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Sample records for fusarium heterosporum lipase

  1. Simultaneous conversion of free fatty acids and triglycerides to biodiesel by immobilized Aspergillus oryzae expressing Fusarium heterosporum lipase.

    PubMed

    Amoah, Jerome; Quayson, Emmanuel; Hama, Shinji; Yoshida, Ayumi; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2017-03-01

    The presence of high levels of free fatty acids (FFA) in oil is a barrier to one-step biodiesel production. Undesirable soaps are formed during conventional chemical methods, and enzyme deactivation occurs when enzymatic methods are used. This work investigates an efficient technique to simultaneously convert a mixture of free fatty acids and triglycerides (TAG). A partial soybean hydrolysate containing 73.04% free fatty acids and 24.81% triglycerides was used as a substrate for the enzymatic production of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME). Whole-cell Candida antarctica lipase B-expressing Aspergillus oryzae, and Novozym 435 produced only 75.2 and 73.5% FAME, respectively. Fusarium heterosporum lipase-expressing A. oryzae produced more than 93% FAME in 72 h using three molar equivalents of methanol. FFA and TAG were converted simultaneously in the presence of increasing water content that resulted from esterification. Therefore, F. heterosporum lipase with a noted high level of tolerance of water could be useful in the industrial production of biodiesel from feedstock that has high proportion of free fatty acids.

  2. The galactolipase activity of Fusarium solani (phospho)lipase.

    PubMed

    Jallouli, Raida; Othman, Houcemeddine; Amara, Sawsan; Parsiegla, Goetz; Carriere, Frédéric; Srairi-Abid, Najet; Gargouri, Youssef; Bezzine, Sofiane

    2015-03-01

    The purified (phospho)lipase of Fusarium solani (FSL), was known to be active on both triglycerides and phospholipids. This study aimed at assessing the potential of this enzyme in hydrolyzing galactolipids. FSL was found to hydrolyze at high rates of synthetic medium chains monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (4658±146U/mg on DiC8-MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (3785±83U/mg on DiC8-DGDG) and natural long chain monogalactosyldiacylglycerol extracted from leek leaves (991±85U/mg). It is the microbial enzyme with the highest activity on galactolipids identified so far with a level of activity comparable to that of pancreatic lipase-related protein 2. FSL maximum activity on galactolipids was measured at pH8. The analysis of the hydrolysis product of natural MGDG from leek showed that FSL hydrolyzes preferentially the ester bond at the sn-1 position of galactolipids. To investigate the structure-activity relationships of FSL, a 3D model of this enzyme was built. In silico docking of medium chains MGDG and DGDG and phospholipid in the active site of FSL reveals structural solutions which are in concordance with in vitro tests.

  3. Biological Activities of a Mixture of Biosurfactant from Bacillus subtilis and Alkaline Lipase from Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    Pereira de Quadros, Cedenir; Cristina Teixeira Duarte, Marta; Maria Pastore, Gláucia

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the antimicrobial effects of a mixture of a biosurfactant from Bacillus subtilis and an alkaline lipase from Fusarium oxysporum (AL/BS mix) on several types of microorganisms, as well as their abilities to remove Listeria innocua ATCC 33093 biofilm from stainless steel coupons. The AL/BS mix had a surface tension of around 30 mN.m-1, indicating that the presence of alkaline lipase did not interfere in the surface activity properties of the tensoactive component. The antimicrobial activity of the AL/BS mix was determined by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) micro-assays. Among all the tested organisms, the presence of the mixture only affected the growth of B. subtilis CCT 2576, B. cereus ATCC 10876 and L. innocua. The most sensitive microorganism was B. cereus (MIC 0.013 mg.mL-1). In addition, the effect of the sanitizer against L. innocua attached to stainless steel coupons was determined by plate count after vortexing. The results showed that the presence of the AL/BS mix improved the removal of adhered cells relative to treatment done without the sanitizer, reducing the count of viable cells by 1.72 log CFU.cm-2. However, there was no significant difference between the sanitizers tested and an SDS detergent standard (p<0.05). PMID:24031642

  4. Kinetic behaviour of recombinant Fusarium solani lipases using monomolecular films: Effect of the heterologous expression.

    PubMed

    Jallouli, Raida; Bouali, Madiha; Gargouri, Youssef; Bezzine, Sofiane

    2017-01-01

    Two lipases from Fusarium solani, FSL and FSL2, were efficiently expressed in Pichia pastoris. To check the influence of the expression on interfacial properties of FSL and to study kinetic properties of FSL2, interfacial parameters of FSL2, native FSL, untagged recombinant and tagged recombinant forms of FSL were compared using the monomolecular film technique. Kinetic study on the dependence of the stereoselectivity of these lipases on the surface pressure was performed using three dicaprin isomers spread in the form of monomolecular films at the air-water interface. The FSL2 seems to have an important penetration power with a preference for adjacent ester groups and the heterologous expression accompanied or not with the N-His-tag extension on the FSL were found to modify the pressure preference and increase the catalytic hydrolysis rate of three dicaprin isomers. The heterologous expression was found to preserve the FSL regioselectivity without affecting its stereospecificity at high and low surface pressure. The evaluation of the recombinant expression Effects on Catalysis (REC), the N-Tag Effects on Catalysis (TEC), and the N-Tag and Recombinant expression Effects on Catalysis (TREC) showed that the heterologous expression was more efficient than the presence of the N-terminal tag extension on the FSL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Purification and biochemical characterization of a novel alkaline (phospho)lipase from a newly isolated Fusarium solani strain.

    PubMed

    Jallouli, Raida; Khrouf, Fatma; Fendri, Ahmed; Mechichi, Tahar; Gargouri, Youssef; Bezzine, Sofiane

    2012-12-01

    An extracellular lipase from Fusarium solani strain (F. solani lipase (FSL)) was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulphate precipitation, gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme has a molecular mass of 30 kDa as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The 12 NH(2)-terminal amino acid residues showed a high degree of homology with a putative lipase from the fungus Necteria heamatoccocae. It is a serine enzyme, like all known lipases from different origins. Interestingly, FSL has not only lipase activity but also a high phospholipase activity which requires the presence of Ca(2+) and bile salts. The specific activities of FSL were about 1,610 and 2,414 U/mg on olive oil emulsion and egg-yolk phosphatidylcholine as substrates, respectively, at pH 8.0 and 37 °C. The (phospho)lipase enzyme was stable in the pH range of 5-10 and at temperatures below 45 °C.

  6. Highly efficient biodiesel production by a whole-cell biocatalyst employing a system with high lipase expression in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Tomohiro; Koda, Risa; Adachi, Daisuke; Nakashima, Kazunori; Wada, Junpei; Bogaki, Takayuki; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2011-05-01

    In the present study, a system with high lipase expression in Aspergillus oryzae was developed using an improved enolase promoter (P-enoA124) and the 5' untranslated region of a heat-shock protein (Hsp-UTR). P-enoA142 enhanced the transcriptional level of a heterologous lipase gene and Hsp-UTR improved its translational efficiency. Fusarium heterosporum lipase (FHL) was inserted into a pSENSU-FHL expression vector harboring P-enoA142 and Hsp-UTR and was transformed into an A. oryzae NS4 strain. Transformants possessing pSENSU-FHL in single (pSENSU-FHL#1) and double copies (pSENSU-FHL#2) were selected to evaluate the lipase activity of the whole-cell biocatalyst. The two strains, pSENSU-FHL#1 and #2, showed excellent lipase activity in hydrolysis compared with the strain transformed with conventional expression vector pNAN8142-FHL. Furthermore, by using pSENSU-FHL#2, methanolysis could proceed much more effectively without deactivation, which allowed a swift addition of methanol to the reaction mixture, thereby reducing reaction time.

  7. An integrative process model of enzymatic biodiesel production through ethanol fermentation of brown rice followed by lipase-catalyzed ethanolysis in a water-containing system.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Daisuke; Koda, Risa; Hama, Shinji; Yamada, Ryosuke; Nakashima, Kazunori; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2013-02-05

    We attempted to integrate lipase-catalyzed ethanolysis into fermentative bioethanol production. To produce bioethanol, ethanol fermentation from brown rice was conducted using a tetraploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing α-amylase and glucoamylase. The resultant ethanol was distilled and separated into three fractions with different concentrations of water and fusel alcohols. In ethanolysis using the first fraction with 89.3% ethanol, a recombinant Aspergillus oryzae whole-cell biocatalyst expressing Fusarium heterosporum lipase (r-FHL) afforded the highest ethyl ester content of 94.0% after 96 h. Owing to a high concentration of water in the bioethanol solutions, r-FHL, which works best in the presence of water when processing ethanolysis, was found to be more suitable for the integrative process than a commercial immobilized Candida antarctica lipase. In addition, r-FHL was used for repeated-batch ethanolysis, resulting in an ethyl ester content of more than 80% even after the fifth batch. Fusel alcohols such as 1-butanol and isobutyl alcohol are thought to decrease the lipase activity of r-FHL. Using this process, a high ethyl ester content was obtained by simply mixing bioethanol, plant oil, and lipase with an appropriate adjustment of water concentration. The developed process model, therefore, would contribute to biodiesel production from only biomass-derived feedstocks.

  8. Heterologous overexpression and biochemical characterization of the (galactophospho)lipase from Fusarium solani in Pichia pastoris that is expressed in planta.

    PubMed

    Jallouli, Raida; Ali, Madiha Bou; Charfeddine, Mariam; Gargouri-Bouzid, Radhia; Gargouri, Youssef; Bezzine, Sofiane

    2016-03-01

    High-level extracellular production of Fusarium solani (galactophospho)lipase, named FSL, was achieved using a Pichia pastoris X33 expression system. The (galactophospho) lipase encoding gene was cloned into pGAPZαA with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-factor signal sequence by two different ways. The two constructs consist of an additional sequence of a (His)6-tag of the vector fused to the N-terminus of this enzyme (tFSL) while the other expression vector was constructed without any additional sequence (rFSL). Compared to the native enzyme (nFSL) (18.75 mg/L), a high level secretion of rFSL (310 mg/L) and tFSL (240 mg/L) was achieved providing an important improvement in enzyme production. Biochemical characterization showed that pure recombinant proteins (rFSL and tFSL) presented similar behaviour towards triglycerides, phospholipid and galactolipid. Like the nFSL, rFSL and tFSL are active at high concentration of bile salts (4mM) and calcium ions enhanced lipase activity. During plant infection, transcripts of this fungal lipase gene were detected 3, 7 and 10 days post infection.

  9. Efficient heterologous expression of Fusarium solani lipase, FSL2, in Pichia pastoris, functional characterization of the recombinant enzyme and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Jallouli, Raida; Parsiegla, Goetz; Carrière, Frédéric; Gargouri, Youssef; Bezzine, Sofiane

    2017-01-01

    The gene coding for a lipase of Fusarium solani, designated as FSL2, shows an open reading frame of 906bp encoding a 301-amino acid polypeptide with a molecular mass of 30kDa. Based on sequence similarity with other fungal lipases, FSL2 contains a catalytic triad, consisting of Ser144, Asp198, and His256. FSL2 cDNA was subcloned into the pGAPZαA vector containing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-factor signal sequence and this construct was used to transform Pichia pastoris and achieve a high-level extracellular production of a FSL2 lipase. Maximum lipase activity was observed after 48h. The optimum activity of the purified recombinant enzyme was measured at pH 8.0-9.0 and 37°C. FSL2 is remarkably stable at alkaline pH values up to 12 and at temperatures below 40°C. It has high catalytic efficiency towards triglycerides with short to long chain fatty acids but with a marked preference for medium and long chain fatty acids. FSL2 activity is decreased at sodium taurodeoxycholate concentrations above the Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC) of this anionic detergent. However, lipase activity is enhanced by Ca(2+) and inhibited by EDTA or Cu(2+) and partially by Mg(2+) or K(+). In silico docking of medium chain triglycerides, monogalctolipids (MGDG), digalactolipids (DGDG) and long chain phospholipids in the active site of FSL2 reveals structural solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Human toxicosis caused by moldy rice contaminated with fusarium and T-2 toxin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z G; Feng, J N; Tong, Z

    1993-03-01

    This is the first report on human toxicosis in China caused by moldy rice contaminated with Fusarium and T-2 toxin due to heavy rainfall during rice harvest season. One hundred and sixty-five persons ate the moldy rice and ninety-seven persons fall ill of food poisoning. The incidence was 58.8% and latent period was 10-30 min. The chief symptoms were nausea, dizziness, vomiting, chills, abdominal distension, abdominal pain, thoracic stuffiness and diarrhea. The fungi isolated from the moldy rice were predominantly Fusarium heterosporum (F. heterosporum) and F. graminearum. T-2 toxin was found in these moldy rice and the highest level was 420 ppb. The chief causative agent of intoxication was T-2 toxin.

