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Sample records for fundamental unstable particles

  1. Unstable particles near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chway, Dongjin; Jung, Tae Hyun; Kim, Hyung Do

    2016-07-01

    We explore the physics of unstable particles when the mother particle's mass is approximately the sum of the masses of its daughter particles. In this case, the conventional wave function renormalization factor used for the narrow width approximation is ill-defined. We propose a simple resolution of the problem that allows the use of the narrow width approximation by defining the wave function renormalization factor and the branching ratio in terms of the spectral density. We test new definitions by calculating the cross section in the Higgs portal model and a significant improvement is obtained. Meanwhile, no single decay width can be assigned to the unstable particles and non-exponential decay occurs at all time scales.

  2. Testing the equivalence principle with unstable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonder, Y.; Fischbach, E.; Hernandez-Coronado, H.; Krause, D. E.; Rohrbach, Z.; Sudarsky, D.

    2013-06-01

    We develop a framework to test the equivalence principle under conditions where the quantum aspects of nature cannot be neglected, specifically in the context of interference phenomena with unstable particles. We derive the nonrelativistic quantum equation that describes the evolution of the wave function of unstable particles under the assumption of the validity of the equivalence principle and when small deviations are assumed to occur. As an example, we study the propagation of unstable particles in a COW experiment, and we briefly discuss the experimental implications of our formalism.

  3. Fundamental principles of particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper goes through the fundamental physics of particles-matter interactions which is necessary for the detection of these particles with detectors. A listing of 41 concepts and detector principles are given. 14 refs., 11 figs.

  4. Light as a Fundamental Particle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Steven

    1975-01-01

    Presents two arguments concerning the role of the photon. One states that the photon is just another particle distinguished by a particular value of charge, spin, mass, lifetime, and interaction properties. The second states that the photon plays a fundamental role with a deep relation to ultimate formulas of physics. (GS)

  5. Light as a Fundamental Particle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Steven

    1975-01-01

    Presents two arguments concerning the role of the photon. One states that the photon is just another particle distinguished by a particular value of charge, spin, mass, lifetime, and interaction properties. The second states that the photon plays a fundamental role with a deep relation to ultimate formulas of physics. (GS)

  6. Towards pair production near threshold with unstable particle effective theory

    SciTech Connect

    Beneke, M.; Kauer, N.; Signer, A.; Zanderighi, G.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    We illustrate the use of effective theory techniques to describe processes involving unstable particles close to resonance. First, we present the main ideas in the context of a scalar resonance in an Abelian gauge-Yukawa model. We then outline the necessary modifications to describe W-pair production close to threshold in electron-positron collisions.

  7. CP violation in correlated production and decay of unstable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, Olaf; Pilaftsis, Apostolos

    2012-03-01

    We study resonant CP-violating Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations that may take place in the production and decay of unstable scalar particles at high-energy colliders. We show that as a consequence of unitarity and CPT invariance of the S-matrix, in 2→2 scatterings mediated by mixed scalar particles, at least three linearly independent decay matrices associated with the unstable scalar states are needed to obtain non-zero CP-odd observables that are also odd under C-conjugation. Instead, for the correlated production and decay of two unstable particle systems in 2→4 processes, we find that only two independent decay matrices are sufficient to induce a net non-vanishing CP-violating phenomenon. As an application of this theorem, we present numerical estimates of CP asymmetries for the correlated production and decay of supersymmetric scalar top-anti-top pairs at the LHC, and demonstrate that these could reach values of order one. As a byproduct of our analysis, we develop a novel spinorial trace technique, which enables us to efficiently evaluate lengthy expressions of squared amplitudes describing the resonant scalar transitions.

  8. Unstable particles in non-relativistic quantum mechanics?

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Coronado, H.

    2011-10-14

    The Schroedinger equation is up-to-a-phase invariant under the Galilei group. This phase leads to the Bargmann's superselection rule, which forbids the existence of the superposition of states with different mass and implies that unstable particles cannot be described consistently in non-relativistic quantum mechanics (NRQM). In this paper we claim that Bargmann's rule neglects physical effects and that a proper description of non-relativistic quantum mechanics requires to take into account this phase through the Extended Galilei group and the definition of its action on spacetime coordinates.

  9. Nonlinear particle-wave kinetics in weakly unstable plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Breizman, B.N.; Berk, H.L.; Pekker, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    With the motivation to address the behavior of the fusion produced alpha particles in a thermonuclear reactor, a theory is developed for predicting the wave saturation levels and particle transport in weakly unstable systems with a discrete number of modes in the presence of energetic particle sources and sinks. Conditions are established for either steady state or bursting nonlinear scenarios when several modes are excited for cases where there is and there is not resonance overlap. Depending on parameters, the particles can undergo benign relaxation, with only a small fraction of the available free energy released to waves and with no global transport, or the particles can experience rapid global transport caused by a substantial conversion of their free energy into wave energy. When the resonance condition of the particle-wave interaction is varied adiabatically, the particles trapped in a wave are found to form phase space holes or clumps that enhance the particle-wave energy exchange. This mechanism, which has been experimentally observed when there is frequency chirping, causes increased saturation levels of instabilities. If resonance sweeping is imposed externally, the particle free energy can even be tapped in stable systems where background dissipation suppresses linear instability. Externally applied resonance sweeping can be important for alpha particle energy channeling, as well as for understanding fishbone and some Alfven wave instability experiments. Near instability threshold, that is when the destabilizing drive just exceeds the background dissipation, a more sophisticated analysis is developed to predict the correct saturation. To leading order, this problem reduces to an integral equation for the wave amplitude with a temporally non local cubic term. This equation has a self-similar solution that blows-up in a finite time.

  10. A Fundamental Theorem on Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2003-05-01

    A fundamental theorem on particle acceleration is derived from the reciprocity principle of electromagnetism and a rigorous proof of the theorem is presented. The theorem establishes a relation between acceleration and radiation, which is particularly useful for insightful understanding of and practical calculation about the first order acceleration in which energy gain of the accelerated particle is linearly proportional to the accelerating field.

  11. The natural philosophy of fundamental particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storti, Riccardo C.

    2007-08-01

    Theoretical estimates and correlations, based upon the Electro-Gravi-Magnetics (EGM) Photon radiation method, are presented for the Root-Mean-Square (RMS) charge radius and massenergy of many well established subatomic particles. The EGM method is a set of engineering equations and techniques derived from the purely mathematical construct known as Buckingham's "Π" (Pi) Theory. The estimates and correlations coincide to astonishing precision with experimental data presented by the Particle Data Group (PDG), CDF, D0, L3, SELEX and ZEUS Collaborations. Our tabulated results clearly demonstrate a possible natural harmonic pattern representing all fundamental subatomic particles. In addition, our method predicts the possible existence of several other subatomic particles not contained within the Standard Model (SM). The accuracy and simplicity of our computational estimates demonstrate that EGM is a useful tool to gain insight into the domain of subatomic particles.

  12. Could unstable relic particles distort the microwave background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, A.; Loeb, A.; Nussinov, S.

    1989-03-01

    Three general classes of possible scenarios for the recently reported distortion of the microwave background radiation (MBR) via decaying relic weakly interacting particles are analyzed. The analysis shows that such particles could not reheat the universe and cause the spectral distortion of the MBR. Gravitational processes such as the early formation of massive black holes may still be plausible energy sources for producing the reported spectral distortion of the MBR at an early cosmological epoch. 24 references.

  13. How do classical particle-field systems become unstable? - The last physics problem that Ronald Davidson studied

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Hong

    2016-10-01

    Many of the classical particle-field systems in (neutral and nonneutral) plasma physics and accelerator physics become unstable when the system parameters vary. How do these instabilities happen? It turns out, very interestingly, that all conservative systems become unstable by the same mechanism, i.e, the resonance between a positive- and a negative-action modes. And this is the only route that a stable system can become unstable. In this talk, I will use several examples in plasma physics and accelerator physics with finite and infinite degrees of freedom to illustrate the basic physical picture and the rigorous theoretical structure of the process. The features at the transition between stable and unstable regions in the parameter space are the fundamental characteristics of the underlying real Hamiltonian system and complex G-Hamiltonian system. The resonance between a positive- and a negative-action modes at the transition is the Krein collision well-known to mathematicians. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-09CH11466).

  14. Studies of Fundamental Particle Dynamics in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rangel, Roger; Trolinger, James D.; Coimbra, Carlos F. M.; Witherow, William; Rogers, Jan; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This work summarizes theoretical and experimental concepts used to design the flight experiment mission for SHIVA - Spaceflight Holography Investigation in a Virtual Apparatus. SHIVA is a NASA project that exploits a unique, holography-based, diagnostics tool to understand the behavior of small particles subjected to transient accelerations. The flight experiments are designed for testing model equations, measuring g, g-jitter, and other microgravity phenomena. Data collection will also include experiments lying outside of the realm of existing theory. The regime under scrutiny is the low Reynolds number, Stokes regime or creeping flow, which covers particles and bubbles moving at very low velocity. The equations describing this important regime have been under development and investigation for over 100 years and yet a complete analytical solution of the general equation had remained elusive yielding only approximations and numerical solutions. In the course of the ongoing NASA NRA, the first analytical solution of the general equation was produced by members of the investigator team using the mathematics of fractional derivatives. This opened the way to an even more insightful and important investigation of the phenomena in microgravity. Recent results include interacting particles, particle-wall interactions, bubbles, and Reynolds numbers larger than unity. The Space Station provides an ideal environment for SHIVA. Limited ground experiments have already confirmed some aspects of the theory. In general the space environment is required for the overall experiment, especially for cases containing very heavy particles, very light particles, bubbles, collections of particles and for characterization of the space environment and its effect on particle experiments. Lightweight particles and bubbles typically rise too fast in a gravitational field and heavy particles sink too fast. In a microgravity environment, heavy and light particles can be studied side-by-side for

  15. Lightest Visible-Sector Supersymmetric Particle is Likely to be Unstable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Bobby S.; Ellis, Sebastian A. R.; Kane, Gordon L.; Nelson, Brent D.; Perry, Malcolm J.

    2016-10-01

    We argue, based on typical properties of known solutions of string or M theory, that the lightest supersymmetric particle of the visible sector is likely to be unstable. In other words, dark matter is probably not a particle with standard model quantum numbers, such as a weakly interacting massive particle. The argument is simple and based on the typical occurrence of (a) hidden sectors, (b) interactions between the standard model (visible) sector and these hidden sectors, and (c) the lack of an argument against massive neutral hidden sector particles being lighter than the lightest visible supersymmetric particle. These conclusions do not rely on arguments such as R -parity violation.

  16. Relativistic Gamow vectors: State vectors for unstable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaldas, Hany Kamel Halim

    The relativistic Gamow vectors are derived from the analytic continuation of the angular momentum velocity kets to the resonance pole of the S- matrix. This construction is justifiable within a Rigged Hilbert Space of Hardy class functions. The kets obtained | p j3[ sRjR ]-> are characterized by a spin jR and a complex mass square sR = (MR - iΓ R/2)2. Our use of the velocity kets renders the Gamow vectors | p j3[ sRjR ]-> ``minimally complex'', as the 4-velocities p̂μ = p μ/ s are taken real and they remain real under Lorentz transformations. When the symmetry transformations of the Gamow vectors are considered, it is found that they obey a semigroup time evolution in the forward light cone for the subgroup of P with causal space- time translations, i.e., for space-time translations with 4-vectors x such that x2 >= 0. This semigroup evolution, which is a consequence of the characterization obtained for the Gamow vectors as functionals in a Rigged Hilbert Space, is in conformity with the time directedness associated with decay phenomena. The Gamow vectors, with a Breit-Wigner distribution and exponential decay law, provide a description of decaying particles with a wide range of Γ/ M. Moreover, the Gamow vectors, being members of a complex basis vector expansion, allow the Wigner-Weisskopf's based effective theories, such as the Lee-Oehme-Yang theory for the neutral K-mesons, to be obtained as an approximation in an exact formalism.

  17. Particles as Fundaments of Discourse Structuring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez-Vest, M. M. Jocelyne

    A serious study of discourse particles (DIPs) must be founded on the analysis of orality in its two main dimensions: oral communication in its ordinary functioning (i.e., discourse, conversation, enunciation), but also in expression ritualized by the oral tradition of cultures that do not have a writing system. The association of the two…

  18. Particles as Fundaments of Discourse Structuring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez-Vest, M. M. Jocelyne

    A serious study of discourse particles (DIPs) must be founded on the analysis of orality in its two main dimensions: oral communication in its ordinary functioning (i.e., discourse, conversation, enunciation), but also in expression ritualized by the oral tradition of cultures that do not have a writing system. The association of the two…

  19. Fundamentals and applications of magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Borgert, Jörn; Schmidt, Joachim D; Schmale, Ingo; Rahmer, Jürgen; Bontus, Claas; Gleich, Bernhard; David, Bernd; Eckart, Rainer; Woywode, Oliver; Weizenecker, Jürgen; Schnorr, Jörg; Taupitz, Matthias; Haegele, Julian; Vogt, Florian M; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new medical imaging technique which performs a direct measurement of magnetic nanoparticles, also known as superparamagnetic iron oxide. MPI can acquire quantitative images of the local distribution of the magnetic material with high spatial and temporal resolution. Its sensitivity is well above that of other methods used for the detection and quantification of magnetic materials, for example, magnetic resonance imaging. On the basis of an intravenous injection of magnetic particles, MPI has the potential to play an important role in medical application areas such as cardiovascular, oncology, and also in exploratory fields such as cell labeling and tracking. Here, we present an introduction to the basic function principle of MPI, together with an estimation of the spatial resolution and the detection limit. Furthermore, the above-mentioned medical applications are discussed with respect to an applicability of MPI.

  20. Microwaves and particle accelerators: a fundamental link

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Swapan

    2011-07-01

    John Cockcroft's splitting of the atom and Ernest Lawrence's invention of the cyclotron in the first half of the twentieth century ushered in the grand era of ever higher energy particle accelerators to probe deeper into matter. It also forged a link, bonding scientific discovery with technological innovation that continues today in the twenty first century. The development of radar and high power vacuum electronics, especially microwave power tubes like the magnetrons and the klystrons in the pre-second world war era, was instrumental in the rapid development of circular and linear charged particle accelerators in the second half of the twentieth century. We had harnessed the powerful microwave radio-frequency sources from few tens of MHz to up to 90 GHz spanning L-band to W-band frequencies. Simultaneously in the second half of the twentieth century, lasers began to offer very first opportunities of controlling charged particles at smaller resolutions on the scale of wavelengths of visible light. We also witnessed in this period the emergence of the photon and neutron sciences driven by accelerators built-by-design producing tailored and ultra-bright pulses of bright photons and neutrons to probe structure and function of matter from aggregate to individual molecular and atomic scales in unexplored territories in material and life sciences. As we enter the twenty first century, the race for ever higher energies, brightness and luminosity to probe atto-metric and atto-second domains of the ultra-small structures and ultra-fast processes continues. These developments depend crucially on yet further advancements in the production and control of high power and high frequency microwaves and light sources, often intricately coupled in their operation to the high energy beams themselves. We give a glimpse of the recent developments and innovations in the electromagnetic production and control of charged particle beams in the service of science and society. (author)

  1. Geometric representation of fundamental particles' inertial mass

    SciTech Connect

    Schachter, L.; Spencer, James

    2015-07-22

    A geometric representation of the (N = 279) masses of quarks, leptons, hadrons and gauge bosons was introduced by employing a Riemann Sphere facilitating the interpretation of the N masses in terms of a single particle, the Masson, which might be in one of the N eigen-states. Geometrically, its mass is the radius of the Riemann Sphere. Dynamically, its derived mass is near the mass of the nucleon regardless of whether it is determined from all N particles of only the hadrons, the mesons or the baryons separately. Ignoring all the other properties of these particles, it is shown that the eigen-values, the polar representation θν of the masses on the Sphere, satisfy the symmetry θν + θN+1-ν = π within less than 1% relative error. In addition, these pair correlations include the pairs θγ + θtop ≃ π and θgluon + θH ≃ π as well as pairing the weak gauge bosons with the three neutrinos.

  2. Thermally induced passage and current of particles in a highly unstable optical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, Artem; Zemánek, Pavel; Filip, Radim

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the statistics of first-passage times of a Brownian particle moving in a highly unstable nonlinear potential proportional to an odd power of position. We observe temperature-induced shortening of the mean first-passage time and its dependence on the power of nonlinearity. We propose a passage-time fraction as both a simple and experimentally detectable witness of the nonlinearity. It is advantageously independent of all other parameters of the experiment and observable for a small number of trajectories. To better characterize the stochastic passage in the unstable potential, we introduce an analogy of the signal-to-noise ratio for the statistical distribution of the first-passage times. Interestingly, the upper bound for the signal-to-noise ratio is temperature independent in the unstable potential. Finally, we describe the nonequilibrium steady state of the particle cyclically passing through unstable odd nonlinearity. The maximum of the steady-state probability distribution shifts against the directions of the current and this counterintuitive effect increases with temperature. All these thermally induced effects are very promising targets for experimental tests of highly nonlinear stochastic dynamics of particles placed into optical potential landscapes of shaped optical tweezers.

  3. Characterization of the structural collapse undergone by an unstable system of ultrasoft particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestipino, Santi; Malescio, Gianpietro

    2016-09-01

    The effective repulsion between macromolecules such as polymer chains or dendrimers is everywhere finite, implying that interaction centers can even coincide. If, in addition, the large-distance attraction is sufficiently strong, then the system is driven unstable. An unstable system lacks a conventional thermodynamics since, in the infinite-size limit, it eventually collapses to a finite-size cluster (for instance, a polymer dispersion undergoes irreversible coagulation when increasing the amount of dissolved salt beyond a certain limit). Using a double-Gaussian (DG) potential for demonstration, we study the phase behavior of a system of ultrasoft particles as a function of the attraction strength η. Above a critical threshold ηc, the DG system is unstable but its collective behavior is far from trivial since two separate regions of the thermodynamic plane can be identified, based on the value taken by the average waiting time for collapse: this is finite and small on one side of the boundary, while presumably infinite in the other region. In order to make sense of this evidence, we consider a stable system of particles interacting through a DG potential augmented with a hard core (stabilized DG, or SDG potential). We provide arguments supporting the view that the boundary line of the unstable DG model is the remnant of the spinodal line of a fluid-fluid phase transition occurring in the SDG model when the hard-core diameter is sent to zero.

  4. Unstable standard candles. Periodic light-curve modulation in fundamental mode classical Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolec, R.

    2017-07-01

    We report the discovery of periodic modulation of pulsation in 51 fundamental mode classical Cepheids of the Magellanic Clouds observed by the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. Although the overall incidence rate is very low, about 1 per cent in each of the Magellanic Clouds, in the case of the Small Magellanic Cloud and pulsation periods between 12 and 16 d, the incidence rate is nearly 40 per cent. On the other hand, in the Large Magellanic Cloud the highest incidence rate is 5 per cent for pulsation periods between 8 and 14 d, and the overall amplitude of the effect is smaller. It indicates that the phenomenon is metallicity dependent. Typical modulation periods are between 70 and 300 d. In nearly all stars, the mean brightness is modulated, which, in principle, may influence the use of classical Cepheids for distance determination. Fortunately, the modulation of mean brightness does not exceed 0.01 mag in all but one star. Also, the effect averages out in typical observations spanning a long time base. Consequently, the effect of modulation on the determination of the distance moduli is negligible. The relative modulation amplitude of the fundamental mode is also low and, with one exception, it does not exceed 6 per cent. The origin of the modulation is unknown. We draw a hypothesis that the modulation is caused by the 2:1 resonance between the fundamental mode and the second overtone that shapes the famous Hertzsprung bump progression.

  5. Lightest Visible-Sector Supersymmetric Particle is Likely to be Unstable.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Bobby S; Ellis, Sebastian A R; Kane, Gordon L; Nelson, Brent D; Perry, Malcolm J

    2016-10-28

    We argue, based on typical properties of known solutions of string or M theory, that the lightest supersymmetric particle of the visible sector is likely to be unstable. In other words, dark matter is probably not a particle with standard model quantum numbers, such as a weakly interacting massive particle. The argument is simple and based on the typical occurrence of (a) hidden sectors, (b) interactions between the standard model (visible) sector and these hidden sectors, and (c) the lack of an argument against massive neutral hidden sector particles being lighter than the lightest visible supersymmetric particle. These conclusions do not rely on arguments such as R-parity violation.

  6. Interplay between protons and electrons in a firehose-unstable plasma: Particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdin, Philippe-A.; Maneva, Yana

    2017-04-01

    Kinetic plasma instabilities originating from unstable, non-Maxwellian shapes of the velocity distribution functions serve as internal degrees of freedom in plasma dynamics, and play an important role near solar current sheets and in solar wind plasmas. In the presence of strong temperature anisotropy (different thermal spreads in the velocity space with respect to the mean magnetic field), plasmas are unstable either to the firehose mode or to the mirror mode in the case of predominant parallel and perpendicular temperatures, respectively. The growth rates of these instabilities and their thresholds depend on plasma properties, such as the temperature anisotropy and the plasma beta. The physics of the temperature anisotropy-driven instabilities becomes even more diverse for various shapes of velocity distribution functions and the particle species of interest. Recent studies based on a linear instability analysis show an interplay in the firehose instability between protons and electrons when the both types of particle species are prone to unstable velocity distribution functions and their instability thresholds. In this work we perform for the first time 3D nonlinear PIC (particle-in-cell) numerical simulations to test for the linear-theory prediction of the simultaneous proton-electron firehose instability. The simulation setup allows us not only to evaluate the growth rate of each firehose instability, but also to track its nonlinear evolution and the related wave-particle interactions such as the pitch-angle scattering or saturation effects. The specialty of our simulation is that the magnetic and electric fields have a low numerical noise level by setting a sufficiently large number of super-particles into the simulation box and enhancing the statistical significance of the velocity distribution functions. We use the iPIC3D code with fully periodic boundaries under various conditions of the electron-to-proton mass ratio, which gives insight into the

  7. Non-factorizable photonic corrections to resonant production and decay of many unstable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmaier, Stefan; Schwan, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Electroweak radiative corrections to the production of high-multiplicity final states with several intermediate resonances in most cases can be sufficiently well described by the leading contribution of an expansion about the resonance poles. In this approach, also known as pole approximation, corrections are classified into separately gauge-invariant factorizable and non-factorizable corrections, where the former can be attributed to the production and decay of the unstable particles on their mass shell. The remaining non-factorizable corrections are induced by the exchange of soft photons between different production and decay subprocesses. We give explicit analytical results for the non-factorizable photonic virtual corrections to the production of an arbitrary number of unstable particles at the one-loop level and, thus, present an essential building block in the calculation of next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections in pole approximation. The remaining virtual factorizable corrections can be obtained with modern automated one-loop matrix-element generators, while the evaluation of the corresponding real photonic corrections can be evaluated with full matrix elements by multi-purpose Monte Carlo generators. Our results can be easily modified to non-factorizable QCD corrections, which are induced by soft-gluon exchange.

  8. Fundamentals of chemistry modeling applicable to a vectorized particle simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Brian L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the fundamentals of extending the vectorized particle simulation method derived by Baganoff and McDonald (1990), McDonald and Baganoff (1988), and McDonald (1989) for modeling chemically reacting flows. Details of reaction mechanics per reaction are presented, with particular attention given to the quantum nature of the vibrational mode. The models of reactive flows developed here were verified through a simulation of a superheated diatomic gas relaxing thermochemically to equilibrium in a reservoir.

  9. Fundamental Particle Structure in the Cosmological Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlopov, Maxim

    2013-11-01

    The nonbaryonic dark matter of the universe is assumed to consist of new stable forms of matter. Their stability reflects symmetry of micro-world and mechanisms of its symmetry breaking. Particle candidates for cosmological dark matter are lightest particles that bear new conserved quantum numbers. Dark matter particles may represent ideal gas of noninteracting particles. Self-interacting dark matter weakly or superweakly coupled to ordinary matter is also possible, reflecting nontrivial pattern of particle symmetry in the hidden sector of particle theory. In the early universe the structure of particle symmetry breaking gives rise to cosmological phase transitions, from which macroscopic cosmological defects or primordial nonlinear structures can be originated. Primordial black holes (PBHs) can be not only a candidate for dark matter, but also represent a universal probe for superhigh energy physics in the early universe. Evaporating PBHs turn to be a source of even superweakly interacting particles, while clouds of massive PBHs can serve as nonlinear seeds for galaxy formation. The observed broken symmetry of the three known families may provide a simultaneous solution for the problems of the mass of neutrino and strong CP-violation in the unique framework of models of horizontal unification. Dark matter candidates can also appear in the new families of quarks and leptons and the existence of new stable charged leptons and quarks is possible, hidden in elusive "dark atoms." Such possibility, strongly restricted by the constraints on anomalous isotopes of light elements, is not excluded in scenarios that predict stable double charged particles. The excessive -2 charged particles are bound in these scenarios with primordial helium in O-helium "atoms," maintaining specific nuclear-interacting form of the dark matter, which may provide an interesting solution for the puzzles of the direct dark matter searches. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, studying

  10. Mode coupling and wave particle interactions for unstable ion acoustic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, P.; Fried, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    A theory for the spatial development of linearly unstable, coupled waves is presented in which both quasi-linear and mode coupling effects are treated in a self-consistent manner. Steady state excitation of two waves is assumed at the boundary x = 0, the plasma being homogeneous in the y and z directions. Coupled equations are derived for the x dependence of the amplitudes of the primary waves and the secondary waves, correct through second order terms in the wave amplitude, but without usual approximation of small growth rates. This general formalism is then applied to the case of coupled ion acoustic waves driven unstable by an ion beam streaming in the direction of the x axis. If the modifications of the ion beam by the waves (quasi-linear effects) are ignored, explosive instabilities (singularities in all of the amplitudes at finite x) are found, even when all of the waves have positive energy. If these wave-particle interactions are included, the solutions are no longer singular, and all of the amplitudes have finite maxima.

  11. Mode-coupling and wave-particle interactions for unstable ion-acoustic waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, P.; Fried, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    A theory for the spatial development of linearly unstable, coupled waves is presented in which both quasilinear and mode-coupling effects are treated in a self-consistent manner. Steady-state excitation of two waves is assumed at the boundary x = 0, the plasma being homogeneous in the y and z directions. Coupled equations are derived for the x dependence of the amplitudes of the primary waves and the secondary waves, correct through terms of second order in the wave amplitude, but without the usual approximation of small growth rates. This general formalism is then applied to the case of coupled ion-acoustic waves driven unstable by an ion beam streaming in the direction of the x axis. If the modifications of the ion beam by the waves (quasilinear effects) are ignored, explosive instabilities (singularities in all of the amplitudes at finite x) are found even when all of the waves have positive energy. If these wave-particle interactions are included, the solutions are no longer singular, and all of the amplitudes have finite maxima.

  12. The unstable ice nucleation properties of Snomax® bacterial particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polen, Michael; Lawlis, Emily; Sullivan, Ryan C.

    2016-10-01

    Snomax® is often used as a surrogate for biological ice nucleating particles (INPs) and has recently been proposed as an INP standard for evaluating ice nucleation methods. We have found the immersion freezing properties of Snomax particles to be substantially unstable, observing a loss of ice nucleation ability over months of repeated droplet freezing measurements of the same batch of Snomax stored as dry pellets in a freezer. This reflects the fragility of the most ice active large protein aggregates and presents issues for the use of Snomax as an INP standard. The ice nucleation properties we determined using a fresh Snomax batch agreed well with the recent method intercomparison from the Ice Nucleation UnIT (UNIT) project, while an older batch did not. Using an oil immersion droplet freezing technique, repeated freezes of Snomax droplets resulted in a decrease in ice nucleation ability after successive refreezes. We attribute this to the disruption or displacement of the most ice active protein aggregates that are thought to contain the ice nucleants. Partitioning of the protein aggregates from the droplet into the immersion oil that is accelerated by droplet freezing events could explain the observed decrease in freezing ability. Droplets in mineral oil or low viscosity silicone oil experienced a smaller reduction in freezing temperature than when squalene oil was used. The effect of the immersion oil may be specific to proteinaceous biological particles, and we have not observed it in nonproteinaceous materials. Caution is warranted in the use of oil immersion droplet freezing methods to determine immersion freezing properties.

  13. Fundamental Formation of Material Particles at All Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng-Johansson, J. X.; Johansson, P.-I.

    2003-04-01

    A systematic survey of relevant pivotal experiments leads us to arrive at (I) vacuum comprises substantial entities called aethers and (II) the velocities of light as measured in vacuum c and by a moving observer c', and the observer's velocity v obey the law of vector addition. (I)-(II) facilitate a General Scheme, which leads to (A) from Newton Mechanics solution for vacuum the fundamental formation of basic material particles having a mass, size, charge, etc. and being a de Broglie wave obeying Quantum Mechanics (B) augmentation in the mass, de Broglie wavevector, etc of a moving particle by a factor γ = 1/[1-(v/c)^2]^1/2 (C) length and time contractions of a moving body as measured in the frame in which the body resides (D) coordinate transformation between an inertial frame at rest and one relatively moving, called Galileo-Lorentz transformation (GLT) (E) using GLT the prediction of null-fringe shift of the Michelson-Morley experiment and the Doppler effect of light etc (F) inference of various contemporary empirical rules, incl Uncertainty relation; etc.

  14. Fundamental Study of Emulsions Stabilized by Soft and Rigid Particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Zifu; Harbottle, David; Pensini, Erica; Ngai, To; Richtering, Walter; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-06-16

    Two distinct uniform hybrid particles, with similar hydrodynamic diameters and comparable zeta potentials, were prepared by copolymerizing N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) and styrene. These particles differed in their styrene to NIPAM (S/N) mass ratios of 1 and 8 and are referred to as S/N 1 and S/N 8, respectively. Particle S/N 1 exhibited a typical behavior of soft particles; that is, the particles shrank in bulk aqueous solutions when the temperature was increased. As a result, S/N 1 particles were interfacially active. In contrast, particle S/N 8 appeared to be rigid in response to temperature changes. In this case, the particles showed a negligible interfacial activity. Interfacial shear rheology tests revealed the increased rigidity of the particle-stabilized film formed at the heptane-water interface by S/N 1 than S/N 8 particles. As a result, S/N 1 particles were shown to be better emulsion stabilizers and emulsify a larger amount of heptane, as compared with S/N 8 particles. The current investigation confirmed a better performance of emulsion stabilization by soft particles (S/N 1) than by rigid particles (S/N 8), reinforcing the importance of controlling softness or deformability of particles for the purpose of stabilizing emulsions.

  15. Fundamentals of particle beam dynamics and phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.; Mane, S.R.

    1991-09-04

    This report discusses the following topics on synchrotron accelerators: Transverse motion---betatron oscillations; machine lattice; representation of a particle beam; and longitudinal motion---synchrotron oscillations.

  16. One-particle spectroscopic intensities as a signature of shape phase transition: The {gamma}-unstable case

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C. E.; Arias, J. M.; Vitturi, A.

    2006-08-15

    We investigate the evolution of one-particle spectroscopic intensities as a possible signature of shape phase transitions. The study describes the odd systems in terms of the interacting boson-fermion model. We consider the particular case of an odd j=3/2 particle coupled to an even-even boson core that undergoes a phase transition from spherical U(5) to {gamma}-unstable O(6) situation. At the critical point, our findings are compared with the one-particle spectroscopic intensities that can be obtained within the E(5/4) model proposed by[F. Iachello, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 052503 (2005); F. Iachello, in Symmetries and Low-Energy Phase Transitions in Nuclear Structure Physics, edited by G. Lo Bianco (University of Camerino Press, Camerino, Italy, in press)].

  17. The Relation between Fundamental Constants and Particle Physics Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Rodger

    2017-01-01

    The observed constraints on the variability of the proton to electron mass ratio $\\mu$ and the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ are used to establish constraints on the variability of the Quantum Chromodynamic Scale and a combination of the Higgs Vacuum Expectation Value and the Yukawa couplings. Further model dependent assumptions provide constraints on the Higgs VEV and the Yukawa couplings separately. A primary conclusion is that limits on the variability of dimensionless fundamental constants such as $\\mu$ and $\\alpha$ provide important constraints on the parameter space of new physics and cosmologies.

  18. Fundamental studies of the solid-particle erosion of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Routbort, J. L.; Scattergood, R. O.

    1982-01-01

    The predictions of the theories of solid-particle erosion of brittle materials are compared to experimental results of studies in which angular Al2O3 particles with mean diameters D of 23 to 270 microns are used to erode (111) surfaces of silicon single crystals at impact angles alpha from 20 to 90 deg and velocities v from 30 to 150 m/s. The description of the steady state erosion rate by a power law, delta W varies directly as (v sin alpha)(n)D(m) must be modified to include threshold and plasticity effects. Furthermore the velocity exponent n depends on D. Results using abrasives of different sizes mixed together can be explained using a logarithmic-normal distribution. The results of transient experiments can be used to explain the synergistic effects which are observed using a biomodal distribution of abrasives.

  19. Kinetic study of radiation-reaction-limited particle acceleration during the relaxation of unstable force-free equilibria

    DOE PAGES

    Yuan, Yajie; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Zrake, Jonathan; ...

    2016-09-07

    Many powerful and variable gamma-ray sources, including pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, seem capable of accelerating particles to gamma-ray emitting energies efficiently over very short timescales. These are likely due to the rapid dissipation of electromagnetic energy in a highly magnetized, relativistic plasma. In order to understand the generic features of such processes, we have investigated simple models based on the relaxation of unstable force-free magnetostatic equilibria. In this work, we make the connection between the corresponding plasma dynamics and the expected radiation signal, using 2D particle-in-cell simulations that self-consistently include synchrotron radiation reactions. We focusmore » on the lowest order unstable force-free equilibrium in a 2D periodic box. We find that rapid variability, with modest apparent radiation efficiency as perceived by a fixed observer, can be produced during the evolution of the instability. The "flares" are accompanied by an increased polarization degree in the high energy band, with rapid variation in the polarization angle. Furthermore, the separation between the acceleration sites and the synchrotron radiation sites for the highest energy particles facilitates acceleration beyond the synchrotron radiation reaction limit. We also discuss the dynamical consequences of the radiation reaction, and some astrophysical applications of this model. Our current simulations with numerically tractable parameters are not yet able to reproduce the most dramatic gamma-ray flares, e.g., from the Crab Nebula. As a result, higher magnetization studies are promising and will be carried out in the future.« less

  20. Kinetic study of radiation-reaction-limited particle acceleration during the relaxation of unstable force-free equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Yajie; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Zrake, Jonathan; East, William E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2016-09-07

    Many powerful and variable gamma-ray sources, including pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, seem capable of accelerating particles to gamma-ray emitting energies efficiently over very short timescales. These are likely due to the rapid dissipation of electromagnetic energy in a highly magnetized, relativistic plasma. In order to understand the generic features of such processes, we have investigated simple models based on the relaxation of unstable force-free magnetostatic equilibria. In this work, we make the connection between the corresponding plasma dynamics and the expected radiation signal, using 2D particle-in-cell simulations that self-consistently include synchrotron radiation reactions. We focus on the lowest order unstable force-free equilibrium in a 2D periodic box. We find that rapid variability, with modest apparent radiation efficiency as perceived by a fixed observer, can be produced during the evolution of the instability. The "flares" are accompanied by an increased polarization degree in the high energy band, with rapid variation in the polarization angle. Furthermore, the separation between the acceleration sites and the synchrotron radiation sites for the highest energy particles facilitates acceleration beyond the synchrotron radiation reaction limit. We also discuss the dynamical consequences of the radiation reaction, and some astrophysical applications of this model. Our current simulations with numerically tractable parameters are not yet able to reproduce the most dramatic gamma-ray flares, e.g., from the Crab Nebula. As a result, higher magnetization studies are promising and will be carried out in the future.

  1. Kinetic Study of Radiation-reaction-limited Particle Acceleration During the Relaxation of Unstable Force-free Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yajie; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Zrake, Jonathan; East, William E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2016-09-01

    Many powerful and variable gamma-ray sources, including pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, seem capable of accelerating particles to gamma-ray emitting energies efficiently over very short timescales. These are likely due to the rapid dissipation of electromagnetic energy in a highly magnetized, relativistic plasma. In order to understand the generic features of such processes, we have investigated simple models based on the relaxation of unstable force-free magnetostatic equilibria. In this work, we make the connection between the corresponding plasma dynamics and the expected radiation signal, using 2D particle-in-cell simulations that self-consistently include synchrotron radiation reactions. We focus on the lowest order unstable force-free equilibrium in a 2D periodic box. We find that rapid variability, with modest apparent radiation efficiency as perceived by a fixed observer, can be produced during the evolution of the instability. The “flares” are accompanied by an increased polarization degree in the high energy band, with rapid variation in the polarization angle. Furthermore, the separation between the acceleration sites and the synchrotron radiation sites for the highest energy particles facilitates acceleration beyond the synchrotron radiation reaction limit. We also discuss the dynamical consequences of the radiation reaction, and some astrophysical applications of this model. Our current simulations with numerically tractable parameters are not yet able to reproduce the most dramatic gamma-ray flares, e.g., from the Crab Nebula. Higher magnetization studies are promising and will be carried out in the future.

  2. Kinetic study of radiation-reaction-limited particle acceleration during the relaxation of unstable force-free equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Yajie; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Zrake, Jonathan; East, William E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2016-09-07

    Many powerful and variable gamma-ray sources, including pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, seem capable of accelerating particles to gamma-ray emitting energies efficiently over very short timescales. These are likely due to the rapid dissipation of electromagnetic energy in a highly magnetized, relativistic plasma. In order to understand the generic features of such processes, we have investigated simple models based on the relaxation of unstable force-free magnetostatic equilibria. In this work, we make the connection between the corresponding plasma dynamics and the expected radiation signal, using 2D particle-in-cell simulations that self-consistently include synchrotron radiation reactions. We focus on the lowest order unstable force-free equilibrium in a 2D periodic box. We find that rapid variability, with modest apparent radiation efficiency as perceived by a fixed observer, can be produced during the evolution of the instability. The "flares" are accompanied by an increased polarization degree in the high energy band, with rapid variation in the polarization angle. Furthermore, the separation between the acceleration sites and the synchrotron radiation sites for the highest energy particles facilitates acceleration beyond the synchrotron radiation reaction limit. We also discuss the dynamical consequences of the radiation reaction, and some astrophysical applications of this model. Our current simulations with numerically tractable parameters are not yet able to reproduce the most dramatic gamma-ray flares, e.g., from the Crab Nebula. As a result, higher magnetization studies are promising and will be carried out in the future.

  3. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics pore-scale simulations of unstable immiscible flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Bandara, Dunusinghe Mudiyanselage Uditha C.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Oostrom, Martinus; Palmer, Bruce J.; Grate, Jay W.; Zhang, Changyong

    2013-12-01

    We have conducted a series of high-resolution numerical experiments using the Pair-Wise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) multiphase flow model. First, we derived analytical expressions relating parameters in the PF-SPH model to the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we used the model to study viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement of immiscible fluids in porous media for a wide range of capillary numbers and viscosity ratios. We demonstrated that the steady state saturation profiles and the boundaries of viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement regions compare favorably with micromodel laboratory experimental results. For displacing fluid with low viscosity, we observed that the displacement pattern changes from viscous fingering to stable displacement with increasing injection rate. When a high viscosity fluid is injected, transition behavior from capillary fingering to stable displacement occurred as the flow rate was increased. These observation also agree with the results of the micromodel laboratory experiments.

  4. How large can the electron to proton mass ratio be in particle-in-cell simulations of unstable systems?

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.; Dieckmann, M. E.

    2010-03-15

    Particle-in-cell simulations are widely used as a tool to investigate instabilities that develop between a collisionless plasma and beams of charged particles. However, even on contemporary supercomputers, it is not always possible to resolve the ion dynamics in more than one spatial dimension with such simulations. The ion mass is thus reduced below 1836 electron masses, which can affect the plasma dynamics during the initial exponential growth phase of the instability and during the subsequent nonlinear saturation. The goal of this article is to assess how far the electron to ion mass ratio can be increased, without changing qualitatively the physics. It is first demonstrated that there can be no exact similarity law, which balances a change in the mass ratio with that of another plasma parameter, leaving the physics unchanged. Restricting then the analysis to the linear phase, a criterion allowing to define a maximum ratio is explicated in terms of the hierarchy of the linear unstable modes. The criterion is applied to the case of a relativistic electron beam crossing an unmagnetized electron-ion plasma.

  5. Fundamental equations of a mixture of gas and small spherical solid particles from simple kinetic theory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, S. I.

    1973-01-01

    The fundamental equations of a mixture of a gas and pseudofluid of small spherical solid particles are derived from the Boltzmann equation of two-fluid theory. The distribution function of the gas molecules is defined in the same manner as in the ordinary kinetic theory of gases, but the distribution function for the solid particles is different from that of the gas molecules, because it is necessary to take into account the different size and physical properties of solid particles. In the proposed simple kinetic theory, two additional parameters are introduced: one is the radius of the spheres and the other is the instantaneous temperature of the solid particles in the distribution of the solid particles. The Boltzmann equation for each species of the mixture is formally written, and the transfer equations of these Boltzmann equations are derived and compared to the well-known fundamental equations of the mixture of a gas and small solid particles from continuum theory. The equations obtained reveal some insight into various terms in the fundamental equations. For instance, the partial pressure of the pseudofluid of solid particles is not negligible if the volume fraction of solid particles is not negligible as in the case of lunar ash flow.

  6. Fundamental physical processes in coronae: Waves, turbulence, reconnection, and particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2008-05-01

    Our understanding of fundamental processes in the solar corona has been greatly progressed based on the space observations of SMM, Yohkoh, Compton GRO, SOHO, TRACE, RHESSI, and STEREO. We observe now acoustic waves, MHD oscillations, turbulence-related line broadening, magnetic configurations related to reconnection processes, and radiation from high-energy particles on a routine basis. We review a number of key observations in EUV, soft X-rays, and hard X-rays that innovated our physical understanding of the solar corona, in terms of hydrodynamics, MHD, plasma heating, and particle acceleration processes.

  7. Nonlinear wave-particle resonant interaction in the radiation belts: Landau resonance vs. fundamental cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnoselskikh, V.; Artemyev, A.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mourenas, D.

    2013-12-01

    We present selected THEMIS observations of highly-oblique and large amplitude chorus waves at medium latitudes. The major part of observed waves propagates at nearly-electrostatic mode with normal angles close to resonance cone. We use test particle simulations and analytical theory to estimate efficiency of nonlinear particle acceleration by these waves via Landau and fundamental cyclotron resonances. We show that trapping into the Landau resonance corresponds to a decrease of electron equatorial pitch-angles, while trapping into the first cyclotron resonance increases electron equatorial pitch-angles. For 100 keV electrons, the energy gain is larger for the trapping due to Landau resonance. Moreover, trapping into the Landau resonance is accessible for a wider range of initial pitch-angles in comparison with the fundamental resonance.

  8. Measurement of fundamental illite particle thicknesses by X-ray diffraction using PVP-10 intercalation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Nuesch, R.; Sucha, V.; Tsipursky, S.

    1998-01-01

    The thicknesses of fundamental illite particles that compose mixed-layer illite-smectite (I-S) crystals can be measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) peak broadening techniques (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach [BWA] method and integral peak-width method) if the effects of swellinf and XRD background noise are eliminated from XRD patterns of the clays. Swelling is eliminated by intercalating Na-saturated I-S with polyvinylpyrrolidone having a molecular weightof 10,000 (PVP-10). Background is minimized by using polished metallic silicon wafers cut perpendicular to (100) as a substrate for XRD specimens, and by using a single-crystal monochromator. XRD measurements of PVP-intercalated diagenetic, hydro-thermal and low-grade metamorphic I-S indicate that there at least 2 type of crystallite thickness distribution shapes for illite fundamental particles, lognormal and asymptotic; that measurements of mean fundamental illite particle thicknesses made by various techniques (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach, integral peak width, fixed cation content, and transmission electron microscopy [TEM]) give comparable results; and that strain (small difference in layer thicknesses) generally has a Gaussian distribution in the lognormal-type illites, but is often absent in the asymptotic-type illites.

  9. Core-shell particles: preparation, fundamentals and applications in high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Richard; Ahmed, Adham; Edge, Tony; Zhang, Haifei

    2014-08-29

    The challenges in HPLC are fast and efficient separation for a wide range of samples. Fast separation often results in very high operating pressure, which places a huge burden on HPLC instrumentation. In recent years, core-shell silica microspheres (with a solid core and a porous shell, also known as fused-core or superficially porous microspheres) have been widely investigated and used for highly efficient and fast separation with reasonably low pressure for separation of small molecules, large molecules and complex samples. In this review, we firstly show the types of core-shell particles and how they are generally prepared, focusing on the methods used to produce core-shell silica particles for chromatographic applications. The fundamentals are discussed on why core-shell particles can perform better with low back pressure, in terms of van Deemter equation and kinetic plots. The core-shell particles are compared with totally porous silica particles and also monolithic columns. The use of columns packed with core-shell particles in different types of liquid chromatography is then discussed, followed by illustrating example applications of such columns for separation of various types of samples. The review is completed with conclusion and a brief perspective on future development of core-shell particles in chromatography.

  10. Fundamental measure theory for non-spherical hard particles: predicting liquid crystal properties from the particle shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, René; Marechal, Matthieu; Mecke, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) for hard bodies provides a theoretical description of the effect of particle shape on inhomogeneous fluids. We present improvements of the DFT framework fundamental measure theory (FMT) for hard bodies and validate these improvements for hard spherocylinders. To keep the paper self-contained, we first discuss the recent advances in FMT for hard bodies that lead to the introduction of fundamental mixed measure theory (FMMT) in our previous paper (2015 Europhys. Lett. 109 26003). Subsequently, we provide an efficient semi-empirical alternative to FMMT and show that the phase diagram for spherocylinders is described with similar accuracy in both versions of the theory. Finally, we present a semi-empirical modification of FMMT whose predictions for the phase diagram for spherocylinders are in excellent quantitative agreement with computer simulation results.

  11. Fundamental measure theory for non-spherical hard particles: predicting liquid crystal properties from the particle shape.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, René; Marechal, Matthieu; Mecke, Klaus

    2016-06-22

    Density functional theory (DFT) for hard bodies provides a theoretical description of the effect of particle shape on inhomogeneous fluids. We present improvements of the DFT framework fundamental measure theory (FMT) for hard bodies and validate these improvements for hard spherocylinders. To keep the paper self-contained, we first discuss the recent advances in FMT for hard bodies that lead to the introduction of fundamental mixed measure theory (FMMT) in our previous paper (2015 Europhys. Lett. 109 26003). Subsequently, we provide an efficient semi-empirical alternative to FMMT and show that the phase diagram for spherocylinders is described with similar accuracy in both versions of the theory. Finally, we present a semi-empirical modification of FMMT whose predictions for the phase diagram for spherocylinders are in excellent quantitative agreement with computer simulation results.

  12. Fundamentals and Application of Magnetic Particles in Cell Isolation and Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Plouffe, Brian D.; Murthy, Shashi K.; Lewis, Laura H.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic sorting using magnetic beads has become a routine methodology for the separation of key cell populations from biological suspensions. Due to the inherent ability of magnets to provide forces at a distance, magnetic cell manipulation is now a standardized process step in numerous processes in tissue engineering, medicine, and in fundamental biological research. Herein we review the current status of magnetic particles to enable isolation and separation of cells, with a strong focus on the fundamental governing physical phenomena, properties and syntheses of magnetic particles and on current applications of magnet-based cell separation in laboratory and clinical settings. We highlight the contribution of cell separation to biomedical research and medicine and detail modern cell separation methods (both magnetic and non-magnetic). In addition to a review of the current state-of-the-art in magnet-based cell sorting, we discuss current challenges and available opportunities for further research, development and commercialization of magnetic particle-based cell separation systems. PMID:25471081

  13. Fundamentals and application of magnetic particles in cell isolation and enrichment: a review.

    PubMed

    Plouffe, Brian D; Murthy, Shashi K; Lewis, Laura H

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic sorting using magnetic beads has become a routine methodology for the separation of key cell populations from biological suspensions. Due to the inherent ability of magnets to provide forces at a distance, magnetic cell manipulation is now a standardized process step in numerous processes in tissue engineering, medicine, and in fundamental biological research. Herein we review the current status of magnetic particles to enable isolation and separation of cells, with a strong focus on the fundamental governing physical phenomena, properties and syntheses of magnetic particles and on current applications of magnet-based cell separation in laboratory and clinical settings. We highlight the contribution of cell separation to biomedical research and medicine and detail modern cell-separation methods (both magnetic and non-magnetic). In addition to a review of the current state-of-the-art in magnet-based cell sorting, we discuss current challenges and available opportunities for further research, development and commercialization of magnetic particle-based cell-separation systems.

  14. Fundamentals and application of magnetic particles in cell isolation and enrichment: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plouffe, Brian D.; Murthy, Shashi K.; Lewis, Laura H.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic sorting using magnetic beads has become a routine methodology for the separation of key cell populations from biological suspensions. Due to the inherent ability of magnets to provide forces at a distance, magnetic cell manipulation is now a standardized process step in numerous processes in tissue engineering, medicine, and in fundamental biological research. Herein we review the current status of magnetic particles to enable isolation and separation of cells, with a strong focus on the fundamental governing physical phenomena, properties and syntheses of magnetic particles and on current applications of magnet-based cell separation in laboratory and clinical settings. We highlight the contribution of cell separation to biomedical research and medicine and detail modern cell-separation methods (both magnetic and non-magnetic). In addition to a review of the current state-of-the-art in magnet-based cell sorting, we discuss current challenges and available opportunities for further research, development and commercialization of magnetic particle-based cell-separation systems.

  15. Interactive Multimedia Software on Fundamental Particles and Forces. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Sculley

    1999-04-27

    Research in the SBIR Phase 2 grant number 95 ER 81944 centered on creating interactive multimedia software for teaching basic concepts in particle physics on fundamental particles and forces. The work was undertaken from February 1997 through July 1998. Overall the project has produced some very encouraging results in terms of product development, interest from the general public and interest from potential Phase 3 funders. Although the original Phase 3 publisher, McGraw Hill Home Interactive, was dissolved by its parent company, and other changes in the CD-ROM industry forced them to change their focus from CD-ROM to the Internet, there has been substantial interest from software publishers and online content providers in the content developed in the course of the Phase 2 research. Results are summarized.

  16. A new fundamental model of moving particle for reinterpreting Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect

    Umar, Muhamad Darwis

    2012-06-20

    The study of Schroedinger equation based on a hypothesis that every particle must move randomly in a quantum-sized volume has been done. In addition to random motion, every particle can do relative motion through the movement of its quantum-sized volume. On the other way these motions can coincide. In this proposed model, the random motion is one kind of intrinsic properties of the particle. The every change of both speed of randomly intrinsic motion and or the velocity of translational motion of a quantum-sized volume will represent a transition between two states, and the change of speed of randomly intrinsic motion will generate diffusion process or Brownian motion perspectives. Diffusion process can take place in backward and forward processes and will represent a dissipative system. To derive Schroedinger equation from our hypothesis we use time operator introduced by Nelson. From a fundamental analysis, we find out that, naturally, we should view the means of Newton's Law F(vector sign) = ma(vector sign) as no an external force, but it is just to describe both the presence of intrinsic random motion and the change of the particle energy.

  17. Modeling fundamental plasma transport and particle-induced emission in a simplified Test Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, Paul Nicholas

    This work involves the modeling of fundamental plasma physics processes occurring within environments that are similar to that of the discharge and plume regions of electric propulsion devices such as Hall effect thrusters. The research is conducted as a collaborative effort with the Plasma & Space Propulsion Laboratory at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), as part of the University of Michigan/AFRL Center for Excellence in Electric Propulsion (MACEEP). Transport physics, such as particle-particle collisions and particle-induced electron emission, are simulated within the UCLA experimental facility and its representative electric propulsion environment. Simulation methods employed include the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and particle-in-cell (PIC) techniques for the kinetic simulation of charged, rarefied species on high-performance computing architectures. Momentum- (MEX) and charge-exchange (CEX) collision cross-section models for Xe and Xe+, both total and differential, are successfully validated at collision energies of ˜1.5 keV within the novel facility. Heavy-species collisional transport models are validated and the importance of scattering anisotropy in this collision-dominated environment is shown. The theory of particle-induced electron emission (PIE) is then investigated in the context of the relevant energies and environments of the UCLA facility and electric propulsion devices and diagnostics. Reduced, semi-empirical models for total yield and emitted electron energy distribution functions that are easily implemented in a DSMC-PIC code are developed for the simulation of secondary-electron emission due to low-energy ions and high-energy atoms, even in the case of incomplete target-material information. These models are important for the characterization of electric propulsion devices due to the problematic nature of low-temperature plasma diagnostic techniques in which the emission of electrons is physically indistinguishable

  18. Lifetime of Cosmic-Ray Muons and the Standard Model of Fundamental Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherji, Sahansha; Shevde, Yash; Majewski, Walerian

    2015-04-01

    Muon is one of the twelve fundamental particles of matter, having the longest free-particle lifetime. It decays into three other leptons through an exchange of the weak vector bosons W+/W-. Muons are present in the secondary cosmic ray showers in the atmosphere, reaching the sea level. By detecting time delay between arrival of the muon and an appearance of the decay electron in our single scintillation detector (donated by the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA), we measured muon's lifetime at rest. It compares well with the value predicted by the Standard Model of Particles. From the lifetime we were able to calculate the ratio gw /MW of the weak coupling constant gw (an analog of the electric charge) to the mass of the W-boson MW. Using further Standard Model relations and an experimental value for MW, we calculated the weak coupling constant, the electric charge of the muon, and the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs field. We determined the sea-level flux of cosmic muons.

  19. Single-particle tracking for studying nanomaterial dynamics: applications and fundamentals in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zagato, Elisa; Forier, Katrien; Martens, Thomas; Neyts, Kristiaan; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan; Remaut, Katrien; Braeckmans, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    Many macromolecular therapeutics could potentially treat genetic disorders and cancer. They have, however, not yet reached the clinical stage owing to a lack of suitable carriers that can bring the therapeutics from the administration site to the subcellular site in target cells. One of the reasons that is hindering the development of such carriers is the limited knowledge of their transport dynamics and intracellular processing. Single-particle tracking (SPT) microscopy, thanks to its single molecule sensitivity and its broad applicability, has found its entry in the field of drug delivery to get an answer to these questions. This review aims to introduce the fundamentals of SPT to the drug delivery community and highlight the most recent discoveries obtained with SPT in the field of drug delivery.

