Science.gov

Sample records for fundamental unstable particles

  1. Unstable particles near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chway, Dongjin; Jung, Tae Hyun; Kim, Hyung Do

    2016-07-01

    We explore the physics of unstable particles when the mother particle's mass is approximately the sum of the masses of its daughter particles. In this case, the conventional wave function renormalization factor used for the narrow width approximation is ill-defined. We propose a simple resolution of the problem that allows the use of the narrow width approximation by defining the wave function renormalization factor and the branching ratio in terms of the spectral density. We test new definitions by calculating the cross section in the Higgs portal model and a significant improvement is obtained. Meanwhile, no single decay width can be assigned to the unstable particles and non-exponential decay occurs at all time scales.

  2. Light as a Fundamental Particle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Steven

    1975-01-01

    Presents two arguments concerning the role of the photon. One states that the photon is just another particle distinguished by a particular value of charge, spin, mass, lifetime, and interaction properties. The second states that the photon plays a fundamental role with a deep relation to ultimate formulas of physics. (GS)

  3. Towards pair production near threshold with unstable particle effective theory

    SciTech Connect

    Beneke, M.; Kauer, N.; Signer, A.; Zanderighi, G.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    We illustrate the use of effective theory techniques to describe processes involving unstable particles close to resonance. First, we present the main ideas in the context of a scalar resonance in an Abelian gauge-Yukawa model. We then outline the necessary modifications to describe W-pair production close to threshold in electron-positron collisions.

  4. A Fundamental Theorem on Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2003-05-01

    A fundamental theorem on particle acceleration is derived from the reciprocity principle of electromagnetism and a rigorous proof of the theorem is presented. The theorem establishes a relation between acceleration and radiation, which is particularly useful for insightful understanding of and practical calculation about the first order acceleration in which energy gain of the accelerated particle is linearly proportional to the accelerating field.

  5. Why quarks cannot be fundamental particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalman, C. S.

    2005-05-01

    Many reasons why quarks should be considered composite particles are found in the book Preons by D'Souza and Kalman. One reason not found in the book is that all the quarks except for the u quark decay. The electron and the electron neutrino do not decay. A model of fundamental particles based upon the weak charge is presented.

  6. Particles as Fundaments of Discourse Structuring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez-Vest, M. M. Jocelyne

    A serious study of discourse particles (DIPs) must be founded on the analysis of orality in its two main dimensions: oral communication in its ordinary functioning (i.e., discourse, conversation, enunciation), but also in expression ritualized by the oral tradition of cultures that do not have a writing system. The association of the two…

  7. Thermally induced passage and current of particles in a highly unstable optical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, Artem; Zemánek, Pavel; Filip, Radim

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the statistics of first-passage times of a Brownian particle moving in a highly unstable nonlinear potential proportional to an odd power of position. We observe temperature-induced shortening of the mean first-passage time and its dependence on the power of nonlinearity. We propose a passage-time fraction as both a simple and experimentally detectable witness of the nonlinearity. It is advantageously independent of all other parameters of the experiment and observable for a small number of trajectories. To better characterize the stochastic passage in the unstable potential, we introduce an analogy of the signal-to-noise ratio for the statistical distribution of the first-passage times. Interestingly, the upper bound for the signal-to-noise ratio is temperature independent in the unstable potential. Finally, we describe the nonequilibrium steady state of the particle cyclically passing through unstable odd nonlinearity. The maximum of the steady-state probability distribution shifts against the directions of the current and this counterintuitive effect increases with temperature. All these thermally induced effects are very promising targets for experimental tests of highly nonlinear stochastic dynamics of particles placed into optical potential landscapes of shaped optical tweezers.

  8. Microwaves and particle accelerators: a fundamental link

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Swapan

    2011-07-01

    John Cockcroft's splitting of the atom and Ernest Lawrence's invention of the cyclotron in the first half of the twentieth century ushered in the grand era of ever higher energy particle accelerators to probe deeper into matter. It also forged a link, bonding scientific discovery with technological innovation that continues today in the twenty first century. The development of radar and high power vacuum electronics, especially microwave power tubes like the magnetrons and the klystrons in the pre-second world war era, was instrumental in the rapid development of circular and linear charged particle accelerators in the second half of the twentieth century. We had harnessed the powerful microwave radio-frequency sources from few tens of MHz to up to 90 GHz spanning L-band to W-band frequencies. Simultaneously in the second half of the twentieth century, lasers began to offer very first opportunities of controlling charged particles at smaller resolutions on the scale of wavelengths of visible light. We also witnessed in this period the emergence of the photon and neutron sciences driven by accelerators built-by-design producing tailored and ultra-bright pulses of bright photons and neutrons to probe structure and function of matter from aggregate to individual molecular and atomic scales in unexplored territories in material and life sciences. As we enter the twenty first century, the race for ever higher energies, brightness and luminosity to probe atto-metric and atto-second domains of the ultra-small structures and ultra-fast processes continues. These developments depend crucially on yet further advancements in the production and control of high power and high frequency microwaves and light sources, often intricately coupled in their operation to the high energy beams themselves. We give a glimpse of the recent developments and innovations in the electromagnetic production and control of charged particle beams in the service of science and society. (author)

  9. Geometric representation of fundamental particles' inertial mass

    SciTech Connect

    Schachter, L.; Spencer, James

    2015-07-22

    A geometric representation of the (N = 279) masses of quarks, leptons, hadrons and gauge bosons was introduced by employing a Riemann Sphere facilitating the interpretation of the N masses in terms of a single particle, the Masson, which might be in one of the N eigen-states. Geometrically, its mass is the radius of the Riemann Sphere. Dynamically, its derived mass is near the mass of the nucleon regardless of whether it is determined from all N particles of only the hadrons, the mesons or the baryons separately. Ignoring all the other properties of these particles, it is shown that the eigen-values, the polar representation θν of the masses on the Sphere, satisfy the symmetry θν + θN+1-ν = π within less than 1% relative error. In addition, these pair correlations include the pairs θγ + θtop ≃ π and θgluon + θH ≃ π as well as pairing the weak gauge bosons with the three neutrinos.

  10. Characterization of the structural collapse undergone by an unstable system of ultrasoft particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestipino, Santi; Malescio, Gianpietro

    2016-09-01

    The effective repulsion between macromolecules such as polymer chains or dendrimers is everywhere finite, implying that interaction centers can even coincide. If, in addition, the large-distance attraction is sufficiently strong, then the system is driven unstable. An unstable system lacks a conventional thermodynamics since, in the infinite-size limit, it eventually collapses to a finite-size cluster (for instance, a polymer dispersion undergoes irreversible coagulation when increasing the amount of dissolved salt beyond a certain limit). Using a double-Gaussian (DG) potential for demonstration, we study the phase behavior of a system of ultrasoft particles as a function of the attraction strength η. Above a critical threshold ηc, the DG system is unstable but its collective behavior is far from trivial since two separate regions of the thermodynamic plane can be identified, based on the value taken by the average waiting time for collapse: this is finite and small on one side of the boundary, while presumably infinite in the other region. In order to make sense of this evidence, we consider a stable system of particles interacting through a DG potential augmented with a hard core (stabilized DG, or SDG potential). We provide arguments supporting the view that the boundary line of the unstable DG model is the remnant of the spinodal line of a fluid-fluid phase transition occurring in the SDG model when the hard-core diameter is sent to zero.

  11. Near-threshold boson pair production in the model of smeared-mass unstable particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kuksa, V. I.; Pasechnik, R. S.

    2010-09-15

    Near-threshold production of boson pairs is considered within the framework of the model of unstable particles with smeared mass. We describe the principal aspects of the model and consider the strategy of calculations including the radiative corrections. The results of calculations are in good agreement with LEP II data and Monte-Carlo simulations. Suggested approach significantly simplifies calculations with respect to the standard perturbative one.

  12. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falgari, P.; Papanastasiou, A. S.; Signer, A.

    2013-05-01

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of Γ X /m X , with Γ X and m X the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the qoverline{q} partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the naïve counting Γ t /m t 1%. However, they can be sizeable, in excess of 10%, close to edges of certain kinematical distributions. The dependence of the results on the mass renormalization scheme, and its implication for a precise extraction of the top-quark mass, is also discussed.

  13. Non-factorizable photonic corrections to resonant production and decay of many unstable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmaier, Stefan; Schwan, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Electroweak radiative corrections to the production of high-multiplicity final states with several intermediate resonances in most cases can be sufficiently well described by the leading contribution of an expansion about the resonance poles. In this approach, also known as pole approximation, corrections are classified into separately gauge-invariant factorizable and non-factorizable corrections, where the former can be attributed to the production and decay of the unstable particles on their mass shell. The remaining non-factorizable corrections are induced by the exchange of soft photons between different production and decay subprocesses. We give explicit analytical results for the non-factorizable photonic virtual corrections to the production of an arbitrary number of unstable particles at the one-loop level and, thus, present an essential building block in the calculation of next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections in pole approximation. The remaining virtual factorizable corrections can be obtained with modern automated one-loop matrix-element generators, while the evaluation of the corresponding real photonic corrections can be evaluated with full matrix elements by multi-purpose Monte Carlo generators. Our results can be easily modified to non-factorizable QCD corrections, which are induced by soft-gluon exchange.

  14. Fractal Rings and Composite Elementary Particles (FRACEP): A Picture of Composite Standard Model Fundamental Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannini, Judith

    2016-03-01

    The object of this work was to study the feasibility of identifying a minimum set of fundamental particles that could be used to build up composite fermions and bosons that exhibit the same properties and behavior as the Standard Model (SM) fundamental particles. The spontaneous decay of most of the SM fermions suggests the possibility that they are composite in nature. The results of this arithmetically-based conceptual model identify a minimum set of only two fundamental particles (with equal and opposite mass) that combine in fractal-like configurations to form Intermediate Building Blocks (IMB). The IMBs then combine to form all of the SM fundamental particles and their anti-counterparts. These composite (bright universe) particles agree with the SM particles in mass, spin, electric charge, decay products and maximum classical radius (indicated by the scattering cross-section). Further, FRACEP identifies an equal set of dark universe particles, based primarily on its negative fundamental particle, which could represent the dark matter and energy understood to be the cause of the expansion of our (bright) universe.

  15. Fundamental theories of waves and particles formulated without classical mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, J. L.; Musielak, Z. E.

    2010-12-01

    Quantum and classical mechanics are two conceptually and mathematically different theories of physics, and yet they do use the same concept of classical mass that was originally introduced by Newton in his formulation of the laws of dynamics. In this paper, physical consequences of using the classical mass by both theories are explored, and a novel approach that allows formulating fundamental (Galilean invariant) theories of waves and particles without formally introducing the classical mass is presented. In this new formulation, the theories depend only on one common parameter called 'wave mass', which is deduced from experiments for selected elementary particles and for the classical mass of one kilogram. It is shown that quantum theory with the wave mass is independent of the Planck constant and that higher accuracy of performing calculations can be attained by such theory. Natural units in connection with the presented approach are also discussed and justification beyond dimensional analysis is given for the particular choice of such units.

  16. One-particle spectroscopic intensities as a signature of shape phase transition: The {gamma}-unstable case

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C. E.; Arias, J. M.; Vitturi, A.

    2006-08-15

    We investigate the evolution of one-particle spectroscopic intensities as a possible signature of shape phase transitions. The study describes the odd systems in terms of the interacting boson-fermion model. We consider the particular case of an odd j=3/2 particle coupled to an even-even boson core that undergoes a phase transition from spherical U(5) to {gamma}-unstable O(6) situation. At the critical point, our findings are compared with the one-particle spectroscopic intensities that can be obtained within the E(5/4) model proposed by[F. Iachello, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 052503 (2005); F. Iachello, in Symmetries and Low-Energy Phase Transitions in Nuclear Structure Physics, edited by G. Lo Bianco (University of Camerino Press, Camerino, Italy, in press)].

  17. Kinetic study of radiation-reaction-limited particle acceleration during the relaxation of unstable force-free equilibria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yuan, Yajie; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Zrake, Jonathan; East, William E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2016-09-07

    Many powerful and variable gamma-ray sources, including pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, seem capable of accelerating particles to gamma-ray emitting energies efficiently over very short timescales. These are likely due to the rapid dissipation of electromagnetic energy in a highly magnetized, relativistic plasma. In order to understand the generic features of such processes, we have investigated simple models based on the relaxation of unstable force-free magnetostatic equilibria. In this work, we make the connection between the corresponding plasma dynamics and the expected radiation signal, using 2D particle-in-cell simulations that self-consistently include synchrotron radiation reactions. We focusmore » on the lowest order unstable force-free equilibrium in a 2D periodic box. We find that rapid variability, with modest apparent radiation efficiency as perceived by a fixed observer, can be produced during the evolution of the instability. The "flares" are accompanied by an increased polarization degree in the high energy band, with rapid variation in the polarization angle. Furthermore, the separation between the acceleration sites and the synchrotron radiation sites for the highest energy particles facilitates acceleration beyond the synchrotron radiation reaction limit. We also discuss the dynamical consequences of the radiation reaction, and some astrophysical applications of this model. Our current simulations with numerically tractable parameters are not yet able to reproduce the most dramatic gamma-ray flares, e.g., from the Crab Nebula. As a result, higher magnetization studies are promising and will be carried out in the future.« less

  18. Kinetic Study of Radiation-reaction-limited Particle Acceleration During the Relaxation of Unstable Force-free Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yajie; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Zrake, Jonathan; East, William E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2016-09-01

    Many powerful and variable gamma-ray sources, including pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, seem capable of accelerating particles to gamma-ray emitting energies efficiently over very short timescales. These are likely due to the rapid dissipation of electromagnetic energy in a highly magnetized, relativistic plasma. In order to understand the generic features of such processes, we have investigated simple models based on the relaxation of unstable force-free magnetostatic equilibria. In this work, we make the connection between the corresponding plasma dynamics and the expected radiation signal, using 2D particle-in-cell simulations that self-consistently include synchrotron radiation reactions. We focus on the lowest order unstable force-free equilibrium in a 2D periodic box. We find that rapid variability, with modest apparent radiation efficiency as perceived by a fixed observer, can be produced during the evolution of the instability. The “flares” are accompanied by an increased polarization degree in the high energy band, with rapid variation in the polarization angle. Furthermore, the separation between the acceleration sites and the synchrotron radiation sites for the highest energy particles facilitates acceleration beyond the synchrotron radiation reaction limit. We also discuss the dynamical consequences of the radiation reaction, and some astrophysical applications of this model. Our current simulations with numerically tractable parameters are not yet able to reproduce the most dramatic gamma-ray flares, e.g., from the Crab Nebula. Higher magnetization studies are promising and will be carried out in the future.

  19. Fundamentals of particle flocculation and removal from water

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, P.T.; Pratsinis, S.E.

    1994-12-31

    The removal of pollutants during drinking and waste water treatment as well as during the recovery of the products of precipitation, crystallization, and polymerization processes requires that solid particles be separated from a suspension. The flocculation of polystyrene particles with aluminum sulfate or alum (Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}) by turbulent shear was studied as a function of the applied shear rates (63--129 s{sup {minus}1}) and flocculant concentrations (11 and 32 mg/L) in a stirred tank. Increasing the shear rate increased the floc growth rate but decreased the maximum attainable floc size. Increasing the concentration of alum increased the floc growth rate and the maximum floc size. A steady state between floc growth and breakage was attained after which the floc size distribution no longer changed. The normalized steady state size distributions allowed evaluation of the relative contributions of shear rate and flocculant concentration to the performance of the process.

  20. Fundamental Constants as Monitors of Particle Physics and Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Rodger

    2016-03-01

    This contribution considers the constraints on particle physics and dark energy parameter space imposed by the astronomical observational constraints on the variation of the proton to electron mass ratio μ and the fine structure constant α. These constraints impose limits on the temporal variation of these parameters on a time scale greater than half the age of the universe, a time scale inaccessible by laboratory facilities such as the Large Hadron Collider. The limits on the variance of μ and α constrain combinations of the QCD Scale, the Higgs VEV and the Yukawa coupling on the particle physics side and a combination of the temporal variation of rolling scalar field and its coupling to the constants on the dark energy side.

  1. Fundamental studies of the solid-particle erosion of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Routbort, J. L.; Scattergood, R. O.

    1982-01-01

    The predictions of the theories of solid-particle erosion of brittle materials are compared to experimental results of studies in which angular Al2O3 particles with mean diameters D of 23 to 270 microns are used to erode (111) surfaces of silicon single crystals at impact angles alpha from 20 to 90 deg and velocities v from 30 to 150 m/s. The description of the steady state erosion rate by a power law, delta W varies directly as (v sin alpha)(n)D(m) must be modified to include threshold and plasticity effects. Furthermore the velocity exponent n depends on D. Results using abrasives of different sizes mixed together can be explained using a logarithmic-normal distribution. The results of transient experiments can be used to explain the synergistic effects which are observed using a biomodal distribution of abrasives.

  2. On the Masses of the Fundamental Particles in the Bound State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanium, R.; Goh, N. K.; Chia, L. S.

    1996-07-01

    A simple computational approach is presented to show that the masses of the fundamental particles are not only lower in the elements but are also different for the various elements. Only basic concepts relating to an atom such as mass number, atomic number, relative isotopic mass, and Avogadro's Number are required. The mass values of the fundamental particles are not needed in the proposed treatment, except for comparison. Some pedagogical elements of interest are also addressed.

  3. Modified gravity in cosmology and fundamental particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, De-Chang

    2008-08-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics and General Relativity are very successful in describing present experimental results. Both of them, however, are assumed to be low-energy approximations of a more complete theory. There are several candidate theories that are proposed to be part of a new conceptual structure beyond the Standard Model. To solve the Hierarchy problem, the energy threshold of the new theories is expected to be the TeV scale. One paradigm, low energy quantum gravity, combines the Standard Model with General Relativity and assumes the existence of extra dimensions. This paradigm predicts that TeV black holes can be produced in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this dissertation we describe a black-hole simulator, BlackMax, for coming accelerators. The generator is based on the Monte Carlo technique and predicts the signatures of black-hole production at the LHC. The remainder of the dissertation is an example of the violation of Birkhoff's law. Birkhoff's law is analogous to a famous result of Newtonian theory, that the gravitational acceleration due to a spherical shell vanishes inside the shell. Since the universe is homogeneous and isotropic on large scales, local gravitational phenomena can be treated as local events only; and one can always ignore the influence from the distant mass distribution. This law is violated in modified gravity theories. It is shown that a spherical shell can affect the geometry in the extra dimensions. The change of geometry in the extra dimensions also changes the geometry inside the shell. The gravitational acceleration inside a spherical shell does not vanish.

  4. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics pore-scale simulations of unstable immiscible flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Bandara, Dunusinghe Mudiyanselage Uditha C.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Oostrom, Martinus; Palmer, Bruce J.; Grate, Jay W.; Zhang, Changyong

    2013-12-01

    We have conducted a series of high-resolution numerical experiments using the Pair-Wise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) multiphase flow model. First, we derived analytical expressions relating parameters in the PF-SPH model to the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we used the model to study viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement of immiscible fluids in porous media for a wide range of capillary numbers and viscosity ratios. We demonstrated that the steady state saturation profiles and the boundaries of viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement regions compare favorably with micromodel laboratory experimental results. For displacing fluid with low viscosity, we observed that the displacement pattern changes from viscous fingering to stable displacement with increasing injection rate. When a high viscosity fluid is injected, transition behavior from capillary fingering to stable displacement occurred as the flow rate was increased. These observation also agree with the results of the micromodel laboratory experiments.

  5. Unstable and exact periodic solutions of three-particles time-dependent FPU chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi-Huai; Xing, Ming-Yan; Li, Xin-Xiang; Wang, Chao

    2015-12-01

    For lower dimensional Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) chains, the α-chain is completely integrable and the Hamiltonian of the β-chain can be identified with the Hénon-Heiles Hamiltonian. When the strengths α, β of the nonlinearities depend on time periodically with the same frequencies as the natural angular frequencies, the resonance phenomenon is inevitable. In this paper, for certain periodic functions α(t) and β(t) with resonance frequencies, we give the existence and stability of some nontrivial exact periodic solutions for a one-dimensional αβ-FPU model composed of three particles with periodic boundary conditions. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11301106, 11201288, and 11261013), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (Grant No. 2014GXNSFBA118017), the Innovation Project of Graduate Education of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China, (Grant No. YCSZ2014143), and the Guangxi Experiment Center of Information Science (Grant No. YB1410).

  6. Fundamental equations of a mixture of gas and small spherical solid particles from simple kinetic theory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, S. I.

    1973-01-01

    The fundamental equations of a mixture of a gas and pseudofluid of small spherical solid particles are derived from the Boltzmann equation of two-fluid theory. The distribution function of the gas molecules is defined in the same manner as in the ordinary kinetic theory of gases, but the distribution function for the solid particles is different from that of the gas molecules, because it is necessary to take into account the different size and physical properties of solid particles. In the proposed simple kinetic theory, two additional parameters are introduced: one is the radius of the spheres and the other is the instantaneous temperature of the solid particles in the distribution of the solid particles. The Boltzmann equation for each species of the mixture is formally written, and the transfer equations of these Boltzmann equations are derived and compared to the well-known fundamental equations of the mixture of a gas and small solid particles from continuum theory. The equations obtained reveal some insight into various terms in the fundamental equations. For instance, the partial pressure of the pseudofluid of solid particles is not negligible if the volume fraction of solid particles is not negligible as in the case of lunar ash flow.

  7. Research on fundamental aspects of inorganic vapor and particle deposition in coal-fired systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, D.E.

    1992-06-01

    Parallel research studies are underway on the following interrelated and fundamental subjects; Geometrical Approach to Determining the Sticking Probability of Particles Impacting on Convex Solid Surfaces; Correlations for High Schmidt Number Particle Deposition From Dilute Flowing Rational Engineering Suspensions; Average Capture Probability of Arriving Particles Which Are Distributed With ResPect to ImPact VelocitY and Incidence Angle (Relative to Deposit Substrate); Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Vapor Infiltration of Non-isothermal Granular Deposits; Effective Area/Volume of Populations of 'MicroPorous' Aerosol Particles (Compact and 'Fractal' Quasispherical Aggregates); Effects of Radiative Heat Transfer on the Coagulation Rates of Combustion-Generated Particles; Structure-Sensitivity of Total Mass Deposition Rates from Combustion Product Streams containing Coagulation-Aged Populations of Aggregated Primary Particles; and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] Chemical Vapor Deposition From Chlorine-containing Coal-Derived Gases.

  8. Unstable Angina

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the ER. You could be having a heart attack which puts you at increased risk for severe cardiac arrhythmias or cardiac arrest , which could lead to sudden death. Learn about an unstable form of angina called ...

  9. Measurement of fundamental illite particle thicknesses by X-ray diffraction using PVP-10 intercalation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Nuesch, R.; Sucha, V.; Tsipursky, S.

    1998-01-01

    The thicknesses of fundamental illite particles that compose mixed-layer illite-smectite (I-S) crystals can be measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) peak broadening techniques (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach [BWA] method and integral peak-width method) if the effects of swellinf and XRD background noise are eliminated from XRD patterns of the clays. Swelling is eliminated by intercalating Na-saturated I-S with polyvinylpyrrolidone having a molecular weightof 10,000 (PVP-10). Background is minimized by using polished metallic silicon wafers cut perpendicular to (100) as a substrate for XRD specimens, and by using a single-crystal monochromator. XRD measurements of PVP-intercalated diagenetic, hydro-thermal and low-grade metamorphic I-S indicate that there at least 2 type of crystallite thickness distribution shapes for illite fundamental particles, lognormal and asymptotic; that measurements of mean fundamental illite particle thicknesses made by various techniques (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach, integral peak width, fixed cation content, and transmission electron microscopy [TEM]) give comparable results; and that strain (small difference in layer thicknesses) generally has a Gaussian distribution in the lognormal-type illites, but is often absent in the asymptotic-type illites.

  10. Fundamentals and application of magnetic particles in cell isolation and enrichment: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plouffe, Brian D.; Murthy, Shashi K.; Lewis, Laura H.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic sorting using magnetic beads has become a routine methodology for the separation of key cell populations from biological suspensions. Due to the inherent ability of magnets to provide forces at a distance, magnetic cell manipulation is now a standardized process step in numerous processes in tissue engineering, medicine, and in fundamental biological research. Herein we review the current status of magnetic particles to enable isolation and separation of cells, with a strong focus on the fundamental governing physical phenomena, properties and syntheses of magnetic particles and on current applications of magnet-based cell separation in laboratory and clinical settings. We highlight the contribution of cell separation to biomedical research and medicine and detail modern cell-separation methods (both magnetic and non-magnetic). In addition to a review of the current state-of-the-art in magnet-based cell sorting, we discuss current challenges and available opportunities for further research, development and commercialization of magnetic particle-based cell-separation systems.

  11. Fundamentals and Application of Magnetic Particles in Cell Isolation and Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Plouffe, Brian D.; Murthy, Shashi K.; Lewis, Laura H.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic sorting using magnetic beads has become a routine methodology for the separation of key cell populations from biological suspensions. Due to the inherent ability of magnets to provide forces at a distance, magnetic cell manipulation is now a standardized process step in numerous processes in tissue engineering, medicine, and in fundamental biological research. Herein we review the current status of magnetic particles to enable isolation and separation of cells, with a strong focus on the fundamental governing physical phenomena, properties and syntheses of magnetic particles and on current applications of magnet-based cell separation in laboratory and clinical settings. We highlight the contribution of cell separation to biomedical research and medicine and detail modern cell separation methods (both magnetic and non-magnetic). In addition to a review of the current state-of-the-art in magnet-based cell sorting, we discuss current challenges and available opportunities for further research, development and commercialization of magnetic particle-based cell separation systems. PMID:25471081

  12. A new fundamental model of moving particle for reinterpreting Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect

    Umar, Muhamad Darwis

    2012-06-20

    The study of Schroedinger equation based on a hypothesis that every particle must move randomly in a quantum-sized volume has been done. In addition to random motion, every particle can do relative motion through the movement of its quantum-sized volume. On the other way these motions can coincide. In this proposed model, the random motion is one kind of intrinsic properties of the particle. The every change of both speed of randomly intrinsic motion and or the velocity of translational motion of a quantum-sized volume will represent a transition between two states, and the change of speed of randomly intrinsic motion will generate diffusion process or Brownian motion perspectives. Diffusion process can take place in backward and forward processes and will represent a dissipative system. To derive Schroedinger equation from our hypothesis we use time operator introduced by Nelson. From a fundamental analysis, we find out that, naturally, we should view the means of Newton's Law F(vector sign) = ma(vector sign) as no an external force, but it is just to describe both the presence of intrinsic random motion and the change of the particle energy.

  13. Precision Experiments with Single Particles in Ion Traps for Tests of Fundamental Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quint, Wolfgang

    2007-06-01

    Ion trap technology has made it possible to store, cool and observe single ions or ensembles of few ions under well controlled experimental conditions and at very low temperatures [1]. Single particles in traps allow for clean investigations of basic interactions and also for the determination of fundamental constants. This has been demonstrated by investigations of Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) with respect to the g-factor of the free electron [2] and of the electron bound in hydrogen-like carbon and oxygen [3], which form the most precise determinations of the fine-structure constant and of the mass of the electron, respectively. A precision test of CPT invariance has been performed in a proton-antiproton mass comparison with single particles in a Penning trap [4]. Optical quantum jump spectroscopy with single laser-cooled ions in rf traps has paved the way for optical frequency standards and for the investigation of a possible variation of fundamental constants. With the novel technique of deceleration, trapping and cooling, even high-accuracy experiments with highly charged ions up to uranium U91+ will be possible at the HITRAP facility at GSI Darmstadt [5]. [1] Observation of a Phase Transition of Stored Laser-Cooled Ions, F. Diedrich, E. Peik, J.M. Chen, W. Quint, H. Walther, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 2931 (1987) [2] New Determination of the Fine Structure Constant from the Electron g Value and QED, G. Gabrielse et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 030802 (2006). [3] New Determination of the Electron's Mass, T. Beier et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 011603 (2002). [4] Precision Mass Spectroscopy of the Antiproton and Proton Using Simultaneously Trapped Particles, G. Gabrielse et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 3198 (1999). [5] Trapping ions of hydrogen-like uranium: The HITRAP project at GSI, T. Beier et al., NIM B 235, 473 (2005).

  14. Modeling fundamental plasma transport and particle-induced emission in a simplified Test Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, Paul Nicholas

    This work involves the modeling of fundamental plasma physics processes occurring within environments that are similar to that of the discharge and plume regions of electric propulsion devices such as Hall effect thrusters. The research is conducted as a collaborative effort with the Plasma & Space Propulsion Laboratory at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), as part of the University of Michigan/AFRL Center for Excellence in Electric Propulsion (MACEEP). Transport physics, such as particle-particle collisions and particle-induced electron emission, are simulated within the UCLA experimental facility and its representative electric propulsion environment. Simulation methods employed include the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and particle-in-cell (PIC) techniques for the kinetic simulation of charged, rarefied species on high-performance computing architectures. Momentum- (MEX) and charge-exchange (CEX) collision cross-section models for Xe and Xe+, both total and differential, are successfully validated at collision energies of ˜1.5 keV within the novel facility. Heavy-species collisional transport models are validated and the importance of scattering anisotropy in this collision-dominated environment is shown. The theory of particle-induced electron emission (PIE) is then investigated in the context of the relevant energies and environments of the UCLA facility and electric propulsion devices and diagnostics. Reduced, semi-empirical models for total yield and emitted electron energy distribution functions that are easily implemented in a DSMC-PIC code are developed for the simulation of secondary-electron emission due to low-energy ions and high-energy atoms, even in the case of incomplete target-material information. These models are important for the characterization of electric propulsion devices due to the problematic nature of low-temperature plasma diagnostic techniques in which the emission of electrons is physically indistinguishable

  15. Lifetime of Cosmic-Ray Muons and the Standard Model of Fundamental Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherji, Sahansha; Shevde, Yash; Majewski, Walerian

    2015-04-01

    Muon is one of the twelve fundamental particles of matter, having the longest free-particle lifetime. It decays into three other leptons through an exchange of the weak vector bosons W+/W-. Muons are present in the secondary cosmic ray showers in the atmosphere, reaching the sea level. By detecting time delay between arrival of the muon and an appearance of the decay electron in our single scintillation detector (donated by the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA), we measured muon's lifetime at rest. It compares well with the value predicted by the Standard Model of Particles. From the lifetime we were able to calculate the ratio gw /MW of the weak coupling constant gw (an analog of the electric charge) to the mass of the W-boson MW. Using further Standard Model relations and an experimental value for MW, we calculated the weak coupling constant, the electric charge of the muon, and the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs field. We determined the sea-level flux of cosmic muons.

  16. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations of fundamental and harmonic radio plasma emission mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, D.; Thurgood, J. O.

    2015-12-01

    first co-author Jonathan O. Thurgood (QMUL) The simulation of three-wave interaction based plasma emission, an underlying mechanism for type III solar radio bursts, is a challenging task requiring fully-kinetic, multi-dimensional models. This paper aims to resolve a contradiction in past attempts, whereby some authors report that no such processes occur and others draw conflicting conclusions, by using 2D, fully kinetic, particle-in-cell simulations of relaxing electron beams. Here we present the results of particle-in-cell simulations which for different physical parameters permit or prohibit the plasma emission. We show that the possibility of plasma emission is contingent upon the frequency of the initial electrostatic waves generated by the bump-in-tail instability, and that these waves may be prohibited from participating in the necessary three-wave interactions due to the frequency beat requirements. We caution against simulating astrophysical radio bursts using unrealistically dense beams (a common approach which reduces run time), as the resulting non-Langmuir characteristics of the initial wave modes significantly suppresses the emission. Comparison of our results indicates that, contrary to the suggestions of previous authors, a plasma emission mechanism based on two counter-propagating beams is unnecessary in astrophysical context. Finally, we also consider the action of the Weibel instability, which generates an electromagnetic beam mode. As this provides a stronger contribution to electromagnetic energy than the emission, we stress that evidence of plasma emission in simulations must disentangle the two contributions and not simply interpret changes in total electromagnetic energy as the evidence of plasma emission. In summary, we present the first self-consistent demonstration of fundamental and harmonic plasma emission from a single-beam system via fully kinetic numerical simulation. Pre-print can be found at http://astro.qmul.ac.uk/~tsiklauri/jtdt1

  17. COST Action MP0806 'Particles in Turbulence': International Conference on Fundamentals, Experiments, Numeric and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Markus; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Toschi, Federico

    2011-12-01

    Turbulent flows are ubiquitous in nature and technology. Turbulent flows govern the transport of particulate matter in nature. For example, in atmospheric flows turbulence impacts the dynamics of aerosols, droplets, spores and of the living world by either chemo-attractant transport or transport of the insects themselves. In marine flows examples include the bubble dynamics that governs the uptake of oxygen and carbon dioxide at the ocean air interface, or the impact of turbulence on the life of phyto- and zoo-plankton, or the spread of pollutants in the oceans and estuaries. Turbulence is equally important for technology from process engineering in chemical and pharmaceutical industries to energy transport and energy generation. The COST Action MP0806 'Particles in Turbulence' has as the primary objective the support of the fundamental research on the statistical properties of particle transport in turbulent flows. The Action provides excellent opportunities for the exchange of ideas by bringing together scientists from different areas of research and applications, or different views on the problem. The COST Action MP0806 organizes several events annually. The conference held at the University of Potsdam from 16 to 18 March 2011 was the main meeting of the Action in 2011. In total 87 researchers from 18 countries (of which 12 were European) met and presented their work, discussed new ideas on theoretical, numerical and experimental approaches, as well as on applications to various scientific domains. The conference attracted also a number of participants from outside the COST Action. The scientific presentations focused on inertial and finite-size particles, particle collisions, as well as advection and reaction in simple and complex flow geometries. Very interesting results were presented at the forefront of the field: the increasing computational power combined with novel numerical techniques now allows for the first time simulation of the dynamics of finites

  18. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations of fundamental and harmonic plasma radio emission mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurgood, J. O.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: The simulation of three-wave interaction based plasma emission, thought to be the underlying mechanism for Type III solar radio bursts, is a challenging task requiring fully-kinetic, multi-dimensional models. This paper aims to resolve a contradiction in past attempts, whereby some studies indicate that no such processes occur. Methods: We self-consistently simulate three-wave based plasma emission through all stages by using 2D, fully kinetic, electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of relaxing electron beams using the EPOCH2D code. Results: Here we present the results of two simulations; Run 1 (nb/n0 = 0.0057, vb/ Δvb = vb/Ve = 16) and Run 2 (nb/n0 = 0.05, vb/ Δvb = vb/Ve = 8), which we find to permit and prohibit plasma emission respectively. We show that the possibility of plasma emission is contingent upon the frequency of the initial electrostatic waves generated by the bump-in-tail instability, and that these waves may be prohibited from participating in the necessary three-wave interactions due to frequency conservation requirements. In resolving this apparent contradiction through a comprehensive analysis, in this paper we present the first self-consistent demonstration of fundamental and harmonic plasma emission from a single-beam system via fully kinetic numerical simulation. We caution against simulating astrophysical radio bursts using unrealistically dense beams (a common approach which reduces run time), as the resulting non-Langmuir characteristics of the initial wave modes significantly suppresses emission. Comparison of our results also indicates that, contrary to the suggestions of previous authors, an alternative plasma emission mechanism based on two counter-propagating beams is unnecessary in an astrophysical context. Finally, we also consider the action of the Weibel instability which generates an electromagnetic beam mode. As this provides a stronger contribution to electromagnetic energy than the emission, we stress that

  19. Inductively Coupled Plasma: Fundamental Particle Investigations with Laser Ablation and Applications in Magnetic Sector Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Saetveit, Nathan Joe

    2008-01-01

    Particle size effects and elemental fractionation in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are investigated with nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation, differential mobility analysis, and magnetic sector ICP-MS. Laser pulse width was found to have a significant influence on the LA particle size distribution and the elemental composition of the aerosol and thus fractionation. Emission from individual particles from solution nebulization, glass, and a pressed powder pellet are observed with high speed digital photography. The presence of intact particles in an ICP is shown to be a likely source of fractionation. A technique for the online detection of stimulated elemental release from neural tissue using magnetic sector ICP-MS is described. Detection limits of 1 μg L-1 or better were found for P, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in a 60 μL injection in a physiological saline matrix.

  20. Fundamentals of elasto-inertial particle focusing in curved microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Nan; Zhang, Xinjie; Dai, Qing; Cheng, Jie; Chen, Ke; Ni, Zhonghua

    2016-07-01

    Elasto-inertial focusing in viscoelastic fluids has attracted increasing interest in recent years due to its potential applications in particle counting and sorting. However, current investigations of the elasto-inertial focusing mechanisms have mainly been focused on simple straight channels with little attention being paid to curved channels. Herein, we experimentally explore the elasto-inertial focusing behaviors of particles in spiral microfluidic channels over a wide range of flow rates, channel aspect ratios and channel radii. As compared with those observed in inertial microfluidics without viscoelasticity, the particle focusing pattern in our spiral elasto-inertial microfluidic system appears in a more interesting manner due to the complex coupling of elasticity, inertia and Dean flow effects. On the basis of the obtained data, the underlying mechanics and force competition behind the focusing behaviors are analyzed. In addition, for the first time, we propose a six-stage process model illustrating the particle focusing process in Dean-coupled elasto-inertial flows with increasing flow rate. It is interesting to find that the Dean drag force makes a significant contribution to particle focusing only at high flow rates and finally shifts the particle focusing positions into the outer channel region. Through carefully balancing the forces acting on particles, single-line 3D focusing can also be achieved at a throughput level of ∼100 μl min(-1), which is much higher than those in most existing studies. We envision that this improved understanding of the particle focusing mechanisms would provide helpful insights into the design and operation of spiral elasto-inertial microfluidic systems.

  1. Fundamentals of elasto-inertial particle focusing in curved microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Nan; Zhang, Xinjie; Dai, Qing; Cheng, Jie; Chen, Ke; Ni, Zhonghua

    2016-07-01

    Elasto-inertial focusing in viscoelastic fluids has attracted increasing interest in recent years due to its potential applications in particle counting and sorting. However, current investigations of the elasto-inertial focusing mechanisms have mainly been focused on simple straight channels with little attention being paid to curved channels. Herein, we experimentally explore the elasto-inertial focusing behaviors of particles in spiral microfluidic channels over a wide range of flow rates, channel aspect ratios and channel radii. As compared with those observed in inertial microfluidics without viscoelasticity, the particle focusing pattern in our spiral elasto-inertial microfluidic system appears in a more interesting manner due to the complex coupling of elasticity, inertia and Dean flow effects. On the basis of the obtained data, the underlying mechanics and force competition behind the focusing behaviors are analyzed. In addition, for the first time, we propose a six-stage process model illustrating the particle focusing process in Dean-coupled elasto-inertial flows with increasing flow rate. It is interesting to find that the Dean drag force makes a significant contribution to particle focusing only at high flow rates and finally shifts the particle focusing positions into the outer channel region. Through carefully balancing the forces acting on particles, single-line 3D focusing can also be achieved at a throughput level of ∼100 μl min(-1), which is much higher than those in most existing studies. We envision that this improved understanding of the particle focusing mechanisms would provide helpful insights into the design and operation of spiral elasto-inertial microfluidic systems. PMID:27300118

  2. Assessment of Airborne Particles. Fundamentals, Applications, and Implications to Inhalation Toxicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Thomas T., Ed.; And Others

    Concern over chemical and radioactive particulate matter in industry and over rapidly increasing air pollution has stimulated research both on the properties of airborne particles and methods for assessing them and on their biological effects following inhalation. The Third Rochester International Conference on Environmental Toxicity was,…

  3. Fundamental study of ammonia-sulfur dioxide reactions to form solid particles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, P.; Bai, H.

    1994-01-18

    The effects of reaction residence time, presence of inert particles and moisture content on the SO{sub 2} removal and the product particle size distributions have been determined. Results indicated that both gas phase and particle phase reach equilibria in a very short time. The presence of inert particles increases the SO{sub 2} removal efficiency slightly, with a greater increase in removal efficiency at higher surface areas. Moisture content is the most important parameter affecting SO{sub 2} removal. Increasing the moisture content from 1.6% to 6.4% by volume results in a 30% increase of the SO{sub 2} removal at a reaction temperature of 51{degree}C. The products at near anhydrous conditions were concluded to be NH{sub 3}SO{sub 2}, (NH{sub 3}){sub 2}SO{sub 2} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 5}. While the products at humid conditions could be either the 1:1 sulfites, NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 3} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 5}, or the 2:1 sulfites, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 3} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 3} {minus}H{sub 2}O, or a mixture of the 1:1 and 2:1 sulfite. Those sulfite particles could subsequently oxidize to form the more stable sulfate particles. A gas-to-particle formation model has been developed to simulate the NH{sub 3}-SO{sub 2} system in the presence and absence of seed aerosols at trace water conditions. This model accounts for simultaneous nucleation, coagulation, condensation and chemical reaction. The applicability of utilizing ammonia injection to a flue gas system has been discussed in terms of two possible removal schemes. One utilizes ammonia injection alone and the other is in conjunction with the injection of Ca(OH){sub 2} slurry in a spray dryer system. Both schemes have the potential of achieving over 90% SO{sub 2} removal from power plants burning high-sulfur coals.

  4. Electron spin resonance probing of fundamental point defects in nanometer-sized silica particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stesmans, A.; Clémer, K.; Afanas'Ev, V. V.

    2005-10-01

    Point defects in fumed ˜7-nm -sized silica nanoparticles have been studied by K - and Q -band electron spin resonance (ESR) following 10-eV irradiation used to photodissociate H from passivated defects. Various types of ESR-active point defects are revealed, including the familiar E' center (generic entity •SiO3 ), EX, the peroxy radical (POR), the methyl radical, and an unknown closely axially symmetric center ( g‖=2.0041 , g⊥=2.0027 ). The possible atomic nature of the latter is addressed. The E' defects, occurring in a maximum density of ˜1×10-3 per nanoparticle, are monitored as a function of thermal treatment in vacuum in the range 850-1115°C in order to assess specific physicochemical structural aspects of the particles. Experimental evidence is presented for the presence of two different systems of E' centers. The specific ESR parameters of the E' centers of one bath are found to be very similar to those of the E'γ center in bulk fused silica, while the second bath exhibits a different zero crossing g value and line shape, attributed to variations in local structure. It is inferred that the latter E' system pertains to the outer SiO2 layers, exposing a structural nature different from bulk glassy SiO2 . Besides PORs, large numbers of other oxygen-hole type defects appear to be present also. The exhaustive number of all oxygen-hole centers, including the PORs, is determined at ˜0.07 defects/nanoparticle, making this kind of defect highly unlikely as playing a substantial role in narrowing of the optical bandgap, in contrast with previous suggestion.

  5. Research on fundamental aspects of inorganic vapor and particle deposition in coal-fired systems. Seventh quarterly technical report, March 6, 1992--June 5, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, D.E.

    1992-06-01

    Parallel research studies are underway on the following interrelated and fundamental subjects; Geometrical Approach to Determining the Sticking Probability of Particles Impacting on Convex Solid Surfaces; Correlations for High Schmidt Number Particle Deposition From Dilute Flowing Rational Engineering Suspensions; Average Capture Probability of Arriving Particles Which Are Distributed With ResPect to ImPact VelocitY and Incidence Angle (Relative to Deposit Substrate); Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Vapor Infiltration of Non-isothermal Granular Deposits; Effective Area/Volume of Populations of `MicroPorous` Aerosol Particles (Compact and `Fractal` Quasispherical Aggregates); Effects of Radiative Heat Transfer on the Coagulation Rates of Combustion-Generated Particles; Structure-Sensitivity of Total Mass Deposition Rates from Combustion Product Streams containing Coagulation-Aged Populations of Aggregated Primary Particles; and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} Chemical Vapor Deposition From Chlorine-containing Coal-Derived Gases.

  6. Unstable heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, M.J.; Pruess, K.

    1987-10-01

    Heat pipes are an important feature of models of vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs. Numerical experiments reveal that a vapor-dominated heat pipe is unstable if pressure is controlled at shallow levels. This instability is discussed in physical terms, and some implications for geothermal reservoirs are considered. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Practical experience with unstable compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malanoski, S. B.

    1980-01-01

    Using analytical mathematical modeling techniques for the system components, an attempt is made to gauge the destabilizing effects in a number of compressor designs. In particular the overhung (or cantilevered) compressor designs and the straddle-mounted (or simply supported) compressor designs are examined. Recommendations are made, based on experiences with stable and unstable compressors, which can be used as guides in future designs. High and low pressure compressors which operate well above their fundamental rotor-bearing lateral natural frequencies can suffer from destructive subsynchronous vibration. Usually the elements in the system design which contribute to this vibration, other than the shafting and the bearings, are the seals (both gas labyrinth and oil breakdown bushings) and the aerodynamic components.

  8. Physics of Unstable Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoa, Dao Tien; Egelhof, Peter; Gales, Sydney; Giai, Nguyen Van; Motobayashi, Tohru

    2008-04-01

    Studies at the RIKEN RI beam factory / T. Motobayashi -- Dilute nuclear states / M. Freer -- Studies of exotic systems using transfer reactions at GANIL / D. Beaumel et al. -- First results from the Magnex large-acceptance spectrometer / A. Cunsolo et al. -- The ICHOR project and spin-isospin physics with unstable beams / H. Sakai -- Structure and low-lying states of the [symbol]He exotic nucleus via direct reactions on proton / V. Lapoux et al. -- Shell gap below [symbol]Sn based on the excited states in [symbol]Cd and [symbol]In / M. Górska -- Heavy neutron-rich nuclei produced in the fragmentation of a [symbol]Pb beam / Zs. Podolyák et al. -- Breakup and incomplete fusion in reactions of weakly-bound nuclei / D.J. Hinde et al. -- Excited states of [symbol]B and [symbol]He and their cluster aspect / Y. Kanada-En'yo et al. -- Nuclear reactions with weakly-bound systems: the treatment of the continuum / C. H. Dasso, A. Vitturi -- Dynamic evolution of three-body decaying resonances / A. S. Jensen et al. -- Prerainbow oscillations in [symbol]He scattering from the Hoyle state of [symbol]C and alpha particle condensation / S. Ohkubo, Y. Hirabayashi -- Angular dispersion behavior in heavy ion elastic scattering / Q. Wang et al. -- Microscopic optical potential in relativistic approach / Z.Yu. Ma et al. -- Exotic nuclei studied in direct reactions at low momentum transfer - recent results and future perspectives at fair / P. Egelhof -- Isotopic temperatures and symmetry energy in spectator fragmentation / M. De Napoli et al. -- Multi-channel algebraic scattering theory and the structure of exotic compound nuclei / K. Amos et al. -- Results for the first feasibility study for the EXL project at the experimental storage ring at GSI / N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki et al. -- Coulomb excitation of ISOLDE neutron-rich beams along the Z = 28 chain / P. Van Duppen -- The gamma decay of the pygmy resonance far from stability and the GDR at finite temperature / G. Benzoni et al

  9. Theory of the unstable Bessel resonator.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Aranda, Raúl I; Chávez-Cerda, Sabino; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2005-09-01

    A rigorous analysis of the unstable Bessel resonator with convex output coupler is presented. The Huygens-Fresnel self-consistency equation is solved to extract the first eigenmodes and eigenvalues of the cavity, taking into account the finite apertures of the mirrors. Attention was directed to the dependence of the output transverse profiles; the losses; and the modal-frequency changes on the curvature of the output coupler, the cavity length, and the angle of the axicon. Our analysis revealed that while the stable Bessel resonator retains a Gaussian radial modulation on the Bessel rings, the unstable configuration exhibits a more uniform amplitude modulation that produces output profiles more similar to ideal Bessel beams. The unstable cavity also possesses higher-mode discrimination in favor of the fundamental mode than does the stable configuration. PMID:16211819

  10. Controls for unstable structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Oliver; Hogg, Tad; Huberman, Bernardo A.

    1997-06-01

    We study the behavior of several organizations for a market based distributed control of unstable physical systems and show how a hierarchical organization is a reasonable compromise between rapid local responses with simple communication and the use of global knowledge. We also introduce a new control organization, the multihierarchy, and show that is uses less power than a hierarchy in achieving stability. The multihierarchy also has a position invariant response that can control disturbances at the appropriate scale and location.

  11. Fundamental ecology is fundamental.

    PubMed

    Courchamp, Franck; Dunne, Jennifer A; Le Maho, Yvon; May, Robert M; Thébaud, Christophe; Hochberg, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    The primary reasons for conducting fundamental research are satisfying curiosity, acquiring knowledge, and achieving understanding. Here we develop why we believe it is essential to promote basic ecological research, despite increased impetus for ecologists to conduct and present their research in the light of potential applications. This includes the understanding of our environment, for intellectual, economical, social, and political reasons, and as a major source of innovation. We contend that we should focus less on short-term, objective-driven research and more on creativity and exploratory analyses, quantitatively estimate the benefits of fundamental research for society, and better explain the nature and importance of fundamental ecology to students, politicians, decision makers, and the general public. Our perspective and underlying arguments should also apply to evolutionary biology and to many of the other biological and physical sciences.

  12. Unstable giant gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Smolic, Jelena; Smolic, Milena

    2006-03-15

    We find giant graviton solutions in Frolov's three parameter generalization of the Lunin-Maldacena background. The background we study has {gamma}-tilde{sub 1}=0 and {gamma}-tilde{sub 2}={gamma}-tilde{sub 3}={gamma}-tilde. This class of backgrounds provides a nonsupersymmetric example of the gauge theory/gravity correspondence that can be tested quantitatively, as recently shown by Frolov, Roiban, and Tseytlin. The giant graviton solutions we find have a greater energy than the point gravitons, making them unstable states. Despite this, we find striking quantitative agreement between the gauge theory and gravity descriptions of open strings attached to the giant.

  13. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility: Fundamental studies of particle formation and interactions. Volume 1: Executive summary and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogleman, Guy (Editor); Huntington, Judith L. (Editor); Schwartz, Deborah E. (Editor); Fonda, Mark L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) project and its current status is provided. The proceedings of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility Experiments Workshop are recorded. The goal of the workshop was to define experiments for the GGSF--a small particle microgravity research facility. The workshop addressed the opportunity for performing, in Earth orbit, a wide variety of experiments that involve single small particles (grains) or clouds of particles. The first volume includes the executive summary, overview, scientific justification, history, and planned development of the Facility.

  14. Fundamental Study of Direct Contact Cold Energy Release by Flowing Hot Air through Ice Particles Packed Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Sigeo; Inaba, Hideo

    This paper has dealt with the direct contact heat exchange characteristics between ice particles (average ice particle diameter : 3.10mm) packed in the rectangular cold energy storage vessel and flowing hot air as a heat transfer medium. The hot air bubbles ascended in the fluidized ice particles layer, and they were cooled down directly by melting ice particles. The temperature efficiency increased as Reynolds number Re increased because the hot air flowing in the layer became active. The dehumidity efficiency increased with an increase in modified Stefan number and Re, since the heat capacity of inlet air and heat transfer coefficient increased. Finally, some empirical correlations for temperature efficiency, dehumidity efficiency and the completion time of cold energy release were derived in terms of various nondimensional parameters.

  15. Discovery of particle unstable 69Br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, William

    2011-04-01

    Two-proton capture on 68Se through 69Br provides a possible mechanism to bypass the waiting point at 68Se during explosive hydrogen burning processes on neutron stars. This two-proton capture rate, however, depends exponentially on the 69Br proton separation energy. We have determined the proton separation energy for 69Br to be -785+34-40 keV by a direct measurement of the p+68Se decay products., This extracted value is less bound than that obtained from Coulomb displacement energy calculations and the known masses for 69Se and 68Se. The influence of our value for the proton separation energy for 69Br on rp-process occurring in Type 1 X-ray bursts is examined in a one-zone burst model. A M Rogers, W G Lynch, M A Famiano, M S Wallace, F Amorini, D Bazin, R J Charity, F Delaunay, R T de Souza, J Elson, A Gade, D Galaviz, S Hudan, J Lee, S Lobostov, S Lukyanov, M Matos, M Mocko, M B Tsang, D Shapira, L G Sobotka, G Verde, arXiv:1009.2950.

  16. Fundamentally updating fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Gail; Barton, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Recent educational research indicates that the six competencies of the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses initiative are best introduced in early prelicensure clinical courses. Content specific to quality and safety has traditionally been covered in senior level courses. This article illustrates an effective approach to using quality and safety as an organizing framework for any prelicensure fundamentals of nursing course. Providing prelicensure students a strong foundation in quality and safety in an introductory clinical course facilitates early adoption of quality and safety competencies as core practice values.

  17. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) II. Module 32-3, Fundamentals of Magnetic Particle Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groseclose, Richard

    This third in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II explains the principles of magnets and magnetic fields and how they are applied in magnetic particle testing, describes the theory and methods of magnetizing test specimens, describes the test equipment used, discusses the principles and…

  18. Fundamental study on transient bubble (slug) behavior by characterizing transient forces of solid particles in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, H.O.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to recognize and interpret the signals of transient motion of bubbles (slugs) in fluidized beds by measuring and utilizing the signals of transient motion of solid particles. The two signals were measured simultaneously and also synchronized by using the TTL signal technique in the same fluidized beds. Also, a simultaneous study of video bubble image, transient force and pressure signals was initiated in a two dimensional fluidized bed. we successfully synchronized three signals so that the relationship of bubble behavior and force pressure signals can be identified and characterized. It has been found that bubble image can well be correlated to the transient force signal of solid particles under certain conditions in three dimensional fluidized beds. Accordingly, it seems that the transient force signals can significantly help understanding the transient motion of bubbles (slugs), which is important to design the fluidized beds.

  19. Fundamental study on transient bubble (slug) behavior by characterizing transient forces of solid particles in fluidized beds. 1990 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, H.O.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to recognize and interpret the signals of transient motion of bubbles (slugs) in fluidized beds by measuring and utilizing the signals of transient motion of solid particles. The two signals were measured simultaneously and also synchronized by using the TTL signal technique in the same fluidized beds. Also, a simultaneous study of video bubble image, transient force and pressure signals was initiated in a two dimensional fluidized bed. we successfully synchronized three signals so that the relationship of bubble behavior and force pressure signals can be identified and characterized. It has been found that bubble image can well be correlated to the transient force signal of solid particles under certain conditions in three dimensional fluidized beds. Accordingly, it seems that the transient force signals can significantly help understanding the transient motion of bubbles (slugs), which is important to design the fluidized beds.

  20. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility: Fundamental studies of particle formation and interactions. Volume 2: Abstracts, candidate experiments and feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogleman, Guy (Editor); Huntington, Judith L. (Editor); Schwartz, Deborah E. (Editor); Fonda, Mark L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) project and its current status is provided. The proceedings of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility Experiments Workshop are recorded. The goal of the workshop was to define experiments for the GGSF--a small particle microgravity research facility. The workshop addressed the opportunity for performing, in Earth orbit, a wide variety of experiments that involve single small particles (grains) or clouds of particles. Twenty experiments from the fields of exobiology, planetary science, astrophysics, atmospheric science, biology, physics, and chemistry were described at the workshop and are outlined in Volume 2. Each experiment description included specific scientific objectives, an outline of the experimental procedure, and the anticipated GGSF performance requirements. Since these experiments represent the types of studies that will ultimately be proposed for the facility, they will be used to define the general science requirements of the GGSF. Also included in the second volume is a physics feasibility study and abstracts of example Gas-Grain Simulation Facility experiments and related experiments in progress.