  11. Genetic engineering of the Fusarium solani pisi lipase cutinase for enhanced partitioning in PEG-phosphate aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Bandmann, N; Collet, E; Leijen, J; Uhlén, M; Veide, A; Nygren, P A

    2000-04-28

    The Fusarium solani pisi lipase cutinase has been genetically engineered to investigate the influence of C-terminal peptide extensions on the partitioning of the enzyme in PEG-salt based aqueous two-phase bioseparation systems. Seven different cutinase lipase variants were constructed containing various C-terminal peptide extensions including tryptophan rich peptide tags ((WP)(2) and (WP)(4)), positively ((RP)(4)) and negatively ((DP)(4)) charged tags as well as combined tags with tryptophan together with either positively ((WPR)(4)) or negatively ((WPD)(4)) charged amino acids. The modified cutinase variants were stably produced in Escherichia coli as secreted to the periplasm from which they were efficiently purified by IgG-affinity chromatography employing an introduced N-terminal IgG-binding ZZ affinity fusion partner present in all variants. Partitioning experiments performed in a PEG 4000/sodium phosphate aqueous two-phase system showed that for variants containing either (WP)(2) or (WP)(4) peptide extensions, 10- to 70-fold increases in the partitioning to the PEG rich top-phase were obtained, when compared to the wild type enzyme. An increased partitioning was also seen for cutinase variants tagged with both tryptophans and charged amino acids, whereas the effect of solely charged peptide extensions was relatively small. In addition, when performing partitioning experiments from cell disintegrates, the (WP)(4)-tagged cutinase showed a similarly high PEG-phase partitioning, indicating that the effect from the peptide tag was unaffected by the background of the host proteins. Taken together, the results show that the partitioning of the recombinantly produced cutinase model enzyme could be significantly improved by relatively minor genetic engineering and that the effects observed for purified proteins are retained also in an authentic whole cell disintegrate system. The results presented should be of general interest also for the improvement of the

  12. Production of fusaric acid by Fusarium species.

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, C W; Porter, J K; Norred, W P; Leslie, J F

    1996-01-01

    Fusaric acid is a mycotoxin with low to moderate toxicity, which is of concern since it might be synergistic with other cooccurring mycotoxins. Fusaric acid is widespread on corn and corn-based food and feeds and is frequently found in grain, where Fusarium spp. are also isolated. We surveyed 78 strains of Fusarium moniliforme, F. crookwellense, F. subglutinans, F. sambucinum, F. napiforme, F. heterosporum, F. oxysporum, F. solani, and F. proliferatum for their ability to produce fusaric acid. Strains in Fusarium section Liseola also were assigned to mating population of the Gibberella fujikuroi species complex. The fungi could be divided into three classes, low (< 100 micrograms/g), moderate (100 to 500 micrograms/g), and high (> 500 micrograms/g), based on the amounts of this mycotoxin produced in culture on autoclaved corn. Strains of mating populations C from rice consistently produced moderate to high concentrations of fusaric acid. Two isolates, one each from mating populations C and D, produced fusaric acid in excess of 1,000 micrograms/g of corn. No isolates of any of the Fusarium species examined were negative for the production of fusaric acid on autoclaved corn. PMID:8899996

  13. Influence of agro-environmental factors on fusarium infestation and population structure in wheat kernels.

    PubMed

    Rohácik, Tibor; Hudec, Kamil

    2005-01-01

    The influence of location, year and cultivar on occurrence, level of infestation and Fusarium species spectrum in winter wheat seeds were evaluated. The wheat seeds from different cultivars and localities of the Slovak Republic were used for Fusarium species evaluation during years 1999, 2000, 2002 and 2003. The significant influence of the locality on total Fusarium kernel infestation was confirmed. The total sample infestation was significantly higher in the colder and moister localities, lower infestation was in warmer and dryer ones. Cultivar "Astella" was significantly the most susceptible. The widest Fusarium species spectrum was recorded in the locations with a high level of total kernel infestation. In localities with lower infestation, the species spectrum was less numerous. F. poae was the dominant species in all locations. The species F. culmorum, F. avenaceum and Microdochium nivale were subdominant and relatively frequent in the locations with higher altitude. The frequency and density of other isolated species (F. graminearum, F. sporotrichioides, F. tricinctum, F. semitectum, F. acuminatum, F. heterosporum, F. sambucinum, F. solani, F. compactum and F. oxysporum) was trivial in all localities. The kernel infestation and Fusarium population structure in wheat grains mostly depends on microclimatic condition of the locality. Rising of rainfall rate and altitude led to an increase in the species spectrum. The wide Fusarium species spectrum is connected with the high frequency of coincident species. The species with low and medium frequency achieved low or trivial density in population structure.

  14. Lipase Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as: LPS Formal name: Lipase Related tests: Amylase , Trypsin , Trypsinogen At a Glance Test Sample The ... lipase is most often used, along with an amylase test , to help diagnose and monitor acute pancreatitis . ...

  15. Fusarium Pathogenomics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium is a genus of filamentous fungi that contains many agronomically important plant pathogens, mycotoxin producers, and opportunistic human pathogens. Comparative analyses have revealed compartmentalization of genomes into regions responsible for metabolism and reproduction (core genome) and p...

  16. Lipase test

    MedlinePlus

    ... cholecystitis Chronic pancreatitis Enzyme Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency Pancreatic cancer Triglyceride level Review Date 2/4/2015 Updated ... team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Gastroenteritis Genetic Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Diseases Pancreatitis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  17. Fusarium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Muhammed, Maged; Anagnostou, Theodora; Desalermos, Athanasios; Kourkoumpetis, Themistoklis K.; Carneiro, Herman A.; Glavis-Bloom, Justin; Coleman, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Fusarium species is a ubiquitous fungus that causes opportunistic infections. We present 26 cases of invasive fusariosis categorized according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) criteria of fungal infections. All cases (20 proven and 6 probable) were treated from January 2000 until January 2010. We also review 97 cases reported since 2000. The most important risk factors for invasive fusariosis in our patients were compromised immune system, specifically lung transplantation (n = 6) and hematologic malignancies (n = 5), and burns (n = 7 patients with skin fusariosis), while the most commonly infected site was the skin in 11 of 26 patients. The mortality rates among our patients with disseminated, skin, and pulmonary fusariosis were 50%, 40%, and 37.5%, respectively. Fusarium solani was the most frequent species, isolated from 49% of literature cases. Blood cultures were positive in 82% of both current study and literature patients with disseminated fusariosis, while the remaining 16% had 2 noncontiguous sites of infection but negative blood cultures. Surgical removal of focal lesions was effective in both current study and literature cases. Skin lesions in immunocompromised patients should raise the suspicion for skin or disseminated fusariosis. The combination of medical monotherapy with voriconazole or amphotericin B and surgery in such cases is highly suggested. PMID:24145697

  18. Fusarium MLST database

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre’s Fusarium MLST website (http://www.cbs.knaw.nl/Fusarium), and the corresponding Fusarium-ID site hosted at the Pennsylvania State University (http://isolate.fusariumdb.org; Geiser et al. 2004, Park et al. 2010) were constructed to facilitate identification of...

  19. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Acid Lipase Disease Information Page What research is being ... research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency. Additional research studies hope to identify ...

  20. Fusarium Wilt of Orchids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium wilt of orchids is highly destructive and economically limiting to the production of quality orchids that has steadily increased in many production facilities. Important crops such as phalaenopsis, cattleyas, and oncidiums appear to be especially susceptible to certain Fusarium species. Fu...

  1. Lipase activity of Mucor pusillus.

    PubMed

    Somkuti, G A; Babel, F J

    1968-04-01

    Two strains of Mucor pusillus were examined for their ability to synthesize lipase in a complex medium used in the production of milk-clotting protease. Lipase activity of both strains reached maximal after 6 days of incubation under submerged conditions at 35 C. Lipase secreted into the medium hydrolyzed butterfat and vegetable lipids, as well as selected synthetic triglycerides. About 50% of lipase activity was destroyed after a 45-min heat treatment at 58 C.

  2. Fusarium Wilt of Banana.

    PubMed

    Ploetz, Randy C

    2015-12-01

    Banana (Musa spp.) is one of the world's most important fruits. In 2011, 145 million metric tons, worth an estimated $44 billion, were produced in over 130 countries. Fusarium wilt (also known as Panama disease) is one of the most destructive diseases of this crop. It devastated the 'Gros Michel'-based export trades before the mid-1900s, and threatens the Cavendish cultivars that were used to replace it; in total, the latter cultivars are now responsible for approximately 45% of all production. An overview of the disease and its causal agent, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense, is presented below. Despite a substantial positive literature on biological, chemical, or cultural measures, management is largely restricted to excluding F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense from noninfested areas and using resistant cultivars where the pathogen has established. Resistance to Fusarium wilt is poor in several breeding targets, including important dessert and cooking cultivars. Better resistance to this and other diseases is needed. The history and impact of Fusarium wilt is summarized with an emphasis on tropical race 4 (TR4), a 'Cavendish'-killing variant of the pathogen that has spread dramatically in the Eastern Hemisphere.

  3. Fusarium wilt of lentil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium wilt of lentil is caused by the soil borne fungus Fusaium oxysporum f. sp. lentis. The pathogen is widespread. The disease shows symptoms of wilting, and stunted plants. Other symptoms include wilting of top leaves resemble water deficiency, shrinking and curling of leaves from the lower...

  4. Lipases efficiently stearate and cutinases acetylate the surface of arabinoxylan films.

    PubMed

    Stepan, A M; Anasontzis, G E; Matama, T; Cavaco-Paulo, A; Olsson, L; Gatenholm, P

    2013-08-10

    This is the first report on successful enzyme catalyzed surface esterification of hemicellulose films. Enzyme catalyzed surface acetylation with vinyl acetate and stearation with vinyl stearate were studied on rye arabinoxylan (AX) films. Different surface analytical techniques (FT-IR, TOF-SIMS, ESCA, CA) show that lipases from Mucor javanicus, Rhizopus oryzae and Candida rugosa successfully surface stearate AX films and that a cutinase from Fusarium solani pisi surface acetylates these films. The specificities of cutinase and lipases were also compared, and higher activity was observed for lipases utilizing long alkyl chain substrates while higher activity was observed for cutinase utilizing shorter alkyl chain substrates. The contact angle analysis showed films with increased initial hydrophobicity on the surfaces. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Plant lipases: partial purification of Carica papaya lipase.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Ivanna; Mateos-Díaz, Juan Carlos; Sandoval, Georgina

    2012-01-01

    Lipases from plants have very interesting features for application in different fields. This chapter provides an overview on some of the most important aspects of plant lipases, such as sources, applications, physiological functions, and specificities. Lipases from laticifers and particularly Carica papaya lipase (CPL) have emerged as a versatile autoimmobilized biocatalyst. However, to get a better understanding of CPL biocatalytic properties, the isolation and purification of individual C. papaya lipolytic enzymes become necessary. In this chapter, a practical protocol for partial purification of the latex-associated lipolytic activity from C. papaya is given.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: lysosomal acid lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions lysosomal acid lipase deficiency lysosomal acid lipase deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  7. Lipases at interfaces: a review.

    PubMed

    Reis, P; Holmberg, K; Watzke, H; Leser, M E; Miller, R

    2009-01-01

    Lipases are acyl hydrolases that play a key role in fat digestion by cleaving long-chain triglycerides into polar lipids. Due to an opposite polarity between the enzyme (hydrophilic) and their substrates (lipophilic), lipase reaction occurs at the interface between the aqueous and the oil phases. Hence, interfaces are the key spots for lipase biocatalysis and an appropriate site for modulating lipolysis. Surprisingly enough, knowledge about the effects of the interfacial composition on lipase catalysis is still limited and only described by the term "interfacial quality". Recent systematic studies based on a biophysical approach allowed for the first time to show the effects of the interfacial microenvironment on lipase catalysis. These studies demonstrate that lipase activity as a function of interfacial composition is more attributed to substrate inaccessibility rather than to enzyme denaturation or inactivation, as it is often hypothesized. A detailed analysis of the interfacial properties of all compounds involved in triglyceride digestion revealed that lipolysis is a self-regulated reaction. This feedback mechanism can be explored as a new avenue to control lipase catalysis. To substantiate this hypothesis, oil hydrolysis in a model gastro-intestinal system was performed, which can be seen as an interfacial engineering approach to enzyme reactivity control. The presented characterization of the interfacial composition and its consequences provide a new approach for the understanding of lipase reactions at interfaces with direct impact on biotechnological and health care applications.

  8. Psychrophilic Lipase from Arctic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ramle, Zakiah; Rahim, Rashidah Abdul

    2016-01-01

    A lipase producer psychrophilic microorganism isolated from Arctic sample was studied. The genomic DNA of the isolate was extracted using modified CTAB method. Identification of the isolate by morphological and 16S rRNA sequence analysis revealed that the isolate is closely related to Arthrobacter gangotriensis (97% similarity). A. gangotriensis was determined as positive lipase producer based on the plate screening using specific and sensitive plate assay of Rhodamine B. The PCR result using Arthrobacter sp.’s full lipase gene sequence as the template primers emphasised a possible lipase gene at 900 bp band size. The gene is further cloned in a suitable vector system for expression of lipase. PMID:27965754

  9. Reduced susceptibility to Fusarium head blight in Brachypodium distachyon through priming with the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol.

    PubMed

    Blümke, Antje; Sode, Björn; Ellinger, Dorothea; Voigt, Christian A

    2015-06-01

    The fungal cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum produces deoxynivalenol (DON) during infection. The mycotoxin DON is associated with Fusarium head blight (FHB), a disease that can cause vast grain losses. Whilst investigating the suitability of Brachypodium distachyon as a model for spreading resistance to F. graminearum, we unexpectedly discovered that DON pretreatment of spikelets could reduce susceptibility to FHB in this model grass. We started to analyse the cell wall changes in spikelets after infection with F. graminearum wild-type and defined mutants: the DON-deficient Δtri5 mutant and the DON-producing lipase disruption mutant Δfgl1, both infecting only directly inoculated florets, and the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase disruption mutant Δgpmk1, with strongly decreased virulence but intact DON production. At 14 days post-inoculation, the glucose amounts in the non-cellulosic cell wall fraction were only increased in spikelets infected with the DON-producing strains wild-type, Δfgl1 and Δgpmk1. Hence, we tested for DON-induced cell wall changes in B. distachyon, which were most prominent at DON concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 ppb. To test the involvement of DON in defence priming, we pretreated spikelets with DON at a concentration of 1 ppm prior to F. graminearum wild-type infection, which significantly reduced FHB disease symptoms. The analysis of cell wall composition and plant defence-related gene expression after DON pretreatment and fungal infection suggested that DON-induced priming of the spikelet tissue contributed to the reduced susceptibility to FHB.

  10. Synthesis and kinetic evaluation of Cyclophostin and Cyclipostins phosphonate analogs as selective and potent inhibitors of microbial lipases

    PubMed Central

    Point, Vanessa; Malla, Raj K.; Diomande, Sadia; Martin, Benjamin P.; Delorme, Vincent; Carriere, Frederic; Canaan, Stephane; Rath, Nigam P.; Spilling, Christopher D.; Cavalier, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    New series of customizable diastereomeric cis- and trans-monocyclic enol-phosphonate analogs to Cyclophostin and Cyclipostins were synthesized. Their potencies and mechanisms of inhibition toward six representative lipolytic enzymes belonging to distinct lipase families were examined. With mammalian gastric and pancreatic lipases no inhibition occurred with any of the compounds tested. Conversely, Fusarium solani Cutinase and lipases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Rv0183 and LipY) were all fully inactivated. Best inhibitors displayed a cis conformation (H and OMe) and exhibited higher inhibitory activities than the lipase inhibitor Orlistat towards same enzymes. Our results have revealed that chemical group at the γ-carbon of the phosphonate ring strongly impacts the inhibitory efficiency, leading to a significant improvement in selectivity toward a target lipase over another. The powerful and selective inhibition of microbial (fungal and mycobacterial) lipases suggests that these 7-membered monocyclic enol-phosphonates should provide useful leads for the development of novel and highly selective antimicrobial agents. PMID:23095026

  11. Snail hepatopancreatic lipase: a new member of invertebrates lipases' group.

    PubMed

    Amara, Sawsan; Fendri, Ahmed; Ben Salem, Nadia; Gargouri, Youssef; Miled, Nabil

    2010-10-01

    Higher animal's lipases are well characterized; however, much less is known about lipases from mollusks. A lipolytic activity was located in the land snail (Eobania vermiculata) digestive glands (hepatopancreas), from which a snail digestive lipase (SnDL) was purified. Pure SnDL has a molecular mass of 60 kDa; it does not present the interfacial activation phenomenon. It was found to be more active on short-chain triacylglycerols than on long-chain triacylglycerols. The NH2-terminal sequence of the SnDL shows 66% of identity with the 17 NH2-terminal amino acids of a putative lipase from sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus). No sequence identity was found with known lipases. Interestingly, neither colipase nor bile salts were detected in the snail hepatopancreas. This suggests that colipase evolved in vertebrates simultaneously with the appearance of an exocrine pancreas and a true liver which produces bile salts. Altogether, these results suggest that SnDL is a member of a new group of digestive lipases belonging to invertebrates.

