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Sample records for fungal redox-responsive ap1

  1. The FUS3 MAPK signaling pathway of the citrus pathogen Alternaria alternata functions independently or cooperatively with the fungal redox-responsive AP1 regulator for diverse developmental, physiological and pathogenic processes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Hsuan; Yang, Siwy Ling; Wang, Nan-Yi; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2010-04-01

    Alternaria alternata, the fungus that causes citrus brown spot, invades its hosts primarily through the production and action of a host-selective ACT toxin that kills citrus cells prior to invasion. In this study, we show that, in the tangerine pathotype of A. alternata, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated signaling pathway governs a number of biological functions, either separately or in a cooperative manner, with the AaAP1 gene encoding a transcription regulator. The reported MAPK is encoded by the AaFUS3 gene, which we show to be necessary for conidial development, resistance to copper fungicides, melanin biosynthesis, and particularly, for elaboration of the penetration process. In contrast, AaFUS3 negatively controls salt tolerance and production of several hydrolytic enzymes. AaFUS3 has no apparent role in the biosynthesis of host-selective toxin or in resistance to oxidative stress. Both AaAP1 and AaFUS3 are required for fungal resistance to 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), 2-chloro-5-hydroxypyridine (CHP), diethyl maleate (DEM), and many pyridine-containing compounds. A strain with mutations in both AaAP1 and AaFUS3 displayed an increased sensitivity to these compounds. Expression of the AaAP1 and AaFUS3 genes and phosphorylation of AaFUS3 were also induced by CHP, DEM, or TIBA. Expression of two genes coding for a putative MFS transporter was coordinately regulated by AaAP1 and AaFUS3. The AaAP1::sGFP (synthetic green fluorescent protein) fusion protein became localized in the nucleus in response to CHP or TIBA. Inactivation of the AaAP1 gene, however, promoted phosphorylation of AaFUS3. Taken together, our results indicate that A. alternata utilizes specialized or synergistic regulatory interactions between the AP1 and MAPK signaling pathways for diverse physiological functions.

  2. Redox Regulation of an AP-1-Like Transcription Factor, YapA, in the Fungal Symbiont Epichloë festucae

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Gemma M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the central regulators of oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is Yap1, a bZIP transcription factor of the AP-1 family. In unstressed cells, Yap1 is reduced and cytoplasmic, but in response to oxidative stress, it becomes oxidized and accumulates in the nucleus. To date, there have been no reports on the role of AP-1-like transcription factors in symbiotic fungi. An ortholog of Yap1, named YapA, was identified in the genome of the grass symbiont Epichloë festucae and shown to complement an S. cerevisiae Δyap1 mutant. Hyphae of the E. festucae ΔyapA strain were sensitive to menadione and diamide but resistant to H2O2, KO2, and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH). In contrast, conidia of the ΔyapA strain were very sensitive to H2O2 and failed to germinate. Using a PcatA-eGFP degron-tagged reporter, YapA was shown to be required for expression of a spore-specific catalase gene, catA. Although YapA-EGFP localized to the nucleus in response to host reactive oxygen species during seedling infection, there was no difference in whole-plant and cellular phenotypes of plants infected with the ΔyapA strain compared to the wild-type strain. Homologs of the S. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe redox-sensing proteins (Gpx3 and Tpx1, respectively) did not act as redox sensors for YapA in E. festucae. In response to oxidative stress, YapA-EGFP localized to the nuclei of E. festucae ΔgpxC, ΔtpxA, and ΔgpxC ΔtpxA cells to the same degree as that in wild-type cells. These results show that E. festucae has a robust system for countering oxidative stress in culture and in planta but that Gpx3- or Tpx1-like thiol peroxidases are dispensable for activation of YapA. PMID:23893078

  3. Redox regulation of an AP-1-like transcription factor, YapA, in the fungal symbiont Epichloe festucae.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Gemma M; Scott, Barry

    2013-10-01

    One of the central regulators of oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is Yap1, a bZIP transcription factor of the AP-1 family. In unstressed cells, Yap1 is reduced and cytoplasmic, but in response to oxidative stress, it becomes oxidized and accumulates in the nucleus. To date, there have been no reports on the role of AP-1-like transcription factors in symbiotic fungi. An ortholog of Yap1, named YapA, was identified in the genome of the grass symbiont Epichloë festucae and shown to complement an S. cerevisiae Δyap1 mutant. Hyphae of the E. festucae ΔyapA strain were sensitive to menadione and diamide but resistant to H2O2, KO2, and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH). In contrast, conidia of the ΔyapA strain were very sensitive to H2O2 and failed to germinate. Using a PcatA-eGFP degron-tagged reporter, YapA was shown to be required for expression of a spore-specific catalase gene, catA. Although YapA-EGFP localized to the nucleus in response to host reactive oxygen species during seedling infection, there was no difference in whole-plant and cellular phenotypes of plants infected with the ΔyapA strain compared to the wild-type strain. Homologs of the S. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe redox-sensing proteins (Gpx3 and Tpx1, respectively) did not act as redox sensors for YapA in E. festucae. In response to oxidative stress, YapA-EGFP localized to the nuclei of E. festucae ΔgpxC, ΔtpxA, and ΔgpxC ΔtpxA cells to the same degree as that in wild-type cells. These results show that E. festucae has a robust system for countering oxidative stress in culture and in planta but that Gpx3- or Tpx1-like thiol peroxidases are dispensable for activation of YapA. PMID:23893078

  4. Redox-responsive alginate microsphere containing cystamine.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kyeongnan; Kim, Jin-Chul

    2016-10-01

    Redox-responsive microspheres were prepared by solidifying the alginate- and cystamine-containing water droplets of O/W emulsion using calcium ion. Emulsions were prepared using alginate/cystamine mixture solution whose the carboxylic group/the amino group molar ratio was 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3, and whose the total concentration was kept to 2% (w/v). The microspheres on Scanning electron microscopy photographs were almost spherical and they were less than 1 μm in diameter. According to the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, the sulfur content of the microspheres was found to be 6.1, 11.4, and 14.8% (w/w), respectively, not markedly different from the calculated content. The release degree of blue dextran loaded in the microspheres was higher as the cystamine content was higher. Microspheres released almost the same amount of dye regardless of dithiothreitol (DTT, a reducing agent) concentration when the cystamine content was relatively low (e.g. 14.5% (w/w)), whereas they released dye in DTT concentration-dependent manner when the cystamine content was relatively high (e.g. 27.0 and 35.1% (w/w)). The light scattering intensity of alginate/cystamine mixture solution was stronger at a larger amount of cystamine, indicating that cystamine could cross-link alginate chains. The light scattering intensity decreased with increasing DTT concentration, possibly because of the breakdown of the disulfide bond of cystamine. The breakdown of the disulfide bond could account for why the DTT concentration-dependent release of dye loaded in the microspheres was observed. PMID:27484719

  5. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Activator Protein 1 (AP-1)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases. PMID:24831826

  6. General Chemoselective and Redox-Responsive Ligation and Release Strategy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a switchable redox click and cleave reaction strategy for conjugating and releasing a range of molecules on demand. This chemoselective redox-responsive ligation (CRRL) and release strategy is based on a redox switchable oxime linkage that is controlled by mild chemical or electrochemical redox signals and can be performed at physiological conditions without the use of a catalyst. Both conjugation and release reactions are kinetically well behaved and quantitative. The CRRL strategy is synthetically modular and easily monitored and characterized by routine analytical techniques. We demonstrate how the CRRL strategy can be used for the dynamic generation of cyclic peptides and the ligation of two different peptides that are stable but can be selectively cleaved upon changes in the redox environment. We also demonstrate a new redox based delivery of cargoes to live cells strategy via the CRRL methodology by synthesizing a FRET redox-responsive probe that is selectively activated within a cellular environment. We believe the ease of the CRRL strategy should find wide use in a range of applications in biology, tissue engineering, nanoscience, synthetic chemistry, and material science and will expand the suite of current conjugation and release strategies. PMID:24559434

  7. Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and c-Fos/AP-1.

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Shunichi; Tsumiyama, Ken

    2009-05-15

    c-Fos/AP-1 controls the expression of inflammatory cytokines and matrix-degrading matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) important in arthritis via promoter AP-1 binding motif. Among inflammatory cytokines, IL-1beta is the most important inducer of a variety of MMPs, and mainly responsible for cartilage breakdown and osteoclastogenesis. IL-1beta and c-Fos/AP-1 influence each other's gene expression and activity, resulting in an orchestrated cross-talk that is crucial to arthritic joint destruction, where TNFalpha can act synergistically with them. While how to stop the degradation of bone and cartilage, i.e., to control MMP, has long been the central issue in the research of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), selective inhibition of c-Fos/AP-1 does resolve arthritic joint destruction. Thus, the blockade of IL-1beta and/or c-Fos/AP-1 can be promising as an effective therapy for rheumatoid joint destruction in addition to the currently available TNFalpha blocking agents that act mainly on arthritis.

  8. ACTIVATION OF AP-1 IN UROTSA CELLS BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ACTIVATION OF AP-1 IN UROTSA CELLS BY METHYLATED TRIVALENT ARSENICALS. Z Drobna1, I Jaspers2, D J Thomas3 and M Styblo1. 1Department of Pediatrics; 2Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 3US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.

  9. The AP-1 transcription factor homolog Pf-AP-1 activates transcription of multiple biomineral proteins and potentially participates in Pinctada fucata biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiangnan; Cheng, Minzhang; Xiang, Liang; Liang, Jian; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein-1 (AP-1) is an important bZIP transcription factor that regulates a series of physiological processes by specifically activating transcription of several genes, and one of its well-chartered functions in mammals is participating in bone mineralization. We isolated and cloned the complete cDNA of a Jun/AP-1 homolog from Pinctada fucata and called it Pf-AP-1. Pf-AP-1 had a highly conserved bZIP region and phosphorylation sites compared with those from mammals. A tissue distribution analysis showed that Pf-AP-1 was ubiquitously expressed in P. fucata and the mRNA level of Pf-AP-1 is extremely high in mantle. Pf-AP-1 expression was positively associated with multiple biomineral proteins in the mantle. The luciferase reporter assay in a mammalian cell line showed that Pf-AP-1 significantly up-regulates the transcriptional activity of the promoters of KRMP, Pearlin, and Prisilkin39. Inhibiting the activity of Pf-AP-1 depressed the expression of multiple matrix proteins. Pf-AP-1 showed a unique expression pattern during shell regeneration and pearl sac development, which was similar to the pattern observed for biomineral proteins. These results suggest that the Pf-AP-1 AP-1 homolog is an important transcription factor that regulates transcription of several biomineral proteins simultaneously and plays a role in P. fucata biomineralization, particularly during pearl and shell formation. PMID:26404494

  10. The AP-1 transcription factor homolog Pf-AP-1 activates transcription of multiple biomineral proteins and potentially participates in Pinctada fucata biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangnan; Cheng, Minzhang; Xiang, Liang; Liang, Jian; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-09-25

    Activator protein-1 (AP-1) is an important bZIP transcription factor that regulates a series of physiological processes by specifically activating transcription of several genes, and one of its well-chartered functions in mammals is participating in bone mineralization. We isolated and cloned the complete cDNA of a Jun/AP-1 homolog from Pinctada fucata and called it Pf-AP-1. Pf-AP-1 had a highly conserved bZIP region and phosphorylation sites compared with those from mammals. A tissue distribution analysis showed that Pf-AP-1 was ubiquitously expressed in P. fucata and the mRNA level of Pf-AP-1 is extremely high in mantle. Pf-AP-1 expression was positively associated with multiple biomineral proteins in the mantle. The luciferase reporter assay in a mammalian cell line showed that Pf-AP-1 significantly up-regulates the transcriptional activity of the promoters of KRMP, Pearlin, and Prisilkin39. Inhibiting the activity of Pf-AP-1 depressed the expression of multiple matrix proteins. Pf-AP-1 showed a unique expression pattern during shell regeneration and pearl sac development, which was similar to the pattern observed for biomineral proteins. These results suggest that the Pf-AP-1 AP-1 homolog is an important transcription factor that regulates transcription of several biomineral proteins simultaneously and plays a role in P. fucata biomineralization, particularly during pearl and shell formation.

  11. Functions of AP1 (Fos/Jun) in bone development.

    PubMed

    Wagner, E F

    2002-11-01

    Genetically modified mice and cells have provided important insights into the biological functions of the dimeric transcription factor complex AP1, in particular into its role in skeletal development. Data obtained from knockout mice revealed that some components, such as c-Fos are key regulators of bone cell differentiation, whereas others, like c-Jun, JunB and Fra-1 are essential in embryonic and/or postnatal development. Apart from identifying the specific roles of AP1 proteins in developmental processes, researchers are beginning to obtain a better molecular understanding of their cell-context dependent functions, their downstream target genes and how they regulate bone cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis.

  12. Dynamic Regulation of AP-1 Transcriptional Complexes Directs Trophoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Lindsey N.; Rumi, M. A. Karim; Roby, Katherine F.

    2015-01-01

    Placentation is a process that establishes the maternal-fetal interface and is required for successful pregnancy. The epithelial component of the placenta consists of trophoblast cells, which possess the capacity for multilineage differentiation and are responsible for placenta-specific functions. FOS-like antigen 1 (FOSL1), a component of AP-1 transcription factor complexes, contributes to the regulation of placental development. FOSL1 expression is restricted to trophoblast giant cells and invasive trophoblast cells. In the present study, we characterized the FOSL1 regulatory pathway in rat trophoblast cells. Transcriptome profiling in control and FOSL1 knockdown cells identified FOSL1-dependent gene sets linked to endocrine and invasive functions. FOSL1 was shown to occupy AP-1 binding sites within these gene loci, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Complementary in vivo experiments using trophoblast-specific lentiviral delivery of FOSL1 short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) provided in vivo validation of FOSL1 targets. FOSL1 actions require a dimerization partner. Coimmunoprecipitation, coimmunolocalization, and ChIP analyses showed that FOSL1 interacts with JUNB and, to a lesser extent, JUN in differentiating trophoblast cells. Knockdown of FOSL1 and JUNB expression inhibited both endocrine and invasive properties of trophoblast cells. In summary, FOSL1 recruits JUNB to form AP-1 transcriptional complexes that specifically regulate the endocrine and invasive trophoblast phenotypes. PMID:26149388

  13. Factors from Trypanosoma cruzi interacting with AP-1 sequences.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, J; Martinetto, H; Portal, D; D'Angelo, M; Torres, H N; Flawiá, M M

    1999-01-01

    Interaction between factors from Trypanosoma cruzi extracts and AP-1 sequences was studied by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Using a double-stranded probe carrying the AP-1 sequence from the SV40 promoter, three specific complexes designated A, B, and C were detected. Complexes A and C were formed when using single-stranded probes. The relative amount of complex B, specific for double-stranded DNA, increased as a function of probe length. Complexes were stabilized by cross-linking with UVC irradiation and resolved on denaturing SDS-PAGE. Complex A generated bands of 60- and 39 kDa; complex B produced two bands of 46- and 43 kDa; and complex C generated one band of 43 kDa. The AP-1 binding activity was much higher in purified nuclear preparations than in soluble fractions, and was detected in crude extracts from the three forms of the parasite. The binding signal, however, was much stronger in amastigote and trypomastigote than in the epimastigote forms. Specific binding was increased by oxidative stress. Antibodies raised against peptides corresponding to conserved domains of mammalian c-Jun and c-Fos detected bands of 40- and 60 kDa, respectively, in a nuclear epimastigote preparation. PMID:10519220

  14. Reactive oxygen species and glutathione dual redox-responsive micelles for selective cytotoxicity of cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yi-Ting; Yen, Yu-Wei; Lo, Chun-Liang

    2015-08-01

    This study developed reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH) dual redox-responsive micelles, which encapsulate anticancer drug camptothecin (CPT), protect CPT activity, and trigger CPT release in cancer cell H2O2- or GSH-rich surroundings. Experimental results show that CPT-loaded dual redox-responsive micelles remain stable at low levels of ROS and GSH in blood circulation, have high redox sensitivities needed to CPT release in cancer cells with high ROS or GSH (e.g., lung, gastric, and colon cancer cells), and prevent undersigned CPT toxicity in ROS/GSH balanced normal cells (e.g., fibroblast cells, etc.) or normal organs (e.g., liver, kidney, etc.). The CPT-loaded dual redox-responsive micelles also had high in vivo antitumor efficacy. This study demonstrates that ROS and GSH dual redox-responsive micelles have potential use as anticancer therapeutic nanomedicine in various cancer therapies.

  15. Redox-Responsive Fluorescent Probes with Different Design Strategies.

    PubMed

    Lou, Zhangrong; Li, Peng; Han, Keli

    2015-05-19

    In an aerobic organism, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are an inevitable metabolic byproduct. Endogenously produced ROS have a significant role in physiological processes, but excess ROS can cause oxidative stress and can damage tissue. Cells possess elaborate mechanisms to regulate their internal redox status. The intracellular redox homeostasis plays an essential role in maintaining cellular function. However, moderate alterations in redox balance can accompany major transitions in a cell's life cycle. Because of the role of ROS in physiology and in pathology, researchers need new tools to study redox chemistry in biological systems.In recent years, researchers have made remarkable progress in developing new, highly sensitive and selective fluorescent probes that respond to redox changes, and in this Account we highlight related research, primarily from our own group. We present an overview of the design, photophysical properties, and fluorescence transduction mechanisms of reported molecules that probe redox changes. We have designed and synthesized a series of fluorescent probes for redox cycles in biological systems relying on the active center of glutathione peroxidase (GPx). We have also constructed probes based on the oxidation and reduction of hydroquinone and of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinooxy (TEMPO). Most of these probes exhibit high sensitivity and good selectivity, absorb in the near-infrared, and respond rapidly. Such probes are useful for confocal fluorescence microscopy, a dynamic imaging technique that could allow researchers to observe biologically important ROS and antioxidants in real time. This technique and these probes provide potentially useful tools for exploring the generation, transport, physiological function, and pathogenic mechanisms of ROS and antioxidants.We also describe features that could improve the properties of redox-responsive fluorescent probes: greater photostability; rapid, dynamic, cyclic and ratiometric responses; and

  16. Luteolin, a flavonoid, inhibits AP-1 activation by basophils

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Toru; Higa, Shinji; Arimitsu, Junsuke; Naka, Tetsuji; Ogata, Atsushi; Shima, Yoshihito; Fujimoto, Minoru; Yamadori, Tomoki; Ohkawara, Tomoharu; Kuwabara, Yusuke; Kawai, Mari; Matsuda, Hisashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Maezaki, Naoyoshi; Tanaka, Tetsuaki; Kawase, Ichiro; Tanaka, Toshio . E-mail: ttanak@imed3.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-02-03

    Flavonoids including luteolin, apigenin, and fisetin are inhibitors of IL-4 synthesis and CD40 ligand expression by basophils. This study was done to search for compounds with greater inhibitory activity of IL-4 expression and to clarify the molecular mechanisms through which flavonoids inhibit their expression. Of the 37 flavonoids and related compounds examined, ayanin, luteolin, and apigenin were the strongest inhibitors of IL-4 production by purified basophils in response to anti-IgE antibody plus IL-3. Luteolin did not suppress Syk or Lyn phosphorylation in basophils, nor did suppress p54/46 SAPK/JNK, p38 MAPK, and p44/42 MAPK activation by a basophilic cell line, KU812 cells, stimulated with A23187 and PMA. However, luteolin did inhibit phosphorylation of c-Jun and DNA binding activity of AP-1 in nuclear lysates from stimulated KU812 cells. These results provide a fundamental structure of flavonoids for IL-4 inhibition and demonstrate a novel action of flavonoids that suppresses the activation of AP-1.

  17. Novel Redox-Responsive Amphiphilic Copolymer Micelles for Drug Delivery: Synthesis and Characterization.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jungeun; Maurya, Abhijeet; Shariat-Madar, Zia; Murthy, S Narasimha; Jo, Seongbong

    2015-11-01

    A novel redox-responsive amphiphilic polymer was synthesized with bioreductive trimethyl-locked quinone propionic acid for a potential triggered drug delivery application. The aim of this study was to synthesize and characterize the redox-responsive amphiphilic block copolymer micelles containing pendant bioreductive quinone propionic acid (QPA) switches. The redox-responsive hydrophobic block (polyQPA), synthesized from QPA-serinol and adipoyl chloride, was end-capped with methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) of molecular weight 750 (mPEG750) to achieve a redox-responsive amphiphilic block copolymer, polyQPA-mPEG750. PolyQPA-mPEG750 was able to self-assemble as micelles to show a critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 0.039% w/v (0.39 mg/ml, 0.107 mM) determined by a dye solubilization method using 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The mean diameter of polymeric micelles was found to be 27.50 nm (PI = 0.064) by dynamic light scattering. Furthermore, redox-triggered destabilization of the polymeric micelles was confirmed by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and particle size measurements in a simulated redox state. PolyQPA-mPEG750 underwent triggered reduction to shed pendant redox-responsive QPA groups and its polymeric micelles were swollen to be dissembled in the presence of a reducing agent, thereby enabling the release of loaded model drug, paclitaxel. The redox-responsive polyQPA-mPEG750 polymer micelles would be useful as a drug delivery system allowing triggered drug release in an altered redox state such as tumor microenvironments with an altered redox potential and/or redox enzyme upregulation.

  18. Retinoic acid receptors inhibit AP1 activation by regulating extracellular signal-regulated kinase and CBP recruitment to an AP1-responsive promoter.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, Madjid; Brand, Céline; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2002-07-01

    Retinoids exhibit antineoplastic activities that may be linked to retinoid receptor-mediated transrepression of activating protein 1 (AP1), a heterodimeric transcription factor composed of fos- and jun-related proteins. Here we show that transcriptional activation of an AP1-regulated gene through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway (MAPK(ERK)) is characterized, in intact cells, by a switch from a fra2-junD dimer to a junD-fosB dimer loading on its promoter and by simultaneous recruitment of ERKs, CREB-binding protein (CBP), and RNA polymerase II. All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) receptor (RAR) was tethered constitutively to the AP1 promoter. AP1 transrepression by retinoic acid was concomitant to glycogen synthase kinase 3 activation, negative regulation of junD hyperphosphorylation, and to decreased RNA polymerase II recruitment. Under these conditions, fra1 loading to the AP1 response element was strongly increased. Importantly, CBP and ERKs were excluded from the promoter in the presence of atRA. AP1 transrepression by retinoids was RAR and ligand dependent, but none of the functions required for RAR-mediated transactivation was necessary for AP1 transrepression. These results indicate that transrepressive effects of retinoids are mediated through a mechanism unrelated to transcriptional activation, involving the RAR-dependent control of transcription factors and cofactor assembly on AP1-regulated promoters.

  19. Molecular Basis for Enhancement of the Meiotic DMCI Recombinase by RAD51AP1

    SciTech Connect

    Dray, Eloise; Dunlop, Myun Hwa; Kauppi, Liisa; San Filippo, Joseph San; Wiese, Claudia; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Begovic, Sead; Schild, David; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott; Sung, Patrick

    2010-11-05

    Homologous recombination is needed for meiotic chromosome segregation, genome maintenance, and tumor suppression. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) has been shown to interact with and enhance the recombinase activity of RAD51. Accordingly, genetic ablation of RAD51AP1 leads to enhanced sensitivity to and also chromosome aberrations upon DNA damage, demonstrating a role for RAD51AP1 in mitotic homologous recombination. Here we show physical association of RAD51AP1 with the meiosis-specific recombinase DMC1 and a stimulatory effect of RAD51AP1 on the DMC1-mediated D-loop reaction. Mechanistic studies have revealed that RAD51AP1 enhances the ability of the DMC1 presynaptic filament to capture the duplex DNA partner and to assemble the synaptic complex, in which the recombining DNA strands are homologously aligned. We also provide evidence that functional co-operation is dependent on complex formation between DMC1 and RAD51AP1, and that distinct epitopes in RAD51AP1 mediate interactions with RAD51 and DMC1. Finally, we show that RAD51AP1 is expressed in mouse testes, and that RAD51AP1 foci co-localize with a subset of DMC1 foci in spermatocytes. These results suggest that RAD51AP1 also serves an important role in meiotic homologous recombination.

  20. Duplication of AP1 within the Spinacia oleracea L. AP1/FUL clade is followed by rapid amino acid and regulatory evolution.

    PubMed

    Sather, D Noah; Golenberg, Edward M

    2009-02-01

    The AP1/FUL clade of MADS box genes have undergone multiple duplication events among angiosperm species. While initially identified as having floral meristem identity and floral organ identity function in Arabidopsis, the role of AP1 homologs does not appear to be universally conserved even among eudicots. In comparison, the role of FRUITFULL has not been extensively explored in non-model species. We report on the isolation of three AP1/FUL genes from cultivated spinach, Spinacia oleracea L. Two genes, designated SpAPETALA1-1 (SpAP1-1) and SpAPETALA1-2 (SpAP1-2), cluster as paralogous genes within the Caryophyllales AP1 clade. They are highly differentiated in the 3', carboxyl-end encoding region of the gene following the third amphipathic alpha-helix region, while still retaining some elements of a signature AP1 carboxyl motifs. In situ hybridization studies also demonstrate that the two paralogs have evolved different temporal and spatial expression patterns, and that neither gene is expressed in the developing sepal whorl, suggesting that the AP1 floral organ identity function is not conserved in spinach. The spinach FRUITFULL homolog, SpFRUITFULL (SpFUL), has retained the conserved motif and groups with Caryophyllales FRUITFULL homologs. SpFUL is expressed in leaf as well as in floral tissue, and shows strong expression late in flower development, particularly in the tapetal layer in males, and in the endothecium layer and stigma, in the females. The combined evidence of high rates of non-synonymous substitutions and differential expression patterns supports a scenario in which the AP1 homologs in the spinach AP1/FUL gene family have experienced rapid evolution following duplication.

  1. Trim69 regulates zebrafish brain development by ap-1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ruiqin; Wang, Renxian; Zhao, Qing; Han, Yongqing; Zong, Shudong; Miao, Shiying; Song, Wei; Wang, Linfang

    2016-01-01

    Proteins belonging to the TRIM family have been implicated in a variety of cellular processes such as apoptosis, differentiation, neurogenesis, muscular physiology and innate immune responses. Trim69, previously identified as a novel gene cloned from a human testis cDNA library, has a homologous gene in zebrafish and this study focused on investigating the function of trim69 in zebrafish neurogenesis. Trim69 was found to be expressed in zebrafish embryo brain at the early stages. Knockdown of trim69 led to deformed brain development, obvious signs of apoptosis present in the head, and decreased expression of neuronal differentiation and stem cell markers. This phenotype was rescued upon co-injection of human mRNA together along with the trim69 knockdown. Results of this study also showed an interaction between TRIM69 and c-Jun in human cells, and upon TRIM69 knock down c-Jun expression subsequently increased, whereas the over-expression of TRIM69 led to the down-regulation of c-Jun. Additionally, knockdown both c-Jun and trim69 can rescue the deformed brain, evident cellular apoptosis in the head and decreased expression of neuronal differentiation and stem cell markers. Overall, our results support a role for trim69 in the development of the zebrafish brain through ap-1 pathway. PMID:27050765

  2. The Forkhead Transcription Factor FOXK2 Promotes AP-1-Mediated Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zongling; Donaldson, Ian J.; Liu, Jingru; Hayes, Andrew; Zeef, Leo A. H.

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional control circuitry in eukaryotic cells is complex and is orchestrated by combinatorially acting transcription factors. Forkhead transcription factors often function in concert with heterotypic transcription factors to specify distinct transcriptional programs. Here, we demonstrate that FOXK2 participates in combinatorial transcriptional control with the AP-1 transcription factor. FOXK2 binding regions are widespread throughout the genome and are often coassociated with AP-1 binding motifs. FOXK2 acts to promote AP-1-dependent gene expression changes in response to activation of the AP-1 pathway. In this context, FOXK2 is required for the efficient recruitment of AP-1 to chromatin. Thus, we have uncovered an important new molecular mechanism that controls AP-1-dependent gene expression. PMID:22083952

  3. The Clathrin Adaptor Complex AP-1 Binds HIV-1 and MLV Gag and Facilitates Their Budding

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Grégory; Segura-Morales, Carolina; Molle, Dorothee; Lopez-Vergès, Sandra; Begon-Pescia, Christina; Cazevieille, Chantal; Schu, Peter; Bertrand, Edouard

    2007-01-01

    Retroviral assembly is driven by Gag, and nascent viral particles escape cells by recruiting the machinery that forms intralumenal vesicles of multivesicular bodies. In this study, we show that the clathrin adaptor complex AP-1 is involved in retroviral release. The absence of AP-1μ obtained by genetic knock-out or by RNA interference reduces budding of murine leukemia virus (MLV) and HIV-1, leading to a delay of viral propagation in cell culture. In contrast, overexpression of AP-1μ enhances release of HIV-1 Gag. We show that the AP-1 complex facilitates retroviral budding through a direct interaction between the matrix and AP-1μ. Less MLV Gag is found associated with late endosomes in cells lacking AP-1, and our results suggest that AP-1 and AP-3 could function on the same pathway that leads to Gag release. In addition, we find that AP-1 interacts with Tsg101 and Nedd4.1, two cellular proteins known to be involved in HIV-1 and MLV budding. We propose that AP-1 promotes Gag release by transporting it to intracellular sites of active budding, and/or by facilitating its interactions with other cellular partners. PMID:17538020

  4. AP-1/σ1A and AP-1/σ1B adaptor-proteins differentially regulate neuronal early endosome maturation via the Rab5/Vps34-pathway

    PubMed Central

    Candiello, Ermes; Kratzke, Manuel; Wenzel, Dirk; Cassel, Dan; Schu, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The σ1 subunit of the AP-1 clathrin-coated-vesicle adaptor-protein complex is expressed as three isoforms. Tissues express σ1A and one of the σ1B and σ1C isoforms. Brain is the tissue with the highest σ1A and σ1B expression. σ1B-deficiency leads to severe mental retardation, accumulation of early endosomes in synapses and fewer synaptic vesicles, whose recycling is slowed down. AP-1/σ1A and AP-1/σ1B regulate maturation of these early endosomes into multivesicular body late endosomes, thereby controlling synaptic vesicle protein transport into a degradative pathway. σ1A binds ArfGAP1, and with higher affinity brain-specific ArfGAP1, which bind Rabex-5. AP-1/σ1A-ArfGAP1-Rabex-5 complex formation leads to more endosomal Rabex-5 and enhanced, Rab5GTP-stimulated Vps34 PI3-kinase activity, which is essential for multivesicular body endosome formation. Formation of AP-1/σ1A-ArfGAP1-Rabex-5 complexes is prevented by σ1B binding of Rabex-5 and the amount of endosomal Rabex-5 is reduced. AP-1 complexes differentially regulate endosome maturation and coordinate protein recycling and degradation, revealing a novel molecular mechanism by which they regulate protein transport besides their established function in clathrin-coated-vesicle formation. PMID:27411398

  5. Redox-Responsive Porphyrin-Based Polysilsesquioxane Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Daniel L.; Lodge, Patrick; Vivero-Escoto, Juan L.

    2015-01-01

    The development of stimulus-responsive photosensitizer delivery systems that carry a high payload of photosensitizers is of great importance in photodynamic therapy. In this study, redox-responsive polysilsesquioxane nanoparticles (PSilQNPs) built by a reverse microemulsion approach using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(carboxyphenyl) porphyrin (TCPP) silane derivatives as building blocks, were successfully fabricated. The structural properties of TCPP-PSilQNPs were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS)/ζ-potential, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The photophysical properties were determined by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The quantity of singlet oxygen generated in solution was measured using 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran. The redox-responsive release of TCPP molecules was successfully demonstrated in solution in the presence of a reducing agent. The internalization of TCPP-PSilQNPs in cancer cells was investigated using laser scanning confocal microscopy. Phototoxicity experiments in vitro showed that the redox-responsive TCPP-PSilQNPs exhibited an improved phototherapeutic effect on cervical cancer cells compared to a non-responsive TCPP-PSilQNP control material. PMID:26729110

  6. Fluorescent carbon dot modified mesoporous silica nanocarriers for redox-responsive controlled drug delivery and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jian; Liu, Chang; Li, Xian; Liu, Jie; Di, Donghua; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Qinfu; Wang, Siling

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a smart nanocarrier (MSNs-SS-CDPAA) is developed for redox-responsive controlled drug delivery and in vivo bioimaging by grafting fluorescent carbon dots to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) via disulfide bonds. The polyanion polymer poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was used to prepare the carboxyl-abundant carbon dots (CDPAA) by hydrothermal polymerization. The negatively charged CDPAA were anchored to the openings of MSNs containing the disulfide bonds through amidation and were used as gatekeepers for trapping the drugs within the pores. The in vitro release results indicated that the prepared MSNs-SS-CDPAA/DOX showed highly redox-responsive drug release in pH 7.4 and pH 5.0 PBS. In addition, the redox-responsive release mechanism was studied by measurement of the Zeta potential and fluorescence spectrophotometry. The prepared MSNs-SS-CDPAA exhibited excellent biocompatibility and fluorescence properties. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed that MSNs-SS-CDPAA could emit blue, green and red fluorescence at an excitation wavelength of 408, 488 and 561nm, respectively. In addition, MSNs-SS-CDPAA/DOX exhibited a high cellular uptake as shown by CDPAA imaging and a therapeutic effect on cancer cells by MTT assay. This study describes a novel strategy for simultaneously controlled drug delivery and real-time imaging to track the behavior of nanoparticles during tumor therapy. PMID:27569517

  7. Redox-Responsive Porphyrin-Based Polysilsesquioxane Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Vega, Daniel L; Lodge, Patrick; Vivero-Escoto, Juan L

    2015-12-31

    The development of stimulus-responsive photosensitizer delivery systems that carry a high payload of photosensitizers is of great importance in photodynamic therapy. In this study, redox-responsive polysilsesquioxane nanoparticles (PSilQNPs) built by a reverse microemulsion approach using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(carboxyphenyl) porphyrin (TCPP) silane derivatives as building blocks, were successfully fabricated. The structural properties of TCPP-PSilQNPs were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS)/ζ-potential, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The photophysical properties were determined by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The quantity of singlet oxygen generated in solution was measured using 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran. The redox-responsive release of TCPP molecules was successfully demonstrated in solution in the presence of a reducing agent. The internalization of TCPP-PSilQNPs in cancer cells was investigated using laser scanning confocal microscopy. Phototoxicity experiments in vitro showed that the redox-responsive TCPP-PSilQNPs exhibited an improved phototherapeutic effect on cervical cancer cells compared to a non-responsive TCPP-PSilQNP control material.

  8. Fabrication of redox-responsive magnetic protein microcapsules from hen egg white by the sonochemical method.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shuangling; Cui, Xuejun; Tian, Fangyuan

    2015-01-01

    Redox-responsive magnetic protein microcapsules with Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) encapsulated inside have been obtained using a facile, cost-effective and fast sonochemical method from hen egg white proteins. Such prepared redox-responsive magnetic hen egg white protein microcapsules (MHEWPMCs) could be easily manipulated to do magnetic-guided targeting delivery. The synchronous loading of the hydrophobic dye Coumarin 6 as a model of drug into MHEWPMCs was readily achieved during the fabrication of MHEWPMCs by dissolving them into the oil phase before ultrasonication. TEM images indicated that Fe3O4 MNPs were encapsulated in MHEWPMCs. Confocal laser scanning microscopic images indicated that the dye was distributed evenly in the MHEWPMCs and no leakage of dye from the MHEWPMCs was observed due to the protection of protein shells. The MHEWPMCs are potential candidates as attractive carriers for drug targeting delivery and stimuli-responsive release due to their magnetic and redox responsiveness of the disulfide in the microcapsule shells. PMID:26300460

  9. Coactivator MBF1 preserves the redox-dependent AP-1 activity during oxidative stress in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jindra, Marek; Gaziova, Ivana; Uhlirova, Mirka; Okabe, Masataka; Hiromi, Yasushi; Hirose, Susumu

    2004-01-01

    Basic leucine zipper proteins Jun and Fos form the dimeric transcription factor AP-1, essential for cell differentiation and immune and antioxidant defenses. AP-1 activity is controlled, in part, by the redox state of critical cysteine residues within the basic regions of Jun and Fos. Mutation of these cysteines contributes to oncogenic potential of Jun and Fos. How cells maintain the redox-dependent AP-1 activity at favorable levels is not known. We show that the conserved coactivator MBF1 is a positive modulator of AP-1. Via a direct interaction with the basic region of Drosophila Jun (D-Jun), MBF1 prevents an oxidative modification (S-cystenyl cystenylation) of the critical cysteine and stimulates AP-1 binding to DNA. Cytoplasmic MBF1 translocates to the nucleus together with a transfected D-Jun protein, suggesting that MBF1 protects nascent D-Jun also in Drosophila cells. mbf1-null mutants live shorter than mbf1+ controls in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). An AP-1-dependent epithelial closure becomes sensitive to H2O2 in flies lacking MBF1. We conclude that by preserving the redox-sensitive AP-1 activity, MBF1 provides an advantage during oxidative stress. PMID:15306851

  10. Redox responsive nanotubes from organometallic polymers by template assisted layer by layer fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jing; Jańczewski, Dominik; Guo, Yuanyuan; Xu, Jianwei; Vancso, G. Julius

    2013-11-01

    Redox responsive nanotubes were fabricated by the template assisted layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly method and employed as platforms for molecular payload release. Positively and negatively charged organometallic poly(ferrocenylsilane)s (PFS) were used to construct the nanotubes, in combination with other polyions. During fabrication, multilayers of these polyions were deposited onto the inner pores of template porous membranes, followed by subsequent removal of the template. Anodized porous alumina and track-etched polycarbonate membranes were used as templates. The morphology, electrochemistry, composition and other properties of the obtained tubular structure were characterized by fluorescence microscopy, scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Composite nanotubes, consisting of poly(acrylic acid) anions with PFS+ and nanoparticles including fluorophore labelled dextran and decorated quantum dots, with PFS polyelectrolytes were also fabricated, broadening the scope of the structures. Cyclic voltammograms of PFS containing nanotubes showed similar redox responsive behaviour to thin LbL assembled films. Redox triggered release of labelled macromolecules from these tubular structures demonstrated application potential in controlled molecular delivery.Redox responsive nanotubes were fabricated by the template assisted layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly method and employed as platforms for molecular payload release. Positively and negatively charged organometallic poly(ferrocenylsilane)s (PFS) were used to construct the nanotubes, in combination with other polyions. During fabrication, multilayers of these polyions were deposited onto the inner pores of template porous membranes, followed by subsequent removal of the template. Anodized porous alumina and track-etched polycarbonate membranes were used as templates. The morphology, electrochemistry, composition and other properties of the obtained tubular

  11. Redox-responsive and calcium-dependent switching of glycosyldisulfide interactions with Concanavalin A.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhichao; Aastrup, Teodor; Anderson, Henrik; Ramström, Olof

    2005-06-01

    Glycosyldisulfides can interact efficiently with carbohydrate-binding entities. This has been shown for a range of thiosaccharide dimers when tested for their effects against the lectin Concanavalin A using a modified quartz crystal microbalance-technique. Contrary to the thiosaccharide monomers, showing no significant binding up to 10 mM, several of the dimers showed IC(50)-values in the low millimolar range. Three of the glycosyldisulfides tested also displayed very high positive apparent cooperativity effects that were found to be both calcium-dependent and redox-responsive. PMID:15878660

  12. Ectopic expression of Jatropha curcas APETALA1 (JcAP1) caused early flowering in Arabidopsis, but not in Jatropha.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingyong; Tao, Yan-Bin; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Jatropha curcas is a promising feedstock for biofuel production because Jatropha oil is highly suitable for the production of biodiesel and bio-jet fuels. However, Jatropha exhibits a low seed yield as a result of unreliable and poor flowering. APETALA1 (AP1) is a floral meristem and organ identity gene in higher plants. The flower meristem identity genes of Jatropha have not yet been identified or characterized. To better understand the genetic control of flowering in Jatropha, an AP1 homolog (JcAP1) was isolated from Jatropha. An amino acid sequence analysis of JcAP1 revealed a high similarity to the AP1 proteins of other perennial plants. JcAP1 was expressed in inflorescence buds, flower buds, sepals and petals. The highest expression level was observed during the early developmental stage of the flower buds. The overexpression of JcAP1 using the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter resulted in extremely early flowering and abnormal flowers in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Several flowering genes downstream of AP1 were up-regulated in the JcAP1-overexpressing transgenic plant lines. Furthermore, JcAP1 overexpression rescued the phenotype caused by the Arabidopsis AP1 loss-of-function mutant ap1-11. Therefore, JcAP1 is an ortholog of AtAP1, which plays a similar role in the regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis. However, the overexpression of JcAP1 in Jatropha using the same promoter resulted in little variation in the flowering time and floral organs, indicating that JcAP1 may be insufficient to regulate flowering by itself in Jatropha. This study helps to elucidate the function of JcAP1 and contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of flower development in Jatropha. PMID:27168978

  13. Ectopic expression of Jatropha curcas APETALA1 (JcAP1) caused early flowering in Arabidopsis, but not in Jatropha

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Mingyong; Tao, Yan-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Jatropha curcas is a promising feedstock for biofuel production because Jatropha oil is highly suitable for the production of biodiesel and bio-jet fuels. However, Jatropha exhibits a low seed yield as a result of unreliable and poor flowering. APETALA1 (AP1) is a floral meristem and organ identity gene in higher plants. The flower meristem identity genes of Jatropha have not yet been identified or characterized. To better understand the genetic control of flowering in Jatropha, an AP1 homolog (JcAP1) was isolated from Jatropha. An amino acid sequence analysis of JcAP1 revealed a high similarity to the AP1 proteins of other perennial plants. JcAP1 was expressed in inflorescence buds, flower buds, sepals and petals. The highest expression level was observed during the early developmental stage of the flower buds. The overexpression of JcAP1 using the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter resulted in extremely early flowering and abnormal flowers in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Several flowering genes downstream of AP1 were up-regulated in the JcAP1-overexpressing transgenic plant lines. Furthermore, JcAP1 overexpression rescued the phenotype caused by the Arabidopsis AP1 loss-of-function mutant ap1-11. Therefore, JcAP1 is an ortholog of AtAP1, which plays a similar role in the regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis. However, the overexpression of JcAP1 in Jatropha using the same promoter resulted in little variation in the flowering time and floral organs, indicating that JcAP1 may be insufficient to regulate flowering by itself in Jatropha. This study helps to elucidate the function of JcAP1 and contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of flower development in Jatropha. PMID:27168978

  14. Analyzing the role of AP-1B in polarized sorting from recycling endosomes in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fölsch, Heike

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cells polarize their plasma membrane into apical and basolateral domains where the apical membrane faces the luminal side of an organ and the basolateral membrane is in contact with neighboring cells and the basement membrane. To maintain this polarity, newly synthesized and internalized cargos must be sorted to their correct target domain. Over the last ten years, recycling endosomes have emerged as an important sorting station at which proteins destined for the apical membrane are segregated from those destined for the basolateral membrane. Essential for basolateral sorting from recycling endosomes is the tissue-specific adaptor complex AP-1B. This chapter describes experimental protocols to analyze the AP-1B function in epithelial cells including the analysis of protein sorting in LLC-PK1 cells lines, immunoprecipitation of cargo proteins after chemical crosslinking to AP-1B, and radioactive pulse-chase experiments in MDCK cells depleted of the AP-1B subunit μ1B.

  15. AP-1 and clathrin are essential for secretory granule biogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Jason; Jauregui, Miluska; Tan, Julie; Rollins, Janet; Lallet, Sylvie; Leventis, Peter A.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L.; Chang, Henry C.; Le Borgne, Roland; Krämer, Helmut; Brill, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

     Regulated secretion of hormones, digestive enzymes, and other biologically active molecules requires the formation of secretory granules. Clathrin and the clathrin adaptor protein complex 1 (AP-1) are necessary for maturation of exocrine, endocrine, and neuroendocrine secretory granules. However, the initial steps of secretory granule biogenesis are only minimally understood. Powerful genetic approaches available in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster were used to investigate the molecular pathway for biogenesis of the mucin-containing “glue granules” that form within epithelial cells of the third-instar larval salivary gland. Clathrin and AP-1 colocalize at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and clathrin recruitment requires AP-1. Furthermore, clathrin and AP-1 colocalize with secretory cargo at the TGN and on immature granules. Finally, loss of clathrin or AP-1 leads to a profound block in secretory granule formation. These findings establish a novel role for AP-1– and clathrin-dependent trafficking in the biogenesis of mucin-containing secretory granules. PMID:21490149

  16. CD2v Interacts with Adaptor Protein AP-1 during African Swine Fever Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Núñez, Daniel; García-Urdiales, Eduardo; Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Nogal, María L.; Barroso, Susana; Revilla, Yolanda; Madrid, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) CD2v protein is believed to be involved in virulence enhancement, viral hemadsorption, and pathogenesis, although the molecular mechanisms of the function of this viral protein are still not fully understood. Here we describe that CD2v localized around viral factories during ASFV infection, suggesting a role in the generation and/or dynamics of these viral structures and hence in disturbing cellular traffic. We show that CD2v targeted the regulatory trans-Golgi network (TGN) protein complex AP-1, a key element in cellular traffic. This interaction was disrupted by brefeldin A even though the location of CD2v around the viral factory remained unchanged. CD2v-AP-1 binding was independent of CD2v glycosylation and occurred on the carboxy-terminal part of CD2v, where a canonical di-Leu motif previously reported to mediate AP-1 binding in eukaryotic cells, was identified. This motif was shown to be functionally interchangeable with the di-Leu motif present in HIV-Nef protein in an AP-1 binding assay. However, we demonstrated that it was not involved either in CD2v cellular distribution or in CD2v-AP-1 binding. Taken together, these findings shed light on CD2v function during ASFV infection by identifying AP-1 as a cellular factor targeted by CD2v and hence elucidate the cellular pathways used by the virus to enhance infectivity. PMID:25915900

  17. Retinoids interfere with the AP1 signalling pathway in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dedieu, Stephane; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2006-06-01

    Retinoic acid and its synthetic analogs exert major effects on many biological processes including cell proliferation and differentiation and are now considered as promising pharmacological agents for prevention and treatment of various cancers. The capacity of retinoids to inhibit AP1-responsive genes seems to be the basis for the chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects of these agents against hyperproliferative diseases. However, the molecular basis of retinoid antiproliferative properties remains to this day largely unknown. Here, we showed that retinoids inhibit phorbol ester-induced MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression in human breast cancer cells. Transcriptional interference was observed for both retinoid agonist and antagonist treatments, revealing separated transactivation and transrepression functions of retinoids. In addition, we examined MAP kinases as potential targets of retinoid signalling in human breast cancer cells and demonstrated that retinoids repress AP1-responsive gene expression by inhibiting MKK6/p38 and mainly MEK/ERK signalling pathways. On the contrary, the JNK-dependent pathway was not identified as a molecular relay for AP1 activity and was insensitive to retinoid treatments. Finally, we established that overexpressed c-fos and c-jun partially abolished the ability of retinoids to inhibit AP1 activity, suggesting that c-jun and/or c-fos containing dimers may constitute one target of retinoids for transrepression of AP1. All together, our data help to improve our understanding of how retinoids antagonize AP1 activity and may regulate tumoral cell proliferation.

  18. Folic Acid and Trastuzumab Functionalized Redox Responsive Polymersomes for Intracellular Doxorubicin Delivery in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lale, Shantanu V; Kumar, Arun; Prasad, Shyam; Bharti, Alok C; Koul, Veena

    2015-06-01

    Redox responsive biodegradable polymersomes comprising of poly(ethylene glycol)-polylactic acid-poly(ethylene glycol) [PEG-s-s-PLA-s-s-PLA-s-s-PEG] triblock copolymer with multiple disulfide linkages were developed to improve intracellular delivery and to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in breast cancer with minimal cardiotoxicity. Folic acid and trastuzumab functionalized monodispersed polymersomes of size ∼150 nm were prepared by nanoprecipitation method while achieving enhanced doxorubicin loading of ∼32% in the polymersomes. Multiple redox responsive disulfide linkages were incorporated in the polymer in order to achieve complete disintegration of polymersomes in redox rich environment of cancer cells resulting in enhanced doxorubicin release as observed in in vitro release studies, where ∼90% doxorubicin release was achieved in pH 5.0 in the presence of 10 mM glutathione (GSH) as compared to ∼20% drug release in pH 7.4. Folic acid and trastuzumab mediated active targeting resulted in improved cellular uptake and enhanced apoptosis in in vitro studies in breast cancer cell lines. In vivo studies in Ehrlich ascites tumor bearing Swiss albino mice showed enhanced antitumor efficacy and minimal cardiotoxicity of polymersomes with ∼90% tumor regression as compared to ∼38% tumor regression observed with free doxorubicin. The results highlight therapeutic potential of the polymersomes as doxorubicin delivery nanocarrier in breast cancer therapy with its superior antitumor efficacy and minimal cardiotoxicity.

  19. Sonochemical fabrication of dual-targeted redox-responsive smart microcarriers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhanfeng; Zhang, Cong; Wang, Bingnan; Wang, Hongyan; Chen, Xuesi; Möhwald, Helmoth; Cui, Xuejun

    2014-12-24

    In the present study, the molecular and magnetic dual-targeted redox-responsive folic acid-cysteine-Fe3O4 microcapsules (FA-Cys-Fe3O4 MCs) have been synthesized via the sonochemical technique, and targeting molecule (folic acid) and Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles are introduced into the microcapsule shells successfully. The obtained FA-Cys-Fe3O4 MCs show excellent magnetic responsive ability by the oriented motion under an external magnetic field. The hydrophobic fluorescent dye (Coumarin 6) is successfully loaded into the FA-Cys-Fe3O4 MCs, demonstrating that it could be also easily realized to encapsulate hydrophobic drugs into the FA-Cys-Fe3O4 MCs when the drugs are dispersed into the oil phase before sonication. Cellular uptake demonstrates that FA-Cys-Fe3O4 MCs could target selectively the cells via folate-receptor-mediated endocytosis. Moreover, the FA-Cys-Fe3O4 MCs show their potential ability to be an attractive carrier for drug controlled release owing to the redox responsiveness of the disulfide in the microcapsule shells. PMID:25478992

  20. Intracellular Doxorubicin Delivery of a Core Cross-linked, Redox-responsive Polymeric Micelles.

    PubMed

    Lili, Yu; Ruihua, Mu; Li, Li; Fei, Liang; Lin, Yao; Li, Su

    2016-02-10

    Redox-responsive micelles based on amphiphilic polyethylene glycol-polymethyl methacrylate with the introduction of disulfide containing cross-linked agent (mPEG-PMMA-SS) were developed for intracellular drug release. Benefiting from the amphiphilicity, mPEG-PMMA-SS could self-assembled into core cross-linked micelles in aqueous medium with tunable sizes (85-151 nm), appropriate zeta potential (-24.8 mV), and desirable critical micelle concentration (CMC) (0.18 mg/mL). Doxorubicin (DOX) could efficiently load into the micelles with satisfactory entrapment efficiency. As expected, the in vitro release studies displayed that DOX release from mPEG-PMMA-SS micelles was about 75% within 10h under tumor-relevant reductive condition, whereas only about 25% DOX was released in non-reductive medium. SRB assays indicated that these mPEG-PMMA-SS micelles were biocompatible and nontoxic up to a concentration of 50 μg/mL. The cytotoxicity studies and the intracellular drug delivery demonstrated that the drug release behavior in cells was related to the concentration of GSH in cytoplasm. Furthermore, the cell experiments using fluorescence microscopy showed clearly that DOX was delivered by micelles to the cytoplasm, released in cytoplasm under reductive environment, and then accumulated in cell nucleus. These results suggest that such redox-responsive micelles may develop into an efficient cytoplasmic delivery for hydrophobic anticancer drugs.

  1. Expression of activator protein-1 (AP-1) family members in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor is believed to be important in tumorigenesis and altered AP-1 activity was associated with cell transformation. We aimed to assess the potential role of AP-1 family members as novel biomarkers in breast cancer. Methods We studied the expression of AP-1 members at the mRNA level in 72 primary breast tumors and 37 adjacent non-tumor tissues and evaluated its correlation with clinicopathological parameters including estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2/neu status. Expression levels of Ubiquitin C (UBC) were used for normalization. Protein expression of AP-1 members was assessed using Western blot analysis in a subset of tumors. We used student’s t-test, one-way ANOVA, logistic regression and Pearson’s correlation coefficient for statistical analyses. Results We found significant differences in the expression of AP-1 family members between tumor and adjacent non-tumor tissues for all AP-1 family members except Fos B. Fra-1, Fra-2, Jun-B and Jun-D mRNA levels were significantly higher in tumors compared to adjacent non-tumor tissues (p < 0.001), whilst c-Fos and c-Jun mRNA levels were significantly lower in tumors compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues (p < 0.001). In addition, Jun-B overexpression had outstanding discrimination ability to differentiate tumor tissues from adjacent non-tumor tissues as determined by ROC curve analysis. Moreover, Fra-1 was significantly overexpressed in the tumors biochemically classified as ERα negative (p = 0.012) and PR negative (p = 0.037). Interestingly, Fra-1 expression was significantly higher in triple-negative tumors compared with luminal carcinomas (p = 0.01). Conclusions Expression levels of Fra-1 and Jun-B might be possible biomarkers for prognosis of breast cancer. PMID:24073962

  2. Normal Dendrite Growth in Drosophila Motor Neurons Requires the AP-1 Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Cortnie L.; Worrell, Jason; Levine, Richard B.; Ramaswami, Mani; Sanyal, Subhabrata

    2009-01-01

    During learning and memory formation, information flow through networks is regulated significantly through structural alterations in neurons. Dendrites, sites of signal integration, are key targets of activity-mediated modifications. Although local mechanisms of dendritic growth ensure synapse-specific changes, global mechanisms linking neural activity to nuclear gene expression may have profound influences on neural function. Fos, being an immediate-early gene, is ideally suited to be an initial transducer of neural activity, but a precise role for the AP-1 transcription factor in dendrite growth remains to be elucidated. Here we measure changes in the dendritic fields of identified Drosophila motor neurons in vivo and in primary culture to investigate the role of the immediate-early transcription factor AP-1 in regulating endogenous and activity-induced dendrite growth. Our data indicate that (a) increased neural excitability or depolarization stimulates dendrite growth, (b) AP-1 (a Fos, Jun heterodimer) is required for normal motor neuron dendritic growth during development and in response to activity induction, and (c) neuronal Fos protein levels are rapidly but transiently induced in motor neurons following neural activity. Taken together, these results show that AP-1 mediated transcription is important for dendrite growth, and that neural activity influences global dendritic growth through a gene-expression dependent mechanism gated by AP-1. PMID:18548486

  3. Activator protein-1 (AP-1) and response to pathogen infection in the Hong Kong oyster (Crassostrea hongkongensis).

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhiming; Qu, Fufa; Li, Jun; Qi, Lin; Yang, Zhang; Kong, Xiaoyu; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1), a downstream target of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, plays a major role in stimulating the synthesis of immune effector molecules during innate immune responses. We have characterized ChAP-1, an AP-1-like protein in Crassostrea hongkongensis that is a member of the AP-1 family of proteins. ChAP-1 is composed of 290 amino acid residues with a Jun and bZIP domain at the N- and C-termini, respectively, a structure similar to that of known Ap-1 proteins. ChAP-1 mRNA is expressed in several tissues analyzed, with highest expression in the mantle. Expression of ChAP-1 increases in response to Vibrio alginolyticus, Salmo haemolyticus or Salmo cerevisiae infection and, despite the location of GFP-tagged full-length ChAP-1 protein in the cytoplasm, ChAP-1 activates the transcription of an L8G5-luc reporter gene, and its over-expression can also activate the AP-1-Luc reporter gene in HEK293T cells.

  4. Effect of innate glutathione levels on activity of redox-responsive gene delivery vectors

    PubMed Central

    Manickam, Devika S.; Li, Jing; Putt, David A.; Zhou, Qing-Hui; Wu, Chao; Lash, Lawrence H.; Oupický, David

    2009-01-01

    Redox-responsive polyplexes represent a promising class of non-viral gene delivery vectors. The reducible disulfide bonds in the polyplexes undergo intracellular reduction owing to the presence of high concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH). Available evidence suggests improved transfection activity of redox-sensitive polyplexes upon artificial modulation of intracellular GSH. This study investigates the effect of innate differences in GSH concentration in a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines on activity of reducible polyplexes of the four major classes of nucleic acid therapeutics: plasmid DNA (pDNA), messenger RNA (mRNA), antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AON) and siRNA. In general, reducible polyplexes of linear poly(amido amines) (PAA) show improved activity compared to non-reducible polyplexes of PAA. Results demonstrate that increased GSH levels are associated with improved transfection of mRNA polyplexes but no clear trend is observed for pDNA, AON and siRNA polyplexes. PMID:19720098

  5. Carbon monoxide and mitochondria—modulation of cell metabolism, redox response and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Ana S.; Figueiredo-Pereira, Cláudia; Vieira, Helena L. A.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenously produced gasotransmitter, which is associated with cytoprotection and cellular homeostasis in several distinct cell types and tissues. CO mainly targets mitochondria because: (i) mitochondrial heme-proteins are the main potential candidates for CO to bind, (ii) many CO's biological actions are dependent on mitochondrial ROS signaling and (iii) heme is generated in the mitochondrial compartment. Mitochondria are the key cell energy factory, producing ATP through oxidative phosphorylation and regulating cell metabolism. These organelles are also implicated in many cell signaling pathways and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Finally, mitochondria contain several factors activating programmed cell death pathways, which are released from the mitochondrial inter-membrane space upon mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Therefore, disclosing CO mode of action at mitochondria opens avenues for deeper understanding CO's biological properties. Herein, it is discussed how CO affects the three main aspects of mitochondrial modulation of cell function: metabolism, redox response and cell death. PMID:25709582

  6. Fabrication of autofluorescent porous silica nanoparticles for redox-responsive drug release.

    PubMed

    Cao, Na; Zhao, Yanbao; Sang, Bin; Wang, Zhihua; Cao, Liuqin; Sun, Lei; Zou, Xueyan

    2016-12-01

    Porous silica nanoparticles were prepared by emulsion-condensation route. The silica nanoparticles with diameter of 50nm have both accessible center-radial large pore channels (19.9nm) and small pore size of 3.5nm. The hierarchical porous structure endows them large pore volume for loading drugs and sustained release property. The silica nanoparticles were further modified with glucose-oxidized glutathione. The formulated Schiff base and disulfide bonds render the silica nanoparticles auto-fluorescent and redox-responsive properties. The cleavage of disulfide bonds caused by reactive thiols facilitates aminomethylbenzoic acid (AMA) release. The release of drug leads to the loss of fluorescence, which would be used to monitor the drug delivery and carrier distribution. PMID:27612720

  7. Generalized Redox-Responsive Assembly of Carbon-Sheathed Metallic and Semiconducting Nanowire Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sinho; Kim, Jieun; Hwang, Dae Yeon; Park, Hyungmin; Ryu, Jaegeon; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Park, Soojin

    2016-02-10

    One-dimensional metallic/semiconducting materials have demonstrated as building blocks for various potential applications. Here, we report on a unique synthesis technique for redox-responsive assembled carbon-sheathed metal/semiconducting nanowire heterostructures that does not require a metal catalyst. In our approach, germanium nanowires are grown by the reduction of germanium oxide particles and subsequent self-catalytic growth during the thermal decomposition of natural gas, and simultaneously, carbon sheath layers are uniformly coated on the nanowire surface. This process is a simple, reproducible, size-controllable, and cost-effective process whereby most metal oxides can be transformed into metallic/semiconducting nanowires. Furthermore, the germanium nanowires exhibit stable chemical/thermal stability and outstanding electrochemical performance including a capacity retention of ∼96% after 1200 cycles at the 0.5-1C rate as lithium-ion battery anode. PMID:26784743

  8. Redox-responsive self-healing materials formed from host–guest polymers

    PubMed Central

    Nakahata, Masaki; Takashima, Yoshinori; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Expanding the useful lifespan of materials is becoming highly desirable, and self-healing and self-repairing materials may become valuable commodities. The formation of supramolecular materials through host–guest interactions is a powerful method to create non-conventional materials. Here we report the formation of supramolecular hydrogels and their redox-responsive and self-healing properties due to host–guest interactions. We employ cyclodextrin (CD) as a host molecule because it is environmentally benign and has diverse applications. A transparent supramolecular hydrogel quickly forms upon mixing poly(acrylic acid) (pAA) possessing β-CD as a host polymer with pAA possessing ferrocene as a guest polymer. Redox stimuli induce a sol−gel phase transition in the supramolecular hydrogel and can control self-healing properties such as re-adhesion between cut surfaces. PMID:22027591

  9. Sub-nanometer expansions of redox responsive polymer films monitored by imaging ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Cumurcu, Aysegul; Feng, Xueling; Ramos, Lionel Dos; Hempenius, Mark A; Schön, Peter; Vancso, G Julius

    2014-10-21

    We describe a novel approach to quantitatively visualize sub nm height changes occurring in thin films of redox active polymers upon reversible electrochemical oxidation/reduction in situ and in real-time with electrochemical imaging ellipsometry (EC-IE). Our approach is based on the utilization of a micro-patterned substrate containing circular patterns of passive (non-redox active) 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MCU) within a redox-responsive oligoethylene sulfide end-functionalized poly(ferrocenyldimethylsilane) (ES-PFS) film on a gold substrate. The non-redox responsive MCU layer was used as a molecular reference layer for the direct visualization of the minute thickness variations of the ES-PFS film. The ellipsometric microscopy images were recorded in aqueous electrolyte solutions at potentials of -0.1 V and 0.6 V vs. Ag/AgCl corresponding to the reduced and oxidized redox states of ES-PFS, respectively. The ellipsometric contrast images showed a 37 (±2)% intensity increase in the ES-PFS layer upon oxidation. The thickness of the ES-PFS layer reversibly changed between 4.0 (±0.1) nm and 3.4 (±0.1) nm upon oxidation and reduction, respectively, as determined by IE. Additionally, electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) was used to verify the redox controlled thickness variations. The proposed method opens novel avenues to optically visualize minute and rapid height changes occurring e.g. in redox active (and other stimulus responsive) polymer films in a fast and non-invasive manner.

  10. Arsenite suppression of involucrin transcription through AP1 promoter sites in cultured human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sinitsyna, Nadezda N.; Reznikova, Tatiana V.; Qin Qin; Song, Hyukhwan; Phillips, Marjorie A.; Rice, Robert H.

    2010-03-15

    While preserving keratinocyte proliferative ability, arsenite suppresses cellular differentiation markers by preventing utilization of AP1 transcriptional response elements. In present experiments, arsenite had a dramatic effect in electrophoretic mobility supershift analysis of proteins binding to an involucrin promoter AP1 response element. Without arsenite treatment, binding of JunB and Fra1 was readily detected in nuclear extracts from preconfluent cultures and was not detected a week after confluence, while c-Fos was detected only after confluence. By contrast, band shift of nuclear extracts from arsenite treated cultures showed only JunB and Fra1 binding in postconfluent as well as preconfluent cultures. Immunoblotting of cell extracts showed that arsenite treatment prevented the loss of Fra1 and the increase in c-Fos proteins that occurred after confluence in untreated cultures. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated substantial reduction of c-Fos and acetylated histone H3 at the proximal and distal AP1 response elements in the involucrin promoter and of coactivator p300 at the proximal element. Alteration of AP1 transcription factors was also examined in response to treatment with four metal containing compounds (chromate, vanadate, hemin, divalent cadmium) that also suppress involucrin transcription. These agents all influenced transcription at AP1 elements in a transcriptional reporter assay, but exhibited less effect than arsenite on binding activity assessed by mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation and displayed variable effects on AP1 protein levels. These findings help trace a mechanism by which transcriptional effects of arsenite become manifest and help rationalize the unique action of arsenite, compared to the other agents, to preserve proliferative ability.

  11. Clathrin and AP-1 regulate apical polarity and lumen formation during C. elegans tubulogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongjie; Kim, Ahlee; Abraham, Nessy; Khan, Liakot A.; Hall, David H.; Fleming, John T.; Gobel, Verena

    2012-01-01

    Clathrin coats vesicles in all eukaryotic cells and has a well-defined role in endocytosis, moving molecules away from the plasma membrane. Its function on routes towards the plasma membrane was only recently appreciated and is thought to be limited to basolateral transport. Here, an unbiased RNAi-based tubulogenesis screen identifies a role of clathrin (CHC-1) and its AP-1 adaptor in apical polarity during de novo lumenal membrane biogenesis in the C. elegans intestine. We show that CHC-1/AP-1-mediated polarized transport intersects with a sphingolipid-dependent apical sorting process. Depleting each presumed trafficking component mislocalizes the same set of apical membrane molecules basolaterally, including the polarity regulator PAR-6, and generates ectopic lateral lumens. GFP::CHC-1 and BODIPY-ceramide vesicles associate perinuclearly and assemble asymmetrically at polarized plasma membrane domains in a co-dependent and AP-1-dependent manner. Based on these findings, we propose a trafficking pathway for apical membrane polarity and lumen morphogenesis that implies: (1) a clathrin/AP-1 function on an apically directed transport route; and (2) the convergence of this route with a sphingolipid-dependent apical trafficking path. PMID:22535410

  12. DIFFERENTIAL ACTIVATION OF AP-1 IN HUMAN BLADDER EPITHELIAL CELLS BY INORGANIC AND METHYLATED ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differential Activation of AP-1 in Human Bladder Epithelial Cells by Inorganic and Methylated Arsenicals

    Zuzana Drobna, Ilona Jaspers, David J. Thomas, and Miroslav Styblo

    ABSTRACT

    Epidemiological studies have linked chronic ingestion of drinking water contai...

  13. CYLD Inhibits Tumorigenesis and Metastasis by Blocking JNK/AP1 Signaling at Multiple Levels

    PubMed Central

    de Marval, Paula Miliani; Lutfeali, Shazia; Jin, Jane Y.; Leshin, Benjamin; Selim, M. Angelica; Zhang, Jennifer Y.

    2011-01-01

    CYLD has been recognized as a tumor suppressor due to its dominant genetic linkage to multiple types of epidermal tumors and a range of other cancers. The molecular mechanisms governing CYLD control of skin cancer are still unclear. Here, we demonstrated that K14-driven epidermal expression of a patient relevant and catalytically deficient CYLD truncation mutant (CYLDm) sensitized mice to skin tumor development in response to DMBA/TPA-challenge. Tumors developed on transgenic mice were prone to malignant progression and lymph node metastasis, and displayed increased activation of JNK and the downstream c-Jun and c-Fos proteins. Most importantly, topical application of a pharmacological JNK inhibitor significantly reduced tumor development and abolished metastasis in the transgenic mice. Further in line with these animal data, exogenous expression of CYLDm in A431, a human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell line, markedly enhanced cell growth, migration and subcutaneous tumor growth in an AP1-depdendent manner. In contrast, expression of the wild type CYLD inhibited SCC tumorigenesis and AP1 function. Most importantly, CYLDm not only increased JNK activation but also induced an upregulation of K63-ubiquitination on both c-Jun and c-Fos, leading to sustained AP1 activation. Our findings uncovered c-Jun and c-Fos as novel CYLD-targets and underscore that CYLD controls epidermal tumorigenesis through blocking the JNK/AP1 signaling pathway at multiple levels. PMID:21478324

  14. AP-1 (Fos/Jun) transcription factors in hematopoietic differentiation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liebermann, D A; Gregory, B; Hoffman, B

    1998-03-01

    A combination of in vitro and in vivo molecular genetic approaches have provided evidence to suggest that AP-1 (Fos/Jun) transcription factors play multiple roles in functional development of hematopoietic precursor cells into mature blood cells along most, if not all, of the hematopoietic cell lineages. This includes the monocyte/macrophage, granulocyte, megakaryocyte, mastocyte and erythroid lineages. In addition, studies using c-fos knockout mice have established a unique role for Fos, as a member of the AP-1 transcription factor complex, in determining the differentiation and activity of progenitors of the osteoclast lineage, a population of bone-forming cells which are of hematopoietic origin as well. Evidence has also accumulated to implicate AP-1 (Fos/Jun) transcription factor complexes as both positive and negative modulators of distinct apoptotic pathways in many cell types, including cells of hematopoietic origin. Fos/Jun have been implicated as positive modulators of apoptosis induced in hematopoietic progenitor cells of the myeloid lineage, a function that may relate to the control of blood cell homeostasis, as well as in programmed cell death associated with terminal differentiation of many other cell types, and apoptosis associated with withdrawal of growth/survival factors. On the other hand, the study of apoptosis induced in mammalian cells has implicated AP-1 in the protection against apoptosis induced by DNA-damaging agents. However, evidence to the contrary has been obtained as well, suggesting that AP-1 may function to modulate stress-induced apoptosis either positively or negatively, depending on the microenvironment and the cell type in which the stress stimulus is induced.

  15. AP1S3 mutations are associated with pustular psoriasis and impaired Toll-like receptor 3 trafficking.

    PubMed

    Setta-Kaffetzi, Niovi; Simpson, Michael A; Navarini, Alexander A; Patel, Varsha M; Lu, Hui-Chun; Allen, Michael H; Duckworth, Michael; Bachelez, Hervé; Burden, A David; Choon, Siew-Eng; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Kirby, Brian; Kolios, Antonios; Seyger, Marieke M B; Prins, Christa; Smahi, Asma; Trembath, Richard C; Fraternali, Franca; Smith, Catherine H; Barker, Jonathan N; Capon, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    Adaptor protein complex 1 (AP-1) is an evolutionary conserved heterotetramer that promotes vesicular trafficking between the trans-Golgi network and the endosomes. The knockout of most murine AP-1 complex subunits is embryonically lethal, so the identification of human disease-associated alleles has the unique potential to deliver insights into gene function. Here, we report two founder mutations (c.11T>G [p.Phe4Cys] and c.97C>T [p.Arg33Trp]) in AP1S3, the gene encoding AP-1 complex subunit σ1C, in 15 unrelated individuals with a severe autoinflammatory skin disorder known as pustular psoriasis. Because the variants are predicted to destabilize the 3D structure of the AP-1 complex, we generated AP1S3-knockdown cell lines to investigate the consequences of AP-1 deficiency in skin keratinocytes. We found that AP1S3 silencing disrupted the endosomal translocation of the innate pattern-recognition receptor TLR-3 (Toll-like receptor 3) and resulted in a marked inhibition of downstream signaling. These findings identify pustular psoriasis as an autoinflammatory phenotype caused by defects in vesicular trafficking and demonstrate a requirement of AP-1 for Toll-like receptor homeostasis. PMID:24791904

  16. Synthesis of amphiphilic copolymers containing zwitterionic sulfobetaine as pH and redox responsive drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mengtan; Leng, Mengtian; Lu, Aijing; He, Liu; Xie, Xiaoxiong; Huang, Lei; Ma, Yuhao; Cao, Jun; Chen, Yuanwei; Luo, Xianglin

    2015-02-01

    Amphiphilic poly(ɛ-caprolactone)-SS-poly(N,N-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate)-r-poly(N-(3-sulfopropyl)-N-methacrylate-N,N-diethylammonium-betaine) (PCL-SS-PDEASB) was designed and synthesized successfully. pH and redox dually responsive micelles were prepared based on the obtained copolymers, with zwitterionic sulfobetaines as hydrophilic shell, DEA as pH sensitive content and disulfide as redox responsive linkage. The micelle diameters were all less than 200 nm and the micelle diameter distributions were narrow. These micelles could be triggered by pH and redox condition. The drug release from the drug-loaded micelles displayed fastest under simultaneously acidic and reductive conditions. Results of in vitro cell toxicity evaluation showed that introduction of sulfobetaines could greatly decrease the toxicity of poly(ɛ-caprolactone)-SS-poly(N,N-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PCL-SS-PDEA) micelles. DOX-loaded PCL-SS-PDEASB micelles showed higher efficiency to kill HeLa cells than DOX-loaded PCL-PDEASB micelles. Half inhibitory concentration (IC50) of DOX-loaded PCL-SS-PDEASB micelles decreased with the content of sulfobetaines increasing and was even closer to that of DOX·HCl. Thus, the pH and redox dually responsive biodegradable micelles generated by PCL-SS-PDEASB may be potential smart drug carriers for tumor targeted delivery. PMID:25531063

  17. Redox-responsive molecular helices with highly condensed π-clouds.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Eisuke; Sato, Hiroyasu; Ando, Shinji; Kosaka, Atsuko; Fukushima, Takanori; Hashizume, Daisuke; Yamasaki, Mikio; Hasegawa, Kimiko; Muraoka, Azusa; Ushiyama, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Koichi; Aida, Takuzo

    2011-01-01

    Helices have long attracted the attention of chemists, both for their inherent chiral structure and their potential for applications such as the separation of chiral compounds or the construction of molecular machines. As a result of steric forces, polymeric o-phenylenes adopt a tight helical conformation in which the densely packed phenylene units create a highly condensed π-cloud. Here, we show an oligomeric o-phenylene that undergoes a redox-responsive dynamic motion. In solution, the helices undergo a rapid inversion. During crystallization, however, a chiral symmetry-breaking phenomenon is observed in which each crystal contains only one enantiomeric form. Crystals of both handedness are obtained, but in a non-racemic mixture. Furthermore, in solution, the dynamic motion of the helical oligomer is dramatically suppressed by one-electron oxidation. X-ray crystallography of both the neutral and oxidized forms indicated that a hole, generated upon oxidation, is shared by the repeating o-phenylene units. This enables conformational locking of the helix, and represents a long-lasting chiroptical memory.

  18. Redox-responsive branched-bottlebrush polymers for in vivo MRI and fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sowers, Molly A.; McCombs, Jessica R.; Wang, Ying; Paletta, Joseph T.; Morton, Stephen W.; Dreaden, Erik C.; Boska, Michael D.; Ottaviani, M. Francesca; Hammond, Paula T.; Rajca, Andrzej; Johnson, Jeremiah A.

