurse practice environment on 4 nurse-reported outcomes: burnout, job dissatisfaction, intention to leave the current position, and perceived quality of care. Results Oncology nurses reported favorable practice environments and better outcomes than did medical-surgical nurses. All 4 subscales of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index studied were significantly associated with outcomes. Specifically, nurses who reported favorable nursing foundations for quality of care (eg, active in-service or preceptorship programs) were less likely to report burnout and leave their current position. Conclusions Better practice environments, including nurse foundations for quality care, can help to achieve optimal nurse outcomes. Implications for Practice Improving hospital practice environments holds significant potential to improve nurse well-being, retention, and quality of care. Specifically, hospitals should consider preceptor programs and continuing education and increase nurses’ participation in hospital decision making. PMID:22751101

  12. Doctor of Nursing Practice Education: Impact on Advanced Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Paplham, Pamela; Austin-Ketch, Tammy

    2015-11-01

    To discuss how doctoral education, specifically the doctorate of nursing practice (DNP) can promote changes in advanced practice nursing. Medline, CINAHL, PubMed. Variations continue to exist in educational curricula, program plans, and scholarly projects, leading to a lack of consistency in experiential learning. At this point in time it is too early in the DNP implementation process to determine ultimate impact. Continuous program self-assessment and evaluation of DNP education programs will be of paramount importance to assure program quality and optimization of health trajectories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nursing documentation and nursing practice: a discourse analysis.

    PubMed

    Heartfield, M

    1996-07-01

    Nursing documentation exists as a daily reality of nurses' work. It is interpreted by some as the evidence of nursing actions and dismissed by others as a misrepresentation of nursing care. This paper reports on a study of nursing documentation as nursing practice. The work of Foucault and discourse analysis provide a research design for examination of how written descriptions of patient events taken from patient case notes result from hegemonic influences that construct a knowledge and therefore a practice of nursing. Discourses as ways of understanding knowledge as language, social practices and power relations are used to identify how nursing documentation functions as a manifestation and ritual of power relations. A focus on body work and fragmented bodies provided details of nursing's participation in the discursive construction of the object patient and invisible nurse. It is through resistances to documentation that alternative knowledge of nursing exists.

  14. Training Advanced Practice Palliative Care Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Deborah Witt

    1999-01-01

    Describes the role and responsibilities of advanced-practice nurses in palliative care and nursing's initiative in promoting high-quality care through the educational preparation of these nurses. (JOW)

  15. Doctorate in nursing practice: a survey of massachusetts nurses.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, Rosanna F; Pulcini, Joyce; Haggerty, Lois A; Tang, Trinh

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) resolved that a new practice degree, the doctorate in nursing practice (DNP), is to become the terminal practice degree and minimum education standard for advanced practice nurses by the year 2015(American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2004). AACN position statement on the practice doctorate in nursing. Retrieved July 1, 2007, from http://www.aacn.nche.edu.html). The DNP will have a clinical-intensive focus. Advanced practice nurses potentially impacted by this resolution will include nurse practitioners, nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and clinical nurse specialists. A task force at the William F. Connell School of Nursing at Boston College conducted an electronic survey in 2006 in an attempt to understand nurses' thoughts about doctoral preparation and the interest of nurses in Massachusetts in pursuing doctoral study. A self-selected group of 376 nurses participated in the study. Nurses identified both positive and negative perceptions related to the degree's viability and practicality, with a majority (55%) preferring the DNP as an educational option.

  16. [A Study of the Evidence-Based Nursing Practice Competence of Nurses and Its Clinical Applications].

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Huang, Ya-Hsuan

    2015-10-01

    Nurses must develop competence in evidence-based nursing in order to provide the best practice medical care to patients. Evidence-based nursing uses issue identification, data mining, and information consolidation from the related medical literature to help nurses find the best evidence. Therefore, for medical institutions to provide quality clinical care, it is necessary for nurses to develop competence in evidence-based nursing. This study aims to explore the effect of a fundamental evidence-based nursing course, as a form of educational intervention, on the development of evidence-based nursing knowledge, self-efficacy in evidence-based practice activities, and outcome expectations of evidence-based practice in nurse participants. Further the competence of these nurses in overcoming obstacles in evidence-based nursing practice. This quasi-experimental study used a pre-post test design with a single group of participants. A convenience sample of 34 nurses from a municipal hospital in northern Taiwan received 8 hours of a fundamental evidence-based nursing course over a two-week period. Participants were asked to complete four questionnaires before and after the intervention. The questionnaires measured the participants' basic demographics, experience in mining the medical literature, evidence-based nursing knowledge, self-efficacy in evidence-based practice activities, outcome expectations of evidence-based practice, competence in overcoming obstacles in evidence-based nursing practice, and learning satisfaction. Collected data was analyzed using paired t, Wilcoxon Signed Rank, and McNemar tests to measure the differences among participants' evidence-based nursing knowledge and practice activities before and after the workshop. The nurses demonstrated significantly higher scores from pre-test to post-test in evidence-based nursing knowledge II, self-efficacy in evidence-based nursing practice activities, and outcome expectations of evidence-based practice

  17. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Marjorie A.; Anderson, Linda J. W.; Rising, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic…

  18. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Marjorie A.; Anderson, Linda J. W.; Rising, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic…

  19. Effective communication: Principle of Nursing Practice E.

    PubMed

    Casey, Anne; Wallis, Alison

    This is the sixth article in a nine-part series describing the Principles of Nursing Practice developed by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) in collaboration with patient and service user organisations, the Department of Health, the Nursing and Midwifery Council, nurses and other healthcare professionals. The article discusses Principle E, effective communication, and provides some examples of good practice.

  20. Applying nursing theory to perioperative nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Gillette, V A

    1996-08-01

    The perioperative nursing role has evolved from that of task-oriented specialists to patient-centered professionals. The concept of caring is significant to perioperative nurses and is manifested by the many caring behaviors perioperative nurses demonstrate toward surgical patients. This article describes how the element of caring is an essential function of perioperative nursing and relates the perioperative nursing role to the work of three nursing theorists (le, Florence Nightingale; Virginia Henderson, RN, AM; Carol L. Montgomery, RN, PhD).

  1. Doctoral education for WOC nurses considering advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Barbara; Colwell, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Advanced practice nursing education is at a crossroads. Societal changes, increased health care demands, and leadership nursing organizations have identified the need of a doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree as the advanced practice degree. WOC nurses need to examine DNP programs when considering returning for an advanced practice degree. This article explores nursing education at the doctorate level and areas the WOC nurse should consider when making a decision about attending a program. The WOC nurse needs to understand the similarities and differences of the doctor of philosophy and the DNP, issues about each program and its completion, personal factors, and the application process. Although selecting a doctoral program is a daunting experience, the education will provide opportunities for the WOC nurse to excel as a scholar, thus influencing the profession and the practice.

  2. Developing practice protocols for advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Paul, S

    1999-08-01

    In most states, the role of an advanced practice nurse is dependent on practice protocols that provide an organized method for analyzing and managing a disease or major symptom. They are also used to control the process of medical care and to specify steps in the delivery of that care. Creating appropriate practice protocols is one of the most important precursors to implementing the advanced practice role, because they virtually drive the clinician's ability to treat or manage clinical situations or disease states. This article outlines the steps involved in developing practice protocols and discusses the content that should be included in a protocol, providing an example of narrative and algorithm format protocols. Pros and cons, as well as legal issues related to practice protocols, are also presented.

  3. Starting a nursing consultation practice.

    PubMed

    Schulmeister, L

    1999-03-01

    Because the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role has been changed or eliminated in many hospital organizations, many CNSs in career transition are considering establishing collaborative or independent nursing consultation practices. Opportunities for consultants exist in diverse practice settings and specialties. Before starting a consultation practice, the CNS should carefully examine goals, identify resources, and begin contacting potential referral sources. He or she must also decide what form of business organization to establish and write a business plan to solidify ideas and prepare for the unexpected. Most CNS consultants rely on personal savings to cover initial business and personal expenses, and many continue working as a CNS until the consultation practice is established. Fees can be set based on community standards, what the market will bear, desired projected income, or a third-party payor's fee schedule. The consultation practice can be marketed by word of mouth, inexpensive advertising techniques such as distributing flyers and business cards, direct mall, and media advertising. In today's healthcare marketplace, opportunities abound for the CNS risk-taker interested in starting a nursing consultation practice.

  4. Assisted living nursing practice: admission assessment.

    PubMed

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    Admission assessment, generally conducted by a registered nurse, is autonomous, without opportunity for dialogue with colleagues and other health care professionals and bounded by the nurse's knowledge and skills, state regulations, facility practices, and marketing. The fact that some states permit admission and retention of nursing home level-of-care residents and provision of end-of-life care means that the assessment has to be able to predict the resident's likely trajectory of well-being as well as chronic illness exacerbation. The nurse must have a clear perspective on staff competencies and judge whether additional education or training will be necessary. This article reviews assessment standards of practice as put forth by the American Assisted Living Nurses Association as part of its application for recognition of assisted living nursing as specialty nursing practice by the American Nurses Association. The role of the Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurse in resident assessment is also discussed.

  5. Grounding our practice in nursing professional development.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Pamela S

    2014-07-01

    The Nursing Professional Development: Scope and Standards of Practice is foundational to the work of nurses in a continuing professional development role. Use of the practice and professional performance aspects of the standards supports both quality of learning activities and the continuous growth process of nurses engaged in this area of practice.

  6. Transformational leadership practices of nurse leaders in professional nursing associations.

    PubMed

    Ross, Erin J; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Click, Elizabeth R; Krouse, Helene J; Clavelle, Joanne T

    2014-04-01

    This study describes the transformational leadership (TL) practices of nurse leaders in professional nursing associations (PNAs). Professional nursing associations are vehicles to provide educational opportunities for nurses as well as leadership opportunities for members. Little has been published about the leadership practices of PNA members. E-mail surveys of 448 nurse leaders in PNAs were conducted in 2013 using the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI). The top 2 TL practices of these nurse leaders were enabling others to act and encouraging the heart. Respondents with more leadership training reported higher TL practices. This is the 1st study to describe TL practices of nurse leaders in PNAs. Results of this study show that nurse leaders of PNAs emulate practices of TL. Transformational leaders can mobilize and direct association members in reaching shared values, objectives, and outcomes. Understanding TL practices of nurse leaders in PNAs are important to the future of nursing in order to enable nurses to lead change and advance health through these organizations.

  7. Cultural characteristics of nursing practice in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Mayuko; Ishigaki, Kazuko; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Fujita, Junko; Katakura, Naoko; Ogata, Yasuko; Mochizuki, Yuki; Okamoto, Yuko; Shinohara, Yuko

    2016-04-01

    The population of Japan has become multi-cultural, and there is more demand for culturally competent nursing care. The purpose of this study was to explore cultural characteristics of nursing practice in Japan focusing on behaviour. We interviewed 25 professionals with experience in or knowledge of nursing practice both in Japan and either the United States, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Thailand or South Korea. Qualitative content analysis has yielded three themes for cultural characteristics of nursing practice in Japan: practice expectations, communication and relationships with patients. Practice expectations for nurses in Japan involved various aspects; nurses conducted a wide range of basic nursing tasks, including bed baths and toileting. They often relied on non-verbal communication to deliver thoughtfulness and perceptiveness. They typically show deference to doctors and colleagues, emphasizing building and maintaining harmony with them. This emphasis on a multifaceted, non-verbal, and harmonious approach seemed characteristic of practice among Japanese nurses. © 2016 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Nursing research ethics, guidance and application in practice.

    PubMed

    Doody, Owen; Noonan, Maria

    2016-07-28

    Ethics is fundamental to good research practice and the protection of society. From a historical point of view, research ethics has had a chequered past and without due cognisance there is always the potential for research to do harm. Research ethics is fundamental to research practice, nurse education and the development of evidence. In conducting research, it is important to plan for and anticipate any potential or actual risks. To engage in research, researchers need to develop an understanding and knowledge of research ethics and carefully plan how to address ethics within their research. This article aims to enhance students' and novice researchers' research ethics understanding and its application to nursing research.

  9. Remote nursing certified practice: viewing nursing and nurse practitioner practice through a social justice lens.

    PubMed

    Tarlier, Denise S; Browne, Annette J

    2011-06-01

    Remote Nursing Certified Practice (RNCP) was introduced in 2010 to regulate nursing practice in remote, largely First Nations communities in British Columbia, Canada. These are communities that often experience profound health and health-care inequities. Typically nurses are the main health-care providers. Using a critical social justice lens, the authors explore the clinical and ethical implications of RNCP in terms of access to equitable, high-quality primary health care.They examine the fit between the level and scope of health services provided by registered nurses working under RNCP and the health needs of remote First Nations communities. In doing so, they draw comparisons between nurse practitioners (NPs) and outpost nurses working in NP roles who historically were employed to provide health care in these communities.The authors conclude by calling for nursing regulations that support equitable, high-quality primary care for all British Columbians.

  10. Exploring nurses' storied accounts of practice.

    PubMed

    Geanellos, R

    1995-06-01

    The learning opportunities presented in nurses' storied accounts of practice are explored. This exploration is achieved through analysis and discussion of three nurse's stories documented in the literature, and uses Benner's (1991) narratives of learning theme as the conceptual framework. The narrative of learning sub themes: being open to experience, liberation, and disillusionment are examined. This examination suggests nurses stories can be used to: discover nursing knowledge, develop shared understandings of what it is to be a nurse, examine nursing's culture and ethics, document interactions for research, teaching and learning, and identify and preserve the practice of nursing. Whereas edited stories from the literature only begin to demonstrate the possibilities for learning that stories offer, through them alternative ways of learning about nursing, exploring nursing practice and developing nursing knowledge are presented.

  11. Safety: principle of nursing practice C.

    PubMed

    Currie, L

    This is the fourth article in a nine-part series describing the Principles of Nursing Practice developed by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) in collaboration with patient and service organisations, the Department of Health, the Nursing and Midwifery Council, nurses and other healthcare professionals. This article discusses Principle C, the provision of safe and effective care.

  12. Being a seasoned nurse in active practice.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Lisa A; Prasun, Marilyn A; Henderson, Lisa; Taft, Lois

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to discover what rewards and inspires seasoned nurses to continue to practice in acute care after the normal age of nurse retirement, and to identify best practices in retention. An aging population and an aging nursing workforce are twin issues that bring urgency to this issue. Seasoned nurses have much to contribute to the workforce, but very few studies have examined strategies to retain them. A grounded theory approach was used in two phases to explore the meaning of being a seasoned nurse. In phase 1, 13 nurses over the age of 62 years were queried about the meaning of being a seasoned nurse actively engaged in acute care nursing. The second phase included 12 nurses in active practice anticipating retirement (aged 55-62 years). Semi-structured interviews were conducted, audiotaped, transcribed and analysed. A concept map with four major themes emerged from the data. The themes were identified as (1) pre-existing attitudes and experiences, (2) retention factors, (3) important needs, and (4) unique contributions. Seasoned nurses enjoy, and engage in, nursing and derive benefits from continued practice. Further research is needed to determine the relative importance of the factors identified as important to nurses as they anticipate, and experience, retirement. IMPLICATION FOR NURSE MANAGERS: An understanding of these factors can be used to aid nursing leaders to retain seasoned nurses in practice beyond retirement age. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Nurses' practice environments, error interception practices, and inpatient medication errors.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Linda; Liang, Yulan; Dickson, Geri L; Xie, Minge; Suh, Dong-Churl

    2012-06-01

    Medication errors remain a threat to patient safety. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the relationships among characteristics of the nursing practice environment, nurse staffing levels, nurses' error interception practices, and rates of nonintercepted medication errors in acute care hospitals. This study, using a nonexperimental design, was conducted in a sample of 82 medical-surgical units recruited from 14 U.S. acute care hospitals. Registered nurses (RNs) on the 82 units were surveyed, producing a sample of 686 staff nurses. Data collected for the 8-month study period included the number of medication errors per 1,000 patient days and the number of RN hours per patient day. Nurse survey data included the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index as a measure of environmental characteristics; a metric of nurses' interception practices was developed for the study. All survey measures were aggregated to the unit level prior to analysis with hierarchical linear modeling. A supportive practice environment was positively associated with error interception practices among nurses in the sample of medical-surgical units. Importantly, nurses' interception practices were inversely associated with medication error rates. A supportive practice environment enhances nurses' error interception practices. These interception practices play a role in reducing medication errors. When supported by their practice environments, nurses employ practices that can assist in interrupting medication errors before they reach the patients. © 2012 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  14. Nurse managers describe their practice environments.

    PubMed

    Warshawsky, Nora E; Lake, Sharon W; Brandford, Arica

    2013-01-01

    Hospital work environments that support the professional practice of nurses are critical to patient safety. Nurse managers are responsible for creating these professional practice environments for staff nurses, yet little is known about the environments needed to support nurse managers. Domains of nurse managers' practice environment have recently been defined. This is a secondary analysis of 2 cross-sectional studies of organizational characteristics that influence nurse manager practice. Content analysis of the free text comments from 127 nurse managers was used to illustrate the 8 domains of nurse managers' practice environments. Nurse managers valued time spent with their staff; therefore, workloads must permit meaningful interaction. Directors demonstrated trust when they empowered nurse managers to make decisions. Administrative leaders should build patient safety cultures on the basis of shared accountability and mutual respect among the health care team. The expectations of nurse managers have greatly expanded in the volume and complexity of direct reports, patient care areas, and job functions. The nurse managers in this analysis reported characteristics of their practice environments that limit their role effectiveness and may negatively impact organizational performance. Further research is needed to understand the effects of nurse managers' practice environments on staff and patient outcomes.

  15. Transitions in nursing education: a model for designing practical/vocational nursing curriculum.

    PubMed

    Watson, M F

    1997-12-01

    Health care reform will change not only the way health care is delivered in the United States but it will bring about fundamental changes in the way health care providers will be educated and trained. Transitions in health care education are expected to occur at all levels, impacting all professional groups including doctors, pharmacists, registered nurses and licensed practical nurses. Watson's Model for the development of practical nursing curriculum is intended to help practical nurse educators design programs that will be technically futuristic, yet embedded in the traditional values of nursing. The model, which is still being tested, hopes to blend the best of two worlds: the proven effectiveness of behaviorism and the essence of humanistic caring.

  16. Drug information sources for practicing nurses.

    PubMed

    Karb, V B

    1989-08-01

    Many printed resources about drugs are available to practicing nurses. In the near future, information will probably by readily accessible via computers. In the interim, it is necessary to rely on other printed materials. As with all purchases, nurses should choose wisely among possible references, and select those meeting the specific needs of the practice setting, as well as complementing the nurses' existing knowledge.

  17. Nursing case management: a rural practice model.

    PubMed

    Stanton, M P; Packa, D

    2001-01-01

    Nursing case management is a blend of individual case- and/or disease-management activities used in urban hospitals or community health settings. The authors propose that in rural communities, a third form of case management is also used. Nursing case management in the rural community has a broader and more diverse scope of practice than nurse case managers practicing in urban settings.

  18. The impact of instituting Process-Oriented Guided-Inquiry Learning (POGIL) in a fundamental nursing course.

    PubMed

    Roller, Maureen C; Zori, Susan

    2017-03-01

    POGIL, using small groups of students, who assume the roles of leader, manager, recorder, and reflector to complete problem based activities in science courses, has demonstrated significant improvement in students' grades and course satisfaction in science courses and a nursing Fundamentals course. Using POGIL with nursing students in fundamentals nursing courses could help to improve final grades and course satisfaction while promoting active learning, critical thinking, and teamwork. To examine differences in final course grades, Assessment Technologies Institute, LLC (ATi) scores and course satisfaction in 2 groups of fundamentals nursing students where one group experienced Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) as a teaching strategy and one group did not. Satisfaction with performing in the varied roles used during POGIL was also examined. This quantitative descriptive study used a comparative design, with one group of students who experienced POGIL while analyzing case scenarios in class and a control group who did not experience POGIL. A t-test was used to compare final grades, ATi scores, and satisfaction survey results. A mid-size, private university in the northeastern United States was the setting. A convenience sample of pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing students taking Fundamental in Nursing Courses during the junior semester. The experimental group (N=63) had higher final course grades (p=0.046), better understanding of the course material (p=0.005), and greater satisfaction with grades (p=0.008) than the control group (N=75). The results of this study revealed that Fundamental nursing students who experienced POGIL had significantly higher final grades and course satisfaction compared with students who did not experience POGIL. The active learning and teamwork experienced during POGIL, may be beneficial to students as they transition to practicing nurses. Additional research using POGIL with a variety of nursing courses could be

  19. Specialty practice entrepreneur: the advanced practice nurse.

    PubMed

    Kowal, N

    1998-01-01

    There are many opportunities in the health care arena to make a difference. The structured sense of change is "old school." New "surfers" of the system will be entrepreneurial in spirit, energy, and flexibility. There is no job description for the perfect person, only a sense of excitement and innovation that gives one the feeling energetic change is about to happen. In nursing, the risk takers are abundant in the APN role. It is the reason why they walk the line of provider/nurse. Making a difference to patients is important. Riding the waves of clinical care is the excitement. The final results are "the big waves" of life--a patient's life. A provider who defines the reality of practice creates a vision and skillfully bridges the road between the two. Design the surfboard--catch the wave.

  20. Nurse Career-Pattern Study. Part I: Practical Nursing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Barbara L.; Knopf, Lucille

    The overall nurse career-patterns study actually consists of four concurrent longitudinal studies relating to the four kinds of nursing programs in which, if possible, each subject will be followed from the time of entrance through a 15-year period after graduation. The practical nurse study seeks to determine whether certain biographical data or…

  1. Identifying emotional intelligence in professional nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Kooker, Barbara Molina; Shoultz, Jan; Codier, Estelle E

    2007-01-01

    The National Center for Health Workforce Analysis projects that the shortage of registered nurses in the United States will double by 2010 and will nearly quadruple to 20% by 2015 (Bureau of Health Professionals Health Resources and Services Administration. [2002]. Projected supply, demand, and shortages of registered nurses, 2000-2020 [On-line]. Available: http:bhpr.hrsa.gov/healthworkforce/reports/rnprojects/report.htm). The purpose of this study was to use the conceptual framework of emotional intelligence to analyze nurses' stories about their practice to identify factors that could be related to improved nurse retention and patient/client outcomes. The stories reflected evidence of the competencies and domains of emotional intelligence and were related to nurse retention and improved outcomes. Nurses recognized their own strengths and limitations, displayed empathy and recognized client needs, nurtured relationships, used personal influence, and acted as change agents. Nurses were frustrated when organizational barriers conflicted with their knowledge/intuition about nursing practice, their communications were disregarded, or their attempts to create a shared vision and teamwork were ignored. Elements of professional nursing practice, such as autonomy, nurse satisfaction, respect, and the professional practice environment, were identified in the excerpts of the stories. The shortage of practicing nurses continues to be a national issue. The use of emotional intelligence concepts may provide fresh insights into ways to keep nurses engaged in practice and to improve nurse retention and patient/client outcomes.

  2. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  3. Nursing record systems: effects on nursing practice and healthcare outcomes.

    PubMed

    Urquhart, Christine; Currell, Rosemary; Grant, Maria J; Hardiker, Nicholas R

    2009-01-21

    A nursing record system is the record of care that was planned or given to individual patients and clients by qualified nurses or other caregivers under the direction of a qualified nurse. Nursing record systems may be an effective way of influencing nurse practice. To assess the effects of nursing record systems on nursing practice and patient outcomes. For the original version of this review in 2000, and updates in 2003 and 2008, we searched: the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register; MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, BNI, ISI Web of Knowledge, and ASLIB Index of Theses. We also handsearched: Computers, Informatics, Nursing (Computers in Nursing); Information Technology in Nursing; and the Journal of Nursing Administration. For this update, searches can be considered complete until the end of 2007. We checked reference lists of retrieved articles and other related reviews. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time series comparing one kind of nursing record system with another in hospital, community or primary care settings. The participants were qualified nurses, students or healthcare assistants working under the direction of a qualified nurse, and patients receiving care recorded or planned using nursing record systems. Two review authors (in two pairs) independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We included nine trials (eight RCTs, one controlled before and after study) involving 1846 people. The studies that evaluated nursing record systems focusing on relatively discrete and focused problems, for example effective pain management in children, empowering pregnant women and parents, reducing loss of notes, reducing time spent on data entry of test results, reducing transcription errors, and reducing the number of pieces of paper in a record, all demonstrated some degree of success in achieving the desired results. Studies of nursing care planning systems

  4. General practice nursing education in Australia.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Tessa; Hutchinson, Ronelle; Foley, Elizabeth; Watts, Ian; Whitecross, Lyndall; Snowdon, Teri

    2006-04-01

    The quality of care delivered by nurses working in Australian general practices rests on a strong foundation of nursing educatlon and training. A national study of nurses working in general practice was conducted using qualitative and quantitative research techniques to explore their role and educational needs. Results from this research suggest that education for general practice nurses is seen by nurses and General Practitioners to be largely non-formal in nature and is seen by GPs and nurses to be tailored towards general practice nursing needs. Such education is often available locally through general practice support organisations; is strongly focused on National Health Priority Areas and clinical care; and is more appropriate for registered rather than enrolled nurses. The educational opportunities currently available to support nursing in general practice are largely ad hoc and vary in relation to quality, appropriateness and accessibility. Nurses working in general practices in Australia need a system of ongoing training and education to support their responsibilities and foster the development of the position as a viable career option for nurses.

  5. Nursing home work practices and nursing assistants' job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Christine E; Squillace, Marie R; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L; Wiener, Joshua M

    2009-10-01

    To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey, and county-level data from the Area Resource File. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate effects of compensation and working conditions on nursing assistants' overall job satisfaction, controlling for personal characteristics and local labor market characteristics. Wages, benefits, and job demands, measured by the ratio of nursing assistant hours per resident day, were associated with job satisfaction. Consistent with previous studies, job satisfaction was greater when nursing assistants felt respected and valued by their employers and had good relationships with supervisors. Nursing assistants were more satisfied when they had enough time to complete their work, when their work was challenging, when they were not subject to mandatory overtime, and where food was not delivered to residents on trays. This is the first investigation of nursing assistant job satisfaction using a nationally representative sample of nursing assistants matched to information about their employing nursing homes. The findings corroborate results of previous studies in showing that compensation and working conditions that provide respect, good relationships with supervisors, and better staffing levels are important to nursing assistant job satisfaction.

  6. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  7. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  8. Japanese nurse practitioner practice and outcomes in a nursing home.

    PubMed

    Ono, M; Miyauchi, S; Edzuki, Y; Saiki, K; Fukuda, H; Tonai, M; Magilvy, J K; Murashima, S

    2015-06-01

    By describing the practice of a Japanese nurse practitioner, this descriptive case study discusses role development and outcomes before and after the intervention. One of the first Japanese nurse practitioners intervened at a nursing home during the government-designated trial period for nurse practitioner practice. Because of the nurse practitioner's meticulous observation and timely care provision to the residents in collaboration with the physician and the other staff in the facility, comparative data showed improvement in daily health status management of every resident and decreased deterioration of residents' health conditions requiring ambulance transfer and hospitalization. © 2014 The Authors. International Nursing Review published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Council of Nurses.

  9. Sperm preservation: Fundamental cryobiology and practical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.F. ); Critser, J.K. ); Mazur, P. )

    1992-01-01

    Human spermatozoa were first frozen successfully almost 40 years ago. While developments in packaging and storing have occurred in the intervening period, there is still little known specifically about how spermatozoa are adversely affected by freezing and thawing. This is largely due to the fact that sufficient cells survive the challenge to give a reasonable expectation of fertilization, but the shift to the exclusive use of cryopreserved semen for donor insemination, occasioned by the awareness of the risks particularly of AIDS transmission, has resulted in a renewed critical interest in the process of cryopreservation. This review will cover the more significant contributions over the past few years, and develop an argument for a sustained fundamental approach to sperm cryobiology.

  10. Sperm preservation: Fundamental cryobiology and practical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.F.; Critser, J.K.; Mazur, P.

    1992-07-01

    Human spermatozoa were first frozen successfully almost 40 years ago. While developments in packaging and storing have occurred in the intervening period, there is still little known specifically about how spermatozoa are adversely affected by freezing and thawing. This is largely due to the fact that sufficient cells survive the challenge to give a reasonable expectation of fertilization, but the shift to the exclusive use of cryopreserved semen for donor insemination, occasioned by the awareness of the risks particularly of AIDS transmission, has resulted in a renewed critical interest in the process of cryopreservation. This review will cover the more significant contributions over the past few years, and develop an argument for a sustained fundamental approach to sperm cryobiology.

  11. Fundamentals of ergonomics in theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J R

    2000-12-01

    In this paper ergonomics is defined as a discipline in its own right, as the theoretical and fundamental understanding of human behaviour and performance in purposeful interacting socio-technical systems, and the application of that understanding to design of interactions in the context of real settings. This definition is justified in the financial, technicat, legal, organisational, social, political and professional contexts in which ergonomists work. On the basis of the history of ergonomics and contemporary contributions, it is proposed that it is one of the modern sciences, drawing as much from the field as from the laboratory, and including elements of an art and a craft as well. Justification for the new definition is provided by examining the interacting systems which are prevalent in the modern world and which are the domain best understood through the holistic approach of ergonomics. Finally a number of challenges for ergonomics are identified.

  12. Fundamental or foundational obligation? Problematizing the ethical call to spiritual care in nursing.

    PubMed

    Pesut, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Spiritual nursing care is increasingly being cited in the nursing literature as a fundamental ethical obligation. This obligation is based upon the argument that nurses provide holistic care, spirituality is a universal dimension of the person, and so nurses should care for the spiritual dimension. However, the literature on the spiritual dimension in nursing illustrates widely differing foundational assumptions about this important aspect of care. The philosophic categories of humanism, theism, and monism can be used to illustrate the different understandings of the spiritual dimension, and the implications of these understandings for the competence of the nurse and the nature of the nurse-patient interaction in the context of spiritual care.

  13. Implementing simulated practice learning for nursing students.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Nikki; Moriarty, Abigail; Welyczko, Nikki

    The learning and teaching of clinical skills for pre-registration nurses are currently high profile in the nursing arena, with clinical skills a central component of new curricula development. This article explores the development and implementation of a simulated practice learning exercise in the pre-registration nursing curriculum, and expounds the advantages and disadvantages of this approach. Authors

  14. State Regulations for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Susan; Zimmerman, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a state-by-state summary of rules and regulations governing school nursing practice in the United States. Official government and agency sites were reviewed to determine providers of services in schools, criteria for becoming a school nurse, protection of titling, mandates for school nursing, and the…

  15. Faculty Practice in a Teaching Nursing Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferington, Felicitus; Panicucci, Carol

    1986-01-01

    Describes two approaches used to define and develop faculty practice in a teaching nursing home. Problems include role conflicts, communication gaps, and differences between faculty and nursing staff goals. Benefits include availability of new nursing care services and increased opportunities for conducting clinical research. (Author/ABB)

  16. The lost path to emancipatory practice: towards a history of reflective practice in nursing.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Sioban

    2012-07-01

    This paper historicizes the taken-for-granted acceptance of reflection as a fundamental professional practice in nursing. It draws attention to the broad application of reflective practice, from pedagogy to practice to regulation, and explores the epistemological basis upon which the authority of reflective discourse rests. Previous work has provided a series of critiques of the logic and suitability of reflective practice across all domains of nursing. The goal of this paper is to commence a history of nursing's reflective identity. The paper begins with a discussion of Dewey and Schön then focuses on Habermas's Theory of Communicative Action as the epistemological basis of reflective practice's standing as a authoritative discourse in nursing.

  17. Nurses' attitudes and practices towards abused women.

    PubMed

    Häggblom, A M E; Hallberg, L R-M; Möller, Anders R

    2005-12-01

    The present article is a descriptive survey assessing nurses' knowledge, training, and practices regarding the care of abused women. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to all nurses working within the government health organization on the Aland Islands, Finland. The response rate was 57%. Most nurses had no formal training in domestic violence and were less likely than the in-service-trained nurses to intervene with abused women. Nurses' knowledge, beliefs, and practices were found to be unsystematic and had drawbacks. Nurses were not familiar with the formal structure provided by the health administration. The results suggest that in order to meet the urgent need for training among nurses, an in-service training program needs to be set up. This program would help the nurses in identifying survivors of abuse and make them prepared to intervene more effectively to promote the health of these women.

  18. Fundamental Nursing: Process-Oriented Guided-Inquiry Learning (POGIL) Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roller, Maureen C.

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the effect of a Process-Oriented Guided-Inquiry Learning (POGIL) implementation in a fundamental baccalaureate-nursing course is one way to determine its effectiveness. To date, the use of POGIL from a research perspective in fundamental nursing has not been documented in the literature. The purpose of the study was to measure the…

  19. The fundamental managerial challenges in the role of a contemporary district nurse: A discussion.

    PubMed

    McComiskey, Florence

    2017-10-02

    This article examines some of the fundamental challenges facing the district nurse in delivery of the managerial aspects of her role in contemporary practice. It discusses the personal attributes that are essential for this role to ensure safe, effective and compassionate leadership and management. The communication skills and ethos underpinning collaborative multidiscilplinary team work and person-centred care are discussed. Issues that compromise positive and productive team working are identified, and strategies dealing with conflict and also change management are debated. These factors are interrelated with the everyday demands of caseload management, the development of educational needs to meet the demands of increased complexity in care needs, and the place of technology in modern health care. It is evidenced that sustained organisational support for this role is more important than ever, due to increasing demand and decreasing capacity. Potential solutions to these challenges are offered to assist the contemporary district nurse.

  20. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Anderson, Linda J W; Rising, Shannon

    2016-06-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic survey on their use of public health interventions as defined by the wheel. Although 67% of the participants were not familiar with the Public Health Intervention Wheel, respondents reported conducting activities that were consistent with the Wheel interventions. Screening, referral and follow-up, case management, and health teaching were the most frequently performed interventions. Intervention use varied by educational level, age of nurse, years of practice, and student population. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a relevant and useful framework that provides a language to explain population-based school nursing practice.

  1. Doctorate of nursing practice: blueprint for excellence.

    PubMed

    Sperhac, Arlene M; Clinton, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    A great deal of work has been done during the past several years since the American Association of Colleges of Nursing voted in October 2004 to move advanced practice nursing to the doctoral level by 2015. Following the approval, task forces were formed to address curriculum issues and the strategies for transitioning advanced practice nursing education from the master's level to the doctorate of nursing practice (DNP). The DNP curriculum contains content on leadership, management, and other topics that are needed to address some of the issues in the health care system that traditionally have not been included in most master of science in nursing curricula, as well as additional essential content and nurse practitioner competencies. As pediatric nurse practitioners and other advanced practice nurses go forward in their careers, the DNP may have an impact on their role. In this article, the background of the DNP movement, changes in advanced practice nursing education, and the concerns of currently practicing pediatric nurse practitioners prepared at the master's level will be addressed.

  2. Nursing practice environment: a strategy for mental health nurse retention?

    PubMed

    Redknap, Robina; Twigg, Di; Rock, Daniel; Towell, Amanda

    2015-06-01

    Historically, mental health services have faced challenges in their ability to attract and retain a competent nursing workforce in the context of an overall nursing shortage. The current economic downturn has provided some respite; however, this is likely to be a temporary reprieve, with significant nursing shortages predicted for the future. Mental health services need to develop strategies to become more competitive if they are to attract and retain skilled nurses and avoid future shortages. Research demonstrates that creating and maintaining a positive nursing practice environment is one such strategy and an important area to consider when addressing nurse retention. This paper examines the impact the nursing practice environment has on nurse retention within the general and mental health settings. Findings indicate, that while there is a wealth of evidence to support the importance of a positive practice environment on nurse retention in the broader health system, there is little evidence specific to mental health. Further research of the mental health practice environment is required.

  3. Physical assessment: implications for nurse educators and nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Lesa, R; Dixon, A

    2007-06-01

    In New Zealand, the physical assessment of a patient has traditionally been the domain of the medical profession. As a country implementing advanced practice roles, with an expectation that both nurse practitioners and registered nurses will use physical assessment skills, the relevancy of physical assessment for each scope of practice has currency. The aim of this literature review was to discover what could be learnt from the experiences of Western countries that already incorporate physical assessment skills into nurses' health assessment. Nurses in the USA, and more recently Canada and Australia, readily incorporate physical assessment skills into their nursing practice as a component of health assessment. The international literature identified that any change to the nurse's role in health assessment, to include physical assessment skills, requires strategies that involve the regulatory, educational and practice components of nursing. Nurses and other health professionals must perceive that this role expansion will improve health outcomes for the diverse populations accessing health care. Teaching physical assessment skills within a holistic health model will enable nurses to contribute a more comprehensive health assessment to the planning and monitoring of people's health care.

  4. Infusing gerontological nursing content into advanced practice nursing education.

    PubMed

    Kohlenberg, Eileen; Kennedy-Malone, Laurie; Crane, Patricia; Letvak, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The inclusion of gerontology content in the nursing curriculum is paramount as our population of older adults grows. As one of 10 recipients of the John A. Hartford Foundation/AACN awards for Enhancing Gerontological and Geriatric Nursing Education for Advanced Practice Nursing Programs, we successfully integrated gerontological/ geriatric content throughout core courses for all concentrations taught at the master's level. The Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist Competencies for Older Adult Care were used as a guide to integrate gerontological nursing content across the core courses. We present examples of content, strategies, and evaluation methods that demonstrate infusion of gerontology in a nursing theory course, research course, and healthcare law and policy course. Twenty-two of the competencies are addressed in these core courses and provide a foundation for further development in the support and specialty courses for the nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, nursing administrator, nurse educator, and nurse anesthetist. We also present helpful Web-based resources for older adult care.

  5. The practice nurse: roles and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Mackereth, C J

    1995-06-01

    In the winter of 1992, a postal survey was conducted on all practice nurses in Gateshead, England. The aim of the research was to describe the work of practice nurses (nurses working with and employed by general practitioners), with particular reference to health promotion and communication, and to explore the practice nurses' perceptions of their roles. The research found little conformity about what practice nurses do, apart from practical tasks. This confirms the essentially practical nature of their work, with poor role definition with regard to screening, health promotion and prevention. Training was found to vary, indicating a need for improvement. Women's health and surveillance of the health of elderly people were used to illustrate these issues. A wide consensus was found about what tasks are appropriate to practice nurses, indicating either that the list of tasks used in the survey accurately describes their potential role or that they are prepared to perform most tasks. Practice nurses perceive themselves as the specialists in health promotion although it was not possible to gain an understanding of whether they had a conception of the wider issues involved, which illustrated a limitation of survey methods. The information obtained will be relevant in the debate about the future of practice nurses, as well as the future of primary health care services in general.

  6. Education of advanced practice nurses in Canada.

    PubMed

    Martin-Misener, Ruth; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Harbman, Patricia; Donald, Faith; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Carter, Nancy; Kilpatrick, Kelley; DiCenso, Alba

    2010-12-01

    In Canada, education programs for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and nurse practitioner (NP) roles began 40 years ago. NP programs are offered in almost all provinces. Education for the CNS role has occurred through graduate nursing programs generically defined as providing preparation for advanced nursing practice. For this paper, we drew on pertinent sections of a scoping review of the literature and key informant interviews conducted for a decision support synthesis on advanced practice nursing to describe the following: (1) history of advanced practice nursing education in Canada, (2) current status of advanced practice nursing education in Canada, (3) curriculum issues, (4) interprofessional education, (5) resources for education and (6) continuing education. Although national frameworks defining advanced nursing practice and NP competencies provide some direction for education programs, Canada does not have countrywide standards of education for either the NP or CNS role. Inconsistency in the educational requirements for primary healthcare NPs continues to cause significant problems and interferes with inter-jurisdictional licensing portability. For both CNSs and NPs, there can be a mismatch between a generalized education and specialized practice. The value of interprofessional education in facilitating effective teamwork is emphasized. Recommendations for future directions for advanced practice nursing education are offered.

  7. Cultural Congruence and Infusion Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Abitz, Tracey L

    2016-01-01

    The importance of cultural competence in every nursing practice setting in today's world cannot be understated. Unconscious bias can have detrimental effects on therapeutic relationships and health outcomes. Nursing models of cultural competence by Purnell, Leininger, and Campinha-Bacote are reviewed. The Kleinman Model and LEARN Model offer questions and guidelines to facilitate assessment of patients' understanding of illness and treatment. The Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice contains elements of diversity and cultural competence throughout. Self-reflection of one's own values, beliefs, biases, and practice as an infusion nurse will promote the development of cultural competence.

  8. Building comfort with ambiguity in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Stilos, Kalli; Moura, Shari L; Flint, Frances

    2007-04-01

    Current nursing literature recognizes the need to honor the concept of ambiguity. Nurses experience uncertainty with handling or honoring complexity and ambiguity when confronted with times of struggle. Traditional models of care fall short as patients and families define their expectations of the healthcare system. Nurses bear witness to the discomfort caused by the unknown in their daily practice. They are challenged to address their feelings, unsure of what to anticipate, what to say, or how to respond to their patients. Uncertainty diminishes the opportunity for meaningful dialogue between nurses and other people. Nurses attempting to ease the discomfort of ambiguity by providing patients or families with reassurance, offering advice on how to fix problems, or avoiding talking about situations often express dissatisfaction. Nurses should be invited to explore ambiguity and seek understanding through dialogue and nursing knowledge. Encouraging nurses to define the meaningfulness in nursing practice that embraces human science theory will help relieve some of the ambiguity that exists in current practice. This article will explore the concept of ambiguity, highlight how nursing theory based on human science can support practice, and propose recommendations for practice.

  9. The art of pediatric oncology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Mary Ann

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric oncology nursing practice must incorporate both the science and the art of the discipline to foster positive physical and psychosocial treatment outcomes for pediatric oncology patients, especially those outcomes related to their health-related quality of life. In this article, the art of nursing care is described within the context of scientifically based care, and the art of nursing practice is evident in the implementation of the scientific principles and standards for pediatric oncology nursing practice. The author proposes that the art of pediatric oncology nursing practice ought to be evident in care activities that the nurse provides within a therapeutic relationship that is steeped in nursing presence. Although the art of nursing care and the nature of an effective therapeutic relationship is tacit, valued knowledge among pediatric oncology nurses, as well as children and adolescents with cancer and their families, it is difficult to describe and challenging to quantify its effect on patient care outcomes. This article discusses the art of pediatric oncology nursing practice and its influence on treatment outcomes.

  10. [Reading nursing Literature in English: new inputs for practicing nurses].

    PubMed

    von Klitzing, Waltraut; Stoll, Hansruedi; Trachsel, Edith; Aldorf, Kurt; Bernhard, Annelis; Eze, Germaine; Spirig, Rebecca

    2007-02-01

    A prerequisite to providing evidence-based care is the ability to comprehend the nursing research literature, most of which is published in English. To facilitate this understanding, a course on "reading the research literature for evidence-based practice in English" was developed by an interdisciplinary team for staff nurses at the University Hospital Basel. The pilot course was offered to nurses who specialized in cancer care. It was led by the oncology Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) from the Department of Medicine. Research articles focusing on the management of chronic illness and cancer pain management were assigned and read. The course consisted of ten 90 minute lessons. The evaluation was designed to address the following questions: 1. Did participation in the course improve the oncology related knowledge of the nurses? 2. Did participation in the course improve the nurses' English language skills? 3. At what level of difficulty did the nurse participants perceive the course to be? 4. Were course participants able to use their newly acquired knowledge to teach their nursing colleagues on the ward? The course evaluation demonstrated that the 15 participants significantly improved their oncology knowledge through this process but that their English skills did not improve. The participants were able to present lectures on their wards based on the course literature, which were positively evaluated by their colleagues and the APN course leader. The participants perceived the course as being sophisticated but also effective at demonstrating the use of English-language research literature for one's own nursing practice.

  11. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program: Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Margaret A.

    A description is provided of "Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice," a required course for pediatric and family nurse practitioner students in a California state university program. The course description presents information on the curricular placement of the course, prerequisites, in-class time allotments, and the focus of the course…

  12. Courage and nursing practice: a theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Lindh, Inga-Britt; Barbosa da Silva, António; Berg, Agneta; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2010-09-01

    This article aims to deepen the understanding of courage through a theoretical analysis of classical philosophers' work and a review of published and unpublished empirical research on courage in nursing. The authors sought answers to questions regarding how courage is understood from a philosophical viewpoint and how it is expressed in nursing actions. Four aspects were identified as relevant to a deeper understanding of courage in nursing practice: courage as an ontological concept, a moral virtue, a property of an ethical act, and a creative capacity. The literature review shed light on the complexity of the concept of courage and revealed some lack of clarity in its use. Consequently, if courage is to be used consciously to influence nurses' ethical actions it seems important to recognize its specific features. The results suggest it is imperative to foster courage among nurses and student nurses to prepare them for ethical, creative action and further the development of professional nursing practices.

  13. Taking personal responsibility: Nurses' and assistant nurses' experiences of good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Sebastian; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Olsson, Malin

    2016-10-01

    Therapeutic nurse-patient relationships are considered essential for good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care. Previous research suggests that inpatient care fails to fulfil patients' expectations in this regard, and that nurses might experience the reality of inpatient care as an obstruction. The aim of the present study was to explore nurses' and assistant nurses' experiences of good nursing practice in the specific context of psychiatric inpatient care. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 12 skilled, relationship-oriented nurses and assistant nurses in order to explore their experiences with nursing practice related to psychiatric inpatient care. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using an interpretive descriptive approach. Findings describe good nursing practice as a matter of nurses and assistant nurses taking personal responsibility for their actions and for the individual patient as a person. Difficulties in providing dignified nursing care and taking personal responsibility cause them to experience feelings of distress and frustration. Shared values and nursing leadership supports being moral and treating patients with respect, having enough time supports being present and connecting with patients, and working as a part of a competent team with critical daily discussions and diversity supports being confident and building trust. The findings suggest that taking personal responsibility is integral to good nursing practice. If unable to improve poor circumstances, nurses might be forced to promote their own survival by refuting or redefining their responsibility. Nurses need to prioritize being with patients and gain support in shaping their own nursing practice. Nursing leadership should provide moral direction and defend humanistic values. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  14. Is compassion essential to nursing practice?