  1. [Comparative studies of the filtration behavior of bacteria and organic particles in porous groundwater conductors. Fundamentals and methods].

    PubMed

    Matthess, G; Bedbur, E; Gundermann, K O; Loof, M; Peters, D

    1991-01-01

    In subsurface aquatic environments two groups of micro-organisms are observed: allochthonous bacteria and viruses, which as contaminants are eliminated from water after some time, and autochthonous groundwater micro-organisms, which belong to the natural subsurface environment and may reach very high abundances under favourable conditions--especially in the presence of a high nutrient supply. The migration of micro-organisms is controlled by flow length dependent transport processes (advection--dispersion, adsorption--desorption), and predominantly by filtration. This can be described on the basis of an expanded advection--dispersion concept. The filter effects in a certain porous aquifer can be quantified by the filter efficiency (filter factor) as a measure of the specific decrease of an initial concentration on a certain flow length. Recent laboratory experiments show that for sand the filter factor depends on the respective microbial species and is highly correlated to the effective grain diameter of the porous material, which is routinely determined in hydrogeology. Experiments with columns filled with quartz sand using the bacteria species Escherichia coli ATCC 11229, Pseudomonas cepacia DSM 50181, Streptococcus faecalis ATCC 6569, and polystyrene beads with similar density and diameters show that the filter factor is controlled by the grain size of filter material, the flow velocity, the diameter of the particle and the ionic strength of the water: The filter factor is specific for each microbial species for the same conditions of the aquatic environment. The filter factor decreases one order of magnitude if the flow velocity increases in the same order. A major control of the filter factor is the grain size. Conventionally the grain size is used as characteristic length instead of the pore size which, although it should be the real reference date, is relatively difficult to measure. For the assessment of the filter factor, the grain size d10, taken from the

  2. Weakly propagating unstable modes in unmagnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tautz, R. C.; Lerche, I.

    2007-07-15

    The basic theory of isolated kinetic Weibel modes [Tautz et al., J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39, 13831 (2006)] is extended to include small real frequencies, describing unstable wave modes that propagate while growing. The new method is applicable for all kinds of arbitrary (therefore including symmetric as well as asymmetric) relativistic particle distribution functions, where the axis of wave propagation describes an oblique angle with respect to a symmetry axis. For the two examples of a warm, counterstreaming Cauchy distribution and a cold two-stream distribution it is shown that, although there are now broad regions in wavenumber space of unstable wave modes, the isolated Weibel modes (which, per definition, do not propagate) are recovered. Thus, this phenomenon deserves future investigation, because, in astrophysical plasmas, virtually all distribution functions are likely to be asymmetric, therefore giving rise to isolated Weibel modes.

  3. Two dimensional unstable scar statistics.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Lee, Kelvin S. H. (ITT Industries/AES Los Angeles, CA)

    2006-12-01

    This report examines the localization of time harmonic high frequency modal fields in two dimensional cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This paper examines the enhancements for these unstable orbits when the opposing mirrors are both convex and concave. In the latter case the construction includes the treatment of interior foci.

  4. Astrophysical data on 5 eV to 1 keV radiation from the radiative decay of fundamental particles - Current limits and prospects for improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, Stuart; Malina, Roger F.

    1986-01-01

    Line emission from the decay of fundamental particles, integrated over cosmological distances, can give rise to detectable spectral features in the diffuse astronomical background between 5 eV and 1 keV. Spectroscopic observations may allow these features to be separated from line emission from the numerous local sources of radiation. The current observational status and existing evidence for such features are reviewed. No definitive detections of nongalactic line features have been made. Several local sources of background mask the features at many wavelengths and confuse the interpretation of the data. No systematic spectral observations have been carried out to date. Upcoming experiments which can be expected to provide significantly better constraints on the presence of spectral features in the diffuse background from 5 eV to 1 keV are reviewed.

  5. Injection-locked unstable laser

    SciTech Connect

    Komine, H.; Brosnan, S. J.

    1984-12-25

    A laser system for producing a laser beam in an unstable resonator whose spatial and temporal characteristics conform with those of a laser beam from a stable resonator. The laser system includes three reflectors, an optical switch and a laser gain medium positioned within an optical propagation path extending between the optical switch and the third reflector. The optical switch selectably exposes either the first or the second reflector to the aforesaid propagation path, the first and second reflectors being designed to form, in combination with the third reflector, a stable and an unstable resonator, respectively. In operation, the optical switch initially is set so as to include the first reflector in the laser resonator, thereby forming a stable resonator which produces a beam of laser light. A short time thereafter, the optical switch changes states so as to substitute the second reflector for the first, thereby forming an unstable resonator. The light from the stable resonator serves as ''seed radiation'' for the unstable resonator, so that the unstable resonator produces a light beam having the same spatial and temporal characteristics as the light from the stable resonator. The system permits the use of a single laser gain medium for both resonators, And it overcomes the need for holes or other surface discontinuities in the resonator reflectors which can degrade the quality of the laser's output beam.

  6. Manual control of unstable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. W.; Hogue, J. R.; Parseghian, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Under certain operational regimes and failure modes, air and ground vehicles can present the human operator with a dynamically unstable or divergent control task. Research conducted over the last two decades has explored the ability of the human operator to control unstable systems under a variety of circumstances. Past research is reviewed and human operator control capabilities are summarized. A current example of automobile directional control under rear brake lockup conditions is also reviewed. A control system model analysis of the driver's steering control task is summarized, based on a generic driver/vehicle model presented at last year's Annual Manual. Results from closed course braking tests are presented that confirm the difficulty the average driver has in controlling the unstable directional dynamics arising from rear wheel lockup.

  7. Analysis of unstable modes distinguishes mathematical models of flagellar motion

    PubMed Central

    Bayly, P. V.; Wilson, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the coordinated beating of cilia and flagella remain incompletely understood despite the fundamental importance of these organelles. The axoneme (the cytoskeletal structure of cilia and flagella) consists of microtubule doublets connected by passive and active elements. The motor protein dynein is known to drive active bending, but dynein activity must be regulated to generate oscillatory, propulsive waveforms. Mathematical models of flagellar motion generate quantitative predictions that can be analysed to test hypotheses concerning dynein regulation. One approach has been to seek periodic solutions to the linearized equations of motion. However, models may simultaneously exhibit both periodic and unstable modes. Here, we investigate the emergence and coexistence of unstable and periodic modes in three mathematical models of flagellar motion, each based on a different dynein regulation hypothesis: (i) sliding control; (ii) curvature control and (iii) control by interdoublet separation (the ‘geometric clutch’ (GC)). The unstable modes predicted by each model are used to critically evaluate the underlying hypothesis. In particular, models of flagella with ‘sliding-controlled’ dynein activity admit unstable modes with non-propulsive, retrograde (tip-to-base) propagation, sometimes at the same parameter values that lead to periodic, propulsive modes. In the presence of these retrograde unstable modes, stable or periodic modes have little influence. In contrast, unstable modes of the GC model exhibit switching at the base and propulsive base-to-tip propagation. PMID:25833248

  8. Tether fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Some fundamental aspects of tethers are presented and briefly discussed. The effects of gravity gradients, dumbbell libration in circular orbits, tether control strategies and impact hazards for tethers are among those fundamentals. Also considered are aerodynamic drag, constraints in momentum transfer applications and constraints with permanently deployed tethers. The theoretical feasibility of these concepts are reviewed.

  9. Fundamental Aspects of External Triggers and Non-Triggers of Substorm Particle Injections, and Implications on Sawtooth Events and Repetitive Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Lyons, L.; Reeves, G.

    2005-12-01

    It is important to understand what specific types of solar wind disturbances lead to a substorm and what other specific types do not. The types of solar wind disturbances include a variation in either IMF or dynamic pressure or a combination of simultaneous variations in both. We used observations of geosynchronous particle fluxes at energies of tens to hundreds of keV and found the following features. (1) A northward turning of the IMF is found to trigger the typical substorm injection as well known already. The injection front is wider when it is triggered by a northward turning under a strongly southward IMF condition. (2) The effect by the northward turning can however be cancelled out by a simultaneous increase of the IMF By magnitude and/or a simultaneous decrease of the dynamic pressure, leading to no substorm. (3) Generally a pressure increase leads to a compression effect which appears as flux increase or decrease or even no change, depending on the radial profile of the particle distribution at constant adiabatic invariants. This compression effect can be different between different MLTs and different particle species. (4) However, a pressure increase under strongly southward IMF conditions leads to not only the typical compression effect but also a nightside substorm injection, i.e., a two-mode response. (5) This pressure-induced substorm injection can however be cancelled out by a simultaneous (further) decrease of the already-southward IMF and/or by a simultaneous increase of the IMF By magnitude. (6) In addition, the effects by a simultaneous increase of both IMF Bz and dynamic pressure add up to lead to a substorm injection accompanied by the typical compression effect, while no substorm injection is expected by a pressure decrease or a decrease of the IMF Bz or a simultaneous decrease of both. We suggest that a substorm injection is triggered only by a variation or a combination of variations that results in a convection reduction within the inner

  10. Finite-aperture tapered unstable resonator lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, Robert George

    The development of high power, high brightness semiconductor lasers is important for applications such as efficient pumping of fiber amplifiers and free space communication. The ability to couple directly into the core of a single-mode fiber can vastly increase the absorption of pump light. Further, the high mode-selectivity provided by unstable resonators accommodates single-mode operation to many times the threshold current level. The objective of this dissertation is to investigate a more efficient semiconductor-based unstable resonator design. The tapered unstable resonator laser consists of a single-mode ridge coupled to a tapered gain region. The ridge, aided by spoiling grooves, provides essential preparation of the fundamental mode, while the taper provides significant amplification and a large output mode. It is shown a laterally finite taper-side mirror (making the laser a "finite-aperture tapered unstable resonator laser") serves to significantly improve differential quantum efficiency. This results in the possibility for higher optical powers while still maintaining single-mode operation. Additionally, the advent of a detuned second order grating allows for a low divergent, quasicircular output beam emitted from the semiconductor surface, easing packaging tolerances, and making two dimensional integrated arrays possible. In this dissertation, theory, design, fabrication, and characterization are presented. Material theory is introduced, reviewing gain, carrier, and temperature effects on field propagation. Coupled-mode and coupled wave theory is reviewed to allow simulation of the passive grating. A numerical model is used to investigate laser design and optimization, and effects of finite-apertures are explored. A microfabrication method is introduced to create the FATURL in InAlGaAs/-InGaAsP/InP material emitting at about 1410 nm. Fabrication consists of photolithography, electron-beam lithography, wet etch and dry etching processes, metal and

  11. Influence of an Additive-Free Particle Spreading Method on Interactions between Charged Colloidal Particles at an Oil/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Yi, Zonglin; Xing, Xiaochen; Ngai, To; Jin, Fan

    2016-05-17

    The assembly and manipulation of charged colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces represent active areas of fundamental and applied research. Previously, we have shown that colloidal particles can spontaneously generate unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface when spreading solvent is used to disperse them at an oil/water interface. These residual charges in turn affect the long-ranged electrostatic repulsive forces and packing of particles at the interface. To further uncover the influence arising from the spreading solvents on interfacial particle interactions, in the present study we utilize pure buoyancy to drive the particles onto an oil/water interface and compare the differences between such a spontaneously adsorbed particle monolayer to the spread monolayer based on solvent spreading techniques. Our results show that the solvent-free method could also lead particles to spread well at the interface, but it does not result in violent sliding of particles along the interface. More importantly, this additive-free spreading method can avoid the formation of unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface. These findings agree well with our previous hypothesis; namely, those unstable residual charges are triboelectric charges that arise from the violently rubbing of particles on oil at the interface. Therefore, if the spreading solvents could be avoided, then we would be able to get rid of the formation of residual charges at interfaces. This finding will provide insight for precisely controlling the interactions among colloidal particles trapped at fluid/fluid interfaces.

  12. Influence of an Additive-Free Particle Spreading Method on Interactions between Charged Colloidal Particles at an Oil/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Yi, Zonglin; Xing, Xiaochen; Ngai, To; Jin, Fan

    2016-05-17

    The assembly and manipulation of charged colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces represent active areas of fundamental and applied research. Previously, we have shown that colloidal particles can spontaneously generate unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface when spreading solvent is used to disperse them at an oil/water interface. These residual charges in turn affect the long-ranged electrostatic repulsive forces and packing of particles at the interface. To further uncover the influence arising from the spreading solvents on interfacial particle interactions, in the present study we utilize pure buoyancy to drive the particles onto an oil/water interface and compare the differences between such a spontaneously adsorbed particle monolayer to the spread monolayer based on solvent spreading techniques. Our results show that the solvent-free method could also lead particles to spread well at the interface, but it does not result in violent sliding of particles along the interface. More importantly, this additive-free spreading method can avoid the formation of unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface. These findings agree well with our previous hypothesis; namely, those unstable residual charges are triboelectric charges that arise from the violently rubbing of particles on oil at the interface. Therefore, if the spreading solvents could be avoided, then we would be able to get rid of the formation of residual charges at interfaces. This finding will provide insight for precisely controlling the interactions among colloidal particles trapped at fluid/fluid interfaces. PMID:27108987

  13. Fundamental Mechanisms of Interface Roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Randall L. Headrick

    2009-01-06

    Publication quality results were obtained for several experiments and materials systems including: (i) Patterning and smoothening of sapphire surfaces by energetic Ar+ ions. Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-ray Scattering (GISAXS) experiments were performed in the system at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) X21 beamline. Ar+ ions in the energy range from 300 eV to 1000 eV were used to produce ripples on the surfaces of single-crystal sapphire. It was found that the ripple wavelength varies strongly with the angle of incidence of the ions, which increase significantly as the angle from normal is varied from 55° to 35°. A smooth region was found for ion incidence less than 35° away from normal incidence. In this region a strong smoothening mechanism with strength proportional to the second derivative of the height of the surface was found to be responsible for the effect. The discovery of this phase transition between stable and unstable regimes as the angle of incidence is varied has also stimulated new work by other groups in the field. (ii) Growth of Ge quantum dots on Si(100) and (111). We discovered the formation of quantum wires on 4° misoriented Si(111) using real-time GISAXS during the deposition of Ge. The results represent the first time-resolved GISAXS study of Ge quantum dot formation. (iii) Sputter deposition of amorphous thin films and multilayers composed of WSi2 and Si. Our in-situ GISAXS experiments reveal fundamental roughening and smoothing phenomena on surfaces during film deposition. The main results of this work is that the WSi2 layers actually become smoother during deposition due to the smoothening effect of energetic particles in the sputter deposition process.

  14. Aberration correction of unstable resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Construction of aspheric reflectors for unstable resonator lasers to provide an arbitrary laser mode inside the resonator to correct aberrations of an output beam by the construction of the shape of an end reflector opposite the output reflector of the resonator cavity, such as aberrations resulting from refraction of a beam exiting the solid of the resonator having an index of refraction greater than 1 or to produce an aberration in the output beam that will precisely compensate for the aberration of an optical train into which the resonator beam is coupled.

  15. Stabilization strategies for unstable dynamics.

    PubMed

    Morasso, Pietro; Casadio, Maura; De Santis, Dalia; Nomura, Taishin; Rea, Francesco; Zenzeri, Jacopo

    2014-12-01

    The stabilization of the human standing posture was originally attributed to the stiffness of the ankle muscles but direct measurements of the ankle stiffness ruled out this hypothesis, leaving open the possibility for a feedback stabilization strategy driven by proprioceptive signals. This solution, however, could be implemented with two different kinds of control mechanisms, namely continuous or intermittent feedback. The debate is now settled and the latter solution seems to be the most plausible one. Moreover, stabilization of unstable dynamics is not limited to bipedal standing. Indeed many manipulation tasks can be described in the same framework and thus a very general protocol for addressing this kind of problems is the use of haptic virtual reality where instability is generated by some kind of divergent or saddle-like force field. Several studies demonstrated that human subjects can choose to adopt a stiffness or feedback strategy as a combination of biomechanical and task constraints and can learn to switch from one strategy to the other if it is feasible or to use one or the other is infeasible. Understanding such mechanisms is relevant, for example, for the design of novel ergonomic man-machine interfaces in difficult, unstable tasks. PMID:25453479

  16. Modified negative-branch confocal unstable resonator.

    PubMed

    Hall, Thomas; Duschek, Frank; Grünewald, Karin M; Handke, Jürgen

    2006-12-01

    A new type of unstable resonator, suitable for a laser with a large medium cross section and a small or median output coupling, is presented. The resonator configuration, a modification of a negative-branch confocal unstable resonator, is numerically investigated. The basis of the theory is the Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral equation, and the calculations describe a passive resonator. With respect to output mirror tilting, the calculations confirm that the modified negative-branch confocal unstable resonator is less sensitive to mirror misalignments than the conventional negative-branch confocal unstable resonator. Furthermore, the modified resonator improves the beam quality in comparison with the conventional unstable resonator. PMID:17119575

  17. Narrow-bandwidth unstable laser resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Reintjes, J.F.; Tankersley, L.L.; Cooper, D.

    1988-10-21

    The present invention relates to unstable laser resonators, particularly to unstable laser resonators, and particularly to an unstable laser resonator that produces optical radiation that simultaneously has the high output power diffraction-limited divergence characteristic of an unstable laser resonator and also the narrow bandwidth that can usually be obtained only with a stable laser resonator. Some success was achieved in the frequency narrowing of the laser radiation from an unstable laser resonator cavity by using a diffraction grating. This technique was works best with lasers that have sharp line structure, such as molecular lasers. For example, selection of a single line in a hydrogen-fluoride laser has been reported in several configurations involving the insertion of a diffraction grating into a standard unstable laser resonator cavity. Although currently available, unstable laser resonators have the configuration of choice for producing high-power, low-divergence radiation from laser cavities; they are not compatible with a simultaneous requirement of narrow bandwidth.

  18. Marketing fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Redmond, W H

    2001-01-01

    This chapter outlines current marketing practice from a managerial perspective. The role of marketing within an organization is discussed in relation to efficiency and adaptation to changing environments. Fundamental terms and concepts are presented in an applied context. The implementation of marketing plans is organized around the four P's of marketing: product (or service), promotion (including advertising), place of delivery, and pricing. These are the tools with which marketers seek to better serve their clients and form the basis for competing with other organizations. Basic concepts of strategic relationship management are outlined. Lastly, alternate viewpoints on the role of advertising in healthcare markets are examined. PMID:11401791

  19. Beam shaping characteristics of an unstable-waveguide hybrid resonator.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Longsheng; Qin, Yingxiong; Tang, Xiahui; Wan, Chenhao; Li, Gen; Zhong, Lijing

    2014-04-01

    The unstable-waveguide hybrid resonator emits a rectangular, simple astigmatic beam with a large number of high-spatial-frequency oscillations in the unstable direction. To equalize the beam quality, in this paper, a beam shaping system with a spatial filter for the hybrid resonator was investigated by numerical simulation and experimental method. The high-frequency components and fundamental mode of the output beam of the hybrid resonator in the unstable direction are separated by a focus lens. The high-frequency components of the beam are eliminated by the following spatial filter. A nearly Gaussian-shaped beam with approximately equal beam propagation factor M² in the two orthogonal directions was obtained. The effects of the width of the spatial filter on the beam quality, power loss, and intensity distribution of the shaped beam were investigated. The M² factor in the unstable direction is changed from 1.6 to 1.1 by optimum design. The power loss is only 9.5%. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:24787183

  20. Beam shaping characteristics of an unstable-waveguide hybrid resonator.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Longsheng; Qin, Yingxiong; Tang, Xiahui; Wan, Chenhao; Li, Gen; Zhong, Lijing

    2014-04-01

    The unstable-waveguide hybrid resonator emits a rectangular, simple astigmatic beam with a large number of high-spatial-frequency oscillations in the unstable direction. To equalize the beam quality, in this paper, a beam shaping system with a spatial filter for the hybrid resonator was investigated by numerical simulation and experimental method. The high-frequency components and fundamental mode of the output beam of the hybrid resonator in the unstable direction are separated by a focus lens. The high-frequency components of the beam are eliminated by the following spatial filter. A nearly Gaussian-shaped beam with approximately equal beam propagation factor M² in the two orthogonal directions was obtained. The effects of the width of the spatial filter on the beam quality, power loss, and intensity distribution of the shaped beam were investigated. The M² factor in the unstable direction is changed from 1.6 to 1.1 by optimum design. The power loss is only 9.5%. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Ray method for unstable resonators.

    PubMed

    Cho, S H; Felsen, L B

    1980-10-15

    The previously developed ray-optical method for unstable, symmetric, bare resonators with sharp-edged stop and circular mirrors is reviewed here. A deductive stepwise procedure is presented, with emphasis on the physical implications. It is shown how the method can accommodate other edge configurations such as those produced by rounding, and also more complicated nonaxial structures such as the half-symmetric resonator with internal axicon. For the latter, the ray approach categorizes those rays that must be eliminated from the equivalent aligned unfolded symmetric resonator, and it identifies the canonical diffraction problems that must be addressed to account for shadowing and scattering due to the axicon tip. Effects due to shielding or truncation of the axicon tip are also considered. Approximate calculations of the eigenvalues for the lowest-loss modes illustrate the effects due to various tip shielding lengths and spacings of the axicon from the output mirror. PMID:20234647

  2. Unstable generalized transduction in Achromobacter.

    PubMed

    Woods, D R; Thomson, J A

    1975-05-01

    Six auxotrophic markers of a halotolerant collagenolytic strain of Achromobacter were transduced by four alpha hages. Abortive transduction was also demonstrated. The generalized transduction system is unusual as the transductants were unstable, characteristic of transduction by lysogeny. The Achromobacter strain is a cryptic lysogen for alpha and purified transductants were either sensitive or resistant to alpha. Purified clones from four resistant transductants and one sensitive transductant liberated phage spontaneously. The host ranges of these spontaneous phage differed from that of the alpha phage used for the transduction experiment. Some initially resistant transductants became simi-sensitive to alpha (efficiency to plating) e.o.p. (10minus-1 to 10minus-2) after repeated cloning.

  3. Nonlinear force dependence on optically bound micro-particle arrays in the evanescent fields of fundamental and higher order microfibre modes

    PubMed Central

    Maimaiti, Aili; Holzmann, Daniela; Truong, Viet Giang; Ritsch, Helmut; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    Particles trapped in the evanescent field of an ultrathin optical fibre interact over very long distances via multiple scattering of the fibre-guided fields. In ultrathin fibres that support higher order modes, these interactions are stronger and exhibit qualitatively new behaviour due to the coupling of different fibre modes, which have different propagation wave-vectors, by the particles. Here, we study one dimensional longitudinal optical binding interactions of chains of 3 μm polystyrene spheres under the influence of the evanescent fields of a two-mode microfibre. The observation of long-range interactions, self-ordering and speed variation of particle chains reveals strong optical binding effects between the particles that can be modelled well by a tritter scattering-matrix approach. The optical forces, optical binding interactions and the velocity of bounded particle chains are calculated using this method. Results show good agreement with finite element numerical simulations. Experimental data and theoretical analysis show that higher order modes in a microfibre offer a promising method to not only obtain stable, multiple particle trapping or faster particle propulsion speeds, but that they also allow for better control over each individual trapped object in particle ensembles near the microfibre surface. PMID:27451935

  4. Nonlinear force dependence on optically bound micro-particle arrays in the evanescent fields of fundamental and higher order microfibre modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maimaiti, Aili; Holzmann, Daniela; Truong, Viet Giang; Ritsch, Helmut; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-07-01

    Particles trapped in the evanescent field of an ultrathin optical fibre interact over very long distances via multiple scattering of the fibre-guided fields. In ultrathin fibres that support higher order modes, these interactions are stronger and exhibit qualitatively new behaviour due to the coupling of different fibre modes, which have different propagation wave-vectors, by the particles. Here, we study one dimensional longitudinal optical binding interactions of chains of 3 μm polystyrene spheres under the influence of the evanescent fields of a two-mode microfibre. The observation of long-range interactions, self-ordering and speed variation of particle chains reveals strong optical binding effects between the particles that can be modelled well by a tritter scattering-matrix approach. The optical forces, optical binding interactions and the velocity of bounded particle chains are calculated using this method. Results show good agreement with finite element numerical simulations. Experimental data and theoretical analysis show that higher order modes in a microfibre offer a promising method to not only obtain stable, multiple particle trapping or faster particle propulsion speeds, but that they also allow for better control over each individual trapped object in particle ensembles near the microfibre surface.

  5. Nonlinear force dependence on optically bound micro-particle arrays in the evanescent fields of fundamental and higher order microfibre modes.

    PubMed

    Maimaiti, Aili; Holzmann, Daniela; Truong, Viet Giang; Ritsch, Helmut; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    Particles trapped in the evanescent field of an ultrathin optical fibre interact over very long distances via multiple scattering of the fibre-guided fields. In ultrathin fibres that support higher order modes, these interactions are stronger and exhibit qualitatively new behaviour due to the coupling of different fibre modes, which have different propagation wave-vectors, by the particles. Here, we study one dimensional longitudinal optical binding interactions of chains of 3 μm polystyrene spheres under the influence of the evanescent fields of a two-mode microfibre. The observation of long-range interactions, self-ordering and speed variation of particle chains reveals strong optical binding effects between the particles that can be modelled well by a tritter scattering-matrix approach. The optical forces, optical binding interactions and the velocity of bounded particle chains are calculated using this method. Results show good agreement with finite element numerical simulations. Experimental data and theoretical analysis show that higher order modes in a microfibre offer a promising method to not only obtain stable, multiple particle trapping or faster particle propulsion speeds, but that they also allow for better control over each individual trapped object in particle ensembles near the microfibre surface. PMID:27451935

  6. Nonlinear force dependence on optically bound micro-particle arrays in the evanescent fields of fundamental and higher order microfibre modes.

    PubMed

    Maimaiti, Aili; Holzmann, Daniela; Truong, Viet Giang; Ritsch, Helmut; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    Particles trapped in the evanescent field of an ultrathin optical fibre interact over very long distances via multiple scattering of the fibre-guided fields. In ultrathin fibres that support higher order modes, these interactions are stronger and exhibit qualitatively new behaviour due to the coupling of different fibre modes, which have different propagation wave-vectors, by the particles. Here, we study one dimensional longitudinal optical binding interactions of chains of 3 μm polystyrene spheres under the influence of the evanescent fields of a two-mode microfibre. The observation of long-range interactions, self-ordering and speed variation of particle chains reveals strong optical binding effects between the particles that can be modelled well by a tritter scattering-matrix approach. The optical forces, optical binding interactions and the velocity of bounded particle chains are calculated using this method. Results show good agreement with finite element numerical simulations. Experimental data and theoretical analysis show that higher order modes in a microfibre offer a promising method to not only obtain stable, multiple particle trapping or faster particle propulsion speeds, but that they also allow for better control over each individual trapped object in particle ensembles near the microfibre surface.

  7. Intervention Research in Highly Unstable Environments

    PubMed Central

    Buckwalter, Kathleen C.; Grey, Margaret; Bowers, Barbara; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Gross, Deborah; Funk, Marjorie; Beck, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    This article highlights issues and presents strategies for conducting intervention research in highly unstable environments such as schools, critical care units, and long-term care facilities. The authors draw on their own experiences to discuss the challenges that may be encountered in highly unstable settings. The concept of validity provides a framework for understanding the value of addressing the many methodological issues that can emerge in settings characterized by instability. We explain unstable environments by elaborating on knowable elements that contribute to instability. Strategies are provided for improving success of intervention research in unstable settings by carrying out an environmental assessment prior to beginning a study. PMID:19035619

  8. Healthcare fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Kauk, Justin; Hill, Austin D; Althausen, Peter L

    2014-07-01

    In order for a trauma surgeon to have an intelligent discussion with hospital administrators, healthcare plans, policymakers, or any other physicians, a basic understanding of the fundamentals of healthcare is paramount. It is truly shocking how many surgeons are unable to describe the difference between Medicare and Medicaid or describe how hospitals and physicians get paid. These topics may seem burdensome but they are vital to all business decision making in the healthcare field. The following chapter provides further insight about what we call "the basics" of providing medical care today. Most of the topics presented can be applied to all specialties of medicine. It is broken down into 5 sections. The first section is a brief overview of government programs, their influence on care delivery and reimbursement, and past and future legislation. Section 2 focuses on the compliance, care provision, and privacy statutes that regulate physicians who care for Medicare/Medicaid patient populations. With a better understanding of these obligations, section 3 discusses avenues by which physicians can stay informed of current and pending health policy and provides ways that they can become involved in shaping future legislation. The fourth section changes gears slightly by explaining how the concepts of trade restraint, libel, antitrust legislation, and indemnity relate to physician practice. The fifth, and final, section ties all of components together by describing how physician-hospital alignment can be mutually beneficial in providing patient care under current healthcare policy legislation.

  9. Osteoporosis in unstable adult scoliosis

    SciTech Connect

    Velis, K.P.; Healey, J.H.; Schneider, R.

    1988-12-01

    New noninvasive techniques as well as conventional methods were used to evaluate skeletal mass in the following three populations of adult white women as follows: (1) 79 subjects with preexisting idiopathic scoliosis designated as unstable (US) because of the associated presence in the lumbar spine of lateral spondylolisthesis with segmental instability; (2) 67 subjects with preexisting idiopathic scoliosis without lateral spondylolisthesis designated as stable (SS); and (3) 248 age-matched nonscoliotic controls. Ages in all three groups were categorized into premenopausal (25-44 years), perimenopausal (45-54 years), and postmenopausal (55-84 years). The results showed higher scoliosis morbidity in the US compared to the SS populations. The prevalence and severity of osteoporosis were markedly increased in US versus SS populations. Femoral neck density determined by dual-photon absorptiometry techniques averaged 26% to 48% lower in all age categories of US patients compared to controls. These changes were found in the youngest age groups, indicating reductions in bone mineral content earlier in the adult life of white women with a specific type of high-morbidity US characterized by the marker of lateral spondylolisthesis.

  10. Research on fundamental aspects of inorganic particle deposition on coal-fired equipment. Final technical report, 6 September 1990--31 October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    We review results of our recent DOE-PETC research program on the deposition dynamics of combustion-generated particles in power production technologies. We outline and illustrate the results of recently developed methods to predict total surface deposition rates and associated convective heat transfer reductions for targets exposed to a distribution of particles suspended in a mainstream. Our methods combine the essential features of recently developed single particle sticking probability laws with correlations of the inertial impaction of particles on targets in high Reynolds number cross-flow, to develop formulae and ``universal`` graphs which provide the dependence of particle deposition rates, and associated reductions in convective heat transfer, on such system parameters as mainstream velocity, mean suspended particle size and target size. The deposition rate/deposit microstructue/properties prediction and correlation procedures illustrated be incorporated into improved ``fouling propensity indices,`` to motivate, evaluate and implement ``ruggedization`` and/or fouling reduction strategies, and/or incorporated (as subroutines) into more ``comprehensive`` CFD models of an entire power plant.

  11. Unstable vicinal crystal growth from cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasteva, A.; Popova, H.; KrzyŻewski, F.; Załuska-Kotur, M.; Tonchev, V.

    2016-03-01

    In order to study the unstable step motion on vicinal crystal surfaces we devise vicinal Cellular Automata. Each cell from the colony has value equal to its height in the vicinal, initially the steps are regularly distributed. Another array keeps the adatoms, initially distributed randomly over the surface. The growth rule defines that each adatom at right nearest neighbor position to a (multi-) step attaches to it. The update of whole colony is performed at once and then time increases. This execution of the growth rule is followed by compensation of the consumed particles and by diffusional update(s) of the adatom population. Two principal sources of instability are employed - biased diffusion and infinite inverse Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier (iiSE). Since these factors are not opposed by step-step repulsion the formation of multi-steps is observed but in general the step bunches preserve a finite width. We monitor the developing surface patterns and quantify the observations by scaling laws with focus on the eventual transition from diffusion-limited to kinetics-limited phenomenon. The time-scaling exponent of the bunch size N is 1/2 for the case of biased diffusion and 1/3 for the case of iiSE. Additional distinction is possible based on the time-scaling exponents of the sizes of multi-step Nmulti, these are 0.36÷0.4 (for biased diffusion) and 1/4 (iiSE).

  12. Fundamentals of Polarized Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The analytical and numerical basis for describing scattering properties of media composed of small discrete particles is formed by the classical electromagnetic theory. Although there are several excellent textbooks outlining the fundamentals of this theory, it is convenient for our purposes to begin with a summary of those concepts and equations that are central to the subject of this book and will be used extensively in the following chapters. We start by formulating Maxwell's equations and constitutive relations for time- harmonic macroscopic electromagnetic fields and derive the simplest plane-wave solution that underlies the basic optical idea of a monochromatic parallel beam of light. This solution naturally leads to the introduction of such fundamental quantities as the refractive index and the Stokes parameters. Finally, we define the concept of a quasi-monochromatic beam of light and discuss its implications.

  13. Database on unstable rock slopes in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppikofer, Thierry; Nordahl, Bo; Bunkholt, Halvor; Nicolaisen, Magnus; Hermanns, Reginald L.; Böhme, Martina; Yugsi Molina, Freddy X.

    2014-05-01

    Several large rockslides have occurred in historic times in Norway causing many casualties. Most of these casualties are due to displacement waves triggered by a rock avalanche and affecting coast lines of entire lakes and fjords. The Geological Survey of Norway performs systematic mapping of unstable rock slopes in Norway and has detected up to now more than 230 unstable slopes with significant postglacial deformation. This systematic mapping aims to detect future rock avalanches before they occur. The registered unstable rock slopes are stored in a database on unstable rock slopes developed and maintained by the Geological Survey of Norway. The main aims of this database are (1) to serve as a national archive for unstable rock slopes in Norway; (2) to serve for data collection and storage during field mapping; (3) to provide decision-makers with hazard zones and other necessary information on unstable rock slopes for land-use planning and mitigation; and (4) to inform the public through an online map service. The database is organized hierarchically with a main point for each unstable rock slope to which several feature classes and tables are linked. This main point feature class includes several general attributes of the unstable rock slopes, such as site name, general and geological descriptions, executed works, recommendations, technical parameters (volume, lithology, mechanism and others), displacement rates, possible consequences, hazard and risk classification and so on. Feature classes and tables linked to the main feature class include the run-out area, the area effected by secondary effects, the hazard and risk classification, subareas and scenarios of an unstable rock slope, field observation points, displacement measurement stations, URL links for further documentation and references. The database on unstable rock slopes in Norway will be publicly consultable through the online map service on www.skrednett.no in 2014. Only publicly relevant parts of

  14. Aberration sensitivity of unstable resonator with semitransparent output coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheyev, P.A.; Shepelenko, A.A.; Zaikin, A.P.

    1994-12-31

    Unstable resonator with semitransparent output coupler is feasible for lasers with moderate gain and large cross section of active medium. The resonator fundamental mode can be obtained up to Fresnel numbers of 10 or more. Output beam quality does not differ much from the Gaussian beam, but at the same time intensity distribution is rather flat and mode-medium coupling is better. This approach does not require the mirrors with tapered reflectivity profile. In practice the design of this type of resonator often requires to place a spherical mirror inside to fold the optical path and that inevitably causes astigmatism. Current presentation describes the results of the investigation of resonator sensitivity to intracavity astigmatism. The requirements for the resonator setup to obtain nearly unperturbed fundamental mode operation, and a convenient resonator design to meet this requirements are discussed.

  15. Unstable Binocular Control in Dyslexic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, J. F.; Fowler, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    Offers evidence for four propositions that demonstrate a strong association between binocular instability and dyslexic reading difficulties. Discusses two propositions designed to prove that it is unstable binocular control that causes reading difficulties, rather than vice versa. (RS)

  16. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics]. [Threshold unstable MHD activity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical predictions were compared with available data from JET on the threshold unstable MHD activity in toroidal confinement devices. In particular, questions arising as to Hartmans number and the selection of a kinematic viscosity are discussed.

  17. Extra-cavity feedback into unstable resonators.

    PubMed

    Corkum, P B; Baldis, H A

    1979-05-01

    Unstable resonators constructed of totally reflecting optics are particularly sensitive to extra-cavity feedback. This is demonstrated experimentally by reflecting the attenuated output of an injection mode-locked TEA CO(2) laser, fitted with a confocal unstable resonator, back into the laser resonator. Even after attenuation by ~10(6), significant perturbation ( greater, similar10%) could be observed in the temporal characteristics of the output train. A theory of extra-cavity feedback in the geometric limit is presented. PMID:20212847

  18. Observation of the particle-unstable nucleus 10N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lépine-Szily, A.; Oliveira, J. M.; Vanin, V. R.; Ostrowski, A. N.; Lichtenthäler, R.; di Pietro, A.; Guimarães, V.; Laird, A. M.; Maunoury, L.; Lima, G. F.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Savajols, H.; Trinder, W.; Villari, A. C.; de Vismes, A.

    2002-05-01

    For the first time evidence of the ground state of the proton-rich, unbound nucleus 10N has been found in the multinucleon transfer reaction 10B(14N,14B)10N. The observed resonance of 10N has a mass excess of 38.8(4) MeV and a width of Γ=2.3(16) MeV, close to the Audi-Wapstra estimation of 38.5(4) MeV. 10N is the last missing A=10 multiplet partner.

  19. Unstable solar lentigo: A defined separate entity.

    PubMed

    Byrom, Lisa; Barksdale, Sarah; Weedon, David; Muir, Jim

    2016-08-01

    An unstable solar lentigo is a solar lentigo with areas of melanocytic hyperplasia not extending past the margin of the lesion. They are discrete, macular, pigmented lesions arising on sun-damaged skin and a subset of typical solar lentigos. Clinically they differ from usual solar lentigines in often being solitary or larger and darker than adjacent solar lentigines. These lesions are of clinical importance as they can arise in close proximity to lentigo maligna and in a single lesion there can be demonstrated changes of solar lentigo, unstable solar lentigo and lentigo maligna. These observations led us to conjecture that unstable solar lentigos could be a precursor lesion to lentigo maligna. In this article we examine the possibility that lentigo maligna can arise within a solar lentigo through an intermediate lesion, the unstable solar lentigo. We propose that the histopathological recognition of this entity will allow for future research into its behaviour and thus management. We review difficulties in the diagnosis of single cell predominant melanocytic proliferations and the concept of unstable lentigo in view of the literature and clinical experience supporting the proposal of its recognition as a separate entity.

  20. Fundamental neutron physics at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.

    1995-10-01

    Modern neutron sources and science share a common origin in mid-20th-century scientific investigations concerned with the study of the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. Since the time of that common origin, neutron science and the study of elementary particles have evolved into quite disparate disciplines. The neutron became recognized as a powerful tool for studying condensed matter with modern neutron sources being primarily used (and justified) as tools for neutron scattering and materials science research. The study of elementary particles has, of course, led to the development of rather different tools and is now dominated by activities performed at extremely high energies. Notwithstanding this trend, the study of fundamental interactions using neutrons has continued and remains a vigorous activity at many contemporary neutron sources. This research, like neutron scattering research, has benefited enormously by the development of modern high-flux neutron facilities. Future sources, particularly high-power spallation sources, offer exciting possibilities for continuing this research.

  1. Testing Our Fundamental Assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Science is all about testing the things we take for granted including some of the most fundamental aspects of how we understand our universe. Is the speed of light in a vacuum the same for all photons regardless of their energy? Is the rest mass of a photon actually zero? A series of recent studies explore the possibility of using transient astrophysical sources for tests!Explaining Different Arrival TimesArtists illustration of a gamma-ray burst, another extragalactic transient, in a star-forming region. [NASA/Swift/Mary Pat Hrybyk-Keith and John Jones]Suppose you observe a distant transient astrophysical source like a gamma-ray burst, or a flare from an active nucleus and two photons of different energies arrive at your telescope at different times. This difference in arrival times could be due to several different factors, depending on how deeply you want to question some of our fundamental assumptions about physics:Intrinsic delayThe photons may simply have been emitted at two different times by the astrophysical source.Delay due to Lorentz invariance violationPerhaps the assumption that all massless particles (even two photons with different energies) move at the exact same velocity in a vacuum is incorrect.Special-relativistic delayMaybe there is a universal speed for massless particles, but the assumption that photons have zero rest mass is wrong. This, too, would cause photon velocities to be energy-dependent.Delay due to gravitational potentialPerhaps our understanding of the gravitational potential that the photons experience as they travel is incorrect, also causing different flight times for photons of different energies. This would mean that Einsteins equivalence principle, a fundamental tenet of general relativity (GR), is incorrect.If we now turn this problem around, then by measuring the arrival time delay between photons of different energies from various astrophysical sources the further away, the better we can provide constraints on these

  2. Experimental realization of a diffractive unstable resonator with Gaussian amplitude of the outcoupled beam using a VECSEL amplifier.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Hans-Christoph; Zeitner, Uwe Detlef

    2009-09-28

    Unstable resonators show an intense discrimination of undesired higher order modes but a high beam quality cannot be obtained with conventional resonators composed of spherical mirrors. In the present paper we demonstrate the possibility to tailor the fundamental mode by inserting diffractive elements into the resonator to generate a desirable output beam profile even for unstable resonators. We show a concept to design such surface structured elements for customizing the amplitude shape of the outcoupled beam. Further we demonstrate the first experimental realization of an unstable diffractive resonator with a Gaussian shaped amplitude profile of the laser beam for a vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL). PMID:19907524

  3. 30 CFR 56.9304 - Unstable ground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unstable ground. 56.9304 Section 56.9304 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Loading, Hauling,...

  4. 30 CFR 56.9304 - Unstable ground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Unstable ground. 56.9304 Section 56.9304 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Loading, Hauling,...

  5. 30 CFR 56.9304 - Unstable ground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unstable ground. 56.9304 Section 56.9304 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Loading, Hauling,...

  6. 30 CFR 56.9304 - Unstable ground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unstable ground. 56.9304 Section 56.9304 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Loading, Hauling,...

  7. 30 CFR 56.9304 - Unstable ground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unstable ground. 56.9304 Section 56.9304 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Loading, Hauling,...

  8. 30 CFR 57.9304 - Unstable ground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Unstable ground. 57.9304 Section 57.9304 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Loading, Hauling,...

  9. 30 CFR 57.9304 - Unstable ground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unstable ground. 57.9304 Section 57.9304 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Loading, Hauling,...

  10. 30 CFR 57.9304 - Unstable ground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unstable ground. 57.9304 Section 57.9304 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Loading, Hauling,...

  11. 30 CFR 57.9304 - Unstable ground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unstable ground. 57.9304 Section 57.9304 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Loading, Hauling,...

  12. 30 CFR 57.9304 - Unstable ground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unstable ground. 57.9304 Section 57.9304 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Loading, Hauling,...

  13. Inferring unstable equilibrium configurations from experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgin, L. N.; Wiebe, R.; Spottswood, S. M.; Beberniss, T.

    2016-09-01

    This research considers the structural behavior of slender, mechanically buckled beams and panels of the type commonly found in aerospace structures. The specimens were deflected and then clamped in a rigid frame in order to exhibit snap-through. That is, the initial equilibrium and the buckled (snapped-through) equilibrium configurations both co-existed for the given clamped conditions. In order to transit between these two stable equilibrium configurations (for example, under the action of an externally applied load), it is necessary for the structural component to pass through an intermediate unstable equilibrium configuration. A sequence of sudden impacts was imparted to the system, of various strengths and at various locations. The goal of this impact force was to induce relatively intermediate-sized transients that effectively slowed-down in the vicinity of the unstable equilibrium configuration. Thus, monitoring the velocity of the motion, and specifically its slowing down, should give an indication of the presence of an equilibrium configuration, even though it is unstable and not amenable to direct experimental observation. A digital image correlation (DIC) system was used in conjunction with an instrumented impact hammer to track trajectories and statistical methods used to infer the presence of unstable equilibria in both a beam and a panel.

  14. Design of aberrationless aspheric unstable resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    We present a method for designing aspheric mirrors for unstable-resonator lasers to yield an arbitrary laser mode inside the resonator. Both analytical and numerical examples are given of aberration-compensated resonators, including solid resonators whose modes on refraction through the output coupler have identical zero spherical aberration.

  15. Gauge unification of fundamental forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus

    The following sections are included: * I. Fundamental Particles, Fundamental Forces, and Gauge Unification * II. The Emergence of Spontaneously Broken SU(2)×U(1) Gauge Theory * III. The Present and Its Problems * IV. Direct Extrapolation from the Electroweak to the Electronuclear * A. The three ideas * B. Tests of electronuclear grand unification * V. Elementarity: Unification with Gravity and Nature of Charge * A. The quest for elementarity, prequarks (preons and pre-preons * B. Post-Planck physics, supergravity, and Einstein's dreams * C. Extended supergravity, SU(8) preons, and composite gauge fields * Appendix A: Examples of Grand Unifying Groups * Appendix B: Does the Grand Plateau really exist * References

  16. NOVA SCIENCE UNIT 15, FUNDAMENTAL PARTICLES 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1964

    THE PRINCIPLES OF ATOMIC STRUCTURE WHICH ARE STRESSED ARE THAT ATOMS ARE MADE UP OF A NUCLEUS WITH A POSITIVE CHARGE, SURROUNDED BY ELECTRONS WITH A NEGATIVE CHARGE, AND THAT THERE IS NO CHANGE IN THE ATOM WHEN THE POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE CHARGES ARE EQUAL. EXPERIMENTS ILLUSTRATE THAT CURRENT ELECTRICITY IS ACTUALLY ELECTRONS IN MOTION, THAT THERE…

  17. Unstable resonators with excited converging wave

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, N. ); Weber, H. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper reports the properties of unstable resonators with an additional mirror inside or outside the resonator investigated, both experimentally and theoretically. The additional mirror excites the converging wave, and by this, output coupling is decreased without affecting beam quality. Experiments were performed with a pulsed Nd:YAG system. The theoretical model was based on the coupled Kirchhoff integrals and solved numerically. Agreement between theory and experiments indicates that this kind of resonator provides high focusability and maximum extraction efficiency simultaneously, even with low-gain media. This enables one to apply unstable resonators to solid-state lasers with low small-signal gain, like alexandrite or CW-pumped Nd:YAG.

  18. Review of management of unstable elbow fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ozel, Omer; Demircay, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Stable and painless elbow motion is essential for activities of daily living. The elbow joint is the second most commonly dislocated joint in adults. The goals of treatment are to perform a stable fixation of all fractures, to achieve concentric and stable reduction of the elbow and to provide early motion. The treatment modality for complex elbow instability is almost always surgical. The treatment objectives are anatomic reduction, stable fixation, and early rehabilitation of the elbow. The common complications of these unstable fractures include recurrent instability, stiffness, myositis ossifications, heterotopic calcification, and neurovascular dysfunction. We analyzed the management of complex elbow fractures and instabilities on the basis of recent literature and suggested possible guidelines for the treatment in this paper. In conclusion, recognition of the injury pattern and restoration of the joint stability are the prerequisites for any successful treatment of an unstable elbow injury. PMID:26807356

  19. Unstable-stable resonators with toroidal mirrors.

    PubMed

    Borghese, A; Canevari, R; Donati, V; Garifo, L

    1981-10-15

    A resonator with toroidal mirrors is described. This resonator behaves like an off-axis unstable confocal resonator in one transverse dimension and like an on-axis concave-convex stable resonator in the other orthogonal dimension. Some experimental results are reported for a fast flow high power cw-CO(2) laser whose transverse cross section is restricted in the stable-resonator direction. These cavities allow an output laser beam with a fully illuminated cross section which is well suited for focusing. Moreover, the fraction of the available laser power which may be concentrated in the central lobe of the focal plane intensity distribution is 2.5-4.5 times higher than other unstable resonators with similarly restricted modal volumes. Finally the alignment requirements are examined. PMID:20372215

  20. The Fate of Unstable Circumbinary Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    What happens to Tattooine-like planets that are instead in unstable orbits around their binary star system? A new study examines whether such planets will crash into a host star, get ejected from the system, or become captured into orbit around one of their hosts.Orbit Around a DuoAt this point we have unambiguously detected multiple circumbinary planets, raising questions about these planets formation and evolution. Current models suggest that it is unlikely that circumbinary planets would be able to form in the perturbed environment close their host stars. Instead, its thought that the planets formed at a distance and then migrated inwards.One danger such planets face when migrating is encountering ranges of radii where their orbits become unstable. Two scientists at the University of Chicago, Adam Sutherland and Daniel Fabrycky, have studied what happens when circumbinary planets migrate into such a region and develop unstable orbits.Producing Rogue PlanetsTime for planets to either be ejected or collide with one of the two stars, as a function of the planets starting distance (in AU) from the binary barycenter. Colors represent different planetary eccentricities. [Sutherland Fabrycky 2016]Sutherland and Fabrycky used N-body simulations to determine the fates of planets orbiting around a star system consisting of two stars a primary like our Sun and a secondary roughly a tenth of its size that are separated by 1 AU.The authors find that the most common fate for a circumbinary planet with an unstable orbit is ejection from the system; over 80% of unstable planets were ejected. This has interesting implications: if the formation of circumbinary planets is common, this mechanism could be filling the Milky Way with a population of free-floating, rogue planets that no longer are associated with their host star.The next most common outcome for unstable planets is collision with one of their host stars (most often the secondary), resulting inaccretion of the planet

  1. Confocal unstable-resonator semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salzman, J.; Lang, R.; Yariv, A.; Larson, A.

    1986-01-01

    GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructure lasers with a monolithic confocal unstable resonator were demonstrated. The curved mirrors satisfying the confocal condition were fabricated by etching. Close to threshold, the lasers operate in a single lateral mode with a nearly collimated output beam. A single-lobe far-field intensity distribution as narrow as 1.9-deg full width at half maximum was measured.

  2. Unstable resonators with a distributed focusing gain.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, T R

    1994-08-20

    The geometrical optics approximation is used to form a model of axisymmetric unstable resonators having distributed focus, gain, and loss. A tapered reflectivity feedback mirror is included. The rate equations for propagation through the focusing gain medium are derived. A unique grid is found for propagation without interpolation along eigenrays in each direction. Numerical examples show the effects of distributed gain and focus on the axial and transverse intensity distributions. PMID:20935986

  3. Special Relativity and Reactions with Unstable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bertulani, C.A.

    2005-10-14

    Dynamical relativistic effects are often neglected in the description of reactions with unstable nuclear beams at intermediate energies (ELab {approx_equal} 100 MeV/nucleon). Evidently, this introduces sizable errors in experimental analysis and theoretical descriptions of these reactions. This is particularly important for the experiments held in GANIL/France, MSU/USA, RIKEN/Japan and GSI/Germany. I review a few examples where relativistic effects have been studied in nucleus-nucleus scattering at intermediate energies.

  4. Testing Our Fundamental Assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Science is all about testing the things we take for granted including some of the most fundamental aspects of how we understand our universe. Is the speed of light in a vacuum the same for all photons regardless of their energy? Is the rest mass of a photon actually zero? A series of recent studies explore the possibility of using transient astrophysical sources for tests!Explaining Different Arrival TimesArtists illustration of a gamma-ray burst, another extragalactic transient, in a star-forming region. [NASA/Swift/Mary Pat Hrybyk-Keith and John Jones]Suppose you observe a distant transient astrophysical source like a gamma-ray burst, or a flare from an active nucleus and two photons of different energies arrive at your telescope at different times. This difference in arrival times could be due to several different factors, depending on how deeply you want to question some of our fundamental assumptions about physics:Intrinsic delayThe photons may simply have been emitted at two different times by the astrophysical source.Delay due to Lorentz invariance violationPerhaps the assumption that all massless particles (even two photons with different energies) move at the exact same velocity in a vacuum is incorrect.Special-relativistic delayMaybe there is a universal speed for massless particles, but the assumption that photons have zero rest mass is wrong. This, too, would cause photon velocities to be energy-dependent.Delay due to gravitational potentialPerhaps our understanding of the gravitational potential that the photons experience as they travel is incorrect, also causing different flight times for photons of different energies. This would mean that Einsteins equivalence principle, a fundamental tenet of general relativity (GR), is incorrect.If we now turn this problem around, then by measuring the arrival time delay between photons of different energies from various astrophysical sources the further away, the better we can provide constraints on these

  5. Unstable resonator with reduced output coupling.

    PubMed

    Pargmann, Carsten; Hall, Thomas; Duschek, Frank; Grünewald, Karin Maria; Handke, Jürgen

    2012-06-20

    The properties of a laser beam coupled out of a standard unstable laser resonator are heavily dependent on the chosen resonator magnification. A higher magnification results in a higher output coupling and a better beam quality. But in some configurations, an unstable resonator with a low output coupling in combination with a good beam quality is desirable. In order to reduce the output coupling for a particular resonator, magnification fractions of the outcoupled radiation are reflected back into the cavity. In the confocal case, the output mirror consists of a spherical inner section with a high reflectivity and a flat outer section with a partial reflectivity coating. With the application of the unstable resonator with reduced output coupling (URROC), magnification and output coupling can be adjusted independently from each other and it is possible to get a good beam quality and a high power extraction for lasers with a large low gain medium. The feasibility of this resonator design is examined numerically and experimentally with the help of a chemical oxygen iodine laser. PMID:22722301

  6. Fundamentals of Atmospheric Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohren, Craig F.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2006-02-01

    This textbook fills a gap in the literature for teaching material suitable for students of atmospheric science and courses on atmospheric radiation. It covers the fundamentals of emission, absorption, and scattering of electromagnetic radiation from ultraviolet to infrared and beyond. Much of the book applies to planetary atmosphere. The authors are physicists and teach at the largest meteorology department of the US at Penn State. Craig T. Bohren has taught the atmospheric radiation course there for the past 20 years with no book. Eugene Clothiaux has taken over and added to the course notes. Problems given in the text come from students, colleagues, and correspondents. The design of the figures especially for this book is meant to ease comprehension. Discussions have a graded approach with a thorough treatment of subjects, such as single scattering by particles, at different levels of complexity. The discussion of the multiple scattering theory begins with piles of plates. This simple theory introduces concepts in more advanced theories, i.e. optical thickness, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter. The more complicated theory, the two-stream theory, then takes the reader beyond the pile-of-plates theory. Ideal for advanced undergraduate and graduate students of atmospheric science.

  7. Combustion Fundamentals Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Increased emphasis is placed on fundamental and generic research at Lewis Research Center with less systems development efforts. This is especially true in combustion research, where the study of combustion fundamentals has grown significantly in order to better address the perceived long term technical needs of the aerospace industry. The main thrusts for this combustion fundamentals program area are as follows: analytical models of combustion processes, model verification experiments, fundamental combustion experiments, and advanced numeric techniques.