    2014-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive multimodality imaging agents have broad potential in medical diagnostics. Herein, we report the development of a new class of branched-bottlebrush polymer dual-modality organic radical contrast agents—ORCAFluors—for combined magnetic resonance and near-infrared fluorescence imaging in vivo. These nitroxide radical-based nanostructures have longitudinal and transverse relaxation times that are on par with commonly used heavy-metal-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. Furthermore, these materials display a unique compensatory redox response: fluorescence is partially quenched by surrounding nitroxides in the native state; exposure to ascorbate or ascorbate/glutathione leads to nitroxide reduction and a concomitant 2- to 3.5-fold increase in fluorescence emission. This behaviour enables correlation of MRI contrast, fluorescence intensity and spin concentration with tissues known to possess high concentrations of ascorbate in mice. Our in vitro and in vivo results, along with our modular synthetic approach, make ORCAFluors a promising new platform for multimodality molecular imaging. PMID:25403521

  19. Fungal Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... effectiveness of treatment. For many superficial skin and yeast infections, a clinical examination of the affected person ... the chemical solution dissolves non-fungal elements; reveals yeast cells and fungal hyphae (branching filaments) on a ...

  20. Fungal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Mycotic arthritis; Infectious arthritis - fungal ... Marquez J, Espinoza LR. Infectious arthritis II: mycobacterial, brucellar, fungal, and parasitic arthritis. In: Hochberg MC, Silman AJ, Smolen JS, Weinblatt ME, Weisman MH, eds. Rheumatology . ...

  1. Peroxide sensing and signaling in the Sporothrix schenckii complex: an in silico analysis to uncover putative mechanisms regulating the Hog1 and AP-1 like signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Ivy; Soares Felipe, Maria Sueli; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Lopes Bezerra, Leila Maria; Da Silva Dantas, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand how fungal pathogens can survive inside the host, we must analyze how they evade the fungicidal mechanisms mounted by the host's immune system, such as generation of toxic reactive oxygen species. Studies have shown that infections caused by Sporothrix brasiliensis can be more aggressive than those due to Sporothrix schenckii. Therefore, we propose to analyze and compare the ability of these two pathogenic species to counteract oxidative stress, which, as noted, can be relevant in the host response to infection. We have shown that S. brasiliensis is more resistant to different oxidants, such as H2O2 and menadione, when compared with S. schenckii. Furthermore, our results suggest that the molecular mechanisms by which Sporothrix spp. AP-1 like transcription factors are regulated probably differs from the one seen in other fungal pathogens. Interestingly, comparison between sequences of SbHog1 and SsHog1 stress activated protein kinases suggest that S. brasiliensis Hog1 display mutations that could account for the differences seen in stress sensitivities of these two species. In summary, this is the first study to our knowledge to investigate oxidative stress responses of Sporothrix spp. and provided a model that can be employed in vivo to address how these fungal pathogens can surmount the oxidative stress generated by the host.

  2. GSH1, which encodes gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, is a target gene for yAP-1 transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, A L; Moye-Rowley, W S

    1994-01-01

    Changes in gene dosage of the YAP1 gene, encoding the yAP-1 transcriptional regulatory protein, cause profound alterations in cellular drug and metal resistance. Previous studies on yAP-1 action in yeast cells have used the AP-1 response element (ARE) from simian virus 40 as an artificial site for yAP-1-mediated transcriptional activation. No authentic yeast target sites for control of gene expression by yAP-1 are known. Here we show that the GSH1 gene, encoding gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, is transcriptionally responsive to the yAP-1 protein. GSH1 encodes the rate-limiting step in yeast glutathione biosynthesis and contains within its promoter region a DNA element that matches the ARE in 11 of 12 positions. The GSH1 yAP-1 response element (YRE) was recognized by yAP-1 protein in vitro. Northern (RNA) blot analysis showed that GSH1 mRNA levels were responsive to YAP1 gene dosage. A site-directed mutation in the YRE that blocked yAP-1 binding in vitro prevented the mutant GSH1 promoter from responding to elevation in YAP1 gene dosage. A delta gsh1 mutant strain was constructed and unable to grow in the absence of exogenous glutathione. A mutant GSH1 gene lacking the YRE was unable to confer normal cadmium tolerance, although other yAP-1-mediated phenotypes remained normal. Thus, GSH1 is one of several genes that are transcriptionally controlled by yAP-1 and influence drug resistance. Images PMID:7915005

  3. Energy expenditure and bone formation share a common sensitivity to AP-1 transcription in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Glenn C; Vialou, Vincent; Sato, Kazusa; Saito, Hiroaki; Yin, Min; Green, Thomas A; Lotinun, Sutada; Kveiborg, Marie; Horne, William C; Nestler, Eric J; Baron, Roland

    2012-08-01

    The regulation of bone and fat homeostasis and its relationship to energy expenditure has recently been the focus of increased attention because of its potential relevance to osteoporosis, obesity, and diabetes. Although central effectors within the hypothalamus have been shown to contribute to the regulation of both energy balance and bone homeostasis, little is known of the underlying mechanisms, including the possible involvement of transcriptional factors within the hypothalamus. Transgenic mice overexpressing ΔFosB, a splice variant of the AP-1 transcription factor FosB with mixed agonist-antagonistic properties, have increased energy expenditure and bone mass. Because these mice express ΔFosB in bone, fat, and hypothalamus, we sought to determine 1) whether overexpression of ΔFosB within the hypothalamus was sufficient to regulate energy expenditure and whether it would also regulate bone mass, and 2) whether these effects were the result of antagonism to AP-1. Our results show that stereotactic injection of an adeno-associated virus vector to restrict overexpression of ΔFosB to the ventral hypothalamus of wild-type mice induced a profound increase in both energy expenditure and bone formation and bone mass. This effect was phenocopied, at an even stronger level, by overexpression of a dominant-negative DNJunD, a pure AP-1 antagonist. Taken together, these results suggest that downregulation of AP-1 activity in the hypothalamus profoundly increases energy expenditure and bone formation, leading to both a decrease in adipose mass and an increase in bone mass. These findings may have physiological implications because ΔFosB is expressed and regulated in the hypothalamus.

  4. AP-1-Targeting Anti-Inflammatory Activity of the Methanolic Extract of Persicaria chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Son, Young-Jin; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Yang, Woo Seok; Park, Jae Gwang; Kim, Han Gyung; Chung, Woo-Jae; Yoon, Keejung; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine, Persicaria chinensis L. has been prescribed to cure numerous inflammatory disorders. We previously analyzed the bioactivity of the methanol extract of this plant (Pc-ME) against LPS-induced NO and PGE2 in RAW264.7 macrophages and found that it prevented HCl/EtOH-induced gastric ulcers in mice. The purpose of the current study was to explore the molecular mechanism by which Pc-ME inhibits activator protein- (AP-) 1 activation pathway and mediates its hepatoprotective activity. To investigate the putative therapeutic properties of Pc-ME against AP-1-mediated inflammation and hepatotoxicity, lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated RAW264.7 and U937 cells, a monocyte-like human cell line, and an LPS/D-galactosamine- (D-GalN-) induced acute hepatitis mouse model were employed. The expression of LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was significantly diminished by Pc-ME. Moreover, Pc-ME reduced AP-1 activation and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation in both LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells and differentiated U937 cells. Additionally, we highlighted the hepatoprotective and curative effects of Pc-ME pretreated orally in a mouse model of LPS/D-GalN-intoxicated acute liver injury by demonstrating the significant reduction in elevated serum AST and ALT levels and histological damage. Therefore, these results strongly suggest that Pc-ME could function as an antihepatitis remedy suppressing MAPK/AP-1-mediated inflammatory events. PMID:25878717

  5. DNA conformation driven by AP-1 triggers cell-specific expression via a strong epithelial enhancer.

    PubMed

    Virolle, T; Djabari, Z; Ortonne, J P; Aberdam, D

    2000-10-01

    We report here the characterization of the regulatory region of the human LAMA3 gene, coding for the alpha3A chain of laminin-5. A 202 bp fragment is sufficient to confer epithelial-specific expression to a thymidine kinase promoter through the cooperative effect of three AP-1 binding sites. Remarkably, removal of the sequences located between the AP-1 sites does not modify the promoter activity in keratinocytes but allows strong expression in fibroblasts. Replacement of the deleted sequences by non-homologous ones fully restores the restricted enhancement in keratinocytes. Functional analysis and mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that a minimal distance between the AP-1 sites is required for the enhancer DNA fragment to adopt a particular conformation driven by the binding of Jun-Fos heterodimers. In non-permissive cells, this conformation leads to the anchorage of non-DNA-binding fibroblastic cofactors to form an inhibitory ternary complex. Therefore, our results describe for the first time an unusual conformation-dependent epithelial-specific enhancer. PMID:11269498

  6. Hepatitis C virus core+1/ARF protein decreases hepcidin transcription through an AP1 binding site.

    PubMed

    Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Vassilaki, Niki; Pissas, George; Kakkanas, Athanassios; Bakiri, Latifa; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Mavromara, Penelope

    2013-07-01

    Chronic viral hepatitis C is characterized by iron accumulation in the liver, and hepcidin regulates iron absorption. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core+1/ARFP is a novel protein produced by a second functional ORF within the core gene. Here, using reporter assays and HCV bicistronic replicons, we show that, similarly to core, core+1/ARFP decreases hepcidin expression in hepatoma cells. The activator protein 1 (AP1) binding site of the human hepcidin promoter, shown here to be relevant to basal promoter activity and to the repression by core, is essential for the downregulation by core+1/ARFP while the previously described C/EBP (CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) sites are not. Consistently, expression of the AP1 components c-jun and c-fos obliterated the repressive effect of core and core+1/ARFP. In conclusion, we provide evidence that core+1/ARFP downregulates AP1-mediated transcription, providing new insights into the biological role of core+1/ARFP, as well as the transcriptional modulation of hepcidin, the main regulator of iron metabolism. PMID:23580428

  7. AP-1-mediated invasion requires increased expression of the hyaluronan receptor CD44.

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, R F; Hennigan, R F; Turnbull, K; Katsanakis, K D; MacKenzie, E D; Birnie, G D; Ozanne, B W

    1997-01-01

    Fibroblasts transformed by Fos oncogenes display increased expression of a number of genes implicated in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. In contrast to normal 208F rat fibroblasts, Fos-transformed 208F fibroblasts are growth factor independent for invasion. We demonstrate that invasion of v-Fos- or epidermal growth factor (EGF)-transformed cells requires AP-1 activity. v-Fos-transformed cell invasion is inhibited by c-jun antisense oligonucleotides and by expression of a c-jun dominant negative mutant, TAM-67. EGF-induced invasion is inhibited by both c-fos and c-jun antisense oligonucleotides. CD44s, the standard form of a transmembrane receptor for hyaluronan, is implicated in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. We demonstrate that increased expression of CD44 in Fos- and EGF-transformed cells is dependent upon AP-1. CD44 antisense oligonucleotides reduce expression of CD44 in v-Fos- or EGF-transformed cells and inhibit invasion but not migration. Expression of a fusion protein between human CD44s and Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) in 208F cells complements the inhibition of invasion by the rat-specific CD44 antisense oligonucleotide. We further show that both v-Fos and EGF transformations result in a concentration of endogenous CD44 or exogenous CD44-GFP at the ends of pseudopodial cell extensions. These results support the hypothesis that one role of AP-1 in transformation is to activate a multigenic invasion program. PMID:9001250

  8. Actively targeted delivery of anticancer drug to tumor cells by redox-responsive star-shaped micelles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chunli; Guo, Xing; Qu, Qianqian; Tang, Zhaomin; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Shaobing

    2014-10-01

    In cancer therapy nanocargos based on star-shaped polymer exhibit unique features such as better stability, smaller size distribution and higher drug capacity in comparison to linear polymeric micelles. In this study, we developed a multifunctional star-shaped micellar system by combination of active targeting ability and redox-responsive behavior. The star-shaped micelles with good stability were self-assembled from four-arm poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer. The redox-responsive behaviors of these micelles triggered by glutathione were evaluated from the changes of micellar size, morphology and molecular weight. In vitro drug release profiles exhibited that in a stimulated normal physiological environment, the redox-responsive star-shaped micelles could maintain good stability, whereas in a reducing and acid environment similar with that of tumor cells, the encapsulated agent was promptly released. In vitro cellular uptake and subcellular localization of these micelles were further studied with confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa. In vivo and ex vivo DOX fluorescence imaging displayed that these FA-functionalized star-shaped micelles possessed much better specificity to target solid tumor. Both the qualitative and quantitative results of the antitumor effect in 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice demonstrated that these redox-responsive star-shaped micelles have a high therapeutic efficiency to artificial solid tumor. Therefore, the multifunctional star-shaped micelles are a potential platform for targeted anticancer drug delivery.

  9. PEGylated mesoporous silica as a redox-responsive drug delivery system for loading thiol-containing drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qinfu; Wang, Chen; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jiahong; Gao, Yikun; Zhang, Xiaojing; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2014-12-30

    In this paper, we describe the development of a redox-responsive delivery system based on 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP)-conjugated colloidal mesoporous silica (CMS) via disulfide bonds. mPEG was modified on the surface of silica to improve the dispersibility and biocompatiblity of CMS by reducing hemolysis and protein adsorption. The CMS carriers with different amounts of thiol groups were prepared to evaluate the impact of modified thiol on the drug loading efficiency. In vitro release studies demonstrated that the CMS nanoparticles exhibited highly redox-responsive drug release. The cumulative release of 6-MP was less than 3% in absence of GSH, and reached more than 70% within 2h in the presence of 3mM GSH. In addition, by comparing the cumulative release profiles of CMS-SS-MP@mPEG with their counterparts without the grafting of hydrophilic PEG, it was found that mPEG chains did not hinder the drug release due to the cleavable disulfide bonds and the improved dispersibility. Overall, this work provides a new strategy to connect thiol-containing/thiolated drugs and hydrophilic polymers to the interior and exterior of silica via disulfide bonds to obtain redox-responsive release and improve the dispersibility and biocompatibility of silica.

  10. Temporal coherency between receptor expression, neural activity and AP-1-dependent transcription regulates Drosophila motoneuron dendrite development

    PubMed Central

    Vonhoff, Fernando; Kuehn, Claudia; Blumenstock, Sonja; Sanyal, Subhabrata; Duch, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Neural activity has profound effects on the development of dendritic structure. Mechanisms that link neural activity to nuclear gene expression include activity-regulated factors, such as CREB, Crest or Mef2, as well as activity-regulated immediate-early genes, such as fos and jun. This study investigates the role of the transcriptional regulator AP-1, a Fos-Jun heterodimer, in activity-dependent dendritic structure development. We combine genetic manipulation, imaging and quantitative dendritic architecture analysis in a Drosophila single neuron model, the individually identified motoneuron MN5. First, Dα7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and AP-1 are required for normal MN5 dendritic growth. Second, AP-1 functions downstream of activity during MN5 dendritic growth. Third, using a newly engineered AP-1 reporter we demonstrate that AP-1 transcriptional activity is downstream of Dα7 nAChRs and Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling. Fourth, AP-1 can have opposite effects on dendritic development, depending on the timing of activation. Enhancing excitability or AP-1 activity after MN5 cholinergic synapses and primary dendrites have formed causes dendritic branching, whereas premature AP-1 expression or induced activity prior to excitatory synapse formation disrupts dendritic growth. Finally, AP-1 transcriptional activity and dendritic growth are affected by MN5 firing only during development but not in the adult. Our results highlight the importance of timing in the growth and plasticity of neuronal dendrites by defining a developmental period of activity-dependent AP-1 induction that is temporally locked to cholinergic synapse formation and dendritic refinement, thus significantly refining prior models derived from chronic expression studies. PMID:23293292

  11. A γ-ray and dual redox-responsive supramolecular polymer constructed by a selenium containing pillar[5]arene dimer and a neutral guest.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yujuan; Jie, Kecheng; Shi, Bingbing; Yao, Yong

    2015-07-14

    The first γ-radiation responsive linear supramolecular via pillararene-based host-guest recognition polymer was built successfully. What is more, this supramolecular polymer exhibited dual redox responsiveness. PMID:26073726

  12. Disruption of AP1S1, Causing a Novel Neurocutaneous Syndrome, Perturbs Development of the Skin and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Drouin, Christian A.; Lapointe, Line; Boudreau, Michèle; Meloche, Caroline; Drouin, Régen; Hudson, Thomas J.; Drapeau, Pierre; Cossette, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Adaptor protein (AP) complexes regulate clathrin-coated vesicle assembly, protein cargo sorting, and vesicular trafficking between organelles in eukaryotic cells. Because disruption of the various subunits of the AP complexes is embryonic lethal in the majority of cases, characterization of their function in vivo is still lacking. Here, we describe the first mutation in the human AP1S1 gene, encoding the small subunit σ1A of the AP-1 complex. This founder splice mutation, which leads to a premature stop codon, was found in four families with a unique syndrome characterized by mental retardation, enteropathy, deafness, peripheral neuropathy, ichthyosis, and keratodermia (MEDNIK). To validate the pathogenic effect of the mutation, we knocked down Ap1s1 expression in zebrafish using selective antisens morpholino oligonucleotides (AMO). The knockdown phenotype consisted of perturbation in skin formation, reduced pigmentation, and severe motility deficits due to impaired neural network development. Both neural and skin defects were rescued by co-injection of AMO with wild-type (WT) human AP1S1 mRNA, but not by co-injecting the truncated form of AP1S1, consistent with a loss-of-function effect of this mutation. Together, these results confirm AP1S1 as the gene responsible for MEDNIK syndrome and demonstrate a critical role of AP1S1 in development of the skin and spinal cord. PMID:19057675

  13. Promotion of Homologous Recombination and Genomic Stability by RAD51AP1 via RAD51 Recombinase Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Claudia; Dray, Eloïse; Groesser, Torsten; Filippo, Joseph San; Shi, Idina; Collins, David W.; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Williams, Gareth; Rydberg, Bjorn; Sung, Patrick; Schild, David

    2007-01-01

    Summary Homologous recombination (HR) repairs chromosome damage and is indispensable for tumor suppression in humans. RAD51 mediates the DNA strand pairing step in HR. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) is a RAD51-interacting protein whose function has remained elusive. Knockdown of RAD51AP1 in human cells by RNA interference engenders sensitivity to different types of genotoxic stress, and RAD51AP1 is epistatic to the HR protein XRCC3. Moreover, RAD51AP1-depleted cells are impaired for the recombinational repair of a DNA double-strand break and exhibit chromatid breaks both spontaneously and upon DNA damaging treatment. Purified RAD51AP1 binds both dsDNA and a D-loop structure, and, only when able to interact with RAD51, greatly stimulates the RAD51-mediated D-loop reaction. Biochemical and cytological results show that RAD51AP1 functions at a step subsequent to the assembly of the RAD51-ssDNA nucleoprotein filament. Our findings provide evidence that RAD51AP1 helps maintain genomic integrity via RAD51 recombinase enhancement. PMID:17996711

  14. Arsenic may be involved in fluoride-induced bone toxicity through PTH/PKA/AP1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qi-bing; Xu, Yu-yan; Yu, Xian; Yang, Jun; Hong, Feng; Zhang, Ai-hua

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to combined fluoride and arsenic continues to be a major public health problem worldwide, affecting thousands of people. In recent years, more and more researchers began to focus on the interaction between the fluorine and the arsenic. In this study, the selected investigation site was located in China. The study group was selected from people living in fluoride-arsenic polluted areas due to burning coal. The total number of participants was 196; including the fluoride-arsenic anomaly group (130) and the fluoride-arsenic normal group (63). By observing the changes in gene and protein expression of PTH/PKA/AP1 signaling pathway, the results show that fluoride can increase the expression levels of PTH, PKA, and AP1, but arsenic can only affect the expression of AP1; fluoride and arsenic have an interaction on the expression of AP1. Further study found that fluoride and arsenic can affect the mRNA expression level of c-fos gene (AP1 family members), and have an interaction on the expression of c-fos, but not c-jun. The results indicate that PTH/PKA/AP1 signaling pathway may play an important role in bone toxicity of fluoride. Arsenic can affect the expression of c-fos, thereby affecting the expression of transcription factor AP1, indirectly involved in fluoride-induced bone toxicity.

  15. Fungal Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2016-01-01

    Fungal endocarditis is a rare and fatal condition. The Candida and Aspergillus species are the two most common etiologic fungi found responsible for fungal endocarditis. Fever and changing heart murmur are the most common clinical manifestations. Some patients may have a fever of unknown origin as the onset symptom. The diagnosis of fungal endocarditis is challenging, and diagnosis of prosthetic valve fungal endocarditis is extremely difficult. The optimum antifungal therapy still remains debatable. Treating Candida endocarditis can be difficult because the Candida species can form biofilms on native and prosthetic heart valves. Combined treatment appears superior to monotherapy. Combination of antifungal therapy and surgical debridement might bring about better prognosis. PMID:27737409

  16. Fungal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Raz, Eytan; Win, William; Hagiwara, Mari; Lui, Yvonne W; Cohen, Benjamin; Fatterpekar, Girish M

    2015-11-01

    Fungal sinusitis is characterized into invasive and noninvasive forms. The invasive variety is further classified into acute, chronic and granulomatous forms; and the noninvasive variety into fungus ball and allergic fungal sinusitis. Each of these different forms has a unique radiologic appearance. The clinicopathologic and corresponding radiologic spectrum and differences in treatment strategies of fungal sinusitis make it an important diagnosis for clinicians and radiologists to always consider. This is particularly true of invasive fungal sinusitis, which typically affects immuno compromised patients and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis allows initiation of appropriate treatment strategies resulting in favorable outcome.

  17. Cinnamon extract induces tumor cell death through inhibition of NFκB and AP1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cinnamomum cassia bark is the outer skin of an evergreen tall tree belonging to the family Lauraceae containing several active components such as essential oils (cinnamic aldehyde and cinnamyl aldehyde), tannin, mucus and carbohydrate. They have various biological functions including anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammation, anti-diabetic and anti-tumor activity. Previously, we have reported that anti-cancer effect of cinnamon extracts is associated with modulation of angiogenesis and effector function of CD8+ T cells. In this study, we further identified that anti-tumor effect of cinnamon extracts is also link with enhanced pro-apoptotic activity by inhibiting the activities NFκB and AP1 in mouse melanoma model. Methods Water soluble cinnamon extract was obtained and quality of cinnamon extract was evaluated by HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography) analysis. In this study, we tested anti-tumor activity and elucidated action mechanism of cinnamon extract using various types of tumor cell lines including lymphoma, melanoma, cervix cancer and colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo mouse melanoma model. Results Cinnamon extract strongly inhibited tumor cell proliferation in vitro and induced active cell death of tumor cells by up-regulating pro-apoptotic molecules while inhibiting NFκB and AP1 activity and their target genes such as Bcl-2, BcL-xL and survivin. Oral administration of cinnamon extract in melanoma transplantation model significantly inhibited tumor growth with the same mechanism of action observed in vitro. Conclusion Our study suggests that anti-tumor effect of cinnamon extracts is directly linked with enhanced pro-apoptotic activity and inhibition of NFκB and AP1 activities and their target genes in vitro and in vivo mouse melanoma model. Hence, further elucidation of active components of cinnamon extract could lead to development of potent anti-tumor agent or complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of

  18. Signalling in inflammatory skin disease by AP-1 (Fos/Jun).

    PubMed

    Uluçkan, Özge; Guinea-Viniegra, Juan; Jimenez, Maria; Wagner, Erwin F

    2015-01-01

    Skin inflammation is a physiological reaction to tissue injury, pathogen invasion and irritants. During this process, innate and/or adaptive immune cells are activated and recruited to the site of inflammation to either promote or suppress inflammation. The sequential recruitment and activation of immune cells is modulated by a combination of cytokines and chemokines, which are regulated by transcription factors, such as AP-1 (Fos/Jun), NF-κB, NFATs, and STATs. Here we review the present evidence and the underlying mechanisms of how Jun/AP-1 proteins control skin inflammation. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) in which AP-1 proteins are deleted in the epidermis have revealed that these proteins control cytokine expression at multiple levels. Constitutive epidermal deletion of JunB in mice leads to a multi-organ disease characterised by increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These JunB-deficient mutant mice display several phenotypes from skin inflammation to a G-CSF-dependent myeloproliferative disease, as well as kidney atrophy and bone loss, reminiscent of psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Importantly, epidermal deletion of both JunB and c-Jun in an inducible manner in adult mice leads to a psoriasis-like disease, in which the epidermal proteome expression profile is comparable to the one from psoriasis patient samples. In this GEMM and in psoriasis patient-derived material, S100A8/A9-dependent C3/CFB complement activation, as well as a miR-21-dependent TIMP-3/TACE pathway leading to TNF-α shedding, plays causal roles in disease development. The newly identified therapeutic targets from GEMMs together with investigations in human patient samples open up new avenues for therapeutic interventions for psoriasis and related inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:26458100

  19. Signalling in inflammatory skin disease by AP-1 (Fos/Jun).

    PubMed

    Uluçkan, Özge; Guinea-Viniegra, Juan; Jimenez, Maria; Wagner, Erwin F

    2015-01-01

    Skin inflammation is a physiological reaction to tissue injury, pathogen invasion and irritants. During this process, innate and/or adaptive immune cells are activated and recruited to the site of inflammation to either promote or suppress inflammation. The sequential recruitment and activation of immune cells is modulated by a combination of cytokines and chemokines, which are regulated by transcription factors, such as AP-1 (Fos/Jun), NF-κB, NFATs, and STATs. Here we review the present evidence and the underlying mechanisms of how Jun/AP-1 proteins control skin inflammation. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) in which AP-1 proteins are deleted in the epidermis have revealed that these proteins control cytokine expression at multiple levels. Constitutive epidermal deletion of JunB in mice leads to a multi-organ disease characterised by increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These JunB-deficient mutant mice display several phenotypes from skin inflammation to a G-CSF-dependent myeloproliferative disease, as well as kidney atrophy and bone loss, reminiscent of psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Importantly, epidermal deletion of both JunB and c-Jun in an inducible manner in adult mice leads to a psoriasis-like disease, in which the epidermal proteome expression profile is comparable to the one from psoriasis patient samples. In this GEMM and in psoriasis patient-derived material, S100A8/A9-dependent C3/CFB complement activation, as well as a miR-21-dependent TIMP-3/TACE pathway leading to TNF-α shedding, plays causal roles in disease development. The newly identified therapeutic targets from GEMMs together with investigations in human patient samples open up new avenues for therapeutic interventions for psoriasis and related inflammatory skin diseases.

  20. Overexpression of members of the AP-1 transcriptional factor family from an early stage of renal carcinogenesis and inhibition of cell growth by AP-1 gene antisense oligonucleotides in the Tsc2 gene mutant (Eker) rat model.

    PubMed

    Urakami, S; Tsuchiya, H; Orimoto, K; Kobayashi, T; Igawa, M; Hino, O

    1997-12-01

    We previously isolated subtracted cDNA clones for genes having increased expression in Tsc2 gene mutant (Eker) rat renal carcinomas (RCs). Among them, fra-1 encoding a transcriptional factor activator protein 1 (AP-1) was identified. We have therefore investigated whether other members of the AP-1 transcription factor family might also be involved in renal carcinogenesis in the Eker rat model. In the present study, overexpression of fra-1, fra-2, c-jun, junB, and junD mRNAs was demonstrated in RCs by Northern blot analysis. Interestingly, AP-1 proteins were highly expressed even in the earliest preneoplastic lesions (e.g., phenotypically altered tubules) as suggested by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-responsive element (TRE)-binding activity of AP-1 proteins was observed in RC cell extracts by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. As a next step, we transfected antisense oligonucleotides targeting AP-1 genes into RC cells and demonstrated that their growth was strongly inhibited. Thus, the data suggest that overexpression of AP-1 genes might play a crucial role in renal carcinogenesis in the Eker rat model. PMID:9405228

  1. SANE's Measurement of the Proton's Virtual Photon Spin Asymmetry, Ap1, at Large Bjorken x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, Jonathan Robert Lee

    The experiment SANE (Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment) measured inclusive double polarization electron asymmetries on a proton target at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory in Newport News Virgina. Polarized electrons were scattered from a solid 14NH3 polarized target provided by the University of Virginia target group. Measurements were taken with the target polarization oriented at 80° and 180° relative to the beam direction, and beam energies of 4.7 and 5.9 GeV were used. Scattered electrons were detected by a multi-component novel non-magnetic detector package constructed for this experiment. Asymmetries measured at the two target orientations allow for the extraction of the virtual Compton asymmetries Ap1 and Ap2 as well as the spin structure functions gp1 and gp2 . This work addresses the extraction of the virtual Compton asymmetry Ap1 in the deep inelastic regime. The analysis uses data in the kinematic range from Bjorken x of 0.30 to 0.55, separated into four Q2 bins from 1.9 to 4.7 GeV2.

  2. c-fos/c-jun expression and AP-1 activation in skin fibroblasts from centenarians.

    PubMed

    Grassilli, E; Bellesia, E; Salomoni, P; Croce, M A; Sikora, E; Radziszewska, E; Tesco, G; Vergelli, M; Latorraca, S; Barbieri, D; Fagiolo, U; Santacaterina, S; Amaducci, L; Tiozzo, R; Sorbi, S; Franceschi, C

    1996-09-13

    In vitro replicative senescence is characterized by an irreversible growth arrest due to the inability of the cell to induce some key regulators of cell cycle progression, such as c-fos and AP-1, in response to mitogenic stimuli. In vitro replicative senescence and in vivo aging have been assumed to be two related phenomena, likely controlled by overlapping or interacting genes. As a corollary, fibroblasts from centenarians, which have undergone a long process of senescence in vivo should have very limited proliferative capability. On the contrary, in a previous work we found that fibroblasts from centenarians exhibited the same capacity to respond to different mitogenic stimuli as fibroblasts from young donors. Here we provide evidences that the well preserved proliferative response is likely due to the fact that some pivotal regulators- c-fos, c-jun and AP-1-are still fully inducible, despite a long process of in vivo senescence. Our data therefore suggest that in vivo and in vitro aging are separate phenomena whose possible relationships, if any, have to be ascertained very carefully. PMID:8806666

  3. Fos/AP-1 proteins in bone and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Erwin F; Eferl, Robert

    2005-12-01

    The skeleton and the immune system share a variety of different cytokines and transcription factors, thereby mutually influencing each other. These interactions are not confined to the bone marrow cavity where bone cells and hematopoietic cells exist in proximity but also occur at locations that are target sites for inflammatory bone diseases. The newly established research area termed 'osteoimmunology' attempts to unravel these skeletal/immunological relationships. Studies towards a molecular understanding of inflammatory bone diseases from an immunological as well as a bone-centered perspective have been very successful and led to the identification of several signaling pathways that are causally involved in inflammatory bone loss. Induction of receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB ligand (RANKL) signals by activated T cells and subsequent activation of the key transcription factors Fos/activator protein-1 (AP-1), NF-kappaB, and NF for activation of T cells c1 (NFATc1) are in the center of the signaling networks leading to osteoclast-mediated bone loss. Conversely, nature has employed the interferon system to antagonize excessive osteoclast differentiation, although this counteracting activity appears to be overruled under pathological conditions. Here, we focus on Fos/AP-1 functions in osteoimmunology, because this osteoclastogenic transcription factor plays a central role in inflammatory bone loss by regulating genes like NFATc1 as well as the interferon system. We also attempt to put potential therapeutic strategies for inflammatory bone diseases in perspective.

  4. The clathrin adaptor AP-1 complex and Arf1 regulate planar cell polarity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria; Balmer, Sophie; Mendoza, Meg; Dussert, Aurore; Collu, Giovanna; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Weber, Ursula; Ciruna, Brian; Mlodzik, Marek

    2015-04-07

    A key step in generating planar cell polarity (PCP) is the formation of restricted junctional domains containing Frizzled/Dishevelled/Diego (Fz/Dsh/Dgo) or Van Gogh/Prickle (Vang/Pk) complexes within the same cell, stabilized via Flamingo (Fmi) across cell membranes. Although models have been proposed for how these complexes acquire and maintain their polarized localization, the machinery involved in moving core PCP proteins around cells remains unknown. We describe the AP-1 adaptor complex and Arf1 as major regulators of PCP protein trafficking in vivo. AP-1 and Arf1 disruption affects the accumulation of Fz/Fmi and Vang/Fmi complexes in the proximo-distal axis, producing severe PCP phenotypes. Using novel tools, we demonstrate a direct and specific Arf1 involvement in Fz trafficking in vivo. Moreover, we uncover a conserved Arf1 PCP function in vertebrates. Our data support a model whereby the trafficking machinery plays an important part during PCP establishment, promoting formation of polarized PCP-core complexes in vivo.

  5. The clathrin adaptor AP-1 complex and Arf1 regulate planar cell polarity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Meg; Dussert, Aurore; Collu, Giovanna; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Weber, Ursula; Ciruna, Brian; Mlodzik, Marek

    2015-01-01

    A key step in generating planar cell polarity (PCP) is the formation of restricted junctional domains containing Frizzled/Dishevelled/Diego (Fz/Dsh/Dgo) or Van Gogh/Prickle (Vang/Pk) complexes within the same cell, stabilized via Flamingo (Fmi) across cell membranes. Although models have been proposed for how these complexes acquire and maintain their polarized localization, the machinery involved in moving core PCP proteins around cells remains unknown. We describe the AP-1 adaptor complex and Arf1 as major regulators of PCP protein trafficking in vivo. AP-1 and Arf1 disruption affects the accumulation of Fz/Fmi and Vang/Fmi complexes in the proximo–distal axis, producing severe PCP phenotypes. Using novel tools, we demonstrate a direct and specific Arf1 involvement in Fz trafficking in vivo. Moreover, we uncover a conserved Arf1 PCP function in vertebrates. Our data support a model whereby the trafficking machinery plays an important part during PCP establishment, promoting formation of polarized PCP-core complexes in vivo. PMID:25849195

  6. Spleen Tyrosine Kinase Regulates AP-1 Dependent Transcriptional Response to Minimally Oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Wiesner, Philipp; Almazan, Felicidad; Kim, Jungsu; Miller, Yury I.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) turns it into an endogenous ligand recognized by pattern-recognition receptors. We have demonstrated that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) binds to CD14 and mediates TLR4/MD-2-dependent responses in macrophages, many of which are MyD88-independent. We have also demonstrated that the mmLDL activation leads to recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) to TLR4 and TLR4 and Syk phosphorylation. In this study, we produced a macrophage-specific Syk knockout mouse and used primary Syk−/− macrophages in our studies. We demonstrated that Syk mediated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK, which in turn phosphorylated c-Fos and c-Jun, respectively, as assessed by an in vitro kinase assay. c-Jun phosphorylation was also mediated by IKKε. c-Jun and c-Fos bound to consensus DNA sites and thereby completed an AP-1 transcriptional complex and induced expression of CXCL2 and IL-6. These results suggest that Syk plays a key role in TLR4-mediated macrophage responses to host-generated ligands, like mmLDL, with subsequent activation of an AP-1 transcription program. PMID:22384232

  7. Overexpression of Two PsnAP1 Genes from Populus simonii × P. nigra Causes Early Flowering in Transgenic Tobacco and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Tangchun; Li, Shuang; Zang, Lina; Dai, Lijuan; Yang, Chuanping; Qu, Guan-Zheng

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, AP1 is a floral meristem identity gene and plays an important role in floral organ development. In this study, PsnAP1-1 and PsnAP1-2 were isolated from the male reproductive buds of poplar (Populus simonii × P. nigra), which are the orthologs of AP1 in Arabidopsis, by sequence analysis. Northern blot and qRT-PCR analysis showed that PsnAP1-1 and PsnAP1-2 exhibited high expression level in early inflorescence development of poplar. Subcellular localization showed the PsnAP1-1 and PsnAP1-2 proteins are localized in the nucleus. Overexpression of PsnAP1-1 and PsnAP1-2 in tobacco under the control of a CaMV 35S promoter significantly enhanced early flowering. These transgenic plants also showed much earlier stem initiation and higher rates of photosynthesis than did wild-type tobacco. qRT-PCR analysis further indicated that overexpression of PsnAP1-1 and PsnAP1-2 resulted in up-regulation of genes related to flowering, such as NtMADS4, NtMADS5 and NtMADS11. Overexpression of PsnAP1-1 and PsnAP1-2 in Arabidopsis also induced early flowering, but did not complement the ap1-10 floral morphology to any noticeable extent. This study indicates that PsnAP1-1 and PsnAP1-2 play a role in floral transition of poplar. PMID:25360739

  8. Chemical shift assignments of zinc finger domain of methionine aminopeptidase 1 (MetAP1) from Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Rachineni, Kavitha; Arya, Tarun; Singarapu, Kiran Kumar; Addlagatta, Anthony; Bharatam, Jagadeesh

    2015-10-01

    Methionine aminopeptidase Type I (MetAP1) cleaves the initiator methionine from about 70 % of all newly synthesized proteins in almost every living cell. Human MetAP1 is a two domain protein with a zinc finger on the N-terminus and a catalytic domain on the C-terminus. Here, we report the chemical shift assignments of the amino terminal zinc binding domain (ZBD) (1-83 residues) of the human MetAP1 derived by using advanced NMR spectroscopic methods. We were able to assign the chemical shifts of ZBD of MetAP1 nearly complete, which reveal two helical fragments involving residues P44-L49 (α1) and Q59-K82 (α2). The protein structure unfolds upon complex formation with the addition of 2 M excess EDTA, indicated by the appearance of amide resonances in the random coil chemical shift region of (15)NHSQC spectrum.

  9. Transcription factor AP-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: Alterations in activity and expression during Human Papillomavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Jammu and Kashmir (J&K) region of India. A substantial proportion of esophageal carcinoma is associated with infection of high-risk HPV type 16 and HPV18, the oncogenic expression of which is controlled by host cell transcription factor Activator Protein-1 (AP-1). We, therefore, have investigated the role of DNA binding and expression pattern of AP-1 in esophageal cancer with or without HPV infection. Methods Seventy five histopathologically-confirmed esophageal cancer and an equal number of corresponding adjacent normal tissue biopsies from Kashmir were analyzed for HPV infection, DNA binding activity and expression of AP-1 family of proteins by PCR, gel shift assay and immunoblotting respectively. Results A high DNA binding activity and elevated expression of AP-1 proteins were observed in esophageal cancer, which differed between HPV positive (19%) and HPV negative (81%) carcinomas. While JunB, c-Fos and Fra-1 were the major contributors to AP-1 binding activity in HPV negative cases, Fra-1 was completely absent in HPV16 positive cancers. Comparison of AP-1 family proteins demonstrated high expression of JunD and c-Fos in HPV positive tumors, but interestingly, Fra-1 expression was extremely low or nil in these tumor tissues. Conclusion Differential AP-1 binding activity and expression of its specific proteins between HPV - positive and HPV - negative cases indicate that AP-1 may play an important role during HPV-induced esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:19758438

  10. Butyrate produced by commensal bacteria potentiates phorbol esters induced AP-1 response in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nepelska, Malgorzata; Cultrone, Antonietta; Béguet-Crespel, Fabienne; Le Roux, Karine; Doré, Joël; Arulampalam, Vermulugesan; Blottière, Hervé M

    2012-01-01

    The human intestine is a balanced ecosystem well suited for bacterial survival, colonization and growth, which has evolved to be beneficial both for the host and the commensal bacteria. Here, we investigated the effect of bacterial metabolites produced by commensal bacteria on AP-1 signaling pathway, which has a plethora of effects on host physiology. Using intestinal epithelial cell lines, HT-29 and Caco-2, stably transfected with AP-1-dependent luciferase reporter gene, we tested the effect of culture supernatant from 49 commensal strains. We observed that several bacteria were able to activate the AP-1 pathway and this was correlated to the amount of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) produced. Besides being a major source of energy for epithelial cells, SCFAs have been shown to regulate several signaling pathways in these cells. We show that propionate and butyrate are potent activators of the AP-1 pathway, butyrate being the more efficient of the two. We also observed a strong synergistic activation of AP-1 pathway when using butyrate with PMA, a PKC activator. Moreover, butyrate enhanced the PMA-induced expression of c-fos and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but not p38 and JNK. In conclusion, we showed that SCFAs especially butyrate regulate the AP-1 signaling pathway, a feature that may contribute to the physiological impact of the gut microbiota on the host. Our results provide support for the involvement of butyrate in modulating the action of PKC in colon cancer cells.

  11. Opposing Effects of Zac1 and Curcumin on AP-1-Regulated Expressions of S100A7

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yu-Wen; Liu, Shu-Ting; Cheng, Hsiao-Chun; Huang, Shih-Ming; Chang, Yung-Lung; Chiang, Chien-Ping; Liu, Ying-Chun; Wang, Wei-Ming

    2015-01-01

    ZAC, an encoding gene mapped at chromosome 6q24-q25 within PSORS1, was previously found over-expressed in the lower compartment of the hyperplastic epidermis in psoriatic lesions. Cytokines produced in the inflammatory dermatoses may drive AP-1 transcription factor to induce responsive gene expressions. We demonstrated that mZac1 can enhance AP-1-responsive S100A7 expression of which the encoding gene was located in PSORS4 with HaCaT keratinocytes. However, the mZac1-enhanced AP-1 transcriptional activity was suppressed by curcumin, indicating the anti-inflammatory property of this botanical agent and is exhibited by blocking the AP-1-mediated cross-talk between PSORS1 and PSORS4. Two putative AP-1-binding sites were found and demonstrated to be functionally important in the regulation of S100A7 promoter activity. Moreover, we found curcumin reduced the DNA-binding activity of AP-1 to the recognition element located in the S100A7 promoter. The S100A7 expression was found to be upregulated in the lesioned epidermis of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, which is where this keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant engaged in the pro-inflammatory feedback loop. Understanding the regulatory mechanism of S100A7 expression will be helpful to develop therapeutic strategies for chronic inflammatory dermatoses via blocking the reciprocal stimuli between the inflammatory cells and keratinocytes. PMID:26633653

  12. Opposing Effects of Zac1 and Curcumin on AP-1-Regulated Expressions of S100A7.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yu-Wen; Liu, Shu-Ting; Cheng, Hsiao-Chun; Huang, Shih-Ming; Chang, Yung-Lung; Chiang, Chien-Ping; Liu, Ying-Chun; Wang, Wei-Ming

    2015-01-01

    ZAC, an encoding gene mapped at chromosome 6q24-q25 within PSORS1, was previously found over-expressed in the lower compartment of the hyperplastic epidermis in psoriatic lesions. Cytokines produced in the inflammatory dermatoses may drive AP-1 transcription factor to induce responsive gene expressions. We demonstrated that mZac1 can enhance AP-1-responsive S100A7 expression of which the encoding gene was located in PSORS4 with HaCaT keratinocytes. However, the mZac1-enhanced AP-1 transcriptional activity was suppressed by curcumin, indicating the anti-inflammatory property of this botanical agent and is exhibited by blocking the AP-1-mediated cross-talk between PSORS1 and PSORS4. Two putative AP-1-binding sites were found and demonstrated to be functionally important in the regulation of S100A7 promoter activity. Moreover, we found curcumin reduced the DNA-binding activity of AP-1 to the recognition element located in the S100A7 promoter. The S100A7 expression was found to be upregulated in the lesioned epidermis of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, which is where this keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant engaged in the pro-inflammatory feedback loop. Understanding the regulatory mechanism of S100A7 expression will be helpful to develop therapeutic strategies for chronic inflammatory dermatoses via blocking the reciprocal stimuli between the inflammatory cells and keratinocytes. PMID:26633653

  13. Anti-cancer effect of snake venom toxin through down regulation of AP-1 mediated PRDX6 expression

    PubMed Central

    Son, Dong Ju; Song, Ho Sub; Kim, Jung Hyun; Ko, Seong Cheol; Song, Min Jong; Lee, Won Hyoung; Yoon, Joo Hee; Ham, Young Wan; Han, Sang Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    Snake venom toxin (SVT) from Vipera lebetina turanica contains a mixture of different enzymes and proteins. Peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6) is known to be a stimulator of lung cancer cell growth. PRDX6 is a member of peroxidases, and has calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) activities. PRDX6 has an AP-1 binding site in its promoter region of the gene. Since AP-1 is implicated in tumor growth and PRDX6 expression, in the present study, we investigated whether SVT inhibits PRDX6, thereby preventing human lung cancer cell growth (A549 and NCI-H460) through inactivation of AP-1. A docking model study and pull down assay showed that SVT completely fits on the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) region of c-Fos of AP-1. SVT (0–10 μg/ml) inhibited lung cancer cell growth in a concentration dependent manner through induction of apoptotic cell death accompanied by induction of cleaved caspase-3, -8, -9, Bax, p21 and p53, but decreased cIAP and Bcl2 expression via inactivation of AP-1. In an xenograft in vivo model, SVT (0.5 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg) also inhibited tumor growth accompanied with the reduction of PRDX6 expression, but increased expression of proapoptotic proteins. These data indicate that SVT inhibits tumor growth via inhibition of PRDX6 activity through interaction with its transcription factor AP-1. PMID:26061816

  14. Promotion of Homologous Recombination and Genomic Stability byRAD51AP1 via RAD51 Recombinase Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, Claudia; Dray, Eloise; Groesser, Torsten; San Filippo,Joseph; Shi, Idina; Collins, David W.; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Williams,Gareth; Rydberg, Bjorn; Sung, Patrick; Schild, David

    2007-04-11

    Homologous recombination (HR) repairs chromosome damage and is indispensable for tumor suppression in humans. RAD51 mediates the DNA strand pairing step in HR. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) is a RAD51-interacting protein whose function has remained elusive. Knockdown of RAD51AP1 in human cells by RNA interference engenders sensitivity to different types of genotoxic stress. Moreover, RAD51AP1-depleted cells are impaired for the recombinational repair of a DNA double-strand break and exhibit chromatid breaks both spontaneously and upon DNA damaging treatment. Purified RAD51AP1 binds dsDNA and RAD51, and it greatly stimulates the RAD51-mediated D-loop reaction. Biochemical and cytological results show that RAD51AP1 functions at a step subsequent to the assembly of the RAD51-ssDNA nucleoprotein filament. Our findings provide the first evidence that RAD51AP1 helps maintain genomic integrity via RAD51 recombinase enhancement.

  15. Retinoic acid-induced AP-1 transcriptional activity regulates B16 mouse melanoma growth inhibition and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Boskovic, Goran; Niles, Richard M

    2003-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) inhibits growth and induces differentiation of B16 mouse melanoma cells. These effects are accompanied by a large increase in PKCalpha mRNA and protein levels and surprisingly an increase in activating protein-1 (AP-1) transcriptional activity. To further investigate the RA-induced AP-1 activity we established clones of B16 cells stably expressing an AP-1-luciferase reporter gene. Treatment of these clones with phorbol dibutyrate increased AP-1 activity which peaked at 2-4 h and returned to baseline level by 24 h. In contrast, RA treatment resulted in a slow increase in AP-1 activity that reached a maximum level at 48 h and was maintained for the duration of the treatment. We tested the importance of the RA-induced AP-1 activity by establishing clones which stably express a dominant negative fos gene (A-fos) and have greatly diminished AP-1 activity. Growth rates of untreated A-fos expressing cells were similar to wt B16 and clones not expressing A-fos. However, clones expressing the dominant-negative fos had a markedly decreased sensitivity to RA-induced inhibition of anchorage-dependent and -independent growth. Treatment of wt B16 cells for 48 h with RA increased melanin production by two to fourfold, but this effect was completely lost in the A-fos clones. The ability of RA to induce RARbeta and PKCalpha expression was retained in A-fos clones, suggesting that A-fos was not interfering with RAR transcription activation functions. We tested whether the RA-induced AP-1 activity might be mediated by the ERK1/2 MAPK pathway. Inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation stimulated AP-1 activity, which was not additive to that induced by RA. This finding raises the possibility that this MAPK pathway may be a target of retinoid action. Our observations suggest that AP-1 transcriptional activity induced by RA likely plays an important role in the biological changes mediated by this retinoid in B16 melanoma cells. PMID:12494454

  16. Two tobacco AP1-like gene promoters with highly specific, tightly regulated and uniquely expressed activity during floral transition, initiation and development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biotech engineering of agronomic traits requires an array of highly specific and tightly regulated promoters in flower or other tissues. In this study, we isolated and characterized two tobacco AP1-like promoters (termed NtAP1La and NtAP1Lb1) in transgenic plants using GUS reporter and tissue-speci...

  17. Bone development and inflammatory disease is regulated by AP-1 (Fos/Jun).

    PubMed

    Wagner, E F

    2010-01-01

    The Fos and Jun proteins are members of the AP-1 transcription factor complex, which is a central regulator for many cellular functions. This paper summarises the important functions of Fos proteins in bone development, with special emphasis on the Fos-related proteins Fra-1 and Fra-2. These factors determine the functions of osteoblasts and osteoclasts and regulate cytokine signalling during bone development. Likewise, the Jun proteins control the expression of cytokines and chemokines and are probably causally involved in inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis. Investigations into the molecular mechanisms responsible for skin inflammation have revealed that Jun proteins control cytokine expression, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha by transcriptional and posttranscriptional pathways. Finally, the paper discusses the relevance of the Jun-dependent mouse model for psoriasis for preclinical studies in the field of anti-angiogenic therapies.

  18. Fungal allergens.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, W E; Helbling, A; Salvaggio, J E; Lehrer, S B

    1995-01-01

    Airborne fungal spores occur widely and often in far greater concentrations than pollen grains. Immunoglobulin E-specific antigens (allergens) on airborne fungal spores induce type I hypersensitivity (allergic) respiratory reactions in sensitized atopic subjects, causing rhinitis and/or asthma. The prevalence of respiratory allergy to fungi is imprecisely known but is estimated at 20 to 30% of atopic (allergy-predisposed) individuals or up to 6% of the general population. Diagnosis and immunotherapy of allergy to fungi require well-characterized or standardized extracts that contain the relevant allergen(s) of the appropriate fungus. Production of standardized extracts is difficult since fungal extracts are complex mixtures and a variety of fungi are allergenic. Thus, the currently available extracts are largely nonstandardized, even uncharacterized, crude extracts. Recent significant progress in isolating and characterizing relevant fungal allergens is summarized in the present review. Particularly, some allergens from the genera Alternaria, Aspergillus, and Cladosporium are now thoroughly characterized, and allergens from several other genera, including some basidiomycetes, have also been purified. The availability of these extracts will facilitate definitive studies of fungal allergy prevalence and immunotherapy efficacy as well as enhance both the diagnosis and therapy of fungal allergy. PMID:7621398

  19. TAK1 regulates NF-{Kappa}B and AP-1 activation in airway epithelial cells following RSV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Nilay; Liu Tianshuang; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella

    2011-09-30

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of epidemic respiratory diseases in infants and young children. RSV infection of airway epithelial cells induces the expression of immune/inflammatory genes through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Nuclear Factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) and AP-1. In this study, we have investigated the signaling pathway leading to activation of these two transcription factors in response to RSV infection. Our results show that IKK{beta} plays a key role in viral-induced NF-{kappa}B activation, while JNK regulates AP-1-dependent gene transcription, as demonstrated by using kinase inactive proteins and chemical inhibitors of the two kinases. Inhibition of TAK1 activation, by overexpression of kinase inactive TAK1 or using cells lacking TAK1 expression, significantly reduced RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity, as well as NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, identifying TAK1 as an important upstream signaling molecule regulating RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 activation. - Highlights: > IKK{beta} is a major kinase involved in RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. > JNK regulates AP-1-dependent gene transcription in RSV infection. > TAK1 is a critical upstream signaling molecule for both pathways in infected cells.

  20. Genome-wide profiling of AP-1-regulated transcription provides insights into the invasiveness of triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunyan; Qiao, Yichun; Jonsson, Philip; Wang, Jian; Xu, Li; Rouhi, Pegah; Sinha, Indranil; Cao, Yihai; Williams, Cecilia; Dahlman-Wright, Karin

    2014-07-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive clinical subtype accounting for up to 20% of all breast cancers, but its malignant determinants remain largely undefined. Here, we show that in TNBC the overexpression of Fra-1, a component of the transcription factor AP-1, offers prognostic potential. Fra-1 depletion or its heterodimeric partner c-Jun inhibits the proliferative and invasive phenotypes of TNBC cells in vitro. Similarly, RNAi-mediated attenuation of Fra-1 or c-Jun reduced cellular invasion in vivo in a zebrafish tumor xenograft model. Exploring the AP-1 cistrome and the AP-1-regulated transcriptome, we obtained insights into the transcriptional regulatory networks of AP-1 in TNBC cells. Among the direct targets identified for Fra-1/c-Jun involved in proliferation, adhesion, and cell-cell contact, we found that AP-1 repressed the expression of E-cadherin by transcriptional upregulation of ZEB2 to stimulate cell invasion. Overall, this work illuminates the pathways through which TNBC cells acquire invasive and proliferative properties.

  1. The E3 ubiquitin ligase Trim7 mediates c-Jun/AP-1 activation by Ras signalling

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Atanu; Diefenbacher, Markus E.; Mylona, Anastasia; Kassel, Olivier; Behrens, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The c-Jun/AP-1 transcription factor controls key cellular behaviours, including proliferation and apoptosis, in response to JNK and Ras/MAPK signalling. While the JNK pathway has been well characterised, the mechanism of activation by Ras was elusive. Here we identify the uncharacterised ubiquitin ligase Trim7 as a critical component of AP-1 activation via Ras. We found that MSK1 directly phosphorylates Trim7 in response to direct activation by the Ras–Raf–MEK–ERK pathway, and this modification stimulates Trim7 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Trim7 mediates Lys63-linked ubiquitination of the AP-1 coactivator RACO-1, leading to RACO-1 protein stabilisation. Consequently, Trim7 depletion reduces RACO-1 levels and AP-1-dependent gene expression. Moreover, transgenic overexpression of Trim7 increases lung tumour burden in a Ras-driven cancer model, and knockdown of Trim7 in established xenografts reduces tumour growth. Thus, phosphorylation-ubiquitination crosstalk between MSK1, Trim7 and RACO-1 completes the long sought-after mechanism linking growth factor signalling and AP-1 activation. PMID:25851810

  2. Antioxidant-induced changes of the AP-1 transcription complex are paralleled by a selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Rösl, F; Das, B C; Lengert, M; Geletneky, K; zur Hausen, H

    1997-01-01

    Considering the involvement of a redox-regulatory pathway in the expression of human papillomaviruses (HPVs), HPV type 16 (HPV-16)-immortalized human keratinocytes were treated with the antioxidant pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate (PDTC). PDTC induces elevated binding of the transcription factor AP-1 to its cognate recognition site within the viral regulatory region. Despite of increased AP-1 binding, normally indispensable for efficient HPV-16 transcription, viral gene expression was selectively suppressed at the level of initiation of transcription. Electrophoretic mobility supershift assays showed that the composition of the AP-1 complex, predominantly consisting of Jun homodimers in untreated cells, was altered. Irrespective of enhanced c-fos expression, c-jun was phosphorylated and became primarily heterodimerized with fra-1, which was also induced after PDTC incubation. Additionally, there was also an increased complex formation between c-jun and junB. Because both fra-1 and junB overexpression negatively interferes with c-jun/c-fos trans-activation of AP-1-responsive genes, our results suggest that the observed block in viral transcription is mainly the consequence of an antioxidant-induced reconstitution of the AP-1 transcription complex. Since expression of the c-jun/c-fos gene family is tightly regulated during cellular differentiation, defined reorganization of a central viral transcription factor may represent a novel mechanism controlling the transcription of pathogenic HPVs during keratinocyte differentiation and in the progression to cervical cancer. PMID:8985358

  3. Fungal nail infection

    MedlinePlus

    Nails - fungal infection; Onychomycosis; Infection - fungal - nails; Tinea unguium ... hair, nails, and outer skin layers. Common fungal infections include: Athlete's foot Jock itch Ringworm on the ...

  4. Human TMEM174 that is highly expressed in kidney tissue activates AP-1 and promotes cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Pingzhang; Sun, Bo; Hao, Dongxia; Zhang, Xiujun; Shi, Taiping; Ma, Dalong

    2010-04-16

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play an important role in regulation of AP-1 activity through the phosphorylation of distinct substrates. In the present study, we identified a novel protein, TMEM174, whose RNA transcripts are highly expressed in human kidney tissue. TMEM174 is comprised of 243 amino acids, and contains two predicted transmembrane helices which determine its subcellular localization in endoplasmic reticulum and influences its functions. Over-expression of TMME174 enhanced the transcriptional activity of AP-1 and promoted cell proliferation, whereas the truncated mutant TMEM174{Delta}TM without the transmembrane regions did not retain these functions. The possible mechanism of activation of AP-1 by TMEM174 was further examined. Our results suggest the potential role of TMEM174 in renal development and physiological function.

  5. Activation of transcription factor AP-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinases in aniline-induced splenic toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M. Firoze . E-mail: mfkhan@utmb.edu; Kannan, Subburaj; Wang Jianling

    2006-01-15

    Signaling mechanisms in aniline-induced fibrogenic and/or tumorigenic response in the spleen are not known. Previous studies have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron accumulation and oxidative stress in the spleen, which may cause activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors and regulate the transcription of genes involved in fibrosis and/or tumorigenesis. To test this, male SD rats were treated with 0.5 mmol/kg/day aniline via drinking water for 30 days, and activation of transcription factor AP-1 was determined in the splenocyte nuclear extracts (NEs). AP-1 DNA-binding activity in the NEs of freshly isolated splenocytes from aniline-treated rats increased in comparison to the controls, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). AP-1 binding was also determined in the NEs of cultured splenocytes (2 h and 24 h), which showed even a greater increase in binding activity at 2 h. The specificity of AP-1 binding for relevant DNA motifs was confirmed by competition EMSA and by supershift EMSA using antibodies specific to c-Jun and c-Fos. To further explore the signaling mechanisms in the AP-1 activation, phosphorylation patterns of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were pursued. Aniline exposure induced increases in the phosphorylation of the three classes of MAPKs: extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK 1/2), and p38 MAPKs. Furthermore, TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression showed a 3-fold increase in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. These observations suggest a strong association among MAPK phosphorylation, AP-1 activation, and enhanced TGF-{beta}1 gene expression. The observed sequence of events subsequent to aniline exposure could regulate genes that lead to fibrogenic and/or tumorigenic response in the spleen.

  6. Baculovirus p35 gene is oppositely regulated by P53 and AP-1 like factors in Spodoptera frugiperda

    SciTech Connect

    Mohareer, Krishnaveni; Sahdev, Sudhir; Hasnain, Seyed E.

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Baculovirus p35 is regulated by both viral and host factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Baculovirus p35 is negatively regulated by SfP53-like factor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Baculovirus p35 is positively regulated by SfAP-1-like factor. -- Abstract: Baculovirus p35 belongs to the early class of genes of AcMNPV and requires viral factors like Immediate Early protein-1 for its transcription. To investigate the role of host factors in regulating p35 gene expression, the putative transcription factor binding sites were examined in silico and the role of these factors in influencing the transcription of p35 gene was assessed. We focused our studies on AP-1 and P53-like factors, which are activated under oxidative stress conditions. The AP-1 motif is located at -1401 while P53 motif is at -1912 relative to p35 translation start site. The predicted AP-1 and P53 elements formed specific complexes with Spodoptera frugiperda nuclear extracts. Both AP-1 and P53 motif binding proteins were down regulated as a function of AcMNPV infection in Spodoptera cells. To address the question whether during an oxidative outburst, the p35 transcription is enhanced; we investigated the role of these oxidative stress induced host transcription factors in influencing p35 gene transcription. Reporter assays revealed that AP-1 element enhances the transcription of p35 by a factor of two. Interestingly, P53 element appears to repress the transcription of p35 gene.

  7. Apigenin inhibits PMA-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and AP-1 factors in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rajeshwari H; Babu, R L; Naveen Kumar, M; Kiran Kumar, K M; Hegde, Shubha M; Ramesh, Govindarajan T; Chidananda Sharma, S

    2015-05-01

    Acute and chronic alveolar or bronchial inflammation is thought to be central to the pathogenesis of many respiratory disorders. Cytokines and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factors (GM-CSF) play an important role in chronic inflammation. Activator protein-1 (AP-1) the superfamily of transcription factors is involved in proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and transformation including inflammation. Understanding the function and regulation of proinflammatory factors involved in inflammation may provide the novel therapeutic strategies in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Our aim of the present study is to investigate the pro-inflammatory cytokines and pattern of AP-1 factors expressed during activation of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells by Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and to understand the anti-inflammatory effect of apigenin. A549 cells were treated with and without PMA or apigenin, and the cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. Expressions of inflammatory mediators and different AP-1 factors were analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. IL-6 protein secreted was analyzed by ELISA, and expressions of IL-1β, c-Jun, and c-Fos proteins were analyzed by Western blotting. Activation of A549 cells by PMA, induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α) mRNAs and secretion of IL-6 and the expression of specific AP-1 factors (c-Jun, c-Fos, and Fra-1). Treatment of cells with apigenin, significantly inhibited PMA-stimulated mRNA expression of above pro-inflammatory cytokines, AP-1 factors, cyclooxygenase-2, and secretion of IL-6 protein. Results suggested that the AP-1 factors may be involved in inflammation and apigenin has anti-inflammatory effect, which may be useful for therapeutic management of lung inflammatory diseases. PMID:25666088

  8. Omega 3 but not omega 6 fatty acids inhibit AP-1 activity and cell transformation in JB6 cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangming; Bibus, Douglas M.; Bode, Ann M.; Ma, Wei-Ya; Holman, Ralph T.; Dong, Zigang

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiological and animal-based investigations have indicated that the development of skin cancer is in part associated with poor dietary practices. Lipid content and subsequently the derived fatty acid composition of the diet are believed to play a major role in the development of tumorigenesis. Omega 3 (ω3) fatty acids, including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), can effectively reduce the risk of skin cancer whereas omega 6 (ω6) fatty acids such as arachidonic acid (AA) reportedly promote risk. To investigate the effects of fatty acids on tumorigenesis, we performed experiments to examine the effects of the ω3 fatty acids EPA and DHA and of the ω6 fatty acid AA on phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate (TPA)-induced or epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced transcription activator protein 1 (AP-1) transactivation and on the subsequent cellular transformation in a mouse epidermal JB6 cell model. DHA treatment resulted in marked inhibition of TPA- and EGF-induced cell transformation by inhibiting AP-1 transactivation. EPA treatment also inhibited TPA-induced AP-1 transactivation and cell transformation but had no effect on EGF-induced transformation. AA treatment had no effect on either TPA- or EGF-induced AP-1 transactivation or transformation, but did abrogate the inhibitory effects of DHA on TPA- or EGF-induced AP-1 transactivation and cell transformation in a dose-dependent manner. The results of this study demonstrate that the inhibitory effects of ω3 fatty acids on tumorigenesis are more significant for DHA than for EPA and are related to an inhibition of AP-1. Similarly, because AA abrogates the beneficial effects of DHA, the dietary ratio of ω6 to ω3 fatty acids may be a significant factor in mediating tumor development. PMID:11416221

  9. ATP6AP1 deficiency causes an immunodeficiency with hepatopathy, cognitive impairment and abnormal protein glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Eric J R; Timal, Sharita; Ryan, Margret; Ashikov, Angel; van Scherpenzeel, Monique; Graham, Laurie A; Mandel, Hanna; Hoischen, Alexander; Iancu, Theodore C; Raymond, Kimiyo; Steenbergen, Gerry; Gilissen, Christian; Huijben, Karin; van Bakel, Nick H M; Maeda, Yusuke; Rodenburg, Richard J; Adamowicz, Maciej; Crushell, Ellen; Koenen, Hans; Adams, Darius; Vodopiutz, Julia; Greber-Platzer, Susanne; Müller, Thomas; Dueckers, Gregor; Morava, Eva; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Martens, Gerard J M; Wevers, Ron A; Niehues, Tim; Huynen, Martijn A; Veltman, Joris A; Stevens, Tom H; Lefeber, Dirk J

    2016-01-01

    The V-ATPase is the main regulator of intra-organellar acidification. Assembly of this complex has extensively been studied in yeast, while limited knowledge exists for man. We identified 11 male patients with hemizygous missense mutations in ATP6AP1, encoding accessory protein Ac45 of the V-ATPase. Homology detection at the level of sequence profiles indicated Ac45 as the long-sought human homologue of yeast V-ATPase assembly factor Voa1. Processed wild-type Ac45, but not its disease mutants, restored V-ATPase-dependent growth in Voa1 mutant yeast. Patients display an immunodeficiency phenotype associated with hypogammaglobulinemia, hepatopathy and a spectrum of neurocognitive abnormalities. Ac45 in human brain is present as the common, processed ∼40-kDa form, while liver shows a 62-kDa intact protein, and B-cells a 50-kDa isoform. Our work unmasks Ac45 as the functional ortholog of yeast V-ATPase assembly factor Voa1 and reveals a novel link of tissue-specific V-ATPase assembly with immunoglobulin production and cognitive function. PMID:27231034

  10. The transcription factor Ets21C drives tumor growth by cooperating with AP-1

    PubMed Central

    Toggweiler, Janine; Willecke, Maria; Basler, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is driven by genetic alterations that perturb the signaling networks regulating proliferation or cell death. In order to block tumor growth, one has to precisely know how these signaling pathways function and interplay. Here, we identified the transcription factor Ets21C as a pivotal regulator of tumor growth and propose a new model of how Ets21C could affect this process. We demonstrate that a depletion of Ets21C strongly suppressed tumor growth while ectopic expression of Ets21C further increased tumor size. We confirm that Ets21C expression is regulated by the JNK pathway and show that Ets21C acts via a positive feed-forward mechanism to induce a specific set of target genes that is critical for tumor growth. These genes are known downstream targets of the JNK pathway and we demonstrate that their expression not only depends on the transcription factor AP-1, but also on Ets21C suggesting a cooperative transcriptional activation mechanism. Taken together we show that Ets21C is a crucial player in regulating the transcriptional program of the JNK pathway and enhances our understanding of the mechanisms that govern neoplastic growth. PMID:27713480

  11. ATP6AP1 deficiency causes an immunodeficiency with hepatopathy, cognitive impairment and abnormal protein glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Eric J. R.; Timal, Sharita; Ryan, Margret; Ashikov, Angel; van Scherpenzeel, Monique; Graham, Laurie A.; Mandel, Hanna; Hoischen, Alexander; Iancu, Theodore C.; Raymond, Kimiyo; Steenbergen, Gerry; Gilissen, Christian; Huijben, Karin; van Bakel, Nick H. M.; Maeda, Yusuke; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Adamowicz, Maciej; Crushell, Ellen; Koenen, Hans; Adams, Darius; Vodopiutz, Julia; Greber-Platzer, Susanne; Müller, Thomas; Dueckers, Gregor; Morava, Eva; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Martens, Gerard J. M.; Wevers, Ron A.; Niehues, Tim; Huynen, Martijn A.; Veltman, Joris A.; Stevens, Tom H.; Lefeber, Dirk J.

    2016-01-01

    The V-ATPase is the main regulator of intra-organellar acidification. Assembly of this complex has extensively been studied in yeast, while limited knowledge exists for man. We identified 11 male patients with hemizygous missense mutations in ATP6AP1, encoding accessory protein Ac45 of the V-ATPase. Homology detection at the level of sequence profiles indicated Ac45 as the long-sought human homologue of yeast V-ATPase assembly factor Voa1. Processed wild-type Ac45, but not its disease mutants, restored V-ATPase-dependent growth in Voa1 mutant yeast. Patients display an immunodeficiency phenotype associated with hypogammaglobulinemia, hepatopathy and a spectrum of neurocognitive abnormalities. Ac45 in human brain is present as the common, processed ∼40-kDa form, while liver shows a 62-kDa intact protein, and B-cells a 50-kDa isoform. Our work unmasks Ac45 as the functional ortholog of yeast V-ATPase assembly factor Voa1 and reveals a novel link of tissue-specific V-ATPase assembly with immunoglobulin production and cognitive function. PMID:27231034

  12. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K.; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)] in vitro and in vivo and that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation. PMID:26711267

  13. The AP-1 family member FOS blocks transcriptional activity of the nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Sirianni, Rosa; Nogueira, Edson; Bassett, Mary H.; Carr, Bruce R.; Suzuki, Takashi; Pezzi, Vincenzo; Andò, Sebastiano; Rainey, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Steroid production in the adrenal zona glomerulosa is under the control of angiotensin II (Ang II), which, upon binding to its receptor, activates protein kinase C (PKC) within these cells. PKC is a potent inhibitor of the steroidogenic enzyme CYP17. We have demonstrated that, in the ovary, PKC activates expression of FOS, a member of the AP-1 family, and increased expression of this gene is linked to CYP17 downregulation. However, the pathway and the molecular mechanism responsible for the inhibitory effect of PKC on CYP17 expression are not defined. Herein, we demonstrated that Ang II inhibited CYP17 through PKC and ERK1/2-activated FOS and that blocking FOS expression decreased PKC-mediated inhibition. Although CYP17 transcription was activated by the nuclear receptor SF-1, expression of FOS resulted in a decrease in SF-1-mediated gene transcription. FOS physically interacted with the hinge region of SF-1 and modulated its transactivity, thus preventing binding of cofactors such as SRC1 and CBP, which were necessary to fully activate CYP17 transcription. Collectively, these results indicate a new regulatory mechanism for SF-1 transcriptional activity that might influence adrenal zone-specific expression of CYP17, a mechanism that can potentially be applied to other steroidogenic tissues. PMID:20980388

  14. Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... it, you'll be saying bye-bye to fungi (say: FUN-guy). What Is a Fungal Infection? Fungi , the word for more than one fungus, can ... but of course, they're not!). Because the fungi that cause tinea (ringworm) live on different parts ...

  15. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression. PMID:26323318

  16. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    SciTech Connect

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-08-31

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Finally, our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression.

  17. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Parplys, Ann C; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G; Leung, Stanley G; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-11-16

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression. PMID:26323318

  18. Identification and characterization of Ref-1, a nuclear protein that facilitates AP-1 DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Xanthoudakis, S; Curran, T

    1992-01-01

    Fos and Jun form a heterodimeric complex that regulates gene transcription by binding to the activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA sequence motif. Previously, we demonstrated that the DNA-binding activity of Fos and Jun is regulated in vitro by a novel redox (reduction-oxidation) mechanism. Reduction of a conserved cysteine (cys) residue in the DNA-binding domains of Fos and Jun by chemical reducing agents or by a nuclear redox factor stimulates DNA-binding activity. Here, we describe purification and characterization of a 37 kDa protein (Ref-1) corresponding to the redox factor. Although Ref-1 does not bind to the AP-1 site in association with Fos and Jun, it partially copurifies with a subset of AP-1 proteins. Purified Ref-1 protein stimulates AP-1 DNA-binding activity through the conserved Cys residues in Fos and Jun, but it does not alter the DNA-binding specificity of Fos and Jun. Ref-1 may represent a novel redox component of the signal transduction processes that regulate eukaryotic gene expression. Images PMID:1537340

  19. The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex modulates peripheral T cell activation and proliferation by controlling AP-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Min; Lee, Changjin; Lee, Sung Kyu; Kim, Jieun; Seong, Rho Hyun

    2010-01-22

    The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex has been implicated in the activation and proliferation of T cells. After T cell receptor signaling, the SWI/SNF complex rapidly associates with chromatin and controls gene expression in T cells. However, the process by which the SWI/SNF complex regulates peripheral T cell activation has not been elucidated. In this study, we show that the SWI/SNF complex regulates cytokine production and proliferation of T cells. During T cell activation, the SWI/SNF complex is recruited to the promoter of the transcription factor AP-1, and it increases the expression of AP-1. Increased expression of the SWI/SNF complex resulted in enhanced AP-1 activity, cytokine production, and proliferation of peripheral T cells, whereas knockdown of the SWI/SNF complex expression impaired the AP-1 expression and reduced the activation and proliferation of T cells. Moreover, mice that constitutively expressed the SWI/SNF complex in T cells were much more susceptible to experimentally induced autoimmune encephalomyelitis than the normal mice were. These results suggest that the SWI/SNF complex plays a critical role during T cell activation and subsequent immune responses.