    PubMed

    Hem, Marit Helene; Heggen, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    The Norwegian Nurses' Association recently (2001) approved a new code of ethics that included compassion as one of the basic values in nursing care. This paper examines the idea of compassion in the context of the Bible story of the Good Samaritan using an analysis of qualitative data from nurses' clinical work with psychiatric patients. The aim is to show how the idea of compassion challenges nursing practice. Thereafter, the paper discusses the benefits of and premises for compassion in care work. The results show that nurses tend not to be guided by compassion in their work with patients. The organisation of the day-to-day work in the hospital ward, the division of labour between nurses and doctors, and the nurses' approach to nursing were identified as influencing this tendency. The study shows that compassion is a radical concept with a potential to promote greater respect for patients' dignity.

  15. The link between nursing discourses and nurses' silence: implications for a knowledge-based discourse for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Canam, Connie J

    2008-01-01

    Much emphasis has been placed on the importance of nurses' articulating what they do to counteract the invisibility of nursing practice. Yet there has been minimal focus on why nurses are silent. This article explores the link between technical and caring discourses and nurses' silence and suggests an alternative discourse that conceptualizes nursing as a knowledge-driven enterprise that shifts the focus from what nurses do to what nurses know by promoting nurses' practice knowledge as a language for articulating their practice.

  16. Impact of Professional Nursing Practices on Patient/Nurse Outcomes: Testing the Essential Professional Nursing Practices Instrument.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marlene; Brewer, Barbara B; Halfer, Diana; Hnatiuk, Cynthia Nowicki; MacPhee, Maura; Duchscher, Judy Boychuk; Maguire, Pat; Coe, Thomas; Schmalenberg, Claudia

    2017-05-01

    Increasing patient and healthcare system complexity and the need to accurately measure the engagement of clinical nurses (CNs) in holistic, professional nursing practice indicates that an update to the Essentials of Magnetism instrument is needed. The purposes of this research were to critique and weight items, assess the value and psychometric properties of the newly constructed Essential Professional Nursing Practices (EPNP) instrument, and establish relationships between EPNPs and CN job, practice, and nurse-assessed patient satisfaction.

  17. The professional practice knowledge of nurse preceptors.

    PubMed

    Paton, Brenda I

    2010-03-01

    Significant research has been conducted and disseminated on preceptorship as an essential component in teaching and evaluating student learning in the final clinical practicum. The preceptorship triad-formally defined as an equilateral relationship among a nurse preceptor, faculty member, and undergraduate nursing student-overlooks the contextual challenges preceptors encounter. Preceptors develop relationships in the clinical setting to enhance teaching, and more importantly, to ensure student practice reflects the depth of clinical reasoning and skill acquisition necessary for safe and competent practice. Using descriptive surveys and qualitative focus groups, a research collaborative among academia, practice, and professional regulating bodies was established in southern Alberta, Canada, to research the types of knowledge nurses acquire and integrate to successfully assess, evaluate, and teach undergraduate nursing students in the clinical environment. This article describes the research findings and highlights the professional practice knowledge of nurse preceptors.

  18. Advanced Practice Nursing Education: Challenges and Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Cynthia; Kantrowitz-Gordon, Ira; Katz, Janet; Hirsch, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Nursing education programs may face significant difficulty as they struggle to prepare sufficient numbers of advanced practice registered nurses to fulfill the vision of helping to design an improved US healthcare system as described in the Institute of Medicine's “Future of nursing” report. This paper describes specific challenges and provides strategies to improve advanced practice nursing clinical education in order to ensure that a sufficient number of APRNs are available to work in educational, practice, and research settings. Best practices are identified through a review of classic and current nursing literature. Strategies include intensive interprofessional collaborations and radical curriculum revisions such as increased use of simulation and domestic and international service work. Nurse educators must work with all stakeholders to create effective and lasting change. PMID:22220273

  19. [Reflections about power relations in nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Velloso, Isabela Silva Câncio; Ceci, Christine; Alves, Marília

    2010-06-01

    Reflections on power relations in nursing practice involves questions related to the daily practice of nursing staff as well the subjectivity of those involved in them. Nursing practice is more than a practice in itself. It assumes the dimension of meaning ascribed to it by different subjects who interact in the places where the practice takes place. We propose a reflection about power relations in nursing practice, considering their complexity, the many processes that constitute them and the circumstances that determine the ways of thinking about and acting in relation to them. Such reflection implies to think about the subject's subjectivity the way professional boundaries are established, and the effects of these relations upon the subjects involved, since power relations are in continuous transformations.

  20. Autonomy and advocacy in perinatal nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Anne H

    2008-05-01

    Advocacy has been positioned as an ideal within the practice of nursing, with national guidelines and professional standards obliging nurses to respect patients' autonomous choices and to act as their advocates. However, the meaning of advocacy and autonomy is not well defined or understood, leading to uncertainty regarding what is required, expected and feasible for nurses in clinical practice. In this article, a feminist ethics perspective is used to examine how moral responsibilities are enacted in the perinatal nurse-patient relationship and to explore the interaction between the various threads that influence, and are in turn affected by, this relationship. This perspective allows for consideration of contextual and relational factors that impact on the way perinatal nursing care is given and received, and provides a framework for exploring the ways in which patient autonomy, advocacy and choice are experienced by childbearing women and their nurses during labour and birth.

  1. The practical skills of newly qualified nurses.

    PubMed

    Danbjørg, Dorthe Boe; Birkelund, Regner

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports the findings from a study of newly qualified nurses and which subjects the nurses regarded as the most important in order to be able to live up to the requirements of clinical practice, and how they experience their potential for developing practical and moral skills, after the decrease in practical training. A qualitative approach guided the research process and the analysis of the data. The data was collected by participant observation and qualitative interviews with four nurses as informants. The conclusions made in this study are based on the statements and the observations of the newly qualified nurses. Our findings are discussed in relation to the Aristotelian concept and other relevant literature. The main message is that the newly qualified nurses did not feel equipped when they finished their training. This could be interpreted as a direct consequence of the decrease in practical training. Our study also underlines that the way nursing theory is perceived and taught is problematic. The interviews revealed that the nurses think that nursing theories should be applied directly in practice. This misunderstanding is probably also applicable to the teachers of the theories.

  2. [Involuntary commitment: implication for psychiatric nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Lilian Hortale de Oliveira; Loyola, Cristina Maria Douat

    2011-06-01

    The characteristics of involuntary psychiatric commitment (IPI) may cause implications on the nursing/patient relationship. The objectives of this study were to list the forms of nursing care delivered to psychiatric patients, according to the type of commitment; analyze the reaction of the nursing team towards the IPI patient, and discuss on the implications that IPI have on the practice o psychiatric nursing. A field research was performed with the nursing team of a psychiatric institution in Rio de Janeiro. After 50 hours of participant observation and 9 of focal group meetings, we found that the teams are concerned with the clinical evolution of the patients. No references of the nursing team to the IPI patient were observed. There are no records or actions of any kind that would suggest a specific look towards this type of patient. Nursing professionals are not able to clearly identify this type of patient, thus the care is provided as per the patient's needs or requests.

  3. Supporting new graduate nurses making the transition to rural nursing practice: views from experienced rural nurses.

    PubMed

    Lea, Jackie; Cruickshank, Mary

    2015-10-01

    To present the findings from the experienced rural nurse participants of a larger study that explored the transitional experiences of newly graduated nurses making the role transition in rural health care facilities in Australia. There are specific and unique aspects of rural nursing practice that influence the nature and timing of support for new graduate nurses that have not been explored or acknowledged as influencing the new graduate nurses' experience of transition. Specifically, the difficulties and challenges that experienced rural nurses face in providing effective and timely support for new graduate nurses who are making the transition to rural nursing practice is yet to be explored. Using a qualitative case study framework, this study specifically aimed to investigate and describe the nature and timing of support required during the transition to nursing practice that is specific for the rural context and capacity. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted with 16 experienced rural nurses who, at the time of the study, worked with new graduate nurses in the rural practice environment. The findings from this study showed that the provision of timely on-ward support for new graduates making the transition to rural nursing practice is affected and influenced by the skill mix and staffing allocation within the rural environment. As well, there is a lack of awareness by rural nurses of how to meet the on-ward support needs of new graduate nurses. This study has identified the specific and unique aspects of the rural nurse's role and responsibilities for which the new graduate nurse requires incremental learning and intensive clinical support. The findings can be used by rural health services and experienced rural registered nurses to assist in implementing adequate and timely support for new graduate nurses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Nursing control over practice and teamwork.

    PubMed

    Castner, Jessica; Ceravolo, Diane J; Foltz-Ramos, Kelly; Wu, Yow-Wu

    2013-05-31

    Nurses' control over practice is essential to nursing care quality and fosters teamwork at the point of care delivery. This article describes a study to measure the impact of nurses' control over their practice from the perspective of teamwork. The purpose of this study was to measure the relationship of control over practice to the five following dimensions of teamwork: team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, mutual support, and communication. The study method was a secondary analysis of 456 surveys from registered nurses working in a five-hospital system. Study results demonstrated that the global measure of teamwork correlated with control over practice and nursing experience, but not with teamwork training. All five individual dimensions of teamwork were perceived as better for those who had a high level of control over practice compared to those who did not. In the discussion section, we consider situation monitoring since this dimension demonstrated an interaction effect between teamwork training and control over practice. Nursing control over practice demonstrates a positive relationship with teamwork and should be considered in future education, policy, and research efforts. Further study is needed to understand control over practice as a potential moderator or mediator of other predecessors of effective teamwork.

  5. Survey of Nursing Integration of Genomics Into Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Calzone, Kathleen A.; Jenkins, Jean; Yates, Jan; Cusack, Georgie; Wallen, Gwenyth R.; Liewehr, David J.; Steinberg, Seth M.; McBride, Colleen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Translating clinically valid genomic discoveries into practice is hinged not only on technologic advances, but also on nurses—the largest global contingent of health providers—acquiring requisite competencies to apply these discoveries in clinical care. The study aim was to assess practicing nurse attitudes, practices, receptivity, confidence, and competency of integrating genomics into nursing practice. Design A convenience sample of practicing nurses was recruited to complete an online survey that assessed domains from Roger’s Diffusion of Innovations Theory and used family history utilization as the basis for competency assessment. Methods Results were tabulated and analyzed using descriptive statistical techniques. Findings Two-hundred-thirty-nine licensed registered nurses, 22 to 72 years of age, with a median of 20 years in practice, responded, for an overall response rate of 28%. Most were White (83%), female (92%), and held baccalaureate degrees (56%). Seventy-one percent considered genetics to be very important to nursing practice; however, 81% rated their understanding of the genetics of common diseases as poor or fair. Per-question response rates varied widely. Instrument assessment indicated that modifications were necessary to decrease respondent burden. Conclusions Respondents’ perceived genomic competency was inadequate, family history was not routinely utilized in care delivery, and the extent of family history varied widely. However, most nurses indicated interest in pursuing continuing genomic education. Clinical Relevance Findings from this study can lead to the development of targeted education that will facilitate optimal workforce preparation for the ongoing influx of genetics and genomics information, technologies, and targeted therapies into the healthcare arena. This pilot study provides a foundation on which to build the next step, which includes a national nursing workforce study. PMID:23205780

  6. Practical Nursing, Volume I. Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Helen W.; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides teachers with up-to-date information and skill-related applications needed by the practical nurse. The volume contains three sections and 24 instructional units: Personal Vocational Relationships (6 units), Nutrition (3 units), and Basic Nursing Principles and Applied Skills (15 units covering such topics as…

  7. Abiding With Reverence in Nurse Practice.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2016-10-01

    Reverence has been known as a forgotten virtue of human flourishing dating back thousands of years. Yet it remains as a concept pertinent to the discipline of nursing. The author of this column explores the ethical concept and its importance with specific application to the practice of nursing from a discipline-specific humanbecoming philosophical-theoretical perspective.

  8. Privacy Questions from Practicing School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergren, Martha Dewey

    2004-01-01

    This Question and Answer (Q&A) article addresses practice issues related to school health records and school nursing documentation that were posed by school nurses in the field. Specifically, the questions addressed concern the following: education records, medication privacy issues, sharing of sensitive health information, privacy of…

  9. Practical Nursing, Volume I. Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Helen W.; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides teachers with up-to-date information and skill-related applications needed by the practical nurse. The volume contains three sections and 24 instructional units: Personal Vocational Relationships (6 units), Nutrition (3 units), and Basic Nursing Principles and Applied Skills (15 units covering such topics as…

  10. A unique perspective on advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Sieloff, C L; DiCarlo, B L; Killeen, M B; McDermott, S D

    1994-01-01

    This article presents a working definition of the advanced practice registered nurse (APRN). The types of nurses that could be included in this definition and the benefits of broadening the category are discussed, as well as possible reasons for the less inclusive, previous definition of this category. Strategies are proposed for resolving concerns about broadening the category.

  11. Nursing students' responses to ethical dilemmas in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Dierckx de Casterlé, B; Grypdonck, M; Vuylsteke-Wauters, M; Janssen, P J

    1997-01-01

    In literature as well as in nursing practice a growing concern about nurses' ethical competence can be observed. Based on the cognitive theory of moral development by Kohlberg, this research examined nursing students' ethical behaviour in five nursing dilemmas. Ethical behaviour refers not only to the ethical reasoning of nursing students but also to the relationship between reasoning and behaviour. Kohlberg's definition of morality was refined by adding a care perspective. The results show that the majority of students can be located in the fourth moral stage according to Kohlberg's theory, that is, the conventional level of moral development. This finding implies that students are still guided by professional rules, norms and duties, and have not (yet) succeeded in making personal ethical decisions on the basis of their own principles and acting according to such decisions.

  12. The research potential of practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jacqueline; Heyman, Bob; Bryar, Rosamund; Graffy, Jonathan; Gunnell, Caroline; Lamb, Bryony; Morris, Lana

    2002-09-01

    Little is known about the research aspirations and experiences of practice nurses. The study discussed in the present paper had three main aims: (1) to assess the level of research interest among practice nurses working in Essex and East London, UK; (2) to identify practice nurses' research priorities; and (3) to explore factors which facilitate and impede the development of practice nursing research. All practice nurses (n = 1,054) in the above areas were sent a questionnaire, and a total of 40% (n = 426) responded after two follow-up letters. Fifty-five respondents who volunteered for further participation were interviewed, either individually or in focus groups. About half (n = 207) of the survey respondents expressed an interest in undertaking research. One-third (n = 145) reported previous participation in research, and 20% (n = 85) had initiated their own research. Logistic regression showed that practice nurses educated to graduate level, and those working in practices with nurse training or participation in external research, were most likely to want to undertake research. Working in a medical training practice was found to be a negative predictor of research interest. Respondents prioritised research into long-term health problems with a high prevalence in the local population; for example, diabetes. Their reasons for wishing to engage in research included improving the service, career development, making work more interesting and reducing isolation. The main barriers identified were lack of time, lack of support from some general practitioners and poor access to higher education resources outside formal courses. The development of practice nurse research would provide a distinctive perspective on health need and service provision. It would contribute to the achievement of the national strategic objective of improving the quality of primary care, enhance the status of the profession, utilise the enthusiasm of individuals, increase job satisfaction and

  13. Business law. Fundamentals for the occupational health nurse.

    PubMed

    D'Arruda, Kimberley A

    2002-05-01

    1. A basic understanding of the judicial system will enable occupational health nurses to read court opinions and have a better understanding of whether or how they or their companies are affected by the decision. With this knowledge, occupational health nurses can help their organization avoid legal liability by ensuring that the company does not act contrary to the decisions of the controlling courts. 2. As they are often involved in the process of contracting for goods and services, occupational health nurses need to be aware of general contract terminology and negotiating techniques so they will be better able to protect their companies. In addition, occupational health nurses can also assist in the actual contract drafting process with knowledge of a few concepts, such as the description, caption, operative language of the agreement, and definitions, of a contract. 3. Occupational health nurses are often called upon to be expert witnesses and can play an integral part in the litigation process. Because of the importance of expert witnesses, occupational health nurses must have an understanding of how to effectively provide expert witness testimony.

  14. Differentiated Nursing Practice: Concepts and Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Margaret L.

    1991-01-01

    Differentiated practice structures the roles and functions of nurses according to education, experience, and competence. Although differentiation has increased staff retention and reduced recruiting costs, improvements in patient care are difficult to prove. (SK)

  15. Strategies to explore innovation in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Price, Bob

    This article examines different types of innovation and explores how they can be applied to health care. It provides information on strategic that can be used by nurses to incorporate innovation in their practice.

  16. Simulation in Kansas practical nursing programs.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Heather A

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the lack of pediatric clinical experiences for practical nursing programs in Kansas (specifically in the Kansas City, Kansas Metropolitan area). The need for pediatric experience along with how pediatric simulation experience can enhance these programs is discussed. A quantitative research study evaluating at how implementation of a simulation activity into the practical nurse core curriculum impacts knowledge, student confidence, and satisfaction is explored.

  17. Fundamentals of Adult Education: Issues and Practices for Lifelong Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poonwassie, Deo H., Ed.; Poonwassie, Anne, Ed.

    This document contains 20 papers on the fundamentals of adult education and foundations, practices, and issues for lifelong learning. The following papers are included: "The Metamorphoses of Andragogy" (James A. Draper); "Stages in the Development of Canadian Adult Education" (Gordon Selman); "Philosophical…

  18. [Innovative thinking in nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Ling; Wang, Ya-Ni; Tsai, Hsiu-Min

    2013-04-01

    The nursing profession is patient-centered and responsible to meet the disparate health needs of a wide range of client "groups". Ensuring continued innovation and change to further improve care quality in an evolving health care system is an important issue. A focus on resolving minor points rather than on achieving major change may be the best approach to realizing continuous innovation in nursing. The advantages include not only promoting nursing quality and decreasing costs and manpower, but also giving satisfaction and self-fulfillment to the innovator. Successful innovation is affected by environmental structural support as well as the characteristics of the innovation and innovator. A successful innovator is sensitive to each opportunity, but is not a risk creator. This article describes innovator characteristics and innovation execution, and investigates the content and process of nursing innovation from various points of view in order to create new ideas and values related to the traditional nursing role.

  19. Hostility Patterns: Implications for Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Sofhauser, Cynthia D

    2015-07-01

    In order to present the state of the science of hostility among and across disciplines, a review of the literature was completed. The knowledge gained may influence nursing practice. Scholarly works from nursing, medical and basic sciences, psychology, sociology, education, philosophy, business, communication, and criminology were reviewed. Similar patterns in the use of the concept were discovered. The patterns revealed five themes: hostility as a health-risk factor, hostility as a factor in family relationships, hostility as a factor in perceived challenge, hostility as a factor in criminal behavior, and hostility as a factor in the workplace. Based on the knowledge gained about hostility, implications for nursing practice related to changing the hostile working environment for nurses were suggested using modeling and role-modeling nursing theory. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Nursing practice environment and registered nurses' job satisfaction in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H

    2012-08-01

     Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs in nursing homes.   The sample included 863 RNs working as staff RNs in 282 skilled nursing facilities in New Jersey. Two-level hierarchical linear modeling was used to account for the RNs nested by nursing homes.   Controlling for individual and nursing home characteristics, staff RNs' participation in facility affairs, supportive manager, and resource adequacy were positively associated with RNs' job satisfaction. Ownership status was significantly related to job satisfaction; RNs working in for-profit nursing homes were less satisfied.   A supportive practice environment is significantly associated with higher job satisfaction among RNs working in nursing homes. Unlike other nursing home characteristics, specific dimensions of the nursing practice environment can be modified through administrative actions to enhance RN job satisfaction.

  1. Developing the Advanced Practice Nurse in Catalonia.

    PubMed

    Comellas-Oliva, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    The development of advanced practice nurses (APN) has proved a challenge for nurses in countries such as the USA, Canada, Great Britain, and Australia among others. It is only in recent years that the system has been considered in Catalonia and Spain as a way to develop new roles to bring effectiveness and efficiency to the health system. From the standpoint of training and implementation of the above-mentioned new nursing roles, the following article aims to conceptualise APN and its reference models, as well as to contextualise and reflect on APN in Catalonia in order to assimilate them into advanced practice.

  2. Revealing higher levels of nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Ball, C

    1999-04-01

    The following discussion describes the early findings of a doctoral study, due for completion in 2001. The findings represent data collected in the USA, Australia, New Zealand and the UK, from nurses deemed to be engaged in advanced nursing practice. The paper will review the need for the study and provide a brief overview of the methodology employed. The current status of the findings, utilizing open coding, is presented. Major categories identified thus far are enhancing patient stay, improving patient outcome, promoting the role, trustworthiness, tenacity and survival in the role. The categories identified clarify current understanding of the concept, advanced nursing practice.

  3. Leadership practices and staff nurses' intent to stay: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cowden, Tracy; Cummings, Greta; Profetto-McGrath, Joanne

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the findings of a systematic review of the literature that examined the relationship between managers' leadership practices and staff nurses' intent to stay in their current position. The nursing shortage demands that managers focus on the retention of staff nurses. Understanding the relationship between leadership practices and nurses' intent to stay is fundamental to retaining nurses in the workforce. Published English language articles on leadership practices and staff nurses' intent to stay were retrieved from computerized databases and a manual search. Data extraction and quality assessments were completed for the final 23 research articles. Relational leadership practices influence staff nurses' intentions to remain in their current position. This study supports a positive relationship between transformational leadership, supportive work environments and staff nurses' intentions to remain in their current positions. Incorporating relational leadership theory into management practices will influence nurse retention. Advancing current conceptual models will increase knowledge of intent to stay. Clarifying the distinction between the concepts intent to stay and intent to leave is needed to establish a clear theoretical foundation for further intent to stay research. Nurse managers and leaders who practice relational leadership and ensure quality workplace environments are more likely to retain their staff. The findings of the present study support the claim that leadership practices influence staff nurse retention and builds on intent to stay knowledge. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Challenges facing internationalisation of nursing practice, nurse education and nursing workforce in Australia.

    PubMed

    Parker, Vicki; McMillan, Margaret

    2007-04-01

    This paper examines factors that have lead to increasing internationalisation in nursing workforce and nursing education and contends that education and support for nurse managers and nurse academics is required in order to better prepare them for the challenges they will face. There are many benefits to be gained from internationalisation of nursing, the most significant being greater cross-cultural understanding and improved practices in workplaces across countries. However, the way in which nursing and nurses contribute to the international agenda is crucial to maintaining standards of education and nursing care in Australia and in countries with whom Australians collaborate. Internationalisation poses numerous challenges that need to be carefully thought through. This paper seeks to unravel and scrutinize some of the issues central to internationalisation in nursing, particularly in the Australian context.

  5. Fundamentally updating fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Gail; Barton, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Recent educational research indicates that the six competencies of the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses initiative are best introduced in early prelicensure clinical courses. Content specific to quality and safety has traditionally been covered in senior level courses. This article illustrates an effective approach to using quality and safety as an organizing framework for any prelicensure fundamentals of nursing course. Providing prelicensure students a strong foundation in quality and safety in an introductory clinical course facilitates early adoption of quality and safety competencies as core practice values. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Best practice in nursing: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Antonia M

    2014-11-01

    Since the early 1990s a shift has occurred in the understanding of what constitutes quality healthcare. This is evidenced by the emergence of new concepts in the nursing literature, including best practice. Although authors have analyzed the concept of best practice in the healthcare sector, further analysis is required to distinguish the concept's unique meanings, and significance for the nursing discipline. This paper seeks to clarify use of the concept of best practice in the nursing literature over the last two decades, and contributes to explaining its defining characteristics, applicability, and significance. It also distinguishes the concept's unique meanings and usefulness in comparison to other related terms. An evolutionary concept analysis method was selected for this analysis. First, a representative sample of nursing sources was obtained utilizing the CINAHL database. This database was searched for sources in English, during the years 1993-2013, with both best practice and nursing in the title. Data was then collected from the sample of retrieved literature on attributes of best practice, antecedent and consequential occurrences, variations, and empirical references. The following related concepts were also explored for purposes of comparison and to situate the understanding of best practice in-context: practice development, evidence-based practice, and standard of care. Use of the concept of best practice in the nursing literature may be categorized into four distinct domains: educational, administrative, clinical and theoretical/conceptual. Exploration of defining attributes revealed that best practice may be characterized as: directive, evidence-based, and quality-focused. Antecedent occurrences in the sample sources were most commonly related to identification of a specified need or problem, somewhat defined by the domain. The implied consequential occurrences were ultimately better outcomes. Best practice is more than practice based on evidence

  7. The nursing human resource planning best practice toolkit: creating a best practice resource for nursing managers.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Leslie; Beduz, Mary Agnes

    2010-05-01

    Evidence of acute nursing shortages in urban hospitals has been surfacing since 2000. Further, new graduate nurses account for more than 50% of total nurse turnover in some hospitals and between 35% and 60% of new graduates change workplace during the first year. Critical to organizational success, first line nurse managers must have the knowledge and skills to ensure the accurate projection of nursing resource requirements and to develop proactive recruitment and retention programs that are effective, promote positive nursing socialization, and provide early exposure to the clinical setting. The Nursing Human Resource Planning Best Practice Toolkit project supported the creation of a network of teaching and community hospitals to develop a best practice toolkit in nursing human resource planning targeted at first line nursing managers. The toolkit includes the development of a framework including the conceptual building blocks of planning tools, manager interventions, retention and recruitment and professional practice models. The development of the toolkit involved conducting a review of the literature for best practices in nursing human resource planning, using a mixed method approach to data collection including a survey and extensive interviews of managers and completing a comprehensive scan of human resource practices in the participating organizations. This paper will provide an overview of the process used to develop the toolkit, a description of the toolkit contents and a reflection on the outcomes of the project.

  8. Criteria for the Evaluation of Educational Programs in Practical Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National League for Nursing, New York, NY. Dept. of Practical Nursing Programs.

    Prepared by practical nursing educators, this document is intended to serve as a tool for (1) self-evaluation by educational programs in practical nursing, (2) evaluation for accreditation by the National League for Nursing, and (3) appraisal of plans for the development of new practical nursing programs. The statements, whcih are organized into…

  9. Translating research findings to clinical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Kate; Fry, Margaret; Shaban, Ramon Z; Considine, Julie

    2017-03-01

    To describe the importance of, and methods for, successfully conducting and translating research into clinical practice. There is universal acknowledgement that the clinical care provided to individuals should be informed on the best available evidence. Knowledge and evidence derived from robust scholarly methods should drive our clinical practice, decisions and change to improve the way we deliver care. Translating research evidence to clinical practice is essential to safe, transparent, effective and efficient healthcare provision and meeting the expectations of patients, families and society. Despite its importance, translating research into clinical practice is challenging. There are more nurses in the frontline of health care than any other healthcare profession. As such, nurse-led research is increasingly recognised as a critical pathway to practical and effective ways of improving patient outcomes. However, there are well-established barriers to the conduct and translation of research evidence into practice. This clinical practice discussion paper interprets the knowledge translation literature for clinicians interested in translating research into practice. This paper is informed by the scientific literature around knowledge translation, implementation science and clinician behaviour change, and presented from the nurse clinician perspective. We provide practical, evidence-informed suggestions to overcome the barriers and facilitate enablers of knowledge translation. Examples of nurse-led research incorporating the principles of knowledge translation in their study design that have resulted in improvements in patient outcomes are presented in conjunction with supporting evidence. Translation should be considered in research design, including the end users and an evaluation of the research implementation. The success of research implementation in health care is dependent on clinician/consumer behaviour change and it is critical that implementation strategy

  10. U.S. Geological Survey Fundamental Science Practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2011-01-01

    The USGS has a long and proud tradition of objective, unbiased science in service to the Nation. A reputation for impartiality and excellence is one of our most important assets. To help preserve this vital asset, in 2004 the Executive Leadership Team (ELT) of the USGS was charged by the Director to develop a set of fundamental science practices, philosophical premises, and operational principles as the foundation for all USGS research and monitoring activities. In a concept document, 'Fundamental Science Practices of the U.S. Geological Survey', the ELT proposed 'a set of fundamental principles to underlie USGS science practices.' The document noted that protecting the reputation of USGS science for quality and objectivity requires the following key elements: - Clearly articulated, Bureau-wide fundamental science practices. - A shared understanding at all levels of the organization that the health and future of the USGS depend on following these practices. - The investment of budget, time, and people to ensure that the USGS reputation and high-quality standards are maintained. The USGS Fundamental Science Practices (FSP) encompass all elements of research investigations, including data collection, experimentation, analysis, writing results, peer review, management review, and Bureau approval and publication of information products. The focus of FSP is on how science is carried out and how products are produced and disseminated. FSP is not designed to address the question of what work the USGS should do; that is addressed in USGS science planning handbooks and other documents. Building from longstanding existing USGS policies and the ELT concept document, in May 2006, FSP policies were developed with input from all parts of the organization and were subsequently incorporated into the Bureau's Survey Manual. In developing an implementation plan for FSP policy, the intent was to recognize and incorporate the best of USGS current practices to obtain the optimum

  11. The Careful Nursing philosophy and professional practice model.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Therese C

    2012-10-01

    To present the Careful Nursing philosophy and professional practice model which has its source in the skilled practice of 19th century Irish nurses and to propose that its implementation could provide a relevant foundation for contemporary nursing practice. Nursing models are widely considered not relevant to nursing practice. Alarming instances of incompetent and insensitive nursing practice and experiences of powerlessness amongst nurses are being reported. Professional practice models that will inspire and strengthen nurses in practice and help them to address these challenges are needed. Nursing history has been suggested as a source of such models. Discursive. Content analysis of historical documents describing the thinking and practice of 19th century Irish nurses. Identification of emergent categories and subcategories as philosophical assumptions, concepts and dimensions of professional nursing practice. A philosophical approach to practise encompassing the nature and innate dignity of the person, the experience of an infinite transcendent reality in life processes and health as human flourishing. A professional practice model constructed from four concepts; therapeutic milieu, practice competence and excellence, management of practice and influence in health systems and professional authority; and their eighteen dimensions. As a philosophy and professional practice model, Careful Nursing can engage nurses and provide meaningful direction for practice. It could help decrease incidents of incompetent and insensitive practice and sustain already exemplary practice. As a basis for theory development, it could help close the relevance gap between nursing practice and nursing science. Careful Nursing highlights respect for the innate dignity of all persons and what this means for nurses in their relationships with patients. It balances attentive tenderness in nurse-patient relationships with clinical skill and judgement. It helps nurses to establish their

  12. Beyond empathy: clinical intimacy in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Timothy W

    2007-10-01

    Understanding, shared meaning, and mutual trust lie at the heart of the therapeutic nurse-patient relationship. This article introduces the concept of clinical intimacy by applying the interpersonal process model of intimacy to the nurse-patient relationship. The distinction between complementary and reciprocal behaviours, and between intimate interactions and intimate relationships, addresses background concerns about the appropriateness of intimacy in nursing relationships. The mutual construction of meaning in the interactive process between nurses and patients is seen to lie at the heart of clinical intimacy as a hermeneutic enterprise. Intimacy is distinguished from empathy based on intentionality and the status and location of meaning. Reasons for continued investigation into clinical intimacy as an explanatory model for nursing as a hermeneutic practice are presented.

  13. Nursing Education Leaders' Perceived Leadership Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLong, Dianne

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the leadership practices perceived by nursing education leaders as measured by the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI). The framework used was a contemporary transformational leadership model described in "The Leadership Challenge" ("4th ed.") by Dr. James Kouzes and Dr. Barry Posner,…

  14. Teaching Research Synthesis to Advanced Practice Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upchurch, Sandra; Brosnan, Christine A.; Grimes, Deanna E.

    2002-01-01

    A process for teaching research synthesis to advanced practice nurses includes two courses: a first research applications course in which students build bibliographic databases, practice statistical analysis, and develop search skills; and a second course in which they complete literature reviews or meta analyses of research on clinical practice…

  15. Teaching Research Synthesis to Advanced Practice Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upchurch, Sandra; Brosnan, Christine A.; Grimes, Deanna E.

    2002-01-01

    A process for teaching research synthesis to advanced practice nurses includes two courses: a first research applications course in which students build bibliographic databases, practice statistical analysis, and develop search skills; and a second course in which they complete literature reviews or meta analyses of research on clinical practice…

  16. Using advanced mobile devices in nursing practice--the views of nurses and nursing students.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Pauline; Petersson, Göran; Saveman, Britt-Inger; Nilsson, Gunilla

    2014-09-01

    Advanced mobile devices allow registered nurses and nursing students to keep up-to-date with expanding health-related knowledge but are rarely used in nursing in Sweden. This study aims at describing registered nurses' and nursing students' views regarding the use of advanced mobile devices in nursing practice. A cross-sectional study was completed in 2012; a total of 398 participants replied to a questionnaire, and descriptive statistics were applied. Results showed that the majority of the participants regarded an advanced mobile device to be useful, giving access to necessary information and also being useful in making notes, planning their work and saving time. Furthermore, the advanced mobile device was regarded to improve patient safety and the quality of care and to increase confidence. In order to continuously improve the safety and quality of health care, advanced mobile devices adjusted for nursing practice should be further developed, implemented and evaluated in research. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. Clinical practice opportunities for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Marfell, Julie A

    2002-09-01

    With approximately 132,000 practicing APNs and a continued need for APNs, the role will continue to expand. Many different business options and models for healthcare practice exist for the APN. Commonly thought of professional practice options for APNs include private practice, joint or collaborative practice, and group practice. Each model of professional practice brings with it different roles and responsibilities, rewards and challenges, and criteria for success. When evaluating different practice opportunities. APNs must be aware of each of these factors and evaluate each factor based on his or her chosen lifestyle. This article has presented an overview of common practice models and the roles and responsibilities, challenges and rewards, criteria for success, and lifestyle considerations inherent in each.

  18. Practical strategies for nursing education program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lewallen, Lynne Porter

    2015-01-01

    Self-evaluation is required for institutions of higher learning and the nursing programs within them. The literature provides information on evaluation models and instruments, and descriptions of how specific nursing education programs are evaluated. However, there are few discussions in the nursing education literature of the practical aspects of nursing education program evaluation: how to get started, how to keep track of data, who to involve in data collection, and how to manage challenging criteria. This article discusses the importance of program evaluation in the academic setting and provides information on practical ways to organize the evaluation process and aggregate data, and strategies for gathering data from students, graduates, alumni, and employers of graduates.

  19. Collaborative practice through nursing case management.

    PubMed

    Chimner, N E; Easterling, A

    1993-01-01

    A 528-bed community teaching hospital redesigned its patient care delivery system, implementing a collaborative practice model on the 30-bed inpatient rehabilitation unit in April 1990. This model is a patient-centered delivery model that encourages the healthcare team to facilitate the achievement of patient outcomes within effective time frames and with an appropriate use of resources. The collaborative practice model includes a nurse case manager's role for the staff nurse, which had as its frame-work the concept of nursing case management. Tested project management techniques were used to ensure a successful implementation process. Various strategies, such as using project teams and providing educational programs, were used to respond to the issues of role conflict and overlap, especially between social workers and nurse case managers. The implementation of this model provided a number of benefits, including improved interdisciplinary relationships and decreased length of stay.

  20. Gelling Your Dermatology Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Sue A.; Chase, Allister Benjamin; Tawa, Marianne C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycosis fungoides is the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Stage IA and IB mycosis fungoides cutaneous T-cell lymphoma can be effectively controlled by skin-directed therapies such as the mechlorethamine gel approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Dermatology nurses play a key role in promoting good patient compliance through patient education about mycosis fungoides cutaneous T-cell lymphoma disease, proper administration of mechlorethamine gel, and connecting patients with patient assistance programs or other supportive services. This article provides the dermatology nurse with a background about early-stage mycosis fungoides cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, skin-directed treatment options, questions that a patient may ask about mycosis fungoides cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and mechlorethamine gel, and patient education tools such as questions dermatology nurses may ask of their patients and a patient handout outlining mechlorethamine gel administration.

  1. [Breastfeeding: nurses' practice under the perspective of the International Classification of Collective Health Nursing Practices].

    PubMed

    Chaves, Maria Marta Nolasco; de Senna Ávila Farias, Fabiana Costa; Apostólico, Maíra Rosa; Cubas, Marcia Regina; Egry, Emiko Yoshikawa

    2011-03-01

    This descriptive and exploratory study aimed to describe nursing diagnoses and interventions under the International Nursing Practice Classification in Collective Health--CIPESC®--in Women's Health Care, sub-theme Pre-Natal and Puerperium, correlating them to nurses' competences at Curitiba's Mother Program. Data used were diagnoses and interventions during nursing consultation from April to July/ 2005. Basic Statistics was used for data treatment. Proper Breastfeeding was the most frequent diagnosis and most interventions are related to strengthening the user to face the health-disease process (68.9%). In spite of nurses' practice during puerperium, such a competence is not part of the Program Protocol. In conclusion, minor adjustments are necessary in the analyzed diagnoses and the Protocol should be reviewed to entail nurses' competences that are developed in their practice in health services according to CIPESC' s registers.

  2. Nursing and motherhood constructions: implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Brennan, S

    1998-03-01

    The present paper addresses the relationship between community based child health nursing services and social constructions of motherhood within Australia during the 1920s. Following the First World War, child health nursing services (then generally known as infant welfare or child welfare services) were established in all Australian states. The focus of the paper is mainly upon the development of the Tasmanian child health service, with some reference to similar services in other states. Within two decades of their establishment, most child-bearing women in Tasmania were in contact with child health services and this apparent success meant that, thereafter, women in Tasmania cared for their children under the 'expert' guidance of nurses. As the 1920s progressed, child health nurses increasingly promoted one particular, and ultimately extremely influential, construction of motherhood, 'scientific motherhood', based upon the philosophy of Dr Truby King. I argue that an understanding of how nursing services have historically reinforced and promoted ideological constructions of motherhood enhances the practice of present day nurses working with women. This argument is supported by reference to present day nursing practice in relation to postnatal depression.

  3. Effective communication skills in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Bramhall, Elaine

    2014-12-09

    This article highlights the importance of effective communication skills for nurses. It focuses on core communication skills, their definitions and the positive outcomes that result when applied to practice. Effective communication is central to the provision of compassionate, high-quality nursing care. The article aims to refresh and develop existing knowledge and understanding of effective communication skills. Nurses reading this article will be encouraged to develop a more conscious style of communicating with patients and carers, with the aim of improving health outcomes and patient satisfaction.

  4. How narratives can change nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Holly; Maw, Heather; Mee, Steve; Buckley, Alison; Corless, Louise

    This series has explored the value of patient narratives in enabling nurses to reflect on how their practice is perceived by, and affects, patients and their families. This article describes how two student learning disability nurses used patient and carer narratives to highlight the effect of a hospital trust's lack of toilet provision for people with physical impairments, using the stories to persuade the trust to develop appropriate facilities.

  5. Mobile applications in nursing education and practice.

    PubMed

    Airth-Kindree, Norah; Vandenbark, R Todd

    2014-01-01

    Students in an RN-BSN completion program capstone course investigated and critically evaluated mobile medical applications using an information literacy conceptual framework. Students also analyzed their potential usefulness as a resource in nursing practice. Student evaluations focused on usability and applicability when recommending the use of mobile applications as a point-of-care reference tools. This pilot assignment offers an innovative teaching strategy for integrating 1 aspect of informatics instruction into the nursing curriculum.

  6. Interpreting patients as a means of clinical practice: introducing nursing hermeneutics.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, Andreas

    2010-10-01

    The increased reference to hermeneutics from nursing scientists, researchers and academics has emphasized that interpretation has traditionally been a fundamental part of nursing practice. In nursing research a propensity for acquiring knowledge and understanding by using, multiple modalities has been demonstrated. In recent years, the use of hermeneutic phenomenology, has featured amongst these modalities. Hermeneutic phenomenology is an inquiry arm of, philosophical hermeneutics. To explore the hypotheses that the patient can be considered as "text" and as such to be, interpreted in order to gain information for decision-making in clinical practice. A qualitative approach (hermeneutic phenomenological) to nursing clinical practice. The clinical case of a patient suffering from cancer is described in the paper who was treated, in an Oncology Centre in Cyprus. A hermeneutical model of clinical decision-making in nursing is implemented in practice. The, model was initially used in medical practice; however it finds applications to nursing as well. According, to the model, a patient is perceived as a literary text which may be interpreted on four levels: (1) the, literal facts of the patient's body and the literal story told by the patient, (2) the nursing diagnostic, meaning of the literal data, (3) the praxis (the nursing interventions) emanating from the nursing, diagnosis, and (4) the change effected by the clinical encounter in both the patient's and nurse's lifeworlds. Nursing interventions were successfully informed by the interpretation process. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Leader Influence, the Professional Practice Environment, and Nurse Engagement in Essential Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, Maria P; Bernhardt, Jean M; Padula, Cynthia A; Adams, Jeffrey M

    The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between leaders' perceived influence over professional practice environments (PPEs) and clinical nurses' reported engagement in essential professional nursing practice. There is little empirical evidence identifying impact of nurse leader influence or why nursing leaders are not perceived, nor do they perceive themselves, as influential in healthcare decision making. A nonexperimental method of prediction was used to examine relationships between engagement in professional practice, measured by Essentials of Magnetism II (EOMII) tool, and nurse leaders' perceived influence, measured by Leadership Influence over Professional Practice Environment Scale (LIPPES). A convenience sample of 30 nurse leaders and 169 clinical nurses, employed in a 247-bed acute care Magnet® hospital, participated. Findings indicated that leaders perceived their influence presence from "often" to "always," with mean scores of 3.02 to 3.70 on a 4-point Likert scale, with the lowest subscale as "access to resources" for which a significant relationship was found with clinical nurses' reported presence of adequate staffing (P < .004). Clinical nurses reported more positive perceptions in adequacy of staffing on the EOMII when nurse leaders perceived themselves to be more influential, as measured by the LIPPES, in collegial administrative approach (P = .014), authority (P = .001), access to resources (P = .004), and leadership expectations of staff (P = .039). Relationships were seen in the outcome measure of the EOMII scale, nurse-assessed quality of patient care (NAQC), where nurse leaders' perception of their authority (P = .003) and access to resources (P = .022) positively impacted and was predictive of NAQC. Findings support assertion that nurse leaders are integral in enhancing PPEs and their influence links structures necessary for an environment that supports outcomes.

  8. Qualitative Distinctions and Similarities in the Practice of Clinical Nurse Specialists and Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Mary V.; Brykczynski, Karen A.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison of results of two studies regarding the actual practice of clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners revealed a shared core of advanced practice competencies as well as distinct differences between practice roles. (JOW)

  9. Structures and practices enabling staff nurses to control their practice.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marlene; Schmalenberg, Claudia; Maguire, Patricia; Brewer, Barbara B; Burke, Rebecca; Chmielewski, Linda; Cox, Karen; Kishner, Janice; Krugman, Mary; Meeks-Sjostrom, Diana; Waldo, Mary

    2008-08-01

    This mixed-methods study uses interviews, participant observations, and the CWEQII empowerment tool to identify structures and attributes of structures that promote control over nursing practice (CNP). Nearly 3,000 staff nurses completed the Essentials of Magnetism (EOM), an instrument that measures CNP, one of the eight staff nurse-identified essential attributes of a productive work environment. Strategic sampling is used to identify 101 high CNP-scoring clinical units in 8 high-EOM scoring magnet hospitals. In addition to 446 staff nurses, managers, and physicians on these high-scoring units, chief nursing officers, chief operating officers, and representatives from other professional departments are interviewed; participant observations are made of all unit/departmental/hospital council and interdisciplinary meetings held during a 4 to 6 day site visit. Structures and components of viable shared governance structures that enabled CNP are identified through constant comparative analysis of interviews and observations, and through analysis of quantitative measures.

  10. Applying skills and knowledge: Principle Of Nursing Practice F.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jenny; Watts, Chris

    This is the seventh article in a nine-part series describing the Principles of Nursing Practice developed by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) in collaboration with patient and service organisations, the Department of Health, the Nursing and Midwifery Council, nurses and other healthcare professionals. The article discusses Principle F, the application of skills and knowledge to person-centred nursing care.

  11. Accountability and responsibility: principle of nursing practice B.

    PubMed

    Scrivener, Ross; Hand, Tanis; Hooper, Roz

    This is the third article in a nine-part series describing the Principles of Nursing Practice developed by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) in collaboration with patient and service organisations, the Department of Health, the Nursing and Midwifery Council, nurses and other healthcare professionals. The article discusses Principle B, the need for accountability and responsibility in the provision of nursing care.

  12. Measuring nursing informatics competencies of practicing nurses in Korea: Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seon Yoon; Staggers, Nancy

    2014-12-01

    Informatics competencies are a necessity for contemporary nurses. However, few researchers have investigated informatics competencies for practicing nurses. A full set of Informatics competencies, an instrument to measure these competencies, and potential influencing factors have yet to be identified for practicing nurses. The Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire was designed, tested for psychometrics, and used to measure beginning and experienced levels of practice. A pilot study using 54 nurses ensured item comprehension and clarity. Internal consistency and face and content validity were established. A cross-sectional survey was then conducted on 230 nurses in Seoul, Korea, to determine construct validity, describe a complete set of informatics competencies, and explore possible influencing factors on existing informatics competencies. Principal components analysis, descriptive statistics, and multiple regression were used for data analysis. Principal components analysis gives support for the Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire construct validity. Survey results indicate that involvement in a managerial position and self-directed informatics-related education may be more influential for improving informatics competencies, whereas general clinical experience and workplace settings are not. This study provides a foundation for understanding how informatics competencies might be integrated throughout nurses' work lives and how to develop appropriate strategies to support nurses in their informatics practice in clinical settings.

  13. A pragmatic view of intuitive knowledge in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Billay, Diane; Myrick, Florence; Luhanga, Florence; Yonge, Olive

    2007-01-01

    Examining and exploring the intuitive knowledge--ergo intuition--of nurses is a critical undertaking for the practice of nursing. Traditionally, as nurses, we have been conditioned to value empirical knowledge above all other forms of knowledge. Intuition is, however, a rich source of nursing knowledge and, the authors would suggest, integral to the practice of nursing. Explicit recognition and embracing of intuition, as being a legitimate form of knowledge in the practice arena, must be intentionally nurtured. The focus of this paper is to explore intuitive knowledge within the context of nursing practice. It will also address various influences on our understanding of intuition as an essential form of nursing knowledge.

  14. Transformational leadership in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Doody, Owen; Doody, Catriona M

    Traditionally, nurses have been over-managed and led inadequately, yet today they face unprecedented challenges and opportunities. Organisations constantly face changes that require an increasingly adaptive and flexible leadership. This type of adaptive leadership is referred to as 'transformational'; under it, environments of shared responsibilities that influence new ways of knowing are created. Transformational leadership motivates followers by appealing to higher ideas and moral values, where the leader has a deep set of internal values and ideas. This leads to followers acting to sustain the greater good, rather than their own interests, and supportive environments where responsibility is shared. This article focuses on transformational leadership and its application to nursing through the four components of transformational leadership. These are: idealised influence; inspirational motivation; intellectual stimulation; and individual consideration.