  8. Exchange Rates and Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Charles; West, Kenneth D.

    2005-01-01

    We show analytically that in a rational expectations present-value model, an asset price manifests near-random walk behavior if fundamentals are I (1) and the factor for discounting future fundamentals is near one. We argue that this result helps explain the well-known puzzle that fundamental variables such as relative money supplies, outputs,…

  9. Unstable periodic orbits in the Lorenz attractor.

    PubMed

    Boghosian, Bruce M; Brown, Aaron; Lätt, Jonas; Tang, Hui; Fazendeiro, Luis M; Coveney, Peter V

    2011-06-13

    We apply a new method for the determination of periodic orbits of general dynamical systems to the Lorenz equations. The accuracy of the expectation values obtained using this approach is shown to be much larger and have better convergence properties than the more traditional approach of time averaging over a generic orbit. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the present work to the computation of unstable periodic orbits of the driven Navier-Stokes equations, which can be simulated using the lattice Boltzmann method.

  10. Exploring the Physics of Unstable Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volya, Alexander

    In this presentation the Continuum Shell Model (CSM) approach is advertised as a powerful theoretical tool for studying physics of unstable nuclei. The approach is illustrated using 17O as an example, which is followed by a brief presentation of the general CSM formalism. The successes of the CSM are highlighted and references are provided throughout the text. As an example, the CSM is applied perturbatively to 20O allowing one to explore the effects of continuum on positions of weakly bound states and low-lying resonances, as well as to discern some effects of threshold discontinuity.

  11. Designing Aberration-Corrected Solid Unstable Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    In improved method of designing solid unstable resonator of laser diode, shapes of mirrors calculated to yield specified mode. Ray tracing used to compute shape of initially unspecified end mirror, given shape of initially specified end mirror and specified output mode. No need to accept aberrations or suboptimal circular shapes, to make iterative design computations in effort to converge on desired mode, or to assume paraxiality of rays: Angles between rays and optical axis large, cross sections of surfaces noncircular, and computed shape of end mirror exact. End mirror corrects for all aberrations.

  12. Nuclear data on unstable nuclei for astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael S.; Meyer, Richard A.; Bardayan, Daniel W.; Blackmon, Jeffery C.; Chae, Kyungyuk; Guidry, Michael W.; Hix, W. Raphael; Kozub, R. L.; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Ma, Zhanwen; Scott, Jason P.

    2004-12-01

    Recent measurements with radioactive beams at ORNL's Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) have prompted the evaluation of a number of reactions involving unstable nuclei needed for stellar explosion studies. We discuss these evaluations, as well as the development of a new computational infrastructure to enable the rapid incorporation of the latest nuclear physics results in astrophysics models. This infrastructure includes programs that simplify the generation of reaction rates, manage rate databases, and visualize reaction rates, all hosted at a new website http://www.nucastrodata.org.

  13. Boundary between stable and unstable regimes of accretion. Ordered and chaotic unstable regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinova, A. A.; Romanova, M. M.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new study of the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable regime of accretion on to rotating magnetized stars in a set of high grid resolution three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations performed in low-viscosity discs. We find that the boundary between the stable and unstable regimes is determined almost entirely by the fastness parameter ωs = Ω⋆/ΩK(rm), where Ω⋆ is the angular velocity of the star and ΩK(rm) is the angular velocity of the Keplerian disc at the disc-magnetosphere boundary r = rm. We found that accretion is unstable if ωs ≲ 0.6. Accretion through instabilities is present in stars with different magnetospheric sizes. However, only in stars with relatively small magnetospheres, rm/R⋆ ≲ 7, do the unstable tongues produce chaotic hotspots on the stellar surface and irregular light curves. At even smaller values of the fastness parameter, ωs ≲ 0.45, multiple irregular tongues merge, forming one or two ordered unstable tongues that rotate with the angular frequency of the inner disc. This transition occurs in stars with even smaller magnetospheres, rm/R⋆ ≲ 4.2. Most of our simulations were performed at a small tilt of the dipole magnetosphere, Θ = 5°, and a small viscosity parameter α = 0.02. Test simulations at higher α values show that many more cases become unstable, and the light curves become even more irregular. Test simulations at larger tilts of the dipole Θ show that instability is present, however, accretion in two funnel streams dominates if Θ ≳ 15°. The results of these simulations can be applied to accreting magnetized stars with relatively small magnetospheres: Classical T Tauri stars, accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars, and cataclysmic variables.

  14. Geometric formulation of unstable-resonator design and application to self-collimating unstable-resonator diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    A new set of design parameters for unstable resonators is presented that yields simpler expressions for the mirror and beam radii and magnification than those given by the usual g parameters. The new formalism is applied to determine the design of a solid unstable resonator of index n with a self-collimated output beam, applicable to unstable-resonator diode lasers.

  15. Geometric formulation of unstable-resonator design and application to self-collimating unstable-resonator diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Lang, R J

    1991-09-01

    A new set of design parameters for unstable resonators is presented that yields simpler expressions for the mirror and beam radii and magnification than those given by the usual g parameters. The new formalism is applied to determine the design of a solid unstable resonator of index n with a self-collimated output beam, applicable to unstable-resonator diode lasers. PMID:19776957

  16. Viscosity Prescription for Gravitationally Unstable Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2015-05-01

    Gravitationally unstable accretion disks emerge in a variety of astrophysical contexts—giant planet formation, FU Orioni outbursts, feeding of active galactic nuclei, and the origin of Pop III stars. When a gravitationally unstable disk is unable to cool rapidly, it settles into a quasi-stationary, fluctuating gravitoturbulent state, in which its Toomre Q remains close to a constant value {{Q}0}∼ 1. Here we develop an analytical formalism describing the evolution of such a disk, which is based on the assumptions of Q={{Q}0} and local thermal equilibrium. Our approach works in the presence of additional sources of angular momentum transport (e.g., MRI), as well as external irradiation. Thermal balance dictates a unique value of the gravitoturbulent stress {{α }gt} driving disk evolution, which is a function of the local surface density and angular frequency. We compare this approach with other commonly used gravitoturbulent viscosity prescriptions, which specify the explicit dependence of stress {{α }gt} on Toomre Q in an ad hoc fashion, and identify the ones that provide consistent results. We nevertheless argue that our Q={{Q}0} approach is more flexible, robust, and straightforward and should be given preference in applications. We illustrate this with a couple of analytical calculations—locations of the snow line and of the outer edge of the dead zone in a gravitoturbulent protoplanetary disk—which clearly show the simplicity and versatility of the Q={{Q}0} approach.

  17. 2001 QR322: a dynamically unstable Neptune Trojan?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, J.; Lykawka, P. S.

    2010-06-01

    Since early work on the stability of the first Neptunian Trojan, 2001 QR322, suggested that it was a dynamically stable, primordial body, it has been assumed that this applies to both that object and its more recently discovered brethren. However, it seems that things are no longer so clear-cut. In this work, we present the results of detailed dynamical simulations of the orbital behaviour of 2001 QR322. Using an ephemeris for the object that has significantly improved since earlier works, we follow the evolution of 19683 test particles, placed on orbits within the observational error ellipse of 2001 QR322's orbit, for a period of 1Gyr. We find that majority of these `clones' of 2001 QR322 are dynamically unstable, exhibiting a near-exponential decay from both the Neptunian Trojan cloud (decay half-life of ~550Myr) and the Solar system (decay half-life of ~590Myr). The stability of the object within Neptune's Trojan cloud is found to be strongly dependent on the initial semimajor axis used, with these objects located at a >= 30.30au being significantly less stable than those interior to this value, as a result of their having initial libration amplitudes very close to a critical threshold dividing regular and irregular motion, located at ~70°-75° (full extent of angular motion). This result suggests that if 2001 QR322 is a primordial Neptunian Trojan, it must be a representative of a population that was once significantly larger than that we see today and adds weight to the idea that the Neptune Trojans may represent a significant source of objects moving on unstable orbits between the giant planets (the Centaurs).

  18. Reaction-Transport Fronts Propagating into Unstable States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, Vicenç; Fedotov, Sergei; Horsthemke, Werner

    In this chapter we consider the problem of propagating fronts traveling into an unstable state of a reaction-transport system. The purpose is to present the general formalism for the asymptotic analysis of traveling fronts. The method relies on the hyperbolic scaling procedure, the theory of large deviations, and the Hamilton-Jacobi technique. A generic model that describes phenomena of this type is the RD equation (2.3) with appropriate kinetics, such as the FKPP equation (4.1). The propagation velocity of fronts of this equation has been studied in Chap.4. The RD equation involves implicitly a long-time large-scale parabolic scaling, while as far as propagating fronts are concerned, the appropriate scaling must be a hyperbolic one. The macroscopic transport process arises from the overall effect of many particles performing complex random movements. Classical diffusion is simply an approximation for this transport in the long-time large-scale parabolic limit. In general, this approximation is not appropriate for problems involving propagating fronts. The basic idea is that the kinetic term in the RD equation with KPP kinetics is very sensitive to the tails of a density profile. These tails are typically "non-universal," "non-diffusional," and dependent on the microscopic details of the underlying random walk. The purpose of this chapter is to demonstrate that the macroscopic dynamics of the front for a reaction-transport system are dependent on the choice of the underlying random walk model for the transport process. To illustrate the idea of an alternative description of front propagation into an unstable state of reaction-transport system, we consider several models including discrete-in-time or continuous-in-time Markov models with long-distance dispersal kernels, non-Markovian models with memory effects, etc., instead of the RD equation. Let us give a few examples of such models.

  19. Black holes and fundamental fields in numerical relativity: Initial data construction and evolution of bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Hirotada; Witek, Helvi; Cardoso, Vitor

    2014-05-01

    Fundamental fields are a natural outcome in cosmology and particle physics and might therefore serve as a proxy for more complex interactions. The equivalence principle implies that all forms of matter gravitate, and one therefore expects relevant, universal imprints of new physics in strong field gravity, such as that encountered close to black holes. Fundamental fields in the vicinities of supermassive black holes give rise to extremely long-lived, or even unstable, configurations, which slowly extract angular momentum from the black hole or simply evolve nonlinearly over long time scales, with important implications for particle physics and gravitational-wave physics. Here, we perform a fully nonlinear study of scalar-field condensates around rotating black holes. We provide novel ways to specify initial data for the Einstein—Klein—Gordon system, with potential applications in a variety of scenarios. Our numerical results confirm the existence of long-lived bar modes, which act as lighthouses for gravitational wave emission: the scalar field condenses outside the black hole geometry and acts as a constant frequency gravitational-wave source for very long time scales. This effect could turn out to be a potential signature of beyond standard model physics and also a promising source of gravitational waves for future gravitational-wave detectors.

  20. Feedback control of unstable cellular solidification fronts.

    PubMed

    Pons, A J; Karma, A; Akamatsu, S; Newey, M; Pomerance, A; Singer, H; Losert, W

    2007-02-01

    We present a feedback control scheme to stabilize unstable cellular patterns during the directional solidification of a binary alloy. The scheme is based on local heating of cell tips which protrude ahead of the mean position of all tips in the array. The feasibility of this scheme is demonstrated using phase-field simulations and, experimentally, using a real-time image processing algorithm, to track cell tips, coupled with a movable laser spot array device to heat the tips locally. We demonstrate, both numerically and experimentally, that spacings well below the threshold for a period-doubling instability can be stabilized. As predicted by the numerical calculations, cellular arrays become stable with uniform spacing through the feedback control which is maintained with minimal heating.

  1. Injection-locking optimization in unstable resonators.

    PubMed

    Kedmi, J; Treves, D

    1981-06-15

    The problem of transverse-mode matching between the lowest-loss mode of a confocal unstable resonator and a Gaussian beam, which is injected into the resonator through a coupling hole in its back mirror, is analyzed. It is found that in resonators having equivalent Fresnel number >0.5, there is a value of the coupling hole diameter for which a mode transition occurs. Below this value the coupling coefficient between the mode and the injected signal increases with the hole diameter. The optimal coupling hole diameter for injection locking lies somewhat below the transition value, where the low-order mode is still dominant and the coupling coefficient is high (~0.25-0.30). The power loss through the coupling hole is negligible (~2%) compared to the output coupling, which is ~50-70%. PMID:20332894

  2. Self-collimated unstable resonator semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Self-collimation of the output is achieved in an unstable resonator semiconductor laser by providing a large concave mirror M sub 1 and a small convex mirror M sub 2 on opposite surfaces of a semiconductor body of a material having an effective index of refraction denoted by n, where the respective mirror radii R sub 1, R sub 2 and beam radii r sub 1, r sub 2 are chosen to satisfy a condition (R sub 2)/(1 + r sub 1) = (n - 1)/n, with a value of geometric magnification 1 less than or equal to M less than or equal to (n + 1)/(n - 1) where r sub 1 and r sub 2 are the radii of counterpropagating beams at respective mirrors of radii R sub 1 and R sub 2.

  3. Self-collimated unstable resonator semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Robert J.

    1991-08-01

    Self-collimation of the output is achieved in an unstable resonator semiconductor laser by providing a large concave mirror (M sub 1) and a small convex mirror (M sub 2) on opposite surfaces of a semiconductor body of a material having an effective index of refraction denoted by n, where the respective mirror radii (R sub 1, R sub 2) and beam radii (r sub 1, r sub 2) are chosen to satisfy a condition (R sub 2)/(1+r sub 1) = (n-1)/n, with a value of geometric magnification 1 less than or equal to M less than or equal to (n+1)/(n-1) where r (sub 1) and r (sub 2) are the radii of counterpropagating beams at respective mirrors of radii R (sub 1) and R (sub 2).

  4. The free energy of mechanically unstable phases

    PubMed Central

    van de Walle, A.; Hong, Q.; Kadkhodaei, S.; Sun, R.

    2015-01-01

    Phase diagrams provide ‘roadmaps' to the possible states of matter. Their determination traditionally rests on the assumption that all phases, even unstable ones, have well-defined free energies under all conditions. However, this assumption is commonly violated in condensed phases due to mechanical instabilities. This long-standing problem impedes thermodynamic database development, as pragmatic attempts at solving this problem involve delicate extrapolations that are highly nonunique and that lack an underlying theoretical justification. Here we propose an efficient computational solution to this problem that has a simple interpretation, both as a topological partitioning of atomic configuration space and as a minimally constrained physical system. Our natural scheme smoothly extends the free energy of stable phases, without relying on extrapolation, thus enabling a formal assessment of widely used extrapolation schemes. PMID:26130613

  5. Unstable periodic orbits in human cardiac rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, K.; Govindan, R. B.; Gopinathan, M. S.

    1998-04-01

    Unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) extracted from experimental electrocardiograph signals are reported for normal and pathological human cardiac rhythms. The periodicity and distribution of the orbits on the chaotic attractor are found to be indicative of the state of health of the cardiac system. The normal cardiac system is characterized by three to four UPOs with typical periodicities and intensities. However, pathological conditions such as premature ventricular contraction, atrio ventricular block, ventricular tachy arrhythmia, and ventricular fibrillation have UPOs whose periodicity and intensity distribution are quite distinct from those of the healthy cases and are characteristic of the pathological conditions. Eigenvalues and the largest positive Lyapunov exponent value for the UPOs are also reported. The UPOs are shown to be insensitive to the embedding dimension and the present UPO analysis is demonstrated to be reliable by the method of surrogate analysis.

  6. Propagating unstable wavelets in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Patrick M.; Madhavan, Adarsh; Reid, Matthew P.; Vigmond, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    Solitonlike propagating modes have been proposed for excitable tissue, but have never been measured in cardiac tissue. In this study, we simulate an experimental protocol to elicit these propagating unstable wavelets (PUWs) in a detailed three-dimensional ventricular wedge preparation. PUWs appear as fixed-shape wavelets that propagate only in the direction of cardiac fibers, with conduction velocity approximately 40% slower than normal action potential excitation. We investigate their properties, demonstrating that PUWs are not true solitons. The range of stimuli for which PUWs were elicited was very narrow (several orders of magnitude lower than the stimulus strength itself), but increased with reduced sodium conductance and reduced coupling in nonlongitudinal directions. We show that the phenomenon does not depend on the particular membrane representation used or the shape of the stimulating electrode.

  7. Phase Transformation Behavior at Low Temperature in Hydrothermal Treatment of Stable and Unstable Titania Sol

    PubMed

    So; Park; Kim; Moon

    1997-07-15

    Nanosize titania sol was prepared from titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) and conditions for the formation of stable sol were identified. As the H+/TTIP mole ratio decreased and H2O/TTIP mole ratio increased, stable sol was likely to be formed. The size and crystallinity remained unchanged after hydrothermal treatment of the stable sol at between 160 and 240°C. However, hydrothermal treatment of unstable sol produced rod-like particles and crystallinity of particles was changed from anatase to rutile. This difference in phase transformation at low hydrothermal treatment temperature was likely to be caused by the fact that stable sol remained to be stable even after hydrothermal treatment, while unstable sol had a tendency to be aggregated. PMID:9268523

  8. Astrophysical quests for neutron capture data of unstable nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käppeler, F.

    2016-11-01

    The abundances of the chemical elements heavier than iron can be attributed in about equal parts to the r and to the s process, which are taking place in supernova explosions and during the He and C burning phases of stellar evolution, respectively. So far, quantitative studies on the extremely short-lived neutron-rich nuclei constituting the ( n, γ) network of the r process are out of reach. On the contrary, the situation for the s -process is far advanced, as the reaction path of the s process from 12C to the Pb/Bi region is located within the valley of stability. Accordingly, a comprehensive database of experimental ( n, γ) cross sections has been established. While for many stable isotopes the necessary accuracy is still to be reached, reliable cross sections for the involved unstable isotopes are almost completely missing. Because of the intrinsic γ background of radioactive samples, successful time-of-flight measurements are depending on intense pulsed neutron sources. Such data are fundamental for our understanding of branchings in the s -process reaction path, which carry important model-independent information on neutron flux and temperature in the deep stellar interior.

  9. Fundamental Physical Constants

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 121 CODATA Fundamental Physical Constants (Web, free access)   This site, developed in the Physics Laboratory at NIST, addresses three topics: fundamental physical constants, the International System of Units (SI), which is the modern metric system, and expressing the uncertainty of measurement results.

  10. Fundamentals of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2003-01-01

    No other book on the market today can match the success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! In a breezy, easy-to-understand style the book offers a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and helps readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving.

  11. Fundamentals of air quality systems

    SciTech Connect

    Noll, K.E.

    1999-08-01

    The book uses numerous examples to demonstrate how basic design concepts can be applied to the control of air emissions from industrial sources. It focuses on the design of air pollution control devices for the removal of gases and particles from industrial sources, and provides detailed, specific design methods for each major air pollution control system. Individual chapters provide design methods that include both theory and practice with emphasis on the practical aspect by providing numerous examples that demonstrate how air pollution control devices are designed. Contents include air pollution laws, air pollution control devices; physical properties of air, gas laws, energy concepts, pressure; motion of airborne particles, filter and water drop collection efficiency; fundamentals of particulate emission control; cyclones; fabric filters; wet scrubbers; electrostatic precipitators; control of volatile organic compounds; adsorption; incineration; absorption; control of gaseous emissions from motor vehicles; practice problems (with solutions) for the P.E. examination in environmental engineering. Design applications are featured throughout.

  12. Short-time behavior of unstable systems in field theory and proton decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, Carlo; Maiani, Luciano; Testa, Massimo

    1993-10-01

    The short-time behavior of an unstable particle is examined in a realistic field theoretical model. The onset of linear decreasing of the nondecay probability is shown to be extremely rapid, so rapid as to exclude any relevance of regimes quadratic in time (``Zeno'' quantum paradox). The result applies to super-renormalizable, renormalizable, and nonrenormalizable cases, particularly to the proton decay problem. We discuss also the deviations from the exponential decay law in small-Q-value decays.

  13. Unstable optical resonator loss calculations using the prony method.

    PubMed

    Siegman, A E; Miller, H Y

    1970-12-01

    The eigenvalues for all the significant low-order resonant modes of an unstable optical resonator with circular mirrors are computed using an eigenvalue method called the Prony method. A general equivalence relation is also given, by means of which one can obtain the design parameters for a single-ended unstable resonator of the type usually employed in practical lasers, from the calculated or tabulated values for an equivalent symmetric or double-ended unstable resonator.

  14. Negative-branch unstable-resonator copper-vapor laser.

    PubMed

    Dixit, S K; Singh, B; Nakhe, S V; Mittal, J K; Bhatnagar, R

    1990-04-15

    Copper-vapor lasers (CVL's) with positive-branch unstable resonators have been used extensively for reducing output-beam divergence. In contrast, the negative-branch unstable resonator has not been applied to CVL's. Here we study the performance of a negative-branch unstable-resonator CVL with various magnifications. A divergence of approximately 3.25 times the diffraction limit was obtained. PMID:19767965

  15. Unstable whistlers and Bernstein waves within the front of supercritical perpendicular shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschietti, Laurent; Lembege, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    In supercritical shocks a significant fraction of ions is reflected at the steep shock ramp and carries a considerable amount of energy. The existence of reflected ions enables streaming instabilities to develop which are excited by the relative drifts between the populations of incoming ions, reflected ions, and electrons. The processes are fundamental to the transformation of directed kinetic energy into thermal energy, a tenet of shock physics. We model the particle distributions as a broad electron population and two ion populations, namely a core and a beam (representing the reflected ions) in order to investigate the kinetic instabilities possible under various wave propagation angles. Recently, assuming the ion beam is directed along the shock normal at 90° to the magnetic field Bo, we analyzed the linear dispersion properties by computing the full electromagnetic dielectric tensor [Muschietti and Lembege, AGU Fall meeting 2015]. Three types of waves were shown to be unstable: (1) Oblique whistlers with wavelengths about the ion inertia length which propagate toward upstream at angles about 50° to the magnetic field. Frequencies are a few times the lower-hybrid. The waves share many similarities to the obliquely propagating whistlers measured in detail by Polar [Hull et al., JGR 117, 2012]. (2) Quasi-perpendicular whistlers with wavelength covering a fraction of the electron inertia length which propagate toward downstream at angles larger than 80° to Bo. Frequencies are close to the lower-hybrid. (3) Bernstein waves with wavelengths close to the electron gyroradius which propagate toward upstream at angles within 5° of perpendicular to the magnetic field. Frequencies are close to the electron cyclotron. The waves have similarities to those reported by Wind and Stereo [Breneman et al., JGR 118, 2013; Wilson et al., JGR 115, 2010]. We will present electromagnetic 1D3V PIC simulations with predetermined propagation angles which illustrate the three types

  16. Slinky Mechanics: Static Shapes and Unstable States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Douglas; Borum, Andy; Moore, Billy; Plaut, Raymond; Dillard, David

    2014-03-01

    The floppy nature of a tumbling Slinky has captivated children and adults alike for over half a century. Highly flexible, the spring will walk down stairs, turn over in your hands, and-much to the chagrin of children everywhere-become easily entangled. The Slinky is an educational tool for demonstrating standing waves, and a structural inspiration due to its ability to extend to many times beyond its initial length without imparting plastic strain on the material. In this work, we provide a mechanical model that captures the static equilibrium configurations of the Slinky in terms of its geometric and material properties. We present both continuous and discrete models to capture a Slinky's static equilibria and unstable transitions. We compare these with experimental results obtained for the Slinky's static equilibrium shapes. We emphasize the importance of modeling coil contact, and determine the critical criteria for the Slinky to topple over in terms of a tilt angle, and the vertical displacement of one bale of coils. Finally, we provide a general description of highly flexible helical springs by considering the nondimensional potential energy of the spring, which characterizes the ``Slinkiness'' of a spring.

  17. Pulse dynamics in an unstable medium

    SciTech Connect

    Balmforth, N.J.; Ierley, G.R.; Worthing, R.

    1995-05-01

    A study is presented of a one-dimensional, nonlinear partial differential equation that describes evolution of dispersive, long-wave instability. The solutions, under certain specific conditions, take the form of trains of well-separated pulses. The dynamics of such patterns of pulses is investigated using singular perturbation theory and with numerical simulation. These tools permit the formulation of a theory of pulse interaction, and enable the mapping out of the range of behavior in parameter space. There are regimes in which steady trains form; such states can be studied with the asymptotic, pulse-interaction theory. In other regimes, pulse trains are unstable to global, wave-like modes or its radiation. This can precipitate more violent phenomena involving pulse creation, or generate periodic states which may follow Shil`nikov`s route to temporal chaos. The asymptotic theory is generalized lo take some account of radiative dynamics. In the limit of small dispersion, steady trains largely cease to exist; the system follows various pathways to temporal complexity and typical-bifurcation sequences are sketched out. The investigation guides us to a critical appraisal of the asymptotic theory and uncovers the wealth of different types of behavior present in the system.

  18. Grating tuned unstable resonator laser cavity

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Larry C.

    1982-01-01

    An unstable resonator to be used in high power, narrow line CO.sub.2 pump lasers comprises an array of four reflectors in a ring configuration wherein spherical and planar wavefronts are separated from each other along separate optical paths and only the planar wavefronts are impinged on a plane grating for line tuning. The reflector array comprises a concave mirror for reflecting incident spherical waves as plane waves along an output axis to form an output beam. A plane grating on the output axis is oriented to reflect a portion of the output beam off axis onto a planar relay mirror spaced apart from the output axis in proximity to the concave mirror. The relay mirror reflects plane waves from the grating to impinge on a convex expanding mirror spaced apart from the output axis in proximity to the grating. The expanding mirror reflects the incident planar waves as spherical waves to illuminate the concave mirror. Tuning is provided by rotating the plane grating about an axis normal to the output axis.

  19. Unstable strip resonators with misaligned circular mirrors.

    PubMed

    Santana, C; Felsen, L B

    1978-08-01

    The waveguide approach developed previously by the authors is here applied to unstable strip resonators with unequal sharp-edged circular mirrors that have been tilted with respect to the resonator axis. An equivalent resonator with nontilted mirrors is defined wherein the mirror edges form asymmetrically placed terminations of the open-ended transverse waveguide. The eigenmode losses are found by calculating the waveguide mode reflection coefficients for each pair of edges and inserting these into the previously derived resonance equation. Numerical calculations for the low-loss detached mode are presented for the special case of symmetrical resonators with equally tilted mirrors since results for this configuration, for moderately large Fresnel numbers, have previously been given by Sanderson and Streifer. Our solutions agree with those of Sanderson and Streifer but accommodate also the range of large Fresnel numbers. It is found that misalignment introduces additional ripples into the power loss vs Fresnel number curves. A ray-optical interpretation in terms of edge diffraction is shown to account for this behavior. PMID:20203787

  20. Thermally unstable perturbations in stratified conducting atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, Fabio; Serio, Salvatore; Peres, Giovanni

    1994-10-01

    We investigate the thermal stability of isobaric perturbations in a stratified isothermal background atmosphere with solar abundances, as resulting from the competition of optically thin plasma radiative cooling and of heating conducted from the surrounding atmosphere. We have analyzed the threshold line between stable and unstable perturbations, in the plane of the two important control parameters: the initial size of the perturbation and the temperature of the unperturbed medium; this line changes with the pressure of the unperturbed atmosphere. We have extended the results of linear perturbation analysis by means of numerical calculations of the evolution of spherical isobaric perturbations, using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code including Spitzer heat conduction. We explore a wide range of the parameters appropriate to the solar and stellar upper atmospheres: the background uniform temperature is between 105 K and 107 K, the initial pressure betweeen 0.1 and 10 dyn/sq cm, and the perturbation size between 105 and 1010 cm. The numerical results are in substantial agreement with the linear analysis. We discuss possible implications of our results also in terms of observable effects, especially concerning plasma downflows, and propose thermal instability as a possible candidate to explain the observed redshifts in solar and stellar transition region lines.

  1. Order-parameter model for unstable multilane traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubashevsky, Ihor A.; Mahnke, Reinhard

    2000-11-01

    We discuss a phenomenological approach to the description of unstable vehicle motion on multilane highways that explains in a simple way the observed sequence of the ``free flow <--> synchronized mode <--> jam'' phase transitions as well as the hysteresis in these transitions. We introduce a variable called an order parameter that accounts for possible correlations in the vehicle motion at different lanes. So, it is principally due to the ``many-body'' effects in the car interaction in contrast to such variables as the mean car density and velocity being actually the zeroth and first moments of the ``one-particle'' distribution function. Therefore, we regard the order parameter as an additional independent state variable of traffic flow. We assume that these correlations are due to a small group of ``fast'' drivers and by taking into account the general properties of the driver behavior we formulate a governing equation for the order parameter. In this context we analyze the instability of homogeneous traffic flow that manifested itself in the above-mentioned phase transitions and gave rise to the hysteresis in both of them. Besides, the jam is characterized by the vehicle flows at different lanes which are independent of one another. We specify a certain simplified model in order to study the general features of the car cluster self-formation under the ``free flow <--> synchronized motion'' phase transition. In particular, we show that the main local parameters of the developed cluster are determined by the state characteristics of vehicle motion only.

  2. Jet broadening in unstable non-Abelian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, Adrian; Schenke, Bjoern; Strickland, Michael; Nara, Yasushi

    2008-08-15

    We perform numerical simulations of the SU(2) Boltzmann-Vlasov equation including both hard elastic particle collisions and soft interactions mediated by classical Yang-Mills fields. Using this technique we calculate the momentum-space broadening of high-energy jets in real time for both locally isotropic and anisotropic plasmas. In both cases we introduce a separation scale that separates hard and soft interactions and demonstrate that our results for jet broadening are independent of the precise separation scale chosen. For an isotropic plasma this allows us to calculate the jet transport coefficient q-circumflex including hard and soft nonequilibrium dynamics. For an anisotropic plasma the jet transport coefficient becomes a tensor with q-circumflex{sub L}{ne}q-circumflex{sub perpendicular}. We find that for weakly coupled anisotropic plasmas the fields develop unstable modes, forming configurations where B{sub perpendicular}>E{sub perpendicular} and E{sub z}>B{sub z}, which lead to q-circumflex{sub L}>q-circumflex{sub perpendicular}. We study whether the effect is strong enough to explain the experimental observation that high-energy jets traversing the plasma perpendicular to the beam axis experience much stronger broadening in rapidity, {delta}{eta}, than in azimuth, {delta}{phi}.

  3. Managing risk in an unstable world.

    PubMed

    Bremmer, Ian

    2005-06-01

    With emerging markets like China and politically unstable countries like Saudi Arabia figuring more than ever into companies' investment calculations, business leaders are turning to political risk analysis to measure the impact of politics on potential markets, minimize risks, and make the most of global opportunities. But political risk is more subjective than its economic counterpart. It is influenced by the passage of laws, the foibles of government leaders, and the rise of popular movements. So corporate leaders must grapple not just with broad, easily observable trends but also with nuances of society and even quirks of personality. And those hard-to-quantify factors must constantly be pieced together into an ongoing narrative within historical and regional contexts. As goods, services, information, ideas, and people cross borders today with unprecedented velocity, corporations debating operational or infrastructural investments abroad increasingly need objective, rigorous assessments. One tool for measuring and presenting stability data, for example, incorporates 20 composite indicators of risk in emerging markets and scores risk variables according to both their structural and their temporal components. The indicators are then organized into four equally weighted subcategories whose ratings are aggregated into a single stability score. Countries are ranked on a scale of zero (a failed state) to100 (a fully institutionalized, stable democracy). Companies can buy political risk analyses from consultants or, as some large energy and financial services organizations have done, develop them in-house. Either way, a complete and accurate picture of any country's risk requires analysts with strong reportorial skills; timely, accurate data on a variety of social and political trends; and a framework for evaluating the impact of individual risks on stability. PMID:15938438

  4. Managing risk in an unstable world.

    PubMed

    Bremmer, Ian

    2005-06-01

    With emerging markets like China and politically unstable countries like Saudi Arabia figuring more than ever into companies' investment calculations, business leaders are turning to political risk analysis to measure the impact of politics on potential markets, minimize risks, and make the most of global opportunities. But political risk is more subjective than its economic counterpart. It is influenced by the passage of laws, the foibles of government leaders, and the rise of popular movements. So corporate leaders must grapple not just with broad, easily observable trends but also with nuances of society and even quirks of personality. And those hard-to-quantify factors must constantly be pieced together into an ongoing narrative within historical and regional contexts. As goods, services, information, ideas, and people cross borders today with unprecedented velocity, corporations debating operational or infrastructural investments abroad increasingly need objective, rigorous assessments. One tool for measuring and presenting stability data, for example, incorporates 20 composite indicators of risk in emerging markets and scores risk variables according to both their structural and their temporal components. The indicators are then organized into four equally weighted subcategories whose ratings are aggregated into a single stability score. Countries are ranked on a scale of zero (a failed state) to100 (a fully institutionalized, stable democracy). Companies can buy political risk analyses from consultants or, as some large energy and financial services organizations have done, develop them in-house. Either way, a complete and accurate picture of any country's risk requires analysts with strong reportorial skills; timely, accurate data on a variety of social and political trends; and a framework for evaluating the impact of individual risks on stability.

  5. Levitated Optomechanics for Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Muddassar; Bateman, James; Vovrosh, Jamie; Hempston, David; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2015-05-01

    Optomechanics with levitated nano- and microparticles is believed to form a platform for testing fundamental principles of quantum physics, as well as find applications in sensing. We will report on a new scheme to trap nanoparticles, which is based on a parabolic mirror with a numerical aperture of 1. Combined with achromatic focussing, the setup is a cheap and readily straightforward solution to trapping nanoparticles for further study. Here, we report on the latest progress made in experimentation with levitated nanoparticles; these include the trapping of 100 nm nanodiamonds (with NV-centres) down to 1 mbar as well as the trapping of 50 nm Silica spheres down to 10?4 mbar without any form of feedback cooling. We will also report on the progress to implement feedback stabilisation of the centre of mass motion of the trapped particle using digital electronics. Finally, we argue that such a stabilised particle trap can be the particle source for a nanoparticle matterwave interferometer. We will present our Talbot interferometer scheme, which holds promise to test the quantum superposition principle in the new mass range of 106 amu. EPSRC, John Templeton Foundation.

  6. Variation of Fundamental Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flambaum, V. V.

    2006-11-01

    Theories unifying gravity with other interactions suggest temporal and spatial variation of the fundamental ``constants'' in expanding Universe. The spatial variation can explain a fine tuning of the fundamental constants which allows humans (and any life) to appear. We appeared in the area of the Universe where the values of the fundamental constants are consistent with our existence. We present a review of recent works devoted to the variation of the fine structure constant α, strong interaction and fundamental masses. There are some hints for the variation in quasar absorption spectra. Big Bang nucleosynthesis, and Oklo natural nuclear reactor data. A very promising method to search for the variation of the fundamental constants consists in comparison of different atomic clocks. Huge enhancement of the variation effects happens in transition between accidentally degenerate atomic and molecular energy levels. A new idea is to build a ``nuclear'' clock based on the ultraviolet transition between very low excited state and ground state in Thorium nucleus. This may allow to improve sensitivity to the variation up to 10 orders of magnitude! Huge enhancement of the variation effects is also possible in cold atomic and molecular collisions near Feshbach resonance.

  7. Monte Carlo fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.; Sutton, T.M.

    1996-02-01

    This report is composed of the lecture notes from the first half of a 32-hour graduate-level course on Monte Carlo methods offered at KAPL. These notes, prepared by two of the principle developers of KAPL`s RACER Monte Carlo code, cover the fundamental theory, concepts, and practices for Monte Carlo analysis. In particular, a thorough grounding in the basic fundamentals of Monte Carlo methods is presented, including random number generation, random sampling, the Monte Carlo approach to solving transport problems, computational geometry, collision physics, tallies, and eigenvalue calculations. Furthermore, modern computational algorithms for vector and parallel approaches to Monte Carlo calculations are covered in detail, including fundamental parallel and vector concepts, the event-based algorithm, master/slave schemes, parallel scaling laws, and portability issues.

  8. Arguing against fundamentality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Kerry

    This paper aims to open up discussion on the relationship between fundamentality and naturalism, and in particular on the question of whether fundamentality may be denied on naturalistic grounds. A historico-inductive argument for an anti-fundamentalist conclusion, prominent within the contemporary metaphysical literature, is examined; finding it wanting, an alternative 'internal' strategy is proposed. By means of an example from the history of modern physics - namely S-matrix theory - it is demonstrated that (1) this strategy can generate similar (though not identical) anti-fundamentalist conclusions on more defensible naturalistic grounds, and (2) that fundamentality questions can be empirical questions. Some implications and limitations of the proposed approach are discussed.

  9. Fundamentals of fluid lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, Bernard J.

    1991-01-01

    The aim is to coordinate the topics of design, engineering dynamics, and fluid dynamics in order to aid researchers in the area of fluid film lubrication. The lubrication principles that are covered can serve as a basis for the engineering design of machine elements. The fundamentals of fluid film lubrication are presented clearly so that students that use the book will have confidence in their ability to apply these principles to a wide range of lubrication situations. Some guidance on applying these fundamentals to the solution of engineering problems is also provided.

  10. Fundamentals of fluid sealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamentals of fluid sealing, including seal operating regimes, are discussed and the general fluid-flow equations for fluid sealing are developed. Seal performance parameters such as leakage and power loss are presented. Included in the discussion are the effects of geometry, surface deformations, rotation, and both laminar and turbulent flows. The concept of pressure balancing is presented, as are differences between liquid and gas sealing. Mechanisms of seal surface separation, fundamental friction and wear concepts applicable to seals, seal materials, and pressure-velocity (PV) criteria are discussed.

  11. Phase transitions in the interacting boson fermion model: The {gamma}-unstable case

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C.E.; Arias, J.M.; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A.

    2005-12-15

    The phase transition around the critical point in the evolution from spherical to deformed {gamma}-unstable shapes is investigated in odd nuclei within the interacting boson fermion model. We consider the particular case of an odd j=3/2 particle coupled to an even-even boson core that undergoes a transition from spherical U(5) to {gamma}-unstable O(6) situation. The particular choice of the j=3/2 orbital preserves in the odd case the condition of {gamma}-instability of the system. As a consequence, energy spectrum and electromagnetic transitions, in correspondence of the critical point, display behaviors qualitatively similar to those of the even core. The results are also in qualitative agreement with the recently proposed E(5/4) model, although few differences are present, due to the different nature of the two schemes.

  12. Universality classes for unstable crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagi, Sofia; Misbah, Chaouqi; Politi, Paolo

    2014-06-01

    Universality has been a key concept for the classification of equilibrium critical phenomena, allowing associations among different physical processes and models. When dealing with nonequilibrium problems, however, the distinction in universality classes is not as clear and few are the examples, such as phase separation and kinetic roughening, for which universality has allowed to classify results in a general spirit. Here we focus on an out-of-equilibrium case, unstable crystal growth, lying in between phase ordering and pattern formation. We consider a well-established 2+1-dimensional family of continuum nonlinear equations for the local height h(x,t) of a crystal surface having the general form ∂th(x,t)=-∇.[j(∇h)+∇(∇2h)]: j (∇h) is an arbitrary function, which is linear for small ∇h, and whose structure expresses instabilities which lead to the formation of pyramidlike structures of planar size L and height H. Our task is the choice and calculation of the quantities that can operate as critical exponents, together with the discussion of what is relevant or not to the definition of our universality class. These aims are achieved by means of a perturbative, multiscale analysis of our model, leading to phase diffusion equations whose diffusion coefficients encapsulate all relevant information on dynamics. We identify two critical exponents: (i) the coarsening exponent, n, controlling the increase in time of the typical size of the pattern, L ˜tn; (ii) the exponent β, controlling the increase in time of the typical slope of the pattern, M ˜tβ, where M ≈H/L. Our study reveals that there are only two different universality classes, according to the presence (n =1/3, β =0) or the absence (n =1/4, β >0) of faceting. The symmetry of the pattern, as well as the symmetry of the surface mass current j (∇h) and its precise functional form, is irrelevant. Our analysis seems to support the idea that also space dimensionality is irrelevant.

  13. Accumulation of unstable periodic orbits and the stickiness in the two-dimensional piecewise linear map.

    PubMed

    Akaishi, A; Shudo, A

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the stickiness of the two-dimensional piecewise linear map with a family of marginal unstable periodic orbits (FMUPOs), and show that a series of unstable periodic orbits accumulating to FMUPOs plays a significant role to give rise to the power law correlation of trajectories. We can explicitly specify the sticky zone in which unstable periodic orbits whose stability increases algebraically exist, and find that there exists a hierarchy in accumulating periodic orbits. In particular, the periodic orbits with linearly increasing stability play the role of fundamental cycles as in the hyperbolic systems, which allows us to apply the method of cycle expansion. We also study the recurrence time distribution, especially discussing the position and size of the recurrence region. Following the definition adopted in one-dimensional maps, we show that the recurrence time distribution has an exponential part in the short time regime and an asymptotic power law part. The analysis on the crossover time T(c)(*) between these two regimes implies T(c)(*) approximately -log[micro(R)] where micro(R) denotes the area of the recurrence region.

  14. Noncommutative Tachyon Kinks as D(p-1)-branes from Unstable Dp-brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Kim, Yoonbai; Kwon, O.-Kab

    2005-01-01

    We study noncommutative (NC) field theory of a real NC tachyon and NC U(1) gauge field, describing the dynamics of an unstable Dp-brane. For every given set of diagonal component of open string metric G 0 , NC parameter θ0 , and interpolating electric field hat E, we find all possible static NC kinks as exact solutions, in spite of complicated NC terms, which are classified by an array of NC kink-antikink and topological NC kinks. By computing their tensions and charges, those configurations are identified as an array of D0bar D0 and single stable D0 from the unstable D1, respectively. When the interpolating electric field has critical value as G 0 2 = hat E2 , the obtained topological kink becomes a BPS object with nonzero thickness and is identified as BPS D0 in the fluid of fundamental strings. Particularly in the scaling limit of infinite θ0 and vanishing G 0 and hat E, while keeping G 0θ0 = hat Eθ0 = 1, finiteness of the tension of NC kink corresponds to tensionless kink in ordinary effective field theory. An extension to stable D(p-1) from unstable Dp is straightforward for pure electric cases with parallel NC parameter and interpolating two-form field.

  15. 2008 LC18: a potentially unstable Neptune Trojan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, J.; Lykawka, P. S.; Bannister, M. T.; Francis, P.

    2012-05-01

    The recent discovery of the first Neptune Trojan at the planet's trailing (L5) Lagrange point, 2008 LC18, offers an opportunity to confirm the formation mechanism of a member of this important tracer population for the Solar system's dynamical history. We tested the stability of 2008 LC18's orbit through a detailed dynamical study, using test particles spread across the ±3σ range of orbital uncertainties in a, e, i and Ω. This showed that the wide uncertainties of the published orbit span regions of both extreme dynamical instability, with lifetimes <100 Myr, and significant stability, with lifetimes >1 Gyr. The stability of 2008 LC18's clones is greatly dependent on their semimajor axis and only weakly correlated with their orbital eccentricity. Test particles on orbits with an initial semimajor axis of less than 29.91 au have dynamical half-lives shorter than 100 Myr; in contrast, particles with an initial semimajor axis of greater than 29.91 au exhibit such strong dynamical stability that almost all are retained over the 1 Gyr of our simulations. More observations of this object are necessary to improve the orbit. If 2008 LC18 is in the unstable region, then our simulations imply that it is either a temporary Trojan capture or a representative of a slowly decaying Trojan population (like its sibling the L4 Neptunian Trojan 2001 QR322), and that it may not be primordial. Alternatively, if the orbit falls into the larger, stable region, then 2008 LC18 is a primordial member of the highly stable and highly inclined component of the Neptune Trojan population, joining 2005 TN53 and 2007 VL305. We attempted to recover 2008 LC18 using the 2.3-m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory to provide this astrometry, but were unsuccessful due to the high stellar density of its current sky location near the Galactic centre. The recovery of this object will require a telescope in the 8-m class.

  16. Reading Is Fundamental, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. National Reading is Fun-damental Program.

    Reading Is Fundamental (RIF) is a national, nonprofit organization designed to motivate children to read by making a wide variety of inexpensive books available to them and allowing the children to choose and keep books that interest them. This annual report for 1977 contains the following information on the RIF project: an account of the…

  17. Fundamentals of Chemical Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, William R.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a course that provides students with a fundamental understanding of the chemical, catalytic, and engineering sciences related to the chemical reactions taking place in a variety of reactors of different configurations. Also describes the eight major lecture topics, course examinations, and term papers. The course schedule is included.…

  18. Unification of Fundamental Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus; Taylor, Foreword by John C.

    2005-10-01

    Foreword John C. Taylor; 1. Unification of fundamental forces Abdus Salam; 2. History unfolding: an introduction to the two 1968 lectures by W. Heisenberg and P. A. M. Dirac Abdus Salam; 3. Theory, criticism, and a philosophy Werner Heisenberg; 4. Methods in theoretical physics Paul Adrian Maurice Dirac.

  19. Fundamentals of Diesel Engines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the fundamentals of diesel engine mechanics. Addressed in the three individual units of the course are the following topics: basic principles of diesel mechanics; principles, mechanics, and…

  20. Fundamentals of Library Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdoo, Monty L.

    2012-01-01

    Being a great teacher is part and parcel of being a great librarian. In this book, veteran instruction services librarian McAdoo lays out the fundamentals of the discipline in easily accessible language. Succinctly covering the topic from top to bottom, he: (1) Offers an overview of the historical context of library instruction, drawing on recent…

  1. Homeschooling and Religious Fundamentalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunzman, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the relationship between homeschooling and religious fundamentalism by focusing on their intersection in the philosophies and practices of conservative Christian homeschoolers in the United States. Homeschooling provides an ideal educational setting to support several core fundamentalist principles: resistance to…

  2. Food Service Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on food service fundamentals is designed to provide a general background in the basic aspects of the food service program in the Marine Corps; it is adaptable for nonmilitary instruction. Introductory materials include specific information for MCI…

  3. Laser Fundamentals and Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Pelt, W. F.; And Others

    As a result of work performed at the Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory with respect to lasers, this manual was prepared in response to the increasing use of lasers in high schools and colleges. It is directed primarily toward the high school instructor who may use the text for a short course in laser fundamentals. The definition of the…

  4. Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Sudowe, Ralf; Folden, Charles M., III; Nitsche, Heino; Hoffman, Darleane C.

    2005-01-15

    The overall objective of this project is the measurement of neutron capture cross sections of importance to stewardship science and astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis, while at the same time helping to train the next generation of scientists with expertise relevant to U.S. national nuclear security missions and to stewardship science. A primary objective of this project is to study neutron capture cross sections for various stable and unstable isotopes that will contribute to the Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program by providing improved data for modeling and interpretation of nuclear device performance. Much of the information obtained will also be important in astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis. Measurements of these neutron capture cross sections are being conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility using the unique Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). In our early discussions with the DANCE group, decisions were made on the first cross sections to be measured and how our expertise in target preparation, radiochemical separations chemistry, and data analysis could best be applied. The initial emphasis of the project was on preparing suitable targets of both natural and separated stable europium isotopes in preparation for the ultimate goal of preparing a sufficiently large target of radioactive 155Eu (t1/2 = 4.7 years) and other radioactive and stable species for neutron cross-section measurements at DANCE. Our Annual Report, ''Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei'' by J. M. Schwantes, R. Sudowe, C. M. Folden III, H. Nitsche, and D. C. Hoffman, submitted to NNSA in December 2003, gives details about the initial considerations and scope of the project. During the current reporting period, electroplated targets of natural Eu together with valuable, stable, and isotopically pure 151Eu and 153Eu, and isotopically separated 154Sm were measured for

  5. Restrictions in the realisation of multipass unstable resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Strakhov, S Yu

    2009-12-31

    Main restrictions in the realisation of multipass unstable resonators caused by intracavity losses and large-scale aberrations are considered. The influence of intracavity losses on the laser radiation power and divergence is analysed based on the numerical simulation of an unstable resonator. The efficiency criterion for the unstable multipass resonator is proposed, which is proportional to the radiation brightness and takes into account the influence of the misalignment, thermal deformation and the main parameters of the active medium and resonator on the parameters of laser radiation. (resonators)

  6. Detecting unstable periodic orbits in high-dimensional chaotic systems from time series: reconstruction meeting with adaptation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huanfei; Lin, Wei; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-05-01

    Detecting unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) in chaotic systems based solely on time series is a fundamental but extremely challenging problem in nonlinear dynamics. Previous approaches were applicable but mostly for low-dimensional chaotic systems. We develop a framework, integrating approximation theory of neural networks and adaptive synchronization, to address the problem of time-series-based detection of UPOs in high-dimensional chaotic systems. An example of finding UPOs from the classic Mackey-Glass equation is presented.

  7. Fundamental studies in geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.; Hager, B. H.; Kanamori, H.

    1981-01-01

    Research in fundamental studies in geodynamics continued in a number of fields including seismic observations and analysis, synthesis of geochemical data, theoretical investigation of geoid anomalies, extensive numerical experiments in a number of geodynamical contexts, and a new field seismic volcanology. Summaries of work in progress or completed during this report period are given. Abstracts of publications submitted from work in progress during this report period are attached as an appendix.

  8. Value of Fundamental Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, Alexey

    Fundamental science is a hard, long-term human adventure that has required high devotion and social support, especially significant in our epoch of Mega-science. The measure of this devotion and this support expresses the real value of the fundamental science in public opinion. Why does fundamental science have value? What determines its strength and what endangers it? The dominant answer is that the value of science arises out of curiosity and is supported by the technological progress. Is this really a good, astute answer? When trying to attract public support, we talk about the ``mystery of the universe''. Why do these words sound so attractive? What is implied by and what is incompatible with them? More than two centuries ago, Immanuel Kant asserted an inseparable entanglement between ethics and metaphysics. Thus, we may ask: which metaphysics supports the value of scientific cognition, and which does not? Should we continue to neglect the dependence of value of pure science on metaphysics? If not, how can this issue be addressed in the public outreach? Is the public alienated by one or another message coming from the face of science? What does it mean to be politically correct in this sort of discussion?

  9. Strongly and weakly unstable anisotropic quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, Cristina; Mrowczynski, Stanislaw

    2005-08-01

    Using explicit solutions of the QCD transport equations, we derive an effective potential for an anisotropic quark-gluon plasma which under plausible assumptions holds beyond the Hard Loop approximation. The configurations, which are unstable in the linear response approach, are characterized by a negative quadratic term of the effective potential. The signs of higher-order terms can be either negative or positive, depending on the parton momentum distribution. In the case of a Gaussian momentum distribution, the potential is negative and unbound from below. Therefore, the modes, which are unstable for gauge fields of small amplitude, remain unstable for arbitrary large amplitudes. We also present an example of a momentum distribution which gives a negative quadratic term of the effective potential but the whole potential has a minimum and it grows for sufficiently large gauge fields. Then, the system is weakly unstable. The character of the instability is important for the dynamical evolution of the plasma system.

  10. Unstable laser resonators with super-Gaussian mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    De Silvestri, S.; Laporta, P.; Magni, V.; Svelto, O.; Majocchi, B.

    1988-03-01

    A new class of tapered reflectivity mirrors with a super-Gaussian profile R atmI exp(-kr/sup n/) is introduced, and a geometrical-optics approach for analysis and design of unstable resonators made with these mirrors is presented. A super-Gaussian mirror, built by a special evaporation technique, has been tested in an unstable resonator of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser, demonstrating its effectiveness in generating diffraction-limited beams.

  11. Unstable laser resonators with super-Gaussian mirrors.

    PubMed

    De Silvestri, S; Laporta, P; Magni, V; Svelto, O; Majocchi, B

    1988-03-01

    A new class of tapered reflectivity mirrors with a super-Gaussian profile R infinity exp(-kr(n)) is introduced, and a geometrical-optics approach for analysis and design of unstable resonators made with these mirrors is presented. A super-Gaussian mirror, built by a special evaporation technique, has been tested in an unstable resonator of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser, demonstrating its effectiveness in generating diffraction-limited beams. PMID:19742027

  12. Unstable-Resonator Oscillator/Amplifier Diode Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J.; Mittelstein, Michael; Tiberio, Richard C.; Forouhar, Siamak; Crawford, Deborah

    1994-01-01

    Fabricated as single-chip integrated circuit. Device based partly on concept proved in commercial solid-state lasers: using unstable-resonator oscillator to define electromagnetic mode and, following oscillator, traveling-wave amplifier to generate high power. Mode-definition and power-amplification functions optimized separately. Hyperbolic-grating, unstable-resonator oscillator/amplifier diode laser produces single-longitudinal-mode, broad, laterally coherent, diffraction-limited, high-power beam.

  13. Application of unstable resonators for copper-vapor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Baogen; Yin Xianhua

    1987-07-01

    An analysis is made of the possibility of using unstable resonators in reducing the divergence of radiation from a high-gain, short inversion lifetime copper vapor laser. The output laser beam characteristics of telescopic resonators are compared with those of plane-concave resonators. It is shown that to obtain an output beam with low divergence in such a laser, unstable resonators must be used.

  14. Unstable laser resonators with super-Gaussian mirrors.

    PubMed

    De Silvestri, S; Laporta, P; Magni, V; Svelto, O; Majocchi, B

    1988-03-01

    A new class of tapered reflectivity mirrors with a super-Gaussian profile R infinity exp(-kr(n)) is introduced, and a geometrical-optics approach for analysis and design of unstable resonators made with these mirrors is presented. A super-Gaussian mirror, built by a special evaporation technique, has been tested in an unstable resonator of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser, demonstrating its effectiveness in generating diffraction-limited beams.