  20. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    DOE PAGES

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; et al

    2015-08-31

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintainingmore » wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Finally, our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression.« less

  1. Heparin (GAG-hed) inhibits LCR activity of Human Papillomavirus type 18 by decreasing AP1 binding

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Rita; Morales-Peza, Néstor; Castelán-Sánchez, Irma; García-Villa, Enrique; Tapia, Rocio; Cid-Arregui, Ángel; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; López-Bayghen, Esther; Gariglio, Patricio

    2006-01-01

    Background High risk HPVs are causative agents of anogenital cancers. Viral E6 and E7 genes are continuously expressed and are largely responsible for the oncogenic activity of these viruses. Transcription of the E6 and E7 genes is controlled by the viral Long Control Region (LCR), plus several cellular transcription factors including AP1 and the viral protein E2. Within the LCR, the binding and activity of the transcription factor AP1 represents a key regulatory event in maintaining E6/E7 gene expression and uncontrolled cell proliferation. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as heparin, can inhibit tumour growth; they have also shown antiviral effects and inhibition of AP1 transcriptional activity. The purpose of this study was to test the heparinoid GAG-hed, as a possible antiviral and antitumoral agent in an HPV18 positive HeLa cell line. Methods Using in vivo and in vitro approaches we tested GAG-hed effects on HeLa tumour cell growth, cell proliferation and on the expression of HPV18 E6/E7 oncogenes. GAG-hed effects on AP1 binding to HPV18-LCR-DNA were tested by EMSA. Results We were able to record the antitumoral effect of GAG-hed in vivo by using as a model tumours induced by injection of HeLa cells into athymic female mice. The antiviral effect of GAG-hed resulted in the inhibition of LCR activity and, consequently, the inhibition of E6 and E7 transcription. A specific diminishing of cell proliferation rates was observed in HeLa but not in HPV-free colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. Treated HeLa cells did not undergo apoptosis but the percentage of cells in G2/M phase of the cell cycle was increased. We also detected that GAG-hed prevents the binding of the transcription factor AP1 to the LCR. Conclusion Direct interaction of GAG-hed with the components of the AP1 complex and subsequent interference with its ability to correctly bind specific sites within the viral LCR may contribute to the inhibition of E6/E7 transcription and cell proliferation. Our data

  2. Simian virus 40 small t antigen cooperates with mitogen-activated kinases to stimulate AP-1 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Frost, J A; Alberts, A S; Sontag, E; Guan, K; Mumby, M C; Feramisco, J R

    1994-01-01

    The simian virus 40 small tumor antigen (small t) specifically interacts with protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) in vivo and alters its catalytic activity in vitro. Among the substrates for PP2A in vitro are the activated forms of MEK and ERK kinases. Dephosphorylation of the activating phosphorylation sites on MEK and ERKs by PP2A in vitro results in a decrease in their respective kinase activities. Recently, it has been shown that overexpression of small t in CV-1 cells results in an inhibition of PP2A activity toward MEK and ERK2 and a constitutive upregulation of MEK and ERK2 activity. Previously, we have observed that overexpression of either ERK1, MEK1, or a constitutively active truncated form of c-Raf-1 (BXB) is insufficient to activate AP-1 in REF52 fibroblasts. We therefore examined whether overexpression of small t either alone or in conjunction with ERK1, MEK1, or BXB could activate AP-1. We found that coexpression of small t and either ERK1, MEK1, or BXB resulted in an increase in AP-1 activity, whereas expression of either small t or any of the kinases alone did not have any effect. Similarly, coexpression of small t and ERK1 activated serum response element-regulated promoters. Coexpression of kinase-deficient mutants of ERK1 and ERK2 inhibited the activation of AP-1 caused by expression of small t and either MEK1 or BXB. Coexpression of an interfering MEK, which inhibited AP-1 activation by small t and BXB, did not inhibit the activation of AP-1 caused by small t and ERK1. In contrast to REF52 cells, we observed that overexpression of either small or ERK1 alone in CV-1 cells was sufficient to stimulate AP-1 activity and that this stimulation was not enhanced by expression of small t and ERK1 together. These results show that the effects of small t on immediate-early gene expression depend on the cell type examined and suggest that the mitogen-activated protein kinase activation pathway is distinctly regulated in different cell types. Images PMID

  3. Regulation of osteosarcoma cell lung metastasis by the c-Fos/AP-1 target FGFR1

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, Daniel; Zandueta, Carolina; Perurena, Naiara; Thomas, David P; Sunters, Andrew; Vuillier, Céline; Bozec, Aline; El-Emir, Ethaar; Miletich, Isabelle; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Lecanda, Fernando; Grigoriadis, Agamemnon E

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of the skeleton and is prevalent in children and adolescents. Survival rates are poor and have remained stagnant due to chemoresistance and the high propensity to form lung metastases. In this study, we used in vivo transgenic models of c-fos oncogene-induced osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma in addition to c-Fos-inducible systems in vitro to investigate downstream signaling pathways that regulate osteosarcoma growth and metastasis. Fgfr1 was identified as a novel c-Fos/AP-1 regulated gene. Induction of c-Fos in vitro in osteoblasts and chondroblasts caused an increase in Fgfr1 RNA and FGFR1 protein expression levels that resulted in increased and sustained activation of MAPKs, morphological transformation and increased anchorage-independent growth in response to FGF2 ligand treatment. High levels of FGFR1 protein and activated pFRS2α signalling were observed in murine and human osteosarcomas. Pharmacological inhibition of FGFR1 signalling blocked MAPK activation and colony growth of osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Orthotopic injection in vivo of FGFR1 silenced osteosarcoma cells caused a marked 2- to 5-fold decrease in spontaneous lung metastases. Similarly, inhibition of FGFR signalling in vivo with the small molecule inhibitor AZD4547 markedly reduced the number and size of metastatic nodules. Thus, deregulated FGFR signalling plays an important role in osteoblast transformation and osteosarcoma formation and regulates the development of lung metastases. Our findings support the development of anti-FGFR inhibitors as potential antimetastatic therapy. PMID:26387545

  4. Intracellular pathways linking hypoxia to activation of c-fos and AP-1.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, D R; Adhikary, G; Overholt, J L; Simonson, M S; Cherniack, N S; Prabhakar, N R

    2000-01-01

    Organisms respond to hypoxia through detection of blood oxygen levels by sensors at peripheral chemoreceptors and by receptors in certain key cells of the body. The pathways over which peripheral chemoreceptor signals are transmitted to respiratory muscles are well established. However, the intracellular pathways that transmit hypoxic stimulus to gene activation are just being identified. Using anti-sense c-fos strategy, we have shown that c-fos is essential for the activation of activator protein-1 transcription factor complex (AP-1) and subsequent stimulation of downstream genes such as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; Mishra et al. 1998). The purpose of the present study was to identify intracellular pathways that link hypoxia to activation of c-fos. The results of the present study show that hypoxia causes Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage gated Ca2+ channels and that hypoxia-induced c-fos gene expression is Ca2+/calmodulin dependent. We also demonstrate that hypoxia activates the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38, but not JNK. Further, phosphorylation of ERK is essential for c-fos activation via SRE cis-element. Further characterization of nuclear signalling pathways provides evidence for the involvement of Src, a non receptor protein tyrosine kinase, and Ras, a small G protein, in the hypoxia-induced c-fos gene expression. These results suggest a possible role for non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases in propagating signals from G-protein coupled receptors to the activation of immediate early genes such as c-fos during hypoxia.

  5. Transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq reveals AP-1 pathway as key regulator that green tea may rely on to inhibit lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing; Zhang, Qi; Xiong, Donghai; Vedell, Peter; Yan, Ying; Jiang, Hui; Cui, Peng; Ding, Feng; Tichelaar, Jay W; Wang, Yian; Lubet, Ronald A; You, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Green tea is a promising chemopreventive agent for lung cancer. Multiple signaling events have been reported, however, the relative importance of these mechanisms in mediating the chemopreventive function of green tea is unclear. In the present study, to examine the involvement of AP-1 in green tea polyphenols induced tumor inhibition, human NSCLC cell line H1299 and mouse SPON 10 cells were identified as AP-1 dependent, as these two lines exhibit high constitutive AP-1 activity, and when TAM67 expression was induced with doxycycline, cell growth was inhibited and correlated with suppressed AP-1 activity. RNA-seq was used to determine the global transcriptional effects of AP-1 inhibition and also uncover the possible involvement of AP-1 in tea polyphenols induced chemoprevention. TAM67 mediated changes in gene expression were identified, and within down-regulated genes, AP-1 was identified as a key transcription regulator. RNA-seq analysis revealed that Polyphenon E-treated cells shared 293 commonly down-regulated genes within TAM67 expressing H1299 cells, and by analysis of limited Chip-seq data, over 10% of the down-regulated genes contain a direct AP-1 binding site, indicating that Polyphenon E elicits chemopreventive activity by regulating AP-1 target genes. Conditional TAM67 expressing transgenic mice and NSCLC cell lines were used to further confirm that the chemopreventive activity of green tea is AP-1 dependent. Polyphenon E lost its chempreventive function both in vitro and in vivo when AP-1 was inhibited, indicating that AP-1 inhibition is a major pathway through which green tea exhibits chemopreventive effects.

  6. bZIP transcription factor CgAP1 is essential for oxidative stress tolerance and full virulence of the poplar anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingjiao; Wang, Yonglin; Tian, Chengming

    2016-10-01

    Yeast AP1 transcription factor is a regulator of oxidative stress response. Here, we report the identification and characterization of CgAP1, an ortholog of YAP1 in poplar anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. The expression of CgAP1 was highly induced by reactive oxygen species. CgAP1 deletion mutants displayed enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress compared with the wild-type strain, and their poplar leaf virulence was obviously reduced. However, the mutants exhibited no obvious defects in aerial hyphal growth, conidia production, and appressoria formation. CgAP1::eGFP fusion protein localized to the nucleus after TBH (tert-Butyl hydroperoxide) treatment, suggesting that CgAP1 functions as a redox sensor in C. gloeosporioides. In addition, CgAP1 prevented the accumulation of ROS during early stages of biotrophic growth. CgAP1 also acted as a positive regulator of several ROS-related genes (i.e., Glr1, Hyr1, and Cyt1) involved in the antioxidative response. These results highlight the key regulatory role of CgAP1 transcription factor in oxidative stress response and provide insights into the function of ROS detoxification in virulence of C. gloeosporioides. PMID:27544415

  7. Fungal keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Sonal S

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: What is the most appropriate management of fungal keratitis? Results: Traditionally, topical Natamycin is the most commonly used medication for filamentous fungi while Amphotericin B is most commonly used for yeast. Voriconazole is rapidly becoming the drug of choice for all fungal keratitis because of its wide spectrum of coverage and increased penetration into the cornea. Implementation: Repeated debridement of the ulcer is recommended for the penetration of topical medications. While small, peripheral ulcers may be treated in the community, larger or central ulcers, especially if associated with signs suggestive of anterior chamber penetration should be referred to a tertiary center. Prolonged therapy for approximately four weeks is usually necessary. PMID:21468333

  8. Fungal Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Kozel, Thomas R.; Wickes, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis of fungal infection is critical to effective treatment. There are many impediments to diagnosis such as a diminishing number of clinical mycologists, cost, time to result, and requirements for sensitivity and specificity. In addition, fungal diagnostics must meet the contrasting needs presented by the increasing diversity of fungi found in association with the use of immunosuppressive agents in countries with high levels of medical care and the need for diagnostics in resource-limited countries where large numbers of opportunistic infections occur in patients with AIDS. Traditional approaches to diagnosis include direct microscopic examination of clinical samples, histopathology, culture, and serology. Emerging technologies include molecular diagnostics and antigen detection in clinical samples. Innovative new technologies that use molecular and immunoassay platforms have the potential to meet the needs of both resource-rich and resource-limited clinical environments. PMID:24692193

  9. Tip-surface interactions at redox responsive poly(ferrocenylsilane) (PFS) interface by AFM-based force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hong Jing; Song, Jing; Vancso, G. Julius

    2009-05-01

    Poly(ferrocenylsilanes) (PFS) belong to the class of redox responsive organometallic polymers. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was used earlier to study single chain PFS response and redox energy driven single chain PFS molecular motors. Here we present further AFM investigations of force interactions between tip and a grafted PFS surface under potential control in electrochemical redox cycles. Typical tip-Au interaction is considered as reference in the force measurements. First the electrostatic component in the diffused double layer (DL) in NaClO 4 electrolyte environment was considered for a "grafted to" PFS, which dominated the interplay between the tip and sample surface. The DL forces can also hinder the physisorption of PFS chain onto the tip when the voltage was applied at -0.1 V. On the other hand, if the tip contacted the PFS surface prior to the electrochemical process, physisorption of PFS chains governed the overall interaction regardless of subsequently applied surface potential. In addition, prolonged contact time, tc, may also contribute to the stability of tip-PFS bridging and detection of electrostatic forces between the tip-PFS interface. The results showed that tip-substrate interaction forces without PFS grafts have negligibly small force contributions under similar, electrochemically controlled, conditions used in single PFS chain based molecular motors.

  10. A redox-responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticle capped with amphiphilic peptides by self-assembly for cancer targeting drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dong; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Ma, Ning; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-06-14

    A redox-responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticle (RRMSN) was developed as a drug nanocarrier by noncovalent functionalization of MSNs with amphiphilic peptides containing the RGD ligand. The alkyl chain stearic acid (C18) with a thiol terminal group was anchored on the surface of MSNs via a disulfide bond, and the amphiphilic peptide (AP) C18-DSDSDSDSRGDS was coated by self-assembly through hydrophobic interactions between the octadecyl groups of MSNs and alkyl chains of AP, which played the role of a gatekeeper collectively. In vitro drug release profiles demonstrated that the anticancer drug (DOX) could be entrapped with nearly no leakage in the absence of dithiothreitol (DTT) or glutathione (GSH). With the addition of DTT or GSH, the entrapped drug released quickly due to the cleavage of the disulfide bond. It was found that after the internalization of MSNs by cancer cells via the receptor-mediated endocytosis, the surface amphiphilic peptides and alkyl chain of RRMSN/DOX were removed to induce rapid drug release intracellularly after the cleavage of the disulfide bond, triggered by GSH secreted in cancer cells. This novel intelligent RRMSN/DOX drug delivery system using self-assembly of amphiphilic peptides around the MSNs provides a facile, but effective strategy for the design and development of smart drug delivery for cancer therapy.

  11. Effects of phosphate neutralization on the shape of the AP-1 transcription factor binding site in duplex DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Tomky, L A; Strauss-Soukup, J K; Maher, L J

    1998-01-01

    Previous electrophoretic experiments suggest that the AP-1 site in duplex DNA bends in response to the pattern of amino acid charges distal to the basic region in bound bZIP proteins. The extent and direction of apparent DNA bending are consistent with the prediction that DNA will collapse locally upon asymmetric phosphate charge neutralization. To prove that asymmetric phosphate neutralization could produce the observed degree of DNA bending, the present experiments partially substitute anionic phosphate diesters in the AP-1 site with various numbers of neutral methylphosphonate linkages. DNA bending is induced toward the neutralized face of DNA. The degree of DNA bending induced by methylphosphonate substitution (approximately 3.5 degrees per neutralized phosphate) is comparable to that induced by GCN4 variants carrying increasing numbers of additional basic amino acids. It is plausible, therefore, that asymmetric phosphate neutralization is the cause of DNA bending in such complexes. PMID:9580678

  12. Interplay between AP-1 and estrogen receptor α in regulating gene expression and proliferation networks in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Qiao, Yichun; Jonsson, Philip; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Williams, Cecilia; Zhao, Chunyan

    2012-09-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that plays an important role in breast cancer. Estrogen-dependent gene regulation by ERα can be mediated by interaction with other DNA-binding proteins, such as activator protein-1 (AP-1). The nature of such interactions in mediating the estrogen response in breast cancer cells remains unclear. Here we show that knockdown of c-Fos, a component of the transcription factor AP-1, attenuates the expression of 37% of all estrogen-regulated genes, suggesting that c-Fos is a fundamental factor for ERα-mediated transcription. Additionally, knockdown of c-Fos affected the expression of a number of genes that were not regulated by estrogen. Pathway analysis reveals that silencing of c-Fos downregulates an E2F1-dependent proproliferative gene network. Thus, modulation of the E2F1 pathway by c-Fos represents a novel mechanism by which c-Fos enhances breast cancer cell proliferation. Furthermore, we show that c-Fos and ERα can cooperate in regulating E2F1 gene expression by binding to regulatory elements in the E2F1 promoter. To start to dissect the molecular details of the cross talk between AP-1 and estrogen signaling, we identify a novel ERα/AP-1 target, PKIB (cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor-β), which is overexpressed in ERα-positive breast cancer tissues. Knockdown of PKIB results in robust growth suppression of breast cancer cells. Collectively, our findings support c-Fos as a critical factor that governs estrogen-dependent gene expression and breast cancer proliferation programs.

  13. DEP-induced fra-1 expression correlates with a distinct activation of AP-1-dependent gene transcription in the lung.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Kleeberger, Steven R; Reddy, Sekhar P

    2004-02-01

    Recent studies indicate a potential role for Fra-1, a heterodimeric partner of activator protein (AP)-1, in toxicant-induced epithelial injury, repair, and cellular transformation. Here we have investigated the effects of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on fra-1 expression in C10 cells, a murine lung epithelial cell line. DEP markedly upregulated fra-1, but not fra-2, expression. The increase in fra-1 mRNA expression correlated well with its protein- and DNA-binding activity. DNA-binding assays also revealed a predominant presence of Jun-B and Jun-D in the AP-1 complex. Interestingly, DEP did not alter Jun-B and Jun-D protein levels. Transcriptional analysis revealed that fra-1 induction is regulated in part at the transcriptional level. The -379 to +32 bp 5'-flanking region mediated this induction. Furthermore, inhibitors of ERK1/2, JNK1, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) significantly suppressed DEP-stimulated fra-1 transcription, suggesting their involvement in the induction process. Consistent with this finding, DEP stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK1, and p38 MAPKs with a distinct activation pattern. Overexpression of Fra-1 downregulated c-Jun and Nrf2 enhanced AP-1- and ARE-mediated reporter gene expression, respectively. In contrast, Fra-1 had the opposite effect on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 promoter activity. In particular, it bound to the functional AP-1 site of the MMP-9 promoter after DEP stimulation. Consistent with this result, DEP also markedly upregulated MMP-9 promoter activity. Collectively, these findings suggest that fra-1 induction by DEP may play a role in selectively regulating gene expression involved in alveolar epithelial cell injury and repair. PMID:14565943

  14. ACHT4-driven oxidation of APS1 attenuates starch synthesis under low light intensity in Arabidopsis plants

    PubMed Central

    Eliyahu, Erez; Rog, Ido; Inbal, Dangoor; Danon, Avihai

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms that use signals of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) could be obscured by ROS produced under stress and thus are better investigated under homeostatic conditions. Previous studies showed that the chloroplastic atypical thioredoxin ACHT1 is oxidized by 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx) in Arabidopsis plants illuminated with growth light and in turn transmits a disulfide-based signal via yet unknown target proteins in a feedback regulation of photosynthesis. Here, we studied the role of a second chloroplastic paralog, ACHT4, in plants subjected to low light conditions. Likewise, ACHT4 reacted in planta with 2-Cys Prx, indicating that it is oxidized by a similar disulfide exchange reaction. ACHT4 further reacted uniquely with the small subunit (APS1) of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), the first committed enzyme of the starch synthesis pathway, suggesting that it transfers the disulfides it receives from 2-Cys Prx to APS1 and turns off AGPase. In accordance, ACHT4 participated in an oxidative signal that quenched AGPase activity during the diurnal transition from day to night, and also in an attenuating oxidative signal of AGPase in a dynamic response to small fluctuations in light intensity during the day. Increasing the level of expressed ACHT4 or of ACHT4ΔC, a C terminus-deleted form that does not react with APS1, correspondingly decreased or increased the level of reduced APS1 and decreased or increased transitory starch content. These findings imply that oxidative control mechanisms act in concert with reductive signals to fine tune starch synthesis during daily homeostatic conditions. PMID:26424450

  15. Relationship between apoptosis and the cell cycle in lymphocytes: roles of protein kinase C, tyrosine phosphorylation, and AP1.

    PubMed

    Walker, P R; Kwast-Welfeld, J; Gourdeau, H; Leblanc, J; Neugebauer, W; Sikorska, M

    1993-07-01

    The mechanism of switching between the cell cycle and active cell death (apoptosis) was investigated in cytokine-dependent CTLL cells. These cells proliferate in the presence of interleukin 2 (IL2), but accumulate in early G1 and undergo apoptosis in its absence. In the absence of IL2 the cells also become sensitive to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis. Using specific inhibitors of protein kinase C and tyrosine kinases we established that two signals are required to fully repress cell death and stimulate G1 progression. One of these signals activates protein kinase C (PKC) which represses cell death and the other activates a tyrosine kinase which confers glucocorticoid resistance and permits cell cycle progression. Thus, phorbol esters can activate PKC and maintain cell viability in the absence of IL2, but the cells cannot proliferate. Moreover, the cells remain sensitive to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis unless the tyrosine kinase-mediated signal is also given. There is a correlation between the presence of AP1 DNA-binding activity and the repression of the cell death pathway. The c-jun gene is expressed constitutively and both IL2 and phorbol esters induce the expression of c-fos to generate a functional AP1 capable of repressing cell death. However, only interleukin 2 can initiate the tyrosine kinase-mediated modification that confers dexamethasone resistance and permits G1 progression. In the absence of IL2 glucocorticoids stimulate AP1 degradation and induce apoptosis.

  16. The NPM-ALK tyrosine kinase mimics TCR signalling pathways, inducing NFAT and AP-1 by RAS-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Turner, Suzanne D; Yeung, Debra; Hadfield, Kathryn; Cook, Simon J; Alexander, Denis R

    2007-04-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) expression is associated with the lymphoid malignancy anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and results from a t(2;5) chromosomal translocation. We show that NPM-ALK induces Ras activation and phosphorylation of the ERK MAP Kinase consistent with activation of the Ras-MAP Kinase pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activation of Ras is necessary for inducing transcription via NFAT/AP-1 composite transcriptional binding sites. This activity is dependent on NPM-ALK forming complexes with proteins that bind to autophosphorylated tyrosine residues at positions 156, 567 and 664, associated with binding to IRS-1, Shc and PLCgamma, respectively. Specifically, NPM-ALK activates transcription from the TRE promoter element, an AP-1 binding region, an activity dependent on both Ras and Shc activity. Our results show that NPM-ALK mimics activated T-cell receptor signalling by inducing pathways associated with the activation of NFAT/AP-1 transcription factors that bind to promoter elements found in a broad array of cytokine genes.

  17. Characterization of CRTAM gene promoter: AP-1 transcription factor control its expression in human T CD8 lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Valle-Rios, Ricardo; Patiño-Lopez, Genaro; Medina-Contreras, Oscar; Canche-Pool, Elsy; Recillas-Targa, Felix; Lopez-Bayghen, Esther; Zlotnik, Albert; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2009-10-01

    Class-I MHC-restricted T-cell associated molecule (CRTAM) is a member of the Nectin-like adhesion molecule family. It is rapidly induced in NK, NKT and CD8(+) T cells. Interaction with its ligand Nectin-like 2 results in increased secretion of IFN-gamma by activated CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Through sequential bioinformatic analyses of the upstream region of the human CRTAM gene, we detected cis-elements potentially important for CRTAM gene transcription. Analyzing 2kb upstream from the ATG translation codon by mutation analysis in conjunction with luciferase reporter assays, electrophoretic mobility shify assay (EMSA) and supershift assays, we identified an AP-1 binding site, located at 1.4kb from the ATG translation codon of CRTAM gene as an essential element for CRTAM expression in activated but not resting human CD8(+) T cells. CRTAM expression was reduced in activated CD8(+) T cells treated with the JNK inhibitor SP600125, indicating that CRTAM expression is driven by the JNK-AP-1 signaling pathway. This study represents the first CRTAM gene promoter analysis in human T cells and indicates that AP-1 is a positive transcriptional regulator of this gene, a likely important finding because CRTAM has recently been shown to play a role in IFN-gamma and IL-17 production and T cell proliferation.

  18. The alternate AP-1 adaptor subunit Apm2 interacts with the Mil1 regulatory protein and confers differential cargo sorting

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Shawn T.; Burston, Helen E.; Bean, Björn D. M.; Raghuram, Nandini; Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Davey, Michael; Wendland, Beverly; Conibear, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Heterotetrameric adaptor protein complexes are important mediators of cargo protein sorting in clathrin-coated vesicles. The cell type–specific expression of alternate μ chains creates distinct forms of AP-1 with altered cargo sorting, but how these subunits confer differential function is unclear. Whereas some studies suggest the μ subunits specify localization to different cellular compartments, others find that the two forms of AP-1 are present in the same vesicle but recognize different cargo. Yeast have two forms of AP-1, which differ only in the μ chain. Here we show that the variant μ chain Apm2 confers distinct cargo-sorting functions. Loss of Apm2, but not of Apm1, increases cell surface levels of the v-SNARE Snc1. However, Apm2 is unable to replace Apm1 in sorting Chs3, which requires a dileucine motif recognized by the γ/σ subunits common to both complexes. Apm2 and Apm1 colocalize at Golgi/early endosomes, suggesting that they do not associate with distinct compartments. We identified a novel, conserved regulatory protein that is required for Apm2-dependent sorting events. Mil1 is a predicted lipase that binds Apm2 but not Apm1 and contributes to its membrane recruitment. Interactions with specific regulatory factors may provide a general mechanism to diversify the functional repertoire of clathrin adaptor complexes. PMID:26658609

  19. Scorpion Venom Heat-Resistant Peptide Attenuates Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Expression via c-Jun/AP-1.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhen; Wu, Xue-Fei; Peng, Yan; Zhang, Rui; Li, Na; Yang, Jin-Yi; Zhang, Shu-Qin; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Zhao, Jie; Li, Shao

    2015-11-01

    Scorpion venom has been used in the Orient to treat central nervous system diseases for many years, and the protein/peptide toxins in Buthus martensii Karsch (BmK) venom are believed to be the effective components. Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) is an active component of the scorpion venom extracted from BmK. In a previous study, we found that SVHRP could inhibit the formation of a glial scar, which is characterized by enhanced glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, in the epileptic hippocampus. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain to be clarified. The results of the present study indicate that endogenous GFAP expression in primary rat astrocytes was attenuated by SVHRP. We further demonstrate that the suppression of GFAP was primarily mediated by inhibiting both c-Jun expression and its binding with AP-1 DNA binding site and other factors at the GFAP promoter. These results support that SVHRP contributes to reducing GFAP at least in part by decreasing the activity of the transcription factor AP-1. In conclusion, the effects of SVHRP on astrocytes with respect to the c-Jun/AP-1 signaling pathway in vitro provide a practical basis for studying astrocyte activation and inhibition and a scientific basis for further studies of traditional medicine.

  20. AP-1 and AP-3 mediate sorting of melanosomal and lysosomal membrane proteins into distinct post-Golgi trafficking pathways.

    PubMed

    Chapuy, Björn; Tikkanen, Ritva; Mühlhausen, Chris; Wenzel, Dirk; von Figura, Kurt; Höning, Stefan

    2008-07-01

    The adaptor complexes AP-1 and AP-3 are localized to endosomes and/or the trans Golgi network (TGN). Because of limitations in analysing intracellular adaptor function directly, their site of function is a matter of ongoing uncertainty. To overcome this problem and to analyse adaptor sorting at the TGN, we reconstituted vesicle formation from Golgi/TGN-enriched membranes in a novel in vitro budding assay. Melanocytes were metabolically labelled followed by a 19 degrees C temperature block to accumulate newly synthesized proteins in Golgi membranes, which were then enriched by subcellular fractionation and used as donor membranes for vesicle formation in vitro. The incorporation of the melanosomal proteins tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP-1) as well as Lamp-1 and 46 kDa mannose-6-phosphate receptor (MPR46) into Golgi/TGN-derived vesicles was temperature, nucleotide, cytosol, ADP ribosylation factor 1 and adaptor dependent. We show that sorting of TRP-1 and MPR46 was AP-1 dependent, while budding of tyrosinase and Lamp-1 required AP-3. Depletion of clathrin inhibited sorting of all four cargo proteins, suggesting that AP-1 and AP-3 are involved in the formation of distinct types of clathrin-coated vesicles, each of which is characterized by the incorporation of specific cargo membrane proteins.

  1. Basolateral sorting of chloride channel 2 is mediated by interactions between a dileucine motif and the clathrin adaptor AP-1

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente-Ortega, Erwin; Gravotta, Diego; Bay, Andres Perez; Benedicto, Ignacio; Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria; Lehmann, Guillermo L.; Lagos, Carlos F.; Rodríguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the many key cellular functions of chloride channels, the mechanisms that mediate their subcellular localization are largely unknown. ClC-2 is a ubiquitous chloride channel usually localized to the basolateral domain of epithelia that regulates cell volume, ion transport, and acid–base balance; mice knocked out for ClC-2 are blind and sterile. Previous work suggested that CLC-2 is sorted basolaterally by TIFS812LL, a dileucine motif in CLC-2's C-terminal domain. However, our in silico modeling of ClC-2 suggested that this motif was buried within the channel's dimerization interface and identified two cytoplasmically exposed dileucine motifs, ESMI623LL and QVVA635LL, as candidate sorting signals. Alanine mutagenesis and trafficking assays support a scenario in which ESMI623LL acts as the authentic basolateral signal of ClC-2. Silencing experiments and yeast three-hybrid assays demonstrated that both ubiquitous (AP-1A) and epithelium-specific (AP-1B) forms of the tetrameric clathrin adaptor AP-1 are capable of carrying out basolateral sorting of ClC-2 through interactions of ESMI623LL with a highly conserved pocket in their γ1-σ1A hemicomplex. PMID:25739457

  2. Cdk3-promoted epithelial-mesenchymal transition through activating AP-1 is involved in colorectal cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Na; Li, Yuejin; Peng, Zhengke; Lu, Chengrong; Dong, Zigang; Tang, Faqing

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase-3 (Cdk3) is a positive regulator of the G1 mammalian cell cycle phase. Cdk3 is involved in cancer progression, but very little is known about its mechanism in cancer development and progression. Herein, we found that Cdk3 increased colorectal cancer metastasis through promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) shift. Cdk3 was found to highly express in metastatic cancer and induce cell motility and invasion. Cdk3 was shown to phosphorylate c-Jun at Ser 63 and Ser 73 in vitro and ex vivo. Cdk3-phosphorylated c-Jun at Ser 63 and Ser 73 resulted in an increased AP-1 activity. Ectopic expression of Cdk3 promoted colorectal cancer from epithelial to mesenchymal transition conjugating AP-1 activation, while AP-1 inhibition dramatically decreased Cdk3-increased EMT shift. These results showed that the Cdk3/c-Jun signaling axis mediating epithelial-mesenchymal transition plays an important role in colorectal cancer metastasis. PMID:26755651

  3. Maf nuclear oncoprotein recognizes sequences related to an AP-1 site and forms heterodimers with both Fos and Jun.

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, K; Noda, M; Nishizawa, M

    1994-01-01

    The v-maf oncogene, identified from AS42 avian retrovirus, encodes a nuclear bZip protein. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of cell transformation induced by this oncogene, we determined the specific binding sequences of its product. Maf protein recognized two types of relatively long palindromic consensus sequences, TGCTGACTCAGCA and TGCTGACGTCAGCA, at roughly equal efficiency. The middle parts of these Maf-binding sequences completely match with two binding sequences for AP-1 transcription factor, i.e., phorbol 12-O-tetradecanoate-13-acetate (TPA)-responsive element (TRE) and cyclic AMP responsive element, suggesting partial overlapping of the target genes for Maf and AP-1. Furthermore, Maf efficiently formed heterodimers with the components of AP-1, Fos and Jun, through their leucine zipper structures, and these heterodimers show binding specificities distinct from those for Maf-Maf and Jun-Jun homodimers. Thus, a multiple combination of the dimers should generate a greatly expanded repertoire of transcriptional regulatory potential. DNA data base search for the Maf-binding consensus sequences suggested that some of the TRE-like cis elements reported previously may actually be the targets for Maf family proteins or their heterodimers with other bZip proteins. Images PMID:8264639

  4. A redox-responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticle capped with amphiphilic peptides by self-assembly for cancer targeting drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Dong; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Ma, Ning; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-05-01

    A redox-responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticle (RRMSN) was developed as a drug nanocarrier by noncovalent functionalization of MSNs with amphiphilic peptides containing the RGD ligand. The alkyl chain stearic acid (C18) with a thiol terminal group was anchored on the surface of MSNs via a disulfide bond, and the amphiphilic peptide (AP) C18-DSDSDSDSRGDS was coated by self-assembly through hydrophobic interactions between the octadecyl groups of MSNs and alkyl chains of AP, which played the role of a gatekeeper collectively. In vitro drug release profiles demonstrated that the anticancer drug (DOX) could be entrapped with nearly no leakage in the absence of dithiothreitol (DTT) or glutathione (GSH). With the addition of DTT or GSH, the entrapped drug released quickly due to the cleavage of the disulfide bond. It was found that after the internalization of MSNs by cancer cells via the receptor-mediated endocytosis, the surface amphiphilic peptides and alkyl chain of RRMSN/DOX were removed to induce rapid drug release intracellularly after the cleavage of the disulfide bond, triggered by GSH secreted in cancer cells. This novel intelligent RRMSN/DOX drug delivery system using self-assembly of amphiphilic peptides around the MSNs provides a facile, but effective strategy for the design and development of smart drug delivery for cancer therapy.A redox-responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticle (RRMSN) was developed as a drug nanocarrier by noncovalent functionalization of MSNs with amphiphilic peptides containing the RGD ligand. The alkyl chain stearic acid (C18) with a thiol terminal group was anchored on the surface of MSNs via a disulfide bond, and the amphiphilic peptide (AP) C18-DSDSDSDSRGDS was coated by self-assembly through hydrophobic interactions between the octadecyl groups of MSNs and alkyl chains of AP, which played the role of a gatekeeper collectively. In vitro drug release profiles demonstrated that the anticancer drug (DOX) could be entrapped with

  5. Redox-responsive magnetic nanoparticle for targeted convection-enhanced delivery of O6-benzylguanine to brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Zachary R; Kievit, Forrest M; Veiseh, Omid; Chiarelli, Peter A; Fang, Chen; Wang, Kui; Hatzinger, Shelby J; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Silber, John R; Zhang, Miqin

    2014-10-28

    Resistance to temozolomide (TMZ) based chemotherapy in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been attributed to the upregulation of the DNA repair protein O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). Inhibition of MGMT using O(6)-benzylguanine (BG) has shown promise in these patients, but its clinical use is hindered by poor pharmacokinetics that leads to unacceptable toxicity. To improve BG biodistribution and efficacy, we developed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) for targeted convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of BG to GBM. The nanoparticles (NPCP-BG-CTX) consist of a magnetic core coated with a redox-responsive, cross-linked, biocompatible chitosan-PEG copolymer surface coating (NPCP). NPCP was modified through covalent attachment of BG and tumor targeting peptide chlorotoxin (CTX). Controlled, localized BG release was achieved under reductive intracellular conditions and NPCP-BG-CTX demonstrated proper trafficking of BG in human GBM cells in vitro. NPCP-BG-CTX treated cells showed a significant reduction in MGMT activity and the potentiation of TMZ toxicity. In vivo, CED of NPCP-BG-CTX produced an excellent volume of distribution (Vd) within the brain of mice bearing orthotopic human primary GBM xenografts. Significantly, concurrent treatment with NPCP-BG-CTX and TMZ showed a 3-fold increase in median overall survival in comparison to NPCP-CTX/TMZ treated and untreated animals. Furthermore, NPCP-BG-CTX mitigated the myelosuppression observed with free BG in wild-type mice when administered concurrently with TMZ. The combination of favorable physicochemical properties, tumor cell specific BG delivery, controlled BG release, and improved in vivo efficacy demonstrates the great potential of these NPs as a treatment option that could lead to improved clinical outcomes.

  6. Redox-Responsive Magnetic Nanoparticle for Targeted Convection-Enhanced Delivery of O6-Benzylguanine to Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to temozolomide (TMZ) based chemotherapy in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been attributed to the upregulation of the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). Inhibition of MGMT using O6-benzylguanine (BG) has shown promise in these patients, but its clinical use is hindered by poor pharmacokinetics that leads to unacceptable toxicity. To improve BG biodistribution and efficacy, we developed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) for targeted convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of BG to GBM. The nanoparticles (NPCP-BG-CTX) consist of a magnetic core coated with a redox-responsive, cross-linked, biocompatible chitosan-PEG copolymer surface coating (NPCP). NPCP was modified through covalent attachment of BG and tumor targeting peptide chlorotoxin (CTX). Controlled, localized BG release was achieved under reductive intracellular conditions and NPCP-BG-CTX demonstrated proper trafficking of BG in human GBM cells in vitro. NPCP-BG-CTX treated cells showed a significant reduction in MGMT activity and the potentiation of TMZ toxicity. In vivo, CED of NPCP-BG-CTX produced an excellent volume of distribution (Vd) within the brain of mice bearing orthotopic human primary GBM xenografts. Significantly, concurrent treatment with NPCP-BG-CTX and TMZ showed a 3-fold increase in median overall survival in comparison to NPCP-CTX/TMZ treated and untreated animals. Furthermore, NPCP-BG-CTX mitigated the myelosuppression observed with free BG in wild-type mice when administered concurrently with TMZ. The combination of favorable physicochemical properties, tumor cell specific BG delivery, controlled BG release, and improved in vivo efficacy demonstrates the great potential of these NPs as a treatment option that could lead to improved clinical outcomes. PMID:25247850

  7. Redox-responsive magnetic nanoparticle for targeted convection-enhanced delivery of O6-benzylguanine to brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Zachary R; Kievit, Forrest M; Veiseh, Omid; Chiarelli, Peter A; Fang, Chen; Wang, Kui; Hatzinger, Shelby J; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Silber, John R; Zhang, Miqin

    2014-10-28

    Resistance to temozolomide (TMZ) based chemotherapy in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been attributed to the upregulation of the DNA repair protein O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). Inhibition of MGMT using O(6)-benzylguanine (BG) has shown promise in these patients, but its clinical use is hindered by poor pharmacokinetics that leads to unacceptable toxicity. To improve BG biodistribution and efficacy, we developed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) for targeted convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of BG to GBM. The nanoparticles (NPCP-BG-CTX) consist of a magnetic core coated with a redox-responsive, cross-linked, biocompatible chitosan-PEG copolymer surface coating (NPCP). NPCP was modified through covalent attachment of BG and tumor targeting peptide chlorotoxin (CTX). Controlled, localized BG release was achieved under reductive intracellular conditions and NPCP-BG-CTX demonstrated proper trafficking of BG in human GBM cells in vitro. NPCP-BG-CTX treated cells showed a significant reduction in MGMT activity and the potentiation of TMZ toxicity. In vivo, CED of NPCP-BG-CTX produced an excellent volume of distribution (Vd) within the brain of mice bearing orthotopic human primary GBM xenografts. Significantly, concurrent treatment with NPCP-BG-CTX and TMZ showed a 3-fold increase in median overall survival in comparison to NPCP-CTX/TMZ treated and untreated animals. Furthermore, NPCP-BG-CTX mitigated the myelosuppression observed with free BG in wild-type mice when administered concurrently with TMZ. The combination of favorable physicochemical properties, tumor cell specific BG delivery, controlled BG release, and improved in vivo efficacy demonstrates the great potential of these NPs as a treatment option that could lead to improved clinical outcomes. PMID:25247850

  8. High REDOX RESPONSIVE TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR1 Levels Result in Accumulation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Arabidopsis thaliana Shoots and Roots.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Mitsuhiro; Johnson, Joy Michal; Hieno, Ayaka; Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Godfrey, Rinesh; Obokata, Junichi; Sherameti, Irena; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y; Böhmer, Frank-D; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Redox Responsive Transcription Factor1 (RRTF1) in Arabidopsis is rapidly and transiently upregulated by H2O2, as well as biotic- and abiotic-induced redox signals. RRTF1 is highly conserved in angiosperms, but its physiological role remains elusive. Here we show that inactivation of RRTF1 restricts and overexpression promotes reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in response to stress. Transgenic lines overexpressing RRTF1 are impaired in root and shoot development, light sensitive, and susceptible to Alternaria brassicae infection. These symptoms are diminished by the beneficial root endophyte Piriformospora indica, which reduces ROS accumulation locally in roots and systemically in shoots, and by antioxidants and ROS inhibitors that scavenge ROS. More than 800 genes were detected in mature leaves and seedlings of transgenic lines overexpressing RRTF1; ∼ 40% of them have stress-, redox-, ROS-regulated-, ROS-scavenging-, defense-, cell death- and senescence-related functions. Bioinformatic analyses and in vitro DNA binding assays demonstrate that RRTF1 binds to GCC-box-like sequences in the promoter of RRTF1-responsive genes. Upregulation of RRTF1 by stress stimuli and H2O2 requires WRKY18/40/60. RRTF1 is co-regulated with the phylogenetically related RAP2.6, which contains a GCC-box-like sequence in its promoter, but transgenic lines overexpressing RAP2.6 do not accumulate higher ROS levels. RRTF1 also stimulates systemic ROS accumulation in distal non-stressed leaves. We conclude that the elevated levels of the highly conserved RRTF1 induce ROS accumulation in response to ROS and ROS-producing abiotic and biotic stress signals.

  9. Early osmotic, antioxidant, ionic, and redox responses to salinity in leaves and roots of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.).

    PubMed

    Ranjit, Singh Laxmi; Manish, Pandey; Penna, Suprasanna

    2016-01-01

    Salt-stress-induced alterations in osmotic, ionic, and redox responses were studied in the early period of treatment (30 min to 5 days) in seedlings of Brassica juncea L. Roots and shoots under mild (50 mM) and severe (250 mM) NaCl stress were analyzed for growth, oxidative stress, osmolyte accumulation, antioxidant defense, and redox state. Growth reduction was less pronounced in the early time period of salt stress while oxidative damage increased linearly and in a sustained manner under severe stress up to 6 h. An early and transient reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst, as evidenced by superoxide and hydrogen peroxide level was observed, followed by activation of enzymatic antioxidant system (GPX, SOD, CAT, and GR) in both root and shoot. The enzymatic activity was not affected much under mild stress particularly at early phase; however, severe stress induced a significant increase in the activity of antioxidant enzymes. Root ascorbate was progressively accumulated, and its redox state maintained in the early time phase of treatment under mild stress while increase in root and shoot glutathione content was recorded under mild stress at 5 days when the active ascorbate pool decreased. While early period of salt stress showed significant Na(+) accumulation over control, plants subjected to mild stress measured less Na(+) accumulation up to 5 days compared to severely stressed plants. The results showed an early induction of differential responses to salt stress in roots and shoots of Brassica which include growth limitations, reduced relative water content, increased osmolytes, redox state, and antioxidant system, and a significant Na(+) increase. The results also indicate that roots and shoots may have distinct mechanisms of responses to salt stress.

  10. A requirement for extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) function in the activation of AP-1 by Ha-Ras, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and serum.

    PubMed Central

    Frost, J A; Geppert, T D; Cobb, M H; Feramisco, J R

    1994-01-01

    The role of ERK-1 and ERK-2 in wild-type (wt) Ha-Ras, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and serum-induced AP-1 activity was studied. Microinjection of ERK-specific substrate peptides inhibited the induction of AP-1 activity by all three stimuli, whereas a control peptide had no effect. By using eukaryotic expression constructs encoding wt ERK-1 and kinase-deficient mutants of ERKs 1 and 2, it was found that ERK-1 and ERK-2 activities are required for AP-1 activation stimulated by either wt Ha-Ras, PMA, or serum. Overexpression of ERK-1 augmented wt Ha-Ras stimulation of AP-1, while having no effect upon PMA or serum stimulation. Overexpression of either kinase-deficient ERK-1 or kinase-deficient ERK-2 partially inhibited AP-1 activation by wt Ha-Ras but had no effect on PMA or serum-induced activation. Coexpression of both interfering mutants abolished AP-1 induction by wt Ha-Ras, PMA, or serum. We conclude that ERKs are necessary components in the pathway leading to the activation of AP-1 stimulated by these agents. Images PMID:8170999

  11. Mutagenesis of cysteine 81 prevents dimerization of the APS1 subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and alters diurnal starch turnover in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.

    PubMed

    Hädrich, Nadja; Hendriks, Janneke H M; Kötting, Oliver; Arrivault, Stéphanie; Feil, Regina; Zeeman, Samuel C; Gibon, Yves; Schulze, Waltraud X; Stitt, Mark; Lunn, John E

    2012-04-01

    Many plants, including Arabidopsis thaliana, retain a substantial portion of their photosynthate in leaves in the form of starch, which is remobilized to support metabolism and growth at night. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) catalyses the first committed step in the pathway of starch synthesis, the production of ADP-glucose. The enzyme is redox-activated in the light and in response to sucrose accumulation, via reversible breakage of an intermolecular cysteine bridge between the two small (APS1) subunits. The biological function of this regulatory mechanism was investigated by complementing an aps1 null mutant (adg1) with a series of constructs containing a full-length APS1 gene encoding either the wild-type APS1 protein or mutated forms in which one of the five cysteine residues was replaced by serine. Substitution of Cys81 by serine prevented APS1 dimerization, whereas mutation of the other cysteines had no effect. Thus, Cys81 is both necessary and sufficient for dimerization of APS1. Compared to control plants, the adg1/APS1(C81S) lines had higher levels of ADP-glucose and maltose, and either increased rates of starch synthesis or a starch-excess phenotype, depending on the daylength. APS1 protein levels were five- to tenfold lower in adg1/APS1(C81S) lines than in control plants. These results show that redox modulation of AGPase contributes to the diurnal regulation of starch turnover, with inappropriate regulation of the enzyme having an unexpected impact on starch breakdown, and that Cys81 may play an important role in the regulation of AGPase turnover.

  12. Isoliquiritigenin inhibits migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells: possible mediation by decreased JNK/AP-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Gyoo Taik; Cho, Han Jin; Chung, Won-Yoon; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Moon, Aree; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2009-09-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (ISL, 4,2',4'-trihydroxychalcone), which is found in licorice, shallot and bean sprouts, is a potent antioxidant with anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ISL treatment on the migration, invasion and adhesion characteristics of DU145 human prostate cancer cells. DU145 cells were cultured in the presence of 0-20 micromol/L ISL with or without 10 microg/L epidermal growth factor (EGF). ISL inhibited basal and EGF-induced cell migration, invasion and adhesion dose dependently. ISL decreased EGF-induced secretion of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but increased TIMP-2 secretion in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, ISL decreased the protein levels of integrin-alpha2, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM), and mRNA levels of uPA, MMP-9, VEGF, ICAM and integrin-alpha2. Furthermore, basal and EGF-induced activator protein (AP)-1 binding activity and phosphorylation of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), c-Jun and Akt were decreased after ISL treatment. However, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was not altered. The JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited basal and EGF-induced secretion of uPA, VEGF, MMP-9 and TIMP-1, as well as AP-1 DNA binding activity and cell migration. These results provide evidence for the role of ISL as a potent antimetastatic agent, which can markedly inhibit the metastatic and invasive capacity of prostate cancer cells. The inhibition of JNK/AP-1 signaling may be one of the mechanisms by which ISL inhibits cancer cell invasion and migration. PMID:18824345

  13. Pseudoephedrine inhibits T-cell activation by targeting NF-κB, NFAT and AP-1 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Fiebich, Bernd L; Collado, Juan A; Stratz, Cristian; Valina, Christian; Hochholzer, Willibald; Muñoz, Eduardo; Bellido, Luz M

    2012-02-01

    Pseudoephedrine (PSE) is a stereoisomer of ephedrine that is commonly used as a nasal decongestant in combination with other anti-inflammatory drugs for the symptomatic treatment of some common pathologies such as common cold. Herein, we describe for the first time the effects of PSE on T-cell activation events. We found that PSE inhibits interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha-gene transcription in stimulated Jurkat cells, a human T-cell leukemia cell line. To further characterize the inhibitory mechanisms of PSE at the transcriptional level, we examined the transcriptional activities of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), and activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factors and found that PSE inhibited NF-κB-dependent transcriptional activity without affecting either the phosphorylation, the degradation of the cytoplasmic NF-κB inhibitory protein, IκBα or the DNA-binding activity. However, phosphorylation of the p65/RelA subunit was clearly inhibited by PSE in stimulated cells. In addition, PSE inhibited the transcriptional activity of NFAT without interfering with the calcium-induced NFAT dephosphorylation event, which represents the major signaling pathway for its activation. NFAT cooperates with c-Jun, a compound of the AP-1 complex, to activate target genes, and we also found that PSE inhibited both JNK activation and AP-1 transcriptional activity. These findings provide new mechanistic insights into the potential immunomodulatory activities of PSE and highlight their potential in designing novel therapeutic strategies to manage inflammatory diseases.

  14. c-Fos: an AP-1 transcription factor with an additional cytoplasmic, non-genomic lipid synthesis activation capacity.

    PubMed

    Caputto, Beatriz L; Cardozo Gizzi, Andrés M; Gil, Germán A

    2014-09-01

    The mechanisms that co-ordinately activate lipid synthesis when high rates of membrane biogenesis are needed to support cell growth are largely unknown. c-Fos, a well known AP-1 transcription factor, has emerged as a unique protein with the capacity to associate to specific enzymes of the pathway of synthesis of phospholipids at the endoplasmic reticulum and activate their synthesis to accompany genomic decisions of growth. Herein, we discuss this cytoplasmic, non-genomic effect of c-Fos in the context of other mechanisms that have been proposed to regulate lipid synthesis.

  15. Necrotic cells influence migration and invasion of glioblastoma via NF-κB/AP-1-mediated IL-8 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, So-Hee; Park, Hyunju; Ahn, Young-Ho; Kim, Sewha; Cho, Min-Sun; Kang, Jihee Lee; Choi, Youn-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary intracranial tumor in adults and has poor prognosis. Diffuse infiltration into normal brain parenchyma, rapid growth, and the presence of necrosis are remarkable hallmarks of GBM. However, the effect of necrotic cells on GBM growth and metastasis is poorly understood at present. In this study, we examined the biological significance of necrotic tissues by exploring the molecular mechanisms underlying the signaling network between necrotic tissues and GBM cells. The migration and invasion of the GBM cell line CRT-MG was significantly enhanced by treatment with necrotic cells, as shown by assays for scratch wound healing and spheroid invasion. Incubation with necrotic cells induced IL-8 secretion in CRT-MG cells in a dose-dependent manner. In human GBM tissues, IL-8 positive cells were mainly distributed in the perinecrotic region, as seen in immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analysis. Necrotic cells induced NF-κB and AP-1 activation and their binding to the IL-8 promoter, leading to enhanced IL-8 production and secretion in GBM cells. Our data demonstrate that when GBM cells are exposed to and stimulated by necrotic cells, the migration and invasion of GBM cells are enhanced and facilitated via NF-κB/AP-1 mediated IL-8 upregulation. PMID:27076368

  16. Functional erythroid promoters created by interaction of the transcription factor GATA-1 with CACCC and AP-1/NFE-2 elements.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, M; Martin, D I

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated interactions between the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 and factors binding two cis-acting elements commonly linked to GATA sites in erythroid control elements. GATA-1 is present at all stages of erythroid differentiation, is necessary for erythropoiesis, and binds sites in all erythroid control elements. However, minimal promoters containing GATA-1 sites are inactive when tested in erythroid cells. Based on this observation, two erythroid cis elements, here termed CACCC and AP-1/NFE-2, were linked to GATA sites in minimal promoters. None of the elements linked only to a TATA box created an active promoter, but GATA sites linked to either CACCC or AP-1/NFE-2 elements formed strong erythroid promoters. A mutation of T to C at position -175 in the gamma-globin promoter GATA site, associated with hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH), increased expression of these promoters in both fetal and adult cells. A construct bearing the beta-globin CACCC element was more active in adult and less active in fetal erythroid cells, when compared with the gamma-globin CACCC element. These studies suggest that erythroid control elements are formed by the interactions of at least three transcription factors, none of which functions alone. Images PMID:1438231

  17. Angiopoietin-1 promotes endothelial cell proliferation and migration through AP-1-dependent autocrine production of interleukin-8.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Malak, Nelly A; Srikant, Coimbatore B; Kristof, Arnold S; Magder, Sheldon A; Di Battista, John A; Hussain, Sabah N A

    2008-04-15

    Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), ligand for the endothelial cell-specific Tie-2 receptors, promotes migration and proliferation of endothelial cells, however, whether these effects are promoted through the release of a secondary mediator remains unclear. In this study, we assessed whether Ang-1 promotes endothelial cell migration and proliferation through the release of interleukin-8 (IL-8). Ang-1 elicited in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) a dose- and time-dependent increase in IL-8 production as a result of induction of mRNA and enhanced mRNA stability of IL-8 transcripts. IL-8 production is also elevated in HUVECs transduced with retroviruses expressing Ang-1. Neutralization of IL-8 in these cells with a specific antibody significantly attenuated proliferation and migration and induced caspase-3 activation. Exposure to Ang-1 triggered a significant increase in DNA binding of activator protein-1 (AP-1) to a relatively short fragment of IL-8 promoter. Upstream from the AP-1 complex, up-regulation of IL-8 transcription by Ang-1 was mediated through the Erk1/2, SAPK/JNK, and PI-3 kinase pathways, which triggered c-Jun phosphorylation on Ser63 and Ser73. These results suggest that promotion of endothelial migration and proliferation by Ang-1 is mediated, in part, through the production of IL-8, which acts in an autocrine fashion to suppress apoptosis and facilitate cell proliferation and migration.

  18. Activation of transcriptional activities of AP-1 and SRE by a new zinc-finger protein ZNF641

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Xingzhu; Li Yongqing; Xiao Jing; Yuan Wuzhou; Yan Yan; Wang Yuequn; Liang Shuyuan; Zhu Chuanbing; Chen Yingduan; Liu Mingyao . E-mail: mliu@ibt.tamhsc.edu; Wu Xiushan

    2006-01-27

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are evolutionarily conserved enzymes in cell signal transduction connecting cell-surface receptors to critical regulatory targets within cells and control cell survival, adaptation, and proliferation. Previous studies revealed that zinc-finger proteins are involved in the regulation of the MAPK signaling pathways. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a novel human zinc-finger protein, ZNF641. The cDNA of ZNF641 is 4.9 kb, encoding 438 amino acids in the nucleus. The protein is highly conserved in evolution across different vertebrate species from mouse to human. Northern blot analysis indicates that ZNF641 is expressed in most of the examined human tissues, with a high level in skeletal muscle. Overexpression of pCMV-Tag2B-ZNF641 in the COS-7 cells activates the transcriptional activities of AP-1 and SRE. Deletion analysis indicates that the linker between KRAB box and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-type zinc-fingers represents the basal activation domain. These results suggest that ZNF641 may be a positive regulator in MAPK-mediated signaling pathways that lead to the activation of AP-1 and SRE.

  19. The AP-1 Transcription Factor c-Jun Prevents Stress-Imposed Maladaptive Remodeling of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Windak, Renata; Müller, Julius; Felley, Allison; Akhmedov, Alexander; Wagner, Erwin F.; Pedrazzini, Thierry; Sumara, Grzegorz; Ricci, Romeo

    2013-01-01

    Systemic hypertension increases cardiac workload and subsequently induces signaling networks in heart that underlie myocyte growth (hypertrophic response) through expansion of sarcomeres with the aim to increase contractility. However, conditions of increased workload can induce both adaptive and maladaptive growth of heart muscle. Previous studies implicate two members of the AP-1 transcription factor family, junD and fra-1, in regulation of heart growth during hypertrophic response. In this study, we investigate the function of the AP-1 transcription factors, c-jun and c-fos, in heart growth. Using pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy in mice and targeted deletion of Jun or Fos in cardiomyocytes, we show that c-jun is required for adaptive cardiac hypertrophy, while c-fos is dispensable in this context. c-jun promotes expression of sarcomere proteins and suppresses expression of extracellular matrix proteins. Capacity of cardiac muscle to contract depends on organization of principal thick and thin filaments, myosin and actin, within the sarcomere. In line with decreased expression of sarcomere-associated proteins, Jun-deficient cardiomyocytes present disarrangement of filaments in sarcomeres and actin cytoskeleton disorganization. Moreover, Jun-deficient hearts subjected to pressure overload display pronounced fibrosis and increased myocyte apoptosis finally resulting in dilated cardiomyopathy. In conclusion, c-jun but not c-fos is required to induce a transcriptional program aimed at adapting heart growth upon increased workload. PMID:24039904

  20. The Synonymous Ala87 Mutation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Modifies Transcriptional Activation Through Both ERE and AP1 Sites.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calero, Tamara; Flouriot, Gilles; Marín, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) exerts regulatory actions through genomic mechanisms. In the classical pathway, ligand-activated ERα binds directly to DNA through estrogen response elements (ERE) located in the promoter of target genes. ERα can also exert indirect regulation of transcription via protein-protein interaction with other transcription factors such as AP-1.S everal ERα synonymous polymorphisms have been identified and efforts to understand their implications have been made. Nevertheless effects of synonymous polymorphisms are still neglected. This chapter focuses on the experimental procedure employed in order to characterize the transcriptional activity of a synonymous polymorphism of the ERα (rs746432) called Alanine 87 (Ala87). Activity of both WT and Ala87 ERα isoforms on transcriptional pathways can be analyzed in transiently transfected cells using different reporter constructs. ERα efficiency on the classical genomic pathway can be analyzed by determining its transactivation activity on an ERE-driven thymidine kinase (TK) promoter controlling the expression of the luciferase reporter gene. Transcriptional activity through the indirect genomic pathway can be analyzed by employing an AP-1 DNA response element-driven promoter also controlling the expression of luciferase reporter gene.

  1. The Synonymous Ala87 Mutation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Modifies Transcriptional Activation Through Both ERE and AP1 Sites.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calero, Tamara; Flouriot, Gilles; Marín, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) exerts regulatory actions through genomic mechanisms. In the classical pathway, ligand-activated ERα binds directly to DNA through estrogen response elements (ERE) located in the promoter of target genes. ERα can also exert indirect regulation of transcription via protein-protein interaction with other transcription factors such as AP-1.S everal ERα synonymous polymorphisms have been identified and efforts to understand their implications have been made. Nevertheless effects of synonymous polymorphisms are still neglected. This chapter focuses on the experimental procedure employed in order to characterize the transcriptional activity of a synonymous polymorphism of the ERα (rs746432) called Alanine 87 (Ala87). Activity of both WT and Ala87 ERα isoforms on transcriptional pathways can be analyzed in transiently transfected cells using different reporter constructs. ERα efficiency on the classical genomic pathway can be analyzed by determining its transactivation activity on an ERE-driven thymidine kinase (TK) promoter controlling the expression of the luciferase reporter gene. Transcriptional activity through the indirect genomic pathway can be analyzed by employing an AP-1 DNA response element-driven promoter also controlling the expression of luciferase reporter gene. PMID:26585143

  2. Ebi/AP-1 suppresses pro-apoptotic genes expression and permits long-term survival of Drosophila sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young-Mi; Hayashi, Shigeo; Tsuda, Leo

    2012-01-01

    Sensory organs are constantly exposed to physical and chemical stresses that collectively threaten the survival of sensory neurons. Failure to protect stressed neurons leads to age-related loss of neurons and sensory dysfunction in organs in which the supply of new sensory neurons is limited, such as the human auditory system. Transducin β-like protein 1 (TBL1) is a candidate gene for ocular albinism with late-onset sensorineural deafness, a form of X-linked age-related hearing loss. TBL1 encodes an evolutionarily conserved F-box-like and WD40 repeats-containing subunit of the nuclear receptor co-repressor/silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptor and other transcriptional co-repressor complexes. Here we report that a Drosophila homologue of TBL1, Ebi, is required for maintenance of photoreceptor neurons. Loss of ebi function caused late-onset neuronal apoptosis in the retina and increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Ebi formed a complex with activator protein 1 (AP-1) and was required for repression of Drosophila pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes expression. These results suggest that Ebi/AP-1 suppresses basal transcription levels of apoptotic genes and thereby protects sensory neurons from degeneration. PMID:22666340

  3. Transcription factor AP1 binds the functional region of the promoter and regulates gene expression of human PPARdelta in LoVo cell.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaogang; Yang, Xudong; Han, Yan; Lu, Shemin

    2013-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ gene (PPARδ) is correlated with carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer, but the regulation of its gene transcription remains unclear. We herein report that AP1 binds the promoter and regulates PPARδ gene expression. With a luciferase reporter system, we identified a functional promoter region of 30 bp of PPARδ gene by deletion and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Using site-directed mutagenesis and decoy analyses, we demonstrated that AP1 bound the functional transcriptional factor binding site in a region extending from -176 to -73 of the PPARδ promoter, which was confirmed using EMSA and supershift assays. Consequently, inhibition of the AP1 binding site led to decreased PPARδ mRNA. Our study demonstrated that AP1 is the transcriptional factor that contributes to PPARδ expression in LoVo cells.

  4. p12CDK2-AP1 interacts with CD82 to regulate the proliferation and survival of human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chai, Juan; Ju, Jun; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Shen, Zhi-Yuan; Liang, Liang; Yang, Xiang-Ming; Ma, Chao; Ni, Qian-Wei; Sun, Mo-Yi

    2016-08-01

    p12 cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2)-associating protein 1 (p12CDK2-AP1) has been demonstrated to negatively regulate the activity of CDK2. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. We aimed to determine the potential binding proteins of p12CDK2-AP1 and to elucidate the role of p12CDK2-AP1 in the regulation of the proliferation, invasion, apoptosis, and in vivo growth of human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. The protein-protein interaction was predicted using computational decision templates. The predicted p12CDK2‑AP1 interacting proteins were overexpressed in human oral squamous cell carcinoma OSCC-15 cells, and the protein binding was examined using co-precipitation (Co-IP). Cell proliferation and invasion were determined via MTT assay and Transwell system, respectively. Cell apoptosis was evaluated using Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining followed by flow cytometric analysis. The in vivo growth of OSCC-15 cells was examined in nude mouse tumor xenografts. We found that overexpression of either p12CDK2-AP1 or CD82 significantly suppressed the proliferation and invasion but promoted the apoptosis of OSCC-15 cells (P<0.05). Importantly, combined overexpression of p12CDK2-AP1 and CD82 showed synergistic antitumor activity compared with the overexpression of a single protein alone (P<0.05). Additionally, the simultaneous overexpression of p12CDK2-AP1 and CD82 significantly suppressed the in vivo tumor growth of OSCC-15 cells in nude mice compared with the negative control (P<0.05). Our findings indicate that p12CDK2-AP1 interacts with CD82 to play a functional role in suppressing the in vitro and in vivo growth of OSCC-15 cells. PMID:27349208

  5. Activation of NF-κB and AP-1 Mediates Hyperproliferation by Inducing β-Catenin and c-Myc in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Gastric Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Eunyoung; Park, Bohye; Lim, Joo Weon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the gastric mucosa of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-infected patients with gastritis or adenocarcinoma, proliferation of gastric epithelial cells is increased. Hyperproliferation is related to induction of oncogenes, such as β-catenin and c-myc. Even though transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1 are activated in H. pylori-infected cells, whether NF-κB or AP-1 regulates the expression of β-catenein or c-myc in H. pylori-infected cells has not been clarified. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB and AP-1 mediates the expression of oncogenes and hyperproliferation of gastric epithelial cells. Materials and Methods Gastric epithelial AGS cells were transiently transfected with mutant genes for IκBα (MAD3) and c-Jun (TAM67) or treated with a specific NF-κB inhibitor caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) or a selective AP-1 inhibitor SR-11302 to suppress activation of NF-κB or AP-1, respecively. As reference cells, the control vector pcDNA was transfected to the cells. Wild-type cells or transfected cells were cultured with or without H. pylori. Results H. pylori induced activation of NF-κB and AP-1, cell proliferation, and expression of oncogenes (β-catenein, c-myc) in AGS cells, which was inhibited by transfection of MAD3 and TAM67. Wild-type cells and the cells transfected with pcDNA showed similar activities of NF-κB and AP-1, proliferation, and oncogene expression regardless of treatment with H. pylori. Both CAPE and SR-11302 inhibited cell proliferation and expression of oncogenes in H. pylori-infected cells. Conclusion H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB and AP-1 regulates transcription of oncogenes and mediates hyperproliferation in gastric epithelial cells. PMID:26996564

  6. A cluster region of AP-1 responsive elements is required for transcriptional activity of mouse ODC gene by hepatocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Laura; Tacchini, Lorenza; Matteucci, Emanuela; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2002-05-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity is regulated by a variety of mechanisms including transcription, translation, and RNA and protein half-life. Since in mouse B16-F1 melanoma cells an early and remarkable (about 6-fold) increase in steady state mRNA levels was observed after hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) treatment, we investigated the transcriptional regulation of mouse ODC promoter. Transient transfection of various ODC-luciferase promoter constructs into the B16-Fl cells in combination with electrophoretic mobility shift assays identified the HGF-responsive element as a cluster of three AP-1 binding sites (-1660 to -1572). Even if each site differs from the canonical TPA responsive element for one nucleotide, only the first two AP-1 consensus sequences seemed to be functional since allowed DNA-binding activity of nuclear proteins after HGF treatment. Comparison of the results of transfection assays with the pOD2.5-luc (2.5 kb gene fragment) and with the construct deprived of the AP-1 cluster pOD-B-luc showed that this 50 bp region was required for ODC transactivating activity in response to HGF. Since in B16-F1 cells HGF increased AP-1 activity and the mRNA expression of various AP-1 subunits, we may conclude that HGF-induced transcription of mouse ODC was largely due to triggering of AP-1 pathway. PMID:12054494

  7. Fra-1/AP-1 induces EMT in mammary epithelial cells by modulating Zeb1/2 and TGFβ expression

    PubMed Central

    Bakiri, L; Macho-Maschler, S; Custic, I; Niemiec, J; Guío-Carrión, A; Hasenfuss, S C; Eger, A; Müller, M; Beug, H; Wagner, E F

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is essential for embryonic morphogenesis and wound healing and critical for tumour cell invasion and dissemination. The AP-1 transcription factor Fra-1 has been implicated in tumorigenesis and in tumour-associated EMT in human breast cancer. We observed a significant inverse correlation between Fra-1 mRNA expression and distant-metastasis-free survival in a large cohort of breast cancer patients derived from multiple array data sets. This unique correlation among Fos genes prompted us to assess the evolutionary conservation between Fra-1 functions in EMT of human and mouse cells. Ectopic expression of Fra-1 in fully polarized, non-tumourigenic, mouse mammary epithelial EpH4 cells induced a mesenchymal phenotype, characterized by a loss of epithelial and gain of mesenchymal markers. Proliferation, motility and invasiveness were also increased in the resulting EpFra1 cells, and the cells were tumourigenic and efficiently colonized the lung upon transplantation. Molecular analyses revealed increased expression of Tgfβ1 and the EMT-inducing transcription factors Zeb1, Zeb2 and Slug. Mechanistically, Fra-1 binds to the tgfb1 and zeb2 promoters and to an evolutionarily conserved region in the first intron of zeb1. Furthermore, increased activity of a zeb2 promoter reporter was detected in EpFra1 cells and shown to depend on AP-1-binding sites. Inhibiting TGFβ signalling in EpFra1 cells moderately increased the expression of epithelial markers, whereas silencing of zeb1 or zeb2 restored the epithelial phenotype and decreased migration in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Thus Fra-1 induces changes in the expression of genes encoding EMT-related transcription factors leading to the acquisition of mesenchymal, invasive and tumorigenic capacities by epithelial cells. This study defines a novel function of Fra-1/AP-1 in modulating tgfb1, zeb1 and zeb2 expression through direct binding to genomic regulatory regions, which establishes

  8. Two Mechanisms Regulate Keratin K15 Expression In Keratinocytes: Role of PKC/AP-1 and FOXM1 Mediated Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Amrita; Teh, Muy-Teck; Hutchison, Iain L.; Wan, Hong; Leigh, Irene M.; Waseem, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Background Keratin 15 (K15) is a type I keratin that is used as a marker of stem cells. Its expression is restricted to the basal layer of stratified epithelia, and the bulge in hair follicles. However, in certain clinical situations including oral lichen planus, K15 is induced in suprabasal layers, which is inconsistent with the role of a stem cell marker. This study provides insights into the mechanisms of K15 expression in the basal and differentiating keratinocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings Human keratinocytes were differentiated by three different methods; suspension in methylcellulose, high cell density and treatment with phorbol ester. The expression of mRNA was determined by quantitative PCR and protein by western blotting and immunostaining. Keratinocytes in suspension suppressed β1-integrin expression, induced differentiation-specific markers and K15, whereas FOXM1 (a cell cycle regulated protein) and K14 were downregulated. Rescuing β1-integrin by either fibronectin or the arginine-glycine-aspartate peptide suppressed K15 but induced K14 and FOXM1 expression. Specific inhibition of PKCδ, by siRNA, and AP-1 transcription factor, by TAM67 (dominant negative c-Jun), suppressed K15 expression, suggesting that PKC/AP-1 pathway plays a role in the differentiation-specific expression of K15. The basal cell-specific K15 expression may involve FOXM1 because ectopic expression of the latter is known to induce K15. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we have identified a single FOXM1 binding motif in the K15 promoter. Conclusions/Significance The data suggests that K15 is induced during terminal differentiation mediated by the down regulation of β1-integrin. However, this cannot be the mechanism of basal/stem cell-specific K15 expression in stratified epithelia, because basal keratinocytes do not undergo terminal differentiation. We propose that there are two mechanisms regulating K15 expression in stratified epithelia; differentiation-specific involving

  9. Fungal Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fungal Skin Infections Overview of Fungal Skin Infections Candidiasis Overview of Dermatophytoses (Ringworm, Tinea) Athlete's Foot Jock ... are caused by yeasts (such as Candida —see Candidiasis ) or dermatophytes, such as Epidermophyton, Microsporum, and Trichophyton ( ...

  10. Fumonisin B1 and hydrolyzed fumonisin B1 (AP1) in tortillas and nixtamalized corn (Zea mays L.) from two different geographic locations in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Meredith, F I; Torres, O R; Saenz de Tejada, S; Riley, R T; Merrill, A H

    1999-10-01

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a common contaminant of corn worldwide and is responsible for several diseases of animals. In the preparation of tortillas, corn is treated with lime (producing nixtamal) that when heated hydrolyzes at least a portion of the FB1 to the aminopentol backbone (AP1), another known toxin. This study analyzed the amounts of FB1 and AP1 in tortillas and nixtamal from two communities in the central highlands of Guatemala where corn is a major dietary staple (Santa Maria de Jesus, Sacatepequez, and Patzicia, Chimaltenango). The amounts of FB1 and AP1 in tortillas from Santa Maria de Jesus were, respectively, 0.85 +/- 2.0 and 26.1 +/- 38.5 microg/g dry weight (mean +/- SD), and from Patzicia were 2.2 +/- 3.6 and 5.7 +/- 9.4 microg/g dry weight. Less than 6% of the tortillas from both locations contained > or = 10 microg FB1/g dry weight; whereas, 66% of the samples from Santa Maria de Jesus and 29% from Patzicia contained > or = 10 microg AP1/g dry weight. The highest amount of AP1 (185 microg/g dry weight) was found in tortillas from Santa Maria de Jesus. The highest amounts of FB1 were 6.5 and 11.6 microg/g dry weight in tortillas from Santa Maria de Jesus and Patzicia, respectively. The mean concentration of FB1 in nixtamal was significantly higher in Santa Maria de Jesus compared to Patzicia. Surprisingly, AP1 was not detected in any of the nixtamal samples. The human impact of exposure to these amounts of fumonisins is not known. However, based on findings with other animals, where corn is a dietary staple, long-term consumption of FB1 and AP1 (especially at > or = 10 microg/g of the diet) may pose a risk to human health.

  11. The V-ATPase accessory protein Atp6ap1b mediates dorsal forerunner cell proliferation and left-right asymmetry in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gokey, Jason J; Dasgupta, Agnik; Amack, Jeffrey D

    2015-11-01

    Asymmetric fluid flows generated by motile cilia in a transient 'organ of asymmetry' are involved in establishing the left-right (LR) body axis during embryonic development. The vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) proton pump has been identified as an early factor in the LR pathway that functions prior to cilia, but the role(s) for V-ATPase activity are not fully understood. In the zebrafish embryo, the V-ATPase accessory protein Atp6ap1b is maternally supplied and expressed in dorsal forerunner cells (DFCs) that give rise to the ciliated organ of asymmetry called Kupffer's vesicle (KV). V-ATPase accessory proteins modulate V-ATPase activity, but little is known about their functions in development. We investigated Atp6ap1b and V-ATPase in KV development using morpholinos, mutants and pharmacological inhibitors. Depletion of both maternal and zygotic atp6ap1b expression reduced KV organ size, altered cilia length and disrupted LR patterning of the embryo. Defects in other ciliated structures-neuromasts and olfactory placodes-suggested a broad role for Atp6ap1b during development of ciliated organs. V-ATPase inhibitor treatments reduced KV size and identified a window of development in which V-ATPase activity is required for proper LR asymmetry. Interfering with Atp6ap1b or V-ATPase function reduced the rate of DFC proliferation, which resulted in fewer ciliated cells incorporating into the KV organ. Analyses of pH and subcellular V-ATPase localizations suggested Atp6ap1b functions to localize the V-ATPase to the plasma membrane where it regulates proton flux and cytoplasmic pH. These results uncover a new role for the V-ATPase accessory protein Atp6ap1b in early development to maintain the proliferation rate of precursor cells needed to construct a ciliated KV organ capable of generating LR asymmetry.

  12. SUMOylation of the inducible (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 transcription complex occurs on target promoters to limit transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Tempé, D; Vives, E; Brockly, F; Brooks, H; De Rossi, S; Piechaczyk, M; Bossis, G

    2014-02-13

    The inducible proto-oncogenic (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 transcription complex binds 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-responsive elements (TRE) in its target genes. It is tightly controlled at multiple levels to avoid the deleterious effects of its inappropriate activation. In particular, SUMOylation represses its transactivation capacity in transient reporter assays using constitutively expressed proteins. This led to the presumption that (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 SUMOylation would be required to turn-off transcription of its target genes, as proposed for various transcription factors. Instead, thanks to the generation of an antibody specific for SUMO-modified c-Fos, we provide here direct evidence that SUMOylated c-Fos is present on a stably integrated reporter TPA-inducible promoter at the onset of transcriptional activation and colocalizes with RNA polymerase II within chromatin. Interestingly, (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 SUMOylation limits reporter gene induction, as well as the appearance of active transcription-specific histone marks on its promoter. Moreover, non-SUMOylatable mutant (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 dimers accumulate to higher levels on their target promoter, suggesting that SUMOylation might facilitate the release of (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 from promoters. Finally, activation of GADD153, an AP-1 target gene, is also associated with a rapid increase in SUMOylation at the level of its TRE and c-Fos SUMOylation dampens its induction by TPA. Taken together, our data suggest that SUMOylation could serve to buffer transcriptional activation of AP-1 target genes.

  13. MMP2-Targeting and Redox-Responsive PEGylated Chlorin e6 Nanoparticles for Cancer Near-Infrared Imaging and Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wenxiu; Xia, Fangfang; Alves, Carla S; Qian, Xiaoqing; Yang, Yuming; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-01-20

    A unique matrix metalloproteinase 2-targeted photosensitizer delivery platform was developed in this study for tumor-targeting imaging and photodynamic therapy. The model photosensitizer therapeutic agent chlorin e6 (Ce6) was first covalently conjugated with matrix metalloproteinase 2-cleavable polypeptide and then modified with polyethylene glycol via a redox-responsive cleavable disulfide linker. The resultant matrix metalloproteinase 2-cleavable polypeptide modified PEGylated Ce6 (PEG-SS-Ce6-MMP2) nanoparticles, which formed via self-assembly, were observed to be monodisperse and significantly stable in aqueous solution. In addition, owing to their cellular redox-responsiveness at the cleavable disulfide linker, the PEG-SS-Ce6-MMP2 nanoparticles were able to release Ce6 rapidly. Despite displaying enhanced intracellular internalization, the synthesized PEG-SS-Ce6-MMP2 nanoparticles did not compromise their phototoxic effects toward A549 cancer cells when compared with free Ce6 and PEGylated Ce6 nanoparticles. In vivo experiments further revealed that, in contrast with the free Ce6 or with the PEGylated Ce6 nanoparticles, the PEG-SS-Ce6-MMP2 nanoparticles showed a remarkable increase in tumor-targeting ability and a significantly improved photodynamic therapeutic efficiency in A549 tumor-bearing mice. These results suggest that the PEG-SS-Ce6-MMP2 nanoparticles hold great potential for tumor-targeting imaging and photodynamic therapy.