  15. Identification of Desired Outcomes for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Janice; Guilday, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    The "Scope and Standards of Professional School Nursing Practice" states that school nurses should evaluate the quality and effectiveness of their practice. School nurses have not yet identified and adopted outcomes by which this effectiveness can be measured. This study used focus groups during a national meeting of school nurse leaders to…

  16. Enhancing assertiveness in district nurse specialist practice.

    PubMed

    Green, Julie

    2016-08-02

    District nurse (DN) care delivery has undergone substantial change in recent years due to changing demographics and service delivery demands that have called for a move of care delivery from secondary to primary care. The title District Nurse is recorded with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) on completion of the Specialist Practice Qualification in District Nursing (SPQ DN), which purports to be a 'transformational' course that prepares future caseload holders to manage their team and prioritise care delivery effectively. This article explores the need for assertiveness skills in this role in response to Australian research, and outlines the pedagogic interventions implemented during the SPQ DN course to enhance this skill. Assertiveness scores were monitored for the duration of the course and demonstrated a significant increase-a topic that is now the subject of a future, funded study.

  17. [Fundamental research in nursing sciences. Historical research on the foundations of a discipline].

    PubMed

    Nadot, Michel

    2012-06-01

    For lack of serious fundamental research in History on the standardization of its own discipline, the nursing profession continues to be fed by clichés, common sense, and relies on symbols and faiths stemming from the past as well as on what characterizes in a general way the female careers in our society. The lack of recognition experienced by the nursing profession is not so surprising from then on. At the time of the globalization of knowledge, which remains to this day, the only source of sustainable competitive advantage, the historian of the nursing discipline should start wondering about the international status of his discipline within the learned worlds.

  18. Healthy buildings: impact on nurses and nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Robin; Hall, Anna Gilmore

    2007-05-31

    Mounting evidence indicates that buildings can be a significant cause of human illness and environmental degradation. According to the United States (US) Environmental Protection Agency, indoor air pollution is one of the top five environmental risks to public health in the US. This may be related, to a large extent, to the fact that US citizens spend as much as 95% of their time indoors. Health care leaders, designers, and architects, recognizing the connection between health and the buildings in which much time is spent, are engaging in sustainable design and construction for healthy, 'green' buildings. The purpose of this article is to assist nurses in understanding the impact that unhealthy buildings can have on nurses and nursing practice and to provide tools and resources to assist nurses in transforming the health care industry with the goal of creating healing environments and reducing the negative environmental impact of the health care industry. First definitions, current initiatives, and motivations related to sustainable designs will be presented. Next sustainable health care design strategies, such as site planning, clean transportation, water conservation, healthy materials selection, indoor environmental quality, and also the benefits of sustainable design will be discussed. The article will conclude by sharing a variety of resources nurses can use to create healing environments in health care settings.

  19. The practice doctorate: where do Canadian nursing leaders stand?

    PubMed

    Joachim, Gloria

    2008-01-01

    This article calls upon Canadian nursing leaders to examine the merits and downsides of the new practice doctorate degree - the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). The impetus for the DNP arose from within the American nursing profession in order to address the knowledge and skills needed by advanced practice nurses to work in today's complex healthcare environment. The DNP is the newest practice doctorate degree and in 2015 will be the entry to practice degree required of all new advanced practice nurses in the United States. Advanced practice nurses who will have the practice doctorate include clinical nurse specialists, nurse practitioners, nurse midwives and nurse anaesthetists. With the establishment and acceptance of the DNP in the United States, American advanced practice nurses will have a different knowledge base than Canadian advanced practice nurses. The evolution and state of advanced practice nursing in Canada are discussed in this article. Canadian nursing leaders must discuss the DNP, its merits and downsides within the Canadian context and begin to make informed decisions about whether or not the DNP should come to Canada.

  20. A Trial of Nursing Cost Accounting using Nursing Practice Data on a Hospital Information System.

    PubMed

    Miyahira, Akiko; Tada, Kazuko; Ishima, Masatoshi; Nagao, Hidenori; Miyamoto, Tadashi; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Takemura, Tadamasa

    2015-01-01

    Hospital administration is very important and many hospitals carry out activity-based costing under comprehensive medicine. However, nursing cost is unclear, because nursing practice is expanding both quantitatively and qualitatively and it is difficult to grasp all nursing practices, and nursing cost is calculated in many cases comprehensively. On the other hand, a nursing information system (NIS) is implemented in many hospitals in Japan and we are beginning to get nursing practical data. In this paper, we propose a nursing cost accounting model and we simulate a cost by nursing contribution using NIS data.

  1. Acute care nurses' spiritual care practices.

    PubMed

    Gallison, Barry S; Xu, Yan; Jurgens, Corrine Y; Boyle, Suzanne M

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify barriers in providing spiritual care to hospitalized patients. A convenience sample (N = 271) was recruited at an academic medical center in New York City for an exploratory, descriptive questionnaire. The Spiritual Care Practice (SCP) questionnaire assesses spiritual care practices and perceived barriers to spiritual care. The SCP determines the percentage that provides spiritual support and perceived barriers inhibiting spiritual care. The participation rate was 44.3% (N = 120). Most (61%) scored less than the ideal mean on the SCP. Although 96% (N = 114) believe addressing patients spiritual needs are within their role, nearly half (48%) report rarely participating in spiritual practices. The greatest perceived barriers were belief that patient's spirituality is private, insufficient time, difficulty distinguishing proselytizing from spiritual care, and difficulty meeting needs when spiritual beliefs were different from their own. Although nurses identify themselves as spiritual, results indicate spirituality assessments are inadequate. Addressing barriers will provide nurses opportunities to address spirituality. Education is warranted to improve nurses' awareness of the diversity of our society to better meet the spiritual needs of patients. Understanding these needs provide the nurse with opportunities to address spirituality and connect desires with actions to strengthen communication and the nurse-patient relationship.

  2. Nurse residency programs and the transition to child health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Delack, Sandi; Martin, Jean; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Sperhac, Arlene M

    2015-06-01

    Nurse residency programs for newly licensed RNs are a critical component in bridging the clinical practice gap between education and practice. In May 2013, the Institute of Pediatric Nursing invited leaders from pediatric nursing organizations and children's hospitals to attend a forum on nurse residency programs for pediatric nurses. This article presents a summary of the discussions that occurred during the forum and makes recommendations for addressing issues related to nurse residency programs.

  3. From Academic-Practice Partnership to Professional Nursing Practice Model.

    PubMed

    Hudacek, Sharon Smith; DiMattio, Mary Jane K; Turkel, Marian C

    2017-03-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "From Academic-Practice Partnership to Professional Nursing Practice Model," found on pages 104-112, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until February 28, 2020. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. OBJECTIVES Describe the benefits and barriers to participation in a community-based academic-practice partnership. Identify three

  4. The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing: A Collaborative Model for Nursing Practice and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatier, Kathleen Hartman

    2002-01-01

    The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing was developed collaboratively by the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing and the Johns Hopkins Hospital Department of Nursing. The institute prepares nurses for practice, keeps practitioners current, and provides nursing staff development programs. (Contains 11 references.) (JOW)

  5. Thinking creatively: from nursing education to practice.

    PubMed

    Kalischuk, Ruth Grant; Thorpe, Karran

    2002-01-01

    Creative thinking is a critical link in the teaching-learning process, one that enhances problem solving in nursing practice. This article describes a conceptualization of creativity based on focus groups with 12 post-RN students and two nurse educators. Inherent within the major theme, striving for balance, were three subthemes-enhancing self-esteem, working within structure, and making time for reflection (i.e., process). When participants achieved balance, both personally and professionally, they experienced increased creative energy that resulted in creative expression, subsequently displayed in educational endeavors and clinical practice (i.e., product). Strategies for fostering creativity and criteria for evaluating creativity are offered, and implications for nurse educators, managers, and practitioners are examined.

  6. Practice Management Skills for the Nurse Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sportsman, Susan; Hawley, Linda J.; Pollock, Susan; Varnell, Gayle

    2001-01-01

    An expert panel identified 20 business concepts important for a family nurse practitioner curriculum. A focus group of practitioners verified the concepts and clarified relevant information to be taught. The business concepts center on management and operations of a clinical practice. (SK)

  7. Practical Nursing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for practical nursing. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  8. Practice Management Skills for the Nurse Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sportsman, Susan; Hawley, Linda J.; Pollock, Susan; Varnell, Gayle

    2001-01-01

    An expert panel identified 20 business concepts important for a family nurse practitioner curriculum. A focus group of practitioners verified the concepts and clarified relevant information to be taught. The business concepts center on management and operations of a clinical practice. (SK)

  9. PRACTICAL NURSING IN ILLINOIS--A PROFILE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TOMLINSON, ROBERT M.; AND OTHERS

    THIS DOCUMENT, THE FIRST OF FIVE PLANNED REPORTS, PRESENTS THE HISTORY AND BACKGROUND OF PRACTICAL NURSING, WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO ILLINOIS. IT DESCRIBES THE BETTER LICENSING PROCEDURES AND STANDARDS THAT HAVE COME WITH THE INCREASED RECOGNITION OF THE VALUE OF THE OCCUPATION TO THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. THE REPORT ALSO DESCRIBES A 1600-HOUR…

  10. Identifying advanced practice: A national survey of a nursing workforce.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Glenn; Duffield, Christine; Doubrovsky, Anna; Adams, Margaret

    2016-03-01

    The size and flexibility of the nursing workforce has positioned nursing as central to the goals of health service improvement. Nursing's response to meeting these goals has resulted in proliferation of advanced practice nursing with a confusing array of practice profiles, titles and roles. Whilst numerous models and definitions of advanced practice nursing have been developed there is scant published research of significant scope that supports these models. Consequently there is an ongoing call in the literature for clarity and stability in nomenclature, and confusion in the health industry on how to optimise the utility of advanced practice nursing. To identify and delineate advanced practice from other levels of nursing practice through examination of a national nursing workforce. A cross-sectional electronic survey of nurses using the validated Advanced Practice Role Delineation tool based on the Strong Model of Advanced Practice. Study participants were registered nurses employed in a clinical service environment across all states and territories of Australia. A sample of 5662 registered nurses participated in the study. Domain means for each participant were calculated then means for nursing position titles were calculated. Position titles were grouped by delineation and were compared with one-way analysis of variance on domain means. The alpha for all tests was set at 0.05. Significant effects were examined with Scheffe post hoc comparisons to control for Type 1 error. The survey tool was able to identify position titles where nurses were practicing at an advanced level and to delineate this cohort from other levels of nursing practice, including nurse practitioner. The results show that nurses who practice at an advanced level are characterised by high mean scores across all Domains of the Strong Model of Advanced Practice. The mean scores of advanced practice nurses were significantly different from nurse practitioners in the Direct Care Domain and

  11. Constructing monsters: correctional discourse and nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Dave; Federman, Cary

    2003-05-01

    This article presents the results of a nursing research that aimed at describing the practice of nursing in an extreme environment where social control and psychiatric nursing care are inextricably enmeshed with one another. The study results indicate that the Correctional Psychiatric Centre (CPC) is a site where two antagonistic discourses (that of the hospital and that of the prison) are contending for the human resources in place. Given that the asylum and the prison are as such two distinct institutions, the correctional psychiatric centre constitutes an ideological space that results from the fusion of both the psychiatric and penal apparatuses. However, characteristics commonly attributed to prisoners, such as 'lying', 'dangerous', 'monstrous' and 'manipulative' are superimposed on the nurses' common theoretical representation that a patient is a person to whom care is provided. Monstrosity was a term regularly employed to describe particular types of inmates. The literature on monsters in quite informative in order to understand the impact of such a representation of forensic psychiatric nursing practice.

  12. Education and Practice Barriers for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Malina, Debra P; Izlar, Janice J

    2014-05-31

    Of the recognized advanced practice registered nursing (APRN) specialties, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) have historically experienced the most vigorous and organized resistance from outside entities regarding rights to practice to the full scope of their education and experience. Opposition to nurse anesthetists practicing to the full scope of their education and training is present in the clinical arena and educational milieu.

  13. Evidence-based nursing practice: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Ervin, Naomi E

    2002-01-01

    The volume of evidence for nursing practice has increased as a result of research and scientific discoveries. Yet we are still struggling with the dilemma of how to get evidence into nursing practice. Estimates are that it takes 20 years before innovations are fully put into use. Research is one type of knowledge to be used in practice. Nursing and patient care would benefit from moving more toward knowledge based on research and evidence. This article reviews barriers to and facilitators of using evidence in nursing practice and discusses a model for promoting the systematic use of evidence in practice. The author also offers suggestions for increasing the evidence base of nursing practice. Using evidence in nursing practice is important for all nurses, but requires more that the attention of the individual nurse.

  14. Action research: changing nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Hegney, Desley Gail; Francis, Karen

    2015-06-03

    This article describes action research as a methodology and gives two examples of its application to nursing and health services research. Action research is cyclical in nature and involves the development, evaluation and redefining of an action plan using four basic steps: planning, action, observation and reflection. These cycles of action continue until the research group is satisfied that its objectives have been met. Data generation and analysis are iterative processes that occur continuously throughout the project, which is usually time-limited. Factors that should be taken into account to ensure success include: engaging the community, consideration of 'insider' versus 'outsider' perspectives, competing agendas, expectations not being met and the integrity of the research methodology.

  15. Nurses as practice change facilitators for healthy behaviors.

    PubMed

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Baumann, Jeanne; Arnold, Anita K; Torres, Trissa

    2008-01-01

    This study used nurses as practice change consultants to help primary care medical practices improve their delivery of health behavior services to patients. Nurse consultants worked with 20 practices from 2 healthcare systems. In each practice, the nurses helped clinicians and staff to develop a practice-specific protocol so that they could identify and intervene with the health behavior of their patients. As a result of the nurse consultant intervention, health behavior delivery was improved. This article describes the specific methods and the lessons learned through this study. We encourage practices to use nurse consultants as one way of improving quality of care.

  16. Exploring reflective thinking in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Teekman, B

    2000-05-01

    While it is claimed in the nursing literature that reflective thinking is the approach par excellence for learning and advancing the art and practice of nursing, few empirical studies have been undertaken in this area to date. Sense-Making, a qualitative research method, was utilized to obtain and analyse data from interviews with 10 registered nurses in order to study reflective thinking in actual nursing practice. Ten non-routine nursing situations were analysed for the presence of reflective thinking. Time-line interviews of the events resulted in a total of 59 micro-moments, each of which was explored in terms of the thinking processes utilized to make sense of the situation as well as the focus of their thought. 'Pre-perceptions' played an important part in how the respondents perceived their situation. Reflective thinking was extensively manifest, especially in moments of doubt and perplexity, and consisted of such cognitive activities as comparing and contrasting phenomena, recognizing patterns, categorizing perceptions, framing, and self-questioning in order to create meaning and understanding. Self-questioning was identified as a significant process within reflective thinking. By exploring and analysing the type of questions respondents were asking themselves, the study uncovered three hierarchical levels of reflective thinking. Respondents most often engaged in reflective thinking-for-action which centred on the here and now in order to act. Reflective thinking-for-evaluation focused on creating wholeness and contributed to the realization of multiple perceptions and multiple responses. Reflective thinking-for-critical-inquiry could not be demonstrated in the study sample. The findings of this study resulted in the development of a model of reflective thinking, which is discussed in terms of the implications for learning in nursing practice.

  17. Nursing students' experience of practice placements.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Kathleen; Paterson, Kirstie; Wallar, Jessica

    2016-11-02

    Clinical practice placements are an essential component of pre-registration nursing programmes. Integration into a new team in an unfamiliar setting, which has its own values, practices, culture and language, can be stressful for nursing students. This article presents and discusses students' reflections on preparing for, entering and leaving practice placements. Ten students who participated in fortnightly group reflective sessions, discussed and analysed their learning experiences while on practice placements in an acute hospital. The challenges the students encountered were deconstructed using a group narrative approach. The students experienced ethical dilemmas around patient dignity, consent and advocacy as well as factors external to the practice setting, such as navigating systems and processes to access information before starting practice placements, managing household duties and academic workloads while working long shifts, and managing fatigue and loneliness. The students devised recommendations for other students to enable them to navigate their practice placements effectively and enhance their learning experience. Raising awareness among academic and practice placement staff of the challenges students encounter before and during their practice placement is essential to assist students to succeed and maximise their learning potential.

  18. Wise women: mentoring as relational learning in perinatal nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Annette; Goldberg, Lisa; Evans, Joan

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on one of four themes from a study exploring mentoring relationships between nurses in the intrapartum setting. The theme, relational learning, highlights how perinatal nurses engage with each other and engage with birthing women on a journey of learning in perinatal nursing practice. Few studies have explored the contextual, lived experiences of informal mentoring relationships within nursing, particularly within perinatal nursing. A qualitative feminist phenomenological study that considered a gender-centred, embodied exploration of human lived experiences was conducted. Five registered nurses practicing on a tertiary level labour and delivery unit in eastern Canada were purposefully recruited. Data were collected by phenomenological interviews, practice observations in the clinical setting and reflective journaling. Four themes emerged through thematic analysis and researcher interpretation: the meaning of nurse-to-nurse mentoring, mentoring as relational learning, mentoring as embodied learning and a contextual understanding of nurse-to-nurse mentoring. Relational learning came to be understood through feminist phenomenological analysis, which revealed that expert perinatal nursing knowledge develops within positive mentoring relationships between perinatal nurses practicing with birthing women. This learning extends beyond tasks to a holistic understanding of clinical situations within specific health and social contexts. The mentor models positive perinatal nursing practices and creates a sense of enthusiasm that harnesses the raw passion new nurses often have for practice. The findings in this study aim to promote the understanding of the importance of relational, experiential learning for perinatal nurses' professional development. The results from this study will encourage nurses and nurse leaders to support mentoring by providing adequate resources and positive feedback for mentoring relationships. This will foster and sustain

  19. Developing voluntary standards for district nurse education and practice.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Mary

    2016-05-01

    This article charts the development of a project, funded by the Queen's Nursing Institute and Queen's Nursing Institute Scotland, to develop voluntary standards that reflect the contemporary and future practice of district nurses. The standards are designed to enhance, but not replace, the Nursing and Midwifery Council standards for district nurse specialist practice. The project encompassed the four UK countries and gathered data from a wide range of sources to inform the new standards that were launched in September 2015.

  20. Trauma advanced practice nurses: implementing the role.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kathleen D; Molitor-Kirsch, Shirley; Elgart, Heidi; Ruffolo, Daria C; Sicoutris, Corinna; Meredith, Denise

    2004-01-01

    The need for advanced practice nurses (APN) has expanded over the past several decades as a result of the changing healthcare environment. Increased patient acuity and decreased resident work hours have lead to a need for additional clinical expertise at the bedside. APNs are becoming an integral part of the acute care delivery team in many trauma programs and intensive care units. To date little has been published regarding the role of the APN in Trauma Centers. This article outlines the wide variety of responsibilities and services provided by a select group of nurse practitioners who work in trauma centers throughout the United States.

  1. Clinical Nurse Specialists Guide Staff Nurses to Promote Practice Accountability Through Peer Review.

    PubMed

    Semper, Julie; Halvorson, Betty; Hersh, Mary; Torres, Clare; Lillington, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the clinical nurse specialist role in developing and implementing a staff nurse education program to promote practice accountability using peer review principles. Peer review is essential for professional nursing practice demanding a significant culture change. Clinical nurse specialists in a Magnet-designated community hospital were charged with developing a staff nurse peer review education program. Peer review is a recognized mechanism of professional self-regulation to ensure delivery of quality care. The American Nurses Association strongly urges incorporating peer review in professional nursing practice models. Clinical nurse specialists play a critical role in educating staff nurses about practice accountability. Clinical nurse specialists developed an education program guided by the American Nurses Association's principles of peer review. A baseline needs assessment identified potential barriers and learning needs. Content incorporated tools and strategies to build communication skills, collaboration, practice change, and peer accountability. The education program resulted in increased staff nurse knowledge about peer review and application of peer review principles in practice. Clinical nurse specialists played a critical role in helping staff nurses understand peer review and its application to practice. The clinical nurse specialist role will continue to be important in sustaining the application of peer review principles in practice.

  2. Interactional nursing--a practice-theory in the dynamic field between the natural, human and social sciences.

    PubMed

    Scheel, Merry Elisabeth; Pedersen, Birthe D; Rosenkrands, Vibeke

    2008-12-01

    Nursing is often described from the point of view of either the natural or the human sciences. In contrast to this, the value foundation in Interactional nursing practice is understood from the point of view of the natural sciences as well as that of the human and social sciences. This article presents many-faceted practice-theory of nursing, which is situated in the dynamic field between these three sciences. The focus of the theory is on interaction and practice resulting in a caring practice. Here practice is based on Taylor's and MacIntyre's interpretation of this concept. Action in nursing is based on Habermas' three varied modes of action seen in the light of an understanding of the world as a system world and a life world. Nursing as an interactional practice-theory is presented with examples of interpretative nursing science, seen in the ethical action-oriented, socio-cultural framework of Taylor and Habermas. It is concluded that phenomenologic and socio-cultural research into caring practice as well as an in-depth, comprehensive interpretation of nursing practice are both highly suited to forming the fundamental theoretical framework in nursing, here seen as an interpretative nursing science. Finally, a comparison is drawn between Interactional nursing practice and Benner's theory of nursing practice.

  3. Nursing with prisoners: the practice of caring, forensic nursing or penal harm nursing?

    PubMed

    Maeve, M K; Vaughn, M S

    2001-12-01

    The number of incarcerated persons in the United States has been increasing dramatically over the last two decades. Incarcerated men and women have increased rates of serious and chronic physical and mental illnesses and therefore require substantial health care efforts. Caring for prisoners is a difficult and often unrewarding experience for health care providers, particularly within a social climate that encourages noncaring behaviors. This article critically analyzes three philosophic stances toward nursing care with prisoners and suggests their philosophic commensurability within traditional nursing practice. Implications for nursing practice, research, and education are discussed.

  4. Advanced practice nurse as outcomes manager.

    PubMed

    Houston, S; Luquire, R

    1997-01-01

    Outcomes management as a patient management system has been designed to impact and improve select outcomes. Central to the development and implementation of best practice senario identified throughout outcomes management is the advanced practice nurse. SLEH has been in the forefront of development and implementation of an outcomes management program. This article describes the outcomes management position and shares the job description and performance evaluation used at this institution. The tools allow for measuring and quantifying the impact of the outcomes manager position on improving patient outcomes. The improvement of outcomes has increased the value of the advanced practice nurse and provided the institution with a solid future necessary for survival in a managed care market.

  5. [Graduate nursing teaching at Unicamp: policies and practices].

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Márcia Regina; Kirschbaum, Débora Isane Ratner; da Silva, Mauro Antônio Pires Dias; Silva, Eliete Maria

    2003-01-01

    The authors analyse teaching at the graduate nursing program from Unicamp (SP), starting from the introduction of a new curriculum in 1997, in accordance to the curricular standards taken from Federal Law concerning education. In theory, the changes implemented subvert the established order. It has been a hard task to operate curricular reform in a public university that is experiencing a financial and management crisis--reflections of a neoliberal ideology in public education policies, which increasingly values scientific production to the detriment of initiatives toward quality teaching. The difficulties found demanded some considerations and the proposition of seven fundamental thesis in order to subsidize problem analysis and guide necessary interventions. Among them, the theme Policies and Practice in nursing teaching is focused in this text.

  6. Nursing care documentation practice: The unfinished task of nursing care in the University of Gondar Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Mihiretu; Endris, Yesuf; Zegeye, Desalegn Tegabu

    2017-09-01

    Even though nursing care documentation is an important part of nursing practice, it is commonly left undone. The objective of this study was to assess nursing care documentation practice and the associated factors among nurses who are working at the University of Gondar Hospital. An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 220 nurses working at the University of Gondar Hospital inpatient wards from March 20 to April 30, 2014. Data were collected using a structured and pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. Data were entered into Epi Info version 7 and analyzed with SPSS version 20. Descriptive statistics, bivariate, and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out. Two hundred and six nurses returned the questionnaire. Good nursing care documentation practice among nurses was 37.4%. A low nurse-to-patient ratio AOR = 2.15 (95%CI [1.155, 4.020]), in-service training on standard nursing process AOR = 2.6 (95%CI[1.326, 5.052]), good knowledge AOR = 2.156(95% CI [1.092, 4.254]), and good attitude toward nursing care documentation AOR = 2.22 (95% CI [1.105, 4.471] were significantly associated with nursing care documentation practice. Most of the nursing care provided remains undocumented. Nurse-to-patient ratio, in-service training, knowledge, and attitude of nurses toward nursing care documentation were factors associated with nursing care documentation practice.

  7. Effectiveness of simulation-based learning on student nurses' self-efficacy and performance while learning fundamental nursing skills.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    It was noted worldwide while learning fundamental skills and facing skills assessments, nursing students seemed to experience low confidence and high anxiety levels. Could simulation-based learning help to enhance students' self-efficacy and performance? Its effectiveness is mostly unidentified. This study was conducted to provide a shared experience to give nurse educators confidence and an insight into how simulation-based teaching can fit into nursing skills learning. A pilot study was completed with 50 second-year undergraduate nursing students, and the main study included 98 students where a pretest-posttest design was adopted. Data were gathered through four questionnaires and a performance assessment under scrutinized controls such as previous experiences, lecturers' teaching skills, duration of teaching, procedure of skills performance assessment and the inter-rater reliability. The results showed that simulation-based learning significantly improved students' self-efficacy regarding skills learning and the skills performance that nurse educators wish students to acquire. However, technology anxiety, examiners' critical attitudes towards students' performance and their unpredicted verbal and non-verbal expressions, have been found as possible confounding factors. The simulation-based learning proved to have a powerful positive effect on students' achievement outcomes. Nursing skills learning is one area that can benefit greatly from this kind of teaching and learning method.

  8. Contested Practice: Political Activism in Nursing and Implications for Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Buck-McFadyen, Ellen; MacDonnell, Judith

    2017-07-27

    Canadian nurses have a social mandate to address health inequities for the populations they serve, as well as to speak out on professional and broader social issues. Although Canadian nursing education supports the role of nurses as advocates for social justice and leadership for health care reform, little is known about how nurse educators understand activism and how this translates in the classroom. A comparative life history study using purposeful sampling and a critical feminist lens was undertaken to explore political activism in nursing and how nurse educators foster political practice among their students. Findings from interviews and focus groups with 26 Ontario nurse educators and nursing students suggested that neoliberal dynamics in both the practice setting and in higher education have constrained nurses' activist practice and favour a technical rational approach to nursing education. Implications and strategies to inspire political action in nursing education are discussed.

  9. Perioperative nurses' perceptions of caring practices.

    PubMed

    McNamara, S A

    1995-02-01

    This study was designed to determine how caring is practiced in perioperative nursing. The theory of nursing by M. Jean Watson, RN, PhD, FAAN, provided the conceptual framework for the study. The researcher used a qualitative, descriptive methodology to analyze data collected in audiotaped interviews with five perioperative nurses and used standard qualitative research procedures for transcribing and analyzing the interview data. The five study participants identified their perceptions of caring behaviors with conscious and unconscious patients in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative periods. They described the essential structure of caring as the establishment of a human care relationship and provision of a supportive, protective, and/or corrective psychological, physical, and spiritual environment.

  10. Nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Ella; Tabak, Nili

    2012-12-01

    Using Ajzen and Madden's Theory of Planned Behavior, this study investigates factors which influence nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines in their daily ward work. A convenience sample of 91 nurses in internal medicine wards in three Israeli hospitals answered four questionnaires. Data were processed by Pearson correlation coefficients and multivariate regression. The main findings were that burnout was negatively correlated with the intention to work according to guidelines and that professionalism (in the sense of a tendency to follow taught procedure rather than personal judgment) was positively correlated with it. Furthermore, nurses who perceive their behavioral control and subjective norms to be positive will be the most determined to work according to guidelines, provided they personally command the necessary resources to do so.

  11. Hospital demand for licensed practical nurses.

    PubMed

    Spetz, Joanne; Dyer, Wendy T; Chapman, Susan; Seago, Jean Ann

    2006-10-01

    Despite evidence that hospital use of licensed practical nurses (LPNs) declined in the 1990s, the current registered nurse (RN) shortage has prompted interest in LPNs as substitutes for RNs. Hospitals, being the dominant employer of RNs, have an economic incentive to use less expensive LPNs as substitutes. Beside wages, there are several forces underlying hospital demand for LPNs. In this article, the authors model and estimate hospital demand for LPNs as a function of nurse wages and hospital, market, and patient characteristics using a longitudinal data set of short-term general hospitals in the United States. The authors find evidence that higher RN wages increase hospital demand for LPNs, both in levels and relative to RNs, suggesting that hospitals at least partially substitute RNs with LPNs.

  12. inPractice: A Practical Nursing Package for Clinical Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ip, Barry; Cavanna, Annlouise; Corbett, Beverley

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the recent development of a computer-assisted learning program--in Practice--at the School of Health Science, in the University of Wales Swansea. The project, which began in 2001, was developed in close collaboration with The Meningitis Trust, the aim being to produce a software package to increase nursing students' knowledge…

  13. inPractice: A Practical Nursing Package for Clinical Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ip, Barry; Cavanna, Annlouise; Corbett, Beverley

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the recent development of a computer-assisted learning program--in Practice--at the School of Health Science, in the University of Wales Swansea. The project, which began in 2001, was developed in close collaboration with The Meningitis Trust, the aim being to produce a software package to increase nursing students' knowledge…

  14. [Telemedicine in current nursing practices].

    PubMed

    Simon, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The first priority telemedicine programme focused, from 2011, on five areas, with the aim of guaranteeing equal access to care to everybody across a healthcare region. Experiments were financed by public authorities. These practices are now integrated into the organisation of healthcare. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  15. Documentation of Nursing Practice Using a Computerized Medical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Carol

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses a definition of the content of the computerized nursing data base developed by the Nursing Department for the Clinical Center Medical Information System at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The author describes the theoretical framework for the content and presents a model to describe the organization of the nursing data components in relation to the process of nursing care delivery. Nursing documentation requirements of Nurse Practice Acts, American Nurses Association Standards of Practice and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals are also addressed as they relate to this data base. The advantages and disadvantages of such an approach to computerized documentation are discussed.

  16. 13C-based metabolic flux analysis: fundamentals and practice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tae Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Isotope-based metabolic flux analysis is one of the emerging technologies applied to system level metabolic phenotype characterization in metabolic engineering. Among the developed approaches, (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis has been established as a standard tool and has been widely applied to quantitative pathway characterization of diverse biological systems. To implement (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in practice, comprehending the underlying mathematical and computational modeling fundamentals is of importance along with carefully conducted experiments and analytical measurements. Such knowledge is also crucial when designing (13)C-labeling experiments and properly acquiring key data sets essential for in vivo flux analysis implementation. In this regard, the modeling fundamentals of (13)C-labeling systems and analytical data processing are the main topics we will deal with in this chapter. Along with this, the relevant numerical optimization techniques are addressed to help implementation of the entire computational procedures aiming at (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in vivo.

  17. Future trends in nursing practice and technology.

    PubMed

    Fuszard, B

    1991-01-01

    Rural hospitals will be affected by changes in nursing anticipated in the future. Welcome changes will be the maturity and life experiences new graduates will bring to the work setting, knowledge of computers, and a broadening database. New graduates will also know various methods of care delivery, including case management, and will be able to select the delivery system that best meets the needs of the patients and institution. They will be more autonomous and possess leadership and management skills. With their knowledge of community as well as institutional nursing, they will be able to draw upon the skills of both groups to bring the two areas of nursing into continuity of care for patients. A difficulty ahead for rural hospitals is recruitment of new graduates, the majority of whom will have established families and lives elsewhere. And the practice of developing their own employees for higher levels of nursing will be compounded by the doubling of time necessary to complete nursing programs in the future.

  18. Practical Nursing, Volume III. Health Occupations Education. [Revised].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Jamee Noell

    This document is a comprehensive guide for instructors to use in teaching the final phase of the practical nursing program. This revised volume contains information related to medical-surgical nursing, mental health nursing, and career success. The section on medical-surgical nursing is composed of many units, dealing with the following subjects:…

  19. Predictors of NCLEX-PN Success for Practical Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eickhoff, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    There is currently a nursing shortage in the United States. By 2022, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expects, the number of job openings for Practical Nurses (PN) will be 168,500, an increase of 25% over 2012 (BLS, 2014). Nursing education does not currently meet present, much less future needs. Nursing programs have limited space; according…

  20. Person-centred care: Principle of Nursing Practice D.

    PubMed

    Manley, Kim; Hills, Val; Marriot, Sheila

    This is the fifth article in a nine-part series describing the Principles of Nursing Practice developed by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) in collaboration with patient and service organisations, the Department of Health, the Nursing and Midwifery Council, nurses and other healthcare professionals. This article discusses Principle D, the provision of person-centred care.

  1. Predictors of NCLEX-PN Success for Practical Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eickhoff, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    There is currently a nursing shortage in the United States. By 2022, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expects, the number of job openings for Practical Nurses (PN) will be 168,500, an increase of 25% over 2012 (BLS, 2014). Nursing education does not currently meet present, much less future needs. Nursing programs have limited space; according…

  2. The Quad Council practice competencies for public health nursing.

    PubMed

    Swider, Susan M; Krothe, Joyce; Reyes, David; Cravetz, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the most recent efforts by the Quad Council of Public Health Nursing organizations to review and revise the competencies for PHN practice, and highlights the implications of these competencies for practice, education, and research. The Quad Council is a coalition of four nursing organizations with a focus on public health nursing and includes the Association of Community Health Nursing Educators; the Association of Public Health Nursing (known prior to July 1, 2012 as the Association of State and Territorial Directors of Nursing); the Public Health Nursing section of the American Public Health Association; and the Council on Economics and Practice of the American Nurses' Association. The Quad Council competencies are based on the Council on Linkages competencies for public health professionals and were designed to ensure that public health nursing fits in the domain of public health science and practice.

  3. [Practical nursing guide in the critical patient].

    PubMed

    Navarro Arnedo, Jesús M; Orgiler Uranga, Pedro E; de Haro Marín, Salvador

    2005-01-01

    Nursing staff that have recently arrived to the ICU, nurses and students, may feel anxiety and fear due to lack of skill and/or knowledge of the techniques, the service's organization and the diseases treated. 1. To know the intensive care aspects that pose greater difficulties to the professionals newly incorporated into the ICU of the Hospital General Universitario of Alicante 2. To provide these professionals with a written guide that responds to the needs and situations that they face day to day. 3. Inform the nursing students, prior to the onset of their practice activities in the ICU, on a combination of basic procedures that make it possible to take better advantage of them. 4. Communicate and facilitate access to the information contained in the guide to the maximum. The professional workers who had recently received their degress and who worked in the ICU during the summery were surveyed to determine the techniques or procedures that posed the greatest difficulties. A <practice nursing guide in the critical patient> was designed in paper and electronic form. The respiratory, Swan-Ganz catheter, defibrillation, cardiac arrhythmias and insertion of temporal pacemakers were the subjects posing the greatest difficulty. A total of 92% of the colleagues would re-chose their practices in the ICU; 33% liked working as a team most. 1. The technology used in the ICU poses problems for the recently arrived colleagues. 2. The guide may be used by the new professionals and students as work tool and contribute to communication between the university and the hospital. 3. The use of Internet to communicate the work done by the Nursing professionals offers great advantages and should be used as one more tool.

  4. A critical engagement with the concept of advancing nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Por, Jitna

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to elucidate the concept of advancing nursing practice by engaging critically with developments in policy in the UK and ongoing debates in the international literature. Advancing practice to the outer edges of nursing's scope of practice is a challenge for the profession both in the UK and elsewhere. However, defining what advancing nursing practice is and what it might become remains problematic. Critical analysis of published papers and policy documents pertaining to the concept of advancing nursing practice. Advancing nursing practice as a concept offers enormous potential for nurses and has been the subject of numerous debates over the last 25 years. Previous history of advanced practice offers no imperative practice and informs us little about the future roles of advanced nurse practitioners. Current understanding about the role of advanced nurse practitioner and the nature of advanced practice remains unclear. Measuring the impact and outcome of the complex advanced practice nursing roles remains a challenge. While it is difficult to articulate succinctly what constitutes advancing nursing practice, defining the activities nurses engage in, the skills and competencies involved and the qualities and attributes required help reduce the ambiguities of the role.

  5. Use of the 5E learning cycle model combined with problem-based learning for a fundamentals of nursing course.

    PubMed

    Jun, Won Hee; Lee, Eun Ju; Park, Han Jong; Chang, Ae Kyung; Kim, Mi Ja

    2013-12-01

    The 5E learning cycle model has shown a positive effect on student learning in science education, particularly in courses with theory and practice components. Combining problem-based learning (PBL) with the 5E learning cycle was suggested as a better option for students' learning of theory and practice. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of the traditional learning method with the 5E learning cycle model with PBL. The control group (n = 78) was subjected to a learning method that consisted of lecture and practice. The experimental group (n = 83) learned by using the 5E learning cycle model with PBL. The results showed that the experimental group had significantly improved self-efficacy, critical thinking, learning attitude, and learning satisfaction. Such an approach could be used in other countries to enhance students' learning of fundamental nursing. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Rival research programmes and their influence on nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Newbold, David

    2004-03-01

    In most forms of industry, there is an explicit link between research and development and subsequent technological processes. New discoveries can alter the direction or trajectory of technological progress. In this respect, health care is no different to any other form of industry. There are several theories of science which attempt to explain this link and predict its behaviour. According to Lakatos (1978), rival research programmes may co-exist, whilst Brouwer (1990) suggests they may vie with each other to alter the direction of technological progress. Presently, there are at least two research programmes which are competing to capture the activities of nurses. These are: the Health Care as Industrial Process programme, generating guideline driven nursing, and use of care pathways to maximize throughput plus labour substitution to minimize costs; and the Health Care as Therapeutic Interaction programme, focused on the management and delivery of the fundamental aspects of nursing care, and the use of emotional labour and psychological care to enable patients to cope and make sense of their situation. Ideally, the direction of practice should reflect both of these valid research programmes, with nurses as the staff best placed to integrate medical technology with humanity. Arguably, it is the Industrial Process programme which is currently dominant, at the price of decreased quality of care, and loss of the health benefits of therapeutic interaction. Greater effort is needed, in terms of research to reduce the apparent 'invisibility' of emotional labour, and education of nurses to boost therapeutic interaction skills. In order to re-direct the trajectory, managers should acknowledge and accommodate aspects of therapeutic interaction in service re-engineering, and use quality assurance tools which may accurately detect and monitor therapeutic interaction by nurses.

  7. [Analysis of the nursing practice in a medical ICU based on an electronic nursing record].

    PubMed

    Song, Kyung Ja

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the entity of critical care nursing practices through analyzing nursing statements described by electronic nursing records in a MICU. 176,459 nursing statements of 188 patients during a 6 month-stay were analyzed statement by statement according to the nursing process(nursing phenomena, nursing diagnosis, & nursing activity) and 21 nursing components of Saba's Clinical Care Classification. Among 176,459 single statements, the statements of nursing activity ranked first in number. The contents of the statements were analyzed and categorized by main themes. Among 489 categorized themes, the number of themes of nursing phenomena statements was the highest. When analyzed by Saba's clinical Care Classification, the nursing statements mainly included a physiological component. Among 21 components, the respiratory component ranked in the first position in nursing phenomena, nursing diagnosis and nursing activity. The extra statements not included in the 21 components were 9,294(15.1%) in nursing phenomena and 21,949(22.7%) in nursing activity. Most are statements related to tests and the doctor. The entity of MICU nursing practice expressed by electronic nursing records was mainly focused on physiological components and more precisely on respiratory components.

  8. Quality measures for nurse practitioner practice evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kleinpell, Ruth; Kapu, April N

    2017-08-01

    Evaluating the impact of nurse practitioner (NP) practice has become a priority area of focus for demonstrating outcomes. A number of quality measures are available to enable practice-specific evaluation of NP roles and initiatives. This article reviews sources of quality measures that can be used to facilitate quantifying the outcomes of NP practice as part of an overall evaluation agenda. National resources and published literature on NP quality measures were reviewed. Various resources and toolkits exist to assist NPs in identifying outcomes of practice using quality measures. The need to demonstrate outcomes of NP practice remains an ongoing priority area regardless of the clinical practice setting. A variety of sources of quality measures exist that can be used to showcase the effect of NP care. The use of quality measures can be effectively integrated into evaluation of NP role and NP-directed initiatives to demonstrate impact, and enhance the conduct of an NP outcomes assessment. The use of organizational, NP-specific, and national-related quality measures can help to showcase how NP care improves the quality, safety, and costs of health care. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  9. Advanced materials for magnetic cooling: Fundamentals and practical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balli, M.; Jandl, S.; Fournier, P.; Kedous-Lebouc, A.

    2017-06-01

    Over the last two decades, the research activities on magnetocalorics have been exponentially increased, leading to the discovery of a wide category of materials including intermetallics and oxides. Even though the reported materials were found to show excellent magnetocaloric properties on a laboratory scale, only a restricted family among them could be upscaled toward industrial levels and implemented as refrigerants in magnetic cooling devices. On the other hand, in the most of the reported reviews, the magnetocaloric materials are usually discussed in terms of their adiabatic temperature and entropy changes (ΔTad and ΔS), which is not enough to get more insight about their large scale applicability. In this review, not only the fundamental properties of the recently reported magnetocaloric materials but also their thermodynamic performance in functional devices are discussed. The reviewed families particularly include Gd1-xRx alloys, LaFe13-xSix, MnFeP1-xAsx, and R1-xAxMnO3 (R = lanthanide and A = divalent alkaline earth)-based compounds. Other relevant practical aspects such as mechanical stability, synthesis, and corrosion issues are discussed. In addition, the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters that play a crucial role in the control of magnetic and magnetocaloric properties are regarded. In order to reproduce the needed magnetocaloric parameters, some practical models are proposed. Finally, the concepts of the rotating magnetocaloric effect and multilayered magnetocalorics are introduced.

  10. The private practice of nursing: the gift of entrepreneurialism.

    PubMed

    Porter-O'Grady, T

    1997-01-01

    The demands of the entrepreneur extend the opportunities and creativity of the nurse. The characteristics of independent practice are now the expectations of the role of every nurse. Understanding the gifts of the entrepreneurial experience helps facilitate the growth of nurses and their practice.

  11. A Study of the Practical Nursing Programs in Vermont.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Ruby C.

    The purpose of the study was to review the entire practical nursing program and to make recommendations for its long-term organization and objectives. Relevant information concerned (1) the history of practical nursing, (2) purpose, membership, and related information on four professional nursing organizations, (3) state and federal legislation…

  12. The journey to independent nurse practitioner practice.

    PubMed

    Rigolosi, Rebecca; Salmond, Susan

    2014-12-01

    The aim is to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the journey of states that achieved independent nurse practitioner (NP) practice from 2007 to 2011. Qualitative, retrospective, descriptive study with interviews of NP state leaders in those states as well as literature review. There are key strategies that should be utilized by states when attempting to pass independent NP practice legislation. Strategies that have been tried and tested by states that have successfully passed legislation are collated and presented. Data from key national movements and legislation with release of the 2010 Institute of Medicine Report The Future of Nursing and the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act add weight and supportive context to the independent NP legislative process, and were used in addition to and as groundwork for arguments and evidence of a national trend toward increasing access to primary care services and decreasing barriers to practice. Kingdon's model illustrates these research findings and suggests the open window for policy change is now. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  13. Family nursing research for practice: the Swedish perspective.

    PubMed

    Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2010-02-01

    This article offers a synthesis of the significant developments and progress of family nursing in Sweden. A review was conducted to locate Swedish family nursing research produced over the past 10 years. CINAHL, Medline, and PubMed were the primary databases used to locate approximately 75 family nursing studies conducted in Sweden. The majority of the studies used descriptive methods with data collected from surveys and interviews involving nurses and family members either together or individually. Only a few of the studies examined family nursing interventions. This article also reports the results of a recent survey of Swedish nurses that examined how family nursing is used in practice. After 10 years of creating a strong foundation for family-focused nursing in Sweden, there is still a need for nurse researchers, educators, and administrators to collaborate in the implementation of family nursing to practice.

  14. Competency frameworks for advanced practice nursing: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sastre-Fullana, P; De Pedro-Gómez, J E; Bennasar-Veny, M; Serrano-Gallardo, P; Morales-Asencio, J M

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes a literature review that identified common traits in advanced practice nursing that are specific to competency development worldwide. There is a lack of international agreement on the definition of advanced practice nursing and its core competencies. Despite the lack of consensus, there is an ongoing process worldwide to establish and outline the standards and competencies for advanced practice nursing roles. International agencies, such as the International Council of Nurses, have provided general definitions for advanced practice nursing. Additionally, a set of competency standards for this aim has been developed. A literature review and a directed search of institutional websites were performed to identify specific developments in advanced practice nursing competencies and standards of practice. To determine a competency map specific to international advanced practice nursing, key documents were analysed using a qualitative approach based on content analysis to identify common traits among documents and countries. The review process identified 119 relevant journal articles related to advanced practice nursing competencies. Additionally, 97 documents from grey literature that were related to advanced practice nursing competency mapping were identified. From the text analysis, 17 worldwide transversal competency domains emerged. Despite the variety of patterns in international advanced practice nursing development, essential competency domains can be found in most national frameworks for the role development of international advanced practice nursing. These 17 core competencies can be used to further develop instruments that assess the perceived competency of advanced practice nurses. The results of this review can help policy developers and researchers develop instruments to compare advanced practice nursing services in various contexts and to examine their association with related outcomes. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  15. Is anybody listening? A qualitative study of nurses' reflections on practice.