  15. Fundamental space radiobiology.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gregory A

    2003-06-01

    The unique feature of the space radiation environment is the dominance of high-energy charged particles (HZE or high LET radiation) emitted by the Sun and galactic sources, or trapped in the Van Allen radiation belts. These charged particles present a significant hazard to space flight crews, and accelerator-based experiments are underway to quantify the health risks due to unavoidable radiation exposure. There are three principal properties of charged particles that distinguish them from conventional radiation, i.e. gamma rays and x-rays. First, they have a defined range in matter rather than an exponential absorption profile. Second, they undergo nuclear reactions to produce secondary particles. Third, and most important, they deposit their energy along well-defined linear paths or tracks rather than diffuse fields. The structured energy deposition pattern interacts on multiple scales with the biological structures of DNA, cells and tissues to produce correlated patterns of damage that evade repair systems. Traditional concepts of dose and its associated normalization parameter, RBE (relative biological effectiveness), break down under experimental scrutiny, and probabilistic models of risk based on the number of particle traversals per cell may be more appropriate. Unique patterns of DNA damage, gene expression, mobilization of repair proteins, activation of cytokines and remodeling of cellular microenvironment are observed following exposure to high LET radiation. At low levels of exposure the communication of bioactive substances from irradiated to unirradiated "bystander" cells can amplify the damage and cause a significant deviation from linearity in dose vs. response relations. Under some circumstances, there is even a multigenerational delay in the expression of radiation-induced genetic damage (genomic instability) which is not strictly dose dependent. These issues and the experimental evidence derived from ground based experiments at particle

  16. Fundamental space radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    The unique feature of the space radiation environment is the dominance of high-energy charged particles (HZE or high LET radiation) emitted by the Sun and galactic sources, or trapped in the Van Allen radiation belts. These charged particles present a significant hazard to space flight crews, and accelerator-based experiments are underway to quantify the health risks due to unavoidable radiation exposure. There are three principal properties of charged particles that distinguish them from conventional radiation, i.e. gamma rays and x-rays. First, they have a defined range in matter rather than an exponential absorption profile. Second, they undergo nuclear reactions to produce secondary particles. Third, and most important, they deposit their energy along well-defined linear paths or tracks rather than diffuse fields. The structured energy deposition pattern interacts on multiple scales with the biological structures of DNA, cells and tissues to produce correlated patterns of damage that evade repair systems. Traditional concepts of dose and its associated normalization parameter, RBE (relative biological effectiveness), break down under experimental scrutiny, and probabilistic models of risk based on the number of particle traversals per cell may be more appropriate. Unique patterns of DNA damage, gene expression, mobilization of repair proteins, activation of cytokines and remodeling of cellular microenvironment are observed following exposure to high LET radiation. At low levels of exposure the communication of bioactive substances from irradiated to unirradiated "bystander" cells can amplify the damage and cause a significant deviation from linearity in dose vs. response relations. Under some circumstances, there is even a multigenerational delay in the expression of radiation-induced genetic damage (genomic instability) which is not strictly dose dependent. These issues and the experimental evidence derived from ground based experiments at particle

  17. Nucleosynthesis and the variation of fundamental couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Christian M.; Schaefer, Gregor; Wetterich, Christof

    2004-10-15

    We determine the influence of a variation of the fundamental 'constants' on the predicted helium abundance in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. The analytic estimate is performed in two parts: the first step determines the dependence of the helium abundance on the nuclear physics parameters, while the second step relates those parameters to the fundamental couplings of particle physics. This procedure can incorporate in a flexible way the time variation of several couplings within a grand unified theory while keeping the nuclear physics computation separate from any GUT model dependence.

  18. Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Jon M. Schwantes; Ralf Sudowe; Heino Nitsche; Darleane C. Hoffman

    2003-12-16

    A primary objective of this project is to study neutron capture cross sections for various stable and unstable isotopes that will contribute to the Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program by providing improved data for modeling and interpretation of nuclear device performance. The information obtained will also be important in astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis. During this reporting period, the emphasis has been on preparing a radioactive target of {sup 155}Eu (half-life = 4.7 years), and several stable targets, including isotopically separated {sup 154}Sm, {sup 151}Eu, and {sup 153}Eu. Measurements of their neutron capture cross sections will be conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). A suitable backing material (beryllium) for the targets has been selected after careful calculations of its contribution to the background of the measurements. In addition, a high voltage plating procedure has been developed and optimized. Stable targets of {sup 151}Eu and {sup 153}Eu and a target of natural Eu ({approx}50% {sup 151}Eu and {approx}50% {sup 153}Eu) have each been plated to a mass thickness of >1 mg/cm{sup 2} and delivered to the DANCE collaboration at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Natural Eu targets will be tested first to confirm that the target dimensions and backing are appropriate prior to performing measurements on the extremely valuable targets of separated isotopes. In order to prepare a target of the radioactive {sup 155}Eu, it must first be separated from the {sup 154}Sm target material that was irradiated in a very high neutron flux of 1.5x1015 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/s for 50 days. The reaction is {sup 154}Sm (n,f){sup 155}Sm (half-life = 22 minutes) {sup 155}Eu. Considerable progress has been made in developing a suitable high-yield and high-purity separation method for separating Eu from targets

  19. The stabilization of unstable detonation waves for the mixture of nitromethane/methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utkin, A. V.; Koldunov, S. A.; Mochalova, V. M.; Torunov, S. I.; Lapin, S. M.

    2015-11-01

    Using a laser interferometer VISAR the measurements of the particle velocity profiles in detonation waves for nitromethane/methanol mixtures with additions of a sensitizer diethylenetriamine were conducted. It is shown that the detonation front in a mixture of nitromethane/methanol is unstable and sensitizer is an effective method for the flow stabilization. If the diluent concentration is less than 10%, the detonation front is stabilized by adding of 1% diethylenetriamine. At higher concentrations of methanol, the sensitizer does not reject instability, but the amplitude of oscillations decreases in several times. An increase of the limit concentration of methanol at the addition of diethylenetriamine to the mixture was found.

  20. Fundamental "Uncertainty" in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichl, Linda E.

    The conference on "Uncertainty and Surprise" was concerned with our fundamental inability to predict future events. How can we restructure organizations to effectively function in an uncertain environment? One concern is that many large complex organizations are built on mechanical models, but mechanical models cannot always respond well to "surprises." An underlying assumption a bout mechanical models is that, if we give them enough information about the world, they will know the future accurately enough that there will be few or no surprises. The assumption is that the future is basically predictable and deterministic.

  1. Fundamental experiments in velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Matthew Ellsworth; Hull, Larry; Shinas, Michael

    2009-01-01

    One can understand what velocimetry does and does not measure by understanding a few fundamental experiments. Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) is an interferometer that will produce fringe shifts when the length of one of the legs changes, so we might expect the fringes to change whenever the distance from the probe to the target changes. However, by making PDV measurements of tilted moving surfaces, we have shown that fringe shifts from diffuse surfaces are actually measured only from the changes caused by the component of velocity along the beam. This is an important simplification in the interpretation of PDV results, arising because surface roughness randomizes the scattered phases.

  2. Fundamentals of electrokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, M. W.

    The study of electrokinetics is a very mature field. Experimental studies date from the early 1800s, and acceptable theoretical analyses have existed since the early 1900s. The use of electrokinetics in practical field problems is more recent, but it is still quite mature. Most developments in the fundamental understanding of electrokinetics are in the colloid science literature. A significant and increasing divergence between the theoretical understanding of electrokinetics found in the colloid science literature and the theoretical analyses used in interpreting applied experimental studies in soil science and waste remediation has developed. The soil science literature has to date restricted itself to the use of very early theories, with their associated limitations. The purpose of this contribution is to review fundamental aspects of electrokinetic phenomena from a colloid science viewpoint. It is hoped that a bridge can be built between the two branches of the literature, from which both will benefit. Attention is paid to special topics such as the effects of overlapping double layers, applications in unsaturated soils, the influence of dispersivity, and the differences between electrokinetic theory and conductivity theory.

  3. Fundamentals of Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, Paul M.

    2008-07-01

    Preface; 1. Basic concepts; 2. The Vlasov, two-fluid, and MHD models of plasma dynamics; 3. Motion of a single plasma particle; 4. Elementary plasma waves; 5. Streaming instabilities and the Landau problem; 6. Cold plasma waves in a magnetized plasma; 7. Waves in inhomogeneous plasmas and wave energy relations; 8. Vlasov theory of warm electrostatic waves in a magnetized plasma; 9. MHD equilibria; 10. Stability of static MHD equilibria; 11. Magnetic helicity interpreted and Woltjer-Taylor relaxation; 12. Magnetic reconnection; 13. Fokker-Planck theory of collisions; 14. Wave-particle nonlinearities; 15. Wave-wave nonlinearities; 16. Non-neutral plasmas; 17. Dusty plasmas; Appendix A. Intuitive method for vector calculus identities; Appendix B. Vector calculus in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates; Appendix C. Frequently used physical constants and formulae; Bibliography; References; Index.

  4. Fundamentals of Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrie, William

    1997-10-01

    This unique textbook presents a comprehensive overview of the fundamental principles of geophysics. Unlike most geophysics textbooks, it combines both the applied and theoretical aspects to the subject. The author explains complex geophysical concepts using abundant diagrams, a simplified mathematical treatment, and easy-to-follow equations. After placing the Earth in the context of the solar system, he describes each major branch of geophysics: gravitation, seismology, dating, thermal and electrical properties, geomagnetism, paleomagnetism and geodynamics. Each chapter begins with a summary of the basic physical principles, and a brief account of each topic's historical evolution. The book will satisfy the needs of intermediate-level earth science students from a variety of backgrounds, while at the same time preparing geophysics majors for continued study at a higher level.

  5. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  6. Fundamentals in Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basdevant, Jean-Louis, Rich, James, Spiro, Michael

    This course on nuclear physics leads the reader to the exploration of the field from nuclei to astrophysical issues. Much nuclear phenomenology can be understood from simple arguments such as those based on the Pauli principle and the Coulomb barrier. This book is concerned with extrapolating from such arguments and illustrating nuclear systematics with experimental data. Starting with the basic concepts in nuclear physics, nuclear models, and reactions, the book covers nuclear decays and the fundamental electro-weak interactions, radioactivity, and nuclear energy. After the discussions of fission and fusion leading into nuclear astrophysics, there is a presentation of the latest ideas about cosmology. As a primer this course will lay the foundations for more specialized subjects. This book emerged from a series of topical courses the authors delivered at the Ecole Polytechnique and will be useful for graduate students and for scientists in a variety of fields.

  7. Fundamentals of zoological scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Herbert

    1982-01-01

    Most introductory physics courses emphasize highly idealized problems with unique well-defined answers. Though many textbooks complement these problems with estimation problems, few books present anything more than an elementary discussion of scaling. This paper presents some fundamentals of scaling in the zoological domain—a domain complex by any standard, but one also well suited to illustrate the power of very simple physical ideas. We consider the following animal characteristics: skeletal weight, speed of running, height and range of jumping, food consumption, heart rate, lifetime, locomotive efficiency, frequency of wing flapping, and maximum sizes of animals that fly and hover. These relationships are compared to zoological data and everyday experience, and match reasonably well.

  8. Relevant signs of stable and unstable thoracolumbar vertebral column trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Gehweiler, J.A.; Daffner, R.H.; Osborne, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    One-hundred and seventeen patients with acute thoracolumbar vertebral column fracture or fracture-dislocations were analyzed and classified into stable (36%) and unstable (64%). Eight helpful roentgen signs were observed that may serve to direct attention to serious underlying, often occult, fractures and dislocations. The changes fall into four principal groups: abnormal soft tissues, abnormal vertebral alignment, abnormal joints, and widened vertebral canal. All stable and unstable lesions showed abnormal soft tissues, while 70% demonstrated kyphosis and/or scoliosis, and an abnormal adjacent intervertebral disk space. All unstable lesions showed one or more of the following signs: displaced vertebra, widened interspinous space, abnormal apophyseal joint(s), and widened vertebral canal.

  9. Spectroscopic signature of the transition in a tunneling mechanism from the instanton path to a complexified stable-unstable manifold

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kin'ya; Ikeda, Kensuke S.

    2009-05-15

    In multidimensional barrier tunneling, there exist different semiclassical mechanisms, i.e., the well-established instanton mechanism and the recently discovered mechanism utilizing complexified stable-unstable manifolds as the guide of tunneling paths. We demonstrate that the transition between the two mechanisms can be observed as a remarkable change in the spectrum of tunneled particles and propose a practical method to evaluate the tunneling rates of the two mechanisms.

  10. Detecting unstable periodic orbits from transient chaotic time series

    PubMed

    Dhamala; Lai; Kostelich

    2000-06-01

    We address the detection of unstable periodic orbits from experimentally measured transient chaotic time series. In particular, we examine recurrence times of trajectories in the vector space reconstructed from an ensemble of such time series. Numerical experiments demonstrate that this strategy can yield periodic orbits of low periods even when noise is present. We analyze the probability of finding periodic orbits from transient chaotic time series and derive a scaling law for this probability. The scaling law implies that unstable periodic orbits of high periods are practically undetectable from transient chaos.

  11. Flame spectra of solid propellants during unstable combustion.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisel, J. L.; Ryan, N. W.; Baer, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The spectral and temporal details of the flames of a series of ammonium perchlorate-polyurethane propellants during both unstable and stable combustion were observed experimentally. A 400-scan per second optical spectrometer operating in the middle infrared region was used. During unstable combustion at low ratios of chamber free volume to nozzle throat area, three different frequencies were observed simultaneously. These were attributable to at least two mechanisms. During stable combustion periodic fluctuations in flame temperature and composition were also observed. Some aspects of theory of bulk mode instability were confirmed, but the assumptions of constant flame temperature and constant composition were found to be inaccurate.

  12. Quasi-stadium laser diodes with an unstable resonator condition.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Takehiro; Harayama, Takahisa; Davis, Peter; Vaccaro, Pablo O; Nishimura, Takehiro; Aida, Tahito

    2003-03-15

    We have observed lasing in a complicated eigenmode of a quasi-stadium laser diode with an unstable resonator consisting of two curved end mirrors obeying an unstable resonator condition and two straight sidewall mirrors. The laser was fabricated by application of a reactive-ion-etching technique to a molecular beam epitaxy-grown graded-index separate-confinement heterostructure single-quantum-well GaAs/AlGaAs structure. The far-field pattern shows that the lasing mode corresponds to the complicated lowest-loss mode obtained numerically by an extended Fox-Li method. PMID:12659262

  13. Modes of unstable resonators with a saturable gain guide.

    PubMed

    Denchev, O; Kurtev, S; Petrov, P

    2001-02-20

    We investigate theoretically gain-guided modes in unstable resonators with a uniformly reflective mirror in the area of highly efficient steady-state lasers, where the gain saturation is the main efficiency factorly. We achieved self-consistent Hermite-Gaussian modes at significant gain saturation as well as the connection of the mode's scaling factor and mode amplitude coefficients with the system parameters by using complex paraxial wave optics. A new stabilization mechanism, saturation guiding, works together with gain guiding in unstable resonators. We obtained more actual results for mode generation and selection by integrating the laser rate equation. PMID:18357074

  14. Ray-wave correspondence in an unstable quasistadium laser resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Takehiro; Harayama, Takahisa; Wiersig, Jan

    2006-02-15

    The relation between unstable periodic orbits and resonator modes in a fully chaotic open-sided two-dimensional laser resonator is theoretically investigated in the short wavelength limit. We derive a periodic-orbit-sum formula for eigenvalues of the resonator modes by applying the semiclassical approximation to the extended Fox-Li mode calculation method. With this formula, we show that the complicated wavelength dependence of the power-coupling coefficients of the fully chaotic quasi-stadium laser resonator can be explained by a few kinds of unstable periodic orbits.

  15. Ray-transfer-matrix approach to unstable resonator analysis.

    PubMed

    Ewanizky, T F

    1979-03-01

    A parametric analysis of unstable resonators is described. The resonator is mathematically represented by an appropriate ray-transfer-matrix, and changes in Gaussian beam parameters are calculated after propagation through the optical structure. The results highlight an inherent selective property that presents an effective loss mechanism for divergent radiation. This selective property is shown to be dependent on the resonator parameters of optical magnification and confocal length error. The analysis concludes that the initially backward-propagating radiation during the prelasing period is important in establishing low threshold and good beam quality in confocal unstable-resonator lasers. PMID:20208805

  16. Output coupler design of unstable cavities for excimer lasers.

    PubMed

    Giuri, C; Perrone, M R; Piccinno, V

    1997-02-20

    We tested the performance of a XeCl laser with unstable resonators using as an output coupler a phase unifying (PU) mirror, a super-Gaussian mirror, and a hard-edge mirror. The quantitative impact of the output coupler design on the energy extraction efficiency, near-field profile, far-field energy distribution, and spatial coherence time evolution has been investigated. Laser beams of larger brightness have been obtained with the PU unstable cavity. A faster growth of the laser beam spatial coherence has been observed with the PU cavity by time-resolved, far-field measurements. PMID:18250783

  17. Application of parameter estimation to highly unstable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, R. E.; Murray, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The application of parameter estimation to highly unstable aircraft is discussed. Included are a discussion of the problems in applying the output error method to such aircraft and demonstrates that the filter error method eliminates these problems. The paper shows that the maximum likelihood estimator with no process noise does not reduce to the output error method when the system is unstable. It also proposes and demonstrates an ad hoc method that is similar in form to the filter error method, but applicable to nonlinear problems. Flight data from the X-29 forward-swept-wing demonstrator is used to illustrate the problems and methods discussed.

  18. Ultrastructural studies of unstable angina in living man

    SciTech Connect

    Gotlieb, A.I.; Freeman, M.R.; Salerno, T.A.; Lichtenstein, S.V.; Armstrong, P.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Nineteen patients with refractory unstable angina who were undergoing aortocoronary bypass were studied to assess the extent of platelet aggregation present in the microvasculature. Ultrastructural findings on the morphology of cardiac muscle and microvasculature were correlated with the findings on coronary angiograms and thallium scans. There were no significant correlations. The presence of platelet aggregates was identified in four biopsies, two of which had thrombus by angiographic criteria. Biopsy in areas with thallium defects revealed an increased prevalence of white blood cells without acute myocardial infarction. This study confirms the presence of platelet aggregates in patients with unstable angina, albeit at a reduced frequency when compared with autopsy studies.

  19. Fundamental Physics Explored with High Intensity Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, T.; Homma, K.

    2012-10-01

    Over the last century the method of particle acceleration to high energies has become the prime approach to explore the fundamental nature of matter in laboratory. It appears that the latest search of the contemporary accelerator based on the colliders shows a sign of saturation (or at least a slow-down) in increasing its energy and other necessary parameters to extend this frontier. We suggest two pronged approach enabled by the recent progress in high intensity lasers. First we envision the laser-driven plasma accelerator may be able to extend the reach of the collider. For this approach to bear fruit, we need to develop the technology of high averaged power laser in addition to the high intensity. For this we mention that the latest research effort of ICAN is an encouraging sign. In addition to this, we now introduce the concept of the noncollider paradigm in exploring fundamental physics with high intensity (and large energy) lasers. One of the examples we mention is the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) far beyond TeV without large luminosity. If we relax or do not require the large luminosity necessary for colliders, but solely in ultrahigh energy frontier, we are still capable of exploring such a fundamental issue. Given such a high energetic particle source and high-intensity laser fields simultaneously, we expect to be able to access new aspects on the matter and the vacuum structure from fundamental physical point of views. LWFA naturally exploits the nonlinear optical effects in the plasma when it becomes of relativistic intensity. Normally nonlinear optical effects are discussed based upon polarization susceptibility of matter to external fields. We suggest application of this concept even to the vacuum structure as a new kind of order parameter to discuss vacuum-originating phenomena at semimacroscopic scales. This viewpoint unifies the following observables with the unprecedented experimental environment we envision; the dispersion relation of

  20. Exotic particles with four or more quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Stephen Lars

    2014-09-01

    The familiar denizens of the particle zoo are made of two or three quarks, but particle theory allows for states comprising any number of those fundamental particles. Finally, after decades of searching, tetraquarks seem to have been spotted.

  1. Overlay accuracy fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Daniel; Levinski, Vladimir; Sapiens, Noam; Cohen, Guy; Amit, Eran; Klein, Dana; Vakshtein, Irina

    2012-03-01

    Currently, the performance of overlay metrology is evaluated mainly based on random error contributions such as precision and TIS variability. With the expected shrinkage of the overlay metrology budget to < 0.5nm, it becomes crucial to include also systematic error contributions which affect the accuracy of the metrology. Here we discuss fundamental aspects of overlay accuracy and a methodology to improve accuracy significantly. We identify overlay mark imperfections and their interaction with the metrology technology, as the main source of overlay inaccuracy. The most important type of mark imperfection is mark asymmetry. Overlay mark asymmetry leads to a geometrical ambiguity in the definition of overlay, which can be ~1nm or less. It is shown theoretically and in simulations that the metrology may enhance the effect of overlay mark asymmetry significantly and lead to metrology inaccuracy ~10nm, much larger than the geometrical ambiguity. The analysis is carried out for two different overlay metrology technologies: Imaging overlay and DBO (1st order diffraction based overlay). It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of DBO to overlay mark asymmetry is larger than the sensitivity of imaging overlay. Finally, we show that a recently developed measurement quality metric serves as a valuable tool for improving overlay metrology accuracy. Simulation results demonstrate that the accuracy of imaging overlay can be improved significantly by recipe setup optimized using the quality metric. We conclude that imaging overlay metrology, complemented by appropriate use of measurement quality metric, results in optimal overlay accuracy.

  2. Auroral particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-01-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  3. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Adrie J. J.

    2011-05-01

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  4. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, Adrie J. J.

    2011-05-05

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  5. Mathematical modeling of transformation process of structurally unstable magnetic configurations into structurally stable ones in two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inovenkov, Igor; Echkina, Eugenia; Ponomarenko, Loubov

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process in astrophysical, space and laboratory plasma. In essence, it represents a change of topology of the magnetic field caused by readjustment of the structure of the magnetic field lines. This change leads to release of energy accumulated in the field. We consider transformation process of structurally unstable magnetic configurations into the structurally steady ones from the point of view of the сatastrophe theory. Special attention is paid to modeling of evolution of the structurally unstable three-dimensional magnetic fields.

  6. Kinetic Simulations of the Lowest-order Unstable Mode of Relativistic Magnetostatic Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Zrake, Jonathan; Yuan, Yajie; East, William E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of particle-in-cell numerical pair plasma simulations of relativistic two-dimensional magnetostatic equilibria known as the “Arnold–Beltrami–Childress” fields. In particular, we focus on the lowest-order unstable configuration consisting of two minima and two maxima of the magnetic vector potential. Breaking of the initial symmetry leads to exponential growth of the electric energy and to the formation of two current layers, which is consistent with the picture of “X-point collapse” first described by Syrovatskii. Magnetic reconnection within the layers heats a fraction of particles to very high energies. After the saturation of the linear instability, the current layers are disrupted and the system evolves chaotically, diffusing the particle energies in a stochastic second-order Fermi process, leading to the formation of power-law energy distributions. The power-law slopes harden with the increasing mean magnetization, but they are significantly softer than those produced in simulations initiated from Harris-type layers. The maximum particle energy is proportional to the mean magnetization, which is attributed partly to the increase of the effective electric field and partly to the increase of the acceleration timescale. We describe in detail the evolving structure of the dynamical current layers and report on the conservation of magnetic helicity. These results can be applied to highly magnetized astrophysical environments, where ideal plasma instabilities trigger rapid magnetic dissipation with efficient particle acceleration and flares of high-energy radiation.

  7. Kinetic Simulations of the Lowest-order Unstable Mode of Relativistic Magnetostatic Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Zrake, Jonathan; Yuan, Yajie; East, William E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of particle-in-cell numerical pair plasma simulations of relativistic two-dimensional magnetostatic equilibria known as the “Arnold-Beltrami-Childress” fields. In particular, we focus on the lowest-order unstable configuration consisting of two minima and two maxima of the magnetic vector potential. Breaking of the initial symmetry leads to exponential growth of the electric energy and to the formation of two current layers, which is consistent with the picture of “X-point collapse” first described by Syrovatskii. Magnetic reconnection within the layers heats a fraction of particles to very high energies. After the saturation of the linear instability, the current layers are disrupted and the system evolves chaotically, diffusing the particle energies in a stochastic second-order Fermi process, leading to the formation of power-law energy distributions. The power-law slopes harden with the increasing mean magnetization, but they are significantly softer than those produced in simulations initiated from Harris-type layers. The maximum particle energy is proportional to the mean magnetization, which is attributed partly to the increase of the effective electric field and partly to the increase of the acceleration timescale. We describe in detail the evolving structure of the dynamical current layers and report on the conservation of magnetic helicity. These results can be applied to highly magnetized astrophysical environments, where ideal plasma instabilities trigger rapid magnetic dissipation with efficient particle acceleration and flares of high-energy radiation.

  8. Mirage cosmology with an unstable probe D3-brane

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Dong Hyeok; Kim, Jin Young

    2005-10-15

    We consider the mirage cosmology by an unstable probe brane whose action is represented by Dirac-Born-Infeld action with tachyon. We study how the presence of tachyon affects the evolution of the brane inflation. At the early stage of the brane inflation, the tachyon kinetic term can play an important role in curing the superluminal expansion in mirage cosmology.

  9. Characterization of Unstable Rock Slopes Through Passive Seismic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinbrod, U.; Burjanek, J.; Fäh, D.

    2014-12-01

    Catastrophic rock slope failures have high social impact, causing significant damage to infrastructure and many casualties throughout the world each year. Both detection and characterization of rock instabilities are therefore of key importance. An analysis of ambient vibrations of unstable rock slopes might be a new alternative to the already existing methods, e.g. geotechnical displacement measurements. Systematic measurements have been performed recently in Switzerland to study the seismic response of potential rockslides concerning a broad class of slope failure mechanisms and material conditions. Small aperture seismic arrays were deployed at sites of interest for a short period of time (several hours) in order to record ambient vibrations. Each measurement setup included a reference station, which was installed on a stable part close to the instability. Recorded ground motion is highly directional in the unstable parts of the rock slope, and significantly amplified with respect to stable areas. These effects are strongest at certain frequencies, which were identified as eigenfrequencies of the unstable rock mass. In most cases the directions of maximum amplification are perpendicular to open cracks and in good agreement with the deformation directions obtained by geodetic measurements. Such unique signatures might improve our understanding of slope structure and stability. Thus we link observed vibration characteristics with available results of detailed geological characterization. This is supported by numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation in fractured media with complex topography.For example, a potential relation between eigenfrequencies and unstable rock mass volume is investigated.

  10. RAYLEIGH–TAYLOR UNSTABLE FLAMES—FAST OR FASTER?

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, E. P.

    2015-04-20

    Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) unstable flames play a key role in the explosions of supernovae Ia. However, the dynamics of these flames are still not well understood. RT unstable flames are affected by both the RT instability of the flame front and by RT-generated turbulence. The coexistence of these factors complicates the choice of flame speed subgrid models for full-star Type Ia simulations. Both processes can stretch and wrinkle the flame surface, increasing its area and, therefore, the burning rate. In past research, subgrid models have been based on either the RT instability or turbulence setting the flame speed. We evaluate both models, checking their assumptions and their ability to correctly predict the turbulent flame speed. Specifically, we analyze a large parameter study of 3D direct numerical simulations of RT unstable model flames. This study varies both the simulation domain width and the gravity in order to probe a wide range of flame behaviors. We show that RT unstable flames are different from traditional turbulent flames: they are thinner rather than thicker when turbulence is stronger. We also show that none of the several different types of turbulent flame speed models accurately predicts measured flame speeds. In addition, we find that the RT flame speed model only correctly predicts the measured flame speed in a certain parameter regime. Finally, we propose that the formation of cusps may be the factor causing the flame to propagate more quickly than predicted by the RT model.

  11. Rayleigh-Taylor Unstable Flames -- Fast or Faster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, E. P.

    2015-04-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable flames play a key role in the explosions of supernovae Ia. However, the dynamics of these flames are still not well understood. RT unstable flames are affected by both the RT instability of the flame front and by RT-generated turbulence. The coexistence of these factors complicates the choice of flame speed subgrid models for full-star Type Ia simulations. Both processes can stretch and wrinkle the flame surface, increasing its area and, therefore, the burning rate. In past research, subgrid models have been based on either the RT instability or turbulence setting the flame speed. We evaluate both models, checking their assumptions and their ability to correctly predict the turbulent flame speed. Specifically, we analyze a large parameter study of 3D direct numerical simulations of RT unstable model flames. This study varies both the simulation domain width and the gravity in order to probe a wide range of flame behaviors. We show that RT unstable flames are different from traditional turbulent flames: they are thinner rather than thicker when turbulence is stronger. We also show that none of the several different types of turbulent flame speed models accurately predicts measured flame speeds. In addition, we find that the RT flame speed model only correctly predicts the measured flame speed in a certain parameter regime. Finally, we propose that the formation of cusps may be the factor causing the flame to propagate more quickly than predicted by the RT model.

  12. Theoretical analysis of stable and unstable aspherical laser cavities.

    PubMed

    Chao, S H; Shealy, D L

    1988-01-01

    The low- order resonant modes of the stable and unstable aspherical resonators are studied by the Fox- Li method. An integral equation is given with which the effect of varying the aspherical cavity surface parameters on the field distribution, the energy loss and the intensity profile have been studied. PMID:20523548

  13. Self-Collimating Unstable-Resonator Diode Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed unstable-resonator diode lasers produce solid, collimated output beams without external collimating optics. Simpler to construct, used as pumps for optical-fiber amplifiers in telecommunications, for other solid-state lasers, and sources of light for free-space communications.

  14. Stabilizing control for a class of delay unstable processes.

    PubMed

    Lee, See Chek; Wang, Qing-Guo; Nguyen, Le Binh

    2010-07-01

    The stabilization of unstable first-order plus time-delay processes with a zero by means of simple controllers is investigated in detail. Explicit stabilizability conditions are established. And the computational methods for determining stabilizing controller parameters are also presented with illustrative examples.

  15. Neuromuscular adjustments of gait associated with unstable conditions.

    PubMed

    Martino, G; Ivanenko, Y P; d'Avella, A; Serrao, M; Ranavolo, A; Draicchio, F; Cappellini, G; Casali, C; Lacquaniti, F

    2015-11-01

    A compact description of coordinated muscle activity is provided by the factorization of electromyographic (EMG) signals. With the use of this approach, it has consistently been shown that multimuscle activity during human locomotion can be accounted for by four to five modules, each one comprised of a basic pattern timed at a different phase of gait cycle and the weighting coefficients of synergistic muscle activations. These modules are flexible, in so far as the timing of patterns and the amplitude of weightings can change as a function of gait speed and mode. Here we consider the adjustments of the locomotor modules related to unstable walking conditions. We compared three different conditions, i.e., locomotion of healthy subjects on slippery ground (SL) and on narrow beam (NB) and of cerebellar ataxic (CA) patients on normal ground. Motor modules were computed from the EMG signals of 12 muscles of the right lower limb using non-negative matrix factorization. The unstable gait of SL, NB, and CA showed significant changes compared with controls in the stride length, stride width, range of angular motion, and trunk oscillations. In most subjects of all three unstable conditions, >70% of the overall variation of EMG waveforms was accounted for by four modules that were characterized by a widening of muscle activity patterns. This suggests that the nervous system adopts the strategy of prolonging the duration of basic muscle activity patterns to cope with unstable conditions resulting from either slippery ground, reduced support surface, or pathology. PMID:26378199

  16. Eigenfields and output beams of an unstable Bessel-Gauss resonator.

    PubMed

    Ling, Dongxiong; Li, Chongguang; Li, Junchang

    2006-06-10

    We evaluate the eigenfields of an unstable Bessel-Gauss resonator (UBGR) by use of the transfer-matrix method in which the transverse profiles and their corresponding losses of the UBGR are considered as the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of a transfer matrix so that the dominant mode fields and their losses of the UBGR can be readily extracted in terms of the matrix eigenvalue algorithm. Moreover, based on the eigenfields across two mirrors that resulted from the transfer-matrix method, we simulate the field distributions in the cavity and the propagation of output beams by means of the angular spectrum method. The computation results show that the UBGR easily produces a fundamental Bessel-Gauss mode of good quality, and the output beams retain the original Bessel-Gauss distribution during propagation. PMID:16761051

  17. A novel approach to modeling unstable EOR displacements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, E.J.

    1994-04-01

    Most enhanced oil recovery schemes involve the displacement of a more dense and more viscous oil by a less dense and less viscous fluid in a heterogeneous porous medium. The interaction of heterogeneity with the several competing forces, namely, viscous, capillary, gravitational, and dispersive forces, can conspire to make the displacements unstable and difficult to model and to predict. The objective of this research was to develop a systematic methodology for modeling unstable fluid displacements in heterogeneous media. Flow visualization experiments were conducted using X-ray computed tomography imaging and a video imaging workstation to gain insights into the dynamics of unstable displacements, acquire detailed quantitative experimental image data for calibrating numerical models of unstable displacements, and image and characterize heterogeneities in laboratory cores geostatistically. High-resolution numerical models modified for use on vector-architecture supercomputers were used to replicate the image data. Geostatistical models of reservoir heterogeneity were incorporated in order to study the interaction of hydrodynamic instability and heterogeneity in reservoir displacements. Finally, a systematic methodology for matching the experimental data with the numerical models and scaling the laboratory results to other systems were developed. The result is a new method for predicting the performance of unstable EOR displacements in the field based on small-scale displacements in the laboratory. The methodology is general and can be applied to forecast the performance of most processes that involve fluid flow and transport in porous media. Therefore, this research should be of interest to those involved in forecasting the performance of enhanced oil recovery processes and the spreading of contaminants in heterogeneous aquifers.

  18. Fundamentals of Space Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, Gilles

    2005-03-01

    A total of more than 240 human space flights have been completed to date, involving about 450 astronauts from various countries, for a combined total presence in space of more than 70 years. The seventh long-duration expedition crew is currently in residence aboard the International Space Station, continuing a permanent presence in space that began in October 2000. During that time, investigations have been conducted on both humans and animal models to study the bone demineralization and muscle deconditioning, space motion sickness, the causes and possible treatment of postflight orthostatic intolerance, the changes in immune function, crew and crew-ground interactions, and the medical issues of living in a space environment, such as the effects of radiation or the risk of developing kidney stones. Some results of these investigations have led to fundamental discoveries about the adaptation of the human body to the space environment. Gilles Clément has been active in this research. This readable text presents the findings from the life science experiments conducted during and after space missions. Topics discussed in this book include: adaptation of sensory-motor, cardio-vascular, bone, and muscle systems to the microgravity of spaceflight; psychological and sociological issues of living in a confined, isolated, and stressful environment; operational space medicine, such as crew selection, training and in-flight health monitoring, countermeasures and support; results of space biology experiments on individual cells, plants, and animal models; and the impact of long-duration missions such as the human mission to Mars. The author also provides a detailed description of how to fly a space experiment, based on his own experience with research projects conducted onboard Salyut-7, Mir, Spacelab, and the Space Shuttle. Now is the time to look at the future of human spaceflight and what comes next. The future human exploration of Mars captures the imagination of both the

  19. Fundamentals of Space Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, G.

    2003-10-01

    As of today, a total of more than 240 human space flights have been completed, involving about 450 astronauts from various countries, for a combined total presence in space of more than 70 years. The seventh long-duration expedition crew is currently in residence aboard the International Space Station, continuing a permanent presence in space that began in October 2000. During that time, investigations have been conducted on both humans and animal models to study the bone demineralization and muscle deconditioning, space motion sickness, the causes and possible treatment of postflight orthostatic intolerance, the changes in immune function, crew and crew-ground interactions, and the medical issues of living in a space environment, such as the effects of radiation or the risk of developing kidney stones. Some results of these investigations have led to fundamental discoveries about the adaptation of the human body to the space environment. Gilles Clément has been active in this research. This book presents in a readable text the findings from the life science experiments conducted during and after space missions. Topics discussed in this book include: adaptation of sensory-motor, cardiovascular, bone and muscle systems to the microgravity of spaceflight; psychological and sociological issues of living in a confined, isolated and stressful environment; operational space medicine, such as crew selection, training and in-flight health monitoring, countermeasures and support; results of space biology experiments on individual cells, plants, and animal models; and the impact of long-duration missions such as the human mission to Mars. The author also provides a detailed description of how to fly a space experiment, based on his own experience with research projects conducted onboard Salyut-7, Mir, Spacelab, and the Space Shuttle. Now is the time to look at the future of human spaceflight and what comes next. The future human exploration of Mars captures the imagination

  20. Fundamentals of phosphate transfer.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Anthony J; Nome, Faruk

    2015-07-21

    Historically, the chemistry of phosphate transfer-a class of reactions fundamental to the chemistry of Life-has been discussed almost exclusively in terms of the nucleophile and the leaving group. Reactivity always depends significantly on both factors; but recent results for reactions of phosphate triesters have shown that it can also depend strongly on the nature of the nonleaving or "spectator" groups. The extreme stabilities of fully ionised mono- and dialkyl phosphate esters can be seen as extensions of the same effect, with one or two triester OR groups replaced by O(-). Our chosen lead reaction is hydrolysis-phosphate transfer to water: because water is the medium in which biological chemistry takes place; because the half-life of a system in water is an accepted basic index of stability; and because the typical mechanisms of hydrolysis, with solvent H2O providing specific molecules to act as nucleophiles and as general acids or bases, are models for reactions involving better nucleophiles and stronger general species catalysts. Not least those available in enzyme active sites. Alkyl monoester dianions compete with alkyl diester monoanions for the slowest estimated rates of spontaneous hydrolysis. High stability at physiological pH is a vital factor in the biological roles of organic phosphates, but a significant limitation for experimental investigations. Almost all kinetic measurements of phosphate transfer reactions involving mono- and diesters have been followed by UV-visible spectroscopy using activated systems, conveniently compounds with good leaving groups. (A "good leaving group" OR* is electron-withdrawing, and can be displaced to generate an anion R*O(-) in water near pH 7.) Reactivities at normal temperatures of P-O-alkyl derivatives-better models for typical biological substrates-have typically had to be estimated: by extended extrapolation from linear free energy relationships, or from rate measurements at high temperatures. Calculation is free

  1. Maximum Entropy Fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harremoeës, P.; Topsøe, F.

    2001-09-01

    In its modern formulation, the Maximum Entropy Principle was promoted by E.T. Jaynes, starting in the mid-fifties. The principle dictates that one should look for a distribution, consistent with available information, which maximizes the entropy. However, this principle focuses only on distributions and it appears advantageous to bring information theoretical thinking more prominently into play by also focusing on the "observer" and on coding. This view was brought forward by the second named author in the late seventies and is the view we will follow-up on here. It leads to the consideration of a certain game, the Code Length Game and, via standard game theoretical thinking, to a principle of Game Theoretical Equilibrium. This principle is more basic than the Maximum Entropy Principle in the sense that the search for one type of optimal strategies in the Code Length Game translates directly into the search for distributions with maximum entropy. In the present paper we offer a self-contained and comprehensive treatment of fundamentals of both principles mentioned, based on a study of the Code Length Game. Though new concepts and results are presented, the reading should be instructional and accessible to a rather wide audience, at least if certain mathematical details are left aside at a rst reading. The most frequently studied instance of entropy maximization pertains to the Mean Energy Model which involves a moment constraint related to a given function, here taken to represent "energy". This type of application is very well known from the literature with hundreds of applications pertaining to several different elds and will also here serve as important illustration of the theory. But our approach reaches further, especially regarding the study of continuity properties of the entropy function, and this leads to new results which allow a discussion of models with so-called entropy loss. These results have tempted us to speculate over the development of natural

  2. Measurement and Fundamental Processes in Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Gregg

    2015-07-01

    In the standard mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics, measurement is an additional, exceptional fundamental process rather than an often complex, but ordinary process which happens also to serve a particular epistemic function: during a measurement of one of its properties which is not already determined by a preceding measurement, a measured system, even if closed, is taken to change its state discontinuously rather than continuously as is usual. Many, including Bell, have been concerned about the fundamental role thus given to measurement in the foundation of the theory. Others, including the early Bohr and Schwinger, have suggested that quantum mechanics naturally incorporates the unavoidable uncontrollable disturbance of physical state that accompanies any local measurement without the need for an exceptional fundamental process or a special measurement theory. Disturbance is unanalyzable for Bohr, but for Schwinger it is due to physical interactions' being borne by fundamental particles having discrete properties and behavior which is beyond physical control. Here, Schwinger's approach is distinguished from more well known treatments of measurement, with the conclusion that, unlike most, it does not suffer under Bell's critique of quantum measurement. Finally, Schwinger's critique of measurement theory is explicated as a call for a deeper investigation of measurement processes that requires the use of a theory of quantum fields.

  3. Landing on an Unstable Surface Decreases ACL Biomechanical Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Rebecca; Malone, Maria; Swank, Kat; Andrews, Rob; Braun, Hillary J.; Slider, Amy; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Quadriceps dominant athletes are at a higher risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries because they lack sufficient hamstring activation resulting in a higher Quadricips: hamstring ratio. Muscular co-contraction (low Q:H) is needed to protect the intra-articular structures of the knee. Exercises that promote co-contraction and proprioception have been shown to reduce quadriceps dominance, enhance knee stability and alter neuromuscular firing patterns. The purpose of this investigation was to examine whether landing on an unstable surface (Bosu Ball) induced a greater amount of co-contraction at the knee compared to a stable surface. Methods: Thirty-one Division I NCAA female athletes performed 3 single leg drop jumps per leg on 2 surfaces. Subjects dropped from a 30 cm step first onto the floor (stable surface), and onto a Bosu ball (unstable surface). Each landing was held for a minimum of 2 seconds. Subjects were familiar with Bosu ball training. Muscle activity of the lateral hamstring and vastus lateralis were used to estimate peak hamstring activity and the Quadriceps:Hamstring (Q:H) co-contraction ratio at the time of peak quadriceps activity. Kinematic data were also collected (Vicon) and used to evaluate the following peak measurements: knee flexion angle, hip flexion angle, and trunk flexion and sway angles (Visual3D). All variables were assessed between the time of landing and the end of deceleration. A 1-level ANOVA was used to test for significant differences across the sports in for each variable of interest. Significance was set at p<0.05. Results: Max co-contraction (Q:H) was significantly reduced when athletes landed on an unstable surface (45% lower, p<0.01 Table 1, Figure 1A) compared to the stable surface. Peak hamstring activity was higher when landing on an unstable surface (15% higher, p=0.05, Table 1) compared to a stable surface. Peak knee flexion angles were 21% greater when athletes landed on a stable surface compared

  4. Measurement and analysis of an unstable model rocket combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisco, James C.

    Experimental data from a longitudinally unstable uni-element model rocket combustor are analyzed using two levels of modeling. Linear acoustic model results showed that perfect acoustic coupling between the injector oxidizer tube and the combustion chamber is not necessary to produce unstable combustion. At a chamber length of 50.8 cm (20-in) perfect coupling was predicted at the chamber second longitudinal mode frequency, but tests were unstable at the first longitudinal mode. Linear growth rates were iteratively determined by fitting the output from a four-mode, longitudinal stability model including nonlinear gas dynamics to the temporal and spectral characteristics of measured pressure oscillations from a single unstable test. Results showed that both the first and second longitudinal modes must be linearly unstable. Acoustically induced vortex shedding was postulated as the driving instability mechanism in the experiment. Two modified experiments were designed: the first had a decreased injector face width, an assumed controlling geometry for the mechanism, and the other was outfitted with an array of point light emission measurements. Test data showed that the injector face width had a drastic influence on stability. At a chamber length of 25.4 cm (10-in) and injector face width of 0.76 cm (0.30-in) the magnitude of pressure oscillations increased to 40% of mean chamber pressure from 2% at a face width of 1.1 cm (0.43-in). Highly unstable tests showed distinct phase relationships between light emission and pressure and their spatial variation indicated the propagation of a light source. The location of combustion driving varied with chamber length. The oscillation decrement, a useful parameter for estimating stability margin from dynamic pressure, is described along with its application to full-scale test data. Four injector configurations shown to have noticeably different oscillation decrements were tested to verify the uni-element scaling methodology. The

  5. Strain Wave during the Transient Process of Fault Unstable Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Liu, L.

    2011-12-01

    The "stick-slip" model was proposed as an important mechanism for shallow-focus earthquakes. The study on the transient process of fault unstable slip failure is helpful for understanding the earthquake preparatory process, the mechanism of energy released, the precursor and after shake effect. Double shear frictional experiments are conducted for simulating "stick-slip" phenomenon, and a specially designed multi-channel super dynamic strain field observation system is employed to acquire dada continuously with the sample rate of 3,400 samples/second. The rock deformation process can be recorded in detail, especially in the moment of unstable slip (The unstable slip duration is less than two second in experiments). The strain results from super dynamic strain field observation system show that multi-frequency components and tremendous amplitude fluctuation are included in strain signals along the fault. There are three clear phases during the unstable slip progress: pre-slip (phase I), high-frequency strain vibration (phase II) and strain regulating to stop (phase III). Each phase has its own characteristics on duration, strain rate, frequency, amplitude and energy release. There are strong fluctuations in duration of approximately 70ms in phase II. The frequency and maximum amplitude are 300-400Hz and 150~300μɛ respectively. Main strain energy release takes place at phase II, less than one-tenth of the total slip time, so that the whole course of dislocation or stress drop would not be taken as earthquake simply at least in laboratory. The phase characteristic of the strain wave is probably its inherent attribute of unstable slip process and independent of dynamical loading conditions. The elastic rebound phenomena, considered as one classic earthquake generation model, can be observed clearly by analyzing the rotation of the principal strain axis with strain variation. The rotated angle ranges from 5° to 15° typically. The value and location of precursor slip

  6. Fundamentals of ICF Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M D

    2005-09-30

    On the Nova Laser at LLNL, we demonstrated many of the key elements required for assuring that the next laser, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will drive an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target to ignition. The indirect drive (sometimes referred to as ''radiation drive'') approach converts laser light to x-rays inside a gold cylinder, which then acts as an x-ray ''oven'' (called a hohlraum) to drive the fusion capsule in its center. On Nova we've demonstrated good understanding of the temperatures reached in hohlraums and of the ways to control the uniformity with which the x-rays drive the spherical fusion capsules. In these lectures we will be reviewing the physics of these laser heated hohlraums, recent attempts at optimizing their performance, and then return to the ICF problem in particular to discuss scaling of ICF gain with scale size, and to compare indirect vs. direct drive gains. In ICF, spherical capsules containing Deuterium and Tritium (DT)--the heavy isotopes of hydrogen--are imploded, creating conditions of high temperature and density similar to those in the cores of stars required for initiating the fusion reaction. When DT fuses an alpha particle (the nucleus of a helium atom) and a neutron are created releasing large amount amounts of energy. If the surrounding fuel is sufficiently dense, the alpha particles are stopped and can heat it, allowing a self-sustaining fusion burn to propagate radially outward and a high gain fusion micro-explosion ensues. To create those conditions the outer surface of the capsule is heated (either directly by a laser or indirectly by laser produced x-rays) to cause rapid ablation and outward expansion of the capsule material. A rocket-like reaction to that outward flowing heated material leads to an inward implosion of the remaining part of the capsule shell. The pressure generated on the outside of the capsule can reach nearly 100 megabar (100 million times atmospheric pressure [1b = 10{sup 6} cgs

  7. Piecewise - Parabolic Methods for Parallel Computation with Applications to Unstable Fluid Flow in 2 and 3 Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, P. R.

    2003-03-26

    This report summarizes the results of the project entitled, ''Piecewise-Parabolic Methods for Parallel Computation with Applications to Unstable Fluid Flow in 2 and 3 Dimensions'' This project covers a span of many years, beginning in early 1987. It has provided over that considerable period the core funding to my research activities in scientific computation at the University of Minnesota. It has supported numerical algorithm development, application of those algorithms to fundamental fluid dynamics problems in order to demonstrate their effectiveness, and the development of scientific visualization software and systems to extract scientific understanding from those applications.

  8. Lagrangian Coherent Structures in an Unstable Bottom Boundary Layer Under a Solitary Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Daniel; Jacobs, Gustaaf; Sadek, Mahmoud; Diamessis, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The role of Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) in fluid mixing is investigated in the unstable bottom boundary layer (BBL) under a solitary surface wave mimicked by a soliton-like pressure gradient driven flow in an oscillating water tunnel. The finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field, both backward in time and forward in time, is determined for a two-dimensional direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the unstable BBL from the development of the instability through the growth of the large scale transport structures. Attracting LCS are identified trailing the primary vortices that form moving separation surfaces which pick up material from the boundary and transport it into the primary vortices. Weaker, secondary separation surfaces form beneath smaller, secondary vortices. At a later time, the secondary vortices are absorbed by the primary vortices and the separation surfaces from the smaller vortices merge with the separation surfaces from the larger vortices. The primary vortices are the most significant sources of mixing between the near wall and outside the boundary layer, implying that the primary vortices are the physical mechanism for particle resuspension.

  9. Shape phase transition in odd-even nuclei: From spherical to deformed gamma-unstable shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Boeyuekata, M.; Alonso, C. E.; Arias, J. M.; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A.

    2010-07-15

    Shape phase transitions in odd-A nuclei are investigated within the framework of the interacting boson-fermion model. The case of a single j=9/2 fermion coupled to an even-even boson core is considered. This boson core transits from spherical to gamma-unstable shapes depending on the value of a control parameter in the boson Hamiltonian. The effect of the coupling of the odd particle to this core along the shape transition and, in particular, at the critical point is discussed. For that purpose, the ground-state energy surface in terms of the beta and gamma shape variables for the even core and odd-even energy surfaces for the different K states coming from j=9/2 are constructed. The evolution of each individual coupled state along the transition from the spherical [U(5)] to the gamma-unstable [O(6)] situation is investigated. One finds that the core-fermion coupling gives rise to a smoother transition than in the even-core case.

  10. Negative expansion of the myotonic dystrophy unstable sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Abeliovich, D.; Lerer, I.; Pashut-Lavon, I.; Shmueli, E. ); Raas-Rothschild, A.; Frydman, M. )

    1993-06-01

    The authors have analyzed the unstable fragment of the myotonic dystrophy (DM) gene in a pregnancy at 50% risk for DM. The affected father in this family had a 3.0-kb expansion of the DM unstable region. The fetus inherited the mutated gene, but with an expansion of 0.5 kb. This case represented a counseling problem in light of the absence of data concerning [open quotes]negative expansion[close quotes]. Analysis of the DM gene in 17 families with 72 affected individuals revealed four more cases of negative expansions, all of them in paternal transmissions. The possible significance of this finding is discussed. 21 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Traveling circumferential unstable wave of cylindrical flame front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trilis, A. V.; Vasiliev, A. A.; Sukhinin, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    The researches of stability of cylindrical front of deflagration combustion in an annular combustion chamber were made using phenomenological model. The flame front is described as discontinuity of gasdynamic parameters. It is considered that the combustion products are under chemical equilibrium. The combustible mixture and the combustion products are ideal gases. The velocity of deflagration combustion is determined using the Chapman-Jouget theory. It depends on the temperature of combustible mixture only. It is found that the combustible flame front is unstable for several types of small disturbances in the system Mechanics of instabilities are examined using both the numeric and analytical methods. The cases of evolution of the unstable waves rotating in circular channel are presented.

  12. Tracking unstable periodic orbits in a bronze ribbon experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressler, U.; Ritz, T.; Schenck Zu Schweinsberg, A.; Doerner, R.; Hübinger, B.; Martienssen, W.

    1995-03-01

    We demonstrate the tracking of an unstable periodic orbit (UPO) in a bronze ribbon experiment. The stabilization of the UPO at each tracking step is performed via the local control method, a variant of the Ott-Grebogi-Yorke [Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 1196 (1990)] feedback control method. Starting with feedback control vectors extracted from the analysis of the experimental data at each tracking step, we redetermine the location of the UPO using an adaptive orbit correction that exploits the applied control signal and the actual trajectory of the system. Doing so, the unstable periodic orbit can be tracked into a parameter regime where the chaotic attractor has long ago lost its stability and another periodic orbit has become stable.

  13. Unstable Angina Pectoris and the Progression to Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Willerson, James T.; Yao, Sheng-Kun; Ferguson, James J.; Anderson, H. Vernon; Golino, Paolo; Buja, L. Maximilian

    1991-01-01

    The conversion from stable to unstable angina and the further progression to myocardial infarction are usually associated with atherosclerotic plaque fissuring or ulceration at sites of coronary artery stenosis and subsequent development of a thrombus. This thrombus formation is initiated by platelet adhesion and aggregation; these, in turn, are promoted by the local release and accumulation of thromboxane A2 and serotonin. This accumulation and the resulting platelet aggregation at sites of endothelial injury cause dynamic vasoconstriction. With time, the platelet-initiated thrombus expands to include white and red blood cells in a fibrin mesh. Thus, a fully occlusive coronary thrombus may develop and cause the progression from unstable angina to acute myocardial infarction, often Q-wave myocardial infarction. We believe that the connection between unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction is a continuum relative to the processes of coronary artery thrombosis and vasoconstriction. When the period of platelet aggregation or dynamic vasoconstriction at sites of endothelial injury and coronary stenosis lasts only a few minutes and is repetitive, unstable angina or non-Q wave myocardial infarction occurs. However, when complete coronary artery occlusion lasts for longer than 4 hours, a transmural or Q-wave myocardial infarction results. Recently, in experimental animal models with mechanically induced coronary artery stenoses and endothelial injury, we have found that other mediators, including adenosine diphosphate and thrombin, also contribute to coronary artery thrombosis. Moreover, in humans with limiting angina, we have identified spontaneous coronary blood flow variations in a pattern similar to the variations caused by alternating platelet attachment and dislodgement in experimental canine modes. In this review, we add information to our previous observations in order to present the possible mechanisms of conversion from chronic to acute coronary heart

  14. Characterization of Unstable Rock Slopes Through Passive Seismic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinbrod, Ulrike; Burjánek, Jan; Fäh, Donat

    2014-05-01

    Catastrophic rock slope failures have high social impact, causing significant damage to infrastructure and many casualties throughout the world each year. Both detection and characterization of rock instabilities are therefore of key importance. Analysing unstable rock slopes by means of ambient vibrations might be a new alternative to the already existing methods as for example geotechnical displacement measurements. A systematic measurement campaign has been initiated recently in Switzerland in order to study the seismic response of potential rockslides concerning a broad class of slope failure mechanisms and material conditions. First results are presented in this contribution. Small aperture seismic arrays were deployed at sites of interest for a short period of time (several hours) in order to record ambient vibrations. During each measurement a reference station was installed on a stable part close to the instability. The total number of stations used varies from 16 down to 2, depending on the site scope and resource availability. Instable rock slopes show a highly directional ground motion which is significantly amplified with respect to stable areas. These effects are strongest at certain frequencies which are identified as eigenfrequencies of the unstable rock mass. The eigenfrequencies and predominant directions have been estimated by frequency dependent polarization analysis. Site-to-reference spectral ratios have been calculated as well in order to estimate the relative amplification of ground motion at unstable parts. The retrieved results were compared with independent in-situ observations and other available data. The directions of maximum amplification are in most cases perpendicular to open cracks mapped on the surface and in good agreement with the deformation directions obtained by geodetic measurements. The interpretation of the observed wave field is done through numerical modelling of seismic wave propagation in fractured media with complex

  15. Is the Milky Way's hot halo convectively unstable?

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L.

    2014-03-20

    We investigate the convective stability of two popular types of model of the gas distribution in the hot Galactic halo. We first consider models in which the halo density and temperature decrease exponentially with height above the disk. These halo models were created to account for the fact that, on some sight lines, the halo's X-ray emission lines and absorption lines yield different temperatures, implying that the halo is non-isothermal. We show that the hot gas in these exponential models is convectively unstable if γ < 3/2, where γ is the ratio of the temperature and density scale heights. Using published measurements of γ and its uncertainty, we use Bayes' theorem to infer posterior probability distributions for γ, and hence the probability that the halo is convectively unstable for different sight lines. We find that, if these exponential models are good descriptions of the hot halo gas, at least in the first few kiloparsecs from the plane, the hot halo is reasonably likely to be convectively unstable on two of the three sight lines for which scale height information is available. We also consider more extended models of the halo. While isothermal halo models are convectively stable if the density decreases with distance from the Galaxy, a model of an extended adiabatic halo in hydrostatic equilibrium with the Galaxy's dark matter is on the boundary between stability and instability. However, we find that radiative cooling may perturb this model in the direction of convective instability. If the Galactic halo is indeed convectively unstable, this would argue in favor of supernova activity in the Galactic disk contributing to the heating of the hot halo gas.