  12. 21 CFR 862.1465 - Lipase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Lipase test system. (a) Identification. A lipase test system is a device intended to measure the activity of the enzymes lipase in serum. Lipase measurements are used in diagnosis and treatment of...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1465 - Lipase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Lipase test system. (a) Identification. A lipase test system is a device intended to measure the activity of the enzymes lipase in serum. Lipase measurements are used in diagnosis and treatment of...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1465 - Lipase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Lipase test system. (a) Identification. A lipase test system is a device intended to measure the activity of the enzymes lipase in serum. Lipase measurements are used in diagnosis and treatment of...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1465 - Lipase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Lipase test system. (a) Identification. A lipase test system is a device intended to measure the activity of the enzymes lipase in serum. Lipase measurements are used in diagnosis and treatment of...

  16. Biodiesel production with immobilized lipase: A review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tianwei; Lu, Jike; Nie, Kaili; Deng, Li; Wang, Fang

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acid alkyl esters, also called biodiesel, are environmentally friendly and show great potential as an alternative liquid fuel. Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of oils or fats with chemical catalysts or lipase. Immobilized lipase as the biocatalyst draws high attention because that process is "greener". This article reviews the current status of biodiesel production with immobilized lipase, including various lipases, immobilization methods, various feedstocks, lipase inactivation caused by short chain alcohols and large scale industrialization. Adsorption is still the most widely employed method for lipase immobilization. There are two kinds of lipase used most frequently especially for large scale industrialization. One is Candida antartica lipase immobilized on acrylic resin, and the other is Candida sp. 99-125 lipase immobilized on inexpensive textile membranes. However, to further reduce the cost of biodiesel production, new immobilization techniques with higher activity and stability still need to be explored.

  17. Lipases in Medicine: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Loli, Heni; Narwal, Sunil Kumar; Saun, Nitin Kumar; Gupta, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Lipases are part of the family of hydrolases that act on carboxylic ester bonds. They are involved in catalyzing the hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) into chylomicrons and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles. Uses of lipases are evolving rapidly and currently they are reported to show high potential in medicine. Intensive study and investigations have led researchers to explore lipases for their use in substitution therapy, where in enzyme deficiency during diseased conditions is compensated by their external administration. In our body, they are used to break down fats present in food so that they can be absorbed in the intestine and deficiency of lipases leads to malabsorption of fats and fat-soluble vitamins. Lipases help a person who has cystic fibrosis, Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis and act as a candidate target for cancer prevention and therapy. They act as diagnostic tool and their presence or increasing levels can indicate certain infection or disease. Obesity causes metabolic disease and is a serious health problem around the world. Thus inhibiting digestive lipase to reduce fat absorption has become the main pharmacological approach to the treatment of obesity in recent years.

  18. Fusarium subglutinans: A new eumycetoma agent.

    PubMed

    Campos-Macías, Pablo; Arenas-Guzmán, Roberto; Hernández-Hernández, Francisca

    2013-07-09

    Eumycetoma is a chronic subcutaneous mycosis mainly caused by Madurella spp. Fusarium opportunistic infections in humans are often caused by Fusarium solani and Fusarium oxysporum. We report a case of eumycetoma by F. subglutinans, diagnosed by clinical aspect and culture, and confirmed by PCR sequencing. The patient was successfully treated with oral itraconazole. To our knowledge, this is the second report of human infection and the first case of mycetoma by Fusarium subglutinans.

  19. Fusarium subglutinans: A new eumycetoma agent☆

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Macías, Pablo; Arenas-Guzmán, Roberto; Hernández-Hernández, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    Eumycetoma is a chronic subcutaneous mycosis mainly caused by Madurella spp. Fusarium opportunistic infections in humans are often caused by Fusarium solani and Fusarium oxysporum. We report a case of eumycetoma by F. subglutinans, diagnosed by clinical aspect and culture, and confirmed by PCR sequencing. The patient was successfully treated with oral itraconazole. To our knowledge, this is the second report of human infection and the first case of mycetoma by Fusarium subglutinans. PMID:24432236

  20. Characterization of turkey pancreatic lipase.

    PubMed

    Sayari, A; Mejdoub, H; Gargouri, Y

    2000-02-01

    Turkey pancreatic lipase (TPL) was purified from delipidated pancreases. Pure TPL (glycerol ester hydrolase, EC 3.1.1.3) was obtained after ammonium sulfate fractionation, Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration, anion exchange chromatography (DEAE-Sepharose) and size exclusion column using high performance liquid chromatography system (HPLC). The pure lipase, which is not a glycoprotein, was presented as a monomer having a molecular mass of about 45 kDa. The lipase activity was maximal at pH 8.5 and 37 degrees C. TPL hydrolyses the long chains triacylglycerols more efficiently than the short ones. A specific activity of 4300 U/mg was measured on triolein as substrate at 37 degrees C and at pH 8.5 in the presence of colipase and 4 mM NaTDC. This enzyme presents the interfacial activation when using tripropionin as substrate. TPL was inactivated when the enzyme was incubated at 65 degrees C or at pH less than 5. Natural detergent (NaTDC), synthetic detergent (Tween-20) or amphipatic protein (beta-lactoglobulin A) act as potent inhibitors of TPL activity. To restore the lipase activity inhibited by NaTDC, colipase should be added to the hydrolysis system. When lipase is inhibited by synthetic detergent or protein, simultaneous addition of colipase and NaTDC was required to restore the TPL activity. The first 22 N-terminal amino acid residues were sequenced. This sequence was similar to those of mammal's pancreatic lipases. The biochemical properties of pancreatic lipase isolated from bird are similar to those of mammals.

  1. Fusarium temperatum and Fusarium subglutinans isolated from maize in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Fumero, María Verónica; Reynoso, María Marta; Chulze, Sofía

    2015-04-16

    Fusarium temperatum and Fusarium subglutinans isolated from the Northwest region (NOA region) of Argentina were characterized using a polyphasic approach based on morphological, biological and molecular markers. Some interfertility between the species was observed. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the two species represented two clades strongly supported by bootstrap values. The toxigenic profile of the strains was also determined. F. temperatum strains were fusaproliferin and beauvericin producers, and only some strains were fumonisin B1 producers. All F. subglutinans strains produced fusaproliferin but none produced beauvericin, indicating a potential toxicological risk from maize harvested in the NOA region of Argentina. This study provides new information about F. temperatum isolated from maize in Argentina.

  2. 21 CFR 184.1415 - Animal lipase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Animal lipase. 184.1415 Section 184.1415 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1415 Animal lipase. (a) Animal lipase (CAS Reg. No. 9001-62-1) is an enzyme preparation obtained from edible forestomach tissue of calves, kids, or lambs, or from animal pancreatic...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1415 - Animal lipase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Animal lipase. 184.1415 Section 184.1415 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1415 Animal lipase. (a) Animal lipase (CAS Reg. No. 9001-62-1) is an enzyme preparation obtained from edible forestomach tissue of calves, kids, or lambs, or from animal pancreatic...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1415 - Animal lipase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Animal lipase. 184.1415 Section 184.1415 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1415 Animal lipase. (a) Animal lipase (CAS Reg. No. 9001-62-1) is an enzyme preparation obtained from edible forestomach tissue of calves, kids, or lambs, or from animal pancreatic...

  5. Fusarochromanone production by Fusarium isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, W D; Nelson, P E; Cook, M E; Smalley, E B

    1990-01-01

    Sixty two Fusarium isolates representing nine species from many parts of the world were screened for fusarochromanone production. A simplified method for the detection of fusarochromanone in culture filtrates or grain cultures was used. Under UV irradiation (364 nm) the chloroform phase from fusarochromanone-positive culture extracts fluoresced a characteristic bright blue color. Results were confirmed by thin-layer-chromatography comparison with pure fusarochromanone standards. Detection was possible in cultures as young as 1 week old. Biosynthesis of fusarochromanone was rare in Fusarium spp. and was only detected in three isolates of Fusarium equiseti, namely R-4482 (barley [Federal Republic of Germany]), R-6137 (barley [Alaska]), and R-8508 (potato [Denmark]), among all the isolates tested from various geographic sources. Images PMID:2285312

  6. Lipases as biocatalyst for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaohu; Niehus, Xochitl; Sandoval, Georgina

    2012-01-01

    The global shortages of fossil fuels, significant increase in the price of crude oil, and increased environmental concerns have stimulated the rapid growth in biodiesel production. Biodiesel is generally produced through transesterification reaction catalyzed either chemically or enzymatically. Enzymatic transesterification draws high attention because that process shows certain advantages over the chemical catalysis of transesterification and it is "greener." This paper reviews the current status of biodiesel production with lipase-biocatalysis approach, including sources of lipases, kinetics, and reaction mechanism of biodiesel production using lipases, and lipase immobilization techniques. Factors affecting biodiesel production and economic feasibility of biodiesel production using lipases are also covered.

  7. Challenges in Fusarium, a Trans-Kingdom Pathogen.

    PubMed

    van Diepeningen, Anne D; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2016-04-01

    Fusarium species are emerging human pathogens, next to being plant pathogens. Problems with Fusarium are in their diagnostics and in their difficult treatment, but also in what are actual Fusarium species or rather Fusarium-like species. In this issue Guevara-Suarez et al. (Mycopathologia. doi: 10.1007/s11046-016-9983-9 , 2016) characterized 89 isolates of Fusarium from Colombia showing especially lineages within the Fusarium solani and oxysporum species complexes to be responsible for onychomycosis.

  8. Inhibition of lipase activities by citrus pectin.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Takahiro; Sumiyosh, Maho; Han, Li-Kun; Fujiwara, Tsutomu; Tsujita, Junji; Okuda, Hiromichi

    2003-10-01

    The oral administration of pectin to rats reduced and delayed the peak plasma triacylglycerol concentration. Pectin inhibited the hydrolysis of trioleoylglycerol emulsified with soybean phosphatidylcholine by pancreatic, carboxylester, and lingual lipases in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the effective concentration of pectin for lingual lipase was 100 times lower than that for pancreatic lipase. Pectin did not inhibit the tributyrin- and p-nitrophenylbutyrate-hydrolyzing activities by pancreatic and carboxylester lipase. When low molecular weight pectin was assayed, pectin at a molecular weight of 90,000 (MW 90) most strongly inhibited three lipase activities. When the effect of pH on pectin inhibition was analyzed using pancreatic lipase, strong inhibition was observed at an acidic pH (below pH 7.0). In the assay system, the pancreatic lipase protein levels in the supernatant and fat layer were estimated by Western blotting with an anti-pancreatic lipase antibody. Pectin reduced the amount of pancreatic lipase protein in the fat layer in a concentration-dependent manner and concomitantly increased that in the supernatant. These results suggest that pectin may interact with emulsified substrates and inhibit the adsorption of lipase to the surface of substrate emulsion.

  9. Molecular characterization of Fusarium oxysporum and fusarium commune isolates from a conifer nursery

    Treesearch

    Jane E. Stewart; Mee-Sook Kim; Robert L. James; R. Kasten Dumroese; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2006-01-01

    Fusarium species can cause severe root disease and damping-off in conifer nurseries. Fusarium inoculum is commonly found in most container and bareroot nurseries on healthy and diseased seedlings, in nursery soils, and on conifer seeds. Isolates of Fusarium spp. can differ in virulence; however, virulence and...

  10. Fusarium oxysporum protects Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) seedlings from root disease caused by Fusarium commune

    Treesearch

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Mee-Sook Kim; Robert L. James

    2012-01-01

    Fusarium root disease can be a serious problem in forest and conservation nurseries in the western United States. Fusarium inoculum is commonly found in most container and bareroot nurseries on healthy and diseased seedlings, in nursery soils, and on conifer seeds. Fusarium spp. within the F. oxysporum species complex have been recognized as pathogens for more than a...

  11. Pathogen profile update: Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Michielse, Caroline B; Rep, Martijn

    2009-05-01

    Kingdom Fungi; Phylum Ascomycota; Class Sordariomycetes; Order Hypocreales; Family Nectriaceae; genus Fusarium. Very broad at the species level. More than 120 different formae speciales have been identified based on specificity to host species belonging to a wide range of plant families. Initial symptoms of vascular wilt include vein clearing and leaf epinasty, followed by stunting, yellowing of the lower leaves, progressive wilting, defoliation and, finally, death of the plant. On fungal colonization, the vascular tissue turns brown, which is clearly visible in cross-sections of the stem. Some formae speciales are not primarily vascular pathogens, but cause foot and root rot or bulb rot. Can cause severe losses in many vegetables and flowers, field crops, such as cotton, and plantation crops, such as banana, date palm and oil palm. Use of resistant varieties is the only practical measure for controlling the disease in the field. In glasshouses, soil sterilization can be performed. http://www.broad.mit.edu/annotation/genome/fusarium_group/MultiHome.html; http://www.fgsc.net/Fusarium/fushome.htm; http://www.phi-base.org/query.php

  12. Genetics Home Reference: familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... In people with familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency , increased fat levels can also cause neurological features, such as depression, memory loss, and mild intellectual decline (dementia). These problems are ...

  13. Lipase of Mucor pusillus1

    PubMed Central

    Somkuti, G. A.; Babel, F. J.; Somkuti, A. C.

    1969-01-01

    Lipase of Mucor pusillus NRRL 2543 was recovered with ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration on Sephadex G-75, and anion-exchange chromatography on diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex A-50. Maximal glycerol ester hydrolase (lipase) activity was observed at pH 5.0 to 5.5 and 50 C when trioctanoin and olive oil were used as substrates. The enzyme also showed esterase activity; it hydrolyzed, with the exception of methyl butyrate, all methyl esters tested. A minimum chain length of six carbons appeared to be a requirement for esterase activity, which was maximal at about pH 5.5 with methyl dodecanoate (C12) as the substrate. Neither the glycerol ester hydrolase (lipase) nor the esterase activity of the enzyme appeared to be affected by thiol group inhibitors, chelating agents, and reducing compounds. On the other hand, hydrolysis of triolein and methyl dodecanoate was arrested to the same extent in the presence of diisopropyl fluorophosphate, which suggested the involvement of serine in the active center of the enzyme. The enzyme remained stable during a 30-day storage at - 10 C. PMID:5772396

  14. Gene cloning and molecular characterization of the Talaromyces thermophilus lipase catalyzed efficient hydrolysis and synthesis of esters.