  20. Parametrically Unstable Alfven-cyclotron Waves and Wave--Particle Interactions in the Solar Corona and Solar Wind

    SciTech Connect

    Maneva, Y. G.; Marsch, E.; Araneda, J. A.

    2009-04-26

    We consider the parametric instabilities of large-amplitude Alfven/ion-cyclotron waves and the consequent wave-particle interactions, and discuss their importance for modelling the evolution of ion velocity distribution functions in the tenuous and collisionless plasma of a coronal hole and the fast solar wind. We perform 1D hybrid simulations to study the nonlinear evolution of the parametric instabilities by analyzing the simulation results in terms of microinstabilities and discussing the influence of both Landau and cyclotron resonances on the evolution of the ion distributions. We demonstrate the origin of a relative drift between the protons and alpha particles, show the related anisotropic ion heating and follow the simultaneous proton beam formation. Finally, we focus on the development and evolution of both electromagnetic and acoustic micro-turbulence and present indications for an inverse energy cascade from shorter to longer wavelengths.

  1. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations of fundamental and harmonic radio plasma emission mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, D.; Thurgood, J. O.

    2015-12-01

    first co-author Jonathan O. Thurgood (QMUL) The simulation of three-wave interaction based plasma emission, an underlying mechanism for type III solar radio bursts, is a challenging task requiring fully-kinetic, multi-dimensional models. This paper aims to resolve a contradiction in past attempts, whereby some authors report that no such processes occur and others draw conflicting conclusions, by using 2D, fully kinetic, particle-in-cell simulations of relaxing electron beams. Here we present the results of particle-in-cell simulations which for different physical parameters permit or prohibit the plasma emission. We show that the possibility of plasma emission is contingent upon the frequency of the initial electrostatic waves generated by the bump-in-tail instability, and that these waves may be prohibited from participating in the necessary three-wave interactions due to the frequency beat requirements. We caution against simulating astrophysical radio bursts using unrealistically dense beams (a common approach which reduces run time), as the resulting non-Langmuir characteristics of the initial wave modes significantly suppresses the emission. Comparison of our results indicates that, contrary to the suggestions of previous authors, a plasma emission mechanism based on two counter-propagating beams is unnecessary in astrophysical context. Finally, we also consider the action of the Weibel instability, which generates an electromagnetic beam mode. As this provides a stronger contribution to electromagnetic energy than the emission, we stress that evidence of plasma emission in simulations must disentangle the two contributions and not simply interpret changes in total electromagnetic energy as the evidence of plasma emission. In summary, we present the first self-consistent demonstration of fundamental and harmonic plasma emission from a single-beam system via fully kinetic numerical simulation. Pre-print can be found at http://astro.qmul.ac.uk/~tsiklauri/jtdt1

  2. COST Action MP0806 'Particles in Turbulence': International Conference on Fundamentals, Experiments, Numeric and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Markus; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Toschi, Federico

    2011-12-01

    Turbulent flows are ubiquitous in nature and technology. Turbulent flows govern the transport of particulate matter in nature. For example, in atmospheric flows turbulence impacts the dynamics of aerosols, droplets, spores and of the living world by either chemo-attractant transport or transport of the insects themselves. In marine flows examples include the bubble dynamics that governs the uptake of oxygen and carbon dioxide at the ocean air interface, or the impact of turbulence on the life of phyto- and zoo-plankton, or the spread of pollutants in the oceans and estuaries. Turbulence is equally important for technology from process engineering in chemical and pharmaceutical industries to energy transport and energy generation. The COST Action MP0806 'Particles in Turbulence' has as the primary objective the support of the fundamental research on the statistical properties of particle transport in turbulent flows. The Action provides excellent opportunities for the exchange of ideas by bringing together scientists from different areas of research and applications, or different views on the problem. The COST Action MP0806 organizes several events annually. The conference held at the University of Potsdam from 16 to 18 March 2011 was the main meeting of the Action in 2011. In total 87 researchers from 18 countries (of which 12 were European) met and presented their work, discussed new ideas on theoretical, numerical and experimental approaches, as well as on applications to various scientific domains. The conference attracted also a number of participants from outside the COST Action. The scientific presentations focused on inertial and finite-size particles, particle collisions, as well as advection and reaction in simple and complex flow geometries. Very interesting results were presented at the forefront of the field: the increasing computational power combined with novel numerical techniques now allows for the first time simulation of the dynamics of finites

  3. Number of Packages of Information which are processed in a Second by the Fundamental Particles (strings) of a Human Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholibeigian, Hassan; Gholibeigian, Ghasem; Gholibeigian, Kazem

    2016-11-01

    The fundamental particle (string) gets a package of complete information of its quantum state via inside of its sub-particle (sub-string) from dimension of information. This package is processed by sub-particle in each Planck time [Gholibeigian, APS 2015, abstract #L1.027]. On the other hand, a 70 kg human's body would have approximately 7*1027 atoms. Of that, 4.7*1027 would be hydrogen atoms. Another 1.8*1027 would be oxygen and there are 7.0*1026 carbon atoms. If we add that all up, total is 2.3*1028 protons, 1.8*1028 neutrons, and 2.3*1028 electrons. Each proton and neutron has 6 fundamental particles. So the total number of packages of information which are processed by each of us in a second becomes: I = [ 6 × (2 . 3 + 1 . 8) ×1028 + 2 . 3 ×1028 ] ×1044 = 2 . 69 ×1073 The processed information carry by fundamental particles. Based on Shanon equation, I = - S , this number can be equal to the increased entropy of each of us per second too. AmirKabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.

  4. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations of fundamental and harmonic plasma radio emission mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurgood, J. O.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: The simulation of three-wave interaction based plasma emission, thought to be the underlying mechanism for Type III solar radio bursts, is a challenging task requiring fully-kinetic, multi-dimensional models. This paper aims to resolve a contradiction in past attempts, whereby some studies indicate that no such processes occur. Methods: We self-consistently simulate three-wave based plasma emission through all stages by using 2D, fully kinetic, electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of relaxing electron beams using the EPOCH2D code. Results: Here we present the results of two simulations; Run 1 (nb/n0 = 0.0057, vb/ Δvb = vb/Ve = 16) and Run 2 (nb/n0 = 0.05, vb/ Δvb = vb/Ve = 8), which we find to permit and prohibit plasma emission respectively. We show that the possibility of plasma emission is contingent upon the frequency of the initial electrostatic waves generated by the bump-in-tail instability, and that these waves may be prohibited from participating in the necessary three-wave interactions due to frequency conservation requirements. In resolving this apparent contradiction through a comprehensive analysis, in this paper we present the first self-consistent demonstration of fundamental and harmonic plasma emission from a single-beam system via fully kinetic numerical simulation. We caution against simulating astrophysical radio bursts using unrealistically dense beams (a common approach which reduces run time), as the resulting non-Langmuir characteristics of the initial wave modes significantly suppresses emission. Comparison of our results also indicates that, contrary to the suggestions of previous authors, an alternative plasma emission mechanism based on two counter-propagating beams is unnecessary in an astrophysical context. Finally, we also consider the action of the Weibel instability which generates an electromagnetic beam mode. As this provides a stronger contribution to electromagnetic energy than the emission, we stress that

  5. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Scalar Statistics along Inertial Particle Trajectory in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya-Ming; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Han, Hai-Feng; Li, Jing; Wang, Han-Feng; Zheng, Chu-Guang

    2009-06-01

    The statistics of a passive scalar along inertial particle trajectory in homogeneous isotropic turbulence with a mean scalar gradient is investigated by using direct numerical simulation. We are interested in the influence of particle inertia on such statistics, which is crucial for further understanding and development of models in non-isothermal gas-particle flows. The results show that the scalar variance along particle trajectory decreases with the increasing particle inertia firstly; when the particle's Stokes number St is less than 1.0, it reaches the minimal value when St is around 1.0, then it increases if St increases further. However, the scalar dissipation rate along the particle trajectory shows completely contrasting behavior in comparison with the scalar variance. The mechanical-to-thermal time scale ratios averaged along particle, p, are approximately two times smaller than that computed in the Eulerian frame r, and stay at nearly 1.77 with a weak dependence on particle inertia. In addition, the correlations between scalar dissipation and now structure characteristics along particle trajectories, such as strain and vorticity, are also computed, and they reach their maximum and minimum, 0.31 and 0.25, respectively, when St is around 1.0.

  6. Particle Size Measurements from the first Fundamentals of Ice Crystal Icing Physics Test in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael C.; Bachalo, William; Kurek, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    This presentation shows particle measurements by the Artium Technologies, Inc. Phase Doppler Interferometer and High Speed Imaging instruments from the first Fundamental Ice Crystal Icing Physics test conducted in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory. The work focuses on humidity sweeps at a larger and a smaller median volumetric diameter. The particle size distribution, number density, and water content measured by the Phase Doppler Interferometer and High Speed Imaging instruments from the sweeps are presented and compared. The current capability for these two instruments to measure and discriminate ICI conditions is examined.

  7. Particle Size Measurements From the First Fundamentals of Ice Crystal Icing Physics Test in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael C.; Bachalo, William; Kurek, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents particle measurements by the Artium Technologies, Inc. Phase Doppler Interferometer and High Speed Imaging instruments from the first Fundamental Ice Crystal Icing Physics test conducted in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory. The work focuses on humidity sweeps at a larger and a smaller median volumetric diameter. The particle size distribution, number density, and water content measured by the Phase Doppler Interferometer and High Speed Imaging instruments from the sweeps are presented and compared. The current capability for these two instruments to measure and discriminate ICI conditions is examined.

  8. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): A Particle Resistance Model for Flow through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jin-Sui; Yin, Shang-Xian; Zhao, Dong-Yu

    2009-06-01

    A particle model for resistance of flow in isotropic porous media is developed based on the fractal geometry theory and on the drag force flowing around sphere. The proposed model is expressed as a function of porosity, fluid property, particle size, fluid velocity (or Reynolds number) and fractal characters Df of particles in porous media. The model predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data. The validity of the proposed model is thus verified.

  9. Fundamental Investigation on Influence of Mechanical Oscillation on Particle Levitation under DC Electric Field Strength in SF6 Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokunohe, Toshiaki; Endo, Fumihiro; Yoshida, Yoshio; Nakagoe, Yoshihiko; Hatano, Masayuki

    The newest GIS is being reduced in size due to advances in arrester performance and reduction of impulse test voltage for specifications. Field strength of the inner surface for the GIS tank is being strengthened more than ever; for this, it is necessary that the design work consider particles included in the GIS. When GCB and DS are opened, residual DC voltage occurs at the conductor between the GCB and DS. Movement of particles under DC voltage is known to differ from that under AC voltage. It is very important to know particle movement under DC voltage, even if the GIS is for AC use. Therefore, this paper deals with particle-levitation under DC voltage in SF6 gas. Effects of polarity and vibration were confirmed for levitation of a particle on an insulated coating electrode. An aluminum particle (φ0.25×L3) on a sheath of 0.5MV/m did not levitate until a 6.5G oscillation acceleration was reached under a single-polarity DC voltage. On the other hand, the particle levitated at about a 2G oscillation acceleration under a reversed polarity DC voltage. Moreover, oscillation acceleration of initial levitation for a large size GIS model was almost equal with that of fundamental experiments.

  10. Fundamental Investigation for Firefly Phenomenon of Particle under DC Voltage in SF6 Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokunohe, Toshiaki; Endo, Fumihiro; Yoshida, Yoshio; Nakagoe, Yoshihiko; Hatano, Masayuki

    GIS is compacted by progress of arrester and reduction of impulse test voltage for specifications recently. Since field strength of inner surface for GIS tank is more strengthened than ever, it is more necessary that included particle in GIS is taken into consideration. When GCB and DS are opened, residual dc voltage occurs at conductor between GCB and DS. It is well known that movement of particle under ac voltage is different from that of dc voltage. Therefore it is very important that particle movement under dc voltage is taken into consideration, even if GIS is for ac. From the above, this paper deals with firefly phenomenon of particle under dc voltage in SF6 gas. It investigates that prevention of fire fly phenomenon by electric field strength of conductor. And the minimum electric field strength to continue firefly phenomenon of particle is made clear. Then the breakdown voltage with firefly particle is compared with that of particle; with a minute gap, fixed to conductor.

  11. Inductively Coupled Plasma: Fundamental Particle Investigations with Laser Ablation and Applications in Magnetic Sector Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Saetveit, Nathan Joe

    2008-01-01

    Particle size effects and elemental fractionation in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are investigated with nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation, differential mobility analysis, and magnetic sector ICP-MS. Laser pulse width was found to have a significant influence on the LA particle size distribution and the elemental composition of the aerosol and thus fractionation. Emission from individual particles from solution nebulization, glass, and a pressed powder pellet are observed with high speed digital photography. The presence of intact particles in an ICP is shown to be a likely source of fractionation. A technique for the online detection of stimulated elemental release from neural tissue using magnetic sector ICP-MS is described. Detection limits of 1 μg L-1 or better were found for P, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in a 60 μL injection in a physiological saline matrix.

  12. Fundamentals of elasto-inertial particle focusing in curved microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Nan; Zhang, Xinjie; Dai, Qing; Cheng, Jie; Chen, Ke; Ni, Zhonghua

    2016-07-05

    Elasto-inertial focusing in viscoelastic fluids has attracted increasing interest in recent years due to its potential applications in particle counting and sorting. However, current investigations of the elasto-inertial focusing mechanisms have mainly been focused on simple straight channels with little attention being paid to curved channels. Herein, we experimentally explore the elasto-inertial focusing behaviors of particles in spiral microfluidic channels over a wide range of flow rates, channel aspect ratios and channel radii. As compared with those observed in inertial microfluidics without viscoelasticity, the particle focusing pattern in our spiral elasto-inertial microfluidic system appears in a more interesting manner due to the complex coupling of elasticity, inertia and Dean flow effects. On the basis of the obtained data, the underlying mechanics and force competition behind the focusing behaviors are analyzed. In addition, for the first time, we propose a six-stage process model illustrating the particle focusing process in Dean-coupled elasto-inertial flows with increasing flow rate. It is interesting to find that the Dean drag force makes a significant contribution to particle focusing only at high flow rates and finally shifts the particle focusing positions into the outer channel region. Through carefully balancing the forces acting on particles, single-line 3D focusing can also be achieved at a throughput level of ∼100 μl min(-1), which is much higher than those in most existing studies. We envision that this improved understanding of the particle focusing mechanisms would provide helpful insights into the design and operation of spiral elasto-inertial microfluidic systems.

  13. Fundamental Particle Combustion Kinetics Measurement in the Shock Tube in Support of Enhanced Blast Weapons Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    designed to detonate small scale aluminized charges in an environment where particle reactivity was strongly suppressed. Particle size distribution...to scale ). The throat of the nozzle, where the minimum flow area occurs, was a critical parameter in the nozzle design . If the throat were too...rest IEnvironmen l.c\\luminized End Loading: Test Date ! Designation LOading AI Powder 1. V\\.ir Bare None/Set up 1/28/2009 0128 bare air 2. V\\.ir

  14. Assessment of Airborne Particles. Fundamentals, Applications, and Implications to Inhalation Toxicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Thomas T., Ed.; And Others

    Concern over chemical and radioactive particulate matter in industry and over rapidly increasing air pollution has stimulated research both on the properties of airborne particles and methods for assessing them and on their biological effects following inhalation. The Third Rochester International Conference on Environmental Toxicity was,…

  15. Assessment of Airborne Particles. Fundamentals, Applications, and Implications to Inhalation Toxicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Thomas T., Ed.; And Others

    Concern over chemical and radioactive particulate matter in industry and over rapidly increasing air pollution has stimulated research both on the properties of airborne particles and methods for assessing them and on their biological effects following inhalation. The Third Rochester International Conference on Environmental Toxicity was,…

  16. Fundamental study of ammonia-sulfur dioxide reactions to form solid particles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, P.; Bai, H.

    1994-01-18

    The effects of reaction residence time, presence of inert particles and moisture content on the SO{sub 2} removal and the product particle size distributions have been determined. Results indicated that both gas phase and particle phase reach equilibria in a very short time. The presence of inert particles increases the SO{sub 2} removal efficiency slightly, with a greater increase in removal efficiency at higher surface areas. Moisture content is the most important parameter affecting SO{sub 2} removal. Increasing the moisture content from 1.6% to 6.4% by volume results in a 30% increase of the SO{sub 2} removal at a reaction temperature of 51{degree}C. The products at near anhydrous conditions were concluded to be NH{sub 3}SO{sub 2}, (NH{sub 3}){sub 2}SO{sub 2} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 5}. While the products at humid conditions could be either the 1:1 sulfites, NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 3} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 5}, or the 2:1 sulfites, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 3} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 3} {minus}H{sub 2}O, or a mixture of the 1:1 and 2:1 sulfite. Those sulfite particles could subsequently oxidize to form the more stable sulfate particles. A gas-to-particle formation model has been developed to simulate the NH{sub 3}-SO{sub 2} system in the presence and absence of seed aerosols at trace water conditions. This model accounts for simultaneous nucleation, coagulation, condensation and chemical reaction. The applicability of utilizing ammonia injection to a flue gas system has been discussed in terms of two possible removal schemes. One utilizes ammonia injection alone and the other is in conjunction with the injection of Ca(OH){sub 2} slurry in a spray dryer system. Both schemes have the potential of achieving over 90% SO{sub 2} removal from power plants burning high-sulfur coals.

  17. Time of flight of ultra-relativistic particles in a realistic Universe: A viable tool for fundamental physics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanizza, G.; Gasperini, M.; Marozzi, G.; Veneziano, G.

    2016-06-01

    Including the metric fluctuations of a realistic cosmological geometry we reconsider an earlier suggestion that measuring the relative time-of-flight of ultra-relativistic particles can provide interesting constraints on fundamental cosmological and/or particle parameters. Using convenient properties of the geodetic light-cone coordinates we first compute, to leading order in the Lorentz factor and for a generic (inhomogeneous, anisotropic) space-time, the relative arrival times of two ultra-relativistic particles as a function of their masses and energies as well as of the details of the large-scale geometry. Remarkably, the result can be written as an integral over the unperturbed line-of-sight of a simple function of the local, inhomogeneous redshift. We then evaluate the irreducible scatter of the expected data-points due to first-order metric perturbations, and discuss, for an ideal source of ultra-relativistic particles, the resulting attainable precision on the determination of different physical parameters.

  18. Interactive effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and iron oxides particles. Epidemiological and fundamental aspects.

    PubMed

    Haguenoer, J M; Shirali, P; Hannothiaux, M H; Nisse-Ramond, C

    1996-01-01

    Iron oxides are present in many occupational atmospheres mainly in iron ore mines and in steel industry. Among these workers, epidemiological studies indicated an excess of lung cancer deaths. In mines, it was difficult to involve iron oxides exposure because there are other possible causes as radon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) present in diesel exhausts, silicosis or siderosis. The contradictory results of these studies are due to the differences of exposure levels or to the presence or not of these cofactors or of a sufficient prevention. But generally the results agree with an interaction of iron oxide dusts and smoking habits. It is unclear if this interaction supports an additive or multiplicative risk of lung cancer. Experimental studies with Fe2O3 showed that these particles are able to induce lung cancers only in the presence of PAH when administered to animals. In vitro studies permitted to observe an interaction in the metabolism of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) leading to a higher level of precursors of the ultimate carcinogen. As this metabolism of BaP is known to be enhanced during lipoperoxidation, it is possible to involve this mechanism with Fe2O3. After phagocytosis and dissolution with production of ferric ions, Fe2O3 can enhance the production of reactive oxygen species responsible of damaging both lipidic constituents and DNA. Fe3O4 and mainly FeO may be more toxic, introducing directly ferrous ions in the cells after dissolution, but the cancerogenicity of the these compounds is unknown, making necessary to develop research.

  19. Practical experience with unstable compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malanoski, S. B.

    1980-01-01

    Using analytical mathematical modeling techniques for the system components, an attempt is made to gauge the destabilizing effects in a number of compressor designs. In particular the overhung (or cantilevered) compressor designs and the straddle-mounted (or simply supported) compressor designs are examined. Recommendations are made, based on experiences with stable and unstable compressors, which can be used as guides in future designs. High and low pressure compressors which operate well above their fundamental rotor-bearing lateral natural frequencies can suffer from destructive subsynchronous vibration. Usually the elements in the system design which contribute to this vibration, other than the shafting and the bearings, are the seals (both gas labyrinth and oil breakdown bushings) and the aerodynamic components.

  20. Unstable heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, M.J.; Pruess, K.

    1987-10-01

    Heat pipes are an important feature of models of vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs. Numerical experiments reveal that a vapor-dominated heat pipe is unstable if pressure is controlled at shallow levels. This instability is discussed in physical terms, and some implications for geothermal reservoirs are considered. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Physics of Unstable Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoa, Dao Tien; Egelhof, Peter; Gales, Sydney; Giai, Nguyen Van; Motobayashi, Tohru

    2008-04-01

    Studies at the RIKEN RI beam factory / T. Motobayashi -- Dilute nuclear states / M. Freer -- Studies of exotic systems using transfer reactions at GANIL / D. Beaumel et al. -- First results from the Magnex large-acceptance spectrometer / A. Cunsolo et al. -- The ICHOR project and spin-isospin physics with unstable beams / H. Sakai -- Structure and low-lying states of the [symbol]He exotic nucleus via direct reactions on proton / V. Lapoux et al. -- Shell gap below [symbol]Sn based on the excited states in [symbol]Cd and [symbol]In / M. Górska -- Heavy neutron-rich nuclei produced in the fragmentation of a [symbol]Pb beam / Zs. Podolyák et al. -- Breakup and incomplete fusion in reactions of weakly-bound nuclei / D.J. Hinde et al. -- Excited states of [symbol]B and [symbol]He and their cluster aspect / Y. Kanada-En'yo et al. -- Nuclear reactions with weakly-bound systems: the treatment of the continuum / C. H. Dasso, A. Vitturi -- Dynamic evolution of three-body decaying resonances / A. S. Jensen et al. -- Prerainbow oscillations in [symbol]He scattering from the Hoyle state of [symbol]C and alpha particle condensation / S. Ohkubo, Y. Hirabayashi -- Angular dispersion behavior in heavy ion elastic scattering / Q. Wang et al. -- Microscopic optical potential in relativistic approach / Z.Yu. Ma et al. -- Exotic nuclei studied in direct reactions at low momentum transfer - recent results and future perspectives at fair / P. Egelhof -- Isotopic temperatures and symmetry energy in spectator fragmentation / M. De Napoli et al. -- Multi-channel algebraic scattering theory and the structure of exotic compound nuclei / K. Amos et al. -- Results for the first feasibility study for the EXL project at the experimental storage ring at GSI / N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki et al. -- Coulomb excitation of ISOLDE neutron-rich beams along the Z = 28 chain / P. Van Duppen -- The gamma decay of the pygmy resonance far from stability and the GDR at finite temperature / G. Benzoni et al

  2. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY(INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Numerical Simulation of Random Close Packings in Particle Deformation from Spheres to Cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian; Li, Shui-Xiang

    2008-11-01

    Variation of packing density in particle deforming from spheres to cubes is studied. A new model is presented to describe particle deformation between different particle shapes. Deformation is simulated by relative motion of component spheres in the sphere assembly model of a particle. Random close packings of particles in deformation form spheres to cubes are simulated with an improved relaxation algorithm. Packings in both 2D and 3D cases are simulated. With the simulations, we find that the packing density increases while the particle sphericity decreases in the deformation. Spheres and cubes give the minimum (0.6404) and maximum (0.7755) of packing density in the deformation respectively. In each deforming step, packings starting from a random configuration and from the final packing of last deforming step are both simulated. The packing density in the latter case is larger than the former in two dimensions, but is smaller in three dimensions. The deformation model can be applied to other particle shapes as well.

  3. Fundamental ecology is fundamental.

    PubMed

    Courchamp, Franck; Dunne, Jennifer A; Le Maho, Yvon; May, Robert M; Thébaud, Christophe; Hochberg, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    The primary reasons for conducting fundamental research are satisfying curiosity, acquiring knowledge, and achieving understanding. Here we develop why we believe it is essential to promote basic ecological research, despite increased impetus for ecologists to conduct and present their research in the light of potential applications. This includes the understanding of our environment, for intellectual, economical, social, and political reasons, and as a major source of innovation. We contend that we should focus less on short-term, objective-driven research and more on creativity and exploratory analyses, quantitatively estimate the benefits of fundamental research for society, and better explain the nature and importance of fundamental ecology to students, politicians, decision makers, and the general public. Our perspective and underlying arguments should also apply to evolutionary biology and to many of the other biological and physical sciences. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility: Fundamental studies of particle formation and interactions. Volume 1: Executive summary and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogleman, Guy (Editor); Huntington, Judith L. (Editor); Schwartz, Deborah E. (Editor); Fonda, Mark L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) project and its current status is provided. The proceedings of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility Experiments Workshop are recorded. The goal of the workshop was to define experiments for the GGSF--a small particle microgravity research facility. The workshop addressed the opportunity for performing, in Earth orbit, a wide variety of experiments that involve single small particles (grains) or clouds of particles. The first volume includes the executive summary, overview, scientific justification, history, and planned development of the Facility.

  5. Haemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    of patients with unstable pelvic fractures will be found to have additional musculoskeletal injuries.25,54,80 Injury severity score (ISS) is...create a tamponade effect, since the retro- peritoneum is disrupted.47,53 The ‘‘splinting’’ of pathological pelvic motion is more likely to be the...pelvic CT angiography performedwith 64-detector row CT. Radiology 2008;246:410–9. 5. Balogh Z, Caldwell E, Heetveld M, et al. Institutional practice

  6. Controls for unstable structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Oliver; Hogg, Tad; Huberman, Bernardo A.

    1997-06-01

    We study the behavior of several organizations for a market based distributed control of unstable physical systems and show how a hierarchical organization is a reasonable compromise between rapid local responses with simple communication and the use of global knowledge. We also introduce a new control organization, the multihierarchy, and show that is uses less power than a hierarchy in achieving stability. The multihierarchy also has a position invariant response that can control disturbances at the appropriate scale and location.

  7. Stable unstable reliability theory.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Hoben; Lohaus, Arnold; Domsch, Holger

    2012-05-01

    Classical reliability theory assumes that individuals have identical true scores on both testing occasions, a condition described as stable. If some individuals' true scores are different on different testing occasions, described as unstable, the estimated reliability can be misleading. A model called stable unstable reliability theory (SURT) frames stability or instability as an empirically testable question. SURT assumes a mixed population of stable and unstable individuals in unknown proportions, with w(i) the probability that individual i is stable. w(i) becomes i's test score weight which is used to form a weighted correlation coefficient r(w) which is reliability under SURT. If all w(i) = 1 then r(w) is the classical reliability coefficient; thus classical theory is a special case of SURT. Typically r(w) is larger than the conventional reliability r, and confidence intervals on true scores are typically shorter than conventional intervals. r(w) is computed with routines in a publicly available R package. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  8. Fundamental Study of Direct Contact Cold Energy Release by Flowing Hot Air through Ice Particles Packed Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Sigeo; Inaba, Hideo

    This paper has dealt with the direct contact heat exchange characteristics between ice particles (average ice particle diameter : 3.10mm) packed in the rectangular cold energy storage vessel and flowing hot air as a heat transfer medium. The hot air bubbles ascended in the fluidized ice particles layer, and they were cooled down directly by melting ice particles. The temperature efficiency increased as Reynolds number Re increased because the hot air flowing in the layer became active. The dehumidity efficiency increased with an increase in modified Stefan number and Re, since the heat capacity of inlet air and heat transfer coefficient increased. Finally, some empirical correlations for temperature efficiency, dehumidity efficiency and the completion time of cold energy release were derived in terms of various nondimensional parameters.

  9. False vacuum as an unstable state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanowski, K.

    2016-11-01

    Calculations performed within the Standard Model suggest that the electroweak vacuum is unstable if MH < 126 GeV, (MH is the mass of the Higgs particle). LHC discovery of the Higgs boson indicates that MH ≃ 125 GeV. So the vacuum in our Universe may be unstable. We analyze properties of unstable vacuum states from the point of view of the quantum theory. At asymptotically late times the survival probability as a function of time t has an inverse power-like form. We show that at this time region the energy of the false vacuum states tends to the energy of the true vacuum state as 1/t2 for t → ∞. This means that the energy density in the unstable vacuum state should have analogous properties and hence the cosmological constant Λ = Λ(t) too. So Λ in the Universe with the unstable vacuum should have a form of the sum of the "bare" cosmological constant and of the term of a type 1/t^2:Λ (t) ≡ Λbare + d/t^2, (where Λbare is the cosmological constant for the Universe with the true vacuum).

  10. Communication of Information with Sub-particles (Sub-strings) from Fifth Dimension of the Universe (Information) as the "Fundamental Symmetry" in the Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholibeigian, Hassan; Gholibeigian, Ghsem; Amirshahkarami, Abdolazim; Gholibeigian, Kazem

    2016-11-01

    All fundamental particles (strings) getting information from their four animated sub-particles (sub-strings) after processing by them for motion. It seems that the source of information which particles and dark mater/energy are floating in it and whispering to its communication may be "fifth dimension" of the nature after space-time dimensions. In other words, the space-time can be the universe's hardware and information's dimension can be dynamic software of the universe which has always become up to date. Communication of information has a vital role in creation and evolution of the universe, may be as the "fundamental symmetry" in the nature, which began before the spark to B.B. (Convection Bang), and leads other symmetries and supersymmetry as well as other phenomena. Duration of the before Planck time, from 0 ->10-44 second, and its correspondence space which its result was generation of the very hot and energetic point for the B.B. / C.B. needed to communication of information. It seems that this fifth dimension has appeared for leading the processes before and after Planck time. How this dimension of the nature appeared and has always become up to date? AmirKabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.

  11. Communication of Information with Sub-particles (Sub-strings) from Fifth Dimension of the Universe (Information) as the ``Fundamental Symmetry'' in the Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholibeigian, Hassan; Gholibeigian, Ghasem; Amirshahkarami, Abdolazim; Gholibeigian, Kazem

    2016-10-01

    Fundamental particles (strings) getting processed information from their four animated sub-particles (sub-strings) for their motion [Gholibeigian, APS, 2015, abstract #L1.027]. It seems that the source of information which particles and dark mater/energy are floating in it and whispering to its communication for getting order may be ``fifth dimension'' of the nature in addition of space-time dimensions. In other words, space-time can be the universe's hardware and information's dimension can be dynamic software of the universe which has always become up to date. Communication of information which has a vital role in creation and evolution of the universe, may be as the ``fundamental symmetry'' in the nature, which sparked to B.B. (Convection Bang). Communication of information leads other symmetries and supersymmetry as well as other phenomena in Universe. Before Planck time, from 0 ->10-44 second, and its correspondence space needed communication of information for preparing the B.B. So, this fifth dimension has appeared for leading the processes before and after Planck time. AmirKabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.

  12. Unstable giant gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Smolic, Jelena; Smolic, Milena

    2006-03-15

    We find giant graviton solutions in Frolov's three parameter generalization of the Lunin-Maldacena background. The background we study has {gamma}-tilde{sub 1}=0 and {gamma}-tilde{sub 2}={gamma}-tilde{sub 3}={gamma}-tilde. This class of backgrounds provides a nonsupersymmetric example of the gauge theory/gravity correspondence that can be tested quantitatively, as recently shown by Frolov, Roiban, and Tseytlin. The giant graviton solutions we find have a greater energy than the point gravitons, making them unstable states. Despite this, we find striking quantitative agreement between the gauge theory and gravity descriptions of open strings attached to the giant.

  13. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) II. Module 32-3, Fundamentals of Magnetic Particle Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groseclose, Richard

    This third in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II explains the principles of magnets and magnetic fields and how they are applied in magnetic particle testing, describes the theory and methods of magnetizing test specimens, describes the test equipment used, discusses the principles and…

  14. Discovery of particle unstable 69Br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, William

    2011-04-01

    Two-proton capture on 68Se through 69Br provides a possible mechanism to bypass the waiting point at 68Se during explosive hydrogen burning processes on neutron stars. This two-proton capture rate, however, depends exponentially on the 69Br proton separation energy. We have determined the proton separation energy for 69Br to be -785+34-40 keV by a direct measurement of the p+68Se decay products., This extracted value is less bound than that obtained from Coulomb displacement energy calculations and the known masses for 69Se and 68Se. The influence of our value for the proton separation energy for 69Br on rp-process occurring in Type 1 X-ray bursts is examined in a one-zone burst model. A M Rogers, W G Lynch, M A Famiano, M S Wallace, F Amorini, D Bazin, R J Charity, F Delaunay, R T de Souza, J Elson, A Gade, D Galaviz, S Hudan, J Lee, S Lobostov, S Lukyanov, M Matos, M Mocko, M B Tsang, D Shapira, L G Sobotka, G Verde, arXiv:1009.2950.

  15. Fundamentally updating fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Gail; Barton, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Recent educational research indicates that the six competencies of the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses initiative are best introduced in early prelicensure clinical courses. Content specific to quality and safety has traditionally been covered in senior level courses. This article illustrates an effective approach to using quality and safety as an organizing framework for any prelicensure fundamentals of nursing course. Providing prelicensure students a strong foundation in quality and safety in an introductory clinical course facilitates early adoption of quality and safety competencies as core practice values. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fundamental study on transient bubble (slug) behavior by characterizing transient forces of solid particles in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, H.O.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to recognize and interpret the signals of transient motion of bubbles (slugs) in fluidized beds by measuring and utilizing the signals of transient motion of solid particles. The two signals were measured simultaneously and also synchronized by using the TTL signal technique in the same fluidized beds. Also, a simultaneous study of video bubble image, transient force and pressure signals was initiated in a two dimensional fluidized bed. we successfully synchronized three signals so that the relationship of bubble behavior and force pressure signals can be identified and characterized. It has been found that bubble image can well be correlated to the transient force signal of solid particles under certain conditions in three dimensional fluidized beds. Accordingly, it seems that the transient force signals can significantly help understanding the transient motion of bubbles (slugs), which is important to design the fluidized beds.

  17. Fundamental study on transient bubble (slug) behavior by characterizing transient forces of solid particles in fluidized beds. 1990 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, H.O.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to recognize and interpret the signals of transient motion of bubbles (slugs) in fluidized beds by measuring and utilizing the signals of transient motion of solid particles. The two signals were measured simultaneously and also synchronized by using the TTL signal technique in the same fluidized beds. Also, a simultaneous study of video bubble image, transient force and pressure signals was initiated in a two dimensional fluidized bed. we successfully synchronized three signals so that the relationship of bubble behavior and force pressure signals can be identified and characterized. It has been found that bubble image can well be correlated to the transient force signal of solid particles under certain conditions in three dimensional fluidized beds. Accordingly, it seems that the transient force signals can significantly help understanding the transient motion of bubbles (slugs), which is important to design the fluidized beds.

  18. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility: Fundamental studies of particle formation and interactions. Volume 2: Abstracts, candidate experiments and feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogleman, Guy (Editor); Huntington, Judith L. (Editor); Schwartz, Deborah E. (Editor); Fonda, Mark L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) project and its current status is provided. The proceedings of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility Experiments Workshop are recorded. The goal of the workshop was to define experiments for the GGSF--a small particle microgravity research facility. The workshop addressed the opportunity for performing, in Earth orbit, a wide variety of experiments that involve single small particles (grains) or clouds of particles. Twenty experiments from the fields of exobiology, planetary science, astrophysics, atmospheric science, biology, physics, and chemistry were described at the workshop and are outlined in Volume 2. Each experiment description included specific scientific objectives, an outline of the experimental procedure, and the anticipated GGSF performance requirements. Since these experiments represent the types of studies that will ultimately be proposed for the facility, they will be used to define the general science requirements of the GGSF. Also included in the second volume is a physics feasibility study and abstracts of example Gas-Grain Simulation Facility experiments and related experiments in progress.

  19. Fundamental considerations on the mechanisms of silver cementation onto zinc particles in the Merril-Crowe process.

    PubMed

    Viramontes Gamboa, G; Medina Noyola, M; López Valdivieso, A

    2005-02-15

    Studies on the Merrill-Crowe process as applied to silver recovery have shown that one half of the used zinc powder is wasted in water reduction at high cyanide concentrations, while the other half reduces silver ions from the cyanide solution. However, the cementation mechanisms as an electrochemical process taking place on the zinc surface do not explain the split of the electric current resulting from the anodic dissolution of zinc into two equal values. This study demonstrates that the mechanism for silver precipitation at high and low cyanide concentrations differs considerably. At low cyanide concentrations cementation is essentially an electrochemically-controlled process following a shrinking-core behavior. At high cyanide concentrations, the process seems not to be electrochemically controlled. The areas for zinc dissolution and silver deposition are not connected by an electrical-conducting medium and reduction of silver-cyano complex ions takes place by hydrogen adsorbed onto silver growing outward from the cementing zinc particles. The results are based on scanning electron microscopy of solids recovered from cementations in stirred reactors and in situ observations by optical microscopy of the cementation process on the edge of thin zinc disks in cyanide solutions.

  20. Fundamental study on transient bubble (slug) behavior by characterizing transient forces of solid particles in fluidized beds. Topical report, January 1991--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, H.

    1992-10-01

    The objective of this work is to recognize and interpret the signals of transient motion of bubbles (slugs) in fluidized beds (METC/DOE) by measuring and utilizing the signals of transient gas phase pressure fluctuation, and also by taking the video pictures of transient motions of the bubbles and emulsion phase in fluidized beds. The two signals were measured simultaneously in a three dimensional fluidized bed. Correlation study on the voidage signal and pressure fluctuation was carried out. A domain concept was introduced and new bubble classification was suggested. A video recording approach was also developed to record the transient bubble motion in a two dimensional fluidized bed with a special consideration. This new approach enhances the understanding of bubble image and the physical meaning of transient particle forces. The fundamental mechanism of bubble flow was experimentally investigated and interesting new findings of the transient bubble flow were obtained.

  1. Astrophysical data on 5 eV to 1 keV radiation from the radiative decay of fundamental particles - Current limits and prospects for improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, Stuart; Malina, Roger F.

    1986-01-01

    Line emission from the decay of fundamental particles, integrated over cosmological distances, can give rise to detectable spectral features in the diffuse astronomical background between 5 eV and 1 keV. Spectroscopic observations may allow these features to be separated from line emission from the numerous local sources of radiation. The current observational status and existing evidence for such features are reviewed. No definitive detections of nongalactic line features have been made. Several local sources of background mask the features at many wavelengths and confuse the interpretation of the data. No systematic spectral observations have been carried out to date. Upcoming experiments which can be expected to provide significantly better constraints on the presence of spectral features in the diffuse background from 5 eV to 1 keV are reviewed.

  2. Information as the Fifth Dimension of the Universe which Fundamental Particles (strings), Dark Matter/Energy and Space-time are Floating in it While they are Listening to its Whispering for Getting Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholibeigian, Hassan; Gholibeigian, Ghasem; Amirshahkarami, Azim; Gholibeigian, Kazem

    2017-01-01

    Four animated sub-particles (sub-strings) as origin of the life and generator of momentum (vibration) of elementary particles (strings) are communicated for transferring information for processing and preparing fundamental particles for the next step. It means that information may be a ``dimension'' of the nature which fundamental particles, dark matter/energy and space-time are floating in it and listening to its whispering and getting quantum information packages about their conditions and laws. So, communication of information which began before the spark to B.B. (Convection Bang), may be a ``Fundamental symmetry'' in the nature because leads other symmetries and supersymmetry as well as other phenomena. The processed information are always carried by fundamental particles as the preserved history and entropy of Universe. So, information wouldn't be destroyed, lost or released by black hole. But the involved fundamental particles of thermal radiation, electromagnetic and gravitational fields carry processed information during emitting from black hole, while they are communicated from fifth dimension for their new movement. AmirKabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.

  3. Fundamental Physics

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-22

    Still photographs taken over 16 hours on Nov. 13, 2001, on the International Space Station have been condensed into a few seconds to show the de-mixing -- or phase separation -- process studied by the Experiment on Physics of Colloids in Space. Commanded from the ground, dozens of similar tests have been conducted since the experiment arrived on ISS in 2000. The sample is a mix of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA or acrylic) colloids, polystyrene polymers and solvents. The circular area is 2 cm (0.8 in.) in diameter. The phase separation process occurs spontaneously after the sample is mechanically mixed. The evolving lighter regions are rich in colloid and have the structure of a liquid. The dark regions are poor in colloids and have the structure of a gas. This behavior carnot be observed on Earth because gravity causes the particles to fall out of solution faster than the phase separation can occur. While similar to a gas-liquid phase transition, the growth rate observed in this test is different from any atomic gas-liquid or liquid-liquid phase transition ever measured experimentally. Ultimately, the sample separates into colloid-poor and colloid-rich areas, just as oil and vinegar separate. The fundamental science of de-mixing in this colloid-polymer sample is the same found in the annealing of metal alloys and plastic polymer blends. Improving the understanding of this process may lead to improving processing of these materials on Earth.

  4. Two dimensional unstable scar statistics.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Lee, Kelvin S. H. (ITT Industries/AES Los Angeles, CA)

    2006-12-01

    This report examines the localization of time harmonic high frequency modal fields in two dimensional cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This paper examines the enhancements for these unstable orbits when the opposing mirrors are both convex and concave. In the latter case the construction includes the treatment of interior foci.

  5. Tether fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Some fundamental aspects of tethers are presented and briefly discussed. The effects of gravity gradients, dumbbell libration in circular orbits, tether control strategies and impact hazards for tethers are among those fundamentals. Also considered are aerodynamic drag, constraints in momentum transfer applications and constraints with permanently deployed tethers. The theoretical feasibility of these concepts are reviewed.

  6. Analysis of unstable modes distinguishes mathematical models of flagellar motion

    PubMed Central

    Bayly, P. V.; Wilson, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the coordinated beating of cilia and flagella remain incompletely understood despite the fundamental importance of these organelles. The axoneme (the cytoskeletal structure of cilia and flagella) consists of microtubule doublets connected by passive and active elements. The motor protein dynein is known to drive active bending, but dynein activity must be regulated to generate oscillatory, propulsive waveforms. Mathematical models of flagellar motion generate quantitative predictions that can be analysed to test hypotheses concerning dynein regulation. One approach has been to seek periodic solutions to the linearized equations of motion. However, models may simultaneously exhibit both periodic and unstable modes. Here, we investigate the emergence and coexistence of unstable and periodic modes in three mathematical models of flagellar motion, each based on a different dynein regulation hypothesis: (i) sliding control; (ii) curvature control and (iii) control by interdoublet separation (the ‘geometric clutch’ (GC)). The unstable modes predicted by each model are used to critically evaluate the underlying hypothesis. In particular, models of flagella with ‘sliding-controlled’ dynein activity admit unstable modes with non-propulsive, retrograde (tip-to-base) propagation, sometimes at the same parameter values that lead to periodic, propulsive modes. In the presence of these retrograde unstable modes, stable or periodic modes have little influence. In contrast, unstable modes of the GC model exhibit switching at the base and propulsive base-to-tip propagation. PMID:25833248

  7. Manual control of unstable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. W.; Hogue, J. R.; Parseghian, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Under certain operational regimes and failure modes, air and ground vehicles can present the human operator with a dynamically unstable or divergent control task. Research conducted over the last two decades has explored the ability of the human operator to control unstable systems under a variety of circumstances. Past research is reviewed and human operator control capabilities are summarized. A current example of automobile directional control under rear brake lockup conditions is also reviewed. A control system model analysis of the driver's steering control task is summarized, based on a generic driver/vehicle model presented at last year's Annual Manual. Results from closed course braking tests are presented that confirm the difficulty the average driver has in controlling the unstable directional dynamics arising from rear wheel lockup.

  8. Width adjustment: relative dominance in unstable alluvial streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    The mechanisms that control the relative dominance of width adjustment in unstable streams are described. Specifically, the role of the following factors affecting the fluvial environment were investigated: vertical processes and fluvial action, bed-material particle, cohesive strength of bank material, and riparian vegetation.

  9. Influence of an Additive-Free Particle Spreading Method on Interactions between Charged Colloidal Particles at an Oil/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Yi, Zonglin; Xing, Xiaochen; Ngai, To; Jin, Fan

    2016-05-17

    The assembly and manipulation of charged colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces represent active areas of fundamental and applied research. Previously, we have shown that colloidal particles can spontaneously generate unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface when spreading solvent is used to disperse them at an oil/water interface. These residual charges in turn affect the long-ranged electrostatic repulsive forces and packing of particles at the interface. To further uncover the influence arising from the spreading solvents on interfacial particle interactions, in the present study we utilize pure buoyancy to drive the particles onto an oil/water interface and compare the differences between such a spontaneously adsorbed particle monolayer to the spread monolayer based on solvent spreading techniques. Our results show that the solvent-free method could also lead particles to spread well at the interface, but it does not result in violent sliding of particles along the interface. More importantly, this additive-free spreading method can avoid the formation of unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface. These findings agree well with our previous hypothesis; namely, those unstable residual charges are triboelectric charges that arise from the violently rubbing of particles on oil at the interface. Therefore, if the spreading solvents could be avoided, then we would be able to get rid of the formation of residual charges at interfaces. This finding will provide insight for precisely controlling the interactions among colloidal particles trapped at fluid/fluid interfaces.

  10. Stabilization Strategies for Unstable Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Devjani J.; Morasso, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Background When humans are faced with an unstable task, two different stabilization mechanisms are possible: a high-stiffness strategy, based on the inherent elastic properties of muscles/tools/manipulated objects, or a low-stiffness strategy, based on an explicit positional feedback mechanism. Specific constraints related to the dynamics of the task and/or the neuromuscular system often force people to adopt one of these two strategies. Methodology/Findings This experiment was designed such that subjects could achieve stability using either strategy, with a marked difference in terms of effort and control requirements between the two strategies. The task was to balance a virtual mass in an unstable environment via two elastic linkages that connected the mass to each hand. The dynamics of the mass under the influence of the unstable force field and the forces applied through the linkages were simulated using a bimanual, planar robot. The two linkages were non-linear, with a stiffness that increased with the amount of stretch. The mass could be stabilized by stretching the linkages to achieve a stiffness that was greater than the instability coefficient of the unstable field (high-stiffness), or by balancing the mass with sequences of small force impulses (low-stiffness). The results showed that 62% of the subjects quickly adopted the high-stiffness strategy, with stiffness ellipses that were aligned along the direction of instability. The remaining subjects applied the low-stiffness strategy, with no clear preference for the orientation of the stiffness ellipse. Conclusions The choice of a strategy was based on the bimanual coordination of the hands: high-stiffness subjects achieved stability quickly by separating the hands to stretch the linkages, while the low-stiffness subjects kept the hands close together and took longer to achieve stability but with lower effort. We suggest that the existence of multiple solutions leads to different types of skilled behavior

  11. Pattern control in unstable structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Oliver; Hogg, Tad; Huberman, Bernardo A.

    1998-07-01

    A major aim of smart structures is to reduce the amount of materials used to build them while achieving the same amount of dynamic control. This reduction can however lead to a loss of stiffness and a consequent instability of the structure in the presence of stresses. We have turned this problem around by examining how the use of dynamical instabilities can lead to improved control of given patterns in smart structures. In particular, we studied the possibility of dynamically switching between two configurations of a mechanical system, one in which the desired patterns are stable and one in which they are unstable. By comparing the performance of a distributed control in terms of time to switch and power consumption we established that unstable patterns often switch faster among themselves than stable ones without consuming more power.

  12. Nonlinear force dependence on optically bound micro-particle arrays in the evanescent fields of fundamental and higher order microfibre modes.

    PubMed

    Maimaiti, Aili; Holzmann, Daniela; Truong, Viet Giang; Ritsch, Helmut; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-07-25

    Particles trapped in the evanescent field of an ultrathin optical fibre interact over very long distances via multiple scattering of the fibre-guided fields. In ultrathin fibres that support higher order modes, these interactions are stronger and exhibit qualitatively new behaviour due to the coupling of different fibre modes, which have different propagation wave-vectors, by the particles. Here, we study one dimensional longitudinal optical binding interactions of chains of 3 μm polystyrene spheres under the influence of the evanescent fields of a two-mode microfibre. The observation of long-range interactions, self-ordering and speed variation of particle chains reveals strong optical binding effects between the particles that can be modelled well by a tritter scattering-matrix approach. The optical forces, optical binding interactions and the velocity of bounded particle chains are calculated using this method. Results show good agreement with finite element numerical simulations. Experimental data and theoretical analysis show that higher order modes in a microfibre offer a promising method to not only obtain stable, multiple particle trapping or faster particle propulsion speeds, but that they also allow for better control over each individual trapped object in particle ensembles near the microfibre surface.

  13. Nonlinear force dependence on optically bound micro-particle arrays in the evanescent fields of fundamental and higher order microfibre modes

    PubMed Central

    Maimaiti, Aili; Holzmann, Daniela; Truong, Viet Giang; Ritsch, Helmut; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    Particles trapped in the evanescent field of an ultrathin optical fibre interact over very long distances via multiple scattering of the fibre-guided fields. In ultrathin fibres that support higher order modes, these interactions are stronger and exhibit qualitatively new behaviour due to the coupling of different fibre modes, which have different propagation wave-vectors, by the particles. Here, we study one dimensional longitudinal optical binding interactions of chains of 3 μm polystyrene spheres under the influence of the evanescent fields of a two-mode microfibre. The observation of long-range interactions, self-ordering and speed variation of particle chains reveals strong optical binding effects between the particles that can be modelled well by a tritter scattering-matrix approach. The optical forces, optical binding interactions and the velocity of bounded particle chains are calculated using this method. Results show good agreement with finite element numerical simulations. Experimental data and theoretical analysis show that higher order modes in a microfibre offer a promising method to not only obtain stable, multiple particle trapping or faster particle propulsion speeds, but that they also allow for better control over each individual trapped object in particle ensembles near the microfibre surface. PMID:27451935

  14. Aberration correction of unstable resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Construction of aspheric reflectors for unstable resonator lasers to provide an arbitrary laser mode inside the resonator to correct aberrations of an output beam by the construction of the shape of an end reflector opposite the output reflector of the resonator cavity, such as aberrations resulting from refraction of a beam exiting the solid of the resonator having an index of refraction greater than 1 or to produce an aberration in the output beam that will precisely compensate for the aberration of an optical train into which the resonator beam is coupled.

  15. Marketing fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Redmond, W H

    2001-01-01

    This chapter outlines current marketing practice from a managerial perspective. The role of marketing within an organization is discussed in relation to efficiency and adaptation to changing environments. Fundamental terms and concepts are presented in an applied context. The implementation of marketing plans is organized around the four P's of marketing: product (or service), promotion (including advertising), place of delivery, and pricing. These are the tools with which marketers seek to better serve their clients and form the basis for competing with other organizations. Basic concepts of strategic relationship management are outlined. Lastly, alternate viewpoints on the role of advertising in healthcare markets are examined.

  16. Fundamentals of Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Wollaber, Allan Benton

    2016-06-16

    This is a powerpoint presentation which serves as lecture material for the Parallel Computing summer school. It goes over the fundamentals of the Monte Carlo calculation method. The material is presented according to the following outline: Introduction (background, a simple example: estimating π), Why does this even work? (The Law of Large Numbers, The Central Limit Theorem), How to sample (inverse transform sampling, rejection), and An example from particle transport.

  17. Unstable extension of Enceladus' lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, Michael T.; Beyer, Ross A.; Showman, Adam P.

    2007-12-01

    Regions near Enceladus' equator, Sarandib and Diyar Planitia, contain extensive sets of parallel ridges and troughs that may be diagnostic of the region's formation conditions. We present photoclinometry profiles across these ridges and troughs, which indicate that they are periodic, low-slope features with dominant wavelengths of 3 to 4 km and amplitudes between 100 and 400 m. The morphology of these terrains is consistent with formation via unstable extension of the lithosphere. Our numerical modeling demonstrates that unstable extension can generate large-scale topography under Enceladus-like conditions. Comparison of our photoclinometry profiles with the dominant wavelengths produced by our numerical model permits estimation of the background heat flow at the time the Sarandib-Diyar province formed. We estimate heat flows of 110 to 220mWm, suggesting that resurfacing of the planitiae was accompanied by strong, localized heating. The extension necessary to produce the ridges and troughs may have been caused by now-inactive diapirs, internal phase changes, or other mechanisms. Our heat flux estimates imply elastic thickness at the time of resurfacing of 0.4 to 1.4 km, which are sufficient to have allowed satellite reorientation if the province was underlain by a low-density region. It is therefore plausible that Enceladus has experienced multiple heating events, each leading to localized resurfacing and global reorientation.

  18. Inherently Unstable Internal Gravity Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Reza

    2016-11-01

    Here we show that there exist internal gravity waves that are inherently unstable, that is, they cannot exist in nature for a long time. The instability mechanism is a one-way (irreversible) harmonic-generation resonance that permanently transfers the energy of an internal wave to its higher harmonics. We show that, in fact, there are countably infinite number of such unstable waves. For the harmonic-generation resonance to take place, nonlinear terms in the free surface boundary condition play a pivotal role, and the instability does not obtain for a linearly-stratified fluid if a simplified boundary condition such as rigid lid or linear form is employed. Harmonic-generation resonance discussed here also provides a mechanism for the transfer of the energy of the internal waves to the higher-frequency part of the spectrum where internal waves are more prone to breaking, hence losing energy to turbulence and heat and contributing to oceanic mixing. Yong Liang (yong.liang@berkeley.edu).

  19. Research on fundamental aspects of inorganic particle deposition on coal-fired equipment. Final technical report, 6 September 1990--31 October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    We review results of our recent DOE-PETC research program on the deposition dynamics of combustion-generated particles in power production technologies. We outline and illustrate the results of recently developed methods to predict total surface deposition rates and associated convective heat transfer reductions for targets exposed to a distribution of particles suspended in a mainstream. Our methods combine the essential features of recently developed single particle sticking probability laws with correlations of the inertial impaction of particles on targets in high Reynolds number cross-flow, to develop formulae and ``universal`` graphs which provide the dependence of particle deposition rates, and associated reductions in convective heat transfer, on such system parameters as mainstream velocity, mean suspended particle size and target size. The deposition rate/deposit microstructue/properties prediction and correlation procedures illustrated be incorporated into improved ``fouling propensity indices,`` to motivate, evaluate and implement ``ruggedization`` and/or fouling reduction strategies, and/or incorporated (as subroutines) into more ``comprehensive`` CFD models of an entire power plant.