  14. Human kidney anion exchanger 1 interacts with adaptor-related protein complex 1 {mu}1A (AP-1 mu1A)

    SciTech Connect

    Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Junking, Mutita; Ngaojanlar, Piengpaga; Sukomon, Nattakan; Ungsupravate, Duangporn; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Akkarapatumwong, Varaporn; Noisakran, Sansanee; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Trafficking defect of kAE1 is a cause of dRTA but trafficking pathway of kAE1 has not been clearly described. {yields} Adaptor-related protein complex 1 {mu}1A (AP-1 mu1A) was firstly reported to interact with kAE1. {yields} The interacting site for AP-1 mu1A on Ct-kAE1 was found to be Y904DEV907, a subset of YXXO motif. {yields} AP-1 mu1A knockdown showed a marked reduction of kAE1 on the cell membrane and its accumulation in endoplasmic reticulum. {yields} AP-1 mu1A has a critical role in kAE1 trafficking to the plasma membrane. -- Abstract: Kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) mediates chloride (Cl{sup -}) and bicarbonate (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) exchange at the basolateral membrane of kidney {alpha}-intercalated cells. Impaired trafficking of kAE1 leads to defect of the Cl{sup -}/HCO{sub 3}{sup -} exchange at the basolateral membrane and failure of proton (H{sup +}) secretion at the apical membrane, causing a kidney disease - distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). To gain a better insight into kAE1 trafficking, we searched for proteins physically interacting with the C-terminal region of kAE1 (Ct-kAE1), which contains motifs crucial for intracellular trafficking, by a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system. An adaptor-related protein complex 1 {mu}1A (AP-1 mu1A) subunit was found to interact with Ct-kAE1. The interaction between either Ct-kAE1 or full-length kAE1 and AP-1 mu1A were confirmed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T by co-immunoprecipitation, affinity co-purification, co-localization, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-based protein fragment complementation assay (PCA) and GST pull-down assay. The interacting site for AP-1 mu1A on Ct-kAE1 was found to be Y904DEV907, a subset of YXXO motif. Interestingly, suppression of endogenous AP-1 mu1A in HEK 293T by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased membrane localization of kAE1 and increased its intracellular accumulation, suggesting for the first time that AP-1 mu1A is involved in the kAE1

  15. Tiron Inhibits UVB-Induced AP-1 Binding Sites Transcriptional Activation on MMP-1 and MMP-3 Promoters by MAPK Signaling Pathway in Human Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Guo, Jia-Hui; Tu, Xue-Liang; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Mei; Zhang, Quan-Wu; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2016-01-01

    Recent research found that Tiron was an effective antioxidant that could act as the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger or alleviate the acute toxic metal overload in vivo. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of Tiron on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 expression in human dermal fibroblast cells. Western blot and ELISA analysis revealed that Tiron inhibited ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced protein expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Real-time quantitative PCR confirmed that Tiron could inhibit UVB-induced mRNA expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Furthermore, Tiron significantly blocked UVB-induced activation of the MAPK signaling pathway and activator protein (AP)-1 in the downstream of this transduction pathway in fibroblasts. Through the AP-1 binding site mutation, it was found that Tiron could inhibit AP-1-induced upregulation of MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression through blocking AP-1 binding to the AP-1 binding sites in the MMP-1 and MMP-3 promoter region. In conclusion, Tiron may be a novel antioxidant for preventing and treating skin photoaging UV-induced. PMID:27486852

  16. Tiron Inhibits UVB-Induced AP-1 Binding Sites Transcriptional Activation on MMP-1 and MMP-3 Promoters by MAPK Signaling Pathway in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Mei; Zhang, Quan-Wu; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2016-01-01

    Recent research found that Tiron was an effective antioxidant that could act as the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger or alleviate the acute toxic metal overload in vivo. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of Tiron on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 expression in human dermal fibroblast cells. Western blot and ELISA analysis revealed that Tiron inhibited ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced protein expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Real-time quantitative PCR confirmed that Tiron could inhibit UVB-induced mRNA expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Furthermore, Tiron significantly blocked UVB-induced activation of the MAPK signaling pathway and activator protein (AP)-1 in the downstream of this transduction pathway in fibroblasts. Through the AP-1 binding site mutation, it was found that Tiron could inhibit AP-1-induced upregulation of MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression through blocking AP-1 binding to the AP-1 binding sites in the MMP-1 and MMP-3 promoter region. In conclusion, Tiron may be a novel antioxidant for preventing and treating skin photoaging UV-induced. PMID:27486852

  17. Fungal stealth technology.

    PubMed

    Rappleye, Chad A; Goldman, William E

    2008-01-01

    Medically important fungi range from commensal organisms that cause opportunistic infections to primary fungal pathogens that can cause disease in immunocompetent hosts. Host phagocyte-expressed pattern-recognition receptors represent one obstacle to infection, and the extent to which fungal cells can evade detection by host receptors helps shape their pathogenic potential. This review highlights recently defined mechanisms employed by successful fungal pathogens to conceal their immunostimulatory molecular signatures from leukocyte receptors or to disrupt host response signals. Continued improvements in our understanding of these fungal stealth mechanisms should provide new options for future therapeutics to expose these fungal pathogens and limit their virulence capacity.

  18. A novel bipartite UNC-101/AP-1 μ1 binding signal mediates KVS-4/Kv2.1 somatodendritic distribution in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Zeng, Jia; Ouyang, Chenxi; Luo, Qianyun; Yu, Miao; Yang, Zhenrong; Wang, Hui; Shen, Kang; Shi, Anbing

    2016-01-01

    Potassium channels such as Kv2.1 are targeted to specific subcellular compartments to fulfill various functions. However, the mechanisms for their localization are poorly understood. Here, we show that KVS-4/Kv2.1 somatodendritic localization in Caenorhabditis elegansDA9 neuron requires UNC-101(AP-1 μ subunit). We define a bipartite sorting signal within KVS-4 consisting of a C-terminal EQMIL and N-terminal WNIIE motifs. The bipartite signal is sufficient to target nonpolarized transmembrane protein MIG-13 into DA9 somatodendritic compartments. Furthermore, we found that AP-1 interacts with the bipartite signal through UNC-101/AP-1 μ N-terminal predicted Longin-like domain. Our results provide new insight into the mechanisms of Kv2.1 post-Golgi sorting and targeting.

  19. Expression of AP-1 family transcription factors in the amygdala during conditioned taste aversion learning: role for Fra-2

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Bumsup; Goltz, Marion; Houpt, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Conditioned taste aversion (CTA) learning occurs after the pairing of a novel taste with a toxin (e.g. sucrose with LiCl). The immediate-early gene c-Fos is necessary for CTA learning, but c-Fos alone cannot be sufficient for consolidation. The expression of other AP-1 proteins from the Fos- and Jun-families may also be required shortly after conditioning for CTA consolidation. To screen for the expression of AP-1 transcription factors within small subregions, RT-PCR analysis was used after laser capture microdissection of the amygdala. Rats were infused intraorally with 5% sucrose (6ml/6min) or injected with LiCl (12ml/kg, 0.15M, i.p.) or given sucrose paired with LiCl (sucrose/LiCl), or not treated; 1 h later their brains were dissected. The lateral (LA), basolateral (BLA), and central (CeA) subnuclei of the amgydala of single 5 μm sections from individual rats were dissected using the Arcturus PixCell II system. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed the consistent presence of c-Fos, Fra-2, c-Jun, and JunD in the amygdala. In situ hybridization confirmed that c-Fos and Fra-2 mRNA expression was increased in the CeA after LiCl and sucrose/LiCl treatment. Immunohistochemistry for Fra-2 revealed high baseline levels of Fra-2 protein in the BLA and CeA, but also an increase in Fra-2 in the BLA and CeA after LiCl and sucrose/LiCl treatment. The similarity of response in LiCl and sucrose/LiCl treated groups might reflect activation by LiCl in both groups. To control for the effects of LiCl, rats were tested in a learned safety experiment. Fra-2 and c-Fos were examined in response to sucrose/LiCl in rats with prior familiarity with sucrose compared to rats without prior exposure to sucrose. The familiar (pre-exposure) group showed a significantly decreased number of Fra-2-positive cells compared with the novel group in the BLA, but not in the CeA. Because pre-exposure to sucrose attenuates CTA learning, a decreased cellular response in pre-exposed rats suggests a specific

  20. Arctigenin, a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, inhibits MAP kinases and AP-1 activation via potent MKK inhibition: the role in TNF-alpha inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Kyung; Jang, Young Pyo; Kim, Young Choong; Kim, Sang Geon

    2004-10-01

    Arctigenin, naturally occurring in Bardanae fructus, Saussurea medusa, Arctium lappa L., Torreya nucifera and Ipomea cairica, is a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Previously, we showed that arctigenin potently inhibited the induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which involved suppression of NF-kappaB activation. In the present study, we examined the effects of arctigenin on mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation in Raw264.7 cells and MAP kinase kinase (MKK) activity. The effect of arctigenin on activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation was also studied in association with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression. Immunoblot analysis showed that arctigenin inhibited phosphorylation of MAP kinases ERK1/2, p38 kinase and JNK and their activities in Raw264.7 cells treated with LPS. Arctigenin potently inhibited the activity of MKK1 in vitro with the IC(50) value of 1 nM. Gel shift and reporter gene analyses revealed that arctigenin inhibited LPS-inducible AP-1 binding to the AP-1 consensus oligonucleotide and AP-1-mediated reporter gene expression. In view of the potential role of AP-1 in the induction of TNF-alpha, we next examined the inhibitory effects of arctigenin on the expression of TNF-alpha. Arctigenin blocked TNF-alpha production and decreased the level of TNF-alpha mRNA in the cells exposed to LPS. These results showed that arctigenin inhibited activation of MAP kinases including ERK1/2, p38 kinase and JNK through the inhibition of MKK activities, leading to AP-1 inactivation, which might, at least in part, contribute to the inhibition of TNF-alpha production.

  1. Assessment of costimulation and coinhibition in a triple parameter T cell reporter line: Simultaneous measurement of NF-κB, NFAT and AP-1.

    PubMed

    Jutz, Sabrina; Leitner, Judith; Schmetterer, Klaus; Doel-Perez, Iago; Majdic, Otto; Grabmeier-Pfistershammer, Katharina; Paster, Wolfgang; Huppa, Johannes B; Steinberger, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Engagement of the T cell receptor complex reprograms T cells for proliferation, cytokine production and differentiation towards effector cells. This process depends on activating costimulatory signals and is counteracted by coinhibitory molecules. Three transcription factors, namely NF-κB, NFAT and AP-1, have a major role in inducing the transcriptional program that is required for T cell activation and differentiation. Here we describe the generation of a triple parameter reporter based on the human Jurkat T cell line, where response elements for NF-κB, NFAT and AP-1 drive the expression of the fluorescent proteins CFP, eGFP and mCherry, respectively. The emission spectra of these proteins allow simultaneous assessment of NF-κB, NFAT and AP-1 activity in response to stimulation. Ligation of the TCR complex induced moderate reporter activity, which was strongly enhanced upon coengagement of the costimulatory receptors CD2 or CD28. Moreover, we have generated and tested triple parameter reporter cells that harbor costimulatory and inhibitory receptors not endogenously expressed in the Jurkat cells. In these experiments we could show that engagement of the costimulatory molecule 4-1BB enhances NF-κB and AP-1 activity, whereas coinhibition via PD-1 or BTLA strongly reduced the activation of NF-κB and NFAT. Engagement of BTLA significantly inhibited AP-1, whereas PD-1 had little effect on the activation of this transcription factor. Our triple parameter reporter T cell line is an excellent tool to assess the effect of costimulatory and coinhibitory receptors on NF-κB, NFAT and AP-1 activity and has a wide range of applications beyond the evaluation of costimulatory pathways.

  2. Lead induces COX-2 expression in glial cells in a NFAT-dependent, AP-1/NFκB-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinlong; Du, Kejun; Cai, Qinzhen; Ma, Lisha; Jiao, Zhenzhen; Tan, Jinrong; Xu, Zhou; Li, Jingxia; Luo, Wenjin; Chen, Jingyuan; Gao, Jimin; Zhang, Dongyun; Huang, Chuanshu

    2014-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies have provided solid evidence for the neurotoxic effect of lead for decades of years. In view of the fact that children are more vulnerable to the neurotoxicity of lead, lead exposure has been an urgent public health concern. The modes of action of lead neurotoxic effects include disturbance of neurotransmitter storage and release, damage of mitochondria, as well as induction of apoptosis in neurons, cerebrovascular endothelial cells, astroglia and oligodendroglia. Our studies here, from a novel point of view, demonstrates that lead specifically caused induction of COX-2, a well known inflammatory mediator in neurons and glia cells. Furthermore, we revealed that COX-2 was induced by lead in a transcription-dependent manner, which relayed on transcription factor NFAT, rather than AP-1 and NFκB, in glial cells. Considering the important functions of COX-2 in mediation of inflammation reaction and oxidative stress, our studies here provide a mechanistic insight into the understanding of lead-associated inflammatory neurotoxicity effect via activation of pro-inflammatory NFAT3/COX-2 axis. PMID:25193092

  3. Biomechanical and biochemical regulation of cathepsin K expression in endothelial cells converge at AP-1 and NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Philip M; Anbazhakan, Suhaas; Kang, Baolin; Pace, Betty S; Platt, Manu O

    2016-05-01

    Cathepsins K and V are powerful elastases elevated in endothelial cells by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) stimulation and disturbed blood flow both of which contribute to inflammation-mediated arterial remodeling. However, mechanisms behind endothelial cell integration of biochemical and biomechanical cues to regulate cathepsin production are not known. To distinguish these mechanisms, human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were stimulated with TNFα and exposed to pro-remodeling or vasoprotective shear stress profiles. TNFα upregulated cathepsin K via JNK/c-jun activation, but vasoprotective shear stress inhibited TNFα-stimulated cathepsin K expression. JNK/c-jun were still phosphorylated, but cathepsin K mRNA levels were significantly reduced to almost null indicating separate biomechanical regulation of cathepsin K by shear stress separate from biochemical stimulation. Treatment with Bay 11-7082, an inhibitor of IκBα phosphorylation, was sufficient to block induction of cathepsin K by both pro-remodeling shear stress and TNFα, implicating NF-κB as the biomechanical regulator, and its protein levels were reduced in HAECs by vasoprotective shear stress. In conclusion, NF-κB and AP-1 activation were necessary to activate cathepsin K expression in endothelial cells, highlighting integration of biochemical and biomechanical stimuli to control cathepsins K and V, powerful elastases implicated for arterial remodeling due to chronic inflammation and disturbed blood flow. PMID:26760306

  4. The AP-1 transcription factor component Fosl2 potentiates the rate of myocardial differentiation from the zebrafish second heart field.

    PubMed

    Jahangiri, Leila; Sharpe, Michka; Novikov, Natasha; González-Rosa, Juan Manuel; Borikova, Asya; Nevis, Kathleen; Paffett-Lugassy, Noelle; Zhao, Long; Adams, Meghan; Guner-Ataman, Burcu; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, C Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate heart forms through successive phases of cardiomyocyte differentiation. Initially, cardiomyocytes derived from first heart field (FHF) progenitors assemble the linear heart tube. Thereafter, second heart field (SHF) progenitors differentiate into cardiomyocytes that are accreted to the poles of the heart tube over a well-defined developmental window. Although heart tube elongation deficiencies lead to life-threatening congenital heart defects, the variables controlling the initiation, rate and duration of myocardial accretion remain obscure. Here, we demonstrate that the AP-1 transcription factor, Fos-like antigen 2 (Fosl2), potentiates the rate of myocardial accretion from the zebrafish SHF. fosl2 mutants initiate accretion appropriately, but cardiomyocyte production is sluggish, resulting in a ventricular deficit coupled with an accumulation of SHF progenitors. Surprisingly, mutant embryos eventually correct the myocardial deficit by extending the accretion window. Overexpression of Fosl2 also compromises production of SHF-derived ventricular cardiomyocytes, a phenotype that is consistent with precocious depletion of the progenitor pool. Our data implicate Fosl2 in promoting the progenitor to cardiomyocyte transition and uncover the existence of regulatory mechanisms to ensure appropriate SHF-mediated cardiomyocyte contribution irrespective of embryonic stage.

  5. Identification of GATA2 and AP-1 activator elements within the enhancer VNTR occurring in intron 5 of the human SIRT3 gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human SIRT3 gene contains an intronic VNTR enhancer. A T > C transition occurring in the second repeat of each VNTR allele implies the presence/absence of a putative GATA binding motif. A partially overlapping AP-1 site, not affected by the transition, was also identified. Aims of the present study ...

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Apigenin on LPS-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Mediators and AP-1 Factors in Human Lung Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rajeshwari H; Babu, R L; Naveen Kumar, M; Kiran Kumar, K M; Hegde, Shubha M; Nagesh, Rashmi; Ramesh, Govindarajan T; Sharma, S Chidananda

    2016-02-01

    Apigenin is one of the plant flavonoids present in fruits and vegetables, acting as an important nutraceutical component. It is recognized as a potential antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory molecule. In the present study, the mechanism of anti-inflammatory action of apigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines and activator protein-1 (AP-1) factors in human lung A549 cells was investigated. The anti-inflammatory activity of apigenin on LPS-induced inflammation was determined by analyzing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and different AP-1 factors. Apigenin significantly inhibited the LPS-induced expression of iNOS, COX-2, expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α), and AP-1 proteins (c-Jun, c-Fos, and JunB) including nitric oxide production. Study confirms the anti-inflammatory effect of apigenin by inhibiting the expression of inflammatory mediators and AP-1 factors involved in the inflammation and its importance in the treatment of lung inflammatory diseases. PMID:26276128

  7. Multiple doses of diacylglycerol and calcium ionophore are necessary to activate AP-1 enhancer activity and induce markers of macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    William, F; Wagner, F; Karin, M; Kraft, A S

    1990-10-25

    In contrast to phorbol esters, multiple doses of diacylgycerols are needed to differentiate U937 human monoblastic leukemic cells to a macrophage-like phenotype. Although both of these agents similarly activate protein kinase C in vitro, it is not known why these agents appear to have differing biologic effects. One possibility is that they regulate gene transcription in slightly different ways. Regulation of gene transcription by phorbol esters is complex and involves the stimulation of the transactivating proteins Jun and Fos which form dimers and bind to the AP-1 enhancer elements (5'-TGAGTCA-3'). To understand whether diacylglycerols regulate gene transcription similarly to phorbol esters and to examine whether activation of AP-1 enhancer activity is correlated with differentiation, we have treated U937 human monoblastic leukemic cells with these agents and examined activation of transcription from AP-1 enhancer elements. We find that, although a single dose of diacylglycerol, like phorbol esters, is sufficient to elevate mRNA levels of both the c-jun and c-fos protooncogenes, in contrast to phorbol esters there is no increase in either Jun protein or activation of AP-1 enhancer activity. However, multiple doses of this agent given over 24 h stimulate repeated elevations in c-jun and c-fos mRNA, increases in Jun protein, and enhancer activation. Treatment of U937 cells with ionomycin, a calcium ionophore, also stimulates an increase in c-jun mRNA, but neither activates AP-1 enhancer activity nor stimulates differentiation of these cells. However ionomycin functions to enhance the effects of diacylglycerols both on transcriptional activation and U937 differentiation. These results suggest a complex regulation of AP-1 enhancer activity in U937 cells by diacylglycerols involving both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. Maximal activation of AP-1 enhancer elements, and not changes in jun and fos mRNA, is correlated with increases in

  8. Visualization of Fra-1/AP-1 activation during LPS-induced inflammatory lung injury using fluorescence optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Tamatam, Chandramohan R.; Potteti, Haranatha R.; Raman, Venu; Lee, Jae-Woo; Matthay, Michael A.; Mehta, Dolly; Reddy, Sekhar P.

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate lung inflammatory response following oxidant and toxicant exposure can lead to abnormal repair and disease pathogenesis, including fibrosis. Thus early detection of molecular and cellular processes and mediators promoting lung inflammation is necessary to develop better strategies for therapeutic intervention and disease management. Previously, we have shown that transcription factor Fra-1/AP-1 plays key roles in lung inflammatory response, as Fra-1-null mice are less susceptible than wild-type mice to LPS-induced lung injury and mortality. Herein, we developed a transgenic reporter mouse model expressing tdTomato under the control of FRA-1 (human) promoter (referred to as FRA-1TdTg mice) to monitor its activation during inflammatory lung injury using fluorescence protein-based optical imaging and molecular analysis in vivo and ex vivo. A higher red fluorescent signal was observed in the lungs of LPS-treated FRA-1TdTg mice compared with vehicle controls, and Western blot and qRT-PCR analyses revealed a significant correlation with the FRA-1-tdTomato reporter expression. Immunocolocalization demonstrated expression of FRA-1-tdTomato largely in lung alveolar macrophages and to some extent in epithelial cells. Moreover, we validated these results with a second reporter mouse model that expressed green fluorescent protein upon activation of endogenous Fra-1 promoter. Additionally, we demonstrated increased expression of FRA-1 in alveolar macrophages in human lung instilled with Escherichia coli ex vivo. Collectively, our data obtained from two independent reporter mouse models and from human samples underscore the significance of Fra-1 activation in alveolar macrophages during inflammatory lung injury and may aid in developing strategies to target this transcription factor in lung injury and repair. PMID:26071555

  9. The adeno-associated virus major regulatory protein Rep78-c-Jun-DNA motif complex modulates AP-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Prasad, C Krishna; Meyers, Craig; Zhan, De-Jin; You, Hong; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Mehta, Jawahar L; Liu, Yong; Hermonat, Paul L

    2003-09-15

    Multiple epidemiologic studies show that adeno-associated virus (AAV) is negatively associated with cervical cancer (CX CA), a cancer which is positively associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Mechanisms for this correlation may be by Rep78's (AAV's major regulatory protein) ability to bind the HPV-16 p97 promoter DNA and inhibit transcription, to bind and interfere with the functions of the E7 oncoprotein of HPV-16, and to bind a variety of HPV-important cellular transcription factors such as Sp1 and TBP. c-Jun is another important cellular factor intimately linked to the HPV life cycle, as well as keratinocyte differentiation and skin development. Skin is the natural host tissue for both HPV and AAV. In this article it is demonstrated that Rep78 directly interacts with c-Jun, both in vitro and in vivo, as analyzed by Western blot, yeast two-hybrid cDNA, and electrophoretic mobility shift-supershift assay (EMSA supershift). Addition of anti-Rep78 antibodies inhibited the EMSA supershift. Investigating the biological implications of this interaction, Rep78 inhibited the c-Jun-dependent c-jun promoter in transient and stable chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT) assays. Rep78 also inhibited c-Jun-augmented c-jun promoter as well as the HPV-16 p97 promoter activity (also c-Jun regulated) in in vitro transcription assays in T47D nuclear extracts. Finally, the Rep78-c-Jun interaction mapped to the amino-half of Rep78. The ability of Rep78 to interact with c-Jun and down-regulate AP-1-dependent transcription suggests one more mechanism by which AAV may modulate the HPV life cycle and the carcinogenesis process.

  10. Human kidney anion exchanger 1 interacts with adaptor-related protein complex 1 μ1A (AP-1 mu1A).

    PubMed

    Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Junking, Mutita; Ngaojanlar, Piengpaga; Sukomon, Nattakan; Ungsupravate, Duangporn; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Akkarapatumwong, Varaporn; Noisakran, Sansanee; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-Thai

    2010-10-01

    Kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) mediates chloride (Cl⁻) and bicarbonate (HCO₃⁻) exchange at the basolateral membrane of kidney α-intercalated cells. Impaired trafficking of kAE1 leads to defect of the Cl⁻/HCO₃⁻ exchange at the basolateral membrane and failure of proton (H+) secretion at the apical membrane, causing a kidney disease--distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). To gain a better insight into kAE1 trafficking, we searched for proteins physically interacting with the C-terminal region of kAE1 (Ct-kAE1), which contains motifs crucial for intracellular trafficking, by a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system. An adaptor-related protein complex 1 μ1A (AP-1 mu1A) subunit was found to interact with Ct-kAE1. The interaction between either Ct-kAE1 or full-length kAE1 and AP-1 mu1A were confirmed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T by co-immunoprecipitation, affinity co-purification, co-localization, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-based protein fragment complementation assay (PCA) and GST pull-down assay. The interacting site for AP-1 mu1A on Ct-kAE1 was found to be Y904DEV907, a subset of YXXØ motif. Interestingly, suppression of endogenous AP-1 mu1A in HEK 293T by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased membrane localization of kAE1 and increased its intracellular accumulation, suggesting for the first time that AP-1 mu1A is involved in the kAE1 trafficking of kidney α-intercalated cells. PMID:20833140

  11. Up-regulation of interleukin-4 production via NF-AT/AP-1 activation in T cells by biochanin A, a phytoestrogen and its metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin; Chung, Su Wol; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Tae Sung . E-mail: tskim@korea.ac.kr

    2006-05-01

    Phytoestrogens are naturally occurring compounds derived from plants. Although phytoestrogens exhibit many biological functions including estrogen agonist/antagonist properties, the effect on allergic responses remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether biochanin A, a phytoestrogen and its metabolites, genistein, p-ethylphenol and phenolic acid, affect production of IL-4, a pro-inflammatory cytokine closely associated with allergic immune responses, in primary CD4{sup +} T cells and EL4 T lymphoma cells. Biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol significantly enhanced IL-4 production from both CD4{sup +} T cells and EL4 cells in a dose-dependent manner, while phenolic acid did not. Biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol also enhanced IL-4 gene promoter activity in EL4 cells transiently transfected with IL-4 promoter constructs, but this effect was impaired in EL4 cells transfected with an IL-4 promoter construct deleted of a P4 site carrying NF-AT and AP-1 binding sites. In addition, biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol increased both NF-AT and AP-1 DNA binding activities, indicating that they might enhance IL-4 production via NF-AT/AP-1 activation. Furthermore, biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation and PKC activity, while they did not affect ERK phosphorylation. The enhanced NF-AT DNA binding activities were suppressed by inhibitors for PI3-K and PKC, but not by p38 MAPK inhibitors. In contrast, the enhanced AP-1 DNA binding activities and p38 MAPK phosphorylation were significantly suppressed by specific inhibitors for PKC and p38 MAPK, but not by PI3-K inhibitors. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol enhance IL-4 production in activated T cells by two independent pathways, PI3-K/PKC/NF-AT and PKC/p38 MAPK/AP-1.

  12. Berberine modulates AP-1 activity to suppress HPV transcription and downstream signaling to induce growth arrest and apoptosis in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background- Specific types of high risk Human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) particularly, HPV types 16 and 18 cause cervical cancer and while the two recently developed vaccines against these HPV types are prophylactic in nature, therapeutic options for treatment and management of already existing HPV infection are not available as yet. Because transcription factor, Activator Protein-1 (AP-1) plays a central role in HPV-mediated cervical carcinogenesis, we explored the possibility of its therapeutic targeting by berberine, a natural alkaloid derived from a medicinal plant species, Berberis which has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties with no known toxicity; however, the effect of berberine against HPV has not been elucidated. Results- We studied the effect of berberine on HPV16-positive cervical cancer cell line, SiHa and HPV18-positive cervical cancer cell line, HeLa using electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays, western and northern blotting which showed that berberine could selectively inhibit constitutively activated AP-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner and downregulates HPV oncogenes expression. Inhibition of AP-1 was also accompanied by changes in the composition of their DNA-binding complex. Berberine specifically downregulated expression of oncogenic c-Fos which was also absent in the AP-1 binding complex. Treatment with berberine resulted in repression of E6 and E7 levels and concomitant increase in p53 and Rb expression in both cell types. Berberine also suppressed expression of telomerase protein, hTERT, which translated into growth inhibition of cervical cancer cells. Interestingly, a higher concentration of berberine was found to reduce the cell viability through mitochondria-mediated pathway and induce apoptosis by activating caspase-3. Conclusion- These results indicate that berberine can effectively target both the host and viral factors responsible for development of cervical cancer through inhibition of AP-1 and

  13. Fungal Genomics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-12

    The JGI Fungal Genomics Program aims to scale up sequencing and analysis of fungal genomes to explore the diversity of fungi important for energy and the environment, and to promote functional studies on a system level. Combining new sequencing technologies and comparative genomics tools, JGI is now leading the world in fungal genome sequencing and analysis. Over 120 sequenced fungal genomes with analytical tools are available via MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a web-portal for fungal biologists. Our model of interacting with user communities, unique among other sequencing centers, helps organize these communities, improves genome annotation and analysis work, and facilitates new larger-scale genomic projects. This resulted in 20 high-profile papers published in 2011 alone and contributing to the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, which targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts). Our next grand challenges include larger scale exploration of fungal diversity (1000 fungal genomes), developing molecular tools for DOE-relevant model organisms, and analysis of complex systems and metagenomes.

  14. Fungal Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Evelyn; Levitz, Stuart M.

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant with the increased prevalence of immunocompromised persons, invasive fungal infections have become considerably more frequent in the last 50 years. High mortality rates caused by invasive mycoses and high morbidity because of intractable mucosal infections have created an unmet need for innovative prophylactic and therapeutic strategies against fungal pathogens. Several immunotherapeutics and vaccines are in development to address this need, although one has yet to reach the clinic. This review focuses on past and current immunotherapeutic and vaccine strategies being tested to either prevent or treat fungal infections, as well as the challenges associated with their development. PMID:25368016

  15. Bone morphogenetic protein-7 inhibits constitutive and interleukin-1 beta-induced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression in human mesangial cells: role for JNK/AP-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung-Ja; Yang, Chul Woo; Jin, Dong Chan; Chang, Yoon Sik; Bang, Byung Kee; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2003-03-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7), which belongs to the TGF-beta superfamily, has been shown to reduce macrophage infiltration and tissue injury in animal models of inflammatory renal disease. To explore the mechanism involved in the anti-inflammatory effect, we investigated the effect of BMP-7 on monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression in cultured human mesangial cells. BMP- 7 significantly inhibited constitutive and IL-1 beta-induced MCP-1 protein production and MCP-1 mRNA expression by mesangial cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. BMP-7 also inhibited IL-1 beta-induced monocyte chemotactic activity released from the mesangial cells. We examined the role of transcription factors NF-kappa B and AP-1 in BMP-7 inhibition of IL-1 beta-induced MCP-1 expression. IL-1 beta increased NF-kappa B and AP-1 activity and both transcription factors mediated IL-1 beta-induced MCP-1 expression in mesangial cells. BMP-7 inhibited IL-1 beta-induced AP-1 activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, IL-1 beta-induced NF-kappa B activity and I kappa B alpha degradation were not affected by BMP-7. Furthermore, IL-1 beta-induced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase was inhibited by BMP-7. These data suggest that BMP-7 inhibits constitutive and IL-1 beta-induced MCP-1 expression in human mesangial cells partly by inhibiting c-Jun N-terminal kinase activity and subsequent AP-1 activity, and provide new insight into the therapeutic potential of BMP-7 in the inflammatory renal diseases.

  16. Sargahydroquinoic acid inhibits TNFα-induced AP-1 and NF-κB signaling in HaCaT cells through PPARα activation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Youngsic; Jung, Yujung; Kim, Min Cheol; Kwon, Hak Cheol; Kang, Ki Sung; Kim, Yong Kee; Kim, Su-Nam

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • SHQA increases PPARα/γ transactivation and inhibits MMP-2/-9 expression. • SHQA inhibits TNFα-induced AP-1 and MAPK signaling. • SHQA inhibits TNFα-induced p65 translocation and IκBα phosphorylation. • SHQA inhibits TNFα-induced AP-1 and NF-κB signaling via PPARα. - Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors and expressed in various cell types in the skin, including keratinocytes, fibroblasts and infiltrating immune cells. Thus, their ligands are targets for the treatment of various skin disorders, such as photo-aging and chronological aging of skin. Intensive studies have revealed that PPARα/γ functions in photo-aging and age-related inflammation by regulating matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) via activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). However, the detailed mechanism of PPARα/γ’s role in skin aging has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we confirmed that sargahydroquinoic acid (SHQA) as a PPARα/γ ligand significantly decreased Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNFα)-induced MMP-2/-9 expression by downregulating TNFα-induced transcription factors, subsequently reducing IκBα degradation and blocking NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in HaCaT human epidermal keratinocyte cells. Treatment of cells with SHQA and GW6471 (PPARα antagonist) not bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (PPARγ antagonists), reversed the effect on TNFα-induced inflammatory signaling pathway activation. Taken together, our data suggest that SHQA inhibit TNFα-induced MMP-2/-9 expression and age-related inflammation by suppressing AP-1 and NF-κB pathway via PPARα.

  17. Hyperactivated NF-κB and AP-1 Transcription Factors Promote Highly Accessible Chromatin and Constitutive Transcription across the Interleukin-6 Gene Promoter in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Ndlovu, ′Matladi N.; Van Lint, Carine; Van Wesemael, Karlien; Callebert, Pieter; Chalbos, Dany; Haegeman, Guy; Vanden Berghe, Wim

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6), involved in cancer-related inflammation, acts as an autocrine and paracrine growth factor, which promotes angiogenesis, metastasis, and subversion of immunity, and changes the response to hormones and to chemotherapeutics. We explored transcription mechanisms involved in differential IL-6 gene expression in breast cancer cells with different metastatic properties. In weakly metastatic MCF7 cells, histone H3 K9 methylation, HP1 binding, and weak recruitment of AP-1 Fra-1/c-Jun, NF-κB p65 transcription factors, and coactivators is indicative of low chromatin accessibility and gene transcription at the IL-6 gene promoter. In highly metastatic MDA-MB231 cells, strong DNase, MNase, and restriction enzyme accessibility, as well potent constitutive transcription of the IL-6 gene promoter, coincide with increased H3 S10 K14 phosphoacetylation and promoter enrichment of AP-1 Fra-1/c-Jun and NF-κB p65 transcription factors and MSK1, CBP/p300, Brg1, and Ezh2 cofactors. Complementation, silencing, and kinase inhibitor experiments further demonstrate involvement of AP-1 Fra-1/c-Jun and NF-κB p65/RelB members, but not of the alpha estrogen receptor in promoting chromatin accessibility and transcription across the IL-6 gene promoter in metastatic breast cancer cells. Finally, the natural withanolide Withaferin A was found to repress IL-6 gene transcription in metastatic breast cancer cells upon dual inhibition of NF-κB and AP-1 Fra-1 transcription factors and silencing of IL-6 promoter chromatin accessibility. PMID:19687301

  18. AP-1 Inhibition by SR 11302 Protects Human Hepatoma HepG2 Cells from Bile Acid-Induced Cytotoxicity by Restoring the NOS-3 Expression

    PubMed Central

    González-Rubio, Sandra; Linares, Clara I.; Aguilar-Melero, Patricia; Rodríguez-Perálvarez, Manuel; Montero-Álvarez, José L.

    2016-01-01

    The harmful effects of bile acid accumulation occurring during cholestatic liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress increase and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS-3) expression decrease in liver cells. We have previously reported that glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA) down-regulates gene expression by increasing SP1 binding to the NOS-3 promoter in an oxidative stress dependent manner. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the role of transcription factor (TF) AP-1 on the NOS-3 deregulation during GCDCA-induced cholestasis. The cytotoxic response to GCDCA was characterized by 1) the increased expression and activation of TFs cJun and c-Fos; 2) a higher binding capability of these at position -666 of the NOS-3 promoter; 3) a decrease of the transcriptional activity of the promoter and the expression and activity of NOS-3; and 4) the expression increase of cyclin D1. Specific inhibition of AP-1 by the retinoid SR 11302 counteracted the cytotoxic effects induced by GCDCA while promoting NOS-3 expression recovery and cyclin D1 reduction. NOS activity inhibition by L-NAME inhibited the protective effect of SR 11302. Inducible NOS isoform was no detected in this experimental model of cholestasis. Our data provide direct evidence for the involvement of AP-1 in the NOS-3 expression regulation during cholestasis and define a critical role for NOS-3 in regulating the expression of cyclin D1 during the cell damage induced by bile acids. AP-1 appears as a potential therapeutic target in cholestatic liver diseases given its role as a transcriptional repressor of NOS-3. PMID:27490694

  19. Molecular targets of the antiinflammatory Harpagophytum procumbens (devil's claw): inhibition of TNFα and COX-2 gene expression by preventing activation of AP-1.

    PubMed

    Fiebich, Bernd L; Muñoz, Eduardo; Rose, Thorsten; Weiss, Gabriele; McGregor, Gerard P

    2012-06-01

    Harpagophytum procumbens (Hp) is often used in the supportive treatment of inflammatory and degenerative diseases of the skeletal system. Although the clinical efficacy in osteoarthritis has been demonstrated in clinical trials, the molecular target(s) of Hp are unclear. This study quantified the effects of the ethanol Hp extract (60% v/v ethanol, sole active ingredient of Pascoe®-Agil), on the expression and release of the major pro-inflammatory mediators in LPS-stimulated human monocytes and the intracellular signalling pathways involved in inflammation. The Hp extract dose-dependently inhibited the release of TNFα as well as that of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂). The Hp prevented TNFα and IL-6 mRNA expression in human monocytes and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in RAW 264.7 cells. Furthermore, the Hp extract inhibited LPS-stimulated AP-1-mediated gene transcription activity and binding to the AP-1 response elements. The extract had no effect on the LPS-induced binding of nuclear factor-κB in RAW 264.7 cells, on LPS-induced degradation of IκBα or on LPS-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), p38MAPK and JNK in human monocytes. The data indicate that a standardized ethanol Hp extract inhibits induction of pro-inflammatory gene expression, possibly by blocking the AP-1 pathway. This is novel evidence of a possible mechanism of action of this antiinflammatory drug. PMID:22072539

  20. A genomic and expression study of AP-1 in primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: evidence for dysregulated expression of JUNB and JUND in MF and SS.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xin; Orchard, Guy; Mitchell, Tracey J; Oyama, Noritaka; Russell-Jones, Robin; Vermeer, Maarten H; Willemze, Rein; van Doorn, Remko; Tensen, Cornelis P; Young, Bryan D; Whittaker, Sean J

    2008-10-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) consists of a group of transcription factors including the JUN and FOS family proteins with diverse biological functions. This study assessed the genomic and expression status of the AP-1 transcription factors in primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) by using immunohistochemistry (IHC), Affymetrix expression microarray, real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). IHC showed JUNB protein expression in tumor cells from 17 of 33 cases of Sezary syndrome (SS) and JUND protein expression in 16 of 23 mycosis fungoides cases. There was no correlation between JUNB and CD30 expression. However, 7 of 12 JUNB-positive SS cases expressed both phosphorylated and total extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) proteins. Expression microarray showed over threefold increased expression of JUNB in three of six SS patients and similar findings were also noted after re-analysis of previously published data. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed the overexpression of JUNB in four SS cases and of JUND in three of four cases. FISH showed increased JUNB copy number in four of seven SS cases. These findings suggest that deregulation of AP-1 expression in CTCL is the result of aberrant expression of JUNB and possible JUND resulting from genomic amplification and constitutive activation of ERK1/2 MAPK in this type of lymphoma.

  1. Regulation of the mouse Na+-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter GLAST: putative role of an AP-1 DNA binding site.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Sotelo, Guadalupe; López-Bayghen, Esther; Hernández-Kelly, L Clara R; Arias-Montaño, J Antonio; Bernabé, Alfonso; Ortega, Arturo

    2007-01-01

    Appropriate removal of L: -glutamate from the synaptic cleft is important for prevention of the excitotoxic effects of this neurotransmitter. The Na+-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter GLAST is regulated in the short term, by a transporter-dependent decrease in uptake activity while in the long term, a receptor's-dependent decrease in GLAST protein levels leads to a severe reduction in glutamate uptake. The promoter region of the mouse glast gene harbors an Activator Protein-1 site (AP-1). To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms triggered by Glu-receptors activation involved in GLAST regulation, we took advantage of the neonatal mouse cerebellar prisms model. We characterized the glutamate uptake activity; the glutamate-dependent effect on GLAST protein levels and over the interaction of nuclear proteins with a mouse glast promoter AP-1 probe. A time and dose dependent decrease in transporter activity matching with a decrease in GLAST levels was recorded upon glutamate treatment. Moreover, a significant increase in glast AP-1 DNA binding was found. Pharmacological experiments established that both effects are mediated through alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate receptors, favoring the notion of the critical involvement of glutamate in the regulation of its binding partners: receptors and transporters.

  2. AP-1 Transcription Factors c-FOS and c-JUN Mediate GnRH-Induced Cadherin-11 Expression and Trophoblast Cell Invasion.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Zhu, Hua; Ma, Liyang; Wang, Yan-Ling; Klausen, Christian; Leung, Peter C K

    2015-06-01

    GnRH is expressed in first-trimester human placenta and increases cell invasion in extravillous cytotrophoblasts (EVTs). Invasive phenotypes have been reported to be regulated by transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1) and mesenchymal cadherin-11. The aim of our study was to investigate the roles of AP-1 components (c-FOS/c-JUN) and cadherin-11 in GnRH-induced cell invasion in human EVT cells. Phosphorylated c-FOS and phosphorylated c-JUN were detected in the cell column regions of human first-trimester placental villi by immunohistochemistry. GnRH treatment increased c-FOS, c-JUN, and cadherin-11 mRNA and protein levels in immortalized EVT (HTR-8/SVneo) cells. Moreover, GnRH treatment induced c-FOS and c-JUN protein phosphorylation and nuclear accumulation. Pretreatment with antide, a GnRH antagonist, attenuated GnRH-induced cadherin-11 expression. Importantly, basal and GnRH-induced cadherin-11 expression and cell invasion were reduced by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of c-FOS, c-JUN, and cadherin-11 in HTR-8/SVneo cells. Our results suggest that GnRH induces the expression and phosphorylation of the AP-1 transcription factors c-FOS and c-JUN in trophoblast cells, which contributes to GnRH-induced elevation of cadherin-11 expression and cell invasion. PMID:25794160

  3. Polarized Traffic of LRP1 Involves AP1B and SNX17 Operating on Y-dependent Sorting Motifs in Different Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Donoso, Maribel; Cancino, Jorge; Lee, Jiyeon; van Kerkhof, Peter; Retamal, Claudio; Bu, Guojun; Gonzalez, Alfonso; Cáceres, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 1 (LRP1) is an endocytic recycling receptor with two cytoplasmic tyrosine-based basolateral sorting signals. Here we show that during biosynthetic trafficking LRP1 uses AP1B adaptor complex to move from a post-TGN recycling endosome (RE) to the basolateral membrane. Then it recycles basolaterally from the basolateral sorting endosome (BSE) involving recognition by sorting nexin 17 (SNX17). In the biosynthetic pathway, Y29 but not N26 from a proximal NPXY directs LRP1 basolateral sorting from the TGN. A N26A mutant revealed that this NPXY motif recognized by SNX17 is required for the receptor's exit from BSE. An endocytic Y63ATL66 motif also functions in basolateral recycling, in concert with an additional endocytic motif (LL86,87), by preventing LRP1 entry into the transcytotic apical pathway. All this sorting information operates similarly in hippocampal neurons to mediate LRP1 somatodendritic distribution regardless of the absence of AP1B in neurons. LRP1 basolateral distribution results then from spatially and temporally segregation steps mediated by recognition of distinct tyrosine-based motifs. We also demonstrate a novel function of SNX17 in basolateral/somatodendritic recycling from a different compartment than AP1B endosomes. PMID:19005208

  4. Extracellular histones induce tissue factor expression in vascular endothelial cells via TLR and activation of NF-κB and AP-1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinyu; Li, Lin; Liu, Jin; Lv, Ben; Chen, Fangping

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular histones have been recognized recently as proinflammatory mediators; they are released from dying cells in response to inflammatory challenge, contributing to endothelial cell dysfunction, thrombin formation, organ failure, and death during sepsis. Clinical studies suggest that the plasma concentration of the histone-DNA complex is correlated with the severity of DIC and is a poor independent prognostic marker in sepsis. In addition, platelet activation stimulates thrombus formation. Whether histones contribute to procoagulant activity in other ways remains elusive. In this study, we confirmed that histones induce tissue factor (TF) expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and macrophages. However, histones did not affect TF pathway inhibitor expression. Moreover, blocking the cell surface receptors TLR4 and TLR2 with specific neutralizing antibodies significantly reduced histone-induced TF expression. Furthermore, histones enhanced the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (c-Rel/p65) and AP-1 expression in a time-dependent manner in ECs. Mutating NF-κB and AP-1 significantly reduced histone-induced TF expression. Altogether, our experiments suggest that histone induces TF expression in ECs via cell surface receptors TLR4 and TLR2, simultaneously depending on the activation of the transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1.

  5. c-Jun/AP-1 pathway-mediated cyclin D1 expression participates in low dose arsenite-induced transformation in mouse epidermal JB6 Cl41 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Dongyun; Li Jingxia; Gao Jimin; Huang Chuanshu

    2009-02-15

    Arsenic is a well-documented human carcinogen associated with skin carcinogenesis. Our previous work reveals that arsenite exposure is able to induce cell transformation in mouse epidermal cell JB6 Cl41 through the activation of ERK, rather than JNK pathway. Our current studies further evaluate downstream pathway in low dose arsenite-induced cell transformation in JB6 Cl41 cells. Our results showed that treatment of cells with low dose arsenite induced activation of c-Jun/AP-1 pathway, and ectopic expression of dominant negative mutant of c-Jun (TAM67) blocked arsenite-induced transformation. Furthermore, our data indicated that cyclin D1 was an important downstream molecule involved in c-Jun/AP-1-mediated cell transformation upon low dose arsenite exposure, because inhibition of cyclin D1 expression by its specific siRNA in the JB6 Cl41 cells resulted in impairment of anchorage-independent growth of cells induced by low dose arsenite. Collectively, our results demonstrate that c-Jun/AP-1-mediated cyclin D1 expression is at least one of the key events implicated in cell transformation upon low dose arsenite exposure.

  6. Inflorescence meristem identity in rice is specified by overlapping functions of three AP1/FUL-like MADS box genes and PAP2, a SEPALLATA MADS box gene.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kaoru; Yasuno, Naoko; Sato, Yutaka; Yoda, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Ryo; Kimizu, Mayumi; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Kyozuka, Junko

    2012-05-01

    In plants, the transition to reproductive growth is of particular importance for successful seed production. Transformation of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) to the inflorescence meristem (IM) is the crucial first step in this transition. Using laser microdissection and microarrays, we found that expression of PANICLE PHYTOMER2 (PAP2) and three APETALA1 (AP1)/FRUITFULL (FUL)-like genes (MADS14, MADS15, and MADS18) is induced in the SAM during meristem phase transition in rice (Oryza sativa). PAP2 is a MADS box gene belonging to a grass-specific subclade of the SEPALLATA subfamily. Suppression of these three AP1/FUL-like genes by RNA interference caused a slight delay in reproductive transition. Further depletion of PAP2 function from these triple knockdown plants inhibited the transition of the meristem to the IM. In the quadruple knockdown lines, the meristem continued to generate leaves, rather than becoming an IM. Consequently, multiple shoots were formed instead of an inflorescence. PAP2 physically interacts with MAD14 and MADS15 in vivo. Furthermore, the precocious flowering phenotype caused by the overexpression of Hd3a, a rice florigen gene, was weakened in pap2-1 mutants. Based on these results, we propose that PAP2 and the three AP1/FUL-like genes coordinately act in the meristem to specify the identity of the IM downstream of the florigen signal.

  7. Src Tyrosine Kinase Activation by 4-Hydroxynonenal Upregulates p38, ERK/AP-1 Signaling and COX-2 Expression in YPEN-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eun Ji; Jeong, Hyoung Oh; Park, Daeui; Kim, Dae Hyun; Choi, Yeon Ja; Chung, Ki Wung; Park, Min Hi; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young

    2015-01-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a major end product of lipid peroxidation, is highly reactive and involved in various cellular processes, such as inflammatory signaling. However, to date, the mechanistic roles of 4-HNE in inflammatory signaling related to protein tyrosine kinases have not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the interaction between 4-HNE and Src (a non-receptor tyrosine kinase) for its involvement in the molecular modulation of the inflammatory signaling pathway utilizing the YPEN-1 cell system. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that 4-HNE phosphorylates (activates) Src at Tyr416 via adduct formation. In addition, LC-MS/MS and a docking simulation model revealed an addiction site at the Cys248 residue of Src, resulting in the stimulation of downstream p38, ERK/AP-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) signaling in YPEN-1 cells. The role of 4-HNE-activated Src in downstream inflammatory signaling was further investigated using dasatinib (a Src inhibitor) and by siRNA knockdown of Src. p38 and ERK were directly regulated by Src, as revealed by immunoblotting of the phosphorylated forms of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which are key elements in the signaling transduction pathway initiated by Src. The study also shows that Src modulates the HNE-enhanced activation of AP-1 and the expression of COX-2 (a target gene of AP-1). Together, the results of this study show that 4-HNE stimulates Src tyrosine kinase in activation of the inflammation process. PMID:26466383

  8. IL-1β and IL-6 activate inflammatory responses of astrocytes against Naegleria fowleri infection via the modulation of MAPKs and AP-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-H; Song, A-R; Sohn, H-J; Lee, J; Yoo, J-K; Kwon, D; Shin, H-J

    2013-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a free-living amoeba, has been found in diverse habitats throughout the world. It causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in children and young adults. The amoeba attaches to nasal mucosa, migrates along olfactory nerves and enters the brain. Astrocytes are involved in the defence against infection and produce inflammatory responses. In this study, we focus on the mechanism of immune responses in astrocytes. We showed, using RNase protection assay, RT-PCR and ELISA in an in vitro culture system, that N. fowleri lysates induce interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and IL-6 expression of astrocytes. In addition, cytokine levels of astrocytes gradually decreased due to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 inhibitors. To determine the transcription factor, we used transcription inhibitor (AP-1 inhibitor), which downregulated IL-1β and IL-6 expression. These results show that AP-1 is related to IL-1β and IL-6 production. N. fowleri-mediated IL-1β and IL-6 expression requires ERK, JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation in astrocytes. These findings show that N. fowleri-stimulated astrocytes in an in vitro culture system lead to AP-1 activation and the subsequent expressions of IL-1β and IL-6, which are dependent on ERK, JNK and p38 MAPKs activation. These results may imply that proinflammatory cytokines have important roles in inflammatory responses to N. fowleri infection.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing signaling molecule N-3-oxododecanoyl homoserine lactone induces matrix metalloproteinase 9 expression via the AP1 pathway in rat fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Gojiro; Minematsu, Takeo; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Yamane, Takumi; Kanazawa, Toshiki; Huang, Lijuan; Asada, Mayumi; Nagase, Takashi; Ikeda, Shin-ichi; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a cell-to-cell communication mechanism, which is responsible for regulating a number of bacterial virulence factors and biofilm maturation and therefore plays an important role for establishing wound infection. Quorum-sensing signals may induce inflammation and predispose wounds to infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa; however, the interaction has not been well investigated. We examined the effects of the P. aeruginosa las quorum-sensing signal, N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL), on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 expression in Rat-1 fibroblasts. 3OC12-HSL upregulated the expression of the MMP9 gene bearing an activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding site in the promoter region. We further investigated the mechanism underlying this effect. c-Fos gene expression increased rapidly after exposure to 3OC12-HSL, and nuclear translocation of c-Fos protein was observed; both effects were reduced by pretreatment with an AP-1 inhibitor. These results suggest that 3OC12-HSL can alter MMP9 gene expression in fibroblasts via the AP-1 signaling pathway.

  10. A novel tribasic Golgi export signal directs cargo protein interaction with activated Rab11 and AP-1–dependent Golgi–plasma membrane trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Hirendrasinh B.; Duncan, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The reovirus fusion–associated small transmembrane (FAST) proteins comprise a unique family of viral membrane fusion proteins dedicated to inducing cell–cell fusion. We recently reported that a polybasic motif (PBM) in the cytosolic tail of reptilian reovirus p14 FAST protein functions as a novel tribasic Golgi export signal. Using coimmunoprecipitation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assays, we now show the PBM directs interaction of p14 with GTP-Rab11. Overexpression of dominant-negative Rab11 and RNA interference knockdown of endogenous Rab11 inhibited p14 plasma membrane trafficking and resulted in p14 accumulation in the Golgi complex. This is the first example of Golgi export to the plasma membrane that is dependent on the interaction of membrane protein cargo with activated Rab11. RNA interference and immunofluorescence microscopy further revealed that p14 Golgi export is dependent on AP-1 (but not AP-3 or AP-4) and that Rab11 and AP-1 both colocalize with p14 at the TGN. Together these results imply the PBM mediates interactions of p14 with activated Rab11 at the TGN, resulting in p14 sorting into AP1-coated vesicles for anterograde TGN–plasma membrane transport. PMID:26941330

  11. A mimic of phosphorylated prolactin induces apoptosis by activating AP-1 and upregulating p21/waf1 in human prostate cancer PC3 cells

    PubMed Central

    DU, LIANLIAN; WU, WEI

    2012-01-01

    A mimic of phosphorylated prolactin (S179D PRL) has been demonstrated to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo; however, the mechanisms involved in this process remain unknown. In this study, we identified that a four-day treatment of S179D PRL (1 μg/ml) in human prostate PC3 cancer cells activated JNK, c-fos and c-jun, and led to apoptosis. We also demonstrated that p21/waf1 was upregulated in cells transfected with the human PRL receptor (S1b) following a four-day incubation with S179D PRL (1 μg/ml). Once the cells were cotransfected with S1b and either c-fos, c-jun or the c-fos/c-jun constructs for 24 h, S17D PRL activated JNK, c-fos and c-jun, and induced apoptosis in the c-fos/c-jun transfected cells. Additionally, S179D PRL upregulated p21 luciferase activity in the cells transfected with the S1b, activating protein-1 (AP-1) (7x) Luc or p21 Luc constructs. SP600125 (25 μM), a JNK blocker, inhibited the upregulation of AP-1 Luc and p21 Luc in the c-fos/c-jun transfected cells. These results demonstrate that S179D PRL activates JNK and AP-1, which leads to p21 upregulation and apoptosis in human prostate PC3 cancer cells. PMID:23162652

  12. Synergism through combination of chemotherapy and oxidative stress-induced autophagy in A549 lung cancer cells using redox-responsive nanohybrids: a new strategy for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hsin-Yi; Chang, Ya-Ju; Fan, Nien-Chu; Wang, Li-Sheng; Lai, Nien-Chu; Yang, Chia-Min; Wu, Li-Chen; Ho, Ja-an Annie

    2015-02-01

    A combination of various therapeutic approaches has emerged as a promising strategy for cancer treatment. A safe and competent nano-delivery system is thus in urgent demand to facilitate the simultaneous transport of various therapeutic agents to cancer cells and a tumor region to achieve synergistic effect. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSNs) were fabricated herein as potential candidates for drug delivery. Serving as gatekeepers, GNPs (5 nm in diameter) were attached onto the amino-functionalized MSNs (denoted as NMSNs) via a relatively weak gold-nitrogen bonding. The resulting nanohybrids (denoted as GCMSNs) were uptaken by cells, and the detachment of GNPs and subsequent intracellular drug release from NMSNs were achieved by competitive binding of intracellular glutathione to GNPs. In addition to the function of gatekeeping, GNPs also play another role as the oxidative stress elicitor. Our in vitro studies revealed that GCMSNs induced higher oxidative stress in lung cancer cells (A549) than in normal cells (3T3-L1). This growth inhibitory effect found in the cancer cells was likely induced by mitochondria dysfunction originated from the GCMSN-induced, oxidative stress-triggered mitochondria-mediated autophagy. The redox-responsive nanohybrids were further loaded with camptothecin and the intensified synergistic therapeutic effects were observed associated with combined chemotherapy and oxidative stress strategy. The results clearly demonstrate that such unique nanohybrids hold great promise for selective and effective cancer treatments.

  13. Cerebral Area Differential Redox Response of Neonatal Rats to Selenite-Induced Oxidative Stress and to Concurrent Administration of Highbush Blueberry Leaf Polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Ferlemi, Anastasia-Varvara; Mermigki, Penelope G; Makri, Olga E; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitrios; Koulakiotis, Nikolaos S; Margarity, Marigoula; Tsarbopoulos, Anthony; Georgakopoulos, Constantinos D; Lamari, Fotini N

    2015-11-01

    Our goal was to delineate the mechanisms of selenite-induced oxidative stress in neonatal rats and investigate the potential of blueberry leaf polyphenols to counteract the induced stress. Vaccinium corymbosum leaf decoction (BLD) was analyzed by UPLC-MS and LC-DAD, along with its in vitro antioxidant activity (DPPH radical scavenging, FRAP, ferrous chelation). Newborn suckling Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: 'Se' and 'SeBLD' received 20 μmol Na2SeO3/kg BW subcutaneously (PN day 10); 'SeBLD' received 100 mg dry BLD/kg BW intraperitoneally (PN11 and 12) and Group 'C' received normal saline. Βiochemical analysis revealed tissue-specific effects of selenite. Brain as a whole was more resistant to selenite toxicity in comparison to liver; midbrain and cerebellum were in general not affected, but cortex was moderately disturbed. Liver lipid peroxidation, GSH, SOD, CAT, GPx were significantly affected, whereas proteolytic activity was not. BLD, which is rich in chlorogenic acid and flavonols (especially quercetin derivatives), exerted significant antioxidant protective effects in all regions. In conclusion, we provide for the first time an insight to the neonatal rat cerebral and liver redox response against a toxic selenite dose and blueberry leaf polyphenols. PMID:26357951

  14. Cerebral Area Differential Redox Response of Neonatal Rats to Selenite-Induced Oxidative Stress and to Concurrent Administration of Highbush Blueberry Leaf Polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Ferlemi, Anastasia-Varvara; Mermigki, Penelope G; Makri, Olga E; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitrios; Koulakiotis, Nikolaos S; Margarity, Marigoula; Tsarbopoulos, Anthony; Georgakopoulos, Constantinos D; Lamari, Fotini N

    2015-11-01

    Our goal was to delineate the mechanisms of selenite-induced oxidative stress in neonatal rats and investigate the potential of blueberry leaf polyphenols to counteract the induced stress. Vaccinium corymbosum leaf decoction (BLD) was analyzed by UPLC-MS and LC-DAD, along with its in vitro antioxidant activity (DPPH radical scavenging, FRAP, ferrous chelation). Newborn suckling Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: 'Se' and 'SeBLD' received 20 μmol Na2SeO3/kg BW subcutaneously (PN day 10); 'SeBLD' received 100 mg dry BLD/kg BW intraperitoneally (PN11 and 12) and Group 'C' received normal saline. Βiochemical analysis revealed tissue-specific effects of selenite. Brain as a whole was more resistant to selenite toxicity in comparison to liver; midbrain and cerebellum were in general not affected, but cortex was moderately disturbed. Liver lipid peroxidation, GSH, SOD, CAT, GPx were significantly affected, whereas proteolytic activity was not. BLD, which is rich in chlorogenic acid and flavonols (especially quercetin derivatives), exerted significant antioxidant protective effects in all regions. In conclusion, we provide for the first time an insight to the neonatal rat cerebral and liver redox response against a toxic selenite dose and blueberry leaf polyphenols.

  15. JGI Fungal Genomics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-03-14

    Genomes of energy and environment fungi are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 50 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such 'parts' suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here

  16. Fungal Biofilm Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ramage, Gordon; Rajendran, Ranjith; Sherry, Leighann; Williams, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Fungal biofilm infections have become increasingly recognised as a significant clinical problem. One of the major reasons behind this is the impact that these have upon treatment, as antifungal therapy often fails and surgical intervention is required. This places a large financial burden on health care providers. This paper aims to illustrate the importance of fungal biofilms, particularly Candida albicans, and discusses some of the key fungal biofilm resistance mechanisms that include, extracellular matrix (ECM), efflux pump activity, persisters, cell density, overexpression of drug targets, stress responses, and the general physiology of the cell. The paper demonstrates the multifaceted nature of fungal biofilm resistance, which encompasses some of the newest data and ideas in the field. PMID:22518145

  17. Systemic opportunistic fungal infections.

    PubMed Central

    Vanbreuseghem, R.; Vroey, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of "opportunistic" fungal infections in compromised hosts, asthenomycoses, differ from those caused by the same fungus in otherwise normal people. Examples are given on the field of dermatophytoses, aspergillosis, candidiasis and cryptococcosis. PMID:523345

  18. Fungal Nail Infection (Onychomycosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... vinegar, vitamin E oil, Vicks® VapoRub®, or tea tree oil. When to Seek Medical Care Fungal nail ... Trusted Links Related diseases: Psoriasis View all diseases Community: Discussion Forum Skinmatters Blog About Us | Terms of ...

  19. Fungal Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Zoonotic Infectious Disease Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Fungal Eye Infections Recommend on ... Zoonotic Infectious Disease Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch File Formats Help: How do ...

  20. Fungal diagnostics in pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lease, Erika D; Alexander, Barbara D

    2011-12-01

    Fungal pneumonia is increasingly common, particularly in highly immunosuppressed patients, such as solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, and the diagnosis is evolving. Although standard techniques such as microscopy and culture remain the mainstays of diagnosis, relatively recent advances in serological and molecular testing are important additions to the field. This article reviews the laboratory tools used to diagnose fungal respiratory disease. PMID:22167394

  1. Fungal Diagnostics in Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lease, Erika D.; Alexander, Barbara D.

    2014-01-01

    Fungal pneumonia is increasingly common, particularly in highly immunosuppressed patients, such as solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, and the diagnosis is evolving. While standard techniques such as microscopy and culture remain the mainstay of diagnosis, relatively recent advances in serologic and molecular testing are important additions to the field. This chapter will review the laboratory tools used to diagnose fungal respiratory disease. PMID:22167394

  2. [Pathogenesis of invasive fungal infections].

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Carratalà, Jordi

    2012-03-01

    Invasive fungal infections remain a life-threatening disease. The development of invasive fungal disease is dependent on multiple factors, such us colonization and efficient host immune response. We aimed to review the pathogenesis of invasive fungal infections, in particular, those caused by Candida and Aspergillus. For this we propose, to describe the fungal characteristics, to detail the host defence mechanisms against fungus and to analyse the host risk factors for invasive fungal infection.

  3. Early activation of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus RTA, RAP, and MTA promoters by the tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate-induced AP1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shizhen Emily; Wu, Frederick Y; Chen, Honglin; Shamay, Meir; Zheng, Qizhi; Hayward, Gary S

    2004-04-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) maintains a latent infection in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells, but treatment with tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) can trigger the full lytic-cycle replication in some of these cells. During lytic-cycle replication, the KSHV-encoded replication and transcription activator (RTA or ORF50), the mRNA transport and accumulation protein (MTA), and the replication-associated protein (RAP) all play crucial roles in expression of downstream viral genes as well as in mediation of viral DNA replication. The cellular CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha) is induced in TPA-treated PEL cells and contributes to transactivation of the promoters for all of these genes through both direct binding and cooperative interactions with RTA and RAP targeted to upstream C/EBP sites. However, little is known about how RTA expression is triggered initially at the earliest stages after TPA induction when the C/EBP alpha levels are still limited. Treatment with TPA proved to significantly induce both AP1 DNA-binding activity and levels of activated phosphorylated cJUN in PEL cells and ectopic expression of cJUN-plus-cFOS-induced RTA protein expression in PEL cells. Cotransfected cJUN plus cFOS or TPA treatment transactivated the KSHV RTA, RAP, and MTA promoters in an AP1-binding site-dependent manner in all three promoters. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that cJUN associates with these KSHV target promoters in PEL cells as early as 4 h after TPA treatment. Furthermore, the KSHV RTA and RAP proteins both interact with cJUN or both cJUN and cFOS in vitro or by coimmunoprecipitation from induced PEL cells and enhance cJUN-plus-cFOS-mediated transactivation of these viral promoters. Both increased phosphorylated cJUN and AP1 DNA-binding activity was detected as early as 1 h after TPA treatment in PEL cells, suggesting that AP1 activity may be crucial for very early activation of the RAP, MTA, and RTA promoters

  4. Lead alters parathyroid hormone-related peptide and transforming growth factor-beta1 effects and AP-1 and NF-kappaB signaling in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zuscik, Michael J; Pateder, Dhruv B; Puzas, J Edward; Schwarz, Edward M; Rosier, Randy N; O'Keefe, Regis J

    2002-07-01

    The skeletal system is an important target for lead toxicity. One of the impacts of lead in the skeleton, the inhibition of axial bone development, is likely due to its effect on the normal progression of chondrocyte maturation that is central to the process of endochondral ossification. Since little is known about the effect of lead on chondrocyte function/maturation, its impact on (1) growth factor-induced proliferation, (2) expression of maturation-specific markers type X collagen and BMP-6, and (3) the activity of AP-1 and NF-kappaB was examined in chick growth plate and sternal chondrocyte models. Exposure to lead alone (1-30 microM) resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of thymidine incorporation in growth plate chondrocytes. Lead also blunted the stimulation of thymidine incorporation by parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), two critical regulators of chondrocyte maturation. Lead (1 and 10 microM), TGF-beta1 (3 ng/ml) and PTHrP (10(-7) M) all significantly inhibited the expression of type X collagen, a marker of chondrocyte terminal differentiation. However, when in combination, lead completely reversed the inhibition of type X collagen by PTHrP and TGF-beta1. The effect of lead on BMP-6. an inducer of terminal differentiation. was also examined. Independently, lead and TGF-beta1 were without effect on BMP-6 expression, but PTHrP significantly suppressed it. Comparatively, lead did not alter PTHrP-mediated suppression of BMP-6, but in combination with TGF-beta1. BMP-6 expression was increased 3-fold. To determine if lead effects on signaling might play a role in facilitating these events, the impact of lead on NF-kappaB and AP-1 signaling was assessed using luciferase reporter constructs in sternal chondrocytes. Lead had no effect on the AP-1 reporter, but it dose-dependently inhibited the NF-kappaB reporter. PTHrP, which signals through AP-1, did not activate the NF-kappaB reporter and did not affect

  5. Fungal endocarditis: current challenges.

    PubMed

    Tattevin, Pierre; Revest, Matthieu; Lefort, Agnès; Michelet, Christian; Lortholary, Olivier

    2014-10-01

    Whilst it used to affect mostly intravenous drug users and patients who underwent valvular surgery with suboptimal infection control procedures, fungal endocarditis is now mostly observed in patients with severe immunodeficiency (onco-haematology), in association with chronic central venous access and broad-spectrum antibiotic use. The incidence of fungal endocarditis has probably decreased in most developed countries with access to harm-reduction policies (i.e. needle exchange programmes) and with improved infection control procedures during cardiac surgery. Use of specific blood culture bottles for diagnosis of fungal endocarditis has decreased due to optimisation of media and automated culture systems. Meanwhile, the advent of rapid techniques, including fungal antigen detection (galactomannan, mannan/anti-mannan antibodies and β-1,3-d-glucans) and PCR (e.g. universal fungal PCR targeting 18S rRNA genes), shall improve sensitivity and reduce diagnostics delays, although limited data are available on their use for the diagnosis of fungal endocarditis. New antifungal agents available since the early 2000s may represent dramatic improvement for fungal endocarditis: (i) a new class, the echinocandins, has the potential to improve the management of Candida endocarditis owing to its fungicidal effect on yeasts as well as tolerability of increased dosages; and (ii) improved survival in patients with invasive aspergillosis with voriconazole compared with amphotericin B, and this may apply to Aspergillus sp. endocarditis as well, although its prognosis remains dismal. These achievements may allow selected patients to be cured with prolonged medical treatment alone when surgery is considered too risky.

  6. Hyaluronic acid functional amphipathic and redox-responsive polymer particles for the co-delivery of doxorubicin and cyclopamine to eradicate breast cancer cells and cancer stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kelei; Zhou, Huige; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhu; Liu, Jing; Tang, Jinglong; Li, Jiayang; Zhang, Jiakun; Sheng, Wang; Zhao, Yuliang; Wu, Yan; Chen, Chunying

    2015-04-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have the ability to transform into bulk cancer cells, to promote tumor growth and establish tumor metastasis. To effectively inhibit tumor growth and prevent metastasis, treatments with conventional chemotherapy drugs should be combined with CSC targeted drugs. In this study, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a new amphiphilic polymer, hyaluronic acid-cystamine-polylactic-co-glycolic acid (HA-SS-PLGA), composed of a hydrophobic PLGA head and a hydrophilic HA segment linked by a bioreducible disulfide bond. With a double emulsion method, a nano delivery system was constructed to deliver doxorubicin (DOX) and cyclopamine (CYC, a primary inhibitor of the hedgehog signaling pathway of CSCs) to both a CD44-overexpressing breast CSC subpopulation and bulk breast cancer cells and allow an on-demand release. The resulting drug-loaded NPs exhibited a redox-responsive drug release profile. Dual drug-loaded particles potently diminished the number and size of tumorspheres and HA showed a targeting effect towards breast CSCs. In vivo combination therapy further demonstrated a remarkable synergistic anti-tumor effect and prolonged survival compared to mono-therapy using the orthotopic mammary fat pad tumor growth model. The co-delivery of drug and the CSC specific inhibitor towards targeted cancer chemotherapeutics provides an insight into anticancer strategy with facile control and high efficacy.Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have the ability to transform into bulk cancer cells, to promote tumor growth and establish tumor metastasis. To effectively inhibit tumor growth and prevent metastasis, treatments with conventional chemotherapy drugs should be combined with CSC targeted drugs. In this study, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a new amphiphilic polymer, hyaluronic acid-cystamine-polylactic-co-glycolic acid (HA-SS-PLGA), composed of a hydrophobic PLGA head and a hydrophilic HA segment linked by a bioreducible disulfide bond

  7. Allergic Fungal Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Alice E W; Borish, Larry; Gurrola, José; Payne, Spencer

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the history of allergic fungal rhinosinusitis and the clinical, pathologic, and radiographic criteria necessary to establish its diagnosis and differentiate this disease from other types of chronic rhinosinusitis. Allergic fungal rhinosinusitis is a noninvasive fungal form of sinus inflammation characterized by an often times unilateral, expansile process in which the typical allergic "peanut-butter-like" mucin contributes to the formation of nasal polyps, hyposmia/anosmia, and structural changes of the face. IgE sensitization to fungi is a necessary, but not sufficient, pathophysiologic component of the disease process that is also defined by microscopic visualization of mucin-containing fungus and characteristic radiological imaging. This article expounds on these details and others including the key clinical and scientific distinctions of this diagnosis, the pathophysiologic mechanisms beyond IgE-mediated hypersensitivity that must be at play, and areas of current and future research. PMID:27393774

  8. Long-Range Enhancer Associated with Chromatin Looping Allows AP-1 Regulation of the Peptidylarginine Deiminase 3 Gene in Differentiated Keratinocyte

    PubMed Central

    Chavanas, Stéphane; Adoue, Véronique; Méchin, Marie-Claire; Ying, Shibo; Dong, Sijun; Duplan, Hélène; Charveron, Marie; Takahara, Hidenari; Serre, Guy; Simon, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Transcription control at a distance is a critical mechanism, particularly for contiguous genes. The peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs) catalyse the conversion of protein-bound arginine into citrulline (deimination), a critical reaction in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and rheumatoid arthritis, and in the metabolism of the major epidermal barrier protein filaggrin, a strong predisposing factor for atopic dermatitis. PADs are encoded by 5 clustered PADI genes (1p35-6). Unclear are the mechanisms controlling the expression of the gene PADI3 encoding the PAD3 isoform, a strong candidate for the deimination of filaggrin in the terminally differentiating epidermal keratinocyte. We describe the first PAD Intergenic Enhancer (PIE), an evolutionary conserved non coding segment located 86-kb from the PADI3 promoter. PIE is a strong enhancer of the PADI3 promoter in Ca2+-differentiated epidermal keratinocytes, and requires bound AP-1 factors, namely c-Jun and c-Fos. As compared to proliferative keratinocytes, calcium stimulation specifically associates with increased local DNase I hypersensitivity around PIE, and increased physical proximity of PIE and PADI3 as assessed by Chromosome Conformation Capture. The specific AP-1 inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid suppresses the calcium-induced increase of PADI3 mRNA levels in keratinocytes. Our findings pave the way to the exploration of deimination control during tumorigenesis and wound healing, two conditions for which AP-1 factors are critical, and disclose that long-range transcription control has a role in the regulation of the gene PADI3. Since invalidation of distant regulators causes a variety of human diseases, PIE results to be a plausible candidate in association studies on deimination-related disorders or atopic disease. PMID:18923650

  9. Treatment of melanoma cells with the synthetic retinoid CD437 induces apoptosis via activation of AP-1 in vitro, and causes growth inhibition in xenografts in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Human malignant melanoma is notoriously resistant to pharmacological modulation. We describe here for the first time that the synthetic retinoid CD437 has a strong dose-dependent antiproliferative effect on human melanoma cells (IC50: 5 x 10(-6) M) via the induction of programmed cell death, as judged by analysis of cell morphology, electron microscopical features, and DNA fragmentation. Programmed cell death was preceded by a strong activation of the AP-1 complex in CD437- treated cells as demonstrated by gel retardation and chloramphenicol transferase (CAT) assays. Northern blot analysis showed a time- dependent increase in the expression of c-fos and c-jun encoding components of AP-1, whereas bcl-2 and p53 mRNA levels remained constant. CD437 also exhibited a strong growth inhibitory effect on MeWo melanoma cells in a xenograft model. In tissue sections of CD437- treated MeWo tumors from these animals, apoptotic melanoma cells and c- fos overexpressing cells were colocalized by TdT-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining and in situ hybridization. Taken together, this report identifies CD437 as a retinoid that activates and upregulates the transcription factor AP-1, leading eventually to programmed cell death of exposed human melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether synthetic retinoids such as CD437 represent a new class of retinoids, which may open up new ways to a more effective therapy of malignant melanoma. PMID:8991099

  10. Celastrol ameliorates HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via NF-kappaB and AP-1 inhibition and heme oxygenase-1 induction in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Youn, Gi Soo; Kwon, Dong-Joo; Ju, Sung Mi; Rhim, Hyangshuk; Bae, Yong Soo; Choi, Soo Young; Park, Jinseu

    2014-10-01

    HIV-1 Tat causes extensive neuroinflammation that may progress to AIDS-related encephalitis and dementia. Celastrol possesses various biological activities such as anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the modulatory effects of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses and the molecular mechanisms underlying its action in astrocytes. Pre-treatment of CRT-MG human astroglioma cells with celastrol significantly inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of ICAM-1/VCAM-1 and subsequent monocyte adhesiveness in CRT-MG cells. In addition, celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, such as CXCL10, IL-8, and MCP-1. Celastrol decreased HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of JNK MAPK, AP-1, and NF-κB. Furthermore, celastrol induced mRNA and protein expression of HO-1 as well as Nrf2 activation. Blockage of HO-1 expression using siRNA reversed the inhibitory effect of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses. These results suggest that celastrol has regulatory effects on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses by blocking the JNK MAPK-AP-1/NF-κB signaling pathways and inducing HO-1 expression in astrocytes. - Highlights: • Celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat -induced activation of JNK MAPK. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of both NF-κB and AP-1. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via HO-1 induction.