    PubMed

    Romdhane, Ines Belhaj-Ben; Frikha, Fakher; Maalej-Achouri, Inès; Gargouri, Ali; Belghith, Hafedh

    2012-02-15

    A genomic bank from Talaromyces thermophilus fungus was constructed and screened using a previously isolated fragment lipase gene as probe. From several clones isolated, the nucleotide sequence of the lipase gene (TTL gene) was completed and sequenced. The TTL coding gene consists of an open reading frame (ORF) of 1083bp encoding a protein of 269 Aa with an estimated molecular mass of 30kDa. The TTL belongs to the same gene family as Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase (TLL, Lipolase®), a well known lipase with multiple applications. The promoter sequence of the TTL gene showed the conservation of known consensus sequences PacC, CreA, Hap2-3-4 and the existence of a particular sequence like the binding sites of Oleate Response Element (ORE) and Fatty acids Responsis Element (FARE) which are similar to that already found to be specific of lipolytic genes in Candida and Fusarium, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that the TTL expression was much higher on wheat bran than on olive oil as sole carbon source. Compared to the Lipolase®, this enzyme was found to be more efficient for the hydrolysis and the synthesis of esters; and its synthetic efficiency even reached 91.6% from Waste Cooking Oil triglycerides.

  15. Fate of Fusarium Toxins during Brewing.

    PubMed

    Habler, Katharina; Geissinger, Cajetan; Hofer, Katharina; Schüler, Jan; Moghari, Sarah; Hess, Michael; Gastl, Martina; Rychlik, Michael

    2017-01-11

    Some information is available about the fate of Fusarium toxins during the brewing process, but only little is known about the single processing steps in detail. In our study we produced beer from two different barley cultivars inoculated with three different Fusarium species, namely, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium sporotrichioides, and Fusarium avenaceum, producing a wide range of mycotoxins such as type B trichothecenes, type A trichothecenes, and enniatins. By the use of multi-mycotoxin LC-MS/MS stable isotope dilution methods we were able to follow the fate of Fusarium toxins during the entire brewing process. In particular, the type B trichothecenes deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol showed similar behaviors. Between 35 and 52% of those toxins remained in the beer after filtration. The contents of the potentially hazardous deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside and the type A trichothecenes increased during mashing, but a rapid decrease of deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside content was found during the following steps of lautering and wort boiling. The concentration of enniatins greatly decreased with the discarding of spent grains or finally with the hot break. The results of our study show the retention of diverse Fusarium toxins during the brewing process and allow for assessing the food safety of beer regarding the monitored Fusarium mycotoxins.

  16. Characterization of effectors from Fusarium graminearum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium graminearum is the causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB), which reduces crop yield and quality by producing various mycotoxins. Effectors play an important role in the pathogenesis of many bacterial and fungal pathogens. In this study, 26 effector candidates were selected for investiga...

  17. Biological and Chemical Complexity of Fusarium proliferatum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The heterothallic ascomycete Fusarium proliferatum (teleomorph Gibberella intermedia) is a genetically diverse biological and phylogenetic species with a worldwide distribution and an unusually broad host range. F. proliferatum is a frequent component of the Fusarium ear rot complexes of maize and ...

  18. Resistance to Fusarium wilt in chickpea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium wilt of chickpea, caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris (Foc), is a destructive disease and is distributed in almost all chickpea producing regions of the world. Foc has eight physiological races designated as 0, 1A, 1B/C, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. The races are different...

  19. Biological and chemical complexity of Fusarium proliferatum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The heterothallic ascomycete Fusarium proliferatum (teleomorph Gibberella intermedia) is a genetically diverse biological and phylogenetic species with a worldwide distribution and an unusually broad host range. F. proliferatum is a frequent component of the Fusarium ear rot complexes of maize and ...

  20. Organic Solvent Tolerant Lipases and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Shamsher S.

    2014-01-01

    Lipases are a group of enzymes naturally endowed with the property of performing reactions in aqueous as well as organic solvents. The esterification reactions using lipase(s) could be performed in water-restricted organic media as organic solvent(s) not only improve(s) the solubility of substrate and reactant in reaction mixture but also permit(s) the reaction in the reverse direction, and often it is easy to recover the product in organic phase in two-phase equilibrium systems. The use of organic solvent tolerant lipase in organic media has exhibited many advantages: increased activity and stability, regiospecificity and stereoselectivity, higher solubility of substrate, ease of products recovery, and ability to shift the reaction equilibrium toward synthetic direction. Therefore the search for organic solvent tolerant enzymes has been an extensive area of research. A variety of fatty acid esters are now being produced commercially using immobilized lipase in nonaqueous solvents. This review describes the organic tolerance and industrial application of lipases. The main emphasis is to study the nature of organic solvent tolerant lipases. Also, the potential industrial applications that make lipases the biocatalysts of choice for the present and future have been presented. PMID:24672342

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF DIFFERENT FUSARIUM SPP. IN ALLIUM SPP. IN GERMANY.

    PubMed

    Boehnke, B; Karlovsky, P; Pfohl, K; Gamliel, A; Isack, Y; Dehne, H W

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 Allium cepa bulbs from different fields in Northern and Southern Germany, seeds and sets from onion breeders were analysed for infestation with Fusarium species. The same investigation was done in 2014 with different edible Allium spp. from local markets. Different Fusarium spp. were isolated and identified by morphological characterisation. 24 different Fusarium spp. were identified. The diversity of Fusarium spp. and the intensity of infestation was higher on edible bulbs compared to the younger sets and seeds. The analysed onions and other edible Allium spp. from local markets showed also high contents of different Fusarium species. The most prevalent identified Fusarium sp. in the analysed Allium spp. in Germany was Fusarium oxysporum which can cause the Fusarium Basal Rot, followed by Fusarium solani. Fusarium proliferatum, which can cause the Fusarium Salmon Blotch in onions, could be detected in about half of the sampled onion fields and in approximately 10% of all analysed onions from fields. Also in the onion sets, on the surface of the seeds and in other edible Allium spp. F. proliferatum could be identified. Besides F. proliferatum, further mycotoxin producing Fusarium spp. like Fusarium equiseti or Fusarium tricinctum were identified. Other Fusarium spp. like Fusarium sporotrichioides and Fusarium poae were first described in Allium sp. in this study. The two most prevalent Fusarium spp. F. oxysporum and F. solani are able to produce mycotoxins like enniatins, fumonisins, moniliformin and T-2 toxins. Fusarium sp. like F. proliferatum, F. equiseti and F. tricinctum are able to produce additional toxins like beauvericins, zearalenone and diacetoscirpenol. This high number of Fusarium spp., which are able to produce a broad spectrum of different mycotoxins, could be a potential health risk for human beings and livestock.

  2. In vitro stability evaluation of coated lipase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lu Jie; Zhu, Jia; Wang, Bin; Cheng, Chu; Du, Yong Jie; Wang, Min Qi

    2017-01-01

    Objective The study was conducted to evaluate the stability of commercial coated lipase (CT-LIP) in vitro. Methods The capsules were tested under different conditions with a range of temperature, pH, dry heat treatment and steaming treatment, simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) in this work, respectively. Free lipase (uncoated lipase, UC-LIP) was the control group. Lipase relative activities measured in various treatments were used as a reference frame to characterize the stability. Results The lipase activities were decreased with increasing temperatures (p<0.05), and there was a markedly decline (p<0.01) in lipase comparative activities of UC-LIP at 80°C compared with CT-LIP group. Higher relative activities of lipase were observed in CT-LIP group compared with the free one under acidic ambient (pH 3 to 7) and an alkaline medium (pH 8 to 12). Residual lipase activities of CT-LIP group were increased (p<0.05) by 5.67% and 35.60% in dry heat and hydrothermal treatments, respectively. The lipase relative activity profile of CT-LIP was raised at first and dropped subsequently (p<0.05) compared with constantly reduced tendency of UC-LIP exposed to both SGF and SIF. Conclusion The results suggest that the CT-LIP possesses relatively higher stability in comparison with the UC-LIP in vitro. The CT-LIP could retain the potential property to provide sustained release of lipase and thus improved its bioavailability in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27507179

  3. Onychomycosis caused by Fusarium solani and Fusarium oxysporum in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Godoy, P; Nunes, E; Silva, V; Tomimori-Yamashita, J; Zaror, L; Fischman, O

    2004-04-01

    Fusarium species are common soil saprophytes and plant pathogens that have been frequently reported as etiologic agents of opportunistic infections in humans. We report eight cases of onychomycosis caused by Fusarium solani (4) and Fusarium oxysporum (4) in São Paulo, Brazil. These species were isolated from toenails in all cases. The infections were initially considered to be caused by dermatophytes. The clinical appearance of the affected toenails was leukonychia or distal subungual hyperkeratosis with yellowish brown coloration. The eight cases reported here suggest that Fusarium spp. should be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis of tinea unguium.

  4. TLC bioautographic method for detecting lipase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Abdel Moniem Sadek

    2012-01-01

    Bioautographic assays using TLC play an important role in the search for active compounds from plants. A TLC bioautographic assay has previously been established for the detection of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors but not for lipases. Development of a TLC bioautographic method for detecting lipase inhibitors in plant extracts. After migration of the plant extracts, the TLC plate was sprayed with α-naphtyl acetate and enzyme solutions before incubation at 37°C for 20 min. Finally, the solution of Fast Blue B salt was sprayed onto the TLC plate giving a purple background colouration. Lipase inhibitors were visualised as white spots on the TLC plates. Orlistat (a known lipase inhibitor) inhibited lipase down to 0.01 µg. Methanolic extracts of Camellia sinensis (L.) kuntz and Rosmarinus officinalis L after migration on TLC gave enzymatic inhibition when applied in amounts of 82 and 56 µg, respectively. On the other hand the methanolic extract of Morus alba leaves did not exhibit any lipase inhibitory activity. The screening test was able to detect lipase inhibition by pure reference substances and by compounds present in complex matrices, such as plant extracts. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Purification of extracellular lipase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Stuer, W; Jaeger, K E; Winkler, U K

    1986-01-01

    Lipase (triacylglycerol acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.3) was excreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAC1R during the late logarithmic growth phase. Characterization of cell-free culture supernatants by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of significant amounts of lipopolysaccharide, part of which seemed to be tightly bound to lipase. After concentration of culture supernatants by ultrafiltration, lipase-lipopolysaccharide complexes were dissociated by treatment with EDTA-Tris buffer and subsequent sonication in the presence of the zwitterionic detergent 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate. The solubilized lipase was purified by isoelectric focusing in an agarose gel containing the same detergent; the lipase activity appeared in a single peak corresponding to a distinct band in the silver-stained gel. The isoelectric point was 5.8. Analysis of purified lipase by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and scanning revealed an apparent molecular weight of 29,000 and a specific activity of 760 mu kat/mg of protein. Estimations based on these data showed that a single P. aeruginosa cell excreted about 200 molecules of lipase, each having a molecular activity of 2.2 X 10(4) per s. Images PMID:3096967

  6. Advances in lipase-catalyzed esterification reactions.

    PubMed

    Stergiou, Panagiota-Yiolanda; Foukis, Athanasios; Filippou, Michalis; Koukouritaki, Maria; Parapouli, Maria; Theodorou, Leonidas G; Hatziloukas, Efstathios; Afendra, Amalia; Pandey, Ashok; Papamichael, Emmanuel M

    2013-12-01

    Lipase-catalyzed esterification reactions are among the most significant chemical and biochemical processes of industrial relevance. Lipases catalyze hydrolysis as well as esterification reactions. Enzyme-catalyzed esterification has acquired increasing attention in many applications, due to the significance of the derived products. More specifically, the lipase-catalyzed esterification reactions attracted research interest during the past decade, due to an increased use of organic esters in biotechnology and the chemical industry. Lipases, as hydrolyzing agents are active in environments, which contain a minimum of two distinct phases, where all reactants are partitioned between these phases, although their distribution is not fixed and changes as the reaction proceeds. The kinetics of the lipase-catalyzed reactions is governed by a number of factors. This article presents a thorough and descriptive evaluation of the applied trends and perspectives concerning the enzymatic esterification, mainly for biofuel production; an emphasis is given on essential factors, which affect the lipase-catalyzed esterification reaction. Moreover, the art of using bacterial and/or fungal strains for whole cell biocatalysis purposes, as well as carrying out catalysis by various forms of purified lipases from bacterial and fungal sources is also reviewed.

  7. Potential lipase inhibitors from Chinese medicinal herbs.

    PubMed

    Fei, Hongqiang; Li, Mengxuan; Liu, Wenjun; Sun, Lin; Li, Na; Cao, Liang; Meng, Zhaoqing; Huang, Wenzhe; Ding, Gang; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Obesity has become a major health concern, and it places both personal and economic burdens on the world's population. Traditional Chinese medicinal herbs are rich source of lead compounds and are possible drug candidates, which may be used to treat this condition. This study screened potent pancreatic lipase inhibitors found in traditional Chinese medicinal herbs for ability to treat obesity. A porcine pancreatic lipase inhibition assay was established, and the inhibitory activity of 35 traditional Chinese medicinal herbs was evaluated at a concentration of 200 μg/mL. Two elutions of herbal extracts with strong lipase inhibitory activity were further fractionated by preparative high-performance liquid chromatography into 22 sub-fractions each, and these sub-fractions were tested for anti-lipase activity. Sub-fractions, which exhibited strong lipase inhibitory activity, were continuously fractionated into individual compounds. Two active compounds with potent anti-lipase activity were finally isolated and identified from two traditional Chinese medicinal herbs, respectively. Among 35 traditional Chinese medicinal herbs, the 95% ethanol elutions of Panax notoginseng (Burk.) F.H. Chen (Araliaceae) and Magnolia officinalis Rehd. et Wils (Magnoliaceae) showed strong anti-lipase activity. Two compounds, including 20(S)-ginsenoside Rg3 and honokiol were identified using bioactivity-guided isolation with IC50 = 33.7 and 59.4 μg/mL, respectively. 20(S)-ginsenoside Rg3 and honokiol might be suitable candidates for the treatment of obesity.

  8. Organization of the human lipoprotein lipase gene and evolution of the lipase gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Kirchgessner, T G; Chuat, J C; Heinzmann, C; Etienne, J; Guilhot, S; Svenson, K; Ameis, D; Pilon, C; d'Auriol, L; Andalibi, A

    1989-01-01

    The human lipoprotein lipase gene was cloned and characterized. It is composed of 10 exons spanning approximately equal to 30 kilobases. The first exon encodes the 5'-untranslated region, the signal peptide plus the first two amino acids of the mature protein. The next eight exons encode the remaining 446 amino acids, and the tenth exon encodes the long 3'-untranslated region of 1948 nucleotides. The lipoprotein lipase transcription start site and the sequence of the 5'-flanking region were also determined. We compared the organization of genes for lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, pancreatic lipase, and Drosophila yolk protein 1, which are members of a family of related genes. A model for the evolution of the lipase gene family is presented that involves multiple rounds of gene duplication plus exon-shuffling and intron-loss events. Images PMID:2602366

  9. Synthesis of hepatic lipase in liver and extrahepatic tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Doolittle, M.H.; Wong, H.; Davis, R.C.; Schotz, M.C.