  20. particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Zhengguo; Fang, Xiaoming; Liang, Guozheng

    2014-05-01

    We explore a facile and nontoxic hydrothermal route for synthesis of a Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material by using l-cysteine as the sulfur source and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as the complexing agent. The effects of the amount of EDTA, the mole ratio of the three metal ions, and the hydrothermal temperature and time on the phase composition of the obtained product have been systematically investigated. The addition of EDTA and an excessive dose of ZnCl2 in the hydrothermal reaction system favor the generation of kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4. Pure kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 has been synthesized at 180°C for 12 h from the reaction system containing 2 mmol of EDTA at 2:2:1 of Cu/Zn/Sn. It is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy that those binary and ternary phases are absent in the kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 product. The kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 material synthesized by the hydrothermal process consists of flower-like particles with 250 to 400 nm in size. It is revealed that the flower-like particles are assembled from single-crystal Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoflakes with ca. 20 nm in size. The band gap of the Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material is estimated to be 1.55 eV. The films fabricated from the hierarchical Cu2ZnSnS4 particles exhibit fast photocurrent responses under intermittent visible-light irradiation, implying that they show potentials for use in solar cells and photocatalysis.

  1. Healthcare fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Kauk, Justin; Hill, Austin D; Althausen, Peter L

    2014-07-01

    In order for a trauma surgeon to have an intelligent discussion with hospital administrators, healthcare plans, policymakers, or any other physicians, a basic understanding of the fundamentals of healthcare is paramount. It is truly shocking how many surgeons are unable to describe the difference between Medicare and Medicaid or describe how hospitals and physicians get paid. These topics may seem burdensome but they are vital to all business decision making in the healthcare field. The following chapter provides further insight about what we call "the basics" of providing medical care today. Most of the topics presented can be applied to all specialties of medicine. It is broken down into 5 sections. The first section is a brief overview of government programs, their influence on care delivery and reimbursement, and past and future legislation. Section 2 focuses on the compliance, care provision, and privacy statutes that regulate physicians who care for Medicare/Medicaid patient populations. With a better understanding of these obligations, section 3 discusses avenues by which physicians can stay informed of current and pending health policy and provides ways that they can become involved in shaping future legislation. The fourth section changes gears slightly by explaining how the concepts of trade restraint, libel, antitrust legislation, and indemnity relate to physician practice. The fifth, and final, section ties all of components together by describing how physician-hospital alignment can be mutually beneficial in providing patient care under current healthcare policy legislation.

  2. Correlations of Decay Times of Entangled Composite Unstable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The role played by time in the quantum theory is still mysterious by many aspects. In particular it is not clear today whether the distribution of decay times of unstable particles could be described by a time operator (TO). As we shall discuss, different approaches to this problem (one could say interpretations) can be found in the literature on the subject. As we shall show, it is possible to conceive crucial experiments aimed at distinguishing the different approaches, by measuring with accuracy the statistical distribution of decay times of entangled particles. Such experiments can be realized in principle with entangled kaon pairs.

  3. Correlations of Decay Times of Entangled Composite Unstable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durt, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    The role played by time in the quantum theory is still mysterious by many aspects. In particular it is not clear today whether the distribution of decay times of unstable particles could be described by a time operator (TO). As we shall discuss, different approaches to this problem (one could say interpretations) can be found in the literature on the subject. As we shall show, it is possible to conceive crucial experiments aimed at distinguishing the different approaches, by measuring with accuracy the statistical distribution of decay times of entangled particles. Such experiments can be realized in principle with entangled kaon pairs.

  4. Arthroscopic treatment of unstable total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, Ricardo; Aguinaga, Iñaki; Corcuera, Irene; Ponte, Juan; Usabiaga, Jaime

    2010-06-01

    Hip arthroscopy may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of apparently well-implanted but unstable total hip replacement prostheses. We present 2 cases of arthroscopically assisted capsular tightening in unstable total hip replacements. Both cases had significant capsular laxity. Case 2 had impingement of the lower part of the acetabulum with the lesser trochanter that caused hip dislocation. Early revision surgery can be avoided with the use of this technique in selected cases of unstable total hip replacements.

  5. Neutrons and Fundamental Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Plaster, Bradley

    2016-01-11

    The research supported by this project addressed fundamental open physics questions via experiments with subatomic particles. In particular, neutrons constitute an especially ideal “laboratory” for fundamental physics tests, as their sensitivities to the four known forces of nature permit a broad range of tests of the so-called “Standard Model”, our current best physics model for the interactions of subatomic particles. Although the Standard Model has been a triumphant success for physics, it does not provide satisfactory answers to some of the most fundamental open questions in physics, such as: are there additional forces of nature beyond the gravitational, electromagnetic, weak nuclear, and strong nuclear forces?, or why does our universe consist of more matter than anti-matter? This project also contributed significantly to the training of the next generation of scientists, of considerable value to the public. Young scientists, ranging from undergraduate students to graduate students to post-doctoral researchers, made significant contributions to the work carried out under this project.

  6. Osteoporosis in unstable adult scoliosis

    SciTech Connect

    Velis, K.P.; Healey, J.H.; Schneider, R.

    1988-12-01

    New noninvasive techniques as well as conventional methods were used to evaluate skeletal mass in the following three populations of adult white women as follows: (1) 79 subjects with preexisting idiopathic scoliosis designated as unstable (US) because of the associated presence in the lumbar spine of lateral spondylolisthesis with segmental instability; (2) 67 subjects with preexisting idiopathic scoliosis without lateral spondylolisthesis designated as stable (SS); and (3) 248 age-matched nonscoliotic controls. Ages in all three groups were categorized into premenopausal (25-44 years), perimenopausal (45-54 years), and postmenopausal (55-84 years). The results showed higher scoliosis morbidity in the US compared to the SS populations. The prevalence and severity of osteoporosis were markedly increased in US versus SS populations. Femoral neck density determined by dual-photon absorptiometry techniques averaged 26% to 48% lower in all age categories of US patients compared to controls. These changes were found in the youngest age groups, indicating reductions in bone mineral content earlier in the adult life of white women with a specific type of high-morbidity US characterized by the marker of lateral spondylolisthesis.

  7. Unstable vicinal crystal growth from cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasteva, A.; Popova, H.; KrzyŻewski, F.; Załuska-Kotur, M.; Tonchev, V.

    2016-03-01

    In order to study the unstable step motion on vicinal crystal surfaces we devise vicinal Cellular Automata. Each cell from the colony has value equal to its height in the vicinal, initially the steps are regularly distributed. Another array keeps the adatoms, initially distributed randomly over the surface. The growth rule defines that each adatom at right nearest neighbor position to a (multi-) step attaches to it. The update of whole colony is performed at once and then time increases. This execution of the growth rule is followed by compensation of the consumed particles and by diffusional update(s) of the adatom population. Two principal sources of instability are employed - biased diffusion and infinite inverse Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier (iiSE). Since these factors are not opposed by step-step repulsion the formation of multi-steps is observed but in general the step bunches preserve a finite width. We monitor the developing surface patterns and quantify the observations by scaling laws with focus on the eventual transition from diffusion-limited to kinetics-limited phenomenon. The time-scaling exponent of the bunch size N is 1/2 for the case of biased diffusion and 1/3 for the case of iiSE. Additional distinction is possible based on the time-scaling exponents of the sizes of multi-step Nmulti, these are 0.36÷0.4 (for biased diffusion) and 1/4 (iiSE).

  8. Fundamentals of Polarized Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The analytical and numerical basis for describing scattering properties of media composed of small discrete particles is formed by the classical electromagnetic theory. Although there are several excellent textbooks outlining the fundamentals of this theory, it is convenient for our purposes to begin with a summary of those concepts and equations that are central to the subject of this book and will be used extensively in the following chapters. We start by formulating Maxwell's equations and constitutive relations for time- harmonic macroscopic electromagnetic fields and derive the simplest plane-wave solution that underlies the basic optical idea of a monochromatic parallel beam of light. This solution naturally leads to the introduction of such fundamental quantities as the refractive index and the Stokes parameters. Finally, we define the concept of a quasi-monochromatic beam of light and discuss its implications.

  9. Fundamental properties of resonances

    PubMed Central

    Ceci, S.; Hadžimehmedović, M.; Osmanović, H.; Percan, A.; Zauner, B.

    2017-01-01

    All resonances, from hydrogen nuclei excited by the high-energy gamma rays in deep space to newly discovered particles produced in Large Hadron Collider, should be described by the same fundamental physical quantities. However, two distinct sets of properties are used to describe resonances: the pole parameters (complex pole position and residue) and the Breit-Wigner parameters (mass, width, and branching fractions). There is an ongoing decades-old debate on which one of them should be abandoned. In this study of nucleon resonances appearing in the elastic pion-nucleon scattering we discover an intricate interplay of the parameters from both sets, and realize that neither set is completely independent or fundamental on its own. PMID:28345595

  10. Fundamental properties of resonances.

    PubMed

    Ceci, S; Hadžimehmedović, M; Osmanović, H; Percan, A; Zauner, B

    2017-03-27

    All resonances, from hydrogen nuclei excited by the high-energy gamma rays in deep space to newly discovered particles produced in Large Hadron Collider, should be described by the same fundamental physical quantities. However, two distinct sets of properties are used to describe resonances: the pole parameters (complex pole position and residue) and the Breit-Wigner parameters (mass, width, and branching fractions). There is an ongoing decades-old debate on which one of them should be abandoned. In this study of nucleon resonances appearing in the elastic pion-nucleon scattering we discover an intricate interplay of the parameters from both sets, and realize that neither set is completely independent or fundamental on its own.

  11. Fundamentals of Polarized Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The analytical and numerical basis for describing scattering properties of media composed of small discrete particles is formed by the classical electromagnetic theory. Although there are several excellent textbooks outlining the fundamentals of this theory, it is convenient for our purposes to begin with a summary of those concepts and equations that are central to the subject of this book and will be used extensively in the following chapters. We start by formulating Maxwell's equations and constitutive relations for time- harmonic macroscopic electromagnetic fields and derive the simplest plane-wave solution that underlies the basic optical idea of a monochromatic parallel beam of light. This solution naturally leads to the introduction of such fundamental quantities as the refractive index and the Stokes parameters. Finally, we define the concept of a quasi-monochromatic beam of light and discuss its implications.

  12. 30 CFR 56.9304 - Unstable ground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unstable ground. 56.9304 Section 56.9304... § 56.9304 Unstable ground. (a) Dumping locations shall be visually inspected prior to work commencing and as ground conditions warrant. (b) Where there is evidence that the ground at a dumping...

  13. 30 CFR 56.9304 - Unstable ground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unstable ground. 56.9304 Section 56.9304... § 56.9304 Unstable ground. (a) Dumping locations shall be visually inspected prior to work commencing and as ground conditions warrant. (b) Where there is evidence that the ground at a dumping location...

  14. 30 CFR 56.9304 - Unstable ground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unstable ground. 56.9304 Section 56.9304... § 56.9304 Unstable ground. (a) Dumping locations shall be visually inspected prior to work commencing and as ground conditions warrant. (b) Where there is evidence that the ground at a dumping location...

  15. 30 CFR 56.9304 - Unstable ground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unstable ground. 56.9304 Section 56.9304... § 56.9304 Unstable ground. (a) Dumping locations shall be visually inspected prior to work commencing and as ground conditions warrant. (b) Where there is evidence that the ground at a dumping location...

  16. Survival of the structures in the universe dominated by unstable dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, Y.; Noguchi, M.

    1986-04-01

    Dynamical evolution of non-linear structures in the universe dominated by unstable particles is studied by the numerical integration of the Vlasov equation. Their dynamical behaviour is determined by two parameters; one is the ratio of energy densities of baryons and unstable particles β and the other is the ratio of the lifetime of unstable particles τX to the initial free-fall time-scale tff,i. Non-linear structures satisfying the survival condition - τX/tff,i > 1/(2β2) - remains as bound systems irrespective of the decay of unstable particles. As long as one considers the cosmologically restricted range of τX and β, galaxies satisfy the survival condition and their evolution is well understood in terms of adiabatic behaviour. On the other hand, clusters of galaxies may be disrupted in future due to decay of unstable particles. A possible restriction to the formation of structures and the consequence of this scenario to the observed angular size of galaxies are discussed quantitatively.

  17. Aberration sensitivity of unstable resonator with semitransparent output coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheyev, P.A.; Shepelenko, A.A.; Zaikin, A.P.

    1994-12-31

    Unstable resonator with semitransparent output coupler is feasible for lasers with moderate gain and large cross section of active medium. The resonator fundamental mode can be obtained up to Fresnel numbers of 10 or more. Output beam quality does not differ much from the Gaussian beam, but at the same time intensity distribution is rather flat and mode-medium coupling is better. This approach does not require the mirrors with tapered reflectivity profile. In practice the design of this type of resonator often requires to place a spherical mirror inside to fold the optical path and that inevitably causes astigmatism. Current presentation describes the results of the investigation of resonator sensitivity to intracavity astigmatism. The requirements for the resonator setup to obtain nearly unperturbed fundamental mode operation, and a convenient resonator design to meet this requirements are discussed.

  18. Investigating Unstable Water Infiltration into Alcohol Contaminated Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, H. C.; Smith, J. E.; Henry, E. J.; Brodsky, Y.

    2009-05-01

    A new mechanism causing highly focused, unstable flow exists in soils contaminated with alcohols due to their surface-activity. For example, surface-active compounds can significantly decrease the interfacial tension of the air-water interface and change the pressure-head of the soil water; directly affecting water flow and solute transport in the vadose zone. This study evaluated the fundamental effects of surface-active alcohols on water infiltration into contaminated soils under controlled laboratory conditions. A small scale 3-D glass flow cell and a mini disk tension infiltrometer were used to monitor the rates and physical characteristics of water infiltration from a constant head point source into sands of various textures contaminated with a butanol solution. The results confirmed that water infiltration into these soils is fundamentally and substantially different than the current understanding of infiltration patterns, including previously described mechanisms of wetting front instability. In butanol-contaminated soils, the wetting fronts exhibited highly focused flow with smaller wetted soil volumes, deeper penetration and substantially higher infiltration rates. In addition, the extent of fingered focused flow was confirmed to be texturally dependent, decreasing with grain size and dependent on the constant head boundary. This study characterized a new mechanism of focused, unstable flow with significant implications for groundwater management and solute transport in alcohol contaminated soils.

  19. Unstable attractors induce perpetual synchronization and desynchronization.

    PubMed

    Timme, Marc; Wolf, Fred; Geisel, Theo

    2003-03-01

    Common experience suggests that attracting invariant sets in nonlinear dynamical systems are generally stable. Contrary to this intuition, we present a dynamical system, a network of pulse-coupled oscillators, in which unstable attractors arise naturally. From random initial conditions, groups of synchronized oscillators (clusters) are formed that send pulses alternately, resulting in a periodic dynamics of the network. Under the influence of arbitrarily weak noise, this synchronization is followed by a desynchronization of clusters, a phenomenon induced by attractors that are unstable. Perpetual synchronization and desynchronization lead to a switching among attractors. This is explained by the geometrical fact, that these unstable attractors are surrounded by basins of attraction of other attractors, whereas the full measure of their own basin is located remote from the attractor. Unstable attractors do not only exist in these systems, but moreover dominate the dynamics for large networks and a wide range of parameters.

  20. Unstable Binocular Control in Dyslexic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, J. F.; Fowler, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    Offers evidence for four propositions that demonstrate a strong association between binocular instability and dyslexic reading difficulties. Discusses two propositions designed to prove that it is unstable binocular control that causes reading difficulties, rather than vice versa. (RS)

  1. Reaction cross sections of unstable nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Akira

    2006-11-02

    Experimental studies on reaction cross sections are reviewed. The recent developments of radioactive nuclear beams have enabled us to measure reaction cross-sections for unstable nuclei. Using Glauber-model analysis, effective nuclear matter density distributions of unstable nuclei can be studied. Recent measurements in RIBLL at IMP and RIPS at RIKEN are introduced. The effective matter density distributions for 14-18C are also mentioned.

  2. From stable to unstable anomaly-induced inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netto, Tibério de Paula; Pelinson, Ana M.; Shapiro, Ilya L.; Starobinsky, Alexei A.

    2016-10-01

    Quantum effects derived through conformal anomaly lead to an inflationary model that can be either stable or unstable. The unstable version requires a large dimensionless coefficient of about 5× {10}^8 in front of the {R}^2 term that results in the inflationary regime in the R+{R}^2 ("Starobinsky") model being a generic intermediate attractor. In this case the non-local terms in the effective action are practically irrelevant, and there is a `graceful exit' to a low curvature matter-like dominated stage driven by high-frequency oscillations of R - scalarons, which later decay to pairs of all particles and antiparticles, with the amount of primordial scalar (density) perturbations required by observations. The stable version is a genuine generic attractor, so there is no exit from it. We discuss a possible transition from stable to unstable phases of inflation. It is shown that this transition is automatic if the sharp cut-off approximation is assumed for quantum corrections in the period of transition. Furthermore, we describe two different quantum mechanisms that may provide a required large {R}^2-term in the transition period.

  3. Observation of the particle-unstable nucleus 10N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lépine-Szily, A.; Oliveira, J. M.; Vanin, V. R.; Ostrowski, A. N.; Lichtenthäler, R.; di Pietro, A.; Guimarães, V.; Laird, A. M.; Maunoury, L.; Lima, G. F.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Savajols, H.; Trinder, W.; Villari, A. C.; de Vismes, A.

    2002-05-01

    For the first time evidence of the ground state of the proton-rich, unbound nucleus 10N has been found in the multinucleon transfer reaction 10B(14N,14B)10N. The observed resonance of 10N has a mass excess of 38.8(4) MeV and a width of Γ=2.3(16) MeV, close to the Audi-Wapstra estimation of 38.5(4) MeV. 10N is the last missing A=10 multiplet partner.

  4. Fundamental Physics within Complex Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Angela Michelle

    In this work, both experimental and numerical methods are used to investigate several of the fundamental processes and assumptions commonly found in an earth-based radio-frequency (RF) complex plasma discharge. First the manner in which the dust particle charge varies with the particle's height above the powered electrode is investigated. Knowledge of the dust particle charge is required to understand nearly all complex plasma experiments since it affects the dust particle's levitation height and particle-particle interactions. A fluid model which includes effects due to ion flow and electron depletion (which are significant dust charging effects within the sheath where the particles levitate) is employed to determine the plasma parameters required to calculate the dust particle charge. Second, the levitation limits of the dust particles and the structure of the sheath are investigated. The CASPER GEC RF reference cell is used to perform two experiments: one to measure the dust levitation height as a function of applied RF voltage and one to determine the electric force profile. The fluid model is then used to interpret the experimental results. This study provides a better understanding of the sheath structure, particle behavior within the sheath, and provides a new, in situ experimental method for locating the approximate height of the sheath edge in any dusty plasma system. Finally, both molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and an experiment are employed to determine the physical processes that a complex plasma system goes through as it rapidly transitions from a liquid to solid state.

  5. Fundamental neutron physics at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.

    1995-10-01

    Modern neutron sources and science share a common origin in mid-20th-century scientific investigations concerned with the study of the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. Since the time of that common origin, neutron science and the study of elementary particles have evolved into quite disparate disciplines. The neutron became recognized as a powerful tool for studying condensed matter with modern neutron sources being primarily used (and justified) as tools for neutron scattering and materials science research. The study of elementary particles has, of course, led to the development of rather different tools and is now dominated by activities performed at extremely high energies. Notwithstanding this trend, the study of fundamental interactions using neutrons has continued and remains a vigorous activity at many contemporary neutron sources. This research, like neutron scattering research, has benefited enormously by the development of modern high-flux neutron facilities. Future sources, particularly high-power spallation sources, offer exciting possibilities for continuing this research.

  6. Testing Our Fundamental Assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Science is all about testing the things we take for granted including some of the most fundamental aspects of how we understand our universe. Is the speed of light in a vacuum the same for all photons regardless of their energy? Is the rest mass of a photon actually zero? A series of recent studies explore the possibility of using transient astrophysical sources for tests!Explaining Different Arrival TimesArtists illustration of a gamma-ray burst, another extragalactic transient, in a star-forming region. [NASA/Swift/Mary Pat Hrybyk-Keith and John Jones]Suppose you observe a distant transient astrophysical source like a gamma-ray burst, or a flare from an active nucleus and two photons of different energies arrive at your telescope at different times. This difference in arrival times could be due to several different factors, depending on how deeply you want to question some of our fundamental assumptions about physics:Intrinsic delayThe photons may simply have been emitted at two different times by the astrophysical source.Delay due to Lorentz invariance violationPerhaps the assumption that all massless particles (even two photons with different energies) move at the exact same velocity in a vacuum is incorrect.Special-relativistic delayMaybe there is a universal speed for massless particles, but the assumption that photons have zero rest mass is wrong. This, too, would cause photon velocities to be energy-dependent.Delay due to gravitational potentialPerhaps our understanding of the gravitational potential that the photons experience as they travel is incorrect, also causing different flight times for photons of different energies. This would mean that Einsteins equivalence principle, a fundamental tenet of general relativity (GR), is incorrect.If we now turn this problem around, then by measuring the arrival time delay between photons of different energies from various astrophysical sources the further away, the better we can provide constraints on these

  7. Unstable solar lentigo: A defined separate entity.

    PubMed

    Byrom, Lisa; Barksdale, Sarah; Weedon, David; Muir, Jim

    2016-08-01

    An unstable solar lentigo is a solar lentigo with areas of melanocytic hyperplasia not extending past the margin of the lesion. They are discrete, macular, pigmented lesions arising on sun-damaged skin and a subset of typical solar lentigos. Clinically they differ from usual solar lentigines in often being solitary or larger and darker than adjacent solar lentigines. These lesions are of clinical importance as they can arise in close proximity to lentigo maligna and in a single lesion there can be demonstrated changes of solar lentigo, unstable solar lentigo and lentigo maligna. These observations led us to conjecture that unstable solar lentigos could be a precursor lesion to lentigo maligna. In this article we examine the possibility that lentigo maligna can arise within a solar lentigo through an intermediate lesion, the unstable solar lentigo. We propose that the histopathological recognition of this entity will allow for future research into its behaviour and thus management. We review difficulties in the diagnosis of single cell predominant melanocytic proliferations and the concept of unstable lentigo in view of the literature and clinical experience supporting the proposal of its recognition as a separate entity.

  8. Identifying unstable rock blocks by measuring micro-tremors and vibration on cliffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Fujisawa, K.; Asai, K.

    2008-01-01

    It is important to identify unstable rock blocks and take countermeasures to prevent sudden rock fall disasters. However, identifying such blocks visually is extremely difficult, so an identification method using peculiar features of unstable blocks must be developed. The method reported here uses a vibrometer, which is inexpensive and easy to operate. In order to assess the feasibility of the method, a field experiment was carried out on rock cliffs in three regions of Japan where unstable blocks are likely to exist. Vibrometers were set up on the cliffs to capture two types of vibration waves in three dimensions, i.e., micro-tremor and reactive vibration. The former type naturally exists all the time, while the latter is generated only by applying stimulation waves. At least one of the vibrometers was installed on stable baserock to compare the results with the wave patterns of unstable rock blocks. In addition to conventional items (amplitude, frequency spectrum, vibration particle trace), trace accumulation length, that is the accumulation of the trace length of a vibrating particle for ten seconds, was introduced to analyze the patterns for both types of wave. As a result, unstable rock blocks were found to generate higher amplitudes of vibration waves than stable rock blocks, and different patterns of frequency spectrum, direction of vibration particle trace, and trace accumulation length. Hence, vibrators were shown to be useful for identifying unstable rock blocks. In particular, by using trace accumulation length as an indicator, the stability of a block can be evaluated without generating stimulative waves, providing a direction for developing a cost-effective simple method for identifying unstable blocks in future.

  9. Unstable Binary Capsulated Transformants in Pneumococcus

    PubMed Central

    Bernheimer, Harriet P.; Wermundsen, Ingbritt E.

    1969-01-01

    Through transformation reactions, binary capsulated SI-III strains of pneumococci have been isolated that are unstable and lose the SI capsular genome at high frequency. The instability is caused by the specific mutation in the SIII capsular genome common to all of the unstable strains. In the family of strains studied, the SI capsular genome was integrated into the recipient chromosome in at least two loci: one apparently adjacent to the resident capsular genome and a second some distance from it. A hypothesis is presented to explain the instability of the strains on the basis of redundancy of genetic information. PMID:4389232

  10. NOVA SCIENCE UNIT 15, FUNDAMENTAL PARTICLES 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1964

    THE PRINCIPLES OF ATOMIC STRUCTURE WHICH ARE STRESSED ARE THAT ATOMS ARE MADE UP OF A NUCLEUS WITH A POSITIVE CHARGE, SURROUNDED BY ELECTRONS WITH A NEGATIVE CHARGE, AND THAT THERE IS NO CHANGE IN THE ATOM WHEN THE POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE CHARGES ARE EQUAL. EXPERIMENTS ILLUSTRATE THAT CURRENT ELECTRICITY IS ACTUALLY ELECTRONS IN MOTION, THAT THERE…

  11. NOVA SCIENCE UNIT 15, FUNDAMENTAL PARTICLES 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1964

    THE PRINCIPLES OF ATOMIC STRUCTURE WHICH ARE STRESSED ARE THAT ATOMS ARE MADE UP OF A NUCLEUS WITH A POSITIVE CHARGE, SURROUNDED BY ELECTRONS WITH A NEGATIVE CHARGE, AND THAT THERE IS NO CHANGE IN THE ATOM WHEN THE POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE CHARGES ARE EQUAL. EXPERIMENTS ILLUSTRATE THAT CURRENT ELECTRICITY IS ACTUALLY ELECTRONS IN MOTION, THAT THERE…

  12. Experimental realization of a diffractive unstable resonator with Gaussian amplitude of the outcoupled beam using a VECSEL amplifier.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Hans-Christoph; Zeitner, Uwe Detlef

    2009-09-28

    Unstable resonators show an intense discrimination of undesired higher order modes but a high beam quality cannot be obtained with conventional resonators composed of spherical mirrors. In the present paper we demonstrate the possibility to tailor the fundamental mode by inserting diffractive elements into the resonator to generate a desirable output beam profile even for unstable resonators. We show a concept to design such surface structured elements for customizing the amplitude shape of the outcoupled beam. Further we demonstrate the first experimental realization of an unstable diffractive resonator with a Gaussian shaped amplitude profile of the laser beam for a vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL).

  13. Inferring unstable equilibrium configurations from experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgin, L. N.; Wiebe, R.; Spottswood, S. M.; Beberniss, T.

    2016-09-01

    This research considers the structural behavior of slender, mechanically buckled beams and panels of the type commonly found in aerospace structures. The specimens were deflected and then clamped in a rigid frame in order to exhibit snap-through. That is, the initial equilibrium and the buckled (snapped-through) equilibrium configurations both co-existed for the given clamped conditions. In order to transit between these two stable equilibrium configurations (for example, under the action of an externally applied load), it is necessary for the structural component to pass through an intermediate unstable equilibrium configuration. A sequence of sudden impacts was imparted to the system, of various strengths and at various locations. The goal of this impact force was to induce relatively intermediate-sized transients that effectively slowed-down in the vicinity of the unstable equilibrium configuration. Thus, monitoring the velocity of the motion, and specifically its slowing down, should give an indication of the presence of an equilibrium configuration, even though it is unstable and not amenable to direct experimental observation. A digital image correlation (DIC) system was used in conjunction with an instrumented impact hammer to track trajectories and statistical methods used to infer the presence of unstable equilibria in both a beam and a panel.

  14. CP, T and fundamental interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frère, Jean-Marie

    2012-03-01

    We discuss the importance of the CP (simultaneous particle-antiparticle and left-right permutation) and T (time reversal) symmetries in the context of fundamental interactions. We show that they may provide clues to go beyond the 4-D gauge interactions. We insist on the fact that T violation is not associated to a degradation (like in entropy), but simply characterised by different trajectories.

  15. The Fate of Unstable Circumbinary Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    What happens to Tattooine-like planets that are instead in unstable orbits around their binary star system? A new study examines whether such planets will crash into a host star, get ejected from the system, or become captured into orbit around one of their hosts.Orbit Around a DuoAt this point we have unambiguously detected multiple circumbinary planets, raising questions about these planets formation and evolution. Current models suggest that it is unlikely that circumbinary planets would be able to form in the perturbed environment close their host stars. Instead, its thought that the planets formed at a distance and then migrated inwards.One danger such planets face when migrating is encountering ranges of radii where their orbits become unstable. Two scientists at the University of Chicago, Adam Sutherland and Daniel Fabrycky, have studied what happens when circumbinary planets migrate into such a region and develop unstable orbits.Producing Rogue PlanetsTime for planets to either be ejected or collide with one of the two stars, as a function of the planets starting distance (in AU) from the binary barycenter. Colors represent different planetary eccentricities. [Sutherland Fabrycky 2016]Sutherland and Fabrycky used N-body simulations to determine the fates of planets orbiting around a star system consisting of two stars a primary like our Sun and a secondary roughly a tenth of its size that are separated by 1 AU.The authors find that the most common fate for a circumbinary planet with an unstable orbit is ejection from the system; over 80% of unstable planets were ejected. This has interesting implications: if the formation of circumbinary planets is common, this mechanism could be filling the Milky Way with a population of free-floating, rogue planets that no longer are associated with their host star.The next most common outcome for unstable planets is collision with one of their host stars (most often the secondary), resulting inaccretion of the planet

  16. Unstable resonators with excited converging wave

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, N. ); Weber, H. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper reports the properties of unstable resonators with an additional mirror inside or outside the resonator investigated, both experimentally and theoretically. The additional mirror excites the converging wave, and by this, output coupling is decreased without affecting beam quality. Experiments were performed with a pulsed Nd:YAG system. The theoretical model was based on the coupled Kirchhoff integrals and solved numerically. Agreement between theory and experiments indicates that this kind of resonator provides high focusability and maximum extraction efficiency simultaneously, even with low-gain media. This enables one to apply unstable resonators to solid-state lasers with low small-signal gain, like alexandrite or CW-pumped Nd:YAG.

  17. Review of management of unstable elbow fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ozel, Omer; Demircay, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Stable and painless elbow motion is essential for activities of daily living. The elbow joint is the second most commonly dislocated joint in adults. The goals of treatment are to perform a stable fixation of all fractures, to achieve concentric and stable reduction of the elbow and to provide early motion. The treatment modality for complex elbow instability is almost always surgical. The treatment objectives are anatomic reduction, stable fixation, and early rehabilitation of the elbow. The common complications of these unstable fractures include recurrent instability, stiffness, myositis ossifications, heterotopic calcification, and neurovascular dysfunction. We analyzed the management of complex elbow fractures and instabilities on the basis of recent literature and suggested possible guidelines for the treatment in this paper. In conclusion, recognition of the injury pattern and restoration of the joint stability are the prerequisites for any successful treatment of an unstable elbow injury. PMID:26807356

  18. Unstable resonators with a distributed focusing gain.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, T R

    1994-08-20

    The geometrical optics approximation is used to form a model of axisymmetric unstable resonators having distributed focus, gain, and loss. A tapered reflectivity feedback mirror is included. The rate equations for propagation through the focusing gain medium are derived. A unique grid is found for propagation without interpolation along eigenrays in each direction. Numerical examples show the effects of distributed gain and focus on the axial and transverse intensity distributions.

  19. Confocal unstable-resonator semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salzman, J.; Lang, R.; Yariv, A.; Larson, A.

    1986-01-01

    GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructure lasers with a monolithic confocal unstable resonator were demonstrated. The curved mirrors satisfying the confocal condition were fabricated by etching. Close to threshold, the lasers operate in a single lateral mode with a nearly collimated output beam. A single-lobe far-field intensity distribution as narrow as 1.9-deg full width at half maximum was measured.

  20. Special Relativity and Reactions with Unstable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bertulani, C.A.

    2005-10-14

    Dynamical relativistic effects are often neglected in the description of reactions with unstable nuclear beams at intermediate energies (ELab {approx_equal} 100 MeV/nucleon). Evidently, this introduces sizable errors in experimental analysis and theoretical descriptions of these reactions. This is particularly important for the experiments held in GANIL/France, MSU/USA, RIKEN/Japan and GSI/Germany. I review a few examples where relativistic effects have been studied in nucleus-nucleus scattering at intermediate energies.

  1. "Explosively growing" vortices of unstably stratified atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishchenko, O. G.; Horton, W.; Pokhotelov, O. A.; Fedun, V.

    2016-10-01

    A new type of "explosively growing" vortex structure is investigated theoretically in the framework of ideal fluid hydrodynamics. It is shown that vortex structures may arise in convectively unstable atmospheric layers containing background vorticity. From an exact analytical vortex solution the vertical vorticity structure and toroidal speed are derived and analyzed. The assumption that vorticity is constant with height leads to a solution that grows explosively when the flow is inviscid. The results shown are in agreement with observations and laboratory experiments

  2. [Intramedullary nailing of unstable proximal humeral fractures].

    PubMed

    Zifko, B; Poigenfürst, J; Pezzei, C

    1992-04-01

    Unstable subcapital fractures and dislocation fractures of the humerus can usually be set by closed reduction. Stabilization of these fractures by intramedullary pins is a method which avoids damage to the soft tissues around the shoulder. Since 1985, elastic steel pins with special features have been in use. The last 20 mm of the tip of the pins is angulated at 15 degrees, and the distal end is curved in a special way for the last 20 mm. According to our experience, the results after using this method in the treatment of unstable fractures of the surgical neck (ASIF type A II/2) and dislocation fractures (ASIF type A III/2) are fair to very good. For unstable fractures (ASIF type C I/2) and other dislocation fractures (ASIF type C III/2), the method is only suitable if good reduction is possible. Between the end of February 1985 and the end of December 1990, 101 fractures of the proximal end of the humerus were treated by closed reduction and fixation with intramedullary pins. Following fractures in the anatomical neck, aseptic necrosis of the fragment of the head leads to unfavorable results. In two patients, pseudarthrosis with poor function developed. Disturbance of wound healing, postoperative hematoma, infection, myositis ossificans, or Sudeck's desease have not been observed.

  3. Further studies of gravitationally unstable protostellar disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomley, Leslie; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Cassen, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    Models of the solar nebula reveal that it might have been gravitationally unstable, both early and later in its evolution. Such instabilities produce density waves and associated gravitational torques, which are potent agents of angular momentum transport. In previous work, we conducted a series of numerical simulations designed to quantify the effects of gravitational instabilities in a generalizable way (Tomley, Cassen, & Steiman-Cameron 1991). Here we present a second series of simulations in which we examine disks of greater size, increased star/disk mass ratio, and flatter surface density distribution than those in our initial study. The purpose is to represent disks at a later stage of evolution than those already studied, to test the quantitative relations derived in our earlier work and to explore the effects of mass ratio on the results. The new results indicate that the tendencies for unstable, uncooled disks to heat to stability and for dynamical evolution rates to be proportional to cooling rates are general characteristics of the behavior of gravitationally unstable disks. Nevertheless, there are quantitative, and (for strong cooling) even qualitative differences that are revealed in the new simulations, particularly with regard to the cooling rates at which clumping tends to occur.

  4. Combustion Fundamentals Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Increased emphasis is placed on fundamental and generic research at Lewis Research Center with less systems development efforts. This is especially true in combustion research, where the study of combustion fundamentals has grown significantly in order to better address the perceived long term technical needs of the aerospace industry. The main thrusts for this combustion fundamentals program area are as follows: analytical models of combustion processes, model verification experiments, fundamental combustion experiments, and advanced numeric techniques.

  5. Jewish Fundamentalism in Israel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-01

    1 Jewish Fundamentalism in Israeli Society ........................ 3 Definitions , Terminology, and Historical Background...discussed. ad2 .4 .4.o Lustick Jewish Fundamentalism Jewish Fundamentalism in Israeli Society Definitions , Terminology, and Historical Background...fundamentalist movement, requires the application of a broader, but carefully construed definition of "fundamentalist." For the purposes of this study a belief

  6. Exchange Rates and Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Charles; West, Kenneth D.

    2005-01-01

    We show analytically that in a rational expectations present-value model, an asset price manifests near-random walk behavior if fundamentals are I (1) and the factor for discounting future fundamentals is near one. We argue that this result helps explain the well-known puzzle that fundamental variables such as relative money supplies, outputs,…

  7. Exchange Rates and Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Charles; West, Kenneth D.

    2005-01-01

    We show analytically that in a rational expectations present-value model, an asset price manifests near-random walk behavior if fundamentals are I (1) and the factor for discounting future fundamentals is near one. We argue that this result helps explain the well-known puzzle that fundamental variables such as relative money supplies, outputs,…

  8. Particle physics: Axions exposed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Maria Paola

    2016-11-01

    Physicists are hunting for a particle called the axion that could solve two major puzzles in fundamental physics. An ambitious study calculates the expected mass of this particle, which might reshape the experimental searches. See Letter p.69

  9. Transient magnetic reconnection and unstable shear layers.

    PubMed

    Brackbill, J U; Knoll, D A

    2001-03-12

    We study three-dimensional magnetic reconnection caused by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability and differential rotation in subsonic and sub-Alfvenic flows. The flows, which are modeled by the resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations with constant resistivity, are stable in the direction of the magnetic field but unstable perpendicular to the magnetic field. Localized transient reconnection is observed on the KH time scale, and kinetic energy increases with decreasing resistivity. As in flux-transfer events in the Earth's magnetopause boundary layer, bipolar structures in the normal flux and bidirectional jetting away from reconnection zones are observed.

  10. Economics-based optimization of unstable flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huberman, B. A.; Helbing, D.

    1999-07-01

    As an example for the optimization of unstable flows, we present an economics-based method for deciding the optimal rates at which vehicles are allowed to enter a highway. It exploits the naturally occurring fluctuations of traffic flow and is flexible enough to adapt in real time to the transient flow characteristics of road traffic. Simulations based on realistic parameter values show that this strategy is feasible for naturally occurring traffic, and that even far from optimality, injection policies can improve traffic flow. Moreover, the same method can be applied to the optimization of flows of gases and granular media.

  11. Exploring the Physics of Unstable Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volya, Alexander

    In this presentation the Continuum Shell Model (CSM) approach is advertised as a powerful theoretical tool for studying physics of unstable nuclei. The approach is illustrated using 17O as an example, which is followed by a brief presentation of the general CSM formalism. The successes of the CSM are highlighted and references are provided throughout the text. As an example, the CSM is applied perturbatively to 20O allowing one to explore the effects of continuum on positions of weakly bound states and low-lying resonances, as well as to discern some effects of threshold discontinuity.

  12. Confocal unstable optical resonator with asymmetrical magnification

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, P.

    1981-12-01

    The appropriate combination of spherical and cylindrical mirrors allows one to arrange an unstable laser cavity with asymmetrical magnification and to generate collimated output as well. By introducing two additional cylindrical mirrors into the cavity the aberration problems of tilted mirror systems are avoided. On the other hand, this modification is a low-cost alternative to cavities with diamond-turned mirrors with ellipsoidal surface curvature. In the geometrical-optics limit there exists a unique combination of mirror radii of curvature for a given ratio of magnification at fixed distances between the mirrors.

  13. Confocal unstable optical resonator with asymmetrical magnification.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, P

    1981-12-01

    The appropriate combination of spherical and cylindrical mirrors allows one to arrange an unstable laser cavity with asymmetrical magnification and to generate collimated output as well. By introducing two additional cylindrical mirrors into the cavity the aberration problems of tilted mirror systems are avoided. On the other hand, this modification is a low-cost alternative to cavities with diamond-turned mirrors with ellipsoidal surface curvature. In the geometrical-optics limit there exists a unique combination of mirror radii of curvature for a given ratio of magnification at fixed distances between the mirrors.

  14. Black holes and fundamental fields in numerical relativity: Initial data construction and evolution of bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Hirotada; Witek, Helvi; Cardoso, Vitor

    2014-05-01

    Fundamental fields are a natural outcome in cosmology and particle physics and might therefore serve as a proxy for more complex interactions. The equivalence principle implies that all forms of matter gravitate, and one therefore expects relevant, universal imprints of new physics in strong field gravity, such as that encountered close to black holes. Fundamental fields in the vicinities of supermassive black holes give rise to extremely long-lived, or even unstable, configurations, which slowly extract angular momentum from the black hole or simply evolve nonlinearly over long time scales, with important implications for particle physics and gravitational-wave physics. Here, we perform a fully nonlinear study of scalar-field condensates around rotating black holes. We provide novel ways to specify initial data for the Einstein—Klein—Gordon system, with potential applications in a variety of scenarios. Our numerical results confirm the existence of long-lived bar modes, which act as lighthouses for gravitational wave emission: the scalar field condenses outside the black hole geometry and acts as a constant frequency gravitational-wave source for very long time scales. This effect could turn out to be a potential signature of beyond standard model physics and also a promising source of gravitational waves for future gravitational-wave detectors.

  15. Boundary between stable and unstable regimes of accretion. Ordered and chaotic unstable regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinova, A. A.; Romanova, M. M.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new study of the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable regime of accretion on to rotating magnetized stars in a set of high grid resolution three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations performed in low-viscosity discs. We find that the boundary between the stable and unstable regimes is determined almost entirely by the fastness parameter ωs = Ω⋆/ΩK(rm), where Ω⋆ is the angular velocity of the star and ΩK(rm) is the angular velocity of the Keplerian disc at the disc-magnetosphere boundary r = rm. We found that accretion is unstable if ωs ≲ 0.6. Accretion through instabilities is present in stars with different magnetospheric sizes. However, only in stars with relatively small magnetospheres, rm/R⋆ ≲ 7, do the unstable tongues produce chaotic hotspots on the stellar surface and irregular light curves. At even smaller values of the fastness parameter, ωs ≲ 0.45, multiple irregular tongues merge, forming one or two ordered unstable tongues that rotate with the angular frequency of the inner disc. This transition occurs in stars with even smaller magnetospheres, rm/R⋆ ≲ 4.2. Most of our simulations were performed at a small tilt of the dipole magnetosphere, Θ = 5°, and a small viscosity parameter α = 0.02. Test simulations at higher α values show that many more cases become unstable, and the light curves become even more irregular. Test simulations at larger tilts of the dipole Θ show that instability is present, however, accretion in two funnel streams dominates if Θ ≳ 15°. The results of these simulations can be applied to accreting magnetized stars with relatively small magnetospheres: Classical T Tauri stars, accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars, and cataclysmic variables.

  16. Geometric formulation of unstable-resonator design and application to self-collimating unstable-resonator diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    A new set of design parameters for unstable resonators is presented that yields simpler expressions for the mirror and beam radii and magnification than those given by the usual g parameters. The new formalism is applied to determine the design of a solid unstable resonator of index n with a self-collimated output beam, applicable to unstable-resonator diode lasers.

  17. Management of acute unstable acromioclavicular joint injuries.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Luis Natera; Reiriz, Juan Sarasquete

    2016-12-01

    Surgical management of acute unstable acromioclavicular joint injuries should be focused on realigning the torn ends of the ligaments to allow for healing potential. The most widely utilized treatment methods incorporate the use of metal hardware, which can alter the biomechanics of the acromioclavicular joint. This leads to a second surgical procedure for hardware removal once the ligaments have healed. Patients with unstable acromioclavicular joint injuries managed with arthroscopy-assisted procedures have shown good and excellent clinical outcomes, without the need for a second operation. These procedures incorporate a coracoclavicular suspension device aimed to function as an internal brace, narrowing the coracoclavicular space thus allowing for healing of the torn coracoclavicular ligaments. The lesser morbidity of a minimally invasive approach and the possibility to diagnose and treat concomitant intraarticular injuries; no obligatory implant removal, and the possibility of having a straight visualization of the inferior aspect of the base of the coracoid (convenient when placing coracoclavicular fixation systems) are the main advantages of the arthroscopic approach over classic open procedures. This article consists on a narrative review of the literature in regard to the management of acute acromioclavicular joint instability.

  18. Multijoint error compensation mediates unstable object control.

    PubMed

    Cluff, Tyler; Manos, Aspasia; Lee, Timothy D; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2012-08-01

    A key feature of skilled object control is the ability to correct performance errors. This process is not straightforward for unstable objects (e.g., inverted pendulum or "stick" balancing) because the mechanics of the object are sensitive to small control errors, which can lead to rapid performance changes. In this study, we have characterized joint recruitment and coordination processes in an unstable object control task. Our objective was to determine whether skill acquisition involves changes in the recruitment of individual joints or distributed error compensation. To address this problem, we monitored stick-balancing performance across four experimental sessions. We confirmed that subjects learned the task by showing an increase in the stability and length of balancing trials across training sessions. We demonstrated that motor learning led to the development of a multijoint error compensation strategy such that after training, subjects preferentially constrained joint angle variance that jeopardized task performance. The selective constraint of destabilizing joint angle variance was an important metric of motor learning. Finally, we performed a combined uncontrolled manifold-permutation analysis to ensure the variance structure was not confounded by differences in the variance of individual joint angles. We showed that reliance on multijoint error compensation increased, whereas individual joint variation (primarily at the wrist joint) decreased systematically with training. We propose a learning mechanism that is based on the accurate estimation of sensory states.

  19. Uranus' Unstable Moons: Collision Outcomes and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cave, Rosemary; Agnor, Craig B.

    2017-06-01

    Orbital integrations of the Uranian satellite system demonstrate that the closest groups of satellites (Cressida-Desdemona and Cupid-Belinda-Perdita) will evolve to crossing orbits on timescales of 103 - 107 years (Duncan and Lissauer 1997, French and Showalter 2012). Thus, collisions between neighbouring Uranian satellites appear to be an inevitable aspect of the system's evolution.For low-velocity collisions in free space, simple mergers are a plausible outcome. However, when impacts occur near a primary's Roche zone, strong tidal forces complicate the outcomes. Previous analytic work, examining collisions of two solid spheres in a strong tidal field, demonstrates that accretion may be constrained by the mass ratio and bulk density of the impacting bodies (Ohtsuki 1993, Canup and Esposito 1995). Further, direct modelling of collisions between gravitational aggregates near Saturn's F-ring shows complex non-merging outcomes (Karjalainen 2007, Hyodo and Ohtsuki 2014).We are examining the outcomes of collisions between Uranus' unstable satellites. We are using the Rebound N-body code to conduct direct simulations of collisions in the tidal field of Uranus, treating satellites as gravitationally bound rubble piles. These models include a range of satellite densities, impact velocities and orientations appropriate to the most unstable satellites. At the meeting we shall present our model results, and discuss how collision outcomes constrain the bulk composition and interior structure of these satellites, and how these outcomes may inform the past and future evolution of the system.

  20. Viscosity Prescription for Gravitationally Unstable Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2015-05-01

    Gravitationally unstable accretion disks emerge in a variety of astrophysical contexts—giant planet formation, FU Orioni outbursts, feeding of active galactic nuclei, and the origin of Pop III stars. When a gravitationally unstable disk is unable to cool rapidly, it settles into a quasi-stationary, fluctuating gravitoturbulent state, in which its Toomre Q remains close to a constant value {{Q}0}∼ 1. Here we develop an analytical formalism describing the evolution of such a disk, which is based on the assumptions of Q={{Q}0} and local thermal equilibrium. Our approach works in the presence of additional sources of angular momentum transport (e.g., MRI), as well as external irradiation. Thermal balance dictates a unique value of the gravitoturbulent stress {{α }gt} driving disk evolution, which is a function of the local surface density and angular frequency. We compare this approach with other commonly used gravitoturbulent viscosity prescriptions, which specify the explicit dependence of stress {{α }gt} on Toomre Q in an ad hoc fashion, and identify the ones that provide consistent results. We nevertheless argue that our Q={{Q}0} approach is more flexible, robust, and straightforward and should be given preference in applications. We illustrate this with a couple of analytical calculations—locations of the snow line and of the outer edge of the dead zone in a gravitoturbulent protoplanetary disk—which clearly show the simplicity and versatility of the Q={{Q}0} approach.

  1. Unstable fronts and motile structures formed by microrollers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Michelle; Delmotte, Blaise; Youssef, Mena; Sacanna, Stefano; Donev, Aleksandar; Chaikin, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Condensation of objects into stable clusters occurs naturally in equilibrium and driven systems. It is commonly held that potential interactions, depletion forces, or sensing are the only mechanisms which can create long-lived compact structures. Here we show that persistent motile structures can form spontaneously from hydrodynamic interactions alone, with no sensing or potential interactions. We study this structure formation in a system of colloidal rollers suspended and translating above a floor, using both experiments and large-scale three-dimensional simulations. In this system, clusters originate from a previously unreported fingering instability, where fingers pinch off from an unstable front to form autonomous `critters’, whose size is selected by the height of the particles above the floor. These critters are a stable state of the system, move much faster than individual particles, and quickly respond to a changing drive. With speed and direction set by a rotating magnetic field, these active structures offer interesting possibilities for guided transport, flow generation, and mixing at the microscale.

  2. Network analysis of chaotic systems through unstable periodic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Miki U.; Saiki, Yoshitaka

    2017-08-01

    A chaotic motion can be considered an irregular transition process near unstable periodic orbits embedded densely in a chaotic set. Therefore, unstable periodic orbits have been used to characterize properties of chaos. Statistical quantities of chaos such as natural measures and fractal dimensions can be determined in terms of unstable periodic orbits. Unstable periodic orbits that can provide good approximations to averaged quantities of chaos or turbulence are also known to exist. However, it is not clear what type of unstable periodic orbits can capture them. In this paper, a model for an irregular transition process of a chaotic motion among unstable periodic orbits as nodes is constructed by using a network. We show that unstable periodic orbits which have lots of links in the network tend to capture time averaged properties of chaos. A scale-free property of the degree distribution is also observed.

  3. 2001 QR322: a dynamically unstable Neptune Trojan?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, J.; Lykawka, P. S.

    2010-06-01

    Since early work on the stability of the first Neptunian Trojan, 2001 QR322, suggested that it was a dynamically stable, primordial body, it has been assumed that this applies to both that object and its more recently discovered brethren. However, it seems that things are no longer so clear-cut. In this work, we present the results of detailed dynamical simulations of the orbital behaviour of 2001 QR322. Using an ephemeris for the object that has significantly improved since earlier works, we follow the evolution of 19683 test particles, placed on orbits within the observational error ellipse of 2001 QR322's orbit, for a period of 1Gyr. We find that majority of these `clones' of 2001 QR322 are dynamically unstable, exhibiting a near-exponential decay from both the Neptunian Trojan cloud (decay half-life of ~550Myr) and the Solar system (decay half-life of ~590Myr). The stability of the object within Neptune's Trojan cloud is found to be strongly dependent on the initial semimajor axis used, with these objects located at a >= 30.30au being significantly less stable than those interior to this value, as a result of their having initial libration amplitudes very close to a critical threshold dividing regular and irregular motion, located at ~70°-75° (full extent of angular motion). This result suggests that if 2001 QR322 is a primordial Neptunian Trojan, it must be a representative of a population that was once significantly larger than that we see today and adds weight to the idea that the Neptune Trojans may represent a significant source of objects moving on unstable orbits between the giant planets (the Centaurs).

  4. Fundamental Physical Constants

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 121 CODATA Fundamental Physical Constants (Web, free access)   This site, developed in the Physics Laboratory at NIST, addresses three topics: fundamental physical constants, the International System of Units (SI), which is the modern metric system, and expressing the uncertainty of measurement results.

  5. Fundamentals of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2003-01-01

    No other book on the market today can match the success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! In a breezy, easy-to-understand style the book offers a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and helps readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving.

  6. Phase Transformation Behavior at Low Temperature in Hydrothermal Treatment of Stable and Unstable Titania Sol

    PubMed

    So; Park; Kim; Moon

    1997-07-15

    Nanosize titania sol was prepared from titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) and conditions for the formation of stable sol were identified. As the H+/TTIP mole ratio decreased and H2O/TTIP mole ratio increased, stable sol was likely to be formed. The size and crystallinity remained unchanged after hydrothermal treatment of the stable sol at between 160 and 240°C. However, hydrothermal treatment of unstable sol produced rod-like particles and crystallinity of particles was changed from anatase to rutile. This difference in phase transformation at low hydrothermal treatment temperature was likely to be caused by the fact that stable sol remained to be stable even after hydrothermal treatment, while unstable sol had a tendency to be aggregated.

  7. Reverse wave suppression in unstable ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirels, H.; Chodzko, R. A.; Bernard, J. M.; Giedt, R. R.; Coffer, J. G.

    1984-12-01

    Criteria for effective reverse-wave suppression (RWS) in CW and pulsed unstable ring lasers with inhomogeneously broadened media are determined theoretically, and the performance of a CW HF linear ring resonator (Chodzko et al., 1976) and of two configurations of a pulsed CO2 annular beam-rotation/internal-axicon (BRIA) resonator (Bullock et al., 1979) without and with an RWS mirror is evaluated experimentally. In the CW laser, the average forward-wave (FW) and RW power values are shown to be 61 and 39 W without RWS and 110 and 2.7 W with RWS, corresponding to a FW/RW power ratio of 41; in the pulsed BRIA lasers, power ratios of about 20 are achieved, but the RWS effectiveness is found to be highly sensitive to RWS-mirror and cavity misalignment. Graphs, drawings, tables, and photographs of typical waveforms are included.

  8. Propagating unstable wavelets in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Patrick M.; Madhavan, Adarsh; Reid, Matthew P.; Vigmond, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    Solitonlike propagating modes have been proposed for excitable tissue, but have never been measured in cardiac tissue. In this study, we simulate an experimental protocol to elicit these propagating unstable wavelets (PUWs) in a detailed three-dimensional ventricular wedge preparation. PUWs appear as fixed-shape wavelets that propagate only in the direction of cardiac fibers, with conduction velocity approximately 40% slower than normal action potential excitation. We investigate their properties, demonstrating that PUWs are not true solitons. The range of stimuli for which PUWs were elicited was very narrow (several orders of magnitude lower than the stimulus strength itself), but increased with reduced sodium conductance and reduced coupling in nonlongitudinal directions. We show that the phenomenon does not depend on the particular membrane representation used or the shape of the stimulating electrode.

  9. Unstable avoided crossing in coupled spinor condensates.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Nathan R; Dalla Torre, Emanuele G; Demler, Eugene

    2014-08-08

    We consider the dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate with two internal states, coupled through a coherent drive. We focus on a specific quench protocol, in which the sign of the coupling field is suddenly changed. At a mean-field level, the system is transferred from a minimum to a maximum of the coupling energy and can remain dynamically stable, in spite of the development of negative-frequency modes. In the presence of a nonzero detuning between the two states, the "charge" and "spin" modes couple, giving rise to an unstable avoided crossing. This phenomenon is generic to systems with two dispersing modes away from equilibrium and constitutes an example of class-I(o) nonequilibrium pattern formation in quantum systems.