    PubMed

    Huntington, Annette; Gilmour, Jean; Tuckett, Anthony; Neville, Stephen; Wilson, Denise; Turner, Catherine

    2011-05-01

    To explore nurses' perceptions of the reality of practice based on data from the Nurses and Midwives e-cohort Study which examined the workforce characteristics, work-life balance and health of nurses. Recruitment and retention of the nursing workforce is of international concern as demands increase due to demographic changes, political pressure and community expectations, in a climate of economic constraint. Qualitative analysis of data from a cohort of Australian, New Zealand and UK nurses. Of the 7604 participants in the electronic cohort, 1909 provided qualitative comments of which 162 related to nursing practice; thematic analysis resulted in four high order themes. The analytical discussion is structured around 'care' as the organising construct. Four themes emerged: 'embodied care' which discusses the impact of work on the nurse's physical and emotional health; 'quantity/quality care' which addresses increasing pressures of work and ability to provide quality care; 'organisational (non)care' raising the seeming lack of support from management; and '(un)collegial/self care' where bullying and professional relationships were raised. Issues raised by participants have been discussed in the nursing literature for several years yet nurses still experience these negative aspects of nursing. It appears there is a significant gap between what is known about the practice environment, recommendations for change and change occurring: the management equivalent of the theory-practice gap, resulting in nurses intending to leave the profession. Research demonstrates that a well-qualified, stable nursing workforce improves quality of health care and health outcomes. Changing the work environment and fostering a positive workplace culture seems fundamental to supporting the retention of nurses, that this is not occurring in some areas in the current climate is a concern for the profession and those responsible for the provision of care. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Nursing science: basic, applied, or practical? Implications for the art of nursing.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J L

    1991-09-01

    Nursing has long been described as both a science and an art. If the science of nursing is to be relevant to the art of nursing, then it must be conceptualized and pursued such that these two central components of nursing remain connected. Current conceptualizations of nursing science are examined in terms of the consequences that each conceptualization might have for the art of nursing. Pursuing nursing science as a basic science or an applied science disarticulates the science of nursing and the art of nursing. The author concludes that only if nursing science is conceptualized and pursued as a practical science will the science of nursing be consistently relevant to the art of nursing.

  17. Educational silos in nursing education: a critical review of practical nurse education in Canada.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Diane L; MacKinnon, Karen A

    2015-09-01

    Changes to practical nurse education (with expanded scopes of practice) align with the increasing need for nurses and assistive personnel in global acute care contexts. A case in point is this critical exploration of Canadian practical nursing literature, undertaken to reveal predominating discourses and relationships to nursing disciplinary knowledge. The objectives of this poststructural critical review were to identify dominant discourses in practical nurse education literature and to analyze these discourses to uncover underlying beliefs, constructed truths, assumptions, ambiguities and sources of knowledge within the discursive landscape. Predominant themes in the discourses surrounding practical nurse education included conversations about the nurse shortage, expanded roles, collaboration, evidence-based practice, role confusion, cost/efficiency, the history of practical nurse education and employer interests. The complex relationships between practical nursing and the disciplinary landscape of nursing are revealed in the analysis of discourses related to the purpose(s) of practical nurse education, curricula/educational programming, relationships between RN and PN education and the role of nursing knowledge. Power dynamics related to employer needs and interests, as well as educational silos and the nature of women's work, are also revealed within the intersection of various discourses.

  18. Dignity, humanity and equality: Principle of Nursing Practice A.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Ann; Irwin, Wendy

    This is the second article in a nine-part series describing the Principles of Nursing Practice developed by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) in collaboration with patient and service organisations, the Department of Health, the Nursing and Midwifery Council, nurses and other healthcare professionals. This article discusses Principle A, the provision of nursing care in a way that maximises the dignity and humanity of patients.

  19. Continuous care across teams: principle of nursing practice G.

    PubMed

    Platt, Mark

    This is the eighth article in a nine-part series describing the Principles of Nursing Practice developed by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) in collaboration with patient and service organisations, the Department of Health, the Nursing and Midwifery Council, nurses and other healthcare professionals. This article discusses Principle G, the need for nurses to work collaboratively with other healthcare professionals to improve patient outcomes.

  20. Putting conflict management into practice: a nursing case study.

    PubMed

    Vivar, Cristina García

    2006-04-01

    This paper is intended to put knowledge in conflict management into practice through reflecting on a nursing case study. Nursing organizations are particularly vulnerable to conflict as the context of nurses' work may be difficult and stressful. Power conflict is argued to be an important source of tension within nursing units. Learning to manage conflict at an early stage is therefore crucial to the effective functioning of nursing organizations. A nursing case study that illustrates power conflict in an oncology nursing unit is displayed and reflection on conflict management from the case is provided. There is no appropriate or inappropriate strategy to deal with conflict. However, detecting initial symptoms of conflict and adopting the most effective behaviour to conflict resolution is essential in nursing units. Further nursing education in conflict management for staff nurses and nurse managers is greatly needed.

  1. Evolvement of French advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Bonnel, Galadriel

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to chronicle the development of the advanced practice nurse (APN) in France and compare international APN indictors of quality care with French studies. A review of the literature was performed by accessing the MEDLINE, Science Direct, and Cochrane Databases for studies of quality of care by APNs during 1965-2012. The author's participation on a national task force in collaboration with the French Ministry of Health provided additional information. After applying limits of this search, 36 studies fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria. In both the French and international APN nursing literature, the most frequently described quality of care measures were level of patient satisfaction and other patient outcomes (clinical and laboratory measures) according to evidence-based guidelines. In three French studies (nephrology, neuro-oncology, and urology settings), nurses performed direct patient care and were legally permitted to take on some limited responsibilities usually held by French physicians, including clinical examinations, diagnosing, and prescribing. Creation of the APN role in France can respond to public health challenges including the rising incidence of chronic diseases and an impending physician shortage. Future APN research should focus on rigorous, innovative design development including collaborative care models. ©2013 The Author(s) ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  2. Towards anti-oppressive practice in mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Hopton, J

    Working in Partnership, the Department of Health's report on the 1994 review of mental health nursing, implies that mental health nurses should develop anti-oppressive approaches to nursing practice. There is a notable absence of articles within the nursing literature which specifically address this issue. This is possibly because the historical and ideological issues which have informed the development of mental health nursing are complex and difficult to unravel. However, an integration of the theories of David Cooper and Frantz Fanon may provide an appropriate starting point for the development of a theory of anti-oppressive practice which addresses some of the issues specific to mental health nursing.

  3. Respect in forensic psychiatric nurse-patient relationships: a practical compromise.

    PubMed

    Rose, Donald N; Peter, Elizabeth; Gallop, Ruth; Angus, Jan E; Liaschenko, Joan

    2011-03-01

    The context of forensic psychiatric nursing is distinct from other psychiatric settings as, it involves placement of patients in secure environments with restrictions determined by the courts. Previous literature has identified that nurses morally struggle with respecting patients who have committed heinous offences, which can lead to the patient being depersonalized and dehumanized. Although respect is fundamental to ethical nursing practice, it has not been adequately explored conceptually or empirically. As a result, little knowledge exists that identifies how nurses develop, maintain, and express respect for patients. The purpose of this study is to analyze the concept of respect systematically, from a forensic psychiatric nurse's perspective using the qualitative methodology of focused ethnography. Forensic psychiatric nurses were recruited from two medium secure forensic rehabilitation units. In the first interview, 13 registered nurses (RNs) and two registered practical nurses (RPNs) participated, and although all informants were invited to the second interview, six RNs were lost to follow-up. Despite this loss, saturation was achieved and the data were interpreted through a feminist philosophical lens. Respect was influenced by factors categorized into four themes: (1) emotive-cognitive reactions, (2) nonjudgmental approach, (3) social identity and power, and (4) context. The data from the themes indicate that forensic psychiatric nurses strike a practical compromise, in their understanding and enactment of respect in therapeutic relationships with forensic psychiatric patients.

  4. Persistent isolationist or collaborator? The nurse's role in interprofessional collaborative practice.

    PubMed

    Orchard, Carole A

    2010-04-01

    The present study explores current understanding about interprofessional collaborative client-centred practice and nursing's role in this form of care delivery. A profession-only focus on nursing practice has been challenged at professional, national governmental and World Health Organization levels stressing for more interprofessional patient-centred collaborative teamwork. Moving to patient-centred collaborative practice is fraught with barriers. Enablers can result in building trust, power sharing and shared decision-making. Changing current workplace environments requires institutional commitments to support collaborative team development. Nurses can become collaborative members of teams through: (1) re-socialize; (2) understanding and articulating nurses roles, knowledge and skills to others; (3) other health providers sharing the same to nurses; (4) identifying where shared roles, knowledge and skills exist; and (5) learning to work in collaborative teams. Nurses must address some fundamental issues about practice that negate collaboration and patient-centred care. All professionals, including nurses, must move away from a service-oriented delivery to a patient-centred collaborative approach to care. The values within health organizations need to be underpinned by collaborative interprofessional patient-centred practice. To accomplish this goal, administrators and managers must support assessment of employees and visiting physicians as to their conformance with agency established expectations for such practice.

  5. Leadership Practices in Hospital Nursing: A Self of Manager Nurses.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vânea Lúcia Dos Santos; Camelo, Silvia Helena Henriques; Soares, Mirelle Inácio; Resck, Zélia Marilda Rodrigues; Chaves, Lucieli Dias Pedreschi; Santos, Fabiana Cristina Dos; Leal, Laura Andrian

    2017-04-03

    To assess the frequency of the leadership practices performed by the manager nurses of hospital institutions and their association with the variables of the socioprofessional profile. Cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational study conducted in four hospitals in a city of the state of São Paulo. A sociodemographic questionnaire and the instrument Leadership Practices Inventory were used. Data collection and analysis were based on an exemplary Leadership Practices Model. Eighty-four manager nurses participated in the study. The mean values of the leadership practices used by the nurses were: enable others to act (50.6); encourage the heart (48.2); model the way (46.7); challenge the process (43.3); and inspire a shared vision (43.1). Data analysis also evidenced a correlation between the practice encourage the heart and the variables time of care and employment relationship. The study evidenced the presence of manager nurses exercising moderate leadership, and promoting teamwork, an environment of trust, and a horizontal vision. However, moderate values also reveal managerial aspects to be improved by the leaders by means of organizational strategies and/or tools aimed at best leadership practices. Avaliar a frequência das práticas de liderança executadas pelos enfermeiros gerentes de instituições hospitalares e sua associação às variáveis do perfil socioprofissional. Estudo transversal, descritivo e correlacional, realizado em quatro hospitaisde um município do interior paulista. Utilizou-se de questionário sociodemográfico e do instrumento Leadership Practices Inventory. A coleta e a análise de dados foram fundamentadas em um Modelo de Práticas para Liderança exemplar. Participaram 84 enfermeiros gerentes. As médias das práticas de liderança utilizadas pelos enfermeiros foram: capacitar os outros a agir (50,6), encorajar o coração (48,2), traçar o caminho (46,7), desafiar o processo (43,3) e inspirar uma visão compartilhada (43,1). Na an

  6. Obesity Prevention Practices of Elementary School Nurses in Minnesota: Findings from Interviews with Licensed School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Johnson, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led…

  7. Obesity Prevention Practices of Elementary School Nurses in Minnesota: Findings from Interviews with Licensed School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Johnson, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led…

  8. Critical theory as a framework for academic nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Martha K

    2014-05-01

    In academic centers of nursing, faculty or academic practice has become more widespread and integrated into the expectations and criteria for appointment and promotion. Yet, the concept of academic practice is not fully embraced among all schools of nursing. Numerous models of academic nursing practice have evolved and vary widely according to the clinical site, the roles of the practitioners, and the systems for generating revenue. Although most models are related to the mission statements of the schools of nursing, few seem to be based on a distinct philosophy of practice. In this article, a consideration of critical theory that provides a framework for practice-based nursing education is presented. By applying the philosophical underpinnings and assumptions of practice that are guided by critical theory, educators may begin to better identify the values of academic nursing practice and incorporate this activity more fully into the educational environment.

  9. [Opinions of nursing students about various sexual practices].

    PubMed

    Egry, E Y

    1985-04-01

    This study sought to determine the beliefs of nursing students on human sexuality, their information sources, and persons influencing their opinion. A survey conducted December 1983 to January 1985 targeted female graduating students in Nursing and Obstetrics at the University of Sao Paulo (USP) School of Nursing; its findings were then compared to similar studies conducted among the general population. The findings show that the target population and general population opinions differ little, reflecting fear and prejudice about sexual practices. Also, the professional training of Brazil's nurses failed to include a fundamental understanding of human sexuality. The 42 respondents are characterized as follows: age 21 to 36 years; 95.2% single; 88% childless; 59.5% born in the city of Sao Paulo; 88% born in the state of Sao Paulo; 85.7% with long term residence in urban areas and state capitals; and 92.5% attended 4 years of nursing school at USP. Results showed: 47.6% favored premarital sex; 26.2% espoused premarital virginity for men and 19% for women; roughly 60% disapproved of extramarital relations for both sexes. 75% considered masturbation normal for both sexes; about 90% approved of contraceptive practices for men and women; 90.5% favored family planning; 26% were strictly against abortion; nearly 60% found prostitution unacceptable for both sexes; and homosexuality in both sexes was considered taboo by 42.8%, and acceptable by 14%. The vast majority favored sexual education at all levels. Regarding sources of sexual infomation: books, magazines and encyclopedias comprised 25%; male friends, 10%; girlfriends, 9.4%; boyfriends 8%; and, the University of Sao Paulo School of Nursing, a mere 6.5%. The persons who influenced their opinions were: first, boyfriend (23.7%) followed by mother, girlfriends and male friends; second, girlfriend (28.5%) followed by boyfriend and male friend; third, girlfriend, boyfriend, male friend, and teachers (7.1% each); fourth

  10. A Holistic Framework for Nursing Time: Implications for Theory, Practice, and Research

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    Topic Nursing time has relevance for those who produce it, those who receive it and those who must pay for it. Though the term nursing time may be commonly used, a common understanding of the concept within the fields of nursing and healthcare administration is lacking. Purpose The purposes of this paper are to explore the concept of nursing time and to identify implications for theory development, clinical and administrative practice, and research. Discussion Both physical and psychological forms of time are viewed as fundamental to our experience of time as social beings. Nursing time has significant intrinsic and instrumental value in nursing and healthcare. A holistic approach incorporating the physical, psychological, and sociological aspects and dimensions of nursing time is advocated. Conclusions Multiple strategies to enhance the patient experience of nursing time are warranted and should address how much time nurses spend with patients as well as how they spend that time. Patterns of overlapping and competing time structures for nurses should be identified and evaluated for their effect on physical time available for patient care and the psychological experiences of time by nurses and patients. PMID:20690994

  11. Patient safety in practical nurses' education: A cross-sectional survey of newly registered practical nurses in Canada.

    PubMed

    VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth; Sears, Nancy; Edge, Dana S; Tregunno, Deborah; Ginsburg, Liane

    2017-04-01

    Practical nurses have experienced an increasing scope of practice, including an expectation to care for complex patients and function on interdisciplinary teams. Little is known about the degree to which patient safety principles are addressed in practical nursing education. To examine self-reported patient safety competencies of practical nurses. A cross-sectional online survey (July 2014) and face-to-face interviews (June 2015). Ontario, Canada. Survey participants were practical nurses newly registered with the College of Nurses of Ontario between January 2012 and December 2013. Interview participants were faculty and students in a practical nursing program in Ontario. Survey respondents completed the Health Professional Education in Patient Safety Survey online. Self-reported competencies in various patient safety domains were compared between classroom and clinical settings. Faculty members were interviewed about educational preparation of practical nurses and students were interviewed to provide insight into interpretation of survey questions. The survey response rate was 28.4% (n=1104/3883). Mean domain scores indicated a high level of confidence in patient safety competence (<4.0/5.0). Confidence was highest in respondents registered with the College of Nurses of Ontario >2years and in those who obtained their education outside of Canada. Faculty believed their approach to teaching and learning instilled a deep understanding of the limits to practical nurse autonomous practice. Practical nurses were confident in what they learned about patient safety in their educational programs. The high degree of patient safety competence may be a true reflection of practical nurses understanding of, and comfort with, the limits of their knowledge and, ultimately, the limits of their individual autonomous practice. Further exploration as to whether the questionnaire requires additional modification for use with practical nurse populations is warranted. However, this

  12. Exploring the expanded practice roles of community mental health nurses.

    PubMed

    Elsom, Stephen; Happell, Brenda; Manias, Elizabeth

    2007-04-01

    Significant changes to the delivery of mental health services have resulted in the expansion of the community mental health nursing role. This qualitative study was undertaken to explore the extent to which community mental health nurses are currently engaged in expanded forms of practice. Focus groups were undertaken with community mental health nurses (n = 27) from metropolitan and rural Victoria, Australia. Thematic analysis identified the following major themes: reported practice, consumers as beneficiaries of expanded practice, risk of harm and litigation, and barriers to expanded practice. The findings emphasize the need for significant changes in current legislation if expanded practice for nurses is to become a reality.

  13. Contributions of Public Health to nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Souza, Káren Mendes Jorge de; Seixas, Clarissa Terenzi; David, Helena Maria Scherlowski Leal; Costa, Aline Queiroz da

    2017-01-01

    Analyze the perceptions of undergraduate nursing students about the contributions of public health to nursing practice in the Unified Health System. Qualitative Descriptive Study. Data collection was carried out through semi-directed interviews with 15 students. The language material was analyzed according to content and thematic analysis. Thematic categories were established, namely: "Perceptions about Public Health" and "Contribution of Public Health to nursing practice in the Unified Health System". Perceptions about Public Health are diversified, but converge to the recognition of this field as the basis for training nurses qualified to work in the SUS with technical competence, autonomy and focusing on the integrality in health care. Analisar as percepções de alunos do curso de bacharelado em Enfermagem acerca das contribuições da Saúde Coletiva para o trabalho de enfermeiros no Sistema Único de Saúde. Estudo descritivo, com abordagem qualitativa. A coleta de dados foi realizada mediante a técnica da entrevista semidirigida com 15 alunos. O material de linguagem foi analisado segundo a técnica de análise de conteúdo temático-categorial. Foram produzidas as categorias temáticas "Percepções acerca da Saúde Coletiva" e "Contribuição da Saúde Coletiva ao trabalho do enfermeiro no Sistema Único de Saúde". As percepções sobre a Saúde Coletiva são plurais, mas convergem para o reconhecimento desse campo como base de sustentação da formação de enfermeiros habilitados a trabalhar no SUS com competência técnica, autonomia e com foco na integralidade do cuidado em saúde.

  14. Nurse drug diversion and nursing leader's responsibilities: legal, regulatory, ethical, humanistic, and practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Tanga, Hazel Y

    2011-01-01

    Nurses who divert drugs pose significant threats to patient safety, but also become a liability to healthcare organizations and the nursing department where the diversion occurred. Healthcare and nursing leaders have a responsibility to ensure that security systems are in place to prevent diversion and protect patients if nursing impairment is suspected as a result of drug diversion. Nursing leaders must consider legal, regulatory, ethical, humanistic, and practical considerations in resolving this issue.

  15. Nurses' views about returning to practice after a career break.

    PubMed

    Durand, Mary Alison; Randhawa, Gurch

    Shortages in nursing staff have led to recruitment campaigns targeting nurses who have left the profession. The present study explored reasons why career-break nurses decide for or against a return to practice, as well as perceptions of nursing following return. Semistructured interview were conducted with 24 nurses who had returned recently to the profession and 28 nurses on a "career break". Findings revealed that those who returned did so when their personal circumstances allowed, and half returned as bank nurses in order to work flexible, family-friendly hours. Some non-returners reported that they could not afford to return because of childcare costs. Although still a caring one, the nurse's role is seen by returners as becoming increasingly technologically and administratively demanding. Flexibility with regard to working practices, increased salaries and demonstrating that it values its staff, were highlighted by interviewees generally as priority issues for the NHS if it wishes to recruit career-break nurses.

  16. Clinical teaching models for nursing practice: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Elsa

    2014-01-01

    Clinical placements provide opportunities for student nurses to learn experientially, thanks to clinical - practical teaching models. For this purpose this review wanted to better investigate the latest methods developed in nursing education to ameliorate the theory practice model in nursing education teaching model. The review of the literature was performed through a search of nursing specific data bases, including Cinahl, Capsur, Ovid, Cockrane Library, PubMed from January 2010 to September 2012. It included key words, such as: Clinical Model; Nursing Education Model; Nursing Practical Teaching Model; Theory-Practice Model. A total of 8 articles were found. Of these, only 4 articles were considered for this review because they better analyzed one clinical teaching model in nursing practice. Each article was structured analyzed, by considering the "PICOS" method, with reference to participants, interventions, comparisons, outcomes, and study design. Four innovative clinical teaching models for nursing practice were considered: the first one was the Problem-Based Leaning method in nursing education; the second one was the Self-Regulated Learning strategy; the third one was the developing nursing students' reflective skills associated as a key component in the perceived coherence between theory and practice; the fourth one was the computer-based clinical simulation. Each work performed an innovative clinical teaching model for nursing student. Some limitations were highlight, but all the literature revised emphasized the evaluation and feedback from students and the perceptions of their clinical activities is essential.

  17. Intravenous Fluid Therapy Course for the Licensed Practical Nurse. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 10-unit intravenous (IV) therapy course for licensed practical nurses. Units contain from one to nine lessons. The first unit provides an introduction and orientation to the course. Subsequent units concern documentation, anatomy and physiology as applied to IV therapy, fundamental aspects of fluid…

  18. Intravenous Fluid Therapy Course for the Licensed Practical Nurse. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 10-unit intravenous (IV) therapy course for licensed practical nurses. Units contain from one to nine lessons. The first unit provides an introduction and orientation to the course. Subsequent units concern documentation, anatomy and physiology as applied to IV therapy, fundamental aspects of fluid…

  19. Advanced practice nursing in Latin America and the Caribbean: regulation, education and practice

    PubMed Central

    Zug, Keri Elizabeth; Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli; Pulcini, Joyce; Garcia, Alessandra Bassalobre; Aguirre-Boza, Francisca; Park, Jeongyoung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the current state of advanced practice nursing regulation, education and practice in Latin America and the Caribbean and the perception of nursing leaders in the region toward an advanced practice nursing role in primary health care to support Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage initiatives. Method: a descriptive cross-sectional design utilizing a web-based survey of 173 nursing leaders about their perceptions of the state of nursing practice and potential development of advanced practice nursing in their countries, including definition, work environment, regulation, education, nursing practice, nursing culture, and perceived receptiveness to an expanded role in primary health care. Result: the participants were largely familiar with the advanced practice nursing role, but most were unaware of or reported no current existing legislation for the advanced practice nursing role in their countries. Participants reported the need for increased faculty preparation and promotion of curricula reforms to emphasize primary health care programs to train advanced practice nurses. The vast majority of participants believed their countries' populations could benefit from an advanced practice nursing role in primary health care. Conclusion: strong legislative support and a solid educational framework are critical to the successful development of advanced practice nursing programs and practitioners to support Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage initiatives. PMID:27508923

  20. The role of rural nurse managers in supporting new graduate nurses in rural practice.

    PubMed

    Lea, Jackie; Cruickshank, Mary

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the nature and timing of support available to new graduate nurses within a rural transition to practice programme. For new graduates in rural practice successful transition is complicated by the unique role of the rural nurse, staff ratios and resources within rural environments. Little is known about the support needs of graduates working in rural health services, or who is best placed to provide support during their transition. This was a qualitative case study, using individual interviews with new graduate nurses at 3, 6 and 9 months milestones during a 12-month rural transition to practice programme plus interviews with experienced rural nurses who were employed in rural health agencies where the new graduate nurses were employed. Graduates in rural health services rely on nurse unit managers and nurse managers for feedback, support and debriefing, provision of emotional support, advocacy, openness, encouragement and protection from organisational requests and demands during the transition to rural nursing practice. Nurse managers play an important role in rural health services in the provision of support for new graduate nurses. As clinical leaders rural nurse managers and nurse unit managers, have an important role in facilitating the successful entry and retention of new graduate nurses into the rural nursing workforce. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Intelligent nursing: accounting for knowledge as action in practice.

    PubMed

    Purkis, Mary E; Bjornsdottir, Kristin

    2006-10-01

    This paper provides an analysis of nursing as a knowledgeable discipline. We examined ways in which knowledge operates in the practice of home care nursing and explored how knowledge might be fruitfully understood within the ambiguous spaces and competing temporalities characterizing contemporary healthcare services. Two popular metaphors of knowledge in nursing practice were identified and critically examined; evidence-based practice and the nurse as an intuitive worker. Pointing to faults in these conceptualizations, we suggest a different way of conceptualizing the relationship between knowledge and practice, namely practice as being activated by contextualized knowledge. This conceptualization is captured in an understanding of the intelligent creation of context by the nurse for nursing practice to be ethical and effective.

  2. Reflections on independence in nurse practitioner practice.

    PubMed

    Weiland, Sandra A

    2008-07-01

    To examine factors that influence the ability of nurse practitioners (NPs) to practice as independent primary care providers. Extensive literature search on CINAHL, OVID, MEDLINE, Internet journal sources, and professional association Web sites. The legal authority for NPs to practice independently is recognized; however, the ability to put that authority into practice is undermined by the historical failure of political, professional, and social entities to recognize NPs as providers capable of providing primary care autonomously. Nonrecognition is responsible for complex reimbursement policies (both federal and state) that economically and professionally restrain the NP role; hence, NPs remain in a financially dependent relationship despite 40 years of proven safe practice. NPs must articulate their independence as practitioners more vociferously in order to meet society's healthcare requirements, as well as to attain professional fulfillment and forge collegial relationships. NPs will never be seen as members of a profession by either themselves or others without the practicality of independence and autonomy. Although legal independence is a fact, real practice independence in the pragmatic sense is contingent upon reimbursement. Without fiscal sustainability, practice independence is an impossibility. And, without professional autonomy, NPs will have only an employee's voice in the dynamic healthcare system in which they are really key players in providing healthcare services to the poor and undeserved populations.

  3. Starting Out: qualitative perspectives of new graduate nurses and nurse leaders on transition to practice.

    PubMed

    Regan, Sandra; Wong, Carol; Laschinger, Heather K; Cummings, Greta; Leiter, Michael; MacPhee, Maura; Rhéaume, Ann; Ritchie, Judith A; Wolff, Angela C; Jeffs, Lianne; Young-Ritchie, Carol; Grinspun, Doris; Gurnham, Mary Ellen; Foster, Barbara; Huckstep, Sherri; Ruffolo, Maurio; Shamian, Judith; Burkoski, Vanessa; Wood, Kevin; Read, Emily

    2017-05-01

    To describe new graduate nurses' transition experiences in Canadian healthcare settings by exploring the perspectives of new graduate nurses and nurse leaders in unit level roles. Supporting successful transition to practice is key to retaining new graduate nurses in the workforce and meeting future demand for healthcare services. A descriptive qualitative study using inductive content analysis of focus group and interview data from 42 new graduate nurses and 28 nurse leaders from seven Canadian provinces. New graduate nurses and nurse leaders identified similar factors that facilitate the transition to practice including formal orientation programmes, unit cultures that encourage constructive feedback and supportive mentors. Impediments including unanticipated changes to orientation length, inadequate staffing, uncivil unit cultures and heavy workloads. The results show that new graduate nurses need access to transition support and resources and that nurse leaders often face organisational constraints in being able to support new graduate nurses. Organisations should ensure that nurse leaders have the resources they need to support the positive transition of new graduate nurses including adequate staffing and realistic workloads for both experienced and new nurses. Nurse leaders should work to create unit cultures that foster learning by encouraging new graduate nurses to ask questions and seek feedback without fear of criticism or incivility. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The Doctor of Nursing Practice: Recognizing a Need or Graying the Line Between Doctor and Nurse?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jason E.

    2008-01-01

    The distinction between doctor and nurse has been historically visible to patients, and the scope of practice for each healthcare provider has been clearly marked by a wall of separation rooted in state law. In fact, even the titles by which these providers have been addressed have remained constant, with the term “doctor” being reserved for reference to physicians. With the advent of the new doctor of nursing practice degree, however, the clear distinction between doctor and nurse is in jeopardy. Moreover, accompanying the push toward a practice doctorate for advanced nursing practice is a call for the expansion of the scope of advanced nursing practice. The urgent questions at hand are the following: First, is a practice doctorate necessary or even appropriate for advanced nursing practice? Second, should the scope of advanced nursing practice be extended at this time? In addition to the increased educational requirements placed on aspiring advanced practice nurses and the associated increase in costs of obtaining the requisite education, requiring a practice doctorate for advanced practice nursing risks blurring the line between doctor and nurse and creates a potential for patient confusion. A true need for requiring a practice doctorate for advanced practice nursing has not been demonstrated. Moreover, the states should tread carefully when considering expanded roles for advanced practice nurses to avoid creating conflict within the medical community. Considering the level of qualification of today's medical school applicants, perhaps we should be training more physicians to meet the demand head-on rather than creating a separate practice doctorate to fill the gap. PMID:19099003

  5. Measuring Nursing Practice Models using Multi-Attribute Utility theory.

    PubMed

    Brennan, P F; Anthony, M K

    2000-10-01

    Nursing Practice Models (NPMs) represent the structural and contextual features that exist within any group practice of nursing. Currently, measurement of NPMs relies on costly and nonreproducible global judgments by experts. Quantitative measurement techniques are needed to provide a useful evaluation of nursing practice. Guided by Multi-Attribute Utility theory (MAU theory), an expert panel identified 24 factors representative of N PMs. The factors became elements in a computational index that, when summed, assigns a score to a given nursing unit reflecting the extent to which that unit's nursing practice model achieves the nursing professional ideal. Initial validation of the index and its elements consisted of comparing assessments of 40 nursing units generated by the index with a global evaluation provided by each of the expert panelists who proposed the model factors. Pearson correlations between the index-generated scores and the global assigned scores provided evidence supporting the preliminary validation of the index.

  6. Hallmarks of the Professional Nursing Practice Environment. AACN White Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Professional Nursing, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This white paper from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing depicts the current environment of nursing practice, including supply and demand. It describes work environments that support professional practice and outlines eight indicators for the practice environment. Contains 48 references and an appendix with suggested questions for…

  7. Interpersonal relations: a theoretical framework for application in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Peplau, H E

    1992-01-01

    Peplau discusses major features of the theory of interpersonal relations. She describes her theory as among the most useful to apply during nursing practice in order to understand nurse-patient interactive phenomena. Peplau addresses how she derived constructs from clinical data and identified their congruence with nursing practice. She further addresses the specific concepts of her theory and their relations, and specific uses of the theory in practice.

  8. A Nursing Practice Model Based on Christ: The Agape Model.

    PubMed

    Eckerd, Nancy

    2017-06-07

    Nine out of 10 American adults believe Jesus was a real person, and almost two-thirds have made a commitment to Jesus Christ. Research further supports that spiritual beliefs and religious practices influence overall health and well-being. Christian nurses need a practice model that helps them serve as kingdom nurses. This article introduces the Agape Model, based on the agape love and characteristics of Christ, upon which Christian nurses may align their practice to provide Christ-centered care.

  9. Informatics in the Doctor of Nursing Practice Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Melinda; Wilson, Marisa; Ozbolt, Judy

    2007-01-01

    In 2006, The American Association of Colleges of Nursing approved a new doctoral degree for clinical leaders, the Doctor of Nursing Practice. These new advanced practice leaders will need sophisticated skills in informatics to acquire and use data, information, and knowledge in their roles. This paper proposes a foundational course for all Doctor of Nursing Practice students and some strategies for integrating informatics throughout the curriculum. PMID:18693859

  10. Nurses' responses to ethical dilemmas in nursing practice: meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; Izumi, Shigeko; Godfrey, Nelda S; Denhaerynck, Kris

    2008-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study to explore nurses' responses to ethical dilemmas in daily nursing practice. Concern about nurses' ethical competence is growing. Most nurses perceived that there were barriers in their work environment to ethical practice, compromising their ability to perform ethically. Since most research focuses on contextual barriers to nurses' ethical practice, little is known about how nurses involve themselves in ethical decision-making and action in daily care. A meta-analysis of nurses' ethical behaviour was conducted using data from nine studies in four countries (n = 1592 registered nurses). In all studies, the Ethical Behaviour Test was used to measure nurses' ethical responses, based on an adapted version of Kohlberg's theory of moral development. Data were analysed using random-intercept regression analysis. All groups, except the expert group, displayed a uniform pattern of conventional ethical reasoning and practice. When nurses were faced with ethical dilemmas, they tended to use conventions as their predominant decision-guiding criteria rather than patients' personal needs and well-being. Conformist practice (following conventions rather than pursuing good for the patient) constitutes a major barrier for nurses to take the appropriate ethical actions, as creativity and critical reflection are absent. There is an urgent need to find ways to promote nurses' ethical development from conventional to postconventional ethical practice. More research is needed to strengthen existing empirical evidence.

  11. The emergence of forensic nursing and advanced nursing practice in Switzerland: an innovative case study consultation.

    PubMed

    Romain-Glassey, Nathalie; Ninane, Françoise; de Puy, Jacqueline; Abt, Maryline; Mangin, Patrice; Morin, Diane

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this article were to systematically describe and examine the novel roles and responsibilities assumed by nurses in a forensic consultation for victims of violence at a University Hospital in French-speaking Switzerland. Utilizing a case study methodology, information was collected from two main sources: (a) discussion groups with nurses and forensic pathologists and (b) a review of procedures and protocols. Following a critical content analysis, the roles and responsibilities of the forensic nurses were described and compared with the seven core competencies of advanced nursing practice as outlined by Hamric, Spross, and Hanson (2009). Advanced nursing practice competencies noted in the analysis included "direct clinical practice," "coaching and guidance," and "collaboration." The role of the nurse in terms of "consultation," "leadership," "ethics," and "research" was less evident in the analysis. New forms of nursing are indeed practiced in the forensic clinical setting, and our findings suggest that nursing practice in this domain is following the footprints of an advanced nursing practice model. Further reflections are required to determine whether the role of the forensic nurse in Switzerland should be developed as a clinical nurse specialist or that of a nurse practitioner.

  12. Factors affecting Korean nursing student empowerment in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yang-Heui; Choi, Jihea

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the phenomenon of nursing student empowerment in clinical practice is important. Investigating the cognition of empowerment and identifying predictors are necessary to enhance nursing student empowerment in clinical practice. To identify empowerment predictors for Korean nursing students in clinical practice based on studies by Bradbury-Jones et al. and Spreitzer. A cross-sectional design was used for this study. This study was performed in three nursing colleges in Korea, all of which had similar baccalaureate nursing curricula. Three hundred seven junior or senior nursing students completed a survey designed to measure factors that were hypothesized to influence nursing student empowerment in clinical practice. Data were collected from November to December 2011. Study variables included self-esteem, clinical decision making, being valued as a learner, satisfaction regarding practice with a team member, perception on professor/instructor/clinical preceptor attitude, and total number of clinical practice fields. Data were analyzed using stepwise multiple regression analyses. All of the hypothesized study variables were significantly correlated to nursing student empowerment. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that clinical decision making in nursing (t=7.59, p<0.001), being valued as a learner (t=6.24, p<0.001), self-esteem (t=3.62, p<0.001), and total number of clinical practice fields (t=2.06, p=0.040). The explanatory power of these predictors was 35% (F=40.71, p<0.001). Enhancing nursing student empowerment in clinical practice will be possible by using educational strategies to improve nursing student clinical decision making. Simultaneously, attitudes of nurse educators are also important to ensure that nursing students are treated as valued learners and to increase student self-esteem in clinical practice. Finally, diverse clinical practice field environments should be considered to enhance experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd

  13. Clerical frames for nursing practice: missionary nurses at Rehoboth.

    PubMed

    Lagerwey, Mary D

    2003-03-01

    This paper presents a discourse analysis of publications of the Christian Reformed Church regarding its Rehoboth Mission near Gallup, New Mexico, among the Navajo. All issues of The Banner, Acts of Synod of the Christian Reformed Church, the Rehoboth Hospital Bulletin, and the Annual Report of the Rehoboth Mission from 1880 to the present were reviewed for references to health-care at Rehoboth from 1903 to 1943. Four religiously framed discourses were identified: discourses justifying provision of health-care at the mission, discourses of the Navajos as immature and potentially dangerous, needing to be civilized, discourses of cleanliness, and discourses of calling. This paper adds to a growing body of knowledge about religious frames within which nurses have practiced in North America.

  14. Hand decontamination: nurses' opinions and practices.

    PubMed

    Gould, D

    Infection is spread in hospital mainly by hands, making hand decontamination the most important means of preventing dissemination. There is some evidence to suggest that when access to hand-decontaminating agents is poor or the agents available are disliked, hands are washed too seldom, increasing risks of cross-infection. However, little attention has been paid to the use of towels and factors which promote their use, although it is known that damp hands transfer bacteria more readily than dry ones and that hands which become sore through poor drying have higher bacterial counts, contributing to the risk of cross-infection. This paper reports the results of the Nursing Times Hand Drying survey designed to assess nurses' access to hand decontamination agents and towels. The results suggest that the 112 nurses who participated were aware of the need for attention to hand hygiene but that access to both hand-decontaminating agents and paper towels was variable. Forty-one per cent complained of a shortage of soap and although nearly all used paper towels, these were in many cases of poor quality. Such towels were perceived as damaging to hands, leaving them feeling damp and sore. Good-quality, soft, paper towels were much appreciated by respondents in this sample. It is concluded that the quality of paper towels contributes to good infection control practice.

  15. Nurse practitioner prescribing practices: the most frequently prescribed medications.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Thomas; Cashin, Andrew; Stuart, Meg; Browne, Graeme; Dunn, Sandra V

    2013-07-01

    To explore which medications Australian nurse practitioners most frequently prescribe. Although nurse practitioners in Australia have prescriptive authority, little is known about which specific medications nurse practitioners are prescribing and how frequently they do so. Descriptive electronic survey. A total of 209 nurse practitioners reported current prescribing practices. Medications reported were categorised according to the Australian Medicines Handbook major drug classifications and frequencies presented. Seventy-eight per cent of respondents reported prescribing medications as part of their Nurse Practitioner practice. In total, participants reported prescribing 234 separate medications from most Australian Medicines Handbook major drug classifications. Medications from the classification anti-infective drugs were most frequently prescribed followed by medications from analgesic, psychotropic, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, genitourinary and gastrointestinal classifications. The majority of nurse practitioners in Australia prescribe medications in their clinical practice, although the proportion of nurse practitioners prescribing has not changed significantly in the past four years. The medications prescribed are comparable with those most frequently prescribed by all prescribers in Australia and highlight the diversity in scope of practice among nurse practitioners. Findings highlight the importance of Nurse Practitioner's a capacity to prescribe wide variety of medications, especially in practice areas such acute, primary and emergency care. The unique role nurse practitioners in relation to management of patients with infective processes and patients requiring pain relief is highlighted. Insight into current Nurse Practitioner prescribing trends informs future Nurse Practitioner curricular and future continuing education programmes. Findings give unique insight for future service planning, especially service providers considering introducing nurse

  16. The prescribing of buprenorphine by advanced practice addictions nurses.

    PubMed

    Strobbe, Stephen; Hobbins, Debra

    2012-02-01

    In order to increase safe access to buprenorphine treatment for patients with opioid dependence, it is the position of the International Nurses Society on Addictions (IntNSA) that the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 (DATA 2000) be amended to allow for the prescribing of buprenorphine by qualified advanced practice nurses who have both prescriptive authority and specialty certification in addictions nursing.

  17. The Relevance of Standards of Professional School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Susan K.; Biordi, Diana L.; Zeller, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    This descriptive correlational study assessed school nurses' knowledge of and perceived relevance of the "Standards of Professional School Nursing Practice". Of the 1,162 Ohio school nurses sent questionnaires, 345 returned usable questionnaires (30%). The typical respondent was a 50-year-old Caucasian woman with 24 years of nursing…

  18. Moving toward a Model for Nursing Education and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lusk, Marilyn; Decker, Ilene

    2001-01-01

    One baccalaureate nursing program and five community college programs collaboratively developed a shared philosophy, curriculum design, and model for nursing education and practice. The model takes a holistic view of the client/patient's mind, body, and spirit engaged in life-changing transitions and depicts the role of nursing care. (SK)

  19. Practical Nursing Education: Criteria and Procedures for Accreditation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Practical Nurse Education and Service, Inc., New York, NY.

    The third in a series of pamphlets on practical nursing education, this document contains information on accreditation standards governing nursing programs. Included are announcements of: (1) available accreditation and consultation services, (2) policies regulating accreditation eligibility, (3) standards of ethics by which nursing programs are…

  20. A Phenomenographic Study Exploring Nursing Education and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degen, Greta M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to illuminate the qualitatively different ways in which three nurses with an associate degree (ADN) and three nurses with a baccalaureate degree (BSN) experience, conceptualize, perceive, and understand their own nursing practice within the context of their educational background. Using a phenomenographic methodology…

  1. Public Policy and Planning for Nurse Education and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldbaum, Eleanor G.; Levitt, Morris J.

    This report focuses on nursing educational and practice issues that government officials may have to address in the near future. The report provides statistical information on nurses, compares statistics for white and black nurses, and recommends policies for the future. Data was gathered for the report during a three-year study of 5,175…

  2. A Phenomenographic Study Exploring Nursing Education and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degen, Greta M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to illuminate the qualitatively different ways in which three nurses with an associate degree (ADN) and three nurses with a baccalaureate degree (BSN) experience, conceptualize, perceive, and understand their own nursing practice within the context of their educational background. Using a phenomenographic methodology…

  3. Practical Nursing Education: Criteria and Procedures for Accreditation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Practical Nurse Education and Service, Inc., New York, NY.

    The third in a series of pamphlets on practical nursing education, this document contains information on accreditation standards governing nursing programs. Included are announcements of: (1) available accreditation and consultation services, (2) policies regulating accreditation eligibility, (3) standards of ethics by which nursing programs are…

  4. Factors Associated With the Perception of Family Nursing Practice Among Mental Health Nurses in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine factors that influenced the perceptions of mental health nurses about involving families in their nursing practice. A sample of 175 Taiwanese mental health nurses who are employed in both inpatient and community settings completed structured questionnaires designed to measure empathy, attitudes about involving families in care, and perceptions of family nursing practice. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson's product-moment correlation, t test, one-way ANOVA, and a hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Positive perceptions of family nursing practice were correlated with more years of clinical experience in mental health, empathy, supportive attitudes toward the importance of family nursing care, and personal experiences with family members with serious illness in need of professional care. These findings may assist in the development of effective educational programs designed to help nurses integrate family nursing knowledge and skills in the care of patients and families experiencing mental illness.

  5. Clinical librarians as facilitators of nurses' evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Sylvia; Wallmyr, Gudrun

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore nurses' and ward-based clinical librarians' reflections on ward-based clinical librarians as facilitators for nurses' use of evidences-based practice. Nurses' use of evidence-based practice is reported to be weak. Studies have suggested that clinical librarians may promote evidence-based practice. To date, little is known about clinical librarians participating nurses in the wards. A descriptive, qualitative design was adopted for the study. In 2007, 16 nurses who had been attended by a clinical librarian in the wards were interviewed in focus groups. Two clinical librarians were interviewed by individual interviews. In the analysis, a content analysis was used. Three themes were generated from the interviews with nurses: 'The grip of everyday work', 'To articulate clinical nursing issues' and 'The clinical librarians at a catalyst'. The nurses experienced the grip of everyday work as a hindrance and had difficulties to articulate and formulate relevant nursing issues. In such a state, the nurses found the clinical librarian presence in the ward as enhancing the awareness of and the use of evidence-based practice. Three themes emerged from the analysis with the librarians. They felt as outsiders, had new knowledge and acquired a new role as ward-based clinical librarians. Facilitation is needed if nurses' evidence-based practice is going to increase. The combined use of nurses and clinical librarians' knowledge and skills can be optimised. To achieve this, nurses' skills in consuming and implementing evidence ought to be strengthened. The fusion of the information and knowledge management skill of the ward-based clinical librarian and the clinical expertise of the nurses can be of value. With such a collaborative model, nurse and ward-based clinical librarian might join forces to increase the use of evidence-based practice. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. 'Nursing research culture' in the context of clinical nursing practice: addressing a conceptual problem.

    PubMed

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-05-01

    To report an analysis of the concept of nursing research culture in the context of clinical nursing practice. Nursing research culture should be valued for its contribution to improving patient care and should be considered as a routine hospital activity. However, the demand for efficiency, nurses' barriers to research use and the lack of definition of the concept of nursing research culture make it difficult to establish. Concept analysis. Data were collected through a literature review in PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO during March 2016. Walker and Avant's eight-step framework for concept analysis. Five defining attributes of nursing research culture in the context of clinical nursing practice were identified: strong monodisciplinary nursing professionalism, academic thinking and socialization, research use as a part of daily nursing practice, acceptance by colleagues and management and facilitation of resources from management and organization. Although the method of concept analysis has been criticized and heavily debated, the development of nursing research cultures based on the defining attributes and antecedents of the concept will be important to emphasize evidence-based clinical nursing care. Further research should support the development and the implementation of nursing research culture in clinical nursing practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Building chronic disease management capacity in General Practice: The South Australian GP Plus Practice Nurse Initiative.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Jeffrey; Koehne, Kristy; Verrall, Claire C; Szabo, Natalie; Bollen, Chris; Parker, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    This paper draws on the implementation experience of the South Australian GP Plus Practice Nurse Initiative in order to establish what is needed to support the development of the chronic disease management role of practice nurses. The Initiative was delivered between 2007 and 2010 to recruit, train and place 157 nurses across 147 General Practices in Adelaide. The purpose was to improve chronic disease management in General Practice, by equipping nurses to work as practice nurses who would coordinate care and establish chronic disease management systems. Secondary analysis of qualitative data contained in the Initiative evaluation report, specifically drawing on quarterly project records and four focus groups conducted with practice nurses, practice nurse coordinators and practice nurse mentors. As evidenced by the need to increase the amount of support provided during the implementation of the Initiative, nurses new to General Practice faced challenges in their new role. Nurses described a big learning curve as they dealt with role transition to a new work environment and learning a range of new skills while developing chronic disease management systems. Informants valued the skills development and support offered by the Initiative, however the ongoing difficulties in implementing the role suggested that change is also needed at the level of the Practice. While just over a half of the placement positions were retained, practice nurses expressed concern with having to negotiate the conditions of their employment. In order to advance the role of practice nurses as managers of chronic disease support is needed at two levels. At one level support is needed to assist practice nurses to build their own skills. At the level of the Practice, and in the wider health workforce system, support is also needed to ensure that Practices are organisationally ready to include the practice nurse within the practice team.