  16. Using unstable periodic orbits to overcome distortion in chaotic signals.

    PubMed

    Carroll, T L

    1999-11-01

    Proposals to use chaos for communications have been hindered by the fact that broadband chaotic signals are distorted by narrow band or frequency dependent communications channels. I show in this paper how the unstable periodic orbits from a chaotic attractor may be used to estimate the parameters of a filter that has acted on a signal from that attractor and estimate the chaotic signal, even when additive noise larger than the chaotic signal is present. PMID:11970420

  17. Thermally-sustained structure in convectively unstable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    The complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with a thermal noise term is studied under conditions when the system is convectively unstable. Under these conditions, the noise is selectively and spatially amplified giving rise to a noise-sustained structure. Analytical results, applicable to a wide range of physical systems, are derived for the variance, and the coefficients and thermal noise term are determined for Taylor-Couette flow with an axial through-flow. Comparison is made to recent experiments.

  18. Is the Milky Way's Hot Halo Convectively Unstable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the convective stability of two popular types of model of the gas distribution in the hot Galactic halo. We first consider models in which the halo density and temperature decrease exponentially with height above the disk. These halo models were created to account for the fact that, on some sight lines, the halo's X-ray emission lines and absorption lines yield different temperatures, implying that the halo is non-isothermal. We show that the hot gas in these exponential models is convectively unstable if γ < 3/2, where γ is the ratio of the temperature and density scale heights. Using published measurements of γ and its uncertainty, we use Bayes' theorem to infer posterior probability distributions for γ, and hence the probability that the halo is convectively unstable for different sight lines. We find that, if these exponential models are good descriptions of the hot halo gas, at least in the first few kiloparsecs from the plane, the hot halo is reasonably likely to be convectively unstable on two of the three sight lines for which scale height information is available. We also consider more extended models of the halo. While isothermal halo models are convectively stable if the density decreases with distance from the Galaxy, a model of an extended adiabatic halo in hydrostatic equilibrium with the Galaxy's dark matter is on the boundary between stability and instability. However, we find that radiative cooling may perturb this model in the direction of convective instability. If the Galactic halo is indeed convectively unstable, this would argue in favor of supernova activity in the Galactic disk contributing to the heating of the hot halo gas.

  19. Fractal structure of eigenmodes of unstable-cavity lasers.

    PubMed

    Karman, G P; Woerdman, J P

    1998-12-15

    We show that the eigenmodes of unstable-cavity lasers have fractal structure, in contrast with the well-known stable-cavity eigenmodes. As with all fractals, the dynamic range over which self-similarity holds is limited; in this case the range is set by diffraction, i.e., by the Fresnel number of the resonator. We determine the fractal dimension of the mode profiles and show that it is related to the aperture shape. PMID:18091952

  20. Fluorination utilizing thermodynamically unstable fluorides and fluoride salts thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, Neil; Whalen, J. Marc; Chacon, Lisa

    2000-12-12

    A method for fluorinating a carbon compound or cationic carbon compound utilizes a fluorination agent selected from thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides and salts thereof in liquid anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. The desired carbon compound or cationic organic compound to undergo fluorination is selected and reacted with the fluorination agent by contacting the selected organic or cationic organic compound and the chosen fluorination agent in a reaction vessel for a desired reaction time period at room temperature or less.

  1. Calcar Preservation Arthroplasty for Unstable Intertrochanteric Femoral Fractures in Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Togrul, Emre; Kose, Ozkan

    2015-01-01

    Background The treatment of unstable intertrochanteric fractures in elderly is still controversial. The purpose of this study is to present treatment strategies for unstable intertrochanteric fractures with hemiarthroplasty using standard uncemented collared femoral stems and at the same time preserving the fractured calcar fragment. Methods Fifty-four patients aged 75 years or older with unstable intertrochanteric fractures were included in this prospective cohort study. All patients were treated with calcar preserving hemiarthroplasty using cementless collored femoral stems. Fractured calcar fragment was stabilized either by compaction between the implant and femur or fixed with cable grip system. Follow-up evaluations were performed at least 24 months and later. Palmer and Parker mobility score and visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score were assessed. We also analyzed radiographs of the operated hip at each follow-up visit. Results The patients were 15 males and 39 females with a mean age of 81.3 years (range, 75 to 93 years). The average operative time was 86.6 minutes. The mean transfused blood units were 1.2 units. The average duration of hospital stay was 5.3 days. The preoperative mean mobility score was 6.20. This score was found to be 4.96 on postoperative third day and 5.90 at 24 months postoperatively. The results of the statistical analysis revealed significant increase in the mobility scores at each follow-up after three days. Radiological interpretation revealed no loosening in the cable-grip systems, and no significant subsidence (> 5 mm) of prosthesis was observed. Conclusions Calcar preservation arthroplasty is a good option for elderly patients with severe osteoporosis, frail constitution and the patients who are at higher risk for second operation due to unstable intertrochanteric fractures. PMID:26640625

  2. Note about unstable D-branes with dynamical tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KlusoÅ, J.

    2016-08-01

    We propose an action for an unstable Dp-brane with dynamical tension. We show that the equations of motion are equivalent to the equations of motion derived from Dirac-Born-Infeld and Wess-Zumino actions for a non-Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Dp-brane. We also find the Hamiltonian formulation of this action and analyze the properties of the solutions corresponding to the tachyon vacuum and zero-tension solution.

  3. Unstable periodic orbits and noise in chaos computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kia, Behnam; Dari, Anna; Ditto, William L.; Spano, Mark L.

    2011-12-01

    Different methods to utilize the rich library of patterns and behaviors of a chaotic system have been proposed for doing computation or communication. Since a chaotic system is intrinsically unstable and its nearby orbits diverge exponentially from each other, special attention needs to be paid to the robustness against noise of chaos-based approaches to computation. In this paper unstable periodic orbits, which form the skeleton of any chaotic system, are employed to build a model for the chaotic system to measure the sensitivity of each orbit to noise, and to select the orbits whose symbolic representations are relatively robust against the existence of noise. Furthermore, since unstable periodic orbits are extractable from time series, periodic orbit-based models can be extracted from time series too. Chaos computing can be and has been implemented on different platforms, including biological systems. In biology noise is always present; as a result having a clear model for the effects of noise on any given biological implementation has profound importance. Also, since in biology it is hard to obtain exact dynamical equations of the system under study, the time series techniques we introduce here are of critical importance.

  4. Unstable periodic orbits and noise in chaos computing.

    PubMed

    Kia, Behnam; Dari, Anna; Ditto, William L; Spano, Mark L

    2011-12-01

    Different methods to utilize the rich library of patterns and behaviors of a chaotic system have been proposed for doing computation or communication. Since a chaotic system is intrinsically unstable and its nearby orbits diverge exponentially from each other, special attention needs to be paid to the robustness against noise of chaos-based approaches to computation. In this paper unstable periodic orbits, which form the skeleton of any chaotic system, are employed to build a model for the chaotic system to measure the sensitivity of each orbit to noise, and to select the orbits whose symbolic representations are relatively robust against the existence of noise. Furthermore, since unstable periodic orbits are extractable from time series, periodic orbit-based models can be extracted from time series too. Chaos computing can be and has been implemented on different platforms, including biological systems. In biology noise is always present; as a result having a clear model for the effects of noise on any given biological implementation has profound importance. Also, since in biology it is hard to obtain exact dynamical equations of the system under study, the time series techniques we introduce here are of critical importance.

  5. Metastability in plyometric training on unstable surfaces: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the past, plyometric training (PT) has been predominantly performed on stable surfaces. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine effects of a 7-week lower body PT on stable vs. unstable surfaces. This type of exercise condition may be denoted as metastable equilibrium. Methods Thirty-three physically active male sport science students (age: 24.1 ± 3.8 years) were randomly assigned to a PT group (n = 13) exercising on stable (STAB) and a PT group (n = 20) on unstable surfaces (INST). Both groups trained countermovement jumps, drop jumps, and practiced a hurdle jump course. In addition, high bar squats were performed. Physical fitness tests on stable surfaces (hexagonal obstacle test, countermovement jump, hurdle drop jump, left-right hop, dynamic and static balance tests, and leg extension strength) were used to examine the training effects. Results Significant main effects of time (ANOVA) were found for the countermovement jump, hurdle drop jump, hexagonal test, dynamic balance, and leg extension strength. A significant interaction of time and training mode was detected for the countermovement jump in favor of the INST group. No significant improvements were evident for either group in the left-right hop and in the static balance test. Conclusions These results show that lower body PT on unstable surfaces is a safe and efficient way to improve physical performance on stable surfaces. PMID:25089202

  6. Self-aggregation of clouds in conditionally unstable moist convection.

    PubMed

    Pauluis, Olivier; Schumacher, Jörg

    2011-08-01

    The behavior of moist Rayleigh-Bénard convection is investigated using a Boussinesq model with a simplified thermodynamics for phase transitions. This idealized configuration makes the problem accessible to high-resolution three-dimensional direct numerical simulations without small-scale parameterizations of the turbulence for extended layers with aspect ratios up to 64. Our study is focused on the frequently observed conditionally unstable environment that is stably stratified for unsaturated air, but is unstable for cloudy air. We find that no sharp threshold for the transition to convective turbulence exists, a situation similar to wall-bounded shear flows. Rather, the transition depends on the amplitude of the initial perturbation of the quiescent equilibrium and on the aspect ratio of the convective domain. In contrast to the classical dry Rayleigh-Bénard case, convection is highly asymmetric with respect to the vertical direction. Moist upwelling air inside turbulent cloud aggregates is surrounded by ambient regions of slowly descending unsaturated air. It is also found that conditionally unstable moist convection is inefficient at transporting energy. Our study suggests that there is an upper bound on the Nusselt number in moist convection that is lower than that of the classical dry case.

  7. Quantum demolition filtering and optimal control of unstable systems.

    PubMed

    Belavkin, V P

    2012-11-28

    A brief account of the quantum information dynamics and dynamical programming methods for optimal control of quantum unstable systems is given to both open loop and feedback control schemes corresponding respectively to deterministic and stochastic semi-Markov dynamics of stable or unstable systems. For the quantum feedback control scheme, we exploit the separation theorem of filtering and control aspects as in the usual case of quantum stable systems with non-demolition observation. This allows us to start with the Belavkin quantum filtering equation generalized to demolition observations and derive the generalized Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation using standard arguments of classical control theory. This is equivalent to a Hamilton-Jacobi equation with an extra linear dissipative term if the control is restricted to Hamiltonian terms in the filtering equation. An unstable controlled qubit is considered as an example throughout the development of the formalism. Finally, we discuss optimum observation strategies to obtain a pure quantum qubit state from a mixed one. PMID:23091216

  8. Unstable circular null geodesics of static spherically symmetric black holes, Regge poles, and quasinormal frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Decanini, Yves; Folacci, Antoine; Raffaelli, Bernard

    2010-05-15

    We consider a wide class of static spherically symmetric black holes of arbitrary dimension with a photon sphere (a hypersurface on which a massless particle can orbit the black hole on unstable circular null geodesics). This class includes various spacetimes of physical interest such as Schwarzschild, Schwarzschild-Tangherlini, and Reissner-Nordstroem black holes, the canonical acoustic black hole, or the Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole. For this class of black holes, we provide general analytical expressions for the Regge poles of the S matrix associated with a massless scalar field theory. This is achieved by using third-order WKB approximations to solve the associated radial wave equation. These results permit us to obtain analytically the nonlinear dispersion relation and the damping of the 'surface waves' lying close to the photon sphere as well as, from Bohr-Sommerfeld-type resonance conditions, formulas beyond the leading-order terms for the complex frequencies corresponding to the weakly damped quasinormal modes.

  9. The effect of unstable loading versus unstable support conditions on spine rotational stiffness and spine stability during repetitive lifting.

    PubMed

    Beaudette, Shawn M; Graham, Ryan B; Brown, Stephen H M

    2014-01-22

    Lumbar spine stability has been extensively researched due to its necessity to facilitate load-bearing human movements and prevent structural injury. The nature of certain human movement tasks are such that they are not equivalent in levels of task-stability (i.e. the stability of the external environment). The goal of the current study was to compare the effects of dynamic lift instability, administered through both the load and base of support, on the dynamic stability (maximal Lyapunov exponents) and stiffness (EMG-driven model) of the lumbar spine during repeated sagittal lifts. Fifteen healthy males performed 23 repetitive lifts with varying conditions of instability at the loading and support interfaces. An increase in spine rotational stiffness occurred during unstable support scenarios resulting in an observed increase in mean and maximum Euclidean norm spine rotational stiffness (p=0.0011). Significant stiffening effects were observed in unstable support conditions about all lumbar spine axes with the exception of lateral bend. Relative to a stable control lifting trial, the addition of both an unstable load as well as an unstable support did not result in a significant change in the local dynamic stability of the lumbar spine (p=0.5592). The results suggest that local dynamic stability of the lumbar spine represents a conserved measure actively controlled, at least in part, by trunk muscle stiffening effects. It is evident therefore that local dynamic stability of the lumbar spine can be modulated effectively within a young-healthy population; however this may not be the case in a patient population.

  10. Matter and Interactions: A Particle Physics Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organtini, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    In classical mechanics, matter and fields are completely separated; matter interacts with fields. For particle physicists this is not the case; both matter and fields are represented by particles. Fundamental interactions are mediated by particles exchanged between matter particles. In this article we explain why particle physicists believe in…

  11. Particle film growth driven by foam bubble coalescence.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Clint, John H; Fletcher, Paul D I; Lees, Timothy J G; Taylor, Philip

    2006-09-01

    Water films stabilised by hydrophobic particles are found to spread rapidly up the inner walls of a glass vessel containing water and hydrophobic particles when it is shaken; shaking produces unstable particle-stabilised foam bubbles whose coalescence with the air/water interface drives film growth up the inner walls of the container.

  12. Planetesimal Formation in Zonal Flows Arising in Magneto-Rotationally-Unstable Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Karsten; Klahr, Hubert; Johansen, Anders

    2014-04-01

    Recent simulations show long -lived sub- and super-Keplerian flows in protoplanetary disks. These so-called zonal flows are found in local as well as global simulations of magneto-rotationally unstable disks. We investigate the strength and life-time of the resulting long-lived gas over- and under-densities as well as particle concentrations function of the azimuthal and radial size of the local shearing box. Changes in the azimuthal extent do not affect the zonal flow features. However, strength and life-time of zonal flows increase with increasing radial box sizes. Our simulations show indications, and support earlier results, that zonal flows have a natural length scale of approximately 5 pressure scale heights. For the first time, the reaction of dust particles in boxes with zonal flows are studied. We show that particles of some centimeters in size reach a hundred-fold higher density than initially, without any self-gravitating forces acting on the point masses. We further investigate collision velocities of dust grains in a turbulent medium.

  13. Review of Electric Dipole Moments of Fundamental Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Semertzidis, Yannis K.

    2009-08-04

    Electric dipole moments (EDM) experiments are in the research frontier of CP-violation beyond the standard model (SM). EDM experiments set the current limits on CP-violation beyond the SM and are most likely to be the first ones to discover if nature has indeed chosen that path.

  14. Strategy Switching in the Stabilization of Unstable Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zenzeri, Jacopo; De Santis, Dalia; Morasso, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand mechanisms of strategy switching in the stabilization of unstable dynamics, this work investigates how human subjects learn to become skilled users of an underactuated bimanual tool in an unstable environment. The tool, which consists of a mass and two hand-held non-linear springs, is affected by a saddle-like force-field. The non-linearity of the springs allows the users to determine size and orientation of the tool stiffness ellipse, by using different patterns of bimanual coordination: minimal stiffness occurs when the two spring terminals are aligned and stiffness size grows by stretching them apart. Tool parameters were set such that minimal stiffness is insufficient to provide stable equilibrium whereas asymptotic stability can be achieved with sufficient stretching, although at the expense of greater effort. As a consequence, tool users have two possible strategies for stabilizing the mass in different regions of the workspace: 1) high stiffness feedforward strategy, aiming at asymptotic stability and 2) low stiffness positional feedback strategy aiming at bounded stability. The tool was simulated by a bimanual haptic robot with direct torque control of the motors. In a previous study we analyzed the behavior of naïve users and we found that they spontaneously clustered into two groups of approximately equal size. In this study we trained subjects to become expert users of both strategies in a discrete reaching task. Then we tested generalization capabilities and mechanism of strategy-switching by means of stabilization tasks which consist of tracking moving targets in the workspace. The uniqueness of the experimental setup is that it addresses the general problem of strategy-switching in an unstable environment, suggesting that complex behaviors cannot be explained in terms of a global optimization criterion but rather require the ability to switch between different sub-optimal mechanisms. PMID:24921254

  15. Chromohydrodynamic approach to the unstable quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, Cristina; Mrowczynski, Stanislaw

    2006-11-15

    We derive hydrodynamic-like equations that are applicable to short-time-scale color phenomena in the quark-gluon plasma. The equations are solved in the linear response approximation, and the gluon polarization tensor is derived. As an application, we study the collective modes in a two-stream system and find plasma instabilities when the fluid velocity is larger than the speed of sound in the plasma. The chromohydrodynamic approach, discussed here in detail, should be considered as simpler over other approaches and well-designed for numerical studies of the dynamics of an unstable quark-gluon plasma.

  16. Quantum field theory of classically unstable Hamiltonian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Y.; Horwitz, L. P.; Levitan, J.; Yahalom, A.

    2015-07-15

    We study a class of dynamical systems for which the motions can be described in terms of geodesics on a manifold (ordinary potential models can be cast into this form by means of a conformal map). It is rigorously proven that the geodesic deviation equation of Jacobi, constructed with a second covariant derivative, is unitarily equivalent to that of a parametric harmonic oscillator, and we study the second quantization of this oscillator. The excitations of the Fock space modes correspond to the emission and absorption of quanta into the dynamical medium, thus associating unstable behavior of the dynamical system with calculable fluctuations in an ensemble with possible thermodynamic consequences.

  17. Unstable behavior of anodic arc discharge for synthesis of nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Sophia; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2016-09-01

    A short carbon arc operating with a high ablation rate of the graphite anode exhibits a combined motion of the arc and the arc attachment to the anode. A characteristic time scale of this motion is in a 10‑3 s range. The arc exhibits a negative differential resistance before the arc motion occurs. Thermal processes in the arc plasma region interacting with the ablating anode are considered as possible causes of this unstable arc behavior. It is also hypothesized that the arc motion could potentially cause mixing of the various nanoparticles synthesized in the arc in the high ablation regime.

  18. Proof that the hydrogen-antihydrogen molecule is unstable.

    PubMed

    Gridnev, D K; Greiner, Carsten

    2005-06-10

    In the framework of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics we derive a necessary condition for four Coulomb charges (m1(+), m2(-), m3(+), m4(-)), where all masses are assumed finite, to form the stable system. The obtained stability condition is physical and is expressed through the required minimal ratio of Jacobi masses. In particular, this provides the rigorous proof that hydrogen-antihydrogen and muonium-antimuonium molecules and hydrogen-positron-muon systems are unstable. It also proves that replacing hydrogen in the hydrogen-antihydrogen molecule with its heavier isotopes does not make the molecule stable. These are the first rigorous results on the instability of these systems.

  19. Threshold studies of pulsed confocal unstable optical parametric oscillators.

    PubMed

    Gong, Mali; Zou, Shanshan; Chen, Gang; Yan, Ping; Liu, Qiang; Huang, Lei

    2004-06-28

    A theoretical threshold model based on the spherical wave assumption for a pulsed double-pass pumped singly resonant confocal positive-branch unstable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) has been proposed. It is demonstrated that this model is also applicable to the plane-parallel resonator in the special case. The OPO threshold as a function of important parameters such as the cavity magnification factor, cavity physical length, crystal length, pump pulsewidth, output coupler reflectance and crystal position inside the resonator has been presented. Experimental data show the good agreement with the results obtained from the theoretical model. PMID:19483810

  20. Unstable resonator alignment study using off-axis injection.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, T R; Ploor, M D

    1991-10-20

    A brief qualitative experiment and subsequent theoretical study provide new insight concerning off-axis injection of unstable resonators. Theoretical results for aligned resonators show that the regurgitated beam intensity distribution and direction of travel are sensitive to the size, tilt, and other parameters of the injected beam, to the coherence length and number of longitudinal modes of the injecting laser, to clipping and diffraction from apertures, and to resonator length tuning. It is concluded that visual observations of output asymmetries can be used to align the resonator to some degree, but precise alignment using measurement of output asymmetries by a detector array is questionable. PMID:20717200

  1. Black strings and [ital p]-branes are unstable

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, R. ); Laflamme, R. )

    1993-05-10

    We investigate the evolution of small perturbations around black strings and branes which are low energy solutions of string theory. For simplicity we focus attention on the zero charge case and show that there are unstable modes for a range of time frequency and wavelength in the extra 10[minus][ital D] dimensions. These perturbations can be stabilized if the extra dimensions are compactified to a scale smaller than the minimum wavelength for which instability occurs and thus will not affect large astrophysical black holes in four dimensions. We comment on the implications of this result for the cosmic censorship hypothesis.

  2. Unstable behavior of anodic arc discharge for synthesis of nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Sophia; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2016-09-01

    A short carbon arc operating with a high ablation rate of the graphite anode exhibits a combined motion of the arc and the arc attachment to the anode. A characteristic time scale of this motion is in a 10-3 s range. The arc exhibits a negative differential resistance before the arc motion occurs. Thermal processes in the arc plasma region interacting with the ablating anode are considered as possible causes of this unstable arc behavior. It is also hypothesized that the arc motion could potentially cause mixing of the various nanoparticles synthesized in the arc in the high ablation regime.

  3. External Fixation of Unstable, “Flail” Nasal Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Anastassov, George E.; Payami, Ali; Manji, Zain

    2012-01-01

    Nasal bone fractures are the most common among facial fractures. Usually these are adequately treated with closed reduction and internal and/or external stabilization with splints. However, there are clinical situations where the nasal bones are severely displaced, the nasal septum fractured and displaced, or there are external drape lacerations which preclude the use of nasal splints. If the nasal bones are reducible but unstable we consider them “flail” and in this case transmucosal, endonasal Kirschner wires are used for dorsal support until sufficient healing occurs. The technique is simple, quick, and predictable and causes minimal discomfort to the patients. PMID:23730426

  4. Unstable spiral modes in disk-shaped galaxies

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Y. Y.; Lin, C. C.; Mark, James W.-K.

    1976-01-01

    The mechanisms for the maintenance and the excitation of trailing spiral modes of density waves in diskshaped galaxies, as proposed by Lin in 1969 and by Mark recently, are substantiated by an analysis of the gas-dynamical model of the galaxy. The self-excitation of the unstable mode in caused by waves propagating outwards from the corotation circle, which carry away angular momentum of a sign opposite to that contained in the wave system inside that circle. Specifically, a simple dispersion relationship is given as a definite integral, which allows the immediate determination of the pattern frequency and the amplification rate, once the basic galactic model is known. PMID:16592313

  5. Cosmology as a probe of fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Godfrey E.

    Cosmology has reached maturity as a precision science. However, it leaves us with open theoretical questions. First, what is the early universe mechanism that is responsible for the observed nearly scale invariant and gaussian primordial density perturbations? Second, is general relativity the correct description of gravity on the largest observable scales? In this dissertation, we report on various theoretical developments related to these questions. We first show that inflation is the unique single field mechanism with unit sound speed capable of generating nearly scale invariant and Gaussian density perturbations over a broad range of scales. Any alternative scenario must either invoke additional fields or assume an unstable background. In the multi-field category, we present a Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) generalization of the pseudo-conformal scenario, an alternative to inflation which relies on the spontaneous breaking of conformal symmetry in the early universe. This scenario, like most alternatives to inflation, requires a violation of the Null Energy Condition (NEC) to smoothly bounce from a contracting phase to an expanding phase. We report that the DBI conformal galileons can violate the NEC without instabilities, while avoiding nearly all pathologies of earlier examples of NEC-violating theories. We then turn to the question of the uniqueness of general relativity as a description of the known graviton degrees of freedom. Assuming only spatial diffeomorphism invariance, we derive general relativity as the unique effective field theory of the transverse, traceless graviton polarizations. The Lorentz covariance of general relativity, having not been assumed in our analysis, is therefore plausibly interpreted as an accidental spacetime symmetry, not a fundamental spacetime symmetry.

  6. Possibilities of radioisotope measuring in control of an unstable solid particles hydrotransport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryka, Leszek; Zych, Marcin; Hanus, Robert; Sobota, Jerzy; Vlasak, Pavel; Śleziak, Monika; Świsulski, Dariusz

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents γ-radiation proposal to control a multiphase flow, independently from circumstances. So this method may be applied even in compound industrial or environmental processes. Moreover in many cases, it is the only method for applications for dense mixture containing coarse angular grains. The constructed equipment allows continuous measurement of density as well as solid phase for both concentration and average velocity. Due to pressure loss, it gives the output digital signal convenient for cybernation of the control process. The proposed procedures were tested at a laboratory installation modeling conditions expected during planned excavation of nodules from Pacific bottom.

  7. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  8. Eigenmodes of misaligned unstable optical resonators with circular mirrors.

    PubMed

    Bowers, M S

    1992-03-20

    It is shown numerically that the diffractive transverse (Fox-Li) eigenmodes supported by an unstable cavity with tilted end mirrors can be computed by expanding these modes in terms of the fully aligned (aberration-free) eigenmodes of the same cavity. Circular mirror resonators are considered in which the aligned cavity eigenmodes can be decomposed into different azimuthal components. The biorthogonality property of the aligned cavity eigenmodes is used to obtain the coefficients in the modal expansion of the misaligned modes. Results are given for two different resonators: a conventional hard-edge unstable cavity with a small tilt of the output coupler and one that uses a graded reflectivity output mirror with a small tilt of the primary mirror. It is shown that the series expansion of the misaligned modes in terms of the aligned modes converges, and the converged eigenvalues are virtually identical to those computed by using the Prony method. Symmetry considerations and other new insights into the effects of a mirror tilt on the modes of a resonator are also discussed.

  9. A Zoology of unstable modes in a stratified cylinder wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosco, Mickael; Meunier, Patrice

    2013-11-01

    Although the dynamics of a cylinder wake is well known and extremely rich for a homogeneous fluid, very few studies have been focused on stratified wakes despite the obvious extensive number of applications for geophysical flows and submarine wakes. The presence of the stratification may largely modify the dynamics of the wake. The study is devoted to understand the effect of the tilt and also of a strong stratification. So extensive experimental and numerical results have been investigated to describe the full dynamics of a tilted cylinder wake. For weak stratification and small tilt angle, the classical mode A found for a homogeneous fluid is still present, but for a large tilt angle, an instability appearing far from the cylinder is created. The case of a cylinder towed a very stratified fluid has been finally investigated. The dynamics is strongly modified and for moderate tilt angles, a new unstable mode appears with a structure similar to the Kelvin-Helmholtz billows (observed in the critical layer of a tilted stratified vortex), whereas for large tilt angles, another unstable mode characterized by a strong shear appears generated without a 2D von Karman structure. This reveals the rich dynamics of the cylinder wake in the presence of a stable stratification.

  10. COIL emission of a modified negative branch confocal unstable resonator.

    PubMed

    Pargmann, Carsten; Hall, Thomas; Duschek, Frank; Grünewald, Karin Maria; Handke, Jürgen

    2007-11-01

    A modified negative branch confocal unstable resonator (MNBUR) was coupled to the chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) device of the German Aerospace Center. It consists of two spherical mirrors and a rectangular scraper for power extraction. Experimentally measured distributions of the near- and far-field intensities and the near-field phase were found in close agreement to numerical calculations. The extracted power came up to approximately 90% of the power as expected for a stable resonator coupled to the same volume of the active medium. The output power revealed a considerable insensitivity towards tilts of the resonator mirrors and the ideal arrangement of the scraper was found to be straightforward by monitoring the near-field distributions of intensity and phase. The beam quality achieved with the MNBUR of an extremely low magnification of only 1.04 was rather poor but nevertheless in accordance with theory. The demonstrated consistency between theory and experiment makes the MNBUR an attractive candidate for lasers that allow for higher magnification. In particular, it promises high brilliance in application to 100 kW class COIL devices, superior to the conventional negative branch confocal unstable resonator. PMID:17973020

  11. Eigenmodes of misaligned unstable optical resonators with circular mirrors.

    PubMed

    Bowers, M S

    1992-03-20

    It is shown numerically that the diffractive transverse (Fox-Li) eigenmodes supported by an unstable cavity with tilted end mirrors can be computed by expanding these modes in terms of the fully aligned (aberration-free) eigenmodes of the same cavity. Circular mirror resonators are considered in which the aligned cavity eigenmodes can be decomposed into different azimuthal components. The biorthogonality property of the aligned cavity eigenmodes is used to obtain the coefficients in the modal expansion of the misaligned modes. Results are given for two different resonators: a conventional hard-edge unstable cavity with a small tilt of the output coupler and one that uses a graded reflectivity output mirror with a small tilt of the primary mirror. It is shown that the series expansion of the misaligned modes in terms of the aligned modes converges, and the converged eigenvalues are virtually identical to those computed by using the Prony method. Symmetry considerations and other new insights into the effects of a mirror tilt on the modes of a resonator are also discussed. PMID:20720740

  12. Unstable dynamics, nonequilibrium phases, and criticality in networked excitable media.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, S; Torres, J J; Marro, J

    2010-10-01

    Excitable systems are of great theoretical and practical interest in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. Here, we numerically study models of excitable media, namely, networks whose nodes may occasionally be dormant and the connection weights are allowed to vary with the system activity on a short-time scale, which is a convenient and realistic representation. The resulting global activity is quite sensitive to stimuli and eventually becomes unstable also in the absence of any stimuli. Outstanding consequences of such unstable dynamics are the spontaneous occurrence of various nonequilibrium phases--including associative-memory phases and one in which the global activity wanders irregularly, e.g., chaotically among all or part of the dynamic attractors--and 1/f noise as the system is driven into the phase region corresponding to the most irregular behavior. A net result is resilience which results in an efficient search in the model attractor space that can explain the origin of some observed behavior in neural, genetic, and ill-condensed matter systems. By extensive computer simulation we also address a previously conjectured relation between observed power-law distributions and the possible occurrence of a "critical state" during functionality of, e.g., cortical networks, and describe the precise nature of such criticality in the model which may serve to guide future experiments.

  13. NOTE: Why Pyrite Is Unstable on the Surface of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fegley, Bruce

    1997-08-01

    The observed sulfur vapor abundance near Venus' surface is lower than the amount needed for pyrite to be stable. This conclusion is reached using either the observed S3abundance or the S2abundance calculated from the observations of S3. Furthermore, the atmosphere is too oxidizing for pyrite to be stable. Pyrite is unstable at Venus' modal radius of 6051.4 km (1992. P. G. Ford and G. H. Pettengill,J. Geophys. Res.97,13,103-13,114) whereT= 740 K andP= 95.6 bar (1986. A. Seiff, J. T. Schofield, A. J. Kliore, F. W. Taylor, S. S. Limaye, H. E. Revercomb, L. A. Sromovsky, V. I. Kerzhanovich, V. I. Moroz, and M. Ya. Marov, InThe Venus International Reference Atmosphere(A. J. Kliore, V. I. Moroz, and G. M. Keating, Eds.), pp. 3-58. Pergamon Press, Oxford). Pyrite is also unstable at 6056 km (T= 705 K,P= 71.2 bar), which is at 4.6 km altitude in the low radar emissivity region (Pettengillet al. 1996). Any pyrite on Venus' surface should decompose rapidly to iron oxides and sulfur vapor, as experimentally demonstrated by Fegleyet al.(1995. B. Fegley Jr., K. Lodders, A. H. Treiman, and G. Klingelhöfer.Icarus115,159-180).

  14. Identifying Unstable Regions of Proteins Involved in Misfolding Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, Will; Cashman, Neil; Plotkin, Steven

    2009-05-01

    Protein misfolding is a necessary step in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). Identifying unstable structural elements in their causative proteins elucidates the early events of misfolding and presents targets for inhibition of the disease process. An algorithm was developed to calculate the Gibbs free energy of unfolding for all sequence-contiguous regions of a protein using three methods to parameterize energy changes: a modified G=o model, changes in solvent-accessible surface area, and all-atoms molecular dynamics. The entropic effects of disulfide bonds and post-translational modifications are treated analytically. It incorporates a novel method for finding local dielectric constants inside a protein to accurately handle charge effects. We have predicted the unstable parts of prion protein and superoxide dismutase 1, the proteins involved in CJD and fALS respectively, and have used these regions as epitopes to prepare antibodies that are specific to the misfolded conformation and show promise as therapeutic agents.

  15. An explanation of unstable wetting fronts in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenhuis, Tammo; Parlange, Jean-Yves; Kung, Samuel; Stoof, Cathelijne; Baver, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Despite the findings of Raats on unstable wetting front almost a half a century ago, simulating wetting fronts in soils is still an area of active research. One of the critical questions currently is whether Darcy law is valid at the wetting front. In this talk, we pose that in many cases for dry soils, Darcy's law does not apply because the pressure field across the front is not continuous. Consequently, the wetting front pressure is not dependent on the pressure ahead of the front but is determined by the radius of water meniscuses and the dynamic contact angle of the water. If we further assume since the front is discontinuous, that water flows at one pore at the time, then by using the modified Hoffman relationship - relating the dynamic contact angle to the pore water velocity - we find the elevated pressures at the wetting front typical for unstable flows that are similar to those observed experimentally in small diameter columns. The theory helps also explain the funnel flow phenomena observed in layered soils.

  16. Unstable angina: comparison of medical and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Hultgren, H N; Pfeifer, J F; Angell, W W; Lipton, M J; Bilisoly, J

    1977-05-01

    Medical versus surgical treatment of unstable angina was compared in a prospective nonrandomized study of 118 patients. Acute transient ST-T wave changes were present during chest pain in all patients. Acute infarction was excluded by serial electrocardiograms and enzyme studies. All patients admitted to the coronary care unit from 1970 to 1975 who fulfilled the entry criteria were included in the study. The starting point for data evaluation was 5 days after hospital admission. Characteristics at entry were similar in 66 medically treated patients and 52 patients who had coronary bypass vein graft surgery. During a mean follow-up period of 23 months in 66 medically treated patients with unstable angina the incidence rate of nonfatal myocardial infarction was 17% and the total mortality rate 21 percent compared with respective rates of 19% and 5.8% in 52 surgically treated patients. In the surgical group 8 patients (15%) had a perioperative infarction and only 2 (4%) had a late infarction; one patient (2%) died at operation. Symptomatic improvement was observed more frequently in the surgically treated group. Sixty percent of surgically treated patients were free of angina compared with 21% of medically treated patients. Eight medically treated patients (12%) required late surgical treatment for persistent severe angina despite optimal medical management. PMID:67799

  17. Particles, Quarks, Leptons and Coloured Glue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, Lewis

    1980-01-01

    Explains the current situation in particle physics by reviewing the three major periods in the development of atomic theory. Outlines the current picture of fundamental particles and identifies five major problems with this model. (GS)

  18. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  19. The moving boundary approach to modeling gravity-driven stable and unstable flow in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindt, Naaran; Wallach, Rony

    2016-04-01

    Many field and laboratory studies in the last 40 years have found that water flow in homogeneous soil profiles may occur in preferential flow pathways rather than in a laterally uniform wetting front, as expected from classical soil physics theory and expressed by the Richards equation. The water-content distribution within such gravity-driven fingers was found to be nonmonotonic due to water accumulation behind a sharp wetting front (denoted as saturation overshoot). The unstable flow was first related to soil coarseness. However, its appearance in water-repellent soils led the authors to hypothesize that gravity-driven unstable flow formation is triggered by a non-zero contact angle between water and soil particles. Despite its widespread occurrence, a macroscopic-type model describing the nonmonotonic water distribution and sharp wetting front is still lacking. The moving boundary approach, which divides the flow domain into two well-defined subdomains with a sharp change in fluid saturation between them, is suggested to replace the classical approach of solving the Richards equation for the entire flow domain. The upper subdomain consists of water and air, whose relationship varies with space and time following the imposed boundary condition at the soil surface as calculated by the Richards equation. The lower subdomain also consists of water and air, but their relationship remains constant following the predetermined initial condition. The moving boundary between the two subdomains is the sharp wetting front, whose location is part of the solution. As such, the problem is inherently nonlinear. The wetting front's movement is controlled by the dynamic water-entry pressure of the soil, which depends on soil wettability and the front's propagation rate. A lower soil wettability, which hinders the spontaneous invasion of dry pores and increases the water-entry pressure, induces a sharp wetting front and water accumulation behind it. The wetting front starts to

  20. Solvothermal synthesis of nanocrystalline copper nitride from an energetically unstable copper azide precursor.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jonglak; Gillan, Edward G

    2005-10-17

    Nonaqueous solvothermal chemical reactions have found extensive utility in the growth of inorganic non-oxide materials. This report describes the successful use of organic solvothermal environments to synthesize energetically unstable copper azide precursors that are then decomposed in situ to crystalline metastable copper nitride at temperatures below 200 degrees C. A comparison of Cu3N products formed from nonpolar (toluene) and coordinating (THF) solvents is described. The cubic Cu3N products are nanocrystalline with aggregated particle-like extended structures and were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, IR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. The thermal stability and composition of Cu3N was examined by thermogravimetric analysis and bulk elemental analysis. The particle surfaces contain bound residual solvent species that can be removed by heating. The poorly coordinating solvent, toluene, lead to a more crystalline product containing less residual organic content. Benchtop reactions were performed to follow the temporal formation and decomposition of metal azide intermediates. These studies provided more detailed information on the progression of metal azide to metal nitride materials in a solvothermal environment.

  1. Unstable Pore-Water Flow in Intertidal Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. A.; Shen, C.; Li, L.

    2014-12-01

    Salt marshes are important intertidal wetlands strongly influenced by interactions between surface water and groundwater. Bordered by coastal water, the marsh system undergoes cycles of inundation and exposure driven by the tide. This leads to dynamic, complex pore-water flow and solute transport in the marsh soil. Pore-water circulations occur over vastly different spatial and temporal scales with strong link to the marsh topography. These circulations control solute transport between the marsh soil and the tidal creek, and ultimately affect the overall nutrient exchange between the marsh and coastal water. The pore-water flows also dictate the soil condition, particularly aeration, which influences the marsh plant growth. Numerous studies have been carried out to examine the pore-water flow process in the marsh soil driven by tides, focusing on stable flow with the assumption of homogeneity in soil and fluid properties. This assumption, however, is questionable given the actual inhomogeneous conditions in the field. For example, the salinity of surface water in the tidal creek varies temporally and spatially due to the influence of rainfall and evapotranspiration as well as the freshwater input from upland areas to the estuary, creating density gradients across the marsh surface and within the marsh soil. Many marshes possess soil stratigraphy with low-permeability mud typically overlying high-permeability sandy deposits. Macropores such as crab burrows are commonly distributed in salt marsh sediments. All these conditions are prone to the development of non-uniform, unstable preferential pore-water flow in the marsh soil, for example, funnelling and fingering. Here we present results from laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to explore such unstable flow. In particular, the analysis aims to address how the unstable flow modifies patterns of local pore-water movement and solute transport, as well as the overall exchange between the marsh soil and

  2. Mass Formulae for Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turu, Michi

    2003-07-01

    May we say?, the distribution of all particle masses are "Random" or "Chaos" or "Fractal" or "Bushing" as a whole. We can say perfectly, it is "Bushing". It's looks like a relationship among the masses of galaxy, sun, earth, moon, lunar orbiter. And also like the structure of contents(section, paragraph, item) in books. Generally, mass structures have the power of it's interaction constants. I state a fundamental formulae about particle masses in this purview.

  3. Status of Fundamental Physics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Mark C.

    2003-01-01

    Update of the Fundamental Physics Program. JEM/EF Slip. 2 years delay. Reduced budget. Community support and advocacy led by Professor Nick Bigelow. Reprogramming led by Fred O Callaghan/JPL team. LTMPF M1 mission (DYNAMX and SUMO). PARCS. Carrier re baselined on JEM/EF.

  4. Fundamental Practices of Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usova, George M.; Gibson, Marcia

    Designed to give guidance to those involved in the curriculum development process within the Shipyard Training Modernization Program (STMP), this guide provides an understanding of the fundamental practices followed in the curriculum development process. It also demonstrates incorrect and correct approaches to the development of the curriculum…

  5. Fundamentals of Microelectronics Processing (VLSI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takoudis, Christos G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a 15-week course in the fundamentals of microelectronics processing in chemical engineering, which emphasizes the use of very large scale integration (VLSI). Provides a listing of the topics covered in the course outline, along with a sample of some of the final projects done by students. (TW)

  6. Fundamentals of the Slide Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boerner, Susan Zee

    This paper is an introduction to the fundamentals of the art (including architecture) slide library, with some emphasis on basic procedures of the science slide library. Information in this paper is particularly relevant to the college, university, and museum slide library. Topics addressed include: (1) history of the slide library; (2) duties of…

  7. Chronometric cosmology and fundamental fermions

    PubMed Central

    Segal, I. E.

    1982-01-01

    It is proposed that the fundamental fermions of nature are modeled by fields on the chronometric cosmos that are not precisely spinors but become such only in the nonchronometric limit. The imbedding of the scale-extended Poincaré group in the linearizer of the Minkowskian conformal group defines such fields, by induction. PMID:16593266

  8. Museum Techniques in Fundamental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    Some museum techniques and methods can be used in fundamental educational programs without elaborate buildings or equipment; exhibitions should be based on valid presumptions and should take into account the "common sense" beliefs of people for whom the exhibit is designed. They can be used profitably in the economic development of local cultural…

  9. Brake Fundamentals. Automotive Articulation Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Larry; And Others

    Designed for secondary and postsecondary auto mechanics programs, this curriculum guide contains learning exercises in seven areas: (1) brake fundamentals; (2) brake lines, fluid, and hoses; (3) drum brakes; (4) disc brake system and service; (5) master cylinder, power boost, and control valves; (6) parking brakes; and (7) trouble shooting. Each…

  10. Fundamentals of Welding. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    These instructional materials assist teachers in improving instruction on the fundamentals of welding. The following introductory information is included: use of this publication; competency profile; instructional/task analysis; related academic and workplace skills list; tools, materials, and equipment list; and 27 references. Seven units of…

  11. Environmental Law: Fundamentals for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, David R.

    This booklet outlines the environmental problems most likely to arise in schools. An overview provides a fundamental analysis of environmental issues rather than comprehensive analysis and advice. The text examines the concerns that surround superfund cleanups, focusing on the legal framework, and furnishes some practical pointers, such as what to…

  12. Fundamentals of Environmental Education. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1976

    An outline of fundamental definitions, relationships, and human responsibilities related to environment provides a basis from which a variety of materials, programs, and activities can be developed. The outline can be used in elementary, secondary, higher education, or adult education programs. The framework is based on principles of the science…

  13. Alphoidless centromere of a familial unstable inverted Y chromosome.

    PubMed

    Rivera, H; Vassquez, A I; Ayala-Madrigal, M L; Ramirez-Dueñas, M L; Davalos, I P

    1996-01-01

    We report on a 3-generation pedigree in which an inverted unstable Y chromosome had no phenotypical or reproductive repercussion despite a sizable proportion of secondary aneuploidies (mainly 45, X cells) in lymphocytes. This chromosome was metacentric and had a single Cd-positive primary constriction, but occasionally assumed a normal acrocentric aspect. FISH using the probe DYZ3 revealed a single strong signal; unexpectedly, the signal was outside the primary constriction and appeared to map in the middle of p, that is, at the usual centromeric localisation. Therefore, this chromosome should be regarded as a remarkable pseudodicentric because the major alphoid array was located at the inactive centromere but not at the active one. This chromosome may have resulted from a) a transcentric inversion with the 48 bp satellite array of proximal Yq being relocated next to the Yq heterochromatin, or b) an intrachromosomal insertion of nonalphoid centromeric sequences.

  14. Unstable periodic orbits in human epileptic hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Pen-Ning Yu; Min-Chi Hsiao; Dong Song; Liu, Charles Y; Heck, Christi N; Millett, David; Berger, Theodore W

    2014-01-01

    Inter-ictal activity is studied in hippocampal slices resected from patients with epilepsy using local field potential recording. Inter-ictal activity in the dentate gyrus (DG) is induced by high-potassium (8 mM), low-magnesium (0.25 mM) aCSF with additional 100 μM 4-aminopyridine(4-AP). The dynamics of the inter-ictal activity is investigated by developing the first return map with inter-pulse intervals. Unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) are detected in the hippocampal slice at the DG area according to both the topological recurrence method and the periodic orbit transform method. Surrogate analysis suggests the presence of UPOs in hippocampal slices from patients with epilepsy. This finding also suggests that inter-ictal activity is a chaotic system and will allow us to apply chaos control techniques to manipulate inter-ictal activity.

  15. Postural control responses sitting on unstable board during visual stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Y.; Shindo, M.; Kuno, S.; Kawakita, T.; Watanabe, S.

    2001-08-01

    Concerning with the relation of vection induced by the optokinetic stimulation and the body movement, especially we attended to the neck joint movement, which counteracted to the shoulder movement. Then, we analyzed the mechanisms of the sitting postural control by using the seesaw board. By the optokinetic stimulation through the head mounted display (H.M.D.), the vection was leaded, and it affected to the sway of the body on the seesaw board. In this experiment, we found that the movement of upper part of body except for the head was the same direction to the seesaw board but the head moved out of phase to the seesaw board. This phenomenon will be suggested that the unstable condition of sway is balanced by the counter swing of head and the neck muscle tonus is controlled by acting of the vestiburo-collic reflex.

  16. Exploring dynamics of unstable many-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    Volya, Alexander; Zelevinsky, Vladimir

    2014-10-15

    In this work we acquaint reader with the Continuum Shell Model (CSM), which is a proper theoretical tool for the description of physics of unstable systems. We describe the effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian of the CSM and concentrate on specific aspects of dynamics using realistic examples. The continuum effects are discussed in the case of weakly bound heavy oxygen isotopes, where inclusion of continuum coupling is necessary to improve the traditional nuclear shell model techniques. Physics of overlapping resonances is illustrated using recent experimental information on {sup 8}B nucleus. In the limit of strong continuum coupling the many-body states restructure relative to continuum leading to a few very broad super-radiant states, while at the same time other states become narrow and nearly decoupled from decay. The recent observations of very broad alpha clustering states in {sup 18}O is one of the most transparent manifestations of super-radiance.

  17. Theory of excess noise in unstable resonator lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lamprecht, C.; Ritsch, H.

    2002-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the quantum dynamics of an unstable resonator laser. Compared to a stable cavity laser of equal gain and loss it exhibits a K-fold enhanced linewidth. This excess noise factor K is a measure of the nonorthogonality of the resonator eigenmodes and amounts to an enlargement of the quantum vacuum fluctuations. Using a quantum treatment starting from first principles based on the nonorthogonal eigenmodes, we put previous theoretical predictions onto a more firm ground. While we find a position-dependent enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate into an empty mode of only {radical}(K), the constructive quantum interference of the spontaneous emission with a single oscillating mode lets the Petermann excess noise factor K reappear in the phase diffusion (laser linewidth). Hence locally enhanced spontaneous emission as well as noise enhanced by interference (amplified spontaneous emission) play an equal role in the origin of excess noise.

  18. Mode-medium instability in an unstable resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sung, C. C.; Li, Y. Q.; Smithers, Martin E.

    1988-01-01

    The mode-medium instability of an active medium in an unstable resonator is investigated. The asymptotic solution due to Horwitz (1973), valid for large Fresnel numbers in an empty cavity, is modified by introducing gain/phase sheets in front of the resonator mirrors. The effect of medium coupling to the mode in the cavity is obtained by introducing a general time-independent Green's function in the Fox-Li (1961) formulation. The time evolution is then obtained by repeated integration of the beam propagation in the cavity. The diffractive terms are shown to grow rapidly at the expense of the geometric term. This instability responsible for the deterioration of the beam quality is studied numerically for a CO2 lasing system as an example.

  19. Eigenvalues for unstable resonators with slightly misaligned strip mirrors.

    PubMed

    Santana, C; Felsen, L B

    1980-09-15

    Very small misalignments in unstable strip resonators may cause detachment of the low-loss eigenmode at a lower equivalent Fresnel number N(eq) and introduce different periodicities into the eigenvalue curves as a function of N(eq). Using the resonance equation developed previously from waveguide mode theory, this behavior is explained in physical terms by coupling between mode fields with even and odd symmetry, which are uncoupled in the perfectly aligned configuration. A simplified explicit equation derived for the eigenvalues of the detached mode is found to predict correctly the periodicities of the eigenvalue oscillations. The waveguide method therefore continues to provide an explicit and reliable procedure for rapidly locating the maxima and minima of the detached-mode eigenvalues over broad ranges of N(eq). PMID:20234585

  20. Antisocial personality disorder--stable and unstable subtypes.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Simone; Coid, Jeremy

    2010-04-01

    There have been criticisms that the criteria for antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) are over-dependent on criminal behavior. This study aimed to identify unrelated criteria of social and behavioral problems and instability, and to investigate their associations in a representative household sample of adults in the UK. Approximately one third of adults with ASPD did not fulfill any of the criteria for instability. They were less aggressive and involved in illegal activities but expressed less remorse for their behaviors. Instability in ASPD was mediated primarily through comorbid anxiety disorders and borderline personality disorder. The concept of Secondary Psychopathy, which has not generally been applied to ASPD, demonstrated many similarities to the unstable subtype.

  1. Unstable Mixing of Compressible Fluids Driven by Cylindrical Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Mary Jane; Zhang, Qiang

    1996-11-01

    As an incident shock wave hits a material interface between two compressible fluids of different densities, the interface becomes unstable. Small disturbances at the interface start to grow forming spikes and bubbles. This interfacial instability is known as the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability. To date, the majority of the numerical and theoretical studies are for the RM instability in plane geometry. We present a systematic study of the RM instabiliy in cylindrical geometry with curved shocks for all four classes: shock exploding from light fluid to heavy fluid; (2) shock imploding from light fluid to heavy fluid; (3) shock exploding from heavy fluid to light fluid; and (4) shock imploding from heavy fluid to light fluid. A careful study and understanding of the effects of various physical parameters will be presented: including the curvature of the geometry, the incident shock strength, the amplitude of the perturbation as well as the number of fingers at the material interface, and the phenomenon of reshock.

  2. Stable and Unstable Lipid Domains in Ceramide-Containing Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Boulgaropoulos, Beate; Arsov, Zoran; Laggner, Peter; Pabst, Georg

    2011-01-01

    We applied x-ray diffraction, calorimetry, and infrared spectroscopy to lipid mixtures of palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, and ceramide. This combination of experimental techniques allowed us to probe the stability and structural properties of coexisting lipid domains without resorting to any molecular probes. In particular, we found unstable microscopic domains (compositional/phase fluctuations) in the absence of ceramide, and macroscopically separated fluid and gel phases upon addition of ceramide. We also observed phase fluctuations in the presence of ceramide within the broad phase transition regions. We compare our results with fluorescence spectroscopy data and complement the previously reported phase diagram. We also obtained electron paramagnetic resonance data to assess the possible limitations of techniques employing a single label. Our study demonstrates the necessity of applying a combination of experimental techniques to probe local/global structural and fast/slow motional properties in complex lipid mixtures. PMID:21539783

  3. Membrane extraction with thermodynamically unstable diphosphonic acid derivatives

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, Earl Philip; Gatrone, Ralph Carl; Nash, Kenneth LaVerne

    1997-01-01

    Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulphur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described.

  4. Unstable, self-limiting thermochemical temperature oscillations in Macrozamia cycads.

    PubMed

    Roemer, Robert B; Terry, L Irene; Walter, Gimme H

    2008-06-01

    Field measurements and laboratory experiments on the Australian cycads Macrozamia lucida and Macrozamia macleayi demonstrate that their cones' diel peak thermogenic temperature increase varies systematically with cone stage, with single thermogenic temperature peaks occurring daily for up to 2 weeks and reaching 12 degrees C above ambient at midstage. The initiation, magnitude and timing of those peaks are strongly modulated by ambient temperature; the period between successive thermogenic temperature peaks is not circadian, and light is neither necessary nor sufficient to initiate a thermogenic event. A mathematical analysis is developed that provides a unified explanation of the experimental results. It describes these unstable, self-limiting thermogenic events in terms of conservation of energy and a first-order chemical reaction rate model that includes an Arrhenius equation dependence of the cone's metabolic heating rate on the cone temperature. PMID:18266900

  5. Unstable, self-limiting thermochemical temperature oscillations in Macrozamia cycads.

    PubMed

    Roemer, Robert B; Terry, L Irene; Walter, Gimme H

    2008-06-01

    Field measurements and laboratory experiments on the Australian cycads Macrozamia lucida and Macrozamia macleayi demonstrate that their cones' diel peak thermogenic temperature increase varies systematically with cone stage, with single thermogenic temperature peaks occurring daily for up to 2 weeks and reaching 12 degrees C above ambient at midstage. The initiation, magnitude and timing of those peaks are strongly modulated by ambient temperature; the period between successive thermogenic temperature peaks is not circadian, and light is neither necessary nor sufficient to initiate a thermogenic event. A mathematical analysis is developed that provides a unified explanation of the experimental results. It describes these unstable, self-limiting thermogenic events in terms of conservation of energy and a first-order chemical reaction rate model that includes an Arrhenius equation dependence of the cone's metabolic heating rate on the cone temperature.

  6. Neutron capture measurements on unstable nuclei at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J. L.; Haight, R. C.; Fowler, M. M.; Miller, G. G.; Rundberg, R. S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    1999-06-10

    Although neutron capture by stable isotopes has been extensively measured, there are very few measurements on unstable isotopes. The intense neutron flux at the Manual Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at LANSCE enables us to measure capture on targets with masses of about 1 mg over the energy range from 1 eV to 100 keV. These measurements are important not only for understanding the basic physics, but also for calculations of stellar nucleosynthesis and Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship. Preliminary measurements on {sup 169}Tm and {sup 171}Tm have been made with deuterated benzene detectors. A new detector array at the Lujan center and a new radioactive isotope separator will combine to give Los Alamos a unique capability for making these measurements.

  7. Two Fundamental Principles of Nature's Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tian; Wang, Shouhong

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, we present two fundamental principles of nature's interactions, the principle of interaction dynamics (PID) and the principle of representation invariance (PRI). Intuitively, PID takes the variation of the action functional under energy-momentum conservation constraint. PID offers a completely different and natural way of introducing Higgs fields. PRI requires that physical laws be independent of representations of the gauge groups. These two principles give rise to a unified field model for four interactions, which can be naturally decoupled to study individual interactions. With these two principles, we are able to derive 1) a unified theory for dark matter and dark energy, 2) layered strong and weak interaction potentials, and 3) the energy levels of subatomic particles. Supported in part by NSF, ONR and Chinese NSF.

  8. Constraining fundamental physics with future CMB experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Martinelli, Matteo; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Sherwin, Blake D.; Spergel, David N.