  11. The Heptameric SmAP1 and SmAP2 Proteins of the Crenarchaeon Sulfolobus Solfataricus Bind to Common and Distinct RNA Targets

    PubMed Central

    Märtens, Birgit; Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Kreuter, Mathias Josef; Grishkovskaya, Irina; Manica, Andrea; Arkhipova, Valentina; Djinovic-Carugo, Kristina; Bläsi, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Sm and Sm-like proteins represent an evolutionarily conserved family with key roles in RNA metabolism. Sm-based regulation is diverse and can range in scope from eukaryotic mRNA splicing to bacterial quorum sensing, with at least one step in these processes being mediated by an RNA-associated molecular assembly built on Sm proteins. Despite the availability of several 3D-structures of Sm-like archaeal proteins (SmAPs), their function has remained elusive. The aim of this study was to shed light on the function of SmAP1 and SmAP2 of the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus (Sso). Using co-purification followed by RNASeq different classes of non-coding RNAs and mRNAs were identified that co-purified either with both paralogues or solely with Sso-SmAP1 or Sso-SmAP2. The large number of associated intron-containing tRNAs and tRNA/rRNA modifying RNAs may suggest a role of the two Sso-SmAPs in tRNA/rRNA processing. Moreover, the 3D structure of Sso-SmAP2 was elucidated. Like Sso-SmAP1, Sso-SmAP2 forms homoheptamers. The binding of both proteins to distinct RNA substrates is discussed in terms of surface conservation, structural differences in the RNA binding sites and differences in the electrostatic surface potential of the two Sso-SmAP proteins. Taken together, this study may hint to common and different functions of both Sso-SmAPs in Sso RNA metabolism. PMID:25905548

  12. RAD51AP2, a novel vertebrate- and meiotic-specific protein, sharesa conserved RAD51-interacting C-terminal domain with RAD51AP1/PIR51

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalenko, Oleg V.; Wiese, Claudia; Schild, David

    2006-07-25

    Many interacting proteins regulate and/or assist the activities of RAD51, a recombinase which plays a critical role in both DNA repair and meiotic recombination. Yeast two-hybrid screening of a human testis cDNA library revealed a new protein, RAD51AP2 (RAD51 Associated Protein 2), that interacts strongly with RAD51. A full-length cDNA clone predicts a novel vertebrate specific protein of 1159 residues, and the RAD51AP2 transcript was observed only in meiotic tissue (i.e. adult testis and fetal ovary), suggesting a meiotic-specific function for RAD51AP2. In HEK293 cells the interaction of RAD51 with an ectopically-expressed recombinant large fragment of RAD51AP2 requires the C-terminal 57 residues of RAD51AP2. This RAD51-binding region shows 81% homology to the C-terminus of RAD51AP1/PIR51, an otherwise totally unrelated RAD51-binding partner that is ubiquitously expressed. Analyses using truncations and point mutations in both RAD51AP1 and RAD51AP2 demonstrate that these proteins use the same structural motif for RAD51 binding. RAD54 shares some homology with this RAD51-binding motif, but this homologous region plays only an accessory role to the adjacent main RAD51-interacting region, which has been narrowed here to 40 amino acids. A novel protein, RAD51AP2, has been discovered that interacts with RAD51 through a C-terminal motif also present in RAD51AP1.

  13. Low doses of LPS and minimally oxidized LDL cooperatively activate macrophages via NF-kappaB and AP-1: Possible mechanism for acceleration of atherosclerosis by subclinical endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Philipp; Choi, Soo-Ho; Almazan, Felicidad; Benner, Christopher; Huang, Wendy; Diehl, Cody J.; Gonen, Ayelet; Butler, Susan; Witztum, Joseph L.; Glass, Christopher K.; Miller, Yury I.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is an important determinant of inflammation in atherosclerotic lesions. It has also been documented that certain chronic infectious diseases, such as periodontitis and chlamydial infection, exacerbate clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis. In addition, low-level but persistent metabolic endotoxemia is often found in diabetic and obese subjects and is induced in mice fed a high-fat diet. Objective In this study, we examined cooperative macrophage activation by low levels of bacterial LPS and by minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL), as a model for subclinical endotoxemia-complicated atherosclerosis. Methods and Results We found that both in vitro and in vivo, mmLDL and LPS (Kdo2-LipidA) cooperatively activated macrophages to express pro-inflammatory cytokines Cxcl2 (MIP-2), Ccl3 (MIP-1alpha), and Ccl4 (MIP-1beta). Importantly, the mmLDL and LPS cooperative effects were evident at a threshold LPS concentration (1 ng/ml) at which LPS alone induced only a limited macrophage response. Analyzing microarray data with a de novo motif discovery algorithm, we found that genes transcribed by promoters containing an AP-1 binding site were significantly upregulated by co-stimulation with mmLDL and LPS. In a nuclear factor-DNA binding assay, the cooperative effect of mmLDL and LPS co-stimulation on c-Jun and c-Fos DNA binding, but not on p65 or p50, was dependent on mmLDL-induced activation of ERK1/2. In addition, mmLDL induced JNK-dependent derepression of AP-1 by removing the corepressor NCoR from the chemokine promoters. Conclusions The cooperative engagement of AP-1 and NF-kappaB by mmLDL and LPS may constitute a mechanism of increased transcription of inflammatory cytokines within atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:20489162

  14. Potent Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Ursolic Acid, a Triterpenoid Antioxidant, Is Mediated through Suppression of NF-κB, AP-1 and NF-AT

    PubMed Central

    Checker, Rahul; Sandur, Santosh K.; Sharma, Deepak; Patwardhan, Raghavendra S.; Jayakumar, S.; Kohli, Vineet; Sethi, Gautam; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Sainis, Krishna B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid carboxylic acid, is the major component of many plants including apples, basil, cranberries, peppermint, rosemary, oregano and prunes and has been reported to possess antioxidant and anti-tumor properties. These properties of UA have been attributed to its ability to suppress NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa B) activation. Since NF-κB, in co-ordination with NF-AT (nuclear factor of activated T cells) and AP-1(activator protein-1), is known to regulate inflammatory genes, we hypothesized that UA might exhibit potent anti-inflammatory effects. Methodology/Principal Findings The anti-inflammatory effects of UA were assessed in activated T cells, B cells and macrophages. Effects of UA on ERK, JNK, NF-κB, AP-1 and NF-AT were studied to elucidate its mechanism of action. In vivo efficacy of UA was studied using mouse model of graft-versus-host disease. UA inhibited activation, proliferation and cytokine secretion in T cells, B cells and macrophages. UA inhibited mitogen-induced up-regulation of activation markers and co-stimulatory molecules in T and B cells. It inhibited mitogen-induced phosphorylation of ERK and JNK and suppressed the activation of immunoregulatory transcription factors NF-κB, NF-AT and AP-1 in lymphocytes. Treatment of cells with UA prior to allogenic transplantation significantly delayed induction of acute graft-versus-host disease in mice and also significantly reduced the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IFN-γ. UA treatment inhibited T cell activation even when added post-mitogenic stimulation demonstrating its therapeutic utility as an anti-inflammatory agent. Conclusions/Significance The present study describes the detailed mechanism of anti-inflammatory activity of UA. Further, UA may find application in the treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:22363615

  15. Molecular Weight-Dependent Immunostimulative Activity of Low Molecular Weight Chitosan via Regulating NF-κB and AP-1 Signaling Pathways in RAW264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bin; Wen, Zheng-Shun; Huang, Yun-Juan; Xia, Mei-Sheng; Xiang, Xing-Wei; Qu, You-Le

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan and its derivatives such as low molecular weight chitosans (LMWCs) have been found to possess many important biological properties, such as antioxidant and antitumor effects. In our previous study, LMWCs were found to elicit a strong immunomodulatory response in macrophages dependent on molecular weight. Herein we further investigated the molecular weight-dependent immunostimulative activity of LMWCs and elucidated its mechanism of action on RAW264.7 macrophages. LMWCs (3 kDa and 50 kDa of molecular weight) could significantly enhance the mRNA expression levels of COX-2, IL-10 and MCP-1 in a molecular weight and concentration-dependent manner. The results suggested that LMWCs elicited a significant immunomodulatory response, which was dependent on the dose and the molecular weight. Regarding the possible molecular mechanism of action, LMWCs promoted the expression of the genes of key molecules in NF-κB and AP-1 pathways, including IKKβ, TRAF6 and JNK1, and induced the phosphorylation of protein IKBα in RAW264.7 macrophage. Moreover, LMWCs increased nuclear translocation of p65 and activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1, C-Jun and C-Fos) in a molecular weight-dependent manner. Taken together, our findings suggested that LMWCs exert immunostimulative activity via activation of NF-κB and AP-1 pathways in RAW264.7 macrophages in a molecular weight-dependent manner and that 3 kDa LMWC shows great potential as a novel agent for the treatment of immune suppression diseases and in future vaccines. PMID:27657093

  16. Phosphorylation of c-Fos by members of the p38 MAPK family. Role in the AP-1 response to UV light.

    PubMed

    Tanos, Tamara; Marinissen, Maria Julia; Leskow, Federico Coluccio; Hochbaum, Daniel; Martinetto, Horacio; Gutkind, J Silvio; Coso, Omar A

    2005-05-13

    Exposure to sources of UV radiation, such as sunlight, induces a number of cellular alterations that are highly dependent on its ability to affect gene expression. Among them, the rapid activation of genes coding for two subfamilies of proto-oncoproteins, Fos and Jun, which constitute the AP-1 transcription factor, plays a key role in the subsequent regulation of expression of genes involved in DNA repair, cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, death by apoptosis, and tissue and extracellular matrix remodeling proteases. Besides being regulated at the transcriptional level, Jun and Fos transcriptional activities are also regulated by phosphorylation as a result of the activation of intracellular signaling cascades. In this regard, the phosphorylation of c-Jun by UV-induced JNK has been readily documented, whereas a role for Fos proteins in UV-mediated responses and the identification of Fos-activating kinases has remained elusive. Here we identify p38 MAPKs as proteins that can associate with c-Fos and phosphorylate its transactivation domain both in vitro and in vivo. This phosphorylation is transduced into changes in its transcriptional ability as p38-activated c-Fos enhances AP1-driven gene expression. Our findings indicate that as a consequence of the activation of stress pathways induced by UV light, endogenous c-Fos becomes a substrate of p38 MAPKs and, for the first time, provide evidence that support a critical role for p38 MAPKs in mediating stress-induced c-Fos phosphorylation and gene transcription activation. Using a specific pharmacological inhibitor for p38alpha and -beta, we found that most likely these two isoforms mediate UV-induced c-Fos phosphorylation in vivo. Thus, these newly described pathways act concomitantly with the activation of c-Jun by JNK/MAPKs, thereby contributing to the complexity of AP1-driven gene transcription regulation.

  17. Glucosinolate-derived isothiocyanates impact mitochondrial function in fungal cells and elicit an oxidative stress response necessary for growth recovery

    PubMed Central

    Calmes, Benoit; N’Guyen, Guillaume; Dumur, Jérome; Brisach, Carlos A.; Campion, Claire; Iacomi, Béatrice; Pigné, Sandrine; Dias, Eva; Macherel, David; Guillemette, Thomas; Simoneau, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Glucosinolates are brassicaceous secondary metabolites that have long been considered as chemical shields against pathogen invasion. Isothiocyanates (ITCs), are glucosinolate-breakdown products that have negative effects on the growth of various fungal species. We explored the mechanism by which ITCs could cause fungal cell death using Alternaria brassicicola, a specialist Brassica pathogens, as model organism. Exposure of the fungus to ICTs led to a decreased oxygen consumption rate, intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial-membrane depolarization. We also found that two major regulators of the response to oxidative stress, i.e., the MAP kinase AbHog1 and the transcription factor AbAP1, were activated in the presence of ICTs. Once activated by ICT-derived ROS, AbAP1 was found to promote the expression of different oxidative-response genes. This response might play a significant role in the protection of the fungus against ICTs as mutants deficient in AbHog1 or AbAP1 were found to be hypersensitive to these metabolites. Moreover, the loss of these genes was accompanied by a significant decrease in aggressiveness on Brassica. We suggest that the robust protection response against ICT-derived oxidative stress might be a key adaptation mechanism for successful infection of host plants by Brassicaceae-specialist necrotrophs like A. brassicicola. PMID:26089832

  18. Purinergic P2Y2 Receptor Control of Tissue Factor Transcription in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells: NEW AP-1 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR SITE AND NEGATIVE REGULATOR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwei; Zhang, Lingxin; Wang, Chuan; Roy, Shama; Shen, Jianzhong

    2016-01-22

    We recently reported that the P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2R) is the predominant nucleotide receptor expressed in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) and that P2Y2R activation by ATP or UTP induces dramatic up-regulation of tissue factor (TF), a key initiator of the coagulation cascade. However, the molecular mechanism of this P2Y2R-TF axis remains unclear. Here, we report the role of a newly identified AP-1 consensus sequence in the TF gene promoter and its original binding components in P2Y2R regulation of TF transcription. Using bioinformatics tools, we found that a novel AP-1 site at -1363 bp of the human TF promoter region is highly conserved across multiple species. Activation of P2Y2R increased TF promoter activity and mRNA expression in HCAEC. Truncation, deletion, and mutation of this distal AP-1 site all significantly suppressed TF promoter activity in response to P2Y2R activation. EMSA and ChIP assays further confirmed that upon P2Y2R activation, c-Jun, ATF-2, and Fra-1, but not the typical c-Fos, bound to the new AP-1 site. In addition, loss-of-function studies using siRNAs confirmed a positive transactivation role of c-Jun and ATF-2 but unexpectedly revealed a strong negative role of Fra-1 in P2Y2R-induced TF up-regulation. Furthermore, we found that P2Y2R activation promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation through Src, leading to Fra-1 activation, whereas Rho/JNK mediated P2Y2R-induced activation of c-Jun and ATF-2. These findings reveal the molecular basis for P2Y G protein-coupled receptor control of endothelial TF expression and indicate that targeting the P2Y2R-Fra-1-TF pathway may be an attractive new strategy for controlling vascular inflammation and thrombogenicity associated with endothelial dysfunction.

  19. Who Gets Fungal Infections?

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections can also happen in people without weak immune systems Fungal infections that are not life-threatening, such ... likely to cause an infection. People with weak immune systems Infections that happen because a person’s immune system ...

  20. Sargahydroquinoic acid inhibits TNFα-induced AP-1 and NF-κB signaling in HaCaT cells through PPARα activation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Youngsic; Jung, Yujung; Kim, Min Cheol; Kwon, Hak Cheol; Kang, Ki Sung; Kim, Yong Kee; Kim, Su-Nam

    2014-08-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors and expressed in various cell types in the skin, including keratinocytes, fibroblasts and infiltrating immune cells. Thus, their ligands are targets for the treatment of various skin disorders, such as photo-aging and chronological aging of skin. Intensive studies have revealed that PPARα/γ functions in photo-aging and age-related inflammation by regulating matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) via activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). However, the detailed mechanism of PPARα/γ's role in skin aging has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we confirmed that sargahydroquinoic acid (SHQA) as a PPARα/γ ligand significantly decreased Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNFα)-induced MMP-2/-9 expression by downregulating TNFα-induced transcription factors, subsequently reducing IκBα degradation and blocking NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in HaCaT human epidermal keratinocyte cells. Treatment of cells with SHQA and GW6471 (PPARα antagonist) not bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (PPARγ antagonists), reversed the effect on TNFα-induced inflammatory signaling pathway activation. Taken together, our data suggest that SHQA inhibit TNFα-induced MMP-2/-9 expression and age-related inflammation by suppressing AP-1 and NF-κB pathway via PPARα. PMID:25019995

  1. [6]-Gingerol induces caspase-dependent apoptosis and prevents PMA-induced proliferation in colon cancer cells by inhibiting MAPK/AP-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, E K; Bava, Smitha V; Narayanan, Sai Shyam; Nath, Lekshmi R; Thulasidasan, Arun Kumar T; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan; Anto, Ruby John

    2014-01-01

    We report mechanism-based evidence for the anticancer and chemopreventive efficacy of [6]-gingerol, the major active principle of the medicinal plant, Ginger (Zingiber officinale), in colon cancer cells. The compound was evaluated in two human colon cancer cell lines for its cytotoxic effect and the most sensitive cell line, SW-480, was selected for the mechanistic evaluation of its anticancer and chemopreventive efficacy. The non-toxic nature of [6]-gingerol was confirmed by viability assays on rapidly dividing normal mouse colon cells. [6]-gingerol inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis as evidenced by externalization of phosphatidyl serine in SW-480, while the normal colon cells were unaffected. Sensitivity to [6]-gingerol in SW-480 cells was associated with activation of caspases 8, 9, 3 &7 and cleavage of PARP, which attests induction of apoptotic cell death. Mechanistically, [6]-gingerol down-regulated Phorbol Myristate Acetate (PMA) induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK MAP kinases and activation of AP-1 transcription factor, but had only little effects on phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase and activation of NF-kappa B. Additionally, it complemented the inhibitors of either ERK1/2 or JNK MAP kinase in bringing down the PMA-induced cell proliferation in SW-480 cells. We report the inhibition of ERK1/2/JNK/AP-1 pathway as a possible mechanism behind the anticancer as well as chemopreventive efficacy of [6]-gingerol against colon cancer.

  2. Nobiletin and tangeretin ameliorate scratching behavior in mice by inhibiting the action of histamine and the activation of NF-κB, AP-1 and p38.

    PubMed

    Jang, Se-Eun; Ryu, Kwon-Ryeol; Park, Sung-Hwan; Chung, Suna; Teruya, Yuto; Han, Myung Joo; Woo, Je-Tae; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2013-11-01

    Nobiletin and tangeretin are polymethoxy flavonoids that are abundantly present in the pericarp of Citrus unshiu (family Rutaceae) and the fruit of Citrus depressa (family Rutaceae). They exhibit various biological activities, including anti-inflammatory and anti-asthmatic effects. To evaluate the anti-allergic effects of nobiletin and tangeretin, we measured their inhibitory effects in histamine- or compound 48/80-induced scratching behavioral mice. Nobiletin and tangeretin potently inhibited scratching behavior, as well as histamine-induced vascular permeability. Furthermore, they inhibited the expression of the allergic cytokines, IL-4 and TNF-α as well as the activation of their transcription factors NF-κB, AP-1 and p38 in histamine-stimulated skin tissues. They also inhibited the expression of IL-4 and TNF-α and the activation of NF-κB and c-jun in PMA-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells. Furthermore, nobiletin and tangeretin inhibited protein kinase C (PKC) activity and the IgE-induced degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells. These agents showed potent anti-histamine effect through the Magnus test when guinea pig ileum was used. Based on these results, nobiletin and tangeretin may ameliorate scratching behavioral reactions by inhibiting the action of histamine as well as the activation of the transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1 via PKC.

  3. Cinnamoyloxy-mammeisin Isolated from Geopropolis Attenuates Inflammatory Process by Inhibiting Cytokine Production: Involvement of MAPK, AP-1, and NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Franchin, Marcelo; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Silva, Rangel Leal; Colón, David F; Bassi, Gabriel Shimizu; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Ikegaki, Masaharu; Alves-Filho, José C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Beutler, John A; Cunha, Thiago Mattar

    2016-07-22

    Chemical compounds belonging to the class of coumarins have promising anti-inflammatory potential. Cinnamoyloxy-mammeisin (CNM) is a 4-phenylcoumarin that can be isolated from Brazilian geopropolis. To our knowledge, its anti-inflammatory activity has never been studied. Therefore, the present study investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of CNM and elucidated its mechanism of action on isolated macrophages. Pretreatment with CNM reduced neutrophil migration into the peritoneal and joint cavity of mice. Likewise, CNM reduced the in vitro and in vivo release of TNF-α and CXCL2/MIP-2. Regarding the possible molecular mechanism of action, CNM reduced the phosphorylation of proteins ERK 1/2, JNK, p38 MAPK, and AP-1 (subunit c-jun) in PG-stimulated macrophages. Pretreatment with CNM also reduced NF-κB activation in RAW 264.7 macrophages stably expressing the NF-κB-luciferase reporter gene. On the other hand, it did not alter IκBα degradation or nuclear translocation of p65. Thus, the results of this study demonstrate promising anti-inflammatory activity of CNM and provide an explanation of its mechanism of action in macrophages via inhibition of MAPK signaling, AP-1, and NF-κB. PMID:27367493

  4. Sulforaphane controls TPA-induced MMP-9 expression through the NF-κB signaling pathway, but not AP-1, in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Rae; Noh, Eun-Mi; Han, Ji-Hey; Kim, Jeong-Mi; Hwang, Bo-Mi; Kim, Byeong-Soo; Lee, Sung-Ho; Jung, Sung Hoo; Youn, Hyun Jo; Chung, Eun Yong; Kim, Jong-Suk

    2013-01-01

    Sulforaphane [1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylsulfinyl)-butane] is an isothiocyanate found in some cruciferous vegetables, especially broccoli. Sulforaphane has been shown to display anti-cancer properties against various cancer cell lines. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which degrades the extracellular matrix (ECM), plays an important role in cancer cell invasion. In this study, we investigated the effect of sulforaphane on 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced MMP-9 expression and cell invasion in MCF-7 cells. TPA-induced MMP-9 expression and cell invasion were decreased by sulforaphane treatment. TPA substantially increased NF-κB and AP-1 DNA binding activity. Pre-treatment with sulforaphane inhibited TPA-stimulated NF-κB binding activity, but not AP-1 binding activity. In addition, we found that sulforaphane suppressed NF-κB activation, by inhibiting phosphorylation of IκB in TPA-treated MCF-7 cells. In this study, we demonstrated that the inhibition of TPA-induced MMP-9 expression and cell invasion by sulforaphane was mediated by the suppression of the NF-κB pathway in MCF-7 cells. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(4): 201-206] PMID:23615261

  5. An AP-1-like transcription factor, NAP-1, regulates expression of the glutathione S-transferase and NADH:flavin oxidoreductase genes in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masakazu; Yamashita, Kazuhiro; Shiozawa, Azusa; Ichiishi, Akihiko; Fukumori, Fumiyasu; Fujimura, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    AP-1-like transcription factors play crucial roles in oxidative stress responses in yeast and filamentous fungi. The deletion of an AP-1-like transcription factor gene, nap-1, in Neurospora crassa slightly increased its sensitivity to oxidative stressors, including menadione. Microarray and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR analyses were employed to identify menadione-inducible genes (migs) and the roles of NAP-1 in their regulation. N. crassa migs include three putative glutathione S-transferase genes and two NADH:flavin oxidoreductase genes, orthologs of OYE2 and OYE3, both of which play roles in menadione tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Menadione induced nuclear localization of NAP-1, and oxidative upregulation of many of migs were NAP-1 dependent. Genes for a thioredoxin, a glutathione reductase, and a glutathione peroxidase were slightly upregulated by the chemical only in the wild-type strain, suggesting that NAP-1 is involved in their oxidative induction and probably dose not contribute to high-level constitutive expressions of such genes.

  6. Thrombin Promotes Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Expression through the PKCδ/c-Src/EGFR/PI3K/Akt/AP-1 Signaling Pathway in Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Yin; Lin, Hsiu-Jung; Chen, Hsin-Shui; Cheng, Shi-Yann; Hsu, Horng-Chaung; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Thrombin is a key mediator of fibrin deposition, angiogenesis, and proinflammatory processes. Abnormalities in these processes are primary features of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) may contribute to the breakdown of articular cartilage during arthritis. However, the role of thrombin in MMP-13 production in chondrocytes is unknown. In this study, we investigated the intracellular signaling pathways involved in thrombin-induced MMP-13 expression in human chondrocytes. We found that stimulation with thrombin led to increased secretion of MMP-13 in cultured human chondrocytes. Further, this thrombin-induced MMP-13 production was reduced after transfection with siRNAs against protease activated receptors 1 and 3 (PAR1 and PAR3), but not with PAR4 siRNA. Treatment with specific inhibitors for PKCδ, c-Src, EGFR, PI3K, Akt, or AP-1 or with the corresponding siRNAs against these signaling proteins also abolished the thrombin-mediated increase in MMP-13 production in chondrocytes. Our results provide evidence that thrombin acts through the PAR1/PAR3 receptors and activates PKCδ and c-Src, resulting in EGFR transactivation and activation of PI3K, Akt, and finally AP-1 on the MMP-13 promoter, thereby contributing to cartilage destruction during arthritis. PMID:24385683

  7. Overview of fungal rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Das, Ashim; Panda, Naresh K

    2004-10-01

    The incidence of fungal rhinosinusitis has increased to such extent in recent years that fungal infection should be considered in all patients with chronic rhino sinusitis. In India though the disease was reported earlier only from northern regions of this country, nowadays the disease is increasingly diagnosed from other parts as well. The disease has been categorized with possible five types: acute necrothing (fulminant), chronic invasive, chronic granulomatous invasive, fungal hall (sinus mycetoma), allergic. The first three types are tissue-invasive and the last two are non-invasive fungal rhinosinusitis. However, the categorization is still controversial and open to discussion. Chronic fungal rhinosinusitis can occur in otherwise healthy host and Aspergillus flavus is the common etiological agent in Indian scenario. The pathophys iologic mechanism of the disease remains unclear. It may represent an allergic IgE response, a cell-mediated reaction, or a combination of two. Early diagnosis may prevent multiple surgical procedures and lead to effective treatment. Histopathology and radio-imaging techniques help to distinguish different types and delineate extension of disease process. Culture helps to identify the responsible etiological agent. The presence or absence oj precipitating antibody correlates well with disease progression or recovery. The most immediate need regarding management is to establish the respective roles of surgery and antifungal therapy. Non-invasive disease requires surgical debridement and sinus ventilation only, though, additional oral or local corticosterold therapy may be beneficial in allergie type. For invasive disease, the adjuvant medical therapy is recommended to prevent recurrence and further extension. Itraconazole has been found as an effective drug in such situation. Patients with acute neerotizing type require radical surgery and amphotericin B therapy.

  8. [Emerging invasive fungal infections].

    PubMed

    Alvez, F; Figueras, C; Roselló, E

    2010-07-01

    The frequency and diversity of invasive fungal infections has changed over the last 25 years. The emergence of less common, but medically important fungi has increased, and the children at risk has expanded, with the inclusion of medical conditions such as cancer, mainly haematological malignancy or stem cell transplant, immunosuppressive therapy, prolonged neutropenia, and T-cell immunodeficiency. Among mould infections, fusariosis and phaeohyphomycosis (Dematiaceous fungi) have been increasingly reported in this group of patients. To successfully manage these challenging infections, it is imperative that paediatricians and sub-specialists remain aware of the optimal and timely diagnosis and therapeutic options. Unlike other common mycoses that cause human disease, there no simple antigen or serological tests available to detect these pathogens in tissue or blood. The outcome for these disseminate, and often refractory fungal infections in neutropenic patients and transplant recipients remains extremely poor, requiring early and aggressive therapy. Unfortunately there are no guidelines outlining the choices for optimal therapy in the treatment of paediatric invasive fungal infections do not exist, and on the other hand are limited paediatric data available comparing antifungal agents in children with proven, probable or suspected invasive fungal infection. The options for treatment rest mainly on some adult guidelines that comment on the treatment of these emerging and uncommon important fungi in children. Despite the sparse clinical trials available on treatment and its poor outcome, options for treatment of invasive fungal infections have increased with the advance of new antifungal agents, with improved tolerability and increased range of activity. The epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of fusariosis and phaeohyphomycosis are discussed in this article.

  9. Overexpression of Runx2 directed by the matrix metalloproteinase-13 promoter containing the AP-1 and Runx/RD/Cbfa sites alters bone remodeling in vivo.

    PubMed

    Selvamurugan, Nagarajan; Jefcoat, Stephen C; Kwok, Sukyee; Kowalewski, Rodney; Tamasi, Joseph A; Partridge, Nicola C

    2006-10-01

    The activator protein-1 (AP-1) and runt domain binding (Runx/RD/Cbfa) sites and their respective binding proteins, c-Fos/c-Jun and Runx2 (Cbfa1), regulate the rat matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) promoter in both parathyroid hormone (PTH)-treated and differentiating osteoblastic cells in culture. To determine the importance of these regulatory sites in the expression of MMP-13 in vivo, transgenic mice containing either wild-type (-456 or -148) or AP-1 and Runx/RD/Cbfa sites mutated (-148A3R3) MMP-13 promoters fused with the E. coli lacZ reporter were generated. The wild-type transgenic lines expressed higher levels of bacterial beta-galactosidase in bone, teeth, and skin compared to the mutant and non-transgenic lines. Next, we investigated if overexpression of Runx2 directed by the MMP-13 promoter regulated expression of bone specific genes in vivo, and whether this causes morphological changes in these animals. Real time RT-PCR experiments identified increased mRNA expression of bone forming genes and decreased MMP-13 in the tibiae of transgenic mice (14 days and 6 weeks old). Histomorphometric analyses of the proximal tibiae showed increased bone mineralization surface, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate in the transgenic mice which appears to be due to decreased osteoclast number. Since MMP-13 is likely to play a role in recruiting osteoclasts to the bone surface, decreased expression of MMP-13 may cause reduced osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, resulting in greater bone formation in transgenic mice. In summary, we show here that the 148 bp upstream of the MMP-13 transcriptional start site is sufficient and necessary for gene expression in bone, teeth, and skin in vivo and the AP-1 and Runx/RD/Cbfa sites are likely to regulate this. Overexpression of Runx2 by these regulatory elements appears to alter the balance between the bone formation-bone resorption processes in vivo. PMID:16639721

  10. Glutathione depletion exacerbates impairment by oxidative stress of phosphoinositide hydrolysis, AP-1, and NF-kappaB activation by cholinergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Song, L; Jope, R S

    1998-01-01

    Oxidative stress appears to contribute to neuronal dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease and other CNS neurodegenerative disorders. This investigation examined if oxidative stress might contribute to impairments in cholinergic receptor-linked signaling systems and if intracellular glutathione levels modulated responses to oxidative stress. To do this the activation of the AP-1 and NF-kappaB transcription factors and of the phosphoinositide second-messenger system was measured in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells after exposure to the oxidants H2O2 or diamide, with or without prior depletion of cellular glutathione. H2O2 concentration-dependently inhibited carbachol-stimulated AP-1 activation and this inhibition was potentiated in glutathione-depleted cells. Carbachol-stimulated NF-kappaB activation was unaffected by H2O2 unless glutathione was depleted, in which case there was a H2O2 concentration-dependent inhibition. Glutathione depletion also potentiated the inhibition by H2O2 of carbachol- or G-protein (NaF)-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis, whereas phospholipase C activated by the calcium ionophore ionomycin was not inhibited. The thiol-oxidizing agent diamide also inhibited phosphoinositide hydrolysis stimulated by carbachol or NaF, and glutathione depletion potentiated the diamide concentration-dependent inhibition. Unlike H2O2, diamide also inhibited ionomycin-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis. Activation of both AP-1 and NF-kappaB stimulated by carbachol was inhibited by diamide, and glutathione depletion potentiated the inhibitory effects of diamide. Thus, diamide inhibited a wider range of signaling processes than did H2O2, but glutathione depletion increased the susceptibility of phosphoinositide hydrolysis and of transcription factor activation to inhibition by both H2O2 and diamide. These results demonstrate that the vulnerability of signaling systems to oxidative stress is influenced by intracellular glutathione levels

  11. Fungal diseases of horses.

    PubMed

    Cafarchia, Claudia; Figueredo, Luciana A; Otranto, Domenico

    2013-11-29

    Among diseases of horses caused by fungi (=mycoses), dermatophytosis, cryptococcosis and aspergillosis are of particular concern, due their worldwide diffusion and, for some of them, zoonotic potential. Conversely, other mycoses such as subcutaneous (i.e., pythiosis and mycetoma) or deep mycoses (i.e., blastomycosis and coccidioidomycosis) are rare, and/or limited to restricted geographical areas. Generally, subcutaneous and deep mycoses are chronic and progressive diseases; clinical signs include extensive, painful lesions (not pathognomonic), which resemble to other microbial infections. In all cases, early diagnosis is crucial in order to achieve a favorable prognosis. Knowledge of the epidemiology, clinical signs, and diagnosis of fungal diseases is essential for the establishment of effective therapeutic strategies. This article reviews the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapeutic protocols of equine fungal infections as a support to early diagnosis and application of targeted therapeutic and control strategies. PMID:23428378

  12. Fungal echinocandin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Louise A.; Gow, Neil A.R.; Munro, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    The echinocandins are the newest class of antifungal agents in the clinical armory. These secondary metabolites are non-competitive inhibitors of the synthesis of β-(1,3)-glucan, a major structural component of the fungal cell wall. Recent work has shown that spontaneous mutations can arise in two hot spot regions of Fks1 the target protein of echinocandins that reduce the enzyme’s sensitivity to the drug. However, other strains have been isolated in which the sequence of FKS1 is unaltered yet the fungus has decreased sensitivity to echinocandins. In addition it has been shown that echinocandin-treatment can induce cell wall salvage mechanisms that result in the compensatory upregulation of chitin synthesis in the cell wall. This salvage mechanism strengthens cell walls damaged by exposure to echinocandins. Therefore, fungal resistance to echinocandins can arise due to the selection of either stable mutational or reversible physiological alterations that decrease susceptibility to these antifungal agents. PMID:19770064

  13. Fungal Sex and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Geraldine

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Human fungal pathogens are associated with diseases ranging from dandruff and skin colonization to invasive bloodstream infections. The major human pathogens belong to the Candida, Aspergillus, and Cryptococcus clades, and infections have high and increasing morbidity and mortality. Many human fungal pathogens were originally assumed to be asexual. However, recent advances in genome sequencing, which revealed that many species have retained the genes required for the sexual machinery, have dramatically influenced our understanding of the biology of these organisms. Predictions of a rare or cryptic sexual cycle have been supported experimentally for some species. Here, I examine the evidence that human pathogens reproduce sexually. The evolution of the mating-type locus in ascomycetes (including Candida and Aspergillus species) and basidiomycetes (Malassezia and Cryptococcus) is discussed. I provide an overview of how sex is suppressed in different species and discuss the potential associations with pathogenesis. PMID:20065328

  14. Fungal sex and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Butler, Geraldine

    2010-01-01

    Human fungal pathogens are associated with diseases ranging from dandruff and skin colonization to invasive bloodstream infections. The major human pathogens belong to the Candida, Aspergillus, and Cryptococcus clades, and infections have high and increasing morbidity and mortality. Many human fungal pathogens were originally assumed to be asexual. However, recent advances in genome sequencing, which revealed that many species have retained the genes required for the sexual machinery, have dramatically influenced our understanding of the biology of these organisms. Predictions of a rare or cryptic sexual cycle have been supported experimentally for some species. Here, I examine the evidence that human pathogens reproduce sexually. The evolution of the mating-type locus in ascomycetes (including Candida and Aspergillus species) and basidiomycetes (Malassezia and Cryptococcus) is discussed. I provide an overview of how sex is suppressed in different species and discuss the potential associations with pathogenesis. PMID:20065328

  15. Small intestinal fungal overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Askin; Rao, Satish S C

    2015-04-01

    Small intestinal fungal overgrowth (SIFO) is characterized by the presence of excessive number of fungal organisms in the small intestine associated with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Candidiasis is known to cause GI symptoms particularly in immunocompromised patients or those receiving steroids or antibiotics. However, only recently, there is emerging literature that an overgrowth of fungus in the small intestine of non-immunocompromised subjects may cause unexplained GI symptoms. Two recent studies showed that 26 % (24/94) and 25.3 % (38/150) of a series of patients with unexplained GI symptoms had SIFO. The most common symptoms observed in these patients were belching, bloating, indigestion, nausea, diarrhea, and gas. The underlying mechanism(s) that predisposes to SIFO is unclear but small intestinal dysmotility and use of proton pump inhibitors has been implicated. However, further studies are needed; both to confirm these observations and to examine the clinical relevance of fungal overgrowth, both in healthy subjects and in patients with otherwise unexplained GI symptoms. Importantly, whether eradication or its treatment leads to resolution of symptoms remains unclear; at present, a 2-3-week course of antifungal therapy is recommended and may be effective in improving symptoms, but evidence for eradication is lacking. PMID:25786900

  16. Developments in Fungal Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Guarro, Josep; Gené, Josepa; Stchigel, Alberto M.

    1999-01-01

    Fungal infections, especially those caused by opportunistic species, have become substantially more common in recent decades. Numerous species cause human infections, and several new human pathogens are discovered yearly. This situation has created an increasing interest in fungal taxonomy and has led to the development of new methods and approaches to fungal biosystematics which have promoted important practical advances in identification procedures. However, the significance of some data provided by the new approaches is still unclear, and results drawn from such studies may even increase nomenclatural confusion. Analyses of rRNA and rDNA sequences constitute an important complement of the morphological criteria needed to allow clinical fungi to be more easily identified and placed on a single phylogenetic tree. Most of the pathogenic fungi so far described belong to the kingdom Fungi; two belong to the kingdom Chromista. Within the Fungi, they are distributed in three phyla and in 15 orders (Pneumocystidales, Saccharomycetales, Dothideales, Sordariales, Onygenales, Eurotiales, Hypocreales, Ophiostomatales, Microascales, Tremellales, Poriales, Stereales, Agaricales, Schizophyllales, and Ustilaginales). PMID:10398676

  17. Fungal toenail infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Fungal infections are reported to cause 23% of foot diseases and 50% of nail conditions in people seen by dermatologists, but are less common in the general population, affecting 3% to 12% of people. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of oral treatments for fungal toenail infections in adults? What are the effects of topical treatments for fungal toenail infections in adults? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to October 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 13 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: amorolfine, butenafine, ciclopirox, fluconazole, itraconazole, terbinafine, tioconazole, and topical ketoconazole. PMID:24625577

  18. Fungal toenail infections

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Fungal infections are reported to cause 23% of foot diseases and 50% of nail conditions in people seen by dermatologists, but are less common in the general population, affecting 3% to 5% of people. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of oral treatments for fungal toenail infections? What are the effects of topical treatments for fungal toenail infections? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 12 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: amorolfine, butenafine, ciclopirox, fluconazole, griseofulvin, itraconazole, ketoconazole, mechanical debridement, terbinafine, and tioconazole. PMID:21846413

  19. Curcumin suppresses activation of NF-kappaB and AP-1 induced by phorbol ester in cultured human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong-Su; Keum, Young-Sam; Seo, Hyo-Joung; Surh, Young-Joon

    2002-05-31

    Many components that are derived from medicinal or dietary plants possess potential chemopreventive properties. Curcumin, a yellow coloring agent from turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn, Zingiberaceae), possesses strong antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activities. In this study, we have found that curcumin inhibits the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced nuclear factor kB (NF-kappaB) activation by preventing the degradation of the inhibitory protein IkBalpa; and the subsequent translocation of the p65 subunit in cultured human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells. Alternatively, curcumin repressed the TPA-induced activation of NF-kappaB through direct interruption of the binding of NF-kappaB to its consensus DNA sequences. Likewise, the TPA-induced DNA binding of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) was inhibited by curcumin pretreatment. PMID:12297018

  20. A Novel AP-1 Element in the CD95 Ligand Promoter Is Required for Induction of Apoptosis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells upon Treatment with Anticancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Eichhorst, Sören T.; Müller, Martina; Li-Weber, Min; Schulze-Bergkamen, Henning; Angel, Peter; Krammer, Peter H.

    2000-01-01

    The CD95 (also called APO-1 or Fas) system plays a major role in the induction of apoptosis in lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues in response to a variety of extracellular signals, including chemotherapeutic drugs. Here we report that the CD95 ligand (CD95L) is upregulated in hepatoma cells upon treatment with antineoplastic drugs. Upregulation by different chemotherapeutic drugs is functionally relevant for drug-induced apoptosis and is mediated by transcriptional mechanisms. The MEKK1/JNKK pathway and a novel AP-1 element in the CD95L promoter downstream of the TATA box are required for CD95L upregulation. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of CD95-mediated apoptosis through CD95L upregulation upon treatment of hepatocellular carcinomas with chemotherapeutic drugs may contribute to the improvement of anticancer chemotherapy. PMID:11003676

  1. Differential Effects of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α Isoforms on Tumor Growth and T-Cell Factor 4/AP-1 Interactions in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Linh M.; Chellappa, Karthikeyani; Dhahbi, Joseph M.; Deans, Jonathan R.; Fang, Bin; Bolotin, Eugene; Titova, Nina V.; Hoverter, Nate P.; Spindler, Stephen R.; Waterman, Marian L.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) is tumor suppressive in the liver but amplified in colon cancer, suggesting that it also might be oncogenic. To investigate whether this discrepancy is due to different HNF4α isoforms derived from its two promoters (P1 and P2), we generated Tet-On-inducible human colon cancer (HCT116) cell lines that express either the P1-driven (HNF4α2) or P2-driven (HNF4α8) isoform and analyzed them for tumor growth and global changes in gene expression (transcriptome sequencing [RNA-seq] and chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing [ChIP-seq]). The results show that while HNF4α2 acts as a tumor suppressor in the HCT116 tumor xenograft model, HNF4α8 does not. Each isoform regulates the expression of distinct sets of genes and recruits, colocalizes, and competes in a distinct fashion with the Wnt/β-catenin mediator T-cell factor 4 (TCF4) at CTTTG motifs as well as at AP-1 motifs (TGAXTCA). Protein binding microarrays (PBMs) show that HNF4α and TCF4 share some but not all binding motifs and that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in sites bound by both HNF4α and TCF4 can alter binding affinity in vitro, suggesting that they could play a role in cancer susceptibility in vivo. Thus, the HNF4α isoforms play distinct roles in colon cancer, which could be due to differential interactions with the Wnt/β-catenin/TCF4 and AP-1 pathways. PMID:26240283

  2. Geniposide suppresses LPS-induced nitric oxide, PGE2 and inflammatory cytokine by downregulating NF-κB, MAPK and AP-1 signaling pathways in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qinghai; Cao, Jinjun; Fang, Li; Zhao, Hongyan; Liu, Zhengxiang; Ran, Jihua; Zheng, Xinchuan; Li, Xiaoling; Zhou, Yu; Ge, Di; Zhang, Hongming; Wang, Li; Ran, Ying; Fu, Jianfeng

    2014-06-01

    Inflammatory responses are important to host immune reactions, but uncontrolled inflammatory mediators may aid in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory diseases. Geniposide, an iridoid glycoside found in the herb gardenia, is believed to have broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory effects in murine models but its mechanism of action is unclear. We investigated the action of this compound in murine macrophages stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as the stimulation of macrophages by LPS is known to induce inflammatory reactions. We determined the effect of geniposide on LPS-induced production of the inflammatory mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), the mRNA and protein expression of the NO and PGE2 synthases, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), respectively, and the mRNA and protein expression of the inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and activator protein (AP)-1 activity were assayed. To understand the action of geniposide on the NF-κB and MAPK pathways, we studied the effect of NF-κB and MAPK inhibitors on the LPS-induced production of NO, PGE2 and TNF-α. Our findings clearly showed that geniposide mainly exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the LPS-induced NF-κB, MAPK and AP-1 signaling pathways in macrophages, which subsequently reduces overexpression of the inducible enzymes iNOS and COX-2 and suppresses the expression and release of the inflammatory factors, TNF-α, IL-6, NO and PGE2. Thus, geniposide shows promise as a therapeutic agent in inflammatory diseases. PMID:24735815

  3. 5-Methoxyl Aesculetin Abrogates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation by Suppressing MAPK and AP-1 Pathways in RAW 264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lei; Li, Xueqin; Wu, Haifeng; Long, Wei; Jiang, Xiaojian; Shen, Ting; Qiang, Qian; Si, Chuanling; Wang, Xinfeng; Jiang, Yunyao; Hu, Weicheng

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, a pale amorphous coumarin derivative, 5-methoxyl aesculetin (MOA), was isolated from the dried bark of Fraxinus rhynchophylla Hance (Oleaceae). MOA modulates cytokine expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages, but the precise mechanisms are still not fully understood. We determined the effects of MOA on the production of inflammatory mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the LPS-induced inflammatory responses of RAW 264.7 macrophages. MOA significantly inhibited the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β. It also effectively attenuated inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, and TNF-α mRNA expression and significantly decreased the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species. It inhibited phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), thus blocking nuclear translocation of activation protein (AP)-1. In a molecular docking study, MOA was shown to target the binding site of ERK via the formation of three hydrogen bonds with two residues of the kinase, which is sufficient for the inhibition of ERK. These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of MOA in RAW 264.7 macrophages derive from its ability to block both the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and one of their downstream transcription factors, activator protein-1 (AP-1). Our observations support the need for further research into MOA as a promising therapeutic agent in inflammatory diseases. PMID:26938526

  4. The euAP1 protein MPF3 represses MPF2 to specify floral calyx identity and displays crucial roles in Chinese lantern development in Physalis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Tian, Ying; Zhang, Ji-Si; Zhao, Man; Gong, Pichang; Riss, Simone; Saedler, Rainer; He, Chaoying

    2013-06-01

    The Chinese lantern phenotype or inflated calyx syndrome (ICS) is a postfloral morphological novelty in Physalis. Its origin is associated with the heterotopic expression of the MADS box gene 2 from Physalis floridana (MPF2) in floral organs, yet the process underlying its identity remains elusive. Here, we show that MPF3, which is expressed specifically in floral tissues, encodes a core eudicot APETALA1-like (euAP1) MADS-domain protein. MPF3 was primarily localized to the nucleus, and it interacted with MPF2 and some floral MADS-domain proteins to selectively bind the CC-A-rich-GG (CArG) boxes in the MPF2 promoter. Downregulating MPF3 resulted in a dramatic elevation in MPF2 in the calyces and androecium, leading to enlarged and leaf-like floral calyces; however, the postfloral lantern was smaller and deformed. Starch accumulation in pollen was blocked. MPF3 MPF2 double knockdowns showed normal floral calyces and more mature pollen than those found in plants in which either MPF3 or MPF2 was downregulated. Therefore, MPF3 specifies calyx identity and regulates ICS formation and male fertility through interactions with MPF2/MPF2. Furthermore, both genes were found to activate Physalis floridana invertase gene 4 homolog, which encodes an invertase cleaving Suc, a putative key gene in sugar partitioning. The novel role of the MPF3-MPF2 regulatory circuit in male fertility is integral to the origin of ICS. Our results shed light on the evolution and development of ICS in Physalis and on the functional evolution of euAP1s in angiosperms.

  5. SERPINE2 Inhibits IL-1α-Induced MMP-13 Expression in Human Chondrocytes: Involvement of ERK/NF-κB/AP-1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Scotece, Morena; Abella, Vanessa; Lois, Ana; Lopez, Veronica; Pino, Jesus; Gomez, Rodolfo; Gomez-Reino, Juan J.; Gualillo, Oreste

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic joint disease, characterized by a progressive loss of articular cartilage. During OA, proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin IL-1, induce the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in chondrocytes, contributing thus to the extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. Members of Serpine family, including plasminogen activator inhibitors have been reported to participate in ECM regulation. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of serpin peptidase inhibitor clade E member 2 (SERPINE2), under basal conditions and in response to increasing doses of IL-1α, in human cultured chondrocytes. We also examined the effects of SERPINE2 on IL-1α-induced MMP-13 expression. For completeness, the signaling pathway involved in this process was also explored. Methods SERPINE2 mRNA and protein expression were evaluated by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis in human T/C-28a2 cell line and human primary chondrocytes. These cells were treated with human recombinant SERPINE2, alone or in combination with IL-1α. ERK 1/2, NFκB and AP-1 activation were assessed by western blot analysis. Results Human cultured chondrocytes express SERPINE2 in basal condition. This expression increased in response to IL-1α stimulation. In addition, recombinant SERPINE2 induced a clear inhibition of MMP-13 expression in IL-1α-stimulated chondrocytes. This inhibitory effect is likely regulated through a pathway involving ERK 1/2, NF-κB and AP-1. Conclusions Taken together, these data demonstrate that SERPINE2 might prevent cartilage catabolism by inhibiting the expression of MMP-13, one of the most relevant collagenases, involved in cartilage breakdown in OA. PMID:26305372

  6. Geniposide suppresses LPS-induced nitric oxide, PGE2 and inflammatory cytokine by downregulating NF-κB, MAPK and AP-1 signaling pathways in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qinghai; Cao, Jinjun; Fang, Li; Zhao, Hongyan; Liu, Zhengxiang; Ran, Jihua; Zheng, Xinchuan; Li, Xiaoling; Zhou, Yu; Ge, Di; Zhang, Hongming; Wang, Li; Ran, Ying; Fu, Jianfeng

    2014-06-01

    Inflammatory responses are important to host immune reactions, but uncontrolled inflammatory mediators may aid in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory diseases. Geniposide, an iridoid glycoside found in the herb gardenia, is believed to have broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory effects in murine models but its mechanism of action is unclear. We investigated the action of this compound in murine macrophages stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as the stimulation of macrophages by LPS is known to induce inflammatory reactions. We determined the effect of geniposide on LPS-induced production of the inflammatory mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), the mRNA and protein expression of the NO and PGE2 synthases, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), respectively, and the mRNA and protein expression of the inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and activator protein (AP)-1 activity were assayed. To understand the action of geniposide on the NF-κB and MAPK pathways, we studied the effect of NF-κB and MAPK inhibitors on the LPS-induced production of NO, PGE2 and TNF-α. Our findings clearly showed that geniposide mainly exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the LPS-induced NF-κB, MAPK and AP-1 signaling pathways in macrophages, which subsequently reduces overexpression of the inducible enzymes iNOS and COX-2 and suppresses the expression and release of the inflammatory factors, TNF-α, IL-6, NO and PGE2. Thus, geniposide shows promise as a therapeutic agent in inflammatory diseases.

  7. Exogenous avian leukosis virus-induced activation of the ERK/AP1 pathway is required for virus replication and correlates with virus-induced tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Manman; Feng, Min; Ye, Yu; Wu, Xiaochan; Liu, Di; Liao, Ming; Cao, Weisheng

    2016-01-01

    A proteomics approach was used to reveal the up-regulated proteins involved in the targeted mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathway in DF-1 cells after ALV subgroup J (ALV-J) infection. Next, we found that ALV-J CHN06 strain infection of DF-1 cells correlated with extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) activation, which was mainly induced within 15 min, a very early stage of infection, and at a late infection stage, from 108 h to 132 h post-infection. Infection with other ALV subgroup (A/B) strains also triggered ERK/MAPK activation. Moreover, when activating ERK2, ALV subgroups A, B and J simultaneously induced the phosphorylation of c-Jun, an AP1 family member and p38 activation but had no obvious effect on JNK activation at either 15 min or 120 h. Interestingly, only PD98059 inhibited the ALV-induced c-Jun phosphorylation while SP600125 or SB203580 had no influence on c-Jun activation. Furthermore, the viral gp85 and gag proteins were found to contribute to ERK2/AP1 activation. Additionally, the specific ERK inhibitor, PD980509, significantly suppressed ALV replication, as evidenced by extremely low levels of ALV promoter activity and ALV-J protein expression. In vivo analysis of ERK2 activation in tumor cells derived from ALV-J-infected chicken demonstrated a strong correlation between ERK/MAPK activation and virus-associated tumorigenesis. PMID:26754177

  8. NF-κB/AP-1-targeted inhibition of macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses by depigmenting compound AP736 derived from natural 1,3-diphenylpropane skeleton.

    PubMed

    Ha, Van Thai; Beak, Heung Soo; Kim, Eunji; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Hossen, Muhammad Jahangir; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Yong; Kim, Jun Ho; Yang, Sungjae; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Joo, Yung Hyup; Lee, Chang Seok; Choi, Joonho; Shin, Hong-Ju; Hong, Sungyoul; Shin, Song Seok; Cho, Jae Youl

    2014-01-01

    AP736 was identified as an antimelanogenic drug that can be used for the prevention of melasma, freckles, and dark spots in skin by acting as a suppressor of melanin synthesis and tyrosinase expression. Since macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses are critical for skin health, here we investigated the potential anti-inflammatory activity of AP736. The effects of AP736 on various inflammatory events such as nitric oxide (NO)/prostaglandin (PG) E2 production, inflammatory gene expression, phagocytic uptake, and morphological changes were examined in RAW264.7 cells. AP736 was found to strongly inhibit the production of both NO and PGE2 in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) treated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, AP736 strongly inhibited both LPS-induced morphological changes and FITC-dextran-induced phagocytic uptake. Furthermore, AP736 also downregulated the expression of multiple inflammatory genes, such as inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2, and interleukin- (IL-) 1β in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Transcription factor analysis, including upstream signalling events, revealed that both NF-κB and AP-1 were targeted by AP736 via inhibition of the IKK/IκBα and IRAK1/TAK1 pathways. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that AP736 is a potential anti-inflammatory drug due to its suppression of NF-κB-IKK/IκBα and AP-1-IRAK1/TAK1 signalling, which may make AP736 useful for the treatment of macrophage-mediated skin inflammation. PMID:25386046

  9. Transient receptor potential melastatin-3 (TRPM3)-induced activation of AP-1 requires Ca2+ ions and the transcription factors c-Jun, ATF2, and ternary complex factor.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Andrea; Hui, Xin; Lipp, Peter; Thiel, Gerald

    2015-04-01

    The steroid pregnenolone sulfate activates the transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1) via stimulation of transient receptor potential melastatin-3 (TRPM3) channels. Here, we show that the signaling pathway requires an influx of Ca(2+) ions into the cells and a rise in the intracellular Ca(2+) levels. The upregulation of AP-1 was attenuated in cells that overexpressed mitogen activated protein kinase phosphatase-1, indicating that Ca(2+) ions prolong the signaling cascade via activation of mitogen activated protein kinases. On the transcriptional level, expression of a dominant-negative mutant of the basic region leucine zipper protein c-Jun, a major constituent of the AP-1 transcription factor complex, or expression of a c-Jun-specific short hairpin RNA attenuated pregnenolone sulfate-induced AP-1 activation. In addition, stimulation of TRPM3 channels increased the transcriptional activation potential of the basic region leucine zipper protein ATF2. Inhibition of ATF2 target gene expression via expression of a dominant-negative mutant of ATF2 or expression of an ATF2-specific short hairpin RNA interfered with TRPM3-mediated stimulation of AP-1. Moreover, we show that a dominant-negative mutant of the ternary complex factor (TCF) Elk-1 attenuated the upregulation of AP-1 following stimulation of TRPM3 channels. Thus, c-Jun, ATF2, and TCFs are required to connect the intracellular signaling cascade elicited by activation of TRPM3 channels with enhanced transcription of AP-1-regulated genes. We conclude that pregnenolone sulfate-induced TRPM3 channel activation changes the gene expression pattern of the cells by activating transcription of c-Jun-, ATF2-, and TCF-controlled genes.

  10. Fungal osteomyelitis and septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bariteau, Jason T; Waryasz, Gregory R; McDonnell, Matthew; Fischer, Staci A; Hayda, Roman A; Born, Christopher T

    2014-06-01

    Management of fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis is challenging, especially in the setting of immunodeficiency and conditions that require immunosuppression. Because fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis are rare conditions, study of their pathophysiology and treatment has been limited. In the literature, evidence-based treatment is lacking and, historically, outcomes have been poor. The most common offending organisms are Candida and Aspergillus, which are widely distributed in humans and soil. However, some fungal pathogens, such as Histoplasma, Blastomyces, Coccidioides, Cryptococcus, and Sporothrix, have more focal areas of endemicity. Fungal bone and joint infections result from direct inoculation, contiguous infection spread, or hematogenous seeding of organisms. These infections may be difficult to diagnose and eradicate, especially in the setting of total joint arthroplasty. Although there is no clear consensus on treatment, guidelines are available for management of many of these pathogens.

  11. Fungal mastoiditis in immunocompromised children.

    PubMed

    Slack, C L; Watson, D W; Abzug, M J; Shaw, C; Chan, K H

    1999-01-01

    The immunocompromised host is subject to a variety of opportunistic infections. Mycotic infections, including invasive fungal sinusitis, are a dreaded complication in immune deficient children. Fungal mastoiditis has rarely been described in this population. Our experience with 2 cases of fungal mastoiditis in immunocompromised children is reviewed. Case histories describing aggressive medical management with and without surgical intervention and a review of the literature are presented. PMID:9932592

  12. Fungal Genome Sequencing and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Scott E.; Thykaer, Jette; Adney, William S.; Brettin, T.; Brockman, Fred J.; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Martinez, Antonio D.; Miller, R. M.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Torok, Tamas; Tuskan, Gerald; Bennett, Joan W.; Berka, Randy; Briggs, Steve; Heitman, Joseph; Taylor, John; Turgeon, Barbara G.; Werner-Washburne, Maggie; Himmel, Michael E.

    2008-09-30

    To date, the number of ongoing filamentous fungal genome sequencing projects is almost tenfold fewer than those of bacterial and archaeal genome projects. The fungi chosen for sequencing represent narrow kingdom diversity; most are pathogens or models. We advocate an ambitious, forward-looking phylogenetic-based genome sequencing program, designed to capture metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into alternative bioenergy sources, bioremediation, and fungal-environment interactions.

  13. Fungal Genome Sequencing and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Scott; Thykaer, Jette; Adney, William S; Brettin, Tom; Brockman, Fred; Dhaeseleer, Patrick; Martinez, A diego; Miller, R michael; Rokhsar, Daniel; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Torok, Tamas; Tuskan, Gerald A; Bennett, Joan; Berka, Randy; Briggs, Steven; Heitman, Joseph; Taylor, John; Turgeon, Gillian; Werner-Washburne, Maggie; Himmel, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    To date, the number of ongoing filamentous fungal genome sequencing projects is almost tenfold fewer than those of bacterial and archaeal genome projects. The fungi chosen for sequencing represent narrow kingdom diversity; most are pathogens or models. We advocate an ambitious, forward-looking phylogenetic-based genome sequencing program, designed to capture metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into alternative bioenergy sources, bioremediation, and fungal-environment interactions. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of The British Mycological Society.

  14. Fungal Genome Sequencing and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect

    Schadt, Christopher Warren; Baker, Scott; Thykaer, Jette; Adney, William S; Brettin, Tom; Brockman, Fred; Dhaeseleer, Patrick; Martinez, A diego; Miller, R michael; Rokhsar, Daniel; Torok, Tamas; Tuskan, Gerald A; Bennett, Joan; Berka, Randy; Briggs, Steven; Heitman, Joseph; Rizvi, L; Taylor, John; Turgeon, Gillian; Werner-Washburne, Maggie; Himmel, Michael

    2008-01-01

    To date, the number of ongoing filamentous fungal genome sequencing projects is almost tenfold fewer than those of bacterial and archaeal genome projects. The fungi chosen for sequencing represent narrow kingdom diversity; most are pathogens or models. We advocate an ambitious, forward-looking phylogenetic-based genome sequencing program, designed to capture metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into alternative bioenergy sources, bioremediation, and fungal-environment interactions.

  15. Effect of estrogen and tamoxifen on the expression pattern of AP-1 factors in MCF-7 cells: role of c-Jun, c-Fos, and Fra-1 in cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Babu, R L; Naveen Kumar, M; Patil, Rajeshwari H; Devaraju, K S; Ramesh, Govindarajan T; Sharma, S Chidananda

    2013-08-01

    The activated transcription factor ERα plays an important role in the breast development and progression of cancer. In a non-classical pathway ER interacts with other transcription factors AP-1, NFkB, SP1, etc. AP-1 transcription factors control rapid responses of mammalian cells to stimuli that impact proliferation, differentiation, and transformation. AP-1 factors are leucine zipper proteins belonging to members of the Jun family (c-Jun, JunB, and JunD) and Fos family (c-Fos, FosB, Fra-1, and Fra-2) proteins. Although AP-1 factors are well characterized, not much is known about the expression pattern of the AP-1 factors in breast cancer cells. Hence to determine which AP-1 factors are expressed and regulated by estrogen, we used human breast cancer MCF-7 cells as in vitro model system. The MCF-7 cells were treated with or without estradiol-17β (E2) or antiestrogen tamoxifen (TMX) and the cell proliferation and viability was assessed by MTT assay. The expression of different AP-1 factors was analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The cells treated with E2 found to increase the cell proliferation by more than 35 % and TMX an antiestrogen decreased by 29 % compared to control. The E2 found to induce the expression of c-Jun, Fra-1, and c-Fos, while TMX decreased the expression. In addition TMX also decreased the mRNA levels of Jun-D and Fra-2. These results suggest that the AP-1 factors c-Jun, c-Fos, and Fra-1 may be involved in the proliferation and transformation of MCF-7 cells. E2 also found to induce cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 mRNA transcripts of cell cycle regulators while TMX significantly decreased compared to control. Further E2 induced the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and TMX decreased mRNA transcripts. The data presented here support the E2-ERα-mediated MCF-7 cell proliferation and confirms the role of AP-1 factors in cell cycle regulation. PMID:23625206

  16. The ether lipid 1-octadecyl-2-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine induces expression of fos and jun proto-oncogenes and activates AP-1 transcription factor in human leukaemic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mollinedo, F; Gajate, C; Modolell, M

    1994-01-01

    The ether lipid analogue 1-octadecyl-2-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (ET-18-OCH3) has been recently shown to induce apoptosis in the human leukaemic HL-60 and U937 myeloid cell lines [Mollinedo, Martinez-Dalmau and Modolell (1993) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 192, 603-609]. We have found that ET-18-OCH3 is also able to promote apoptosis in the human leukaemic Jurkat T lymphoid cell line. This lymphoid cell line as well as the two myeloid HL-60 and U937 cell lines incorporated significant amounts of exogenously added radiolabelled ET-18-OCH3. Addition of ET-18-OCH3 to these human leukaemic cells induced an increase in the steady-state mRNA levels of fos and jun proto-oncogenes, components of the transcription factor AP-1. These increases in fos and jun mRNA levels were associated with the activation of the AP-1 transcription factor after addition of ET-18-OCH3 to human leukaemic cells, as assessed by an enhanced binding activity of transcription factor AP-1 to its cognate DNA sequence as well as by stimulation of transcription from an AP-1 enhancer element. These data demonstrate that the ether lipid ET-18-OCH3 can affect gene expression by inducing expression of fos and jun proto-oncogenes and by modulating the activity of transcription factor AP-1. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8092982

  17. Fungal biodiversity to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Chambergo, Felipe S; Valencia, Estela Y

    2016-03-01

    Fungal habitats include soil, water, and extreme environments. With around 100,000 fungus species already described, it is estimated that 5.1 million fungus species exist on our planet, making fungi one of the largest and most diverse kingdoms of eukaryotes. Fungi show remarkable metabolic features due to a sophisticated genomic network and are important for the production of biotechnological compounds that greatly impact our society in many ways. In this review, we present the current state of knowledge on fungal biodiversity, with special emphasis on filamentous fungi and the most recent discoveries in the field of identification and production of biotechnological compounds. More than 250 fungus species have been studied to produce these biotechnological compounds. This review focuses on three of the branches generally accepted in biotechnological applications, which have been identified by a color code: red, green, and white for pharmaceutical, agricultural, and industrial biotechnology, respectively. We also discuss future prospects for the use of filamentous fungi in biotechnology application.

  18. Thrombin mediates migration of rat brain astrocytes via PLC, Ca²⁺, CaMKII, PKCα, and AP-1-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Lee, I-Ta; Wu, Wen-Bin; Liu, Chiung-Ju; Hsieh, Hsi-Lung; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chien-Chung; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2013-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays a crucial role in pathological processes of brain inflammation, injury, and neurodegeneration. Thrombin has been known as a regulator of MMP-9 expression and cells migration. However, the mechanisms underlying thrombin-induced MMP-9 expression in rat brain astrocytes (RBA-1 cells) remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that thrombin induced the expression of pro-form MMP-9 and migration of RBA-1 cells, which were inhibited by pretreatment with the inhibitor of Gq-coupled receptor (GPAnt2A), Gi/o-coupled receptor (GPAnt2), PC-PLC (D609), PI-PLC (U73122), Ca(2+)-ATPase (thapsigargin, TG), calmodulin (CaMI), CaMKII (KN62), PKC (Gö6976 or GF109203X), MEK1/2 (PD98059), p38 MAPK (SB202190), JNK1/2 (SP600125), or AP-1 (Tanshinone IIA) or the intracellular calcium chelator (BAPTA/AM) and transfection with siRNA of PKCα, Erk2, JNK1, p38 MAPK, c-Jun, or c-Fos. In addition, thrombin-induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was attenuated by PPACK (a thrombin inhibitor). Thrombin further induced CaMKII phosphorylation and PKCα translocation, which were inhibited by U73122, D609, KN62, TG, or BAPTA/AM. Thrombin also induced PKCα-dependent p42/p44 MAPK and JNK1/2, but not p38 MAPK activation. Finally, we showed that thrombin enhanced c-Fos expression and c-Jun phosphorylation. c-Fos mRNA levels induced by thrombin were reduced by PD98059, SP600125, and Gö6976, but not SB202190. Thrombin stimulated in vivo binding of c-Fos to the MMP-9 promoter, which was reduced by pretreatment with SP600125 or PD98059, but not SB202190. These results concluded that thrombin activated a PLC/Ca(2+)/CaMKII/PKCα/p42/p44 MAPK and JNK1/2 pathway, which in turn triggered AP-1 activation and ultimately induced MMP-9 expression in RBA-1 cells.

  19. CXCL12 induces connective tissue growth factor expression in human lung fibroblasts through the Rac1/ERK, JNK, and AP-1 pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Shih, Chung-Huang; Tseng, Chih-Chieh; Yu, Chung-Chi; Tsai, Yuan-Jhih; Bien, Mauo-Ying; Chen, Bing-Chang

    2014-01-01

    CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor-1, SDF-1) is a potent chemokine for homing of CXCR4+ fibrocytes to injury sites of lung tissue, which contributes to pulmonary fibrosis. Overexpression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) plays a critical role in pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the roles of Rac1, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and activator protein-1 (AP-1) in CXCL12-induced CTGF expression in human lung fibroblasts. CXCL12 caused concentration- and time-dependent increases in CTGF expression and CTGF-luciferase activity. CXCL12-induced CTGF expression was inhibited by a CXCR4 antagonist (AMD3100), small interfering RNA of CXCR4 (CXCR4 siRNA), a dominant negative mutant of Rac1 (RacN17), a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) inhibitor (PD98059), a JNK inhibitor (SP600125), a p21-activated kinase inhibitor (PAK18), c-Jun siRNA, and an AP-1 inhibitor (curcumin). Treatment of cells with CXCL12 caused activations of Rac1, Rho, ERK, and c-Jun. The CXCL12-induced increase in ERK phosphorylation was inhibited by RacN17. Treatment of cells with PD98059 and SP600125 both inhibited CXCL12-induced c-Jun phosphorylation. CXCL12 caused the recruitment of c-Jun and c-Fos binding to the CTGF promoter. Furthermore, CXCL12 induced an increase in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, a myofibroblastic phenotype, and actin stress fiber formation. CXCL12-induced actin stress fiber formation and α-SMA expression were respectively inhibited by AMD3100 and CTGF siRNA. Taken together, our results suggest that CXCL12, acting through CXCR4, activates the Rac/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, which in turn initiates c-Jun phosphorylation, and recruits c-Jun and c-Fos to the CTGF promoter and ultimately induces CTGF expression in human lung fibroblasts. Moreover, overexpression of CTGF mediates CXCL12-induced α-SMA expression. PMID:25121739

  20. Effects of AP-1 and NF-κB inhibitors on colonic endocrine cells in rats with TNBS-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between intestinal neuroendocrine peptides/amines and the immune system appear to have an important role in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The present study investigated the effects of activator protein (AP)-1 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibitors on inflammation-induced alterations in enteroendocrine cells. A total of 48 male Wistar rats were divided into the following four groups (n=12 rats/group): Control, trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis only (TNBS group), TNBS-induced colitis with 3-[(dodecylthiocarbonyl)-methyl]-glutarimide (DTCM-G) treatment (DTCM-G group), and TNBS-induced colitis with dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ) treatment (DHMEQ group). A total of 3 days following administration of TNBS, the rats were treated as follows: The control and TNBS groups received 0.5 ml vehicle (0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose; CMC), respectively; the DTCM-G group received DTCM-G (20 mg/kg body weight) in 0.5% CMC; and the DHMEQ group received DHMEQ (15 mg/kg body weight) in 0.5% CMC. All injections were performed intraperitoneally twice daily for 5 days. The rats were sacrificed, and tissue samples obtained from the colon were examined histopathologically and immunohistochemically. Inflammation was evaluated using a scoring system. In addition, the sections were immunostained for chromogranin A (CgA), serotonin, peptide YY (PYY), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and somatostatin, and immunostaining was quantified using image-analysis software. The density of cells expressing CgA, PYY and PP was significantly lower in the TNBS group compared with in the control group, whereas the density of cells expressing serotonin, oxyntomodulin and somatostatin was significantly higher in the TNBS group compared with in the control group. None of the endocrine cell types differed significantly between the control group and either the DTCM-G or DHMEQ groups. All of the colonic endocrine cell types were affected in

  1. Ras association domain family member 10 suppresses gastric cancer growth by cooperating with GSTP1 to regulate JNK/c-Jun/AP-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Liang, Q; Liu, W; Zhang, N; Xu, L; Zhang, X; Zhang, J; Sung, J J Y; Yu, J

    2016-05-12

    The Ras association domain family (RASSF) encodes several members with tumor-suppressive potentials. We aimed to investigate the biological function and clinical implication of RASSF10 in gastric cancer (GC). We found that RASSF10 was silenced in six of seven GC cell lines and in primary GC tissues, but was highly expressed in normal gastric tissues. The silence of RASSAF10 was mediated by promoter methylation as evaluated by bisulfite genomic sequencing. RASSF10 expression could be restored by demethylation treatment. A negative correlation between methylation and mRNA expression of RASSF10 was observed in 223 gastric samples of The Cancer Genome Atlas study (P<0.0001). Re-expression of RASSF10 in GC cell lines (AGS and MKN45) significantly suppressed cell viability, colony formation, migration and invasion, reduced cells in S phase, accumulated cells in G2 phase and induced cell apoptosis in vitro, and inhibited tumorigenicity in nude mice. These were confirmed by decreased expression of proliferation markers (proliferating cell nuclear antigen, p-CDC2 and p-CDC25) and increased apoptotic cascades (cleaved caspases-9, -8, -3 and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase). Conversely, RASSF10 knockdown in normal gastric cell line yielded an opposing effect. Co-immunoprecipitation combined with mass spectrometry analyses were performed to reveal the downstream effectors of RASSF10. The result revealed that glutathione S-transferase Pi 1 (GSTP1) was a direct cooperator of RASSF10. The tumor-suppressive effect of RASSF10 was partially mediated by cooperating with GSTP1 to deregulate Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/c-Jun/AP-1 pathway. Importantly, RASSF10 methylation was detected in 56.6% (98/173) of primary GCs and is an independent risk factor for poor survival of GC patients (P=0.001). In conclusions, RASSF10 functions as a tumor suppressor by cooperating with GSTP1 to deregulate JNK/c-Jun/AP-1 pathway in GC. Promoter methylation of RASSF10 is associated with poor survival

  2. Managing acute invasive fungal sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Dwyhalo, Kristina M; Donald, Carrlene; Mendez, Anthony; Hoxworth, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Acute invasive fungal sinusitis is the most aggressive form of fungal sinusitis and can be fatal, especially in patients who are immunosuppressed. Early diagnosis and intervention are crucial and potentially lifesaving, so primary care providers must maintain a high index of suspicion for this disease. Patients may need to be admitted to the hospital for IV antifungal therapy and surgical debridement.