  8. Leaving the Philippines: oral histories of nurses' transition to Canadian nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Ronquillo, Charlene

    2012-12-01

    Filipino nurses are the leading group of immigrant nurses in Canada, making up a substantial portion of the nursing workforce, yet little is known about the contexts surrounding their immigration and transition experiences at the individual level. This study examines the transition experiences of Filipino nurses who immigrated to Canada between 1970 and 2000. Using oral history as the framework and method, it establishes a body of work in examining the history of this group of nurses in a Canadian context. Individual interviews were conducted with 9 Filipino nurses working in 2 Canadian provinces. Findings suggest that nurses may have delayed the process of becoming a Registered Nurse because the family was considered a priority, they found that adjusting to the role and scope of Canadian nursing practice required time, and they felt "foreign" and sensed a need to prove their competence to Canadian nurses.

  9. The History of Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing Education and Practice.

    PubMed

    Mackey, April; Bassendowski, Sandra

    Beginning with Florence Nightingale in the 1800s and evolving again within the medical community, evidence-based practice continues to advance along with the nursing discipline. Evidence-based practice is foundational to undergraduate and graduate nursing education and is a way for the nursing discipline to minimize the theory to practice gap. This article discusses the concept of evidence-based practice from a historical perspective as it relates to nursing in the educational and practice domains. The concept evidence-based practice is defined, and the similarities and differences to evidence-based medicine are discussed. It is crucial that registered nurses be proactive in their quest for research knowledge, so the gap between theory and practice continues to close. Utilizing nursing best practice guidelines, reviewing and implementing applicable research evidence, and taking advantage of technological advances are all ways in which nursing can move forward as a well-informed discipline. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nursing practice environment, quality of care, and morale of hospital nurses in Japan.

    PubMed

    Anzai, Eriko; Douglas, Clint; Bonner, Ann

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe Japanese hospital nurses' perceptions of the nursing practice environment and examine its association with nurse-reported ability to provide quality nursing care, quality of patient care, and ward morale. A cross-sectional survey design was used including 223 nurses working in 12 acute inpatient wards in a large Japanese teaching hospital. Nurses rated their work environment favorably overall using the Japanese version of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Subscale scores indicated high perceptions of physician relations and quality of nursing management, but lower scores for staffing and resources. Ward nurse managers generally rated the practice environment more positively than staff nurses except for staffing and resources. Regression analyses found the practice environment was a significant predictor of quality of patient care and ward morale, whereas perceived ability to provide quality nursing care was most strongly associated with years of clinical experience. These findings support interventions to improve the nursing practice environment, particularly staffing and resource adequacy, to enhance quality of care and ward morale in Japan. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Discharge planning as part of daily nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Foust, Janice B

    2007-05-01

    Nurses deal with planning posthospitalization care within increasingly urgent focused environments and amid competing priorities. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine nurses' discharge planning efforts as these occurred in practice. Eight nurses were observed and interviewed as they cared for selected patients. Major findings indicate that nurses' expectations of patients' progress guided their discharge assessments, teaching, and planning over time. Discharge teaching was a prominent part of daily practice that became more specific as hospital discharge neared. A gap between observed and documented discharge planning efforts existed, which poses significant challenges for nurses in many positions.

  12. CE: Incorporating Acupressure into Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Judy

    2015-12-01

    Rooted in traditional Chinese medicine, the use of acupressure to alleviate symptoms, support the healing process, promote relaxation, and improve overall health has grown considerably in the West. The effects of acupressure--like those of acupuncture, with which it shares a theoretical framework--cannot always be explained in terms of Western anatomical and physiologic concepts, but this noninvasive practice involves minimal risk, can be easily integrated into nursing practice, and has been shown to be effective in treating nausea as well as low back, neck, labor, and menstrual pain. The author discusses potential clinical indications for the use of acupressure, describes the technique, explains how to evaluate patient outcomes, and suggests how future research into this integrative intervention might be improved.

  13. Nurse leaders' experiences of implementing regulatory changes in sexual health nursing practice in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Bungay, Vicky; Stevenson, Janine

    2013-05-01

    Most research about regulatory policy change concerning expanded nursing activities has emphasized advanced practice roles and acute care settings. This study is a contribution to the small pool of research concerned with regulatory policy implementation for nurses undertaking expanded nursing practice activities in a public health context. Using the regulatory changes in certified nursing practice in one Canadian province as our starting point, we investigated the experiences of nurse leaders in implementing this change. Using a qualitative interpretive descriptive approach informed by tenets of complexity theory, we examined the experiences of 16 nurse leaders as situated within the larger public health care system in which nurses practice. Two interrelated themes, (a) preparing for certification and (b) the certification process, were identified to illustrate how competing and contrasting demands between health care and regulatory organizations created substantial barriers to policy change. Implications for health service delivery and future research are discussed.

  14. Current Status of Fellowship Programs for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses in the Nurse Practitioner Role.

    PubMed

    Camal Sanchez, Carlos Alberto

    2017-05-31

    Students completing an advanced practice RN program for practice as a nurse practitioner may seek options for further advancement. Although postgraduate clinical fellowship programs exist, information about such programs is not readily available. This article offers a resource for faculty to assist graduate students in finding advanced practice RN nurse practitioner fellowship programs in the United States.

  15. Assuring Quality and Access in Advanced Practice Nursing: A Challenge to Nurse Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundinger, Mary O.; Cook, Sarah Sheets; Lenz, Elizabeth R.; Piacentini, Karen; Auerhahn, Carolyn; Smith, Jennifer

    2000-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses are assuming increasingly accountable roles in primary health care. A doctor of nursing practice degree would signify the high level of competency they achieve. Columbia University's training model is an example of the preparation needed for this level of professional practice. (SK)

  16. Occupational health nursing practice through the Human Caring lens.

    PubMed

    Noel, Dianne L

    2010-01-01

    Many health care and academic centers have adopted Watson's Theory of Human Caring as their guiding principle; the theory is also used in other disciplines, such as library science. Human caring theory offers occupational health nurses as structure that not only defines a focus for practice, but also provides a basis for moral and philosophical practice analyses. In particular, nurses may find this theory useful in confirming the definition of "caring" and reconsidering what nursing is all about. More importantly, consideration and application of this theory may lead to research on its applicability to the field of occupational health nursing. This article presents the science and philosophy of human caring, specifically Watson's Theory of Human Caring. Two case studies are presented that demonstrate how the theory could be used to evaluate occupational health nursing practice. To demonstrate its possible relevance as an occupational health nursing framework, an analysis of and comparison to existing occupational health nursing guidelines are detailed and discussed.

  17. The practice role in the academic nursing community.

    PubMed

    Broussard, A B; Delahoussaye, C P; Poirrier, G P

    1996-02-01

    The practice role of nurse educators has emerged as a mechanism to unite practice, research, and education. The long-term outcome of such a synthesis should be an improvement in the quality of nursing care delivered to clients. Clinically focused nursing research designed by nurse educators who maintain a practice role or nurse clinicians who maintain a teaching role has the potential to unify and thus advance the profession. The authors discuss the historical background from which the practice role evolved, and efforts of recent nursing leaders to facilitate the incorporation of the nursing practice role by educators. Models for faculty practice are identified, and advantages of faculty practice are reviewed. The authors also describe barriers to the establishment of faculty practice, contemporary developments impacting faculty practice, and research needed to advance faculty practice. Nurse educators in many academic communities in the 1990s are discovering that not only must they produce scholarly work in addition to their teaching and service to the university and community, but that they may also be under growing pressure to be engaged in clinical practice. This pressure may be self-imposed or may be an expectation of their colleagues in nursing education or the administrators of their nursing programs. The focus of this research brief will be to describe the historical background from which this "new" role evolved, to discuss strategies or models developed to facilitate the faculty practice role, and to identify faculty practice issues that have emerged with the adoption of this role in academia. An additional focus will be to critically review faculty practice-related research performed since Chicadonz' (1987) review.

  18. Enhancing nursing practice by utilizing voice recognition for direct documentation.

    PubMed

    Fratzke, Jason; Tucker, Sharon; Shedenhelm, Heidi; Arnold, Jackie; Belda, Tom; Petera, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Innovative strategies that preserve nursing time for direct patient care activities are needed. This study examined the utility, feasibility, and acceptability of voice recognition (VR) software to document nursing care and patient outcomes in an electronic health record in a simulated nursing care environment. A phase 1 trial included 5 iterative experiments with observations and nurse participant feedback to allow enhancements to the speech detection capabilities and refinement of the technology, software, and processes. Utility ratings improved over time; however, interference on nursing care remained a concern throughout. Nurse participants favored keyboard entry electronic health record, largely due to software and technical issues, but also relative to the culture shift the new technology brings to nursing practice. Successful adoption of VR technology by nursing will be dependent on receptiveness of the nurses and perceived benefits, timely access to education and training, and minimization of barriers to using the software.

  19. Integrating management concepts into licensed practical nurse and associate degree in nursing student clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Cummings, J E; Nugent, L

    1997-01-01

    In an associate degree nursing program in which students have the option to take the practical nurse licensing examination at the end of the first year, management concepts and experiences are introduced during the second semester. Many students work as licensed practical nurses and are expected to manage care for groups of clients. Using this model, students work together to practice time management and leadership skills.

  20. Invisible nursing research: thoughts about mixed methods research and nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Jacqueline

    2015-04-01

    In this this essay, the author addresses the close connection between mixed methods research and nursing practice. If the assertion that research and practice are parallel processes is accepted, then nursing practice may be considered "invisible mixed methods research," in that almost every encounter between a nurse and a patient involves collection and integration of qualitative (word) and quantitative (number) information that actually is single-case mixed methods research.

  1. Collaborative graduate education: executive nurse practice and health care leadership.

    PubMed

    Elaine, Hardy; DeBasio, Nancy; Warmbrodt, Lynn; Gartland, Myles; Bassett, William; Tansey, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Research College of Nursing and the Rockhurst University Helzberg School of Management Health Care Initiative collaborated to offer the Executive Nurse Practice: Health Care Leadership track to Research College of Nursing graduate students. This effort was not only cost effective, but also offered expert faculty in both the fields of nursing and business. The curriculum is an integration of both fields and faculties from both institutions as they communicate and collaborate each semester to successfully coordinate the track.

  2. Leadership and responsive care: principle of Nursing Practice H.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Christine; Manley, Kim

    This is the final article in a nine-part series describing the Principles of Nursing Practice developed by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) in collaboration with patient and service organisations, the Department of Health, the Nursing and Midwifery Council, nurses and other healthcare professionals. This article discusses Principle H, the need for leadership among staff and the provision of care that is responsive to individuals' needs.

  3. Senior nurse role expectations of graduate registered and enrolled nurses on commencement to practice.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Elisabeth R; McKenna, Lisa; D'Amore, Angelo

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports on a project to examine the expectations of senior nurses regarding graduate roles of registered and enrolled nurses educated in Victoria, Australia. Participants completed an online survey to indicate whether predetermined competencies were in the roles of graduate enrolled or registered nurses or not in the role of either nurse. Chi-squared analysis was used to identify differences between participant groups. Participants expressed variations in role expectations for the different level of graduate nurse. Although basic nursing care was undertaken by both graduate enrolled and registered nurses, no specific role was identified for enrolled nurses. Differences were found in the opinions of senior nurses over the roles of graduate nurses, demonstrating considerable variation in expectations. Management, education and research roles were not identified as the role of either nurse on graduation. Differences were found in the expectations of the different senior nurse groups regarding the roles of the enrolled nurse, particularly in the new skills taught in the enrolled nurse diploma program. Confusion exists regarding the roles of both types of nurse on graduation. Further research across Australia is required to clarify the roles of the different level of nurse in different practice contexts.

  4. Comparison of nurse practice environments in Denmark and the USA.

    PubMed

    Mainz, H; Baernholdt, M; Ramlau-Hansen, C H; Brink, O

    2015-12-01

    The aims were to translate, validate and test the reliability of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index in a Danish context; and to compare Danish nurses' ratings of their nurse work environments with the highest rated work environments, USA magnet hospitals. Patient quality and safety are priorities for managers, administrators and policy makers worldwide. A supportive work environment is an important factor to improve quality and safety. The most used scale to measure the nurse work environment is Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. There is no Danish translation of the scale or a comparison of nurse work environment between Denmark and other countries. The translation and cultural adaption followed the steps recommended by the World Health Organization. Content validity was evaluated using cognitive interviewing in-person and through surveys. The reliability was tested using Cronbach's alpha. Finally, Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index ratings from 127 nurses were compared with results from Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals using t-tests. The Danish translation of Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index had a high validity and reliability. Danish nurses rated their nurse work environment more favourable than nurses in non-Magnet hospitals and at the same level as Magnet hospitals. Lowest Danish scores were found in the two hospital-level subscales in items related to staff nurses' involvement in discussions on daily problems, the visibility of the chief nursing officer and importance of up-to-date nursing documentation. Danish nurses report a supportive nurse work environment with overall scores at the same level as Magnet hospitals. Opportunities for improvement were identified in the subscales. A first step to improve patient quality and safety is addressing factors that influence quality and safety. Using the Danish Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index, interventions to improve

  5. Tunable impedance matching network fundamental limits and practical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Wesley N.

    As wireless devices continue to increase in utility while decreasing in dimension, design of the RF front-end becomes more complex. It is common for a single handheld device to operate on a plethora of frequency bands, utilize multiple antennae, and be subjected to a variety of environments. One complexity in particular which arises from these factors is that of impedance mismatch. Recently, tunable impedance matching networks have begun to be implemented to address this problem. This dissertation presents the first in-depth study on the frequency tuning range of tunable impedance matching networks. Both the fundamental limitations of ideal networks as well as practical considerations for design and implementation are addressed. Specifically, distributed matching networks with a single tuning element are investigated for use with parallel resistor-capacitor and series resistor-inductor loads. Analytical formulas are developed to directly calculate the frequency tuning range TR of ideal topologies. The theoretical limit of TR for these topologies is presented and discussed. Additional formulas are developed which address limitations in transmission line characteristic impedance and varactor range. Equations to predict loss due to varactor quality factor are demonstrated and the ability of parasitics to both increase and decrease TR are shown. Measured results exemplify i) the potential to develop matching networks with a small impact from parasitics, ii) the need for accurate knowledge of parasitics when designing near transition points in optimal parameters, iii) the importance of using a transmission line with the right characteristic impedance, and iv) the ability to achieve extremely low loss at the design frequency with a lossy varactor under the right conditions (measured loss of -0.07 dB). In the area of application, tunable matching networks are designed and measured for mobile handset antennas, demonstrating up to a 3 dB improvement in power delivered to a

  6. Training and Education in Practice Nursing: The Perspectives of the Practice Nurse, Employing General Practitioner and Family Health Service Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkin, Karl; Lunt, Neil

    1995-01-01

    Interviews with 56 practice nurses, 29 general practitioners (GPs), 23 health administrators, and 1 government official revealed that nurses use a variety of education and training opportunities; GPs largely let nurses take responsibility for their continuing education. The informal nature of training opportunities and lack of funding were…

  7. Is the influence of nurse care practices and nursing home organization understood? A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Cachón-Pérez, José Miguel; Gómez-Pérez, Daniel; Gómez-Calero, Cristina; Brea-Rivero, Miguel; Fernández-DE-Las-Peñas, César

    2013-11-01

    To describe residents' experience of nursing home organization and nursing care practices in a region of Spain. Nursing home organization, nursing practices and rules within the institution may all influence residents' daily living and their perception on the quality of care provided. A qualitative approach was conducted, using purposeful and theoretical sampling. Data were collected from nursing home residents, following unstructured and semi-structured interviews, researcher field notes and residents' personal diaries and letters. Giorgi analysis was conducted. Two main themes emerged. (1) 'Following nursing home rules'. Norms may be seen as boundaries, especially for those residents who were independent before admission. (2) 'Prioritizing nursing care in residents'. Prioritizing the nursing care may limit the autonomy of residents because it does not meet their preferences and needs. Understanding the meaning of nursing home organization and nursing care practices with nursing home residents might provide deeper insight into their expectations. Nursing staff should have greater involvement in the nursing home organization, as well as in prioritizing the care provision based on resident's needs and preferences. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. [A study of perceived practice environment among nurses in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Lee, Sheuan; Pai, Hsiang-Chu; Yen, Wen-Jiuan

    2008-08-01

    The International Council of Nurses (ICN) issued the title, Positive Practice Environments: Quality Workplaces = Quality Patient Care, as the theme of International Nurses Day in 2007. An appeal is being made for all ICN National Nursing Associations to focus on improving practice environments and protecting nursing staff. The purpose of the study was to explore the perceived practice environment of nurses in Taiwan on the basis of the tool kit of positive environments designed by ICN, involving the eight dimensions of safety, supplies, resources, pay, continuing education, support, equipment, and respect. A self- administered Practice Environment Survey Scale was used. The findings indicated that participants were mostly female, the average age was 34.15 years old, and most of them worked in northern Taiwan (33.4%). The perceived practice environment score was determined as a percentage, and the average score among nurses was 65. The three lowest scores were recorded in the domains of pay, resources and equipment. There were significant differences in the perceived practice environment scores among participants' demographic characteristics (p < .05). Nurses recorded more negative practice environment scores than administrators. The results will be useful in the formulation of nursing policy and in nursing administration.

  9. Strategic collaborative model for evidence-based nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Olade, Rosaline A

    2004-01-01

    To describe a model that has been developed to guide nurses and other health professionals in collaborative efforts toward evidence-based nursing practice. A review of literature was conducted using MEDLINE and CINAHL to search for articles on research utilization for evidence-based practice in health care delivery. Empirical studies; reviews; and theoretical, opinion, and information articles were included in the review in order to provide a more comprehensive view of the state of evidence-based nursing internationally. Findings revealed a number of barriers to evidence-based nursing practice, which have persisted over the last two decades, including inadequate knowledge of research among practicing nurses, lack of administrative support for research activities in clinical settings, lack of empowerment of nurses, and lack of needed mentoring from nursing research consultants. Barriers in the areas of nursing education and administrative support appear to be major. A need was identified for a pragmatic model that encourages cooperation and collaboration between educators/researchers in academia and the administrative leaders in the clinical facilities if evidence-based nursing practice is to become the norm. FRAMEWORK OF MODEL: The Tyler Collaborative Model is based on an eclectic approach to planned change for creating evidence-based practice. This model identifies a step-by-step process for change, while allowing for the opportunity to integrate any of the previously available methods of critical appraisal to determine the best evidence for practice in each clinical setting.

  10. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses’ Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs in nursing homes. Design and Methods: The sample included 863 RNs working as staff RNs in 282 skilled nursing facilities in New Jersey. Two-level hierarchical linear modeling was used to account for the RNs nested by nursing homes. Results: Controlling for individual and nursing home characteristics, staff RNs’ participation in facility affairs, supportive manager, and resource adequacy were positively associated with RNs’ job satisfaction. Ownership status was significantly related to job satisfaction; RNs working in for-profit nursing homes were less satisfied. Implications: A supportive practice environment is significantly associated with higher job satisfaction among RNs working in nursing homes. Unlike other nursing home characteristics, specific dimensions of the nursing practice environment can be modified through administrative actions to enhance RN job satisfaction. PMID:21908803

  11. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

  12. Implementation of information technology in nursing practice - challenge for management in psychiatric nursing.

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Marita; Hätönen, Heli; Välimäki, Maritta

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of information technology (IT) applications in nursing practice requires systematic investments and guidance. A collaborative organisational culture, and systematic and close clinical and administrative cooperation during the implementation process support the acceptance of IT among users in organisation. Although knowledge of IT projects management exists, there is a lack of knowledge about nursing management in IT implementation processes in psychiatric nursing.

  13. Faculty Practice and Roles of Staff Nurses and Clinical Faculty in Nursing Student Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langan, Joanne C.

    2003-01-01

    Focus groups and interviews were conducted with 15 clinical faculty, 4 nursing education administrators, 22 nurses, and 4 hospital administrators involved in clinical placements. When nurses worked with practicing faculty, they experienced less role overload, conflict, and ambiguity. Lack of communication of expectations among administrators,…

  14. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

  15. Articulation Matrix for Home Health Aide, Nursing Assistant, Patient Care Assistant, Practical Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This document demonstrates the relationships among four Florida nursing education programs (home health aide, nursing assistant, patient care assistant, and practical nursing) by listing student performance standards and indicating which ones are required in each program. The 268 student performance standards are arranged in 23 areas of…

  16. 200 years of nursing--a chief nurse's reflections on practice, theory, policy, education, and research.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Jeanette Ives

    2012-01-01

    This bimonthly department, sponsored by the AONE, presents information to assist nurse leaders in shaping the future of healthcare through creative and innovative leadership. The strategic priorities of AONE anchor the editorial content. They reflect contemporary healthcare and nursing practice issues that challenge nurse executives as they strive to meet the needs of patients.

  17. Gerontology found me: gaining understanding of advanced practice nurses in geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Detrixhe, Dia D; Grassley, Jane S; Zeigler, Vicki L

    2013-10-01

    Examining the meanings of the experiences of advanced practice nurses (APNs) who chose to work with older adults and why they continue to work with this population was the focus of this hermeneutic qualitative research study. Twelve geriatric APNs currently practicing in two South Central states were interviewed using an open-ended interview guide. Using Gadamerian hermeneutics, the researchers identified Gerontology Found Me as the significant expression that reflected the fundamental meaning of the experience as a whole. Four themes emerged that further described the meanings of the participants' personal, educational, and professional experiences: Becoming a Gerontology Nurse, Being a Gerontology Nurse, Belonging to Gerontology, and Bringing Others to Gerontology. This study concluded that APNs' personal and professional experiences were more influential than educational experiences to become geriatric nurses, and having these personal and professional experiences of being in relationship with older individuals further contributed to their choice of gerontology.

  18. Breaking the rules of the game: Ethical implications for nursing practice and education.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2006-07-01

    Rules in games are fundamental to the ethics of practice. Rules provide a context or space where a game is defined and played. Throughout human life, games may be formalized with written and unwritten rules. Imaginations may be sparked in the creative structuring of new, informal games. Formal and informal rules can serve to provide direction for what may be viewed as decorum and appropriate behavior with professional groups. In this column, the author illuminates possible ethical meanings for rule-making and breaking with implications for nursing practice and education from a nursing theoretical perspective.

  19. A wellness framework for pediatric nursing clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Spurr, Shelley; Bally, Jill; Ogenchuk, Marcella; Peternelj-Taylor, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a proposed holistic Framework for Exploring Adolescent Wellness specific to the discipline of nursing. Conceptualized as a practical adolescent wellness assessment tool, the framework attends to the physical, spiritual, psychological and social dimensions of adolescent health. Through the discussion of a reconstructed case study the framework's application to nursing practice is illustrated. Nurses are distinctly positioned to promote adolescent wellness. This approach facilitates the exploration of the multiple influences on the health of adolescents, across a variety of clinical practice specialties and settings, by nurses of varying experiences.

  20. The influence of logical positivism on nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Whall, A L

    1989-01-01

    While logical positivism has been said to have had major influence on the development of nursing theory, whether this influence pervades other aspects of the discipline has not been discussed. One central aspect of logical positivism, the verificationist perspective, was used to examine texts, curricular guides and standards of practice that guided nursing practice in the decades in which logical positivism had influence on nursing theory construction. This review of the literature does not support the influence of logical positivism, as exemplified by the verificationist perspective, on nursing practice guidelines.

  1. [Translating Evidence Into Practice in the Field of Nursing].

    PubMed

    Mu, Pei-Fan

    2016-12-01

    Evidence-based healthcare, the organized translation of knowledge into practice, and the implementation of evidence in practice have become vital in nursing care and health policy. Evidence translation is an essential concept that relates to the knowledge development and core competence of advanced practice nurses (APNs). The present article introduces the development and definitions of nursing evidence translation. The evidence-based nursing perspectives of Techne and Phronesis are used to illustrate the characteristics and nature of knowledge translation. The evidence translation models are introduced and the barriers that are often encountered during the three stages of evidence translation are explained. The final section discusses the future development of evidence translation.

  2. The scope of private practice nursing in an Australian sample.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Anne; Averis, Andrea; Walsh, Ken

    2004-01-01

    The changing Australian health care system is creating new opportunities for nurses who work directly with clients in private practice settings. This study examines the scope of practice of a cohort of nurses in private practice. In a questionnaire sent to 106 self-employed nurse entrepreneurs, questions were asked pertaining to the participants' scope of practice, their clients, the types of services offered, and their fee structures. Questions about scope of practice were divided into domains of clinical practice, business consultancy, education, and research. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected for a final sample 54 eligible responses. Participants had been in private practice for an average of 7.6 years (range: 1-20) and reported a mean of 21 years of nursing experience (range: 4-42) before entering private practice. Over half held diplomas in specialty areas. Most participants reported clinical practice, consultancy, or education as the primary work domain; research was much less important as a work activity. Nurses reported difficulties with building client base and receiving adequate fees for service, particularly in clinical practice. Increasing awareness within the nursing profession and health sector about various aspects of private practice nursing could improve service quality for their clients.

  3. Psychiatric Nurses' Attitude and Practice toward Physical Restraint.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Amal Sobhy

    2017-02-01

    This study was to assess psychiatric nurses' attitude and practice toward physical restraint among mentally ill patients. A descriptive research design was used to achieve the study objective. The present study was carried out in three specialized governmental mental hospitals and two psychiatric wards in general hospital. A convenient purposive sample of 96 nurses who were working in the previously mentioned setting was included. The tool used for data collection was the Self-Administered Structured Questionnaire; it included three parts: The first comprised items concerned with demographic characteristics of the nurses, the second comprised 10 item measuring nurses' attitudes toward physical restraint, and the third was used to assess nurses' practices regarding use of physical restraint. There were insignificant differences between attitudes and practices in relation to nurses' sex, level of education, years of experience and work place. Moreover, a positive significant correlation was found between nurses' total attitude scores, and practices regarding use of physical restraint. Psychiatric nurses have positive attitude and adequate practice toward using physical restraints as an alternative management for psychiatric patients. It is important for psychiatric nurses to acknowledge that physical restraints should be implemented as the last resort. The study recommended that it is important for psychiatric nurses to acknowledge that physical restraints should be implemented as the last resort. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Growing Nurse Leaders: Their Perspectives on Nursing Leadership and Today’s Practice Environment

    PubMed

    Dyess, Susan M; Sherman, Rose O; Pratt, Beth A; Chiang-Hanisko, Lenny

    2016-01-14

    With the growing complexity of healthcare practice environments and pending nurse leader retirements, the development of future nurse leaders is increasingly important. This article reports on focus group research conducted with Generation Y nurses prior to their initiating coursework in a Master’s Degree program designed to support development of future nurse leaders. Forty-four emerging nurse leaders across three program cohorts participated in this qualitative study conducted to capture perspectives about nursing leaders and leadership. Conventional content analysis was used to analyze and code the data into categories. We discuss the three major categories identified, including: idealistic expectations of leaders, leading in a challenging practice environment, and cautious but optimistic outlook about their own leadership and future, and study limitations. The conclusion offers implications for future nurse leader development. The findings provide important insight into the viewpoints of nurses today about leaders and leadership.

  5. The art of remediation in professional emergency nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Walker-Cillo, Gayle A; Harding, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    One of the most difficult arenas in the emergency environment for the new and seasoned clinical nurse specialist is the clinical remediation of professional nursing staff. It is easy to say that each person must be treated the same, but the foundation of each practice issue and problem is unique. Identifying and utilizing a standardized process with which concerns are addressed on the basis of theoretical models, expert nursing knowledge, and standards of practice are the keys to success.

  6. [Education of the nurse for caring: reflections of professional practice].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Ana Célia Caetano; Filha, Maria José Matias Muniz; da Silva, Lucia de Fátima; Monteiro, Ana Ruth Macedo; Fialho, Ana Virgílio Melo

    2006-01-01

    It is a reflective study that aimed at discussing the education of the nurse concerning the care in a perspective of change of the professional practice. The curricular guidelines for the profession are based Guidelines and Basis for National Edcucation which have aims to educate capable nurses to transform the practical reality of the Brazilian nursing. However, we realize that only the implementation of such guidelines does not make possible the education of critical, reflexive and transforming professionals regarding the real world.

  7. Nurse practitioner prescribing practice in Australia.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Sandra V; Cashin, Andrew; Buckley, Thomas; Newman, Claire

    2010-03-01

    In Australia, nurse practitioner (NP) services are a relatively new development with little being known about the prescribing practices of Australian NPs. The aim of this study was to conduct the first national study of Australian NP prescribing practices. Focus groups were conducted to inform construction of an electronic survey that was available for all NPs and NP candidates across Australia to complete. Seventy-two percent of authorized NPs and 39% of NP candidates reported that their practice involved prescribing pharmaceutical agents. Of those respondents who did prescribe during the course of their practice, 59% (n = 29) of the authorized NPs and 64% (n = 16) of the NP candidates reported that they usually prescribe at least once a day. The results from this study suggest that fewer Australian NPs prescribe than do NPs in the United States, and those who do prescribe do so less frequently. The current health policy framework in Australia while creating space for the role of the NP is restricting the role's utility and potential contribution to the health care of Australians.

  8. Practice nurse use of evidence in clinical practice: a descriptive survey.

    PubMed

    Prior, Patsy; Wilkinson, Jill; Neville, Stephen

    2010-08-01

    The role of practice nurses is a specific feature of the modernisation agenda of the New Zealand health service. Increasing importance is being placed on service improvement through effective decision making and enhanced clinical performance. To contribute to the development of primary health care it is crucial that nurses have the skills to appropriately implement research based and other evidence in practice. This study involved 55 West Auckland practice nurses working in the general practice setting. The aim of the study was to describe nurses' perceptions of their use of evidence-based practice, attitudes toward evidence-based practice and perceptions of their knowledge/skills associated with evidence-based practice. An additional aim was to determine the effect of educational preparation on practice, attitudes and knowledge/skills toward evidence-based practice. A descriptive survey design was selected for this study. The results demonstrated that nurses' attitudes toward evidence-based practice, knowledge and skills relevant to the implementation of evidence-based practice and the educational preparation of the nurses were important factors influencing the effective utilisation and application of research results in practice. Educational interventions are identified as an integral aspect of implementing evidence-based practice and enhancing practice nurses' knowledge and skill relevant to the use of evidence in practice. Further research is needed to assess the contextual factors which can inhibit or promote achievement of evidence-based practice by practice nurses.

  9. Radiation Belt Storm Probes: Resolving Fundamental Physics with Practical Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr Y.; Mauk, Barry H.; Fox, Nicola J.; Sibeck, David G.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental processes that energize, transport, and cause the loss of charged particles operate throughout the universe at locations as diverse as magnetized planets, the solar wind, our Sun, and other stars. The same processes operate within our immediate environment, the Earth's radiation belts. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission will provide coordinated two-spacecraft observations to obtain understanding of these fundamental processes controlling the dynamic variability of the near-Earth radiation environment. In this paper we discuss some of the profound mysteries of the radiation belt physics that will be addressed by RBSP and briefly describe the mission and its goals.

  10. Radiation Belt Storm Probes: Resolving Fundamental Physics with Practical Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr Y.; Mauk, Barry H.; Fox, Nicola J.; Sibeck, David G.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental processes that energize, transport, and cause the loss of charged particles operate throughout the universe at locations as diverse as magnetized planets, the solar wind, our Sun, and other stars. The same processes operate within our immediate environment, the Earth's radiation belts. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission will provide coordinated two-spacecraft observations to obtain understanding of these fundamental processes controlling the dynamic variability of the near-Earth radiation environment. In this paper we discuss some of the profound mysteries of the radiation belt physics that will be addressed by RBSP and briefly describe the mission and its goals.

  11. Practical Application of Fundamental Concepts in Exercise Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsbottom R.; Kinch, R. F. T.; Morris, M. G.; Dennis, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    The collection of primary data in laboratory classes enhances undergraduate practical and critical thinking skills. The present article describes the use of a lecture program, running in parallel with a series of linked practical classes, that emphasizes classical or standard concepts in exercise physiology. The academic and practical program ran…

  12. Practical Application of Fundamental Concepts in Exercise Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsbottom R.; Kinch, R. F. T.; Morris, M. G.; Dennis, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    The collection of primary data in laboratory classes enhances undergraduate practical and critical thinking skills. The present article describes the use of a lecture program, running in parallel with a series of linked practical classes, that emphasizes classical or standard concepts in exercise physiology. The academic and practical program ran…

  13. Making "cents" of the business side of nurse practitioner practice.

    PubMed

    Luster-Tucker, AtNena

    2016-03-15

    Nurse practitioners produce excellent patient outcomes and should be allowed to practice to the full extent of their education and training. In addition to clinical skills, nurse practitioners need to understand the business side of practice in order to ensure fair and equitable compensation.

  14. [Foundations and construction of the ethical approach in nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Moutel, Grégoire

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of science and our society raises ethical questions in medical and nursing practice. These give rise to the requirement for individual and collective reflection in order to consider the consequences of decisions and to judge on sometimes complex choices. This reflection concerns both nursing practices and the organisation of the health system.

  15. Linking nursing theory and practice: a critical-feminist approach.

    PubMed

    Georges, Jane M

    2005-01-01

    Situated in a critical-feminist perspective, this article describes a pedagogical approach to linking nursing theory and practice. The inclusion of the critical humanities is emphasized in creating an environment in which this linkage can be reified for learners. Implications for the future of nursing theory and its links to practice in the context of current political realities in academia are considered.

  16. Broadening horizons: engaging advanced practice nursing students in faculty research.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Josie A

    2009-01-01

    Inviting advanced practice nursing students to participate in faculty research can be an innovative way to interest students in using current evidence as the basis for their practice. The author discusses strategies for effectively engaging graduate nursing students into research projects in ways that broaden the students' perspectives and strengthen their healthcare decision-making skills.

  17. Fall prevention practices in adult medical-surgical nursing units described by nurse managers.

    PubMed

    Shever, Leah L; Titler, Marita G; Mackin, Melissa Lehan; Kueny, Angela

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe nursing practices (e.g., assessment, interventions) around fall prevention, as perceived by nurse managers in adult, medical-surgical nursing units. One hundred forty nurse managers from 51 hospitals from across the United States participated. Descriptive frequencies are used to describe nurse manager responses. The most commonly used fall risk assessment tool was the Morse Fall Risk Assessment Tool (40%). The most common fall prevention interventions included bed alarms (90%), rounds (70%), sitters (68%), and relocating the patient closer to the nurses' station (56%). Twenty-nine percent of nurse managers identified physical restraints as an intervention to prevent falls whereas only 10% mentioned ambulation. No nurse manager identified that RN hours per patient-day were adjusted to prevent falls or fall-related injuries. More work is needed to build systems that ensure evidence-based nursing interventions are consistently applied in acute care.

  18. National nursing workforce survey of nursing attitudes, knowledge and practice in genomics

    PubMed Central

    Calzone, Kathleen A; Jenkins, Jean; Culp, Stacey; Bonham, Vence L; Badzek, Laurie

    2013-01-01

    Aim Genomics has the potential to improve personalized healthcare. Nurses are vital to the utilization of genomics in practice. This study assessed nursing attitudes, receptivity, confidence, competency, knowledge and practice in genomics to inform education efforts. Materials & methods Cross-sectional study of registered nurses who completed an online Genetic/Genomic Nursing Practice Survey posted on a national nursing organization website. Results A total of 619 registered nurses participated. The largest proportion of education level were nurses with a baccalaureate degree (39%). Most (67.5%) considered genomics very important to nursing practice. However, 57% reported their genomic knowledge base to be poor or fair. The mean total knowledge score correct response rate was 75%. Yet 60% incorrectly answered that diabetes and heart disease are caused by a single gene variant. Most (64%) had never heard of the Essential Nursing Competencies and Curricula Guidelines in Genomics. Higher academic education or post licensure genetic education increased family history collection in practice. Conclusion Most nurses are inadequately prepared to translate genomic information into personalized healthcare. Targeted genomic education is needed to assure optimal workforce preparation for genomics practice integration. PMID:24363765

  19. A spirit-focused conceptual model of nursing for the advanced practice nurse.

    PubMed

    Swanson, C S

    1995-01-01

    A spirit-focused conceptual model of nursing views the person as a spiritual being whose life and purpose arise from a personal relationship with God. The individual's definition of God determines how he or she responds to stimuli, sets goals, and establishes purpose in life. Consequently, this definition influences the professional nursing relationship, and the nurse's and patient's concepts of health and perceptions of the environment. The pediatric nurse practitioner and client are the primary examples of practice examined in this study.

  20. Epigenetics: An Emerging Framework for Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nursing.

    PubMed

    DeSocio, Janiece E

    2016-07-01

    The aims of this paper are to synthesize and report research findings from neuroscience and epigenetics that contribute to an emerging explanatory framework for advanced practice psychiatric nursing. Discoveries in neuroscience and epigenetics reveal synergistic mechanisms that support the integration of psychotherapy, psychopharmacology, and psychoeducation in practice. Advanced practice psychiatric nurses will benefit from an expanded knowledge base in neuroscience and epigenetics that informs and explains the scientific rationale for our integrated practice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Financial literacy as an essential element in nursing management practice.

    PubMed

    Talley, Linda B; Thorgrimson, Diane H; Robinson, Nellie C

    2013-01-01

    Grooming nurses at all levels of the organization to master health care executive skills is critical to the organization's success and the individual's growth. Selecting and executing next steps for nursing leadership team development is critical to success. Leaders must make it their responsibility to provide nurses with increased exposure to quality, safety, and financial data, thereby allowing nurses to translate data while achieving and sustaining successful outcomes. The work of the CNO Dashboard to measure, report, trend, and translate clinical and non-clinical outcomes must be integrated throughout all levels of nursing staff so that nursing practice is positioned to continually strive for best practice. The education and evolution of nurses as business managers is critical to building a strong RN workforce.

  2. HIV and pregnancy: considerations for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Lachat, Maryanne F; Scott, Carol A; Relf, Michael V

    2006-01-01

    This article describes current nursing practice for pregnant women with HIV. In the United States, the number of new cases of HIV continues to rise in women of childbearing age. Women often learn of their HIV status when a pregnancy involves them in the healthcare delivery system. Since the manifestation of the disease in 1981, there have been significant advances in treatment, and now, among pregnant women testing positive for HIV, the risk of perinatal transmission can be decreased to 1% with pharmacologic intervention. Yet, HIV disease poses many new challenges to the woman testing positive who is considering pregnancy or who is already pregnant. The progression of the symptoms of AIDS is similar to the common symptoms of pregnancy; the HIV medications may also cause these symptoms. Adherence to the HIV medication regime is necessary for ongoing viral suppression, for missed doses can initiate drug resistance and the whole categories of antiretroviral drugs may become ineffective. Additionally, the HIV stigma continues to impact those infected and interferes with the access to healthcare. HIV poses a major challenge for the nurse caring for the childbearing woman.

  3. Practicing nurses perspectives of clinical scholarship: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a scarcity of research published on clinical scholarship. Much of the conceptualisation has been conducted in the academy. Nurse academics espouse that the practice of nursing must be built within a framework of clinical scholarship. A key concept of clinical scholarship emerging from discussions in the literature is that it is an essential component of enabling evidence–based nursing and the development of best practice standards to provide for the needs of patients/clients. However, there is no comprehensive definition of clinical scholarship from the practicing nurses. The aim of this study was to contribute to this definitional discussion on the nature of clinical scholarship in nursing. Methods Naturalistic inquiry informed the method. Using an interpretative approach 18 practicing nurses from Australia, Canada and England were interviewed using a semi-structured format. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed and the text coded for emerging themes. The themes were sorted into categories and the components of clinical scholarship described by the participants compared to the scholarship framework of Boyer [JHEOE 7:5-18, 2010]. Results Clinical scholarship is difficult to conceptualise. Two of the essential elements of clinical scholarship are vision and passion. The other components of clinical scholarship were building and disseminating nursing knowledge, sharing knowledge, linking academic research to practice and doing practice-based research. Conclusion Academic scholarship dominated the discourse in nursing. However, in order for nursing to develop and to impact on health care, clinical scholarship needs to be explored and theorised. Nurse educators, hospital-based researchers and health organisations need to work together with academics to achieve this goal. Frameworks of scholarship conceptualised by nurse academics are reflected in the findings of this study with their emphasis on reading and doing research and translating it

  4. Knowledge sources for evidence-based practice in rheumatology nursing.

    PubMed

    Neher, Margit; Ståhl, Christian; Ellström, Per-Erik; Nilsen, Per

    2015-12-01

    As rheumatology nursing develops and extends, knowledge about current use of knowledge in rheumatology nursing practice may guide discussions about future knowledge needs. To explore what perceptions rheumatology nurses have about their knowledge sources and about what knowledge they use in their practice, 12 nurses working in specialist rheumatology were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. The data were analyzed using conventional qualitative content analysis. The analysis yielded four types of knowledge sources in clinical practice: interaction with others in the workplace, contacts outside the workplace, written materials, and previous knowledge and experience. Colleagues, and physicians in particular, were important for informal learning in daily rheumatology practice. Evidence from the medical arena was accessed through medical specialists, while nursing research was used less. Facilitating informal learning and continuing formal education is proposed as a way toward a more evidence-based practice in extended roles. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. The Psychiatric Family Nurse Practitioner: A Collaborator in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Patricia D.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of the psychiatric family nurse practitioner (Psych.F.N.P.) to contribute to family practice through physical care and mental health care exists in the here and now. This role is a synthesis of 2 advanced practice roles, the psychiatric clinical nurse specialist (Psych.C.N.S.) and family nurse practitioner (F.N.P.), both of which continue to have great utility independently. This synthesis is a practical application of concepts that have evolved to meet the changing patterns of health care delivery. At this time, dual certification as a Psych.C.N.S. and F.N.P. best reflects the broad practice expertise of the psychiatric family nurse practitioner. The experienced psychiatric family nurse practitioner provides direct care for both physical and psychological needs of patients in a family practice setting. PMID:15014701

  6. Influence of practice environment and nurse characteristics on perinatal nurses' responses to ethical dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Penticuff, J H; Walden, M

    2000-01-01

    Previous research on nurses' responses to ethical dilemmas has focused either on nurse characteristics or on practice environment characteristics, but has not examined both influences concurrently. To explore the relative contributions of practice environment characteristics and nurse personal and professional characteristics to perinatal nurses' willingness to be involved in activities to resolve clinical ethical dilemmas. A descriptive correlational design and hierarchical multiple regression were used to examine responses of 127 perinatal nurses to three instruments: the Nursing Ethical Involvement Scales (NEIS), Perinatal Values Questionnaire (PVQ), and Demographic Data Sheet (DDS). The organizational variable, nursing influence, accounted for the greatest amount of variance in nurses' reported resolution actions, with nurses' concern about ethics and consequentialist values also contributing significantly. The three predictors together accounted for 31% (24% adjusted) of the variance in actions to resolve clinical ethical dilemmas. Level of nursing education was not a statistically significant influence. These results suggest that nurses are more likely to be involved in dilemma resolution activities when they perceive themselves to have higher levels of influence in their practice environments and higher levels of concern about the ethical aspects of clinical situations. Nurses who emphasize consideration of morally relevant aspects of individual patient situations (consequentialist value orientation) and deemphasize adherence to abstract standards, rules, and policies also are more likely to be involved in dilemma resolution.

  7. The Impact of the Nursing Practice Environment on Missed Nursing Care

    PubMed Central

    Hessels, Amanda J.; Flynn, Linda; Cimiotti, Jeannie P.; Cadmus, Edna; Gershon, Robyn R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Missed nursing care is an emerging problem negatively impacting patient outcomes. There are gaps in our knowledge of factors associated with missed nursing care. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the nursing practice environment and missed nursing care in acute care hospitals. Methods This is a secondary analysis of cross sectional data from a survey of over 7.000 nurses from 70 hospitals on workplace and process of care. Ordinary least squares and multiple regression models were constructed to examine the relationship between the nursing practice environment and missed nursing care while controlling for characteristics of nurses and hospitals. Results Nurses missed delivering a significant amount of necessary patient care (10–27%). Inadequate staffing and inadequate resources were the practice environment factors most strongly associated with missed nursing care events. Conclusions This multi-site study examined the risk and risk factors associated with missed nursing care. Improvements targeting modifiable risk factors may reduce the risk of missed nursing care. PMID:27547768

  8. New Brunswick nurses' views on nursing research, and factors influencing their research activities in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Robichaud-Ekstrand, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    New Brunswick became the first province in Canada to require a baccalaureate degree in nursing as the entry to practice, yet nursing research in hospital settings remains quite low. This study examined clinical nurses' views on nursing research, and identified some contributing factors to the research-practice gap. This descriptive, cross-sectional multicenter study involved 1081 nurses working in the Francophone Regional Health Authority in New Brunswick, Canada. Nurses were eager to identify nursing-care problems to improve patient care (92.9%), and to be involved in collecting data for nursing research studies (95.2%). However, without research supervision, few had engaged in basic research activities, such as formulating or refining research questions (24.5%), presenting at research conferences (6.9%), or changing their practice based on research findings (27.2%). Younger, more educated nurses, nurse managers, and educators participated more readily in research. Sharing research and clinical expertise, as well as infrastructures between academic and clinical institutions is the key to enduring successful patient-centered nursing research in clinical settings. Concrete actions are proposed to build clinical nursing research. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Nursing intellectual capital theory: implications for research and practice.

    PubMed

    Covell, Christine L; Sidani, Souraya

    2013-05-31

    Due to rising costs of healthcare, determining how registered nurses and knowledge resources influence the quality of patient care is critical. Studies that have investigated the relationship between nursing knowledge and outcomes have been plagued with conceptual and methodological issues. This has resulted in limited empirical evidence of the impact of nursing knowledge on patient or organizational outcomes. The nursing intellectual capital theory was developed to assist with this area of inquiry. Nursing intellectual capital theory conceptualizes the sources of nursing knowledge available within an organization and delineates its relationship to patient and organizational outcomes. In this article, we review the nursing intellectual capital theory and discuss its implications for research and practice. We explain why the theory shows promise for guiding research on quality work environments and how it may assist with administrative decision-making related to nursing human resource management and continuing professional development.

  10. Retaining an aging nurse workforce: perceptions of human resource practices.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Mary Val; McIntosh, Barbara; Rambur, Betty; Naud, Shelly

    2009-01-01

    The expected retirement of the largest cohort of nurses will push the RN workforce below projected need by 2020. The challenges of managing a nursing workforce with the majority of nurses over 45 years of age are now necessitating attention to polices for recruitment and retention of older nurses, particularly in rural areas. This convenience sample study employed a mailed survey to investigate perceptions of nurses in 12 institutions (four hospitals, seven home health agencies, and one nursing home serving a small rural state). The goal was to explore rural RNs' perceptions of intent to stay in their current position, with their organization, and employment as a nurse; organizational and unit-level culture regarding older nurses in the workplace; importance of specific human resource practices/policies to their own intention to stay; and extent to which these human resource practices/policies are currently done. The results indicate that although there are similarities across age cohorts, important differences exist that can be addressed to create career-span sensitive policies and practices. This study provides an indicator of progress or lack of progress in addressing older nurse recruitment and retention, and also offers guidance for differentiating policies and practices for younger and older nurses.