    2010-12-15

    The Planck experiment will soon provide a very accurate measurement of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. This will let cosmologists determine most of the cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. Future experiments will improve and complement the Planck data with better angular resolution and better polarization sensitivity. This unexplored region of the CMB power spectrum contains information on many parameters of interest, including neutrino mass, the number of relativistic particles at recombination, the primordial helium abundance, and the injection of additional ionizing photons by dark matter self-annihilation. We review the imprint of each parameter on the CMB and forecast the constraints achievable by future experiments by performing a Monte Carlo analysis on synthetic realizations of simulated data. We find that next generation satellite missions such as CMBPol could provide valuable constraints with a precision close to that expected in current and near future laboratory experiments. Finally, we discuss the implications of this intersection between cosmology and fundamental physics.

  9. MIGRATION OF GAS GIANT PLANETS IN GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Scott; Durisen, Richard H.; Boley, Aaron C. E-mail: durisen@astro.indiana.edu

    2011-08-20

    Characterization of migration in gravitationally unstable disks is necessary to understand the fate of protoplanets formed by disk instability. As part of a larger study, we are using a three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics code to investigate how an embedded gas giant planet interacts with a gas disk that undergoes gravitational instabilities (GIs). This Letter presents results from simulations with a Jupiter-mass planet placed in orbit at 25 AU within a 0.14 M{sub sun} disk. The disk spans 5-40 AU around a 1 M{sub sun} star and is initially marginally unstable. In one simulation, the planet is inserted prior to the eruption of GIs; in another, it is inserted only after the disk has settled into a quasi-steady GI-active state, where heating by GIs roughly balances radiative cooling. When the planet is present from the beginning, its own wake stimulates growth of a particular global mode with which it strongly interacts, and the planet plunges inward 6 AU in about 10{sup 3} years. In both cases with embedded planets, there are times when the planet's radial motion is slow and varies in direction. At other times, when the planet appears to be interacting with strong spiral modes, migration both inward and outward can be relatively rapid, covering several AUs over hundreds of years. Migration in both cases appears to stall near the inner Lindblad resonance of a dominant low-order mode. Planet orbit eccentricities fluctuate rapidly between about 0.02 and 0.1 throughout the GI-active phases of the simulations.

  10. Examination of mode shapes in an unstable model combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisco, J. C.; Yu, Y. C.; Sankaran, V.; Anderson, W. E.

    2011-01-01

    The coupling between the fluid dynamics, heat addition, and the acoustics of a combustor system determine whether it is prone toward combustion instability. This paper presents results from a benchmark study of the eigenmodes in an unstable experimental combustor. The axisymmetric combustor configuration is representative of a number of practical systems and comprises an injector tube, geometric expansion into a combustion chamber, and a short converging nozzle. Instability limit cycle amplitudes ranged from 5% to nearly 50% of the mean 2.2 MPa pressure. Multiple harmonics were measured for the highly unstable cases. The model combustor was designed to provide a fairly comprehensive set of tested effects: sonic vs subsonic inlets; oxidizer tube lengths that were either quarter-wave, half-wave, or off-resonant acoustic equivalents to the combustion chamber; a significant injector mean flow with Ma˜0.4; and a varied combustion chamber length. The measured mode shape data were analyzed and reduced to provide comparison with results from a linearized one-dimensional Euler model, which included the effects of real boundary conditions, entropy generation, area change, and heat and mass addition, but did not include a model for unsteady heat addition. For low-amplitude instabilities, the measured resonance frequencies agreed with those calculated by the model for the injector tube-combustion chamber system. Resonance frequencies for the high-amplitude oscillation cases corresponded to the first longitudinal frequency of the combustion chamber and its integer multiples. Good quantitative agreement was obtained between computed and measured phase difference profiles, and mode envelopes agreed qualitatively. These results provide a basis for subsequent combustion response studies on the effects of unsteady heat addition.

  11. Ivabradine use in refractory unstable angina: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ripa, C; Germano, G; Caparra, A; Capparuccia, C A; Antonicelli, R

    2009-01-01

    In this report, we describe the clinical results of ivabradine use in a patient with a serious form of unstable angina. For this patient, it was proposed that no other therapeutic, pharmacologic or surgical, option was available. The patient is a 75-year-old woman who presented with repeated episodes of retrosternal chest pain. She notably had a history of type II diabetes mellitus treated by insulin for several years and complicated by diabetic macro-angiopathy. ECG tracings recorded during these episodes showed abnormalities of the lateral repolarization phase of ischaemic nature. There was no measured increase in cardiac enzymes. She was transferred to our CCU with a diagnosis of unstable angina. In our CCU, the patient was treated with nitrates, metoprolol, aspirin, clopidogrel and atorvastatin at maximal sustainable doses. Following persistent clinical-instrumental instability, she was subjected to coronary angiography. This study revealed severe multi-vessel coronary artery disease not amenable to surgery or angioplasty revascularization. In addition to the therapy already provided, a beta-blocker (metoprolol 50 mgx2/die) and diltiazem (30 mgx2/die) were added despite their potentially dangerous and adverse chronotropic effects. Despite this treatment, the patients heart rate remained high (between 80 and 100 beats/min). This heart rate appeared to be the main driving cause of her anginal symptoms. At this point, the use of ivabradine seemed the only option, even though use would be off-label compared to current indications for the drugs use. We started with a low dose of 2.5 mg/b.i.d. and titrated up to 5 mg b.i.d. As we titrated, we witnessed a gradual reduction in heart rate. A consequent stabilization of her clinical pattern progressed into an almost unexpected asymptomatic state. After about a week of clinical observation, the patient recovered. After three months, she remains asymptomatic. PMID:19822102

  12. Modal and thermal analysis of Les Arches unstable rock column (Vercors massif, French Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottelin, P.; Lévy, C.; Baillet, L.; Jongmans, D.; Guéguen, P.

    2013-08-01

    A potentially unstable limestone column (˜1000 m3, Vercors, French Alps) delineated by an open rear fracture was continuously instrumented with two three-component seismic sensors from mid-May 2009 to mid-October 2011. Spectral analysis of seismic noise allowed several resonance frequencies to be determined, ranging from 6 to 21 Hz. The frequency domain decomposition (FDD) technique was applied to the ambient vibrations recorded on the top of the rock column. Three vibration modes were identified at 6, 7.5 and 9 Hz, describing the upper part of corresponding modal shapes. Finite element numerical modelling of the column dynamic response confirmed that the first two modes are bending modes perpendicular and parallel to the fracture, respectively, while the third one corresponds to torsion. Seismic noise monitoring also pointed out that resonance frequencies fluctuate with time, under thermomechanical control. For seasonal cycles, changes in frequency are due to the variations of the bulk elastic properties with temperature. At daily scale, increase in fundamental frequency with temperature has been interpreted as resulting from the rock expansion inducing a closure of the rear fracture rock bridges, hence stiffening the contact between the column and the rock mass. Conversely, the rock contraction induces a fracture opening and a decrease in resonance frequency. In winter, when the temperature drops below 0 °C, a dramatic increase in fundamental frequency is observed from 6 Hz to more than 25 Hz, resulting from ice formation in the fracture. During spring, the resonance frequency gradually diminishes with ice melting to reach the value measured before winter.

  13. Model for a fundamental theory with supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoo, Seiichiro

    Physics in the year 2006 is tightly constrained by experiment, observation, and mathematical consistency. The Standard Model provides a remarkably precise description of particle physics, and general relativity is quite successful in describing gravitational phenomena. At the same time, it is clear that a more fundamental theory is needed for several distinct reasons. Here we consider a new approach, which begins with the unusually ambitious point of view that a truly fundamental theory should aspire to explaining the origins of Lorentz invariance, gravity, gauge fields and their symmetry, supersymmetry, fermionic fields, bosonic fields, quantum mechanics and spacetime. The present dissertation is organized so that it starts with the most conventional ideas for extending the Standard Model and ends with a microscopic statistical picture, which is actually the logical starting point of the theory, but which is also the most remote excursion from conventional physics. One motivation for the present work is the fact that a Euclidean path integral in quantum physics is equivalent to a partition function in statistical physics. This suggests that the most fundamental description of nature may be statistical. This dissertation may be regarded as an attempt to see how far one can go with this premise in explaining the observed phenomena, starting with the simplest statistical picture imaginable. It may be that nature is richer than the model assumed here, but the present results are quite suggestive, because, with a set of assumptions that are not unreasonable, one recovers the phenomena listed above. At the end, the present theory leads back to conventional physics, except that Lorentz invariance and supersymmetry are violated at extremely high energy. To be more specific, one obtains local Lorentz invariance (at low energy compared to the Planck scale), an SO( N) unified gauge theory (with N = 10 as the simplest possibility), supersymmetry of Standard Model fermions and

  14. Elementary Particles and Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigg, Chris

    1985-01-01

    Discusses subatomic particles (quarks, leptons, and others) revealed by higher accelerator energies. A connection between forces at this subatomic level has been established, and prospects are good for a description of forces that encompass binding atomic nuclei. Colors, fundamental interactions, screening, camouflage, electroweak symmetry, and…

  15. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Classical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Classical Physics Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of physical forces and their properties. The handbook includes information on the units used to measure physical properties; vectors, and how they are used to show the net effect of various forces; Newton's Laws of motion, and how to use these laws in force and motion applications; and the concepts of energy, work, and power, and how to measure and calculate the energy involved in various applications. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility systems and equipment.

  16. Variation of fundamental constants: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flambaum, Victor

    2008-05-01

    Theories unifying gravity with other interactions suggest temporal and spatial variation of the fundamental ``constants'' in expanding Universe. There are some hints for the variation of different fundamental constants in quasar absorption spectra and Big Bang nucleosynthesis data. A large number of publications (including atomic clocks) report limits on the variations. We want to study the variation of the main dimensionless parameters of the Standard Model: 1. Fine structure constant alpha (combination of speed of light, electron charge and Plank constant). 2. Ratio of the strong interaction scale (LambdaQCD) to a fundamental mass like electron mass or quark mass which are proportional to Higgs vacuum expectation value. The proton mass is propotional to LambdaQCD, therefore, the proton-to-electron mass ratio comes into this second category. We performed necessary atomic, nuclear and QCD calculations needed to study variation of the fundamental constants using the Big Bang Nucleosynthsis, quasar spectra, Oklo natural nuclear reactor and atomic clock data. The relative effects of the variation may be enhanced in transitions between narrow close levels in atoms, molecules and nuclei. If one will study an enhanced effect, the relative value of systematic effects (which are not enhanced) may be much smaller. Note also that the absolute magnitude of the variation effects in nuclei (e.g. in very narrow 7 eV transition in 229Th) may be 5 orders of magnitude larger than in atoms. A different possibility of enhancement comes from the inversion transitions in molecules where splitting between the levels is due to the quantum tunneling amplitude which has strong, exponential dependence on the electron to proton mass ratio. Our study of NH3 quasar spectra has already given the best limit on the variation of electron to proton mass ratio.

  17. The Physics Handbook: Fundamentals and Key Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Charles P., Jr.

    1999-03-01

    A comprehensive quick reference to basic topics and equations in physics This compendium of physics covers the key equations and fundamental principles that are taught in graduate programs. It offers a succinct yet systematic treatment of all areas of physics, including mathematical physics, solid state, particle physics, statistical mechanics, and optics. In one complete, self-contained volume, author Charles P. Poole, Jr. provides both review material for students preparing for PhD qualifying examinations and a quick reference for physicists who need to brush up on basic topics or delve into areas outside their expertise. Poole devotes two chapters to regularly needed information such as trigonometric and vector identities and special functions. The remaining chapters incorporate less frequently summoned concepts, including Lagrangians, parity, dispersion relations, chaos, free energies, statistical mechanical ensembles, elementary particle classification, and so forth. An indispensable resource for graduate students and physicists in industry and academia, The Physics Handbook: * Puts key information at the reader's fingertips * Incorporates essential material previously scattered through many different texts * Features 150 illustrations * Addresses theoretical as well as practical issues * Includes an extensive bibliography pointing to more thorough texts for individual subject areas

  18. Chiroptical signatures of life and fundamental physics.

    PubMed

    Macdermott, Alexandra J

    2012-09-01

    This paper aims to inspire experimentalists to carry out proposed new chiroptical experiments springing from the theoretical study of the role of parity violation in the origin of biomolecular homochirality and to provide a brief update on the current status of calculations of the electroweak parity-violating energy difference (PVED) between enantiomers. If the PVED did select life's handedness, we would expect to find life on other planets consistently using the same hand as terrestrial biochemistry. Much more importantly, even finding the "wrong" hand (rather than a racemic mixture) on another planet could be the homochiral signature of life, and we discuss our proposal for chiroptical detection of life on extra-solar planets. The PVED may also have an exciting future as a "molecular footprint" of fundamental physics: comparison of calculated PVEDs with measured values could one day allow chemists to do "table-top particle physics" more cheaply with improved chiroptical techniques instead of ever larger particle accelerators. We discuss our proposed chiroptical method to measure the PVED by using molecular beams. To our knowledge, optical rotation has not yet been measured in molecular beams, but the rewards of doing so include a host of other "first ever" results in addition to measurement of the PVED.

  19. Radiation Belt Storm Probes: Resolving Fundamental Physics with Practical Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr Y.; Mauk, Barry H.; Fox, Nicola J.; Sibeck, David G.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental processes that energize, transport, and cause the loss of charged particles operate throughout the universe at locations as diverse as magnetized planets, the solar wind, our Sun, and other stars. The same processes operate within our immediate environment, the Earth's radiation belts. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission will provide coordinated two-spacecraft observations to obtain understanding of these fundamental processes controlling the dynamic variability of the near-Earth radiation environment. In this paper we discuss some of the profound mysteries of the radiation belt physics that will be addressed by RBSP and briefly describe the mission and its goals.

  20. BOOK REVIEWS: Quantum Mechanics: Fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, A.

    2004-02-01

    This review is of three books, all published by Springer, all on quantum theory at a level above introductory, but very different in content, style and intended audience. That of Gottfried and Yan is of exceptional interest, historical and otherwise. It is a second edition of Gottfried’s well-known book published by Benjamin in 1966. This was written as a text for a graduate quantum mechanics course, and has become one of the most used and respected accounts of quantum theory, at a level mathematically respectable but not rigorous. Quantum mechanics was already solidly established by 1966, but this second edition gives an indication of progress made and changes in perspective over the last thirty-five years, and also recognises the very substantial increase in knowledge of quantum theory obtained at the undergraduate level. Topics absent from the first edition but included in the second include the Feynman path integral, seen in 1966 as an imaginative but not very useful formulation of quantum theory. Feynman methods were given only a cursory mention by Gottfried. Their practical importance has now been fully recognised, and a substantial account of them is provided in the new book. Other new topics include semiclassical quantum mechanics, motion in a magnetic field, the S matrix and inelastic collisions, radiation and scattering of light, identical particle systems and the Dirac equation. A topic that was all but totally neglected in 1966, but which has flourished increasingly since, is that of the foundations of quantum theory. John Bell’s work of the mid-1960s has led to genuine theoretical and experimental achievement, which has facilitated the development of quantum optics and quantum information theory. Gottfried’s 1966 book played a modest part in this development. When Bell became increasingly irritated with the standard theoretical approach to quantum measurement, Viki Weisskopf repeatedly directed him to Gottfried’s book. Gottfried had devoted a

  1. Focus on the "unstable" carotid plaque: detection of intraplaque angiogenesis with contrast ultrasound. Present state and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Maria Fabrizia; Vicenzini, Edoardo

    2009-04-01

    Over the past 20 years, conventional ultrasonography has identified features of the "unstable" carotid plaque. Histological studies have recognized that plaque inflammation and neoangiogenesis play a pivotal role in the developing of the vulnerable plaque. Hence, the growing interest on the biological activities of atherosclerotic lesions leading to cerebrovascular events. The presence of adventitial vasa vasorum and the occurrence of plaque vascularization have been considered as predictors of unstable lesions in cerebrovascular and/or cardiovascular patients. The advent of ultrasound contrast agents has represented a fundamental step in the up-to-date functional evaluation in several fields with minimally invasive procedures. Contrast specific ultrasound modalities are currently used with excellent results in oncology, in cardiology and in vascular diseases. Contrast carotid ultrasound is an emerging imaging technique, able to depict in vivo new functional information on plaque activity and vascularization that may add further new data on the actual condition and future cerebrovascular risk. Further studies will provide a better clarification of the degree of neo-angiogenesis. A future strategy could be represented by the monitoring of plaque neoangiogenesis in order to detect the possible pharmacological effects on plaque remodeling.

  2. Spontaneous motion of an elliptic camphor particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Iida, Keita; Nagayama, Masaharu

    2013-01-01

    The coupling between deformation and motion in a self-propelled system has attracted broader interest. In the present study, we consider an elliptic camphor particle for investigating the effect of particle shape on spontaneous motion. It is concluded that the symmetric spatial distribution of camphor molecules at the water surface becomes unstable first in the direction of a short axis, which induces the camphor disk motion in this direction. Experimental results also support the theoretical analysis. From the present results, we suggest that when an elliptic particle supplies surface-active molecules to the water surface, the particle can exhibit translational motion only in the short-axis direction.

  3. GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE FLAMES: RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR STRETCHING VERSUS TURBULENT WRINKLING

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, E. P.; Rosner, R.

    2013-07-10

    In this paper, we provide support for the Rayleigh-Taylor-(RT)-based subgrid model used in full-star simulations of deflagrations in Type Ia supernovae explosions. We use the results of a parameter study of two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of an RT unstable model flame to distinguish between the two main types of subgrid models (RT or turbulence dominated) in the flamelet regime. First, we give scalings for the turbulent flame speed, the Reynolds number, the viscous scale, and the size of the burning region as the non-dimensional gravity (G) is varied. The flame speed is well predicted by an RT-based flame speed model. Next, the above scalings are used to calculate the Karlovitz number (Ka) and to discuss appropriate combustion regimes. No transition to thin reaction zones is seen at Ka = 1, although such a transition is expected by turbulence-dominated subgrid models. Finally, we confirm a basic physical premise of the RT subgrid model, namely, that the flame is fractal, and thus self-similar. By modeling the turbulent flame speed, we demonstrate that it is affected more by large-scale RT stretching than by small-scale turbulent wrinkling. In this way, the RT instability controls the flame directly from the large scales. Overall, these results support the RT subgrid model.

  4. Sporadic-E layers and unstable wind shears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. G.; Miller, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Electron density profiles of sporadic-E layers have been observed with good height resolution using rocket-borne probes. These generally show a simple shape consistent with the effect of a linear wind shear acting on metallic ions. Occasionally more complex shapes have been recorded, including double peaks and, on one occasion, a nearly rectangular profile. A direct method of obtaining the wind profile from the concentration profile of metallic ions has been developed. The metallic ion concentration profile itself is obtained from the electron density profile. Both procedures derive from the steady-state continuity equation. For linear wind shears it is found that the maximum value of the shear is about 50 m/s/km which corresponds to a Richardson number of 1/4. Layers of complex shape are associated with non-linear wind shears in which the maximum shear considerably exceeds this value. It is concluded that the complex profiles of sporadic-E layers can be interpreted as an effect of unstable wind shears.

  5. Quantitative comparison of cellular patterns of stable and unstable mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Lee, J. H. S.; Lee, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-09-01

    This study describes a comparison of smoked foils from five different mixtures ({{C}}2{{H}}2+2.5{{O}}2+85 %{{Ar}}, 2{{H}}2+{{O}}2+50 %{{Ar}}, {{C}}2{{H}}2+2.5{{O}}2+70 %{{Ar}}, {C}2{{H}}2+5{{N}}2{{O}}, and {{CH}}4+2{{O}}2) that produced transverse waves of regular and irregular spacing. Histograms, variance, and the autocorrelation function (ACF) were used to quantify the spacing irregularity. Each smoked foil was first digitized then separated into left-running and right-running waves for subsequent analysis. The five mixtures showed different degrees of irregularity in the analysis of the histograms and the ACF of the spacing of the transverse waves. The dominant mode was readily found from the peak in the histogram and the first peak in the ACF result. The spacing of the main transverse waves provided by the histogram and the first peak of the ACF were much closer to the spacing of the transverse waves measured by eye for stable mixtures than for unstable ones due to their stronger dominant mode. In certain cases, other modes besides the dominant one were observed, such as two peaks in the histogram and other large peaks in the ACF result. Variance was used as a quantitative measurement of the cellular pattern irregularity level.

  6. Astrophysical Implications of Magnetoacoustic Autowaves in Thermally Unstable Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, A.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2004-07-01

    The formation and evolution of magnetoacoustic autowaves in thermally unstable plasmas is discussed, with particular reference to solar and stellar flares. The competition of thermal overstability, thermal conductivity and radiative losses leads to self-organisation of weakly nonlinear magnetoacoustic perturbations into dissipative structures with the parameters independent of the initial perturbation. This evolution is modelled in terms of the extended Burgers equation. The properties of the autowaves are expressed through the plasma parameters such as the magnetic field, plasma temperature and density. The autowaves are saw-tooth shaped waves, with an eventual amplitude that depends upon the balance between the amplification due to radiative losses and decay due to thermal conductivity. Increased dissipation due to thermal conductivity or stronger non-linearity leads to a lower amplitude, while stronger thermal instability leads to a higher final amplitude. X-ray, white light and radio band observations and numerical simulations of flaring loops show quasi-periodic pulsations during the flares. These pulsations are standing acoustic waves (primarily the second harmonic) and show little decay over a number of periods despite the large theoretically predicted damping due to thermal conductivity. It is suggested that these waves are magnetoacoustic autowaves.

  7. Unstable high molecular weight inverted repetitive DNA in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, J C; Rucinsky, T E

    1982-01-01

    About 1% of newly synthesized DNA from PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes can be isolated as large (up to 90 kilobase pairs) double stranded fragments that resist sequential alkali and heat denaturation steps but are not closed circular. By electron microscopy about 1% have single-strand hairpin loops at one end and therefore present inverted repetitive sequences (IR-DNA). Most of the remainder have a blunt-appearing double-strand terminus at both ends (78%) or one end (18%). Indirect evidence indicates that these also are inverted complementary structures with terminal hairpin loops too small to be visualized: (1) Treatment with either a 5' or 3' single-strand exonuclease generates essentially only fragments with a single strand at one end; (2) with partial denaturation, the number of fragments with identifiable single-strand hairpin loops increases (to about 20%); (3) after S1 nuclease digestion, greater than 95% can be fully heat denatured. Cot analysis indicates that these fragments are derived from dispersed sites throughout the genome. Up to 25% of DNA released from lymphocytes during growth similarly resists denaturation, and released DNA and IR-DNA are both enriched in the same set of repetitive sequences. Thus at least a portion of IR-DNA appears to be unstable. Images PMID:7145706

  8. About the method of investigation of applied unstable process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, O. V.; Sapega, V. F.

    2003-04-01

    ABOUT THE METHOD OF INVESTIGATION OF APPLIED UNSTABLE PROCESS O.V. Romanova (1), V.F. Sapega (1) (1) All-russian geological institute (VSEGEI) zapgeo@mail.wpus.net (mark: for Romanova)/Fax: +7-812-3289283 Samples of Late Proterosoic (Rephean) rocks from Arkhangelsk, Jaroslav and Leningrad regions were prepared by the developed method of sample preparation and researched by X-ray analysis. The presence of mantle fluid process had been previously estabished in some of the samples (injecting tuffizites) (Kazak, Jakobsson, 1999). It appears that unchanged rephean rocks contain the set of low-temperature minerals as illite, chlorite, vermiculite, goethite, indicates conditions of diagenesis with temperature less than 300° C. Presense of corrensite, rectorite, illite-montmorillonite indicates application of the post-diagenesis low-temperature process to the original sediment rock. At the same time the rocks involved in the fluid process, contain such minerals as olivine, pyrope, graphite and indicate application of the high-temperature process not less than 650-800°C. Within these samples a set of low-temperature minerals occur also, this demonstrates the short-timing and disequilibrium of the applied high-temperature process. Therefore implementation of the x-ray method provides unambiguous criterion to the establishment of the fluid process which as a rule is coupled with the development of kimberlite rock fields.

  9. Quantitative comparison of cellular patterns of stable and unstable mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Lee, J. H. S.; Lee, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-07-01

    This study describes a comparison of smoked foils from five different mixtures (C2H2+2.5{O}2+85 % Ar, 2H2+O2+50 % Ar, C2H2+2.5O2+70 % Ar, C2H2+5N2O, and CH4+2O2) that produced transverse waves of regular and irregular spacing. Histograms, variance, and the autocorrelation function (ACF) were used to quantify the spacing irregularity. Each smoked foil was first digitized then separated into left-running and right-running waves for subsequent analysis. The five mixtures showed different degrees of irregularity in the analysis of the histograms and the ACF of the spacing of the transverse waves. The dominant mode was readily found from the peak in the histogram and the first peak in the ACF result. The spacing of the main transverse waves provided by the histogram and the first peak of the ACF were much closer to the spacing of the transverse waves measured by eye for stable mixtures than for unstable ones due to their stronger dominant mode. In certain cases, other modes besides the dominant one were observed, such as two peaks in the histogram and other large peaks in the ACF result. Variance was used as a quantitative measurement of the cellular pattern irregularity level.

  10. Phosphatidylcholine, an edible carrier for nanoencapsulation of unstable thiamine.

    PubMed

    Juveriya Fathima, Syeda; Fathima, Irum; Abhishek, Virat; Khanum, Farhath

    2016-04-15

    Lipid nanoparticles have been used for carrying different therapeutic agents because of the advantage in improved absorption, bioavailability, targeted deliveries and reduction in the quantity of drugs required. The aim of the study was to prepare and characterize nanoliposomes containing thiamine hydrochloride and study their physicochemical stability as this vitamin is highly unstable. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) was used as an edible encapsulant. The average size of nanoliposomes was found to be 150 nm and zeta potential was -34 mV. The encapsulation efficiency was 97%. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed the size, spherical nature and smooth surface of the nanoliposomes. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) evidenced that the nanoliposomes were stable up to 300°C. The functional groups present were determined by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the presence of vitamin was confirmed in final formulation by biochemical analysis. The crystalline nature of thiamine was analyzed by X-ray diffraction studies. Storage studies indicated that the nanoliposomes were highly stable up to 3 months at different temperatures. Thus, phosphatidylcholine can be used as carrier vehicle of nutrients especially vitamins, as it can form stable nanoliposomes with 97% encapsulation efficiency.

  11. Phosphatidylcholine, an edible carrier for nanoencapsulation of unstable thiamine.

    PubMed

    Juveriya Fathima, Syeda; Fathima, Irum; Abhishek, Virat; Khanum, Farhath

    2016-04-15

    Lipid nanoparticles have been used for carrying different therapeutic agents because of the advantage in improved absorption, bioavailability, targeted deliveries and reduction in the quantity of drugs required. The aim of the study was to prepare and characterize nanoliposomes containing thiamine hydrochloride and study their physicochemical stability as this vitamin is highly unstable. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) was used as an edible encapsulant. The average size of nanoliposomes was found to be 150 nm and zeta potential was -34 mV. The encapsulation efficiency was 97%. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed the size, spherical nature and smooth surface of the nanoliposomes. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) evidenced that the nanoliposomes were stable up to 300°C. The functional groups present were determined by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the presence of vitamin was confirmed in final formulation by biochemical analysis. The crystalline nature of thiamine was analyzed by X-ray diffraction studies. Storage studies indicated that the nanoliposomes were highly stable up to 3 months at different temperatures. Thus, phosphatidylcholine can be used as carrier vehicle of nutrients especially vitamins, as it can form stable nanoliposomes with 97% encapsulation efficiency. PMID:26616989

  12. Soil loosening and drainage of structurally unstable silty soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twomlow, Stephen J.; Parkinson, Robert J.; Reid, Ian

    1990-12-01

    Secondary drainage treatments are carried out with the objective of enhancing the performance of permanent piped schemes. In this study, a drainage experiment was designed to investigate the effect of soil loosening on storm water redistribution in a structurally unstable silt soil following the installation of underdrainage. Results show that even though loosening reduced dry bulk density between 0.2 and 0.4 m depth by 15%, with a 270% increase in transmission pores (> 60 μm equivalent diameter) at the interface of what was the cultivated and undisturbed soil, drainage efficiency was not enhanced, as might have been expected from the 10- to 20-fold increase in hydraulic conductivity. Loosening not only lengthens the median time of concentration by 0.42 and 0.33 h for simple and secondary winter storms, respectively, but also caused lower peak discharges when compared with unloosened soil. Measurements of soil water energetics reveal that a greater proportion of rainfall is diverted into the loosened zone below the plough layer and detained there, reducing the 24 h drainage efficiency. On a seasonal timescale, the greater storage between 0.2 and 0.4 m depth causes a 6.3% increase in the winter mean water content, and means that the rooting environment of the loosened soil is wetter prior to a rainstorm. Consequently, in wet autumns and springs, loosened soils will be more susceptible to structural damage by animal poaching or the traffic of farm machinery.

  13. Survival of habitable planets in unstable planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Daniel; Davies, Melvyn B.; Johansen, Anders

    2016-09-01

    Many observed giant planets lie on eccentric orbits. Such orbits could be the result of strong scatterings with other giant planets. The same dynamical instability that produces these scatterings may also cause habitable planets in interior orbits to become ejected, destroyed, or be transported out of the habitable zone. We say that a habitable planet has resilient habitability if it is able to avoid ejections and collisions and its orbit remains inside the habitable zone. Here we model the orbital evolution of rocky planets in planetary systems where giant planets become dynamically unstable. We measure the resilience of habitable planets as a function of the observed, present-day masses and orbits of the giant planets. We find that the survival rate of habitable planets depends strongly on the giant planet architecture. Equal-mass planetary systems are far more destructive than systems with giant planets of unequal masses. We also establish a link with observation; we find that giant planets with present-day eccentricities higher than 0.4 almost never have a habitable interior planet. For a giant planet with an present-day eccentricity of 0.2 and semimajor axis of 5 AU orbiting a Sun-like star, 50% of the orbits in the habitable zone are resilient to the instability. As semimajor axis increases and eccentricity decreases, a higher fraction of habitable planets survive and remain habitable. However, if the habitable planet has rocky siblings, there is a significant risk of rocky planet collisions that would sterilize the planet.

  14. Differential rotation of the unstable nonlinear r -modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, John L.; Lindblom, Lee; Lockitch, Keith H.

    2016-01-01

    At second order in perturbation theory, the r -modes of uniformly rotating stars include an axisymmetric part that can be identified with differential rotation of the background star. If one does not include radiation reaction, the differential rotation is constant in time and has been computed by Sá. It has a gauge dependence associated with the family of time-independent perturbations that add differential rotation to the unperturbed equilibrium star: For stars with a barotropic equation of state, one can add to the time-independent second-order solution arbitrary differential rotation that is stratified on cylinders (that is a function of distance ϖ to the axis of rotation). We show here that the gravitational radiation-reaction force that drives the r -mode instability removes this gauge freedom; the exponentially growing differential rotation of the unstable second-order r -mode is unique. We derive a general expression for this rotation law for Newtonian models and evaluate it explicitly for slowly rotating models with polytropic equations of state.

  15. Foraging and farming as niche construction: stable and unstable adaptations.

    PubMed

    Rowley-Conwy, Peter; Layton, Robert

    2011-03-27

    All forager (or hunter-gatherer) societies construct niches, many of them actively by the concentration of wild plants into useful stands, small-scale cultivation, burning of natural vegetation to encourage useful species, and various forms of hunting, collectively termed 'low-level food production'. Many such niches are stable and can continue indefinitely, because forager populations are usually stable. Some are unstable, but these usually transform into other foraging niches, not geographically expansive farming niches. The Epipalaeolithic (final hunter-gatherer) niche in the Near East was complex but stable, with a relatively high population density, until destabilized by an abrupt climatic change. The niche was unintentionally transformed into an agricultural one, due to chance genetic and behavioural attributes of some wild plant and animal species. The agricultural niche could be exported with modifications over much of the Old World. This was driven by massive population increase and had huge impacts on local people, animals and plants wherever the farming niche was carried. Farming niches in some areas may temporarily come close to stability, but the history of the last 11,000 years does not suggest that agriculture is an effective strategy for achieving demographic and political stability in the world's farming populations.

  16. Unstable-unit tensegrity plate: modeling and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavsky, Ron; de Oliveira, Mauricio C.; Skelton, Robert E.

    2003-08-01

    A new topology for a prestressed tensegrity plate, the unstable-unit tensegrity plate (UUTP), is introduced, together with a detailed algorithm for its design. The plate is a truss made of strings (flexible elements) and bars (rigid elements), which are loaded in tension and compression, respectively, where bars do not touch each other. Given the outline dimensions of the desired plate, and the number of bars along the plate's width and length, the algorithm solves for the nodes' positions and the prestress forces that make a plate in equilibrium. This is done by solving a non-linear matrix equation via Newton's method. This equation reflects static equilibrium conditions. We've designed several such plates, proving the feasibility of the proposed topology and the effectiveness of its design algorithm. Two such plates are characterized in detail, both statically and dynamically (via simulation). The proposed algorithm may be extended to solve for other tensegrity structures having different topologies and/or different shapes. The UUTP may be used as a building block of many types of structures, both uncontrolled and controlled, either large-scale or miniature-scale.

  17. Foraging and farming as niche construction: stable and unstable adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Rowley-Conwy, Peter; Layton, Robert

    2011-01-01

    All forager (or hunter–gatherer) societies construct niches, many of them actively by the concentration of wild plants into useful stands, small-scale cultivation, burning of natural vegetation to encourage useful species, and various forms of hunting, collectively termed ‘low-level food production’. Many such niches are stable and can continue indefinitely, because forager populations are usually stable. Some are unstable, but these usually transform into other foraging niches, not geographically expansive farming niches. The Epipalaeolithic (final hunter–gatherer) niche in the Near East was complex but stable, with a relatively high population density, until destabilized by an abrupt climatic change. The niche was unintentionally transformed into an agricultural one, due to chance genetic and behavioural attributes of some wild plant and animal species. The agricultural niche could be exported with modifications over much of the Old World. This was driven by massive population increase and had huge impacts on local people, animals and plants wherever the farming niche was carried. Farming niches in some areas may temporarily come close to stability, but the history of the last 11 000 years does not suggest that agriculture is an effective strategy for achieving demographic and political stability in the world's farming populations. PMID:21320899

  18. Black strings in Gauss-Bonnet theory are unstable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, Alex; Oliva, Julio; Vera, Aldo

    2015-05-01

    We report the existence of unstable s-wave modes for black strings in Gauss-Bonnet theory (which is quadratic in the curvature) in seven dimensions. This theory admits analytic uniform black strings that are, in the transverse section, black holes of the same Gauss-Bonnet theory in six dimensions. All the components of the perturbation can be written in terms of a single component and its derivatives. For this, we find a master equation that admits bounded solutions provided the characteristic time of the exponential growth of the perturbation is related to the wave number along the extra direction, as in general relativity. It is known that these configurations suffer from a thermal instability; therefore, the results presented here provide evidence for the Gubser-Mitra conjecture in the context of Gauss-Bonnet theory. Because of the nontriviality of the curvature of the background, all of the components of the metric perturbation appear in the linearized equations. Similar to spherical black holes, the black strings should be obtained as the short-distance limit r ≪α1 /2 of the black-string solution of Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory (which is not known analytically), where α is the Gauss-Bonnet coupling.

  19. Thermal conduction in a mirror-unstable plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, S. V.; Churazov, E. M.; Kunz, M. W.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The plasma of galaxy clusters is subject to firehose and mirror instabilities at scales of order the ion Larmor radius. The mirror instability generates fluctuations of magnetic-field strength δB/B ˜ 1. These fluctuations act as magnetic traps for the heat-conducting electrons, suppressing their transport. We calculate the effective parallel thermal conductivity in the ICM in the presence of the mirror fluctuations for different stages of the evolution of the instability. The mirror fluctuations are limited in amplitude by the maximum and minimum values of the field strength, with no large deviations from the mean value. This key property leads to a finite suppression of thermal conduction at large scales. We find suppression down to ≈0.2 of the Spitzer value for the secular phase of the perturbations' growth, and ≈0.3 for their saturated phase. The effect operates in addition to other suppression mechanisms and independently of them. Globally, fluctuations δB/B ˜ 1 can be present on much larger scales, of the order of the scale of turbulent motions. However, we do not expect large suppression of thermal conduction by these, because their scale is considerably larger than the collisional mean free path of the ICM electrons. The obtained suppression of thermal conduction by a factor of ˜5 appears to be characteristic and potentially universal for a weakly collisional mirror-unstable plasma.

  20. Insights into the pathophysiology of unstable coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, S D; Ravn, H B; Falk, E

    1997-09-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis without thrombosis is, in general, a benign disease. However, plaque disruption, or fissuring, with superimposed thrombosis, frequently complicates the course of coronary atherosclerosis. Small ruptures often remain clinically silent, whereas more extensive plaque rupture may cause the development of unstable angina, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. The risk of plaque disruption depends more on plaque type (composition) than on plaque size and stenosis severity. Major determinants of a plaque's vulnerability to rupture are: the size and consistency of the lipid-rich atheromatous core; the thickness of the fibrous cap covering the core; and ongoing inflammation and repair within the cap. Both plaque vulnerability (intrinsic disease) and rupture triggers (extrinsic forces) are important for plaque disruption. The former predisposes the plaque to rupture whereas the latter may precipitate it. The resultant thrombotic response, which is important for the clinical presentation and outcome, is portly determined by the reactivity of the circulating platelets and the balance between the fibrinolytic and coagulation systems. New ways of identification and treatment of the dangerous vulnerable plaques responsible for infarction and death, and optimization of antithrombotic treatment, are highly warranted in order to prevent and treat life-threatening coronary thrombosis.

  1. Disabilities caused by unstable mutations in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Patricia; Morales, Fernando; Castro, Isabel

    2004-09-01

    Motonic dystrophy and fragile X syndrome are two genetically determined relatively common disabilities. Both are examples of a new type of mutation mechanism called unstable or dynamic mutations, triple repeats expansions or DNA amplification. Fragile X syndrome is recognized as the main cause of hereditary mental retardation and myotonic dystrophy is considered the most common muscular dystrophy of adults. This is a prospective non randomized study of clinically affected people, in order to confirm the diagnosis with molecular techniques (Southern blot and PCR) and to perform cascade screening of the rest of the family to offer them adequate genetic counseling. We were able to corroborate the initial diagnosis in most clinical cases of myotonic dystrophy, but in the cases of mental retardation more than half studies were negative for fragile X syndrome, stressing the difficulties encountered by medical practitioners to diagnose this syndrome. The reasons for this are several; probable the main culprit is the subtle and unspecific clinical picture affected individuals exhibit, particularly children before puberty. Cascade screening, genetic counseling and selective abortion are the only tools available to prevent these disabling diseases for the moment. PMID:17361543

  2. Generalization in Adaptation to Stable and Unstable Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kadiallah, Abdelhamid; Franklin, David W.; Burdet, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Humans skillfully manipulate objects and tools despite the inherent instability. In order to succeed at these tasks, the sensorimotor control system must build an internal representation of both the force and mechanical impedance. As it is not practical to either learn or store motor commands for every possible future action, the sensorimotor control system generalizes a control strategy for a range of movements based on learning performed over a set of movements. Here, we introduce a computational model for this learning and generalization, which specifies how to learn feedforward muscle activity in a function of the state space. Specifically, by incorporating co-activation as a function of error into the feedback command, we are able to derive an algorithm from a gradient descent minimization of motion error and effort, subject to maintaining a stability margin. This algorithm can be used to learn to coordinate any of a variety of motor primitives such as force fields, muscle synergies, physical models or artificial neural networks. This model for human learning and generalization is able to adapt to both stable and unstable dynamics, and provides a controller for generating efficient adaptive motor behavior in robots. Simulation results exhibit predictions consistent with all experiments on learning of novel dynamics requiring adaptation of force and impedance, and enable us to re-examine some of the previous interpretations of experiments on generalization. PMID:23056191

  3. Fundamental studies of coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The authors have examined the pyrolysis of Argonne samples of Wyodak and Illinois No. 6 coal in argon, undecane, Tetralin, and water. The effects of the pyrolysis on individual particles of coal were monitored visually in a cell with diamond windows capable of operation to temperature and pressures in excess of 500{degrees}C and 3000 psi. The changes in the particles from ambient to 460{degrees}C were recorded in real time on video tape, and images were then taken from the tape record and analyzed. The study showed that in argon both coals developed tars at 350{degrees}-370{degrees}C. The tars then quickly evaporated, leaving core particles remarkably similar in size and shape to the initial particles. These observations suggest that coal does not melt nor become fully liquid when heated. Nor does the softened coal undergo crosslinking to generate coke. Rather the simple loss of volatiles leaves behind the core residue as coke. Contrary to the common view, there appears to be no link between the bond-breaking processes yielding tar and the interaction of the coal with H-donors leading to liquefaction. Water as a medium was surprising in its effect. Both coals began to shrink at 300{degrees}-350{degrees}C, with the effect appearing to be more of an erosion rather than a uniform loss of substance as seen in Tetralin. The Wyodak continued to shrink to 460{degrees}C to about half its initial size. With the Illinois No. 6 coal, however, the process reversed at around 420{degrees}C, and the particles appeared to grow with the evolution of a tar, continuing to 460{degrees}C. The authors submit that this final observation is evidence for hydrothermal synthesis of hydrocarbons at these conditions.

  4. Fundamental Limits to Cellular Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Becker, Nils B.; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Mugler, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    In recent years experiments have demonstrated that living cells can measure low chemical concentrations with high precision, and much progress has been made in understanding what sets the fundamental limit to the precision of chemical sensing. Chemical concentration measurements start with the binding of ligand molecules to receptor proteins, which is an inherently noisy process, especially at low concentrations. The signaling networks that transmit the information on the ligand concentration from the receptors into the cell have to filter this receptor input noise as much as possible. These networks, however, are also intrinsically stochastic in nature, which means that they will also add noise to the transmitted signal. In this review, we will first discuss how the diffusive transport and binding of ligand to the receptor sets the receptor correlation time, which is the timescale over which fluctuations in the state of the receptor, arising from the stochastic receptor-ligand binding, decay. We then describe how downstream signaling pathways integrate these receptor-state fluctuations, and how the number of receptors, the receptor correlation time, and the effective integration time set by the downstream network, together impose a fundamental limit on the precision of sensing. We then discuss how cells can remove the receptor input noise while simultaneously suppressing the intrinsic noise in the signaling network. We describe why this mechanism of time integration requires three classes (groups) of resources—receptors and their integration time, readout molecules, energy—and how each resource class sets a fundamental sensing limit. We also briefly discuss the scheme of maximum-likelihood estimation, the role of receptor cooperativity, and how cellular copy protocols differ from canonical copy protocols typically considered in the computational literature, explaining why cellular sensing systems can never reach the Landauer limit on the optimal trade

  5. Frontiers of Fundamental Physics 14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 14th annual international symposium "Frontiers of Fundamental Physics" (FFP14) was organized by the OCEVU Labex. It was held in Marseille, on the Saint-Charles Campus of Aix Marseille University (AMU) and had over 280 participants coming from all over the world. FFP Symposium began in India in 1997 and it became itinerant in 2004, through Europe, Canada and Australia. It covers topics in fundamental physics with the objective to enable scholars working in related areas to meet on a single platform and exchange ideas. In addition to highlighting the progress in these areas, the symposium invites the top researchers to reflect on the educational aspects of our discipline. Moreover, the scientific concepts are also discussed through philosophical and epistemological viewpoints. Several eminent scientists, such as the laureates of prestigious awards (Nobel Prize, Fields Medal,…), have already participated in these meetings. The FFP14 Symposium developed around seven main themes, namely: Astroparticle Physics, Cosmology, High Energy Physics, Quantum Gravity, Mathematical Physics, Physics Education, Epistemology and Philosophy. The morning was devoted to the plenary session, with talks for a broad audience of physicists in its first half (9:00-10:30), and more specialized in its second half (11:00-12:30); this part was held in three amphitheaters. The parallel session of the Symposium took place during the afternoon (14:30-18:30) with seven thematic conferences and an additional conference on open topics named "Frontiers of Fundamental Physics". These eight conferences were organized around the contributions of participants, in addition to the ones of invited speakers. Altogether, there were some 250 contributions to the symposium (talks and posters). The plenary talks were webcasted live and recorded. The slides of the talks and the videos of the plenary talks are available from the Symposium web site: http://ffp14.cpt.univ-mrs.fr/

  6. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications description of the adhesion, friction, abrasion, and wear behavior of solid film lubricants and related tribological materials, including diamond and diamond-like solid films. The book details the properties of solid surfaces, clean surfaces, and contaminated surfaces as well as discussing the structures and mechanical properties of natural and synthetic diamonds; chemical-vapor-deposited diamond film; surface design and engineering toward wear-resistant, self-lubricating diamond films and coatings. The author provides selection and design criteria as well as applications for synthetic and natural coatings in the commercial, industrial and aerospace industries..

  7. Reconstruction of fundamental SUSY parameters

    SciTech Connect

    P. M. Zerwas et al.

    2003-09-25

    We summarize methods and expected accuracies in determining the basic low-energy SUSY parameters from experiments at future e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders in the TeV energy range, combined with results from LHC. In a second step we demonstrate how, based on this set of parameters, the fundamental supersymmetric theory can be reconstructed at high scales near the grand unification or Planck scale. These analyses have been carried out for minimal supergravity [confronted with GMSB for comparison], and for a string effective theory.

  8. Unstable ring-shaped ion distribution functions induced by charge-exchange collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloch, W. J.; Pécseli, H. L.; Trulsen, J. K.

    2013-12-01

    The stability of ion velocity distributions in magnetized plasmas is studied under conditions where the plasma has an E0 × B/B2-drift with respect to a neutral background. Charge-exchange collisions can give rise to velocity distributions having the form of a ring or a loss-cone that can become linearly unstable. Sometimes the distributions have distorted forms and a stability analysis is not straightforward. Numerical simulations offer the most convenient method of a stability analysis in such cases. By numerical simulations using a particle-in-cell code that includes collisional interactions we demonstrate the formation of such velocity distributions and study the instabilities associated with them. We observe the saturation of the linear instability by quasi-linear velocity space diffusion. The parameter dependence of the instability conditions is illustrated by examples. The results are relevant for explaining some of the low frequency oscillations observed in the lower parts of the Earth's ionosphere (E- and F-regions), where collisions with neutrals are abundant. The results are important for laboratory experiments as well.

  9. Clickable Janus Particles.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Laura C; Stebe, Kathleen J; Lee, Daeyeon

    2016-09-14

    Janus particles are colloidal analogues of molecular amphiphiles that can self-assemble to form diverse suprastructures, exhibit motility under appropriate catalytic reactions, and strongly adsorb to fluid-fluid interfaces to stabilize multiphasic fluid mixtures. The chemistry of Janus particles is the fundamental parameter that controls their behavior and utility as colloid surfactants in bulk solution and at fluid interfaces. To enable their widespread utilization, scalable methods that allow for the synthesis of Janus particles with diverse chemical compositions and shapes are highly desirable. Here, we develop clickable Janus particles that can be modified through thiol-yne click reactions with commercially available thiols. Janus particles are modified to be amphiphilic by introducing either carboxyl, hydroxyl, or amine moieties. We also demonstrate that regulating the extent of the modification can be used to control the particle morphology, and thus the type of emulsion stabilized, as well as to fabricate composite Janus particles through sequential click reactions. Modifying Janus particles through thiol-yne click chemistry provides a fast-reacting, scalable synthesis method for the fabrication of diverse Janus particles. PMID:27548642

  10. ORBITAL MIGRATION OF PROTOPLANETS IN A MARGINALLY GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.

    2013-02-20

    Core accretion and disk instability require giant protoplanets to form in the presence of disk gas. Protoplanet migration models generally assume disk masses low enough that the disk's self-gravity can be neglected. However, disk instability requires a disk massive enough to be marginally gravitationally unstable (MGU). Even for core accretion, an FU Orionis outburst may require a brief MGU disk phase. We present a new set of three-dimensional, gravitational radiation hydrodynamics models of MGU disks with multiple protoplanets, which interact gravitationally with the disk and with each other, including disk gas mass accretion. Initial protoplanet masses are 0.01 to 10 M {sub Circled-Plus} for core accretion models, and 0.1 to 3 M {sub Jup} for Nice scenario models, starting on circular orbits with radii of 6, 8, 10, or 12 AU, inside a 0.091 M {sub Sun} disk extending from 4 to 20 AU around a 1 M {sub Sun} protostar. Evolutions are followed for up to {approx}4000 yr and involve phases of relative stability (e {approx} 0.1) interspersed with chaotic phases (e {approx} 0.4) of orbital interchanges. The 0.01 to 10 M {sub Circled-Plus} cores can orbit stably for {approx}1000 yr: monotonic inward or outward orbital migration of the type seen in low mass disks does not occur. A system with giant planet masses similar to our solar system (1.0, 0.33, 0.1, 0.1 M {sub Jup}) was stable for over 1000 yr, and a Jupiter-Saturn-like system was stable for over 3800 yr, implying that our giant planets might well survive an MGU disk phase.

  11. Ventilation is unstable during drowsiness before sleep onset.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Stuart; Morrell, Mary J; Cordingley, Jeremy J; Semple, Stephen J

    2005-11-01

    Ventilation is unstable during drowsiness before sleep onset. We have studied the effects of transitory changes in cerebral state during drowsiness on breath duration and lung volume in eight healthy subjects in the absence of changes in airway resistance and fluctuations of ventilation and CO2 tension, characteristic of the onset of non-rapid eye movement sleep. A volume-cycled ventilator in the assist control mode was used to maintain CO2 tension close to that when awake. Changes in cerebral state were determined by the EEG on a breath-by-breath basis and classified as alpha or theta breaths. Breath duration and the pause in gas flow between the end of expiratory airflow and the next breath were computed for two alpha breaths which preceded a theta breath and for the theta breath itself. The group mean (SD) results for this alpha-to-theta transition was associated with a prolongation in breath duration from 5.2 (SD 1.3) to 13.0 s (SD 2.1) and expiratory pause from 0.7 (SD 0.4) to 7.5 s (SD 2.2). Because the changes in arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2) are unknown during the theta breaths, we made in two subjects a continuous record of PaCO2 in the radial artery. PaCO2 remained constant from the alpha breaths through to the expiratory period of the theta breath by which time the duration of breath was already prolonged, representing an immediate and altered ventilatory response to the prevailing PaCO2. In the eight subjects, the CO2 tension awake was 39.6 Torr (SD 2.3) and on assisted ventilation 38.0 Torr (1.4). We conclude that the ventilatory instability recorded in the present experiments is due to the apneic threshold for CO2 being at or just below that when awake.

  12. UNSTABLE PLANETARY SYSTEMS EMERGING OUT OF GAS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Soko; Thommes, Edward W.; Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2010-05-01

    The discovery of over 400 extrasolar planets allows us to statistically test our understanding of the formation and dynamics of planetary systems via numerical simulations. Traditional N-body simulations of multiple-planet systems without gas disks have successfully reproduced the eccentricity (e) distribution of the observed systems by assuming that the planetary systems are relatively closely packed when the gas disk dissipates, so that they become dynamically unstable within the stellar lifetime. However, such studies cannot explain the small semimajor axes a of extrasolar planetary systems, if planets are formed, as the standard planet formation theory suggests, beyond the ice line. In this paper, we numerically study the evolution of three-planet systems in dissipating gas disks, and constrain the initial conditions that reproduce the observed a and e distributions simultaneously. We adopt initial conditions that are motivated by the standard planet formation theory, and self-consistently simulate the disk evolution and planet migration, by using a hybrid N-body and one-dimensional gas disk code. We also take into account eccentricity damping, and investigate the effect of saturation of corotation resonances on the evolution of planetary systems. We find that the a distribution is largely determined in a gas disk, while the e distribution is determined after the disk dissipation. We also find that there may be an optimum disk mass which leads to the observed a-e distribution. Our simulations generate a larger fraction of planetary systems trapped in mean-motion resonances (MMRs) than the observations, indicating that the disk's perturbation to the planetary orbits may be important to explain the observed rate of MMRs. We also find a much lower occurrence of planets on retrograde orbits than the current observations of close-in planets suggest.

  13. UNDERSTANDING GALAXY OUTFLOWS AS THE PRODUCT OF UNSTABLE TURBULENT SUPPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-02-01

    The interstellar medium is a multiphase gas in which turbulent support is as important as thermal pressure. Sustaining this configuration requires both continuous turbulent stirring and continuous radiative cooling to match the decay of turbulent energy. While this equilibrium can persist for small turbulent velocities, if the one-dimensional velocity dispersion is larger than Almost-Equal-To 35 km s{sup -1}, the gas moves into an unstable regime that leads to rapid heating. I study the implications of this turbulent runaway, showing that it causes a hot gas outflow to form in all galaxies with a gas surface density above Almost-Equal-To 50 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}, corresponding to a star formation rate per unit area of Almost-Equal-To 0.1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. For galaxies with v{sub esc} {approx}> 200 km s{sup -1}, the sonic point of this hot outflow should lie interior to the region containing cold gas and stars, while for galaxies with smaller escape velocities, the sonic point should lie outside this region. This leads to efficient cold cloud acceleration in higher mass galaxies, while in lower mass galaxies, clouds may be ejected by random turbulent motions rather than accelerated by the wind. Finally, I show that energy balance cannot be achieved at all for turbulent media above a surface density of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}.

  14. Astronomers Gain Clues About Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-12-01

    An international team of astronomers has looked at something very big -- a distant galaxy -- to study the behavior of things very small -- atoms and molecules -- to gain vital clues about the fundamental nature of our entire Universe. The team used the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to test whether the laws of nature have changed over vast spans of cosmic time. The Green Bank Telescope The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for GBT gallery) "The fundamental constants of physics are expected to remain fixed across space and time; that's why they're called constants! Now, however, new theoretical models for the basic structure of matter indicate that they may change. We're testing these predictions." said Nissim Kanekar, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), in Socorro, New Mexico. So far, the scientists' measurements show no change in the constants. "We've put the most stringent limits yet on some changes in these constants, but that's not the end of the story," said Christopher Carilli, another NRAO astronomer. "This is the exciting frontier where astronomy meets particle physics," Carilli explained. The research can help answer fundamental questions about whether the basic components of matter are tiny particles or tiny vibrating strings, how many dimensions the Universe has, and the nature of "dark energy." The astronomers were looking for changes in two quantities: the ratio of the masses of the electron and the proton, and a number physicists call the fine structure constant, a combination of the electron charge, the speed of light and the Planck constant. These values, considered fundamental physical constants, once were "taken as time independent, with values given once and forever" said German particle physicist Christof Wetterich. However, Wetterich explained, "the viewpoint of modern particle theory has changed in recent years," with ideas such as

  15. Orbital Survival of Meter-size and Larger Bodies During Gravitationally Unstable Phases of Protoplanetary Disk Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2015-07-01

    A long-standing problem in the collisional accretion of terrestrial planets is the possible loss of m-size bodies through their inward migration onto the protostar as a result of gas drag forces. Such inward migration can be halted, and indeed even reversed, in a protoplanetary disk with local pressure maxima, such as marginally gravitationally unstable (MGU) phases of evolution, e.g., FU Orionis events. Results are presented for a suite of three-dimensional models of MGU disks extending from 1 to 10 AU and containing solid particles with sizes of 1 cm, 10 cm, 1 m, or 10 m, subject to disk gas drag and gravitational forces. These hydrodynamical models show that over disk evolution time scales of ∼ 6× {10}3 years or longer, during which over half the gaseous disk mass is accreted by the protostar, very few 1 and 10 m bodies are lost through inward migration: most bodies survive and orbit stably in the outer disk. A greater fraction of 1 and 10 cm particles are lost to the central protostar during these time periods, as such particles are more closely tied to the disk gas accreting onto the protostar, but even in these cases, a significant fraction survive and undergo transport from the hot inner disk to the cold outer disk, perhaps explaining the presence of small refractory particles in Comet Wild 2. Evidently MGU disk phases offer a means to overcome the m-sized migration barrier to collisional accumulation.