  3. Golgi-Dependent Transport of Vacuolar Sorting Receptors Is Regulated by COPII, AP1, and AP4 Protein Complexes in Tobacco[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gershlick, David C.; de Marcos Lousa, Carine; Foresti, Ombretta; Lee, Andrew J.; Pereira, Estela A.; daSilva, Luis L.P.; Bottanelli, Francesca; Denecke, Jurgen

    2014-01-01

    The cycling of vacuolar sorting receptors (VSRs) between early and late secretory pathway compartments is regulated by signals in the cytosolic tail, but the exact pathway is controversial. Here, we show that receptor targeting in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) initially involves a canonical coat protein complex II–dependent endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi bulk flow route and that VSR–ligand interactions in the cis-Golgi play an important role in vacuolar sorting. We also show that a conserved Glu is required but not sufficient for rate-limiting YXXɸ-mediated receptor trafficking. Protein–protein interaction studies show that the VSR tail interacts with the μ-subunits of plant or mammalian clathrin adaptor complex AP1 and plant AP4 but not that of plant and mammalian AP2. Mutants causing a detour of full-length receptors via the cell surface invariantly cause the secretion of VSR ligands. Therefore, we propose that cycling via the plasma membrane is unlikely to play a role in biosynthetic vacuolar sorting under normal physiological conditions and that the conserved Ile-Met motif is mainly used to recover mistargeted receptors. This occurs via a fundamentally different pathway from the prevacuolar compartment that does not mediate recycling. The role of clathrin and clathrin-independent pathways in vacuolar targeting is discussed. PMID:24642936

  4. Citrus bergamia Juice Extract Attenuates β-Amyloid-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Activation of THP-1 Cells Through MAPK and AP-1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Currò, Monica; Risitano, Roberto; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Cirmi, Santa; Gangemi, Chiara; Caccamo, Daniela; Ientile, Riccardo; Navarra, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids have been shown to be effective in protecting against age-related cognitive and motor decline in both in vitro and in vivo models. Recently, a flavonoid-rich extract of Citrus bergamia juice (BJe) has been shown to display anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties against LPS-induced activation of human THP-1 monocytes. In the light of these observations, we wondered whether BJe may be beneficial against neuroinflammatory processes, such as those observed in Alzheimer’s disease. To this aim we used THP-1 monocytes to investigate the mechanisms underlying the beneficial potential of BJe against amyloid-beta1–42 (Aβ1−42) -mediated inflammation. Exposure of THP-1 cells to Aβ1−42 significantly induced the expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-1β in THP-1 cells and increased the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 as well as p46 and p54 members of JNK family. Moreover, Aβ1−42 raises AP-1 DNA binding activity in THP-1-treated cells. Interestingly, all these effects were reduced in the presence of BJe. Our data indicate that BJe may effectively counteract the pro-inflammatory activation of monocytes/microglial cells exposed to amyloid fibrils, suggesting a promising role as a natural drug against neuroinflammatory processes. PMID:26853104

  5. A new APE1/Ref-1-dependent pathway leading to reduction of NF-kappaB and AP-1, and activation of their DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kozue; Hirao, Satoshi; Kabe, Yasuaki; Ogura, Yuji; Sato, Iwao; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Wada, Tadashi; Handa, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    APE1/Ref-1 is thought to be a multifunctional protein involved in reduction-oxidation (redox) regulation and base excision DNA repair, and is required for early embryonic development in mice. APE1/Ref-1 has redox activity and AP endonuclease activity, and is able to enhance DNA-binding activity of several transcription factors, including NF-kappaB, AP-1 and p53, through reduction of their critical cysteine residues. However, it remains elusive exactly how APE1/Ref-1 carries out its essential functions in vivo. Here, we show that APE1/Ref-1 not only reduces target transcription factors directly but also facilitates their reduction by other reducing molecules such as glutathione or thioredoxin. The new activity of APE1/Ref-1, termed redox chaperone activity, is exerted at concentration significantly lower than that required for its redox activity and is neither dependent on its redox activity nor on its AP endonuclease activity. We also show evidence that redox chaperone activity of APE1/Ref-1 is critical to NF-kappaB-mediated gene expression in human cells and is mediated through its physical association with target transcription factors. Thus, APE1/Ref-1 may play multiple roles in an antioxidative stress response pathway through its different biochemical activities. These findings also provide new insight into the mechanism of intracellular redox regulation.

  6. Piperine inhibits PMA-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression through downregulating NF-κB, C/EBP and AP-1 signaling pathways in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Han, Eun Hee; Jang, Woo-Seok; Choi, Jae Ho; Khanal, Tilak; Park, Bong Hwan; Tran, Thu Phuong; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2012-07-01

    Piperine is a major component of black (Piper nigrum Linn) and long (Piper longum Linn) peppers, and is widely used as a traditional food and medicine. It also exhibits a variety of biological activities, which include antioxidant, anti-tumor and anti-pyretic properties. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of piperine on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression and analyzed the molecular mechanism of its activity in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. Piperine dose-dependently decreased PMA-induced COX-2 expression and PGE(2) production, as well as COX-2 promoter-driven luciferase activity. Transient transfections utilizing COX-2 promoter deletion constructs and COX-2 promoter constructs, in which specific enhancer elements were mutagenized, revealed that the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) and activator protein-1 (AP-1), were the predominant contributors to the effects of piperine. In addition, piperine inhibited PMA-induced NF-κB, C/EBP and c-Jun nuclear translocation. Furthermore, piperine significantly inhibited PMA-induced activation of the Akt and ERK. These findings demonstrate that piperine effectively attenuates COX-2 production, and provide further insight into the signal transduction pathways involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of piperine. PMID:22542552

  7. Citrus bergamia Juice Extract Attenuates β-Amyloid-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Activation of THP-1 Cells Through MAPK and AP-1 Pathways.

    PubMed

    Currò, Monica; Risitano, Roberto; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Cirmi, Santa; Gangemi, Chiara; Caccamo, Daniela; Ientile, Riccardo; Navarra, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids have been shown to be effective in protecting against age-related cognitive and motor decline in both in vitro and in vivo models. Recently, a flavonoid-rich extract of Citrus bergamia juice (BJe) has been shown to display anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties against LPS-induced activation of human THP-1 monocytes. In the light of these observations, we wondered whether BJe may be beneficial against neuroinflammatory processes, such as those observed in Alzheimer's disease. To this aim we used THP-1 monocytes to investigate the mechanisms underlying the beneficial potential of BJe against amyloid-beta1-42 (Aβ1-42) -mediated inflammation. Exposure of THP-1 cells to Aβ1-42 significantly induced the expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-1β in THP-1 cells and increased the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 as well as p46 and p54 members of JNK family. Moreover, Aβ1-42 raises AP-1 DNA binding activity in THP-1-treated cells. Interestingly, all these effects were reduced in the presence of BJe. Our data indicate that BJe may effectively counteract the pro-inflammatory activation of monocytes/microglial cells exposed to amyloid fibrils, suggesting a promising role as a natural drug against neuroinflammatory processes.

  8. TE-domestication and horizontal transfer in a putative Nef-AP1mu mimic of HLA-A cytoplasmic domain re-trafficking.

    PubMed

    Murray, Joseph S; Murray, Elaina H

    2016-01-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC; also called HLA in human) are polymorphic elements in the genomes of sharks to humans. Class-I and class-II MHC loci appear responsible for much of the genetic linkage to myriad disease states via the capacity to bind short (~8-15 a.a.) peptides of a given pathogen's proteome, or in some cases, the altered proteomes of cancerous cells, and even (in autoimmunity) certain nominal 'self' peptides (Janeway, 2004).(1) Unfortunately, little is known about how the canonical structure of the MHC-I/-II peptide-presenting gene evolved, particularly since beyond ~500 Mya (sharks) no paralogs exist.(2,3) We previously reported that HLA-A isotype alleles with the α1-helix, R65 motif, are wide-spread in phylogeny, but that the α 2-helix, H151R motif, has apparently segregated out of most species. Surprisingly, an uncharacterized orf in T. syrichta (Loc-103275158) encoded R151, but within a truncated A-23 like gene containing 5'- and 3'- footprints of the transposon (TE), tigger-1; the extant tarsier A-23 allele is totally missing exon-3 and part-of exon-4; together, suggesting TE-mediated inactivation of an intact/ancestral A-23 allele (Murray, 2015a).(4) The unique Loc-103275158 orf encodes a putative 15-exon transcript with no apparent paralogs throughout phylogeny. However, an HLA-A11 like gene in M. leucophaeus with a shortened C-terminal domain, and an HLA-A like orf in C. atys with two linked α1/α2/α3 domains, both contain a second transmembrane segment, which is conserved in Loc-103275158. Thus, we could model the putative protein with its Nef-like tail domain docked to its MHC-I like α3 domain (i.e., on the same side of a membrane). This modeled tertiary structure is strikingly similar to the solved structure of the Nef:MHC-I CD:AP1mu transporter (Jia, 2012).(5) Nef:AP1mu binds the CD of MHC-I in trafficking MHC-I away from the trans-golgi and into the endocytic pathway in HIV-1 infected cells. The CD loop of the

  9. TE-domestication and horizontal transfer in a putative Nef-AP1mu mimic of HLA-A cytoplasmic domain re-trafficking.

    PubMed

    Murray, Joseph S; Murray, Elaina H

    2016-01-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC; also called HLA in human) are polymorphic elements in the genomes of sharks to humans. Class-I and class-II MHC loci appear responsible for much of the genetic linkage to myriad disease states via the capacity to bind short (~8-15 a.a.) peptides of a given pathogen's proteome, or in some cases, the altered proteomes of cancerous cells, and even (in autoimmunity) certain nominal 'self' peptides (Janeway, 2004).(1) Unfortunately, little is known about how the canonical structure of the MHC-I/-II peptide-presenting gene evolved, particularly since beyond ~500 Mya (sharks) no paralogs exist.(2,3) We previously reported that HLA-A isotype alleles with the α1-helix, R65 motif, are wide-spread in phylogeny, but that the α 2-helix, H151R motif, has apparently segregated out of most species. Surprisingly, an uncharacterized orf in T. syrichta (Loc-103275158) encoded R151, but within a truncated A-23 like gene containing 5'- and 3'- footprints of the transposon (TE), tigger-1; the extant tarsier A-23 allele is totally missing exon-3 and part-of exon-4; together, suggesting TE-mediated inactivation of an intact/ancestral A-23 allele (Murray, 2015a).(4) The unique Loc-103275158 orf encodes a putative 15-exon transcript with no apparent paralogs throughout phylogeny. However, an HLA-A11 like gene in M. leucophaeus with a shortened C-terminal domain, and an HLA-A like orf in C. atys with two linked α1/α2/α3 domains, both contain a second transmembrane segment, which is conserved in Loc-103275158. Thus, we could model the putative protein with its Nef-like tail domain docked to its MHC-I like α3 domain (i.e., on the same side of a membrane). This modeled tertiary structure is strikingly similar to the solved structure of the Nef:MHC-I CD:AP1mu transporter (Jia, 2012).(5) Nef:AP1mu binds the CD of MHC-I in trafficking MHC-I away from the trans-golgi and into the endocytic pathway in HIV-1 infected cells. The CD loop of the

  10. The Effects of NF-κB and c-Jun/AP-1 on the Expression of Prothrombotic and Proinflammatory Molecules Induced by Anti-β2GPI in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yinjing; Zhou, Hong; Wang, Ting; Yan, Jinchuan

    2016-01-01

    Our previous data demonstrated that nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) are involved in the process of anti-β2GPI/β2GPI-induced tissue factor (TF) expression in monocytes. However, the role of NF-κB and AP-1 in pathogenic mechanisms of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in vivo has been rarely studied. This study aimed to investigate whether NF-κB and c-Jun/AP-1 are involved in anti-β2GPI-induced expression of prothrombotic and proinflammatory molecules in mouse. IgG-APS or anti-β2GPI antibodies were injected into BALB/c mice in the presence or absence of PDTC (a specific inhibitor of NF-κB) and Curcumin (a potent inhibitor of AP-1) treatment. Our data showed that both IgG-APS and anti-β2GPI could induce the activation of NF-κB and c-Jun/AP-1 in mouse peritoneal macrophages. The anti-β2GPI-induced TF activity in homogenates of carotid arteries and peritoneal macrophages from mice could significantly decrease after PDTC and/or Curcumin treatment, in which PDTC showed the strongest inhibitory effect, but combination of two inhibitors had no synergistic effect. Furthermore, anti-β2GPI-induced expression of TF, VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin in the aorta and expression of TF, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in peritoneal macrophages of mice were also significantly attenuated by PDTC and/or Curcumin treatment. These results indicate that both NF-κB and c-Jun/AP-1 are involved in regulating anti-β2GPI-induced expression of prothrombotic and proinflammatory molecules in vivo. Inhibition of NF-κB and c-Jun/AP-1 pathways may be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis and inflammation in patients with APS. PMID:26829121

  11. Antitumor action of curcumin in human papillomavirus associated cells involves downregulation of viral oncogenes, prevention of NFkB and AP-1 translocation, and modulation of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Divya, Chandrasekhar S; Pillai, M Radhakrishna

    2006-05-01

    Curcumin (diferuloyl methane), the major yellow pigment from the rhizomes of turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn), has anticancer properties. Infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) leads to development of cervical carcinoma, predominantly through the action of viral oncoproteins E6 and E7. The present study aims at analyzing the antitumor and antiviral properties of curcumin, on HPV associated cervical cancer cells. Our findings indicate curcumin to be cytotoxic to cervical cancer cells in a concentration-dependent and time-dependent manner. The cytotoxic activity was selectively more in HPV16 and HPV18 infected cells compared to non-HPV infected cells. Balance between tumor cell proliferation and spontaneous cell death via apoptosis had an important role in regulation of tumor cell growth. Curcumin-induced apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. Morphological hallmarks of apoptosis such as nuclear fragmentation and internucleosomal fragmentation of DNA were observed. Curcumin also selectively inhibited expression of viral oncogenes E6 and E7, evident from RT-PCR and Western blotting data. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that activation of NFkappaB-induced by TNFalpha is down regulated by curcumin. Curcumin blocked IkBalpha phosphorylation and degradation, leading to abrogation of NFkappaB activation. Curcumin also down regulated the expression of COX-2, a gene regulated by NFkappaB. Binding of AP-1, an indispensable component for efficient epithelial tissue-specific gene expression of HPV was also selectively down regulated by curcumin. These results provide attractive data for the possible use of curcumin in the management of HPV associated tumors. PMID:16526022

  12. The human papillomavirus type 16 E7 gene product interacts with and trans-activates the AP1 family of transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Antinore, M J; Birrer, M J; Patel, D; Nader, L; McCance, D J

    1996-01-01

    The E7 gene product of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) binds to the retinoblastoma gene product (pRb) and dissociates pRb-E2F complexes. However, the observation that the ability of E7 to bind pRb is not required for the HPV16-induced immortalization of primary keratinocytes prompted a search for other cellular factors bound by E7. Using a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion protein system, we show that E7 complexes with AP1 transcription factors including c-Jun, JunB, JunD and c-Fos. The ability of E7 to complex with c-Jun in vivo is demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation and the yeast two-hybrid system. An analysis of E7 point mutants in the GST system indicates that the E7 zinc-finger motif, but not the pRb binding domain, is involved in these interactions. Using c-Jun deletion mutants, E7 binding maps between amino acids 224 and 286 of c-Jun. E7 trans-activates c-Jun-induced transcription from a Jun responsive promoter, and this activity correlates with the ability of E7 mutants to bind Jun proteins. Finally, a transcriptionally inactive c-Jun deletion, which can bind E7, interferes with the E7-induced transformation of rat embryo fibroblasts in cooperation with an activated ras, indicating that the Jun-E7 interaction is physiologically relevant and that Jun factors may be targeted in the E7 transformation pathway. Images PMID:8617242

  13. Amitriptyline up-regulates connexin43-gap junction in rat cultured cortical astrocytes via activation of the p38 and c-Fos/AP-1 signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Morioka, N; Suekama, K; Zhang, F F; Kajitani, N; Hisaoka-Nakashima, K; Takebayashi, M; Nakata, Y

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Intercellular communication via gap junctions, comprised of connexin (Cx) proteins, allow for communication between astrocytes, which in turn is crucial for maintaining CNS homeostasis. The expression of Cx43 is decreased in post-mortem brains from patients with major depression. A potentially novel mechanism of tricyclic antidepressants is to increase the expression and functioning of gap junctions in astrocytes. Experimental Approach The effect of amitriptyline on the expression of Cx43 and gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in rat primary cultured cortical astrocytes was investigated. We also investigated the role of p38 MAPK intracellular signalling pathway in the amitriptyline-induced expression of Cx43 and GJIC. Key Results Treatment with amitriptyline for 48 h significantly up-regulated Cx43 mRNA, protein and GJIC. The up-regulation of Cx43 was not monoamine-related since noradrenaline, 5-HT and dopamine did not induce Cx43 expression and pretreatment with α- and β-adrenoceptor antagonists had no effect. Intracellular signalling involved p38 MAPK, as amitriptyline significantly increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation and Cx43 expression and GJIC were significantly blocked by the p38 inhibitor SB 202190. Furthermore, amitriptyline-induced Cx43 expression and GJIC were markedly reduced by transcription factor AP-1 inhibitors (curcumin and tanshinone IIA). The translocation of c-Fos from the cytosol and the nucleus of cortical astrocytes was increased by amitriptyline, and this response was dependent on p38 activity. Conclusion and Implication These findings indicate a novel mechanism of action of amitriptyline through cortical astrocytes, and further suggest that targeting this mechanism could lead to the development of a new class of antidepressants. PMID:24641259

  14. A novel synthetic derivative of the natural product berbamine inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis of human osteosarcoma cells, associated with activation of JNK/AP-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Nam, Sangkil; Zhao, Robin; Tian, Yan; Liu, Lucy; Horne, David A; Jove, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor in children and adolescents. There is a critical need to find more potent drugs for patients with metastatic or recurrent disease. Berbamine (BBM) is a natural compound derived from the Berberis amurensis plants. BBM and its derivatives have been shown to have antitumor effects in several cancers. Here, we report that a novel synthetic berbamine derivative, BBMD3, inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis of G292, KHOS, and MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells. Induction of apoptosis in these tumor cells depends on activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Since pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) and caspase-9 inhibitor (Z-LEHD-FMK) could block the cleavage of PARP, the apoptosis induced by BBMD3 is through intrinsic signaling pathway. BBMD3 increased phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK), resulting in increase of phosphorylated c-Jun and total c-Fos, the major components of transcriptional factor AP-1. JNK inhibitor could partially suppress antitumor effect of BBMD3 on osteosarcoma cells. BBMD3 increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS scavenger, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), could block the phosphorylation of JNK and c-Jun induced by BBMD3. BBMD3 increased the expression of the pro-apototic gene Bad, associated with apoptosis induction. Finally, BBMD3 also decreased the expression of cyclin D1 and D2, the positive cell cycle regulators, which is correlated with growth inhibition in osteosarcoma cells. Collectively, these findings indicate that BBMD3 is a potentially promising drug for the treatment of human osteosarcoma.

  15. Cell-specific expression of the macrophage scavenger receptor gene is dependent on PU.1 and a composite AP-1/ets motif.

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, K S; Semple, K; Wu, H; Glass, C K

    1994-01-01

    The type I and II scavenger receptors (SRs) are highly restricted to cells of monocyte origin and become maximally expressed during the process of monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation. In this report, we present evidence that SR genomic sequences from -245 to +46 bp relative to the major transcriptional start site were sufficient to confer preferential expression of a reporter gene to cells of monocyte and macrophage origin. This profile of expression resulted from the combinatorial actions of multiple positive and negative regulatory elements. Positive transcriptional control was primarily determined by two elements, located 181 and 46 bp upstream of the major transcriptional start site. Transcriptional control via the -181 element was mediated by PU.1/Spi-1, a macrophage and B-cell-specific transcription factor that is a member of the ets domain gene family. Intriguingly, the -181 element represented a relatively low-affinity binding site for Spi-B, a closely related member of the ets domain family that has been shown to bind with relatively high affinity to other PU.1/Spi-1 binding sites. These observations support the idea that PU.1/Spi-1 and Spi-B regulate overlapping but nonidentical sets of genes. The -46 element represented a composite binding site for a distinct set of ets domain proteins that were preferentially expressed in monocyte and macrophage cell lines and that formed ternary complexes with members of the AP-1 gene family. In concert, these observations suggest a model for how interactions between cell-specific and more generally expressed transcription factors function to dictate the appropriate temporal and cell-specific patterns of SR expression during the process of macrophage differentiation. Images PMID:8007948

  16. Identification of two forms of TNF tolerance in human monocytes: differential inhibition of NF-κB/AP-1- and PP1-associated signaling.

    PubMed

    Günther, Johannes; Vogt, Nico; Hampel, Katharina; Bikker, Rolf; Page, Sharon; Müller, Benjamin; Kandemir, Judith; Kracht, Michael; Dittrich-Breiholz, Oliver; Huber, René; Brand, Korbinian

    2014-04-01

    The molecular basis of TNF tolerance is poorly understood. In human monocytes we detected two forms of TNF refractoriness, as follows: absolute tolerance was selective, dose dependently affecting a small group of powerful effector molecules; induction tolerance represented a more general phenomenon. Preincubation with a high TNF dose induces both absolute and induction tolerance, whereas low-dose preincubation predominantly mediates absolute tolerance. In cells preincubated with the high TNF dose, we observed blockade of IκBα phosphorylation/proteolysis and nuclear p65 translocation. More prominent in cells preincubated with the high dose, reduced basal IκBα levels were found, accompanied by increased IκBα degradation, suggesting an increased IκBα turnover. In addition, a nuclear elevation of p50 was detected in tolerant cells, which was more visible following high-dose preincubation. TNF-induced phosphorylation of p65-Ser(536), p38, and c-jun was inhibited, and basal inhibitory p65-Ser(468) phosphorylation was increased in tolerant cells. TNF tolerance induced by the low preincubation dose is mediated by glycogen synthesis kinase-3, whereas high-dose preincubation-mediated tolerance is regulated by A20/glycogen synthesis kinase-3 and protein phosphatase 1-dependent mechanisms. To our knowledge, we present the first genome-wide analysis of TNF tolerance in monocytic cells, which differentially inhibits NF-κB/AP-1-associated signaling and shifts the kinase/phosphatase balance. These forms of refractoriness may provide a cellular paradigm for resolution of inflammation and may be involved in immune paralysis.

  17. V-ATPase subunit ATP6AP1 (Ac45) regulates osteoclast differentiation, extracellular acidification, lysosomal trafficking, and protease exocytosis in osteoclast-mediated bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Yang, De-Qin; Feng, Shengmei; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Haibo; Paulson, Christie; Li, Yi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal trafficking and protease exocytosis in osteoclasts are essential for ruffled border formation and bone resorption. Yet, the mechanism underlying lysosomal trafficking and the related process of exocytosis remains largely unknown. We found ATP6ap1 (Ac45), an accessory subunit of vacuolar-type H+-ATPases (V-ATPases), to be highly induced by receptor activator for nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) in osteoclast differentiation. Ac45 knockdown osteoclasts formed normal actin rings, but had severely impaired extracellular acidification and bone resorption. Ac45 knockdown significantly reduced osteoclast formation. The decrease in the number of osteoclasts does not result from abnormal apoptosis; rather, it results from decreased osteoclast precursor cell proliferation and fusion, which may be partially due to the downregulation of ERK phosphorylation and FBJ osteosarcoma oncogene (c-fos), nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and Tm7sf4 expression. Notably, Ac45 knockdown osteoclasts exhibited impaired lysosomal trafficking and exocytosis, as indicated by the absence of lysosomal trafficking to the ruffled border and a lack of cathepsin K exocytosis into the resorption lacuna. Our data revealed that the impaired exocytosis is specifically due to Ac45 deficiency, and not the general consequence of a defective V-ATPase. Together, our results demonstrate the essential role of Ac45 in osteoclast-mediated extracellular acidification and protease exocytosis, as well as the ability of Ac45 to guide lysosomal intracellular trafficking to the ruffled border, potentially through its interaction with the small GTPase Rab7. Our work indicates that Ac45 may be a novel therapeutic target for osteolytic disease. PMID:22467241

  18. Cancer Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... mould-related diseases in immunocompromised patients. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 2011;66:i5-i14. Ribaud P. Fungal ... al. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Use of Antimicrobial Agents in Neutropenic Patients with Cancer: 2010 Update ...

  19. Cadmium induces urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression and the cell invasiveness of human gastric cancer cells via the ERK-1/2, NF-κB, and AP-1 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Khoi, Pham Ngoc; Xia, Yong; Lian, Sen; Kim, Ho Dong; Kim, Do Hyun; Joo, Young Eun; Chay, Kee-Oh; Kim, Kyung Keun; Jung, Young Do

    2014-10-01

    Cadmium exposure has been linked to human cancers, including stomach cancer. In this study, the effects of cadmium on urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression in human gastric cancer cells and the underlying signal transduction pathways were investigated. Cadmium induced uPAR expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Cadmium also induced uPAR promoter activity. Additionally, cadmium induced the activation of extracellular signal regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK-1/2), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and the activation of c-Jun amino terminal kinase (JNK). A specific inhibitor of MEK-1 (PD98059) inhibited cadmium-induced uPAR expression, while JNK and p38 MAPK inhibitors did not. Expression vectors encoding dominant-negative MEK-1 (pMCL-K97M) also prevented cadmium-induced uPAR promoter activity. Site-directed mutagenesis and electrophoretic mobility shift studies showed that sites for the transcription factors nuclear factor (NF)-κB and activator protein-1 (AP-1) were involved in cadmium-induced uPAR transcription. Suppression of the cadmium-induced uPAR promoter activity by a mutated-type NF-κB-inducing kinase and I-κB and an AP-1 decoy oligonucleotide confirmed that the activation of NF-κB and AP-1 are essential for cadmium-induced uPAR upregulation. Cells pretreated with cadmium showed markedly enhanced invasiveness and this effect was partially abrogated by uPAR-neutralizing antibodies and by inhibitors of ERK-1/2, NF-κB, and AP-1. These results suggest that cadmium induces uPAR expression via ERK-1/2, NF-κB, and AP-1 signaling pathways and, in turn, stimulates cell invasiveness in human gastric cancer AGS cells.

  20. Global Expression Analysis Identified a Preferentially Nerve Growth Factor-induced Transcriptional Program Regulated by Sustained Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) and AP-1 Protein Activation during PC12 Cell Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Mullenbrock, Steven; Shah, Janki; Cooper, Geoffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells in response to NGF is a prototypical model in which signal duration determines a biological response. Sustained ERK activity induced by NGF, as compared with transient activity induced by EGF, is critical to the differentiation of these cells. To characterize the transcriptional program activated preferentially by NGF, we compared global gene expression profiles between cells treated with NGF and EGF for 2–4 h, when sustained ERK signaling in response to NGF is most distinct from the transient signal elicited by EGF. This analysis identified 69 genes that were preferentially up-regulated in response to NGF. As expected, up-regulation of these genes was mediated by sustained ERK signaling. In addition, they were up-regulated in response to other neuritogenic treatments (pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate plus dbcAMP) and were enriched for genes related to neuronal differentiation/function. Computational analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation identified binding of CREB and AP-1 family members (Fos, FosB, Fra1, JunB, JunD) upstream of >30 and 50%, respectively, of the preferentially NGF-induced genes. Expression of several AP-1 family members was induced by both EGF and NGF, but their induction was more robust and sustained in response to NGF. The binding of Fos family members to their target genes was similarly sustained in response to NGF and was reduced upon MEK inhibition, suggesting that AP-1 contributes significantly to the NGF transcriptional program. Interestingly, Fra1 as well as two other NGF-induced AP-1 targets (HB-EGF and miR-21) function in positive feedback loops that may contribute to sustained AP-1 activity. PMID:22065583

  1. Biosynthesis of Fungal Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Gavia, Diego J.; Tang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    This review provides a summary of recent research advances in elucidating the biosynthesis of fungal indole alkaloids. Different strategies used to incorporate and derivatize the indole/indoline moieties in various families of fungal indole alkaloids will be discussed, including tryptophan-containing nonribosomal peptides and polyketide-nonribosomal peptide hybrids; and alkaloids derived from other indole building blocks. This review also includes discussion regarding the downstream modifications that generate chemical and structural diversity among indole alkaloids. PMID:25180619

  2. Traversing the fungal terpenome

    PubMed Central

    Quin, Maureen B.; Flynn, Christopher M.; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Fungi (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) are prolific producers of structurally diverse terpenoid compounds. Classes of terpenoids identified in fungi include the sesqui-, di- and triterpenoids. Biosynthetic pathways and enzymes to terpenoids from each of these classes have been described. These typically involve the scaffold generating terpene synthases and cyclases, and scaffold tailoring enzymes such as e.g. cytochrome P450 monoxygenases, NAD(P)+ and flavin dependent oxidoreductases, and various group transferases that generate the final bioactive structures. The biosynthesis of several sesquiterpenoid mycotoxins and bioactive diterpenoids has been well-studied in Ascomycota (e.g. filamentous fungi). Little is known about the terpenoid biosynthetic pathways in Basidiomycota (e.g. mushroom forming fungi), although they produce a huge diversity of terpenoid natural products. Specifically, many trans-humulyl cation derived sesquiterpenoid natural products with potent bioactivities have been isolated. Biosynthetic gene clusters responsible for the production of trans-humulyl cation derived protoilludanes, and other sesquiterpenoids, can be rapidly identified by genome sequencing and bioinformatic methods. Genome mining combined with heterologous biosynthetic pathway refactoring has the potential to facilitate discovery and production of pharmaceutically relevant fungal terpenoids. PMID:25171145

  3. Structural Analysis of Fungal Cerebrosides

    PubMed Central

    Barreto-Bergter, Eliana; Sassaki, Guilherme L.; de Souza, Lauro M.

    2011-01-01

    Of the ceramide monohexosides (CMHs), gluco- and galactosyl-ceramides are the main neutral glycosphingolipids expressed in fungal cells. Their structural determination is greatly dependent on the use of mass spectrometric techniques, including fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry, electrospray ionization, and energy collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry. Nuclear magnetic resonance has also been used successfully. Such a combination of techniques, combined with classical analytical separation, such as high-performance thin layer chromatography and column chromatography, has led to the structural elucidation of a great number of fungal CMHs. The structure of fungal CMH is conserved among fungal species and consists of a glucose or galactose residue attached to a ceramide moiety containing 9-methyl-4,8-sphingadienine with an amidic linkage to hydroxylated fatty acids, most commonly having 16 or 18 carbon atoms and unsaturation between C-3 and C-4. Along with their unique structural characteristics, fungal CMHs have a peculiar subcellular distribution and striking biological properties. Fungal cerebrosides were also characterized as antigenic molecules directly or indirectly involved in cell growth or differentiation in Schizophyllum commune, Cryptococcus neoformans, Pseudallescheria boydii, Candida albicans, Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. Besides classical techniques for cerebroside (CMH) analysis, we now describe new approaches, combining conventional thin layer chromatography and mass spectrometry, as well as emerging technologies for subcellular localization and distribution of glycosphingolipids by secondary ion mass spectrometry and imaging matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight. PMID:22164155

  4. Fungal pathogens of Proteaceae.

    PubMed

    Crous, P W; Summerell, B A; Swart, L; Denman, S; Taylor, J E; Bezuidenhout, C M; Palm, M E; Marincowitz, S; Groenewald, J Z

    2011-12-01

    Species of Leucadendron, Leucospermum and Protea (Proteaceae) are in high demand for the international floriculture market due to their brightly coloured and textured flowers or bracts. Fungal pathogens, however, create a serious problem in cultivating flawless blooms. The aim of the present study was to characterise several of these pathogens using morphology, culture characteristics, and DNA sequence data of the rRNA-ITS and LSU genes. In some cases additional genes such as TEF 1-α and CHS were also sequenced. Based on the results of this study, several novel species and genera are described. Brunneosphaerella leaf blight is shown to be caused by three species, namely B. jonkershoekensis on Protea repens, B. nitidae sp. nov. on Protea nitida and B. protearum on a wide host range of Protea spp. (South Africa). Coniothyrium-like species associated with Coniothyrium leaf spot are allocated to other genera, namely Curreya grandicipis on Protea grandiceps, and Microsphaeropsis proteae on P. nitida (South Africa). Diaporthe leucospermi is described on Leucospermum sp. (Australia), and Diplodina microsperma newly reported on Protea sp. (New Zealand). Pyrenophora blight is caused by a novel species, Pyrenophora leucospermi, and not Drechslera biseptata or D. dematoidea as previously reported. Fusicladium proteae is described on Protea sp. (South Africa), Pestalotiopsis protearum on Leucospermum cuneiforme (Zimbabwe), Ramularia vizellae and R. stellenboschensis on Protea spp. (South Africa), and Teratosphaeria capensis on Protea spp. (Portugal, South Africa). Aureobasidium leaf spot is shown to be caused by two species, namely A. proteae comb. nov. on Protea spp. (South Africa), and A. leucospermi sp. nov. on Leucospermum spp. (Indonesia, Portugal, South Africa). Novel genera and species elucidated in this study include Gordonomyces mucovaginatus and Pseudopassalora gouriqua (hyphomycetes), and Xenoconiothyrium catenata (coelomycete), all on Protea spp. (South Africa).

  5. Treatment with novel AP-1 and NF-κB inhibitors restores the colonic endocrine cells to normal levels in rats with DSS-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    EL-SALHY, MAGDY; UMEZAWA, KAZUO

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of two anti-inflammatory agents on the abnormalities in colonic endocrine cells in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats (n=45) using DSS; a further 15 rats without colitis were included in a healthy control group. The animals with DSS-induced colitis were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups as follows: i) DSS group, rats were treated with 0.5 ml of 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC); ii) DSS-G group, rats were treated with 3-[(dodecyl thiocarbonyl)-methyl]-glutarimide (DTCM-G), a novel activator protein 1 (AP-1) inhibitor, 20 mg/kg in CMC; and iii) DSS-Q group, rats were treated with dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin, a nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, 15 mg/kg in CMC. The treatments were administered intraperitoneally, twice daily for 5 days, after which the animals were sacrificed and tissue samples from the colon were immunostained for chromogranin A (CgA), serotonin, peptide YY (PYY), enteroglucagon, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), somatostatin, leukocytes, B/T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, macrophages/monocytes and mast cells. The densities of these endocrine and immune cells were quantified by computer-aided image analysis. The densities of CgA-, serotonin-, PYY- and enteroglucagon-producing cells were significantly higher, and those of PP- and somatostatin-producing cells were significantly lower in the DSS-G, DSS-Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all the immune cells were lower in the DSS-G, DSS-Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all endocrine cell types and immune cells in both the DSS groups treated with anti-inflammatory agents were restored to control levels. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that there is an interaction between endocrine and immune cells during inflammation. This interaction with subsequent changes in endocrine cells is responsible for the clinical manifestation of

  6. Treatment with novel AP-1 and NF-κB inhibitors restores the colonic endocrine cells to normal levels in rats with DSS-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of two anti-inflammatory agents on the abnormalities in colonic endocrine cells in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats (n=45) using DSS; a further 15 rats without colitis were included in a healthy control group. The animals with DSS-induced colitis were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups as follows: i) DSS group, rats were treated with 0.5 ml of 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC); ii) DSS‑G group, rats were treated with 3-[(dodecylthiocarbonyl)‑methyl]‑glutarimide (DTCM‑G), a novel activator protein 1 (AP-1) inhibitor, 20 mg/kg in CMC; and iii) DSS‑Q group, rats were treated with dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin, a nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, 15 mg/kg in CMC. The treatments were administered intraperitoneally, twice daily for 5 days, after which the animals were sacrificed and tissue samples from the colon were immunostained for chromogranin A (CgA), serotonin, peptide YY (PYY), enteroglucagon, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), somatostatin, leukocytes, B/T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, macrophages/monocytes and mast cells. The densities of these endocrine and immune cells were quantified by computer‑aided image analysis. The densities of CgA-, serotonin-, PYY- and enteroglucagon-producing cells were significantly higher, and those of PP- and somatostatin-producing cells were significantly lower in the DSS‑G, DSS‑Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all the immune cells were lower in the DSS‑G, DSS‑Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all endocrine cell types and immune cells in both the DSS groups treated with anti‑inflammatory agents were restored to control levels. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that there is an interaction between endocrine and immune cells during inflammation. This interaction with subsequent changes in endocrine cells is responsible for the

  7. Primary immunodeficiencies underlying fungal infections

    PubMed Central

    Lanternier, Fanny; Cypowyj, Sophie; Picard, Capucine; Bustamante, Jacinta; Lortholary, Olivier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review We review the primary immunodeficiencies underlying an increasing variety of superficial and invasive fungal infections. We also stress that the occurrence of such fungal infections should lead physicians to search for the corresponding single-gene inborn errors of immunity. Finally, we suggest that other fungal infections may also result from hitherto unknown inborn errors of immunity, at least in some patients with no known risk factors. Recent findings An increasing number of primary immunodeficiencies are being shown to underlie fungal infectious diseases in children and young adults. Inborn errors of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase complex (chronic granulomatous disease), severe congenital neutropenia and leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I confer a predisposition to invasive aspergillosis and candidiasis. More rarely, inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity underlie endemic mycoses. Inborn errors of IL-17 immunity have recently been shown to underlie chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, whereas inborn errors of CARD9 immunity underlie deep dermatophytosis and invasive candidiasis. Summary Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, invasive candidiasis, invasive aspergillosis, deep dermatophytosis, pneumocystosis, and endemic mycoses can all be caused by primary immunodeficiencies. Each type of infection is highly suggestive of a specific type of primary immunodeficiency. In the absence of overt risk factors, single-gene inborn errors of immunity should be sought in children and young adults with these and other fungal diseases. PMID:24240293

  8. Map kinases in fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Xu, J R

    2000-12-01

    MAP kinases in eukaryotic cells are well known for transducing a variety of extracellular signals to regulate cell growth and differentiation. Recently, MAP kinases homologous to the yeast Fus3/Kss1 MAP kinases have been identified in several fungal pathogens and found to be important for appressorium formation, invasive hyphal growth, and fungal pathogenesis. This MAP kinase pathway also controls diverse growth or differentiation processes, including conidiation, conidial germination, and female fertility. MAP kinases homologous to yeast Slt2 and Hog1 have also been characterized in Candida albicans and Magnaporthe grisea. Mutants disrupted of the Slt2 homologues have weak cell walls, altered hyphal growth, and reduced virulence. The Hog1 homologues are dispensable for growth but are essential for regulating responses to hyperosmotic stress in C. albicans and M. grisea. Overall, recent studies have indicated that MAP kinase pathways may play important roles in regulating growth, differentiation, survival, and pathogenesis in fungal pathogens. PMID:11273677

  9. Directed Evolution of Fungal Laccases

    PubMed Central

    Maté, Diana; García-Ruiz, Eva; Camarero, Susana; Alcalde, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Fungal laccases are generalists biocatalysts with potential applications that range from bioremediation to novel green processes. Fuelled by molecular oxygen, these enzymes can act on dozens of molecules of different chemical nature, and with the help of redox mediators, their spectrum of oxidizable substrates is further pushed towards xenobiotic compounds (pesticides, industrial dyes, PAHs), biopolymers (lignin, starch, cellulose) and other complex molecules. In recent years, extraordinary efforts have been made to engineer fungal laccases by directed evolution and semi-rational approaches to improve their functional expression or stability. All these studies have taken advantage of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a heterologous host, not only to secrete the enzyme but also, to emulate the introduction of genetic diversity through in vivo DNA recombination. Here, we discuss all these endeavours to convert fungal laccases into valuable biomolecular platforms on which new functions can be tailored by directed evolution. PMID:21966249

  10. Functional Conservation and Divergence of Four Ginger AP1/AGL9 MADS–Box Genes Revealed by Analysis of Their Expression and Protein–Protein Interaction, and Ectopic Expression of AhFUL Gene in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juanjuan; Sun, Wei; Xia, Kuaifei; Liao, Jingping; Zhang, Mingyong

    2014-01-01

    Alpinia genus are known generally as ginger–lilies for showy flowers in the ginger family, Zingiberaceae, and their floral morphology diverges from typical monocotyledon flowers. However, little is known about the functions of ginger MADS–box genes in floral identity. In this study, four AP1/AGL9 MADS–box genes were cloned from Alpinia hainanensis, and protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and roles of the four genes in floral homeotic conversion and in floral evolution are surveyed for the first time. AhFUL is clustered to the AP1lineage, AhSEP4 and AhSEP3b to the SEP lineage, and AhAGL6–like to the AGL6 lineage. The four genes showed conserved and divergent expression patterns, and their encoded proteins were localized in the nucleus. Seven combinations of PPI (AhFUL–AhSEP4, AhFUL–AhAGL6–like, AhFUL–AhSEP3b, AhSEP4–AhAGL6–like, AhSEP4–AhSEP3b, AhAGL6–like–AhSEP3b, and AhSEP3b–AhSEP3b) were detected, and the PPI patterns in the AP1/AGL9 lineage revealed that five of the 10 possible combinations are conserved and three are variable, while conclusions cannot yet be made regarding the other two. Ectopic expression of AhFUL in Arabidopsis thaliana led to early flowering and floral organ homeotic conversion to sepal–like or leaf–like. Therefore, we conclude that the four A. hainanensis AP1/AGL9 genes show functional conservation and divergence in the floral identity from other MADS–box genes. PMID:25461565

  11. Anti-inflammatory effects of proanthocyanidin-rich red rice extract via suppression of MAPK, AP-1 and NF-κB pathways in Raw 264.7 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yodkeeree, Supachai; Pitchakarn, Pornsiri; Punfa, Wanisa

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Several pharmacological properties of red rice extract have been reported including anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, and reduced cancer cell invasion. This study was conducted to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of red rice extract on the production of inflammatory mediators in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced Raw 264.7 macrophages. MATERIALS/METHODS Pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 were determined by ELISA and cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression was evaluated using western blot analysis. In addition, the signaling pathway controlling the inflammatory cascade such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), activator proteins-1 (AP-1), and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) was determined. RESULTS Our results showed that red rice polar extract fraction (RR-P), but not non-polar extract fraction, inhibited interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and nitric oxide production in LPS-induced Raw 264.7 cells. RR-P also reduced the expression of inflammatory enzymes, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2. In addition, activation of AP-1 and NF-κB transcription factor in the nucleus was abrogated by RR-P. RR-P inhibited the phosphorylation of extracellular signaling-regulated kinase 1/2, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, and p38 MAPK signaling responsible for the expression of inflammatory mediators in LPS-stimulated Raw 264.7 cells. Based on chemical analysis, high amounts of proanthocyanidin and catechins were detected in the RR-P fraction. However, only proanthocyanidin reduced NF-κB and AP-1 activation in LPS-activated Raw 264.7 cells. CONCLUSION These observations suggest that the anti-inflammatory properties of RR-P may stem from the inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators via suppression of the AP-1, NF-κB, and MAPKs pathways. PMID:27247720

  12. Isolation and characterisation of P-EPTX-Ap1a and P-EPTX-Ar1a: pre-synaptic neurotoxins from the venom of the northern (Acanthophis praelongus) and Irian Jayan (Acanthophis rugosus) death adders.

    PubMed

    Chaisakul, Janeyuth; Konstantakopoulos, Nicki; Smith, A Ian; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2010-09-15

    The neurotoxicity observed following death adder envenoming has been thought to be solely due to the presence of potent post-synaptic neurotoxins. Clinically, these effects are often poorly reversed by death adder antivenom or anticholinesterase, particularly when patients present with established paralysis. This suggests that either the post-synaptic neurotoxins are irreversible/'pseudo' irreversible, or the venom contains pre-synaptic neurotoxins that do not respond to antivenom. To support the later hypothesis, a pre-synaptic neurotoxin (P-EPTX-Aa1a) has recently been isolated from the venom of Acanthophis antarcticus. We examined Acanthophis praelongus and Acanthophis rugosus venoms for the presence of pre-synaptic neurotoxins. P-EPTX-Ap1a (40,719Da) and P-EPTX-Ar1a (40,879Da) were isolated from A. praelongus and A. rugosus venoms, respectively. P-EPTX-Ap1a and P-EPTX-Ar1a are comprised of three different subunits, alpha, beta1 and beta2. The two toxins displayed similar levels of PLA(2) activity which was almost solely attributed to the alpha subunit in both toxins. P-EPTX-Ap1a (20-100nM) and P-EPTX-Ar1a (20-100nM) caused inhibition of indirect twitches of the skeletal muscle preparation without affecting contractile responses to nicotinic receptor agonists. Interestingly, only the alpha subunit of both toxins (300nM) displayed neurotoxic activity. Inhibition of PLA(2) activity markedly reduced the effect of the toxins on muscle twitch height. These results confirm that P-EPTX-Ap1a and P-EPTX-Ar1a are pre-synaptic neurotoxins and represent the second and third such toxins to be isolated from death adder venom. The presence of pre-synaptic neurotoxins in Acanthophis sp. venoms indicates that treatment strategies for envenoming by these snakes needs to be reassessed given the likelihood of irreversible neurotoxicity. PMID:20488165

  13. Isolation and characterisation of P-EPTX-Ap1a and P-EPTX-Ar1a: pre-synaptic neurotoxins from the venom of the northern (Acanthophis praelongus) and Irian Jayan (Acanthophis rugosus) death adders.

    PubMed

    Chaisakul, Janeyuth; Konstantakopoulos, Nicki; Smith, A Ian; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2010-09-15

    The neurotoxicity observed following death adder envenoming has been thought to be solely due to the presence of potent post-synaptic neurotoxins. Clinically, these effects are often poorly reversed by death adder antivenom or anticholinesterase, particularly when patients present with established paralysis. This suggests that either the post-synaptic neurotoxins are irreversible/'pseudo' irreversible, or the venom contains pre-synaptic neurotoxins that do not respond to antivenom. To support the later hypothesis, a pre-synaptic neurotoxin (P-EPTX-Aa1a) has recently been isolated from the venom of Acanthophis antarcticus. We examined Acanthophis praelongus and Acanthophis rugosus venoms for the presence of pre-synaptic neurotoxins. P-EPTX-Ap1a (40,719Da) and P-EPTX-Ar1a (40,879Da) were isolated from A. praelongus and A. rugosus venoms, respectively. P-EPTX-Ap1a and P-EPTX-Ar1a are comprised of three different subunits, alpha, beta1 and beta2. The two toxins displayed similar levels of PLA(2) activity which was almost solely attributed to the alpha subunit in both toxins. P-EPTX-Ap1a (20-100nM) and P-EPTX-Ar1a (20-100nM) caused inhibition of indirect twitches of the skeletal muscle preparation without affecting contractile responses to nicotinic receptor agonists. Interestingly, only the alpha subunit of both toxins (300nM) displayed neurotoxic activity. Inhibition of PLA(2) activity markedly reduced the effect of the toxins on muscle twitch height. These results confirm that P-EPTX-Ap1a and P-EPTX-Ar1a are pre-synaptic neurotoxins and represent the second and third such toxins to be isolated from death adder venom. The presence of pre-synaptic neurotoxins in Acanthophis sp. venoms indicates that treatment strategies for envenoming by these snakes needs to be reassessed given the likelihood of irreversible neurotoxicity.

  14. Chitin synthesis and fungal pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lenardon, Megan D; Munro, Carol A; Gow, Neil AR

    2010-01-01

    Chitin is an essential part of the carbohydrate skeleton of the fungal cell wall and is a molecule that is not represented in humans and other vertebrates. Complex regulatory mechanisms enable chitin to be positioned at specific sites throughout the cell cycle to maintain the overall strength of the wall and enable rapid, life-saving modifications to be made under cell wall stress conditions. Chitin has also recently emerged as a significant player in the activation and attenuation of immune responses to fungi and other chitin-containing parasites. This review summarises latest advances in the analysis of chitin synthesis regulation in the context of fungal pathogenesis. PMID:20561815

  15. Fungal laryngitis in immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, A; Prasanna Kumar, S; Somu, L; Sudhir, B

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of fungal laryngitis is often overlooked in immunocompetent patients because it is commonly considered a disease of the immunocompromised. Further confusion is caused by clinical and histological similarity to more common conditions like Leukoplakia. Demonstration of hyperkeratosis particularly if associated with intraepithelial neutrophils on biopsy should trigger a search for fungus using specialized stains. These patients usually present with hoarseness of voice. Pain is present inconsistently along with dysphagia and odynophagia. We present three cases of fungal laryngitis in immunocompetent patients out of which one underwent microlaryngeal surgery with excision biopsy. All these patients responded well with oral antifungal therapy.

  16. Inhibitory effect of reinioside C on vascular smooth muscle cells proliferation induced by angiotensin II via inhibiting NADPH oxidase-ROS-ENK1/2-NF-kappaB-AP-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Hong, Dan; Bai, Yong-Ping; Shi, Rui-Zheng; Tan, Gui-Shan; Hu, Chang-Ping; Zhang, Guo-Gang

    2014-09-01

    The proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis and restenosis. In the present study, the effect of reinioside C, a main active ingredient of Polygala fallax Hemsl, on proliferation of VSMCs induced by Ang II was investigated. It was found that Ang II (1 microM) markedly stimulated proliferation of VSMCs. Pretreatment of reinioside C (3, 10 or 30 microM) concentration-dependently inhibited the proliferative effect of Ang II. To determine the possible mechanism, NADPH oxidase subunits (Nox-1, Nox-4) mRNA expression, intracellular ROS level, phosphorylation of ERK1/2, NF-kappaB activity, and mRNA expression of AP-1 subunits (c-fos, c-jun) and c-myc were measured. The results demonstrated that reinioside C attenuated Ang II-induced NADPH oxidase mRNA expression, generation of ROS, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, activation of NF-kappaB, and mRNA expression of AP-1 and c-myc in VSMCs in a concentration-dependent manner. The effects of Ang II were also inhibited by diphenyleneiodonium (DPI, the NADPH oxidase inhibitor), PD98059 (the ERK1/2 inhibitor) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, the NF-kappaB inhibitor). These results suggest reinioside C attenuates Ang II-induced proliferation of VSMCs by inhibiting NADPH oxidase-ROS-ERK1/2-NF-kappaB-AP-1 pathway. PMID:25272943

  17. Pycnogenol Attenuates the Release of Proinflammatory Cytokines and Expression of Perilipin 2 in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Microglia in Part via Inhibition of NF-κB and AP-1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Bin; Dun, Sai-Hong; Gu, Jian-Qiu; Guo, Yang; Ikuyama, Shoichiro

    2015-01-01

    Over activation of microglia results in the production of proinflammatory agents that have been implicated in various brain diseases. Pycnogenol is a patented extract from French maritime pine bark (Pinus pinaster Aiton) with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potency. The present study investigated whether pycnogenol may be associated with the production of proinflammatory mediators in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 (mouse-derived) microglia. It was found that pycnogenol treatment was dose-dependently associated with significantly less release of nitricoxide (NO), TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β, and lower levels of intercellular adhesion molecule1 (ICAM-1) and perilipin 2 (PLIN2). Furthermore, this effect was replicated in primary brain microglia. Levels of inducible NO synthase mRNA and protein were attenuated, whereas there was no change in the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Further evidence indicated that pycnogenol treatment led to the suppression of NF-κB activation through inhibition of p65 translocation into the nucleus and inhibited DNA binding of AP-1, suggesting that these proinflammatory factors are associated with NF-κB and AP-1. We conclude that pycnogenol exerts anti-inflammatory effects through inhibition of the NF-κB and AP-1pathway, and may be useful as a therapeutic agent in the prevention of diseases caused by over activation of microglia. PMID:26367267

  18. An Estrogen Receptor-α/p300 Complex Activates the BRCA-1 Promoter at an AP-1 Site That Binds Jun/Fos Transcription Factors: Repressive Effects of p53 on BRCA-1 Transcription1

    PubMed Central

    Jeffy, Brandon D; Hockings, Jennifer K; Kemp, Michael Q; Morgan, Sherif S; Hager, Jill A; Beliakoff, Jason; Whitesell, Luke J; Bowden, G. Timothy; Romagnolo, Donato F

    2005-01-01

    Abstract One of the puzzles in cancer predisposition is that women carrying BRCA-1 mutations preferentially develop tumors in epithelial tissues of the breast and ovary. Moreover, sporadic breast tumors contain lower levels of BRCA-1 in the absence of mutations in the BRCA-1 gene. The problem of tissue specificity requires analysis of factors that are unique to tissues of the breast. For example, the expression of estrogen receptor-α (ERα) is inversely correlated with breast cancer risk, and 90% of BRCA-1 tumors are negative for ERα. Here, we show that estrogen stimulates BRCA-1 promoter activity in transfected cells and the recruitment of ERα and its cofactor p300 to an AP-1 site that binds Jun/Fos transcription factors. The recruitment of ERα/p300 coincides with accumulation in the S-phase of the cell cycle and is antagonized by the antiestrogen tamoxifen. Conversely, we document that overexpression of wild-type p53 prevents the recruitment of ERα to the AP-1 site and represses BRCA-1 promoter activity. Taken together, our findings support a model in which an ERα/AP-1 complex modulates BRCA-1 transcription under conditions of estrogen stimulation. Conversely, the formation of this transcription complex is abrogated in cells overexpressing p53. PMID:16229810

  19. Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections Recommend on Facebook ... Mold . Top of Page Preventing fungal infections in stem cell transplant patients Fungi are difficult to avoid because ...

  20. Protective immune responses to fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Rivera, A

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of fungal infections has been on the rise over several decades. Fungal infections threaten animals, plants and humans alike and are thus of significant concern to scientists across disciplines. Over the last decade, significant advances on fungal immunology have lead to a better understanding of important mechanisms of host protection against fungi. In this article, I review recent advances of relevant mechanisms of immune-mediated protection to fungal infections.

  1. Advanced glycation end products upregulate lysyl oxidase and endothelin-1 in human aortic endothelial cells via parallel activation of ERK1/2-NF-κB and JNK-AP-1 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Adamopoulos, Christos; Piperi, Christina; Gargalionis, Antonios N; Dalagiorgou, Georgia; Spilioti, Eliana; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G

    2016-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction involves deregulation of the key extracellular matrix (ECM) enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) and the vasoconstrictor protein, endothelin-1 (ET-1), whose gene expression can be modulated by the transcriptional activators nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1). Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) present an aggravating factor of endothelial dysfunction which upon engagement to their receptor RAGE induce upregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), leading to NF-κB and AP-1 potentiation. We hypothesized that AGEs could induce NF-κΒ- and AP-1-dependent regulation of LOX and ET-1 expression via the AGE/RAGE/MAPK signaling axis. Western blot, real-time qRT-PCR, FACS analysis and electrophoretic mobility-shift assays were employed in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) following treatment with AGE-bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) to investigate the signaling pathway towards this hypothesis. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis of AGEs, RAGE, LOX and ET-1 expression was conducted in aortic endothelium of a rat experimental model exposed to high- or low-AGE content diet. HAECs exposed to AGE-BSA for various time points exhibited upregulation of LOX and ET-1 mRNA levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Exposure of HAECs to AGE-BSA also showed specific elevation of phospho(p)-ERK1/2 and p-JNK levels in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. AGE administration significantly increased NF-κΒ- and AP-1-binding activity to both LOX and ET-1 cognate promoter regions. Moreover, LOX and ET-1 overexpression in rat aortic endothelium upon high-AGE content diet confirmed the functional interrelation of these molecules. Our findings demonstrate that AGEs trigger NF-κΒ- and AP-1-mediated upregulation of LOX and ET-1 via the AGE/RAGE/MAPK signaling cascade in human endothelial cells, thus contributing to distorted endothelial homeostasis by impairing endothelial barrier function, altering ECM biomechanical properties

  2. Fungal endophyte diversity in Sarracenia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal endophytes were isolated from four species of the carnivorous pitcher plant genus Sarracenia: S. minor, S. oreophila, S. purpurea, and S. psittacina. Twelve taxa of fungi, eight within the Ascomycota and four within the Basidiomycota, were identified based on PCR amplification and sequencing ...

  3. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: FUNGAL TREATMENT BULLETIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fungal treatment technology uses white rot fungi (lignin degrading fungi) to treat organic contaminated soils in situ. Organic materials inoculated with the fungi are mechanically mixed into the contaminated soil. Using enzymes normally produced for wood degradation as well as ot...

  4. The Chemical Basis of Fungal Bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Purtov, Konstantin V; Petushkov, Valentin N; Baranov, Mikhail S; Mineev, Konstantin S; Rodionova, Natalja S; Kaskova, Zinaida M; Tsarkova, Aleksandra S; Petunin, Alexei I; Bondar, Vladimir S; Rodicheva, Emma K; Medvedeva, Svetlana E; Oba, Yuichi; Oba, Yumiko; Arseniev, Alexander S; Lukyanov, Sergey; Gitelson, Josef I; Yampolsky, Ilia V

    2015-07-01

    Many species of fungi naturally produce light, a phenomenon known as bioluminescence, however, the fungal substrates used in the chemical reactions that produce light have not been reported. We identified the fungal compound luciferin 3-hydroxyhispidin, which is biosynthesized by oxidation of the precursor hispidin, a known fungal and plant secondary metabolite. The fungal luciferin does not share structural similarity with the other eight known luciferins. Furthermore, it was shown that 3-hydroxyhispidin leads to bioluminescence in extracts from four diverse genera of luminous fungi, thus suggesting a common biochemical mechanism for fungal bioluminescence.

  5. Fungal Exopolysaccharide: Production, Composition and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Subhadip; Banerjee, Debdulal

    2013-01-01

    Fungal exopolysaccharides (EPSs) have been recognized as high value biomacromolecules for the last two decades. These products, including pullulan, scleroglucan, and botryosphaeran, have several applications in industries, pharmaceuticals, medicine, foods etc. Although fungal EPSs are highly relevant, to date information concerning fungal biosynthesis is scarce and an extensive search for new fugal species that can produce novel EPSs is still needed. In most cases, the molecular weight variations and sugar compositions of fungal EPSs are dependent to culture medium composition and different physical conditions provided during fermentation. An inclusive and illustrative review on fungal EPS is presented here. The general outline of the present work includes fungal EPS production, their compositions and applications. An emphasis is also given to listing out different fungal strains that can produce EPSs. PMID:24826070

  6. Fungal Infections: The Stubborn Cases

    PubMed Central

    Adam, John E.

    1982-01-01

    Despite development of numerous antifungal preparations, mycotic infections persist, because of inaccurate diagnosis leading to inappropriate therapy, drug failure, non-compliance or resistance of the organism to antifungal medication. Direct KOH examination is the simplest method of proving the existence of a fungus. Fungal infections tend to be overdiagnosed; disorders which do not improve with three to four weeks of treatment should be reassessed before being labelled ‘stubborn’. Griseofulvin is effective treatment for all dermatophytes, but has certain side effects. Newer topical antifungals are also effective, but no single drug cures all fungal infections. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:20469387

  7. Structural aspects of fungal allergens.

    PubMed

    Crameri, Reto

    2015-03-01

    Despite the increasing number of solved crystal structures of allergens, the key question why some proteins are allergenic and the vast majority is not remains unanswered. The situation is not different for fungal allergens which cover a wide variety of proteins with different chemical properties and biological functions. They cover enzymes, cell wall, secreted, and intracellular proteins which, except cross-reactive allergens, does not show any evidence for structural similarities at least at the three-dimensional level. However, from a diagnostic point of view, pure allergens biotechnologically produced by recombinant technology can provide us, in contrast to fungal extracts which are hardly producible as standardized reagents, with highly pure perfectly standardized diagnostic reagents.

  8. Fungal endophyte diversity in Sarracenia.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Anthony; Bodri, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    Fungal endophytes were isolated from 4 species of the carnivorous pitcher plant genus Sarracenia: S. minor, S. oreophila, S. purpurea, and S. psittacina. Twelve taxa of fungi, 8 within the Ascomycota and 4 within the Basidiomycota, were identified based on PCR amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA (ITS rDNA) with taxonomic identity assigned using the NCBI nucleotide megablast search tool. Endophytes are known to produce a large number of metabolites, some of which may contribute to the protection and survival of the host. We speculate that endophyte-infected Sarracenia may benefit from their fungal associates by their influence on nutrient availability from within pitchers and, possibly, by directly influencing the biota within pitchers.

  9. Superficial fungal infections in children.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Danielle M; Smidt, Aimee C

    2014-04-01

    Superficial fungal infections can involve the hair, skin, and nails. Most affected children are healthy, although immunosuppression is a risk factor for more severe presentation. Causative organisms typically are members of the Trichophyton, Microsporum, and Epidermophyton genera (dermatophytes), can be acquired from other infected humans, animals, or soil, and illicit a host inflammatory response. Nondermatophyte infections include pityriasis versicolor. In this article, the most common clinical presentations, diagnostic recommendations, and treatment algorithms for dermatophyte and nondermatophyte mycoses in children and adolescents are described.

  10. Subseafloor basalts as fungal habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivarsson, M.; Bengtson, S.

    2013-12-01

    The oceanic crust makes up the largest potential habitat for life on Earth, yet next to nothing is known about the abundance, diversity and ecology of its biosphere. Our understanding of the deep biosphere of subseafloor crust is, with a few exceptions, based on a fossil record. Surprisingly, a majority of the fossilized microorganisms have been interpreted or recently re-interpreted as remnants of fungi rather than prokaryotes. Even though this might be due to a bias in fossilization the presence of fungi in these settings can not be neglected. We have examined fossilized microorganisms in drilled basalt samples collected at the Emperor Seamounts in the Pacific Ocean. Synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomography microscopy (SRXTM) studies has revealed a complex morphology and internal structure that corresponds to characteristic fungal morphology. Chitin was detected in the fossilized hyphae, which is another strong argument in favour of a fungal interpretation. Chitin is absent in prokaryotes but a substantial constituent in fungal cell walls. The fungal colonies consist of both hyphae and yeast-like growth states as well as resting structures and possible fruit bodies, thus, the fungi exist in vital colonies in subseafloor basalts. The fungi have also been involved in extensive weathering of secondary mineralisations. In terrestrial environments fungi are known as an important geobiological agent that promotes mineral weathering and decomposition of organic matter, and they occur in vital symbiosis with other microorganisms. It is probable to assume that fungi would play a similar role in subseafloor basalts and have great impact on the ecology and on biogeochemical cycles in such environments.

  11. o,p'-DDT induces cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression in murine macrophages: Role of AP-1 and CRE promoter elements and PI3-kinase/Akt/MAPK signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Eun Hee; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Hyung-Kyun; Hwang, Yong Pil; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2008-12-01

    Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) has been used as an insecticide to prevent the devastation of malaria in tropical zones. However, many reports suggest that DDT may act as an endocrine disruptor and may have possible carcinogenic effects. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) acts as a link between inflammation and carcinogenesis through its involvement in tumor promotion. In the present study, we examined the effect of o,p'-DDT on COX-2 gene expression and analyzed the molecular mechanism of its activity in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. Exposure to o,p'-DDT markedly enhanced the production of prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), a major COX-2 metabolite, in murine macrophages. Furthermore, o,p'-DDT dose-dependently increased the levels of COX-2 protein and mRNA. Transfection with human COX-2 promoter construct, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNA-affinity protein-binding assay experiments revealed that o,p'-DDT activated the activator protein 1 (AP-1) and cyclic AMP response element (CRE) sites, but not the NF-{kappa}B site. Phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3)-kinase, its downstream signaling molecule, Akt, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) were also significantly activated by the o,p'-DDT-induced AP-1 and CRE activation. These results demonstrate that o,p'-DDT induced COX-2 expression via AP-1 and CRE activation through the PI3-K/Akt/ERK, JNK, and p38 MAP kinase pathways. These findings provide further insight into the signal transduction pathways involved in the carcinogenic effects of o,p'-DDT.

  12. RAD51AP2, a novel vertebrate- and meiotic-specific protein, shares a conserved RAD51-interacting C-terminal domain with RAD51AP1/PIR51

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V.; Wiese, Claudia; Schild, David

    2006-01-01

    Many interacting proteins regulate and/or assist the activities of RAD51, a recombinase which plays a critical role in both DNA repair and meiotic recombination. Yeast two-hybrid screening of a human testis cDNA library revealed a new protein, RAD51AP2 (RAD51 Associated Protein 2), that interacts strongly with RAD51. A full-length cDNA clone predicts a novel vertebrate-specific protein of 1159 residues, and the RAD51AP2 transcript was observed only in meiotic tissue (i.e. adult testis and fetal ovary), suggesting a meiotic-specific function for RAD51AP2. In HEK293 cells the interaction of RAD51 with an ectopically-expressed recombinant large fragment of RAD51AP2 requires the C-terminal 57 residues of RAD51AP2. This RAD51-binding region shows 81% homology to the C-terminus of RAD51AP1/PIR51, an otherwise totally unrelated RAD51-binding partner that is ubiquitously expressed. Analyses using truncations and point mutations in both RAD51AP1 and RAD51AP2 demonstrate that these proteins use the same structural motif for RAD51 binding. RAD54 shares some homology with this RAD51-binding motif, but this homologous region plays only an accessory role to the adjacent main RAD51-interacting region, which has been narrowed here to 40 amino acids. A novel protein, RAD51AP2, has been discovered that interacts with RAD51 through a C-terminal motif also present in RAD51AP1. PMID:16990250

  13. The mouse nac1 gene, encoding a cocaine-regulated Bric-a-brac Tramtrac Broad complex/Pox virus and Zinc finger protein, is regulated by AP1.

    PubMed

    Mackler, S A; Homan, Y X; Korutla, L; Conti, A C; Blendy, J A

    2003-01-01

    NAC1 cDNA was identified as a novel transcript induced in the nucleus accumbens from rats chronically treated with cocaine. NAC1 is a member of the Bric-a-brac Tramtrac Broad complex/Pox virus and Zinc finger family of transcription factors and has been shown by overexpression studies to prevent the development of behavioral sensitization resulting from repeated cocaine treatment. This paper reports the cloning and characterization of the corresponding gene. The mouse Nac1 gene consist of six exons, with exon 2 containing an alternative splice donor, providing a molecular explanation of the splice variants observed in mouse and rat. Transcripts of Nac1 were ubiquitously detected in different mouse tissues with prominent expression in the brain. The mouse Nac1 gene was localized to chromosome 8, suggesting a highly plausible candidate gene to explain differences in cocaine-induced behaviors between C57BL6/J and DBA/2J mice that had previously been mapped to the area. In addition, a functional AP1 binding site has been identified in an intron 1 enhancer of the Nac1 gene that plays an essential role in the activation of the gene in differentiation of neuroblastoma cells. Co-transfection with c-jun and c-fos expression plasmids, which encode the two subunits of AP1, activated the wild type Nac1 intron 1 enhancer two-fold over basal, nearly at the level of NAC1 enhancer activity seen in differentiated N2A cells. Mutation of the AP1 site completely abrogated all activation of the NAC1 enhancer in differentiated N2A cells. Activation of immediate early genes such as c-fos and c-jun following chronic drug treatments has been well characterized. The present data describe one potential regulatory cascade involving these transcription factors and activation of NAC1. Identification of drug induced alterations in gene expression is key to understanding the types of molecular adaptations underlying addiction.

  14. A Central Role for JNK/AP-1 Pathway in the Pro-Oxidant Effect of Pyrrolidine Dithiocarbamate through Superoxide Dismutase 1 Gene Repression and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Hematopoietic Human Cancer Cell Line U937

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Pascal; Lomri, Abderrahim

    2015-01-01

    Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) known as antioxidant and specific inhibitor of NF-κB was also described as pro-oxidant by inducing cell death and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in cancer. However, the mechanism by which PDTC indices its pro-oxidant effect is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effect of PDTC on the human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene transcription in hematopoietic human cancer cell line U937. We herein show for the first time that PDTC decreases SOD1 transcripts, protein and promoter activity. Furthermore, SOD1 repression by PDTC was associated with an increase in oxidative stress as evidenced by ROS production. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays (EMSA) show that PDTC increased binding of activating protein-1 (AP-1) in dose dependent-manner suggesting that the MAPkinase up-stream of AP-1 is involved. Ectopic NF-κB p65 subunit overexpression had no effect on SOD1 transcription. In contrast, in the presence of JNK inhibitor (SP600125), p65 induced a marked increase of SOD1 promoter, suggesting that JNK pathway is up-stream of NF-κB signaling and controls negatively its activity. Indeed, using JNK deficient cells, PDTC effect was not observed nether on SOD1 transcription or enzymatic activity, nor on ROS production. Finally, PDTC represses SOD1 in U937 cells through JNK/c-Jun phosphorylation. Taken together, these results suggest that PDTC acts as pro-oxidant compound in JNK/AP-1 dependent-manner by repressing the superoxide dismutase 1 gene leading to intracellular ROS accumulation. PMID:25996379

  15. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein induces transcription factor AP-1 by activation of extracellular signal-regulated and c-Jun N-terminal mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Benn, J; Su, F; Doria, M; Schneider, R J

    1996-01-01

    The HBx protein of hepatitis B virus is a dual-specificity activator of transcription, stimulating signal transduction pathways in the cytoplasm and transcription factors in the nucleus, when expressed in cell lines in culture. In the cytoplasm, HBx was shown to stimulate the Ras-Raf-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) cascade, which is essential for activation of transcription factor AP-1. Here we show that HBx protein stimulates two independently regulated members of the MAP kinase family when expressed transiently in cells. HBx protein stimulates the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). HBx activation of ERKs and JNKs leads to induction and activation of AP-1 DNA binding activity involving transient de novo synthesis of c-Fos protein and prolonged synthesis of c-Jun, mediated by N-terminal phosphorylation of c-Jun carried out by HBx-activated JNK. New c-Jun synthesis was blocked by coexpression with a dominant-negative MAP kinase kinase (MEK kinase, MEKK-1), confirming that HBx stimulates the prolonged synthesis of c-Jun by activating JNK signalling pathways. Activation of the c-fos gene was blocked by coexpression with a Raf-C4 catalytic mutant, confirming that HBx induces c-Fos by acting on Ras-Raf linked pathways. HBx activation of ERK and JNK pathways resulted in prolonged accumulation of AP-1-c-Jun dimer complexes. HBx activation of JNK and sustained activation of c-jun, should they occur in the context of hepatitis B virus infection, might play a role in viral transformation and pathogenesis. PMID:8764004

  16. Fungal genome resources at NCBI

    PubMed Central

    Robbertse, B.; Tatusova, T.

    2011-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is well known for the nucleotide sequence archive, GenBank and sequence analysis tool BLAST. However, NCBI integrates many types of biomolecular data from variety of sources and makes it available to the scientific community as interactive web resources as well as organized releases of bulk data. These tools are available to explore and compare fungal genomes. Searching all databases with Fungi [organism] at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ is the quickest way to find resources of interest with fungal entries. Some tools though are resources specific and can be indirectly accessed from a particular database in the Entrez system. These include graphical viewers and comparative analysis tools such as TaxPlot, TaxMap and UniGene DDD (found via UniGene Homepage). Gene and BioProject pages also serve as portals to external data such as community annotation websites, BioGrid and UniProt. There are many different ways of accessing genomic data at NCBI. Depending on the focus and goal of research projects or the level of interest, a user would select a particular route for accessing genomic databases and resources. This review article describes methods of accessing fungal genome data and provides examples that illustrate the use of analysis tools. PMID:22737589

  17. Systems Biology of Fungal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Fabian; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Pollmächer, Johannes; Valiante, Vito; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of pathogenicity mechanisms of the most important human-pathogenic fungi, Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans, has gained great interest in the light of the steadily increasing number of cases of invasive fungal infections. A key feature of these infections is the interaction of the different fungal morphotypes with epithelial and immune effector cells in the human host. Because of the high level of complexity, it is necessary to describe and understand invasive fungal infection by taking a systems biological approach, i.e., by a comprehensive quantitative analysis of the non-linear and selective interactions of a large number of functionally diverse, and frequently multifunctional, sets of elements, e.g., genes, proteins, metabolites, which produce coherent and emergent behaviors in time and space. The recent advances in systems biology will now make it possible to uncover the structure and dynamics of molecular and cellular cause-effect relationships within these pathogenic interactions. We review current efforts to integrate omics and image-based data of host-pathogen interactions into network and spatio-temporal models. The modeling will help to elucidate pathogenicity mechanisms and to identify diagnostic biomarkers and potential drug targets for therapy and could thus pave the way for novel intervention strategies based on novel antifungal drugs and cell therapy. PMID:22485108

  18. Eupafolin inhibits PGE2 production and COX2 expression in LPS-stimulated human dermal fibroblasts by blocking JNK/AP-1 and Nox2/p47{sup phox} pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Ming-Horng; Liang, Chan-Jung; Yen, Feng-Lin; Chiang, Yao-Chang; Lee, Chiang-Wen

    2014-09-01

    Eupafolin, a major active component found in the methanol extracts of Phyla nodiflora, has been used to treat inflammation of skin. We examined its effects on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in LPS-treated human dermal fibroblasts. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) significantly increased prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) production associated with increased COX-2 expression in Hs68 cells. This effect was blocked by eupafolin, TLR-4 antibody, antioxidants (APO and NAC), as well as inhibitors, including U0126 (ERK1/2), SB202190 (p38), SP600125 (JNK1/2), and Tanshinone IIA (AP-1). In gene regulation level, qPCR and promoter assays revealed that COX-2 expression was attenuated by eupafolin. In addition, eupafolin also ameliorated LPS-induced p47 phox activation and decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and NADPH oxidase (Nox) activity. Moreover, pretreatment with eupafolin and APO led to reduced LPS-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK, and p38. Further, eupafolin attenuated LPS-induced increase in AP-1 transcription factor binding activity as well as the increase in the phosphorylation of c-Jun and c-Fos. In vivo studies have shown that in dermal fibroblasts of LPS treated mice, eupafolin exerted anti-inflammation effects by decreasing COX-2 protein levels. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects of eupafolin that involved inhibition of LPS-induced ROS generation, suppression of MAPK phosphorylation, diminished DNA binding activity of AP-1 and attenuated COX-2 expression leading to reduced production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Our results demonstrate that eupafolin may be used to treat inflammatory responses associated with dermatologic diseases. - Highlights: • LPS activates the Nox2/p47{sup phox}/JNK/AP-1 and induces COX2 expression in Hs68 cells. • Eupafolin inhibits LPS-induced COX-2 expression via Nox2/p47{sup phox} inhibition. • Eupafolin may be used in the treatment of skin diseases involving inflammation.