  11. Nursing roles and responsibilities in general practice: three case studies.

    PubMed

    Walker, Léonie; Clendon, Jill; Nelson, Katherine

    2015-09-01

    Primary care nursing teams may now comprise registered nurses (usually termed practice nurses), nurse practitioners, physician assistants, enrolled nurses, and primary care practice assistants, clinical assistants, or nursing assistants. There is a need to understand how practitioners in the different roles work with patients in the changed environment. The aim of this study was to describe the different configurations of health professionals' skill-mix in three dissimilar primary care practices, their inter- and intra-professional collaboration and communication, and to explore the potential of expanded nursing scopes and roles to improve patient access. Document review, observation and interviews with key stakeholders were used to explore how health practitioners in three practice settings work together, including their delegation, substitution, enhancement and innovation in roles and interdisciplinary interactions in providing patient care. A multiphase integrative, qualitative and skill-mix framework analysis was used to compare findings related to nursing skill-mix across case studies. Three models of primary care provision, utilising different nursing skill-mix and innovations were apparent. These illustrate considerable flexibility and responsiveness to local need and circumstances. Enabling nurses to work to the full extent of their scope, along with some adjustments to the models of care, greater multidisciplinary cooperation and coordination could mitigate future workforce shortages and improve patient access to care.

  12. Striving for nursing excellence to strengthen nursing practice for the future.

    PubMed

    Driever, Marie J; McNulty, Julie; Nowak, Nancy; Wild, Rietman Lorie

    2007-01-01

    The practice of nursing continues in a state of change, with a number of issues challenging us as we strive for excellence. Nursing leaders must confront these on a daily basis and are passionate about and committed to continually strengthening nursing practice for the delivery of excellent patient care. The nursing workforce issues, nursing leadership challenges, focus on quality, safety and evidence based practice, decreasing health disparities and creating patient partnerships all must be addressed for us to succeed. Through exploring the interconnections of these issues, we can make a significant change in one to affect other areas. Challenges bring opportunities and we are seeing our hard work begin to make significant improvements. The work force is stabilizing, we are experimenting with ways to get staff excited about becoming nurse leaders, focusing on improving care through quality and safety initiatives, moving toward evidence based practice and achieving partnerships with patients other healthcare providers and our communities.

  13. Aseptic practice recommendations for circulating operating theatre nurses.

    PubMed

    Aholaakko, Teija-Kaisa; Metsälä, Eija

    Aseptic practices prevent exposure of a surgical wound to microbes, operating theatre environment and personnel. The circulating nurse assists the operating theatre personnel and supervises aseptic practices preventing surgical site infections. In the absence of analytical tools, few studies exist on intraoperative nursing-related aseptic practices. This study introduces recommendations to assess the role of the circulating nurse in aseptic practices. The authors used international recommendations and research findings to construct a 20-item self-report instrument with a demonstrated reliability across the scale. The authors structured the scale based on three phases: establishment; maintenance; and disestablishment of a sterile operating field. The tool was tested among operating theatre and day surgery nurses, and compared the differences in the mean acceptance rates of aseptic practice recommendations based on background characteristics. College-level nurses and nurses with 15 or more years' work experience accepted the recommendations at higher levels than bachelor-level nurses and nurses with less work experience. Continual assessment of the evidence base and comprehensive evaluation represent important components in further developing the tool. A reasonable number of items covering clinical practice are necessary for assessing the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of aseptic practices, and a larger response rate is needed to validate the tool in future.

  14. Understanding the domestic rupture in forensic psychiatric nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Jean Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to examine the tensions that exist between care and custody in correctional environments by presenting the (im)possibilities of psychiatric nursing practice within this context. The analysis will be guided by empirical data obtained from a qualitative research conducted in a correctional setting. Semistructured interviews with nurses were conducted and used as the primary source of data for analysis. This article will explore the contextual characteristics of psychiatric nursing practice in correctional settings, describe the alienating effects of this context on nursing practice, theorize nurses' experience using Festinger's theory on cognitive dissonance, and, finally, explore how some nurses engage in the reconstruction of their care to counter the effects of working in correctional settings.

  15. Nothing out of the ordinary: advanced fertility nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Allan, Helen; Barber, Debbie

    2004-12-01

    This paper discusses data from a case study of fertility nursing practice. An ethnographic case study approach using participant observation and nine semi-structured interviews with staff and patients was undertaken. The data were analysed thematically and these themes are discussed in this paper. We present the meaning a small group of nurses working in a fertility unit in the UK attach to new roles and the ways in which changes in practice may be influenced. The nurses in this study believed that nature of the task demanded changes to practice and they identified personal, interpersonal and socio-cultural factors which influenced these changes. These new roles facilitated greater continuity of care for patients. This paper discusses the effects of these new roles on knowing and intimacy in nurse - patient relationships. The data suggests that new nursing roles, which are based on "traditional" nursing and "new" technical skills, are fragile and may not be shared across a professional community.

  16. Effects of a sexual health care nursing record on the attitudes and practice of oncology nurses.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dukyoo; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2016-10-01

    A nursing record focused on sexual health care for patients with cancer could encourage oncology nurses to provide sexual health care for oncology patients in a simple and effective manner. However, existing electronic information systems focus on professional use and not sexual health care, which could lead to inefficiencies in clinical practice. To examine the effects of a sexual health care nursing record on the attitudes and practice of oncology nurses. Twenty-four full-time registered nurses caring for oncology patients were randomly assigned to the intervention and control groups in Korea. The researchers developed a sexual health care record and applied it to the intervention group for one month. Data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U test and chi-square test. Content analysis was used to analyze interviews. Oncology nurses using the sexual health care record had significantly higher levels of sexual health care practice at 4 weeks post-intervention as compared to those who provided usual care to patients with cancer. A sexual health care record may have the potential to facilitate oncology nurses' practice of sexual health care. This study highlighted the importance of using SHC records with oncology patients to improve nursing practice related to sexuality issues. A nursing record focused on SHC for patients with cancer could make it easier and more effective for oncology nurses to provide such care to their patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Practical Nursing in Iowa: A Profile. A Study of the Developments, Trends and Current Status of Practical Nursing in Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Elizabeth E.; And Others

    This sub-study of a 39-month longitudinal study conducted by the University of Illinois in cooperation with the University of Iowa, undertook to discern the trends in practical nursing in Iowa and to record a history of its development. The 435 member 10 percent random sample of practical nurses licensed in Iowa through December 1965, which was…

  18. Authentic leaders creating healthy work environments for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2006-05-01

    Implementation of authentic leadership can affect not only the nursing workforce and the profession but the healthcare delivery system and society as a whole. Creating a healthy work environment for nursing practice is crucial to maintain an adequate nursing workforce; the stressful nature of the profession often leads to burnout, disability, and high absenteeism and ultimately contributes to the escalating shortage of nurses. Leaders play a pivotal role in retention of nurses by shaping the healthcare practice environment to produce quality outcomes for staff nurses and patients. Few guidelines are available, however, for creating and sustaining the critical elements of a healthy work environment. In 2005, the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses released a landmark publication specifying 6 standards (skilled communication, true collaboration, effective decision making, appropriate staffing, meaningful recognition, and authentic leadership) necessary to establish and sustain healthy work environments in healthcare. Authentic leadership was described as the "glue" needed to hold together a healthy work environment. Now, the roles and relationships of authentic leaders in the healthy work environment are clarified as follows: An expanded definition of authentic leadership and its attributes (eg, genuineness, trustworthiness, reliability, compassion, and believability) is presented. Mechanisms by which authentic leaders can create healthy work environments for practice (eg, engaging employees in the work environment to promote positive behaviors) are described. A practical guide on how to become an authentic leader is advanced. A research agenda to advance the study of authentic leadership in nursing practice through collaboration between nursing and business is proposed.

  19. Practice standards for emergency nursing: An international review.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tamsin; Shaban, Ramon Z; Creedy, Debra K

    2015-11-01

    Presentations to emergency departments (EDs) and patient acuity continue to increase. Whilst strategies to deliver safe patient care in the ED are evolving, emergency nurses need to be well educated through specialist qualifications to enable delivery of advanced patient care. This paper presents a comparative analysis of available international practice and competency standards for nurses graduating from emergency nursing courses in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States. CINAHL, Scopus, Ovid MEDLINE, and Embase were searched for papers, published in English, using the terms: 'emergency', 'accident and emergency', 'nursing', 'competency', 'practice standards', 'scope of practice', 'regulation', and 'specialist standards'. Secondary sources from relevant reference lists and professional websites were also searched. The standards from the five countries were common across five domains: clinical expertise, communication, teamwork, resources and environment, and legal. None of the standards were specific to the emergency nursing graduate, and there was variability in the level of expertise required for which the standards apply. The available practice standards demonstrated some commonality. Consideration of the utility of a universal framework for informing the development of emergency nursing practice standards and emergency nursing curriculum for nurses wishing to specialise is needed. Copyright © 2015 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A controlled vocabulary for nursing practice and research.

    PubMed

    Saranto, Kaija

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes the process of evolving a controlled Nursing Vocabulary for indexing and information retrieval purposes. The vocabulary is based on terms of the thesaurus of Medline i.e. MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) by National Library of Medicine and the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) by the International Council of Nurses. The vocabulary consists of 10 themes central to nursing domain. The vocabulary is added as an independent theme to the Finnish thesaurus FinMeSH. The validity of the vocabulary has been tested for indexing nursing research once and has afterwards been revised. The validity will be tested again during spring 2002.

  1. Creating an international nursing practice and education workplace.

    PubMed

    Hern, Marcia J; Vaughn, Gretchen; Mason, Debby; Weitkamp, Tina

    2005-02-01

    In today's global workplace, both nursing practice and education need to promote international health. Nurses from a comprehensive 373-patient-bed hospital at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and faculty from the College of Nursing, University of Cincinnati, in southwest Ohio have successfully collaborated to develop several unique international nursing exchange programs. The goals of these programs are to increase cultural sensitivity and nursing knowledge relevant to a global community. The essential components used in creating and implementing the programs with Scotland, Honduras, and Korea will serve as an international workplace model for others, especially for those settings focused on children and family health care.

  2. Reimagining Nursing's Place in the History of Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Fairman, Julie; D'Antonio, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    This work posits how medical history might be conceptualized if nurses and nursing history was used as the analytical lens. Nursing is seen not as a separate part or subsection of medical history, but rather one that is deeply embedded in the relationships and social order of clinical practice. Nursing is an analytical category in and of itself. By approaching nursing as such a category, we enlarge “new notions of historical significance” to encompass personal, political, public, and private activities that constitute medical experiences. PMID:18375461

  3. Nursing faculty mentors as facilitators for evidence-based nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Jeffers, Brenda Recchia; Robinson, Sherry; Luxner, Karla; Redding, Donna

    2008-01-01

    Increasing use of evidence-based practice (EBP) within complex healthcare organizations requires the identification of individuals who will support and facilitate new practice patterns. In a large Midwestern hospital, a diverse group of academic nursing faculty functioning as mentors to develop clinical nurses' skills in the use of EBP has demonstrated early success. This article highlights the context, challenges, and successes of faculty mentors for developing nursing staff's involvement in and use of EBP.

  4. Towards a strong virtue ethics for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Alan E

    2006-07-01

    Illness creates a range of negative emotions in patients including anxiety, fear, powerlessness, and vulnerability. There is much debate on the 'therapeutic' or 'helping' nurse-patient relationship. However, despite the current agenda regarding patient-centred care, the literature concerning the development of good interpersonal responses and the view that a satisfactory nursing ethics should focus on persons and character traits rather than actions, nursing ethics is dominated by the traditional obligation, act-centred theories such as consequentialism and deontology. I critically examine these theories and the role of duty-based notions in both general ethics and nursing practice. Because of well-established flaws, I conclude that obligation-based moral theories are incomplete and inadequate for nursing practice. I examine the work of Hursthouse on virtue ethics' action guidance and the v-rules. I argue that the moral virtues and a strong (action-guiding) version of virtue ethics provide a plausible and viable alternative for nursing practice. I develop an account of a virtue-based helping relationship and a virtue-based approach to nursing. The latter is characterized by three features: (1) exercising the moral virtues such as compassion; (2) using judgement; and (3) using moral wisdom, understood to include at least moral perception, moral sensitivity, and moral imagination. Merits and problems of the virtue-based approach are examined. I relate the work of MacIntyre to nursing and I conceive nursing as a practice: nurses who exercise the virtues and seek the internal goods help to sustain the practice of nursing and thus prevent the marginalization of the virtues. The strong practice-based version of virtue ethics proposed is context-dependent, particularist, and relational. Several areas for future philosophical inquiry and empirical nursing research are suggested to develop this account yet further.

  5. Care, Autonomy, and Gender in Nursing Practice: A Historical Study of Nurses' Experiences.

    PubMed

    Galbany-Estragués, Paola; Comas-d'Argemir, Dolors

    2017-10-01

    Care is the essence of the nursing role and is closely related to the concept of professional autonomy. Autonomy is implicated in power relations between doctors and nurses and between men and women. These relationships are closely linked to care practices and the inequality of nursing and medicine. The aim of this study was to analyze nursing discourse regarding the concept of care and its relationship to the concept of autonomy and gender. This is a historical study based on oral interviews that took place between November 2008 and February 2011. We interviewed 19 nursing professionals who currently worked at the Hospital of the Holy Spirit (near Barcelona) or had worked there between 1961 and 2010. Semistructured interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. We highlight four main themes: "a real nurse"; "more technology, less care"; "the fragility of autonomy"; and "the invisibility of nursing work." These themes show the contradictions in the nursing profession that are based on the concept of care. However, in daily practice, the concept of care varies. Time pressure distances the nursing practice from its theoretical context. Changes in the concept of care are related to transformations in the health system and nursing work. Changes related to the autonomy of nursing are related to changes in the concept of care. In practice, care has a biomedical orientation. Care has become technologized and bureaucratized, which reduces the time that is spent with the patient. In a context in which medical authority predominates, nursing's struggle for autonomy is based on the recognition of the value of care. When care becomes invisible, the autonomy of nursing as a profession is threatened. This conclusion allows reflections about shifts in the concept of care and how they affect clinical practice and the autonomy of the nursing profession.

  6. Care, Autonomy, and Gender in Nursing Practice: A Historical Study of Nurses' Experiences.

    PubMed

    Galbany-Estragués, Paola; Comas-d'Argemir, Dolors

    2016-12-19

    Care is the essence of the nursing role and is closely related to the concept of professional autonomy. Autonomy is implicated in power relations between doctors and nurses and between men and women. These relationships are closely linked to care practices and the inequality of nursing and medicine. The aim of this study was to analyze nursing discourse regarding the concept of care and its relationship to the concept of autonomy and gender. This is a historical study based on oral interviews that took place between November 2008 and February 2011. We interviewed 19 nursing professionals who currently worked at the Hospital of the Holy Spirit (near Barcelona) or had worked there between 1961 and 2010. Semistructured interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. We highlight four main themes: "a real nurse"; "more technology, less care"; "the fragility of the autonomy"; and "the invisibility of nursing work." These themes show the contradictions in the nursing profession that are based on the concept of care. However, in daily practice, the concept of care varies. Time pressure distances the nursing practice from its theoretical context. Changes in the concept of care are related to transformations in the health system and nursing work. Changes related to the autonomy of nursing are related to changes in the concept of care. In practice, care has a biomedical orientation. Care has become technologized and bureaucratized, which reduces the time that is spent with the patient. In a context in which medical authority predominates, nursing's struggle for autonomy is based on the recognition of the value of care. When care becomes invisible, the autonomy of nursing as a profession is threatened. This conclusion allows reflections about shifts in the concept of care and how they affect clinical practice and the autonomy of the nursing profession.

  7. Seminar: Legal Perspectives of Nursing Practice. Nursing 89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Odette P.

    This course outline provides information to be used by students in conjunction with Nursing 89, a seminar on the legal aspects of nursing to be offered starting in Spring 1982 at Diablo University (California). General information is provided first, including a class calendar, a statement defining the purpose of the course, an outline of…

  8. Nurses in Australian general practice: implications for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Davidson, Patricia M; Salamonson, Yenna; Ollerton, Richard; Griffiths, Rhonda

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the demographic and employment characteristics of Australian practice nurses and explore the relationship between these characteristics and the nurses' role. Nursing in general practice is an integral component of primary care and chronic disease management in the United Kingdom and New Zealand, but in Australia it is an emerging specialty and there is limited data on the workforce and role. National postal survey embedded in a sequential mixed method design. 284 practice nurses completed a postal survey during 2003-2004. Descriptive statistics and factor analysis were utilized to analyse the data. Most participants were female (99%), Registered Nurses (86%), employed part-time in a group practice, with a mean age of 45.8 years, and had a hospital nursing certificate as their highest qualification (63%). The tasks currently undertaken by participants and those requiring further education were inversely related (R2 = -0.779). Conversely, tasks perceived to be appropriate for a practice nurse and those currently undertaken by participants were positively related (R2 = 0.8996). There was a mismatch between the number of participants who perceived that a particular task was appropriate and those who undertook the task. This disparity was not completely explained by demographic or employment characteristics. Extrinsic factors such as legal and funding issues, lack of space and general practitioner attitudes were identified as barriers to role expansion. Practice nurses are a clinically experienced workforce whose skills are not optimally harnessed to improve the care of the growing number of people with chronic and complex conditions. Relevance to clinical practice. Study data reveal a need to overcome the funding, regulatory and interprofessional barriers that currently constrain the practice nurse role. Expansion of the practice nurse role is clearly a useful adjunct to specialist management of chronic and complex disease

  9. The ethics curriculum for doctor of nursing practice programs.

    PubMed

    Peirce, Anne Griswold; Smith, Jennifer A

    2008-01-01

    Ethical questions dealt with by nurses who have Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degrees include traditional bioethical questions, but also business and legal ethics. Doctorally prepared nurses are increasingly in positions to make ethical decisions rather than to respond to decisions made by others. The traditional master's-degree advanced practice nursing curriculum does not address the extended expertise and decision-making skills needed by DNP practitioners as they face these new types of ethical dilemmas. We propose that a curricular framework that addresses clinical, research, business, and legal ethics is needed by all DNP students.

  10. Assertiveness in nursing practice: an action research and reflection project.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Beverley; Edwards, Paul; Holroyd, Beth; Unwin, Anna; Rowley, Joanne

    2005-12-01

    This article describes an action research project that highlighted reflective processes, so hospital nurses could work systematically through problem solving processes to uncover constraints against effective nursing care; and to improve the quality of their care in light of the identified constraints and possibilities. Four Registered Nurses (RNs) co-researched their practice with the facilitator and over the research period identified the thematic concern of the need for assertiveness in their work. The RNs planned, implemented and evaluated an action plan and, as a direct result of their reflections and collaborative action, they improved their nursing practice in relation to becoming more effective in assertiveness in work situations.

  11. Nurse Leadership and Informatics Competencies: Shaping Transformation of Professional Practice.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Margaret Ann; Moen, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Nurse leaders must demonstrate capacities and develop specific informatics competencies in order to provide meaningful leadership and support ongoing transformation of the healthcare system. Concurrently, staff informatics competencies must be planned and fostered to support critical principles of transformation and patient safety in practice, advance evidence-informed practice, and enable nursing to flourish in complex digital environments across the healthcare continuum. In addition to nurse leader competencies, two key aspects of leadership and informatics competencies will be addressed in this chapter - namely, the transformation of health care and preparation of the nursing workforce.

  12. How registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and resident aides spend time in nursing homes: An observational study.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Rose; Donovan, Cindy; Stewart, Connie; Donovan, Alicia

    2015-09-01

    Calls for improved conditions in nursing homes have pointed to the importance of optimizing the levels and skills of care providers. Understanding the work of care providers will help to determine if staff are being used to their full potential and if opportunities exist for improved efficiencies. To explore the activities of care providers in different nursing homes and to identify if variations exist within and across homes and shifts. A multi-centre cross-sectional observational work flow study was conducted in seven different nursing homes sites in one Canadian province. Data were collected by a research assistant who conducted 368 h of observation. The research assistant collected data by following an identical route in each site and recording observations on staff activities. Findings indicate staff activities vary across roles, sites and shifts. Licensed practical nurses (nursing assistants) have the greatest variation in their role while registered nurses have the least amount of variability. In some sites both registered nurses and licensed practical nurses perform activities that may be safely delegated to others. Care providers spend as much as 53.7% of their time engaged in non-value added activities. There may be opportunities for registered nurses and licensed practical nurses to delegate some of their activities to non-regulated workers. The time care providers spend in non-value activities suggest there may be opportunities to improve efficiencies within the nursing home setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses in Minnesota: findings from interviews with licensed school nurses.

    PubMed

    Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F; Kubik, Martha Y; Johnson, Karen E

    2011-02-01

    Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led obesity prevention programs, and school nurses' interest in implementing obesity prevention programs. Semistructured interviews were conducted with key informants from 21 Minnesota school districts (urban = 7; suburban = 8; and rural = 6), who were licensed school nurses (LSNs). Findings indicated that LSNs provided some primary and secondary obesity prevention services. Key informants felt school nurses, administrators, and parents would be supportive of school-based, LSN-led obesity prevention efforts. Interest in increasing efforts was limited by time constraints, staffing, and resources. School nurses are well positioned to provide prevention services that will contribute to reducing childhood obesity.

  14. Factors influencing evidence-based nursing utilization intention in Korean practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Park, Jee-Won; Ahn, Jeong-Ah; Park, Mi-Mi

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe Korean nurses' perceptions, attitudes and utilization intention for evidence-based nursing (EBN), and to explore what factors influence utilization intention. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 2012. Registered nurses directly involved in clinical practice were recruited at a medical centre in Korea. A total of 420 nurses completed a self-report questionnaire. Results showed that participants reported moderate scores regarding their perceptions and attitudes towards EBN, and rated themselves as higher than the median for utilization intention. Furthermore, this study revealed that perceptions of and attitudes towards EBN, occupational view and previous EBN education were significant factors affecting utilization intention. Nurse educators and managers should encourage nurses to have better attitudes towards EBN, help them be more satisfied with their work and provide them with appropriate education for EBN to establish evidence-based practice as a part of daily nursing care. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. The Nursing Students' Experience of Psychiatric Practice in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Song, Eunju

    2015-10-01

    In 1995, South Korea passed the Mental Health Act, and since this time it has developed many mental health policies and facilities. The aim of this study is to understand and explore the experience of nursing students in the changed psychiatric practice environment since 1995. The present study is a qualitative thematic analysis. Interviews were conducted with 11 third and fourth grade nursing students who had experienced psychiatric practice in South Korea. A thematic analysis of 11 in-depth student interviews identified three themes: 'orientation before psychiatric practice', 'facing the mental hospital', and 'change and choice'. After practicing, nursing students developed positive attitude regarding psychiatry. Educators will have to focus more on education and support in order for the students to maintain positive attitude throughout their experience. The research herein shows that the role of the educators and psychiatric nurses is extremely important for nursing students in the elimination of a negative attitude towards psychiatry.

  16. Bridging nursing practice and education through a strategic global partnership.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Marilyn; Rajeswaran, Lakshmi; Dithole, Kefalotse; Hoke, Linda; Mampane, Patricia; Sebopelo, Sheila; Molefe, Margret; Muecke, Marjorie A; Rich, Victoria L; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2016-02-01

    To forge strong relationships among nurse scholars from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA (USA); University of Botswana School of Nursing, Gaborone, Botswana; the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Princess Marina Hospital (PMH), Gaborone; and the Ministry of Health of Botswana, a strategic global partnership was created to bridge nursing practice and education. This partnership focused on changing practice at PMH through the translation of new knowledge and evidence-based practice. Guided by the National Institutes of Health team science field guide, the conceptual implementation of this highly successful practice change initiative is described in detail, highlighting our strategies, challenges and continued collaboration for nurses to be leaders in improving health in Botswana. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Returns to nursing education: rural and nonrural practice.

    PubMed

    Pan, S; Straub, L

    1997-01-01

    This study uses data from a national sample of registered nurses to compare earnings of nurses in rural and nonrural practice. The comparisons, conditioned by the nurses' education level, are analogous to the concept of "returns to human capital investment" used in labor economics. A general linear model is applied within a framework of labor economics analysis. Results show that nurses with more education receive less for their investment if they practice in rural areas. Work experience and employment setting are also related to lower annualized earnings for rural practice. One exception to the otherwise consistent findings is that returns to advanced practice nursing are higher in rural areas. Results and policy implications are discussed.

  18. District nurse clinics: accountability and practice.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2013-02-01

    The numbers of district nurse clinics are continuing to grow in primary care and they provide timely and more cost effective intervention for patients. The clinics provide exciting opportunities for district nurses but also carry an increased risk of exposure to liability. This article discusses some of the key areas of accountability underpinning the duty of care of district nurses working in nurse-led clinics.

  19. The knowledgeable practice of critical care nurses: a poststructural inquiry.

    PubMed

    Copnell, Beverley

    2008-04-01

    Contemporary nursing literature emphasises the desirability of clinical nurses being "knowledgeable". However, the need for nurses constantly to acquire more knowledge is reiterated. Lack of knowledge is seen to underlie an array of professional problems. Little is known of how nurses themselves understand what it means to practise knowledgeably. To explore critical care nurses' understandings of knowledgeable practice and its relationship to being a "good nurse". A poststructuralist framework informed the study. The study participants were 12 critical care nurses. Data were generated through three individual focused interviews with each participant. Data analysis involved deconstruction of the interview texts to reveal participants' discourses of knowledgeable practice and the implications of these discourses for their subjectivity and for their work. A discourse of knowledgeable practice was revealed as central to participants' sense of identity as "good nurses". Participants believed their knowledge resided in their heads ("knowing why") and in their hands ("knowing how"). Fluency of action, which was achieved and maintained by frequent repetition of activities, contributed to their sense of being knowledgeable. Participants described being excluded from knowledge in some instances. In general, however, "actual" knowledge was of less importance than was being positioned, by themselves and others, as knowledgeable. This positioning was frequently undermined by other staff, both medical and nursing. Analysis revealed that the discourse of knowledgeable practice was underpinned by a dichotomy of ignorant/knowledgeable, in which "ignorant" was the dominant category; hence, nurses were assumed to be ignorant until they could "prove" otherwise. The findings contest the notion, espoused in nursing literature, that acquisition of knowledge can "empower" nurses, thus providing the solution to problems they may experience. Rather, strategies are required that challenge

  20. Reframing the Australian nurse teacher competencies: do they reflect the 'REAL' world of nurse teacher practice?

    PubMed

    Guy, Jacqui; Taylor, Christine; Roden, Janet; Blundell, Jennifer; Tolhurst, Gerda

    2011-04-01

    The Australian nurse teacher competencies were introduced in 1996; however, the researchers perceived that changes to the health care system and a nursing workforce shortage may have affected nurse teacher roles over the past decade. This study aimed to explore perceptions of nurse teachers on the applicability of the current Australian nurse teacher competencies to practice, and modify the nurse teacher competencies to better reflect current practice. Methodology utilized mixed methods, and data collection was via focus groups, telephone interviews, and survey data. Results revealed that participants were mostly positive about the original competency statements, although there were some variations between items. Themes that emerged from the qualitative data were: changing trends in health care; preparation for teaching; understanding of the competencies, contextual influences on education role; nurse teachers as change agents, and resource management. Conclusions were that the Australian nurse teacher competencies (1996) were reflective of the current generic roles of nurse teachers however some of the competencies needed reframing to meet the current needs of nurse teachers. However, changes needed to be made in areas such as reducing complex language, inclusion of technology, and cultural competencies. Nurse teachers were supportive of the research because they valued the teacher competencies for reflection on their practice and the development of portfolios, job descriptions and performance appraisals. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Nursing faculties’ knowledge and attitude on evidence-based practice

    PubMed Central

    Mehrdad, Neda; Joolaee, Soodabeh; Joulaee, Azadeh; Bahrani, Naser

    2012-01-01

    Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) is one of the main professional competencies for health care professionals and a priority for medicine and nursing curriculum as well. EBP leads to improve effective and efficient care and patient outcomes. Nurse educators have responsibility to teach the future nurses, and an opportunity to promote patient outcomes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe nurse educators’ knowledge and attitude on EBP. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive study conducted in nursing faculties of two major universities of medical sciences affiliated to Ministry of Health and Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered using a three-section questionnaire. Content and face validity was further enhanced by submitting it to nursing research and education experts. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS 11 software. Results: According the results, nursing faculties’ knowledge of EBP was mainly moderate (47.1%). Significant statistical relationship was found between the level of knowledge with education and teaching experience in different nursing programs. Nurses generally held positive attitudes toward EBP (88.6%) and there was no statistical significant relationship with demographic variables. Conclusion: Nursing educators are in a position to influence nursing research in clinical practice in the future. Therefore, it is critical to achieve implementation of EBP and be a change agent for a paradigm shift toward EBP. PMID:23922597

  2. An ethnographic study of nurses' experience with nursing research and its integration in practice.

    PubMed

    Dupin, Cécile Marie; Borglin, Gunilla; Debout, Christophe; Rothan-Tondeur, Monique

    2014-09-01

    To report from a study aimed at illuminating how French Registered Nurses experience and engage in nursing research in clinical practice. Nursing research in France is mainly conducted by nurses working at clinical research units rather than by dedicated nurse researchers. Education, i.e. advanced degrees, in the field of nursing research is still in its infancy and not yet consistent with the international context. Outside France, the general perception is that nursing research is a unified part of professional nursing. Consequently, in-depth knowledge about how nurses in a French clinical context might experience and engage in nursing research is still lacking. The design of this study was influenced by an ethnographic approach as described by the French anthropologists Beaud and Weber. Data, participatory observations, field notes and interviews (n = 6) were collected in a teaching hospital between April-August 2012. The field consisted of a wound-care unit and clinical research units. Collected data were analysed based on Beaud and Weber's description of analysis. Three beliefs were identified: being a unified part of a research team, being an integral part of 'crosswise - across' activities and being part of research activities. Commitment to nursing research was strengthened by patient-related issues. Based on this context, nursing research would likely benefit from the support of a naturalized reciprocity between clinical practice and research. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Woman-Centered Maternity Nursing Education and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Giarratano, Gloria

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this Heideggerian phenomenological study was to uncover the meanings of the clinical experiences of registered nurses working in maternity settings after they studied maternity nursing from a woman-centered, feminist perspective in a generic baccalaureate nursing program. Purposeful sampling was conducted to locate and recruit nurses who had graduated from this nursing program between the December 1996 and December 1998 semesters and were currently working in a maternal-newborn clinical setting. Each participant had taken the required woman-centered, maternity-nursing course during her/his undergraduate education. Data collection included an individual, open-ended interview that focused on the nurses' descriptions of their everyday practices as maternity nurses. Nineteen maternal-newborn nurses between the ages of 23 and 43 years who had been in practice from six months to three years were interviewed. The constitutive patterns identified from the interviews were: “Otherness,” “Being and Becoming Woman-Centered,” and “Tensions in Practicing Woman-Centered Care.” Findings revealed that the nurses had a raised awareness of oppressive maternity care practices and applied ideology of woman-centeredness as a framework for providing more humanistic care. Creating woman-centered maternity care meant negotiating tensions and barriers in medically focused maternity settings and looking for opportunities for advocacy and woman-empowerment. The barriers the nurses faced in implementing woman-centered care exposed limitations to childbearing choices and nursing practices that remain problematic in maternity care. PMID:17273327

  4. Orchestrating care: nursing practice with hospitalised older adults.

    PubMed

    Dahlke, Sherry Ann; Phinney, Alison; Hall, Wendy Ann; Rodney, Patricia; Baumbusch, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    The increased incidence of health challenges with aging means that nurses are increasingly caring for older adults, often in hospital settings. Research about the complexity of nursing practice with this population remains limited. To seek an explanation of nursing practice with hospitalised older adults. Design. A grounded theory study guided by symbolic interactionism was used to explore nursing practice with hospitalised older adults from a nursing perspective. Glaserian grounded theory methods were used to develop a mid-range theory after analysis of 375 hours of participant observation, 35 interviews with 24 participants and review of selected documents. The theory of orchestrating care was developed to explain how nurses are continuously trying to manage their work environments by understanding the status of the patients, their unit, mobilising the assistance of others and stretching available resources to resolve their problem of providing their older patients with what they perceived as 'good care' while sustaining themselves as 'good' nurses. They described their practice environments as hard and under-resourced. Orchestrating care is comprised of two subprocesses: building synergy and minimising strain. These two processes both facilitated and constrained each other and nurses' abilities to orchestrate care. Although system issues presented serious constraints to nursing practice, the ways in which nurses were making meaning of their work environment both aided them in managing their challenges and constrained their agency. Nurses need to be encouraged to share their important perspective about older adult care. Administrators have a role to play in giving nurses voice in workplace committees and in forums. Further research is needed to better understand how multidisciplinary teams influence care of hospitalized older adults. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Empowerment of nursing students in clinical practice: spheres of influence.

    PubMed

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Irvine, Fiona; Sambrook, Sally

    2010-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study exploring the empowerment of nursing students in clinical practice. There is a great deal of literature regarding empowerment in nursing but most focuses on the empowerment of patients and registered nurses. There is very little regarding the empowerment of nursing students. Of the limited available studies, most explore empowerment in an academic, rather than a clinical context. This longitudinal study was underpinned by hermeneutic phenomenology. Thirteen first-year nursing students were recruited using a purposive sampling strategy. Annual, in-depth interviews were conducted with the students on their trajectory from the first to third year of the undergraduate programme. Data were collected between 2007 and 2009. By the end of the study, most students felt more empowered than they had at the beginning. They attributed this to increased knowledge and confidence. Empowerment of nursing students in clinical practice can be represented in the form of 'spheres of influence'. Intrinsic, essential structures of having knowledge and confidence are at the core. External spheres influence the extent to which nursing students are likely to experience increased knowledge and confidence, and thus empowerment. However, nursing students use a number of strategies to promote their own empowerment in clinical practice. Efforts to promote the empowerment of nursing students in clinical practice need to be multi-layered and targeted at each of the spheres of influence.

  6. Creating opportunities to support oncology nursing practice: surviving and thriving.

    PubMed

    Rashleigh, Laura; Cordon, Charissa; Wong, Jiahui

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence to support that specialization in nursing leads to improved outcomes for patients, including increased QOL, improved symptom management, and fewer hospital admissions. Oncology nurses face several challenges in pursuing specialization, due to individual and system issues such as limited time and resources. To address these challenges, de Souza Institute launched a province-wide study group for nurses in Ontario who planned to write the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) Oncology Certification Exam. The study group was led by educators from de Souza and Princess Margaret Hospital and drew expertise from nursing leaders across Ontario who shared the same vision of oncology nursing excellence. The study group was innovative by embracing telemedicine and web-based technology, which enabled flexibility for nurses' work schedules, learning styles, physical location and practice experience. The study group utilized several theoretical perspectives and frameworks to guide the curriculum: Adult Learning Theories, Cooperative Learning, Generational Learning Styles, CANO standards for practice and the CNA exam competencies. This approach enabled 107 oncology nurses across the province in 17 different sites to connect, as a group, study interactively and fully engage in their learning. A detailed evaluation method was utilized to assess baseline knowledge, learning needs, cooperative group process, exam success rates, and document unexpected outcomes. Ninety-four per cent of participants passed the CNA Oncology Exam. Lessons learned and future implications are discussed. The commitment remains to enable thriving through generating new possibilities, building communities of practice, mentoring nurses and fostering excellence in oncology practice.

  7. Mapping the future of environmental health and nursing: strategies for integrating national competencies into nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Laura S; Butterfield, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    :Nurses are increasingly the primary contact for clients concerned about health problems related to their environment. In response to the need for nursing expertise in the field of environmental health, the Institute of Medicine (IOM), Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) have designed core competencies for the nursing profession. The IOM competencies focus on four areas: (1) knowledge and concepts; (2) assessment and referral; advocacy, ethics, and risk communication; and (4) legislation and regulation. The competencies establish a baseline of knowledge and awareness in order for nurses to prevent and minimize health problems associated with exposure to environmental agents. To address the known difficulties of incorporating new priorities into established practice, nurses attending an environmental health short course participated in a nominal group process focusing on the question, "What specific actions can we take to bring environmental health into the mainstream of nursing practice?" This exercise was designed to bring the concepts of the national initiatives (IOM, NINR, ATSDR) to the awareness of individual nurses involved in the direct delivery of care. Results include 38 action items nurses identified as improving awareness and utilization of environmental health principles. The top five ideas were: (1) get environmental health listed as a requirement or competency in undergraduate nursing education; (2) improve working relationships with interdepartmental persons-a team approach; (3) strategically place students in essential organizations such as NIOSH, ATSDR, or CDC; (4) educate nurse educators; and (5) create environmental health awards in nursing. The 38 original ideas were also reorganized into a five-tiered conceptual model. The concepts of this model include: (1) developing partnerships; (2) strengthening publications; (3) enhancing continuing education; (4) updating nursing

  8. Evidence-Based Teaching Practice in Nursing Education: Faculty Perspectives and Practices.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Kathleen A; O'Conner-Von, Susan K; Brockway, Christine; Rierson, Cindy L; Sendelbach, Sue

    2015-01-01

    This national online study was conducted to describe nursing faculty perspectives and practices about evidence-based teaching practice (EBTP). Professional standards for nurse educator practice stress the importance of EBTP; however, the use of evidence by faculty in curriculum design, evaluation and educational measurement, and program development has not been reported. Nurse administrators of accredited nursing programs in the United States (N = 1,586) were emailed information about the study, including the research consent form and anonymous survey link, and invited to forward information to nursing faculty. Respondents (551 faculty and nurse administrators) described the importance of EBTP in nursing education, used multiple sources of evidence in their faculty responsibilities, and identified factors that influence their ability to use EBTP. EBTP in nursing education requires sustained institutional, administrative, and collegial support to promote faculty effectiveness and student learning.

  9. General practice nursing: who is cherishing this workforce?

    PubMed Central

    Webley-Brown, Carol

    2017-01-01

    The remodelling of the NHS requires a strong general practice nurse (GPN) workforce within general practice. The challenges facing general practice nursing are set within the current policy context and recent available evidence and illustrated by drawing upon the experience of a current GPN working in London. It is argued that there is a need to support the professional development of GPNs and nurture the next generation of potential GPNs if the current shortage of GPNs is to be addressed. PMID:28356920

  10. An examination of advanced practice nurses' job satisfaction internationally.

    PubMed

    Steinke, M K; Rogers, M; Lehwaldt, D; Lamarche, K

    2017-06-28

    To examine the level of job satisfaction of nurse practitioners/advanced practice nurses in developing and developed countries. The nurse practitioner/advanced practice nurse has the advanced, complex skills and experience to play an important role in providing equitable health care across all nations. Key factors that contribute to health disparities include lack of access to global health human resources, the right skill mix of healthcare providers and the satisfaction and retention of quality workers. The study utilized a descriptive analysis and cross-sectional survey methodology with quantitative and qualitative sections of 1419 job satisfaction survey respondents from an online survey. Age, number of hours worked in a week and length of time that nurse practitioners/advanced practice nurses worked in their current jobs were statistically significant in job satisfaction. A key barrier was the lack of respect from supervisors and physicians. It was clear from the number of comments in the qualitative section of the survey that having a wide scope of practice is rewarding and challenging to the nurse practitioner and advanced practice nurse. The challenges to transform healthcare gaps of access into a better distribution of health care in all countries would constitute a systematic change in policy including providing education and training for doctors and nurses that will match the skills needed in the workplace; emphasizing the right skill mix for the healthcare team; supporting advanced practice nurses in the workplace; and utilizing all healthcare providers to the fullest extent of their abilities. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  11. Cypriot and Greek nurses' perceptions of the professional practice environment.

    PubMed

    Papastavrou, E; Efstathiou, G; Lemonidou, C; Kalafati, M; Katajisto, J; Suhonen, R

    2014-06-01

    Research evidence supports that the role of the professional practice environment is crucial for the delivery of quality care as it is significantly correlated with patient and nurse outcomes. However, in countries sharing similar cultural and ethnic backgrounds, like Cyprus and Greece, as well as the increased mobility of patients and healthcare workers, there is a lack of information regarding this issue. The aim of this study is to explore and compare Cypriot and Greek nurses' perceptions of their professional practice environment. A descriptive comparative survey was employed using a sample of nurses in Cyprus (N = 150) and Greece (N = 147). Information was collected with the Revised Professional Practice Environment Scale (RPPE). The results revealed significant differences between the two countries in three out of eight factors of the RPPE, with Greece's mean value being higher than Cyprus's: Handling Disagreements and Conflicts, Leadership and Autonomy in Clinical Practice, and Teamwork. The findings generate additional knowledge about the organizational context of care delivery that might help nursing leaders to understand how nurses perceive their work environment and how this influences their work, and consequently the care provided. The results can be utilized by nurse ward managers to improve the quality of nursing care provided. Further research is needed using different approaches to explore nurses' experience in more depth. Measuring nurses' perceptions of their professional practice environment may assist managers and policymakers in introducing interventions that contribute to a better practice environment and consequently to improved nursing, as well as patient, outcomes. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  12. Nursing research reframed by the inescapable reality of practice: a personal encounter.

    PubMed

    Huntington, A

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes how an innocent venture outside the confines of academia to update my nursing skills completely changed the focus of my research. I was deeply involved in the theoretical development of my thesis, which I thought was a feminist exploration of the meaning of health for mid-life women. I was immersed in feminist theory and was exploring the work of the French Feminists. I had written comprehensive draft chapters about nursing, women's bodies and science. While I was absorbed in my theoretical exploration I decided to venture back into practice to improve my nursing skills. I am still unsure why I chose to do this; however, in hindsight, my theoretical exploration was inexorably pushing me in that direction. While my conscious thinking was focused on my stated topic, my subconscious (my intuition) turned me towards another. Being confronted with the reality of nursing practice through working with staff nurses in a gynaecological ward caused a major disjunction in every aspect of my research: the topic, my methodology and the setting, and the experience challenged my feelings about nurses and nursing. This inevitably led to a dramatic and fundamental change in my research.

  13. Incorporating best practices into undergraduate critical care nursing education.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Zara R; Iafrati, Nancy S

    2014-02-01

    Incorporation of best clinical practices into the baccalaureate critical care nursing curriculum is important. At The College at Brockport, best clinical practices are introduced early in the semester and are reinforced throughout the semester in both class and clinical settings. Among the best clinical practices included are those recommended by the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, The Joint Commission, Quality and Safety Education for Nurses, the Surviving Sepsis Campaign, and the Institute for Safe Medication Practices. The culminating assignment of the semester requires students to focus on patient safety. Students describe the use of the National Patient Safety Goals and other best practices in the critical care setting. The role of the nurse leader and exploration of near-miss and work-around events also are described. Nursing students need to provide safe competent nursing care by incorporating best practices into their clinical practice now and in the future when they become registered professional nurses.

  14. Empirical and pragmatic adequacy of grounded theory: Advancing nurse empowerment theory for nurses' practice.

    PubMed

    Udod, Sonia A; Racine, Louise

    2017-05-25

    To draw on the findings of a grounded theory study aimed at exploring how power is exercised in nurse-manager relationships in the hospital setting, this paper examines the empirical and pragmatic adequacy of grounded theory as a methodology to advance the concept of empowerment in the area of nursing leadership and management. The evidence on staff nurse empowerment has highlighted the magnitude of individual and organisational outcomes, but has not fully explicated the micro-level processes underlying how power is exercised, shared or created within the nurse-manager relationship. Although grounded theory is a widely adopted nursing research methodology, it remains less used in nursing leadership because of the dominance of quantitative approaches to research. Grounded theory methodology provides the empirical and pragmatic relevance to inform nursing practice and policy. Grounded theory is a relevant qualitative approach to use in leadership research as it provides a fine and detailed analysis of the process underlying complexity and bureaucracy. Discursive paper. A critical examination of the empirical and pragmatic relevance of grounded theory by (Corbin & Strauss, , ) as a method for analysing and solving problems in nurses' practice is provided. This paper provides evidence to support the empirical and pragmatic adequacy of grounded theory methodology. Although the application of the ontological, epistemological and methodological assumptions of grounded theory is challenging, this methodology is useful to address real-life problems in nursing practice by developing theoretical explanations of nurse empowerment, or lack thereof, in the workplace. Grounded theory represents a relevant methodology to inform nursing leadership research. Grounded theory is anchored in the reality of practice. The strength of grounded theory is to provide results that can be readily applied to clinical practice and policy as they arise from problems that affect practice and that

  15. Perceptions of Liberal Education of Two Types of Nursing Graduates: The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBrew, Jacqueline Kayler

    2010-01-01

    The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), which defines the expectations of a new baccalaureate-prepared nurse, includes a liberal education as a desired outcome for bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) graduates. A liberal education is thought to provide the professional nurse with the skills needed to practice nursing, including…

  16. Perceptions of Liberal Education of Two Types of Nursing Graduates: The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBrew, Jacqueline Kayler

    2010-01-01

    The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), which defines the expectations of a new baccalaureate-prepared nurse, includes a liberal education as a desired outcome for bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) graduates. A liberal education is thought to provide the professional nurse with the skills needed to practice nursing, including…

  17. Knowledge, attitudes and competence in nursing practice of typhoon disaster relief work among Chinese nurses: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lin; He, Hong-Gu; Zhou, Wen-Guang; Shi, Su-Hua; Yin, Ting-Ting; Kong, Yue

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the relationships among nurses' knowledge of, attitudes towards and level of competence in nursing practice, as well as factors influencing nurses' competence in nursing practice, in typhoon disaster relief work. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted using a self-developed questionnaire to obtain data from 607 nurses working in four tertiary hospitals and two secondary hospitals in Fujian, China, in November 2011. Our findings show that the nurses' average percentage scores on their responses to questions in the domains of knowledge, attitudes and practice were 66.33%, 68.87% and 67.60%, respectively. The findings demonstrated a significant positive relationship between nurses' attitudes and their practice. Nurses' working unit, prior training in typhoon disaster relief, current position of employment and attitudes were significant predictors of nurses' competence in practice. The results indicate that strategies need to be developed for nurses to improve their knowledge, attitudes and practice.