  16. Fundamental Travel Demand Model Example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanssen, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Instances of transportation models are abundant and detailed "how to" instruction is available in the form of transportation software help documentation. The purpose of this paper is to look at the fundamental inputs required to build a transportation model by developing an example passenger travel demand model. The example model reduces the scale to a manageable size for the purpose of illustrating the data collection and analysis required before the first step of the model begins. This aspect of the model development would not reasonably be discussed in software help documentation (it is assumed the model developer comes prepared). Recommendations are derived from the example passenger travel demand model to suggest future work regarding the data collection and analysis required for a freight travel demand model.

  17. Fundamental base closure environmental principles

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    Military base closures present a paradox. The rate, scale and timing of military base closures is historically unique. However, each base itself typically does not present unique problems. Thus, the challenge is to design innovative solutions to base redevelopment and remediation issues, while simultaneously adopting common, streamlined or pre-approved strategies to shared problems. The author presents six environmental principles that are fundamental to base closure. They are: remediation not clean up; remediation will impact reuse; reuse will impact remediation; remediation and reuse must be coordinated; environmental contamination must be evaluated as any other initial physical constraint on development, not as an overlay after plans are created; and remediation will impact development, financing and marketability.

  18. Fundamental reaction pathways during coprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Gatsis, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the fundamental reaction pathways in coal petroleum residuum coprocessing. Once the reaction pathways are defined, further efforts can be directed at improving those aspects of the chemistry of coprocessing that are responsible for the desired results such as high oil yields, low dihydrogen consumption, and mild reaction conditions. We decided to carry out this investigation by looking at four basic aspects of coprocessing: (1) the effect of fossil fuel materials on promoting reactions essential to coprocessing such as hydrogen atom transfer, carbon-carbon bond scission, and hydrodemethylation; (2) the effect of varied mild conditions on the coprocessing reactions; (3) determination of dihydrogen uptake and utilization under severe conditions as a function of the coal or petroleum residuum employed; and (4) the effect of varied dihydrogen pressure, temperature, and residence time on the uptake and utilization of dihydrogen and on the distribution of the coprocessed products. Accomplishments are described.

  19. Astronomical reach of fundamental physics.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Adam S; Ostriker, Jeremiah P

    2014-02-18

    Using basic physical arguments, we derive by dimensional and physical analysis the characteristic masses and sizes of important objects in the universe in terms of just a few fundamental constants. This exercise illustrates the unifying power of physics and the profound connections between the small and the large in the cosmos we inhabit. We focus on the minimum and maximum masses of normal stars, the corresponding quantities for neutron stars, the maximum mass of a rocky planet, the maximum mass of a white dwarf, and the mass of a typical galaxy. To zeroth order, we show that all these masses can be expressed in terms of either the Planck mass or the Chandrasekar mass, in combination with various dimensionless quantities. With these examples, we expose the deep interrelationships imposed by nature between disparate realms of the universe and the amazing consequences of the unifying character of physical law. PMID:24477692

  20. Holographic viscosity of fundamental matter.

    PubMed

    Mateos, David; Myers, Robert C; Thomson, Rowan M

    2007-03-01

    A holographic dual of a finite-temperature SU(Nc) gauge theory with a small number of flavors Nf or =1/4pi. Given the known results for the entropy density, the contribution of the fundamental matter eta fund is therefore enhanced at strong 't Hooft coupling lambda; for example, eta fund approximately lambda NcNfT3 in four dimensions. Other transport coefficients are analogously enhanced. These results hold with or without a baryon number chemical potential. PMID:17358523

  1. [INFORMATION, A FUNDAMENTAL PATIENT RIGHT?].

    PubMed

    Mémeteau, Gérard

    2015-03-01

    Although expressed before the "Lambert" case, which has led us to think about refusal and assent in the context of internal rights, conventional rights--and in the context of the patient's bed!--these simple remarks present the patient's right to medical information as a so-called fundamental right. But it can only be understood with a view to a treatment or other medical act; otherwise it has no reason to be and is only an academic exercise, however exciting, but not much use by itself. What if we reversed the terms of the problem: the right of the doctor to information? (The beautiful thesis of Ph. Gaston, Paris 8, 2 December 2014).

  2. Fundamental studies of polymer filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.F.; Lu, M.T.; Robison, T.W.; Rogers, Y.C.; Wilson, K.V.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were (1) to develop an enhanced fundamental understanding of the coordination chemistry of hazardous-metal-ion complexation with water-soluble metal-binding polymers, and (2) to exploit this knowledge to develop improved separations for analytical methods, metals processing, and waste treatment. We investigated features of water-soluble metal-binding polymers that affect their binding constants and selectivity for selected transition metal ions. We evaluated backbone polymers using light scattering and ultrafiltration techniques to determine the effect of pH and ionic strength on the molecular volume of the polymers. The backbone polymers were incrementally functionalized with a metal-binding ligand. A procedure and analytical method to determine the absolute level of functionalization was developed and the results correlated with the elemental analysis, viscosity, and molecular size.

  3. Astronomical reach of fundamental physics.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Adam S; Ostriker, Jeremiah P

    2014-02-18

    Using basic physical arguments, we derive by dimensional and physical analysis the characteristic masses and sizes of important objects in the universe in terms of just a few fundamental constants. This exercise illustrates the unifying power of physics and the profound connections between the small and the large in the cosmos we inhabit. We focus on the minimum and maximum masses of normal stars, the corresponding quantities for neutron stars, the maximum mass of a rocky planet, the maximum mass of a white dwarf, and the mass of a typical galaxy. To zeroth order, we show that all these masses can be expressed in terms of either the Planck mass or the Chandrasekar mass, in combination with various dimensionless quantities. With these examples, we expose the deep interrelationships imposed by nature between disparate realms of the universe and the amazing consequences of the unifying character of physical law.

  4. Astronomical reach of fundamental physics

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Adam S.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2014-01-01

    Using basic physical arguments, we derive by dimensional and physical analysis the characteristic masses and sizes of important objects in the universe in terms of just a few fundamental constants. This exercise illustrates the unifying power of physics and the profound connections between the small and the large in the cosmos we inhabit. We focus on the minimum and maximum masses of normal stars, the corresponding quantities for neutron stars, the maximum mass of a rocky planet, the maximum mass of a white dwarf, and the mass of a typical galaxy. To zeroth order, we show that all these masses can be expressed in terms of either the Planck mass or the Chandrasekar mass, in combination with various dimensionless quantities. With these examples, we expose the deep interrelationships imposed by nature between disparate realms of the universe and the amazing consequences of the unifying character of physical law. PMID:24477692

  5. Cognition is … Fundamentally Cultural

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Andrea; Beller, Sieghard

    2013-01-01

    A prevailing concept of cognition in psychology is inspired by the computer metaphor. Its focus on mental states that are generated and altered by information input, processing, storage and transmission invites a disregard for the cultural dimension of cognition, based on three (implicit) assumptions: cognition is internal, processing can be distinguished from content, and processing is independent of cultural background. Arguing against each of these assumptions, we point out how culture may affect cognitive processes in various ways, drawing on instances from numerical cognition, ethnobiological reasoning, and theory of mind. Given the pervasive cultural modulation of cognition—on all of Marr’s levels of description—we conclude that cognition is indeed fundamentally cultural, and that consideration of its cultural dimension is essential for a comprehensive understanding. PMID:25379225

  6. Fundamental issues in questionnaire design.

    PubMed

    Murray, P

    1999-07-01

    The questionnaire is probably the most common form of data collection tool used in nursing research. There is a misconception that anyone with a clear grasp of English and a modicum of common sense can design an effective questionnaire. Contrary to such common belief, this article will demonstrate that questionnaire design is a complex and time consuming process, but a necessary labour to ensure valid and reliable data is collected. In addition, meticulous construction is more likely to yield data that can be utilized in the pursuit of objective, quantitative and generalizable truths, upon which practice and policy decisions can be formulated. This article examines a myriad of fundamental issues surrounding questionnaire design, which encompass question wording, question order, presentation, administration and data collection, amongst other issues.

  7. Rare Isotopes and Fundamental Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, B. Alex; Engel, Jonathan; Haxton, Wick; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael; Romalis, Michael; Savard, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Experiments searching for new interactions in nuclear beta decay / Klaus P. Jungmann -- The beta-neutrino correlation in sodium-21 and other nuclei / P. A. Vetter ... [et al.] -- Nuclear structure and fundamental symmetries/ B. Alex Brown -- Schiff moments and nuclear structure / J. Engel -- Superallowed nuclear beta decay: recent results and their impact on V[symbol] / J. C. Hardy and I. S. Towner -- New calculation of the isospin-symmetry breaking correlation to superallowed Fermi beta decay / I. S. Towner and J. C. Hardy -- Precise measurement of the [symbol]H to [symbol]He mass difference / D. E. Pinegar ... [et al.] -- Limits on scalar currents from the 0+ to 0+ decay of [symbol]Ar and isospin breaking in [symbol]Cl and [symbol]Cl / A. Garcia -- Nuclear constraints on the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction / W. C. Haxton -- Atomic PNC theory: current status and future prospects / M. S. Safronova -- Parity-violating nucleon-nucleon interactions: what can we learn from nuclear anapole moments? / B. Desplanques -- Proposed experiment for the measurement of the anapole moment in francium / A. Perez Galvan ... [et al.] -- The Radon-EDM experiment / Tim Chupp for the Radon-EDM collaboration -- The lead radius Eexperiment (PREX) and parity violating measurements of neutron densities / C. J. Horowitz -- Nuclear structure aspects of Schiff moment and search for collective enhancements / Naftali Auerbach and Vladimir Zelevinsky -- The interpretation of atomic electric dipole moments: Schiff theorem and its corrections / C. -P. Liu -- T-violation and the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the mercury atom / M. D. Swallows ... [et al.] -- The new concept for FRIB and its potential for fundamental interactions studies / Guy Savard -- Collinear laser spectroscopy and polarized exotic nuclei at NSCL / K. Minamisono -- Environmental dependence of masses and coupling constants / M. Pospelov.

  8. Fundamental enabling issues in nanotechnology :

    SciTech Connect

    Floro, Jerrold Anthony; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Hearne, Sean Joseph; Hoyt, Jeffrey John; Seel, Steven Craig; Webb, Edmund Blackburn,; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.

    2007-10-01

    To effectively integrate nanotechnology into functional devices, fundamental aspects of material behavior at the nanometer scale must be understood. Stresses generated during thin film growth strongly influence component lifetime and performance; stress has also been proposed as a mechanism for stabilizing supported nanoscale structures. Yet the intrinsic connections between the evolving morphology of supported nanostructures and stress generation are still a matter of debate. This report presents results from a combined experiment and modeling approach to study stress evolution during thin film growth. Fully atomistic simulations are presented predicting stress generation mechanisms and magnitudes during all growth stages, from island nucleation to coalescence and film thickening. Simulations are validated by electrodeposition growth experiments, which establish the dependence of microstructure and growth stresses on process conditions and deposition geometry. Sandia is one of the few facilities with the resources to combine experiments and modeling/theory in this close a fashion. Experiments predicted an ongoing coalescence process that generates signficant tensile stress. Data from deposition experiments also supports the existence of a kinetically limited compressive stress generation mechanism. Atomistic simulations explored island coalescence and deposition onto surfaces intersected by grain boundary structures to permit investigation of stress evolution during later growth stages, e.g. continual island coalescence and adatom incorporation into grain boundaries. The predictive capabilities of simulation permit direct determination of fundamental processes active in stress generation at the nanometer scale while connecting those processes, via new theory, to continuum models for much larger island and film structures. Our combined experiment and simulation results reveal the necessary materials science to tailor stress, and therefore performance, in

  9. Size Limit for Particle-Stabilized Emulsion Droplets under Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavacoli, J. W.; Katgert, G.; Kim, E. G.; Cates, M. E.; Clegg, P. S.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate that emulsion droplets stabilized by interfacial particles become unstable beyond a size threshold set by gravity. This holds not only for colloids but also for supracolloidal glass beads, using which we directly observe the ejection of particles near the droplet base. The number of particles acting together in these ejection events decreases with time until a stable acornlike configuration is reached. Stability occurs when the weight of all remaining particles is less than the interfacial binding force of one particle. We also show the importance of the curvature of the droplet surface in promoting particle ejection.

  10. Size limit for particle-stabilized emulsion droplets under gravity.

    PubMed

    Tavacoli, J W; Katgert, G; Kim, E G; Cates, M E; Clegg, P S

    2012-06-29

    We demonstrate that emulsion droplets stabilized by interfacial particles become unstable beyond a size threshold set by gravity. This holds not only for colloids but also for supracolloidal glass beads, using which we directly observe the ejection of particles near the droplet base. The number of particles acting together in these ejection events decreases with time until a stable acornlike configuration is reached. Stability occurs when the weight of all remaining particles is less than the interfacial binding force of one particle. We also show the importance of the curvature of the droplet surface in promoting particle ejection.

  11. Fundamental studies of coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.S.

    1993-02-04

    The results for the control run for a single particle are shown in Figure 1. The figure, which includes other thermolytic data for Illinois No. 6 coal, shows that the particle was stable in size to around 440[degree]C. At that point it contracted very rapidly to about half its size over the next 15[degrees]. Also shown are data for the same coal from SRI's field ionization mass spectrometer (FIMS), in which case a sample of the coal is heated at 2.5[degrees]C/min from ambient to 500[degrees]C and the effluent is swept into mass spectrometer. The evolution of the coal volatiles is reflected by accumulated ion count with increasing temperature, and is presented in the figure as the fraction of total volatiles. As the figure shows, the abrupt increase in volatility corresponds very closely to the equally abrupt reduction in particle size. The weight average molecular weight profile from the FIMS work is also in the figure, and shows that the coal experiences a simple loss of volatiles of increasing molecular weight up to around 440[degrees]C. At that point pyrolysis and fragmentation come about, reflected in the quick reversal and decline in molecular weight. The high rate of volatility and shrinkage are clearly associated with this second stage in the pyrolytic process. These results are further in line with the account of Eser et al. (1991) who found in studies of Illinois No. 6 coal in a high pressure microdilatometer that the coal contracted by about 40% in the same region of temperature at heating rates of around 20[degrees]C/min. At higher heating rates the contraction was followed by a swelling. Finally, in our cell work we observed the deposition of tar in the diamond windows starting at around 350[degrees]C.

  12. Diagnostics of the unstable envelopes of Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassitelli, L.; Chené, A.-N.; Sanyal, D.; Langer, N.; St-Louis, N.; Bestenlehner, J. M.; Fossati, L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The envelopes of stars near the Eddington limit are prone to various instabilities. A high Eddington factor in connection with the iron opacity peak leads to convective instability, and a corresponding envelope inflation may induce pulsational instability. Here, we investigate the occurrence and consequences of both instabilities in models of Wolf-Rayet stars. Aims: We determine the convective velocities in the sub-surface convective zones to estimate the amplitude of the turbulent velocity at the base of the wind that potentially leads to the formation of small-scale wind structures, as observed in several Wolf-Rayet stars. We also investigate the effect of stellar wind mass loss on the pulsations of our stellar models. Methods: We approximated solar metallicity Wolf-Rayet stars in the range 2-17 M⊙ by models of mass-losing helium stars, computed with the Bonn stellar evolution code. We characterized the properties of convection in the envelope of these stars adopting the standard mixing length theory. Results: Our results show the occurrence of sub-surface convective regions in all studied models. Small (≈1 km s-1) surface velocity amplitudes are predicted for models with masses below ≈10 M⊙. For models with M ≳ 10 M⊙, the surface velocity amplitudes are of the order of 10 km s-1. Moreover we find the occurrence of pulsations for stars in the mass range 9-14 M⊙, while mass loss appears to stabilize the more massive Wolf-Rayet stars. We confront our results with observationally derived line variabilities of 17 WN stars, of which we analysed eight here for the first time. The data suggest variability to occur for stars above 10 M⊙, which is increasing linearly with mass above this value, in agreement with our results. We further find our models in the mass range 9-14M⊙ to be unstable to radial pulsations, and predict local magnetic fields of the order of hundreds of gauss in Wolf-Rayet stars more massive than ≈10 M⊙. Conclusions: Our

  13. UNSTABLE HELIUM SHELL BURNING ON ACCRETING WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Ken J.; Bildsten, Lars E-mail: bildsten@kitp.ucsb.edu

    2009-07-10

    AM Canum Venaticorum (AM CVn) binaries consist of a degenerate helium donor and a helium, C/O, or O/Ne white dwarf accretor, with accretion rates of M-dot=10{sup -13}-10{sup -5}M{sub odot}yr{sup -1}. For accretion rates <10{sup -6} M {sub sun} yr{sup -1}, the accreted helium ignites unstably, resulting in a helium flash. As the donor mass and M-dot decrease, the ignition mass increases and eventually becomes larger than the donor mass, yielding a 'last-flash' ignition mass of {approx}<0.1 M{sub sun}. Bildsten et al. have predicted that the largest outbursts of these systems will lead to dynamical burning and thermonuclear supernovae. In this paper, we study the evolution of the He-burning shells in more detail. We calculate maximum achievable temperatures as well as the minimum envelope masses that achieve dynamical burning conditions, finding that AM CVn systems with accretors {approx}>0.8 M {sub sun} will undergo dynamical burning. Triple-{alpha} reactions during the hydrostatic evolution set a lower limit to the {sup 12}C mass fraction of 0.001-0.05 when dynamical burning occurs, but core dredge-up may yield {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, and/or {sup 20}Ne mass fractions of {approx}0.1. Accreted {sup 14}N will likely remain {sup 14}N during the accretion and convective phases, but regardless of {sup 14}N's fate, the neutron-to-proton ratio at the beginning of convection is fixed until the onset of dynamical burning. During explosive burning, the {sup 14}N will undergo {sup 14}N({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 18}F({alpha}, p){sup 21}Ne, liberating a proton for the subsequent {sup 12}C(p, {gamma}){sup 13}N({alpha}, p){sup 16}O reaction, which bypasses the relatively slow {alpha}-capture onto {sup 12}C. Future hydrodynamic simulations must include these isotopes, as the additional reactions will reduce the Zel'dovich-von Neumann-Doering length, making the propagation of the detonation wave more likely.

  14. Landslide trigger factors on populated, unstable slopes, Tusion, Tajikistan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domej, Gisela

    2015-04-01

    The Pamir region close to the Tajik-Afghan border is regularly affected by severe landslides threatening local population, their livelihood and infrastructure. In addition to landslides appearing as immediate consequence of earthquake, a high number of ground movements without previous seismic activity are also observed. The number of reported events and problem areas has strongly increased within the last ten to fifteen years. Consequently, a study was conducted to determine the triggering factors of these landslides without seismic cause. For accessibility reasons, the community of Tusion, southeast of Khorog, Gorno-Badakhshan, southern Tajikistan, where the capital township is located on a slowly moving slope, was chosen for the pilot project, and geologic mapping as well as seismic refraction and Schlumberger geoelectrics were applied. The geologic survey showed that the valley flanks around Tusion are covered with large amounts of postglacial and fluvial debris as well as moraine deposits. The absence of glacial ice and the retreat of remaining glaciers caused unstable valley flanks at many sites and, in consequence, extensive gravitational mass movements in the past, which are responsible for the today's layered ground structure as well as many secondary slumps. The latter often damage irrigation lines, which tends to further destabilize the slope. To obtain an accurate image of the superposed layers, the geophysical survey was conducted on three inhabited flanks. Arguments in favour for those three locations were not only the possibility of direct risk estimation for the region, but also the fact that the number of landslides increases constantly with population growth. Seismic and electric methods were applied in parallel to distinguish soil types and structural properties as well as to estimate the degree of water saturation. Despite of the methods' simplicity, they revealed precise explanations on triggering factors of landslides. The geophysical survey

  15. Fundamental studies of coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.S.

    1992-12-04

    SRI International is conducting studies of the effects of liquid water at temperatures and pressures near its critical point on the behavior of coal. The present study involves the construction and operation of a cell for visual observation of the process. The cell is batch charged with a dispersion of coal particles in solvent; it is designed for continuous flow operation should that mode of operation become desirable. It can be electrically heated to 550[degree]C and can handle pressures to 5000 psi. Direct observation of individual particles takes place through a pair of diamond windows, a lens assembly, and a television monitoring system. A number of runs have been performed during this quarter, including runs with Wyodak and Illinois No. 6 coal with both water and tetralin. A video tape of two runs was submitted with a monthly report during this quarter, and a tape with four runs in included with this report. Unfortunately just as our experience with the cell was developing, one of the diamonds cracked and the replacement is not expected before December. Accordingly we have spent some time operating the cell with a single window and front lighting.

  16. Fundamentals and Techniques of Nonimaging

    SciTech Connect

    O'Gallagher, J. J.; Winston, R.

    2003-07-10

    This is the final report describing a long term basic research program in nonimaging optics that has led to major advances in important areas, including solar energy, fiber optics, illumination techniques, light detectors, and a great many other applications. The term ''nonimaging optics'' refers to the optics of extended sources in systems for which image forming is not important, but effective and efficient collection, concentration, transport, and distribution of light energy is. Although some of the most widely known developments of the early concepts have been in the field of solar energy, a broad variety of other uses have emerged. Most important, under the auspices of this program in fundamental research in nonimaging optics established at the University of Chicago with support from the Office of Basic Energy Sciences at the Department of Energy, the field has become very dynamic, with new ideas and concepts continuing to develop, while applications of the early concepts continue to be pursued. While the subject began as part of classical geometrical optics, it has been extended subsequently to the wave optics domain. Particularly relevant to potential new research directions are recent developments in the formalism of statistical and wave optics, which may be important in understanding energy transport on the nanoscale. Nonimaging optics permits the design of optical systems that achieve the maximum possible concentration allowed by physical conservation laws. The earliest designs were constructed by optimizing the collection of the extreme rays from a source to the desired target: the so-called ''edge-ray'' principle. Later, new concentrator types were generated by placing reflectors along the flow lines of the ''vector flux'' emanating from lambertian emitters in various geometries. A few years ago, a new development occurred with the discovery that making the design edge-ray a functional of some other system parameter permits the construction of whole

  17. Do goldfish miss the fundamental?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, Richard R.

    2003-10-01

    The perception of harmonic complexes was studied in goldfish using classical respiratory conditioning and a stimulus generalization paradigm. Groups of animals were initially conditioned to several harmonic complexes with a fundamental frequency (f0) of 100 Hz. ln some cases the f0 component was present, and in other cases, the f0 component was absent. After conditioning, animals were tested for generalization to novel harmonic complexes having different f0's, some with f0 present and some with f0 absent. Generalization gradients always peaked at 100 Hz, indicating that the pitch value of the conditioning complexes was consistent with the f0, whether or not f0 was present in the conditioning or test complexes. Thus, goldfish do not miss the fundmental with respect to a pitch-like perceptual dimension. However, generalization gradients tended to have different skirt slopes for the f0-present and f0-absent conditioning and test stimuli. This suggests that goldfish distinguish between f0 present/absent stimuli, probably on the basis of a timbre-like perceptual dimension. These and other results demonstrate that goldfish respond to complex sounds as if they possessed perceptual dimensions similar to pitch and timbre as defined for human and other vertebrate listeners. [Work supported by NIH/NIDCD.

  18. Fluorescence lifetimes: fundamentals and interpretations.

    PubMed

    Noomnarm, Ulai; Clegg, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence measurements have been an established mainstay of photosynthesis experiments for many decades. Because in the photosynthesis literature the basics of excited states and their fates are not usually described, we have presented here an easily understandable text for biology students in the style of a chapter in a text book. In this review we give an educational overview of fundamental physical principles of fluorescence, with emphasis on the temporal response of emission. Escape from the excited state of a molecule is a dynamic event, and the fluorescence emission is in direct kinetic competition with several other pathways of de-excitation. It is essentially through a kinetic competition between all the pathways of de-excitation that we gain information about the fluorescent sample on the molecular scale. A simple probability allegory is presented that illustrates the basic ideas that are important for understanding and interpreting most fluorescence experiments. We also briefly point out challenges that confront the experimenter when interpreting time-resolved fluorescence responses.

  19. Fundamental studies of fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aamodt, R.E.; Catto, P.J.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Myra, J.R.; Russell, D.A.

    1992-05-26

    The major portion of this program is devoted to critical ICH phenomena. The topics include edge physics, fast wave propagation, ICH induced high frequency instabilities, and a preliminary antenna design for Ignitor. This research was strongly coordinated with the world's experimental and design teams at JET, Culham, ORNL, and Ignitor. The results have been widely publicized at both general scientific meetings and topical workshops including the speciality workshop on ICRF design and physics sponsored by Lodestar in April 1992. The combination of theory, empirical modeling, and engineering design in this program makes this research particularly important for the design of future devices and for the understanding and performance projections of present tokamak devices. Additionally, the development of a diagnostic of runaway electrons on TEXT has proven particularly useful for the fundamental understanding of energetic electron confinement. This work has led to a better quantitative basis for quasilinear theory and the role of magnetic vs. electrostatic field fluctuations on electron transport. An APS invited talk was given on this subject and collaboration with PPPL personnel was also initiated. Ongoing research on these topics will continue for the remainder fo the contract period and the strong collaborations are expected to continue, enhancing both the relevance of the work and its immediate impact on areas needing critical understanding.

  20. Low threshold characteristic of pulsed confocal unstable optical parametric oscillators with Gaussian reflectivity mirrors.

    PubMed

    Zou, Shanshan; Gong, Mali; Liu, Qiang; Chen, Gang

    2005-02-01

    An iterative threshold model for a pulsed singly resonant Gaussian-reflectivity-mirror (GRM) confocal unstable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) has been proposed. It is found that OPO threshold is determined by important parameters such as GRM central reflectance, Gaussian reflectivity profile, cavity magnification factor, cavity physical length, crystal length, pump pulsewidth. It is demonstrated that this model can be extended to plane-parallel resonator or uniform-reflectivity-mirror (URM) unstable resonator when some specific values are taken. Experimental results show excellent agreement with values calculated from theoretical model. Both theoretical calculations and experimental data illustrate that GRM is a useful solution to reduce threshold of unstable OPO. PMID:19494938

  1. Evaluation of stable and unstable resonator configurations for efficient second-harmonic laser systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams-Byrd, Julie A.; Barnes, Norman P.

    1992-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of a stable resonator, self-filtering unstable resonator, and an unstable resonator with a graded reflectivity mirror (GRM) as the output coupler is presented. The GRM resonator produced a slope efficiency of 1.4 percent, best beam quality (1.4 times diffraction limit), and highest conversion efficiency (50 percent). Other accomplishments include determination of the importance of measuring thermal focusing when designing unstable resonators, development of techniques in measuring thermal focusing and birefringence in laser materials, and development of a high brightness laser system for efficient second harmonic conversion.

  2. Unstable Nuclei in Astrophysics - Proceedings of the International Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Kajino, T.

    1992-01-01

    Kinematics Reaction Yields at 0° * Astrophysical Information for Capture Reactions by Coulomb Dissociation (Contributed) * VI. Electroweak Processes in Astrophysics * The Neutrino Process and Neutrino r-Process * Diffusion of Neutrinos in a Presupernova Star and the Effect of Electron Screening of Nuclei * Multigroup Simulation of Protoneutron Star Cooling and Neutrino Spectra * VII. Neutron Stars and Equations of State * Properties of Dense Supernova Matter and Hot Neutron Stars at the Birth * Impact of the Nuclear Equation of State on Models of Rotating Neutron Stars * Supernova and Neutron Stars with Equations of State in Relativistic Many Body Theory Constrained by Unstable Nuclei * Nuclear Shapes in the Crust of Neutron Stars and in the Core of Supernovae (Contributed) * List of Contributed Papers * List of Participants * Author Index

  3. Consequences of an unstable chemical stratification on mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Tosi, Nicola; Breuer, Doris

    2013-04-01

    Early in the history of terrestrial planets, the fractional crystallization of primordial magma oceans may have led to the formation of large scale chemical heterogeneities. These may have been preserved over the entire planetary evolution as suggested for Mars by the isotopic analysis of the so-called SNC meteorites. The fractional crystallization of a magma ocean leads to a chemical stratification characterized by a progressive enrichment in heavy elements from the core-mantle boundary to the surface. This results in an unstable configuration that causes the overturn of the mantle and the subsequent formation of a stable chemical layering. Assuming scaling parameters appropriate for Mars, we first performed simulations of 2D thermo-chemical convection in Cartesian geometry with the numerical code YACC [1]. We investigated systems heated either solely from below or from within by varying systematically the buoyancy ratio B, which measures the relative importance of chemical to thermal buoyancy, and the mantle rheology, by considering systems with constant, strongly temperature-dependent and plastic viscosity. We ran a large set of simulations spanning a wide parameter space in order to understand the basic physics governing the magma ocean cumulate overturn and its consequence on mantle dynamics. Moreover, we derived scaling laws that relate the time over which chemical heterogeneities can be preserved (mixing time) and the critical yield stress (maximal yield stress that allows the lithosphere to undergo brittle failure) to the buoyancy ratio. We have found that the mixing time increases exponentially with B, while the critical yield stress shows a linear dependence. We investigated then Mars' early thermo-chemical evolution using the code GAIA in a 2D cylindrical geometry [2] and assuming a detailed magma ocean crystallization sequence as obtained from geochemical modeling [3]. We used an initial composition profile adapted from [3], accounted for an exothermic

  4. Fundamental mechanisms of micromachine reliability

    SciTech Connect

    DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.; KNAPP,JAMES A.; REDMOND,JAMES M.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; MAYER,THOMAS K.

    2000-01-01

    Due to extreme surface to volume ratios, adhesion and friction are critical properties for reliability of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS), but are not well understood. In this LDRD the authors established test structures, metrology and numerical modeling to conduct studies on adhesion and friction in MEMS. They then concentrated on measuring the effect of environment on MEMS adhesion. Polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) is the primary material of interest in MEMS because of its integrated circuit process compatibility, low stress, high strength and conformal deposition nature. A plethora of useful micromachined device concepts have been demonstrated using Sandia National Laboratories' sophisticated in-house capabilities. One drawback to polysilicon is that in air the surface oxidizes, is high energy and is hydrophilic (i.e., it wets easily). This can lead to catastrophic failure because surface forces can cause MEMS parts that are brought into contact to adhere rather than perform their intended function. A fundamental concern is how environmental constituents such as water will affect adhesion energies in MEMS. The authors first demonstrated an accurate method to measure adhesion as reported in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 through 5, they then studied the effect of water on adhesion depending on the surface condition (hydrophilic or hydrophobic). As described in Chapter 2, they find that adhesion energy of hydrophilic MEMS surfaces is high and increases exponentially with relative humidity (RH). Surface roughness is the controlling mechanism for this relationship. Adhesion can be reduced by several orders of magnitude by silane coupling agents applied via solution processing. They decrease the surface energy and render the surface hydrophobic (i.e. does not wet easily). However, only a molecular monolayer coats the surface. In Chapters 3-5 the authors map out the extent to which the monolayer reduces adhesion versus RH. They find that adhesion is independent of

  5. Cosmology with decaying particles

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S.

    1984-09-01

    We consider a cosmological model in which an unstable massive relic particle species (denoted by X) has an initial mass density relative to baryons ..beta../sup -1/ identically equal rho/sub X//rho/sub B/ >> 1, and then decays recently (redshift z less than or equal to 1000) into particles which are still relativistic today (denoted by R). We write down and solve the coupled equations for the cosmic scale factor a(t), the energy density in the various components (rho/sub X/, rho/sub R/, rho/sub B/), and the growth of linear density perturbations (delta rho/rho). The solutions form a one parameter (..beta..) family of solutions; physically ..beta../sup -1/ approx. = (..cap omega../sub R//..cap omega../sub NR/) x (1 + z/sub D/) = (ratio today of energy density of relativistic to nonrelativistic particles) x (1 + redshift of (decay)). We discuss the observational implications of such a cosmological model and compare our results to earlier results computed in the simultaneous decay approximation. In an appendix we briefly consider the case where one of the decay products of the X is massive and becomes nonrelativistic by the present epoch. 21 references.

  6. Dissolution patterns and mixing dynamics in unstable reactive flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Juan J.; Dentz, Marco; Cabeza, Yoar; Carrera, Jesus

    2015-08-01

    We study the fundamental problem of mixing and chemical reactions under a Rayleigh-Taylor-type hydrodynamic instability in a miscible two-fluid system. The dense fluid mixture, which is generated at the fluid-fluid interface, leads to the onset of a convective fingering instability and triggers a fast chemical dissolution reaction. Contrary to intuition, the dissolution pattern does not map out the finger geometry. Instead, it displays a dome-like, hierarchical structure that follows the path of the ascending fluid interface and the regions of maximum mixing. These mixing and reaction hot spots coincide with the flow stagnation points, at which the interfacial mixing layer is compressed and deformed. We show that the deformation of the boundary layer around the stagnation points controls the evolution of the global scalar dissipation and reaction rates and shapes the structure of the reacted zones. The persistent compression of the mixing layer explains the independence of the mixing rate from the Rayleigh number when convection dominates.

  7. Delayed feedback control and phase reduction of unstable quasi-periodic orbits.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Natsuhiro; Komuro, Motomasa

    2014-09-01

    The delayed feedback control (DFC) is applied to stabilize unstable quasi-periodic orbits (QPOs) in discrete-time systems. The feedback input is given by the difference between the current state and a time-delayed state in the DFC. However, there is an inevitable time-delay mismatch in QPOs. To evaluate the influence of the time-delay mismatch on the DFC, we propose a phase reduction method for QPOs and construct a phase response curve (PRC) from unstable QPOs directly. Using the PRC, we estimate the rotation number of QPO stabilized by the DFC. We show that the orbit of the DFC is consistent with the unstable QPO perturbed by a small state difference resulting from the time-delay mismatch, implying that the DFC can certainly stabilize the unstable QPO.

  8. Two degree of freedom control scheme for unstable processes with small time delay.

    PubMed

    Ajmeri, Moina; Ali, Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a recently reported two degree of freedom control structure namely the Parallel Control Structure (PCS) is modified to achieve improved control performance for unstable processes. New tuning rules are proposed using a direct synthesis approach for unstable first order plus time delay (UFOPTD), unstable second order plus time delay (USOPTD) and integrating and unstable plus time delay (IUPTD) process models. The proposed method has two tuning parameters whose suitable values are recommended after studying their effect on the system performance and robustness. This is an advantage of the present work over the other reported control schemes where the authors provide suitable ranges of the tuning parameters values. Simulation examples show that the present scheme results in improved nominal and perturbed responses as compared to the recently reported methods. Also it is observed that satisfactory performance is achieved when the proposed tuning rules are applied on an isothermal chemical reactor which exhibits multiple steady state solutions. PMID:25617941

  9. Astronomia Motivadora no Ensino Fundamental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, J.; Voelzke, M. R.

    2008-09-01

    O objetivo principal deste trabalho é procurar desenvolver o interesse dos alunos pelas ciências através da Astronomia. Uma pesquisa com perguntas sobre Astronomia foi realizada junto a 161 alunos do Ensino Fundamental, com o intuito de descobrir conhecimentos prévios dos alunos sobre o assunto. Constatou-se, por exemplo, que 29,3% da 6ª série responderam corretamente o que é eclipse, 30,0% da 8ª série acertaram o que a Astronomia estuda, enquanto 42,3% dos alunos da 5ª série souberam definir o Sol. Pretende-se ampliar as turmas participantes e trabalhar, principalmente de forma prática com: dimensões e escalas no Sistema Solar, construção de luneta, questões como dia e noite, estações do ano e eclipses. Busca-se abordar, também, outros conteúdos de Física tais como a óptica na construção da luneta, e a mecânica no trabalho com escalas e medidas, e ao utilizar uma luminária para representar o Sol na questão do eclipse, e de outras disciplinas como a Matemática na transformação de unidades, regras de três; Artes na modelagem ou desenho dos planetas; a própria História com relação à busca pela origem do universo, e a Informática que possibilita a busca mais rápida por informações, além de permitir simulações e visualizações de imagens importantes. Acredita-se que a Astronomia é importante no processo ensino aprendizagem, pois permite a discussão de temas curiosos como, por exemplo, a origem do universo, viagens espaciais a existência ou não de vida em outros planetas, além de temas atuais como as novas tecnologias.

  10. High-power monolithic unstable-resonator solid-state laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Zhou, S H; Chen, Y C

    1998-03-15

    We report the operation of a diode-pumped monolithic Q-switched unstable-resonator solid-state laser that generates 2.15-mJ, 2-ns pulses in a single transverse mode and a single longitudinal mode. We show that the unstable resonator is effective in suppressing the spatial and the temporal instability of the laser beam in a disk-shaped laser whose transverse dimension is comparable with or larger than its longitudinal dimension. PMID:18084541

  11. Advantages of negative-branch compared with positive-branch one-dimensional unstable resonators.

    PubMed

    Yasui, K; Takenaka, Y

    2001-07-20

    Effects of small misalignments in positive- and negative-branch strip confocal unstable resonators have been compared at the same absolute values of collimated Fresnel numbers and at the same Fresnel numbers. We show that positions of beam modes in negative-branch unstable resonators are far less sensitive to misalignment because of both geometric features and diffraction effects of beam flipping in the resonators. PMID:18360383

  12. Unstable resonator antenna properties in coherent lidar applications - A comparative study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, David M.; Menzies, Robert T.

    1988-01-01

    The antenna parameters of a coherent lidar in the far-field diffraction-limited regime, where the lidar transmitter consists of an unstable resonator with a Gaussian reflectivity profile output coupler, are investigated. A figure-of-merit combining lasr transmitter energy extraction efficiency with the far-field attributes of a given cavity configuration has been used to compare the lidar performance and relative merits of such systems as they relate to those of conventional unstable cavities with diffractive output coupling.

  13. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Isolated unstable Weibel modes in unmagnetized plasmas with tunable asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, R. C.; Lerche, I.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, an initially unmagnetized pair plasma with asymmetric velocity distributions is investigated where any unstable Weibel mode must be isolated, with discrete values for the growth rates and the unstable wavenumbers. For both a non-relativistic distribution with thermal spread and a high-relativistic two-stream distribution it is shown that isolated modes are excited and that, as the asymmetry tends to zero, the growth rate remains finite, as long as the distribution function is not precisely symmetric.

  14. Chaotic attractors based on unstable dissipative systems via third-order differential equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Cantón, E.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an approach how to yield 1D, 2D and 3D-grid multi-scroll chaotic systems in R3 based on unstable dissipative systems via third-order differential equation. This class of systems is constructed by a switching control law(SCL) changing the equilibrium point of an unstable dissipative system. The switching control law that governs the position of the equilibrium point varies according to the number of scrolls displayed in the attractor.

  15. A generalized twistor dynamics of relativistic particles and strings

    SciTech Connect

    Soroka, V.A.; Sorokin, D.P.; Tkach, V.I.; Volkov, D.V. )

    1992-09-30

    In this paper, a generalization of relativistic particle and sting dynamics based on a notion of twistor shift and containing a fundamental length constant is considered, which results in a modification of particle (or string) interactions with background fields.

  16. Manifold structures of unstable periodic orbits and the appearance of periodic windows in chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Miki U; Saiki, Yoshitaka

    2014-02-01

    Manifold structures of the Lorenz system, the Hénon map, and the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky system are investigated in terms of unstable periodic orbits embedded in the attractors. Especially, changes of manifold structures are focused on when some parameters are varied. The angle between a stable manifold and an unstable manifold (manifold angle) at every sample point along an unstable periodic orbit is measured using the covariant Lyapunov vectors. It is found that the angle characterizes the parameter at which the periodic window corresponding to the unstable periodic orbit finishes, that is, a saddle-node bifurcation point. In particular, when the minimum value of the manifold angle along an unstable periodic orbit at a parameter is small (large), the corresponding periodic window exists near (away from) the parameter. It is concluded that the window sequence in a parameter space can be predicted from the manifold angles of unstable periodic orbits at some parameter. The fact is important because the local information in a parameter space characterizes the global information in it. This approach helps us find periodic windows including very small ones.

  17. Azimuthally unstable resonators for high-power CO[sub 2] lasers with annular gain media

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlichmann, D.; Habich, U.; Plum, H.D.; Loosen, P.; Herziger, G. )

    1994-06-01

    Stable-unstable resonators have proved suitable for the extraction of a high-quality beam from a gain area that consists of a rectangular slab. Such gain areas have two substantially different transverse dimensions, and the resonators are stable in the small dimension while unstable in the larger one. Using off-axis unstable resonators avoids a central beam obscuration and improves beam quality. The adaptation of stable-unstable resonators to annular gain areas is described in this paper. The resulting resonators are stable in the radial direction and unstable in the azimuthal direction. Different unstable resonators, wound to match the annular geometry, are presented. The resonator modes are calculated numerically using a 3D-diffraction code that considers gain and misalignment. Resonator design parameters are obtained from a geometrical description of the resonator. Experimental results from a diffusion-cooled CO[sub 2] laser confirm theoretical predictions and show that the resonators are capable of extracting beams that are nearly diffraction-limited with high efficiency from an annular gain medium. Output powers of 2 kW have been obtained from a gain length of 1.8 m.

  18. Time resolved beam divergence from a copper vapor laser with unstable resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.W.

    1995-02-01

    The temporal evolution of the far-field intensity distribution (and hence beam divergence) for the output of a CVL operating with both on-axis and off-axis unstable resonators is investigated in detail. The CVL output pulse consists of several temporally resolved components, where each successive component has lower divergence approaching the diffraction limit. A comprehensive model of the divergence of each temporal component from a CVL operating with a variety of unstable resonators is presented. In this model the resonator control the output divergence by imposing geometric constrains on the propagation of spontaneous emission on repeated round-trips through the unstable resonator equivalent lens guide. Effects of resonator asymmetry and radial gain variations on the far-field intensity distribution (and hence divergence) are evaluated. Experimental measurements of the temporal evolution of output divergence from a CVL operating with both on-axis and off-axis unstable resonators and for a variety of excitation conditions are also presented. For CVL operation at high pulse repetition frequency the ASE at the start of the laser pulse has an annular profile. This annular gain distribution is found to modify the output far-field intensity distribution of the earlier temporal components of the laser pulse. For on-axis unstable resonators these components are found to have annular far-field intensity distributions, whereas for off-axis unstable resonators they have greatly reduced but anisotropic divergence.

  19. Ontogeny of Unstable Chromosomes Generated by Telomere Error in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Weinert, Ted

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication errors at certain sites in the genome initiate chromosome instability that ultimately leads to stable genomic rearrangements. Where instability begins is often unclear. And, early instability may form unstable chromosome intermediates whose transient nature also hinders mechanistic understanding. We report here a budding yeast model that reveals the genetic ontogeny of genome rearrangements, from initial replication error to unstable chromosome formation to their resolution. Remarkably, the initial error often arises in or near the telomere, and frequently forms unstable chromosomes. Early unstable chromosomes may then resolve to an internal "collection site" where a dicentric forms and resolves to an isochromosome (other outcomes are possible at each step). The initial telomere-proximal unstable chromosome is increased in mutants in telomerase subunits, Tel1, and even Rad9, with no known telomere-specific function. Defects in Tel1 and in Rrm3, a checkpoint protein kinase with a role in telomere maintenance and a DNA helicase, respectively, synergize dramatically to generate unstable chromosomes, further illustrating the consequence of replication error in the telomere. Collectively, our results suggest telomeric replication errors may be a common cause of seemingly unrelated genomic rearrangements located hundreds of kilobases away. PMID:27716774

  20. Unstable infiltration fronts in porous media on laboratory scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Cindi; Neuweiler, Insa

    2014-05-01

    Water flow and transport of substances in the unsaturated zone are important processes for the quality and quantity of water in the hydrologic cycle. The water movement through preferential paths is often much faster than standard models (e. g. Richards equation in homogeneous porous media) predict. One type/phenomenon of preferential flow can occur during water infiltration into coarse and/or dry porous media: the so-called gravity-driven fingering flow. To upscale the water content and to describe the averaged water fluxes in order to couple models of different spheres it is necessary to understand and to quantify the behavior of flow instabilities. We present different experiments of unstable infiltration in homogeneous and heterogeneous structures to analyze development and morphology of gravity-driven fingering flow on the laboratory scale. Experiments were carried out in two-dimensional and three-dimensional sand tanks as well as in larger two-dimensional sand tanks with homogeneous and heterogeneous filling of sand and glass beads. In the small systems, water content in the medium was measured at different times. We compare the experiments to prediction of theoretical approaches (e.g. Saffman and Taylor, 1958; Chuoke et al., 1959; Philip 1975a; White et al., 1976; Parlange and Hill, 1976a; Glass et al., 1989a; Glass et al., 1991; Wang et al., 1998c) that quantify properties of the gravity-driven fingers. We use hydraulic parameters needed for the theoretical predictions (the water-entry value (hwe), van Genuchten parameter (Wang et al., 1997, Wang et al., 2000) and saturated conductivity (Ks), van Genuchten parameter (Guarracino, 2007) to simplify the prediction of the finger properties and if necessary to identify a constant correction factor. We find in general that the finger properties correspond well to theoretical predictions. In heterogeneous settings, where fine inclusions are embedded into a coarse material, the finger properties do not change much

  1. Rare particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kutschera, W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) to search for hypothetical particles and known particles of rare processes is discussed. The hypothetical particles considered include fractionally charged particles, anomalously heavy isotopes, and superheavy elements. The known particles produced in rare processes discussed include doubly-charged negative ions, counting neutrino-produced atoms in detectors for solar neutrino detection, and the spontaneous emission of /sup 14/C from /sup 223/Ra. 35 references. (WHK)

  2. Neutrino properties and fundamental symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, T.J.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There are two components to this work. The first is a development of a new detection scheme for neutrinos. The observed deficit of neutrinos from the Sun may be due to either a lack of understanding of physical processes in the Sun or may be due to neutrinos oscillating from one type to another during their transit from the Sun to the Earth. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is designed to use a water Cerenkov detector employing one thousand tonnes of heavy water to resolve this question. The ability to distinguish muon and tau neutrinos from electron neutrinos is crucial in order to carry out a model-independent test of neutrino oscillations. We describe a developmental exploration of a novel technique to do this using {sup 3}He proportional counters. Such a method offers considerable advantages over the initially proposed method of using Cerenkov light from capture on NaCl in the SNO. The second component of this work is an exploration of optimal detector geometry for a time-reversal invariance experiment. The question of why time moves only in the forward direction is one of the most puzzling problems in modern physics. We know from particle physics measurements of the decay of kaons that there is a charge-parity symmetry that is violated in nature, implying time-reversal invariance violation. Yet, we do not understand the origin of the violation of this symmetry. To promote such an understanding, we are developing concepts and prototype apparatus for a new, highly sensitive technique to search for time-reversal-invariance violation in the beta decay of the free neutron. The optimized detector geometry is seven times more sensitive than that in previous experiments. 15 refs.

  3. Fundamental Principles of Proper Space Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Sean

    It is desirable to understand the movement of both matter and energy in the universe based upon fundamental principles of space and time. Time dilation and length contraction are features of Special Relativity derived from the observed constancy of the speed of light. Quantum Mechanics asserts that motion in the universe is probabilistic and not deterministic. While the practicality of these dissimilar theories is well established through widespread application inconsistencies in their marriage persist, marring their utility, and preventing their full expression. After identifying an error in perspective the current theories are tested by modifying logical assumptions to eliminate paradoxical contradictions. Analysis of simultaneous frames of reference leads to a new formulation of space and time that predicts the motion of both kinds of particles. Proper Space is a real, three-dimensional space clocked by proper time that is undergoing a densification at the rate of c. Coordinate transformations to a familiar object space and a mathematical stationary space clarify the counterintuitive aspects of Special Relativity. These symmetries demonstrate that within the local universe stationary observers are a forbidden frame of reference; all is in motion. In lieu of Quantum Mechanics and Uncertainty the use of the imaginary number i is restricted for application to the labeling of mass as either material or immaterial. This material phase difference accounts for both the perceived constant velocity of light and its apparent statistical nature. The application of Proper Space Kinematics will advance more accurate representations of microscopic, oscopic, and cosmological processes and serve as a foundation for further study and reflection thereafter leading to greater insight.

  4. ELECTRON HEATING IN A RELATIVISTIC, WEIBEL-UNSTABLE PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rahul; Eichler, David; Gedalin, Michael

    2015-06-20

    The dynamics of two initially unmagnetized relativistic counter-streaming homogeneous ion–electron plasma beams are simulated in two dimensions (2D) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. It is shown that current filaments, which form due to the Weibel instability, develop a large-scale longitudinal electric field in the direction opposite to the current carried by the filaments as predicted by theory. This field, which is partially inductive and partially electrostatic, is identified as the main source of net electron acceleration, greatly exceeding that due to magnetic field decay at later stages. The transverse electric field, although larger than the longitudinal field, is shown to play a smaller role in heating electrons, contrary to previous claims. It is found that in one dimension, the electrons become strongly magnetized and are not accelerated beyond their initial kinetic energy. Rather, the heating of the electrons is enhanced by the bending and break up of the filaments, which releases electrons that would otherwise be trapped within a single filament and slow the development of the Weibel instability (i.e., the magnetic field growth) via induction as per Lenz’s law. In 2D simulations, electrons are heated to about one quarter of the initial kinetic energy of ions. The magnetic energy at maximum is about 4%, decaying to less than 1% by the end of the simulation. The ions are found to gradually decelerate until the end of the simulation, by which time they retain a residual anisotropy of less than 10%.

  5. From fundamental fields to constituent quarks and nucleon form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Coester, F.

    1990-01-01

    Constituent-quark models formulated in the frame work of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics have been successful in accounting for the mass spectra of mesons and baryons. Applications to elastic electron scattering require relativistic dynamics. Relativistic quantum mechanics of constituent quarks can be formulated by constructing a suitable unitary representation of the Poincare group on the three-quark Hilbert space. The mass and spin operators of this representation specify the relativistic model dynamics. The dynamics of fundamental quark fields, on the other hand, is specified by a Euclidean functional integral. In this paper I show how the dynamics of the fundamental fields can be related in principle to the Hamiltonian dynamics of quark particles through the properties of the Wightman functions. 14 refs.

  6. Big Bang nucleosynthesis as a probe of varying fundamental ``constants''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, Thomas; Stern, Steffen; Wetterich, Christof

    2007-11-01

    We analyze the effect of variation of fundamental couplings and mass scales on primordial nucleosynthesis in a systematic way. The first step establishes the response of primordial element abundances to the variation of a large number of nuclear physics parameters, including nuclear binding energies. We find a strong influence of the n-p mass difference, of the nucleon mass and of A = 3,4,7 binding energies. A second step relates the nuclear parameters to the parameters of the Standard Model of particle physics. The deuterium, and, above all, 7Li abundances depend strongly on the average light quark mass. We calculate the behaviour of abundances when variations of fundamental parameters obey relations arising from grand unification. We also discuss the possibility of a substantial shift in the lithium abundance while the deuterium and 4He abundances are only weakly affected.

  7. Primordial nucleosynthesis as a probe of fundamental physics parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, Thomas; Stern, Steffen; Wetterich, Christof

    2007-09-01

    We analyze the effect of variation of fundamental couplings and mass scales on primordial nucleosynthesis in a systematic way. The first step establishes the response of primordial element abundances to the variation of a large number of nuclear physics parameters, including nuclear binding energies. We find a strong influence of the n-p mass difference (for the He4 abundance), of the nucleon mass (for deuterium), and of A=3, 4, 7 binding energies (for He3, Li6, and Li7). A second step relates the nuclear parameters to the parameters of the standard model of particle physics. The deuterium, and, above all, Li7 abundances depend strongly on the average light quark mass m^≡(mu+md)/2. We calculate the behavior of abundances when variations of fundamental parameters obey relations arising from grand unification. We also discuss the possibility of a substantial shift in the lithium abundance while the deuterium and He4 abundances are only weakly affected.

  8. Supergranular-scale magnetic flux emergence beneath an unstable filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, J.; Cid, C.; Guerrero, A.; Saiz, E.; Cerrato, Y.

    2015-11-01

    may play a fundamental role, which is helped by the emergence. Movies associated to Figs. 1 and 2 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moosmuller, Hans (Inventor); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Inventor); Arnott, W. Patrick (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  10. Particle separation

    DOEpatents

    Moosmuller, Hans; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Arnott, W. Patrick

    2011-04-26

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  11. Particle transport and deposition: basic physics of particle kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Akira; Henry, Frank S.; Butler, James P.

    2015-01-01

    The human body interacts with the environment in many different ways. The lungs interact with the external environment through breathing. The enormously large surface area of the lung with its extremely thin air-blood barrier is exposed to particles suspended in the inhaled air. Whereas the particle-lung interaction may cause deleterious effects on health if the inhaled pollutant aerosols are toxic, this interaction can be beneficial for disease treatment if the inhaled particles are therapeutic aerosolized drug. In either case, an accurate estimation of dose and sites of deposition in the respiratory tract is fundamental to understanding subsequent biological response, and the basic physics of particle motion and engineering knowledge needed to understand these subjects is the topic of this chapter. A large portion of this chapter deals with three fundamental areas necessary to the understanding of particle transport and deposition in the respiratory tract. These are: 1) the physical characteristics of particles, 2) particle behavior in gas flow, and 3) gas flow patterns in the respiratory tract. Other areas, such as particle transport in the developing lung and in the diseased lung are also considered. The chapter concludes with a summary and a brief discussion of areas of future research. PMID:24265235

  12. Particle transport and deposition: basic physics of particle kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Akira; Henry, Frank S; Butler, James P

    2013-10-01

    The human body interacts with the environment in many different ways. The lungs interact with the external environment through breathing. The enormously large surface area of the lung with its extremely thin air-blood barrier is exposed to particles suspended in the inhaled air. The particle-lung interaction may cause deleterious effects on health if the inhaled pollutant aerosols are toxic. Conversely, this interaction can be beneficial for disease treatment if the inhaled particles are therapeutic aerosolized drugs. In either case, an accurate estimation of dose and sites of deposition in the respiratory tract is fundamental to understanding subsequent biological response, and the basic physics of particle motion and engineering knowledge needed to understand these subjects is the topic of this article. A large portion of this article deals with three fundamental areas necessary to the understanding of particle transport and deposition in the respiratory tract. These are: (i) the physical characteristics of particles, (ii) particle behavior in gas flow, and (iii) gas-flow patterns in the respiratory tract. Other areas, such as particle transport in the developing lung and in the diseased lung are also considered. The article concludes with a summary and a brief discussion of areas of future research.