    1987-11-01

    Immunoprecipitations of hepatic lipase from pulse-labeled rat liver have demonstrated that hepatic lipase is synthesized in two distinct molecular weight forms, HL-I (Mr = 51,000) and HL-II (Mr = 53,000). Both forms are immunologically related to purified hepatic lipase, but not to lipoprotein lipase. HL-I and HL-II are also kinetically related and represent different stages of intracellular processing. Glycosidase experiments suggest that HL-I is the high mannose microsomal form of the mature, sialylated HL-II enzyme. Hepatic lipase activity was detected in liver and adrenal gland but was absent in brain, heart, kidney, testes, small intestine, lung, and spleen. The adrenal and liver lipase activities were inhibited in a similar dose-dependent manner by hepatic lipase antiserum. Immunoblot analysis of partially purified adrenal lipase showed an immunoreactive band co-migrating with HL-II at 53,000 daltons which was absent in a control blot treated with preimmune serum. Adrenal lipase and authentic hepatic lipase yielded similar peptide maps, confirming the presence of the lipase in adrenal gland. However, incorporation of L-(/sup 35/S)methionine into immunoprecipitable hepatic lipase was not detected in this tissue. In addition, Northern blot analysis showed the presence of hepatic lipase mRNA in liver but not adrenal gland. The presence of hepatic lipase in adrenal gland in the absence of detectable synthesis or messenger suggests that hepatic lipase originates in liver and is transported to this extrahepatic site.

  10. Lipases That Activate at High Solvent Polarities.

    PubMed

    Skjold-Jørgensen, Jakob; Vind, Jesper; Svendsen, Allan; Bjerrum, Morten J

    2016-01-12

    Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase (TlL) and related lipases become activated in low-polarity environments that exist at the water-lipid interface where a structural change of the "lid" region occurs. In this work, we have investigated the activation of TlL (Lipase_W89) and certain lid mutants, containing either a single positive charge mutation, E87K (Lipase_K87_W89), within the lid region or a lid residue composition of both lipase and esterase character (Hybrid_W89) as a function of solvent polarity. Activation differences between the variants and TlL were studied by a combination of biophysical and theoretical methods. To investigate the structural changes taking place in the lid region upon lipase activation, we used a fluorescence-based method measuring the efficiency of Trp89 in the lid to quench the fluorescence of a bimane molecule attached in front (C255) and behind (C61) the lid. These structural changes were compared to the enzymatic activity of each variant at the water-substrate interface and to theoretical calculations of the energies associated with lid opening as a function of the dielectric constant (ε) of the environment. Our results show that the lid in Lipase_K87_W89 undergoes a pronounced structural transition toward an open conformation around ε = 50, whereas only small changes are detected for Lipase_W89 ascribed to the stabilizing effect of the positive charge mutation on the open lid conformation. Interestingly, Hybrid_W89, with the same charge as Lipase_W89, shows a stabilization of the open lid even more pronounced at high solvent polarities than that of Lipase_K87_W89, allowing activation at ε < 80. This is further indicated by measurement of the lipase activity for each variant showing that Hybrid_W89 is more quickly activated at the water-lipid interface of a true, natural substrate. Combined, we show that a correlation exists between structural changes and enzymatic activities detected on one hand and theoretical calculations on lid

  11. Brachypodium distachyon: a new pathosystem to study Fusarium head blight and other Fusarium diseases of wheat

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fusarium species cause Fusarium head blight (FHB) and other important diseases of cereals. The causal agents produce trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON). The dicotyledonous model species Arabidopsis thaliana has been used to study Fusarium-host interactions but it is not ideal for model-to-crop translation. Brachypodium distachyon (Bd) has been proposed as a new monocotyledonous model species for functional genomic studies in grass species. This study aims to assess the interaction between the most prevalent FHB-causing Fusarium species and Bd in order to develop and exploit Bd as a genetic model for FHB and other Fusarium diseases of wheat. Results The ability of Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum to infect a range of Bd tissues was examined in various bioassays which showed that both species can infect all Bd tissues examined, including intact foliar tissues. DON accumulated in infected spike tissues at levels similar to those of infected wheat spikes. Histological studies revealed details of infection, colonisation and host response and indicate that hair cells are important sites of infection. Susceptibility to Fusarium and DON was assessed in two Bd ecotypes and revealed variation in resistance between ecotypes. Conclusions Bd exhibits characteristics of susceptibility highly similar to those of wheat, including susceptibility to spread of disease in the spikelets. Bd is the first reported plant species to allow successful infection on intact foliar tissues by FHB-causing Fusarium species. DON appears to function as a virulence factor in Bd as it does in wheat. Bd is proposed as a valuable model for undertaking studies of Fusarium head blight and other Fusarium diseases of wheat. PMID:21639892

  12. Neutrophil chemotaxis by Propionibacterium acnes lipase and its inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W L; Shalita, A R; Suntharalingam, K; Fikrig, S M

    1982-01-01

    The chemoattraction of Propionibacterium acnes lipase for neutrophils and the effect of lipase inhibitor and two antibiotic agents on the chemotaxis were evaluated. Of the various fractions tested, partially purified lipase (fraction 2c) was the most active cytotaxin produced by P. acnes. Serum mediators were not required for the generation of chemotaxis by lipase in vitro. Diisopropyl phosphofluoridate at low concentration (10(-4) mM) completely inhibited lipase activity as well as polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis generated by lipase. Tetracycline hydrochloride and erythromycin base at concentrations of 10(-1) mM and 1 mM, respectively, caused 100% inhibition of PMN migration toward lipase or zymosan-activated serum. The inhibiting activity of the antibiotics was directed against cells independently of any effect on lipase. Chemotaxis by P. acnes lipase suggests a wider role for this enzyme in the inflammatory process and the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. Images PMID:7054130

  13. Lipase and phospholipase biosensors: a review.

    PubMed

    Herrera-López, Enrique J

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of biology, electronics, and nanotechnology have improved the development of biosensors. A biosensor is a device composed of a biological recognition element and a sensor element. Biosensor applications are becoming increasingly important in areas such as biotechnology, pharmaceutics, food, and environment. Lipases and phospholipases are enzymes which have been used widely in food industry, oleochemical industry, biodegradable polymers, detergents, and other applications. In the medical industry, lipases and phospholipases are used as diagnostic tools to detect triglycerides, cholesterol, and phospholipids levels in blood samples. Therefore, the development of lipase and phospholipase biosensors is of paramount importance in the clinical area. This chapter introduces the reader into the preliminaries of biosensor and reviews recent developments of lipase and phospholipase biosensors.

  14. Lipase catalyzed synthesis of silicone polyesters.

    PubMed

    Poojari, Yadagiri; Clarson, Stephen J

    2009-11-28

    Immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) was successfully employed as a catalyst to synthesize silicone aromatic polyesters by the transesterification of dimethyl terephthalate with alpha,omega-bis(hydroxyalkyl)-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) in toluene under mild reaction conditions.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: hepatic lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... affects the body's ability to break down fats (lipids). People with this disorder have increased amounts of ... It is unclear what effect this change in lipid levels has on people with hepatic lipase deficiency . ...

  16. Lipase

    MedlinePlus

    ... in wheat products (celiac disease), Crohn's disease, and cystic fibrosis. ... the pancreas (pancreatic insufficiency) that is associated with cystic fibrosis.Allergy to gluten in wheat products (celiac disease). ...

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of the Phytopathogenic Fungus Fusarium euwallaceae, the Causal Agent of Fusarium Dieback

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Rangel, Diana; Hernández-Domínguez, Eric; Pérez-Torres, Claudia-Anahí; Ortiz-Castro, Randy; Villafán, Emanuel; Alonso-Sánchez, Alexandro; Rodríguez-Haas, Benjamín; López-Buenfil, Abel; García-Avila, Clemente; Ramírez-Pool, José-Abrahán

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the genome of Fusarium euwallaceae strain HFEW-16-IV-019, an isolate obtained from Kuroshio shot hole borer (a Euwallacea sp.). These beetles were collected in Tijuana, Mexico, from elm trees showing typical symptoms of Fusarium dieback. The final assembly consists of 287 scaffolds spanning 48,274,071 bp and 13,777 genes. PMID:28860245

  18. Fusarium-damaged kernels and deoxynivalenol in Fusarium-infected U.S. Winter Wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a devastating disease that threatens wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production in many areas worldwide. FHB infection results in Fusarium-damaged kernels (FDK) and deoxynivalenol (DON) that dramatically reduce grain yield and quality. More effective and accurate disease e...

  19. Conjunctively screening of biocontrol agents (BCAs) against fusarium root rot and fusarium head blight caused by Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Yao; Xie, Yue-Shen; Cui, Yuan-Yu; Xu, Jianjun; He, Wei; Chen, Huai-Gu; Guo, Jian-Hua

    2015-08-01

    Fusarium root-rot and fusarium head blight are plant diseases caused by Fusarium sp. in different growth periods of wheat, bring heavy losses to crop production in China. This research is aiming to screen biocontrol agents conjunctively for controlling these two diseases at the same time, as well as evaluate our previous BCAs (Biological Control Agents) screening strategies in more complex situation, considering biocontrol is well concerned as an environmental-friendly plant disease controlling method. Totally 966 bacterial isolates were screened from different parts of wheat tissues, of which potential biocontrol values were detected according to their abilities in antagonism inhibition and secreting extracellular hydrolytic enzyme. Biocontrol tests against fusarium root rot and fusarium head blight were carried out on 37 bacterial isolates with potential biocontrol capacity after pre-selection through ARDRA- and BOX-PCR analysis on strains with high assessment points. We acquired 10 BCAs with obvious biocontrol efficacy (more than 40%) in greenhouse and field tests. Pseudomonas fluorescens LY1-8 performed well in both two tests (biocontrol efficacy: 44.62% and 58.31%), respectively. Overall, correlation coefficient is 0.720 between assessment values of 37 tested BCA strains and their biocontrol efficacy in trails against fusarium root rot; correlation coefficient is 0.806 between their assessment values and biocontrol efficacy in trails against fusarium head blight. We acquired 10 well-performed potential BCAs, especially P. fluorescens LY1-8 displayed good biocontrol capacity against two different diseases on wheat. Biocontrol efficacies results in both greenhouse and field tests showed high positive correlation with assessment values (0.720 and 0.806), suggesting that the BCAs screening and assessing strategy previously developed in our lab is also adaptable for conjunctively screening BCAs for controlling both root and shoot diseases on wheat caused by same

  20. Immobilised lipase for in vitro lipolysis experiments.

    PubMed

    Phan, Stephanie; Salentinig, Stefan; Hawley, Adrian; Boyd, Ben J

    2015-04-01

    In vitro lipolysis experiments are used to assess digestion of lipid-based formulations, and probe solubilisation by colloidal phases during digestion. However, proteins and other biological components in the pancreatin often used as the lipase result in high-background scattering when interrogating structures using scattering approaches, complicating the resolution of colloidal structures. In this study, to circumvent this problem, a modified in vitro digestion model employing lipase immobilised on polymer beads, which allows for separation of the lipid digestion components during lipolysis, was investigated. Titration of the fatty acids released during digestion of medium chain triglycerides using pancreatin compared with immobilised lipase, combined with HPLC was used to follow the digestion, and small-angle X-ray scattering was used to determine colloidal structure formation. Digestion of medium chain triglycerides at the same nominal activity revealed that for the immobilised lipase, a longer digestion time was required to achieve the same extent of digestion. However, the same structural endpoint was observed, indicating that structure formation was not affected by the choice of lipase used. Lipolysis with immobilised lipase led to the reduction of parasitic scattering, resulting in clearer and more defined scattering from the structures generated by the lipolysis products. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  1. Fusarium Infection in Lung Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Herman A.; Coleman, Jeffrey J.; Restrepo, Alejandro; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium is a fungal pathogen of immunosuppressed lung transplant patients associated with a high mortality in those with severe and persistent neutropenia. The principle portal of entry for Fusarium species is the airways, and lung involvement almost always occurs among lung transplant patients with disseminated infection. In these patients, the immunoprotective mechanisms of the transplanted lungs are impaired, and they are, therefore, more vulnerable to Fusarium infection. As a result, fusariosis occurs in up to 32% of lung transplant patients. We studied fusariosis in 6 patients following lung transplantation who were treated at Massachusetts General Hospital during an 8-year period and reviewed 3 published cases in the literature. Cases were identified by the microbiology laboratory and through discharge summaries. Patients presented with dyspnea, fever, nonproductive cough, hemoptysis, and headache. Blood tests showed elevated white blood cell counts with granulocytosis and elevated inflammatory markers. Cultures of Fusarium were isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage, blood, and sputum specimens. Treatments included amphotericin B, liposomal amphotericin B, caspofungin, voriconazole, and posaconazole, either alone or in combination. Lung involvement occurred in all patients with disseminated disease and it was associated with a poor outcome. The mortality rate in this group of patients was high (67%), and of those who survived, 1 patient was treated with a combination of amphotericin B and voriconazole, 1 patient with amphotericin B, and 1 patient with posaconazole. Recommended empirical treatment includes voriconazole, amphotericin B or liposomal amphotericin B first-line, and posaconazole for refractory disease. High-dose amphotericin B is recommended for treatment of most cases of fusariosis. The echinocandins (for example, caspofungin, micafungin, anidulafungin) are generally avoided because Fusarium species have intrinsic resistance to them. Treatment

  2. Conversion of a Mono- and Diacylglycerol Lipase into a Triacylglycerol Lipase by Protein Engineering.

    PubMed

    Lan, Dongming; Popowicz, Grzegorz Maria; Pavlidis, Ioannis V; Zhou, Pengfei; Bornscheuer, Uwe T; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-07-06

    Despite the fact that most lipases are believed to be active against triacylglycerides, there is a small group of lipases that are active only on mono- and diacylglycerides. The reason for this difference in substrate scope is not clear. We tried to identify the reasons for this in the lipase from Malassezia globosa. By protein engineering, and with only one mutation, we managed to convert this enzyme into a typical triacylglycerol lipase (the wild-type lipase does not accept triacylglycerides). The variant Q282L accepts a broad spectrum of triacylglycerides, although the catalytic behavior is altered to some extent. From in silico analysis it seems that specific hydrophobic interactions are key to the altered substrate specificity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Fusarium stalk blight and rot in sugar beet

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium stalk blight of sugar beet can cause reductions or complete loss of seed production. The causal agent is Fusarium oxysporum. In addition, Fusarium solani has been demonstrated to cause a rot of sugar beet seed stalk, and other species have been reported associated with sugar beet fruit, but...