  10. Asymptotic analysis of loaded, unstable, cylindrical resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Chitanvis, S.M. )

    1991-09-01

    I show that the solution of the electromagnetic equations for a loaded cavity with a large Fresnel number {ital F} ({ital F}{gt}100) can be obtained analytically. This asymptotic solution is obtained as a perturbation of the geometrical-optics solution, with edge-diffraction effects appearing as ripples of order 1/({ital F}){sup 1/2}. The basic technique is to obtain a series expansion of the relevant integrals in powers of 1/({ital F}){sup 1/2}. This scheme works even better if the laser is operating in the saturated regime. This method of solution represents an extension of the method of Butts and Avizonis (J. Opt. Soc. Am. {bold 68}, 1072 (1978)), which is applicable to empty, cylindrical, unstable resonators.

  11. The free energy of mechanically unstable phases

    PubMed Central

    van de Walle, A.; Hong, Q.; Kadkhodaei, S.; Sun, R.

    2015-01-01

    Phase diagrams provide ‘roadmaps' to the possible states of matter. Their determination traditionally rests on the assumption that all phases, even unstable ones, have well-defined free energies under all conditions. However, this assumption is commonly violated in condensed phases due to mechanical instabilities. This long-standing problem impedes thermodynamic database development, as pragmatic attempts at solving this problem involve delicate extrapolations that are highly nonunique and that lack an underlying theoretical justification. Here we propose an efficient computational solution to this problem that has a simple interpretation, both as a topological partitioning of atomic configuration space and as a minimally constrained physical system. Our natural scheme smoothly extends the free energy of stable phases, without relying on extrapolation, thus enabling a formal assessment of widely used extrapolation schemes. PMID:26130613

  12. Self-collimated unstable resonator semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Self-collimation of the output is achieved in an unstable resonator semiconductor laser by providing a large concave mirror M sub 1 and a small convex mirror M sub 2 on opposite surfaces of a semiconductor body of a material having an effective index of refraction denoted by n, where the respective mirror radii R sub 1, R sub 2 and beam radii r sub 1, r sub 2 are chosen to satisfy a condition (R sub 2)/(1 + r sub 1) = (n - 1)/n, with a value of geometric magnification 1 less than or equal to M less than or equal to (n + 1)/(n - 1) where r sub 1 and r sub 2 are the radii of counterpropagating beams at respective mirrors of radii R sub 1 and R sub 2.

  13. Capture cross sections on unstable nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Escher, J. E.; Scielzo, N.; Bedrossian, P.; Ilieva, R. S.; Humby, P.; Cooper, N.; Goddard, P. M.; Werner, V.; Tornow, W.; Rusev, G.; Kelley, J. H.; Pietralla, N.; Scheck, M.; Savran, D.; Löher, B.; Yates, S. W.; Crider, B. P.; Peters, E. E.; Tsoneva, N.; Goriely, S.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate neutron-capture cross sections on unstable nuclei near the line of beta stability are crucial for understanding the s-process nucleosynthesis. However, neutron-capture cross sections for short-lived radionuclides are difficult to measure due to the fact that the measurements require both highly radioactive samples and intense neutron sources. Essential ingredients for describing the γ decays following neutron capture are the γ-ray strength function and level densities. We will compare different indirect approaches for obtaining the most relevant observables that can constrain Hauser-Feshbach statistical-model calculations of capture cross sections. Specifically, we will consider photon scattering using monoenergetic and 100% linearly polarized photon beams. Challenges that exist on the path to obtaining neutron-capture cross sections for reactions on isotopes near and far from stability will be discussed.

  14. Isopycnal eddy mixing across the Kuroshio Extension: Stable versus unstable states in an eddying model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ru; Gille, Sarah T.; McClean, Julie L.

    2017-05-01

    The Kuroshio Extension (KE) jet transitions between stable and unstable states on interannual time scales. Cross-jet eddy mixing in the two states is contrasted in the KE region (28°-40°N, 125°-165°E), using a global eddying 0.1° configuration of the Parallel Ocean Program with online numerical particles. The 4 year period chosen (June 1994 to May 1998) covers a full cycle of the stable state, unstable state and the transition period. Large values of cross-jet eddy diffusivities within the KE jet are concentrated in the upper 1000 m. In the upper ocean, elevated cross-jet mixing within the KE jet is mainly concentrated in the downstream part of the KE jet, where the jet is weak but eddy activity is strong. The simulated time-mean KE jet is more intense and extends further east in the stable state than in the unstable state. Consequently, strong cross-jet mixing within the KE jet is located west of 150°E during June 1996 to May 1997 (a typical unstable state), but east of 150°E during June 1995 to May 1996 (a typical stable state). However, average mixing within the KE jet is indistinguishable in the typical stable and unstable states. In the deep ocean, mixing is strongly influenced by topography, and thus their horizontal structures have less inter-annual variability than in the upper ocean. One caveat is that results here cover one representative cycle of the two states. To obtain the climate mean mixing structures for the stable or unstable state, one would need numerical output covering a period much longer than 4 years.

  15. Thermodynamics fundamentals of energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Nicolae

    The work reported in the chapters 1-5 focuses on the fundamentals of heat transfer, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics and electrical phenomena related to the conversion of one form of energy to another. Chapter 6 is a re-examination of the fundamental heat transfer problem of how to connect a finite-size heat generating volume to a concentrated sink. Chapter 1 extends to electrical machines the combined thermodynamics and heat transfer optimization approach that has been developed for heat engines. The conversion efficiency at maximum power is 1/2. When, as in specific applications, the operating temperature of windings must not exceed a specified level, the power output is lower and efficiency higher. Chapter 2 addresses the fundamental problem of determining the optimal history (regime of operation) of a battery so that the work output is maximum. Chapters 3 and 4 report the energy conversion aspects of an expanding mixture of hot particles, steam and liquid water. At the elemental level, steam annuli develop around the spherical drops as time increases. At the mixture level, the density decreases while the pressure and velocity increases. Chapter 4 describes numerically, based on the finite element method, the time evolution of the expanding mixture of hot spherical particles, steam and water. The fluid particles are moved in time in a Lagrangian manner to simulate the change of the domain configuration. Chapter 5 describes the process of thermal interaction between the molten material and water. In the second part of the chapter the model accounts for the irreversibility due to the flow of the mixture through the cracks of the mixing vessel. The approach presented in this chapter is based on exergy analysis and represents a departure from the line of inquiry that was followed in chapters 3-4. Chapter 6 shows that the geometry of the heat flow path between a volume and one point can be optimized in two fundamentally different ways. In the "growth" method the

  16. Astrophysical quests for neutron capture data of unstable nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käppeler, F.

    2016-11-01

    The abundances of the chemical elements heavier than iron can be attributed in about equal parts to the r and to the s process, which are taking place in supernova explosions and during the He and C burning phases of stellar evolution, respectively. So far, quantitative studies on the extremely short-lived neutron-rich nuclei constituting the ( n, γ) network of the r process are out of reach. On the contrary, the situation for the s -process is far advanced, as the reaction path of the s process from 12C to the Pb/Bi region is located within the valley of stability. Accordingly, a comprehensive database of experimental ( n, γ) cross sections has been established. While for many stable isotopes the necessary accuracy is still to be reached, reliable cross sections for the involved unstable isotopes are almost completely missing. Because of the intrinsic γ background of radioactive samples, successful time-of-flight measurements are depending on intense pulsed neutron sources. Such data are fundamental for our understanding of branchings in the s -process reaction path, which carry important model-independent information on neutron flux and temperature in the deep stellar interior.

  17. Unstable whistlers and Bernstein waves within the front of supercritical perpendicular shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschietti, Laurent; Lembege, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    In supercritical shocks a significant fraction of ions is reflected at the steep shock ramp and carries a considerable amount of energy. The existence of reflected ions enables streaming instabilities to develop which are excited by the relative drifts between the populations of incoming ions, reflected ions, and electrons. The processes are fundamental to the transformation of directed kinetic energy into thermal energy, a tenet of shock physics. We model the particle distributions as a broad electron population and two ion populations, namely a core and a beam (representing the reflected ions) in order to investigate the kinetic instabilities possible under various wave propagation angles. Recently, assuming the ion beam is directed along the shock normal at 90° to the magnetic field Bo, we analyzed the linear dispersion properties by computing the full electromagnetic dielectric tensor [Muschietti and Lembege, AGU Fall meeting 2015]. Three types of waves were shown to be unstable: (1) Oblique whistlers with wavelengths about the ion inertia length which propagate toward upstream at angles about 50° to the magnetic field. Frequencies are a few times the lower-hybrid. The waves share many similarities to the obliquely propagating whistlers measured in detail by Polar [Hull et al., JGR 117, 2012]. (2) Quasi-perpendicular whistlers with wavelength covering a fraction of the electron inertia length which propagate toward downstream at angles larger than 80° to Bo. Frequencies are close to the lower-hybrid. (3) Bernstein waves with wavelengths close to the electron gyroradius which propagate toward upstream at angles within 5° of perpendicular to the magnetic field. Frequencies are close to the electron cyclotron. The waves have similarities to those reported by Wind and Stereo [Breneman et al., JGR 118, 2013; Wilson et al., JGR 115, 2010]. We will present electromagnetic 1D3V PIC simulations with predetermined propagation angles which illustrate the three types

  18. Experimental and numerical study on the unstable crack growth under uniaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okinaka, T.; Wijerathne, L.

    2017-02-01

    Image analysis with ultra-high-speed camera and two dimensional dynamic numerical analysis are applied to study the rapid unstable growth of wing crack under the uniaxial compression. Growing wing crack terminates and restarts its unstable rapid growth in some cases. Such a termination and restart behavior of the growing crack is studied through the experiment and numerical analysis in this work. First, rectangle transparent specimen, including the initial crack inclined to the compressive axis, is subjected to the uniaxial compression till the wing cracks start unstable rapid growth from both ends of the initial crack. Images of growing cracks and those of stress distribution, visualized as the photo-elastic fringe pattern, are captured by the high speed camera with the frame rate of 500k frames per second. The behavior of growing crack and the change in the stress field due to the crack growth are discussed through the captured images. Next, two dimensional dynamic numerical analysis is carried out. PDS-FEM (Particle Discretization Scheme), which allows the discontinuity of the displacement in the continuous analytical domain, is combined with the central difference time integration scheme to simulate the rapid unstable growth of the wing crack dynamically. The accuracy of the proposed simulation is discussed through the comparison with the images, captured by the experiment.

  19. Levitated Optomechanics for Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Muddassar; Bateman, James; Vovrosh, Jamie; Hempston, David; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2015-05-01

    Optomechanics with levitated nano- and microparticles is believed to form a platform for testing fundamental principles of quantum physics, as well as find applications in sensing. We will report on a new scheme to trap nanoparticles, which is based on a parabolic mirror with a numerical aperture of 1. Combined with achromatic focussing, the setup is a cheap and readily straightforward solution to trapping nanoparticles for further study. Here, we report on the latest progress made in experimentation with levitated nanoparticles; these include the trapping of 100 nm nanodiamonds (with NV-centres) down to 1 mbar as well as the trapping of 50 nm Silica spheres down to 10?4 mbar without any form of feedback cooling. We will also report on the progress to implement feedback stabilisation of the centre of mass motion of the trapped particle using digital electronics. Finally, we argue that such a stabilised particle trap can be the particle source for a nanoparticle matterwave interferometer. We will present our Talbot interferometer scheme, which holds promise to test the quantum superposition principle in the new mass range of 106 amu. EPSRC, John Templeton Foundation.

  20. Nucleation via an unstable intermediate phase.

    PubMed

    Sear, Richard P

    2009-08-21

    The pathway for crystallization from dilute vapors and solutions is often observed to take a detour via a liquid or concentrated-solution phase. For example, in moist subzero air, droplets of liquid water form, which then freeze. In this example and in many others, an intermediate phase (here liquid water) is dramatically accelerating the kinetics of a phase transition between two other phases (water vapor and ice). Here we study this phenomenon via exact computer simulations of a simple lattice model. Surprisingly, we find that the rate of nucleation of the new equilibrium phase is actually fastest when the intermediate phase is slightly unstable in the bulk, i.e., has a slightly higher free energy than the phase we start in. Nucleation occurs at a concave part of the surface and microscopic amounts of the intermediate phase can form there even before the phase is stable in the bulk. As the nucleus of the equilibrium phase is microscopic, this allows nucleation to occur effectively in the intermediate phase before it is stable in the bulk.

  1. Pulse dynamics in an unstable medium

    SciTech Connect

    Balmforth, N.J.; Ierley, G.R.; Worthing, R.

    1997-02-01

    A study is presented of a one-dimensional, nonlinear partial differential equation that describes evolution of dispersive, long wave instability. The solutions, under certain specific conditions, take the form of trains of well-separated pulses. The dynamics of such patterns of pulses is investigated using singular perturbation theory and numerical simulation. These tools permit the formulation of a theory of pulse interaction and enable the mapping out of the range of behavior in parameter space. There are regimes in which steady trains form; such states can be studied with the asymptotic, pulse-interaction theory. In other regimes, pulse trains are unstable to global, wavelike modes or radiation. This can precipitate more violent phenomena involving pulse creation or generate oscillating states which may follow Shil`nikov`s route to temporal chaos. The asymptotic theory is generalized to take some account of radiative dynamics. In the limit of small dispersion, steady trains largely cease to exist; the system follows various pathways to temporal complexity, and typical bifurcation sequences are sketched out. The investigation guides one to a critical appraisal of the asymptotic theory and uncovers the wealth of different types of behavior present in the system.

  2. Pulse dynamics in an unstable medium

    SciTech Connect

    Balmforth, N.J.; Ierley, G.R.; Worthing, R.

    1995-05-01

    A study is presented of a one-dimensional, nonlinear partial differential equation that describes evolution of dispersive, long-wave instability. The solutions, under certain specific conditions, take the form of trains of well-separated pulses. The dynamics of such patterns of pulses is investigated using singular perturbation theory and with numerical simulation. These tools permit the formulation of a theory of pulse interaction, and enable the mapping out of the range of behavior in parameter space. There are regimes in which steady trains form; such states can be studied with the asymptotic, pulse-interaction theory. In other regimes, pulse trains are unstable to global, wave-like modes or its radiation. This can precipitate more violent phenomena involving pulse creation, or generate periodic states which may follow Shil`nikov`s route to temporal chaos. The asymptotic theory is generalized lo take some account of radiative dynamics. In the limit of small dispersion, steady trains largely cease to exist; the system follows various pathways to temporal complexity and typical-bifurcation sequences are sketched out. The investigation guides us to a critical appraisal of the asymptotic theory and uncovers the wealth of different types of behavior present in the system.

  3. Grating tuned unstable resonator laser cavity

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Larry C.

    1982-01-01

    An unstable resonator to be used in high power, narrow line CO.sub.2 pump lasers comprises an array of four reflectors in a ring configuration wherein spherical and planar wavefronts are separated from each other along separate optical paths and only the planar wavefronts are impinged on a plane grating for line tuning. The reflector array comprises a concave mirror for reflecting incident spherical waves as plane waves along an output axis to form an output beam. A plane grating on the output axis is oriented to reflect a portion of the output beam off axis onto a planar relay mirror spaced apart from the output axis in proximity to the concave mirror. The relay mirror reflects plane waves from the grating to impinge on a convex expanding mirror spaced apart from the output axis in proximity to the grating. The expanding mirror reflects the incident planar waves as spherical waves to illuminate the concave mirror. Tuning is provided by rotating the plane grating about an axis normal to the output axis.

  4. Order-parameter model for unstable multilane traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubashevsky, Ihor A.; Mahnke, Reinhard

    2000-11-01

    We discuss a phenomenological approach to the description of unstable vehicle motion on multilane highways that explains in a simple way the observed sequence of the ``free flow <--> synchronized mode <--> jam'' phase transitions as well as the hysteresis in these transitions. We introduce a variable called an order parameter that accounts for possible correlations in the vehicle motion at different lanes. So, it is principally due to the ``many-body'' effects in the car interaction in contrast to such variables as the mean car density and velocity being actually the zeroth and first moments of the ``one-particle'' distribution function. Therefore, we regard the order parameter as an additional independent state variable of traffic flow. We assume that these correlations are due to a small group of ``fast'' drivers and by taking into account the general properties of the driver behavior we formulate a governing equation for the order parameter. In this context we analyze the instability of homogeneous traffic flow that manifested itself in the above-mentioned phase transitions and gave rise to the hysteresis in both of them. Besides, the jam is characterized by the vehicle flows at different lanes which are independent of one another. We specify a certain simplified model in order to study the general features of the car cluster self-formation under the ``free flow <--> synchronized motion'' phase transition. In particular, we show that the main local parameters of the developed cluster are determined by the state characteristics of vehicle motion only.

  5. Fundamentals of the dwarf fundamental plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, M. L.; Vaduvescu, O.; Pozo Nunez, F.; Barr Dominguez, A.; Fingerhut, R.; Unda-Sanzana, E.; Li, B.; Albrecht, M.

    2012-04-01

    Aims: Star-forming dwarfs are studied to elucidate the physical underpinnings of their fundamental plane. Processes controlling dynamics are evaluated, connections between quiescent and bursting dwarfs are examined, and the viability of using structural properties of dwarfs to determine distances is assessed. Methods: Deep surface photometry in Ks is presented for 19 star-forming dwarfs. The data are amalgamated with previously published observations to create a sample of 66 galaxies suitable for exploring how global properties and kinematics are connected. Results: It is confirmed that residuals in the Tully-Fisher relation are correlated with surface brightness, but that even after accomodating the surface brightness dependence through the dwarf fundamental plane, residuals in absolute magnitude are far larger than expected from observational errors. Rather, a morefundamental plane is identified which connects the potential to HI line width and surface brightness. Residuals correlate with the axis ratio in a way which can be accommodated by recognizing the galaxies to be oblate spheroids viewed at varying angles. Correction of surface brightnesses to face-on leads to a correlation among the potential, line width, and surface brightness for which residuals are entirely attributable to observational uncertainties. The mean mass-to-light ratio of the diffuse component of the galaxies is constrained to be 0.88 ± 0.20 in Ks. Blue compact dwarfs lie in the same plane as dwarf irregulars. The dependence of the potential on line width is less strong than expected for virialized systems, but this may be because surface brightness is acting as a proxy for variations in the mass-to-light ratio from galaxy to galaxy. Altogether, the observations suggest that gas motions are predominantly disordered and isotropic, that they are a consequence of gravity, not turbulence, and that the mass and scale of dark matter haloes scale with the amount and distribution of luminous matter

  6. The analysis and diagnosis of unstable behavior of the blood vessel wall with an aneurysm based on noise science.

    PubMed

    Yokobori, A Toshimitsu; Owa, Michiaki; Ichiki, Masataka; Satoh, Tomoki; Ohtomo, Yuji; Satoh, Yusuke; Ohgoshi, Seiichi; Kinoshita, Yoshihiko; Karino, Shinichi

    2006-08-01

    Previously, one of the authors developed a noninvasive measurement method of acceleration and deceleration during the expansion process of the blood vessel wall under pulsatile pressure flow by measuring the strain rate of the blood vessel wall using a supersonic Doppler effect sensor aided by computer analysis (DPC method). In this paper, on the basis of the analysis of chaos theory, that is, the complexity of science, the unstable behavior of the blood vessel wall with an aneurysm was investigated by identifying the characteristic DPC wave forms induced by the onset and progression of aneurysm. These results showed that unstable dynamic behavior of the blood vessel wall occurs due to the progression of the aneurysm. Furthermore, using the theoretical analysis of chaos, this unstable behavior of the blood vessel wall was quantified and the fundamental principle of a noninvasive diagnostic method of the progressive degree of aneurysm was proposed.

  7. Arguing against fundamentality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Kerry

    This paper aims to open up discussion on the relationship between fundamentality and naturalism, and in particular on the question of whether fundamentality may be denied on naturalistic grounds. A historico-inductive argument for an anti-fundamentalist conclusion, prominent within the contemporary metaphysical literature, is examined; finding it wanting, an alternative 'internal' strategy is proposed. By means of an example from the history of modern physics - namely S-matrix theory - it is demonstrated that (1) this strategy can generate similar (though not identical) anti-fundamentalist conclusions on more defensible naturalistic grounds, and (2) that fundamentality questions can be empirical questions. Some implications and limitations of the proposed approach are discussed.

  8. Monte Carlo fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.; Sutton, T.M.

    1996-02-01

    This report is composed of the lecture notes from the first half of a 32-hour graduate-level course on Monte Carlo methods offered at KAPL. These notes, prepared by two of the principle developers of KAPL`s RACER Monte Carlo code, cover the fundamental theory, concepts, and practices for Monte Carlo analysis. In particular, a thorough grounding in the basic fundamentals of Monte Carlo methods is presented, including random number generation, random sampling, the Monte Carlo approach to solving transport problems, computational geometry, collision physics, tallies, and eigenvalue calculations. Furthermore, modern computational algorithms for vector and parallel approaches to Monte Carlo calculations are covered in detail, including fundamental parallel and vector concepts, the event-based algorithm, master/slave schemes, parallel scaling laws, and portability issues.

  9. Unstable trajectories and the quantum mechanical uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Hans R.

    2008-08-15

    There is still an ongoing discussion about various seemingly contradictory aspects of classical particle motion and its quantum mechanical counterpart. One of the best accepted viewpoints that intend to bridge the gap is the so-called Copenhagen Interpretation. A major issue there is to regard wave functions as probability amplitudes (usually for the position of a particle). However, the literature also reports on approaches that claim a trajectory for any quantum mechanical particle, Bohmian mechanics probably being the most prominent one among these ideas. We introduce a way to calculate trajectories as well, but our crucial ingredient is their well controlled local (thus also momentaneous) degree of instability. By construction, at every moment their unpredictability, i.e., their local separation rates of neighboring trajectories, is governed by the local value of the given modulus square of a wave function. We present extensive numerical simulations of the H and He atom, and for some velocity-related quantities, namely angular momentum and total energy, we inspect their agreement with the values appearing in wave mechanics. Further, we interpret the archetypal double slit interference experiment in the spirit of our findings. We also discuss many-particle problems far beyond He, which guides us to a variety of possible applications.

  10. Unstable trajectories and the quantum mechanical uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Hans R.

    2008-08-01

    There is still an ongoing discussion about various seemingly contradictory aspects of classical particle motion and its quantum mechanical counterpart. One of the best accepted viewpoints that intend to bridge the gap is the so-called Copenhagen Interpretation. A major issue there is to regard wave functions as probability amplitudes (usually for the position of a particle). However, the literature also reports on approaches that claim a trajectory for any quantum mechanical particle, Bohmian mechanics probably being the most prominent one among these ideas. We introduce a way to calculate trajectories as well, but our crucial ingredient is their well controlled local (thus also momentaneous) degree of instability. By construction, at every moment their unpredictability, i.e., their local separation rates of neighboring trajectories, is governed by the local value of the given modulus square of a wave function. We present extensive numerical simulations of the H and He atom, and for some velocity-related quantities, namely angular momentum and total energy, we inspect their agreement with the values appearing in wave mechanics. Further, we interpret the archetypal double slit interference experiment in the spirit of our findings. We also discuss many-particle problems far beyond He, which guides us to a variety of possible applications.

  11. Fundamentals of fluid lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, Bernard J.

    1991-01-01

    The aim is to coordinate the topics of design, engineering dynamics, and fluid dynamics in order to aid researchers in the area of fluid film lubrication. The lubrication principles that are covered can serve as a basis for the engineering design of machine elements. The fundamentals of fluid film lubrication are presented clearly so that students that use the book will have confidence in their ability to apply these principles to a wide range of lubrication situations. Some guidance on applying these fundamentals to the solution of engineering problems is also provided.

  12. Fundamentals of fluid sealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamentals of fluid sealing, including seal operating regimes, are discussed and the general fluid-flow equations for fluid sealing are developed. Seal performance parameters such as leakage and power loss are presented. Included in the discussion are the effects of geometry, surface deformations, rotation, and both laminar and turbulent flows. The concept of pressure balancing is presented, as are differences between liquid and gas sealing. Mechanisms of seal surface separation, fundamental friction and wear concepts applicable to seals, seal materials, and pressure-velocity (PV) criteria are discussed.

  13. Unstable ground in western North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trimble, Donald E.

    1979-01-01

    Unstable ground in western North Dakota is mainly the result of mass-wasting processes. The units most affected are mudstones, siltstones, and sandstones of the Fort Union Formation. Ground instability generally is indicated by landslides, soil slides, or subsidence. Landslides are mostly of the slump-earthflow type and are localized along the flanks of the high buttes in southwestern North Dakota, including HT (Black) Butte, Chalky Buttes, Sentinel Butte, and East and West Rainy Buttes, and along parts of the valleys of the Des Lacs, Missouri, Little Missouri, and Heart Rivers. Landslides are sparse elsewhere. Soil slides are common in the areas south and southwest of the maximum position of the Pleistocene glacial ice margin on slopes of 15 degrees or more, and have taken place on some slopes as gentle as five degrees. The weathered, exposed surface of the Fort Union Formation seems to be especially susceptible to soil slides. Soil slides constitute the major type of ground instability in southwestern North Dakota. Subsidence is of two types: (1) subsidence over old underground mine workings, and (2) subsidence over naturally ignited and burned underground coal beds. Major subsidence has taken place over old, underground workings near Beulah, Wilton, Lehigh, Haynes, and Belfield, and lesser subsidence near Scranton, and west and north of Bowman. Thickness of overburden above the coal in all these areas is believed to be less than 30 m (100 ft). Subsidence has not taken place over old underground workings along the Des Lacs and-Souris valleys northwest of Minot, where the thickness of overburden is more than 60 m (200 ft). Spectacular subsidence has occurred over a burning underground coal bed at Burning Coal Vein Park near the Little Missouri River, northwest of Amidon.

  14. Managing risk in an unstable world.

    PubMed

    Bremmer, Ian

    2005-06-01

    With emerging markets like China and politically unstable countries like Saudi Arabia figuring more than ever into companies' investment calculations, business leaders are turning to political risk analysis to measure the impact of politics on potential markets, minimize risks, and make the most of global opportunities. But political risk is more subjective than its economic counterpart. It is influenced by the passage of laws, the foibles of government leaders, and the rise of popular movements. So corporate leaders must grapple not just with broad, easily observable trends but also with nuances of society and even quirks of personality. And those hard-to-quantify factors must constantly be pieced together into an ongoing narrative within historical and regional contexts. As goods, services, information, ideas, and people cross borders today with unprecedented velocity, corporations debating operational or infrastructural investments abroad increasingly need objective, rigorous assessments. One tool for measuring and presenting stability data, for example, incorporates 20 composite indicators of risk in emerging markets and scores risk variables according to both their structural and their temporal components. The indicators are then organized into four equally weighted subcategories whose ratings are aggregated into a single stability score. Countries are ranked on a scale of zero (a failed state) to100 (a fully institutionalized, stable democracy). Companies can buy political risk analyses from consultants or, as some large energy and financial services organizations have done, develop them in-house. Either way, a complete and accurate picture of any country's risk requires analysts with strong reportorial skills; timely, accurate data on a variety of social and political trends; and a framework for evaluating the impact of individual risks on stability.

  15. Homeschooling and Religious Fundamentalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunzman, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the relationship between homeschooling and religious fundamentalism by focusing on their intersection in the philosophies and practices of conservative Christian homeschoolers in the United States. Homeschooling provides an ideal educational setting to support several core fundamentalist principles: resistance to…

  16. Basic Publication Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savedge, Charles E., Ed.

    Designed for students who produce newspapers and newsmagazines in junior high, middle, and elementary schools, this booklet is both a scorebook and a fundamentals text. The scorebook provides realistic criteria for judging publication excellence at these educational levels. All the basics for good publications are included in the text of the…

  17. The Fundamental Property Relation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Joseph J.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a basic equation in thermodynamics (the fundamental property relation), focusing on a logical approach to the development of the relation where effects other than thermal, compression, and exchange of matter with the surroundings are considered. Also demonstrates erroneous treatments of the relation in three well-known textbooks. (JN)

  18. Unification of Fundamental Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus; Taylor, Foreword by John C.

    2005-10-01

    Foreword John C. Taylor; 1. Unification of fundamental forces Abdus Salam; 2. History unfolding: an introduction to the two 1968 lectures by W. Heisenberg and P. A. M. Dirac Abdus Salam; 3. Theory, criticism, and a philosophy Werner Heisenberg; 4. Methods in theoretical physics Paul Adrian Maurice Dirac.

  19. Fundamentals of Library Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdoo, Monty L.

    2012-01-01

    Being a great teacher is part and parcel of being a great librarian. In this book, veteran instruction services librarian McAdoo lays out the fundamentals of the discipline in easily accessible language. Succinctly covering the topic from top to bottom, he: (1) Offers an overview of the historical context of library instruction, drawing on recent…

  20. Food Service Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on food service fundamentals is designed to provide a general background in the basic aspects of the food service program in the Marine Corps; it is adaptable for nonmilitary instruction. Introductory materials include specific information for MCI…

  1. Fundamentals of soil science

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study guide provides comments and references for professional soil scientists who are studying for the soil science fundamentals exam needed as the first step for certification. The performance objectives were determined by the Soil Science Society of America's Council of Soil Science Examiners...

  2. Fundamentals of Chemical Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, William R.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a course that provides students with a fundamental understanding of the chemical, catalytic, and engineering sciences related to the chemical reactions taking place in a variety of reactors of different configurations. Also describes the eight major lecture topics, course examinations, and term papers. The course schedule is included.…

  3. Sales Fundamentals Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed as a resource for marketing education teachers in planning and teaching a course on sales fundamentals for students in grades 10-12 who are interested in a sales career. Internships, simulations, and co-op experiences may be used to expand practical application of the course. The student course objectives are to…

  4. Fundamental research data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A fundamental research data base containing ground truth, image, and Badhwar profile feature data for 17 North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota agricultural sites is described. Image data was provided for a minimum of four acquisition dates for each site and all four images were registered to one another.

  5. Laser Fundamentals and Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Pelt, W. F.; And Others

    As a result of work performed at the Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory with respect to lasers, this manual was prepared in response to the increasing use of lasers in high schools and colleges. It is directed primarily toward the high school instructor who may use the text for a short course in laser fundamentals. The definition of the…

  6. Reading Is Fundamental, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. National Reading is Fun-damental Program.

    Reading Is Fundamental (RIF) is a national, nonprofit organization designed to motivate children to read by making a wide variety of inexpensive books available to them and allowing the children to choose and keep books that interest them. This annual report for 1977 contains the following information on the RIF project: an account of the…

  7. Fundamentals of Diesel Engines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the fundamentals of diesel engine mechanics. Addressed in the three individual units of the course are the following topics: basic principles of diesel mechanics; principles, mechanics, and…

  8. Fundamentals of Solid Lubrication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT During this program, we have worked to develop a fundamental understanding of the chemical and tribological issues related to...approach, tribological measurements performed over a range of length scales, and the correlation of the two classes of information. Research activities...correlated measurements of surface composition and environmentally specific tribological performance of thin film solid lubricants. • Correlate shear

  9. Fundamentals of Electromagnetic Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorrain, Paul; Corson, Dale R.; Lorrain, Francois

    Based on the classic Electromagnetic Fields and Waves by the same authors, Fundamentals of Electromagnetic Phenomena capitalizes on the older text's traditional strengths--solid physics, inventive problems, and an experimental approach--while offering a briefer, more accessible introduction to the basic principles of electromagnetism.

  10. Phase transitions in the interacting boson fermion model: The {gamma}-unstable case

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C.E.; Arias, J.M.; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A.

    2005-12-15

    The phase transition around the critical point in the evolution from spherical to deformed {gamma}-unstable shapes is investigated in odd nuclei within the interacting boson fermion model. We consider the particular case of an odd j=3/2 particle coupled to an even-even boson core that undergoes a transition from spherical U(5) to {gamma}-unstable O(6) situation. The particular choice of the j=3/2 orbital preserves in the odd case the condition of {gamma}-instability of the system. As a consequence, energy spectrum and electromagnetic transitions, in correspondence of the critical point, display behaviors qualitatively similar to those of the even core. The results are also in qualitative agreement with the recently proposed E(5/4) model, although few differences are present, due to the different nature of the two schemes.

  11. Nuclear Structure and Magnetic Moment of the Unstable 12B-12N Mirror Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yong-Nan; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Yuan, Da-Qing; Zuo, Yi; Fan, Ping; Mihara, M.; Matsuta, K.; Fukuda, M.; Minamisono, T.; Suzuki, T.; Xu, Yong-Jun; Zhu, Jia-Zheng; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Luo, Hai-Long; Zhang, Xi-Zhen; Zhu, Sheng-Yun

    2010-02-01

    Magnetic moments of the A = 12 unstable mirror pair nuclides 12B and 12N have been measured by the β- NMR, technique. The experimentally measured magnetic moments are μ(12B) = 1.001(17)μN and μ(12N) = 0.4571(1)μN The improved shell model using an SFO Hamiltonian with enhanced spin-isospin monopole proton-neutron interaction and modified single-particle energies is employed to calculate the magnetic moments of 12B and 12N. The calculation yields μ(12B) = 0.929μN and μ(12N) = 0.452μN and has produced a new magic number 6 for the short-lived unstable mirror pair nuclides 12B and 12N.

  12. 2008 LC18: a potentially unstable Neptune Trojan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, J.; Lykawka, P. S.; Bannister, M. T.; Francis, P.

    2012-05-01

    The recent discovery of the first Neptune Trojan at the planet's trailing (L5) Lagrange point, 2008 LC18, offers an opportunity to confirm the formation mechanism of a member of this important tracer population for the Solar system's dynamical history. We tested the stability of 2008 LC18's orbit through a detailed dynamical study, using test particles spread across the ±3σ range of orbital uncertainties in a, e, i and Ω. This showed that the wide uncertainties of the published orbit span regions of both extreme dynamical instability, with lifetimes <100 Myr, and significant stability, with lifetimes >1 Gyr. The stability of 2008 LC18's clones is greatly dependent on their semimajor axis and only weakly correlated with their orbital eccentricity. Test particles on orbits with an initial semimajor axis of less than 29.91 au have dynamical half-lives shorter than 100 Myr; in contrast, particles with an initial semimajor axis of greater than 29.91 au exhibit such strong dynamical stability that almost all are retained over the 1 Gyr of our simulations. More observations of this object are necessary to improve the orbit. If 2008 LC18 is in the unstable region, then our simulations imply that it is either a temporary Trojan capture or a representative of a slowly decaying Trojan population (like its sibling the L4 Neptunian Trojan 2001 QR322), and that it may not be primordial. Alternatively, if the orbit falls into the larger, stable region, then 2008 LC18 is a primordial member of the highly stable and highly inclined component of the Neptune Trojan population, joining 2005 TN53 and 2007 VL305. We attempted to recover 2008 LC18 using the 2.3-m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory to provide this astrometry, but were unsuccessful due to the high stellar density of its current sky location near the Galactic centre. The recovery of this object will require a telescope in the 8-m class.

  13. Accumulation of unstable periodic orbits and the stickiness in the two-dimensional piecewise linear map.

    PubMed

    Akaishi, A; Shudo, A

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the stickiness of the two-dimensional piecewise linear map with a family of marginal unstable periodic orbits (FMUPOs), and show that a series of unstable periodic orbits accumulating to FMUPOs plays a significant role to give rise to the power law correlation of trajectories. We can explicitly specify the sticky zone in which unstable periodic orbits whose stability increases algebraically exist, and find that there exists a hierarchy in accumulating periodic orbits. In particular, the periodic orbits with linearly increasing stability play the role of fundamental cycles as in the hyperbolic systems, which allows us to apply the method of cycle expansion. We also study the recurrence time distribution, especially discussing the position and size of the recurrence region. Following the definition adopted in one-dimensional maps, we show that the recurrence time distribution has an exponential part in the short time regime and an asymptotic power law part. The analysis on the crossover time T(c)(*) between these two regimes implies T(c)(*) approximately -log[micro(R)] where micro(R) denotes the area of the recurrence region.

  14. Noncommutative Tachyon Kinks as D(p-1)-branes from Unstable Dp-brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Kim, Yoonbai; Kwon, O.-Kab

    2005-01-01

    We study noncommutative (NC) field theory of a real NC tachyon and NC U(1) gauge field, describing the dynamics of an unstable Dp-brane. For every given set of diagonal component of open string metric G 0 , NC parameter θ0 , and interpolating electric field hat E, we find all possible static NC kinks as exact solutions, in spite of complicated NC terms, which are classified by an array of NC kink-antikink and topological NC kinks. By computing their tensions and charges, those configurations are identified as an array of D0bar D0 and single stable D0 from the unstable D1, respectively. When the interpolating electric field has critical value as G 0 2 = hat E2 , the obtained topological kink becomes a BPS object with nonzero thickness and is identified as BPS D0 in the fluid of fundamental strings. Particularly in the scaling limit of infinite θ0 and vanishing G 0 and hat E, while keeping G 0θ0 = hat Eθ0 = 1, finiteness of the tension of NC kink corresponds to tensionless kink in ordinary effective field theory. An extension to stable D(p-1) from unstable Dp is straightforward for pure electric cases with parallel NC parameter and interpolating two-form field.

  15. Universality classes for unstable crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Biagi, Sofia; Misbah, Chaouqi; Politi, Paolo

    2014-06-01

    Universality has been a key concept for the classification of equilibrium critical phenomena, allowing associations among different physical processes and models. When dealing with nonequilibrium problems, however, the distinction in universality classes is not as clear and few are the examples, such as phase separation and kinetic roughening, for which universality has allowed to classify results in a general spirit. Here we focus on an out-of-equilibrium case, unstable crystal growth, lying in between phase ordering and pattern formation. We consider a well-established 2+1-dimensional family of continuum nonlinear equations for the local height h(x,t) of a crystal surface having the general form ∂_{t}h(x,t)=-∇·[j(∇h)+∇(∇^{2}h)]: j(∇h) is an arbitrary function, which is linear for small ∇h, and whose structure expresses instabilities which lead to the formation of pyramidlike structures of planar size L and height H. Our task is the choice and calculation of the quantities that can operate as critical exponents, together with the discussion of what is relevant or not to the definition of our universality class. These aims are achieved by means of a perturbative, multiscale analysis of our model, leading to phase diffusion equations whose diffusion coefficients encapsulate all relevant information on dynamics. We identify two critical exponents: (i) the coarsening exponent, n, controlling the increase in time of the typical size of the pattern, L∼t^{n}; (ii) the exponent β, controlling the increase in time of the typical slope of the pattern, M∼t^{β}, where M≈H/L. Our study reveals that there are only two different universality classes, according to the presence (n=1/3, β=0) or the absence (n=1/4, β>0) of faceting. The symmetry of the pattern, as well as the symmetry of the surface mass current j(∇h) and its precise functional form, is irrelevant. Our analysis seems to support the idea that also space dimensionality is irrelevant.

  16. Unstable shoes increase energy expenditure of obese patients.

    PubMed

    Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Malatesta, Davide; Agosti, Fiorenza; Sartorio, Alessandro

    2012-05-01

    Ergonomic unstable shoes, which are widely available to the general population, could increase daily non-exercise activity thermogenesis as the result of increased muscular involvement. We compared the energy expenditure of obese patients during standing and walking with conventional flat-bottomed shoes versus unstable shoes. Twenty-nine obese patients were asked to stand quietly and to walk at their preferred walking speed while wearing unstable or conventional shoes. The main outcome measures were metabolic rate of standing and gross and net energy cost of walking, as assessed with indirect calorimetry. Metabolic rate of standing was higher while wearing unstable shoes compared with conventional shoes (1.11 ± 0.20 W/kg(-1) vs 1.06 ± 0.23 W/kg(-1), P=.0098). Gross and net energy cost of walking were higher while wearing unstable shoes compared with conventional shoes (gross: 4.20 ± 0.42 J/kg(-1)/m(-1)vs 4.01 ± 0.39 J/kg(-1)/m(-1), P=.0035; net: 3.37 ± 0.41 J/kg(-1)/m(-1) vs 3.21 ± 0.37 J/kg(-1)/m(-1); P=.032). In obese patients, it is possible to increase energy expenditure of standing and walking by means of ergonomic unstable footwear. Long-term use of unstable shoes may eventually prevent a positive energy balance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Projection-free approximate balanced truncation of large unstable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinois, Thibault L. B.; Morgans, Aimee S.; Schmid, Peter J.

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we show that the projection-free, snapshot-based, balanced truncation method can be applied directly to unstable systems. We prove that even for unstable systems, the unmodified balanced proper orthogonal decomposition algorithm theoretically yields a converged transformation that balances the Gramians (including the unstable subspace). We then apply the method to a spatially developing unstable system and show that it results in reduced-order models of similar quality to the ones obtained with existing methods. Due to the unbounded growth of unstable modes, a practical restriction on the final impulse response simulation time appears, which can be adjusted depending on the desired order of the reduced-order model. Recommendations are given to further reduce the cost of the method if the system is large and to improve the performance of the method if it does not yield acceptable results in its unmodified form. Finally, the method is applied to the linearized flow around a cylinder at Re = 100 to show that it actually is able to accurately reproduce impulse responses for more realistic unstable large-scale systems in practice. The well-established approximate balanced truncation numerical framework therefore can be safely applied to unstable systems without any modifications. Additionally, balanced reduced-order models can readily be obtained even for large systems, where the computational cost of existing methods is prohibitive.

  18. Fundamental studies in geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.; Hager, B. H.; Kanamori, H.

    1981-01-01

    Research in fundamental studies in geodynamics continued in a number of fields including seismic observations and analysis, synthesis of geochemical data, theoretical investigation of geoid anomalies, extensive numerical experiments in a number of geodynamical contexts, and a new field seismic volcanology. Summaries of work in progress or completed during this report period are given. Abstracts of publications submitted from work in progress during this report period are attached as an appendix.

  19. Fundamentals of petroleum maps

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Elroy, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    It's a complete guide to the fundamentals of reading, using, and making petroleum maps. The topics covered are well spotting, lease posting, contouring, hanging cross sections, and ink drafting. This book not only tells the how of petroleum mapping, but it also tells the why to better understand the principles and techniques. The books does not teach ''drafting,'' but does describe the proper care and use of drafting equipment for those who are totally new to the task.

  20. Phacoemulsification. Technology and fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Gilger, B C

    1997-09-01

    The number one rule of phacoemulsification and aspiration cataract surgery is to know your machine. This chapter is designed to help the surgeon who is currently using phacoemulsification, or those who wish to understand more about technique, learn the basics and technology of the various types of phacoemulsification machines. Fluidics, pump design, handpiece mechanics, phacoemulsification needles, and fundamentals of phacoemulsification of cataracts will be reviewed.

  1. Redefining the Fundamental Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crain, Margaret Ann

    2006-01-01

    Every researcher must make some fundamental questions. A researcher's questions should include the following: (1) What is the nature of the reality that I wish to study? (2) How will I know it? (3) What must I do to know it? (4) Who am I? (5) Where is God in this? and (6) For religious educators--How does my research lead to a world of peace and…

  2. Fundamentals of neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Greg Hall, D

    2011-01-01

    Session 1 of the 2010 STP/IFSTP Joint Symposium on Toxicologic Neuropathology, titled "Fundamentals of Neurobiology," was organized to provide a foundation for subsequent sessions by presenting essential elements of neuroanatomy and nervous system function. A brief introduction to the session titled "Introduction to Correlative Neurobiology" was provided by Dr. Greg Hall (Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN). Correlative neurobiology refers to considerations of the relationships between the highly organized and compartmentalized structure of nervous tissues and the functioning within this system.

  3. Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Sudowe, Ralf; Folden, Charles M., III; Nitsche, Heino; Hoffman, Darleane C.

    2005-01-15

    The overall objective of this project is the measurement of neutron capture cross sections of importance to stewardship science and astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis, while at the same time helping to train the next generation of scientists with expertise relevant to U.S. national nuclear security missions and to stewardship science. A primary objective of this project is to study neutron capture cross sections for various stable and unstable isotopes that will contribute to the Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program by providing improved data for modeling and interpretation of nuclear device performance. Much of the information obtained will also be important in astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis. Measurements of these neutron capture cross sections are being conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility using the unique Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). In our early discussions with the DANCE group, decisions were made on the first cross sections to be measured and how our expertise in target preparation, radiochemical separations chemistry, and data analysis could best be applied. The initial emphasis of the project was on preparing suitable targets of both natural and separated stable europium isotopes in preparation for the ultimate goal of preparing a sufficiently large target of radioactive 155Eu (t1/2 = 4.7 years) and other radioactive and stable species for neutron cross-section measurements at DANCE. Our Annual Report, ''Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei'' by J. M. Schwantes, R. Sudowe, C. M. Folden III, H. Nitsche, and D. C. Hoffman, submitted to NNSA in December 2003, gives details about the initial considerations and scope of the project. During the current reporting period, electroplated targets of natural Eu together with valuable, stable, and isotopically pure 151Eu and 153Eu, and isotopically separated 154Sm were measured for

  4. Detecting unstable periodic orbits in high-dimensional chaotic systems from time series: reconstruction meeting with adaptation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huanfei; Lin, Wei; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-05-01

    Detecting unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) in chaotic systems based solely on time series is a fundamental but extremely challenging problem in nonlinear dynamics. Previous approaches were applicable but mostly for low-dimensional chaotic systems. We develop a framework, integrating approximation theory of neural networks and adaptive synchronization, to address the problem of time-series-based detection of UPOs in high-dimensional chaotic systems. An example of finding UPOs from the classic Mackey-Glass equation is presented.

  5. Fundamentals of Structural Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, David D.; Fletcher, Raymond C.

    2005-09-01

    Fundamentals of Structural Geology provides a new framework for the investigation of geological structures by integrating field mapping and mechanical analysis. Assuming a basic knowledge of physical geology, introductory calculus and physics, it emphasizes the observational data, modern mapping technology, principles of continuum mechanics, and the mathematical and computational skills, necessary to quantitatively map, describe, model, and explain deformation in Earth's lithosphere. By starting from the fundamental conservation laws of mass and momentum, the constitutive laws of material behavior, and the kinematic relationships for strain and rate of deformation, the authors demonstrate the relevance of solid and fluid mechanics to structural geology. This book offers a modern quantitative approach to structural geology for advanced students and researchers in structural geology and tectonics. It is supported by a website hosting images from the book, additional colour images, student exercises and MATLAB scripts. Solutions to the exercises are available to instructors. The book integrates field mapping using modern technology with the analysis of structures based on a complete mechanics MATLAB is used to visualize physical fields and analytical results and MATLAB scripts can be downloaded from the website to recreate textbook graphics and enable students to explore their choice of parameters and boundary conditions The supplementary website hosts color images of outcrop photographs used in the text, supplementary color images, and images of textbook figures for classroom presentations The textbook website also includes student exercises designed to instill the fundamental relationships, and to encourage the visualization of the evolution of geological structures; solutions are available to instructors

  6. Value of Fundamental Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, Alexey

    Fundamental science is a hard, long-term human adventure that has required high devotion and social support, especially significant in our epoch of Mega-science. The measure of this devotion and this support expresses the real value of the fundamental science in public opinion. Why does fundamental science have value? What determines its strength and what endangers it? The dominant answer is that the value of science arises out of curiosity and is supported by the technological progress. Is this really a good, astute answer? When trying to attract public support, we talk about the ``mystery of the universe''. Why do these words sound so attractive? What is implied by and what is incompatible with them? More than two centuries ago, Immanuel Kant asserted an inseparable entanglement between ethics and metaphysics. Thus, we may ask: which metaphysics supports the value of scientific cognition, and which does not? Should we continue to neglect the dependence of value of pure science on metaphysics? If not, how can this issue be addressed in the public outreach? Is the public alienated by one or another message coming from the face of science? What does it mean to be politically correct in this sort of discussion?

  7. Fundamental space radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    The unique feature of the space radiation environment is the dominance of high-energy charged particles (HZE or high LET radiation) emitted by the Sun and galactic sources, or trapped in the Van Allen radiation belts. These charged particles present a significant hazard to space flight crews, and accelerator-based experiments are underway to quantify the health risks due to unavoidable radiation exposure. There are three principal properties of charged particles that distinguish them from conventional radiation, i.e. gamma rays and x-rays. First, they have a defined range in matter rather than an exponential absorption profile. Second, they undergo nuclear reactions to produce secondary particles. Third, and most important, they deposit their energy along well-defined linear paths or tracks rather than diffuse fields. The structured energy deposition pattern interacts on multiple scales with the biological structures of DNA, cells and tissues to produce correlated patterns of damage that evade repair systems. Traditional concepts of dose and its associated normalization parameter, RBE (relative biological effectiveness), break down under experimental scrutiny, and probabilistic models of risk based on the number of particle traversals per cell may be more appropriate. Unique patterns of DNA damage, gene expression, mobilization of repair proteins, activation of cytokines and remodeling of cellular microenvironment are observed following exposure to high LET radiation. At low levels of exposure the communication of bioactive substances from irradiated to unirradiated "bystander" cells can amplify the damage and cause a significant deviation from linearity in dose vs. response relations. Under some circumstances, there is even a multigenerational delay in the expression of radiation-induced genetic damage (genomic instability) which is not strictly dose dependent. These issues and the experimental evidence derived from ground based experiments at particle

  8. Fundamental space radiobiology.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gregory A

    2003-06-01

    The unique feature of the space radiation environment is the dominance of high-energy charged particles (HZE or high LET radiation) emitted by the Sun and galactic sources, or trapped in the Van Allen radiation belts. These charged particles present a significant hazard to space flight crews, and accelerator-based experiments are underway to quantify the health risks due to unavoidable radiation exposure. There are three principal properties of charged particles that distinguish them from conventional radiation, i.e. gamma rays and x-rays. First, they have a defined range in matter rather than an exponential absorption profile. Second, they undergo nuclear reactions to produce secondary particles. Third, and most important, they deposit their energy along well-defined linear paths or tracks rather than diffuse fields. The structured energy deposition pattern interacts on multiple scales with the biological structures of DNA, cells and tissues to produce correlated patterns of damage that evade repair systems. Traditional concepts of dose and its associated normalization parameter, RBE (relative biological effectiveness), break down under experimental scrutiny, and probabilistic models of risk based on the number of particle traversals per cell may be more appropriate. Unique patterns of DNA damage, gene expression, mobilization of repair proteins, activation of cytokines and remodeling of cellular microenvironment are observed following exposure to high LET radiation. At low levels of exposure the communication of bioactive substances from irradiated to unirradiated "bystander" cells can amplify the damage and cause a significant deviation from linearity in dose vs. response relations. Under some circumstances, there is even a multigenerational delay in the expression of radiation-induced genetic damage (genomic instability) which is not strictly dose dependent. These issues and the experimental evidence derived from ground based experiments at particle

  9. Fundamental space radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    The unique feature of the space radiation environment is the dominance of high-energy charged particles (HZE or high LET radiation) emitted by the Sun and galactic sources, or trapped in the Van Allen radiation belts. These charged particles present a significant hazard to space flight crews, and accelerator-based experiments are underway to quantify the health risks due to unavoidable radiation exposure. There are three principal properties of charged particles that distinguish them from conventional radiation, i.e. gamma rays and x-rays. First, they have a defined range in matter rather than an exponential absorption profile. Second, they undergo nuclear reactions to produce secondary particles. Third, and most important, they deposit their energy along well-defined linear paths or tracks rather than diffuse fields. The structured energy deposition pattern interacts on multiple scales with the biological structures of DNA, cells and tissues to produce correlated patterns of damage that evade repair systems. Traditional concepts of dose and its associated normalization parameter, RBE (relative biological effectiveness), break down under experimental scrutiny, and probabilistic models of risk based on the number of particle traversals per cell may be more appropriate. Unique patterns of DNA damage, gene expression, mobilization of repair proteins, activation of cytokines and remodeling of cellular microenvironment are observed following exposure to high LET radiation. At low levels of exposure the communication of bioactive substances from irradiated to unirradiated "bystander" cells can amplify the damage and cause a significant deviation from linearity in dose vs. response relations. Under some circumstances, there is even a multigenerational delay in the expression of radiation-induced genetic damage (genomic instability) which is not strictly dose dependent. These issues and the experimental evidence derived from ground based experiments at particle

  10. The Unstable Repeats - Three Evolving Faces of Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David L.; Orr, Harry T.; Warren, Stephen T.

    2013-01-01

    Disorders characterized by expansion of an unstable nucleotide repeat account for a number of inherited neurological diseases. Here, we review examples of unstable repeat disorders that nicely illustrate the three of the major pathogenic mechanisms associated with these diseases: loss-of-function typically by disrupting transcription of the mutated gene, RNA toxic gain-of-function, and protein toxic gain-of-function. In addition to providing insight into the mechanisms underlying these devastating neurological disorders, the study of these unstable microsatellite repeat disorders has provided insight into very basic aspects of neuroscience. PMID:23473314

  11. Fundamental limits of optical force and torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimzadegan, A.; Alaee, R.; Fernandez-Corbaton, I.; Rockstuhl, C.

    2017-01-01

    Optical force and torque provide unprecedented control on the spatial motion of small particles. A valid scientific question, that has many practical implications, concerns the existence of fundamental upper bounds for the achievable force and torque exerted by a plane wave illumination with a given intensity. Here, while studying isotropic particles, we show that different light-matter interaction channels contribute to the exerted force and torque, and analytically derive upper bounds for each of the contributions. Specific examples for particles that achieve those upper bounds are provided. We study how and to which extent different contributions can add up to result in the maximum optical force and torque. Our insights are important for applications ranging from molecular sorting, particle manipulation, and nanorobotics up to ambitious projects such as laser-propelled spaceships.

  12. Fundamental photon orbits: Black hole shadows and spacetime instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Pedro V. P.; Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.; Radu, Eugen

    2017-07-01

    The standard black holes (BHs) in general relativity, as well as other ultracompact objects (with or without an event horizon) admit planar circular photon orbits. These light rings (LRs) determine several spacetime properties. For instance, stable LRs trigger instabilities and, in spherical symmetry, (unstable) LRs completely determine BH shadows. In generic stationary, axisymmetric spacetimes, nonplanar bound photon orbits may also exist, regardless of the integrability properties of the photon motion. We suggest a classification of these fundamental photon orbits (FPOs) and, using Poincaré maps, determine a criterion for their stability. For the Kerr BH, all FPOs are unstable (similar to its LRs) and completely determine the Kerr shadow. But in non-Kerr spacetimes, stable FPOs may also exist, even when all LRs are unstable, triggering new instabilities. We illustrate this for the case of Kerr BHs with Proca hair, wherein, moreover, qualitatively novel shadows with a cuspy edge exist, a feature that can be understood from the interplay between stable and unstable FPOs. FPOs are the natural generalization of LRs beyond spherical symmetry and should generalize the LRs key role in different spacetime properties.