  18. [Geertz' Interpretive Theory and care management: visualizing nurses' social practice].

    PubMed

    Prochnow, Adelina Giacomelli; Leite, Joséte Luzia; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical reflection on hospital nursing care management and Geertz' Interpretive Theory of Culture. We discuss some significant elements of culture in management, based on the theoretical reference frameworks of nursing, administration and anthropology. In these, the importance of cultural diversity is highlighted as an innovative resource to expand the vision of human integrity, valuing divergences, respect and sharing, which are important for nurses in the construction of their social practice.

  19. Ethical climate in nursing practice: the leader's role.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2005-01-01

    Clarity in an organization's mission, vision, and values is key to effective management in today's complex healthcare work environment. To clearly articulate mission, vision, and values, employees must experience consistency between what is espoused and what is lived. The purpose of this article is to discuss the nurse leader's role in ensuring congruence between caring missions and caring practices. Ethical principles are discussed as the foundation necessary for creating an ethical climate for nursing practice. Components of ethical climate are presented and strategies to create a positive ethical climate for nursing practice are provided.

  20. Moving forward together: the practice doctorate in nursing.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Ann; Carter, Michael; Marion, Lucy; Pohl, Joanne M; Werner, Kathryn E

    2005-09-30

    Societal drivers, as well as trends in education and health care, are advancing the practice doctorate in nursing. For nurse practitioner preparation, the current resurgence of interest in the practice doctorate could precipitate change that mimics the evolution from post-basic certificate to Master's level education. The National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) is a resource for the study of the practice doctorate relative to quality nurse practitioner education. This article will offer some insights into the movement toward the practice doctorate by describing, from the NP perspective, the societal impetus for change, the historical perspective of NP and doctoral education, the 4 Ws (why, what, where, and when) of the movement, and some of the myths and realities about the practice doctorate.

  1. Essential elements of the nursing practice environment in nursing homes: Psychometric evaluation.

    PubMed

    de Brouwer, Brigitte Johanna Maria; Kaljouw, Marian J; Schoonhoven, Lisette; van Achterberg, Theo

    2017-06-01

    To develop and psychometrically test the Essentials of Magnetism II in nursing homes. Increasing numbers and complex needs of older people in nursing homes strain the nursing workforce. Fewer adequately trained staff and increased care complexity raise concerns about declining quality. Nurses' practice environment has been reported to affect quality of care and productivity. The Essentials of Magnetism II © measures processes and relationships of practice environments that contribute to productivity and quality of care and can therefore be useful in identifying processes requiring change to pursue excellent practice environments. However, this instrument was not explicitly evaluated for its use in nursing home settings so far. In a preparatory phase, a cross-sectional survey study focused on face validity of the essentials of magnetism in nursing homes. A second cross-sectional survey design was then used to further test the instrument's validity and reliability. Psychometric testing included evaluation of content and construct validity, and reliability. Nurses (N = 456) working at 44 units of three nursing homes were included. Respondent acceptance, relevance and clarity were adequate. Five of the eight subscales and 54 of the 58 items did meet preset psychometric criteria. All essentials of magnetism are considered relevant for nursing homes. The subscales Adequacy of Staffing, Clinically Competent Peers, Patient Centered Culture, Autonomy and Nurse Manager Support can be used in nursing homes without problems. The other subscales cannot be directly applied to this setting. The valid subscales of the Essentials of Magnetism II instrument can be used to design excellent nursing practice environments that support nurses' delivery of care. Before using the entire instrument, however, the other subscales have to be improved. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Moral distress in certified registered nurse anesthetists: implications for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Radzvin, Linda Clerici

    2011-02-01

    Registered nurses are frequently confronted with ethical dilemmas in their nursing practice. As a consequence of their decisions regarding ethical challenges, nurses report experiencing moral distress. This experience is often manifested by such feelings as anger, guilt, and sadness, and has been identified as a contributing factor to burnout and turnover in nursing. The purpose of this exploratory, descriptive study was to determine if Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) experience moral distress in their nursing practice. A random sample of 800 CRNAs from the registry of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists was selected to participate in this study. Participating nurses were asked to complete a demographic data survey and the Ethics Stress Scale. Three hundred surveys were analyzed for this study. The data supported the assumption that CRNAs do experience moral distress in their nursing practice. Although a small number of nurse anesthetists experienced high levels of moral distress, CRNAs generally experienced moderate levels of moral distress. Moral distress was associated with situations in which anesthetists believed they were aware of the morally correct course of action but were unable to follow through with these behaviors. Also, CRNAs reported physical and psychological manifestations in relation to moral distress.

  3. [Nursing development at the Solothurn hospitals. Towards clinically oriented nursing expertise and practice development].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Ursi Barandun; Hirsbrunner, Therese; Jäger, Susanne; Näf, Ernst; Römmich, Sabine; Horlacher, Kathrin

    2011-02-01

    At the Solothurn Hospitals (soH), 13 academically educated nurses are responsible for the development of nursing care with the goal to improve patient-oriented, effective, appropriate, and economic care. The strategy contains three priorities: a) expert care of single patients in demanding situations, b) sustained application of organisational methods such as primary nursing, nursing process, and skill/grade mix, and c) design and management of practice development projects related to specific patient groups. A first evaluation with qualitative and quantitative methods showed that the exemplary care of single patients by expert nurses was evaluated as positive for the patients as well as for the teams on two wards by nurses who were interviewed. After the introduction of primary nursing, the application rate was 81 to 90 % and the introduction of fall prevention methods in geriatric rehabilitation decreased the fall rate from 8.2 to 5.5 per 1000 patient days. A comparision with the literature shows that the expert nurses of soH perform both, working at the bedside and being responsible for practice development projects, as specialised Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs). APNs at the Solothurn Hospitals work also as generalists when organisational methods need to be consolidated. Their successes depend from their integration into the hierarchy and both, into the nursing as well as into the interprofessional teams. Competencies in Transformational Leadership also are essential at all management levels.

  4. Rethinking the intensive care environment: considering nature in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Minton, Claire; Batten, Lesley

    2016-01-01

    With consideration of an environmental concept, this paper explores evidence related to the negative impacts of the intensive care unit environment on patient outcomes and explores the potential counteracting benefits of 'nature-based' nursing interventions as a way to improve care outcomes. The impact of the environment in which a patient is nursed has long been recognised as one determinant in patient outcomes. Whilst the contemporary intensive care unit environment contains many features that support the provision of the intensive therapies the patient requires, it can also be detrimental, especially for long-stay patients. This narrative review considers theoretical and evidence-based literature that supports the adoption of nature-based nursing interventions in intensive care units. Research and theoretical literature from a diverse range of disciplines including nursing, medicine, psychology, architecture and environmental science were considered in relation to patient outcomes and intensive care nursing practice. There are many nature-based interventions that intensive care unit nurses can implement into their nursing practice to counteract environmental stressors. These interventions can also improve the environment for patients' families and nurses. Intensive care unit nurses must actively consider and manage the environment in which nursing occurs to facilitate the best patient outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Methodological issues in researching palliative care nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Bottorff, Joan L; Kelly, Mary; Young, Jennifer

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this integrative review was to describe the research conducted by nurses since the mid-1990s on nursing practice in the context of palliative/end-of-life care, identify promising methodological developments as well as methodological challenges, and propose strategies to support the development of this field of nursing research. A search of databases resulted in 121 research reports published between 1995 and 2003. Studies were included if the lead author was a nurse and the focus was nursing practice or nurses' attitudes about providing palliative or end-of-life care. Relatively few studies included patients, there were limitations in the data-collection methods used, and there was a lack of studies evaluating palliative care nursing. An emphasis on the interdisciplinary nature of palliative care may be hindering nurses from examining the effectiveness of nursing interventions. Increased attention should be given to examining the efficiency and effectiveness of nursing interventions to ensure the best outcomes for patients and their families.

  6. "Fundamental communication skills in medical practice" as minor elective subject.

    PubMed

    Zalihić, Amra; Černi Obrdalj, Edita

    2014-01-01

    Poor and inadequate communication affects the therapeutic relationship between doctors and patients. Guided by this idea, we organized a minor elective course entitled "communication skills". We wanted to bring closer to the students the holistic approach of the family physician to the patient, the importance of the family, its impact on the patient and vice versa, and the significance of the local community and its influence on an individual's health. The aim of this article is to explain how we organized this elective course. The course was organized in the form of 12 hours of theory (3 lectures and 9 seminars) and 24 hours of practical training. There were 26 students from all years. Through theory, and even more through the practical part the students met with different types of patients. At the end of the course, students in lower years were evaluated by means of an interview, and graduate students through a practical test - a conversation with a patient. The initial results, including the students' grading of this course, were highly encouraging. Both teachers and students were highly satisfied on completion of the course. Content on communication training is rare in teaching. Practicing communication skills will empower the doctor - patient therapeutic relationship. Copyright © 2014 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  7. Practical ethical theory for nurses responding to complexity in care.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, Roseanne Moody

    2010-05-01

    In the context of health care system complexity, nurses need responsive leadership and organizational support to maintain intrinsic motivation, moral sensitivity and a caring stance in the delivery of patient care. The current complexity of nurses' work environment promotes decreases in work motivation and moral satisfaction, thus creating motivational and ethical dissonance in practice. These and other work-related factors increase emotional stress and burnout for nurses, prompting both new and seasoned nurse professionals to leave their current position, or even the profession. This article presents a theoretical conceptual model for professional nurses to review and make sense of the ethical reasoning skills needed to maintain a caring stance in relation to the competing values that must coexist among nurses, health care administrators, patients and families in the context of the complex health care work environments in which nurses are expected to practice. A model, Nurses' Ethical Reasoning Skills, is presented as a framework for nurses' thinking through and problem solving ethical issues in clinical practice in the context of complexity in health care.

  8. Everyday ethics: ethical issues and stress in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Connie M; Taylor, Carol; Soeken, Karen; O'Donnell, Patricia; Farrar, Adrienne; Danis, Marion; Grady, Christine

    2010-11-01

    This paper is a report of a study of the type, frequency, and level of stress of ethical issues encountered by nurses in their everyday practice. Everyday ethical issues in nursing practice attract little attention but can create stress for nurses. Nurses often feel uncomfortable in addressing the ethical issues they encounter in patient care. A self-administered survey was sent in 2004 to 1000 nurses in four states in four different census regions of the United States of America. The adjusted response rate was 52%. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, cross-tabulations and Pearson correlations. A total of 422 questionnaires were used in the analysis. The five most frequently occurring and most stressful ethical and patient care issues were protecting patients' rights; autonomy and informed consent to treatment; staffing patterns; advanced care planning; and surrogate decision-making. Other common occurrences were unethical practices of healthcare professionals; breaches of patient confidentiality or right to privacy; and end-of-life decision-making. Younger nurses and those with fewer years of experience encountered ethical issues more frequently and reported higher levels of stress. Nurses from different regions also experienced specific types of ethical problems more commonly. Nurses face daily ethical challenges in the provision of quality care. To retain nurses, targeted ethics-related interventions that address caring for an increasingly complex patient population are needed. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Everyday Ethics: Ethical Issues and Stress in Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Connie M.; Taylor, Carol; Soeken, Karen; O'Donnell, Patricia; Farrar, Adrienne; Danis, Marion; Grady, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Aim This paper is a report of a study of the type, frequency, and level of stress of ethical issues encountered by nurses in their everyday practice. Background Everyday ethical issues in nursing practice attract little attention but can create stress for nurses. Nurses often feel uncomfortable in addressing the ethical issues they encounter in patient care. Methods A self-administered survey was sent in 2004 to 1000 nurses in four states in four different census regions of the United States of America. The adjusted response rate was 52%. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, cross-tabulations and Pearson correlations. Results A total of 422 questionnaires were used in the analysis. The five most frequently-occurring and most stressful ethical and patient care issues were protecting patients' rights; autonomy and informed consent to treatment; staffing patterns; advanced care planning; and surrogate decision-making. Other common occurrences were unethical practices of healthcare professionals; breaches of patient confidentiality or right to privacy; and end-of-life decision-making. Younger nurses and those with fewer years of experience encountered ethical issues more frequently and reported higher levels of stress. Nurses from different regions also experienced specific types of ethical problems more commonly. Conclusion Nurses face daily ethical challenges in the provision of quality care. To retain nurses, targeted ethics-related interventions that address caring for an increasingly complex patient population are needed. PMID:20735502

  10. Best practices in nursing homes. Clinical supervision, management, and human resource practices.

    PubMed

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen

    2008-07-01

    Human resource practices including supervision and management are associated with organizational performance. Evidence supportive of such an association in nursing homes is found in the results of numerous research studies conducted during the past 17 years. In this article, best practices related to this topic have been culled from descriptive, explanatory, and intervention studies in a range of interdisciplinary research journals published between 1990 and 2007. Identified best practices include implementation of training programs on supervision and management for licensed nurses, certified nursing assistant job enrichment programs, implementation of consistent nursing assignments, and the use of electronic documentation. Organizational barriers and facilitators of these best practices are described.

  11. Instructional Practices: Interpersonal Relationships in Nursing Practice: An Interdisciplinary Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Ben W.; VanDenBerg, Evelyn

    1978-01-01

    Examines an interdisciplinary course offered by the Nursing and Speech Communication Departments at Miami University which is intended to supplement basic nursing education that doesn't include the concept of interpersonal relationships. (MH)

  12. Project 2000: Perceptions of the Philosophy and Practice of Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jill Macleod; And Others

    A study examined how student, teacher, and practitioner/manager perceptions of the philosophy and practice of nursing changed during the Project 2000 demonstration program, which marked a dramatic revision of the curriculum taught at colleges of nursing across England and Wales. Data were collected from the following: literature review;…

  13. Aligning Career with Faith: Reflective Practice for Christian Nurse Educators.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Heather

    Christian nurses are challenged by the process of incorporating faith and Christianity into their career. Nurse educators are particularly challenged to embed Christian principles into the tenure and promotion journey. Developing a God-inspired plan takes time and patience. Prayer, reflective practice, evaluation, decisions, and follow-through are areas that can be incorporated to infuse faith throughout the tenure and promotion process.

  14. How can radio frequency identification technology impact nursing practice?

    PubMed

    Billingsley, Luanne; Wyld, David

    2014-12-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology can save nurses time, improve quality of care, en hance patient and staff safety, and decrease costs. However, without a better understanding of these systems and their benefits to patients and hospitals, nurses may be slower to recommend, implement, or adopt RFID technology into practice.

  15. A joint course for general practitioner and practice nurse trainers.

    PubMed Central

    Bolden, K J; Lewis, A P

    1990-01-01

    An experimental multidisciplinary course for prospective general practitioner and practice nurse trainers is described. Factual knowledge and attitudes were measured before and after the course and some of the changes measured emphasized the importance of multidisciplinary training. The ideas generated by the group of nurse trainers in terms of their future professional development were identified. PMID:2265007

  16. Licensed Practical Nurses in Occupational Health. An Initial Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jane A.; And Others

    The study, conducted in 1971, assessed characteristics of licensed practical nurses (LPN's) who worked in occupational health nursing. The survey instrument, a questionnaire, was returned by 591 LPN's in occupational health and provided data related to: personal characteristics, work and setting, administrative and professional functioning,…

  17. Criteria for the Evaluation of Educational Programs in Practical Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National League for Nursing, New York, NY. Dept. of Practical Nursing Programs.

    The document is intended to serve as a tool for self-evaluation by educational programs, evaluation for accreditation by the National League for Nursing, and appraisal of plans for the development of new practical nursing programs. The statements, which are organized into criteria and related guidelines, cover the areas of philosophy and…

  18. Psychiatric Nursing Faculty Practice: Care within the Community Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richie, Mary Fern; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing faculty practice offers the academic nurse opportunity to generate salary support and integrate students into the real world of mental health care. It promotes scholarship and knowledge-building and has a direct impact on the lives of patients. (Author/JOW)

  19. Faculty Practice in Nursing Education Programs in Rural States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkram, Gelene Marie

    1998-01-01

    This descriptive study identified demographic, organizational, and satisfaction data of faculty in nursing education programs in rural states who do and do not engage in faculty practice. Out of a total of 509 surveys which were sent to faculty from 35 nursing schools located in twelve rural states, 366 surveys were returned for a 72% response…

  20. Nurse-led general practice blazes a trail.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-02-24

    The nurse-led Cuckoo Lane Surgery in London has been rated outstanding by the Care Quality Commission. Nurses run the practice and deliver most of the care to patients. Patient satisfaction rates are very high, and staff say Cuckoo Lane is an exceptionally rewarding place to work.

  1. Evidence based practice: are critical care nurses ready for it?

    PubMed

    Bucknall, T; Copnell, B; Shannon, K; McKinley, D

    2001-08-01

    In the emergence of the evidence based practice movement, critical care nurses have struggled to identify scientific evidence on which to base their clinical practice. While the lack of critical care nursing research is a major concern, other important issues have significantly stalled the implementation of evidence even when it is available. A descriptive study of 274 critical care nurses was undertaken to examine nursing research activity in Victorian critical care units. The study aimed to identify critical care nurses' research skills, the barriers encountered in participation and implementation and the current availability of resources. Results revealed that 42 per cent of the nurses who participated in the study believed that they were not prepared adequately to evaluate research, and less than a third believed they were sufficiently skilled to conduct valid scientific studies. An association was found between nurses' ability to confidently perform research activities and higher academic qualifications. The study found that there is a lack of organisational support and management commitment for the development of evidence based nursing. In order to facilitate the implementation of evidence based practice, clinicians must be made aware of the available resources, be educated and mentored when carrying out and using clinical research, and be supported in professional initiatives that promote evidence based practice. It is argued that this will have positive implications for patient outcomes in the critical care environment.

  2. Optimizing Oxygenation in the Mechanically Ventilated Patient: Nursing Practice Implications.

    PubMed

    Barton, Glenn; Vanderspank-Wright, Brandi; Shea, Jacqueline

    2016-12-01

    Critical care nurses constitute front-line care provision for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Hypoxemic respiratory compromise/failure is a primary reason that patients require ICU admission and mechanical ventilation. Critical care nurses must possess advanced knowledge, skill, and judgment when caring for these patients to ensure that interventions aimed at optimizing oxygenation are both effective and safe. This article discusses fundamental aspects of respiratory physiology and clinical indices used to describe oxygenation status. Key nursing interventions including patient assessment, positioning, pharmacology, and managing hemodynamic parameters are discussed, emphasizing their effects toward mitigating ventilation-perfusion mismatch and optimizing oxygenation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Changes in nurses' views and practices concerning nurse prescribing between 2006 and 2012: results from two national surveys.

    PubMed

    Kroezen, Marieke; de Veer, Anke; Francke, Anneke; Groenewegen, Peter; van Dijk, Liset

    2014-11-01

    To assess changes in the prescribing practices and views about nurse prescribing of Registered Nurses in the Netherlands between 2006 and 2012. Considering the developments that took place in the Netherlands between 2006 and 2012, such as increased opportunities for nurse prescribing education and stricter control of nurses' prescribing practices, this study examines the extent to which nurses' prescribing practices and views have changed in the intervening years. In both years, nurses were not legally allowed to prescribe. Survey study. Surveys were conducted in 2006 and 2012. Questionnaires were sent to a national sample of nurses. The questionnaires addressed nurses' views on nurse prescribing and the extent to which nurse prescribing took place in the respondents' work setting. There were 386 and 644 respondents to the 2006 and 2012 surveys respectively. The proportion of nurses who said that they felt adequately equipped to prescribe medicines remained constant around 12%. Insufficient knowledge to prescribe remained the most important reason for feelings of inadequacy. More than a quarter of the nurses in both surveys stated that nurses in their team sometimes write prescriptions. There were few changes in views on the consequences of nurse prescribing for nurses' practice. Overall, nurses' support for nurse prescribing remained stable at a fairly cautious level, while the number of nurses feeling inadequately equipped to prescribe remained high. As nurse prescribing is expected to improve the quality and continuity of care, this should be taken into account in policy expectations. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Nursing clinical practice changes to improve self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Padilha, J M; Sousa, P A F; Pereira, F M S

    2017-03-13

    To propose nursing clinical practice changes to improve the development of patient self-management. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is one of the main causes of chronic morbidity, loss of quality of life and high mortality rates. Control of the disease's progression, the preservation of autonomy in self-care and maintenance of quality of life are extremely challenging for patients to execute in their daily living. However, there is still little evidence to support nursing clinical practice changes to improve the development of self-management. A participatory action research study was performed in a medicine inpatient department and the outpatient unit of a Portuguese hospital. The sample comprised 52 nurses and 99 patients. For data collection, we used interviews, participant observation and content analysis. The main elements of nursing clinical practice that were identified as a focus for improvement measures were the healthcare model, the organization of healthcare and the documentation of a support decision-making process. The specific guidelines, the provision of material to support decision-making and the optimization of information sharing between professionals positively influenced the change process. This change improved the development of self-management skills related to the awareness of the need for 'change', hope, involvement, knowledge and abilities. The implemented changes have improved health-related behaviours and clinical outcomes. To support self-management development skills, an effective nursing clinical practice change is needed. This study has demonstrated the relevance of a portfolio of techniques and tools to help patients adopt healthy behaviours. The involvement and participation of nurses and patients in the conceptualization, implementation and evaluation of policy change are fundamental issues to improve the quality of nursing care and clinical outcomes. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  5. The slippery slope of nursing regulation: challenging issues for contemporary nursing practice in Canada.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Bernie M; MacPhee, Maura

    2014-09-01

    This paper provides readers with an overview of some contemporary issues associated with nursing regulation and scope of practice in Canada. Issues with the current organizational structure of nursing regulation and its impact on nursing advocacy in Canada are explored. An argument is presented that nursing regulation needs more consistency and collaboration in Canada. Several examples are used to illustrate this. Fragmentation of regulation is explored and regulatory disciplinary processes are examined in relation to some countries with similar professional structures. The impact of changes in the regulatory status of complementary and alternative health practitioners on nursing is also critiqued. We provide recommendations for future policy and practice to better pave the way for nursing scope and regulatory clarity.

  6. Participation in the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) programme.

    PubMed

    Bartz, Claudia; Coenen, Amy; Hong, Woi-Hyun

    2006-01-01

    The International Council of Nurses (ICN) is a federation of 129 national nurses associations. The International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) is a programme of the ICN. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and maintenance processes of the ICNP Programme that are used to increase participation. These include processes by which the ICNP was and continues to be developed, tested, distributed and implemented worldwide, with emphasis on the current version, ICNP Version 1.0. The ICNP is a unified nursing language that facilitates cross-mapping among local terms and existing terminologies. ICNP conforms to current terminology standards and criteria, for example, ISO standards and HL7. The ICNP Alpha and Beta Versions documented the progress of concept validation and classification of nursing phenomena and interventions. The ICNP Beta 2 Version was a combinatorial terminology organized in two multi-axial structures representing nursing phenomena and nursing actions. The ICNP Version 1.0, launched in 2005, changed the relatively straight-forward multi-axial structure into a compositional terminology through the application of description logics using Web Ontology Language (OWL) within Protégé, an ontology development environment. ICNP Version 1.0 is also represented in a multiaxial model (7-Axis) for nurses to compose nursing diagnosis, intervention and outcome statements. Language translations and clinical information systems applications are required to make the ICNP Version 1.0 available to nurses at the point of healthcare delivery. ICNP data collected in healthcare environments provide standardized terminology for nursing that allows comparison of nursing practice across health care settings, specialties and countries; facilitate data-based clinical and management decision making; and contribute to the development of guidelines and standards for best practices and optimal outcomes for patients, families and communities.

  7. Structural empowerment and professional nursing practice behaviors of baccalaureate nursing students in clinical learning environments.

    PubMed

    Livsey, Kae R

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the associations between professional behaviors of baccalaureate nursing students and student perceptions of select factors within the clinical learning environment, including the role of clinical faculty leadership. Participants (n=243) were recruited from a randomly selected list of 1000 members of the National Student Nurses Association (NSNA) among sixteen states within the Southern region of the United States. Results revealed a direct relationship exists between student perceptions of structural empowerment in their clinical learning environment and professional nursing practice behaviors among students. Also found was that relationships between variables in the model are significantly strengthened by student perceptions of strong leadership behaviors of clinical faculty. Findings from this study may assist nurse educators by contributing knowledge relevant to support/facilitate the transition of individuals from student nurses to professional registered nurses and, thus enhance the impact of professional nurses' contributions in healthcare delivery.

  8. Reconceptualizing the core of nurse practitioner education and practice.

    PubMed

    Burman, Mary E; Hart, Ann Marie; Conley, Virginia; Brown, Julie; Sherard, Pat; Clarke, Pamela N

    2009-01-01

    The movement to the doctor of nursing practice (DNP) is progressing rapidly with new programs emerging and curricular documents being developed. We argue that the implementation of the DNP is a good move for nursing, provided that we use the opportunity to reconceptualize the core of advanced practice nursing, especially nurse practitioner (NP) practice. Theory and research articles from nursing focused on advanced practice nursing, NPs, and doctoral education. The foundation of NP education is currently based essentially on borrowed or shared content in assessment, pharmacology, and pathophysiology. We argue that the heart and soul of nursing is in health promotion, both in healthy persons and in those dealing with chronic illness. Current master's programs do not prepare NPs to assume high-level practice focused on health promotion and disease management using the latest theoretical developments in health behavior change, behavioral sciences, exercise physiology, nutrition, and medical anthropology. Although these are touched upon in most NP programs, they do not represent the core science of NP education and need to be a critical part of any DNP program. Ultimately, our vision is for NP care to be consistently "different," yet just as essential as physician care, leading to positive outcomes in health promotion and disease management.

  9. Practical application of fundamental concepts in exercise physiology.

    PubMed

    Ramsbottom, R; Kinch, R F T; Morris, M G; Dennis, A M

    2007-12-01

    The collection of primary data in laboratory classes enhances undergraduate practical and critical thinking skills. The present article describes the use of a lecture program, running in parallel with a series of linked practical classes, that emphasizes classical or standard concepts in exercise physiology. The academic and practical program ran under the title of a particular year II module named Sports Performance: Physiology and Assessment, and results are presented over a 3-yr period (2004-2006), based on an undergraduate population of 31 men and 34 women. The module compared laboratory-based indexes of endurance (e.g., ventilatory threshold and exercise economy) and high-intensity exercise (e.g., anaerobic power), respectively, with measures of human performance (based on 20-m shuttle run tests). The specific experimental protocols reinforced the lecture content to improve student understanding of the physiological and metabolic responses (and later adaptations) to exercise. In the present study, the strongest relationship with endurance performance was the treadmill velocity at maximal aerobic power (r = +0.88, P < 0.01, n = 51); in contrast, the strongest relationship with high-intensity exercise performance was the mean power output (in W/kg) measured during a 30-s all-out cycle ergometer sprint (r = +0.80, P < 0.01, n = 48). In class student data analysis improved undergraduate indepth or critical thinking during seminars and enhanced computer and data presentation skills. The endurance-based laboratories are particularly useful for examining the underlying scientific principles that determine aerobic performance but could equally well be adapted to investigate other topics, e.g., differences in the exercise response between men and women.

  10. The transforming effect of handheld computers on nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brent W

    2005-01-01

    Handheld computers have the power to transform nursing care. The roots of this power are the shift to decentralization of communication, electronic health records, and nurses' greater need for information at the point of care. This article discusses the effects of handheld resources, calculators, databases, electronic health records, and communication devices on nursing practice. The US government has articulated the necessity of implementing the use of handheld computers in healthcare. Nurse administrators need to encourage and promote the diffusion of this technology, which can reduce costs and improve care.

  11. Decision making in nursing practice: a case review.

    PubMed

    Clack, Gail

    2009-06-01

    Clinical decisions and clinical judgements are important elements of nursing practice because they have a direct effect on patient care. A four-stage information processing framework was used to critique a decision to carry out chest examination and auscultation during the routine assessment of a child's asthma status. The use of this process demonstrates that nurses apply a combination of analytical and intuitive strategies when making decisions. Nurses who manage the care of patients in nurse-led clinics need to acquire advanced assessment skills to support their clinical decision making.

  12. Practical discourse in nursing: going beyond empiricism and historicism.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J L

    1985-07-01

    This discussion presents a critical appraisal of recent works in Advances in Nursing Science that have dealt with metatheoretical concerns. In metatheoretical analysis, such as that presented by Silva and Rothbart, nurses are beginning to focus on the traditions that have guided research. This process should be extended by reviewing historical stages of development in empiricist and postempiricist philosophy. Recent work in postempiricist philosophy is especially important since it can help nursing transcend historicist insights. Continental philosophy goes beyond historicist critique by focusing on practical discourse within a community of investigators. This is a stage of development that can be rationally decisive for the scientific development of nursing.

  13. Leadership redefined: educating the Doctorate of Nursing Practice nurse leader through innovation.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Kathryn Lothschuetz

    2011-01-01

    In today's society, health care systems are characterized by change, unpredictability, increasing speed of information and knowledge exchanges, redefined organizational boundaries and hierarchy, emphasis on value, teamwork, interdisciplinary collaboration, diversity, and interconnectedness. This new reality has forced nurse educators to redefine nursing leadership and prepare the Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) leader through innovative courses offering experiential learning based on complex adaptive systems and quantum leadership theory. This article describes the experiential learning approach and integrated learning experience for DNP students.

  14. Pernicious anemia: Fundamental and practical aspects in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Tun, Aung Myint; Thein, Kyaw Zin; Myint, Zin War; Oo, Thein Hlaing

    2017-02-03

    Pernicious anemia (PA), the most common cause of cobalamin deficiency anemia worldwide, is an autoimmune disease of multifactorial etiologies involving complex environmental and immunological factors. Although it was first reported by Addison in 1849 with subsequent advances in understanding of pathogenesis and molecular biology, diagnosis of pernicious anemia is still challenging for clinicians because of its complexity and diverse clinical presentations. Herein, we provide an overview of PA, mainly focusing on its scientific and practical aspects in diagnosis. We also discuss the limitations of currently available diagnostic tools for evaluation of cobalamin deficiency and PA.

  15. Impact of Healthcare Information Technology on Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Piscotty, Ronald J; Kalisch, Beatrice; Gracey-Thomas, Angel

    2015-07-01

    To report additional mediation findings from a descriptive cross sectional study to examine if nurses' perceptions of the impact of healthcare information technology on their practice mediates the relationship between electronic nursing care reminder use and missed nursing care. The study used a descriptive design. The sample (N = 165) was composed of registered nurses working on acute care hospital units. The sample was obtained from a large teaching hospital in Southeast Michigan in the fall of 2012. All eligible nursing units (n = 19) were included. The MISSCARE Survey, Nursing Care Reminders Usage Survey, and the Impact of Healthcare Information Technology Scale were used to collect data to test for mediation. Mediation was tested using the method described by Baron and Kenny. Multiple regression equations were used to analyze the data to determine if mediation occurred between the variables. Missed nursing care, the outcome variable, was regressed on the predictor variable, reminder usage, and the mediator variable impact of technology on nursing practice. The impact of healthcare information technology (IHIT) on nursing practice negatively affected missed nursing care (t = -4.12, p < .001), explaining 9.8% of variance in missed nursing care. With IHIT present, the predictor (reminder usage) was no longer significant (t = -.70, p = .48). Thus, the reduced direct association between reminder usage and missed nursing care when IHIT was in the model supported the hypothesis that IHIT was at least one of the mediators in the relationship between reminder usage and missed nursing care. The perceptions of the impact of healthcare information technology mediates the relationship between nursing care reminder use and missed nursing care. The findings are beneficial to the advancement of healthcare technology in that designers of healthcare information technology systems need to keep in mind that perceptions regarding impacts of the technology will influence usage

  16. Practice protocol: transition to community nursing practice revisited.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Irene; Chater, Keri

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore and describe the process of transition that nurses experience when moving from the acute sector to a specialist area of community nursing. Issues explored include the increased movement of nurses into the community sector, the experience of culture shock and changes in nursing roles. Transition issues including the need for effective management and infrastructure support, mentoring and preceptorship, skills acquisition and continuing education will be examined. Joint implementation of what is successful at both university and industry levels can improve the transition to community nursing.

  17. e-Learning competency for practice nurses: an evaluation report.

    PubMed

    Heartfield, Marie; Morello, Andrea; Harris, Melanie; Lawn, Sharon; Pols, Vincenza; Stapleton, Carolyn; Battersby, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    Practice nurses in Australia are now funded to facilitate chronic condition management, including self-management support. Chronic disease management requires an established rapport, support and proactivity between general practitioners, patients and the practice nurses. To achieve this, training in shared decision making is needed. e-Learning supports delivery and achievement of such policy outcomes, service improvements and skill development. However, e-learning effectiveness for health care professionals' is determined by several organisational, economic, pedagogical and individual factors, with positive e-learning experience linked closely to various supports. This paper reinforces previous studies showing nurses' expanding role across general practice teams and reports on some of the challenges of e-learning. Merely providing practice nurses with necessary information via web-based learning systems does not ensure successful learning or progress toward improving health outcomes for patients.

  18. Effects of nursing position on transformational leadership practices.

    PubMed

    Herman, Susan; Gish, Mary; Rosenblum, Ruth

    2015-02-01

    This study sought to identify significant differences in nursing leadership strengths by position title. Recent reports show aspects of transformational leadership (TL) related to position, age, and educational level. This study focuses on differentiating the strength of leadership practices across the range of nursing management positions. The Leadership Practices Inventory-Self-assessment survey, and a variety of demographic questions, were used to anonymously poll voluntary members of the Association of California Nurse Leaders. Nursing positions of director level and above were strongest in leadership practices. Those at manager and below were identified as needing additional leadership development. LPI-S subscales Enable Others to Act and Model the Way were strongest. Those at the manager level and below will benefit most from additional education and training. Even upper levels of management would gain from enhancing the LPI practices of Challenge the Process and Inspire a Shared Vision.

  19. Nurses' clinical reasoning: processes and practices of medication safety.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Geri L; Flynn, Linda

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we describe the depth of knowledge and skill nurses used in making decisions regarding the safe processes and practices of medication administration. Using grounded theory, we identified the essence of medication safety by nurses as the theme of clinical reasoning. Nurses used two medication safety processes within the clinical reasoning theme-maintaining medication safety and managing the environment-together with six categories of patient-focused medication safety practices in the first process and four categories of environmental-focused safety practices within the second process. These processes and practices present an emerging model of safe medication administration developed from the narratives of 50 medical-surgical nurses. This model provides researchers with the basis for the development of systemic policies for safer medication administration for patients. Health care professional educators might also find the results useful in developing curricula focused on patient safety as the foundation of quality care.

  20. Nurses' clinical practice in primary care: a process under construction.

    PubMed

    Matumoto, Silvia; Fortuna, Cinira Magali; Kawata, Lauren Suemi; Mishima, Silvana Martins; Pereira, Maria José Bistafa

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to present the re-signification process of the meanings of nurses' clinical practice in primary care from the perspective of extended clinic and permanent education. An intervention research was carried out with the approval of an ethics committee. Nine nurses participated in reflection groups from September to December 2008 in Ribeirão Preto-SP-Brazil. The redefinition process of the meanings proposed by the institutional analysis was mapped. The results point out that the nurses perceive differences in clinical work, by acknowledging the sense of user-centered clinical practice; daily limits and tensions and the need for support from managers and the team to deal with users' problems and situations. They identify the necessity to open space in the schedule to do that. It was concluded that nurses' clinical practice is being consolidated, and that collective analysis processes permit learning and the reconstruction of practices.

  1. Practical implications of some recent studies in electrospray ionization fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Cech, N B; Enke, C G

    2001-01-01

    In accomplishing successful electrospray ionization analyses, it is imperative to have an understanding of the effects of variables such as analyte structure, instrumental parameters, and solution composition. Here, we review some fundamental studies of the ESI process that are relevant to these issues. We discuss how analyte chargeability and surface activity are related to ESI response, and how accessible parameters such as nonpolar surface area and reversed phase HPLC retention time can be used to predict relative ESI response. Also presented is a description of how derivitizing agents can be used to maximize or enable ESI response by improving the chargeability or hydrophobicity of ESI analytes. Limiting factors in the ESI calibration curve are discussed. At high concentrations, these factors include droplet surface area and excess charge concentration, whereas at low concentrations ion transmission becomes an issue, and chemical interference can also be limiting. Stable and reproducible non-pneumatic ESI operation depends on the ability to balance a number of parameters, including applied voltage and solution surface tension, flow rate, and conductivity. We discuss how changing these parameters can shift the mode of ESI operation from stable to unstable, and how current-voltage curves can be used to characterize the mode of ESI operation. Finally, the characteristics of the ideal ESI solvent, including surface tension and conductivity requirements, are discussed. Analysis in the positive ion mode can be accomplished with acidified methanol/water solutions, but negative ion mode analysis necessitates special constituents that suppress corona discharge and facilitate the production of stable negative ions.

  2. Vocation and altruism in nursing: the habits of practice.

    PubMed

    Carter, Melody

    2014-09-01

    At a time when British nursing has been under scrutiny for an apparent lack of compassion in education and practice, this paper based offers a perspective on the notions of vocation and altruism in nursing. To understand the vocational and altruistic motivations of nurses through the application of Pierre Bourdieu's concepts of 'symbolic capital', 'field' and 'habitus' through a long interview with nurse respondents. A reflexive qualitative study was undertaken using the long interview. A thematic analysis of the data, using a qualitative data software package for analysis, was undertaken. The ideas of Pierre Bourdieu (Habitus, Capital and Field) were used to analyse and explain the content of community nurses' 'talk'. Twelve Community Nurses working in a variety of local primary care settings volunteered to participate in the study. It was a self-selecting convenience sample of nurses responding to an invitation to be interviewed. A study in support of a doctoral thesis conducted within NHS primary care settings with registered nurses. The key considerations for this study were to be mindful of the possibility of emotional harm or distress being caused to the respondents during the retelling of their experiences. It was also essential to ensure that the locations or names of patients or staff (if discussed) were anonymised. Ethical approval was sought and granted by both the Local NHS Primary Care and the University Ethics committees before the study commenced. The nurse respondents had highly individual and at times contradictory views on their motivations to nurse including their views on vocation and altruism in nursing careers. Bourdieu's ideas apply well to the nursing context and provided a useful theoretical framework to explore the social and cultural influences on nursing careers. Gender is important consideration in all aspects of nursing but class and educational experience is an important dimension in the stories nurses tell. The culturally determined

  3. Advanced Holistic Nursing Practice Narratives: A View of Caring Praxis.

    PubMed

    Enzman Hines, Mary; Gaughan, Jennifer

    2017-07-01

    Advanced holistic nurses (AHNs), emerging as leaders in health care transformation, are described as caregivers, but caring and caring-within-practice are often difficult for AHNs to explicate. Nursing research that describes caring in advanced practice is limited. Only one study has been reported that focused on describing practice for advanced practice nurses. This article presents a secondary analysis of narratives from a larger qualitative study of holistic pediatric nursing practice. From that study, narratives provided by six holistic advanced practice nurse participants, working in a variety of settings, were extracted and analyzed to illuminate caring-within-practice. Participants were asked to write a reflective narrative on a patient exemplar of caring and use John's model for structured reflection to provide a deeper reflection on their narrative of caring. Researchers analyzed the extracted narratives to identify common themes of caring-within-practice. Seven themes emerged depicting AHNs caring-within-practice: normalizing the environment, creating sacred space, being rooted in compassion, the art of being present, establishing trust-caring, coaching the family as caregiver, and inspiration for the future. This article provides excerpts from the narratives that support the themes, discusses the findings, and presents implications of the study.

  4. Teaching and learning care--exploring nursing students' clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Solvoll, Betty-Ann; Heggen, Kristin M

    2010-01-01

    Care has always been a key element of nursing. This paper presents findings from research on the following issue: What opportunities and limitations do nursing students encounter when learning nursing care? The study has a qualitative design with field methodology and the study of documents. Six nursing students have been closely monitored during their clinical studies in hospitals, nursing homes and home-based nursing. The study shows that nursing students are likely to possess the potential to provide care for sick and unknown people. The motivation for their commitment to patients may contain an egoistical orientation and runs contrary to former ideals of the nurse's self-sacrificing altruism. Moreover the study shows that there is a potential in the clinical field and in the university college to reflective considerations on experience of care. While clinical practice often has focus on practical problem-solving and procedures, the college tends to focus on abstract theory. Both of these promote the privatisation and neglect of the students' experience of care. The paper concludes with a call for teaching and learning strategies targeting the use of nursing students' personal experience of care.

  5. Nursing care systems: enhancing care processes in practice and management.

    PubMed

    Marin, H F; Carr, R

    2008-01-01

    To summarize aspects of nursing informatics application and introduces challenges that are currently being addressed by nurses around the world. Key contributions in the field are surveyed and put in the perspective of the IMIA Nursing Informatics Strategic Plan. As a discipline, nursing informatics offers real and practical instruments and opportunities to delivery nursing care across settings, units of care and specialties. A variety of patient care systems are managed by nurses who are introduced to this link during their training embracing information networks, communication skills together with an ability to work both in practice and administrative positions in a variety of clinical and community settings. At a time when the tendency is toward a computer-based patient record, nurses must be able to identify what kind of nursing data and information will construct useable and useful nursing knowledge. There are many options for each area of application and the selection must be done carefully, considering the enhancement for organizational, technological and local requirements.

  6. Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner: The 2014 Practice Analysis.

    PubMed

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Madden, Maureen A; Gutknecht, Sarah; Foerster, Adele

    2016-01-01

    Practice research serves as the certification framework for validating advanced practice roles and updating national qualifying examinations. This national study describes the current practice of the acute care pediatric nurse practitioner (AC PNP) to inform an update of the Certified Pediatric Nurse Practitioner-Acute Care (CPNP-AC) examination content outline. A descriptive analysis was performed of the responses of 319 pediatric nurse practitioners, practicing in an acute care role, who completed a practice survey in 2014. Respondents were primarily White women with a mean age of 40 years; 75% had been formally educated as AC PNPs, compared with 48% in 2009. Regional practice was most heavily concentrated in the Southeast (28%) and Midwest (27%). Most respondents (81%) practiced in urban areas. Respondents reported spending 75% of practice time in inpatient settings. The most frequently cited areas of practice were critical care (36%), followed by emergency department (9%) and subspecialty practices. This third analysis of AC PNP practice 10 years after initiation of the CPNP-AC certification examination demonstrates changes in clinical practice and educational preparation. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nursing Interventions Core to Specialty Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Joanne Comi; Donahue, William; Bulechek, Gloria M.

    1998-01-01

    The identification of nursing interventions that are core to each clinical specialty will be useful in the development of nursing information systems, staff education programs and evaluations, referral networks, certification and licensing examinations, curricula, and research and theory construction. (Author/JOW)

  8. Ethics in Nursing Practice and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint

    1983-01-01

    The fact that ethics has become important to nurses is a reflection of two types of developments: (1) rapid expansion and application of biomedical technology, and (2) the human rights movement. Therefore, nursing involves an increasing number of activities with both moral and technical implications. (SSH)

  9. Ethics in Nursing Practice and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint

    1983-01-01

    The fact that ethics has become important to nurses is a reflection of two types of developments: (1) rapid expansion and application of biomedical technology, and (2) the human rights movement. Therefore, nursing involves an increasing number of activities with both moral and technical implications. (SSH)

  10. Practice environment for nurse practitioners in California. Identifying barriers.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, A L; Gilliss, C L; Yoder, L

    1996-01-01

    Barriers exist that prevent nurse practitioners from using their primary health care knowledge and skills. We present the incidence of and specific barriers experienced by nurse practitioner respondents in California, the state with the largest number of nurse practitioners in the nation. A January 1995 survey was sent to all nurse practitioners certified in California to elicit their experiences regarding legal or social barriers in their practice, with space for an open-ended response. Of an estimated 3,895 nurse practitioners in California, 2,741 (70%) returned surveys. Most nurse practitioner (65%) respondents in California are providing primary care. Perceived barriers to practice are lack of prescriptive authority, lack of support from physicians, reimbursement difficulties, and lack of public awareness. Current barriers to nurse practitioner practice in California are similar to national barriers discovered in 1992 data. The development of interprofessional dialogue and the recognition of the contributions of all primary care professionals are some of the steps that can be taken to reduce these barriers and increase the use and effectiveness of nurse practitioners in primary care. PMID:8987426

  11. Physical assessment skills: a developing dimension of clinical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Maureen A; Moorse, Sue E

    2002-08-01

    This paper proposes that the current use of physical assessment skills within critical care nursing practice is part of a on-going nursing role development process. A review of the critical care nursing role highlights how nurses in this setting have always been responsive to patient management needs. In exploring one recent nursing role development, the critical care outreach nurse, it is suggested that enhanced assessment skills enable these practitioners to safely and competently assess critically ill patients out of the intensive care environment. The use of patient case studies in this paper, demonstrate how the theory of a more intensive physical assessment knowledge base can be applied in the everyday practice of an critical care outreach nurse. Through such systematic patient review, patient management plans can be agreed and ward based practitioners can be supported in the on-going treatment of sick ward patients. The use of the cases presented also highlights the complexity of the outreach nurse's practice in addressing clinical management and team management issues.

  12. Work engagement in nursing practice: a relational ethics perspective.

    PubMed

    Keyko, Kacey

    2014-12-01

    The concept of work engagement has existed in business and psychology literature for some time. There is a significant body of research that positively correlates work engagement with organizational outcomes. To date, the interest in the work engagement of nurses has primarily been related to these organizational outcomes. However, the value of work engagement in nursing practice is not only an issue of organizational interest, but of ethical interest. The dialogue on work engagement in nursing must expand to include the ethical importance of engagement. The relational nature of work engagement and the multiple levels of influence on nurses' work engagement make a relational ethics approach to work engagement in nursing appropriate and necessary. Within a relational ethics perspective, it is evident that work engagement enables nurses to have meaningful relationships in their work and subsequently deliver ethical care. In this article, I argue that work engagement is essential for ethical nursing practice. If engagement is essential for ethical nursing practice, the environmental and organizational factors that influence work engagement must be closely examined to pursue the creation of moral communities within healthcare environments.