  4. Diversity of the Fusarium complex on French maize

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ear rot caused by Fusarium species is a major threat to maize production worldwide, causing yield reduction and poor grain quality. In addition, various species of the genus Fusarium can produce mycotoxins, which accumulate in the grain. The distribution and predominance of the different Fusarium sp...

  5. Molecular identification of Fusarium spp. causing wilt of chickpea and the first report of Fusarium redolens in Turkey

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important food legume crop and Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris is one of the most important diseases of chickpea in Turkey. Fusarium redolens is known to cause wilt-like disease of chickpea in other countries, but has not been reported fr...

  6. Temperature effects on the interactions of sugar beet Fusarium yellows caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium yellows of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.), caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae, causes a significant reduction in root yield, sucrose percentage, and juice purity. The environmental or agronomic factors that contribute to development and severity of Fusarium yellows have not been desc...

  7. Monoacylglycerol Lipase Regulates Fever Response.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Nguyen, William; Mori, Simone; Moroncini, Gianluca; Viader, Andreu; Nomura, Daniel K; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Conti, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase inhibitors such as ibuprofen have been used for decades to control fever through reducing the levels of the pyrogenic lipid transmitter prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Historically, phospholipases have been considered to be the primary generator of the arachidonic acid (AA) precursor pool for generating PGE2 and other eicosanoids. However, recent studies have demonstrated that monoacyglycerol lipase (MAGL), through hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol, provides a major source of AA for PGE2 synthesis in the mammalian brain under basal and neuroinflammatory states. We show here that either genetic or pharmacological ablation of MAGL leads to significantly reduced fever responses in both centrally or peripherally-administered lipopolysaccharide or interleukin-1β-induced fever models in mice. We also show that a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist does not attenuate these anti-pyrogenic effects of MAGL inhibitors. Thus, much like traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, MAGL inhibitors can control fever, but appear to do so through restricted control over prostaglandin production in the nervous system.

  8. Genomic analysis of Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Brown, D W; Butchko, R A E; Proctor, R H

    2008-09-01

    Fusarium verticillioides (teleomorph Gibberella moniliformis) can be either an endophyte of maize, causing no visible disease, or a pathogen-causing disease of ears, stalks, roots and seedlings. At any stage, this fungus can synthesize fumonisins, a family of mycotoxins structurally similar to the sphingolipid sphinganine. Ingestion of fumonisin-contaminated maize has been associated with a number of animal diseases, including cancer in rodents, and exposure has been correlated with human oesophageal cancer in some regions of the world, and some evidence suggests that fumonisins are a risk factor for neural tube defects. A primary goal of the authors' laboratory is to eliminate fumonisin contamination of maize and maize products. Understanding how and why these toxins are made and the F. verticillioides-maize disease process will allow one to develop novel strategies to limit tissue destruction (rot) and fumonisin production. To meet this goal, genomic sequence data, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and microarrays are being used to identify F. verticillioides genes involved in the biosynthesis of toxins and plant pathogenesis. This paper describes the current status of F. verticillioides genomic resources and three approaches being used to mine microarray data from a wild-type strain cultured in liquid fumonisin production medium for 12, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120h. Taken together, these approaches demonstrate the power of microarray technology to provide information on different biological processes.

  9. In-vitro antifungal susceptibility of clinical and environmental Fusarium spp. strains.

    PubMed

    Pujol, I; Guarro, J; Gené, J; Sala, J

    1997-02-01

    The MICs of amphotericin B, miconazole, ketoconazole, flucytosine, itraconazole and fluconazole for 19 isolates of Fusarium oxysporum, 16 Fusarium solani, seven Fusarium verticilliodes, four Fusarium proliferatum, four Fusarium dimerum, three Fusarium equiseti, and one each of the following species: Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium chlamydosporum, Fusarium semitectum, Fusarium avenaceum and Fusarium subglutinans were determined by a broth microdilution method. Thirty-eight of these isolates were of clinical origin and 20 from environmental sources. In general, Fusarium spp. strains showed resistance to all the antifungals tested. However, the most active agent was amphotericin B. Fluconazole and flucytosine were not active against any of the isolates tested. A correlation study of in-vitro testing with in-vivo outcome of amphotericin B of the cases of disseminated fusarium infections published is reported.

  10. Sensitivity of Fusarium strains to Chelidonium majus L. extracts.

    PubMed

    Matos, O C; Baeta, J; Silva, M J; Pinto Ricardo, C

    1999-08-01

    Ten Fusarium strains were tested for their sensitivity to extracts of Chelidonium majus L. Growth inhibition was measured either in solid or in liquid media. Aqueous extracts had considerable inhibitory action but methanolic extracts showed the best results. Root extracts were more inhibitory than shoot extracts. On the basis of growth inhibition the Fusarium strains were aggregated into five classes, the extremes being Fusarium culmorum plus Fusarium graminearum (quite resistant) and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (very sensitive), with the other seven strains occupying the three intermediate classes. The high resistance of most Fusarium strains to conventional fungicides led us to propose C. majus as a good source of substances useful for the treatment of fungal infections, with special importance for those caused by Fusarium.

  11. Inhibitory effects of antimicrobial agents against Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hideaki; Inuzuka, Hiroko; Hori, Nobuhide; Takahashi, Nobumichi; Ishida, Kyoko; Mochizuki, Kiyofumi; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Muraosa, Yasunori; Watanabe, Akira; Kamei, Katsuhiko

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of antibacterial, biocidal, and antifungal agents against Fusarium spp. Seven Fusarium spp: four F. falciforme (Fusarium solani species complex), one Fusarium spp, one Fusarium spp. (Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti species complex), and one F. napiforme (Gibberella fujikuroi species complex), isolated from eyes with fungal keratitis were used in this study. Their susceptibility to antibacterial agents: flomoxef, imipenem, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, and Tobracin® (contained 3,000 μg/ml of tobramycin and 25 μg/ml of benzalkonium chloride (BAK), a biocidal agent: BAK, and antifungal agents: amphotericin B, pimaricin (natamycin), fluconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, voriconazole, and micafungin, was determined by broth microdilution tests. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50), 100% inhibitory concentration (IC100), and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against the Fusarium isolates were determined. BAK had the highest activity against the Fusarium spp. except for the antifungal agents. Three fluoroquinolones and two aminoglycosides had inhibitory effects against the Fusarium spp. at relatively high concentrations. Tobracin® had a higher inhibitory effect against Fusarium spp. than tobramycin alone. Amphotericin B had the highest inhibitory effect against the Fusarium spp, although it had different degrees of activity against each isolate. Our findings showed that fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and BAK had some degree of inhibitory effect against the seven Fusarium isolates, although these agents had considerably lower effect than amphotericin B. However, the inhibitory effects of amphotericin B against the Fusarium spp. varied for the different isolates. Further studies for more effective medications against Fusarium, such as different combinations of antibacterial, biocidal, and antifungal agents are needed.

  12. Occurrence of Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium musae on banana fruits marketed in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Orsolya; Bartók, Tibor; Szécsi, Árpád

    2015-06-01

    Fusarium strains were isolated from rotten banana fruit imported into Hungary from some African and some Neotropical countries. The strains were identified using morphological features, 2-benzoxazolinone tolerance, translation elongation factor (EF-1α) sequences and inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis. All strains from Africa proved to be F. verticillioides whereas the strains from the Neotropics are Fusarium musae. According to the PCR proof and the fumonisin toxin measurement F. musae strains cannot produce any fumonisins (FB1-4).

  13. A double blind lipase for lipase comparison of a high lipase and standard pancreatic enzyme preparation in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, I M; Wolfe, S P; Owens, H M; Sheldon, T A; Littlewood, J M; Walters, M P

    1993-01-01

    A standard acid resistant microsphere pancreatic enzyme preparation was compared with identical capsules half filled with mini-tablets of a new high lipase preparation in a randomised double blind crossover study in children with cystic fibrosis. Each patient received his/her usual number of capsules and the same dose of lipase during each period of the study. Eighteen patients completed the study. There were fewer gastrointestinal symptoms when pancreatic enzyme was supplied as the high lipase preparation. There was also a significant improvement in fat absorption (17%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 6 to 27), reduction in faecal fat output (15.8 g/day, 95% CI 6.4 to 22.5), and faecal energy loss (789 kJ/day, 95% CI 211 to 1384). It is concluded that half filled capsules of the new high lipase preparation are more effective than the standard preparation and it is likely that filled capsules would allow patients to use fewer than half the number of pancreatic enzyme capsules. PMID:7683190

  14. Lipase-catalyzed process for biodiesel production: protein engineering and lipase production.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun Tae; Qi, Feng; Yuan, Chongli; Zhao, Xuebing; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami; Liu, Dehua; Varma, Arvind

    2014-04-01

    Biodiesel is an environment-friendly and renewable fuel produced by transesterification of various feedstocks. Although the lipase-catalyzed biodiesel production has many advantages over the conventional alkali catalyzed process, its industrial applications have been limited by high-cost and low-stability of lipase enzymes. This review provides a general overview of the recent advances in lipase engineering, including both protein modification and production. Recent advances in biotechnology such as in protein engineering, recombinant methods and metabolic engineering have been employed but are yet to impact lipase engineering for cost-effective production of biodiesel. A summary of the current challenges and perspectives for potential solutions are also provided. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Use of a fluorescent radiolabeled triacylglycerol as a substrate for lipoprotein lipase and hepatic triglyceride lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Dousset, N.; Negre, A.; Salvayre, R.; Rogalle, P.; Dang, Q.Q.; Douste-Blazy, L.

    1988-06-01

    A fluorescent radiolabeled triacylglycerol has been synthesized by using a fluorescent fatty acid (pyrene decanoic acid) and a radiolabeled oleic acid. This analog of the natural substrate, 1(3)pyrene decanoic-2,3 (1,2)-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol, has been tested as substrate for determining lipoprotein lipase and hepatic triacylglycerol lipase activities in post-heparin plasma. Optimal conditions for the determination of the two post-heparin plasma lipases were similar to those using radiolabeled triolein. Using this substrate, both post-heparin lipases exhibited their characteristic properties (pH optimum and effect of inhibitors) and attacked external ester bonds (1 or 3) containing pyrene decanoic and oleic acids at a similar rate.

  16. Fusarium and other opportunistic hyaline fungi

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter focuses on those fungi that grow in tissue in the form of hyaline or lightly colored septate hyphae. These fungi include Fusarium and other hyaline fungi. Disease caused by hyaline fungi is referred to as hyalohyphomycosis. Hyaline fungi described in this chapter include the anamorphic,...

  17. Biological and Chemical Complexity of Fusarium proliferatum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the past, the fungus Fusarium proliferatum has been confused with morphologically similar species. Today, F. proliferatum is well defined by morphology, its teleomorphic state (Gibberella intermedia), and DNA-based analyses. F. proliferatum has a worldwide distribution and an unusually broad ho...

  18. Investigating Spore killer of Fusarium verticillioides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maize is one of the most important crops in the world. Fusarium verticillioides may colonize maize as an endophyte or as a pathogen, causing disease at any life stage of the plant. During growth on maize, F. verticillioides can synthesis a number of mycotoxins including fumonisins, which have been l...

  19. Diet quality determines lipase gene expression and lipase/esterase activity in Daphnia pulex

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzenberger, Anke; Wacker, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We studied the short- (12 h) and long-term (144 h) response of Daphnia pulex lipases to quality shifts in diets consisting of different mixtures of the green alga Scenedesmus with the cyanobacterium Synechococcus, two species with contrasting lipid compositions. The lipase/esterase activity in both the gut and the body tissues had fast responses to the diet shift and increased with higher dietary contributions of Synechococcus. When screening the Daphnia genome for TAG lipases, we discovered a large gene-family expansion of these enzymes. We used a subset of eight genes for mRNA expression analyses and distinguished between influences of time and diet on the observed gene expression patterns. We identified five diet-responsive lipases of which three showed a sophisticated short- and long-term pattern of expression in response to small changes in food-quality. Furthermore, the gene expression of one of the lipases was strongly correlated to lipase/esterase activity in the gut suggesting its potentially major role in digestion. These findings demonstrate that the lipid-related enzymatic machinery of D. pulex is finely tuned to diet and might constitute an important mechanism of physiological adaptation in nutritionally complex environments. PMID:28069588

  20. Lipase maturation factor 1 is required for endothelial lipase activity[S

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Zeev, Osnat; Hosseini, Maryam; Lai, Ching-Mei; Ehrhardt, Nicole; Wong, Howard; Cefalù, Angelo B.; Noto, Davide; Averna, Maurizio R.; Doolittle, Mark H.; Péterfy, Miklós

    2011-01-01

    Lipase maturation factor 1 (Lmf1) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein involved in the posttranslational folding and/or assembly of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipase (HL) into active enzymes. Mutations in Lmf1 are associated with diminished LPL and HL activities (“combined lipase deficiency”) and result in severe hypertriglyceridemia in mice as well as in human subjects. Here, we investigate whether endothelial lipase (EL) also requires Lmf1 to attain enzymatic activity. We demonstrate that cells harboring a (cld) loss-of-function mutation in the Lmf1 gene are unable to generate active EL, but they regain this capacity after reconstitution with the Lmf1 wild type. Furthermore, we show that cellular EL copurifies with Lmf1, indicating their physical interaction in the ER. Finally, we determined that post-heparin phospholipase activity in a patient with the LMF1W464X mutation is reduced by more than 95% compared with that in controls. Thus, our study indicates that EL is critically dependent on Lmf1 for its maturation in the ER and demonstrates that Lmf1 is a required factor for all three vascular lipases, LPL, HL, and EL. PMID:21447484

  1. New extremophilic lipases and esterases from metagenomics.

    PubMed

    López-López, Olalla; Cerdán, Maria E; González Siso, Maria I

    2014-01-01

    Lipolytic enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of ester bonds in the presence of water. In media with low water content or in organic solvents, they can catalyze synthetic reactions such as esterification and transesterification. Lipases and esterases, in particular those from extremophilic origin, are robust enzymes, functional under the harsh conditions of industrial processes owing to their inherent thermostability and resistance towards organic solvents, which combined with their high chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivity make them very attractive biocatalysts for a variety of industrial applications. Likewise, enzymes from extremophile sources can provide additional features such as activity at extreme temperatures, extreme pH values or high salinity levels, which could be interesting for certain purposes. New lipases and esterases have traditionally been discovered by the isolation of microbial strains producing lipolytic activity. The Genome Projects Era allowed genome mining, exploiting homology with known lipases and esterases, to be used in the search for new enzymes. The Metagenomic Era meant a step forward in this field with the study of the metagenome, the pool of genomes in an environmental microbial community. Current molecular biology techniques make it possible to construct total environmental DNA libraries, including the genomes of unculturable organisms, opening a new window to a vast field of unknown enzymes with new and unique properties. Here, we review the latest advances and findings from research into new extremophilic lipases and esterases, using metagenomic approaches, and their potential industrial and biotechnological applications.