  13. Auroral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-06-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  14. Auroral particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-01-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  15. Exotic particles with four or more quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Stephen Lars

    2014-09-01

    The familiar denizens of the particle zoo are made of two or three quarks, but particle theory allows for states comprising any number of those fundamental particles. Finally, after decades of searching, tetraquarks seem to have been spotted.

  16. The effect of nonlinearity on unstable zones of Mathieu equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saryazdi, M. Gh

    2017-03-01

    Mathieu equation is a well-known ordinary differential equation in which the excitation term appears as the non-constant coefficient. The mathematical modelling of many dynamic systems leads to Mathieu equation. The determination of the locus of unstable zone is important for the control of dynamic systems. In this paper, the stable and unstable regions of Mathieu equation are determined for three cases of linear and nonlinear equations using the homotopy perturbation method. The effect of nonlinearity is examined in the unstable zone. The results show that the transition curves of linear Mathieu equation depend on the frequency of the excitation term. However, for nonlinear equations, the curves depend also on initial conditions. In addition, increasing the amplitude of response leads to an increase in the unstable zone.

  17. Increased intracapsular pressures after unstable slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Soto, Jose A; Duffy, Michael F; Birnbaum, Mark A; Vander Have, Kelly L

    2008-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is the most dreaded complication associated with an unstable slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). We hypothesize that the hip joint pressure will be increased in unstable slips, confirming that emergent treatment and decompression are warranted. Thirteen unstable SCFE hips were evaluated. Hip pressure monitoring was performed. Postcapsulotomy measurements were also performed in all of the patients. Five of these under gentle manipulation. Six patients underwent measurement of the hip pressure on the unaffected side. The mean pressure on the affected hip was 48 mm Hg. The mean pressure on the unaffected side was 23 mm Hg. There was a significant increase in intraarticular hip pressure after attempted manipulation (mean, 75 mm Hg). Hip pressures are increased in unstable SCFE to levels higher for those of a compartment syndrome probably causing a tamponade effect. There is a need to perform a capsulotomy if manipulation is performed.

  18. Fundamental experiments in velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Matthew Ellsworth; Hull, Larry; Shinas, Michael

    2009-01-01

    One can understand what velocimetry does and does not measure by understanding a few fundamental experiments. Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) is an interferometer that will produce fringe shifts when the length of one of the legs changes, so we might expect the fringes to change whenever the distance from the probe to the target changes. However, by making PDV measurements of tilted moving surfaces, we have shown that fringe shifts from diffuse surfaces are actually measured only from the changes caused by the component of velocity along the beam. This is an important simplification in the interpretation of PDV results, arising because surface roughness randomizes the scattered phases.

  19. Fundamental research data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A fundamental research data base was created on a single 9-track 1600 BPI tape containing ground truth, image, and Badhwar profile feature data for 17 North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota agricultural sites. Each site is 5x6 nm in area. Image data has been provided for a minimum of four acquisition dates for each site. All four images have been registered to one another. A list of the order of the files on tape and the dates of acquisition is provided.

  20. Fundamental cosmology from precision spectroscopy: Varying couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, A. C. O.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Pedrosa, P. O. J.; Nunes, N. J.

    2014-09-01

    The observational evidence for the acceleration of the Universe demonstrates that canonical theories of cosmology and particle physics are incomplete, if not incorrect, and that new physics is out there, waiting to be discovered. Forthcoming high-resolution ultrastable spectrographs will play a crucial role in this quest for new physics, by enabling a new generation of precision consistency tests. Here we focus on astrophysical tests of the stability of nature's fundamental couplings, and by using principal component analysis techniques further calibrated by existing VLT data we discuss how the improvements that can be expected with ESPRESSO and ELT-HIRES will impact on fundamental cosmology. In particular we show that a 20 to 30 night program on ELT-HIRES will allow it to play a leading role in fundamental cosmology.

  1. Unstable laser resonators with super-Gaussian mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    De Silvestri, S.; Laporta, P.; Magni, V.; Svelto, O.; Majocchi, B.

    1988-03-01

    A new class of tapered reflectivity mirrors with a super-Gaussian profile R atmI exp(-kr/sup n/) is introduced, and a geometrical-optics approach for analysis and design of unstable resonators made with these mirrors is presented. A super-Gaussian mirror, built by a special evaporation technique, has been tested in an unstable resonator of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser, demonstrating its effectiveness in generating diffraction-limited beams.

  2. Active Control of Linear Periodic System with Two Unstable Modes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    tV;;;.~II.~9 - B ~ZV ~- p1 . ,,~ >. ~ ACTIVE CONTROL OF LINEAR PERIODIC SYSTEM WITH TWO UNSTABLE MODES THESIS by Gregory E. Myers, B.S.E. 2nd Lt...PERIODIC SYSTEM WITH TWO UNSTABLE MODES THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Technology Air University...December 1982 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited -ow PREFACE This thesis is a continuation of the work done by Yeakel in the control of

  3. The stabilization of unstable detonation waves for the mixture of nitromethane/methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utkin, A. V.; Koldunov, S. A.; Mochalova, V. M.; Torunov, S. I.; Lapin, S. M.

    2015-11-01

    Using a laser interferometer VISAR the measurements of the particle velocity profiles in detonation waves for nitromethane/methanol mixtures with additions of a sensitizer diethylenetriamine were conducted. It is shown that the detonation front in a mixture of nitromethane/methanol is unstable and sensitizer is an effective method for the flow stabilization. If the diluent concentration is less than 10%, the detonation front is stabilized by adding of 1% diethylenetriamine. At higher concentrations of methanol, the sensitizer does not reject instability, but the amplitude of oscillations decreases in several times. An increase of the limit concentration of methanol at the addition of diethylenetriamine to the mixture was found.

  4. Fundamentals of Space Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisacane, Vincent L.

    2005-06-01

    Fundamentals of Space Systems was developed to satisfy two objectives: the first is to provide a text suitable for use in an advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate course in both space systems engineering and space system design. The second is to be a primer and reference book for space professionals wishing to broaden their capabilities to develop, manage the development, or operate space systems. The authors of the individual chapters are practicing engineers that have had extensive experience in developing sophisticated experimental and operational spacecraft systems in addition to having experience teaching the subject material. The text presents the fundamentals of all the subsystems of a spacecraft missions and includes illustrative examples drawn from actual experience to enhance the learning experience. It included a chapter on each of the relevant major disciplines and subsystems including space systems engineering, space environment, astrodynamics, propulsion and flight mechanics, attitude determination and control, power systems, thermal control, configuration management and structures, communications, command and telemetry, data processing, embedded flight software, survuvability and reliability, integration and test, mission operations, and the initial conceptual design of a typical small spacecraft mission.

  5. Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Jon M. Schwantes; Ralf Sudowe; Heino Nitsche; Darleane C. Hoffman

    2003-12-16

    A primary objective of this project is to study neutron capture cross sections for various stable and unstable isotopes that will contribute to the Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program by providing improved data for modeling and interpretation of nuclear device performance. The information obtained will also be important in astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis. During this reporting period, the emphasis has been on preparing a radioactive target of {sup 155}Eu (half-life = 4.7 years), and several stable targets, including isotopically separated {sup 154}Sm, {sup 151}Eu, and {sup 153}Eu. Measurements of their neutron capture cross sections will be conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). A suitable backing material (beryllium) for the targets has been selected after careful calculations of its contribution to the background of the measurements. In addition, a high voltage plating procedure has been developed and optimized. Stable targets of {sup 151}Eu and {sup 153}Eu and a target of natural Eu ({approx}50% {sup 151}Eu and {approx}50% {sup 153}Eu) have each been plated to a mass thickness of >1 mg/cm{sup 2} and delivered to the DANCE collaboration at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Natural Eu targets will be tested first to confirm that the target dimensions and backing are appropriate prior to performing measurements on the extremely valuable targets of separated isotopes. In order to prepare a target of the radioactive {sup 155}Eu, it must first be separated from the {sup 154}Sm target material that was irradiated in a very high neutron flux of 1.5x1015 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/s for 50 days. The reaction is {sup 154}Sm (n,f){sup 155}Sm (half-life = 22 minutes) {sup 155}Eu. Considerable progress has been made in developing a suitable high-yield and high-purity separation method for separating Eu from targets

  6. Fundamentals of gel dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuley, K. B.; Nasr, A. T.

    2013-06-01

    Fundamental chemical and physical phenomena that occur in Fricke gel dosimeters, polymer gel dosimeters, micelle gel dosimeters and genipin gel dosimeters are discussed. Fricke gel dosimeters are effective even though their radiation sensitivity depends on oxygen concentration. Oxygen contamination can cause severe problems in polymer gel dosimeters, even when THPC is used. Oxygen leakage must be prevented between manufacturing and irradiation of polymer gels, and internal calibration methods should be used so that contamination problems can be detected. Micelle gel dosimeters are promising due to their favourable diffusion properties. The introduction of micelles to gel dosimetry may open up new areas of dosimetry research wherein a range of water-insoluble radiochromic materials can be explored as reporter molecules.

  7. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  8. Fundamentals of zoological scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Herbert

    1982-01-01

    Most introductory physics courses emphasize highly idealized problems with unique well-defined answers. Though many textbooks complement these problems with estimation problems, few books present anything more than an elementary discussion of scaling. This paper presents some fundamentals of scaling in the zoological domain—a domain complex by any standard, but one also well suited to illustrate the power of very simple physical ideas. We consider the following animal characteristics: skeletal weight, speed of running, height and range of jumping, food consumption, heart rate, lifetime, locomotive efficiency, frequency of wing flapping, and maximum sizes of animals that fly and hover. These relationships are compared to zoological data and everyday experience, and match reasonably well.

  9. Nuclei and Fundamental Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, Wick

    2016-09-01

    Nuclei provide marvelous laboratories for testing fundamental interactions, often enhancing weak processes through accidental degeneracies among states, and providing selection rules that can be exploited to isolate selected interactions. I will give an overview of current work, including the use of parity violation to probe unknown aspects of the hadronic weak interaction; nuclear electric dipole moment searches that may shed light on new sources of CP violation; and tests of lepton number violation made possible by the fact that many nuclei can only decay by rare second-order weak interactions. I will point to opportunities in both theory and experiment to advance the field. Based upon work supported in part by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics and SciDAC under Awards DE-SC00046548 (Berkeley), DE-AC02-05CH11231 (LBNL), and KB0301052 (LBNL).

  10. Gas cell neutralizers (Fundamental principles)

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehrer, B.

    1985-06-01

    Neutralizing an ion-beam of the size and energy levels involved in the neutral-particle-beam program represents a considerable extension of the state-of-the-art of neutralizer technology. Many different mediums (e.g., solid, liquid, gas, plasma, photons) can be used to strip the hydrogen ion of its extra electron. A large, multidisciplinary R and D effort will no doubt be required to sort out all of the ''pros and cons'' of these various techniques. The purpose of this particular presentation is to discuss some basic configurations and fundamental principles of the gas type of neutralizer cell. Particular emphasis is placed on the ''Gasdynamic Free-Jet'' neutralizer since this configuration has the potential of being much shorter than other type of gas cells (in the beam direction) and it could operate in nearly a continuous mode (CW) if necessary. These were important considerations in the ATSU design which is discussed in some detail in the second presentation entitled ''ATSU Point Design''.

  11. Unstable genes unstable mind: beyond the central dogma of molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Mahabaleshwar V; Saraph, Arundhati A

    2011-08-01

    Schizophrenia has a polygenic mode of inheritance and an estimated heritability of over 80%, but success in understanding its genetic underpinnings to date has been modest. Unlike in trinucleotide neurodegenerative disorders, the phenomenon of genetic anticipation observed in schizophrenia or bipolar disorder has not been explained. For the first time, we provide a plausible molecular explanation of genetic anticipation and pathophysiology of schizophrenia, at least in part, with supporting evidence. We postulate that abnormally increased numbers of CAG repeats in many genes being expressed in the brain, coding for glutamine, cumulatively press for higher demand of glutamine in the respective brain cells, resulting in a metabolic crisis and dysregulation of the glutamate-glutamine cycle. This can adversely affect the functioning of both glutamate and GABA receptors, which are known to be involved in psychosis, and may also affect glutathione levels, increasing oxidative stress. The resulting psychosis (gain in function), originating from unstable genes, is described as an effect "beyond the central dogma of molecular biology". The hypothesis explains genetic anticipation, as further expansions in subsequent generations may result in increased severity and earlier occurrence. Many other well described findings provide proof of concept. This is a testable hypothesis, does not deny any known facts and opens up new avenues of research.

  12. Hysteresis and Wavenumber Vacillation in Unstable Baroclinic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Hysteresis and wavenumber vacillation are studied numerically in a weakly stratified quasigeostrophic model. In general, the amplitude of the most unstable wave increases, as the flow becomes more unstable. When the wave becomes saturated, the next longer wave will grow at the expanse of the most unstable wave and becomes the dominant wave. However, once the longwave state is established, it may remain in that regime even as the instability is decreased beyond the threshold where it first developed, thus constituting a hysteresis loop. In a highly unstable case, the flow may not show a preference for any single wave. Instead, the dominant wave aperiodically varies among several long waves. This phenomenon is known as wavenumber vacillation. Hysteresis is further examined in terms of eddy heat flux. It is shown that total eddy heat flux increases as the flow becomes more unstable, but displays a sharp drop when transition to a longer wave occurs. However, in a longwave state, the heat flux always decreases with decreasing instability even pass the threshold when wave transition first occurs.

  13. Gait biomechanics of a second generation unstable shoe.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jacob K; Zhang, Songning; Paquette, Max R; Milner, Clare E; Brock, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    The recent popularity of unstable shoes has sparked much interest in the efficacy of the shoe design. Anecdotal evidence suggests that earlier designs appear bulky and less aesthetically appealing for everyday use. The purpose of this study was to examine effects of a second generation unstable shoe on center of pressure (COP), ground reaction force (GRF), kinematics, and kinetics of the ankle joint during level walking at normal and fast speeds. In addition, findings were compared with results from the first generation shoe. Fourteen healthy males performed five successful level walking trials in four testing conditions: walking in unstable and control shoes at normal (1.3 m/s) and fast (1.8 m/s) speeds. The unstable shoe resulted in an increase in mediolateral COP displacement, first peak vertical GRF loading rate, braking GRF, ankle eversion range of motion (ROM), and inversion moment; as well as a decrease in anteroposterior COP displacement, second peak vertical GRF, ankle plantarflexion ROM, and dorsiflexion moment. Only minor differences were found between the shoe generations. Results of the generational comparisons suggest that the lower-profile second generation shoe may be as effective at achieving the desired unstable effects while promoting a smoother transition from heel contact through toe off compared with the first generation shoe.

  14. GRBs and Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitjean, Patrick; Wang, F. Y.; Wu, X. F.; Wei, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense flashes at the cosmological distances, which are the most luminous explosions in the Universe. The high luminosities of GRBs make them detectable out to the edge of the visible universe. So, they are unique tools to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal evolution of the Universe. First, they can be used to constrain the history of cosmic acceleration and the evolution of dark energy in a redshift range hardly achievable by other cosmological probes. Second, long GRBs are believed to be formed by collapse of massive stars. So they can be used to derive the high-redshift star formation rate, which can not be probed by current observations. Moreover, the use of GRBs as cosmological tools could unveil the reionization history and metal evolution of the Universe, the intergalactic medium (IGM) properties and the nature of first stars in the early universe. But beyond that, the GRB high-energy photons can be applied to constrain Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) and to test Einstein's Equivalence Principle (EEP). In this paper, we review the progress on the GRB cosmology and fundamental physics probed by GRBs.

  15. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Adrie J. J.

    2011-05-01

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  16. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, Adrie J. J.

    2011-05-05

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  17. Relevant signs of stable and unstable thoracolumbar vertebral column trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Gehweiler, J.A.; Daffner, R.H.; Osborne, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    One-hundred and seventeen patients with acute thoracolumbar vertebral column fracture or fracture-dislocations were analyzed and classified into stable (36%) and unstable (64%). Eight helpful roentgen signs were observed that may serve to direct attention to serious underlying, often occult, fractures and dislocations. The changes fall into four principal groups: abnormal soft tissues, abnormal vertebral alignment, abnormal joints, and widened vertebral canal. All stable and unstable lesions showed abnormal soft tissues, while 70% demonstrated kyphosis and/or scoliosis, and an abnormal adjacent intervertebral disk space. All unstable lesions showed one or more of the following signs: displaced vertebra, widened interspinous space, abnormal apophyseal joint(s), and widened vertebral canal.

  18. Buoyancy effects in an unstably stratified turbulent boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Luo, Kun; Fan, Jianren

    2017-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation has been performed to investigate the effect of buoyancy on an unstably stratified turbulent boundary layer with the Oberbeck-Boussinesq approximation. The simulation results show that the mean values of the streamwise velocity and scalar fields are increased in the near-wall region but decreased in the outer layer under the effect of buoyancy, which leads to significant increases in the skin-friction drag and heat transfer. In addition, it is found that the unstable thermal stratification results in large increases in the intensities of the near-wall streamwise vortices and high- and low-speed streaks, and a reduction in the mean diameter of the vortical structures. Moreover, the turbulent coherent structures become less organized due to the stratification effect. With respect to the neutral boundary layer flow, the outer vortical structures tend to bias the direction of the principal extensional strain towards the vertical plane in the unstably stratified flow.

  19. Kinetic Simulations of the Lowest-order Unstable Mode of Relativistic Magnetostatic Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Zrake, Jonathan; Yuan, Yajie; East, William E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of particle-in-cell numerical pair plasma simulations of relativistic two-dimensional magnetostatic equilibria known as the “Arnold-Beltrami-Childress” fields. In particular, we focus on the lowest-order unstable configuration consisting of two minima and two maxima of the magnetic vector potential. Breaking of the initial symmetry leads to exponential growth of the electric energy and to the formation of two current layers, which is consistent with the picture of “X-point collapse” first described by Syrovatskii. Magnetic reconnection within the layers heats a fraction of particles to very high energies. After the saturation of the linear instability, the current layers are disrupted and the system evolves chaotically, diffusing the particle energies in a stochastic second-order Fermi process, leading to the formation of power-law energy distributions. The power-law slopes harden with the increasing mean magnetization, but they are significantly softer than those produced in simulations initiated from Harris-type layers. The maximum particle energy is proportional to the mean magnetization, which is attributed partly to the increase of the effective electric field and partly to the increase of the acceleration timescale. We describe in detail the evolving structure of the dynamical current layers and report on the conservation of magnetic helicity. These results can be applied to highly magnetized astrophysical environments, where ideal plasma instabilities trigger rapid magnetic dissipation with efficient particle acceleration and flares of high-energy radiation.

  20. Mathematical modeling of transformation process of structurally unstable magnetic configurations into structurally stable ones in two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inovenkov, Igor; Echkina, Eugenia; Ponomarenko, Loubov

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process in astrophysical, space and laboratory plasma. In essence, it represents a change of topology of the magnetic field caused by readjustment of the structure of the magnetic field lines. This change leads to release of energy accumulated in the field. We consider transformation process of structurally unstable magnetic configurations into the structurally steady ones from the point of view of the сatastrophe theory. Special attention is paid to modeling of evolution of the structurally unstable three-dimensional magnetic fields.

  1. Detecting unstable periodic orbits in chaotic time series using synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olyaei, Ali Azimi; Wu, Christine; Kinsner, Witold

    2017-07-01

    An alternative approach of detecting unstable periodic orbits in chaotic time series is proposed using synchronization techniques. A master-slave synchronization scheme is developed, in which the chaotic system drives a system of harmonic oscillators through a proper coupling condition. The proposed scheme is designed so that the power of the coupling signal exhibits notches that drop to zero once the system approaches an unstable orbit yielding an explicit indication of the presence of a periodic motion. The results shows that the proposed approach is particularly suitable in practical situations, where the time series is short and noisy, or it is obtained from high-dimensional chaotic systems.

  2. Ultrastructural studies of unstable angina in living man

    SciTech Connect

    Gotlieb, A.I.; Freeman, M.R.; Salerno, T.A.; Lichtenstein, S.V.; Armstrong, P.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Nineteen patients with refractory unstable angina who were undergoing aortocoronary bypass were studied to assess the extent of platelet aggregation present in the microvasculature. Ultrastructural findings on the morphology of cardiac muscle and microvasculature were correlated with the findings on coronary angiograms and thallium scans. There were no significant correlations. The presence of platelet aggregates was identified in four biopsies, two of which had thrombus by angiographic criteria. Biopsy in areas with thallium defects revealed an increased prevalence of white blood cells without acute myocardial infarction. This study confirms the presence of platelet aggregates in patients with unstable angina, albeit at a reduced frequency when compared with autopsy studies.

  3. Detecting unstable periodic orbits from transient chaotic time series

    PubMed

    Dhamala; Lai; Kostelich

    2000-06-01

    We address the detection of unstable periodic orbits from experimentally measured transient chaotic time series. In particular, we examine recurrence times of trajectories in the vector space reconstructed from an ensemble of such time series. Numerical experiments demonstrate that this strategy can yield periodic orbits of low periods even when noise is present. We analyze the probability of finding periodic orbits from transient chaotic time series and derive a scaling law for this probability. The scaling law implies that unstable periodic orbits of high periods are practically undetectable from transient chaos.

  4. Error behavior of multistep methods applied to unstable differential systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of modeling a dynamic system described by a system of ordinary differential equations which has unstable components for limited periods of time is discussed. It is shown that the global error in a multistep numerical method is the solution to a difference equation initial value problem, and the approximate solution is given for several popular multistep integration formulas. Inspection of the solution leads to the formulation of four criteria for integrators appropriate to unstable problems. A sample problem is solved numerically using three popular formulas and two different stepsizes to illustrate the appropriateness of the criteria.

  5. Application of parameter estimation to highly unstable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, R. E.; Murray, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The application of parameter estimation to highly unstable aircraft is discussed. Included are a discussion of the problems in applying the output error method to such aircraft and demonstrates that the filter error method eliminates these problems. The paper shows that the maximum likelihood estimator with no process noise does not reduce to the output error method when the system is unstable. It also proposes and demonstrates an ad hoc method that is similar in form to the filter error method, but applicable to nonlinear problems. Flight data from the X-29 forward-swept-wing demonstrator is used to illustrate the problems and methods discussed.

  6. Ray-wave correspondence in an unstable quasistadium laser resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Takehiro; Harayama, Takahisa; Wiersig, Jan

    2006-02-15

    The relation between unstable periodic orbits and resonator modes in a fully chaotic open-sided two-dimensional laser resonator is theoretically investigated in the short wavelength limit. We derive a periodic-orbit-sum formula for eigenvalues of the resonator modes by applying the semiclassical approximation to the extended Fox-Li mode calculation method. With this formula, we show that the complicated wavelength dependence of the power-coupling coefficients of the fully chaotic quasi-stadium laser resonator can be explained by a few kinds of unstable periodic orbits.

  7. Quasi-stadium laser diodes with an unstable resonator condition.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Takehiro; Harayama, Takahisa; Davis, Peter; Vaccaro, Pablo O; Nishimura, Takehiro; Aida, Tahito

    2003-03-15

    We have observed lasing in a complicated eigenmode of a quasi-stadium laser diode with an unstable resonator consisting of two curved end mirrors obeying an unstable resonator condition and two straight sidewall mirrors. The laser was fabricated by application of a reactive-ion-etching technique to a molecular beam epitaxy-grown graded-index separate-confinement heterostructure single-quantum-well GaAs/AlGaAs structure. The far-field pattern shows that the lasing mode corresponds to the complicated lowest-loss mode obtained numerically by an extended Fox-Li method.

  8. Matter and Interactions: A Particle Physics Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organtini, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    In classical mechanics, matter and fields are completely separated; matter interacts with fields. For particle physicists this is not the case; both matter and fields are represented by particles. Fundamental interactions are mediated by particles exchanged between matter particles. In this article we explain why particle physicists believe in…

  9. Matter and Interactions: A Particle Physics Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organtini, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    In classical mechanics, matter and fields are completely separated; matter interacts with fields. For particle physicists this is not the case; both matter and fields are represented by particles. Fundamental interactions are mediated by particles exchanged between matter particles. In this article we explain why particle physicists believe in…

  10. Fundamentals of Space Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, G.

    2003-10-01

    As of today, a total of more than 240 human space flights have been completed, involving about 450 astronauts from various countries, for a combined total presence in space of more than 70 years. The seventh long-duration expedition crew is currently in residence aboard the International Space Station, continuing a permanent presence in space that began in October 2000. During that time, investigations have been conducted on both humans and animal models to study the bone demineralization and muscle deconditioning, space motion sickness, the causes and possible treatment of postflight orthostatic intolerance, the changes in immune function, crew and crew-ground interactions, and the medical issues of living in a space environment, such as the effects of radiation or the risk of developing kidney stones. Some results of these investigations have led to fundamental discoveries about the adaptation of the human body to the space environment. Gilles Clément has been active in this research. This book presents in a readable text the findings from the life science experiments conducted during and after space missions. Topics discussed in this book include: adaptation of sensory-motor, cardiovascular, bone and muscle systems to the microgravity of spaceflight; psychological and sociological issues of living in a confined, isolated and stressful environment; operational space medicine, such as crew selection, training and in-flight health monitoring, countermeasures and support; results of space biology experiments on individual cells, plants, and animal models; and the impact of long-duration missions such as the human mission to Mars. The author also provides a detailed description of how to fly a space experiment, based on his own experience with research projects conducted onboard Salyut-7, Mir, Spacelab, and the Space Shuttle. Now is the time to look at the future of human spaceflight and what comes next. The future human exploration of Mars captures the imagination

  11. Fundamentals of Space Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, Gilles

    2005-03-01

    A total of more than 240 human space flights have been completed to date, involving about 450 astronauts from various countries, for a combined total presence in space of more than 70 years. The seventh long-duration expedition crew is currently in residence aboard the International Space Station, continuing a permanent presence in space that began in October 2000. During that time, investigations have been conducted on both humans and animal models to study the bone demineralization and muscle deconditioning, space motion sickness, the causes and possible treatment of postflight orthostatic intolerance, the changes in immune function, crew and crew-ground interactions, and the medical issues of living in a space environment, such as the effects of radiation or the risk of developing kidney stones. Some results of these investigations have led to fundamental discoveries about the adaptation of the human body to the space environment. Gilles Clément has been active in this research. This readable text presents the findings from the life science experiments conducted during and after space missions. Topics discussed in this book include: adaptation of sensory-motor, cardio-vascular, bone, and muscle systems to the microgravity of spaceflight; psychological and sociological issues of living in a confined, isolated, and stressful environment; operational space medicine, such as crew selection, training and in-flight health monitoring, countermeasures and support; results of space biology experiments on individual cells, plants, and animal models; and the impact of long-duration missions such as the human mission to Mars. The author also provides a detailed description of how to fly a space experiment, based on his own experience with research projects conducted onboard Salyut-7, Mir, Spacelab, and the Space Shuttle. Now is the time to look at the future of human spaceflight and what comes next. The future human exploration of Mars captures the imagination of both the

  12. Fundamentals of phosphate transfer.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Anthony J; Nome, Faruk

    2015-07-21

    Historically, the chemistry of phosphate transfer-a class of reactions fundamental to the chemistry of Life-has been discussed almost exclusively in terms of the nucleophile and the leaving group. Reactivity always depends significantly on both factors; but recent results for reactions of phosphate triesters have shown that it can also depend strongly on the nature of the nonleaving or "spectator" groups. The extreme stabilities of fully ionised mono- and dialkyl phosphate esters can be seen as extensions of the same effect, with one or two triester OR groups replaced by O(-). Our chosen lead reaction is hydrolysis-phosphate transfer to water: because water is the medium in which biological chemistry takes place; because the half-life of a system in water is an accepted basic index of stability; and because the typical mechanisms of hydrolysis, with solvent H2O providing specific molecules to act as nucleophiles and as general acids or bases, are models for reactions involving better nucleophiles and stronger general species catalysts. Not least those available in enzyme active sites. Alkyl monoester dianions compete with alkyl diester monoanions for the slowest estimated rates of spontaneous hydrolysis. High stability at physiological pH is a vital factor in the biological roles of organic phosphates, but a significant limitation for experimental investigations. Almost all kinetic measurements of phosphate transfer reactions involving mono- and diesters have been followed by UV-visible spectroscopy using activated systems, conveniently compounds with good leaving groups. (A "good leaving group" OR* is electron-withdrawing, and can be displaced to generate an anion R*O(-) in water near pH 7.) Reactivities at normal temperatures of P-O-alkyl derivatives-better models for typical biological substrates-have typically had to be estimated: by extended extrapolation from linear free energy relationships, or from rate measurements at high temperatures. Calculation is free

  13. Fundamental physics at the threshold of discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toro, Natalia

    This thesis is divided into two parts: one driven by theory, the other by experiment. The first two chapters consider two model-building challenges: the little hierarchy of supersymmetry and the slowness of confinement in Randall-Sundrum models. In the third chapter, we turn to the question of determining the nature of fundamental physics at the TeV scale from LHC data. Crucial to this venture is a characterization for models of new physics. We present On-Shell Effective Theories (OSETs), a characterization of hadron collider data in terms of masses, production cross sections, and decay modes of new particles. We argue that such a description can likely be obtained from ≲ 1 year of LHC data, and in many scenarios is an essential intermediate step in describing fundamental physics at the TeV scale.

  14. Mirage cosmology with an unstable probe D3-brane

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Dong Hyeok; Kim, Jin Young

    2005-10-15

    We consider the mirage cosmology by an unstable probe brane whose action is represented by Dirac-Born-Infeld action with tachyon. We study how the presence of tachyon affects the evolution of the brane inflation. At the early stage of the brane inflation, the tachyon kinetic term can play an important role in curing the superluminal expansion in mirage cosmology.

  15. RAYLEIGH–TAYLOR UNSTABLE FLAMES—FAST OR FASTER?

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, E. P.

    2015-04-20

    Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) unstable flames play a key role in the explosions of supernovae Ia. However, the dynamics of these flames are still not well understood. RT unstable flames are affected by both the RT instability of the flame front and by RT-generated turbulence. The coexistence of these factors complicates the choice of flame speed subgrid models for full-star Type Ia simulations. Both processes can stretch and wrinkle the flame surface, increasing its area and, therefore, the burning rate. In past research, subgrid models have been based on either the RT instability or turbulence setting the flame speed. We evaluate both models, checking their assumptions and their ability to correctly predict the turbulent flame speed. Specifically, we analyze a large parameter study of 3D direct numerical simulations of RT unstable model flames. This study varies both the simulation domain width and the gravity in order to probe a wide range of flame behaviors. We show that RT unstable flames are different from traditional turbulent flames: they are thinner rather than thicker when turbulence is stronger. We also show that none of the several different types of turbulent flame speed models accurately predicts measured flame speeds. In addition, we find that the RT flame speed model only correctly predicts the measured flame speed in a certain parameter regime. Finally, we propose that the formation of cusps may be the factor causing the flame to propagate more quickly than predicted by the RT model.

  16. Characterization of Unstable Rock Slopes Through Passive Seismic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinbrod, U.; Burjanek, J.; Fäh, D.

    2014-12-01

    Catastrophic rock slope failures have high social impact, causing significant damage to infrastructure and many casualties throughout the world each year. Both detection and characterization of rock instabilities are therefore of key importance. An analysis of ambient vibrations of unstable rock slopes might be a new alternative to the already existing methods, e.g. geotechnical displacement measurements. Systematic measurements have been performed recently in Switzerland to study the seismic response of potential rockslides concerning a broad class of slope failure mechanisms and material conditions. Small aperture seismic arrays were deployed at sites of interest for a short period of time (several hours) in order to record ambient vibrations. Each measurement setup included a reference station, which was installed on a stable part close to the instability. Recorded ground motion is highly directional in the unstable parts of the rock slope, and significantly amplified with respect to stable areas. These effects are strongest at certain frequencies, which were identified as eigenfrequencies of the unstable rock mass. In most cases the directions of maximum amplification are perpendicular to open cracks and in good agreement with the deformation directions obtained by geodetic measurements. Such unique signatures might improve our understanding of slope structure and stability. Thus we link observed vibration characteristics with available results of detailed geological characterization. This is supported by numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation in fractured media with complex topography.For example, a potential relation between eigenfrequencies and unstable rock mass volume is investigated.

  17. Shearing box simulations in the Rayleigh unstable regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauman, Farrukh; Blackman, Eric G.

    2017-01-01

    We study the stability properties of Rayleigh unstable flows both in the purely hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) regimes for two different values of the shear q = 2.1, 4.2 (q = -dln Ω/dln r) and compare it with the Keplerian case q = 1.5. We find that the q > 2 regime is unstable both in the hydrodynamic and in the MHD limit (with an initially weak magnetic field). In this regime, the velocity fluctuations dominate the magnetic fluctuations. In contrast, in the q < 2 (magnetorotational instability (MRI)) regime the magnetic fluctuations dominate. This highlights two different paths to MHD turbulence implied by the two regimes, suggesting that in the q > 2 regime the instability produces primarily velocity fluctuations that cause magnetic fluctuations, with the causality reversed for the q < 2 MRI unstable regime. We also find that the magnetic field correlation is increasingly localized as the shear is increased in the Rayleigh unstable regime. In calculating the time evolution of spatial averages of different terms in the MHD equations, we find that the q > 2 regime is dominated by terms which are nonlinear in the fluctuations, whereas for q < 2, the linear terms play a more significant role.

  18. Stabilizing control for a class of delay unstable processes.

    PubMed

    Lee, See Chek; Wang, Qing-Guo; Nguyen, Le Binh

    2010-07-01

    The stabilization of unstable first-order plus time-delay processes with a zero by means of simple controllers is investigated in detail. Explicit stabilizability conditions are established. And the computational methods for determining stabilizing controller parameters are also presented with illustrative examples.

  19. Assessment and treatment of patients with acute unstable bradycardia.

    PubMed

    Swift, Jennie

    Bradycardia is a slow heart rate that can lead to cardiac arrest or occur after initial resuscitation following cardiac arrest. This article provides information on acute unstable bradycardia and common arrhythmias. It focuses on the assessment of patients with acute bradycardia and how the presence or absence of adverse clinical features, in conjunction with an arrhythmia, dictates the necessity and choice of treatment.

  20. Enantioselective Reactions of Configurationally Unstable alpha-Thiobenzyllithium Compounds.

    PubMed

    Nakamura; Nakagawa; Watanabe; Toru

    2000-01-01

    Too unstable for asymmetric deprotonation, alpha-sulfenyl carbanions can undergo asymmetric substitution reactions with high stereoselectivity [Eq. (1)]. The key to the asymmetric induction is the dynamic kinetic resolution of the complex formed between the organolithium compound and a chiral ligand, the most effective of which were bisoxazoline derivatives.

  1. Neuromuscular adjustments of gait associated with unstable conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ivanenko, Y. P.; d'Avella, A.; Serrao, M.; Ranavolo, A.; Draicchio, F.; Cappellini, G.; Casali, C.; Lacquaniti, F.

    2015-01-01

    A compact description of coordinated muscle activity is provided by the factorization of electromyographic (EMG) signals. With the use of this approach, it has consistently been shown that multimuscle activity during human locomotion can be accounted for by four to five modules, each one comprised of a basic pattern timed at a different phase of gait cycle and the weighting coefficients of synergistic muscle activations. These modules are flexible, in so far as the timing of patterns and the amplitude of weightings can change as a function of gait speed and mode. Here we consider the adjustments of the locomotor modules related to unstable walking conditions. We compared three different conditions, i.e., locomotion of healthy subjects on slippery ground (SL) and on narrow beam (NB) and of cerebellar ataxic (CA) patients on normal ground. Motor modules were computed from the EMG signals of 12 muscles of the right lower limb using non-negative matrix factorization. The unstable gait of SL, NB, and CA showed significant changes compared with controls in the stride length, stride width, range of angular motion, and trunk oscillations. In most subjects of all three unstable conditions, >70% of the overall variation of EMG waveforms was accounted for by four modules that were characterized by a widening of muscle activity patterns. This suggests that the nervous system adopts the strategy of prolonging the duration of basic muscle activity patterns to cope with unstable conditions resulting from either slippery ground, reduced support surface, or pathology. PMID:26378199

  2. Unstable Spreading of Ionic Liquids on an Aqueous Substrate.

    PubMed

    Tsuchitani, Shigeki; Fukutake, Taiga; Mukai, Daiki; Miki, Hirofumi; Kikuchi, Kunitomo

    2017-10-04

    The spontaneous spreading of thin liquid films over substrate surfaces is attracting much attention due to its broad applications. Under particular conditions, surfactants deposited on substrates exhibit unstable spreading. In spite of the large effects of the stability of the spreading on the accuracy and efficiency of industrial processes that use the spreading, understanding how the stability of the spreading process is governed by the physical and chemical properties of the system is still little known. Recently, ionic liquids have been characterized as a new kind of surfactant due to their special properties. Here, we investigate the stability of the spreading of deposited imidazolium-based ionic liquids on an aqueous substrate. We focus mainly on the effects that the water solubility of the ionic liquids has on the stability. Hydrophobic ionic liquids exhibit spreading that has a highly periodic and petal-like unstable spreading front, whereas hydrophilic ionic liquids spread without such a regular spreading front and their spreading area shrinks after reaching its maximum. We propose a model for the generation of unstable spreading of hydrophobic ionic liquids, i.e., the unstable spreading front is created by the penetration of oncoming water in front of the spreading tip into the more viscous spreading ionic liquid layer, like the viscous fingering that occurs in a Hele-Shaw cell. However, the direction of the penetration is the opposite of the direction that the interface moves (the spreading direction), which is contrary to that in viscous fingering.

  3. Unstable oscillatory Pierce modes of neutralized electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, J.R.; Lemons, D.S.

    1982-04-01

    Oscillatory modes of the Pierce system have been calculated. These modes are found to have growth rates comparable to the previously investigated purely growing modes. When these modes are included, it is found that the Pierce system is unstable for most values of ..omega../sub p/ L/V/sub 0/>..pi...

  4. A novel approach to modeling unstable EOR displacements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, E.J.

    1994-04-01

    Most enhanced oil recovery schemes involve the displacement of a more dense and more viscous oil by a less dense and less viscous fluid in a heterogeneous porous medium. The interaction of heterogeneity with the several competing forces, namely, viscous, capillary, gravitational, and dispersive forces, can conspire to make the displacements unstable and difficult to model and to predict. The objective of this research was to develop a systematic methodology for modeling unstable fluid displacements in heterogeneous media. Flow visualization experiments were conducted using X-ray computed tomography imaging and a video imaging workstation to gain insights into the dynamics of unstable displacements, acquire detailed quantitative experimental image data for calibrating numerical models of unstable displacements, and image and characterize heterogeneities in laboratory cores geostatistically. High-resolution numerical models modified for use on vector-architecture supercomputers were used to replicate the image data. Geostatistical models of reservoir heterogeneity were incorporated in order to study the interaction of hydrodynamic instability and heterogeneity in reservoir displacements. Finally, a systematic methodology for matching the experimental data with the numerical models and scaling the laboratory results to other systems were developed. The result is a new method for predicting the performance of unstable EOR displacements in the field based on small-scale displacements in the laboratory. The methodology is general and can be applied to forecast the performance of most processes that involve fluid flow and transport in porous media. Therefore, this research should be of interest to those involved in forecasting the performance of enhanced oil recovery processes and the spreading of contaminants in heterogeneous aquifers.

  5. Fundamentals of ICF Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M D

    2005-09-30

    On the Nova Laser at LLNL, we demonstrated many of the key elements required for assuring that the next laser, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will drive an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target to ignition. The indirect drive (sometimes referred to as ''radiation drive'') approach converts laser light to x-rays inside a gold cylinder, which then acts as an x-ray ''oven'' (called a hohlraum) to drive the fusion capsule in its center. On Nova we've demonstrated good understanding of the temperatures reached in hohlraums and of the ways to control the uniformity with which the x-rays drive the spherical fusion capsules. In these lectures we will be reviewing the physics of these laser heated hohlraums, recent attempts at optimizing their performance, and then return to the ICF problem in particular to discuss scaling of ICF gain with scale size, and to compare indirect vs. direct drive gains. In ICF, spherical capsules containing Deuterium and Tritium (DT)--the heavy isotopes of hydrogen--are imploded, creating conditions of high temperature and density similar to those in the cores of stars required for initiating the fusion reaction. When DT fuses an alpha particle (the nucleus of a helium atom) and a neutron are created releasing large amount amounts of energy. If the surrounding fuel is sufficiently dense, the alpha particles are stopped and can heat it, allowing a self-sustaining fusion burn to propagate radially outward and a high gain fusion micro-explosion ensues. To create those conditions the outer surface of the capsule is heated (either directly by a laser or indirectly by laser produced x-rays) to cause rapid ablation and outward expansion of the capsule material. A rocket-like reaction to that outward flowing heated material leads to an inward implosion of the remaining part of the capsule shell. The pressure generated on the outside of the capsule can reach nearly 100 megabar (100 million times atmospheric pressure [1b = 10{sup 6} cgs

  6. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  7. An Evaluation of Fundamental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Larry J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    When compared with regular schools in the same district, fundamental school students performed as well as or better than regular school students; fundamental schools rated better on learning climate, discipline, and suspensions; and there were no differences in student self-concept. (Author/BW)

  8. Piecewise - Parabolic Methods for Parallel Computation with Applications to Unstable Fluid Flow in 2 and 3 Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, P. R.

    2003-03-26

    This report summarizes the results of the project entitled, ''Piecewise-Parabolic Methods for Parallel Computation with Applications to Unstable Fluid Flow in 2 and 3 Dimensions'' This project covers a span of many years, beginning in early 1987. It has provided over that considerable period the core funding to my research activities in scientific computation at the University of Minnesota. It has supported numerical algorithm development, application of those algorithms to fundamental fluid dynamics problems in order to demonstrate their effectiveness, and the development of scientific visualization software and systems to extract scientific understanding from those applications.

  9. Strain Wave during the Transient Process of Fault Unstable Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Liu, L.

    2011-12-01

    The "stick-slip" model was proposed as an important mechanism for shallow-focus earthquakes. The study on the transient process of fault unstable slip failure is helpful for understanding the earthquake preparatory process, the mechanism of energy released, the precursor and after shake effect. Double shear frictional experiments are conducted for simulating "stick-slip" phenomenon, and a specially designed multi-channel super dynamic strain field observation system is employed to acquire dada continuously with the sample rate of 3,400 samples/second. The rock deformation process can be recorded in detail, especially in the moment of unstable slip (The unstable slip duration is less than two second in experiments). The strain results from super dynamic strain field observation system show that multi-frequency components and tremendous amplitude fluctuation are included in strain signals along the fault. There are three clear phases during the unstable slip progress: pre-slip (phase I), high-frequency strain vibration (phase II) and strain regulating to stop (phase III). Each phase has its own characteristics on duration, strain rate, frequency, amplitude and energy release. There are strong fluctuations in duration of approximately 70ms in phase II. The frequency and maximum amplitude are 300-400Hz and 150~300μɛ respectively. Main strain energy release takes place at phase II, less than one-tenth of the total slip time, so that the whole course of dislocation or stress drop would not be taken as earthquake simply at least in laboratory. The phase characteristic of the strain wave is probably its inherent attribute of unstable slip process and independent of dynamical loading conditions. The elastic rebound phenomena, considered as one classic earthquake generation model, can be observed clearly by analyzing the rotation of the principal strain axis with strain variation. The rotated angle ranges from 5° to 15° typically. The value and location of precursor slip

  10. Shape phase transition in odd-even nuclei: From spherical to deformed gamma-unstable shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Boeyuekata, M.; Alonso, C. E.; Arias, J. M.; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A.

    2010-07-15

    Shape phase transitions in odd-A nuclei are investigated within the framework of the interacting boson-fermion model. The case of a single j=9/2 fermion coupled to an even-even boson core is considered. This boson core transits from spherical to gamma-unstable shapes depending on the value of a control parameter in the boson Hamiltonian. The effect of the coupling of the odd particle to this core along the shape transition and, in particular, at the critical point is discussed. For that purpose, the ground-state energy surface in terms of the beta and gamma shape variables for the even core and odd-even energy surfaces for the different K states coming from j=9/2 are constructed. The evolution of each individual coupled state along the transition from the spherical [U(5)] to the gamma-unstable [O(6)] situation is investigated. One finds that the core-fermion coupling gives rise to a smoother transition than in the even-core case.

  11. Extension of the CPT theorem to non-Hermitian Hamiltonians and unstable states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannheim, Philip D.

    2016-02-01

    We extend the CPT theorem to quantum field theories with non-Hermitian Hamiltonians and unstable states. Our derivation is a quite minimal one as it requires only the time-independent evolution of scalar products, invariance under complex Lorentz transformations, and a non-standard but nonetheless perfectly legitimate interpretation of charge conjugation as an antilinear operator. The first of these requirements does not force the Hamiltonian to be Hermitian. Rather, it forces its eigenvalues to either be real or to appear in complex conjugate pairs, forces the eigenvectors of such conjugate pairs to be conjugates of each other, and forces the Hamiltonian to admit of an antilinear symmetry. The latter two requirements then force this antilinear symmetry to be CPT, while forcing the Hamiltonian to be real rather than Hermitian. Our work justifies the use of the CPT theorem in establishing the equality of the lifetimes of unstable particles that are charge conjugates of each other. We show that the Euclidean time path integrals of a CPT-symmetric theory must always be real. In the quantum-mechanical limit the key results of the PT symmetry program of Bender and collaborators are recovered, with the C-operator of the PT symmetry program being identified with the linear component of the charge conjugation operator.

  12. Particles, Quarks, Leptons and Coloured Glue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, Lewis

    1980-01-01

    Explains the current situation in particle physics by reviewing the three major periods in the development of atomic theory. Outlines the current picture of fundamental particles and identifies five major problems with this model. (GS)

  13. Particles, Quarks, Leptons and Coloured Glue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, Lewis

    1980-01-01

    Explains the current situation in particle physics by reviewing the three major periods in the development of atomic theory. Outlines the current picture of fundamental particles and identifies five major problems with this model. (GS)

  14. [The efficacy of emoxipin and neoton in unstable stenocardia].

    PubMed

    Golikov, A P; Riabinin, V A; Golikov, P P; Davydov, B V; Polumiskov, V Iu; Rudnev, D V; Taranova, Z V

    1996-01-01

    55 patients with unstable angina pectoris (group 1) received conventional treatment and neoton infusions (30 g/day for 3 days). Emoxipin was injected intramuscularly to 20 patients of group 2 (3 mg/kg for 20 days) and intravenously to 38 patients of group 3 (10 mg/kg). Control group consisted of 100 patients. Stabilization occurred in 89.2, 80 and 86.8% of group 1, 2 and 3 patients, respectively, versus 78% in controls. Holter ECG monitoring provided evidence on decline of myocardial ischemia for group 1 patients. Diene conjugates in group 1 decreased by 37%, ceruloplasmin level was higher by 30% compared to controls. Respective indices for emoxipin reached 52 and 37%, respectively. It is concluded that emoxipin and neoton produced a beneficial effect on unstable angina pectoris through correction of lipid peroxidation.

  15. Traveling circumferential unstable wave of cylindrical flame front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trilis, A. V.; Vasiliev, A. A.; Sukhinin, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    The researches of stability of cylindrical front of deflagration combustion in an annular combustion chamber were made using phenomenological model. The flame front is described as discontinuity of gasdynamic parameters. It is considered that the combustion products are under chemical equilibrium. The combustible mixture and the combustion products are ideal gases. The velocity of deflagration combustion is determined using the Chapman-Jouget theory. It depends on the temperature of combustible mixture only. It is found that the combustible flame front is unstable for several types of small disturbances in the system Mechanics of instabilities are examined using both the numeric and analytical methods. The cases of evolution of the unstable waves rotating in circular channel are presented.

  16. Cancer stem cells as the engine of unstable tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Solé, Ricard V; Rodríguez-Caso, Carlos; Deisboeck, Thomas S; Saldaña, Joan

    2008-08-21

    Genomic instability is considered by many authors the key engine of tumorigenesis. However, mounting evidence indicates that a small population of drug resistant cancer cells can also be a key component of tumor progression. Such cancer stem cells would define a compartment effectively acting as the source of most tumor cells. Here we study the interplay between these two conflicting components of cancer dynamics using two types of tissue architecture. Both mean field and multicompartment models are studied. It is shown that tissue architecture affects the pattern of cancer dynamics and that unstable cancers spontaneously organize into a heterogeneous population of highly unstable cells. This dominant population is in fact separated from the low-mutation compartment by an instability gap, where almost no cancer cells are observed. The possible implications of this prediction are discussed.

  17. Stable and unstable Airy-related caustics and beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. V.

    2017-05-01

    Optical beams with an underlying caustic structure are stable under perturbation if the caustics belong to the catastrophe-theory classification; otherwise they are unstable. The original Airy beam in two spatial dimensions, with its curved caustic, is stable in this sense. But the separable Airy-product beam in three-dimensions is unstable: under separability-breaking perturbation, it unfolds into the hyperbolic umbilic diffraction catastrophe, which is stable. By including initial phase factors, a variety of new exact solutions of the paraxial wave equation can be generated, corresponding to Pearcey and higher-catastrophe beams with stable caustics, and with the associated diffraction catastrophes appearing in their canonical forms or as deformations of these.

  18. Is the magnetopause Rayleigh-Taylor unstable sometimes?

    SciTech Connect

    Gratton, F.T.; Farrugia, C.J.; Cowley, S.W.H.

    1996-03-01

    The authors examine the question of whether the magnetopause is Rayleigh-Taylor stable. The magnetopause tends to be in continuous motion because of the effect of the dyanmic pressure from the solar wind. When there is a sudden drop in solar wind pressure, and the magnetopause tends to accelerate sunward, a situation is created where the magnetopause may go unstable. The authors look at two possible stabilizing effects, first the magnetic shear which exists across the magnetopause, and then the viscous nature of the magnetosheath plasma. They find that large shear leads to stability for the Rayleigh-Taylor mode. When there is a strong northward component in the magnetosheath field, they find that the magnetopause may be unstable to this mode for both global and internal modes. They also discuss the effect of such instabilities on observations.

  19. Excess noise in strip off-axis confocal unstable resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gen; Tang, Xiahui; Wang, Du; Qin, Yingxiong; Xiao, Longsheng

    2012-02-01

    The lowest-loss mode and higher-order modes in strip off-axis confocal unstable resonators are calculated by the eigenvector method. The moduli of all pairs of the adjacent order eigenvalues exhibit crossing behavior. For the lowest- and next-lowest-loss modes, crossings occur when the equivalent Fresnel number N eq is close to s + 0.08 (s positive integer), and the lowest-loss mode profile calculated by the Fox-Li iteration is no longer self-reproducing, but the superposition of both eigenmodes with unfixed complex weights varies as the number of iterations. Numerical calculations of excess noise factors K in strip off-axis confocal unstable resonators are described in detail. The value of K shows an irregular resonance switching against N eq. The hybrid model presented by van Eijkelenborg et al. is modified in this paper, and shows a good quantitative agreement with nonorthogonality theory.

  20. Inherently unstable internal gravity waves due to resonant harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yong; Zareei, Ahmad; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2017-01-01

    Here we show that there exist internal gravity waves that are inherently unstable, that is, they cannot exist in nature for a long time. The instability mechanism is a one-way (irreversible) harmonic-generation resonance that permanently transfers the energy of an internal wave to its higher harmonics. We show that, in fact, there are countably infinite number of such unstable waves. For the harmonic-generation resonance to take place, nonlinear terms in the free surface boundary condition play a pivotal role, and the instability does not obtain for a linearly-stratified fluid if a simplified boundary condition such as rigid lid or linear form is employed. Harmonic-generation resonance presented here also provides a mechanism for the transfer of the energy of the internal waves to the higher-frequency part of the spectrum where internal waves are more prone to breaking, hence losing energy to turbulence and heat and contributing to oceanic mixing.

  1. Counting Unstable Eigenvalues in Hamiltonian Spectral Problems via Commuting Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haragus, Mariana; Li, Jin; Pelinovsky, Dmitry E.

    2017-08-01

    We present a general counting result for the unstable eigenvalues of linear operators of the form J L in which J and L are skew- and self-adjoint operators, respectively. Assuming that there exists a self-adjoint operator K such that the operators J L and J K commute, we prove that the number of unstable eigenvalues of J L is bounded by the number of nonpositive eigenvalues of K. As an application, we discuss the transverse stability of one-dimensional periodic traveling waves in the classical KP-II (Kadomtsev-Petviashvili) equation. We show that these one-dimensional periodic waves are transversely spectrally stable with respect to general two-dimensional bounded perturbations, including periodic and localized perturbations in either the longitudinal or the transverse direction, and that they are transversely linearly stable with respect to doubly periodic perturbations.

  2. Thermally unstable hydrides of titanium aluminide Ti3Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantseva, N. V.; Popov, A. G.; Mushnikov, N. V.; Skripov, A. V.; Soloninin, A. V.; Aleksashin, B. A.; Novozhenov, V. I.; Sazonova, V. A.; Kharisova, A. G.

    2011-04-01

    The hydrogen capacity of (Ti, Nb)3Al titanium aluminides subjected to mechanical activation in a hydrogen atmosphere has been studied. It has been shown that the application of this procedure allows one to prepare thermally unstable titanium aluminide (Ti3Al) hydrides with a high hydrogen content (to 2.6 wt %) at room temperature and normal pressure; in this case, no special requirements for the hydrogen purity are placed. The thermally unstable nanostructured Ti3Al hydrides were found to exhibit a higher hydrogen mobility as compared to that of the microcrystalline hydrides. Low niobium additions (to 2.1 at %) have been found to decrease the hydrogen capacity. Experiments on the preparation of bulk samples from the hydride powders obtained were performed.

  3. A fundamental study of liquid phase particle breakup. Revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-12-01

    Combustion efficiency of aluminized propellants in solid rocket motors is reduced by incomplete aluminum combustion and two-phase nozzle flow losses. Combustion of these propellants can produce large Al/Al2O3 agglomerates. As a direct result of agglomerate breakup, the aluminum combustion rate is increased, and the thermal energy released is more efficiently transferred into exhaust kinetic energy. This research sought to obtain physical data to characterize the mechanisms of aerodynamic droplet breakup. Experiments have been completed in which conventional liquids and a liquid metal (mercury) was studied. The primary goal of the conventional liquid experiments was to examine the effect of liquid properties (viscosity and surface tension) on the breakup mechanism, time scale, and fragment size distribution. The goal of the mercury experiments was to examine the effect of the much higher surface tension more characteristic of liquid aluminum. A key element of the experimental effort is the use of nonintrusive laser diagnostics including pulsed laser holography (PLH) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). The exceptional temporal and spatial resolution of PLH provided the ability to resolve the mechanism of breakup and the size distribution of the fragments. LDV was used to determine drop velocity distributions along the nozzle revealing the rapid acceleration of the flattened droplets and then, surprisingly, the milder acceleration of the fragments.