  19. Induction of Connective Tissue Growth Factor Expression by Hypoxia in Human Lung Fibroblasts via the MEKK1/MEK1/ERK1/GLI-1/GLI-2 and AP-1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi; Lin, Chien-huang; Chen, Jing-Yun; Li, Chien-Hua; Liu, Yu-Tin; Chen, Bing-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Several reports have indicated that hypoxia, GLI, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) contribute to pulmonary fibrosis in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We investigated the participation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) kinase 1 (MEKK1)/MEK1/ERK1/GLI-1/2 and activator protein-1 (AP-1) signaling in hypoxia-induced CTGF expression in human lung fibroblasts. Hypoxia time-dependently increased CTGF expression, which was attenuated by the small interfering RNA (siRNA) of GLI-1 (GLI-1 siRNA) and GLI-2 (GLI-2 siRNA) in both human lung fibroblast cell line (WI-38) and primary human lung fibroblasts (NHLFs). Moreover, GLI-1 siRNA and GLI-2 siRNA attenuated hypoxia-induced CTGF-luciferase activity, and the treatment of cells with hypoxia induced GLI-1 and GLI-2 translocation. Furthermore, hypoxia-induced CTGF expression was reduced by an MEK inhibitor (PD98059), MEK1 siRNA, ERK inhibitor (U0126), ERK1 siRNA, and MEKK1 siRNA. Both PD98059 and U0126 significantly attenuated hypoxia-induced CTGF-luciferase activity. Hypoxia time-dependently increased MEKK1, ERK, and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Moreover, SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) also apparently inhibited hypoxia-induced CTGF expression. The treatment of cells with hypoxia induced ERK, GLI-1, or GLI-2 complex formation. Hypoxia-induced GLI-1 and GLI-2 translocation into the nucleus was significantly attenuated by U0126. In addition, hypoxia-induced ERK Tyr204 phosphorylation was impeded by MEKK1 siRNA. Moreover, hypoxia-induced CTGF-luciferase activity was attenuated by cells transfected with AP-1 site mutation in a CTGF construct. Exposure to hypoxia caused a time-dependent phosphorylation of c-Jun, but not of c-Fos. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) revealed that hypoxia induced the recruitment of c-Jun, GLI-1, and GLI-2 to the AP-1 promoter region of CTGF. Hypoxia-treated cells exhibited an increase in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen production, which was blocked by GLI-1 siRNA and

  20. Osteopontin selectively regulates p70S6K/mTOR phosphorylation leading to NF-κB dependent AP-1-mediated ICAM-1 expression in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancer and accounts for over 400,000 deaths each year worldwide. It causes premature death in women, despite progress in early detection, treatment, and advances in understanding the molecular basis of the disease. Therefore, it is important to understand the in depth mechanism of tumor progression and develop new strategies for the treatment of breast cancer. Thus, this study is aimed at gaining an insight into the molecular mechanism by which osteopontin (OPN), a member of SIBLING (Small Integrin Binding LIgand N-linked Glycoprotein) family of protein regulates tumor progression through activation of various transcription factors and expression of their downstream effector gene(s) in breast cancer. Results In this study, we report that purified native OPN induces ICAM-1 expression in breast cancer cells. The data revealed that OPN induces NF-κB activation and NF-κB dependent ICAM-1 expression. We also observed that OPN-induced NF-κB further controls AP-1 transactivation, suggesting that there is cross talk between NF-κB and AP-1 which is unidirectional towards AP-1 that in turn regulates ICAM-1 expression in these cells. We also delineated the role of mTOR and p70S6 kinase in OPN-induced ICAM-1 expression. The study suggests that inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin augments whereas overexpression of mTOR/p70S6 kinase inhibits OPN-induced ICAM-1 expression. Moreover, overexpression of mTOR inhibits OPN-induced NF-κB and AP-1-DNA binding and transcriptional activity. However, rapamycin further enhanced these OPN-induced effects. We also report that OPN induces p70S6 kinase phosphorylation at Thr-421/Ser-424, but not at Thr-389 or Ser-371 and mTOR phosphorylation at Ser-2448. Overexpression of mTOR has no effect in regulation of OPN-induced phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase at Thr-421/Ser-424. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin attenuates Ser-371 phosphorylation but does not have any effect on Thr-389 and

  1. Prevalence and clinical profile of fungal rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Dayanand; Zacharias, George; Palaninathan, Sengottaiah; Vishwanathan, Ravisankar; Venkatraman, Vaidyanathan

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are only a few landmark studies from the Indian subcontinent on fungal rhinosinusitis. The lack of awareness among clinicians regarding the varying clinical presentations of fungal rhinosinusitis prompted us to undertake this study. Objective: To determine the prevalence, etiologic basis, clinical features, radiologic features, and microscopic features of fungal rhinosinusitis, and to evaluate the various treatment modalities available. Methods: This was a prospective study in which evaluation of 100 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis was done. Specimens collected were subjected to both microbiology and pathologic examination; data collected, including clinical and radiologic features, were analyzed by the Pearson χ2 test and Fisher's exact test. Results: The prevalence of fungal rhinosinusitis in our study was 30% (n = 30). Mucor was the most commonly isolated species (n = 15 [50%]) of fungus. Pathologic examination had a higher sensitivity (76.67%) compared with microbiology tests (50%) in the diagnosis of fungal rhinosinusitis. Fungus ball (n = 14 [46.6%]) was the most prevalent entity in the spectrum of fungal rhinosinusitis. Forty percent of cases (n = 12) were of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis. The prevalence of fungal rhinosinusitis was higher among individuals who were immunocompetent (n = 17 [56.6%]). Of patients who were immunocompromised, 84.6% (n = 11) had mucormycosis. Conclusions: Unilateral involvement of paranasal sinuses was more in favor of fungal etiology. Complications were more common in fungal rhinosinusitis caused by Mucor species. Mucormycosis, a rare clinical entity, in subjects who were immunocompetent, had a high prevalence in our study. PMID:27349695

  2. Invasive fungal infections after natural disasters.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Park, Benjamin J

    2014-03-01

    The link between natural disasters and subsequent fungal infections in disaster-affected persons has been increasingly recognized. Fungal respiratory conditions associated with disasters include coccidioidomycosis, and fungi are among several organisms that can cause near-drowning pneumonia. Wound contamination with organic matter can lead to post-disaster skin and soft tissue fungal infections, notably mucormycosis. The role of climate change in the environmental growth, distribution, and dispersal mechanisms of pathogenic fungi is not fully understood; however, ongoing climate change could lead to increased disaster-associated fungal infections. Fungal infections are an often-overlooked clinical and public health issue, and increased awareness by health care providers, public health professionals, and community members regarding disaster-associated fungal infections is needed.

  3. Invasive Fungal Infections after Natural Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Kaitlin

    2014-01-01

    The link between natural disasters and subsequent fungal infections in disaster-affected persons has been increasingly recognized. Fungal respiratory conditions associated with disasters include coccidioidomycosis, and fungi are among several organisms that can cause near-drowning pneumonia. Wound contamination with organic matter can lead to post-disaster skin and soft tissue fungal infections, notably mucormycosis. The role of climate change in the environmental growth, distribution, and dispersal mechanisms of pathogenic fungi is not fully understood; however, ongoing climate change could lead to increased disaster-associated fungal infections. Fungal infections are an often-overlooked clinical and public health issue, and increased awareness by health care providers, public health professionals, and community members regarding disaster-associated fungal infections is needed. PMID:24565446

  4. Invasive fungal infections after natural disasters.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Park, Benjamin J

    2014-03-01

    The link between natural disasters and subsequent fungal infections in disaster-affected persons has been increasingly recognized. Fungal respiratory conditions associated with disasters include coccidioidomycosis, and fungi are among several organisms that can cause near-drowning pneumonia. Wound contamination with organic matter can lead to post-disaster skin and soft tissue fungal infections, notably mucormycosis. The role of climate change in the environmental growth, distribution, and dispersal mechanisms of pathogenic fungi is not fully understood; however, ongoing climate change could lead to increased disaster-associated fungal infections. Fungal infections are an often-overlooked clinical and public health issue, and increased awareness by health care providers, public health professionals, and community members regarding disaster-associated fungal infections is needed. PMID:24565446

  5. Surgical management of fungal endophthalmitis resulting from fungal keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Chen, Nan; Dong, Xiao-Guang; Yuan, Gong-Qiang; Yu, Bin; Xie, Li-Xin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To report the fungal organisms, clinical features, surgical treatment strategies, and outcomes of patients with culture-proven exogenous fungal endophthalmitis (EFE) secondary to keratitis, and evaluate the role of surgery in the treatment. METHODS The clinical records of 27 patients (27 eyes) with culture-proven EFE resulting from fungal keratitis treated at Shandong Eye Institute from January 2007 to January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Information about fungal culture results, clinical features, surgical procedures, and final visual acuity was obtained. RESULTS There were 39 positive culture results from samples of cornea, hypopyon, vitreous and lens capsule, accounting for 56%, 26%, 15% and 2.5%, respectively. Fusarium was identified in 44% (12/27) of the eyes, followed by Aspergillus in 22% (6/27). Posterior segment infection was involved in 78% (21/27) of the patients. The corneal infection was larger than 3 mm ×3 mm in 89% (24/27) of the patients, and 22% (6/27) of them had the entire cornea, and even the sclera involved. Three eyes had silicone oil tamponade, and two eyes had retinal detachment. Twenty-two eyes (81.5%) underwent penetrating keratoplasty (PKP), and over half of them (54.5%) were operated within 3d from the onset of antifungal therapy. Fourteen eyes (52%) underwent intracameral antifungal drug injection, and three of them required repeated injections. Fifteen eyes (55.6%) underwent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). The rate of the eyes undergoing PPV as the initial surgical procedure was 60% (9/15), lower than 77% in PKP. Intravitreal injection was given in 59% of the eyes (16/27), and 75% of them required repeated injections. The final visual acuity was 20/100 or better in 37% of the eyes, and better than counting fingers in 55.6% of the eyes. Five eyes (18.5%) were eviscerated. In the two eyes with concurrent retinal detachment, one achieved retinal reattachment, and the other was eviscerated. In the three eyes with silicone oil

  6. α-Chaconine isolated from a Solanum tuberosum L. cv Jayoung suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory mediators via AP-1 inactivation in RAW 264.7 macrophages and protects mice from endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung-Goo; Lee, Suel-Gie; Lee, Hwi-Ho; Lee, Hae Jun; Shin, Ji-Sun; Kim, Nan-Jung; An, Hyo-Jin; Nam, Jung-Hwan; Jang, Dae Sik; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2015-06-25

    In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of α-chaconine in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages and in LPS-induced septic mice. α-Chaconine inhibited the expressions of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) at the transcriptional level, and attenuated the transcriptional activity of activator protein-1 (AP-1) by reducing the translocation and phosphorylation of c-Jun. α-Chaconine also suppressed the phosphorylation of TGF-β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1), which lies upstream of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 7 (MKK7)/Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. JNK knockdown using siRNA prevented the α-chaconine-mediated inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators. In a sepsis model, pretreatment with α-chaconine reduced the LPS-induced lethality and the mRNA and production levels of pro-inflammatory mediators by inhibiting c-Jun activation. These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of α-chaconine are associated with the suppression of AP-1, and support its possible therapeutic role for the treatment of sepsis. PMID:25913072

  7. TGF-β2 induces Grb2 to recruit PI3-K to TGF-RII that activates JNK/AP-1-signaling and augments invasiveness of Theileria-transformed macrophages.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Malak; Whitworth, Jessie; Noé, Gaelle; Liu, Wang Qing; Vidal, Michel; Langsley, Gordon

    2015-10-29

    Theileria-infected macrophages display many features of cancer cells such as heightened invasive capacity; however, the tumor-like phenotype is reversible by killing the parasite. Moreover, virulent macrophages can be attenuated by multiple in vitro passages and so provide a powerful model to elucidate mechanisms related to transformed macrophage virulence. Here, we demonstrate that in two independent Theileria-transformed macrophage cell lines Grb2 expression is down-regulated concomitant with loss of tumor virulence. Using peptidimer-c to ablate SH2 and SH3 interactions of Grb2 we identify TGF-receptor II and the p85 subunit of PI3-K, as Grb2 partners in virulent macrophages. Ablation of Grb2 interactions reduces PI3-K recruitment to TGF-RII and decreases PIP3 production, and dampens JNK phosphorylation and AP-1-driven transcriptional activity down to levels characteristic of attenuated macrophages. Loss of TGF-R>PI3-K>JNK>AP-1 signaling negatively impacts on virulence traits such as reduced JAM-L/ITG4A and Fos-B/MMP9 expression that contribute to virulent macrophage adhesion and invasiveness.

  8. Luteolin 8-C-β-fucopyranoside inhibits invasion and suppresses TPA-induced MMP-9 and IL-8 via ERK/AP-1 and ERK/NF-κB signaling in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Ho; Kim, Jung-Hee; Lee, Dong-Hun; Kang, Jeong-Woo; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Yoon, Do-Young

    2013-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) play major roles in tumor progression and invasion of breast cancer cells. The present study was undertaken to investigate the inhibitory mechanism of cell invasion by luteolin 8-C-β-fucopyranoside (named as LU8C-FP), a C-glycosylflavone, in human breast cancer cells. We investigated whether LU8C-FP would inhibit MMP-9 activation and IL-8 expression in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-treated MCF-7 breast cancer cells. LU8C-FP suppressed TPA-induced MMP-9 and IL-8 secretion and mRNA expression via inhibition of the MAPK signaling pathway and down-regulation of nuclear AP-1 and NF-κB. TPA-induced phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 was suppressed by LU8C-FP, whereas JNK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation were unaffected. In addition, LU8C-FP blocked the ERK 1/2 pathways following expression of MMP-9 and IL-8. These results suggest LU8C-FP may function to suppress invasion of breast cancer cells through the ERK/AP-1 and ERK/NF-κB signaling cascades.

  9. Fulgidic Acid Isolated from the Rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus Suppresses LPS-Induced iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, and IL-6 Expression by AP-1 Inactivation in RAW264.7 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji-Sun; Hong, Yujin; Lee, Hwi-Ho; Ryu, Byeol; Cho, Young-Wuk; Kim, Nam-Jung; Jang, Dae Sik; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2015-01-01

    To identify bioactive natural products possessing anti-inflammatory activity, the potential of fulgidic acid from the rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus and the underlying mechanisms involved in its anti-inflammatory activity were evaluated in this study. Fulgidic acid reduced the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW264.7 macrophages. Consistent with these findings, fulgidic acid suppressed the LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) at the protein level, as well as iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, and IL-6 at mRNA levels. Fulgidic acid suppressed the LPS-induced transcriptional activity of activator protein-1 (AP-1) as well as the phosphorylation of c-Fos and c-Jun. On the other hand, fulgidic acid did not show any effect on LPS-induced nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activity. Taken together, these results suggest that the anti-inflammatory effect of fulgidic acid is associated with the suppression of iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, and IL-6 expression through down-regulating AP-1 activation in LPS-induced RAW264.7 macrophages. PMID:26133719

  10. α-Chaconine isolated from a Solanum tuberosum L. cv Jayoung suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory mediators via AP-1 inactivation in RAW 264.7 macrophages and protects mice from endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung-Goo; Lee, Suel-Gie; Lee, Hwi-Ho; Lee, Hae Jun; Shin, Ji-Sun; Kim, Nan-Jung; An, Hyo-Jin; Nam, Jung-Hwan; Jang, Dae Sik; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2015-06-25

    In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of α-chaconine in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages and in LPS-induced septic mice. α-Chaconine inhibited the expressions of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) at the transcriptional level, and attenuated the transcriptional activity of activator protein-1 (AP-1) by reducing the translocation and phosphorylation of c-Jun. α-Chaconine also suppressed the phosphorylation of TGF-β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1), which lies upstream of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 7 (MKK7)/Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. JNK knockdown using siRNA prevented the α-chaconine-mediated inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators. In a sepsis model, pretreatment with α-chaconine reduced the LPS-induced lethality and the mRNA and production levels of pro-inflammatory mediators by inhibiting c-Jun activation. These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of α-chaconine are associated with the suppression of AP-1, and support its possible therapeutic role for the treatment of sepsis.

  11. Oleoylethanolamide exerts anti-inflammatory effects on LPS-induced THP-1 cells by enhancing PPARα signaling and inhibiting the NF-κB and ERK1/2/AP-1/STAT3 pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lichao; Guo, Han; Li, Ying; Meng, Xianglan; Yan, Lu; Dan Zhang; Wu, Sangang; Zhou, Hao; Peng, Lu; Xie, Qiang; Jin, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the anti-inflammatory actions of oleoylethanolamide (OEA) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced THP-1 cells. The cells were stimulated with LPS (1 μg/ml) in the presence or absence of OEA (10, 20 and 40 μM). The pro-inflammatory cytokines were evaluated by qRT-PCR and ELISA. The THP-1 cells were transiently transfected with PPARα small-interfering RNA, and TLR4 activity was determined with a blocking test using anti-TLR4 antibody. Additionally, a special inhibitor was used to analyse the intracellular signaling pathway. OEA exerted a potent anti-inflammatory effect by reducing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and TLR4 expression, and by enhancing PPARα expression. The modulatory effects of OEA on LPS-induced inflammation depended on PPARα and TLR4. Importantly, OEA inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB activation, IκBα degradation, expression of AP-1, and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and STAT3. In summary, our results demonstrated that OEA exerts anti-inflammatory effects by enhancing PPARα signaling, inhibiting the TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway, and interfering with the ERK1/2-dependent signaling cascade (TLR4/ERK1/2/AP-1/STAT3), which suggests that OEA may be a therapeutic agent for inflammatory diseases. PMID:27721381

  12. HIV-1 Nef Induces CCL5 production in astrocytes through p38-MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathway and utilizes NF-kB, CEBP and AP-1 transcription factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xun; Shah, Ankit; Gangwani, Mohitkumar R.; Silverstein, Peter S.; Fu, Mingui; Kumar, Anil

    2014-03-01

    The prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remains high in patients infected with HIV-1. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by astrocytes/microglia exposed to viral proteins is thought to be one of the mechanisms leading to HIV-1- mediated neurotoxicity. In the present study we examined the effects of Nef on CCL5 induction in astrocytes. The results demonstrate that CCL5 is significantly induced in Nef-transfected SVGA astrocytes. To determine the mechanisms responsible for the increased CCL5 caused by Nef, we employed siRNA and chemical antagonists. Antagonists of NF-κB, PI3K, and p38 significantly reduced the expression levels of CCL5 induced by Nef transfection. Furthermore, specific siRNAs demonstrated that the Akt, p38MAPK, NF-κB, CEBP, and AP-1 pathways play a role in Nef-mediated CCL5 expression. The results demonstrated that the PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways, along with the transcription factors NF-κB, CEBP, and AP-1, are involved in Nef-induced CCL5 production in astrocytes.

  13. Human fungal pathogens: Why should we learn?

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Yoon

    2016-03-01

    Human fungal pathogens that cause invasive infections are hidden killers, taking lives of one and a half million people every year. However, research progress in this field has not been rapid enough to effectively prevent or treat life-threatening fungal diseases. To update recent research progress and promote more active research in the field of human fungal pathogens, eleven review articles concerning the virulence mechanisms and host interactions of four major human fungal pathogens-Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Histoplasma capsulatum-are presented in this special issue. PMID:26920875

  14. Regulation of the fungal secretome.

    PubMed

    McCotter, Sean W; Horianopoulos, Linda C; Kronstad, James W

    2016-08-01

    The ability of countless representatives of the Kingdom Fungi to adapt to and proliferate in diverse environments is facilitated by regulation of their secretomes to respond to changes in environmental conditions and to mediate interactions with other organisms. Secretome changes often fulfill common functions of nutrient acquisition, facilitation of host/symbiont interactions, cell wall modification, and optimization of the enzyme suite to adapt to new environmental resources. In this review, we expand on our recent work on signaling and the secretome in the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans to consider a range of selected examples of regulation of fungal secretomes. These examples include the impact of carbon source and aspects of the response to plant and animal hosts. Additionally, the influence of key protein kinases (e.g., Pka1, Snf1) and transcription factors (e.g., Rim101/PacC) is highlighted to illustrate some underlying regulatory factors influencing the secretome. Although there is a wealth of information about fungal secretomes from both experimentation and genome sequence mining, there are also major gaps in our knowledge about the complete composition of fungal secretomes and mechanisms of dynamic change. For example, a more comprehensive understanding of the composition and regulation of the secretome will require consideration of the emerging roles of unconventional secretion and extracellular vesicles in delivering proteins outside the cell. Overall, changes in the secretome are well documented in diverse fungi and the underlying mechanisms are currently under investigation; however, there remain unknown steps in the regulation of secretory pathways and gaps in understanding the regulation of unconventional secretion, which warrant further research. PMID:26879194

  15. Topical therapy for fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Amber A; Dahl, Mark V

    2004-01-01

    Fungi often infect the skin surface and subsequently invade the stratum corneum to avoid being shed from the skin surface by desquamation. Pharmacologic agents applied to the surface of the skin in the form of creams, lotions, or sprays, readily penetrate into the stratum corneum to kill the fungi (fungicidal agents), or at least render them unable to grow or divide (fungistatic agents). Thus, topical therapies work well to rid the skin of topical fungi and yeasts. Azole drugs such as miconazole, clotrimazole, and ketoconazole are fungistatic, limiting fungal growth but depending on epidermal turnover to shed the still-living fungus from the skin surface. Allylamines and benzylamines such as terbinafine, naftifine, and butenafine are fungicidal, actually killing the fungal organisms. Fungicidal drugs are often preferred over fungistatic drugs for treatment of dermatophytic fungal infections, since treatment times as short as one application daily for 1 week are associated with high cure rates. Furthermore, patients often stop treatments when the skin appears healed, usually after about a week of treatment. If this short-term treatment is stopped, fungi recur more often when fungistatic, rather than fungicidal, drugs have been used. Yeast infections such as those caused by Candida albicans respond less well to allylamine drugs. The azole drugs are often preferred for these types of infections. Nail infections are difficult to cure with topical therapies because the infections usually occur under the nail instead of on top of it and products penetrate poorly, if at all, through the nail plate. Infections of hair follicles, nails, and widespread infections often require systemic treatments. Antifungal agents are compounded into many different types of vehicles. Patients often prefer to treat weeping infections with spray formulations. Most physicians prescribe branded products in cream or lotion bases. Cost is a factor dictating prescription choice, especially since

  16. Fungal spores: hazardous to health?

    PubMed Central

    Sorenson, W G

    1999-01-01

    Fungi have long been known to affect human well being in various ways, including disease of essential crop plants, decay of stored foods with possible concomitant production of mycotoxins, superficial and systemic infection of human tissues, and disease associated with immune stimulation such as hypersensitivity pneumonitis and toxic pneumonitis. The spores of a large number of important fungi are less than 5 microm aerodynamic diameter, and therefore are able to enter the lungs. They also may contain significant amounts of mycotoxins. Diseases associated with inhalation of fungal spores include toxic pneumonitis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, tremors, chronic fatigue syndrome, kidney failure, and cancer. PMID:10423389

  17. Immune response to fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Jose L; Garcia, Marta E

    2008-09-15

    The immune mechanisms of defence against fungal infections are numerous, and range from protective mechanisms that were present early in evolution (innate immunity) to sophisticated adaptive mechanisms that are induced specifically during infection and disease (adaptive immunity). The first-line innate mechanism is the presence of physical barriers in the form of skin and mucous membranes, which is complemented by cell membranes, cellular receptors and humoral factors. There has been a debate about the relative contribution of humoral and cellular immunity to host defence against fungal infections. For a long time it was considered that cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was important, but humoral immunity had little or no role. However, it is accepted now that CMI is the main mechanism of defence, but that certain types of antibody response are protective. In general, Th1-type CMI is required for clearance of a fungal infection, while Th2 immunity usually results in susceptibility to infection. Aspergillosis, which is a disease caused by the fungus Aspergillus, has been the subject of many studies, including details of the immune response. Attempts to relate aspergillosis to some form of immunosuppression in animals, as is the case with humans, have not been successful to date. The defence against Aspergillus is based on recognition of the pathogen, a rapidly deployed and highly effective innate effector phase, and a delayed but robust adaptive effector phase. Candida albicans, part of the normal microbial flora associated with mucous surfaces, can be present as congenital candidiasis or as acquired defects of cell-mediated immunity. Resistance to this yeast is associated with Th1 CMI, whereas Th2 immunity is associated with susceptibility to systemic infection. Dermatophytes produce skin alterations in humans and other animals, and the essential role of the CMI response is to destroy the fungi and produce an immunoprotective status against re-infection. The resolution

  18. POSSIBLE ROLE OF FUNGAL HEMOLYSINS IN SICK BUILDING SYNDROME

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many fungi produce proteinaceous hemolytic agents. Like bacterial hemolysins, fungal hemolysins create pores or holes in membranes. Depending on which membranes are damaged, fungal hemolysins can produce a variety of effects. Fungal hemolysins can cause histamine release from ...

  19. Fungal infections of the orbit

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Bipasha; Raichura, Nirav Dilip; Alam, Md. Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections of the orbit can lead to grave complications. Although the primary site of inoculation of the infective organism is frequently the sinuses, the patients can initially present to the ophthalmologist with ocular signs and symptoms. Due to its varied and nonspecific clinical features, especially in the early stages, patients are frequently misdiagnosed and even treated with steroids which worsen the situation leading to dire consequences. Ophthalmologists should be familiar with the clinical spectrum of disease and the variable presentation of this infection, as early diagnosis and rapid institution of appropriate therapy are crucial elements in the management of this invasive sino-orbital infection. In this review, relevant clinical, microbiological, and imaging findings are discussed along with the current consensus on local and systemic management. We review the recent literature and provide a comprehensive analysis. In the immunocompromised, as well as in healthy patients, a high index of suspicion must be maintained as delay in diagnosis of fungal pathology may lead to disfiguring morbidity or even mortality. Obtaining adequate diagnostic material for pathological and microbiological examination is critical. Newer methods of therapy, particularly oral voriconazole and topical amphotericin B, may be beneficial in selected patients. PMID:27380972

  20. Naming names: the etymology of fungal entomopathogens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chapter introduces the reader to the etymology of the generic names given to 26 fungal entomopathogens. Possessing some knowledge on how a name originates sometimes provides us with information on a fungal characteristic that might help us identify the organism, e.g., Conidiobolus, Cordyceps, P...

  1. Organ Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... of hospital-associated infections for more information. Fungal infections can happen any time after your surgery. Fungal infections can happen ... Neofytos D, Fishman JA, Horn D, et al. Epidemiology and outcome of invasive ... in solid organ transplant recipients. Transplant Infectious Disease ...

  2. Industrial Fungal Enzymes: An Occupational Allergen Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Green, Brett J.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2011-01-01

    Occupational exposure to high-molecular-weight allergens is a risk factor for the development and pathogenesis of IgE-mediated respiratory disease. In some occupational environments, workers are at an increased risk of exposure to fungal enzymes used in industrial production. Fungal enzymes have been associated with adverse health effects in the work place, in particular in baking occupations. Exposure-response relationships have been demonstrated, and atopic workers directly handling fungal enzymes are at an increased risk for IgE-mediated disease and occupational asthma. The utilization of new and emerging fungal enzymes in industrial production will present new occupational exposures. The production of antibody-based immunoassays is necessary for the assessment of occupational exposure and the development of threshold limit values. Allergen avoidance strategies including personal protective equipment, engineering controls, protein encapsulation, and reduction of airborne enzyme concentrations are required to mitigate occupational exposure to fungal enzymes. PMID:21747869

  3. Fungal natural products in research and development.

    PubMed

    Schueffler, Anja; Anke, Timm

    2014-10-01

    To date approximately 100 000 fungal species are known although far more than one million are expected. The variety of species and the diversity of their habitats, some of them less exploited, allow the conclusion that fungi continue to be a rich source of new metabolites. Besides the conventional fungal isolates, an increasing interest in endophytic and in marine-derived fungi has been noticed. In addition new screening strategies based on innovative chemical, biological, and genetic approaches have led to novel fungal metabolites in recent years. The present review focuses on new fungal natural products published from 2009 to 2013 highlighting the originality of the structures and their biological potential. Furthermore synthetic products based on fungal metabolites as well as new developments in the uses or the biological activity of known compounds or new derivatives are discussed.

  4. Activation of the transcription factor FosB/activating protein-1 (AP-1) is a prominent downstream signal of the extracellular nucleotide receptor P2RX7 in monocytic and osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Gavala, Monica L; Hill, Lindsay M; Lenertz, Lisa Y; Karta, Maya R; Bertics, Paul J

    2010-10-29

    Activation of the ionotropic P2RX7 nucleotide receptor by extracellular ATP has been implicated in modulating inflammatory disease progression. Continuous exposure of P2RX7 to ligand can result in apoptosis in many cell types, including monocytic cells, whereas transient activation of P2RX7 is linked to inflammatory mediator production and the promotion of cell growth. Given the rapid hydrolysis of ATP in the circulation and interstitial space, transient activation of P2RX7 appears critically important for its action, yet its effects on gene expression are unclear. The present study demonstrates that short-term stimulation of human and mouse monocytic cells as well as mouse osteoblasts with P2RX7 agonists substantially induces the expression of several activating protein-1 (AP-1) members, particularly FosB. The potent activation of FosB after P2RX7 stimulation is especially noteworthy considering that little is known concerning the role of FosB in immunological regulation. Interestingly, the magnitude of FosB activation induced by P2RX7 stimulation appears greater than that observed with other known inducers of FosB expression. In addition, we have identified a previously unrecognized role for FosB in osteoblasts with respect to nucleotide-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis from arachidonic acid and is critical for osteoblastic differentiation and immune behavior. The present studies are the first to link P2RX7 action to FosB/AP-1 regulation in multiple cell types, including a role in nucleotide-induced COX-2 expression, and support a role for FosB in the control of immune and osteogenic function by P2RX7. PMID:20813842

  5. Age-associated reduction of cellular spreading/mechanical force up-regulates matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression and collagen fibril fragmentation via c-Jun/AP-1 in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhaoping; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J; Quan, Taihao

    2014-12-01

    The dermal compartment of human skin is largely composed of dense collagen-rich fibrils, which provide structural and mechanical support. Skin dermal fibroblasts, the major collagen-producing cells, are interact with collagen fibrils to maintain cell spreading and mechanical force for function. A characteristic feature of aged human skin is fragmentation of collagen fibrils, which is initiated by matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1). Fragmentation impairs fibroblast attachment and thereby reduces spreading. Here, we investigated the relationship among fibroblast spreading, mechanical force, MMP-1 expression, and collagen fibril fragmentation. Reduced fibroblast spreading due to cytoskeletal disruption was associated with reduced cellular mechanical force, as determined by atomic force microscopy. These reductions substantially induced MMP-1 expression, which led to collagen fibril fragmentation and disorganization in three-dimensional collagen lattices. Constraining fibroblast size by culturing on slides coated with collagen micropatterns also significantly induced MMP-1 expression. Reduced spreading/mechanical force induced transcription factor c-Jun and its binding to a canonical AP-1 binding site in the MMP-1 proximal promoter. Blocking c-Jun function with dominant negative mutant c-Jun significantly reduced induction of MMP-1 expression in response to reduced spreading/mechanical force. Furthermore, restoration of fibroblast spreading/mechanical force led to decline of c-Jun and MMP-1 levels and eliminated collagen fibril fragmentation and disorganization. These data reveal a novel mechanism by which alteration of fibroblast shape/mechanical force regulates c-Jun/AP-1-dependent expression of MMP-1 and consequent collagen fibril fragmentation. This mechanism provides a foundation for understanding the cellular and molecular basis of age-related collagen fragmentation in human skin.

  6. Dietary turmeric modulates DMBA-induced p21{sup ras}, MAP kinases and AP-1/NF-{kappa}B pathway to alter cellular responses during hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Rachana; Ingle, Arvind; Maru, Girish

    2008-11-01

    The chemopreventive efficacy of turmeric has been established in experimental systems. However, its mechanism(s) of action are not fully elucidated in vivo. The present study investigates the mechanism of turmeric-mediated chemoprevention in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis at 2, 4, 6, 10 and 12 weeks. Dietary turmeric (1%) led to decrease in DMBA-induced tumor burden and multiplicity, and enhanced the latency period in parallel, to its modulatory effects on oncogene products and various cellular responses during HBP tumorigenesis. DMBA-induced expression of ras oncogene product, p21 and downstream target, the mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly decreased by turmeric during HBP carcinogenesis. Turmeric also diminished the DMBA-induced mRNA expression of proto-oncogenes (c-jun, c-fos) and NF-{kappa}B, leading to decreased protein levels and in further attenuation of DMBA-induced AP-1/NF-{kappa}B DNA-binding in the buccal pouch nuclear extracts. Besides, buccal pouch of hamsters receiving turmeric diet showed significant alterations in DMBA-induced effects: (a) decrease in cell proliferation (diminished PCNA and Bcl2 expression), (b) enhanced apoptosis (increased expression of Bax, caspase-3 and apoptotic index), (c) decrease in inflammation (levels of Cox-2, the downstream target of AP-1/NF-{kappa}B, and PGE2) and (d) aberrant expression of differentiation markers, the cytokeratins (1, 5, 8, and 18). Together, the protective effects of dietary turmeric converge on augmenting apoptosis of the initiated cells and decreasing cell proliferation in DMBA-treated animals, which in turn, is reflected in decreased tumor burden, multiplicity and enhanced latency period. Some of these biomarkers are likely to be helpful in monitoring clinical trials and evaluating drug effect measurements.

  7. Comparative analysis of the pteridophyte Adiantum MFT ortholog reveals the specificity of combined FT/MFT C and N terminal interaction with FD for the regulation of the downstream gene AP1.

    PubMed

    Hou, Cheng-Jing; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2016-07-01

    To study the evolution of phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) gene families in non-flowering plants, we performed a functional analysis of the PEBP gene AcMFT of the MFT clade in the pteridophyte Adiantum capillus-veneris. The expression of AcMFT was regulated by photoperiod similar to that for FT under both long day and short day conditions. Ectopic expression of AcMFT in Arabidopsis promotes the floral transition and partially complements the late flowering defect in transgenic Arabidopsis ft-1 mutants, suggesting that AcMFT functions similarly to FT in flowering plants. Interestingly, a similar partial compensation of the ft-1 late flowering phenotype was observed in Arabidopsis ectopically expressing only exon 4 of the C terminus of AcMFT and FT. This result indicated that the fourth exon of AcMFT and FT plays a similar and important role in promoting flowering. Further analysis indicated that exons 1-3 in the N terminus specifically enhanced the function of FT exon 4 in controlling flowering in Arabidopsis. Protein pull-down assays indicated that Arabidopsis FD proteins interact with full-length FT and AcMFT, as well as peptides encoded by 1-3 exon fragments or the 4th exon alone. Furthermore, similar FRET efficiencies for FT-FD and AcMFT-FD heterodimer in nucleus were observed. These results indicated that FD could form the similar complex with FT and AcMFT. Further analysis indicated that the expression of AP1, a gene downstream of FT, was up-regulated more strongly by FT than AcMFT in transgenic Arabidopsis. Our results revealed that AcMFT from a non-flowering plant could interact with FD to regulate the floral transition and that this function was reduced due to the weakened ability of AcMFT-FD to activate the downstream gene AP1.

  8. Eugenolol and glyceryl-isoeugenol suppress LPS-induced iNOS expression by down-regulating NF-kappaB AND AP-1 through inhibition of MAPKS and AKT/IkappaBalpha signaling pathways in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yeh, J L; Hsu, J H; Hong, Y S; Wu, J R; Liang, J C; Wu, B N; Chen, I J; Liou, S F

    2011-01-01

    Eugenol and isoeugenol, two components of clover oil, have been reported to possess several biomedical properties, such as anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant effects. This study aims to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of eugenol, isoeugenol and four of their derivatives on expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7), and to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. We found that two derivatives, eugenolol and glyceryl-isoeugenol, had potent inhibitory effects on LPS-induced upregulation of nitrite levels, iNOS protein and iNOS mRNA. In addition, they both suppressed the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) induced by LPS. Moreover, they both attenuated the DNA binding of NF-kB and AP-1, phosphorylation of inhibitory kB-alpha (IkB-alpha), and nuclear translocation of p65 protein induced by LPS. Finally, we demonstrated that glyceryl-isoeugenol suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK and p38 MAPK, whereas eugenolol suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Taken together, these results suggest that that eugenolol and glyceryl-isoeugenol suppress LPS-induced iNOS expression by down-regulating NF-kB and AP-1 through inhibition of MAPKs and Akt/IkB-alpha signaling pathways. Thus, this study implies that eugenolol and glyceryl-isoeugenol may provide therapeutic benefits for inflammatory diseases.

  9. The zta transactivator involved in induction of lytic cycle gene expression in Epstein-Barr virus-infected lymphocytes binds to both AP-1 and ZRE sites in target promoter and enhancer regions.

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, P M; Hardwick, J M; Sample, J; Hayward, G S; Hayward, S D

    1990-01-01

    The BZLF1 or zta immediate-early gene of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encodes a 33-kilodalton phosphorylated nuclear protein that is a specific transcriptional activator of the EBV lytic cycle when introduced into latently infected B lymphocytes. We have shown previously that the divergent EBV DSL target promoter contains two zta-response regions, one within the minimal promoter and the other in an upstream lymphocyte-dependent enhancer region. In this study, we used footprinting and gel mobility retardation assays to reveal that bacterially synthesized Zta fusion proteins bound directly to six TGTGCAA-like motifs within DSL. Four of the Zta-binding sites lay adjacent to cellular TATA and CAAT factor-binding sites within the minimal promoter, and two mapped within the enhancer region. Single-copy oligonucleotides containing these Zta-binding sites conferred Zta responsiveness to heterologous promoters. In addition, the Zta protein, which possesses a similar basic domain to the conserved DNA-binding region of the c-Fos, c-Jun, GCN4, and CREB protein family, proved to bind directly to the consensus AP-1 site in the collagenase 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate response element. Cotransfection with zta also trans activated a target reporter gene containing inserted wild-type 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate response element oligonucleotides. Cellular AP-1 binding activity proved to be low in latently EBV-infected Raji cells but was induced (together with the Zta protein) after activation of the lytic cycle with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. We conclude that EBV may have captured and modified a cellular gene encoding a c-jun-like DNA-binding protein during its evolutionary divergence from other herpesviruses and that this protein is used to specifically redirect transcriptional activity toward expression of EBV lytic-cycle genes in infected cells. Images PMID:2154599

  10. Chapter 8: Invasive fungal rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Praveen; Wise, Sarah K

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (IFRS) is a disease of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity that typically affects immunocompromised patients in the acute fulminant form. Early symptoms can often mimic rhinosinusitis, while late symptoms can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Swelling and mucosal thickening can quickly progress to pale or necrotic tissue in the nasal cavity and sinuses, and the disease can rapidly spread and invade the palate, orbit, cavernous sinus, cranial nerves, skull base, carotid artery, and brain. IFRS can be life threatening if left undiagnosed or untreated. While the acute fulminant form of IFRS is the most rapidly progressive and destructive, granulomatous and chronic forms also exist. Diagnosis of IFRS often mandates imaging studies in conjunction with clinical, endoscopic, and histopathological examination. Treatment of IFRS consists of reversing the underlying immunosuppression, antifungal therapy, and aggressive surgical debridement. With early diagnosis and treatment, IFRS can be treated and increase patient survival.

  11. Innate Defense against Fungal Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Rebecca A; Gaffen, Sarah L; Hise, Amy G; Brown, Gordon D

    2014-11-10

    Human fungal infections have been on the rise in recent years and proved increasingly difficult to treat as a result of the lack of diagnostics, effective antifungal therapies, and vaccines. Most pathogenic fungi do not cause disease unless there is a disturbance in immune homeostasis, which can be caused by modern medical interventions, disease-induced immunosuppression, and naturally occurring human mutations. The innate immune system is well equipped to recognize and destroy pathogenic fungi through specialized cells expressing a broad range of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). This review will outline the cells and PRRs required for effective antifungal immunity, with a special focus on the major antifungal cytokine IL-17 and recently characterized antifungal inflammasomes.

  12. Fungal genome sequencing: basic biology to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Krishna Kant

    2016-08-01

    The genome sequences provide a first glimpse into the genomic basis of the biological diversity of filamentous fungi and yeast. The genome sequence of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with a small genome size, unicellular growth, and rich history of genetic and molecular analyses was a milestone of early genomics in the 1990s. The subsequent completion of fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and genetic model, Neurospora crassa initiated a revolution in the genomics of the fungal kingdom. In due course of time, a substantial number of fungal genomes have been sequenced and publicly released, representing the widest sampling of genomes from any eukaryotic kingdom. An ambitious genome-sequencing program provides a wealth of data on metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into medical science, agriculture science, ecology, bioremediation, bioenergy, and the biotechnology industry. Fungal genomics have higher potential to positively affect human health, environmental health, and the planet's stored energy. With a significant increase in sequenced fungal genomes, the known diversity of genes encoding organic acids, antibiotics, enzymes, and their pathways has increased exponentially. Currently, over a hundred fungal genome sequences are publicly available; however, no inclusive review has been published. This review is an initiative to address the significance of the fungal genome-sequencing program and provides the road map for basic and applied research.

  13. Fungal symbionts alter plant drought response.

    PubMed

    Worchel, Elise R; Giauque, Hannah E; Kivlin, Stephanie N

    2013-04-01

    Grassland productivity is often primarily limited by water availability, and therefore, grasslands may be especially sensitive to climate change. Fungal symbionts can mediate plant drought response by enhancing drought tolerance and avoidance, but these effects have not been quantified across grass species. We performed a factorial meta-analysis of previously published studies to determine how arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and endophytic fungal symbionts affect growth of grasses under drought. We then examined how the effect of fungal symbionts on plant growth was influenced by biotic (plant photosynthetic pathway) and abiotic (level of drought) factors. We also measured the phylogenetic signal of fungal symbionts on grass growth under control and drought conditions. Under drought conditions, grasses colonized by AM fungi grew larger than those without mycorrhizal symbionts. The increased growth of grasses conferred from fungal symbionts was greatest at the lowest soil moisture levels. Furthermore, under both drought and control conditions, C3 grasses colonized by AM fungi grew larger than C3 grasses without symbionts, but the biomass of C4 grasses was not affected by AM fungi. Endophytes did not increase plant biomass overall under any treatment. However, there was a phylogenetically conserved increase in plant biomass in grasses colonized by endophytes. Grasses and their fungal symbionts seem to interact within a context-dependent symbiosis, varying with biotic and abiotic conditions. Because plant-fungal symbioses significantly alter plant drought response, including these responses could improve our ability to predict grassland functioning under global change.

  14. DAMP signaling in fungal infections and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Cristina; Carvalho, Agostinho; Esposito, Antonella; Bistoni, Francesco; Romani, Luigina

    2012-01-01

    Fungal infections and diseases predominantly affect patients with deregulated immunity. Compelling experimental and clinical evidence indicate that severe fungal diseases belong to the spectrum of fungus-related inflammatory diseases. Some degree of inflammation is required for protection during the transitional response occurring temporally between the rapid innate and slower adaptive response. However, progressive inflammation worsens disease and ultimately prevents pathogen eradication. The challenge now is to elucidate cellular and molecular pathways distinguishing protective vs. pathogenic inflammation to fungi. In addition to fungal ligands of pattern recognition receptors (pathogen-associated molecular patterns, PAMPs), several host-encoded proteins, the damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), are released during tissue injury and activate innate recognition receptors. DAMPs have been shown to regulate inflammation in fungal diseases. The DAMP/receptor for advanced glycation end-products axis integrated with the PAMP/Toll-like receptors axis in the generation of the inflammatory response in experimental and clinical fungal pneumonia. These emerging themes better accommodate fungal pathogenesis in the face of high-level inflammation seen in several clinical settings and point to DAMP targeting as a novel immunomodulatory strategy in fungal diseases. PMID:22973279

  15. Corneal fungal disease in small animals.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Stacy E

    2003-08-01

    Corneal fungal diseases, including fungal keratitis and stromal abscess, are uncommon in small animals. Ocular infection secondary to systemic mycosis is reported far more frequently. Suspicion of a fungal corneal ulcer should be raised based on a history of underlying trauma, especially with plant material, geographic location, chronic use of topical antibiotics or corticosteroids, or an extremely prolonged course of disease despite appropriate treatment. Clinical signs observed with fungal keratitis may include blepharospasm, epiphora, miosis, corneal opacity, and vascularization. Unfortunately, none of these signs is specific to fungal infection. If fungal keratitis is suspected or confirmed, then aggressive medical therapy should be instituted. Medications used include topical antifungals, parasympatholytics, anticollagenases, and antibacterials as well as systemic anti-inflammatory drugs. Because there are very few fungicidal medications, the course of medical treatment for fungal corneal disease requires a prolonged duration with frequent re-examination and assessment. Surgical treatment is sometimes required to save the eye and vision. Surgeries to be considered include debridement, conjunctival graft placement, and corneal transplantation. PMID:14604093

  16. Microbial Pathogens in the Fungal Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Heitman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The fungal kingdom is vast, spanning ~1.5 to as many as 5 million species diverse as unicellular yeasts, filamentous fungi, mushrooms, lichens, and both plant and animal pathogens. The fungi are closely aligned with animals in one of the six to eight supergroups of eukaryotes, the opisthokonts. The animal and fungal kingdoms last shared a common ancestor ~1 billion years ago, more recently than other groups of eukaryotes. As a consequence of their close evolutionary history and shared cellular machinery with metazoans, fungi are exceptional models for mammalian biology, but prove more difficult to treat in infected animals. The last common ancestor to the fungal/metazoan lineages is thought to have been unicellular, aquatic, and motile with a posterior flagellum, and certain extant species closely resemble this hypothesized ancestor. Species within the fungal kingdom were traditionally assigned to four phyla, including the basal fungi (Chytridiomycota, Zygomycota) and the more recently derived monophyletic lineage, the dikarya (Ascomycota, Basidiomycota). The fungal tree of life project has revealed that the basal lineages are polyphyletic, and thus there are as many as eight to ten fungal phyla. Fungi that infect vertebrates are found in all of the major lineages, and virulence arose multiple times independently. A sobering recent development involves the species Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis from the basal fungal phylum, the Chytridiomycota, which has emerged to cause global amphibian declines and extinctions. Genomics is revolutionizing our view of the fungal kingdom, and genome sequences for zygomycete pathogens (Rhizopus, Mucor), skin-associated fungi (dermatophytes, Malassezia), and the Candida pathogenic species clade promise to provide insights into the origins of virulence. Here we survey the diversity of fungal pathogens and illustrate key principles revealed by genomics involving sexual reproduction and sex determination, loss of conserved pathways in

  17. Allergic fungal otomastoiditis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiung-Ming; Chiang, Ching-Wen

    2013-04-01

    Allergic mucin is described as thick, peanut butter-like mucus impacted in the paranasal sinuses of patients with allergic fungal rhinosinusitis. The presence of allergic mucin in the middle ear has never been reported. We encountered a 65-year-old female with allergic mucin found impacted in her left middle ear and mastoid cavity during revised tympanoplasty surgery at our institute. Bilateral endoscopic sinus surgery performed 3 months later showed no evidence of fungal infection or allergic mucin in her paranasal sinuses. We report the case herein and propose the term allergic fungal otomastoiditis for this disease entity. PMID:22825725

  18. HPLC-MS/MS Analyses Show That the Near-Starchless aps1 and pgm Leaves Accumulate Wild Type Levels of ADPglucose: Further Evidence for the Occurrence of Important ADPglucose Biosynthetic Pathway(s) Alternative to the pPGI-pPGM-AGP Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Francisco José; Li, Jun; Almagro, Goizeder; Montero, Manuel; Pujol, Pablo; Galarza, Regina; Kaneko, Kentaro; Oikawa, Kazusato; Wada, Kaede; Mitsui, Toshiaki; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In leaves, it is widely assumed that starch is the end-product of a metabolic pathway exclusively taking place in the chloroplast that (a) involves plastidic phosphoglucomutase (pPGM), ADPglucose (ADPG) pyrophosphorylase (AGP) and starch synthase (SS), and (b) is linked to the Calvin-Benson cycle by means of the plastidic phosphoglucose isomerase (pPGI). This view also implies that AGP is the sole enzyme producing the starch precursor molecule, ADPG. However, mounting evidence has been compiled pointing to the occurrence of important sources, other than the pPGI-pPGM-AGP pathway, of ADPG. To further explore this possibility, in this work two independent laboratories have carried out HPLC-MS/MS analyses of ADPG content in leaves of the near-starchless pgm and aps1 mutants impaired in pPGM and AGP, respectively, and in leaves of double aps1/pgm mutants grown under two different culture conditions. We also measured the ADPG content in wild type (WT) and aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid two different ADPG cleaving enzymes, and in aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid GlgC, a bacterial AGP. Furthermore, we measured the ADPG content in ss3/ss4/aps1 mutants impaired in starch granule initiation and chloroplastic ADPG synthesis. We found that, irrespective of their starch contents, pgm and aps1 leaves, WT and aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid ADPG cleaving enzymes, and aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid GlgC accumulate WT ADPG content. In clear contrast, ss3/ss4/aps1 leaves accumulated ca. 300 fold-more ADPG than WT leaves. The overall data showed that, in Arabidopsis leaves, (a) there are important ADPG biosynthetic pathways, other than the pPGI-pPGM-AGP pathway, (b) pPGM and AGP are not major determinants of intracellular ADPG content, and (c) the contribution of the chloroplastic ADPG pool to the total ADPG pool is low. PMID:25133777

  19. Expanding Fungal Diets Through Synthetic Algal-Fungal Mutualism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Alaisha; Galazka, Jonathan (Editor)

    2015-01-01

    Fungi can synthesize numerous molecules with important properties, and could be valuable production platforms for space exploration and colonization. However, as heterotrophs, fungi require reduced carbon. This limits their efficiency in locations such as Mars, where reduced carbon is scarce. We propose a system to induce mutualistic symbiosis between the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the filamentous fungi Neurospora crassa. This arrangement would mimic natural algal-fungal relationships found in lichens, but have added advantages including increased growth rate and genetic tractability. N. crassa would metabolize citrate (C6H5O7 (sup -3)) and release carbon dioxide (CO2) that C. reinhardtii would assimilate into organic sugars during photosynthesis. C. reinhardtii would metabolize nitrate (NO3-) and release ammonia (NH3) as a nitrogen source for N. crassa. A N. crassa mutant incapable of reducing nitrate will be used to force this interaction. This system eliminates the need to directly supply its participants with carbon dioxide and ammonia. Furthermore, the release of oxygen by C. reinhardtii via photosynthesis would enable N. crassa to respire. We hope to eventually create a system closer to lichen, in which the algae transfers not only nitrogen but reduced carbon, as organic sugars, to the fungus for growth and production of valuable compounds.

  20. PNNL Fungal Biotechnology Core DOE-OBP Project

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Scott E.; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Butcher, Mark G.; Collett, James R.; Culley, David E.; Dai, Ziyu; Magnuson, Jon K.; Panisko, Ellen A.

    2009-11-30

    In 2009, we continued to address barriers to fungal fermentation in the primary areas of morphology control, genomics, proteomics, fungal hyperproductivity, biomass-to-products via fungal based consolidated bioprocesses, and filamentous fungal ethanol. “Alternative renewable fuels from fungi” was added as a new subtask. Plans were also made to launch a new advanced strain development subtask in FY2010.

  1. Air Contamination With Fungals In Museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarlat, Iuliana; Haiducu, Maria; Stepa, Raluca

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the studies was to determine the level and kind of fungal contamination of air in museum, deposits patrimony, restoration and conservation laboratories and their effects on health of workers. Microbiological air purity was measured with a SAS-100 Surface Air System impactor. The fungal contamination was observed in all 54 rooms where we made determinations. The highest levels of fungal were recorded at rooms with hygroscopic patrimony objects, eg carpets, chairs, upholstered chairs, books etc. The most species identified included under common allergens: Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Mucor. There fungal species belonging to the genus identified in this study, can trigger serious diseases museum workers, such as for example Aspergillus fumigatus, known allergies and toxic effects that may occur. In some places of the museum, occupational exposure limit values to fungi present in the air in the work environment, recommended by the specialized literature, have been overcome.

  2. Foreword: Special issue on fungal grapevine diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An impressively large proportion of fungicides applied in European, North American and Australian agriculture has been used to manage grapevine powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator), grapevine downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola), and botrytis bunch rot (Botrytis cinerea). These fungal and oomycetous plan...

  3. (Post-)genomics approaches in fungal research.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Pontes, María Victoria; de Vries, Ronald P; Zhou, Miaomiao

    2014-11-01

    To date, hundreds of fungal genomes have been sequenced and many more are in progress. This wealth of genomic information has provided new directions to study fungal biodiversity. However, to further dissect and understand the complicated biological mechanisms involved in fungal life styles, functional studies beyond genomes are required. Thanks to the developments of current -omics techniques, it is possible to produce large amounts of fungal functional data in a high-throughput fashion (e.g. transcriptome, proteome, etc.). The increasing ease of creating -omics data has also created a major challenge for downstream data handling and analysis. Numerous databases, tools and software have been created to meet this challenge. Facing such a richness of techniques and information, hereby we provide a brief roadmap on current wet-lab and bioinformatics approaches to study functional genomics in fungi. PMID:25037051

  4. Standard methods for fungal brood disease research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper we describe the disease symptoms and protocols commonly used in research of honey bee fungal diseases chalkbrood and stonebrood, caused by Ascosphaera apis and Aspergillus spp. respectively....

  5. Developing fungal pigments for "painting" vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sara C

    2012-02-01

    The use of fungal pigments as color additives to wood as a method to increase forest revenue is a relatively new, but quickly developing field. Sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is currently the primary utilized hardwood for spalting and appears to be the best suited North American hardwood for such purposes. The combination of Trametes versicolor and Bjerkandera adusta has been identified in several instances as a strong fungal pairing for zone line production; however, Xylaria polymorpha is capable of creating zone lines without the antagonism of a secondary fungus. Few fungal pigments have been developed for reliable use; Scytalidium cuboideum is capable of producing a penetrating pink/red stain, as well as a blue pigment after extended incubation, and Chlorociboria sp. produces a blue/green pigment if grown on aspen (Populus tremuloides). Several opportunities exist for stimulation of fungal pigments including the use of copper sulfate and changes in wood pH. PMID:22237673

  6. The structure and function of fungal cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The structure and function of fungal cell walls were studied with particular emphasis on dermatophytes. Extraction, isolation, analysis, and observation of the cell wall structure and function were performed. The structure is described microscopically and chemically.

  7. Scolecobasidium humicola, a fungal pathogen of fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, A.J.; Yasutake, W.T.

    1973-01-01

    Scolecobasidium humicola, a previously undescribed fungal pathogen of fish was isolated from coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). In natural infections the kidney was the organ most affected. The disease was difficult to transmit experimentally and appeared to be only weakly contagious.

  8. Allergen Immunotherapy in an HIV+ Patient with Allergic Fungal Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Myles, Ian A.; Gada, Satyen

    2015-01-01

    Patients with HIV/AIDS can present with multiple types of fungal rhinosinusitis, fungal balls, granulomatous invasive fungal rhinosinusitis, acute or chronic invasive fungal rhinosinusitis, or allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS). Given the variable spectrum of immune status and susceptibility to severe infection from opportunistic pathogens it is extremely important that clinicians distinguish aggressive fungal invasive fungal disease from the much milder forms such as AFRS. Here we describe a patient with HIV and AFRS to both remind providers of the importance of ruling out invasive fungal disease and outline the other unique features of fungal sinusitis treatment in the HIV-positive population. Additionally we discuss the evidence for and against use of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) for fungal disease in general, as well as the evidence for AIT in the HIV population. PMID:25954557

  9. Atopic cough and fungal allergy.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Haruhiko; Fujimura, Masaki; Ohkura, Noriyuki; Makimura, Koichi

    2014-10-01

    We have shown that some patients presenting with chronic bronchodilator-resistant non-productive cough have a global atopic tendency and cough hypersensitivity without nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness, abbreviated as atopic cough (AC). The cough can be treated successfully with histamine H1 antagonists and/or glucocorticoids. Eosinophilic tracheobronchitis and cough hypersensitivity are pathological and physiological characteristics of AC. Fungus-associated chronic cough (FACC) is defined as chronic cough associated with basidiomycetous (BM) fungi found in induced sputum, and recognition of FACC has provided the possibility of using antifungal drugs as new treatment strategies. Bjerkandera adusta is a wood decay BM fungus, which has attracted attention because of its potential role in enhancing the severity of cough symptoms in FACC patients by sensitization to this fungus. Before making a diagnosis of "idiopathic cough" in cases of chronic refractory cough, remaining intractable cough-related laryngeal sensations, such as "a sensation of mucus in the throat (SMIT)," which is correlated with fungal colonization, should be evaluated and treated appropriately in each patient. The new findings, i.e., the detection of environmental mushroom spores that should not be present in the human airways in addition to the good clinical response of patients to antifungal drugs, may lead to the development of novel strategies for treatment of chronic cough. PMID:25383202

  10. Atopic cough and fungal allergy

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Masaki; Ohkura, Noriyuki; Makimura, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that some patients presenting with chronic bronchodilator-resistant non-productive cough have a global atopic tendency and cough hypersensitivity without nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness, abbreviated as atopic cough (AC). The cough can be treated successfully with histamine H1 antagonists and/or glucocorticoids. Eosinophilic tracheobronchitis and cough hypersensitivity are pathological and physiological characteristics of AC. Fungus-associated chronic cough (FACC) is defined as chronic cough associated with basidiomycetous (BM) fungi found in induced sputum, and recognition of FACC has provided the possibility of using antifungal drugs as new treatment strategies. Bjerkandera adusta is a wood decay BM fungus, which has attracted attention because of its potential role in enhancing the severity of cough symptoms in FACC patients by sensitization to this fungus. Before making a diagnosis of “idiopathic cough” in cases of chronic refractory cough, remaining intractable cough-related laryngeal sensations, such as “a sensation of mucus in the throat (SMIT),” which is correlated with fungal colonization, should be evaluated and treated appropriately in each patient. The new findings, i.e., the detection of environmental mushroom spores that should not be present in the human airways in addition to the good clinical response of patients to antifungal drugs, may lead to the development of novel strategies for treatment of chronic cough. PMID:25383202

  11. Fungal peroxisomes as biosynthetic organelles.

    PubMed

    Stehlik, Thorsten; Sandrock, Björn; Ast, Julia; Freitag, Johannes

    2014-12-01

    Peroxisomes are nearly ubiquitous single-membrane organelles harboring multiple metabolic pathways beside their prominent role in the β-oxidation of fatty acids. Here we review the diverse metabolic functions of peroxisomes in fungi. A variety of fungal metabolites are at least partially synthesized inside peroxisomes. These include the essential co-factor biotin but also different types of secondary metabolites. Peroxisomal metabolites are often derived from acyl-CoA esters for example β-oxidation intermediates. In several ascomycetes a subtype of peroxisomes has been identified that is metabolically inactive but is required to plug the septal pores of wounded hyphae. Thus, peroxisomes are versatile organelles that can adapt their function to the life style of an organism. This remarkable variability suggests that the full extent of the biosynthetic capacity of peroxisomes is still elusive. Moreover, in fungi peroxisomes are non-essential under laboratory conditions making them attractive organelles for biotechnological approaches and the design of novel metabolic pathways in customized peroxisomes.

  12. Estimated burden of fungal infections in Germany.

    PubMed

    Ruhnke, Markus; Groll, Andreas H; Mayser, Peter; Ullmann, Andrew J; Mendling, Werner; Hof, Herbert; Denning, David W

    2015-10-01

    In the late 1980's, the incidence of invasive fungal diseases (IFDs) in Germany was estimated with 36.000 IFDs per year. The current number of fungal infections (FI) occurring each year in Germany is still not known. In the actual analysis, data on incidence of fungal infections in various patients groups at risk for FI were calculated and mostly estimated from various (mostly national) resources. According to the very heterogenous data resources robust data or statistics could not be obtained but preliminary estimations could be made and compared with data from other areas in the world using a deterministic model that has consistently been applied in many countries by the LIFE program ( www.LIFE-worldwide.org). In 2012, of the 80.52 million population (adults 64.47 million; 41.14 million female, 39.38 million male), 20% are children (0-14 years) and 16% of population are ≥65 years old. Using local data and literature estimates of the incidence or prevalence of fungal infections, about 9.6 million (12%) people in Germany suffer from a fungal infection each year. These figures are dominated (95%) by fungal skin disease and recurrent vulvo-vaginal candidosis. In general, considerable uncertainty surrounds the total numbers because IFDs do not belong to the list of reportable infectious diseases in Germany and most patients were not hospitalised because of the IFD but a distinct underlying disease.

  13. The population biology of fungal invasions.

    PubMed

    Gladieux, P; Feurtey, A; Hood, M E; Snirc, A; Clavel, J; Dutech, C; Roy, M; Giraud, T

    2015-05-01

    Fungal invasions are increasingly recognized as a significant component of global changes, threatening ecosystem health and damaging food production. Invasive fungi also provide excellent models to evaluate the generality of results based on other eukaryotes. We first consider here the reasons why fungal invasions have long been overlooked: they tend to be inconspicuous, and inappropriate methods have been used for species recognition. We then review the information available on the patterns and mechanisms of fungal invasions. We examine the biological features underlying invasion success of certain fungal species. We review population structure analyses, revealing native source populations and strengths of bottlenecks. We highlight the documented ecological and evolutionary changes in invaded regions, including adaptation to temperature, increased virulence, hybridization, shifts to clonality and association with novel hosts. We discuss how the huge census size of most fungi allows adaptation even in bottlenecked, clonal invaders. We also present new analyses of the invasion of the anther-smut pathogen on white campion in North America, as a case study illustrating how an accurate knowledge of species limits and phylogeography of fungal populations can be used to decipher the origin of invasions. This case study shows that successful invasions can occur even when life history traits are particularly unfavourable to long-distance dispersal and even with a strong bottleneck. We conclude that fungal invasions are valuable models to contribute to our view of biological invasions, in particular by providing insights into the traits as well as ecological and evolutionary processes allowing successful introductions.

  14. Burden of fungal infections in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Badiane, Aida S; Ndiaye, Daouda; Denning, David W

    2015-10-01

    Senegal has a high rate of tuberculosis and a low HIV seropositivity rate and aspergilloma, life-threatening fungal infections, dermatophytosis and mycetoma have been reported in this study. All published epidemiology papers reporting fungal infection rates from Senegal were identified. Where no data existed, we used specific populations at risk and fungal infection frequencies in each to estimate national incidence or prevalence. The results show that tinea capitis is common being found in 25% of children, ~1.5 million. About 191,000 Senegalese women get recurrent vaginal thrush, ≥4 times annually. We estimate 685 incident cases of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) following TB and prevalence of 2160 cases. Asthma prevalence in adults varies from 3.2% to 8.2% (mean 5%); 9976 adults have allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) and 13,168 have severe asthma with fungal sensitisation (SAFS). Of the 59,000 estimated HIV-positive patients, 366 develop cryptococcal meningitis; 1149 develop Pneumocystis pneumonia and 1946 develop oesophageal candidiasis, in which oral candidiasis (53%) and dermatophytosis (16%) are common. Since 2008-2010, 113 cases of mycetoma were diagnosed. In conclusion, we estimate that 1,743,507 (12.5%) people in Senegal suffer from a fungal infection, excluding oral candidiasis, fungal keratitis, invasive candidiasis or aspergillosis. Diagnostic and treatment deficiencies should be rectified to allow epidemiological studies. PMID:26449509

  15. Fungal allelochemicals in insect pest management.

    PubMed

    Holighaus, Gerrit; Rohlfs, Marko

    2016-07-01

    Interactions between insects and fungi are widespread, and important mediators of these interactions are fungal chemicals that can therefore be considered as allelochemicals. Numerous studies suggest that fungal chemicals can affect insects in many different ways. Here, we apply the terminology established by insect-plant ecologists for categorizing the effect of fungal allelochemicals on insects and for evaluating the application potential of these chemicals in insect pest management. Our literature survey shows that fungal volatile and non-volatile chemicals have an enormous potential to influence insect behavior and fitness. Many of them still remain to be discovered, but some recent examples of repellents and toxins could open up new ways for developing safe insect control strategies. However, we also identified shortcomings in our understanding of the chemical ecology of insect-fungus interactions and the way they have been investigated. In particular, the mode-of-action of fungal allelochemicals has often not been appropriately designated or examined, and the way in which induction by insects affects fungal chemical diversity is poorly understood. This review should raise awareness that in-depth ecological studies of insect-fungus interactions can reveal novel allelochemicals of particular benefit for the development of innovative insect pest management strategies. PMID:27147531

  16. Fungal allelochemicals in insect pest management.

    PubMed

    Holighaus, Gerrit; Rohlfs, Marko

    2016-07-01

    Interactions between insects and fungi are widespread, and important mediators of these interactions are fungal chemicals that can therefore be considered as allelochemicals. Numerous studies suggest that fungal chemicals can affect insects in many different ways. Here, we apply the terminology established by insect-plant ecologists for categorizing the effect of fungal allelochemicals on insects and for evaluating the application potential of these chemicals in insect pest management. Our literature survey shows that fungal volatile and non-volatile chemicals have an enormous potential to influence insect behavior and fitness. Many of them still remain to be discovered, but some recent examples of repellents and toxins could open up new ways for developing safe insect control strategies. However, we also identified shortcomings in our understanding of the chemical ecology of insect-fungus interactions and the way they have been investigated. In particular, the mode-of-action of fungal allelochemicals has often not been appropriately designated or examined, and the way in which induction by insects affects fungal chemical diversity is poorly understood. This review should raise awareness that in-depth ecological studies of insect-fungus interactions can reveal novel allelochemicals of particular benefit for the development of innovative insect pest management strategies.

  17. Prednisone inhibits the IL-1β-induced expression of COX-2 in HEI-OC1 murine auditory cells through the inhibition of ERK-1/2, JNK-1 and AP-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hua; Jang, Byeong-Churl

    2014-12-01

    Hearing loss can be induced by multiple causes, including cochlear inflammation. Prednisone (PDN) is a well-known steroid clinically used in the treatment of hearing loss. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects and the mechanisms of action of PDN on the expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, an inflammatory enzyme involved in the production of prostaglandins (PGs), in House Ear Institute-Organ of Corti 1 (HEI-OC1) cells (a murine auditory cell line) treated with the inflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-1β. The exposure of HEI-OC1 cells to IL-1β increased COX-2 protein and mRNA expression, COX-2 promoter-driven luciferase activity and COX-2 enzymatic activity [as indicated by the increased production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a major COX-2 metabolite]. However, PDN markedly inhibited the IL-1β-induced COX-2 protein and mRNA expression, COX-2 promoter activity and PGE2 production in the HEI-OC1 cells without affecting COX-2 protein and mRNA stability. PDN further inhibited the IL-1β-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-1, but had no effect on the cytokine-induced activation of p38 MAPK and proteolysis of IκB-α, a nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitory protein. PDN also partially suppressed the IL-1β‑induced activation of activator protein (AP)-1 (but not that of NF-κB) promoter-driven luciferase activity. Of note, the inhibitory effects of PDN on the IL-1β-induced expression of COX-2 and the activation of ERK-1/2 and JNK-1 in the HEI-OC1 cells were significantly diminished by RU486, a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist, suggesting that PDN exerts its inhibitory effects through GR. To the best of our knowledge, our study demonstrates for the first time that PDN inhibits the IL-1β-induced COX-2 expression and activity in HEI-OC1 cells by COX-2 transcriptional repression, which is partly associated with the inhibition of ERK-1/2, JNK-1 and AP-1 activation.

  18. AP1- and NF-kappaB-binding sites conserved among mammalian WNT10B orthologs elucidate the TNFalpha-WNT10B signaling loop implicated in carcinogenesis and adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masuko; Katoh, Masaru

    2007-04-01

    WNT signals are context-dependently transduced to canonical and non-canonical signaling cascades. We cloned and characterized wild-type human WNT10B, while another group cloned aberrant human WNT10B with Gly60Asp amino-acid substitution. Proto-oncogene WNT10B is expressed in gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, and cervical cancer. Because WNT10B blocks adipocyte differentiation, coding SNP of WNT10B gene is associated with familial obesity. In 2001, we reported WNT10B upregulation by TNFalpha. Here, comparative integromics analyses on WNT10B orthologs were performed to elucidate the transcriptional mechanism of WNT10B. Chimpanzee WNT10B and cow Wnt10b genes were identified within NW_001223159.1 and AC150975.2 genome sequences, respectively, by using bioinformatics (Techint) and human intelligence (Humint). Chimpanzee WNT10B and cow Wnt10b showed 98.7% and 95.1% total-amino-acid identity with human WNT10B, respectively. N-terminal signal peptide, 24 Cys residues, two Asn-linked glycosylation sites, and Gly60 of human WNT10B were conserved among mammalian WNT10B orthologs. Transcription start site of human WNT10B gene was 106-bp upstream of NM_003394.2 RefSeq 5'-end. Number of GC di-nucleotide repeats just down-stream of WNT10B transcription start site varied among primates and human population. Comparative genomics analyses revealed that double AP1-binding sites in the 5'-flanking promoter region and NF-kappaB-binding site in intron 3 were conserved among human, chimpanzee, cow, mouse, and rat WNT10B orthologs. Because TNFalpha signaling through TNFR1 and TRADD/RIP/TRAF2 complex activates JUN kinase (JNK) and IkappaB kinase (IKK) signaling cascades, conserved AP1- and NF-kappaB-binding sites explain the mechanism of TNFalpha-induced WNT10B upregulation. TNFalpha-WNT10B signaling loop is the negative feedback mechanism of adipogenesis to prevent obesity and metabolic syndrome. On the other hand, TNFalpha-WNT10B signaling loop is

  19. Pathogenic Roles for Fungal Melanins

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Eric S.

    2000-01-01

    Melanins represent virulence factors for several pathogenic fungi; the number of examples is growing. Thus, albino mutants of several genera (in one case, mutated precisely in the melanizing enzyme) exhibit decreased virulence in mice. We consider the phenomenon in relation to known chemical properties of melanin, beginning with biosynthesis from ortho-hydroquinone precursors which, when oxidized enzymatically to quinones, polymerize spontaneously to melanin. It follows that melanizing intermediates are cross-linking reagents; melanization stabilizes the external cell wall against hydrolysis and is thought to determine semipermeability in the osmotic ram (the appressorium) of certain plant pathogens. Polymeric melanins undergo reversible oxidation-reduction reactions between cell wall-penetrating quinone and hydroquinone oxidation states and thus represent polymeric redox buffers; using strong oxidants, it is possible to titrate the melanin on living cells and thereby demonstrate protection conferred by melanin in several species. The amount of buffering per cell approximately neutralizes the amount of oxidant generated by a single macrophage. Moreover, the intermediate oxidation state, the semiquinone, is a very stable free radical and is thought to trap unpaired electrons. We have suggested that the oxidation state of external melanin may be regulated by external Fe(II). An independent hypothesis holds that in Cryptococcus neoformans, an important function of the melanizing enzyme (apart from melanization) is the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III), thereby forestalling generation of the harmful hydroxyl radical from H2O2. Thus, problems in fungal pathogenesis have led to evolving hypotheses regarding melanin functioning. PMID:11023965

  20. Cationicity-enhanced analogues of the antimicrobial peptides, AcrAP1 and AcrAP2, from the venom of the scorpion, Androctonus crassicauda, display potent growth modulation effects on human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Du, Qiang; Hou, Xiaojuan; Ge, Lilin; Li, Renjie; Zhou, Mei; Wang, Hui; Wang, Lei; Wei, Minjie; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The non disulphide-bridged peptides (NDBPs) of scorpion venoms are attracting increased interest due to their structural heterogeneity and broad spectrum of biological activities. Here, two novel peptides, named AcrAP1 and AcrAP2, have been identified in the lyophilised venom of the Arabian scorpion, Androctonus crassicauda, through "shotgun" molecular cloning of their biosynthetic precursor-encoding cDNAs. The respective mature peptides, predicted from these cloned cDNAs, were subsequently isolated from the same venom sample using reverse phase HPLC and their identities were confirmed by use of mass spectrometric techniques. Both were found to belong to a family of highly-conserved scorpion venom antimicrobial peptides - a finding confirmed through the biological investigation of synthetic replicates. Analogues of both peptides designed for enhanced cationicity, displayed enhanced potency and spectra of antimicrobial activity but, unlike the native peptides, these also displayed potent growth modulation effects on a range of human cancer cell lines. Thus natural peptide templates from venom peptidomes can provide the basis for rational analogue design to improve both biological potency and spectrum of action. The diversity of such templates from such natural sources undoubtedly provides the pharmaceutical industry with unique lead compounds for drug discovery. PMID:25332684

  1. Inhibition of GSK3 differentially modulates NF-{kappa}B, CREB, AP-1 and {beta}-catenin signaling in hepatocytes, but fails to promote TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Goetschel, Frank; Kern, Claudia; Lang, Simona; Sparna, Titus; Markmann, Cordula; Schwager, Joseph; McNelly, Sabine; Weizsaecker, Fritz von; Laufer, Stefan; Hecht, Andreas Merfort, Irmgard

    2008-04-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is known to modulate cell survival and apoptosis through multiple intracellular signaling pathways. However, its hepatoprotective function and its role in activation of NF-{kappa}B and anti-apoptotic factors are poorly understood and remain controversial. Here we investigated whether inhibition of GSK-3 could induce apoptosis in the presence of TNF-{alpha} in primary mouse hepatocytes. We show that pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3 in primary mouse hepatocytes does not lead to TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis despite reduced NF-{kappa}B activity. Enhanced stability of I{kappa}B-{alpha} appears to be responsible for lower levels of nuclear NF-{kappa}B and hence reduced transactivation. Additionally, inhibition of GSK-3 was accompanied by marked upregulation of {beta}-catenin, AP-1, and CREB transcription factors. Stimulation of canonical Wnt signaling and CREB activity led to elevated levels of anti-apoptotic factors. Hence, survival of primary mouse hepatocytes may be caused by the activation and/or upregulation of other key regulators of liver homeostasis and regeneration. These signaling molecules may compensate for the compromised anti-apoptotic function of NF-{kappa}B and allow survival of hepatocytes in the presence of TNF-{alpha} and GSK-3 inhibition.