  13. Forces and Particles: Concepts Again in Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, George

    1973-01-01

    Traces the historical developments in physics leading to the present conflict of fundamental beliefs about the nature of the physical world. It has been recently proposed that the concept of fundamental particles (corpuscularianism) be replaced with a full-blown field dynamical theory. (JR)

  14. Exosomes: Fundamental Biology and Roles in Cardiovascular Physiology.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Ahmed; Marbán, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are nanosized membrane particles that are secreted by cells that transmit information from cell to cell. The information within exosomes prominently includes their protein and RNA payloads. Exosomal microRNAs in particular can potently and fundamentally alter the transcriptome of recipient cells. Here we summarize what is known about exosome biogenesis, content, and transmission, with a focus on cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology. We also highlight some of the questions currently under active investigation regarding these extracellular membrane vesicles and their potential in diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  15. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Very Large Telescope sets stringent limit on possible variation of the fine-structure constant over cosmological time Summary Detecting or constraining the possible time variations of fundamental physical constants is an important step toward a complete understanding of basic physics and hence the world in which we live. A step in which astrophysics proves most useful. Previous astronomical measurements of the fine structure constant - the dimensionless number that determines the strength of interactions between charged particles and electromagnetic fields - suggested that this particular constant is increasing very slightly with time. If confirmed, this would have very profound implications for our understanding of fundamental physics. New studies, conducted using the UVES spectrograph on Kueyen, one of the 8.2-m telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope array at Paranal (Chile), secured new data with unprecedented quality. These data, combined with a very careful analysis, have provided the strongest astronomical constraints to date on the possible variation of the fine structure constant. They show that, contrary to previous claims, no evidence exist for assuming a time variation of this fundamental constant. PR Photo 07/04: Relative Changes with Redshift of the Fine Structure Constant (VLT/UVES) A fine constant To explain the Universe and to represent it mathematically, scientists rely on so-called fundamental constants or fixed numbers. The fundamental laws of physics, as we presently understand them, depend on about 25 such constants. Well-known examples are the gravitational constant, which defines the strength of the force acting between two bodies, such as the Earth and the Moon, and the speed of light. One of these constants is the so-called "fine structure constant", alpha = 1/137.03599958, a combination of electrical charge of the electron, the Planck constant and the speed of light. The fine structure constant describes how electromagnetic forces hold

  16. BOOK REVIEWS: Quantum Mechanics: Fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, A.

    2004-02-01

    This review is of three books, all published by Springer, all on quantum theory at a level above introductory, but very different in content, style and intended audience. That of Gottfried and Yan is of exceptional interest, historical and otherwise. It is a second edition of Gottfried’s well-known book published by Benjamin in 1966. This was written as a text for a graduate quantum mechanics course, and has become one of the most used and respected accounts of quantum theory, at a level mathematically respectable but not rigorous. Quantum mechanics was already solidly established by 1966, but this second edition gives an indication of progress made and changes in perspective over the last thirty-five years, and also recognises the very substantial increase in knowledge of quantum theory obtained at the undergraduate level. Topics absent from the first edition but included in the second include the Feynman path integral, seen in 1966 as an imaginative but not very useful formulation of quantum theory. Feynman methods were given only a cursory mention by Gottfried. Their practical importance has now been fully recognised, and a substantial account of them is provided in the new book. Other new topics include semiclassical quantum mechanics, motion in a magnetic field, the S matrix and inelastic collisions, radiation and scattering of light, identical particle systems and the Dirac equation. A topic that was all but totally neglected in 1966, but which has flourished increasingly since, is that of the foundations of quantum theory. John Bell’s work of the mid-1960s has led to genuine theoretical and experimental achievement, which has facilitated the development of quantum optics and quantum information theory. Gottfried’s 1966 book played a modest part in this development. When Bell became increasingly irritated with the standard theoretical approach to quantum measurement, Viki Weisskopf repeatedly directed him to Gottfried’s book. Gottfried had devoted a

  17. Investigating the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Heather L.

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental theorem of calculus, in its simplified complexity, connects differential and integral calculus. The power of the theorem comes not merely from recognizing it as a mathematical fact but from using it as a systematic tool. As a high school calculus teacher, the author developed and taught lessons on this fundamental theorem that were…

  18. Fundamentals of fossil simulator instructor training

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This single-volume, looseleaf text introduces the beginning instructor to fundamental instructor training principles, and then shows how to apply those principles to fossil simulator training. Topics include the fundamentals of classroom instruction, the learning process, course development, and the specifics of simulator training program development.

  19. Individual differences in fundamental social motives.

    PubMed

    Neel, Rebecca; Kenrick, Douglas T; White, Andrew Edward; Neuberg, Steven L

    2016-06-01

    Motivation has long been recognized as an important component of how people both differ from, and are similar to, each other. The current research applies the biologically grounded fundamental social motives framework, which assumes that human motivational systems are functionally shaped to manage the major costs and benefits of social life, to understand individual differences in social motives. Using the Fundamental Social Motives Inventory, we explore the relations among the different fundamental social motives of Self-Protection, Disease Avoidance, Affiliation, Status, Mate Seeking, Mate Retention, and Kin Care; the relationships of the fundamental social motives to other individual difference and personality measures including the Big Five personality traits; the extent to which fundamental social motives are linked to recent life experiences; and the extent to which life history variables (e.g., age, sex, childhood environment) predict individual differences in the fundamental social motives. Results suggest that the fundamental social motives are a powerful lens through which to examine individual differences: They are grounded in theory, have explanatory value beyond that of the Big Five personality traits, and vary meaningfully with a number of life history variables. A fundamental social motives approach provides a generative framework for considering the meaning and implications of individual differences in social motivation. (PsycINFO Database Record

  20. Fundamentals of Physics, Problem Supplement No. 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2000-05-01

    No other book on the market today can match the success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! In a breezy, easy-to-understand style the book offers a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and helps readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving.

  1. Fundamentals of Physics, 7th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-05-01

    No other book on the market today can match the 30-year success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! In a breezy, easy-to-understand style the book offers a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and helps readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving. This book offers a unique combination of authoritative content and stimulating applications.

  2. Fundamentals of Physics, Student's Solutions Manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2000-07-01

    No other book on the market today can match the success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! In a breezy, easy-to-understand style the book offers a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and helps readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving.

  3. Direct reactions for nuclear structure required for fundamental symmetry tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, P. E.; Rand, E. T.; Diaz Varela, A.; Ball, G. C.; Bildstein, V.; Faestermann, T.; Hadinia, B.; Hertenberger, R.; Jamieson, D. S.; Jigmeddorj, B.; Leach, K. G.; Svensson, C. E.; Wirth, H.-F.

    2016-09-01

    A program of nuclear structure studies to support fundamental symmetry tests has been initiated. Motivated by the search for an electric dipole moment in 199Hg, the structure in the vicinity has been explored via direct reaction studies. To date, these have included the 198,200Hg(d, d') inelastic scattering reactions, with the aim to obtain information on the E2 and E3 strength distributions, and the 198Hg(d, p) and 200Hg(d, t) reactions to obtain information on the single-particle states in 199Hg. The studies using the 200Hg targets have been fully analyzed using the FRESCO reaction code yielding the E2 and E3 strength distribution to 4 MeV in excitation energy, and the (d, t) single- particle strength to over 3 MeV in excitation energy.

  4. Particle generator

    DOEpatents

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2005-06-28

    Energy tunable solid state sources of neutral particles are described. In a disclosed embodiment, a halogen particle source includes a solid halide sample, a photon source positioned to deliver photons to a surface of the halide, and a collimating means positioned to accept a spatially defined plume of hyperthermal halogen particles emitted from the sample surface.

  5. A new instability index for unstable mode selection in squeal prediction by complex eigenvalue analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, J.; Massi, F.; D`Ambrogio, W.; Berthier, Y.

    2016-09-01

    During these last decades the modal instability of systems, generated by frictional contact forces, has been the subject of a huge amount of works in friction induced vibration literature. Linear and nonlinear numerical analyses have been largely investigated to predict and reproduce squeal vibrations. While nonlinear transient analysis needs large computational efforts, results of Complex Eigenvalue Analysis (CEA) suffer from an over-prediction issue and it is not able to predict correctly the mode that will become effectively unstable in case of several unstable eigenvalues. Because the CEA has been adopted as an efficient tool for brake design, a more reliable index is here proposed, from the CEA outputs and energetic considerations, to identify the mode that will become effectively unstable. A modular lumped model is developed to reproduce friction induced vibrations. The use of the eigenvalue real part, as discriminant of the system instability, is here combined with information coming from the eigenvectors, projected on the equilibrium position, to account for the energy flows involved in the squeal phenomena. This approach allows to define a Modal Absorption Index (MAI). The MAI allows for comparing unstable modes of the same system and is applied in this paper to predict, by CEA outputs, the unstable mode that will effectively result in squeal vibrations.

  6. Muscle co-contraction around the knee when walking with unstable shoes.

    PubMed

    Horsak, Brian; Heller, Mario; Baca, Arnold

    2015-02-01

    Walking with unstable shoes has been discussed to decrease joint loading. Typical estimates of joint loading using an inverse dynamic approach only account for net joint moments, not considering the potential role of muscular co-contraction. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare muscular co-contraction levels when walking with two different unstable shoe constructions (rocker-bottom and toning shoes) compared to walking with regular shoes. For each shoe condition, 12 healthy subjects walked with both, a regular shoe and with an unstable shoe at self-selected walking speed at a 10-m walkway. Surface EMG data of selected muscles were recorded and time normalized for calculating co-contraction indices (CCI) for opposing muscle groups. Results showed an increase of co-contraction primarily for vastii and gastrocnemius muscles for the first and second half of stance when walking with an unstable shoe construction. Therefore, when using an inverse dynamic approach to analyze joint loading differences between regular shoes and unstable shoes, one should be cautious in interpreting the data, as these methods base their estimates of joint moments upon the net joint torque.

  7. Force production during squats performed with a rotational resistance device under stable versus unstable conditions

    PubMed Central

    Moras, Gerard; Vázquez-Guerrero, Jairo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Force production during a squat action on a rotational resistance device (RRD) under stable and unstable conditions. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one healthy males were asked to perform six sets of six repetitions of squats on an RRD on either stable or unstable surfaces. The stable and unstable sets were performed on different days. Muscular outputs were obtained from a linear encoder and a strain gauge fixed to a vest. [Results] Overall, the results showed no significant differences for any of the dependent variables across exercise modes. Forcemean outputs were higher in the concentric phase than in the eccentric phase for each condition, but there were no differences in velocity, time or displacement. The forcepeak was similar in the eccentric and concentric phases of movement under both stable and unstable conditions. There were no significant differences in forcemean between sets per condition or between conditions. [Conclusion] These results suggest that performing squats with a RRD achieves similar forcemean and forcepeak under stable and unstable conditions. The forcepeak produced is also similar in concentric and eccentric phases. PMID:26696707

  8. Particle accelerators test cosmological theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.; Steigman, G.

    1988-06-01

    Over the past decade two subfields of science, cosmology and elementary-particle physics, have become married in a symbiotic relationship that has produced a number of exciting offspring. These offspring are beginning to yield insights on the creation of spacetime and matter at epochs as early as 10 to the minus 43 to 10 to the minus 35 second after the birth of the universe in the primordial explosion known as the big bang. Important clues to the nature of the big bang itself may even come from a theory currently under development, known as the ultimate theory of everything (T.E.O.). A T.E.O. would describe all the interactions among the fundamental particles in a single bold stroke. Now that cosmology ahs begun to make predictions about elementary-particle physics, it has become conceivable that those cosmological predictions could be checked with carefully controlled accelerator experiments. It has taken more than 10 years for accelerators to reach the point where they can do the appropriate experiments, but the experiments are now in fact in progress. The preliminary results confirm the predictions of cosmology. The cosmological prediction the authors have been concerned with pertains to setting limits on the number of fundamental particles of matter. It appears that there are 12 fundamental particles, as well as their corresponding antiparticles. Six of the fundamental particles are quarks. The other six are leptons. The 12 particles are grouped in three families, each family consisting of four members. Cosmology suggests there must be a finite number of families and, further limits the possible range of to small values: only three or at most four families exist. 7 figs.

  9. Induction of genomic instability in TK6 human lymphoblasts exposed to 137Cs gamma radiation: comparison to the induction by exposure to accelerated 56Fe particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Helen H.; Horng, Min-Fen; Ricanati, Marlene; Diaz-Insua, M.; Jordan, Robert; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    The induction of genomic instability in TK6 human lymphoblasts by exposure to (137)Cs gamma radiation was investigated by measuring the frequency and characteristics of unstable clones isolated approximately 36 generations after exposure. Clones surviving irradiation and control clones were analyzed for 17 characteristics including chromosomal aberrations, growth defects, alterations in response to a second irradiation, and mutant frequencies at the thymidine kinase and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase loci. Putative unstable clones were defined as those that exhibited a significant alteration in one or more characteristics compared to the controls. The frequency and characteristics of the unstable clones were compared in clones exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays or (56)Fe particles. The majority of the unstable clones isolated after exposure to either gamma rays or (56)Fe particles exhibited chromosomal instability. Alterations in growth characteristics, radiation response and mutant frequencies occurred much less often than cytogenetic alterations in these unstable clones. The frequency and complexity of the unstable clones were greater after exposure to (56)Fe particles than to gamma rays. Unstable clones that survived 36 generations after exposure to gamma rays exhibited increases in the incidence of dicentric chromosomes but not of chromatid breaks, whereas unstable clones that survived 36 generations after exposure to (56)Fe particles exhibited increases in both chromatid and chromosome aberrations.

  10. Particle accelerators inside spinning black holes.

    PubMed

    Lake, Kayll

    2010-05-28

    On the basis of the Kerr metric as a model for a spinning black hole accreting test particles from rest at infinity, I show that the center-of-mass energy for a pair of colliding particles is generically divergent at the inner horizon. This shows not only that classical black holes are internally unstable, but also that Planck-scale physics is a characteristic feature within black holes at scales much larger that the Planck length. The novel feature of the divergence discussed here is that the phenomenon is present only for black holes with rotation, and in this sense it is distinct from the well-known Cauchy horizon instability.

  11. Cardiac catheterization in patients with unstable angina. Recent onset vs crescendo pattern.

    PubMed

    Plotnik, G D; Fisher, M L; Carliner, N H; Becker, L C

    1980-08-01

    Among patients with unstable angina pectoris, those with crescendo angina seem to be at high risk for death and myocardial infarction. We reviewed the clinical, arteriographic, and hemodynamic findings in 218 consecutive catheterized patients with unstable angina. Unstable angina was defined as ischemic cardiac pain at rest associated with transient ECG changes but no evidence for acute myocardial infarction. Patients were divided into two groups according to the duration of symptoms: 134 patients with crescendo angina (new, or increasing, rest pain with previous ischemic symptoms present for more than three months) and 84 with recent onset angina (symptoms present for less than three months). Compared with patients with recent onset symptoms, patients with crescendo angina had more extensive coronary disease and lower ejection fractions, which may explain their poor prognosis.

  12. Energy harvesting by dynamic unstability and internal resonance for piezoelectric beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Chunbo; Qin, Weiyang Deng, Wangzheng

    2015-08-31

    We investigated the energy harvesting of a vertical beam with tip mass under vertical excitations. We applied dynamic unstability and internal resonance to improve the efficiency of harvesting. The experiments of harmonic excitation were carried out. Results show that for the beam there exist internal resonances in the dynamically unstable and the buckling bistable cases. The dynamic unstability is a determinant for strong internal resonance or mode coupling, which can be used to create a large output from piezoelectric patches. Then, the experiments of stochastic excitation were carried out. Results prove that the internal resonance or mode coupling can transfer the excitation energy to the low order modes, mainly the first and the second one. This can bring about a large output voltage. For a stochastic excitation, it is proved that there is an optimal weight of tip mass for realizing internal resonance and producing large outputs.

  13. Effects of Unstable Conditions on Kinematics and Performance Variables in Young Handball Players

    PubMed Central

    Urbán, Tomás; Gutiérrez, Óscar; Moreno, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    The execution variability and outcomes found in throwing actions have received special attention in numerous studies in recent years. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of an unstable condition on velocity, accuracy and kinematics of movement in the seven metres throw in handball. Twenty-five young handball players took part in an experiment, throwing towards a target on a stable and an unstable surface. Each participant performed 32 throws, 16 for each situation. Linear variability of the dominant hand was assessed by 3D Motion Tracking. A radar sports gun was used to record the velocity of the ball and the throws were video recorded to establish their accuracy. Results showed significant decreases in throwing velocity in unstable conditions, but these did not significantly affect the accuracy achieved in performance. Differences were also found in movement kinematics between the two throwing conditions and relationships were found between kinematics, velocity and accuracy. PMID:26240647

  14. [Changes of fatty acid spectrum of thrombocyte lipids in patients with a stable and unstable angina].

    PubMed

    Lyzohub, V H; Zaval's'ka, T V; Abu Sara, Kh A Kh; Briuzhina, T S; Savchenko, O V

    2009-01-01

    Ischemic heart desease (IHD) remains actual issue of the current clinical medicine, because, IHD takes a leading position among reasons of death rate of population. Purpose of the study was to find diagnostic features of fat-acid composition of lipid of thrombocytes in patients with stable and unstable course of ischemic heart disease (IHD). 52 patients with an unstable angina pectoris aged 42-65 years and 31 patients with stable angina aged 41-66 years have been observed. Reliable changes in relation of the sum of saturated, unsaturated and poli-unsaturated of fat acids of phosphotides of thrombocytes in patients with unstable course of ischemic heart disease (IHD) have been detected. It improves knowledge about the mechanisms of destabilization of coronal circulation of blood. PMID:20455444

  15. Multirod unstable resonators for high-power solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, N; Bostanjoglo, G; Weber, H

    1993-10-20

    The properties of positive-branch and negative-branch unstable resonators with variable reflectivity mirrors and several variable internal lenses were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Design rules for optimized unstable resonators for one or more active elements are derived on the basis of the ABCD matrix formalism. Experiments were performed with a pulsed Nd:YAG system consisting of three 6 in. × 3/8 in. (15.24 cm × 0.95 cm) rods. This system provided a maximum output power of 550 W per rod when a symmetric flat-flat resonator was used. Unstable resonators achieved up to 75% of this maximum value with beam-parameter products between 2 and 10 mm mrad. The beam quality becomes worse as more active elements are used inside the resonator. This deterioration of focusability is caused by spherical aberration in combination with differences of refractive power for r and Φ polarizations. PMID:20856412

  16. Unstable slippage across a fault that separates elastic media of different elastic constants

    SciTech Connect

    Weertman, J.

    1980-03-10

    In this study it is demonstrated that relatively slow, quasi-static slippage on a fault that separates 2 half-spaces of different elastic constants can become unstable if the slippage is governed by the Amontons-Coulomb friction law.(The shear stress across a fault required for slipping motion is proportional to the normal compressive stress across the fault.) If the 2 half-spaces have identical properties, unstable slippage is not possible under this friction law. The unstable slippage that is investigated in this work is a consequences of the existence of a short-range normal traction stress that gliding edge dislocations produce across an interface between 2 half-spaces of different elastic constants. This normal traction stress does not exist if the 2 half-spaces have identical properties. (Recent work of Dundurs, Comninous et al. has revealed the importance of the short-range traction stress components to crack problems.) 30 references.

  17. [Changes of fatty acid spectrum of thrombocyte lipids in patients with a stable and unstable angina].

    PubMed

    Lyzohub, V H; Zaval's'ka, T V; Abu Sara, Kh A Kh; Briuzhina, T S; Savchenko, O V

    2009-01-01

    Ischemic heart desease (IHD) remains actual issue of the current clinical medicine, because, IHD takes a leading position among reasons of death rate of population. Purpose of the study was to find diagnostic features of fat-acid composition of lipid of thrombocytes in patients with stable and unstable course of ischemic heart disease (IHD). 52 patients with an unstable angina pectoris aged 42-65 years and 31 patients with stable angina aged 41-66 years have been observed. Reliable changes in relation of the sum of saturated, unsaturated and poli-unsaturated of fat acids of phosphotides of thrombocytes in patients with unstable course of ischemic heart disease (IHD) have been detected. It improves knowledge about the mechanisms of destabilization of coronal circulation of blood.

  18. A novel double loop control model design for chemical unstable processes.

    PubMed

    Cong, Er-Ding; Hu, Ming-Hui; Tu, Shan-Tung; Xuan, Fu-Zhen; Shao, Hui-He

    2014-03-01

    In this manuscript, based on Smith predictor control scheme for unstable process in industry, an improved double loop control model is proposed for chemical unstable processes. Inner loop is to stabilize integrating the unstable process and transform the original process to first-order plus pure dead-time dynamic stable process. Outer loop is to enhance the performance of set point response. Disturbance controller is designed to enhance the performance of disturbance response. The improved control system is simple with exact physical meaning. The characteristic equation is easy to realize stabilization. Three controllers are separately design in the improved scheme. It is easy to design each controller and good control performance for the respective closed-loop transfer function separately. The robust stability of the proposed control scheme is analyzed. Finally, case studies illustrate that the improved method can give better system performance than existing design methods. PMID:24309506

  19. Chromatin-unstable boar spermatozoa have little chance of reaching oocytes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ardón, Florencia; Helms, Dietmar; Sahin, Evrim; Bollwein, Heinrich; Töpfer-Petersen, Edda; Waberski, Dagmar

    2008-04-01

    In the present study, the prevalence of chromatin instability in the fertilizing-competent sperm population in the porcine oviduct in vivo was examined through qualitative analysis of the chromatin structure status of accessory boar sperm found in in vivo-derived embryos. The binding of chromatin-unstable sperm to oviductal epithelium in vitro was also studied. To examine the sperm chromatin state, a modified fluorescence microscopic sperm chromatin structure assay was used. Among a population of 173 fertile boars, individuals were selected for according to their chromatin status: 25 animals showed more than 5% of chromatin-unstable sperm in their ejaculates, and 7 showed consistently elevated percentages of chromatin-unstable sperm in three successively collected semen samples. A positive correlation was found between incidence of chromatin instability and attached cytoplasmic droplets (r=0.44, P<0.01). Analyses of accessory spermatozoa from in vivo-derived embryos demonstrated that the proportion of chromatin-unstable sperm was significantly (P<0.05) reduced in the population of fertilizing-competent sperm in the oviduct compared with the inseminated sperm. Populations of sperm bound to the oviduct in vitro had significantly (P<0.05) lower percentages of chromatin instability than in the original diluted semen sample. In conclusion, numbers of sperm with unstable chromatin are reduced in the oviductal sperm reservoir, possibly because of associated changes in the plasma membrane that prevent sperm from binding to the oviductal epithelium. We conclude that in vivo the likelihood that sperm with unstable chromatin will reach the egg and fertilize it is low. PMID:18367507

  20. Rotor-Liquid-Fundament System's Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kydyrbekuly, A.

    The work is devoted to research of oscillation and sustainability of stationary twirl of vertical flexible static dynamically out-of-balance rotor with cavity partly filled with liquid and set on relative frame fundament. The accounting of such factors like oscillation of fundament, liquid oscillation, influence of asymmetry of installation of a rotor on a shaft, anisotropism of shaft support and fundament, static and dynamic out-of-balance of a rotor, an external friction, an internal friction of a shaft, allows to settle an invoice more precisely kinematic and dynamic characteristics of system.

  1. A simplified model for unstable temperature field calculation of gas turbine rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guangxin

    1989-06-01

    A simplified model is presented for calculating the unstable temperature field of a cooled turbine rotor by the finite element method. In the simplified model, an outer radius for calculating has been chosen which is smaller than the radius of the fir-tree root groove's bottom. And an equivalent heat release coefficient has been introduced. Thus, the calculation can be treated as an axial symmetrical problem and carried out on a microcomputer. The simplified model has been used to calculate the unstable temperature field during the start-up of a rotor. A comparison with the three-dimensional calculated result shows that the simplified model is satisfactory.

  2. Video- Demonstrations of Stable and Unstable Solid Body Rotation on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Saturday Morning Science, the science of opportunity series of applied experiments and demonstrations, performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS) by Expedition 6 astronaut Dr. Don Pettit, revealed some remarkable findings. In this video clip, Pettit demonstrates stable and unstable modes for solid body rotation on the ISS. Using a hard cover textbook, he demonstrates that it will rotate stably about the longest and shortest axis, which represent the maximum and minimum movements of Inertia. Trying to rotate the book around an intermediate axis results in an unstable rotation in which the book appears to flip-flop while it rotates.

  3. Switching from stable to unknown unstable steady states of dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Tamasevicius, Arūnas; Tamaseviciūte, Elena; Mykolaitis, Gytis; Bumeliene, Skaidra

    2008-08-01

    We demonstrate that a dynamical system can be switched from a stable steady state to a previously unknown unstable (saddle) steady state using proportional feedback coupling to an auxiliary unstable system. The simplest one-dimensional nonlinear model is treated analytically, the more complicated two-dimensional pendulum is considered numerically, while the damped Duffing-Holmes oscillator is investigated analytically, numerically, and experimentally. Experiments have been performed using a simplified version of the electronic Young-Silva circuit imitating the dynamical behavior of the Duffing-Holmes system. The physical mechanism behind the switching effect is discussed. PMID:18850919

  4. A Comprehensive Approach to Determination of Nuclear Data of Unstable Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Satoshi; Nishio, Katsuhisa; Aritomo, Yohihiro; Koura, Hiroyuki; Iwamoto, Osamu; Makii, Hiroyuki; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Hirose, Kentaro

    2016-02-01

    A comprehensive approach to determine nuclear data of unstable nuclei will be described. It consists of a measurement of fission and capture cross sections, mass distribution of fission fragments (independent fission yields) and number of prompt fission neutrons by the method of surrogate reactions. A multi-dimensional Langevin model is being developed to estimate the independent fission yields theoretically. Furthermore, the β decay properties of the fission fragments, almost all are neutron-rich unstable nuclei, are investigated systematically by improving the gross theory of β decay, which will yield information on the decay heat and delayed-neutron data

  5. Observation of an unstable l =1 diocotron mode on a hollow electron column

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, C.F. )

    1990-02-05

    Stable and unstable diocotron modes varying as {ital e}{sup {ital il}{theta}}, with {ital l}=1, are measured on a magnetized, partially hollow electron column. The unstable mode is observed to grow exponentially over several decades, in contradiction to present 2 D fluid theory. This {ital l}=1 instability can dominate the evolution well into the nonlinear regime, resulting in cross-field transport to a stable, monotonically decreasing density profile. To the extent this process is described by 2D {bold E}{times}{bold B} drifts, it is isomorphic to the Kelvin-Helmholtz shear-flow instability of inviscid fluids.

  6. Broad Search for Unstable Resonant Orbits in the Planar Circular Restricted Three-Body Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Rodney L.; Campagnola, Stefano; Lantoine, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Unstable resonant orbits in the circular restricted three-body problem have increasingly been used for trajectory design using optimization and invariant manifold techniques.In this study, several methods for computing these unstable resonant orbits are explored including flyby maps, continuation from two-body models, and grid searches. Families of orbits are computed focusing on the Jupiter-Europa system, and their characteristics are explored. Different parameters such as period and stability are examined for each set of resonantor bits, and the continuation of several specific orbits is explored in more detail.

  7. First-principles calculations of free energies of unstable phases: the case of fcc W.

    PubMed

    Ozolins, V

    2009-02-13

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are used to solve the long-standing problem of calculating the free energies of unstable phases, such as fcc W. We find that fcc W is mechanically unstable with respect to long-wavelength shear at all temperatures considered (T>2500 K), while the short-wavelength phonon modes are anharmonically stabilized. The calculated fcc-bcc enthalpy and entropy differences at T=3500 K (308 meV and 0.74k_{B} per atom, respectively) agree well with the recent values derived from analysis of experimental data.

  8. [Changes in proinflammatory cytokine and destructive metalloproteinase levels during formation of unstable atherosclerotic plaque].

    PubMed

    Ragino, Iu I; Cherniavskiĭ, A M; Polonskaia, Ia V; Volkov, A M; Semaeva, E V; Tsymbal, S Iu; Voevoda, M I

    2009-01-01

    We studied men with coronary atherosclerosis without acute coronary syndrome and determined typical valuable parameters of inflammatory (tumor necrotic factor, antagonist of receptor to interleukin [IL] 1, IL 6, IL 8, monocytes chemotactic protein 1, endothelial monocytes activating protein II), and destructive (matrix metalloproteinase [MMP] 3, MMP 7, MMP 9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase) processes at consecutive stages of formation of coronary atherosclerotic plaque: "normal intimal tissue --> lipid stain --> early stable plaque --> unstable vulnerable plaque <--> stable plaque with fibrosis", and in 3 types of unstable plaques (lipid type, inflammatory erosive type, necrotic type). PMID:19656094

  9. Compact-beam stable-unstable resonator for free-electron laser. Phase 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, A.H.; White, C.J.; Boyd, T.L.; Schmitt, M.J.; Aldrich, C.H.

    1991-10-01

    A significant problem in the design of high-energy free-electron lasers (FELs) centers on the technique for outcoupling the output beam. FELs with currently achievable output power usually include a conventional stable resonator with output through a partially transmitting mirror which will not work for arbitrarily high average power. An alternate scheme must be found for high-energy FELs. A high- efficiency grating outcoupler is an attractive possibility, but it is difficult to manufacture. Other suggestions include unstable resonators with an intracavity focus and unstable resonators with an intracavity focus and beam rotation. The intensity distribution at the intracavity focus of a negative-branch unstable resonator has side-lobes that would be scraped off by the faces of the wiggler magnets or by the beam tube through the wiggler. The resulting power loss would be significant. Therefore, it is desirable to develop another type of resonator for use with FELs. The resonator that we have developed is the compact-beam stable-unstable ring resonator. It is a stable resonator in one transverse dimension and an unstable resonator with an intracavity focus in the orthogonal transverse dimension. A scraper mirror outcouples the output beam from one side of the mode only. The resonator can be configured so that it has a small beam waist at the center of the wiggler in the stable direction and has an intracavity focus in the unstable direction. The half- width of the central lobe of the focus is approximately the size of the stable beam waist. In the stable direction, the Gaussian amplitude distribution results in a small loss on the wiggler magnets, or on a beam tube that will fit within the wiggler, if one is used. The beam tube can have an elliptical shape to permit the passage of several side lobes in the unstable dimension. A mode of the CBSUR is a product of the mode of a strip stable resonator with a strip compact-beam negative-branch unstable resonator.

  10. Hybrid stable-unstable resonators for diffusion-cooled CO(2) slab lasers.

    PubMed

    Lapucci, A; Labate, A; Rossetti, F; Mascalchi, S

    1996-06-20

    We present the numerical and experimental study that we carried out to compare the performances of two hybrid stable-unstable resonators for diffusion-cooled CO(2) slab lasers. The two resonators are designed to fit a 320 mm × 60 mm ×2 mm rf-discharge channel and are both guided in the narrow transverse direction. They differ in the other transverse direction, consisting of a positive- or a negative-branch unstable resonator scheme. The two solutions have been characterized in terms of modal structure, power extraction, stability, and quality of the extracted beam. PMID:21102698

  11. Unstable resonators of high-power chemical oxygen-iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Savin, A V; Strakhov, S Yu; Druzhinin, S L

    2006-09-30

    Configurations of unstable resonators are considered depending on the basic parameters of a high-power chemical oxygen-iodine laser and the design of an unstable resonator is proposed which provides the compensation of the inhomogeneity of the small-signal gain downstream of the active medium, a high energy efficiency, and stability to intracavity aberrations. The optical scheme of this resonator is presented and its properties are analysed by simulating numerically the kinetics of the active medium and resonator itself in the diffraction approximation. (laser beams and resonators)

  12. High mode volume self filtering unstable resonator applied to a short pulse XeCl laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luches, A.; Nassisi, V.; Perrone, M. R.; Radiotis, E.

    1989-05-01

    A high mode volume non confocal self filtering unstable resonator has been applied to a short pulse XeCl laser. Such a resonator made up of a concave mirror (focal length is 25 cm) and a convex mirror (focal length is -25 cm), has a magnification | M|=34 and a cavity length of 151 cm. A nearly diffraction limited laser beam of 5.5 mJ, 10 ns duration and with a brightness of 2.5×10 13 W cm -2 sr -1 has been obtained. These results are compared to those obtained with another self-filtering unstable resonator having the same resonator length but | M|=10.

  13. High-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental studies.

    PubMed

    Kluge, H-Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry for fundamental studies in metrology and atomic, nuclear and particle physics requires extreme sensitivity and efficiency as well as ultimate resolving power and accuracy. An overview will be given on the global status of high-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental physics and metrology. Three quite different examples of modern mass spectrometric experiments in physics are presented: (i) the retardation spectrometer KATRIN at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, employing electrostatic filtering in combination with magnetic-adiabatic collimation-the biggest mass spectrometer for determining the smallest mass, i.e. the mass of the electron anti-neutrino, (ii) the Experimental Cooler-Storage Ring at GSI-a mass spectrometer of medium size, relative to other accelerators, for determining medium-heavy masses and (iii) the Penning trap facility, SHIPTRAP, at GSI-the smallest mass spectrometer for determining the heaviest masses, those of super-heavy elements. Finally, a short view into the future will address the GSI project HITRAP at GSI for fundamental studies with highly-charged ions.

  14. Atomically Precise Colloidal Metal Nanoclusters and Nanoparticles: Fundamentals and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rongchao; Zeng, Chenjie; Zhou, Meng; Chen, Yuxiang

    2016-09-28

    Colloidal nanoparticles are being intensely pursued in current nanoscience research. Nanochemists are often frustrated by the well-known fact that no two nanoparticles are the same, which precludes the deep understanding of many fundamental properties of colloidal nanoparticles in which the total structures (core plus surface) must be known. Therefore, controlling nanoparticles with atomic precision and solving their total structures have long been major dreams for nanochemists. Recently, these goals are partially fulfilled in the case of gold nanoparticles, at least in the ultrasmall size regime (1-3 nm in diameter, often called nanoclusters). This review summarizes the major progress in the field, including the principles that permit atomically precise synthesis, new types of atomic structures, and unique physical and chemical properties of atomically precise nanoparticles, as well as exciting opportunities for nanochemists to understand very fundamental science of colloidal nanoparticles (such as the stability, metal-ligand interfacial bonding, ligand assembly on particle surfaces, aesthetic structural patterns, periodicities, and emergence of the metallic state) and to develop a range of potential applications such as in catalysis, biomedicine, sensing, imaging, optics, and energy conversion. Although most of the research activity currently focuses on thiolate-protected gold nanoclusters, important progress has also been achieved in other ligand-protected gold, silver, and bimetal (or alloy) nanoclusters. All of these types of unique nanoparticles will bring unprecedented opportunities, not only in understanding the fundamental questions of nanoparticles but also in opening up new horizons for scientific studies of nanoparticles. PMID:27585252

  15. Atomically Precise Colloidal Metal Nanoclusters and Nanoparticles: Fundamentals and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rongchao; Zeng, Chenjie; Zhou, Meng; Chen, Yuxiang

    2016-09-28

    Colloidal nanoparticles are being intensely pursued in current nanoscience research. Nanochemists are often frustrated by the well-known fact that no two nanoparticles are the same, which precludes the deep understanding of many fundamental properties of colloidal nanoparticles in which the total structures (core plus surface) must be known. Therefore, controlling nanoparticles with atomic precision and solving their total structures have long been major dreams for nanochemists. Recently, these goals are partially fulfilled in the case of gold nanoparticles, at least in the ultrasmall size regime (1-3 nm in diameter, often called nanoclusters). This review summarizes the major progress in the field, including the principles that permit atomically precise synthesis, new types of atomic structures, and unique physical and chemical properties of atomically precise nanoparticles, as well as exciting opportunities for nanochemists to understand very fundamental science of colloidal nanoparticles (such as the stability, metal-ligand interfacial bonding, ligand assembly on particle surfaces, aesthetic structural patterns, periodicities, and emergence of the metallic state) and to develop a range of potential applications such as in catalysis, biomedicine, sensing, imaging, optics, and energy conversion. Although most of the research activity currently focuses on thiolate-protected gold nanoclusters, important progress has also been achieved in other ligand-protected gold, silver, and bimetal (or alloy) nanoclusters. All of these types of unique nanoparticles will bring unprecedented opportunities, not only in understanding the fundamental questions of nanoparticles but also in opening up new horizons for scientific studies of nanoparticles.

  16. Fundamental and harmonic radiation in type III solar radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, I. H.

    1994-01-01

    Type III solar radio bursts are investigated by modeling the propagation of the electron beam and the generation and subsequent propagation of waves to the observer. Predictions from this model are compared in detail with particle, Langmuir wave, and radio data from the International Sun Earth Explorer-3 (ISSE-3) spacecraft and with other observations to clarify the roles of fundamental and harmonic emission in type III radio bursts. Langmuir waves are seen only after the arrival of the beam, in accord with the standard theory. These waves persist after a positive beam slope is last resolved, implying that sporadic positive slopes persist for some time, unresolved but in accord with the predictions of stochastic growth theory. Local electromagnetic emission sets in only after Langmuir waves are seen, in accord with the standard theory, which relies on nonlinear processes involving Langmuir waves. In the events investigated here, fundamental radiation appears to dominate early in the event, followed and/or accompanied by harmonic radiation after the peak, with a long-lived tail of multiply scattered fundamental or harmonic emission extending long afterwards. These results are largely independent of, but generally consistent with, the conclusions of earlier works.

  17. High-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental studies.

    PubMed

    Kluge, H-Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry for fundamental studies in metrology and atomic, nuclear and particle physics requires extreme sensitivity and efficiency as well as ultimate resolving power and accuracy. An overview will be given on the global status of high-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental physics and metrology. Three quite different examples of modern mass spectrometric experiments in physics are presented: (i) the retardation spectrometer KATRIN at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, employing electrostatic filtering in combination with magnetic-adiabatic collimation-the biggest mass spectrometer for determining the smallest mass, i.e. the mass of the electron anti-neutrino, (ii) the Experimental Cooler-Storage Ring at GSI-a mass spectrometer of medium size, relative to other accelerators, for determining medium-heavy masses and (iii) the Penning trap facility, SHIPTRAP, at GSI-the smallest mass spectrometer for determining the heaviest masses, those of super-heavy elements. Finally, a short view into the future will address the GSI project HITRAP at GSI for fundamental studies with highly-charged ions. PMID:20530821

  18. Particle-Charge Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerstenau, Stephen; Wilson, Gregory R.

    2008-01-01

    An instrument for rapidly measuring the electric charges and sizes (from approximately 1 to approximately 100 micrometers) of airborne particles is undergoing development. Conceived for monitoring atmospheric dust particles on Mars, instruments like this one could also be used on Earth to monitor natural and artificial aerosols in diverse indoor and outdoor settings for example, volcanic regions, clean rooms, powder-processing machinery, and spray-coating facilities. The instrument incorporates a commercially available, low-noise, ultrasensitive charge-sensing preamplifier circuit. The input terminal of this circuit--the gate of a field-effect transistor--is connected to a Faraday-cage cylindrical electrode. The charged particles of interest are suspended in air or other suitable gas that is made to flow along the axis of the cylindrical electrode without touching the electrode. The flow can be channeled and generated by any of several alternative means; in the prototype of this instrument, the gas is drawn along a glass capillary tube (see upper part of figure) coaxial with the electrode. The size of a particle affects its rate of acceleration in the flow and thus affects the timing and shape of the corresponding signal peak generated by the charge-sensing amplifier. The charge affects the magnitude (and thus also the shape) of the signal peak. Thus, the signal peak (see figure) conveys information on both the size and electric charge of a sensed particle. In experiments thus far, the instrument has been found to be capable of measuring individual aerosol particle charges of magnitude greater than 350 e (where e is the fundamental unit of electric charge) with a precision of +/- 150 e. The instrument can sample particles at a rate as high as several thousand per second.

  19. Particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  20. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    1991-01-01

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  1. Analysis of unstable periodic orbits and chaotic orbits in the one-dimensional linear piecewise-smooth discontinuous map.

    PubMed

    Rajpathak, Bhooshan; Pillai, Harish K; Bandyopadhyay, Santanu

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we analytically examine the unstable periodic orbits and chaotic orbits of the 1-D linear piecewise-smooth discontinuous map. We explore the existence of unstable orbits and the effect of variation in parameters on the coexistence of unstable orbits. Further, we show that this structuring is different from the well known period adding cascade structure associated with the stable periodic orbits of the same map. Further, we analytically prove the existence of chaotic orbit for this map.

  2. Analysis of unstable periodic orbits and chaotic orbits in the one-dimensional linear piecewise-smooth discontinuous map

    SciTech Connect

    Rajpathak, Bhooshan Pillai, Harish K.; Bandyopadhyay, Santanu

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we analytically examine the unstable periodic orbits and chaotic orbits of the 1-D linear piecewise-smooth discontinuous map. We explore the existence of unstable orbits and the effect of variation in parameters on the coexistence of unstable orbits. Further, we show that this structuring is different from the well known period adding cascade structure associated with the stable periodic orbits of the same map. Further, we analytically prove the existence of chaotic orbit for this map.

  3. Database and online map service on unstable rock slopes in Norway - From data perpetuation to public information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppikofer, Thierry; Nordahl, Bobo; Bunkholt, Halvor; Nicolaisen, Magnus; Jarna, Alexandra; Iversen, Sverre; Hermanns, Reginald L.; Böhme, Martina; Yugsi Molina, Freddy X.

    2015-11-01

    The unstable rock slope database is developed and maintained by the Geological Survey of Norway as part of the systematic mapping of unstable rock slopes in Norway. This mapping aims to detect catastrophic rock slope failures before they occur. More than 250 unstable slopes with post-glacial deformation are detected up to now. The main aims of the unstable rock slope database are (1) to serve as a national archive for unstable rock slopes in Norway; (2) to serve for data collection and storage during field mapping; (3) to provide decision-makers with hazard zones and other necessary information on unstable rock slopes for land-use planning and mitigation; and (4) to inform the public through an online map service. The database is organized hierarchically with a main point for each unstable rock slope to which several feature classes and tables are linked. This main point feature class includes several general attributes of the unstable rock slopes, such as site name, general and geological descriptions, executed works, recommendations, technical parameters (volume, lithology, mechanism and others), displacement rates, possible consequences, as well as hazard and risk classification. Feature classes and tables linked to the main feature class include different scenarios of an unstable rock slope, field observation points, sampling points for dating, displacement measurement stations, lineaments, unstable areas, run-out areas, areas affected by secondary effects, along with tables for hazard and risk classification and URL links to further documentation and references. The database on unstable rock slopes in Norway will be publicly consultable through an online map service. Factsheets with key information on unstable rock slopes can be automatically generated and downloaded for each site. Areas of possible rock avalanche run-out and their secondary effects displayed in the online map service, along with hazard and risk assessments, will become important tools for

  4. Physics of windblown particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Leach, Rodman; Marshall, John R.; White, Bruce; Iversen, James D.; Nickling, William G.; Gillette, Dale; Sorensen, Michael

    1987-01-01

    A laboratory facility proposed for the Space Station to investigate fundamental aspects of windblown particles is described. The experiments would take advantage of the environment afforded in earth orbit and would be an extension of research currently being conducted on the geology and physics of windblown sediments on earth, Mars, and Venus. Aeolian (wind) processes are reviewed in the planetary context, the scientific rational is given for specific experiments to be conducted, the experiment apparatus (the Carousel Wind Tunnel, or CWT) is described, and a plan presented for implementing the proposed research program.

  5. Relation of the diffuse reflectance remission function to the fundamental optical parameters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, E. L.

    1972-01-01

    The Kubelka-Munk equations describing the diffuse reflectance of a powdered sample were compared to equations obtained using a uniformly-sized rough-surfaced spherical particle model. The comparison resulted in equations relating the remission function and the Kubelka-Munk constants to the index of refraction, the absorption coefficient, and the average particle diameter of a powdered sample. Published experimental results were used to test the equation relating to the remission function to the fundamental optical parameters.

  6. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  7. Cosmology and particle physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1988-01-01

    The interplay between cosmology and elementary particle physics is discussed. The standard cosmology is reviewed, concentrating on primordial nucleosynthesis and discussing how the standard cosmology has been used to place constraints on the properties of various particles. Baryogenesis is discussed, showing how a scenario in which the B-, C-, and CP-violating interactions in GUTs provide a dynamical explanation for the predominance of matter over antimatter and for the present baryon-to-photon ratio. It is shown how the very early dynamical evolution of a very weakly coupled scalar field which is initially displaced from the minimum of its potential may explain a handful of very fundamental cosmological facts which are not explained by the standard cosmology.

  8. UNSTABLE FEMORAL FRACTURES TREATED WITH TITANIUM ELASTIC INTRAMEDULLARY NAILS, IN CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Jamil Faissal; Schelle, Gisele; Valenza, Weverley; Pavelec, Anna Carolina; Souza, Camila Deneka Arantes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the indications, epidemiology, associated lesions, complications and prognosis among children with unstable femoral diaphysis fractures who were treated with titanium elastic intramedullary nails. Method: This was a retrospective analysis on 24 patients aged 5-12 years with unstable femoral diaphysis fractures who underwent surgical treatment with elastic titanium intramedullary nails at the Cajuru University Hospital, Curitiba-PR, between April 2002 and March 2008, with a minimum follow-up of 36 months. The epidemiological data, angular deviations, leg shortening and bone consolidation were evaluated. Results: The medical files of 113 cases operated between April 2002 and March 2008 were reassessed. From these, 24 cases of unstable femoral diaphysis fractures treated with elastic titanium intramedullary nails with retrograde insertion were included in the study. There were two bilateral fractures and two exposed fractures. Seven patients were female and 17 were male, and the mean age was 8.3 years. The following were presented at the end of the study: shortening, varus or valgus displacement, final retrocurvatum or antecurvatum of zero, and absence of delayed consolidation or pseudarthrosis. Conclusions: The elastic titanium intramedullary nails were easily placed and removed. We believe that using elastic titanium intramedullary nails is a good option for fixation of unstable femoral fractures in children. PMID:27047868

  9. Statistical characteristics, circulation regimes and unstable periodic orbits of a barotropic atmospheric model.

    PubMed

    Gritsun, A

    2013-05-28

    The theory of chaotic dynamical systems gives many tools that can be used in climate studies. The widely used ones are the Lyapunov exponents, the Kolmogorov entropy and the attractor dimension characterizing global quantities of a system. Another potentially useful tool from dynamical system theory arises from the fact that the local analysis of a system probability distribution function (PDF) can be accomplished by using a procedure that involves an expansion in terms of unstable periodic orbits (UPOs). The system measure (or its statistical characteristics) is approximated as a weighted sum over the orbits. The weights are inversely proportional to the orbit instability characteristics so that the least unstable orbits make larger contributions to the PDF. Consequently, one can expect some relationship between the least unstable orbits and the local maxima of the system PDF. As a result, the most probable system trajectories (or 'circulation regimes' in some sense) may be explained in terms of orbits. For the special classes of chaotic dynamical systems, there is a strict theory guaranteeing the accuracy of this approach. However, a typical atmospheric model may not qualify for these theorems. In our study, we will try to apply the idea of UPO expansion to the simple atmospheric system based on the barotropic vorticity equation of the sphere. We will check how well orbits approximate the system attractor, its statistical characteristics and PDF. The connection of the most probable states of the system with the least unstable periodic orbits will also be analysed.

  10. Bertotti-Robinson thin-shell wormhole is physical but unstable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirabi, Z.

    2016-08-01

    I construct a thin-shell wormhole in the spherically symmetric, static Bertotti-Robinson magnetic universe which is supported by normal matter in the sense that the energy conditions are all satisfied. Using the so called small velocity perturbation it is shown that this thin-shell wormhole is basically physical but unstable against radial perturbation.

  11. Cs laser with unstable cavity transversely pumped by multiple diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, B V; Shaffer, M K; Knize, R J

    2009-08-17

    We have demonstrated a Cs vapor laser with an unstable resonator transversely pumped by 15 narrowband laser diode arrays. A slope efficiency of 43%, a total optical efficiency of 31% and a maximum output power 49 W were obtained with a pump power of 157 Watts. PMID:19687954

  12. Efficiency of an unstable resonator with an active medium containing small-scale phase inhomogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Lobachev, V V; Strakhov, S Yu

    2004-01-31

    Properties of an unstable resonator with small-scale periodic inhomogeneities of the refractive index in an active medium are considered. It is shown that the parameters of output radiation depend on the structure of a phase inhomogeneity. The methods for increasing the resonator efficiency are analysed. (resonators. interferometers)

  13. Injection Seeding of Ti:Al2O3 in an unstable resonator theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. C.; Wang, L. G.; Barnes, N. P.; Edwards, W. C.; Cheng, W. A.; Hess, R. V.; Lockard, G. E.; Ponsardin, P. L.

    1991-01-01

    Injection Seeding of a Ti:Al2O3 unstable resonator using both a pulsed single-mode Ti:Al2O3 laser and a continuous wave laser diode has been characterized. Results are compared with a theory which calculates injection seeding as function of seed and resonator alignment, beam profiles, and power.

  14. Radially variable reflectivity output coupler of novel design for unstable resonators.

    PubMed

    De Silvestri, S; Laporta, P; Magni, V; Svelto, O

    1987-02-01

    An output coupler with radially variable reflectivity, based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer made of two suitable spherical mirrors, is proposed. Application to a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with an unstable resonator has produced diffraction-limited output beams with energy up to 300 mJ. PMID:19738800

  15. Spherical aberration in on-axis and offset unstable confocal resonators.

    PubMed

    Moyer, R H

    1982-03-15

    An analysis of spherical aberration in on-axis and offset unstable laser resonators is presented. Closed-form analytic expressions of the associated Strehl ratio as a function of cavity dimensions and magnification are derived, and effects of simple phase corrections in the optical system are assumed. PMID:20389813

  16. Greek University Candidates' Targets in a Changing, Unstable and Unpredictable Economic Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalerante, E.; Mormory, P.; Mormoris, M.

    2013-01-01

    The topic of the present study is concerned with the university candidates' educational and career choices against an unstable economic background that may necessitate the reformulation and readjustment of choices to innovative concepts of advancement and future development as they may apply to youngsters of different social class and gender. The…

  17. Modeling diseases of noncoding unstable repeat expansions using mutant pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yanovsky-Dagan, Shira; Mor-Shaked, Hagar; Eiges, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations involving DNA repeat expansions are responsible for over 20 different neuronal and neuromuscular diseases. All result from expanded tracts of repetitive DNA sequences (mostly microsatellites) that become unstable beyond a critical length when transmitted across generations. Nearly all are inherited as autosomal dominant conditions and are typically associated with anticipation. Pathologic unstable repeat expansions can be classified according to their length, repeat sequence, gene location and underlying pathologic mechanisms. This review summarizes the current contribution of mutant pluripotent stem cells (diseased human embryonic stem cells and patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells) to the research of unstable repeat pathologies by focusing on particularly large unstable noncoding expansions. Among this class of disorders are Fragile X syndrome and Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, myotonic dystrophy type 1 and myotonic dystrophy type 2, Friedreich ataxia and C9 related amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and/or frontotemporal dementia, Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy and potentially more. Common features that are typical to this subclass of conditions are RNA toxic gain-of-function, epigenetic loss-of-function, toxic repeat-associated non-ATG translation and somatic instability. For each mechanism we summarize the currently available stem cell based models, highlight how they contributed to better understanding of the related mechanism, and discuss how they may be utilized in future investigations. PMID:26131313

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with unstable angina: comparison with acute myocardial infarction and normals

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, M.; Johnson, R.F. Jr.; Fawcett, H.D.; Schreiber, M.H.

    1988-09-01

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging in characterizing normal, ischemic and infarcted segments of myocardium was examined in 8 patients with unstable angina, 11 patients with acute myocardial infarction, and 7 patients with stable angina. Eleven normal volunteers were imaged for comparison. Myocardial segments in short axis magnetic resonance images were classified as normal or abnormal on the basis of perfusion changes observed in thallium-201 images in 22 patients and according to the electrocariographic localization of infarction in 4 patients. T2 relaxation time was measured in 57 myocardial segments with abnormal perfusion (24 with reversible and 33 with irreversible perfusion changes) and in 25 normally perfused segments. T2 measurements in normally perfused segments of patients with acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina and stable angina were within normal range derived from T2 measurements in 48 myocardial segments of 11 normal volunteers (42 +/- 10 ms). T2 in abnormal myocardial segments of patients with stable angina also was not significantly different from normal. T2 of abnormal segments in patients with unstable angina (64 +/- 14 in reversibly ischemic and 67 +/- 21 in the irreversibly ischemic segments) was prolonged when compared to normal (p less than 0.0001) and was not significantly different from T2 in abnormal segments of patients with acute myocardial infarction (62 +/- 18 for reversibly and 66 +/- 11 for irreversibly ischemic segments). The data indicate that T2 prolongation is not specific for acute myocardial infarction and may be observed in abnormally perfused segments of patients with unstable angina.

  19. Nonconfocal unstable resonator for solid-state dye lasers based on a gradient-reflectivity mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Allik, T.H.; Hutchinson, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    A compact high-brightness solid-state dye laser, consisting of a nonconfocal unstable resonator formed of a planar mirror and a gradient-reflectivity mirror, is modeled by use of ray-tracing analysis. Collimated 80-mJ output was obtained in a 10-mmmrad beam. {copyright} {ital 1995 Optical Society of America.}

  20. Watershed Scale Shear Stress From Tethersonde Wind Profile Measurements Under Near Neutral and Unstable Atmospheric Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlange, M. B.; Katul, G. G.

    1995-04-01

    Mean wind speed profiles were measured in the atmospheric surface layer, using a tethersonde system, above the Ojai Valley Watershed in southern California. The valley is mainly planted with mature avocado and orange trees. The surface shear stress and latent and sensible heat fluxes were measured above the trees which are up to 9 m in height. Near-neutral wind speed profile measurements allowed the determination of the watershed surface roughness (z0 = 1.4 m) and the momentum displacement height (d0 = 7.0 m). The wind speed measurements obtained under unstable atmospheric stability were analyzed using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. New stability correction functions proposed based on theory and experiments of Kader-Yaglom as well as the now classic Businger-Dyer type functions were tested. The watershed shear stress values calculated using the surface layer wind speed profiles with the new Monin-Obukhov stability functions were found to be improved in comparison with the values obtained with the Businger-Dyer functions under strongly unstable stability conditions. The Monin-Obukhov model with the Businger-Dyer stability correction function underpredicted the momentum flux by 25% under strongly unstable stability conditions, while the new Kader-Yaglom formulation compared well on average (R2 = 0.77) with the surface eddy correlation measurements for all atmospheric stability conditions. The unstable 100-m drag coefficient was found to be u*2/V1002 = 0.0182.