  4. Calcar Preservation Arthroplasty for Unstable Intertrochanteric Femoral Fractures in Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Togrul, Emre; Kose, Ozkan

    2015-01-01

    Background The treatment of unstable intertrochanteric fractures in elderly is still controversial. The purpose of this study is to present treatment strategies for unstable intertrochanteric fractures with hemiarthroplasty using standard uncemented collared femoral stems and at the same time preserving the fractured calcar fragment. Methods Fifty-four patients aged 75 years or older with unstable intertrochanteric fractures were included in this prospective cohort study. All patients were treated with calcar preserving hemiarthroplasty using cementless collored femoral stems. Fractured calcar fragment was stabilized either by compaction between the implant and femur or fixed with cable grip system. Follow-up evaluations were performed at least 24 months and later. Palmer and Parker mobility score and visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score were assessed. We also analyzed radiographs of the operated hip at each follow-up visit. Results The patients were 15 males and 39 females with a mean age of 81.3 years (range, 75 to 93 years). The average operative time was 86.6 minutes. The mean transfused blood units were 1.2 units. The average duration of hospital stay was 5.3 days. The preoperative mean mobility score was 6.20. This score was found to be 4.96 on postoperative third day and 5.90 at 24 months postoperatively. The results of the statistical analysis revealed significant increase in the mobility scores at each follow-up after three days. Radiological interpretation revealed no loosening in the cable-grip systems, and no significant subsidence (> 5 mm) of prosthesis was observed. Conclusions Calcar preservation arthroplasty is a good option for elderly patients with severe osteoporosis, frail constitution and the patients who are at higher risk for second operation due to unstable intertrochanteric fractures. PMID:26640625

  5. External fixation of unstable metacarpal and phalangeal fractures.

    PubMed

    Parsons, S W; Fitzgerald, J A; Shearer, J R

    1992-04-01

    A prospective study of the management of 30 patients with 37 unstable or complex metacarpal or phalangeal fractures treated with the "Shearer" micro-external fixator was carried out over an 18-month period. The stability achieved, with minimal soft-tissue tethering, allowed early joint mobilisation with good or excellent function in 94% of metacarpal and 85% of phalangeal fractures by nine weeks. There were no cases of non-union and few complications.

  6. Is the Milky Way's hot halo convectively unstable?

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L.

    2014-03-20

    We investigate the convective stability of two popular types of model of the gas distribution in the hot Galactic halo. We first consider models in which the halo density and temperature decrease exponentially with height above the disk. These halo models were created to account for the fact that, on some sight lines, the halo's X-ray emission lines and absorption lines yield different temperatures, implying that the halo is non-isothermal. We show that the hot gas in these exponential models is convectively unstable if γ < 3/2, where γ is the ratio of the temperature and density scale heights. Using published measurements of γ and its uncertainty, we use Bayes' theorem to infer posterior probability distributions for γ, and hence the probability that the halo is convectively unstable for different sight lines. We find that, if these exponential models are good descriptions of the hot halo gas, at least in the first few kiloparsecs from the plane, the hot halo is reasonably likely to be convectively unstable on two of the three sight lines for which scale height information is available. We also consider more extended models of the halo. While isothermal halo models are convectively stable if the density decreases with distance from the Galaxy, a model of an extended adiabatic halo in hydrostatic equilibrium with the Galaxy's dark matter is on the boundary between stability and instability. However, we find that radiative cooling may perturb this model in the direction of convective instability. If the Galactic halo is indeed convectively unstable, this would argue in favor of supernova activity in the Galactic disk contributing to the heating of the hot halo gas.

  7. Characterization of Unstable Rock Slopes Through Passive Seismic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinbrod, Ulrike; Burjánek, Jan; Fäh, Donat

    2014-05-01

    Catastrophic rock slope failures have high social impact, causing significant damage to infrastructure and many casualties throughout the world each year. Both detection and characterization of rock instabilities are therefore of key importance. Analysing unstable rock slopes by means of ambient vibrations might be a new alternative to the already existing methods as for example geotechnical displacement measurements. A systematic measurement campaign has been initiated recently in Switzerland in order to study the seismic response of potential rockslides concerning a broad class of slope failure mechanisms and material conditions. First results are presented in this contribution. Small aperture seismic arrays were deployed at sites of interest for a short period of time (several hours) in order to record ambient vibrations. During each measurement a reference station was installed on a stable part close to the instability. The total number of stations used varies from 16 down to 2, depending on the site scope and resource availability. Instable rock slopes show a highly directional ground motion which is significantly amplified with respect to stable areas. These effects are strongest at certain frequencies which are identified as eigenfrequencies of the unstable rock mass. The eigenfrequencies and predominant directions have been estimated by frequency dependent polarization analysis. Site-to-reference spectral ratios have been calculated as well in order to estimate the relative amplification of ground motion at unstable parts. The retrieved results were compared with independent in-situ observations and other available data. The directions of maximum amplification are in most cases perpendicular to open cracks mapped on the surface and in good agreement with the deformation directions obtained by geodetic measurements. The interpretation of the observed wave field is done through numerical modelling of seismic wave propagation in fractured media with complex

  8. Unstable Titan-generated Rayleigh-Taylor Lakes Impact Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umurhan, O. M.; Korycansky, D. G.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of surface morphology on Titan, Triton, and other worlds is strongly influenced by the interplay of various fluid dynamical processes. Specifically, overturning instabilities can easily arise due to the special circumstances of landform evolution that probably occurred on these worlds. On Titan, large impacts that formed basins like Menrva crater (and possibly Hotei Regio) would have generated impact-melt ice lakes unstably arranged over less dense ice. Cantaloupe terrains, for example as seen on Triton, may be the result of condensation of volatiles (methane, nitrogen) leading to unstably stratified layers of different compositions and densities. In each of these cases, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities leading to large scale diapirism may be at play. In addition to the dynamics of these instabilities, other physical effects (e.g. heat diffusion, freezing/melting, porosity, temperature dependent viscosity) likely play an important role in the evolution of these features. In this ongoing study, we examine the properties of unstably stratified fluids in which the lower less-dense ice has a temperature dependent viscosity. Surprisingly, we find that there exists an optimal disturbance length scale corresponding to the fastest growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. For unstably stratified layers of water (low viscosity heavy liquid lying above an ice whose viscosity increases with depth) the fastest growing mode corresponds to 40-60 km scales with overturn times of approximately 100 days. We present a detailed numerical stability analysis in a corresponding Boussinessq model (in the creeping flow limit) incorporating thermal conduction and latent heat release and we examine the stability properties surveying a variety of parameters. We have also developed a two-dimensional numerical code (a hybrid spectral/compact-differencing scheme) to model the evolution of such systems for which we shall present preliminary numerical results depicting the outcome of

  9. Thermally-sustained structure in convectively unstable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    The complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with a thermal noise term is studied under conditions when the system is convectively unstable. Under these conditions, the noise is selectively and spatially amplified giving rise to a noise-sustained structure. Analytical results, applicable to a wide range of physical systems, are derived for the variance, and the coefficients and thermal noise term are determined for Taylor-Couette flow with an axial through-flow. Comparison is made to recent experiments.

  10. Note about unstable D-branes with dynamical tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KlusoÅ, J.

    2016-08-01

    We propose an action for an unstable Dp-brane with dynamical tension. We show that the equations of motion are equivalent to the equations of motion derived from Dirac-Born-Infeld and Wess-Zumino actions for a non-Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Dp-brane. We also find the Hamiltonian formulation of this action and analyze the properties of the solutions corresponding to the tachyon vacuum and zero-tension solution.

  11. Prospects for electron scattering on unstable, exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Toshimi; Simon, Haik

    2017-09-01

    Electron scattering off radioactive ions becomes feasible for the first time due to advances in storage ring and trapping techniques in conjunction with intense secondary beams from novel beam facilities. Using a point-like purely leptonic probe enables the investigation of charge distributions and electromagnetic excitations in β-unstable exotic nuclei with an enhanced overshoot in proton and neutron numbers and the use of QED, one of the most precisely studied theories, for describing the scattering process.

  12. Unstable anginal syndrome and pulmonary oedema due to thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed Central

    Glikson, M.; Freimark, D.; Leor, R.; Shechter, M.; Kaplinsky, E.; Rabinowitz, B.

    1991-01-01

    We report on a 40 year old woman who presented with typical unstable angina pectoris associated with pulmonary oedema, due to poorly controlled hyperthyroidism. No cardiac abnormality was detected by echo-Doppler and nuclear ventriculography. Coronary angiography demonstrated normal coronary arteries. This case represents a new manifestation of the known association of cardiac ischaemia with hyperthyroidism in the presence of normal coronary arteries. PMID:2057437

  13. Fluorination utilizing thermodynamically unstable fluorides and fluoride salts thereof

    DOEpatents

    Bartlett, Neil; Whalen, J. Marc; Chacon, Lisa

    2000-12-12

    A method for fluorinating a carbon compound or cationic carbon compound utilizes a fluorination agent selected from thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides and salts thereof in liquid anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. The desired carbon compound or cationic organic compound to undergo fluorination is selected and reacted with the fluorination agent by contacting the selected organic or cationic organic compound and the chosen fluorination agent in a reaction vessel for a desired reaction time period at room temperature or less.

  14. Inherently unstable networks collapse to a critical point.

    PubMed

    Sheinman, M; Sharma, A; Alvarado, J; Koenderink, G H; MacKintosh, F C

    2015-07-01

    Nonequilibrium systems that are driven or drive themselves towards a critical point have been studied for almost three decades. Here we present a minimalist example of such a system, motivated by experiments on collapsing active elastic networks. Our model of an unstable elastic network exhibits a collapse towards a critical point from any macroscopically connected initial configuration. Taking into account steric interactions within the network, the model qualitatively and quantitatively reproduces results of the experiments on collapsing active gels.

  15. Unstable periodic orbits and noise in chaos computing.

    PubMed

    Kia, Behnam; Dari, Anna; Ditto, William L; Spano, Mark L

    2011-12-01

    Different methods to utilize the rich library of patterns and behaviors of a chaotic system have been proposed for doing computation or communication. Since a chaotic system is intrinsically unstable and its nearby orbits diverge exponentially from each other, special attention needs to be paid to the robustness against noise of chaos-based approaches to computation. In this paper unstable periodic orbits, which form the skeleton of any chaotic system, are employed to build a model for the chaotic system to measure the sensitivity of each orbit to noise, and to select the orbits whose symbolic representations are relatively robust against the existence of noise. Furthermore, since unstable periodic orbits are extractable from time series, periodic orbit-based models can be extracted from time series too. Chaos computing can be and has been implemented on different platforms, including biological systems. In biology noise is always present; as a result having a clear model for the effects of noise on any given biological implementation has profound importance. Also, since in biology it is hard to obtain exact dynamical equations of the system under study, the time series techniques we introduce here are of critical importance.

  16. Momentum broadening in unstable quark-gluon plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Carrington, M. E.; Mrówczyński, St.; Schenke, B.

    2017-02-01

    We present that quark-gluon plasma produced at the early stage of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions is unstable, if weakly coupled, due to the anisotropy of its momentum distribution. Chromomagnetic fields are spontaneously generated and can reach magnitudes much exceeding typical values of the fields in equilibrated plasma. We consider a high-energy test parton traversing an unstable plasma that is populated with strong fields. We study the momentum broadening parametermore » $$ˆ\\atop{q}$$ which determines the radiative energy loss of the test parton. We develop a formalism which gives $$ˆ\\atop{q}$$ as the solution of an initial value problem, and we focus on extremely oblate plasmas which are physically relevant for relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The parameter $$ˆ\\atop{q}$$ is found to be strongly dependent on time. For short times it is of the order of the equilibrium value, but at later times $$ˆ\\atop{q}$$ grows exponentially due to the interaction of the test parton with unstable modes and becomes much bigger than the value in equilibrium. The momentum broadening is also strongly directionally dependent and is largest when the test parton velocity is transverse to the beam axis. Lastly, consequences of our findings for the phenomenology of jet quenching in relativistic heavy-ion collisions are briefly discussed.« less

  17. Metastability in plyometric training on unstable surfaces: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the past, plyometric training (PT) has been predominantly performed on stable surfaces. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine effects of a 7-week lower body PT on stable vs. unstable surfaces. This type of exercise condition may be denoted as metastable equilibrium. Methods Thirty-three physically active male sport science students (age: 24.1 ± 3.8 years) were randomly assigned to a PT group (n = 13) exercising on stable (STAB) and a PT group (n = 20) on unstable surfaces (INST). Both groups trained countermovement jumps, drop jumps, and practiced a hurdle jump course. In addition, high bar squats were performed. Physical fitness tests on stable surfaces (hexagonal obstacle test, countermovement jump, hurdle drop jump, left-right hop, dynamic and static balance tests, and leg extension strength) were used to examine the training effects. Results Significant main effects of time (ANOVA) were found for the countermovement jump, hurdle drop jump, hexagonal test, dynamic balance, and leg extension strength. A significant interaction of time and training mode was detected for the countermovement jump in favor of the INST group. No significant improvements were evident for either group in the left-right hop and in the static balance test. Conclusions These results show that lower body PT on unstable surfaces is a safe and efficient way to improve physical performance on stable surfaces. PMID:25089202

  18. Metastability in plyometric training on unstable surfaces: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kibele, Armin; Classen, Claudia; Muehlbauer, Thomas; Granacher, Urs; Behm, David G

    2014-01-01

    In the past, plyometric training (PT) has been predominantly performed on stable surfaces. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine effects of a 7-week lower body PT on stable vs. unstable surfaces. This type of exercise condition may be denoted as metastable equilibrium. Thirty-three physically active male sport science students (age: 24.1 ± 3.8 years) were randomly assigned to a PT group (n = 13) exercising on stable (STAB) and a PT group (n = 20) on unstable surfaces (INST). Both groups trained countermovement jumps, drop jumps, and practiced a hurdle jump course. In addition, high bar squats were performed. Physical fitness tests on stable surfaces (hexagonal obstacle test, countermovement jump, hurdle drop jump, left-right hop, dynamic and static balance tests, and leg extension strength) were used to examine the training effects. Significant main effects of time (ANOVA) were found for the countermovement jump, hurdle drop jump, hexagonal test, dynamic balance, and leg extension strength. A significant interaction of time and training mode was detected for the countermovement jump in favor of the INST group. No significant improvements were evident for either group in the left-right hop and in the static balance test. These results show that lower body PT on unstable surfaces is a safe and efficient way to improve physical performance on stable surfaces.

  19. Momentum broadening in unstable quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrington, M. E.; Mrówczyński, St.; Schenke, B.

    2017-02-01

    Quark-gluon plasma produced at the early stage of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions is unstable, if weakly coupled, due to the anisotropy of its momentum distribution. Chromomagnetic fields are spontaneously generated and can reach magnitudes much exceeding typical values of the fields in equilibrated plasma. We consider a high-energy test parton traversing an unstable plasma that is populated with strong fields. We study the momentum broadening parameter q ̂ which determines the radiative energy loss of the test parton. We develop a formalism which gives q ̂ as the solution of an initial value problem, and we focus on extremely oblate plasmas which are physically relevant for relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The parameter q ̂ is found to be strongly dependent on time. For short times it is of the order of the equilibrium value, but at later times q ̂ grows exponentially due to the interaction of the test parton with unstable modes and becomes much bigger than the value in equilibrium. The momentum broadening is also strongly directionally dependent and is largest when the test parton velocity is transverse to the beam axis. Consequences of our findings for the phenomenology of jet quenching in relativistic heavy-ion collisions are briefly discussed.

  20. Treatment of unstable fractures of the pelvic ring in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Loegters, Tim; Briem, Daniel; Gatzka, Christian; Linhart, Wolfgang; Begemann, Phillip G; Rueger, Johannes M; Windolf, Joachim

    2005-04-01

    Unstable fractures of the posterior pelvic ring during pregnancy are rare. Pregnancy increases the high demands on the therapy of these types of fractures. The aim of the therapeutic strategy in such a situation is a good functional outcome of the mother without influencing the fetal health. Some osteosynthetic techniques result in good functional outcomes, but they are associated with high amounts of ionizing radiation. We report the case of a pregnant woman who sustained a vertical unstable fracture of the posterior pelvic ring as a result of a traffic accident. The fracture was treated surgically by open reduction and internal fixation with two transiliac reconstruction plates with minimal radiographic exposure to the fetus. One year later, a good functional result concerning the mother was shown. The child was healthy without any signs of prenatal impairment. Surgical treatment of an unstable fracture of the pelvic ring during pregnancy is possible with a justifiable risk to the mother and the child. Consideration of the expected fetal radiation exposure in the course of the therapy is particularly recommended. Using minimal doses of ionizing radiation, the described method results in a good clinical outcome of the mother while simultaneously reducing the radiation exposure of the fetus to an acceptable level.

  1. Self-aggregation of clouds in conditionally unstable moist convection.

    PubMed

    Pauluis, Olivier; Schumacher, Jörg

    2011-08-02

    The behavior of moist Rayleigh-Bénard convection is investigated using a Boussinesq model with a simplified thermodynamics for phase transitions. This idealized configuration makes the problem accessible to high-resolution three-dimensional direct numerical simulations without small-scale parameterizations of the turbulence for extended layers with aspect ratios up to 64. Our study is focused on the frequently observed conditionally unstable environment that is stably stratified for unsaturated air, but is unstable for cloudy air. We find that no sharp threshold for the transition to convective turbulence exists, a situation similar to wall-bounded shear flows. Rather, the transition depends on the amplitude of the initial perturbation of the quiescent equilibrium and on the aspect ratio of the convective domain. In contrast to the classical dry Rayleigh-Bénard case, convection is highly asymmetric with respect to the vertical direction. Moist upwelling air inside turbulent cloud aggregates is surrounded by ambient regions of slowly descending unsaturated air. It is also found that conditionally unstable moist convection is inefficient at transporting energy. Our study suggests that there is an upper bound on the Nusselt number in moist convection that is lower than that of the classical dry case.

  2. Quantum demolition filtering and optimal control of unstable systems.

    PubMed

    Belavkin, V P

    2012-11-28

    A brief account of the quantum information dynamics and dynamical programming methods for optimal control of quantum unstable systems is given to both open loop and feedback control schemes corresponding respectively to deterministic and stochastic semi-Markov dynamics of stable or unstable systems. For the quantum feedback control scheme, we exploit the separation theorem of filtering and control aspects as in the usual case of quantum stable systems with non-demolition observation. This allows us to start with the Belavkin quantum filtering equation generalized to demolition observations and derive the generalized Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation using standard arguments of classical control theory. This is equivalent to a Hamilton-Jacobi equation with an extra linear dissipative term if the control is restricted to Hamiltonian terms in the filtering equation. An unstable controlled qubit is considered as an example throughout the development of the formalism. Finally, we discuss optimum observation strategies to obtain a pure quantum qubit state from a mixed one.

  3. Adaptive control of unknown unstable steady states of dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Pyragas, K; Pyragas, V; Kiss, I Z; Hudson, J L

    2004-08-01

    A simple adaptive controller based on a low-pass filter to stabilize unstable steady states of dynamical systems is considered. The controller is reference-free; it does not require knowledge of the location of the fixed point in the phase space. A topological limitation similar to that of the delayed feedback controller is discussed. We show that the saddle-type steady states cannot be stabilized by using the conventional low-pass filter. The limitation can be overcome by using an unstable low-pass filter. The use of the controller is demonstrated for several physical models, including the pendulum driven by a constant torque, the Lorenz system, and an electrochemical oscillator. Linear and nonlinear analyses of the models are performed and the problem of the basins of attraction of the stabilized steady states is discussed. The robustness of the controller is demonstrated in experiments and numerical simulations with an electrochemical oscillator, the dissolution of nickel in sulfuric acid; a comparison of the effect of using direct and indirect variables in the control is made. With the use of the controller, all unstable phase-space objects are successfully reconstructed experimentally.

  4. Self-aggregation of clouds in conditionally unstable moist convection

    PubMed Central

    Pauluis, Olivier; Schumacher, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of moist Rayleigh–Bénard convection is investigated using a Boussinesq model with a simplified thermodynamics for phase transitions. This idealized configuration makes the problem accessible to high-resolution three-dimensional direct numerical simulations without small-scale parameterizations of the turbulence for extended layers with aspect ratios up to 64. Our study is focused on the frequently observed conditionally unstable environment that is stably stratified for unsaturated air, but is unstable for cloudy air. We find that no sharp threshold for the transition to convective turbulence exists, a situation similar to wall-bounded shear flows. Rather, the transition depends on the amplitude of the initial perturbation of the quiescent equilibrium and on the aspect ratio of the convective domain. In contrast to the classical dry Rayleigh–Bénard case, convection is highly asymmetric with respect to the vertical direction. Moist upwelling air inside turbulent cloud aggregates is surrounded by ambient regions of slowly descending unsaturated air. It is also found that conditionally unstable moist convection is inefficient at transporting energy. Our study suggests that there is an upper bound on the Nusselt number in moist convection that is lower than that of the classical dry case. PMID:21768333

  5. Investigation of the unstable flow phenomenon in a pump turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, JunLian; Wang, DeZhong; Walters, D. Keith; Wei, XianZhu

    2014-06-01

    Instability of pump turbine with S-shaped curve is characterized by large fluctuations of rotational speed during the transient processes. For investigating this phenomenon, a numerical model based on the dynamic sliding mesh method (DSSM) is presented and used to numerically solve the 3D transient flow which is characterized by the variable rotation speed of runner. The method is validated by comparison with measured data for a load rejection process in a prototype pump turbine. The results show that the calculated rotation speed agrees well with the experimental data. Based on the validated model, simulations were performed for the runaway process using an artificially assumed operating condition under which the unstable rotation speed is expected to appear. The results confirm that the instability of runner rotational speed can be effectively captured with the proposed method. Presented results include the time history profiles of unit flow rate and unit rotating speed. The internal flow characteristics in a typical unstable period are discussed in detail and the mechanism of the unstable hydraulic phenomenon is explained. Overall, the results suggest that the method presented here can be a viable alternative to predict the dynamic characteristics of pump turbines during transient processes.

  6. Soft-Sphere Packings at Finite Pressure but Unstable to Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagois-Bohy, Simon; Tighe, Brian P.; Simon, Johannes; Henkes, Silke; van Hecke, Martin

    2012-08-01

    When are athermal soft-sphere packings jammed? Any experimentally relevant definition must, at the very least, require a jammed packing to resist shear. We demonstrate that widely used (numerical) protocols, in which particles are compressed together, can and do produce packings that are unstable to shear—and that the probability of generating such packings reaches one near jamming. We introduce a new protocol which, by allowing the system to explore different box shapes as it equilibrates, generates truly jammed packings with strictly positive shear moduli G. For these packings, the scaling of the average of G is consistent with earlier results, while the probability distribution P(G) exhibits novel and rich scalings.

  7. Reactive Ion Etched Unstable and Stable Semiconductor Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biellak, Stephen Alexander

    1995-01-01

    High power, diffraction-limited semiconductor laser diodes are desirable for numerous applications such as efficient solid state laser pumping, nonlinear frequency conversion, and free-space communication. In the past several years, wide-stripe diode lasers and laser arrays with powers of up to several watts have become commercially available, but the beam quality of these devices is generally poor due to filamentation, a nonlinear material effect that aberrates the output beam profile. An attractive alternative to these simple Fabry-Perot lasers is offered by unstable resonators, which have inherently large gain volumes and a cavity geometry that inhibits filamentation. Prototype unstable resonators with dry-etched cavity mirrors have recently been demonstrated to achieve near diffraction -limited operation at moderately high output powers. However, the lateral mode properties of unstable resonators have heretofore not been examined in detail, nor has a reliable, high-throughput mirror etch process been developed for these devices. In this work, we have developed a GaAs RIE etching technique using common process equipment that yields mirrors with RMS surface roughness of 3 to 5 nm. We have fabricated unstable resonators and have measured lateral M ^2 beam quality values as low as 1.25 at 300 mW single facet output power in high magnification devices. The impact of cavity geometry and processing techniques on device performance was studied, and the optimal parameters for high-brightness applications were determined. Nearly concentric stable-resonator diode lasers were also fabricated for the first time using this etching technique. These stable-resonators were observed to operate in lateral modes determined primarily by the physical resonator structure up to several times threshold, after which nonlinear effects dominated the cavity modes. Based on these measurements, a description of stable device behavior in terms of gain saturation was developed. Finally, a

  8. Outcomes of Short Segment Posterior Instrumentation in Unstable Thoracolumbar Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Gajjar, Sharvil H; Chaudhari, Nitin; Chaudhari, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The spinal traumas are common and leading problem in orthopaedics practice. The individuals are at a risk of high energy trauma in modern era. Unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures are serious injuries of concern, if left untreated may result in marked morbidity and disability to the patient. Thoracolumbar is the second most common segment involved in the spinal cord following spinal injuries followed by cervical segment. The goal of treatment of any spinal injury is restoration of the patient to maximum possible function with disability free life. Aim To analyse the outcomes of unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures stabilized with short segment posterior instrumentation with transpedicular screws. Materials and Methods This prospective interventional study consisted of 32 patients with unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures carried out at Department of Orthopaedics, New Civil Hospital, Surat during Jan 2014 to Dec 2015. We stabilized the patients with unstable thoracolumbar spinal fractures with short segment posterior instrumentation by using the intermediate screw option in the fractured vertebra level as a method of augmentation. Patients were evaluated for maintenance of spinal correction and neurological improvement after short segment posterior instrumentation in unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures. Results The mean age for males was 35.57 ± 11.62 years and for females was 33.56 ± 11.2 years. The most common vertebra involved in the study group was T12 (31.25%). In the study, about 66% patients had a fall from height as the mode of injury, whereas 34% injuries were due to road traffic accident. In the study group, the mean regional angle observed during pre-operative stages was 16.0°±5.1°. There was a statistically significant (p<0.05) difference between pre-op and post-operative regional angles as well as anterior wedge angles. There was a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) in the vertebral height between pre-operative and

  9. Ablative Thermal Protection System Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation for a short course on the fundamentals of ablative thermal protection systems. It covers the definition of ablation, description of ablative materials, how they work, how to analyze them and how to model them.

  10. Clinical fundamentals for radiation oncologists.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jack

    2011-11-01

    Clinical fundamentals for radiation oncologists. Hasan Murshed. Medical Physics Publishing, Madison, WI, 2011. 680 pp. (soft cover), Price: $90.00. 978-1-930524-43-9. © 2011 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. The effect of unstable loading versus unstable support conditions on spine rotational stiffness and spine stability during repetitive lifting.

    PubMed

    Beaudette, Shawn M; Graham, Ryan B; Brown, Stephen H M

    2014-01-22

    Lumbar spine stability has been extensively researched due to its necessity to facilitate load-bearing human movements and prevent structural injury. The nature of certain human movement tasks are such that they are not equivalent in levels of task-stability (i.e. the stability of the external environment). The goal of the current study was to compare the effects of dynamic lift instability, administered through both the load and base of support, on the dynamic stability (maximal Lyapunov exponents) and stiffness (EMG-driven model) of the lumbar spine during repeated sagittal lifts. Fifteen healthy males performed 23 repetitive lifts with varying conditions of instability at the loading and support interfaces. An increase in spine rotational stiffness occurred during unstable support scenarios resulting in an observed increase in mean and maximum Euclidean norm spine rotational stiffness (p=0.0011). Significant stiffening effects were observed in unstable support conditions about all lumbar spine axes with the exception of lateral bend. Relative to a stable control lifting trial, the addition of both an unstable load as well as an unstable support did not result in a significant change in the local dynamic stability of the lumbar spine (p=0.5592). The results suggest that local dynamic stability of the lumbar spine represents a conserved measure actively controlled, at least in part, by trunk muscle stiffening effects. It is evident therefore that local dynamic stability of the lumbar spine can be modulated effectively within a young-healthy population; however this may not be the case in a patient population.

  12. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  13. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  14. Possibilities of radioisotope measuring in control of an unstable solid particles hydrotransport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryka, Leszek; Zych, Marcin; Hanus, Robert; Sobota, Jerzy; Vlasak, Pavel; Śleziak, Monika; Świsulski, Dariusz

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents γ-radiation proposal to control a multiphase flow, independently from circumstances. So this method may be applied even in compound industrial or environmental processes. Moreover in many cases, it is the only method for applications for dense mixture containing coarse angular grains. The constructed equipment allows continuous measurement of density as well as solid phase for both concentration and average velocity. Due to pressure loss, it gives the output digital signal convenient for cybernation of the control process. The proposed procedures were tested at a laboratory installation modeling conditions expected during planned excavation of nodules from Pacific bottom.

  15. Serratus anterior muscle activation during knee push-up plus exercise performed on static stable, static unstable, and oscillating unstable surfaces in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si-hyun; Kwon, Oh-yun; Kim, Su-jung; Park, Kyue-nam; Choung, Sung-dae; Weon, Jong-hyuck

    2014-02-01

    To compare electromyographic (EMG) activity of the serratus anterior (SA) during knee push-up plus exercises according to various surfaces (static stable, static unstable, and oscillating unstable surfaces). Comparative study by repeated measures. Yonsei University laboratory. In total, 15 healthy male subjects participated. The subjects performed knee push-up plus exercises on three different surfaces: static stable, static unstable, and oscillating unstable surfaces. Surface EMG activity of the SA for the peak and average amplitudes were collected from the dominant arm and presented as a percentage of the maximal voluntary contraction. A one-way repeated-measures ANOVA with a Bonferroni post hoc test was performed to compare differences in SA EMG activity according to the surface. The peak and average amplitudes of SA activity were significantly greater during knee push-up plus on the oscillating unstable surface than on the static stable or static unstable surfaces (p < 0.01). Additionally, there was no significant difference between the stable and static unstable surfaces (p > 0.05). Knee push-up plus exercise on an oscillating unstable surface activates the SA more than the same exercise on static stable and static unstable surfaces. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Iliosacral screw fixation of the unstable pelvic ring injuries.

    PubMed

    Rysavý, M; Pavelka, T; Khayarin, M; Dzupa, V

    2010-06-01

    To report on the early results and possible complications of iliosacral screw fixation in the management of unstable pelvic ring injuries. One hundred and two unstable pelvic ring injuries were treated using iliosacral screw fixation for posterior pelvic ring disruptions. Closed manipulative reductions of the posterior lesion were attempted for all patients. Open reductions were used in the minority of patients with unsatisfactory closed reductions as assessed fluoroscopically at the time of surgery. Anterior fixations were by means of open reduction in 62 patients and by external fixation in 14 patients, and by screws in 7 patients. Twenty patients had no anterior fixation. Plain anteroposterior, inlet and outlet radiographs of the pelvis were obtained postoperatively at six weeks, three months, six months and one year. A pelvic computed tomography scan was performed postoperatively in those patients where residual displacement or screw misplacement was suspected. Complications were recorded. One patient died 31 days after the trauma due to pneumonia and one died 9 months after the surgery after a fall from a height in a second suicidal attempt. There were two posterior pelvic infections and one anterior pelvic infection. Screw misplacement occurred in seven cases. In six cases a misplaced screw produced transient L5 neuroapraxia. There was no fixation failure requiring revision surgery. There was one case of injury to the superior gluteal artery. Unstable pelvic ring disruptions are severe injuries, associated with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. Pelvic fractures can be treated by variety of methods. Treatment with traction and pelvic slings does not offer accurate reduction and confines the patient to prolong bed rest with all potential complications. Several authors documented lower morbidity and mortality rates and shorter hospital stay in patients treated by early operative stabilization of pelvic injuries. The timing of the surgery is still

  17. Unstable Roche-Lobe Overflow of Gaseous Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Brian

    The discoveries of more than 100 roughly Earth-sized bodies with orbital periods less than 1 day, ultra-short-period planets or candidates (USPs), have challenged planet formation theories, and evidence suggests USPs may be the remnants of gaseous planets that shed their atmospheres. Indeed, many hot Jupiters are near Roche-Lobe overflow (RLO), and tidal decay can push them the rest of the way in. Recent work has shown stable RLO (atmospheres lost via a steady outflow and thin accretion disk) probably cannot produce USPs on its own but suggested unstable RLO (atmospheres quickly shed on dynamical timescales) may. In fact, stable RLO may drive overflowing hot Jupiters into unstable RLO, and by analogy with the common-envelope binaries, the core that remains can drive off the gaseous envelope at the cost of its orbital energy. Wellestablished mass-radius relations for gaseous planets, coupled to simple energy and angular momentum considerations, provide a connection between the observed masses and periods for USPs and their putative progenitor gaseous planets, with few free parameters. We propose to investigate the hypothesis that USPs originate through tidal decay and a combination of stable and unstable Roche-lobe overflow of short-period gaseous planets through the following studies: -We will explore the planetary masses, orbital periods, etc. that produce unstable RLO using the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) suite. -We will relate the observed periods and masses of USPs to their putative progenitor masses and periods to see whether they are consistent with the unstable RLO hypothesis. This proposal is directly relevant to the Exoplanets Research Program since it seeks to "understand the ... physical processes of exoplanets" and "improve understanding of [their] origins" through "theoretical studies ... and modeling'". We also expect that it will have broad impacts on a variety of astrophysical topics: -Ultra-short period planets could

  18. Elementary Particles and Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigg, Chris

    1985-01-01

    Discusses subatomic particles (quarks, leptons, and others) revealed by higher accelerator energies. A connection between forces at this subatomic level has been established, and prospects are good for a description of forces that encompass binding atomic nuclei. Colors, fundamental interactions, screening, camouflage, electroweak symmetry, and…

  19. Nucleosome Core Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Nucleosome Core Particle grown on STS-81. The fundamental structural unit of chromatin and is the basis for organization within the genome by compaction of DNA within the nucleus of the cell and by making selected regions of chromosomes available for transcription and replication. Principal Investigator's are Dr. Dan Carter and Dr. Gerard Bunick of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  20. Nucleosome Core Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Nucleosome Core Particle grown on STS-81. The fundamental structural unit of chromatin and is the basis for organization within the genome by compaction of DNA within the nucleus of the cell and by making selected regions of chromosomes available for transcription and replication. Principal Investigator's are Dr. Dan Carter and Dr. Gerard Bunick of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  1. Elementary Particles and Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigg, Chris

    1985-01-01

    Discusses subatomic particles (quarks, leptons, and others) revealed by higher accelerator energies. A connection between forces at this subatomic level has been established, and prospects are good for a description of forces that encompass binding atomic nuclei. Colors, fundamental interactions, screening, camouflage, electroweak symmetry, and…

  2. Strategy Switching in the Stabilization of Unstable Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zenzeri, Jacopo; De Santis, Dalia; Morasso, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand mechanisms of strategy switching in the stabilization of unstable dynamics, this work investigates how human subjects learn to become skilled users of an underactuated bimanual tool in an unstable environment. The tool, which consists of a mass and two hand-held non-linear springs, is affected by a saddle-like force-field. The non-linearity of the springs allows the users to determine size and orientation of the tool stiffness ellipse, by using different patterns of bimanual coordination: minimal stiffness occurs when the two spring terminals are aligned and stiffness size grows by stretching them apart. Tool parameters were set such that minimal stiffness is insufficient to provide stable equilibrium whereas asymptotic stability can be achieved with sufficient stretching, although at the expense of greater effort. As a consequence, tool users have two possible strategies for stabilizing the mass in different regions of the workspace: 1) high stiffness feedforward strategy, aiming at asymptotic stability and 2) low stiffness positional feedback strategy aiming at bounded stability. The tool was simulated by a bimanual haptic robot with direct torque control of the motors. In a previous study we analyzed the behavior of naïve users and we found that they spontaneously clustered into two groups of approximately equal size. In this study we trained subjects to become expert users of both strategies in a discrete reaching task. Then we tested generalization capabilities and mechanism of strategy-switching by means of stabilization tasks which consist of tracking moving targets in the workspace. The uniqueness of the experimental setup is that it addresses the general problem of strategy-switching in an unstable environment, suggesting that complex behaviors cannot be explained in terms of a global optimization criterion but rather require the ability to switch between different sub-optimal mechanisms. PMID:24921254

  3. Analysis of PITFL injuries in rotationally unstable ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Warner, Stephen J; Garner, Matthew R; Schottel, Patrick C; Hinds, Richard M; Loftus, Michael L; Lorich, Dean G

    2015-04-01

    Reduction and stabilization of the syndesmosis in unstable ankle fractures is important for ankle mortise congruity and restoration of normal tibiotalar contact forces. Of the syndesmotic ligaments, the posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (PITFL) provides the most strength for maintaining syndesmotic stability, and previous work has demonstrated the significance of restoring PITFL function when it remains attached to a posterior malleolus fracture fragment. However, little is known regarding the nature of a PITFL injury in the absence of a posterior malleolus fracture. The goal of this study was to describe the PITFL injury pattern based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intraoperative observation. A prospective database of all operatively treated ankle fractures by a single surgeon was used to identify all supination-external rotation (SER) types III and IV ankle fracture patients with complete preoperative orthogonal ankle radiographs and MRI. All patients with a posterior malleolus fracture were excluded. Using a combination of preoperative imaging and intraoperative findings, we analyzed the nature of injuries to the PITFL. In total, 185 SER III and IV operatively treated ankle fractures with complete imaging were initially identified. Analysis of the preoperative imaging and operative reports revealed 34% (63/185) had a posterior malleolus fracture and were excluded. From the remaining 122 ankle fractures, the PITFL was delaminated from the posterior malleolus in 97% (119/122) of cases. A smaller proportion (3%; 3/122) had an intrasubstance PITFL rupture. Accurate and stable syndesmotic reduction is a significant component of restoring the ankle mortise after unstable ankle fractures. In our large cohort of rotationally unstable ankle fractures without posterior malleolus fractures, we found that most PITFL injuries occur as a delamination off the posterior malleolus. This predictable PITFL injury pattern may be used to guide new methods for

  4. Unstable Distal Radius Fractures Treated by Volar Locking Anatomical Plates

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Anto; Deniese, Pascal Noel; Babu, Abey Thomas; Rengasamy, Kanagasabai; Najimudeen, Syed

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Fracture of the distal end of radius represents the most common fracture of the upper extremity accounting for 16-20% of all fractures. Plating is now emerging as the gold standard for management of distal radius fractures due to increased rate of complications such as malunion, subluxation/dislocation of distal radio-ulnar joint or late collapse of fracture. Procedures such as closed reduction and cast immobilization, ligamentotaxis with external fixator and percutaneous pin fixation are no longer acceptable. Aim The purpose of the study was to evaluate the functional and radiological outcome of unstable distal radius fractures treated with the volar locking plate. Materials and Methods We reviewed 53 patients from January 2011 to December 2015, treated for unstable distal radius fractures using a volar locking compression plate. Standard radiographic and clinical assessment after 12 months (range 12-16 months) were measured and final functional and radiological outcome were assessed using the Modified Mayo wrist scoring system and Sarmiento’s modification of Lindstorm criteria respectively. Results There were 42 males and 11 females with an average age of 39.12±31.78 years (18-71 years). At the end of 12 months, 36 patients had an excellent radiological outcome and 10 patients had good radiological outcome as per Sarmiento’s modification of Lindstorm criteria. Eleven patients had an excellent functional outcome and 26 patients had a good functional outcome as per modified Mayo wrist scoring system. There was one case of superficial wound infection which subsided with intravenous antibiotics. Conclusion The volar locking plate fixation helps in early mobilization of the wrist, restores anatomy, allows early return to function, prevents secondary loss of reduction and hence is an effective treatment for unstable fractures of the distal radius. PMID:28274009

  5. Defining the fundamentals of care.

    PubMed

    Kitson, Alison; Conroy, Tiffany; Wengstrom, Yvonne; Profetto-McGrath, Joanne; Robertson-Malt, Suzi

    2010-08-01

    A three-stage process is being undertaken to investigate the fundamentals of care. Stage One (reported here) involves the use of a met a-narrative review methodology to undertake a thematic analysis, categorization and synthesis of selected contents extracted from seminal texts relating to nursing practice. Stage Two will involve a search for evidence to inform the fundamentals of care and a refinement of the review method. Stage Three will extend the reviews of the elements defined as fundamentals of care. This introductory paper covers the following aspects: the conceptual basis upon which nursing care is delivered; how the fundamentals of care have been defined in the literature and in practice; an argument that physiological aspects of care, self-care elements and aspects of the environment of care are central to the conceptual refinement of the term fundamentals of care; and that efforts to systematize such information will enhance overall care delivery through improvements in patient safety and quality initiatives in health systems.

  6. Changes in phase space during learning an unstable balance.

    PubMed

    Mégrot, Fabrice; Bardy, Benoît G

    2006-07-10

    Six participants learned to maintain an unstable balance on a stabilometer, during 6 consecutive days of practice (total of 90 trials). Lateral and angular variations of body segments and body center of mass were analysed, and their evolution over the learning period was compared to the changes in dimensional variables capturing the structure of the movement itself (embedding and correlation dimension, largest Lyapunov exponent). Results indicated that (i) learning occurred, (ii) was accompanied by persistence in the dimension of the movement, and (iii) by a reduction in chaotic (or stochastic) components. Compared to other results in the learning literature, these results suggest that dimensional changes over learning are task-specific.

  7. Photoneutron cross sections for unstable neutron-rich oxygen isotopes.

    PubMed

    Leistenschneider, A; Aumann, T; Boretzky, K; Cortina, D; Cub, J; Datta Pramanik, U; Dostal, W; Elze, T W; Emling, H; Geissel, H; Grünschloss, A; Hellstr, M; Holzmann, R; Ilievski, S; Iwasa, N; Kaspar, M; Kleinböhl, A; Kratz, J V; Kulessa, R; Leifels, Y; Lubkiewicz, E; Münzenberg, G; Reiter, P; Rejmund, M; Scheidenberger, C; Schlegel, C; Simon, H; Stroth, J; Sümmerer, K; Wajda, E; Walús, W; Wan, S

    2001-06-11

    The dipole response of stable and unstable neutron-rich oxygen nuclei of masses A = 17 to A = 22 has been investigated experimentally utilizing electromagnetic excitation in heavy-ion collisions at beam energies about 600 MeV/nucleon. A kinematically complete measurement of the neutron decay channel in inelastic scattering of the secondary beam projectiles from a Pb target was performed. Differential electromagnetic excitation cross sections d sigma/dE were derived up to 30 MeV excitation energy. In contrast to stable nuclei, the deduced dipole strength distribution appears to be strongly fragmented and systematically exhibits a considerable fraction of low-lying strength.

  8. Unstable behavior of anodic arc discharge for synthesis of nanomaterials

    DOE PAGES

    Gershman, Sophia; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2016-07-27

    A short carbon arc operating with a high ablation rate of the graphite anode exhibits a combined motion of the arc and the arc attachment to the anode. A characteristic time scale of this motion is in a 10-3 sec range. The arc exhibits a negative differential resistance before the arc motion occurs. Thermal processes in the arc plasma region interacting with the ablating anode are considered as possible causes of this unstable arc behavior. It is also hypothesized that the arc motion could potentially cause mixing of the various nanoparticles synthesized in the arc in the high ablation regime.

  9. Stable and unstable vortices in multicomponent bose-einstein condensates

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ripoll; Perez-Garcia

    2000-05-08

    We study the stability and dynamics of vortices in two-species condensates as prepared in the recent JILA experiment [Matthews et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2498 (1999)]. We find that of the two possible configurations, in which one species has vorticity m = 1 and the other one has m = 0, only one is linearly stable, which agrees with the experimental results. However, it is found that in the unstable case the vortex is not destroyed by the instability, but may be transferred from one species to the other or display complex spatiotemporal dynamics.

  10. Unstable behavior of anodic arc discharge for synthesis of nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Gershman, Sophia; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2016-07-27

    A short carbon arc operating with a high ablation rate of the graphite anode exhibits a combined motion of the arc and the arc attachment to the anode. A characteristic time scale of this motion is in a 10-3 sec range. The arc exhibits a negative differential resistance before the arc motion occurs. Thermal processes in the arc plasma region interacting with the ablating anode are considered as possible causes of this unstable arc behavior. It is also hypothesized that the arc motion could potentially cause mixing of the various nanoparticles synthesized in the arc in the high ablation regime.

  11. Unstable evolution of pointwise trajectory solutions to chaotic maps.

    PubMed

    Fox, Ronald F.

    1995-12-01

    Simple chaotic maps are used to illustrate the inherent instability of trajectory solutions to the Frobenius-Perron equation. This is demonstrated by the difference in the behavior of delta-function solutions and of extended densities. Extended densities evolve asymptotically and irreversibly into invariant measures on stationary attractors. Pointwise trajectories chaotically roam over these attractors forever. Periodic Gaussian distributions on the unit interval are used to provide insight. Viewing evolving densities as ensembles of unstable pointwise trajectories gives densities a stochastic interpretation. (c) 1995 American Institute of Physics.

  12. A novel approach to modeling unstable EOR displacements

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    This research is aimed at developing a methodology for predicting the performance of unstable displacements in heterogeneous porous media. A performance prediction approach that integrates numerical modeling with laboratory experiments will be developed. Flow visualization experiments will be performed on laboratory corefloods using X-ray computed tomography (CT) and other imaging technologies to map the in situ fluid saturations in time and space. A systematic procedure will be developed to replicate the experimental image data with high-resolution numerical models of the displacements. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Stabilizing unstable steady states using multiple delay feedback control.

    PubMed

    Ahlborn, Alexander; Parlitz, Ulrich

    2004-12-31

    Feedback control with different and independent delay times is introduced and shown to be an efficient method for stabilizing fixed points (equilibria) of dynamical systems. In comparison to other delay based chaos control methods multiple delay feedback control is superior for controlling steady states and works also for relatively large delay times (sometimes unavoidable in experiments due to system dead times). To demonstrate this approach for stabilizing unstable fixed points we present numerical simulations of Chua's circuit and a successful experimental application for stabilizing a chaotic frequency doubled Nd-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser.

  14. Management of unstable ankle fractures and syndesmosis injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, J Adam; Porter, David A

    2009-06-01

    Athletes with unstable ankle injuries treated with rigid and anatomic internal fixation with concomitant repair of indicated ligaments followed by an accelerated rehabilitation program consisting of early weight bearing and near-immediate range of motion (ROM) can obtain excellent outcomes. Early ROM and weight bearing, if indicated depending on the specific injury pattern, can be effective with low morbidity. Return to sports can be expected as early as 4 weeks after rigid fixation of an isolated fibula fracture and up to 8 to 10 weeks after stabilization of a bimalleolar equivalent fracture with deltoid repair. Syndesmosis fixation can take up to 4 to 6 months before successful return to sport.

  15. Unstable behavior of anodic arc discharge for synthesis of nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Gershman, Sophia; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2016-07-27

    A short carbon arc operating with a high ablation rate of the graphite anode exhibits a combined motion of the arc and the arc attachment to the anode. A characteristic time scale of this motion is in a 10-3 sec range. The arc exhibits a negative differential resistance before the arc motion occurs. Thermal processes in the arc plasma region interacting with the ablating anode are considered as possible causes of this unstable arc behavior. It is also hypothesized that the arc motion could potentially cause mixing of the various nanoparticles synthesized in the arc in the high ablation regime.

  16. Quantum field theory of classically unstable Hamiltonian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Y.; Horwitz, L. P.; Levitan, J.; Yahalom, A.

    2015-07-15

    We study a class of dynamical systems for which the motions can be described in terms of geodesics on a manifold (ordinary potential models can be cast into this form by means of a conformal map). It is rigorously proven that the geodesic deviation equation of Jacobi, constructed with a second covariant derivative, is unitarily equivalent to that of a parametric harmonic oscillator, and we study the second quantization of this oscillator. The excitations of the Fock space modes correspond to the emission and absorption of quanta into the dynamical medium, thus associating unstable behavior of the dynamical system with calculable fluctuations in an ensemble with possible thermodynamic consequences.

  17. Stable/unstable slow integral manifolds in critical cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchepakina, Elena

    2017-02-01

    The paper deals with the problem of a construction of global stable/unstable slow integral manifolds of the singularly perturbed systems in critical cases. In addition to the well-known critical cases a novel scenario of the stability change of the slow integral manifold is considered. All three critical cases leading to the change of the stability are discussed via the Hindmarsh-Rose dynamic model. It is shown that the suitable choice of the additional parameters of the system yields the slow integral manifold with multiple change of its stability.

  18. Astrophysical probes of fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2009-10-01

    I review the motivation for varying fundamental couplings and discuss how these measurements can be used to constrain fundamental physics scenarios that would otherwise be inaccessible to experiment. I highlight the current controversial evidence for varying couplings and present some new results. Finally I focus on the relation between varying couplings and dark energy, and explain how varying coupling measurements might be used to probe the nature of dark energy, with some advantages over standard methods. In particular I discuss what can be achieved with future spectrographs such as ESPRESSO and CODEX.

  19. Constraining fundamental physics with future CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Silvia; Martinelli, Matteo; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Sherwin, Blake D.; Spergel, David N.

    2010-12-01

    The Planck experiment will soon provide a very accurate measurement of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. This will let cosmologists determine most of the cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. Future experiments will improve and complement the Planck data with better angular resolution and better polarization sensitivity. This unexplored region of the CMB power spectrum contains information on many parameters of interest, including neutrino mass, the number of relativistic particles at recombination, the primordial helium abundance, and the injection of additional ionizing photons by dark matter self-annihilation. We review the imprint of each parameter on the CMB and forecast the constraints achievable by future experiments by performing a Monte Carlo analysis on synthetic realizations of simulated data. We find that next generation satellite missions such as CMBPol could provide valuable constraints with a precision close to that expected in current and near future laboratory experiments. Finally, we discuss the implications of this intersection between cosmology and fundamental physics.

  20. Constraining fundamental physics with future CMB experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Martinelli, Matteo; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Sherwin, Blake D.; Spergel, David N.

    2010-12-15

    The Planck experiment will soon provide a very accurate measurement of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. This will let cosmologists determine most of the cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. Future experiments will improve and complement the Planck data with better angular resolution and better polarization sensitivity. This unexplored region of the CMB power spectrum contains information on many parameters of interest, including neutrino mass, the number of relativistic particles at recombination, the primordial helium abundance, and the injection of additional ionizing photons by dark matter self-annihilation. We review the imprint of each parameter on the CMB and forecast the constraints achievable by future experiments by performing a Monte Carlo analysis on synthetic realizations of simulated data. We find that next generation satellite missions such as CMBPol could provide valuable constraints with a precision close to that expected in current and near future laboratory experiments. Finally, we discuss the implications of this intersection between cosmology and fundamental physics.

  1. Designing capture trajectories to unstable periodic orbits around Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Ryan P.; Lam, Try

    2006-01-01

    The hostile environment of third body perturbations restricts a mission designer's ability to find well-behaved reproducible capture trajectories when dealing with limited control authority as is typical with low-thrust missions. The approach outlined in this paper confronts this shortcoming by utilizing dynamical systems theory and an extensive preexisting database of Restricted Three Body Problem (RTBP) periodic orbits. The stable manifolds of unstable periodic orbits are utilized to attract a spacecraft towards Europa. By selecting an appropriate periodic orbit, a mission designer can control important characteristics of the captured state including stability, minimum altitudes, characteristic inclinations, and characteristic radii among others. Several free parameters are optimized in the non-trivial mapping from the RTBP to a more realistic model. Although the ephemeris capture orbit is ballistic by design, low-thrust is used to target the state that leads to the capture orbit, control the spacecraft after arriving on the unstable quasi-periodic orbit, and begin the spiral down towards the science orbit. The approach allows a mission designer to directly target fuel efficient captures at Europa in an ephemeris model. Furthermore, it provides structure and controllability to the design of capture trajectories that reside in a chaotic environment.

  2. A Mouse Model for Human Unstable Hemoglobin Santa Ana.

    PubMed

    Miyashiro, Samantha I; Massironi, Silvia M G; Mori, Claudia M C; Cruz, Carolina C; Hagiwara, Mitika K; Maiorka, Paulo C

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, we described the phenotype, histologic morphology, and molecular etiology of a mouse model of unstable hemoglobin Santa Ana. Hematologic evaluation of anemic mice (Anem/+) discovered after N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis revealed moderate anemia with intense reticulocytosis and polychromasia, followed by anisocytosis, macrocytosis, hypochromia, and intraerythrocytic inclusion and Heinz bodies. The mice also demonstrated hemoglobinuria, bilirubinemia, and erythrocytic populations with differing resistance to osmotic lysis. Splenomegaly (particularly in older mutant mice) and jaundice were apparent at necropsy. Histopathologic examination revealed dramatically increased hematopoiesis and hemosiderosis in hematopoietic organs and intracellular iron deposition in tubular renal cells. These data are characteristic of a congenital hemolytic regenerative anemia, similar to human anemias due to unstable hemoglobin. Genetic mapping assigned the affected gene to mouse chromosome 7, approximately 50 cM from the Hbb locus. The sequence of the mutant Hbb gene exhibited a T→C transversion at nucleotide 179 in Hbb-b1, leading to the substitution of proline for leucine at amino acid residue 88 and thus homologous to the genetic defect underlying Santa Ana anemia in humans.

  3. Unstable deformation in layered media: Application to planetary lithospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, Maria Theresa

    Described are theoretical models in which observed length scales of deformation on a planetary surface are used to make inferences about the mechanical properties, style of deformation and nature of forces acting on the lithosphere. Each model represents an application of linearized hydrodynamic stability theory in which the lithosphere is treated as a strength and density stratified continuum in a state of horizontal extension or compression. The first paper, Extension of Continental Lithosphere: A Model for Two Scales of Basin and Range Deformation, demonstrates that short and long wavelengths of deformation may develop in response to unstable extension of the strong upper crust and upper mantle regions of the lithosphere, respectively. The second paper, Rifting by Ductile Lithosphere Extension: A Dynamic Model for Rift Morphology, analyzes the dynamic contribution to rift morphology of flow induced by a necking instability in an extending lithosphere. It is shown that deformation which nucleates about an initial thickness perturbation in the strong layer of an extending lithosphere results in a rift-like structure, with a width related to the dominant wavelength of the extensional instability. The third paper, Unstable Compression of Oceanic Lithosphere: An Analysis of Intraplate Deformation in the Central Indian Basin, shows that the wavelength of intraplate deformation observed in the Indian Ocean can provide constraints on the strong layer strength of the lithosphere.