  2. Gastric lipase secretion in children with gastritis.

    PubMed

    Tomasik, Przemyslaw J; Wędrychowicz, Andrzej; Rogatko, Iwona; Zając, Andrzej; Fyderek, Krzysztof; Sztefko, Krystyna

    2013-07-29

    Gastric lipase is one of the prepancreatic lipases found in some mammalian species and in humans. Our knowledge of the hormonal regulation of gastric lipase secretion in children and adolescents is still very limited. The aim of this study was to compare the activity of human gastric lipase (HGL) in gastric juice in healthy adolescents and in patients with gastritis. The adolescents were allocated to three groups: the first including patients with Helicobacter pylori gastritis (HPG; n = 10), the second including patients with superficial gastritis caused by pathogens other than H. pylori (non-HPG; n = 14) and the control group including healthy adolescents (n = 14). Activity of HGL was measured in gastric juice collected during endoscopy. Plasma concentrations of cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) were measured in all adolescents. Activity of HGL in the non-HPG group was significantly lower than in the HPG group (p < 0.005) and the control group (p < 0.005). Mean plasma GIP levels in the control group were lower than in the non-HPG group (p < 0.003) and the HPG group (p < 0.01). We conclude that the regulation of HGL secretion by GLP-1 and CCK is altered in patients with gastritis. Moreover, GIP is a potent controller of HGL activity, both in healthy subjects and in patients with gastritis.

  3. Polyphenolic Compounds as Pancreatic Lipase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Tina; Melzig, Matthias F

    2015-07-01

    Obesity and its associated diseases such as diabetes mellitus and coronary heart diseases are a major challenge for our society. An important target for the treatment of obesity includes the development of inhibitors of nutrient digestion and absorption. Inhibition of pancreatic lipase and the associated reduction of lipid absorption is an attractive approach for the discovery of potent agents. Currently, the only clinically approved pharmacologic agent as pancreatic lipase inhibitor is Orlistat. However, its usage is compromised by unpleasant gastrointestinal adverse reactions (oily stools, oily spotting, flatulence). The use of botanical materials as a potential source of new drugs is of increasing importance and application. Natural products that are interesting for obesity treatment are generally considered to have less toxic and side effects than totally synthetic drugs. One of the most important sources of potential pancreatic lipase inhibitors represents the class of polyphenols. This article summarizes most studied subclasses of polyphenols including flavonoids, hydroxycinnamic acids, hydroxybenzoic acids and lignans with pancreatic lipase inhibitory effects. A structural comparison of potent inhibitors shows an increased inhibitory effect depending on number and position of phenolic hydroxyl groups, degree of polymerization and elimination of glycosylation during digestion.

  4. Structural characterization of MAPLE deposited lipase biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronne, Antonio; Ausanio, Giovanni; Bloisi, Francesco; Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria; Fanelli, Esther; Massoli, Patrizio; Vicari, Luciano R. M.

    2014-11-01

    Lipases (triacylglycerol ester hydrolases) are enzymes used in several industrial applications. Enzymes immobilization can be used to address key issues limiting widespread application at industrial level. Immobilization efficiency is related to the ability to preserve the native conformation of the enzyme. MAPLE (Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation) technique, a laser deposition procedure for treating organic/polymeric/biomaterials, was applied for the deposition of lipase enzyme in an ice matrix, using near infrared laser radiation. Microscopy analysis showed that the deposition occurred in micrometric and submicrometric clusters with a wide size distribution. AFM imaging showed that inter-cluster regions are uniformly covered with smaller aggregates of nanometric size. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used for both recognizing the deposited material and analyzing its secondary structure. Results showed that the protein underwent reversible self-association during the deposition process. Actually, preliminary tests of MAPLE deposited lipase used for soybean oil transesterification with isopropyl alcohol followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry gave results consistent with undamaged deposition of lipase.

  5. New Extremophilic Lipases and Esterases from Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    López-López, Olalla; Cerdán, Maria E; González Siso, Maria I

    2014-01-01

    Lipolytic enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of ester bonds in the presence of water. In media with low water content or in organic solvents, they can catalyze synthetic reactions such as esterification and transesterification. Lipases and esterases, in particular those from extremophilic origin, are robust enzymes, functional under the harsh conditions of industrial processes owing to their inherent thermostability and resistance towards organic solvents, which combined with their high chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivity make them very attractive biocatalysts for a variety of industrial applications. Likewise, enzymes from extremophile sources can provide additional features such as activity at extreme temperatures, extreme pH values or high salinity levels, which could be interesting for certain purposes. New lipases and esterases have traditionally been discovered by the isolation of microbial strains producing lipolytic activity. The Genome Projects Era allowed genome mining, exploiting homology with known lipases and esterases, to be used in the search for new enzymes. The Metagenomic Era meant a step forward in this field with the study of the metagenome, the pool of genomes in an environmental microbial community. Current molecular biology techniques make it possible to construct total environmental DNA libraries, including the genomes of unculturable organisms, opening a new window to a vast field of unknown enzymes with new and unique properties. Here, we review the latest advances and findings from research into new extremophilic lipases and esterases, using metagenomic approaches, and their potential industrial and biotechnological applications. PMID:24588890

  6. 21 CFR 184.1415 - Animal lipase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Animal lipase. 184.1415 Section 184.1415 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD... requirements and additional requirements for enzyme preparations in the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d ed. (1981), p...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1415 - Animal lipase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Animal lipase. 184.1415 Section 184.1415 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific...

  8. Identification of Ina proteins from Fusarium acuminatum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, Jan Frederik; Kunert, Anna Theresa; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2015-04-01

    Freezing of water above -36° C is based on ice nucleation activity (INA) mediated by ice nucleators (IN) which can be of various origins. Beside mineral IN, biological particles are a potentially important source of atmospheric IN. The best-known biological IN are common plant-associated bacteria. The IN activity of these bacteria is induced by a surface protein on the outer cell membrane, which is fully characterized. In contrast, much less is known about the nature of fungal IN. The fungal genus Fusarium is widely spread throughout the earth. It belongs to the Ascomycota and is one of the most severe fungal pathogens. It can affect a variety of organisms from plants to animals including humans. INA of Fusarium was already described about 30 years ago and INA of Fusarium as well as other fungal genera is assumed to be mediated by proteins or at least to contain a proteinaceous compound. Although many efforts were made the precise INA machinery of Fusarium and other fungal species including the proteins and their corresponding genes remain unidentified. In this study preparations from living fungal samples of F. acuminatum were fractionated by liquid chromatography and IN active fractions were identified by freezing assays. SDS-page and de novo sequencing by mass spectrometry were used to identify the primary structure of the protein. Preliminary results show that the INA protein of F. acuminatum is contained in the early size exclusion chromatography fractions indicating a high molecular size. Moreover we could identify a single protein band from IN active fractions at 130-145 kDa corresponding to sizes of IN proteins from bacterial species. To our knowledge this is for the first time an isolation of a single protein from in vivo samples, which can be assigned as IN active from Fusarium.

  9. Anti-obesity activity of hen egg anti-lipase immunoglobulin yolk, a novel pancreatic lipase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is completely no report about both hen egg anti-lipase immunoglobulin yolk (IgY) and its anti-obesity action. Thus, we tried to isolate and characterize a novel anti-lipase immunoglobulin from hen egg yolk. Moreover, we investigated whether hen egg yolk anti-lipase IgY inhibits pancreatic lipase activity in vitro, and examined its ability to prevent obesity in a murine high fat diet-induced obesity model. Methods We determined the inhibitory action of Anti-lipase IgY on lipase activity in vitro. We also focused our evaluation on the anti-obesity properties of Anti-lipase IgY in a murine high fat diet-induced obesity model. Results Anti-lipase IgY blocked porcine lipase activity with an IC50 of 0.49 μM. Supplementing the high fat diet with only 0.2% (w/w) of Anti-lipase IgY for 35 days significantly decreased the weights of intraperitoneal adipose tissues, epididymal, mesenteric, retroperitoneal and perirenal adipose tissues, and the amounts of hepatic total lipid, triglyceride, and cholesterol. This was accompanied by a significant increase in the fecal excretion of triglyceride in the absence of diarrhea. Furthermore, Anti-lipase IgY treatment restored body weight gain to levels similar to mice fed with Control IgY. Conclusions This study provides the first report of the development of anti-lipase IgY and the direct evidence that inhibition of pancreatic lipase using Anti-lipase IgY is an effective anti-obesity treatment due to the associated increase in fecal excretion of triglyceride. PMID:24321125

  10. Distribution of disease symptoms and mycotoxins in maize ears infected by Fusarium culmorum and Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Elisabeth; Ellner, Frank

    2015-08-01

    Red ear rot an important disease of maize cultivated in Europe is caused by toxigenic Fusarium species like Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum. To get detailed information on the time course of the infection process leading to the accumulation of Fusarium mycotoxins in maize ears, a field study was conducted over 2 years with two maize varieties, which were inoculated with F. culmorum or F. graminearum isolates at the stage of female flowering. Every fortnight after inoculation, infection and contamination progress in the ears was followed by visually evaluating disease signs and analysing Fusarium toxin concentrations in the infected ear tissues. In principle, infection and mycotoxin distribution were similar in respect of pathogens, varieties, and years. External infection symptoms showing some small pale or brown-marbled kernels with dark brown pedicels were mainly seen at the ear tip, whereas internal infection symptoms on the rachis were much more pronounced and spread in the upper half showing greyish brownish or pink discoloration of the pith. Well correlated with disease symptoms, a top-down gradient from high to low toxin levels within the ear with considerably higher concentrations in the rachis compared with the kernels was observed. It is suggested that both Fusarium pathogens primarily infect the rachis from the tip toward the bottom, whereas the kernels are subsequently infected via the rachillae connected to the rachis. A special focus on the pronounced disease symptoms visible in the rachis may be an approach to improve the evaluation of maize-genotype susceptibility against red ear rot pathogens. It has to be underlined that the accumulation of Fusarium mycotoxins in the rachis greatly accelerated 6 weeks after inoculation; therefore, highest contamination risk is indicated for feedstuffs containing large amounts of rachis (e.g., corn cob mix), especially when cut late in growing season.

  11. Immobilisation and application of lipases in organic media.

    PubMed

    Adlercreutz, Patrick

    2013-08-07

    Different methods of preparing lipases for use in organic media are critically reviewed. Solid lipase preparations can be made by typical immobilisation methods such as adsorption, entrapment, covalent coupling or cross-linking. Immobilisation is especially attractive for lipases because, in addition to the normal benefits of enzyme immobilisation, it can also lead to a considerable increase in catalytic activity, probably caused by conformational changes in the lipase molecules. Activation can be achieved, for example, using hydrophobic support materials or surfactants during the immobilisation procedure. Surfactants can also be used to solubilise lipases in organic media via the formation of hydrophobic ion pairs, surfactant-coated lipase or reversed micelles. Lipase preparation methods are discussed with regard to potential lipase inactivation and activation effects, mass transfer limitations, lipase stability and other features important for applications. The practical applications of lipases in organic media reviewed include ester synthesis, modification of triacylglycerols and phospholipids, fatty acid enrichment, enantiomer resolution, biodiesel production and acylation of carbohydrates and bioactive compounds.

  12. Efficient biocatalyst by encapsulating lipase into nanoporous gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xueying; Li, Yufei; Wu, Chao; Wang, Xia; Xu, Ping

    2013-04-01

    Lipases are one of the most important biocatalysts for biotechnological applications. Immobilization is an efficient method to increase the stability and reusability of lipases. In this study, nanoporous gold (NPG), a new kind of nanoporous material with tunable porosity and excellent biocompatibility, was employed as an effective support for lipase immobilization. The pore size of NPG and adsorption time played key roles in the construction of lipase-NPG biocomposites. The morphology and composition of NPG before and after lipase loading are verified using a scanning electron microscope, equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The resulting lipase-NPG biocomposites exhibited excellent catalytic activity and remarkable reusability. The catalytic activity of the lipase-NPG biocomposite with a pore size of 35 nm had no decrease after ten recycles. Besides, the lipase-NPG biocomposite exhibited high catalytic activity in a broader pH range and higher temperature than that of free lipase. In addition, the leaching of lipase from NPG could be prevented by matching the protein's diameter and pore size. Thus, the encapsulation of enzymes within NPG is quite useful for establishing new functions and will have wide applications for different chemical processes.

  13. Fate of Fusarium Toxins during the Malting Process.

    PubMed

    Habler, Katharina; Hofer, Katharina; Geißinger, Cajetan; Schüler, Jan; Hückelhoven, Ralph; Hess, Michael; Gastl, Martina; Rychlik, Michael

    2016-02-17

    Little is known about the fate of Fusarium mycotoxins during the barley malting process. To determine the fungal DNA and mycotoxin concentrations during malting, we used barley grain harvested from field plots that we had inoculated with Fusarium species that produce type A or type B trichothecenes or enniatins. Using a recently developed multimycotoxin liquid chromatography-tandem mass stable isotope dilution method, we identified Fusarium-species-specific behaviors of mycotoxins in grain and malt extracts and compared toxin concentrations to amounts of fungal DNA in the same samples. In particular, the type B trichothecenes and Fusarium culmorum DNA contents were increased dramatically up to 5400% after kilning. By contrast, the concentrations of type A trichothecenes and Fusarium sporotrichioides DNA decreased during the malting process. These data suggest that specific Fusarium species that contaminate the raw grain material might have different impacts on malt quality.

  14. Placental lipases in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

    PubMed

    Barrett, Helen L; Kubala, Marta H; Scholz Romero, Katherin; Denny, Kerina J; Woodruff, Trent M; McIntyre, H David; Callaway, Leonie K; Nitert, Marloes Dekker

    2014-01-01

    Infants of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are more likely to be born large for gestational age with a higher percentage body fat. Elevated maternal lipids may contribute to this. Placental lipases such as lipoprotein lipase (LPL), endothelial lipase (EL) and hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) are involved in transferring lipids from mother to fetus. Previous studies of expression of these lipases in placentae in women with diabetes in pregnancy have reported divergent results. Intracellular lipases such as adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and HSL are central to lipid droplet metabolism. The activities of these lipases are both influenced by Perilipin 1, and ATGL is also activated by a co-factor comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) and inhibited by G0/G1 switch gene 2 (GS02). None of these modifying factors or ATGL have been examined previously in placenta. The purpose of this study was therefore to examine the expression of ATGL, HSL, LPL, EL, as well as Perilipin 1, GS02 and CGI-58 in term pregnancies complicated by GDM. mRNA and protein expression of the lipases were measured in placentae from 17 women with GDM and 17 normoglycaemic pregnancies, matched for maternal BMI and gestational age of delivery. ATGL mRNA expression was increased and HSL mRNA expression reduced in placentae from GDM although there was no differences in protein expression of any of the lipases. All lipases were localised to trophoblasts and endothelial cells. The expression of Perilipin 1 and CGI-58 mRNA was increased and GS02 not altered in GDM. These results suggest that there is no difference in expression in these four lipases between GDM and normoglycaemic placentae, and therefore altered lipid transfer via these lipases does not contribute to large for gestational age in infants of women with GDM.