  13. Crossmapping of Nursing Problem and Action Statements in Telephone Nursing Consultation Documentations with International Classification for Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jung

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study is to cross-map telephone nursing consultation documentations with International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP; ver. 1.0 concepts). Methods The narrative telephone nursing consultation documentations of 170 ophthalmology nursing unit patients were analyzed. The nursing statements were examined and cross-mapped with the Korean version of the ICNP ver. 1.0. If all the concepts of a statement were mapped to ICNP concepts, it was classified as 'completely mapped'. If any concept of a statement wasnot mapped, it was classified as 'partially mapped'. If none of the concepts were mapped, it was classified as 'not mapped'. Results A total of 738 statements wereused for documenting telephone nursing consultations. These statements were divided into 3 groups according to their content: 1) 294 nursing phenomena-related statements (72 unique statements), 2) 440 nursing actions-related statements (76 unique statements), and 3) 4 other statements (2 unique statements). In total, 189 unique nursing concepts extracted from 150 unique statements and 108 concepts (62.44%) were mapped onto ICNP concepts. Conclusions This study demonstrated the feasibility of computerizing narrative nursing documentations for electronic telephone triagein the ophthalmology nursing unit. PMID:21818446

  14. Fundamental and practical limits of planar tracking solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Grede, Alex J; Price, Jared S; Giebink, Noel C

    2016-12-26

    Planar microtracking provides an alternate paradigm for solar concentration that offers the possibility of realizing high-efficiency embedded concentrating photovoltaic systems in the form factor of standard photovoltaic panels. Here, we investigate the thermodynamic limit of planar tracking optical concentrators and establish that they can, in principal, achieve the sine limit of their orientationally-tracked counterparts provided that the receiver translates a minimum distance set by the field of view half-angle. We develop a phase space methodology to optimize practical planar tracking concentrators and apply it to the design of a two surface, catadioptric system that operates with > 90% optical efficiency over a 140° field of view at geometric gains exceeding 1000×. These results provide a reference point for subsequent developments in the field and indicate that planar microtracking can achieve the high optical concentration ratio required in commercial concentrating photovoltaic systems.

  15. Description of practice as an ambulatory care nurse: psychometric properties of a practice-analysis survey.

    PubMed

    Baghi, Heibatollah; Panniers, Teresa L; Smolenski, Mary C

    2007-01-01

    Changes within nursing demand that a specialty conduct periodic, appropriate practice analyses to continually validate itself against preset standards. This study explicates practice analysis methods using ambulatory care nursing as an exemplar. Data derived from a focus group technique were used to develop a survey that was completed by 499 ambulatory care nurses. The validity of the instrument was assessed using principal components analysis; reliability was estimated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The focus group with ambulatory care experts produced 34 knowledge and activity statements delineating ambulatory care nursing practice. The survey data produced five factors accounting for 71% of variance in the data. The factors were identified as initial patient assessment, professional nursing issues and standards, client care management skills, technical/clinical skills, and system administrative operations. It was concluded that practice analyses delineate a specialty and provide input for certification examinations aimed at measuring excellence in a field of nursing.

  16. Emotional intelligence in mental health nurses talking about practice.

    PubMed

    Akerjordet, Kristin; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore mental health nurses' experiences of emotional intelligence (EI) in their nursing practice by means of qualitative interviews. The interview questions where developed from the literature on EI. This study used a hermeneutic analysis. Four main themes emerged: relationship with the patient; the substance of supervision; motivation; and responsibility. It was concluded that EI stimulates the search for a deeper understanding of a professional mental health nursing identity. Emotional learning and maturation processes are central to professional competence, that is, personal growth and development. In addition, the moral character of the mental health nurse in relation to clinical practice is of importance. The findings imply multiple types of intelligence related to nursing science as well as further research possibilities within the area of EI.

  17. Ethics education in advanced practice nursing: respect for human dignity.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Kathleen A; O'Conner-Von, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Ethics education is an essential component of academic programs that prepare nurses for advanced practice; the concept of respect for human dignity is integral to this education. Sixty-three graduate students enrolled in their first course of a nurse practitioner program completed a researcher-developed Ethics Questionnaire that was designed to elicit their baseline ethics-related knowledge, including their understanding of the concept "respect for human dignity". Qualitative analysis of data yielded findings that validate the importance of using the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements as an essential foundation for ethics content and as a framework for understanding the meaning of human dignity in advanced practice nursing. Assessment and learning strategies are recommended.

  18. Important interactional strategies for everyday public health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Porr, Caroline J

    2015-01-01

    This Clinical Concepts article concerns the relational tools required by public health nurses to establish relationships with single mothers living on public assistance, mothers who are vulnerable and often stigmatized. The implications of stigmatization for relationship building are highlighted based on previous research investigating how public health nurses working in Canadian jurisdictions establish professional caring relationships with this cohort of mothers. Public health nurses employed interactional strategies including engaging in a positive manner and offering verbal commendations which served as effective relational tools to break through mothers' walls of defensiveness and to resume the dynamic process of relationship building. Building Relationship is a key practice standard for public health nurses and is instrumental to their work at both individual and community levels to improve social determinants of health. The author concludes with recommendations to facilitate building relationships during everyday public health nursing practice.

  19. My practice evolution: an appreciation of the discrepancies between the idealism of nursing education and the realities of hospital practice.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Danielle E K

    2010-01-01

    Newly graduated registered nurses face a barrage of physical and mental challenges in their first few years of practice, especially in the hospital setting. This article explores discrepancies between student nurse practice and professional nursing practice and the challenges that new nurses face in bridging the gap between idealistic theory and realistic practice. The author's subsequent graduate nursing education and continued practice in the field resulted in a personal evolution of practice that elicited a profound sense of appreciation for the field and a desire to share these experiences with other practicing nurses and students.

  20. Clinical practice models in nursing education: implication for students' mobility.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolska, B; McGonagle, I; Jackson, C; Kane, R; Cabrera, E; Cooney-Miner, D; Di Cara, V; Pajnkihar, M; Prlić, N; Sigurdardottir, A K; Kekuš, D; Wells, J; Palese, A

    2015-03-01

    In accordance with the process of nursing globalization, issues related to the increasing national and international mobility of student and qualified nurses are currently being debated. Identifying international differences and comparing similarities for mutual understanding, development and better harmonization of clinical training of undergraduate nursing students is recommended. The aim of the study was to describe and compare the nature of the nursing clinical practice education models adopted in different countries. A qualitative approach involving an expert panel of nurses was adopted. The Nominal Group Technique was employed to develop the initial research instrument for data collection. Eleven members of the UDINE-C network, representing institutions engaged in the process of professional nursing education and research (universities, high schools and clinical institutes), participated. Three data collection rounds were implemented. An analysis of the findings was performed, assuring rigour. Differences and homogeneity are reported and discussed regarding: (a) the clinical learning requirements across countries; (b) the prerequisites and clinical learning process patterns; and (c) the progress and final evaluation of the competencies achieved. A wider discussion is needed regarding nursing student exchange and internalization of clinical education in placements across European and non-European countries. A clear strategy for nursing education accreditation and harmonization of patterns of organization of clinical training at placements, as well as strategies of student assessment during this training, are recommended. There is also a need to develop international ethical guidelines for undergraduate nursing students gaining international experience. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  1. Nurses' perceptions and practice of physical restraint in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hui; Li, Chen; Gu, Yan; He, Yanan

    2015-09-01

    There is controversy concerning the use of physical restraint. Despite this controversy, some nurses still consider the application of physical restraint unavoidable for some of their clients. Identify the perceptions and practice of physical restraint in China. This was a descriptive study that combined qualitative interviews with a quantitative cross-sectional survey. A total of 18 nurses were interviewed and 330 nurses were surveyed. Approval of the study was obtained from the hospital ethics committee. Permission to conduct the study was obtained from the director of nursing. Participants were assured that their participation is voluntary. Physical restraint was commonly used to protect patients' safety. Naturally, intensive care unit nurses used physical restraint much more frequently than general medical/surgical ward nurses (p < 0.01). In addition, night shift nurses tended to use physical restraint more frequently. Nursing managers should be aware of the role nurses play in the use of physical restraint. In-service training regarding the proper use of physical restraint should be strengthened and nurse staffing levels should be improved in order to minimize the use of physical restraint in China. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Examination of Motivating Factors Attracting Licensed Practical Nurses into a Registered Nursing Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Care, Wm. Dean

    A study identified characteristics and motivating factors that influenced licensed practical nurses (LPNs) to participate in a registered nursing (RN) upgrading program at a hospital in western Canada. A literature review considered the concepts of motivation, participation, adult learning, and life transitions and explored a variety of models and…

  3. The support needs of new graduate nurses making the transition to rural nursing practice in Australia.

    PubMed

    Lea, Jackie; Cruickshank, Mary

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the findings from the new graduate nurse participants of a larger study that explored the transitional experiences of newly graduated nurses making the role transition in rural health care facilities in Australia. Evidence indicates that workload, skill mix and organizational pressures are still of concern for new nursing graduates within the Australian context and internationally. Many graduates are expected by employers to have high levels of independence, well developed problem solving abilities and be able to assume management and leadership responsibilities early in their graduate year. An exploratory, descriptive, qualitative case study design was utilised to determine the particular support needs over time that would assist with a safe transition to the rural nursing workforce. The aims of the study were to: (1) Explore the new graduate nurses' perceptions and experience of the nature and timing of support throughout their Transition to Practice Program in a rural setting; (2) Identify the functional elements of rural graduate nurse transition programs and develop guidelines that will assist in the design of Transition to Practice Programs that match the rural context and capacity. A purposive sample of 15 new graduate nurses who had commenced a 12 month Transition to Practice Program within a rural health facility from northern New South Wales, Australia, participated in this study. In-depth individual interviews with the new graduate nurses were conducted at time intervals of three to four months, six to seven months and 10 to 11 months. One of the key findings of this study is that as the new graduate nurse making the transition to professional rural nursing practice moves along the transition continuum, there are particular and unique aspects of the rural nurse's role and responsibilities for which the new graduate nurse will require specific learning support during their transition. When the new graduate moves from

  4. Promoting a Strategic Approach to Clinical Nurse Leader Practice Integration.

    PubMed

    Williams, Marjory; Avolio, Alice E; Ott, Karen M; Miltner, Rebecca S

    2016-01-01

    The Office of Nursing Services of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) piloted implementation of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) into the care delivery model and established a strategic goal in 2011 to implement the CNL role across the VA health care system. The VA Office of Nursing Services CNL Implementation and Evaluation (CNL I&E) Service was created as one mechanism to facilitate that goal in response to a need identified by facility nurse executives for consultative support for CNL practice integration. This article discusses strategies employed by the CNL I&E consultative team to help facility-level nursing leadership integrate CNLs into practice. Measures of success include steady growth in CNL practice capacity as well as positive feedback from nurse executives about the value of consultative engagement. Future steps to better integrate CNL practice into the VA include consolidation of lessons learned, collaboration to strengthen the evidence base for CNL practice, and further exploration of the transformational potential of CNL practice across the care continuum.

  5. The role of practical wisdom in nurse manager practice: why experience matters.

    PubMed

    Cathcart, Eloise Balasco; Greenspan, Miriam

    2013-10-01

    To illustrate through the interpretation of one representative nurse manager's narrative how the methodology of practice articulation gives language to the ways practical wisdom develops in leadership practice and facilitates learning. Patricia Benner's corpus of research has demonstrated that reflection on clinical narratives comes closer than other pedagogical methods to replicating and enhancing the experiential learning required for the development of practical wisdom. Using Benner's methodology of practice articulation, 91 nurse managers wrote and read to a peer group a narrative of their lived experience in the role. The groups interpreted the narratives to extract the skilled knowledge and ethics embedded in the practice of the nurse manager authors. One narrative was chosen for this paper because it is a particularly clear exemplar of how practical wisdom develops in nurse manager practice. Articulating and reflecting on experiential learning led to an understanding of how practical wisdom developed in one nurse manager's practice. Interpretation of the narrative of one nurse manager illustrated how reflection on a complex ethical dilemma was a source of character development for the individual and the peer group. Describing and interpreting how practical wisdom develops for individual nurse managers can be a source of learning for the narrative author and other role incumbents who need to make sound decisions and take prudent action in ethically challenging situations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Nurse work engagement impacts job outcome and nurse-assessed quality of care: model testing with nurse practice environment and nurse work characteristics as predictors

    PubMed Central

    Van Bogaert, Peter; van Heusden, Danny; Timmermans, Olaf; Franck, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To explore the mechanisms through which nurse practice environment dimensions, such as nurse–physician relationship, nurse management at the unit level and hospital management and organizational support, are associated with job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care. Mediating variables included nurse work characteristics of workload, social capital, decision latitude, as well as work engagement dimensions of vigor, dedication and absorption. Background: Understanding how to support and guide nurse practice communities in their daily effort to answer complex care most accurate, alongside with the demand of a stable and healthy nurse workforce, is challenging. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Method: Based on earlier empirical findings, a structural equation model, designed with valid measurement instruments, was tested. The study population included registered acute care hospital nurses (N = 1201) in eight hospitals across Belgium. Results: Nurse practice environment dimensions predicted nurses’ ratings of job outcome variables as well as quality of care. Features of nurses’ work characteristics, e.g., perceived workload, decision latitude, social capital, and the three dimension of work engagement, played mediating roles between nurse practice environment and outcomes. A revised model, using various fit measures, explained 60% of job outcomes and 47% of nurse-assessed quality of care. Conclusion: The findings in this study show that nurse work characteristics as workload, decision latitude, and social capital, alongside with nurse work engagement (e.g., vigor, dedication, and absorption) influence nurses’ perspective of their nurse practice environment, job outcomes, and quality of care. The results underline aspects to considerate for various stakeholders, such as executives, nurse managers, physicians, and staff nurses, in setting up and organizing health care services. PMID:25431563

  7. From expert to tasks, expert nursing practice redefined?

    PubMed

    Christensen, Martin; Hewitt-Taylor, Jaqui

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to explore the concept of expertise in nursing from the perspective of how it relates to current driving forces in health care in which it discusses the potential barriers to acceptance of nursing expertise in a climate in which quantification of value and cost containment run high on agendas. Expert nursing practice can be argued to be central to high quality, holistic, individualized patient care. However, changes in government policy which have led to the inception of comprehensive guidelines or protocols of care are in danger of relegating the 'expert nurse' to being an icon of the past. Indeed, it could be argued that expert nurses are an expensive commodity within the nursing workforce. Consequently, with this change to the use of clinical guidelines, it calls into question how expert nursing practice will develop within this framework of care. The article critically reviews the evidence related to the role of the Expert Nurse in an attempt to identify the key concepts and ideas, and how the inception of care protocols has implications for their role. Nursing expertise which focuses on the provision of individualized, holistic care and is based largely on intuitive decision making cannot, should not be reduced to being articulated in positivist terms. However, the dominant power and decision-making focus in health care means that nurses must be confident in articulating the value of a concept which may be outside the scope of knowledge of those with whom they are debating. The principles of abduction or fuzzy logic may be useful in assisting nurses to explain in terms which others can comprehend, the value of nursing expertise.

  8. Learning Support System Reproducing Finger Movements in Practicing Nursing Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Majima, Yukie; Maekawa, Yasuko; SOGA, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Heretofore, “skill proficiency” in nursing techniques has only been developed through experience. To pass that technical proficiency down to later generations, this study is intended to build a learning support system using virtual reality by reproducing finger movements used in practicing nursing techniques. For practicing blood drawing techniques, we earlier developed a prototype system that uses a finger motion capture system to acquire finger position data when a syringe is grasped. It uses the acquired data to reproduce the process of the techniques three-dimensionally. This paper outlines the prototype system and reports its effectiveness for learning after examining results of a demonstration experiment for nursing students. PMID:24199102

  9. Nurse Manager Safety Practices in Outpatient Hemodialysis Units.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Hawkins, Charlotte; Flynn, Linda; Lindgren, Teri G; Weaver, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Little is known regarding the specific managerial activities or best practices that nurse managers in outpatient hemodialysis settings use to achieve positive safety outcomes. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe specific managerial practices used by nurse managers in outpatient hemodialysis units to enhance patient safety and quality of care. A descriptive qualitative design was used. Seventeen nurse managers in outpatient hemodialysis units comprised the study sample. Telephone interviews were conducted, and qualitative content analysis was used to encode the data. Nurse managers identified patients, staff, the dialysis unit environment, and the dialysis organization as sources of safety risks. Nurse manager safety practices illuminated from the data were complex and multifaceted, and were aimed at reducing patient, staff environmental, and organization risks. The findings from this study offer a description and a better understanding of the practices in which nurse managers in outpatient hemodialysis units engage to keep patients safe in their units, and they underscore the critical role of nurse managers in creating and maintaining patient safety within outpatient hemodialysis settings.

  10. Enhancing nurses' empowerment: the role of supervisors' empowering management practices.

    PubMed

    Montani, Francesco; Courcy, François; Giorgi, Gabriele; Boilard, Amélie

    2015-09-01

    This study tests a theoretical model where: (a) nurses' dispositional resistance to change is indirectly negatively related to behavioural empowerment through the mediating role of psychological empowerment; and (b) supervisors' empowering management practices buffer both the negative relationship between dispositional resistance to change and psychological empowerment and the indirect negative relationship between resistance to change and behavioural empowerment via psychological empowerment. Promoting a high level of empowerment among nursing personnel is important to ensure their effectiveness in the context of organizational change. It is thus essential to advance our current understanding of the factors that hamper nurses' psychological and behavioural expressions of empowerment and to clarify supervisor practices that can overcome such barriers. A cross-sectional research design. We collected survey data during 2012 from a sample of 197 nurses from a Canadian hospital undergoing a major organizational change. Results from moderated mediation analyses provided evidence for an indirect negative relationship between dispositional resistance to change and behavioural empowerment through psychological empowerment, and for a moderating (buffering) effect of supervisors' empowering management practices on this mediated relationship. These findings provided support for our hypotheses. Supervisors' empowering management practices represent an important contextual buffer against the negative effects of dispositional resistance to change on nurses' empowerment. Organizations should develop empowering management skills among nurses' supervisors to counteract the detrimental effects of dispositional resistance to change and to sustain an empowered nursing workforce. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Using Data to Strengthen Ambulatory Oncology Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Friese, Christopher R; Siefert, Mary Lou; Thomas-Frost, Kaitlin; Walker, Stacy; Ponte, Patricia Reid

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to measure quality of care do not capture the unique aspects of ambulatory oncology settings. To retain nurses, ensure a safe practice environment, and encourage behaviors that support high-quality care, there is a need to identify factors associated with job satisfaction and turnover with measures that reflect the ambulatory setting. The objective of this study was to examine the patterns and correlates of the work environment for nurses and nurse practitioners working in a National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center. Web-based questionnaires were disseminated to employees with a registered nurse license in ambulatory settings and related support services and included 3 affiliated satellite locations. Participants completed the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index, revised for ambulatory oncology settings, the Safety Organizing Scale, and items to assess job satisfaction, perceived quality of care, and intention to leave their current position. Logistic and linear regression models were used to examine factors associated with these outcomes. From 403 individuals, 319 (79.2%) participated. The majority of respondents endorsed excellent quality of care (57.7%), job satisfaction (69.3%), and intention to stay in current position (77.4%). Endorsement of favorable collegial nurse-physician relationships was significantly associated with all 3 outcomes and increased performance of safety organizing behaviors. Nurses reported variations in practice environments and safety organizing behaviors across units. Work environment assessments are useful to retain experienced nurses and support the delivery of high-quality patient care. Routine assessment of the work environment for registered nurses and advanced practice nurses is feasible and informative.

  12. BOOK REVIEW: Evaluating the Measurement Uncertainty: Fundamentals and practical guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira, Ignacio

    2003-08-01

    on to treat evaluation of expanded uncertainty, joint treatment of several measurands, least-squares adjustment, curve fitting and more. Chapter 6 is devoted to Bayesian inference. Perhaps one can say that Evaluating the Measurement Uncertainty caters to a wider reader-base than the GUM; however, a mathematical or statistical background is still advantageous. Also, this is not a book with a library of worked overall uncertainty evaluations for various measurements; the feel of the book is rather theoretical. The novice will still have some work to do—but this is a good place to start. I think this book is a fitting companion to the GUM because the text complements the GUM, from fundamental principles to more sophisticated measurement situations, and moreover includes intelligent discussion regarding intent and interpretation. Evaluating the Measurement Uncertainty is detailed, and I think most metrologists will really enjoy the detail and care put into this book. Jennifer Decker

  13. Inadequate environment, resources, and values lead to missed nursing care: A focused ethnographic study on the surgical ward using the Fundamentals of Care framework.

    PubMed

    Jangland, Eva; Teodorsson, Therese; Molander, Karin; Muntlin Athlin, Åsa

    2017-09-28

    The purpose was to explore the delivery of care from the perspective of patients with acute abdominal pain focusing on the contextual factors at system level using the Fundamentals of Care framework. The Fundamentals of Care framework describes several contextual and systemic factors that can impact the delivery of care. To deliver high- quality, person-centred care it is important to understand how these factors affect patients' experiences and care needs. A focused ethnographic approach. A total of 20 observations were performed on two surgical wards at a Swedish university hospital. Data were collected using participant observation and informal interviews and analysed using deductive content analysis. The findings, presented in four categories, reflect the value patients place on the caring relationship and a friendly atmosphere on the ward. Patients had concerns about the environment, particularly the high-tempo culture on the ward and its impact on their integrity, rest and sleep, access to information and planning, and need for support in addressing their existential thoughts. The observers also noted that missed nursing care had serious consequences for patient safety. Patients with acute abdominal pain were cared for in the high-tempo culture of a surgical ward with limited resources, unclear leadership, and challenges to patients' safety. The findings highlight the crucial importance of prioritizing and valuing the patients' fundamental care needs for recovery. Nursing leaders and nurses need to take the lead to re-conceptualize the value of fundamental care in the acute care setting. To improve clinical practice the value of fundamentals of care must be addressed regardless of patient's clinical condition. Providing a caring relationship is paramount to ensure a positive impact on patient's well-being and recovery. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Biological nurse specialist: goodwill to good practice.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Deborah; El Miedany, Yasser

    The extensive use of biological agents in recent years for the treatment of rheumatological diseases has required a steep learning curve for the specialist nurses who manage and work in this specialty. Safe prescribing of biological therapies requires good infrastructure and specialist nursing personnel. With additional training, the specialist nurse may take responsibility for a number of tasks in the patient pathway including screening, treatment administration, patient education, prescription coordination for home drug delivery, patient support, monitoring and data collection. Biological treatment is becoming more widely used in several specialities, in particular gastroenterology, dermatology and ophthalmology. Since 2002, rheumatology specialist nurses have taken the lead in assessment and providing biologic therapy, not only for patients suffering from rheumatic diseases but also for those with immune-mediated inflammatory disorders. The unique nature and variable safety profiles of these agents led to the development of immune-mediated inflammatory disease infusion (IMID) centres and highlighted the importance of having biological specialist nurses. This article will discuss the evolution of the IMID/biologic specialist nurse role and how IMID services started with goodwill from the rheumatology nurse specialists to develop into a main component of the holistic approach to care.

  15. The Key Role of Nurse Researchers in the Evaluation of Nurse Practitioner Models of Practice.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, Catherine; Prosser, Brenton; Davey, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The Nurse Practitioner-Aged Care Models of Practice Program involved diverse models of practice comprising multiple stakeholders located in more than 30 locations across Australia, in remote, rural, urban, and metropolitan settings. Funded by the Australian government, the aims of the program included supporting development of effective, economically viable, and sustainable aged care nurse practitioner models of practice; and enabling improvements in access to primary health care for people aged older than 65 years. This article describes the process by which a framework was developed to support the evaluation of this program. A particular challenge for the nurse researchers involved in the evaluation was to ensure the unique values of the nursing profession were upheld alongside economic, biomedical, and empirical imperatives in the diverse processes involved in collecting and interpreting data. The evaluation framework developed provides an important means of enabling research teams who undertake complex evaluations of diverse nursing models of practice to maintain a common goal--to unify the various stakeholders involved, while at the same time upholding what is most important to the profession of nursing. This article highlights how nurses can play an influential role when involved in the multidisciplinary evaluation of new andinnovative approaches to practice.

  16. Lessons Learned From Expansion of a Public Health Nursing Doctorate in Nursing Practice Program.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Nathan G; Speck, Patricia M; Bowdre, Trimika L; Connor, Pamela D

    Despite nurses' demonstrated expertise in the public health workforce, there has been a continued erosion of public health nursing (PHN) positions in health departments and academe. The need for a strong public health infrastructure and well-educated public health workforce remains vital in meeting PHN research challenges. In response to these needs, our college of nursing undertook a six-year Health Resources and Services Administration-funded expansion of the PHN Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program. This article illustrates program evaluation, lessons learned, and PHN DNP graduate and workforce outcomes related to supplying culturally diverse PHN leaders, assuring quality improvement, creating sustainable partnerships, and improving poor health outcomes.

  17. Influencing health policy: strategies for nursing education to partner with nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Short, Nancy M

    2008-01-01

    Cost, access, and quality have dominated health policy for more than 30 years. During that time, the number of health policy analysts and health services researchers has grown exponentially; however, health care policy remains a mysterious topic for most registered nurses. The foundations for a professional understanding of health care policy and policymaking should be well laid in formal education and synthesized with practice and work environments. Without time to promote synthesis of policy concepts related to the practice environment, nurses have no basis for further exploration and may remain naive to the influences of policy throughout their career. Practicing nurses, as eyewitnesses to the shortcomings of the U.S. health care system, are best suited to inform policymakers of needs, unintended consequences, and success stories. This article summarizes strategies to promote a partnership between the academy and nursing practice.

  18. Value of wireless personal digital assistants for practice: perceptions of advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Bernard; Klein, Gerri

    2008-08-01

    The aims were to explore advanced practice nurses' perceptions on wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies, to establish the type and range of tools that would be useful to support their practice and to identify any requirements and limitations that may impact the implementation of wireless Personal Digital Assistants in practice. The wireless Personal Digital Assistant is becoming established as a hand-held computing tool for healthcare professionals. The reflections of advanced practice nurses' about the value of wireless Personal Digital Assistants and its potential to contribute to improved patient care has not been investigated. A qualitative interpretivist design was used to explore advanced practice nurses' perceptions on the value of wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies to support their practice. The data were collected using survey questionnaires and individual and focus group interviews with nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and information technology managers based in British Columbia, Canada. An open-coding content analysis was performed using qualitative data analysis software. Wireless Personal Digital Assistant's use supports the principles of pervasivity and is a technology rapidly being adopted by advanced practice nurses. Some nurses indicated a reluctance to integrate wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies into their practices because of the cost and the short technological life cycle of these devices. Many of the barriers which precluded the use of wireless networks within facilities are being removed. Nurses demonstrated a complex understanding of wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies and gave good rationales for its integration in their practice. Nurses identified improved client care as the major benefit of this technology in practice and the type and range of tools they identified included clinical reference tools such as drug and diagnostic/laboratory reference applications and wireless

  19. Integration of Quality and Safety Education for Nurses Into Practice: Academic-Practice Partnership's Role.

    PubMed

    Koffel, Chris; Burke, Kathleen G; McGuinn, Kathy; Miltner, Rebecca S

    There is a trend to adopt the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competencies into nursing practice's organizational activities. Incorporating the competencies has created unique challenges for the practice setting. The purpose of this article is to identify the different types of academic-practice partnerships that promote quality and safety, including a specific focus on how the QSEN competencies are being incorporated into practice settings.

  20. Student nurse socialisation in compassionate practice: a Grounded Theory study.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Katherine; Horton, Khim; Smith, Pam

    2012-10-01

    Compassionate practice is expected of Registered Nurses (RNs) around the world while at the same time remaining a contested concept. Nevertheless, student nurses are expected to enact compassionate practice in order to become RNs. In order for this to happen they require professional socialisation within environments where compassion can flourish. However, there is concern that student nurse socialisation is not enabling compassion to flourish and be maintained upon professional qualification. In order to investigate this further, a glaserian Grounded Theory study was undertaken using in-depth, digitally recorded interviews with student nurses (n=19) at a university in the north of England during 2009 and 2010. Interviews were also undertaken with their nurse teachers (n=5) and data from National Health Service (NHS) patients (n=72,000) and staff (n=290,000) surveys were used to build a contextual picture of the student experience. Within the selected findings presented, analysis of the data indicates that students aspire to the professional ideal of compassionate practice although they have concerns about how compassionate practice might fit within the RN role because of constraints on RN practice. Students feel vulnerable to dissonance between professional ideals and practice reality. They experience uncertainty about their future role and about opportunities to engage in compassionate practice. Students manage their vulnerability and uncertainty by balancing between an intention to uphold professional ideals and challenge constraints, and a realisation they might need to adapt their ideals and conform to constraints. This study demonstrates that socialisation in compassionate practice is compromised by dissonance between professional idealism and practice realism. Realignment between the reality of practice and professional ideals, and fostering student resilience, are required if students are to be successfully socialised in compassionate practice and enabled

  1. Scope of Practice Barriers for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses: A State Task Force to Minimize Barriers.

    PubMed

    Lofgren, Maria A; Berends, Susan K; Reyes, Jimmy; Wycoff, Carmen; Kinnetz, Meghan; Frohling, Ami; Baker, Laura; Whitty, Sue; Dirks, Mary; OʼBrien, Mary

    2017-09-01

    Collegial relationships, administrative champions, and persistence are key components to breaking down barriers to advanced practice RN (APRN) practice. This article addresses how Iowa APRNs in a state-sanctioned task force identified barriers for practicing at the top of their licensure in a full practice authority state including defending the right to control the scope of nursing practice in court.

  2. Future realities in nursing: partnerships, practice, and economics.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, G A; Davidhizar, R; Tiller, C M; Quinn, M E

    1999-01-01

    Health care reform, innovations in technology, and the need to make health care cost-effective have affected all aspects of health care practice and education. Critical thinking skills, interpersonal and communication skills, leadership and motivation skills, computer literacy, and cultural sensitivity are all capabilities nursing graduates must now possess if they are to practice effectively in the complex and competitive contexts that today define the health care marketplace. Partnerships with community agencies are essential if faculty are to prepare a new generation of nurses who will be proficient in the skills that 21st-century nursing practice will demand. Although academic institutions have made some changes to meet marketplace demands, nursing educators, practitioners, and researchers must thoroughly reconceptualize their philosophies and retool their curricula in response to these changes.

  3. [Anticoagulant therapy clinic: moving towards Advanced Nursing Practice].

    PubMed

    Romero Ruiz, Adolfo; Parrado Borrego, Gema; Rodríguez González, José; Caparrós Miranda, Isabel S; Vargas Lirio, M Isabel; Ortiz Fernández, Primitiva

    2014-01-01

    There is currently around one million people receiving oral anticoagulants in Spain. The drug most used is acenocoumarol, which requires coagulation monitoring to ensure that the patient is within its normal therapeutic range. Patients usually start this treatment in a hospital clinic and, when they are stabilised, they are referred to primary care, where they are followed-up by their community nurses. The usual practice is that nurses are responsible for changes in the dose when the patients are outside the range. This practice is not performed by hospital nurses, despite having sufficient experience and knowledge to adequately manage these types of patients. An Advanced Nursing Practice model has been introduced into the Haematology management unit of the Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga. This involves various aspects of attention and care of patients on anticoagulant therapy, and includes adjusting the doses of their treatment following a catalogue of therapeutic and diagnostic ranges.

  4. Critical thinking, nurse education and universities: some thoughts on current issues and implications for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Morrall, Peter; Goodman, Benny

    2013-09-01

    When in the latter part of the 20th century nurse 'training' in the UK left the old schools of nursing (based within the health delivery system) and entered universities, the promise was not just a change of focus from training to education but an embracement of 'higher' education. Specifically, nurses were to be exposed to the demands of thinking rather than just doing - and critical thinking at that. However, despite a history of critical perspectives informing nursing theory, that promise may be turning sour. The insidious saturation of the university system in bureaucracy and managerialism has, we argue, undermined critical thinking. A major funding restructuring of higher education in the UK, coinciding with public concern about the state of nursing practice, is undermining further the viability of critical thinking in nursing and potentially the acceptability of university education for nurses. Nevertheless, while critical thinking in universities has decayed, there is no obvious educational alternative that can provide this core attribute, one that is even more necessary to understand health and promote competent nursing practice in an increasingly complex and globalising world. We propose that nurse academics and their colleagues from many other academic and professional disciplines engage in collegiate 'moral action' to re-establish critical thinking in UK universities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Importance of nursing leadership in advancing evidence-based nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Wanda G

    Our patients depend on us to do the best on their behalf. If we do not take accountability for our practice, continually examining what is the best way to deliver care, we are limiting our role to technical skills and not fully actualizing our professional role. [Evidence-based practice] is essential to practicing safely as nurses (p. 53).1.

  6. Development of the Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice Australia.

    PubMed

    Cashin, Andrew; Buckley, Thomas; Donoghue, Judith; Heartfield, Marie; Bryce, Julianne; Cox, Darlene; Waters, Donna; Gosby, Helen; Kelly, John; Dunn, Sandra V

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the context and development of the new Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice in Australia, which went into effect in January 2014. The researchers used a mixed-methods design to engage a broad range of stakeholders who brought both political and practice knowledge to the development of the new standards. Methods included interviews, focus groups, surveys, and work-based observation of nurse practitioner practice. Stakeholders varied in terms of their need for detail in the standards. Nonetheless, they invariably agreed that the standards should be clinically focussed attributes. The pillars common in many advanced practice nursing standards, such as practice, research, education, and leadership, were combined and expressed in a new and unique clinical attribute. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Development of the Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice Australia

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Thomas; Donoghue, Judith; Heartfield, Marie; Bryce, Julianne; Cox, Darlene; Waters, Donna; Gosby, Helen; Kelly, John; Dunn, Sandra V.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the context and development of the new Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice in Australia, which went into effect in January 2014. The researchers used a mixed-methods design to engage a broad range of stakeholders who brought both political and practice knowledge to the development of the new standards. Methods included interviews, focus groups, surveys, and work-based observation of nurse practitioner practice. Stakeholders varied in terms of their need for detail in the standards. Nonetheless, they invariably agreed that the standards should be clinically focussed attributes. The pillars common in many advanced practice nursing standards, such as practice, research, education, and leadership, were combined and expressed in a new and unique clinical attribute. PMID:26162455

  8. [Nursing practice based on theoretical models: a qualitative study of nurses' perception].

    PubMed

    Amaducci, Giovanna; Iemmi, Marina; Prandi, Marzia; Saffioti, Angelina; Carpanoni, Marika; Mecugni, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Many faculty argue that theory and theorizing are closely related to the clinical practice, that the disciplinary knowledge grows, more relevantly, from the specific care context in which it takes place and, moreover, that knowledge does not proceed only by the application of general principles of the grand theories to specific cases. Every nurse, in fact, have  a mental model, of what may or may not be aware, that motivate and substantiate every action and choice of career. The study describes what the nursing theoretical model is; the mental model and the tacit  knowledge underlying it. It identifies the explicit theoretical model of the professional group that rapresents nursing partecipants, aspects of continuity with the theoretical model proposed by this degree course in Nursing.. Methods Four focus groups were made which were attended by a total of 22 nurses, rapresentatives of almost every Unit of Reggio Emilia Hospital's. We argue that the theoretical nursing model of each professional group is the result of tacit knowledge, which help to define the personal mental model, and the theoretical model, which explicitly underlying theoretical content learned applied consciously and reverted to / from nursing practice. Reasoning on the use of theory in practice has allowed us to give visibility to a theoretical model explicitly nursing authentically oriented to the needs of the person, in all its complexity in specific contexts.

  9. Promoting cultures of thinking: transforming nursing education to transform nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Freed, Patricia E; McLaughlin, Dorcas E

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary nursing education is highly invested in the development of the academic, critical, and empirical aspects of education that represent the science of nursing, and concomitantly less attentive to the development of the creative, interpersonal aspects of education typically associated with the art of nursing. This represents a reversal of historic patterns in nursing education, but the pendulum may have swung so far that there could be costs to nursing practice unless the creative, interpersonal aspects of education can be reclaimed and balanced. Ideas and suggestions regarding how nurse educators might foster the creation of cultures of thinking, which represent whole-brain, integrated teaching approaches that are based on emerging neurocognitive evidence, are discussed.

  10. Friends of nursing: a community of caring to promote excellence in nursing practice, education, and research.

    PubMed

    Hitchings, Kim S; Capuano, Terry Ann; Herzog, Mary Ellen

    2012-05-01

    More than 25 years ago, the name "Friends of Nursing" was adopted by an academic, community Magnet(®) hospital to signify a model for community support of nursing. From inception, the intent was to recruit philanthropic dollars to promote recognition of and excellence in nursing practice, education, and research. Although philanthropy in health care settings is common, what is unique about this program is the long-standing, dedicated conceptual framework for nursing philanthropy and the very significant number of philanthropic dollars from literally thousands of donors to support a diverse range of activities to affect and advance the professional excellence of nurses and the quality of patient care. This model has been successfully replicated within a wide variety of other health care organizations and nursing services throughout the United States and abroad.

  11. Leaving from and returning to nursing practice: contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Isabel; Taua, Chris

    2009-07-01

    Many nurses leave nursing and never return. Others return after a period of time. Given the global shortage of nurses a better understanding of these movements is needed. The present study focused on nurses who had been out of nursing for more than five years, and explored factors that influenced their leaving and return to practice. All the nurses who had undertaken a Competency Assessment Programme at a given New Zealand tertiary institution during 2005 were invited to participate. Of the 70 questionnaires mailed out 32 (44.5%) were completed and returned. Quantitative data were analysed using Microsoft Excel, and the qualitative data were coded and analysed by means of content analysis. For each, leaving and returning, three key issues emerged. Nurses left for personal reasons, to seek a career change, or because of poor working conditions. They returned when they had the personal freedom to do so, for fiscal reasons, or because they were motivated by some sense of unfinished business. These findings indicate that it is important for educators involved with Competency Assessment Programmes to collaborate with employers in ensuring that there are opportunities for re-entry to positive work environments, with a degree of flexibility that suits the demographic characteristics of those nurses returning to practice.

  12. Nurse case management and general practice: implications for GP consortia

    PubMed Central

    Iliffe, Steve; Drennan, Vari; Manthorpe, Jill; Gage, Heather; Davies, Sue L; Massey, Helen; Scott, Cherill; Brearley, Sally; Goodman, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Background Case management is widely promoted as a means of ensuring continuity of care, improving patient outcomes, and achieving efficient management of resources. Community matrons have been introduced recently as specialists in the case management of patients with multiple complex problems. Aim To understand how nurse case managers are seen by GPs and NHS managers. Setting (1) Telephone interviews with 41 community nurse managers recruited from 10 English strategic health authorities and two Welsh health boards; (2) face-to-face interviews with 12 nurse case managers, 12 GPs and five NHS community service managers in three study sites with different population and practitioner characteristics. Method Semi-structured individual interviews, by telephone or face to face. Results Attitudes among GPs to nurse case managers were shaped by perceptions of the quality of community nursing on the one hand and the perceived benefit of case management as a method of reducing hospital use on the other. The dominant mood was scepticism about the ability of nurse case managers to reduce hospital admissions. Community matrons were seen as staff who were imposed on local health services, sometimes to detrimental effect. Conclusion The introduction of case management and community matrons may disrupt existing communities of practice and be perceived negatively, at least in areas where good working relationships between nurses and GPs have developed. Commissioners should be aware of the potential resistance to changes in skill mix and role in nursing services, and promote innovation in ways that minimise disruption to functional communities of practice. PMID:22152848

  13. Clinical residency training: Is it essential to the Doctor of Nursing Practice for nurse practitioner preparation?

    PubMed

    Harper, Doreen C; McGuinness, Teena M; Johnson, Jean

    The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree positions nurse practitioners (NPs) and other advanced practice registered nurses, with clinical competencies similar to other disciplines requiring doctoral education (medicine, physical therapy, psychology, and pharmacy). In addition, all these disciplines also offer residencies. However, nursing is the only discipline that does not require a doctoral degree and/or have a systematic approach to residency training for advanced practice roles. The authors posit that there are critical policy issues to resolve within the nursing profession to clarify the role that clinical residencies should play in transition to DNP practice specifically related to NPs. The purpose of this article was to (a) describe the context of NP residency models within NP curricula that strengthen the DNP Essentials with an emphasis on Essential VIII and a focus on distinctive clinical specialization, (b) describe the history and policy implications of NP residency programs as well as existing programs that assist transition to practice, and (c) recommend policies for consideration related to DNP NP residencies. Literature on nurse practitioner residencies was reviewed. While nurse practitioner residencies continue to grow, research is needed regarding outcomes of job satisfaction, clinical competencies, and patient satisfaction. The first year of practice for nurse practitioners is a critical period of professional development. It is important to further clarify the need, direction, and program standards. Academically affiliated residencies will facilitate the development and standardization of curricula and competencies to enhance clinical rigor. The partnership between academic units and clinical agencies will pool resources and strengthen nursing in both settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The perceived health promotion practice of nurses in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Aldossary, Ameera; Barriball, Louise; While, Alison

    2013-09-01

    The health promotion practice of nurses working in Saudi Arabia is unidentified. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceived health promotion practice of staff nurses in Saudi Arabia. This was achieved by surveying the views of nurses (n = 614), doctors (n = 130) and patients (n = 322) in 10 hospitals located in the Eastern Province of the country using a self-report questionnaire. There was agreement that nurses had the necessary skills to promote health in general and had sufficient knowledge to promote health in the three specific areas explored: physical activity, smoking cessation and weight control. However, the findings also showed that the majority of participants wanted nurses to give priority to acute care over health promotion within the hospital setting and that patients dislike nurses asking about health-related behaviours when these are not directly relevant to their presenting health problems. Concerns were also raised about the language and cultural competency of a largely migrant nursing workforce to effectively communicate health promotion messages to patients. In view of the findings, policy-makers in Saudi Arabia need to consider providing appropriate training programmes for nurses to introduce the wider concept of their health promotion role. Health promotion protocols, strategies and standards to support nurses to more effectively implement health promotion with their routine practice are also required. It is suggested that, while reliance on a largely migrant workforce who do not speak Arabic continues, the potential benefits of a good quality interpretation service to improve nurse-patient communication should be considered.

  15. Supporting evidence-based practice for nurses through information technologies.

    PubMed

    Doran, Diane M; Haynes, R Brian; Kushniruk, André; Straus, Sharon; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Hall, Linda McGillis; Dubrowski, Adam; Di Pietro, Tammie; Newman, Kristine; Almost, Joan; Nguyen, Ha; Carryer, Jennifer; Jedras, Dawn

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the usability of mobile information terminals, such as personal digital assistants (PDAs) or Tablet personal computers, to improve access to information resources for nurses and to explore the relationship between PDA or Tablet-supported information resources and outcomes. The authors evaluated an initiative of the Nursing Secretariat, Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, which provided nurses with PDAs and Tablet PCs, to enable Internet access to information resources. Nurses had access to drug and medical reference information, best practice guidelines (BPGs), and to abstracts of recent research studies. The authors took place over a 12-month period. Diffusion of Innovation theory and the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) model guided the selection of variables for study. A longitudinal design involving questionnaires was used to evaluate the impact of the mobile technologies on barriers to research utilization, perceived quality of care, and on nurses' job satisfaction. The setting was 29 acute care, long-term care, home care, and correctional organizations in Ontario, Canada. The sample consisted of 488 frontline-nurses. Nurses most frequently consulted drug and medical reference information, Google, and Nursing PLUS. Overall, nurses were most satisfied with the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario (RNAO) BPGs and rated the RNAO BPGs as the easiest resource to use. Among the PDA and Tablet users, there was a significant improvement in research awareness/values, and in communication of research. There was also, for the PDA users only, a significant improvement over time in perceived quality of care and job satisfaction, but primarily in long-term care settings. It is feasible to provide nurses with access to evidence-based practice resources via mobile information technologies to reduce the barriers to research utilization.

  16. Representation of nurse's managerial practice in inpatient units: nursing staff perspective.

    PubMed

    Lima, Rogério Silva; Lourenço, Eliana Bernardes; Rosado, Sara Rodrigues; Fava, Silvana Maria Coelho Leite; Sanches, Roberta Seron; Dázio, Eliza Maria Rezende

    2016-03-01

    Objective To understand the meanings that nursing staff gives to nurse's managerial practice in the inpatient unit. Methods This is an exploratory and descriptive research with qualitative approach, conducted in a general hospital in a Southern city of Minas Gerais State. We used the Theory of Social Representations as theoretical framework. The study sample were composed by 23 nursing technicians and five nursing assistants. Data collection was conducted through semi-structured interviews, from December 2011 to January 2012. For data analysis we used the discourse analysis, according to social psychology framework. Results The meanings attributed to management occurred from the closeness/distance to staff and to patients` care actions. Conclusions The managerial nurse, perceived as a process apart from care, is classified as non familiar practice, of hard understanding and valuation.

  17. Homeland security challenges in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Boatright, Connie; McGlown, K Joanne

    2005-09-01

    Nurses need a comprehensive knowledge of doctrine, laws, regulations,programs, and processes that build the operational framework for health care preparedness. Key components of this knowledge base reside in the areas of: evolution of homeland security: laws and mandates affecting health care and compliance and regulatory issues for health care organizations. This article addresses primary components in both of these areas, after first assessing the status of nursing's involvement (in homeland security), as portrayed in the professional literature.

  18. Can sociology help to improve nursing practice?

    PubMed

    Matthews, David

    The first in a five-part series on sociology offers an overview of the debate about the relationship between sociology and nursing. Although sociological education is currently limited within nurse education, there is a long-held argument for its relevance. With a growing emphasis on preventative and public healthcare, sociology may yet prove its usefulness. Subsequent articles cover four of the key social factors affecting health.

  19. The perioperative dialogue: holistic nursing in practice.

    PubMed

    Rudolfsson, Gudrun; von Post, Iréne; Eriksson, Katie

    2007-01-01

    This article is a synthesis of 2 qualitative studies focusing on patients', anesthetists', and operating-room nurses' experiences of the perioperative dialogue and employing grounded theory as the method of analysis. The aim of the synthesis was to achieve a new holistic understanding of health in the perioperative dialogue. The synthesis highlights the importance of being in communion in a continuous whole due to continuity of care for the creation of health in both patients and nurses.

  20. Let's empower practice nurses to improve care.

    PubMed

    2016-04-20

    How many times have we read a report or piece of research that suggests nurses could be taking on more of the work currently performed by doctors? It is invariably accompanied by figures suggesting that the NHS would save squillions of pounds every year if only consultants and GPs let nurses take on more responsibilities. Not only that, but access to services would improve and outcomes would be unaffected or might even be enhanced.