  4. Unstable Behavior of Anodic Arc Discharge for Synthesis of Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Sophia; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2016-09-01

    Fast imaging and electrical current measurements reveal unstable behavior of the carbon arc discharge for synthesis of nanomaterials. The arc column and the arc attachment region to the anode move in a somewhat sporadic way with a characteristic time in a 10-3 sec range. The arc exhibits a negative differential resistance before the arc motion occurs. A physical mechanism is proposed based on the thermal processes in the arc plasma region interacting with the ablating anode which leads to the shift of the arc to a new anode region. According to the transient heat transfer analysis, the time needed to heat a new anode region is also in a 10-3 sec range. For a 0.6 cm diameter anode used in our experiments, this time yields a frequency of about 200-300 Hz, comparable to the measured frequency of the arc motion. The voltage and current measurements show oscillations with a similar characteristic frequency. The thermal model is indirectly supported by the measured negative differential resistance of the arc discharge during arc oscillations. The observed unstable behavior of the arc may be responsible for the mixing of the flow of nanoparticles during the synthesis of nanoparticles leading to poor selectivity typical for the arc synthesis. The work was supported by US DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  5. Excess quantum noise fluctuations in unstable-resonator lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuh-Jen; Mussche, Paul; Fanning, Geoff; Siegman, A. E.

    1996-12-01

    Experiments completed during the past year confirm the existence of a sizable excess quantum noise factor in lasers using unstable optical resonators or, more generally, resonators with nonorthogonal oscillation modes. Schawlow and Townes predicted in 1958, before the first laser was built, that even an ideal laser should exhibit a finite linewidth resulting from spontaneous emission by the laser atoms.1 Lamb and others, using standard techniques of cavity mode expansion and second quantization, then showed that the spontaneous emission in any laser should have a magnitude equal to the downward stimulated emission due to one additional quantum of signal energy acting on the inverted laser medium.2 This "one extra noise photon" approach to quantum noise has since become conventional wisdom in the field. Petermann noted in 1979, however, that spontaneous emission into the oscillating mode of a gain-guided semiconductor laser could be significantly larger than one photon per mode, leading to potentially measurable consequences for such lasers.3 In 1985, Haus and Kawakami showed that there would be partial coherence between the excess noise emission into different cavity modes, thus avoiding apparent conflicts between this excess emission and basic concepts of thermal equilibrium.4 One of us then showed in 1989 that this excess quantum noise was actually associated with the nonhermitian or biorthogonal character of the modes in certain laser structures rather than with gain guiding per se, so that large excess quantum noise effects should be observed in unstable resonator lasers in particular.5

  6. Unstable dynamics, nonequilibrium phases, and criticality in networked excitable media.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, S; Torres, J J; Marro, J

    2010-10-01

    Excitable systems are of great theoretical and practical interest in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. Here, we numerically study models of excitable media, namely, networks whose nodes may occasionally be dormant and the connection weights are allowed to vary with the system activity on a short-time scale, which is a convenient and realistic representation. The resulting global activity is quite sensitive to stimuli and eventually becomes unstable also in the absence of any stimuli. Outstanding consequences of such unstable dynamics are the spontaneous occurrence of various nonequilibrium phases--including associative-memory phases and one in which the global activity wanders irregularly, e.g., chaotically among all or part of the dynamic attractors--and 1/f noise as the system is driven into the phase region corresponding to the most irregular behavior. A net result is resilience which results in an efficient search in the model attractor space that can explain the origin of some observed behavior in neural, genetic, and ill-condensed matter systems. By extensive computer simulation we also address a previously conjectured relation between observed power-law distributions and the possible occurrence of a "critical state" during functionality of, e.g., cortical networks, and describe the precise nature of such criticality in the model which may serve to guide future experiments.

  7. Management of the unstable cervical spine: elective versus emergent cases.

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Vincent; Hans, Pol

    2009-10-01

    The present review focuses on similarities and discrepancies in the management of emergent and elective unstable cervical spine (C-spine) patients. During mobilization, lifting is superior to rolling in limiting spine movements. Before prone position surgery, the transfer of the patient on a rotating table is preferable to rolling. In trauma patients, helical computed tomography (CT) with sagittal reconstruction is the first choice for clearing the C-spine. In those patients, airway compromise may be related to hidden cervical edema or hematoma. Several devices can be of help in performing safe tracheal intubation in patients with limited neck movements, but awake fiberoptic intubation remains the safest procedure. The muscle relaxant antagonist sugammadex can improve safety for rapid sequence induction. It can rapidly reverse profound steroid-based neuromuscular blockade and allows avoidance of succinylcholine in this indication. Propofol anesthesia better prevents coughing upon emergence than inhaled anesthesia. Neuroprotection in cord-damaged patients is disappointing, and the controversy on the efficacy of high-dose methylprednisolone is not closed. Nevertheless, maintenance of homeostasis remains the cornerstone of neuroprotection. Subtle details differentiate the management of emergent and elective unstable C-spine patients. In both situations, the presence or the absence of a neurological insult governs the therapeutic strategy.

  8. Identifying Unstable Regions of Proteins Involved in Misfolding Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, Will; Cashman, Neil; Plotkin, Steven

    2009-05-01

    Protein misfolding is a necessary step in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). Identifying unstable structural elements in their causative proteins elucidates the early events of misfolding and presents targets for inhibition of the disease process. An algorithm was developed to calculate the Gibbs free energy of unfolding for all sequence-contiguous regions of a protein using three methods to parameterize energy changes: a modified G=o model, changes in solvent-accessible surface area, and all-atoms molecular dynamics. The entropic effects of disulfide bonds and post-translational modifications are treated analytically. It incorporates a novel method for finding local dielectric constants inside a protein to accurately handle charge effects. We have predicted the unstable parts of prion protein and superoxide dismutase 1, the proteins involved in CJD and fALS respectively, and have used these regions as epitopes to prepare antibodies that are specific to the misfolded conformation and show promise as therapeutic agents.

  9. Unstable dynamics, nonequilibrium phases, and criticality in networked excitable media

    SciTech Connect

    Franciscis, S. de; Torres, J. J.; Marro, J.

    2010-10-15

    Excitable systems are of great theoretical and practical interest in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. Here, we numerically study models of excitable media, namely, networks whose nodes may occasionally be dormant and the connection weights are allowed to vary with the system activity on a short-time scale, which is a convenient and realistic representation. The resulting global activity is quite sensitive to stimuli and eventually becomes unstable also in the absence of any stimuli. Outstanding consequences of such unstable dynamics are the spontaneous occurrence of various nonequilibrium phases--including associative-memory phases and one in which the global activity wanders irregularly, e.g., chaotically among all or part of the dynamic attractors--and 1/f noise as the system is driven into the phase region corresponding to the most irregular behavior. A net result is resilience which results in an efficient search in the model attractor space that can explain the origin of some observed behavior in neural, genetic, and ill-condensed matter systems. By extensive computer simulation we also address a previously conjectured relation between observed power-law distributions and the possible occurrence of a ''critical state'' during functionality of, e.g., cortical networks, and describe the precise nature of such criticality in the model which may serve to guide future experiments.

  10. Finding and Scaling Unstable Periodic Orbits in Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Frank

    1998-03-01

    Unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) of low order can be detected in noisy physical(D. Pierson and F. Moss, Phys. Rev. Lett.) 75, 2124 (1995)and biological(X. Pei and F. Moss, Nature) 379, 618 (1996) systems. The statistically based detection method extracts the number of encounters with UPOs of period p, and compares that with findings from surrogate files. UPOs can be distinguished from stable orbits. The results are expressed as a time evolving statistical measure, useful for analyzing short files from non-stationary systems. We show bifurcations between stable and unstable behavior in peripheral cold receptors, neurosecretory hypothalamic cells (both in rat) and electroreceptors in catfish(H.A. Braun, et al., J. Comp. Neurosci.), in press. Since only orbits of the lowest orders (p < 4) can be detected, a scaling is necessary to connect the experimentally observable orbits to the infinite set of UPOs which characterize dissipative chaos. A scaling due to C.-Y. Lai is calculated for the Henon map. Data from crayfish photoreceptor cells for p = 1 to 3 are consistent with this scaling.

  11. Designing capture trajectories to unstable periodic orbits around Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Ryan P.; Lam, Try

    2006-01-01

    The hostile environment of third body perturbations restricts a mission designer's ability to find well-behaved reproducible capture trajectories when dealing with limited control authority as is typical with low-thrust missions. The approach outlined in this paper confronts this shortcoming by utilizing dynamical systems theory and an extensive preexisting database of Restricted Three Body Problem (RTBP) periodic orbits. The stable manifolds of unstable periodic orbits are utilized to attract a spacecraft towards Europa. By selecting an appropriate periodic orbit, a mission designer can control important characteristics of the captured state including stability, minimum altitudes, characteristic inclinations, and characteristic radii among others. Several free parameters are optimized in the non-trivial mapping from the RTBP to a more realistic model. Although the ephemeris capture orbit is ballistic by design, low-thrust is used to target the state that leads to the capture orbit, control the spacecraft after arriving on the unstable quasi-periodic orbit, and begin the spiral down towards the science orbit. The approach allows a mission designer to directly target fuel efficient captures at Europa in an ephemeris model. Furthermore, it provides structure and controllability to the design of capture trajectories that reside in a chaotic environment.

  12. Museum Techniques in Fundamental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    Some museum techniques and methods can be used in fundamental educational programs without elaborate buildings or equipment; exhibitions should be based on valid presumptions and should take into account the "common sense" beliefs of people for whom the exhibit is designed. They can be used profitably in the economic development of local…

  13. Fundamentals of the Slide Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boerner, Susan Zee

    This paper is an introduction to the fundamentals of the art (including architecture) slide library, with some emphasis on basic procedures of the science slide library. Information in this paper is particularly relevant to the college, university, and museum slide library. Topics addressed include: (1) history of the slide library; (2) duties of…

  14. Fundamentals of Welding. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    These instructional materials assist teachers in improving instruction on the fundamentals of welding. The following introductory information is included: use of this publication; competency profile; instructional/task analysis; related academic and workplace skills list; tools, materials, and equipment list; and 27 references. Seven units of…

  15. Status of Fundamental Physics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Mark C.

    2003-01-01

    Update of the Fundamental Physics Program. JEM/EF Slip. 2 years delay. Reduced budget. Community support and advocacy led by Professor Nick Bigelow. Reprogramming led by Fred O Callaghan/JPL team. LTMPF M1 mission (DYNAMX and SUMO). PARCS. Carrier re baselined on JEM/EF.

  16. Environmental Law: Fundamentals for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, David R.

    This booklet outlines the environmental problems most likely to arise in schools. An overview provides a fundamental analysis of environmental issues rather than comprehensive analysis and advice. The text examines the concerns that surround superfund cleanups, focusing on the legal framework, and furnishes some practical pointers, such as what to…

  17. Brake Fundamentals. Automotive Articulation Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Larry; And Others

    Designed for secondary and postsecondary auto mechanics programs, this curriculum guide contains learning exercises in seven areas: (1) brake fundamentals; (2) brake lines, fluid, and hoses; (3) drum brakes; (4) disc brake system and service; (5) master cylinder, power boost, and control valves; (6) parking brakes; and (7) trouble shooting. Each…

  18. Fundamentals of Environmental Education. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1976

    An outline of fundamental definitions, relationships, and human responsibilities related to environment provides a basis from which a variety of materials, programs, and activities can be developed. The outline can be used in elementary, secondary, higher education, or adult education programs. The framework is based on principles of the science…

  19. Programs for Fundamentals of Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallardo, Julio; Delgado, Steven

    This document provides computer programs, written in BASIC PLUS, for presenting fundamental or remedial college chemistry students with chemical problems in a computer assisted instructional program. Programs include instructions, a sample run, and 14 separate practice sessions covering: mathematical operations, using decimals, solving…

  20. Chronometric cosmology and fundamental fermions

    PubMed Central

    Segal, I. E.

    1982-01-01

    It is proposed that the fundamental fermions of nature are modeled by fields on the chronometric cosmos that are not precisely spinors but become such only in the nonchronometric limit. The imbedding of the scale-extended Poincaré group in the linearizer of the Minkowskian conformal group defines such fields, by induction. PMID:16593266

  1. Fundamentals of Environmental Education. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1976

    An outline of fundamental definitions, relationships, and human responsibilities related to environment provides a basis from which a variety of materials, programs, and activities can be developed. The outline can be used in elementary, secondary, higher education, or adult education programs. The framework is based on principles of the science…

  2. Fundamentals of Welding. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    These instructional materials assist teachers in improving instruction on the fundamentals of welding. The following introductory information is included: use of this publication; competency profile; instructional/task analysis; related academic and workplace skills list; tools, materials, and equipment list; and 27 references. Seven units of…

  3. Brake Fundamentals. Automotive Articulation Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Larry; And Others

    Designed for secondary and postsecondary auto mechanics programs, this curriculum guide contains learning exercises in seven areas: (1) brake fundamentals; (2) brake lines, fluid, and hoses; (3) drum brakes; (4) disc brake system and service; (5) master cylinder, power boost, and control valves; (6) parking brakes; and (7) trouble shooting. Each…

  4. Fundamentals of Microelectronics Processing (VLSI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takoudis, Christos G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a 15-week course in the fundamentals of microelectronics processing in chemical engineering, which emphasizes the use of very large scale integration (VLSI). Provides a listing of the topics covered in the course outline, along with a sample of some of the final projects done by students. (TW)

  5. Lighting Fundamentals. Monograph Number 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locatis, Craig N.; Gerlach, Vernon S.

    Using an accompanying, specified film that consists of 10-second pictures separated by blanks, the learner can, with the 203-step, self-correcting questions and answers provided in this program, come to understand the fundamentals of lighting in photography. The learner should, by the end of the program, be able to describe and identify the…

  6. Fundamentals of Microelectronics Processing (VLSI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takoudis, Christos G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a 15-week course in the fundamentals of microelectronics processing in chemical engineering, which emphasizes the use of very large scale integration (VLSI). Provides a listing of the topics covered in the course outline, along with a sample of some of the final projects done by students. (TW)

  7. FUNdamental Movement in Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Linley

    2001-01-01

    Noting that the development of fundamental movement skills is basic to children's motor development, this booklet provides a guide for early childhood educators in planning movement experiences for children between 4 and 8 years. The booklet introduces a wide variety of appropriate practices to promote movement skill acquisition and increased…

  8. The moving boundary approach to modeling gravity-driven stable and unstable flow in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindt, Naaran; Wallach, Rony

    2016-04-01

    Many field and laboratory studies in the last 40 years have found that water flow in homogeneous soil profiles may occur in preferential flow pathways rather than in a laterally uniform wetting front, as expected from classical soil physics theory and expressed by the Richards equation. The water-content distribution within such gravity-driven fingers was found to be nonmonotonic due to water accumulation behind a sharp wetting front (denoted as saturation overshoot). The unstable flow was first related to soil coarseness. However, its appearance in water-repellent soils led the authors to hypothesize that gravity-driven unstable flow formation is triggered by a non-zero contact angle between water and soil particles. Despite its widespread occurrence, a macroscopic-type model describing the nonmonotonic water distribution and sharp wetting front is still lacking. The moving boundary approach, which divides the flow domain into two well-defined subdomains with a sharp change in fluid saturation between them, is suggested to replace the classical approach of solving the Richards equation for the entire flow domain. The upper subdomain consists of water and air, whose relationship varies with space and time following the imposed boundary condition at the soil surface as calculated by the Richards equation. The lower subdomain also consists of water and air, but their relationship remains constant following the predetermined initial condition. The moving boundary between the two subdomains is the sharp wetting front, whose location is part of the solution. As such, the problem is inherently nonlinear. The wetting front's movement is controlled by the dynamic water-entry pressure of the soil, which depends on soil wettability and the front's propagation rate. A lower soil wettability, which hinders the spontaneous invasion of dry pores and increases the water-entry pressure, induces a sharp wetting front and water accumulation behind it. The wetting front starts to

  9. The Fundamental Manifold of Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2006-02-01

    We present a unifying empirical description of the structural and kinematic properties of all spheroids embedded in dark matter halos. We find that the intracluster stellar spheroidal components of galaxy clusters, which we call cluster spheroids (CSphs) and which are typically 100 times the size of normal elliptical galaxies, lie on a ``fundamental plane'' as tight as that defined by elliptical galaxies (rms in effective radius of ~0.07) but having a different slope. The slope, as measured by the coefficient of the logσ term, declines significantly and systematically between the fundamental planes of ellipticals, brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), and CSphs. We attribute this decline primarily to a continuous change in Me/Le, the mass-to-light ratio within the effective radius re, with spheroid scale. The magnitude of the slope change requires that it arise principally from differences in the relative distributions of luminous and dark matter, rather than from stellar population differences such as in age and metallicity. By expressing the Me/Le term as a function of σ in the simple derivation of the fundamental plane and requiring the behavior of that term to mimic the observed nonlinear relationship between logMe/Le and logσ, we simultaneously fit a two-dimensional manifold to the measured properties of dwarf elliptical and elliptical galaxies, BCGs, and CSphs. The combined data have an rms scatter in logre of 0.114 (0.099 for the combination of ellipticals, BCGs, and CSphs), which is modestly larger than each fundamental plane has alone, but which includes the scatter introduced by merging different studies done in different filters by different investigators. This ``fundamental manifold'' fits the structural and kinematic properties of spheroids that span a factor of 100 in σ and 1000 in re. While our mathematical form is neither unique nor derived from physical principles, the tightness of the fit leaves little room for improvement by other unification

  10. Unstable Pore-Water Flow in Intertidal Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. A.; Shen, C.; Li, L.

    2014-12-01

    Salt marshes are important intertidal wetlands strongly influenced by interactions between surface water and groundwater. Bordered by coastal water, the marsh system undergoes cycles of inundation and exposure driven by the tide. This leads to dynamic, complex pore-water flow and solute transport in the marsh soil. Pore-water circulations occur over vastly different spatial and temporal scales with strong link to the marsh topography. These circulations control solute transport between the marsh soil and the tidal creek, and ultimately affect the overall nutrient exchange between the marsh and coastal water. The pore-water flows also dictate the soil condition, particularly aeration, which influences the marsh plant growth. Numerous studies have been carried out to examine the pore-water flow process in the marsh soil driven by tides, focusing on stable flow with the assumption of homogeneity in soil and fluid properties. This assumption, however, is questionable given the actual inhomogeneous conditions in the field. For example, the salinity of surface water in the tidal creek varies temporally and spatially due to the influence of rainfall and evapotranspiration as well as the freshwater input from upland areas to the estuary, creating density gradients across the marsh surface and within the marsh soil. Many marshes possess soil stratigraphy with low-permeability mud typically overlying high-permeability sandy deposits. Macropores such as crab burrows are commonly distributed in salt marsh sediments. All these conditions are prone to the development of non-uniform, unstable preferential pore-water flow in the marsh soil, for example, funnelling and fingering. Here we present results from laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to explore such unstable flow. In particular, the analysis aims to address how the unstable flow modifies patterns of local pore-water movement and solute transport, as well as the overall exchange between the marsh soil and

  11. Unstable dynamics and population limitation in mountain hares.

    PubMed

    Newey, Scott; Dahl, Fredrik; Willebrand, Tomas; Thirgood, Simon

    2007-11-01

    The regular large-scale population fluctuations that characterize many species of northern vertebrates have fascinated ecologists since the time of Charles Elton. There is still, however, no clear consensus on what drives these fluctuations. Throughout their circumpolar distribution, mountain hares Lepus timidus show regular and at times dramatic changes in density. There are distinct differences in the nature, amplitude and periodicity of these fluctuations between regions and the reasons for these population fluctuations and the geographic differences remain largely unknown. In this review we synthesize knowledge on the factors that limit or regulate mountain hare populations across their range in an attempt to identify the drivers of unstable dynamics. Current knowledge of mountain hare population dynamics indicates that trophic interactions--either predator-prey or host-parasite--appear to be the major factor limiting populations and these interactions may contribute to the observed unstable dynamics. There is correlative and experimental evidence that some mountain hare populations in Fennoscandia are limited by predation and that predation may link hare and grouse cycles to microtine cycles. Predation is unlikely to be important in mountain hare populations in Scotland as most hares occur on sporting estates where predators are controlled, but this hypothesis remains to be experimentally tested. There is, however, emerging experimental evidence that some Scottish mountain hare populations are limited by parasites and that host-parasite interactions contribute to unstable dynamics. By contrast, there is little evidence from Fennoscandia that parasitism is of any importance to mountain hare population dynamics, although disease may cause periodic declines. Although severe weather and food limitation may interact to cause periodic high winter mortality there is little evidence that food availability limits mountain hare populations. There is a paucity of

  12. Chiroptical signatures of life and fundamental physics.

    PubMed

    Macdermott, Alexandra J

    2012-09-01

    This paper aims to inspire experimentalists to carry out proposed new chiroptical experiments springing from the theoretical study of the role of parity violation in the origin of biomolecular homochirality and to provide a brief update on the current status of calculations of the electroweak parity-violating energy difference (PVED) between enantiomers. If the PVED did select life's handedness, we would expect to find life on other planets consistently using the same hand as terrestrial biochemistry. Much more importantly, even finding the "wrong" hand (rather than a racemic mixture) on another planet could be the homochiral signature of life, and we discuss our proposal for chiroptical detection of life on extra-solar planets. The PVED may also have an exciting future as a "molecular footprint" of fundamental physics: comparison of calculated PVEDs with measured values could one day allow chemists to do "table-top particle physics" more cheaply with improved chiroptical techniques instead of ever larger particle accelerators. We discuss our proposed chiroptical method to measure the PVED by using molecular beams. To our knowledge, optical rotation has not yet been measured in molecular beams, but the rewards of doing so include a host of other "first ever" results in addition to measurement of the PVED.

  13. Phagocytosis: A Fundamental Process in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    One hundred years have passed since the death of Élie Metchnikoff (1845–1916). He was the first to observe the uptake of particles by cells and realized the importance of this process for the host response to injury and infection. He also was a strong advocate of the role of phagocytosis in cellular immunity, and with this he gave us the basis for our modern understanding of inflammation and the innate and acquired immune responses. Phagocytosis is an elegant but complex process for the ingestion and elimination of pathogens, but it is also important for the elimination of apoptotic cells and hence fundamental for tissue homeostasis. Phagocytosis can be divided into four main steps: (i) recognition of the target particle, (ii) signaling to activate the internalization machinery, (iii) phagosome formation, and (iv) phagolysosome maturation. In recent years, the use of new tools of molecular biology and microscopy has provided new insights into the cellular mechanisms of phagocytosis. In this review, we present a general view of our current knowledge on phagocytosis. We emphasize novel molecular findings, particularly on phagosome formation and maturation, and discuss aspects that remain incompletely understood. PMID:28691037

  14. Nonlinear dispersive evolution of coherent trapped particle structures in collisionless plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Debraj; Sharma, Devendra

    2016-10-01

    The nonlinear limit of the collective perturbations in plasma is characterized by the onset of amplitude dependence in the wave dispersion. In a special class of nonlinear effects having origin in plasma kinetic theory, this amplitude dependence is removed only by collisions such that perturbations have no linear counterpart in collisionless limit and must follow a nonlinear dispersion relation (NDR). Exploring whether these fundamentally nonlinear perturbations can be driven unstable without entropy production might transform the character of the linear threshold based operating mechanism of the plasma turbulence that relies on well defined discrete spectrum prescribed by the linear plasma dispersion. In our multiscale, exact mass ratio, kinetic simulations the evolution of fundamentally nonlinear trapped particle structures is explored on both fast and slow ion and electron acoustic branches of the associated Nonlinear dispersion relation, respectively. The propagating structures that mutually interact exhibit a near continuum of the phase velocities and show microscopic evolution of the separatrix between streaming and trapped particle regions in the phase space, describing the subtle continuity between discrete and continuum bases of the plasma turbulence.

  15. Radiation Belt Storm Probes: Resolving Fundamental Physics with Practical Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr Y.; Mauk, Barry H.; Fox, Nicola J.; Sibeck, David G.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental processes that energize, transport, and cause the loss of charged particles operate throughout the universe at locations as diverse as magnetized planets, the solar wind, our Sun, and other stars. The same processes operate within our immediate environment, the Earth's radiation belts. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission will provide coordinated two-spacecraft observations to obtain understanding of these fundamental processes controlling the dynamic variability of the near-Earth radiation environment. In this paper we discuss some of the profound mysteries of the radiation belt physics that will be addressed by RBSP and briefly describe the mission and its goals.

  16. Radiation Belt Storm Probes: Resolving Fundamental Physics with Practical Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr Y.; Mauk, Barry H.; Fox, Nicola J.; Sibeck, David G.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental processes that energize, transport, and cause the loss of charged particles operate throughout the universe at locations as diverse as magnetized planets, the solar wind, our Sun, and other stars. The same processes operate within our immediate environment, the Earth's radiation belts. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission will provide coordinated two-spacecraft observations to obtain understanding of these fundamental processes controlling the dynamic variability of the near-Earth radiation environment. In this paper we discuss some of the profound mysteries of the radiation belt physics that will be addressed by RBSP and briefly describe the mission and its goals.

  17. Neuromuscular control and rehabilitation of the unstable ankle.

    PubMed

    Hung, You-Jou

    2015-06-18

    Lateral ankle sprain is a common orthopedic injury with a very high recurrence rate in athletes. After decades of research, it is still unclear what contributes to the high recurrence rate of ankle sprain, and what is the most effective intervention to reduce the incident of initial and recurrent injuries. In addition, clinicians often implement balance training as part of the rehabilitation protocol in hopes of enhancing the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint. However, there is no consensus on whether the neuromuscular control and proprioception are compromised in unstable ankles. To reduce the prevalence of ankle sprains, the effectiveness of engaging balance training to enhance the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint is also questionable.

  18. Neuromuscular control and rehabilitation of the unstable ankle

    PubMed Central

    Hung, You-jou

    2015-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprain is a common orthopedic injury with a very high recurrence rate in athletes. After decades of research, it is still unclear what contributes to the high recurrence rate of ankle sprain, and what is the most effective intervention to reduce the incident of initial and recurrent injuries. In addition, clinicians often implement balance training as part of the rehabilitation protocol in hopes of enhancing the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint. However, there is no consensus on whether the neuromuscular control and proprioception are compromised in unstable ankles. To reduce the prevalence of ankle sprains, the effectiveness of engaging balance training to enhance the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint is also questionable. PMID:26085985

  19. Oscillation structure of localized perturbations in modulationally unstable media.

    PubMed

    Biondini, Gino; Li, Sitai; Mantzavinos, Dionyssios

    2016-12-01

    We characterize the properties of the asymptotic stage of modulational instability arising from localized perturbations of a constant background, including the number and location of the individual peaks in the oscillation region. We show that, for long times, the solution tends to an ensemble of classical (i.e., sech-shaped) solitons of the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation (as opposed to the various breatherlike solutions of the same equation with a nonzero background). We also confirm the robustness of the theoretical results by comparing the analytical predictions with careful numerical simulations with a variety of initial conditions, which confirm that the evolution of modulationally unstable media in the presence of localized initial perturbations is indeed described by the same asymptotic state.

  20. Oscillation structure of localized perturbations in modulationally unstable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondini, Gino; Li, Sitai; Mantzavinos, Dionyssios

    2016-12-01

    We characterize the properties of the asymptotic stage of modulational instability arising from localized perturbations of a constant background, including the number and location of the individual peaks in the oscillation region. We show that, for long times, the solution tends to an ensemble of classical (i.e., sech-shaped) solitons of the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation (as opposed to the various breatherlike solutions of the same equation with a nonzero background). We also confirm the robustness of the theoretical results by comparing the analytical predictions with careful numerical simulations with a variety of initial conditions, which confirm that the evolution of modulationally unstable media in the presence of localized initial perturbations is indeed described by the same asymptotic state.

  1. Neutron Capture Measurements on Unstable Nuclei at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.; Haight, R.; Wilhelmy, J.; Fowler, M.; Rundberg, R.; Miller, G.

    1998-11-04

    Although neutron capture by stable isotopes has been extensively measured, there are very few measurements on unstable isotopes. The intense neutron flux at the Manual Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at LANSCE enables us to measure capture on targets with masses of about 1 mg over the energy range from 1 eV to 100 keV. These measurements are important not only for understanding the basic physics, but also for calculations of stellar nucleosynthesis and Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship. Preliminary measurements on {sup 169}Tm and {sup 171}Tm have been made with deuterated benzene detectors. A new detector array at the Lujan center and a new radioactive isotope separator will combine to give Los Alamos a unique capability for making these measurements.

  2. Neutron capture measurements on unstable nuclei at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J. L.; Haight, R. C.; Fowler, M. M.; Miller, G. G.; Rundberg, R. S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    1999-06-10

    Although neutron capture by stable isotopes has been extensively measured, there are very few measurements on unstable isotopes. The intense neutron flux at the Manual Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at LANSCE enables us to measure capture on targets with masses of about 1 mg over the energy range from 1 eV to 100 keV. These measurements are important not only for understanding the basic physics, but also for calculations of stellar nucleosynthesis and Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship. Preliminary measurements on {sup 169}Tm and {sup 171}Tm have been made with deuterated benzene detectors. A new detector array at the Lujan center and a new radioactive isotope separator will combine to give Los Alamos a unique capability for making these measurements.

  3. A chaotic system with a single unstable node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprott, J. C.; Jafari, Sajad; Pham, Viet-Thanh; Hosseini, Zahra Sadat

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes an unusual example of a three-dimensional dissipative chaotic flow with quadratic nonlinearities in which the only equilibrium is an unstable node. The region of parameter space with bounded solutions is relatively small as is the basin of attraction, which accounts for the difficulty of its discovery. Furthermore, for some values of the parameters, the system has an attracting torus, which is uncommon in three-dimensional systems, and this torus can coexist with a strange attractor or with a limit cycle. The limit cycle and strange attractor exhibit symmetry breaking and attractor merging. All the attractors appear to be hidden in that they cannot be found by starting with initial conditions in the vicinity of the equilibrium, and thus they represent a new type of hidden attractor with important and potentially problematic engineering consequences.

  4. Unstable behavior of lasers and other optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narducci, L. N.; Tredicce, J. R.; Yuan, J. M.; Abraham, N. B.

    1987-11-01

    This final report summarizes the theoretical and experimental activities carried out jointly by the Qauntum Optics Group at Drexel University and the Nonlinear Dynamics and Laser Physics Group at Bryn Mawr College during the period October 15, 1985 to August 31, 1987. The report includes detailed reviews of our major findings in the study of laser dynamics, especially theoretically, but also experimentally, and summaries of other parallel studies on Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) and nonlinear dynamics. Our emphasis has been on the formulation of a generalized version of the Maxwell-Bloch equations for the laser to include transverse degrees of freedom. We have succeeded in developing this model and have investigated in detail its steady state and linear stability properties. Our main result is the discovery of low threshold unstable behaviors and the identification of their physical origin.

  5. Wetting reversal at gelation transition freezes thermodynamically unstable states.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Shinya; Sano, Masahito

    2013-07-23

    The contact angle of a drop of gelling solution on a flat, solid surface was monitored as the hot solution was allowed to cool. When a solvent with a high cohesive energy and a wettable solid surface was used, a wetting solution turned into a dewetting solid at the gelation transition. The density profiles in gel as probed by confocal Raman microscopy reveal that the adsorption of both gelator and solvent shifts at the transition and the solvent is severely depleted from the interfacial region. Thus, the wetting reversal is accompanied by the interfacial desolvation. As a result of the adsorption shift during the gelation process in progress, a locally concentrated region of the gelator is frozen in space far away from the surface. This is a thermodynamically unstable state but can be realized reproducibly. The profile analysis also shows that the effect of the surface extends out to a few hundred micrometers, 2 orders of magnitude larger than the bulk correlation length.

  6. Analysis of modes in an unstable strip laser resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley, J. E.

    1980-12-01

    The mode eigenvalue equation for an unstable strip laser resonator is developed from scalar diffraction theory. The field distributions are expressed as a series and the integral is then evaluated using a first order approximation to the method of stationary phase. The resulting approximate closed form is rearranged to form an eigenvalue polynomial, the roots of which are the mode eigenvalues. Eigenfunction expressions are then developed using second order approximation to the method of stationary phase. Modifications to these expressions are then made to account for the presence of uniform gain in the resonator. The results of a computer program using the derived expressions are presented. Comparisons to previously published results are made for the bare cavity case, and results for the loaded cavity case follow.

  7. Unstable, self-limiting thermochemical temperature oscillations in Macrozamia cycads.

    PubMed

    Roemer, Robert B; Terry, L Irene; Walter, Gimme H

    2008-06-01

    Field measurements and laboratory experiments on the Australian cycads Macrozamia lucida and Macrozamia macleayi demonstrate that their cones' diel peak thermogenic temperature increase varies systematically with cone stage, with single thermogenic temperature peaks occurring daily for up to 2 weeks and reaching 12 degrees C above ambient at midstage. The initiation, magnitude and timing of those peaks are strongly modulated by ambient temperature; the period between successive thermogenic temperature peaks is not circadian, and light is neither necessary nor sufficient to initiate a thermogenic event. A mathematical analysis is developed that provides a unified explanation of the experimental results. It describes these unstable, self-limiting thermogenic events in terms of conservation of energy and a first-order chemical reaction rate model that includes an Arrhenius equation dependence of the cone's metabolic heating rate on the cone temperature.

  8. Unstable periodic orbits in human epileptic hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Pen-Ning Yu; Min-Chi Hsiao; Dong Song; Liu, Charles Y; Heck, Christi N; Millett, David; Berger, Theodore W

    2014-01-01

    Inter-ictal activity is studied in hippocampal slices resected from patients with epilepsy using local field potential recording. Inter-ictal activity in the dentate gyrus (DG) is induced by high-potassium (8 mM), low-magnesium (0.25 mM) aCSF with additional 100 μM 4-aminopyridine(4-AP). The dynamics of the inter-ictal activity is investigated by developing the first return map with inter-pulse intervals. Unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) are detected in the hippocampal slice at the DG area according to both the topological recurrence method and the periodic orbit transform method. Surrogate analysis suggests the presence of UPOs in hippocampal slices from patients with epilepsy. This finding also suggests that inter-ictal activity is a chaotic system and will allow us to apply chaos control techniques to manipulate inter-ictal activity.

  9. Postural control responses sitting on unstable board during visual stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Y.; Shindo, M.; Kuno, S.; Kawakita, T.; Watanabe, S.

    2001-08-01

    Concerning with the relation of vection induced by the optokinetic stimulation and the body movement, especially we attended to the neck joint movement, which counteracted to the shoulder movement. Then, we analyzed the mechanisms of the sitting postural control by using the seesaw board. By the optokinetic stimulation through the head mounted display (H.M.D.), the vection was leaded, and it affected to the sway of the body on the seesaw board. In this experiment, we found that the movement of upper part of body except for the head was the same direction to the seesaw board but the head moved out of phase to the seesaw board. This phenomenon will be suggested that the unstable condition of sway is balanced by the counter swing of head and the neck muscle tonus is controlled by acting of the vestiburo-collic reflex.

  10. Differential rotation of the unstable nonlinear r-mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, John; Lindblom, Lee; Lockitch, Keith

    2014-03-01

    To second order in perturbation theory, the r-modes of uniformly rotating stars include an axisymmetric part that can be identified with a growing differential rotation of the background star. If one does not include radiation-reaction, the differential rotation is constant in time and has been computed by Sá. It has a gauge dependence associated with a choice of equilibrium configuration: Adding to the time-independent second-order solution arbitrary differential rotation that is stratified on cylinders: δΩ = δΩ (ϖ) . For the radiation-reaction driven r-mode, however, the differential rotation includes an exponentially growing part that is unique, gauge-independent, and vorticity-conserving. We compute this differential rotation for slowly rotating Newtonian models, acted on by the radiation-reaction force of the unstable mode. Work supported in part by NSF grants PHY 1001515 and DMS1065438 and by a grant from the Sherman Fairchild Foundation.

  11. The Posterior Unstable Shoulder: Natural History, Clinical Evaluation and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Díaz Heredia, Jorge; Ruiz Iban, Miguel Angel; Ruiz Diaz, Raquel; Moros Marco, Santos; Gutierrez Hernandez, Juan Carlos; Valencia, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is a low incidence of posterior instability which is present in only 2% to 10% of all unstable shoulders. The posterior instable shoulder includes different manifestations like fixed dislocation, recurrent subluxation or dislocation. Methods: Research and online content related to posterior instability is reviewed. Natural history, clinical evaluation and imaging are described. Results: An awareness of the disorder, together with a thoughtful evaluation, beginning with the clinical history, usually leads to proper diagnosis. An appropriate physical exam, taking in account hyperlaxity and specific tests for posterior instability should be done. Conclusion: Posterior shoulder instability is an uncommon condition and is challenging to diagnose. There is not a single injury that is responsible for all cases of recurrent shoulder dislocation or subluxation, and the presence of soft tissue lesions or bone alterations should be evaluated, with the use of adequate simple radiology and multiplanar imaging.

  12. The three wheeler (adult tricycle): an unstable, dangerous machine.

    PubMed

    Haynes, C D; Stroud, S D; Thompson, C E

    1986-07-01

    Three-wheel motor vehicular accidents are a common occurrence, yet we found little publicity or published research dedicated to exposing the dangers of this popular recreational vehicle, and manufacturers have released few warnings. In a 3-year period, 125 patients were seen in the emergency department in one east Alabama referral area, a far higher rate of accidents than caused by other similar types of vehicles. The most common mechanism of these accidents was rollover of the machine; fractures were the most frequent injury suffered. The very young are common victims. Accident prevention must begin with education of both parents and children about the potential dangers of three-wheelers--they are, indeed, dangerous, unstable machines.

  13. Acetabular augmentation for the treatment of unstable total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholl, J. E.; Koka, S. R.; Bintcliffe, I. W.; Addison, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Twenty-eight unstable total hip arthroplasties were treated with an acetabular augmentation wedge. Of the hips, 23 have had no further dislocations at a mean follow-up of 26 months. Five patients continued to dislocate and have needed further surgery. To our knowledge this is the largest reported series of acetabular augmentation with as good results as those of the most successful reported series of this technique, and a success rate comparable to other methods of treating recurrent dislocation. Careful patient selection, and using a thin augmentation wedge to avoid impingement, are important to the success of a technique which is a useful option in the management of recurrent dislocation. Images Figure 1 PMID:10364973

  14. Membrane extraction with thermodynamically unstable diphosphonic acid derivatives

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Gatrone, R.C.; Nash, K.L.

    1997-10-14

    Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulphur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described. 1 fig.

  15. Membrane extraction with thermodynamically unstable diphosphonic acid derivatives

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, Earl Philip; Gatrone, Ralph Carl; Nash, Kenneth LaVerne

    1997-01-01

    Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulphur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described.

  16. Antisocial personality disorder--stable and unstable subtypes.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Simone; Coid, Jeremy

    2010-04-01

    There have been criticisms that the criteria for antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) are over-dependent on criminal behavior. This study aimed to identify unrelated criteria of social and behavioral problems and instability, and to investigate their associations in a representative household sample of adults in the UK. Approximately one third of adults with ASPD did not fulfill any of the criteria for instability. They were less aggressive and involved in illegal activities but expressed less remorse for their behaviors. Instability in ASPD was mediated primarily through comorbid anxiety disorders and borderline personality disorder. The concept of Secondary Psychopathy, which has not generally been applied to ASPD, demonstrated many similarities to the unstable subtype.

  17. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Classical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Classical Physics Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of physical forces and their properties. The handbook includes information on the units used to measure physical properties; vectors, and how they are used to show the net effect of various forces; Newton's Laws of motion, and how to use these laws in force and motion applications; and the concepts of energy, work, and power, and how to measure and calculate the energy involved in various applications. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility systems and equipment.

  18. Astrophysical Probes of Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, C. J. A. P.

    I review the theoretical motivation for varying fundamental couplings and discuss how these measurements can be used to constrain a number of fundamental physics scenarios that would otherwise be inacessible to experiment. As a case study I will focus on the relation between varying couplings and dark energy, and explain how varying coupling measurements can be used to probe the nature of dark energy, with important advantages over the standard methods. Assuming that the current observational evidence for varying α. and μ is correct, a several-sigma detection of dynamical dark energy is feasible within a few years, using currently operational ground-based facilities. With forthcoming instruments like CODEX, a high-accuracy reconstruction of the equation of state may be possible all the way up to redshift z ˜ 4.

  19. [Analysis of clinical phenotype and genotype of unstable Hemoglobin Rush].

    PubMed

    Ge, Shijun; Yang, Biqing; Yi, Wei; Huang, Kai; Liu, Hongxian; Huang, Xiaoqin; Chu, Jiayou; Yang, Zhaoqing

    2017-02-10

    To analyze the hematological and genetic characteristics of unstable hemoglobin Rush (Hb Rush) and compound heterozygote of Hb Rush and thalassemia. Peripheral blood samples and genomic DNA from three patients (including two ethnic Dai and one Han Chinese) with anemia of undetermined origin were collected. Hematological phenotypes of these patients were determined through red blood cell analysis and hemoglobin electrophoresis. Genotypes of alpha- and beta-globin genes, -158 XmnⅠ polymorphic site of (G)γ promoter region, and haplotypes of 7 polymorphic restriction sites in the beta-globin gene cluster were determined using PCR-based methods and DNA sequencing. All patients have presented hypochromic microcytic anemia and hemoglobin fraction with significant increased measurement (30.5%-59.2%) in the region of fetal hemoglobin during alkaline medium electrophoresis. DNA analysis suggested that all patients have carried mutations leading to the unstable hemoglobin Rush (HBB codon 101, GAG>CAG, Glu>Gln). Two of them were compound heterozygotes of Hb Rush and thalassemia mutations of -α (3.7),CD17 and Hb E, respectively. Hb Rush mutation was associated with various haplotypes of the β-globin gene cluster. No significant association was found between increased abnormal hemoglobin fraction in the region of Hb F and the polymorphism of (G)γ promoter or large deletion of the beta-globin gene cluster. This study has confirmed the distribution of Hb Rush among various Chinese populations and is the third report of its kind. Hb Rush can result in increased measurement of hemoglobin fraction in the region of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) during routine hemoglobin electrophoresis under alkaline condition. Hb Rush heterozygote alone can lead to hypochromic microcytic anemia and thalassemia-like phenotype. Prenatal diagnosis of Hb Rush is necessary for carriers.

  20. MIGRATION OF GAS GIANT PLANETS IN GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Scott; Durisen, Richard H.; Boley, Aaron C. E-mail: durisen@astro.indiana.edu

    2011-08-20

    Characterization of migration in gravitationally unstable disks is necessary to understand the fate of protoplanets formed by disk instability. As part of a larger study, we are using a three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics code to investigate how an embedded gas giant planet interacts with a gas disk that undergoes gravitational instabilities (GIs). This Letter presents results from simulations with a Jupiter-mass planet placed in orbit at 25 AU within a 0.14 M{sub sun} disk. The disk spans 5-40 AU around a 1 M{sub sun} star and is initially marginally unstable. In one simulation, the planet is inserted prior to the eruption of GIs; in another, it is inserted only after the disk has settled into a quasi-steady GI-active state, where heating by GIs roughly balances radiative cooling. When the planet is present from the beginning, its own wake stimulates growth of a particular global mode with which it strongly interacts, and the planet plunges inward 6 AU in about 10{sup 3} years. In both cases with embedded planets, there are times when the planet's radial motion is slow and varies in direction. At other times, when the planet appears to be interacting with strong spiral modes, migration both inward and outward can be relatively rapid, covering several AUs over hundreds of years. Migration in both cases appears to stall near the inner Lindblad resonance of a dominant low-order mode. Planet orbit eccentricities fluctuate rapidly between about 0.02 and 0.1 throughout the GI-active phases of the simulations.

  1. Augmentation of proximal femoral nail in unstable trochanteric fractures

    PubMed Central

    Gadegone, Wasudeo M.; Shivashankar, Bhaskaran; Lokhande, Vijayanad; Salphale, Yogesh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Biomechanically proximal femoral nail (PFN) is a better choice of implant, still it is associated with screw breakage, cut out of screw through femoral head, Z effect, reverse Z effect, and lateral migration of screws. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of augmented PFN in terms of prevention of postoperative complications and failure rates in unstable trochanteric fractures. Material and methods: We carried out a prospective study of 82 cases with unstable trochanteric femoral fractures from April 2010 to December 2015. Forty-two females and 40 males in the age group between 58 and 81 years were included in this study. There were 45 cases of AO 31 A2 (2.2, 2.3) and 37 cases of AO 31 A3 (3.1, 3.2, 3.3). Fractures were fixed by PFN with augmentation by an additional screw from trochanter to inferior quadrant of femoral head or cerclage wire to strengthen the lateral trochanteric wall. Results: The bone healing is observed in all the cases in the mean period of 14.2 weeks. Nine patients developed complications, including lateral migration of neck screws (n = 5), Z effect (n = 1), infection (n = 2), and breakage of distal interlocking bolt in one case. Removal of screws was required in five cases. Patients were followed up for a mean of 8.4 months. At the end of follow-up the Salvati and Wilson hip function was 32 (out of 40) in 88% of patients. Conclusion: The stabilization of lateral trochanteric wall with additional screw or cerclage wire increases the stability of construct. PMID:28186871

  2. Early predictors of mortality in hemodynamically unstable pelvis fractures.

    PubMed

    Smith, Wade; Williams, Allison; Agudelo, Juan; Shannon, Michael; Morgan, Steven; Stahel, Phillip; Moore, Ernest

    2007-01-01

    To determine reliable, early indicators of mortality and causes of death in hemodynamically unstable patients with pelvic ring injuries. This was a retrospective review of a prospective pelvic database. In all, 187 hemodynamically unstable patients with pelvic fractures (persistent systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg after receiving 2 L of intravenous crystalloid) admitted from April 1998 to November 2004 were included. Intervention was Level 1 Trauma Center-Pelvis Fracture standardized protocol. Main outcome measurements were: Injury Severity Score (ISS), Revised Trauma Score (RTS), age, blood transfusion, mortality, and multisystem organ failure (MOF). Group 1 (39 patients) did not survive their injury. Group 2 (148 patients) survived their injury. Fracture pattern (chi(2) = 9.1, P = 0.33), and treatment with angiography/embolization (chi(2) = 0.054, P = 0.84) were not predictive of death. Patients requiring more blood had a statistically significant higher mortality rate. The ISS (t = -5.62, P < 0.001), RTS (t = 6.10, P < 0.001), age >60 years old (chi(2) = 5.4, P = 0.03), and transfusion (t = -2.70, P = 0.010) were statistically significant independent predictors of mortality. A logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic curves indicated that of these variables, RTS was the most predictive independent variable. However, a model including all four variables was superior at predicting mortality. Most deaths were attributed to exsanguination (74.4%) or MOF (17.9%). Predictors of mortality in pelvis fracture patients should be available early in the course of treatment in order to be useful. Death within 24 hours was most often a result of acute blood loss while death after 24 hours was most often caused by MOF. Improved survival will depend upon the evolution of early hemorrhage control and resuscitative strategies in patients at high mortality risk.

  3. Migration of Gas Giant Planets in a Gravitationally Unstable Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Karna Mahadev; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Michael, Scott; Durisen, Richard H.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the migration of giant planets in gravitationally unstable protoplanetary disks is important for understanding planetary system architecture, especially the existence of planets orbiting close to and at large distances from their stars. Migration rates can determine the efficiency of planet formation and survival rates of planets. We present results from simulations of 0.3, 1, and 3 Jupiter-mass planets in a 0.14 M⊙ protoplanetary disk around a 1 M⊙ star, where the disk is marginally unstable to gravitational instabilities (GIs). Each planet is simulated separately. We use CHYMERA, a radiative 3D hydrodynamics code developed by the Indiana University Hydrodynamics Group. The simulations include radiative cooling governed by realistic dust opacities. The planets are inserted into the disk, once the disk has settled into its quasi-steady GI-active phase. We simulate each of the 0.3, 1, and 3 Jupiter-mass planets by inserting it at three different locations in the disk, at the corotation radius and at the inner and outer Lindblad resonances. No matter where placed, the 3 Jupiter-mass planets tend to drift inexorably inward but with a rate that slows after many orbital periods. The 1 Jupiter-mass planets migrate mostly inward, but their motion can be delayed or reversed near the corotation of the two-armed wave. The 0.3 Jupiter-mass planets are much less predictable and frequently migrate outward. We analyze how the density of matter and waves in the disk at different azimuthal locations affect the migration.

  4. Ambient vibrations of unstable rock slopes - insights from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burjanek, Jan; Kleinbrod, Ulrike; Fäh, Donat

    2017-04-01

    The recent events in Nepal (2015 M7.8 Gorkha) and New Zealand (2016 M7.8 Kaikoura) highlighted the importance of earthquake-induced landslides, which caused significant damages. Moreover, landslide created dams present a potential developing hazard. In order to reduce the costly consequences of such events it is important to detect and characterize earthquake susceptible rock slope instabilities before an event, and to take mitigation measures. For the characterisation of instable slopes, acquisition of ambient vibrations might be a new alternative to the already existing methods. We present both observations and 3D numerical simulations of the ambient vibrations of unstable slopes. In particular, models of representative real sites have been developed based on detailed terrain mapping and used for the comparison between synthetics and observations. A finite-difference code has been adopted for the seismic wave propagation in a 3D inhomogeneous visco-elastic media with irregular free surface. It utilizes a curvilinear grid for a precise modeling of curved topography and local mesh refinement to make computational mesh finer near the free surface. Topographic site effects, controlled merely by the shape of the topography, do not explain the observed seismic response. In contrast, steeply-dipping compliant fractures have been found to play a key role in fitting observations. Notably, the synthetized response is controlled by inertial mass of the unstable rock, and by stiffness, depth and network density of the fractures. The developed models fit observed extreme amplification levels (factors of 70!) and show directionality as well. This represents a possibility to characterize slope structure and infer depth or volume of the slope instability from the ambient noise recordings in the future.

  5. A multi-faceted approach to the physiologically unstable patient.

    PubMed

    Robb, Gillian; Seddon, Mary

    2010-10-01

    Patients on general hospital wards who deteriorate clinically are often not recognised as needing an escalation in care, and effective interventions are delayed. This study reviews a multifaceted approach to the identification and management of these patients in a large metropolitan hospital in Auckland, New Zealand. Four interventions were combined into the Physiologically Unstable Patient (PUP) programme. These were: (1) redesign of the vital sign observation chart; (2) introduction of an early warning scoring system; (3) deployment of a nurse-led rapid response team; and (4) a comprehensive ward-based education programme. Completeness and accuracy of routine observations; actions taken in accordance with the algorithm; impact on medical emergency team callouts, cardiac arrest calls and unplanned intensive care unit admissions. The PUP programme was implemented in 16 wards over 15 months. Vital sign recording improved, and the PUP score became a recognised metric for prioritising patients for review. Consistent with others' experience, there was a reluctance to call for help. Raised PUP scores prompted action around 30% of the time on average. Medical emergency team calls increased significantly from a median of 27.5 calls per month to 70.5. There was no significant change in unplanned transfers to intensive care unit or in cardiac arrest calls. A multifaceted programme to identify physiologically unstable patients on general wards can be introduced and can improve the recognition of such patients, but there are still barriers to ensuring that these patients receive the extra care that they require. These systemic failings need to be investigated and addressed for real change to occur.

  6. Microplasmas: from applications to fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguon, Olivier; Huang, Sisi; Gauthier, Mario; Karanassios, Vassili

    2014-05-01

    Microplasmas are receiving increasing attention in the scientific literature and in recent conferences. Yet, few analytical applications of microplasmas for elemental analysis using liquid samples have been described in the literature. To address this, we describe two applications: one involves the determination of Zn in microsamples of the metallo-enzyme Super Oxide Dismutase. The other involves determination of Pd-concentration in microsamples of Pd nanocatalysts. These applications demonstrate the potential of microplasmas and point to the need for future fundamental studies.

  7. BOOK REVIEWS: Quantum Mechanics: Fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, A.

    2004-02-01

    This review is of three books, all published by Springer, all on quantum theory at a level above introductory, but very different in content, style and intended audience. That of Gottfried and Yan is of exceptional interest, historical and otherwise. It is a second edition of Gottfried’s well-known book published by Benjamin in 1966. This was written as a text for a graduate quantum mechanics course, and has become one of the most used and respected accounts of quantum theory, at a level mathematically respectable but not rigorous. Quantum mechanics was already solidly established by 1966, but this second edition gives an indication of progress made and changes in perspective over the last thirty-five years, and also recognises the very substantial increase in knowledge of quantum theory obtained at the undergraduate level. Topics absent from the first edition but included in the second include the Feynman path integral, seen in 1966 as an imaginative but not very useful formulation of quantum theory. Feynman methods were given only a cursory mention by Gottfried. Their practical importance has now been fully recognised, and a substantial account of them is provided in the new book. Other new topics include semiclassical quantum mechanics, motion in a magnetic field, the S matrix and inelastic collisions, radiation and scattering of light, identical particle systems and the Dirac equation. A topic that was all but totally neglected in 1966, but which has flourished increasingly since, is that of the foundations of quantum theory. John Bell’s work of the mid-1960s has led to genuine theoretical and experimental achievement, which has facilitated the development of quantum optics and quantum information theory. Gottfried’s 1966 book played a modest part in this development. When Bell became increasingly irritated with the standard theoretical approach to quantum measurement, Viki Weisskopf repeatedly directed him to Gottfried’s book. Gottfried had devoted a

  8. The nature of unstable oxide growth in zirconium and zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensor, Brendan

    > 1 MeV) were examined using muXRD and muXRF to determine the effect of irradiation on oxide grain size, phase content, and the oxidation of Fe at the APS. With increasing neutron fluence, the grain size of the oxide increased, leading to less tetragonal phase in the oxide away from the metal-oxide interface. At the metal-oxide interface, higher amounts of tetragonal phase were observed with increasing neutron fluence. This could be caused by the redistribution of Fe from second phase particles (SPPs) into the matrix or due to the hardening of the Zr matrix caused by the exposure to neutrons. The cases of unstable oxide growth examined here were linked to both the distribution and presence of alloying elements in Zr and Zr alloys and to the level of stress in the oxide. These two phenomena appear to be the primary causes leading to regions of advanced oxide growth and careful consideration should be given to them when designing and using future Zr alloys in advanced nuclear reactor concepts.