  2. The evolution of fungal metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Wisecaver, Jennifer H; Slot, Jason C; Rokas, Antonis

    2014-12-01

    Fungi contain a remarkable range of metabolic pathways, sometimes encoded by gene clusters, enabling them to digest most organic matter and synthesize an array of potent small molecules. Although metabolism is fundamental to the fungal lifestyle, we still know little about how major evolutionary processes, such as gene duplication (GD) and horizontal gene transfer (HGT), have interacted with clustered and non-clustered fungal metabolic pathways to give rise to this metabolic versatility. We examined the synteny and evolutionary history of 247,202 fungal genes encoding enzymes that catalyze 875 distinct metabolic reactions from 130 pathways in 208 diverse genomes. We found that gene clustering varied greatly with respect to metabolic category and lineage; for example, clustered genes in Saccharomycotina yeasts were overrepresented in nucleotide metabolism, whereas clustered genes in Pezizomycotina were more common in lipid and amino acid metabolism. The effects of both GD and HGT were more pronounced in clustered genes than in their non-clustered counterparts and were differentially distributed across fungal lineages; specifically, GD, which was an order of magnitude more abundant than HGT, was most frequently observed in Agaricomycetes, whereas HGT was much more prevalent in Pezizomycotina. The effect of HGT in some Pezizomycotina was particularly strong; for example, we identified 111 HGT events associated with the 15 Aspergillus genomes, which sharply contrasts with the 60 HGT events detected for the 48 genomes from the entire Saccharomycotina subphylum. Finally, the impact of GD within a metabolic category was typically consistent across all fungal lineages, whereas the impact of HGT was variable. These results indicate that GD is the dominant process underlying fungal metabolic diversity, whereas HGT is episodic and acts in a category- or lineage-specific manner. Both processes have a greater impact on clustered genes, suggesting that metabolic gene clusters

  3. Divergent and Convergent Evolution of Fungal Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yanfang; Xiao, Guohua; Zheng, Peng; Cen, Kai; Zhan, Shuai; Wang, Chengshu

    2016-01-01

    Fungal pathogens of plants and animals have multifarious effects; they cause devastating damages to agricultures, lead to life-threatening diseases in humans, or induce beneficial effects by reducing insect pest populations. Many virulence factors have been determined in different fungal pathogens; however, the molecular determinants contributing to fungal host selection and adaptation are largely unknown. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of seven ascomycete insect pathogens and performed the genome-wide analyses of 33 species of filamentous ascomycete pathogenic fungi that infect insects (12 species), plants (12), and humans (9). Our results revealed that the genomes of plant pathogens encode more proteins and protein families than the insect and human pathogens. Unexpectedly, more common orthologous protein groups are shared between the insect and plant pathogens than between the two animal group pathogens. We also found that the pathogenicity of host-adapted fungi evolved multiple times, and that both divergent and convergent evolutions occurred during pathogen–host cospeciation thus resulting in protein families with similar features in each fungal group. However, the role of phylogenetic relatedness on the evolution of protein families and therefore pathotype formation could not be ruled out due to the effect of common ancestry. The evolutionary correlation analyses led to the identification of different protein families that correlated with alternate pathotypes. Particularly, the effector-like proteins identified in plant and animal pathogens were strongly linked to fungal host adaptation, suggesting the existence of similar gene-for-gene relationships in fungus–animal interactions that has not been established before. These results well advance our understanding of the evolution of fungal pathogenicity and the factors that contribute to fungal pathotype formation. PMID:27071652

  4. Fungal endophytes: modifiers of plant disease.

    PubMed

    Busby, Posy E; Ridout, Mary; Newcombe, George

    2016-04-01

    Many recent studies have demonstrated that non-pathogenic fungi within plant microbiomes, i.e., endophytes ("endo" = within, "phyte" = plant), can significantly modify the expression of host plant disease. The rapid pace of advancement in endophyte ecology warrants a pause to synthesize our understanding of endophyte disease modification and to discuss future research directions. We reviewed recent literature on fungal endophyte disease modification, and here report on several emergent themes: (1) Fungal endophyte effects on plant disease span the full spectrum from pathogen antagonism to pathogen facilitation, with pathogen antagonism most commonly reported. (2) Agricultural plant pathosystems are the focus of research on endophyte disease modification. (3) A taxonomically diverse group of fungal endophytes can influence plant disease severity. And (4) Fungal endophyte effects on plant disease severity are context-dependent. Our review highlights the importance of fungal endophytes for plant disease across a broad range of plant pathosystems, yet simultaneously reveals that complexity within plant microbiomes presents a significant challenge to disentangling the biotic environmental factors affecting plant disease severity. Manipulative studies integrating eco-evolutionary approaches with emerging molecular tools will be poised to elucidate the functional importance of endophytes in natural plant pathosystems that are fundamental to biodiversity and conservation.

  5. Fueling the Future with Fungal Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2014-10-27

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the JGI Fungal Genomic Program. One of its projects, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts and pathogens) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation and sugar fermentation) by means of genome sequencing and analysis. New chapters of the Encyclopedia can be opened with user proposals to the JGI Community Science Program (CSP). Another JGI project, the 1000 fungal genomes, explores fungal diversity on genome level at scale and is open for users to nominate new species for sequencing. Over 400 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics will lead to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such ‘parts’ suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  6. Fungal Genomics for Energy and Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2013-03-11

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). One of its projects, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts) by means of genome sequencing and analysis. New chapters of the Encyclopedia can be opened with user proposals to the JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP). Another JGI project, the 1000 fungal genomes, explores fungal diversity on genome level at scale and is open for users to nominate new species for sequencing. Over 200 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  7. Towards a Cancer Drug of Fungal Origin

    PubMed Central

    Kornienko, Alexander; Evidente, Antonio; Vurro, Maurizio; Mathieu, Véronique; Cimmino, Alessio; Evidente, Marco; van Otterlo, Willem A. L.; Dasari, Ramesh; Lefranc, Florence; Kiss, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Although fungi produce highly structurally diverse metabolites, many of which have served as excellent sources of pharmaceuticals, no fungi-derived agent has been approved as a cancer drug so far. This is despite a tremendous amount of research being aimed at the identification of fungal metabolites with promising anticancer activities. This review discusses the results of clinical testing of fungal metabolites and their synthetic derivatives, with the goal to evaluate how far we are from an approved cancer drug of fungal origin. Also, because in vivo studies in animal models are predictive of the efficacy and toxicity of a given compound in a clinical situation, literature describing animal cancer testing of compounds of fungal origin is reviewed as well. Agents showing the potential to advance to clinical trials are also identified. Finally, the technological challenges involved in the exploitation of fungal biodiversity and procurement of sufficient quantities of clinical candidates are discussed and potential solutions that could be pursued by researchers are highlighted. PMID:25850821

  8. Fungal endophytes: modifiers of plant disease.

    PubMed

    Busby, Posy E; Ridout, Mary; Newcombe, George

    2016-04-01

    Many recent studies have demonstrated that non-pathogenic fungi within plant microbiomes, i.e., endophytes ("endo" = within, "phyte" = plant), can significantly modify the expression of host plant disease. The rapid pace of advancement in endophyte ecology warrants a pause to synthesize our understanding of endophyte disease modification and to discuss future research directions. We reviewed recent literature on fungal endophyte disease modification, and here report on several emergent themes: (1) Fungal endophyte effects on plant disease span the full spectrum from pathogen antagonism to pathogen facilitation, with pathogen antagonism most commonly reported. (2) Agricultural plant pathosystems are the focus of research on endophyte disease modification. (3) A taxonomically diverse group of fungal endophytes can influence plant disease severity. And (4) Fungal endophyte effects on plant disease severity are context-dependent. Our review highlights the importance of fungal endophytes for plant disease across a broad range of plant pathosystems, yet simultaneously reveals that complexity within plant microbiomes presents a significant challenge to disentangling the biotic environmental factors affecting plant disease severity. Manipulative studies integrating eco-evolutionary approaches with emerging molecular tools will be poised to elucidate the functional importance of endophytes in natural plant pathosystems that are fundamental to biodiversity and conservation. PMID:26646287

  9. Potential Roles of Fungal Extracellular Vesicles during Infection.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Luna S; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are produced by virtually all cell types. Within the past few years, work in this field has revealed more information about fungal EVs. Fungal EVs have been shown to carry proteins, lipids, pigments, polysaccharides, and RNA; these components are known virulence factors, a fact which supports the hypothesis that fungal EVs concentrate pathogenic determinants. Additionally, recent studies have demonstrated that fungal EVs stimulate the host immune system. In this review, putative roles of fungal EVs are discussed, including their potential as vaccination tools and their possible contribution to pathogenesis in invasive fungal diseases. PMID:27390779

  10. Potential Roles of Fungal Extracellular Vesicles during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Luna S.; Nimrichter, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are produced by virtually all cell types. Within the past few years, work in this field has revealed more information about fungal EVs. Fungal EVs have been shown to carry proteins, lipids, pigments, polysaccharides, and RNA; these components are known virulence factors, a fact which supports the hypothesis that fungal EVs concentrate pathogenic determinants. Additionally, recent studies have demonstrated that fungal EVs stimulate the host immune system. In this review, putative roles of fungal EVs are discussed, including their potential as vaccination tools and their possible contribution to pathogenesis in invasive fungal diseases. PMID:27390779

  11. Type 2-depleted fungal laccase.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, P M; McMillin, D R; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, M; Antholine, W E; Reinhammar, B

    1988-01-01

    Although copper is quantitatively removed from fungal laccase (Polyporus versicolor) by extended dialysis against high concentrations of cyanide, we have been unable to reconstitute the protein by addition of Cu(I) ions. However, two new methods for reversibly removing the type 2 Cu centre have been developed. The visible absorption at 610 nm, which is attributable to type 1 Cu, is unaffected by the procedure, but the absorbance of the type 3 Cu at 330 nm is decreased by 60 +/- 10%. The decrease is due, at least in part, to partial reduction of the binuclear type 3 centre, although there may be some change in the molar absorptivity of the oxidized chromophore as well. The change in the c.d. spectrum that occurs at approx. 350 nm may be explained in the same way, but it may also reflect the loss of a signal due to the type 2 Cu. Upon removal of the type 2 Cu an absorbance increase appears at approx. 435 nm, and it is assigned to the semi-reduced form of the type 3 pair. In the e.p.r. spectrum of the type 2-depleted enzyme the type 1 Cu signal exhibits well-resolved ligand hyperfine splitting, which can be simulated on the basis of contributions from two N and two H nuclei (AH congruent to AN congruent to 25 MHz). The H atoms are assumed to be attached to the beta-carbon of the covalently bonded cysteine ligand. A signal from a semi-reduced form(s) of the type 3 site can also be resolved in the spectrum of the type 2-depleted enzyme, and on the basis of the second integral of the e.p.r. spectrum 40% of the type 3 pairs are believed to be in a partially reduced state. The semi-reduced type 3 site is remarkably stable and is not readily oxidized by H2O2 or IrCl6(2-) or reduced by Fe(CN)6(4-). Intramolecular electron transfer is apparently quite slow in at least some forms of the type 2-depleted enzyme, and this may explain why the activity is at best 5% of that of the native enzyme. Full activity returns when type 2 copper is restored. PMID:2845923

  12. Prospects for the development of fungal vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Deepe, G S

    1997-01-01

    In an era that emphasizes the term "cost-effective," vaccines are the ideal solution to preventing disease at a relatively low cost to society. Much of the previous emphasis has been on childhood scourges such as measles, mumps, rubella, poliomyelitis, and Haemophilus influenzae type b. The concept of vaccines for fungal diseases has had less impact because of the perceived limited problem. However, fungal diseases have become increasingly appreciated as serious medical problems that require recognition and aggressive management. The escalation in the incidence and prevalence of infection has prompted a renewed interest in vaccine development. Herein, I discuss the most recent developments in the search for vaccines to combat fungal infections. Investigators have discovered several inert substances from various fungi that can mediate protection in animal models. The next challenge will be to find the suitable mode of delivery for these immunogens. PMID:9336663

  13. Plant hormones: a fungal point of view.

    PubMed

    Chanclud, Emilie; Morel, Jean-Benoit

    2016-10-01

    Most classical plant hormones are also produced by pathogenic and symbiotic fungi. The way in which these molecules favour the invasion of plant tissues and the development of fungi inside plant tissues is still largely unknown. In this review, we examine the different roles of such hormone production by pathogenic fungi. Converging evidence suggests that these fungal-derived molecules have potentially two modes of action: (i) they may perturb plant processes, either positively or negatively, to favour invasion and nutrient uptake; and (ii) they may also act as signals for the fungi themselves to engage appropriate developmental and physiological processes adapted to their environment. Indirect evidence suggests that abscisic acid, gibberellic acid and ethylene produced by fungi participate in pathogenicity. There is now evidence that auxin and cytokinins could be positive regulators required for virulence. Further research should establish whether or not fungal-derived hormones act like other fungal effectors.

  14. Fungal infections in burns: Diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Capoor, Malini R.; Sarabahi, Sujata; Tiwari, Vinay Kumar; Narayanan, Ravi Prakash

    2010-01-01

    Burn wound infection (BWI) is a major public health problem and the most devastating form of trauma worldwide. Fungi cause BWI as part of monomicrobial or polymicrobial infection, fungaemia, rare aggressive soft tissue infection and as opportunistic infections. The risk factors for acquiring fungal infection in burns include age of burns, total burn size, body surface area (BSA) (30–60%), full thickness burns, inhalational injury, prolonged hospital stay, late surgical excision, open dressing, artificial dermis, central venous catheters, antibiotics, steroid treatment, long-term artificial ventilation, fungal wound colonisation (FWC), hyperglycaemic episodes and other immunosuppressive disorders. Most of the fungal infections are missed owing to lack of clinical awareness and similar presentation as bacterial infection coupled with paucity of mycology laboratories. Expedient diagnosis and treatment of these mycoses can be life-saving as the mortality is otherwise very high. Emergence of resistance in non-albicans Candida spp., unusual yeasts and moulds in fungal BWI, leaves very few fungi susceptible to antifungal drugs, leaving many patients susceptible. There is a need to speciate fungi as far as the topical and systemic antifungal is concerned. Deep tissue biopsy and other relevant samples are processed by standard mycological procedures using direct microscopy, culture and histopathological examination. Patients with FWC should be treated by aggressive surgical debridement and, in the case of fungal wound infection (FWI), in addition to surgical debridement, an intravenous antifungal drug, most commonly amphotericin B or caspofungin, is prescribed followed by de-escalating with voriconazole or itraconazole, or fluconazole depending upon the species or antifungal susceptibility, if available. The propensity for fungal infection increases, the longer the wound is present. Therefore, the development of products to close the wound more rapidly, improvement in

  15. Identification & Characterization of Fungal Ice Nucleation Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, Jan Frederik; Kunert, Anna Theresa; Kampf, Christopher Johannes; Mauri, Sergio; Weidner, Tobias; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2016-04-01

    Freezing of water at relatively warm subfreezing temperatures is dependent on ice nucleation catalysis facilitated by ice nuclei (IN). These IN can be of various origins and although extensive research was done and progress was achieved, the nature and mechanisms leading to an effective IN are to date still poorly understood. Some of the most important processes of our geosphere like the water cycle are highly dependent on effective ice nucleation at temperatures between -2°C - -8°C, a temperature range which is almost exclusively covered by biological IN (BioIN). BioIN are usually macromolecular structures of biological polymers. Sugars as well as proteins have been reported to serve as IN and the best characterized BioIN are ice nucleation proteins (IN-P) from gram negative bacteria. Fungal strains from Fusarium spp. were described to be effective IN at subfreezing temperatures up to -2°C already 25 years ago and more and more fungal species are described to serve as efficient IN. Fungal IN are also thought to be proteins or at least contain a proteinaceous compound, but to date the fungal IN-P primary structure as well as their coding genetic elements of all IN active fungi are unknown. The aim of this study is a.) to identify the proteins and their coding genetic elements from IN active fungi (F. acuminatum, F. avenaceum, M. alpina) and b.) to characterize the mechanisms by which fungal IN serve as effective IN. We designed an interdisciplinary approach using biological, analytical and physical methods to identify fungal IN-P and describe their biological, chemical, and physical properties.

  16. Fractal dimension based corneal fungal infection diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Madhusudhanan; Perkins, A. Louise; Beuerman, Roger W.; Iyengar, S. Sitharama

    2006-08-01

    We present a fractal measure based pattern classification algorithm for automatic feature extraction and identification of fungus associated with an infection of the cornea of the eye. A white-light confocal microscope image of suspected fungus exhibited locally linear and branching structures. The pixel intensity variation across the width of a fungal element was gaussian. Linear features were extracted using a set of 2D directional matched gaussian-filters. Portions of fungus profiles that were not in the same focal plane appeared relatively blurred. We use gaussian filters of standard deviation slightly larger than the width of a fungus to reduce discontinuities. Cell nuclei of cornea and nerves also exhibited locally linear structure. Cell nuclei were excluded by their relatively shorter lengths. Nerves in the cornea exhibited less branching compared with the fungus. Fractal dimensions of the locally linear features were computed using a box-counting method. A set of corneal images with fungal infection was used to generate class-conditional fractal measure distributions of fungus and nerves. The a priori class-conditional densities were built using an adaptive-mixtures method to reflect the true nature of the feature distributions and improve the classification accuracy. A maximum-likelihood classifier was used to classify the linear features extracted from test corneal images as 'normal' or 'with fungal infiltrates', using the a priori fractal measure distributions. We demonstrate the algorithm on the corneal images with culture-positive fungal infiltrates. The algorithm is fully automatic and will help diagnose fungal keratitis by generating a diagnostic mask of locations of the fungal infiltrates.

  17. Fungal proteinaceous compounds with multiple biological activities.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Chan, Yau Sang; Dan, Xiuli; Pan, Wenliang; Wang, Hexiang; Guan, Suzhen; Chan, Ki; Ye, Xiuyun; Liu, Fang; Xia, Lixin; Chan, Wai Yee

    2016-08-01

    Fungi comprise organisms like molds, yeasts and mushrooms. They have been used as food or medicine for a long time. A large number of fungal proteins or peptides with diverse biological activities are considered as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and anticancer agents. They encompass proteases, ribosome inactivating proteins, defensins, hemolysins, lectins, laccases, ribonucleases, immunomodulatory proteins, and polysaccharopeptides. The target of the present review is to update the status of the various bioactivities of these fungal proteins and peptides and discuss their therapeutic potential. PMID:27338574

  18. Serpentine soils promote ectomycorrhizal fungal diversity.

    PubMed

    Branco, Sara

    2010-12-01

    Serpentine soils impose physiological stresses that limit plant establishment and diversity. The degree to which serpentine soils entail constraints on other organisms is, however, poorly understood. Here, I investigate the effect of serpentine soils on ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi by conducting a reciprocal transplant experiment, where serpentine and nonserpentine ECM fungal communities were cultured in both their native and non-native soils. Contrary to expectation, serpentine soils hosted higher fungal richness compared to nonserpentine, and most species were recovered from serpentine soil, suggesting ECM fungi are not overall specialized or strongly affected by serpentine edaphic constraints.

  19. Fungal outbreak in a show cave.

    PubMed

    Jurado, V; Porca, E; Cuezva, S; Fernandez-Cortes, A; Sanchez-Moral, S; Saiz-Jimenez, C

    2010-08-01

    Castañar de Ibor Cave (Spain) was discovered in 1967 and declared a Natural Monument in 1997. In 2003 the cave was opened to public visits. Despite of extensive control, on 26 August 2008 the cave walls and sediments appeared colonized by long, white fungal mycelia. This event was the result of an accidental input of detritus on the afternoon of 24 August 2008. We report here a fungal outbreak initiated by Mucor circinelloides and Fusarium solani and the methods used to control it.

  20. UVB exposure enhanced benzanthrone-induced inflammatory responses in SKH-1 mouse skin by activating the expression of COX-2 and iNOS through MAP kinases/NF-κB/AP-1 signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Sabiya; Alam, Shamshad; Pal, Anu; Kumar, Mahadeo; Singh, Dhirendra; Ansari, Kausar Mahmood

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to explore the role of UVB on benzanthrone (BA)-induced skin inflammation and its mechanism/s. SKH-1 hairless mice were topically exposed with BA (25 and 50 mg/kg b.wt) either alone or along with UVB (50 mJ/cm(2)) for 24 h and estimation of ROS, histopathological analysis, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, mast cell staining, immunohistochemistry for COX-2 and iNOS as well as western blotting for MAPKs, p-NF-κB, c-jun, c-fos COX-2 and iNOS were carried out. Enhanced ROS generation, increased epidermal thickness, mast cell number, MPO activity, enhanced expression of COX-2 and iNOS, MAPKs, c-jun, c-fos, NF-κB were found in BA either alone or when followed by UVB treatment, compared to the control groups. Expression of COX-2, iNOS and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 were found to be more enhanced in BA and UVB- exposed group compared to BA and UVB only group, while phosphorylation of JNK1/2, p38, NF-κB and expression of c-jun and c-fos were comparable with BA and UVB only groups. In summary, we suggest that UVB exposure enhanced BA-induced SKH-1 skin inflammation possibly via oxidative stress-mediated activation of MAPKs-NF-κB/AP-1 signalling, which subsequently increased the expression of COX-2 and iNOS and led to inflammation in SKH-1 mouse skin.

  1. The mucin MUC4 is a transcriptional and post-transcriptional target of K-ras oncogene in pancreatic cancer. Implication of MAPK/AP-1, NF-κB and RalB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Romain; Skrypek, Nicolas; Duchêne, Belinda; Renaud, Florence; Martínez-Maqueda, Daniel; Vincent, Audrey; Porchet, Nicole; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Jonckheere, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    The membrane-bound mucinMUC4 is a high molecularweight glycoprotein frequently deregulated in cancer. In pancreatic cancer, one of the most deadly cancers in occidental countries, MUC4 is neo-expressed in the preneoplastic stages and thereafter is involved in cancer cell properties leading to cancer progression and chemoresistance. K-ras oncogene is a small GTPase of the RAS superfamily, highly implicated in cancer. K-ras mutations are considered as an initiating event of pancreatic carcinogenesis and K-ras oncogenic activities are necessary components of cancer progression. However, K-ras remains clinically undruggable. Targeting early downstream K-ras signaling in cancer may thus appear as an interesting strategy and MUC4 regulation by K-ras in pancreatic carcinogenesis remains unknown. Using the Pdx1-Cre; LStopL-K-rasG12D mouse model of pancreatic carcinogenesis, we show that the in vivo early neo-expression of the mucin Muc4 in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplastic lesions (PanINs) induced by mutated K-ras is correlated with the activation of ERK, JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways. In vitro, transfection of constitutively activated K-rasG12V in pancreatic cancer cells led to the transcriptional upregulation of MUC4. This activation was found to be mediated at the transcriptional level by AP-1 and NF-κB transcription factors via MAPK, JNK and NF-κB pathways and at the posttranscriptional level by a mechanism involving the RalB GTPase. Altogether, these results identify MUC4 as a transcriptional and post-transcriptional target of K-ras in pancreatic cancer. This opens avenues in developing new approaches to target the early steps of this deadly cancer.

  2. Design, synthesis and evaluation of novel 2-thiophen-5-yl-3H-quinazolin-4-one analogues as inhibitors of transcription factors NF-kappaB and AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation: Their possible utilization as anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Giri, Rajan S; Thaker, Hardik M; Giordano, Tony; Williams, Jill; Rogers, Donna; Vasu, Kamala K; Sudarsanam, Vasudevan

    2010-04-01

    In an attempt to discover novel inhibitors of NF-kappaB and AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation utilizing the concept of chemical lead based medicinal chemistry and bioisosterism a series of 2-(2,3-disubstituted-thiophen-5-yl)-3H-quinazolin-4-one analogs was designed. A facile and simple route for the synthesis of the designed molecules was developed. Synthesized molecules were evaluated for their activity as inhibitors towards NF-kappaB and AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation in a cell line report-based assay. This series provides us with a substantial number of compounds inhibiting the activity of NF-kappaB and/or AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation. These compounds also exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity in in vivo models of inflammation and cancer. The 4-pyridyl group is found to be the most important pharmacophore on the third position of thiophene ring for inhibiting NF-kappaB and AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation. The relationships between the activities shown by these compounds in the in vivo and in vitro models have been established by using FVB transgenic mice model. These results suggest the suitability of the designed molecular framework as a potential scaffold for the design of molecules with inhibitory activity towards NF-kappaB and AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation, which may also exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. This series of molecules warrants further study to explore their potential as therapies for use in chronic inflammatory conditions and cancer. Development of the synthetic protocol for the synthesis of this series of molecules, biological activities and a structure-activity relationship (SAR) have been discussed herein.

  3. MycoCosm, an Integrated Fungal Genomics Resource

    SciTech Connect

    Shabalov, Igor; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-16

    MycoCosm is a web-based interactive fungal genomics resource, which was first released in March 2010, in response to an urgent call from the fungal community for integration of all fungal genomes and analytical tools in one place (Pan-fungal data resources meeting, Feb 21-22, 2010, Alexandria, VA). MycoCosm integrates genomics data and analysis tools to navigate through over 100 fungal genomes sequenced at JGI and elsewhere. This resource allows users to explore fungal genomes in the context of both genome-centric analysis and comparative genomics, and promotes user community participation in data submission, annotation and analysis. MycoCosm has over 4500 unique visitors/month or 35000+ visitors/year as well as hundreds of registered users contributing their data and expertise to this resource. Its scalable architecture allows significant expansion of the data expected from JGI Fungal Genomics Program, its users, and integration with external resources used by fungal community.

  4. Fungal bioconversion of lignocellulosic residues; opportunities & perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dashtban, Mehdi; Schraft, Heidi; Qin, Wensheng

    2009-01-01

    The development of alternative energy technology is critically important because of the rising prices of crude oil, security issues regarding the oil supply, and environmental issues such as global warming and air pollution. Bioconversion of biomass has significant advantages over other alternative energy strategies because biomass is the most abundant and also the most renewable biomaterial on our planet. Bioconversion of lignocellulosic residues is initiated primarily by microorganisms such as fungi and bacteria which are capable of degrading lignocellulolytic materials. Fungi such as Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger produce large amounts of extracellular cellulolytic enzymes, whereas bacterial and a few anaerobic fungal strains mostly produce cellulolytic enzymes in a complex called cellulosome, which is associated with the cell wall. In filamentous fungi, cellulolytic enzymes including endoglucanases, cellobiohydrolases (exoglucanases) and beta-glucosidases work efficiently on cellulolytic residues in a synergistic manner. In addition to cellulolytic/hemicellulolytic activities, higher fungi such as basidiomycetes (e.g. Phanerochaete chrysosporium) have unique oxidative systems which together with ligninolytic enzymes are responsible for lignocellulose degradation. This review gives an overview of different fungal lignocellulolytic enzymatic systems including extracellular and cellulosome-associated in aerobic and anaerobic fungi, respectively. In addition, oxidative lignocellulose-degradation mechanisms of higher fungi are discussed. Moreover, this paper reviews the current status of the technology for bioconversion of biomass by fungi, with focus on mutagenesis, co-culturing and heterologous gene expression attempts to improve fungal lignocellulolytic activities to create robust fungal strains.

  5. Fungal association with sessile marine invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Yarden, Oded

    2014-01-01

    The presence and association of fungi with sessile marine animals such as coral and sponges has been well established, yet information on the extent of diversity of the associated fungi is still in its infancy. Culture – as well as metagenomic – and transcriptomic-based analyses have shown that fungal presence in association with these animals can be dynamic and can include “core” residents as well as shifts in fungal communities. Evidence for detrimental and beneficial interactions between fungi and their marine hosts is accumulating and current challenges include the elucidation of the chemical and cellular crosstalk between fungi and their associates within the holobionts. The ecological function of fungi in association with sessile marine animals is complex and is founded on a combination of factors such as fungal origin, host health, environmental conditions and the presence of other resident or invasive microorganisms in the host. Based on evidence from the much more studied terrestrial systems, the evaluation of marine animal–fungal symbioses under varying environmental conditions may well prove to be critical in predicting ecosystem response to global change, including effects on the health of sessile marine animals. PMID:24860565

  6. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications. PMID:26273247

  7. Fungal biology and agriculture: revisiting the field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yarden, O.; Ebbole, D.J.; Freeman, S.; Rodriguez, R.J.; Dickman, M. B.

    2003-01-01

    Plant pathology has made significant progress over the years, a process that involved overcoming a variety of conceptual and technological hurdles. Descriptive mycology and the advent of chemical plant-disease management have been followed by biochemical and physiological studies of fungi and their hosts. The later establishment of biochemical genetics along with the introduction of DNA-mediated transformation have set the stage for dissection of gene function and advances in our understanding of fungal cell biology and plant-fungus interactions. Currently, with the advent of high-throughput technologies, we have the capacity to acquire vast data sets that have direct relevance to the numerous subdisciplines within fungal biology and pathology. These data provide unique opportunities for basic research and for engineering solutions to important agricultural problems. However, we also are faced with the challenge of data organization and mining to analyze the relationships between fungal and plant genomes and to elucidate the physiological function of pertinent DNA sequences. We present our perspective of fungal biology and agriculture, including administrative and political challenges to plant protection research.

  8. Simple quantification of in planta fungal biomass.

    PubMed

    Ayliffe, Michael; Periyannan, Sambasivam K; Feechan, Angela; Dry, Ian; Schumann, Ulrike; Lagudah, Evans; Pryor, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    An accurate assessment of the disease resistance status of plants to fungal pathogens is an essential requirement for the development of resistant crop plants. Many disease resistance phenotypes are partial rather than obvious immunity and are frequently scored using subjective qualitative estimates of pathogen development or plant disease symptoms. Here we report a method for the accurate comparison of total fungal biomass in plant tissues. This method, called the WAC assay, is based upon the specific binding of the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin to fungal chitin. The assay is simple, high-throughput, and sensitive enough to discriminate between single Puccinia graminis f.sp tritici infection sites on a wheat leaf segment. It greatly lends itself to replication as large volumes of tissue can be pooled from independent experiments and assayed to provide truly representative quantification, or, alternatively, fungal growth on a single, small leaf segment can be quantified. In addition, as the assay is based upon a microscopic technique, pathogen infection sites can also be examined at high magnification prior to quantification if desired and average infection site areas are determined. Previously, we have demonstrated the application of the WAC assay for quantifying the growth of several different pathogen species in both glasshouse grown material and large-scale field plots. Details of this method are provided within.

  9. Fungal bioconversion of lignocellulosic residues; opportunities & perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dashtban, Mehdi; Schraft, Heidi; Qin, Wensheng

    2009-01-01

    The development of alternative energy technology is critically important because of the rising prices of crude oil, security issues regarding the oil supply, and environmental issues such as global warming and air pollution. Bioconversion of biomass has significant advantages over other alternative energy strategies because biomass is the most abundant and also the most renewable biomaterial on our planet. Bioconversion of lignocellulosic residues is initiated primarily by microorganisms such as fungi and bacteria which are capable of degrading lignocellulolytic materials. Fungi such as Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger produce large amounts of extracellular cellulolytic enzymes, whereas bacterial and a few anaerobic fungal strains mostly produce cellulolytic enzymes in a complex called cellulosome, which is associated with the cell wall. In filamentous fungi, cellulolytic enzymes including endoglucanases, cellobiohydrolases (exoglucanases) and beta-glucosidases work efficiently on cellulolytic residues in a synergistic manner. In addition to cellulolytic/hemicellulolytic activities, higher fungi such as basidiomycetes (e.g. Phanerochaete chrysosporium) have unique oxidative systems which together with ligninolytic enzymes are responsible for lignocellulose degradation. This review gives an overview of different fungal lignocellulolytic enzymatic systems including extracellular and cellulosome-associated in aerobic and anaerobic fungi, respectively. In addition, oxidative lignocellulose-degradation mechanisms of higher fungi are discussed. Moreover, this paper reviews the current status of the technology for bioconversion of biomass by fungi, with focus on mutagenesis, co-culturing and heterologous gene expression attempts to improve fungal lignocellulolytic activities to create robust fungal strains. PMID:19774110

  10. Habitat filters in fungal endophyte community assembly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal endophytes can influence host health, and more broadly, can instigate trophic cascades with effects scaling to the ecosystem level. Despite this, biotic mechanisms of endophyte community assembly are largely unknown. We used maize to investigate three potential habitat filters in endophyte co...

  11. 50-plus years of fungal viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Ghabrial, Said A.; Castón, José R.; Nibert, Max L.; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-05-15

    Mycoviruses are widespread in all major taxa of fungi. They are transmitted intracellularly during cell division, sporogenesis, and/or cell-to-cell fusion (hyphal anastomosis), and thus their life cycles generally lack an extracellular phase. Their natural host ranges are limited to individuals within the same or closely related vegetative compatibility groups, although recent advances have established expanded experimental host ranges for some mycoviruses. Most known mycoviruses have dsRNA genomes packaged in isometric particles, but an increasing number of positive- or negative-strand ssRNA and ssDNA viruses have been isolated and characterized. Although many mycoviruses do not have marked effects on their hosts, those that reduce the virulence of their phytopathogenic fungal hosts are of considerable interest for development of novel biocontrol strategies. Mycoviruses that infect endophytic fungi and those that encode killer toxins are also of special interest. Structural analyses of mycoviruses have promoted better understanding of virus assembly, function, and evolution. - Highlights: • Historical perspective of fungal virus research. • Description, classification and diversity of fungal virus families. • Structural features of fungal virus particles. • Hypovirulence and exploitation of mycoviruses in biological control of plant pathogenic fungi.

  12. Standard methods for fungal brood disease research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chalkbrood and stonebrood are two fungal diseases associated with honey bee brood. Chalkbrood, caused by Ascosphaera apis, is a common and widespread disease that can result in severe reduction of emerging worker bees and thus overall colony productivity. Stonebrood is caused by Aspergillus spp. tha...

  13. How to describe a new fungal species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The formal and informal requirements for the publication of descriptions of new fungal species are discussed. This involves following the rules of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature as well as meeting the standards set by the editorial board of the journals in which these descriptions ...

  14. Fungal infections of the folds (intertriginous areas).

    PubMed

    Metin, Ahmet; Dilek, Nursel; Demirseven, Duriye Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Superficial fungal infections are widespread, regardless of age and gender, in populations all around the world and may affect the skin and skin appendages. Although there are thousands of fungal infections from various genera and families in nature, those that are pathogenic for humans and nesting in skin folds are limited in number. The prevalence and distribution of these fungi vary according to the patients and certain environmental factors. Because the areas including the lids, external auditory canal, behind the ears, navel, inguinal region, and axillae, also called flexures, are underventilated and moist areas exposed to friction, they are especially sensitive to fungal infections. Fungi can both directly invade the skin, leading to infections, and indirectly stimulate immune mechanisms due to tissue interaction and their antigenic character and contribute to the development or exacerbation of secondary bacterial infections, seborrheic dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis. Superficial fungal infections can be classified and studied as dermatophyte infections, candidal infections, Malassezia infections, and other superficial infections independently from the involved skin fold areas. PMID:26051058

  15. Pre- and postharvest fungal apple diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The domesticated apple (Malus domestica) is the most significant pome fruit grown and consumed worldwide. China is the largest producer followed by the United States on a global scale. However, fungal plant pathogens cause significant economic losses in the field and in storage which negatively impa...

  16. Grass fungal endophytes and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Craven, Kelly

    2015-03-10

    The invention provides isolated fungal endophytes and synthetic combinations thereof with host grass plants. Methods for inoculating grass plant with the endophytes, for propagating the grass-endophyte combinations, and for producing feeds and biofuels from grass-endophyte combinations are also provided.

  17. Fungal Bioconversion of Lignocellulosic Residues; Opportunities & Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Dashtban, Mehdi; Schraft, Heidi; Qin, Wensheng

    2009-01-01

    The development of alternative energy technology is critically important because of the rising prices of crude oil, security issues regarding the oil supply, and environmental issues such as global warming and air pollution. Bioconversion of biomass has significant advantages over other alternative energy strategies because biomass is the most abundant and also the most renewable biomaterial on our planet. Bioconversion of lignocellulosic residues is initiated primarily by microorganisms such as fungi and bacteria which are capable of degrading lignocellulolytic materials. Fungi such as Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger produce large amounts of extracellular cellulolytic enzymes, whereas bacterial and a few anaerobic fungal strains mostly produce cellulolytic enzymes in a complex called cellulosome, which is associated with the cell wall. In filamentous fungi, cellulolytic enzymes including endoglucanases, cellobiohydrolases (exoglucanases) and β-glucosidases work efficiently on cellulolytic residues in a synergistic manner. In addition to cellulolytic/hemicellulolytic activities, higher fungi such as basidiomycetes (e.g. Phanerochaete chrysosporium) have unique oxidative systems which together with ligninolytic enzymes are responsible for lignocellulose degradation. This review gives an overview of different fungal lignocellulolytic enzymatic systems including extracellular and cellulosome-associated in aerobic and anaerobic fungi, respectively. In addition, oxidative lignocellulose-degradation mechanisms of higher fungi are discussed. Moreover, this paper reviews the current status of the technology for bioconversion of biomass by fungi, with focus on mutagenesis, co-culturing and heterologous gene expression attempts to improve fungal lignocellulolytic activities to create robust fungal strains. PMID:19774110

  18. ASSESSING ALLERGENICITY OF INDOOR AIR FUNGAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing Allergenicity of Indoor Air Fungal Contaminants
    M D W Ward1, M E Viana2, N Haykal-Coates1, L B Copeland1, S H Gavett1, and MJ K Selgrade1. 1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC, USA. 2NCSU, CVM, Raleigh, NC, USA.
    Rationale: The indoor environment has increased in impor...

  19. Fungal biology and agriculture: revisiting the field.

    PubMed

    Yarden, O; Ebbole, D J; Freeman, S; Rodriguez, R J; Dickman, M B

    2003-10-01

    Plant pathology has made significant progress over the years, a process that involved overcoming a variety of conceptual and technological hurdles. Descriptive mycology and the advent of chemical plant-disease management have been followed by biochemical and physiological studies of fungi and their hosts. The later establishment of biochemical genetics along with the introduction of DNA-mediated transformation have set the stage for dissection of gene function and advances in our understanding of fungal cell biology and plant-fungus interactions. Currently, with the advent of high-throughput technologies, we have the capacity to acquire vast data sets that have direct relevance to the numerous subdisciplines within fungal biology and pathology. These data provide unique opportunities for basic research and for engineering solutions to important agricultural problems. However, we also are faced with the challenge of data organization and mining to analyze the relationships between fungal and plant genomes and to elucidate the physiological function of pertinent DNA sequences. We present our perspective of fungal biology and agriculture, including administrative and political challenges to plant protection research.

  20. Opportunistic invasive fungal infections: diagnosis & clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Badiee, Parisa; Hashemizadeh, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are a significant health problem in immunocompromised patients. The clinical manifestations vary and can range from colonization in allergic bronchopulmonary disease to active infection in local aetiologic agents. Many factors influence the virulence and pathogenic capacity of the microorganisms, such as enzymes including extracellular phospholipases, lipases and proteinases, dimorphic growth in some Candida species, melanin production, mannitol secretion, superoxide dismutase, rapid growth and affinity to the blood stream, heat tolerance and toxin production. Infection is confirmed when histopathologic examination with special stains demonstrates fungal tissue involvement or when the aetiologic agent is isolated from sterile clinical specimens by culture. Both acquired and congenital immunodeficiency may be associated with increased susceptibility to systemic infections. Fungal infection is difficult to treat because antifungal therapy for Candida infections is still controversial and based on clinical grounds, and for molds, the clinician must assume that the species isolated from the culture medium is the pathogen. Timely initiation of antifungal treatment is a critical component affecting the outcome. Disseminated infection requires the use of systemic agents with or without surgical debridement, and in some cases immunotherapy is also advisable. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown an association between drug dose and treatment outcome. Drug dose monitoring is necessary to ensure that therapeutic levels are achieved for optimal clinical efficacy. The objectives of this review are to discuss opportunistic fungal infections, diagnostic methods and the management of these infections. PMID:24718393

  1. The Amsterdam declaration on fungal nomenclature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Amsterdam Declaration on Fungal Nomenclature was developed at a international symposium convened in Amsterdam on 19-20 April 2011 under the auspices of the International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi (ICTF). The purpose of the symposium was to address the issue of whether or how the curren...

  2. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira Filho, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa Junior, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications. PMID:26273247

  3. Fungal molecular diagnostics: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Simon D; Clark, Ian M

    2004-01-01

    Conventional methods to identify fungi have often relied on identification of disease symptoms, isolation and culturing of environmental organisms, and laboratory identification by morphology and biochemical tests. Although these methods are still fundamental there is an increasing move towards molecular diagnostics of fungi in all fields. In this review, some of the molecular approaches to fungal diagnostics based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA/RNA probe technology are discussed. This includes several technological advances in PCR-based methods for the detection, identification and quantification of fungi including real-time PCR which has been successfully used to provide rapid, quantitative data on fungal species from environmental samples. PCR and probe based methods have provided new tools for the enumeration of fungal species, but it is still necessary to combine the new technology with more conventional methods to gain a fuller understanding of interactions occurring in the environment. Since its introduction in the mid 1980's PCR has provided many molecular diagnostic tools, some of which are discussed within this review, and with the advances in micro-array technology and real-time PCR methods the future is bright for the development of accurate, quantitative diagnostic tools that can provide information not only on individual fungal species but also on whole communities.

  4. Development of a fungal spore aerosol generator: test with Cladosporium cladosporioides and Penicillium citrinum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Uk; Kim, Young Joong; Lee, Chang Ho; Yun, Sun Hwa; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Ji, Jun-Ho

    2008-04-01

    As the first step to develop efficient means to control fungal spore bioaerosols, we designed, manufactured, and evaluated a fungal spore aerosol generator. We studied the physical and biological properties of the fungal spore bioaerosols on two common fungal species. The results demonstrated that the fungal spore bioaerosol generator effectively produces fungal spore bioaerosols.

  5. Fungal spore fragmentation as a function of airflow rates and fungal generation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaani, Hussein; Hargreaves, Megan; Ristovski, Zoran; Morawska, Lidia

    The aim of this study was to characterise and quantify the fungal fragment propagules derived and released from several fungal species ( Penicillium, Aspergillus niger and Cladosporium cladosporioides) using different generation methods and different air velocities over the colonies. Real time fungal spore fragmentation was investigated using an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVASP) and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The study showed that there were significant differences ( p < 0.01) in the fragmentation percentage between different air velocities for the three generation methods, namely the direct, the fan and the fungal spore source strength tester (FSSST) methods. The percentage of fragmentation also proved to be dependent on fungal species. The study found that there was no fragmentation for any of the fungal species at an air velocity ≤0.4 m s -1 for any method of generation. Fluorescent signals, as well as mathematical determination also showed that the fungal fragments were derived from spores. Correlation analysis showed that the number of released fragments measured by the UVAPS under controlled conditions can be predicted on the basis of the number of spores, for Penicillium and A. niger, but not for C. cladosporioides. The fluorescence percentage of fragment samples was found to be significantly different to that of non-fragment samples ( p < 0.0001) and the fragment sample fluorescence was always less than that of the non-fragment samples. Size distribution and concentration of fungal fragment particles were investigated qualitatively and quantitatively, by both UVAPS and SMPS, and it was found that the UVAPS was more sensitive than the SMPS for measuring small sample concentrations, whilethe results obtained from the UVAPS and SMAS were not identical for the same samples.

  6. Diagnostic of Fungal Infections Related to Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella

    2016-01-01

    Fungal biofilm-related infections, most notably those caused by the Candida and Aspergillus genera, need to be diagnosed accurately and rapidly to avoid often unfavorable outcomes. Despite diagnosis of these infections is still based on the traditional histopathology and culture, the use of newer, rapid methods has enormously enhanced the diagnostic capability of a modern clinical mycology laboratory. Thus, while accurate species-level identification of fungal isolates can be achieved with turnaround times considerably shortened, nucleic acid-based or antigen-based detection methods can be considered useful adjuncts for the diagnosis of invasive forms of candidiasis and aspergillosis. Furthermore, simple, reproducible, and fast methods have been developed to quantify biofilm production by fungal isolates in vitro. In this end, isolates can be categorized as low, moderate, or high biofilm-forming, and this categorization may reflect their differential response to the conventional antifungal therapy. By means of drug susceptibility testing performed on fungal biofilm-growing isolates, it is now possible to evaluate not only the activity of conventional antifungal agents, but also of novel anti-biofilm agents. Despite this, future diagnostic methods need to target specific biofilm components/molecules, in order to provide a direct proof of the presence of this growth phenotype on the site of infection. In the meantime, our knowledge of the processes underlying the adaptive drug resistance within the biofilm has put into evidence biofilm-specific molecules that could be potentially helpful as therapeutic targets. Surely, the successful management of clinically relevant fungal biofilms will rely upon the advancement and/or refinement of these approaches. PMID:27300347

  7. Cytochemical Labeling for Fungal and Host Components in Plant Tissues Inoculated with Fungal Wilt Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellette, G. B.; Baayen, R. P.; Chamberland, H.; Simard, M.; Rioux, D.; Charest, P. M.

    2004-08-01

    Antibodies to detect pectin in present investigations attached to distinct fibrils in vessel lumina. In carnation infected with an isolate of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp., labeling of pathogen cells also occurred; in a resistant cultivar (cv.), it was coincident with proximate pectin fibrils and linked to altered fungal walls, which was the opposite in the susceptible cv., indicating that hindrance of pathogen ability to degrade pectin may be related to resistance. Labeling of the fungus in culture was nil, except in media containing pectin, showing that pectin is not native to the pathogen. Labeling of fungal walls for cellulose in elm (inoculated with Ophiostoma novo-ulmi) and carnation also occurred, linked to adsorbed host wall components. The chitin probe often attached to dispersed matter, in vessel lumina, traceable to irregularly labeled fungal cells and host wall degradation products. With an anti-horseradish peroxidase probe, host and fungal walls were equally labeled, and with a glucosidase, differences of labeling between these walls were observed, depending on pH of the test solution. Fungal extracellular matter and filamentous structures, present in fungal walls, predominantly in another elm isolate (Phaeotheca dimorphospora), did not label with any of the probes used. However, in cultures of this fungus, extracellular material labeled, even at a distance from the colony margin, with an anti-fimbriae probe.

  8. Fungal biofilm formation on cochlear implant hardware after antibiotic-induced fungal overgrowth within the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Cristobal, Ricardo; Edmiston, Charles E; Runge-Samuelson, Christina L; Owen, Heather A; Firszt, Jill B; Wackym, P Ashley

    2004-08-01

    Cochlear implantation in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media is managed with perioperative antibiotics; however, fungal overgrowth can occur. We present a child who received oral cefdinir and topical ofloxacin (Floxin). After 6 weeks, a fungal (Candida) biofilm was demonstrated on the implant surface. In this clinical setting, an antimicrobial strategy using an oral antifungal to prevent fungal overgrowth is a possibility.

  9. TNF-α modulates genome-wide redistribution of ΔNp63α/TAp73 and NF-κB c-REL interactive binding on TP53 and AP-1 motifs to promote an oncogenic gene program in squamous cancer

    PubMed Central

    Si, Han; Lu, Hai; Yang, Xinping; Mattox, Austin; Jang, Minyoung; Bian, Yansong; Sano, Eleanor; Viadiu, Hector; Yan, Bin; Yau, Christina; Ng, Sam; Lee, Steven K.; Romano, Rose-Anne; Davis, Sean; Walker, Robert L.; Xiao, Wenming; Sun, Hongwei; Wei, Lai; Sinha, Satrajit; Benz, Christopher C; Stuart, Joshua M.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Van Waes, Carter; Chen, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) network study of 12 cancer types (PanCancer 12) revealed frequent mutation of TP53, and amplification and expression of related TP63 isoform ΔNp63 in squamous cancers. Further, aberrant expression of inflammatory genes and TP53/p63/p73 targets were detected in the PanCancer 12 project, reminiscent of gene programs co-modulated by cREL/ΔNp63/TAp73 transcription factors we uncovered in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). However, how inflammatory gene signatures and cREL/p63/p73 targets are co-modulated genome-wide is unclear. Here, we examined how inflammatory factor TNF-α broadly modulates redistribution of cREL with ΔNp63α/TAp73 complexes and signatures genome-wide in the HNSCC model UM-SCC46 using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq). TNF-α enhanced genome-wide co-occupancy of cREL with ΔNp63α on TP53/p63 sites, while unexpectedly promoting redistribution of TAp73 from TP53 to Activator Protein-1 (AP-1) sites. cREL, ΔNp63α, and TAp73 binding and oligomerization on NF-κB, TP53 or AP-1 specific sequences were independently validated by ChIP-qPCR, oligonucleotide-binding assays, and analytical ultracentrifugation. Function of the binding activity was confirmed using TP53, AP-1, and NF-κB specific response elements, or p21, SERPINE1, and IL-6 promoter luciferase reporter activities. Concurrently, TNF-α regulated a broad gene network with co-binding activities for cREL, ΔNp63α, and TAp73 observed upon array profiling and RT-PCR. Overlapping target gene signatures were observed in squamous cancer subsets and in inflamed skin of transgenic mice overexpressing ΔNp63α. Furthermore, multiple target genes identified in this study were linked to TP63 and TP73 activity and increased gene expression in large squamous cancer samples from PanCancer 12 TCGA by CircleMap. PARADIGM inferred pathway analysis revealed the network connection of TP63 and NF-κB complexes through an AP-1 hub, further supporting

  10. Symbiotic fungal associations in 'lower' land plants.

    PubMed Central

    Read, D J; Ducket, J G; Francis, R; Ligron, R; Russell, A

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of the current state of knowledge of symbiotic fungal associations in 'lower' plants is provided. Three fungal phyla, the Zygomycota, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, are involved in forming these associations, each producing a distinctive suite of structural features in well-defined groups of 'lower' plants. Among the 'lower' plants only mosses and Equisetum appear to lack one or other of these types of association. The salient features of the symbioses produced by each fungal group are described and the relationships between these associations and those formed by the same or related fungi in 'higher' plants are discussed. Particular consideration is given to the question of the extent to which root fungus associations in 'lower' plants are analogous to 'mycorrhizas' of 'higher' plants and the need for analysis of the functional attributes of these symbioses is stressed. Zygomycetous fungi colonize a wide range of extant lower land plants (hornworts, many hepatics, lycopods, Ophioglossales, Psilotales and Gleicheniaceae), where they often produce structures analogous to those seen in the vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizas of higher plants, which are formed by members of the order Glomales. A preponderance of associations of this kind is in accordance with palaeohbotanical and molecular evidence indicating that glomalean fungi produced the archetypal symbioses with the first plants to emerge on to land. It is shown, probably for the first time, that glomalean fungi forming typical VA mycorrhiza with a higher plant (Plantago lanceolata) can colonize a thalloid liverwort (Pellia epiphylla), producing arbuscules and vesicles in the hepatic. The extent to which these associations, which are structurally analogous to mycorrhizas, have similar functions remains to be evaluated. Ascomycetous associations are found in a relatively small number of families of leafy liverworts. The structural features of the fungal colonization of rhizoids and underground axes of

  11. Indicators of airborne fungal concentrations in urban homes: understanding the conditions that affect indoor fungal exposures.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Judith A; Rosenbaum, Paula F; Anagnost, Susan E; Hunt, Andrew; Abraham, Jerrold L

    2015-06-01

    Indoor fungal exposure can compromise respiratory health. Low-income urban areas are of concern because of high asthma and allergy rates and housing disrepair. Understanding the conditions that affect indoor fungal exposures is important for assessing health risks and for developing mitigation strategies. We examined the types and concentrations of airborne fungi inside and outside of homes in low-income areas of Syracuse, NY as well as the effect of snow cover on fungal levels. At 103 homes, air samples for viable fungi were collected, occupants were interviewed and homes were inspected for visible mold, musty odors, water problems and other factors. Multivariable logistic regression was used to relate high fungal levels to home conditions. Predominant indoor fungi included Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, Alternaria and hyaline unknowns. Basidiomycetes and an uncommon genus Acrodontium were also found frequently due to analysis methods developed for this project. With snow cover, outdoor total fungal levels were depressed and indoor concentrations were three times higher than outdoor on average with a maximum of 29 times higher. Visible mold was related to elevated levels of Penicillium (OR 4.11 95% CI 1.37-14.0) and bacteria (OR 3.79 95% CI 1.41-11.2). Musty, moldy odors were associated with elevated concentrations of total fungi (OR 3.48 95% CI 1.13-11.6) and basidiomycetes. Cockroaches, an indicator of moisture, were associated with elevated levels of Penicillium (OR 3.66 95% CI 1.16-13.1) and Aspergillus (OR 4.36 95% CI 1.60-13.4). Increasing relative humidity was associated with higher concentrations of Penicillium, yeasts and basidiomycetes. Visible mold, musty odors, indoor humidity and cockroaches are modifiable factors that were important determinants of indoor fungal exposures. Indoor air investigators should interpret indoor:outdoor fungal ratios cautiously when snow cover is present.

  12. Indicators of airborne fungal concentrations in urban homes: understanding the conditions that affect indoor fungal exposures.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Judith A; Rosenbaum, Paula F; Anagnost, Susan E; Hunt, Andrew; Abraham, Jerrold L

    2015-06-01

    Indoor fungal exposure can compromise respiratory health. Low-income urban areas are of concern because of high asthma and allergy rates and housing disrepair. Understanding the conditions that affect indoor fungal exposures is important for assessing health risks and for developing mitigation strategies. We examined the types and concentrations of airborne fungi inside and outside of homes in low-income areas of Syracuse, NY as well as the effect of snow cover on fungal levels. At 103 homes, air samples for viable fungi were collected, occupants were interviewed and homes were inspected for visible mold, musty odors, water problems and other factors. Multivariable logistic regression was used to relate high fungal levels to home conditions. Predominant indoor fungi included Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, Alternaria and hyaline unknowns. Basidiomycetes and an uncommon genus Acrodontium were also found frequently due to analysis methods developed for this project. With snow cover, outdoor total fungal levels were depressed and indoor concentrations were three times higher than outdoor on average with a maximum of 29 times higher. Visible mold was related to elevated levels of Penicillium (OR 4.11 95% CI 1.37-14.0) and bacteria (OR 3.79 95% CI 1.41-11.2). Musty, moldy odors were associated with elevated concentrations of total fungi (OR 3.48 95% CI 1.13-11.6) and basidiomycetes. Cockroaches, an indicator of moisture, were associated with elevated levels of Penicillium (OR 3.66 95% CI 1.16-13.1) and Aspergillus (OR 4.36 95% CI 1.60-13.4). Increasing relative humidity was associated with higher concentrations of Penicillium, yeasts and basidiomycetes. Visible mold, musty odors, indoor humidity and cockroaches are modifiable factors that were important determinants of indoor fungal exposures. Indoor air investigators should interpret indoor:outdoor fungal ratios cautiously when snow cover is present. PMID:25725196

  13. Does Spore Count Matter in Fungal Allergy?: The Role of Allergenic Fungal Species

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wan-Rou; Lee, Mey-Fann; Hsu, Ling-Yi; Tien, Chih-Jen; Shih, Feng-Ming; Hsiao, Shih-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Fungi have been known to be important aeroallergens for hundreds of years. Most studies have focused on total fungal concentration; however, the concentration of specific allergenic fungi may be more important on an individual basis. Methods Ten fungal allergic patients and 2 non-fungal allergic patients were enrolled. The patients with a decrease in physician or patient global assessment by more than 50% of their personal best were considered to have an exacerbation of allergic symptoms and to be in the active stage. Those who maintained their physician and patient global assessment scores at their personal best for more than 3 months were considered to be in the inactive stage. The concentrations of dominant fungi in the patients' houses and outdoors were measured by direct and viable counts at active and inactive stages. Results The exacerbation of allergic symptoms was not correlated with total fungal spore concentration or the indoor/outdoor ratio (I/O). Specific fungi, such as Cladosporium oxysporum (C. oxyspurum), C. cladosporioides, and Aspergillus niger (A. niger), were found to be significantly higher concentrations in the active stage than in the inactive stage. Presumed allergenic spore concentration threshold levels were 100 CFU/m3 for C. oxysporum, and 10 CFU/m3 for A. niger, Penicillium brevicompactum and Penicillium oxalicum. Conclusions The major factor causing exacerbation of allergic symptoms in established fungal allergic patients may be the spore concentration of specific allergenic fungi rather than the total fungal concentration. These results may be useful in making recommendations as regards environmental control for fungal allergic patients. PMID:27334778

  14. Chytrids dominate arctic marine fungal communities.

    PubMed

    Hassett, B T; Gradinger, R

    2016-06-01

    Climate change is altering Arctic ecosystem structure by changing weather patterns and reducing sea ice coverage. These changes are increasing light penetration into the Arctic Ocean that are forecasted to increase primary production; however, increased light can also induce photoinhibition and cause physiological stress in algae and phytoplankton that can favour disease development. Fungi are voracious parasites in many ecosystems that can modulate the flow of carbon through food webs, yet are poorly characterized in the marine environment. We provide the first data from any marine ecosystem in which fungi in the Chytridiomycota dominate fungal communities and are linked in their occurrence to light intensities and algal stress. Increased light penetration stresses ice algae and elevates disease incidence under reduced snow cover. Our results show that chytrids dominate Arctic marine fungal communities and have the potential to rapidly change primary production patterns with increased light penetration.

  15. Chytrids dominate arctic marine fungal communities.

    PubMed

    Hassett, B T; Gradinger, R

    2016-06-01

    Climate change is altering Arctic ecosystem structure by changing weather patterns and reducing sea ice coverage. These changes are increasing light penetration into the Arctic Ocean that are forecasted to increase primary production; however, increased light can also induce photoinhibition and cause physiological stress in algae and phytoplankton that can favour disease development. Fungi are voracious parasites in many ecosystems that can modulate the flow of carbon through food webs, yet are poorly characterized in the marine environment. We provide the first data from any marine ecosystem in which fungi in the Chytridiomycota dominate fungal communities and are linked in their occurrence to light intensities and algal stress. Increased light penetration stresses ice algae and elevates disease incidence under reduced snow cover. Our results show that chytrids dominate Arctic marine fungal communities and have the potential to rapidly change primary production patterns with increased light penetration. PMID:26754171

  16. Striking a balance: fungal commensalism versus pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Iliev, Iliyan D; Underhill, David M

    2013-06-01

    The environment is suffused with nearly countless types of fungi, and our immune systems must be tuned to cope with constant exposure to them. In addition, it is becoming increasingly clear that many surfaces of our bodies are colonized with complex populations of fungi (the mycobiome) in the same way that they are colonized with complex populations of bacteria. The immune system must tolerate colonization with commensal fungi but defend against fungal invasion. Truly life-threatening fungal infections are common only when this balance is disrupted through, for example, profound immunosuppression or genetic mutation. Recent studies have begun to shed light on how this balance is established and maintained, and suggest future studies on the role of fungi in homeostatic conditions.

  17. Synthetic biology of fungal natural products

    PubMed Central

    Mattern, Derek J.; Valiante, Vito; Unkles, Shiela E.; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an ever-expanding field in science, also encompassing the research area of fungal natural product (NP) discovery and production. Until now, different aspects of synthetic biology have been covered in fungal NP studies from the manipulation of different regulatory elements and heterologous expression of biosynthetic pathways to the engineering of different multidomain biosynthetic enzymes such as polyketide synthases or non-ribosomal peptide synthetases. The following review will cover some of the exemplary studies of synthetic biology in filamentous fungi showing the capacity of these eukaryotes to be used as model organisms in the field. From the vast array of different NPs produced to the ease for genetic manipulation, filamentous fungi have proven to be an invaluable source for the further development of synthetic biology tools. PMID:26284053

  18. Candida albicans β-Glucan Exposure Is Controlled by the Fungal CEK1-Mediated Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway That Modulates Immune Responses Triggered through Dectin-1 ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Galán-Díez, Marta; Arana, David M.; Serrano-Gómez, Diego; Kremer, Leonor; Casasnovas, José M.; Ortega, Mara; Cuesta-Domínguez, Álvaro; Corbí, Angel L.; Pla, Jesús; Fernández-Ruiz, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Innate immunity to Candida albicans depends upon the recognition of molecular patterns on the fungal cell wall. However, the masking of major components such as β-glucan seems to be a mechanism that fungi have evolved to avoid immune cell recognition through the dectin-1 receptor. Although the role of C. albicans mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways as virulence determinants has been established previously with animal models, the mechanism involved in this behavior is largely unknown. In this study we demonstrate that a disruption of the C. albicans extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-like 1 (CEK1)-mediated MAPK pathway causes enhanced cell wall β-glucan exposure, triggering immune responses more efficiently than the wild type, as measured by dectin-1-mediated specific binding and human dendritic cell (hDC)- and macrophage-mediated phagocytosis, killing, and activation of intracellular signaling pathways. At the molecular level, the disruption of CEK1 resulted in altered spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), Raf-1, and ERK1/2 activations together with IκB degradation on hDCs and increased dectin-1-dependent activator protein 1 (AP-1) activation on transfected cells. In addition, concurring with these altered pathways, we detected increased reactive oxygen species production and cytokine secretion. In conclusion, the CEK1-mediated MAPK pathway is involved in β-glucan exposure in a fungal pathogen, hence influencing dectin-1-dependent immune cell recognition, thus establishing this fungal intracellular signaling route as a promising novel therapeutic target. PMID:20100861

  19. Burden of serious fungal infections in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Osmanov, Ali; Denning, David W

    2015-10-01

    Ukraine has high rates of TB, AIDS and cancer. We estimated the burden of fungal disease from epidemiology papers and specific populations at risk and fungal infection frequencies. HIV/AIDS cases and deaths (2012) and tuberculosis statistics were obtained from the State Service of Ukraine, while chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) cases were from M. Miravitlles et al., Thorax 64, 863-868 (2009). Annual estimates are 893,579 Ukrainian women get recurrent vaginal thrush (≥4× per year), 50,847 cases of oral candidiasis and 13,727 cases of oesophageal candidiasis in HIV, and 101 (1%) of 10,085 new AIDS cases develop cryptococcal meningitis, 6152 cases of Pneumocystis pneumonia (13.5 cases per 100,000). Of the 29,265 cases of active respiratory TB in 2012, it is estimated that 2881 new cases of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) occurred and that the 5-year period prevalence is 7724 cases with a total CPA burden of 10,054 cases. Assuming adult asthma prevalence is ~2.9%, 28,447 patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) are likely and 37,491 with severe asthma with fungal sensitisation. We estimate 2278 cases and 376 postsurgical intra-abdominal Candida infections. Invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients is estimated at 303 patients annually; 930 cases in COPD patients. Ninety cases of mucormycosis (2 per 1,000,000) are estimated. In total, ~1,000,000 (2.2%) people in Ukraine develop serious fungal infections annually. PMID:26449513

  20. A combination approach to treating fungal infections

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sanjib K.; Fosso, Marina Y.; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Azoles are antifungal drugs used to treat fungal infections such as candidiasis in humans. Their extensive use has led to the emergence of drug resistance, complicating antifungal therapy for yeast infections in critically ill patients. Combination therapy has become popular in clinical practice as a potential strategy to fight resistant fungal isolates. Recently, amphiphilic tobramycin analogues, C12 and C14, were shown to display antifungal activities. Herein, the antifungal synergy of C12 and C14 with four azoles, fluconazole (FLC), itraconazole (ITC), posaconazole (POS), and voriconazole (VOR), was examined against seven Candida albicans strains. All tested strains were synergistically inhibited by C12 when combined with azoles, with the exception of C. albicans 64124 and MYA-2876 by FLC and VOR. Likewise, when combined with POS and ITC, C14 exhibited synergistic growth inhibition of all C. albicans strains, except C. albicans MYA-2876 by ITC. The combinations of FLC-C14 and VOR-C14 showed synergistic antifungal effect against three C. albicans and four C. albicans strains, respectively. Finally, synergism between C12/C14 and POS were confirmed by time-kill and disk diffusion assays. These results suggest the possibility of combining C12 or C14 with azoles to treat invasive fungal infections at lower administration doses or with a higher efficiency. PMID:26594050

  1. Fungal Biodiversity in the Alpine Tarfala Valley

    PubMed Central

    Coleine, Claudia; Selbmann, Laura; Ventura, Stefano; D’Acqui, Luigi Paolo; Onofri, Silvano; Zucconi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are distributed worldwide in all semiarid and arid lands, where they play a determinant role in element cycling and soil development. Although much work has concentrated on BSC microbial communities, free-living fungi have been hitherto largely overlooked. The aim of this study was to examine the fungal biodiversity, by cultural-dependent and cultural-independent approaches, in thirteen samples of Arctic BSCs collected at different sites in the Alpine Tarfala Valley, located on the slopes of Kebnekaise, the highest mountain in northern Scandinavia. Isolated fungi were identified by both microscopic observation and molecular approaches. Data revealed that the fungal assemblage composition was homogeneous among the BSCs analyzed, with low biodiversity and the presence of a few dominant species; the majority of fungi isolated belonged to the Ascomycota, and Cryptococcus gilvescens and Pezoloma ericae were the most frequently-recorded species. Ecological considerations for the species involved and the implication of our findings for future fungal research in BSCs are put forward. PMID:27682108

  2. Fungal Biodiversity in the Alpine Tarfala Valley

    PubMed Central

    Coleine, Claudia; Selbmann, Laura; Ventura, Stefano; D’Acqui, Luigi Paolo; Onofri, Silvano; Zucconi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are distributed worldwide in all semiarid and arid lands, where they play a determinant role in element cycling and soil development. Although much work has concentrated on BSC microbial communities, free-living fungi have been hitherto largely overlooked. The aim of this study was to examine the fungal biodiversity, by cultural-dependent and cultural-independent approaches, in thirteen samples of Arctic BSCs collected at different sites in the Alpine Tarfala Valley, located on the slopes of Kebnekaise, the highest mountain in northern Scandinavia. Isolated fungi were identified by both microscopic observation and molecular approaches. Data revealed that the fungal assemblage composition was homogeneous among the BSCs analyzed, with low biodiversity and the presence of a few dominant species; the majority of fungi isolated belonged to the Ascomycota, and Cryptococcus gilvescens and Pezoloma ericae were the most frequently-recorded species. Ecological considerations for the species involved and the implication of our findings for future fungal research in BSCs are put forward.

  3. A combination approach to treating fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sanjib K; Fosso, Marina Y; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Azoles are antifungal drugs used to treat fungal infections such as candidiasis in humans. Their extensive use has led to the emergence of drug resistance, complicating antifungal therapy for yeast infections in critically ill patients. Combination therapy has become popular in clinical practice as a potential strategy to fight resistant fungal isolates. Recently, amphiphilic tobramycin analogues, C12 and C14, were shown to display antifungal activities. Herein, the antifungal synergy of C12 and C14 with four azoles, fluconazole (FLC), itraconazole (ITC), posaconazole (POS), and voriconazole (VOR), was examined against seven Candida albicans strains. All tested strains were synergistically inhibited by C12 when combined with azoles, with the exception of C. albicans 64124 and MYA-2876 by FLC and VOR. Likewise, when combined with POS and ITC, C14 exhibited synergistic growth inhibition of all C. albicans strains, except C. albicans MYA-2876 by ITC. The combinations of FLC-C14 and VOR-C14 showed synergistic antifungal effect against three C. albicans and four C. albicans strains, respectively. Finally, synergism between C12/C14 and POS were confirmed by time-kill and disk diffusion assays. These results suggest the possibility of combining C12 or C14 with azoles to treat invasive fungal infections at lower administration doses or with a higher efficiency. PMID:26594050

  4. Fungal osteomyelitis of maxillofacial bones: Rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Urs, Aadithya B; Singh, Hanspal; Mohanty, Sujata; Sharma, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is defined as inflammation of the medullary cavities, haversian system and adjacent cortex of bone. Osteomyelitis involving maxilla is quite rare when compared to that of mandible. Fungal osteomyelitis is very rarely seen and documented in the maxillofacial area. It is devastating to patients if it is invasive in nature. A prospective study was undertaken from December 2011 to December 2013. Biopsied hard tissue bits were decalcified and sections were stained with H&E, periodic acid Schiff and Grocott methenamine silver. Culture sensitivity was carried out in all cases. Surgical intervention followed by antifungal therapy was advocated to treat the patients. The current series showed five cases of fungal osteomyelitis which included candidal osteomyelitis, aspergillosis and mucormycosis with slight predominance of maxilla over mandible. Osteomyelitis of facial bones needs to be investigated thoroughly as there is no difference in clinical presentation between bacterial and fungal osteomyelitis. The diagnostic workup with biopsy and culture sensitivity helps to identify the pathogen at the earliest. Appropriate antifungal treatment needs to be advocated for successful treatment. PMID:27721629

  5. New strategic insights into managing fungal biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Elisa; Morace, Giulia; Borgo, Francesca; Rajendran, Ranjith; Sherry, Leighann; Nile, Christopher; Ramage, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections have dramatically increased in the last decades in parallel with an increase of populations with impaired immunity, resulting from medical conditions such as cancer, transplantation, or other chronic diseases. Such opportunistic infections result from a complex relationship between fungi and host, and can range from self-limiting to chronic or life-threatening infections. Modern medicine, characterized by a wide use of biomedical devices, offers new niches for fungi to colonize and form biofilm communities. The capability of fungi to form biofilms is well documented and associated with increased drug tolerance and resistance. In addition, biofilm formation facilitates persistence in the host promoting a persistent inflammatory condition. With a limited availability of antifungals within our arsenal, new therapeutic approaches able to address both host and pathogenic factors that promote fungal disease progression, i.e., chronic inflammation and biofilm formation, could represent an advantage in the clinical setting. In this paper we discuss the antifungal properties of myriocin, fulvic acid, and acetylcholine in light of their already known anti-inflammatory activity and as candidate dual action therapeutics to treat opportunistic fungal infections. PMID:26500623

  6. Patterns of fungal diversity and composition along a salinity gradient

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Devon J; Martiny, Jennifer BH

    2011-01-01

    Estuarine salinity gradients are known to influence plant, bacterial and archaeal community structure. We sequenced 18S rRNA genes to investigate patterns in sediment fungal diversity (richness and evenness of taxa) and composition (taxonomic and phylogenetic) along an estuarine salinity gradient. We sampled three marshes—a salt, brackish and freshwater marsh—in Rhode Island. To compare the relative effect of the salinity gradient with that of plants, we sampled fungi in plots with Spartina patens and in plots from which plants were removed 2 years prior to sampling. The fungal sediment community was unique compared with previously sampled fungal communities; we detected more Ascomycota (78%), fewer Basidiomycota (6%) and more fungi from basal lineages (16%) (Chytridiomycota, Glomeromycota and four additional groups) than typically found in soil. Across marshes, fungal composition changed substantially, whereas fungal diversity differed only at the finest level of genetic resolution, and was highest in the intermediate, brackish marsh. In contrast, the presence of plants had a highly significant effect on fungal diversity at all levels of genetic resolution, but less of an effect on fungal composition. These results suggest that salinity (or other covarying parameters) selects for a distinctive fungal composition, and plants provide additional niches upon which taxa within these communities can specialize and coexist. Given the number of sequences from basal fungal lineages, the study also suggests that further sampling of estuarine sediments may help in understanding early fungal evolution. PMID:20882058

  7. Fungal Assemblages in Different Habitats in an Erman's Birch Forest.

    PubMed

    Yang, Teng; Sun, Huaibo; Shen, Congcong; Chu, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Recent meta-analyses of fungal diversity using deeply sequenced marker genes suggest that most fungal taxa are locally distributed. However, little is known about the extent of overlap and niche partitions in total fungal communities or functional guilds within distinct habitats on a local forest scale. Here, we compared fungal communities in endosphere (leaf interior), phyllosphere (leaf interior and associated surface area) and soil samples from an Erman's birch forest in Changbai Mountain, China. Community structures were significantly differentiated in terms of habitat, with soil having the highest fungal richness and phylogenetic diversity. Endophytic and phyllosphere fungi of Betula ermanii were more phylogenetically clustered compared with the corresponding soil fungi, indicating the ability of that host plants to filter and select their fungal partners. Furthermore, the majority of soil fungal taxa were soil specialists, while the dominant endosphere and phyllosphere taxa were aboveground generalists, with soil and plant foliage only sharing <8.2% fungal taxa. Most of the fungal taxa could be assigned to different functional guilds; however, the assigned guilds showed significant habitat specificity with variation in relative abundance. Collectively, the fungal assemblages in this Erman's birch forest were strictly niche specialized and constrained by weak migration among habitats. The findings suggest that phylogenetic relatedness and functional guilds' assignment can effectively interpret the certain ecological processes. PMID:27625646

  8. Percutaneous Management of Systemic Fungal Infection Presenting As Bilateral Renal Fungal Ball

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Abhishek; Shrivastava, Nitin; Singh, Chirom Amit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Zygomycoses are uncommon, frequently fatal diseases caused by fungi of the class Zygomycetes. The majority of human cases are caused by Mucorales (genus—rhizopus, mucor, and absidia) fungi. Renal involvement is uncommon and urine microscopy, pottasium hydroxide mount, and fungal cultures are frequently negative. Case Presentation: A twenty-one-year-old young unmarried lady presented to our emergency department with bilateral flank pain, fever, nausea, and decreased urine output of one-month duration. She was found to have azotemia with sepsis with bilateral hydronephrosis with a left renal pelvic obstructing stone. Even after nephrostomy drainage and broad spectrum antibiotics, her condition worsened. She developed disseminated fungal infection, and timely systemic antifungal followed by bilateral nephroscopic clearance saved the patient. Conclusion: Although renal fungal infections are uncommon, a high index of suspicion and early antifungal and surgical intervention can give favorable outcomes. PMID:27704055

  9. A resource for the in silico identification of fungal polyketide synthases from predicted fungal proteomes.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Javier A; Al-Azzam, Omar; Denton, Anne M; Markell, Samuel G; Goswami, Rubella S

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a tool specifically designed to identify iterative polyketide synthases (iPKSs) from predicted fungal proteomes. A fungi-based PKS prediction model, specifically for fungal iPKSs, was developed using profile hidden Markov models (pHMMs) based on two essential iPKS domains, the β-ketoacyl synthase (KS) domain and acyltransferase (AT) domain, derived from fungal iPKSs. This fungi-based PKS prediction model was initially tested on the well-annotated proteome of Fusarium graminearum, identifying 15 iPKSs that matched previous predictions and gene disruption studies. These fungi-based pHMMs were subsequently applied to the predicted fungal proteomes of Alternaria brassicicola, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici, Verticillium albo-atrum and Verticillium dahliae. The iPKSs predicted were compared against those predicted by the currently available mixed-kingdom PKS models that include both bacterial and fungal sequences. These mixed-kingdom models have been proven previously by others to be better in predicting true iPKSs from non-iPKSs compared with other available models (e.g. Pfam and TIGRFAM). The fungi-based model was found to perform significantly better on fungal proteomes than the mixed-kingdom PKS model in accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and precision. In addition, the model was capable of predicting the reducing nature of fungal iPKSs by comparison of the bit scores obtained from two separate reducing and nonreducing pHMMs for each domain, which was confirmed by phylogenetic analysis of the KS domain. Biological confirmation of the predictions was obtained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the KS and AT domains of predicted iPKSs from V. dahliae using domain-specific primers and genomic DNA, followed by sequencing of the PCR products. It is expected that the fungi-based PKS model will prove to be a useful tool for the identification and annotation of fungal PKSs from predicted proteomes. PMID:22112245

  10. Current Thoughts in Fungal Keratitis: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Zubair; Miller, Darlene; Galor, Anat

    2013-01-01

    Fungal keratitis remains a challenging and often elusive diagnosis in geographic regions where it is endemic. Marred by delays in diagnosis, the sequelae of corneal fungal infections, though preventable, can be irreversible. Recent studies and advances in the arena have broadened the approach and treatment to mycotic keratitis. This review will discuss current diagnostic modalities of fungal keratitis and will particularly focus on treatment regimens. It will also explore future therapeutic models and critique the potential benefit of each. PMID:24040467

  11. Immunology of fungal infections: lessons learned from animal models.

    PubMed

    Steele, Chad; Wormley, Floyd L

    2012-08-01

    The continuing AIDS epidemic coupled with increased usage of immunosuppressive drugs to prevent organ rejection or treat autoimmune diseases has resulted in an increase in individuals at risk for acquiring fungal diseases. These concerns highlight the need to elucidate mechanisms of ind