  9. Anisotropic Particles in Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg A.; Soldati, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Anisotropic particles are common in many industrial and natural turbulent flows. When these particles are small and neutrally buoyant, they follow Lagrangian trajectories while exhibiting rich orientational dynamics from the coupling of their rotation to the velocity gradients of the turbulence field. This system has proven to be a fascinating application of the fundamental properties of velocity gradients in turbulence. When particles are not neutrally buoyant, they experience preferential concentration and very different preferential alignment than neutrally buoyant tracer particles. A vast proportion of the parameter range of anisotropic particles in turbulence is still unexplored, with most existing research focusing on the simple foundational cases of axisymmetric ellipsoids at low concentrations in homogeneous isotropic turbulence and in turbulent channel flow. Numerical simulations and experiments have recently developed a fairly comprehensive picture of alignment and rotation in these cases, and they provide an essential foundation for addressing more complex problems of practical importance. Macroscopic effects of nonspherical particle dynamics include preferential concentration in coherent structures and drag reduction by fiber suspensions. We review the models used to describe nonspherical particle motion, along with numerical and experimental methods for measuring particle dynamics.

  10. Size limit for particle-stabilized emulsion droplets under gravity.

    PubMed

    Tavacoli, J W; Katgert, G; Kim, E G; Cates, M E; Clegg, P S

    2012-06-29

    We demonstrate that emulsion droplets stabilized by interfacial particles become unstable beyond a size threshold set by gravity. This holds not only for colloids but also for supracolloidal glass beads, using which we directly observe the ejection of particles near the droplet base. The number of particles acting together in these ejection events decreases with time until a stable acornlike configuration is reached. Stability occurs when the weight of all remaining particles is less than the interfacial binding force of one particle. We also show the importance of the curvature of the droplet surface in promoting particle ejection.

  11. Case report: nonoperative treatment of an unstable Jefferson fracture using a cervical collar.

    PubMed

    Haus, Brian M; Harris, Mitchel B

    2008-05-01

    The treatment of unstable burst fractures of the atlas (Jefferson fractures) is controversial. Unstable Jefferson fractures have been managed successfully with either immobilization, typically halo traction or halo vest, or surgery. We report a patient with an unstable Jefferson fracture treated nonoperatively with a cervical collar, frequent clinical examinations, and flexion-extension radiographs. Twelve months after treatment, the patient achieved painless union of his fracture. The successful treatment confirms prior studies reporting unstable Jefferson fractures have been treated nonoperatively. The outcome challenges the clinical relevance of treatment algorithms that rely on the "rules of Spence" to guide treatment of unstable Jefferson fractures and illustrates instability may not necessarily be present in patients with considerable lateral mass widening. Additionally, it emphasizes a more reliable way of assessing C1-C2 stability in unstable Jefferson fractures is by measuring the presence and extent of anterior subluxation on lateral flexion and extension views.

  12. Fundamental studies of coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The authors have examined the pyrolysis of Argonne samples of Wyodak and Illinois No. 6 coal in argon, undecane, Tetralin, and water. The effects of the pyrolysis on individual particles of coal were monitored visually in a cell with diamond windows capable of operation to temperature and pressures in excess of 500{degrees}C and 3000 psi. The changes in the particles from ambient to 460{degrees}C were recorded in real time on video tape, and images were then taken from the tape record and analyzed. The study showed that in argon both coals developed tars at 350{degrees}-370{degrees}C. The tars then quickly evaporated, leaving core particles remarkably similar in size and shape to the initial particles. These observations suggest that coal does not melt nor become fully liquid when heated. Nor does the softened coal undergo crosslinking to generate coke. Rather the simple loss of volatiles leaves behind the core residue as coke. Contrary to the common view, there appears to be no link between the bond-breaking processes yielding tar and the interaction of the coal with H-donors leading to liquefaction. Water as a medium was surprising in its effect. Both coals began to shrink at 300{degrees}-350{degrees}C, with the effect appearing to be more of an erosion rather than a uniform loss of substance as seen in Tetralin. The Wyodak continued to shrink to 460{degrees}C to about half its initial size. With the Illinois No. 6 coal, however, the process reversed at around 420{degrees}C, and the particles appeared to grow with the evolution of a tar, continuing to 460{degrees}C. The authors submit that this final observation is evidence for hydrothermal synthesis of hydrocarbons at these conditions.

  13. Pump Diode Characterization for an Unstable Diode-Pumped Alkali Laser Resonator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    PUMP DIODE CHARACTERIZATION FOR AN UNSTABLE DIODE - PUMPED ALKALI LASER RESONATOR THESIS Chad T. Taguba, Master Sergeant, USAF AFIT-ENP-13-M-33...not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENP-13-M-33 PUMP DIODE CHARACTERIZATION FOR AN UNSTABLE DIODE - PUMPED ALKALI LASER ... DIODE CHARACTERIZATION FOR AN UNSTABLE DIODE - PUMPED ALKALI LASER RESONATOR Approved: Chad T. Taguba, BS Master Sergeant, USAF

  14. Fundamental Limits to Cellular Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Becker, Nils B.; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Mugler, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    In recent years experiments have demonstrated that living cells can measure low chemical concentrations with high precision, and much progress has been made in understanding what sets the fundamental limit to the precision of chemical sensing. Chemical concentration measurements start with the binding of ligand molecules to receptor proteins, which is an inherently noisy process, especially at low concentrations. The signaling networks that transmit the information on the ligand concentration from the receptors into the cell have to filter this receptor input noise as much as possible. These networks, however, are also intrinsically stochastic in nature, which means that they will also add noise to the transmitted signal. In this review, we will first discuss how the diffusive transport and binding of ligand to the receptor sets the receptor correlation time, which is the timescale over which fluctuations in the state of the receptor, arising from the stochastic receptor-ligand binding, decay. We then describe how downstream signaling pathways integrate these receptor-state fluctuations, and how the number of receptors, the receptor correlation time, and the effective integration time set by the downstream network, together impose a fundamental limit on the precision of sensing. We then discuss how cells can remove the receptor input noise while simultaneously suppressing the intrinsic noise in the signaling network. We describe why this mechanism of time integration requires three classes (groups) of resources—receptors and their integration time, readout molecules, energy—and how each resource class sets a fundamental sensing limit. We also briefly discuss the scheme of maximum-likelihood estimation, the role of receptor cooperativity, and how cellular copy protocols differ from canonical copy protocols typically considered in the computational literature, explaining why cellular sensing systems can never reach the Landauer limit on the optimal trade

  15. Micronization processes with supercritical fluids: fundamentals and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Martín, A; Cocero, M J

    2008-02-14

    Supercritical fluid techniques for materials precipitation have been proposed as an alternative to conventional precipitation processes as they allow to improve the performance of these processes in terms of reduction of particle size and control of morphology and particle size distribution, without degradation or contamination of the product. These techniques have received much attention during the last years, and their feasibility and performance have been experimentally demonstrated for many substances. One of the main pending tasks is the development of a systematic procedure for the design and scale-up of these processes. This requires not only empirical knowledge, but also information about the fundamentals of the process. This work aims to review the published literature dealing with a fundamental investigation or modeling of supercritical fluid precipitation processes.

  16. Design considerations for a 50-W cw, fundamental mode, diode-pumped solid state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shine, Robert J., Jr.; Merrill, Todd C.; Alfrey, Anthony J.; Gustafson, Eric K.; Byer, Robert L.

    1993-06-01

    To achieve the design goal of 50 watts cw in a single-frequency, fundamental mode we have chosen a slab laser design. The slab geometry with a zig-zag optical path eliminates stress birefringence and thermal focusing to first order in a uniformly pumped, ideal slab. However, at the thermal loads we are considering, higher order effects become significant. We have developed a computer program to analyze the full three dimensional behavior of the thermally loaded slab and have used this code in an attempt to minimize the wavefront distortion of a beam as it traverses the slab. The resonator design is also critical in achieving single- frequency, fundamental mode operation with high extraction efficiency. Because of the rectangular geometry and size of the slab laser, we have chosen to build a stable-unstable resonator. Single frequency operation is obtained by injection locking a ring cavity. Mode selection is achieved in the wide transverse direction of the slab by using an unstable cavity with a super-Gaussian mirror. An unstable resonator supports large mode volumes and has large discrimination against higher order transverse modes. In addition, a super-Gaussian mirror profile provides efficient extraction in a high quality mode. Our resonator design should lead to efficient operation in a near TEM00 mode with a slope efficiency approaching those of slab lasers with multimode output.

  17. Short-range Fundamental forces

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniadis, I; Baessler, Stefan; Buechner, M; Fedorov, General Victor; Hoedl, S.; Lambrecht, A; Nesvizhevsky, V.; Pignol, G; Reynaud, S.; Sobolev, Yu.

    2011-01-01

    We consider theoretical motivations to search for extra short-range fundamental forces as well as experiments constraining their parameters. The forces could be of two types: (1) spin-independent forces; and (2) spin-dependent axion-like forces. Different experimental techniques are sensitive in respective ranges of characteristic distances. The techniques include measurements of gravity at short distances, searches for extra interactions on top of the Casimir force, precision atomic and neutron experiments. We focus on neutron constraints, thus the range of characteristic distances considered here corresponds to the range accessible for neutron experiments.

  18. Fundamental Characteristics of Breather Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabchoub, Amin

    2014-05-01

    The formation of oceanic rogue waves can be explained by the modulation instability of deep-water Stokes waves. In particular, being doubly-localized and amplifying the background wave amplitude by a factor of three or higher, the class of Peregrine-type breather solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) are considered to be appropriate models to describe extreme ocean wave dynamics. Here, we present an experimental validation of fundamental properties of the NLS within the context of Peregrine breather dynamics and we discuss the long-term behavior of such in time and space localized structures.

  19. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications description of the adhesion, friction, abrasion, and wear behavior of solid film lubricants and related tribological materials, including diamond and diamond-like solid films. The book details the properties of solid surfaces, clean surfaces, and contaminated surfaces as well as discussing the structures and mechanical properties of natural and synthetic diamonds; chemical-vapor-deposited diamond film; surface design and engineering toward wear-resistant, self-lubricating diamond films and coatings. The author provides selection and design criteria as well as applications for synthetic and natural coatings in the commercial, industrial and aerospace industries..

  20. Reconstruction of fundamental SUSY parameters

    SciTech Connect

    P. M. Zerwas et al.

    2003-09-25

    We summarize methods and expected accuracies in determining the basic low-energy SUSY parameters from experiments at future e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders in the TeV energy range, combined with results from LHC. In a second step we demonstrate how, based on this set of parameters, the fundamental supersymmetric theory can be reconstructed at high scales near the grand unification or Planck scale. These analyses have been carried out for minimal supergravity [confronted with GMSB for comparison], and for a string effective theory.

  1. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications description of the adhesion, friction, abrasion, and wear behavior of solid film lubricants and related tribological materials, including diamond and diamond-like solid films. The book details the properties of solid surfaces, clean surfaces, and contaminated surfaces as well as discussing the structures and mechanical properties of natural and synthetic diamonds; chemical-vapor-deposited diamond film; surface design and engineering toward wear-resistant, self-lubricating diamond films and coatings. The author provides selection and design criteria as well as applications for synthetic and natural coatings in the commercial, industrial and aerospace industries..

  2. Influence of prolonged wearing of unstable shoes on upright standing postural control.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Andreia S P; Macedo, Rui; Santos, Rubim; Sousa, Filipa; Silva, Andreia; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2016-02-01

    To study the influence of prolonged wearing of unstable shoes on standing postural control in prolonged standing workers. The participants were divided into two groups: one wore unstable shoes while the other wore conventional shoes for 8weeks. Stabilometry parameters related to centre of pressure (CoP), rambling (RM) and trembling (TR) as well as the total agonist/antagonist muscle activity, antagonist co-activation and reciprocal activation were evaluated during upright standing, before and after the 8weeks period. In both moments, the subjects were evaluated wearing the unstable shoes and in barefoot. The unstable shoe condition presented increased CoP displacement related variables and decreased co-activation command compared to barefoot before and after the intervention. The prolonged wearing of unstable shoes led to: (1) reduction of medial-lateral CoP root mean square and area; (2) decreased anteroposterior RM displacement; (3) increased anteroposterior RM mean velocity and mediolateral RM displacement; (4) decreased anteroposterior TR RMS; and (5) increased thigh antagonist co-activation in the unstable shoe condition. The unstable shoe condition is associated to a higher destabilising effect that leads to a selection of more efficient and accurate postural commands compared to barefoot. Prolonged wearing of unstable shoes provides increased effectiveness and performance of the postural control system, while wearing of unstable shoes in upright standing, that are reflected by changes in CoP related variables and by a reorganisation of postural control commands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. CONTINUATION OF FEEDS IN THE UNSTABLE BURNS PATIENT.

    PubMed

    Rooi, A L; Muganza, A; Ndobe, E A; Nel, M

    2017-06-01

    Early enteral nutrition (EEN) and the continuation of enteral nutrition (EN) are critical factors in burn patients, who typically have higher nutritional needs due to their post-injury hypercatabolic state and their additional need for nutrients to aid in the healing of wounds and skin grafts. In the critically ill patient, EN is the preferred mode of administration; however, controversy exists regarding the concomitant use of EN and intravenous vasopressor agents in the haemodynamically unstable patient. This is because vasoactive substances (e.g. adrenalin) contribute to gut hypoperfusion, thereby increasing the chances of tissue hypoxia and intestinal ischaemia [Wells, 2012]. Consensus is to withhold EN whilst the patient is receiving high dose intravenous vasopressor support. At the Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital (CHBAH) all patients admitted to the Adult Burns Unit (ABU) receive enteral feeds on admission, irrespective of whether they are receiving vasopressor support or not. A retrospective medical record review was conducted at the ABU of CHBAH and included all adult burn ICU patients receiving concomitant EN and vasopressor support for at least two hours or more. The patient register was used to identify the patients admitted to the ICU during the 5-year period from 01 September 2010 to 31 December 2015. The number of patients during this period totalled 1109, of which 475 were admitted to ICU. From this group, only 44 patients met the inclusion criteria (TBSA > 20%; and/or inhalation injury; mechanical ventilation) in addition to receiving concomitant EN and intravenous vasopressor support (i.e. adrenalin). Twenty-five percent of patients (11/44) experienced GIT upset and concomitant high aspirates (> 200 ml/6 hrs) on high doses of adrenalin. Only 9% (4/44) experienced vomiting (V), while 21% (9/44) experienced diarrhoea (D). In only 3 of the 44 patients (7%) were the enteral feeds stopped (V and D in 1 patient; 1 had aspirates > 500 ml; 1 had

  4. Field Theory of Fundamental Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shouhong; Ma, Tian

    2017-01-01

    First, we present two basic principles, the principle of interaction dynamics (PID) and the principle of representation invariance (PRI). Intuitively, PID takes the variation of the action under energy-momentum conservation constraint. We show that the PID is the requirement of the presence of dark matter and dark energy, the Higgs field and the quark confinement. PRI requires that the SU(N) gauge theory be independent of representations of SU(N). It is clear that PRI is the logic requirement of any gauge theory. With PRI, we demonstrate that the coupling constants for the strong and the weak interactions are the main sources of these two interactions, reminiscent of the electric charge. Second, we emphasize that symmetry principles-the principle of general relativity and the principle of Lorentz invariance and gauge invariance-together with the simplicity of laws of nature, dictate the actions for the four fundamental interactions. Finally, we show that the PID and the PRI, together with the symmetry principles give rise to a unified field model for the fundamental interactions, which is consistent with current experimental observations and offers some new physical predictions. The research is supported in part by the National Science Foundation (NSF) grant DMS-1515024, and by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) grant N00014-15-1-2662.

  5. Astronomers Gain Clues About Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-12-01

    An international team of astronomers has looked at something very big -- a distant galaxy -- to study the behavior of things very small -- atoms and molecules -- to gain vital clues about the fundamental nature of our entire Universe. The team used the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to test whether the laws of nature have changed over vast spans of cosmic time. The Green Bank Telescope The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for GBT gallery) "The fundamental constants of physics are expected to remain fixed across space and time; that's why they're called constants! Now, however, new theoretical models for the basic structure of matter indicate that they may change. We're testing these predictions." said Nissim Kanekar, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), in Socorro, New Mexico. So far, the scientists' measurements show no change in the constants. "We've put the most stringent limits yet on some changes in these constants, but that's not the end of the story," said Christopher Carilli, another NRAO astronomer. "This is the exciting frontier where astronomy meets particle physics," Carilli explained. The research can help answer fundamental questions about whether the basic components of matter are tiny particles or tiny vibrating strings, how many dimensions the Universe has, and the nature of "dark energy." The astronomers were looking for changes in two quantities: the ratio of the masses of the electron and the proton, and a number physicists call the fine structure constant, a combination of the electron charge, the speed of light and the Planck constant. These values, considered fundamental physical constants, once were "taken as time independent, with values given once and forever" said German particle physicist Christof Wetterich. However, Wetterich explained, "the viewpoint of modern particle theory has changed in recent years," with ideas such as

  6. Syndetic model of fundamental interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Ernest

    2015-02-01

    The standard model of quarks and leptons is extended to connect three outstanding issues in particle physics and astrophysics: (1) the absence of strong CP nonconservation, (2) the existence of dark matter, and (3) the mechanism of nonzero neutrino masses, and that of the first family of quarks and leptons, all in the context of having only one Higgs boson in a renormalizable theory. Some phenomenological implications are discussed.

  7. Foraging and farming as niche construction: stable and unstable adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Rowley-Conwy, Peter; Layton, Robert

    2011-01-01

    All forager (or hunter–gatherer) societies construct niches, many of them actively by the concentration of wild plants into useful stands, small-scale cultivation, burning of natural vegetation to encourage useful species, and various forms of hunting, collectively termed ‘low-level food production’. Many such niches are stable and can continue indefinitely, because forager populations are usually stable. Some are unstable, but these usually transform into other foraging niches, not geographically expansive farming niches. The Epipalaeolithic (final hunter–gatherer) niche in the Near East was complex but stable, with a relatively high population density, until destabilized by an abrupt climatic change. The niche was unintentionally transformed into an agricultural one, due to chance genetic and behavioural attributes of some wild plant and animal species. The agricultural niche could be exported with modifications over much of the Old World. This was driven by massive population increase and had huge impacts on local people, animals and plants wherever the farming niche was carried. Farming niches in some areas may temporarily come close to stability, but the history of the last 11 000 years does not suggest that agriculture is an effective strategy for achieving demographic and political stability in the world's farming populations. PMID:21320899

  8. Numerical investigations on unstable direct contact condensation of cryogenic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayachandran, K. N.; Arnab, Roy; Parthasarathi, Ghosh

    2017-02-01

    A typical problem of Direct Contact Condensation (DCC) occurs at the liquid oxygen (LOX) booster turbopump exit of oxidiser rich staged combustion cycle based semi-cryogenic rocket engines, where the hot gas mixture (predominantly oxygen and small amounts of combustion products) that runs the turbine mixes with LOX from the pump exit. This complex multiphase phenomena leads to the formation of solid CO2 & H2O, which is undesirable for the functioning of the main LOX turbopump. As a starting point for solving this complex problem, in this study, the hot gas mixture is taken as pure oxygen and hence, DCC of pure oxygen vapour jets in subcooled liquid oxygen is simulated using the commercial CFD package ANSYS CFX®. A two fluid model along with the thermal phase change model is employed for capturing the heat and mass transfer effects. The study mainly focuses on the subsonic DCC bubbling regime, which is reported as unstable with bubble formation, elongation, necking and collapsing effects. The heat transfer coefficients over a period of time have been computed and the various stages of bubbling have been analysed with the help of vapour volume fraction and pressure profiles. The results obtained for DCC of oxygen vapour-liquid mixtures is in qualitative agreement with the experimental results on DCC of steam-water mixtures.

  9. Differential rotation of the unstable nonlinear r -modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, John L.; Lindblom, Lee; Lockitch, Keith H.

    2016-01-01

    At second order in perturbation theory, the r -modes of uniformly rotating stars include an axisymmetric part that can be identified with differential rotation of the background star. If one does not include radiation reaction, the differential rotation is constant in time and has been computed by Sá. It has a gauge dependence associated with the family of time-independent perturbations that add differential rotation to the unperturbed equilibrium star: For stars with a barotropic equation of state, one can add to the time-independent second-order solution arbitrary differential rotation that is stratified on cylinders (that is a function of distance ϖ to the axis of rotation). We show here that the gravitational radiation-reaction force that drives the r -mode instability removes this gauge freedom; the exponentially growing differential rotation of the unstable second-order r -mode is unique. We derive a general expression for this rotation law for Newtonian models and evaluate it explicitly for slowly rotating models with polytropic equations of state.

  10. Unstable minisatellite expansion causing recessively inherited myoclonus epilepsy, EPM1.

    PubMed

    Virtaneva, K; D'Amato, E; Miao, J; Koskiniemi, M; Norio, R; Avanzini, G; Franceschetti, S; Michelucci, R; Tassinari, C A; Omer, S; Pennacchio, L A; Myers, R M; Dieguez-Lucena, J L; Krahe, R; de la Chapelle, A; Lehesjoki, A E

    1997-04-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsy of Unverricht-Lundborg type (EPM1; MIM 254800) is an autosomal recessive disorder that occurs with a low frequency in many populations but is more common in Finland and the Mediterranean region. It is characterized by stimulus-sensitive myoclonus and tonic-clonic seizures with onset at age 6-15 years, typical electroencephalographic abnormalities and a variable rate of progression between and within families. Following the initial mapping of the EPM1 gene to chromosome 21 (ref. 6) and the refinement of the critical region to a small interval, positional cloning identified the gene encoding cystatin B (CST6), a cysteine protease inhibitor, as the gene underlying EPM1 (ref. 10). Levels of messenger RNA encoded by CST6 were dramatically decreased in patients. A 3' splice site and a stop codon mutation were identified in three families, leaving most mutations uncharacterized. In this study, we report a novel type of disease-causing mutation, an unstable 15- to 18-mer minisatellite repeat expansion in the putative promoter region of the CST6 gene. The mutation accounts for the majority of EPM1 patients worldwide. Haplotype data are compatible with a single ancestral founder mutation. The length of the repeat array differs between chromosomes and families, but changes in repeat number seem to be comparatively rare events.

  11. The Unstable Elbow: Current Concepts in Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tashjian, Robert Z; Wolf, Brian R; van Riet, Roger P; Steinmann, Scott P

    2016-01-01

    Elbow instability is common and may occur after a variety of injuries, including falls or direct blows. Instability can be classified as either acute or chronic. Acute instability is classified as simple (without fracture) or complex (with associated fracture). Chronic instability is classified as a chronically dislocated or recurrently unstable elbow. Recurrent instability commonly presents as isolated medial or lateral collateral ligament insufficiency. A chronically dislocated elbow is often more complex, involving both osseous and ligamentous injuries. The treatment of simple dislocations typically involves closed reduction and nonsurgical management. Chronic recurrent lateral and medial collateral ligament insufficiencies have very different clinical characteristics, but definitive treatment frequently involves ligament reconstruction. Complex instability usually requires surgery, which includes open reduction and internal fixation of coronoid and olecranon fractures, repair or replacement of radial head fractures, and lateral collateral ligament repair. Medial collateral ligament repair and/or external fixation are rarely required to restore stability. It is important for surgeons to understand current concepts in the diagnosis and management of acute and chronic elbow instability as well as the preferred surgical treatments and techniques for the management of these injuries.

  12. Soil loosening and drainage of structurally unstable silty soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twomlow, Stephen J.; Parkinson, Robert J.; Reid, Ian

    1990-12-01

    Secondary drainage treatments are carried out with the objective of enhancing the performance of permanent piped schemes. In this study, a drainage experiment was designed to investigate the effect of soil loosening on storm water redistribution in a structurally unstable silt soil following the installation of underdrainage. Results show that even though loosening reduced dry bulk density between 0.2 and 0.4 m depth by 15%, with a 270% increase in transmission pores (> 60 μm equivalent diameter) at the interface of what was the cultivated and undisturbed soil, drainage efficiency was not enhanced, as might have been expected from the 10- to 20-fold increase in hydraulic conductivity. Loosening not only lengthens the median time of concentration by 0.42 and 0.33 h for simple and secondary winter storms, respectively, but also caused lower peak discharges when compared with unloosened soil. Measurements of soil water energetics reveal that a greater proportion of rainfall is diverted into the loosened zone below the plough layer and detained there, reducing the 24 h drainage efficiency. On a seasonal timescale, the greater storage between 0.2 and 0.4 m depth causes a 6.3% increase in the winter mean water content, and means that the rooting environment of the loosened soil is wetter prior to a rainstorm. Consequently, in wet autumns and springs, loosened soils will be more susceptible to structural damage by animal poaching or the traffic of farm machinery.

  13. Thermal conduction in a mirror-unstable plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, S. V.; Churazov, E. M.; Kunz, M. W.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The plasma of galaxy clusters is subject to firehose and mirror instabilities at scales of order the ion Larmor radius. The mirror instability generates fluctuations of magnetic-field strength δB/B ˜ 1. These fluctuations act as magnetic traps for the heat-conducting electrons, suppressing their transport. We calculate the effective parallel thermal conductivity in the ICM in the presence of the mirror fluctuations for different stages of the evolution of the instability. The mirror fluctuations are limited in amplitude by the maximum and minimum values of the field strength, with no large deviations from the mean value. This key property leads to a finite suppression of thermal conduction at large scales. We find suppression down to ≈0.2 of the Spitzer value for the secular phase of the perturbations' growth, and ≈0.3 for their saturated phase. The effect operates in addition to other suppression mechanisms and independently of them. Globally, fluctuations δB/B ˜ 1 can be present on much larger scales, of the order of the scale of turbulent motions. However, we do not expect large suppression of thermal conduction by these, because their scale is considerably larger than the collisional mean free path of the ICM electrons. The obtained suppression of thermal conduction by a factor of ˜5 appears to be characteristic and potentially universal for a weakly collisional mirror-unstable plasma.

  14. Coupling of damped and growing modes in unstable shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, A. E.; Terry, P. W.; Zweibel, E. G.; Pueschel, M. J.

    2017-06-01

    Analysis of the saturation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is undertaken to determine the extent to which the conjugate linearly stable mode plays a role. For a piecewise-continuous mean flow profile with constant shear in a fixed layer, it is shown that the stable mode is nonlinearly excited, providing an injection-scale sink of the fluctuation energy similar to what has been found for gyroradius-scale drift-wave turbulence. Quantitative evaluation of the contribution of the stable mode to the energy balance at the onset of saturation shows that nonlinear energy transfer to the stable mode is as significant as energy transfer to small scales in balancing energy injected into the spectrum by the instability. The effect of the stable mode on momentum transport is quantified by expressing the Reynolds stress in terms of stable and unstable mode amplitudes at saturation, from which it is found that the stable mode can produce a sizable reduction in the momentum flux.

  15. Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable dynamics influenced by pressure fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, A. K.; Abarzhi, S. I.

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically study the effect of pressure fluctuations on the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) unstable interface in approximation of ideal incompressible immiscible fluids and two-dimensional flow. Pressure fluctuations are treated as an effective acceleration directed from the heavy to light fluid with inverse square time dependence. The group theory approach is applied to analyze large-scale coherent dynamics, solve the complete set of the governing equations, and find regular asymptotic solutions describing RM bubbles. A strong effect is found, for the first time to our knowledge, of pressure fluctuations on the interface morphology and dynamics. In the linear regime, a nearly flat bubble gets more curved, and its velocity increases for strong pressure fluctuations and decreases otherwise. In the nonlinear regime, solutions form a one-parameter family parameterized by the bubble front curvature. For the fastest stable solution in the family, the RM bubble is curved for strong pressure fluctuations and is flattened otherwise. The flow is characterized by the intense motion of the fluids in the vicinity of the interface, effectively no motion away from the interface, and presence of shear at the interface leading to formation of smaller scale vortical structures. Our theoretical results agree with and explain existing experiments and simulations and identify new qualitative and quantitative characteristics to evaluate the strength of pressure fluctuations in experiments and simulations.

  16. Stable and Unstable Rotational Dynamics of a Smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loth, Matthew; Gibbons, Chad; Belaiter, Sami; Clarage, James B.

    2017-10-01

    One of the canonical, and memorable, classroom demonstrations from an upper-division mechanics course is to toss a rigid body with three distinct principal moments of inertia into the air, giving it a spin along one of its three principal axes. A student's mechanics textbook itself works great for the body, secured rigidly shut with a rubber band. The book will spin stably about its longest and shortest dimensions, just like a top or gyroscope. What is surprising is that any attempt to spin the book about its intermediate axis (the axis parallel to the book's lines of text) will result in a wildly unstable and chaotic tumbling, which most students find curious enough to warrant staying awake for a subsequent derivation of Euler's equations. However, now that most students read their text "books" off of a tablet or phone, this demonstration may seem outdated. Or is it? Like a textbook, a phone or tablet also has three distinct principal moments. Better still, not only do these solid state devices require no rubber band, but these bodies can collect detailed data on their dynamical state, turning a demonstration into an actual experiment. This article reports the results of this modern version of the classical "book toss" demonstration, fittingly carried out by a team composed of both an old physics professor and a youthful group of three undergraduate students studying physics and engineering.

  17. Quantitative comparison of cellular patterns of stable and unstable mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Lee, J. H. S.; Lee, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-09-01

    This study describes a comparison of smoked foils from five different mixtures ({{C}}2{{H}}2+2.5{{O}}2+85 %{{Ar}}, 2{{H}}2+{{O}}2+50 %{{Ar}}, {{C}}2{{H}}2+2.5{{O}}2+70 %{{Ar}}, {C}2{{H}}2+5{{N}}2{{O}}, and {{CH}}4+2{{O}}2) that produced transverse waves of regular and irregular spacing. Histograms, variance, and the autocorrelation function (ACF) were used to quantify the spacing irregularity. Each smoked foil was first digitized then separated into left-running and right-running waves for subsequent analysis. The five mixtures showed different degrees of irregularity in the analysis of the histograms and the ACF of the spacing of the transverse waves. The dominant mode was readily found from the peak in the histogram and the first peak in the ACF result. The spacing of the main transverse waves provided by the histogram and the first peak of the ACF were much closer to the spacing of the transverse waves measured by eye for stable mixtures than for unstable ones due to their stronger dominant mode. In certain cases, other modes besides the dominant one were observed, such as two peaks in the histogram and other large peaks in the ACF result. Variance was used as a quantitative measurement of the cellular pattern irregularity level.

  18. Direct Numerical Simulation of Multiphase Flows with Unstable Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, Eugenio; Lehmkuhl, Oriol; Antepara, Oscar; Oliva, Assensi

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a numerical model that intends to simulate efficiently the surface instability that arise in multiphase flows, typically liquid-gas, both for laminar or turbulent regimes. The model is developed on the in-house computing platform TermoFluids, and operates the finite-volume, direct numerical simulation (DNS) of multiphase flows by means of a conservative level-set method for the interface-capturing. The mesh size is optimized by means of an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) strategy, that allows the dynamic re-concentration of the mesh in the vicinity of the interfaces between fluids, in order to correctly represent the diverse structures (as ligaments and droplets) that may rise from unstable phenomena. In addition, special attention is given to the discretization of the various terms of the momentum equations, to ensure stability of the flow and correct representation of turbulent vortices. As shown, the method is capable of truthfully simulate the interface phenomena as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and the Plateau-Rayleigh instability, both in the case of 2-D and 3-D configurations. Therefore it is suitable for the simulation of complex phenomena such as simulation of air-blast atomization, with several important application in the field of automotive and aerospace engines. A prove is given by our preliminary study of the 3-D coaxial liquid-gas jet.

  19. [Correlations between clinical picture and coronary angiography in unstable angina].

    PubMed

    Zöllei, E; Halmai, L; Horváth, T; Pap, I; Törk, T; Verzár, Z; Rudas, L; Gaál, T

    1996-03-10

    In a one year period (from 01.07. 1993 to 30. 06. 1994) 103 patients were admitted to the Central Intensive Care Unit of the Albert Szent-Györgyi Medical University with the diagnosis of unstable angina. In this cohort of patients the authors assessed the correlation of clinical and angiographic data. Significant coronary artery disease was found in 84% (85 patients), single-vessel disease in 23% (24 patients), double-vessel disease in 38% (29 patients), triple-vessel disease in 20% (21 patients), left main stenosis in 8% (8 patients). The culprit lesion was determined in 73 cases. The distribution of the culprit lesion severity was the following: 50-70% in 17% (12 cases), 70-90% in 27% (20 cases), greater than 90% in 44% (32 cases), 100% in 12% (9 cases). Simplex lesions were seen in 43 cases, complex lesions in 9 cases, diffuse irregularities in 5 cases and total occlusions in 9 cases. Abnormalities indicating intracoronary thrombin-us were seen on 5 coronarograms. No correlation could be demonstrated between the clinical classes according to Braunwald and the angiographic morphology.

  20. Intramedullary Screw and Kirschner Wire Fixation for Unstable Scaphoid Nonunion.

    PubMed

    Allon, Raviv; Kramer, Aviv; Wollstein, Ronit

    2016-12-01

    Surgical treatment of scaphoid nonunion is not always successful, often requiring stabilization and bone grafting to achieve healing. Even after intramedullary screw fixation, residual instability may still hinder union. The purpose of this study was to describe the addition of Kirschner wires (KWs) through the capitate and the lunate to supplement an intramedullary screw for temporary enhanced stability, possibly improving healing of unstable fractures. A case-control study reviewing 25 cases with addition of KWs and 19 controls was performed. Demographic and fracture information, time to diagnosis, and healing time were documented. We found no differences in population characteristics, fracture characteristics, or outcome measures between patients treated with this method and those treated with a screw alone. We had no complications related to the addition of KWs. Preoperative lunate type and scapholunate gapping was suggestive but not significantly associated with KW insertion. Addition of KWs is safe and may be considered in scaphoid nonunion in the presence of intraoperative suboptimal stability. Intraoperative stability may possibly be inferred by reviewing preoperative radiographs for signs of instability.

  1. Secondary Students' Stable and Unstable Optics Conceptions Using Contextualized Questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hye-Eun; Treagust, David F.

    2014-04-01

    This study focuses on elucidating and explaining reasons for the stability of and interrelationships between students' conceptions about Light Propagation and Visibility of Objects using contextualized questions across 3 years of secondary schooling from Years 7 to 9. In a large-scale quantitative study involving 1,233 Korean students and 1,149 Singaporean students, data were analyzed from responses to the Light Propagation Diagnostic Instrument consisting of four pairs of items, each of which evaluated the same concept in two different problem situations. Findings show that only about 10-45 % of students could apply their conceptions of basic optics in contextualized problem situations giving rise to both stable and unstable alternative conceptions. Students' understanding of Light Propagation concepts compared with Visibility of Objects concepts was more stable in different problem situations. The concepts of Light Propagation and Visibility of Objects were only moderately correlated. School grade was not a strong predictive variable, but students' school achievement correlated strongly with their conceptual understanding in optics. The teaching and learning approach and education systems in the two countries may have had some influence on students' conceptual understanding.

  2. Big bang nucleosynthesis constraints on massive, unstable neutrinos.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigman, G.

    1995-01-01

    The tau-neutrino, if sufficiently massive, must be unstable. Big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) can provide constraints on the ντ mass and lifetime. The modification to the energy density of the early universe in the case of a massive τ-neutrino which decays via ντ→νμ+φ (where φ is a weakly coupled massless scalar) is described and the results of BBN production of the light elements is presented. Consistency with the primordial abundances of D, 3He, 7Li and, especially, 4He leads to constraints on the mass (mντ) and lifetime (τντ) of the tau-neutrino. Very massive ντ (mντ ≥ 5 - 10 MeV), up to the ARGUS bound of 31 MeV, are only allowed for short lifetimes (≤40 sec). Much lighter (mντ ≤ 0.01 MeV) ντ are permitted for lifetimes longer than ≡0.01 sec but, mντ(MeV) ≤ 10 τν(sec) for shorter lifetimes.

  3. About the method of investigation of applied unstable process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, O. V.; Sapega, V. F.

    2003-04-01

    ABOUT THE METHOD OF INVESTIGATION OF APPLIED UNSTABLE PROCESS O.V. Romanova (1), V.F. Sapega (1) (1) All-russian geological institute (VSEGEI) zapgeo@mail.wpus.net (mark: for Romanova)/Fax: +7-812-3289283 Samples of Late Proterosoic (Rephean) rocks from Arkhangelsk, Jaroslav and Leningrad regions were prepared by the developed method of sample preparation and researched by X-ray analysis. The presence of mantle fluid process had been previously estabished in some of the samples (injecting tuffizites) (Kazak, Jakobsson, 1999). It appears that unchanged rephean rocks contain the set of low-temperature minerals as illite, chlorite, vermiculite, goethite, indicates conditions of diagenesis with temperature less than 300° C. Presense of corrensite, rectorite, illite-montmorillonite indicates application of the post-diagenesis low-temperature process to the original sediment rock. At the same time the rocks involved in the fluid process, contain such minerals as olivine, pyrope, graphite and indicate application of the high-temperature process not less than 650-800°C. Within these samples a set of low-temperature minerals occur also, this demonstrates the short-timing and disequilibrium of the applied high-temperature process. Therefore implementation of the x-ray method provides unambiguous criterion to the establishment of the fluid process which as a rule is coupled with the development of kimberlite rock fields.

  4. Unstable Air-Sea Interaction in the Extratropical North Atlantic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of coupled modes in the extratropical North Atlantic has fascinated the climate community since 1960's. A significant aspect of such modes is an unstable air-sea interaction, also called positive feedback, where disturbances between the atmosphere and ocean grow unbound. If a delayed response exists before the negative feedback takes effect, an oscillatory behaviour will develop. Here we explore the relationship between heat flux (positive upward) and sea surface temperature (SST). Positive feedback is characterized by a cross-correlation between the two where correlation maintains a negative sign whether SST or heat flux leads. We use model results and observations to argue that in the North Atlantic there exist regions with positive feedback. The two main locations coincide with the well-known north-south SST dipole where anomalies of opposite sign occupy areas east of Florida and north-east of Newfoundland. We show that oceanic dynamics, wave propagation and advection, give rise to oceanic anomalies in these regions. Subsequently these anomalies are amplified by atmosphere- ocean interaction: thus a positive feedback.

  5. Astrophysical Implications of Magnetoacoustic Autowaves in Thermally Unstable Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, A.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2004-07-01

    The formation and evolution of magnetoacoustic autowaves in thermally unstable plasmas is discussed, with particular reference to solar and stellar flares. The competition of thermal overstability, thermal conductivity and radiative losses leads to self-organisation of weakly nonlinear magnetoacoustic perturbations into dissipative structures with the parameters independent of the initial perturbation. This evolution is modelled in terms of the extended Burgers equation. The properties of the autowaves are expressed through the plasma parameters such as the magnetic field, plasma temperature and density. The autowaves are saw-tooth shaped waves, with an eventual amplitude that depends upon the balance between the amplification due to radiative losses and decay due to thermal conductivity. Increased dissipation due to thermal conductivity or stronger non-linearity leads to a lower amplitude, while stronger thermal instability leads to a higher final amplitude. X-ray, white light and radio band observations and numerical simulations of flaring loops show quasi-periodic pulsations during the flares. These pulsations are standing acoustic waves (primarily the second harmonic) and show little decay over a number of periods despite the large theoretically predicted damping due to thermal conductivity. It is suggested that these waves are magnetoacoustic autowaves.

  6. GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE FLAMES: RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR STRETCHING VERSUS TURBULENT WRINKLING

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, E. P.; Rosner, R.

    2013-07-10

    In this paper, we provide support for the Rayleigh-Taylor-(RT)-based subgrid model used in full-star simulations of deflagrations in Type Ia supernovae explosions. We use the results of a parameter study of two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of an RT unstable model flame to distinguish between the two main types of subgrid models (RT or turbulence dominated) in the flamelet regime. First, we give scalings for the turbulent flame speed, the Reynolds number, the viscous scale, and the size of the burning region as the non-dimensional gravity (G) is varied. The flame speed is well predicted by an RT-based flame speed model. Next, the above scalings are used to calculate the Karlovitz number (Ka) and to discuss appropriate combustion regimes. No transition to thin reaction zones is seen at Ka = 1, although such a transition is expected by turbulence-dominated subgrid models. Finally, we confirm a basic physical premise of the RT subgrid model, namely, that the flame is fractal, and thus self-similar. By modeling the turbulent flame speed, we demonstrate that it is affected more by large-scale RT stretching than by small-scale turbulent wrinkling. In this way, the RT instability controls the flame directly from the large scales. Overall, these results support the RT subgrid model.

  7. Unstable and stable periodicities in thermally sensitive electroreceptors of catfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Frank; Pei, Xing; Braun, Hans; Schafer, Klaus; Peters, Rob

    1997-03-01

    A statistical technique for distinguishing and counting unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) and stable limit cycles (LCs), based on their differing phase space topologies, has recently been developed(D. Pierson and F. Moss, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2124 (1995)). Because the method is able to operate effectively on data files from noisy dynamical sources, it is uniquely effective when operating on data from biological sources, for example, weakly stimulated sensory neurons(X. Pei and F. Moss, Nature 379, 618 (1996)). Here we report the results of a study of bifurcations between UPOs and LCs in the electroreceptor organs of the catfish with the surface temperature of the receptors used as the bifurcation parameter. These organs have previously been shown to exhibit an internal near sub threshold oscillator which may account for the spontaneous appearance of the UPOs for certain values of the temperature. In previous experiments on different sensory systems (possibly of lower dimension) external periodic forcing was necessary for the appearance of UPOs.

  8. Some properties of unstable slip on rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spetzler, Hartmut; Sobolev, Guennadi; Koltsov, Anatoli; Zang, Arno; Getting, Ivan C.

    1991-03-01

    In this paper we report results obtained from various friction experiments under direct and oblique shear loading conditions. We used four rock types of varying brittleness (quartzite, anhydrite, limestone, pyrophyllite) with different surface roughness. The observations concentrate on the time span several milliseconds before dynamic failure occurs. During this period a premonitory, unstable phase of slip (slip 2) occurs. This differs importantly from a premonitory, stable process (slip 1) with durations of hundreds of seconds. On smooth surfaces slip 2 is usually observed with ductile rocks and less reliably with brittle rocks. Slip 2 is mostly accompanied by acoustic emissions, which increase in rate of occurrence and in magnitude until the stick-slip event. Foreshocks are observed during approximately 50% of the slip 2 events on rough surfaces. Foreshocks far exceed the “acoustic noise level”, which is also prevalent before stick-slip events on rough surfaces. In the direct shear experiment, where two faults are being loaded simultaneously, in about 20% of the cases precursory slip 2 was observed on the opposite side on which the final stick-slip event occurred.

  9. Gamma camera intrinsic uniformity in an unstable power supply environment.

    PubMed

    Ejeh, John E; Adedapo, Kayode S; Akinlade, Bidemi I; Osifo, Bola O A

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to show that a gamma camera in a developing country could perform efficiently despite electricity outages using intrinsic flood uniformity tests as an index of performance. A total of 143 intrinsic uniformity test results for a new gamma camera in use in an environment with unstable power supply are presented. The integral uniformity for the central field of view (CFOV) was found to be between 3.43% and 1.49% (3.29% for acceptance test) while the integral uniformity for the useful field of view (UFOV) was between 4.51% and 1.9% (5.21% for acceptance test). The differential uniformity for the CFOV was between 1.99% and 1.04% (2.25% for acceptance test) while that of the UFOV was between 2.84% and 1.23% (2.63% for acceptance test). In conclusion, these results show that the uniformity of the gamma camera under this condition is within an acceptable range for both planar and SPET imaging.

  10. Unstable shear flows in two dimensional strongly correlated liquids - a hydrodynamic and molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Akanksha; Ganesh, Rajaraman; Joy, Ashwin

    2016-11-01

    In Navier-Stokes fluids, shear flows are known to become unstable leading to instability and eventually to turbulence. A class of flow namely, Kolmogorov Flows (K-Flows) exhibit such transition at low Reynolds number. Using fluid and molecular dynamics, we address the physics of transition from laminar to turbulent regime in strongly correlated-liquids such as in multi-species plasmas and also in naturally occurring plasmas with K-Flows as initial condition. A 2D phenomenological generalized hydrodynamic model is invoked wherein the effect of strong correlations is incorporated via a viscoelastic memory. To study the stability of K-Flows or in general any shear flow, a generalized eigenvalue solver has been developed along with a spectral solver for the full nonlinear set of fluid equations. A study of the linear and nonlinear features of K-Flow in incompressible and compressible limit exhibits cyclicity and nonlinear pattern formation in vorticity. A first principles based molecular dynamics simulation of particles interacting via Yukawa potential is performed with features such as configurational and kinetic thermostats for K-Flows. This work reveals several interesting similarities and differences between hydrodynamics and molecular dynamics studies.

  11. The Unstable Distal Radius Fracture—How Do We Define It? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Walenkamp, Monique M. J.; Vos, Lara M.; Strackee, Simon D.; Goslings, J. Carel; Schep, Niels W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Unstable distal radius fractures are a popular research subject. However, to appreciate the findings of studies that enrolled patients with unstable distal radius fractures, it should be clear how the authors defined an unstable distal radius fracture. Questions In what percentage of studies involving patients with unstable distal radius fractures did the authors define unstable distal radius fracture? What are the most common descriptions of an unstable distal radius fracture? And is there one preferred evidence-based definition for future authors? Methods A systematic search of literature was performed to identify any type of study with the term unstable distal radius fracture. We assessed whether a definition was provided and determined the level of evidence for the most common definitions. Results The search yielded 2,489 citations, of which 479 were included. In 149 studies, it was explicitly stated that patients with unstable distal radius fractures were enrolled. In 54% (81/149) of these studies, the authors defined an unstable distal radius fracture. Overall, we found 143 different definitions. The seven most common definitions were: displacement following adequate reduction; Lafontaine's definition; irreducibility; an AO type C2 fracture; a volarly displaced fracture; Poigenfürst's criteria; and Cooney's criteria. Only Lafontaine's definition originated from a clinical study (level IIIb). Conclusion In only half of the studies involving patients with an unstable distal radius fracture did the authors defined what they considered an unstable distal radius fracture. None of the definitions stood out as the preferred choice. A general consensus definition could help to standardize future research. PMID:26649263

  12. Unstable Angina in the Era of Cardiac Troponin Assays with Improved Sensitivity-A Clinical Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Eggers, K M; Jernberg, T; Lindahl, B

    2017-06-21

    There is an expectation that with the adoption of more sensitive cardiac troponin (cTn) assays, unstable angina would become a rarity. However, recent data from the SWEDEHEART registry demonstrated that 15% of patients admitted with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome still were regarded as having unstable angina. We aimed to further investigate the clinical characteristics and outcome of these patients. This was a retrospective, registry-based analysis (SWEDEHEART) including 3204 unstable patients, 18,194 non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients, and 977 controls without acute cardiovascular disease. All patients had available data on peak cTnT levels (more sensitive assay) and 1-year outcome. The annual proportions of patients with unstable angina (2009-2013) among those with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome ranged from 9.4% to 15.3%. Only 1239 unstable angina patients (39.7%) had a peak cTnT level ≤14 ng/L. Patients with unstable angina tended to be younger than those with NSTEMI but had higher prevalence of most cardiovascular risk factors and more advanced coronary artery disease. Compared with controls, the adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) regarding major cardiovascular events were 2.97 (1.30-6.78) and 5.44 (2.54-11.65) in unstable angina patients with peak cTnT ≤14 ng/L and >14 ng/L, respectively. The diagnosis of unstable angina is still commonly used, even in the era of more sensitive cTn assays. Minor cTnT elevation is common, which makes unstable angina difficult to distinguish from NSTEMI. Patients with unstable angina have a nonneglectable cardiovascular risk. We suggest that the clinical management of patients presenting with unstable symptoms should depend on their estimated cardiovascular risk rather than on strictly applied diagnostic criteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A study of unstable rock failures using finite difference and discrete element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, Ryan J.

    Case histories in mining have long described pillars or faces of rock failing violently with an accompanying rapid ejection of debris and broken material into the working areas of the mine. These unstable failures have resulted in large losses of life and collapses of entire mine panels. Modern mining operations take significant steps to reduce the likelihood of unstable failure, however eliminating their occurrence is difficult in practice. Researchers over several decades have supplemented studies of unstable failures through the application of various numerical methods. The direction of the current research is to extend these methods and to develop improved numerical tools with which to study unstable failures in underground mining layouts. An extensive study is first conducted on the expression of unstable failure in discrete element and finite difference methods. Simulated uniaxial compressive strength tests are run on brittle rock specimens. Stable or unstable loading conditions are applied onto the brittle specimens by a pair of elastic platens with ranging stiffnesses. Determinations of instability are established through stress and strain histories taken for the specimen and the system. Additional numerical tools are then developed for the finite difference method to analyze unstable failure in larger mine models. Instability identifiers are established for assessing the locations and relative magnitudes of unstable failure through measures of rapid dynamic motion. An energy balance is developed which calculates the excess energy released as a result of unstable equilibria in rock systems. These tools are validated through uniaxial and triaxial compressive strength tests and are extended to models of coal pillars and a simplified mining layout. The results of the finite difference simulations reveal that the instability identifiers and excess energy calculations provide a generalized methodology for assessing unstable failures within potentially complex

  14. Fundamental Travel Demand Model Example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanssen, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Instances of transportation models are abundant and detailed "how to" instruction is available in the form of transportation software help documentation. The purpose of this paper is to look at the fundamental inputs required to build a transportation model by developing an example passenger travel demand model. The example model reduces the scale to a manageable size for the purpose of illustrating the data collection and analysis required before the first step of the model begins. This aspect of the model development would not reasonably be discussed in software help documentation (it is assumed the model developer comes prepared). Recommendations are derived from the example passenger travel demand model to suggest future work regarding the data collection and analysis required for a freight travel demand model.

  15. Cognition is … Fundamentally Cultural

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Andrea; Beller, Sieghard

    2013-01-01

    A prevailing concept of cognition in psychology is inspired by the computer metaphor. Its focus on mental states that are generated and altered by information input, processing, storage and transmission invites a disregard for the cultural dimension of cognition, based on three (implicit) assumptions: cognition is internal, processing can be distinguished from content, and processing is independent of cultural background. Arguing against each of these assumptions, we point out how culture may affect cognitive processes in various ways, drawing on instances from numerical cognition, ethnobiological reasoning, and theory of mind. Given the pervasive cultural modulation of cognition—on all of Marr’s levels of description—we conclude that cognition is indeed fundamentally cultural, and that consideration of its cultural dimension is essential for a comprehensive understanding. PMID:25379225

  16. Astronomical reach of fundamental physics.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Adam S; Ostriker, Jeremiah P

    2014-02-18

    Using basic physical arguments, we derive by dimensional and physical analysis the characteristic masses and sizes of important objects in the universe in terms of just a few fundamental constants. This exercise illustrates the unifying power of physics and the profound connections between the small and the large in the cosmos we inhabit. We focus on the minimum and maximum masses of normal stars, the corresponding quantities for neutron stars, the maximum mass of a rocky planet, the maximum mass of a white dwarf, and the mass of a typical galaxy. To zeroth order, we show that all these masses can be expressed in terms of either the Planck mass or the Chandrasekar mass, in combination with various dimensionless quantities. With these examples, we expose the deep interrelationships imposed by nature between disparate realms of the universe and the amazing consequences of the unifying character of physical law.

  17. Fundamental concepts of quantum chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robnik, M.

    2016-09-01

    We review the fundamental concepts of quantum chaos in Hamiltonian systems. The quantum evolution of bound systems does not possess the sensitive dependence on initial conditions, and thus no chaotic behaviour occurs, whereas the study of the stationary solutions of the Schrödinger equation in the quantum phase space (Wigner functions) reveals precise analogy of the structure of the classical phase portrait. We analyze the regular eigenstates associated with invariant tori in the classical phase space, and the chaotic eigenstates associated with the classically chaotic regions, and the corresponding energy spectra. The effects of quantum localization of the chaotic eigenstates are treated phenomenologically, resulting in Brody-like level statistics, which can be found also at very high-lying levels, while the coupling between the regular and the irregular eigenstates due to tunneling, and of the corresponding levels, manifests itself only in low-lying levels.

  18. Fundamental reaction pathways during coprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Gatsis, J.G. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the fundamental reaction pathways in coal petroleum residuum coprocessing. Once the reaction pathways are defined, further efforts can be directed at improving those aspects of the chemistry of coprocessing that are responsible for the desired results such as high oil yields, low dihydrogen consumption, and mild reaction conditions. We decided to carry out this investigation by looking at four basic aspects of coprocessing: (1) the effect of fossil fuel materials on promoting reactions essential to coprocessing such as hydrogen atom transfer, carbon-carbon bond scission, and hydrodemethylation; (2) the effect of varied mild conditions on the coprocessing reactions; (3) determination of dihydrogen uptake and utilization under severe conditions as a function of the coal or petroleum residuum employed; and (4) the effect of varied dihydrogen pressure, temperature, and residence time on the uptake and utilization of dihydrogen and on the distribution of the coprocessed products. Accomplishments are described.

  19. Astronomical reach of fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Adam S.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2014-02-01

    Using basic physical arguments, we derive by dimensional and physical analysis the characteristic masses and sizes of important objects in the universe in terms of just a few fundamental constants. This exercise illustrates the unifying power of physics and the profound connections between the small and the large in the cosmos we inhabit. We focus on the minimum and maximum masses of normal stars, the corresponding quantities for neutron stars, the maximum mass of a rocky planet, the maximum mass of a white dwarf, and the mass of a typical galaxy. To zeroth order, we show that all these masses can be expressed in terms of either the Planck mass or the Chandrasekar mass, in combination with various dimensionless quantities. With these examples, we expose the deep interrelationships imposed by nature between disparate realms of the universe and the amazing consequences of the unifying character of physical law.

  20. Quantum repeaters: fundamental and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Hua, Sha; Liu, Yu; Ye, Jun; Zhou, Quan

    2007-04-01

    An overview of the Quantum Repeater techniques based on Entanglement Distillation and Swapping is provided. Beginning with a brief history and the basic concepts of the quantum repeaters, the article primarily focuses on the communication model based on the quantum repeater techniques, which mainly consists of two fundamental modules --- the Entanglement Distillation module and the Swapping module. The realizations of Entanglement Distillation are discussed, including the Bernstein's Procrustean method, the Entanglement Concentration and the CNOT-purification method, etc. The schemes of implementing Swapping, which include the Swapping based on Bell-state measurement and the Swapping in Cavity QED, are also introduced. Then a comparison between these realizations and evaluations on them are presented. At last, the article discusses the experimental schemes of quantum repeaters at present, documents some remaining problems and emerging trends in this field.