  15. Hyperkeratotic Warty Skin Lesion of Foot Caused by Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Ravinder; Maheshwari, Megha

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium species are common soil-inhabiting organisms and plant pathogens. Human infections are usually precipitated by local or systemic predisposing factors, and disseminated infection is associated with impaired immune responses. Skin infections caused by Fusarium spp. include keratitis, onychomycosis, mycetoma, painful discrete erythematous nodules. Hyperkeratotic skin lesions caused by Fusarium spp. are, however, rarely reported. We report a case of hyperkeratotic verrucous warty skin lesion in the foot of a 50-year-old immunocompetent male, farmer by occupation. PMID:23716829

  16. In silico and experimental characterization of chimeric Bacillus thermocatenulatus lipase with the complete conserved pentapeptide of Candida rugosa lipase.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mostafa; Karkhane, Ali Asghar; Yakhchali, Bagher; Shamsara, Mehdi; Aminzadeh, Saeed; Morshedi, Dena; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Torktaz, Ibrahim; Karimi, Esmat; Safari, Zahra

    2013-02-01

    Lipases are one of the highest value commercial enzymes as they have broad applications in detergent, food, pharmaceutical, and dairy industries. To provide chimeric Bacillus thermocatenulatus lipase (BTL2), the completely conserved pentapeptide (¹¹²Ala-His-Ser-Gln-Gly¹¹⁶) was replaced with similar sequences (²⁰⁷Gly-Glu-Ser-Ala-Gly²¹¹) of Candida rugosa lipase (CLR) at the nucleophilic elbow region. For this purpose, three mutations including A112G, H113E, and Q115A were inserted in the conserved pentapeptide sequence of btl2 gene. Based on the crystal structures of 2W22, the best structure of opened form of the chimeric lipases were garnered using the MODELLER v9.10 software. The native and chimeric lipases were docked to a set of ligands, and a trial version of Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD) software was used to obtain the energy values. Docking results confirmed chimeric lipase to be better than the native lipase. Following the in silico study, cloning experiments were conducted and expression of native and chimeric btl2 gene in Pichia pastoris was performed. The native and chimeric lipases were purified, and the effect of these mutations on characteristics of chimeric lipase studied and then compared with those of native lipase. Chimeric lipase exhibited 1.6-fold higher activity than the native lipase at 55 °C. The highest percentage of both lipases activity was observed at 60 °C and pH of 8.0. The ion Ca²⁺ slightly inhibited the activity of both lipases, whereas the organic solvent enhanced the lipase stability of chimeric lipase as compared with the native lipase. According to the results, the presence of two glycine residues at the conserved pentapeptide region of this chimeric lipase (¹¹²Gly-Glu-Ser-Ala-Gly¹¹⁶) may increase the flexibility of the nucleophilic elbow region and affect the enzyme activity level.

  17. Investigations on Fusarium spp. and their mycotoxins causing Fusarium ear rot of maize in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Shala-Mayrhofer, Vitore; Varga, Elisabeth; Marjakaj, Robert; Berthiller, Franz; Musolli, Agim; Berisha, Defrime; Kelmendi, Bakir; Lemmens, Marc

    2013-01-01

    After wheat, maize (Zea mays L.) is the second most important cereal crop in Kosovo and a major component of animal feed. The purpose of this study was to analyse the incidence and identity of the Fusarium species isolated from naturally infected maize kernels in Kosovo in 2009 and 2010, as well as the mycotoxin contamination. The disease incidence of Fusarium ear rot (from 0.7% to 40% diseased ears) on maize in Kosovo is high. The most frequently Fusarium spp. identified on maize kernels were Fusarium subglutinans, F. verticillioides/F. proliferatum and F. graminearum. Maize kernel samples were analysed by LC-MS/MS and found to be contaminated with deoxynivalenol (DON), DON-3-glucoside, 3-acetyl-DON, 15-acetyl-DON, zearalenone, zearalenone-14-sulphate, moniliformin, fumonisin B1 and fumonisin B2. This is the first report on the incidence and identification of Fusarium species isolated from naturally infected maize as well as the mycotoxin contamination in Kosovo.

  18. Genetic diversity and antifungal susceptibility of Fusarium isolates in onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Priscila D; Heidrich, Daiane; Corrêa, Carolina; Scroferneker, Maria Lúcia; Vettorato, Gerson; Fuentefria, Alexandre M; Goldani, Luciano Z

    2017-09-01

    Fusarium species have emerged as an important human pathogen in skin disease, onychomycosis, keratitis and invasive disease. Onychomycosis caused by Fusarium spp. The infection has been increasingly described in the immunocompetent and immunosuppressed hosts. Considering onychomycosis is a difficult to treat infection, and little is known about the genetic variability and susceptibility pattern of Fusarium spp., further studies are necessary to understand the pathogenesis and better to define the appropriate antifungal treatment for this infection. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to describe the in vitro susceptibility to different antifungal agents and the genetic diversity of 35 Fusarium isolated from patients with onychomycosis. Fusarium spp. were isolated predominantly from female Caucasians, and the most frequent anatomical location was the nail of the hallux. Results revealed that 25 (71.4%) of isolates belonged to the Fusarium solani species complex, followed by 10 (28.5%) isolates from the Fusarium oxysporum species complex. Noteworthy, the authors report the first case of Neocosmospora rubicola isolated from a patient with onychomycosis. Amphotericin B was the most effective antifungal agent against the majority of isolates (60%, MIC ≤4 μg/mL), followed by voriconazole (34.2%, MIC ≤4 μg/mL). In general, Fusarium species presented MIC values >64 μg/mL for fluconazole, itraconazole and terbinafine. Accurate pathogen identification, characterisation and susceptibility testing provide a better understanding of pathogenesis of Fusarium in onychomycosis. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Endophytic Fusarium spp. from Roots of Lawn Grass (Axonopus compressus)

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Latiffah; Ning, Chua Harn

    2013-01-01

    Fungal endophytes are found inside host plants but do not produce any noticeable disease symptoms in their host. In the present study, endophytic Fusarium species were isolated from roots of lawn grass (Axonopus compressus). A total of 51 isolates were recovered from 100 root segments. Two Fusarium species, F. oxysporum (53%) and F. solani (47%), were identified based on macroconidia and conidiogenous cell morphology. The detection of endophytic F. oxysporum and F. solani in the roots of lawn grass contributes to the knowledge of both the distribution of the two Fusarium species and the importance of roots as endophytic niches for Fusarium species. PMID:24575251

  20. Antifungal activity of Bacillus coagulans against Fusarium sp.

    PubMed

    Czaczyk, Katarzyna; Trojanowska, Krystyna; Mueller, Anna

    2002-01-01

    The antifungal activity of Bacillus coagulans against three pathogenic species of Fusarium was examined. Fungal growth was determined by colony forming units, dry matter and ergosterol level. Biosynthesis of Fusarium mycotoxins was also investigated. The strongest inhibition of fungal growth was noticed when Bacillus coagulans was co-inoculated at the beginning of culture. Estimation of ergosterol level as a determinant of fungal growth showed the greatest degree of Fusarium sp. inhibition. Addition of Bacillus coagulans to Fusarium culmorum culture inhibits the DON (deoxynivalenol) production.

  1. Gastric lipase: localization of the enzyme in the stomach

    SciTech Connect

    DeNigris, S.J.; Hamosh, M.; Hamosh, P.; Kasbekar, D.K.

    1986-03-05

    Isolated gastric glands prepared from human and rabbit stomach secrete lipase in response to secretagogues. They have investigated the localization of this enzyme in three species (rabbit, baboon, guinea pig). Gastric mucosa was sampled from the cardia (C), fundus-smooth (FS), fundus-ruggae (FR) and the antral area (A). Lipase activity was measured in mucosal homogenates using /sup 3/H-triolein as substrate and is expressed in units (U) = nmols free fatty acid released/min/mg wet weight. The localization of lipase is compared with that of pepsin (measured by hydrolysis of 2% hemoglobin at pH 1.8 and expressed in I.U.). Lipase is localized in a well defined area in the rabbit and is diffusely distributed in both guinea pig and baboon. The distribution of lipase and pepsin containing cells differs in all three species. The cellular origin of gastric lipase remains to be determined.

  2. Burkholderia cepacia lipase: A versatile catalyst in synthesis reactions.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Daniel Alberto; Tonetto, Gabriela Marta; Ferreira, María Luján

    2017-09-23

    The lipase from Burkholderia cepacia, formerly known as Pseudomonas cepacia lipase, is a commercial enzyme in both soluble and immobilized forms widely recognized for its thermal resistance and tolerance to a large number of solvents and short-chain alcohols. The main applications of this lipase are in transesterification reactions and in the synthesis of drugs (because of the properties mentioned above). This review intends to show the features of this enzyme and some of the most relevant aspects of its use in different synthesis reactions. Also, different immobilization techniques together with the effect of various compounds on lipase activity are presented. This lipase shows important advantages over other lipases, especially in reaction media including solvents or reactions involving short-chain alcohols. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Cytochemical localization of lipases during spore germination from Bryum capillare.

    PubMed

    Carrapiço, F; Salomé, M; Pais, S

    1983-03-01

    In the oil containing spores of Bryum capillare, lipid breakdown occurs within three days after sowing. The periods of activity of acid, neutral and alkaline lipases are coincident. They start at the first day after sowing the spores. After 3 days of germination, when storage fats forming large globules are mobilised no lipase activity could be detected any longer in the glyoxysomes. Acid lipase is preferentially located in spherosomal membrane but is also present at the glyoxysomal membrane. Alkaline lipase is specifically located in the glyoxysomes and mitochondria. A cooperation presumably exists between acid and alkaline lipases in the hydrolysis of monoglycerides at the glyoxysomal level. Neutral lipase activity is localized at the spherosomal membrane, in the endoplasmic reticulum and in dictyosomes. It is absent from glyoxysomes.

  4. A spectrophotometric assay for lipase activity utilizing immobilized triacylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Safarík, I

    1991-01-01

    New substrates for the determination of lipase activity have been developed. Triacylglycerols were immobilized by adsorption on an appropriate carrier or adsorbent yielding a lipase substrate in a powder form. The adsorbed triacylglycerols were easily hydrolyzed by lipases present in a reaction mixture. The released fatty acids were extracted with benzene and converted to the corresponding Cu (II) salts (copper soaps) which were measured spectrophotometrically.

  5. Deoxynivalenol and other selected Fusarium toxins in Swedish oats--occurrence and correlation to specific Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Fredlund, Elisabeth; Gidlund, Ann; Sulyok, Michael; Börjesson, Thomas; Krska, Rudolf; Olsen, Monica; Lindblad, Mats

    2013-10-15

    Fusarium moulds frequently contaminate oats and other cereals world-wide, including those grown in Northern Europe. To investigate the presence of toxigenic Fusarium species and their toxins in oats, samples were taken during 2010 and 2011 in three geographical regions of Sweden (east, west, south). The samples were analysed by real-time PCR for the specific infection level of seven Fusarium species associated with oats and other cereals (Fusarium poae, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium langsethiae, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium tricinctum, Fusarium sporotrichioides and Fusarium avenaceum) and with a multi-mycotoxin method based on liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS/MS) for the detection of many fungal metabolites, including deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEA), nivalenol (NIV), T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxins, moniliformin (MON), beauvericin (BEA) and enniatins (ENNs). Most samples contained at least four of the seven Fusarium species analysed and F. poae, F. langsethiae and F. avenaceum were present in approximately 90-100% of all samples. The most common toxins detected were DON, NIV, BEA and ENNs, which were present in more than 90% of samples. Most Fusarium species and their toxins occurred in higher concentrations in 2010 than in 2011, with the exception of DON and its main producer F. graminearum. Significant regional differences were detected for some moulds and mycotoxins, with higher levels of F. graminearum, DON and ZEA in western Sweden than in the east (P<0.05) and higher levels of F. tricinctum and MON in the south (P<0.05). Correlation analysis showed significant correlations between many Fusarium species and toxin levels. For example, F. tricinctum was significantly correlated to F. avenaceum (r = 0.72, P<0.001), DON to ZEA (r = 0.52, P<0.001), DON to F. graminearum (r = 0.77, P<0.001) and the sum of T-2 and HT-2 to F. langsethiae (r = 0.77, P<0.001). The multi-toxin approach employed allowed simultaneous

  6. [Adipose triglyceride lipase regulates adipocyte lipolysis].

    PubMed

    Xu, Chong; Xu, Guo-Heng

    2008-01-01

    Obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes are associated with elevated concentration of circulating free fatty acids (FFAs), which are critically governed by the process of triglyceride lipolysis in adipocytes. Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) are two major enzymes in the control of triacylglycerol hydrolysis in adipose tissue. ATGL expressed predominantly in white adipose tissue specifically initiates triacylglycerol hydrolysis to generate diacylglycerols and FFA, a role distinguished from HSL that mainly hydrolyzes diacylglycerols. The transcription of ATGL is regulated by several factors. ATGL activity is regulated by CGI-58. Under basal conditions, interaction of CGI-58 with a lipid droplet associating protein, perilipin, results in an inactivation of ATGL activity. During PKA-stimulated lipolysis, CGI-58 is released from phosphorylated perilipin and in turn, binds to ATGL. This action facilitates triglyceride lipolysis. This review focuses on the regulation and function of ATGL in adipose lipolysis and metabolism.

  7. Preparation and properties of immobilized lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, N; Shirai, K; Jackson, R L

    1980-11-07

    Purified bovine milk lipoprotein lipase has been covalently attached to CH-Sepharose with water-soluble carbodiimide. The immobilized enzyme retained enzymic activity and was stimulated 7-fold by the addition of human apolipoprotein C-II. Both [3H]heparin and 125I-labeled apolipoprotein C-II bound to the immobilized enzyme; unlabeled heparin and apolipoprotein C-II competed for binding of their respective labeled compounds. Apolipoprotein C-II did not compete for binding of [3H]heparin and vice versa. Human apolipoprotein C-III did not bind to the immobilized enzyme nor did it compete for apolipoprotein C-II binding. We conclude from these studies that both apolipoprotein C-II and heparin interact with immobilized lipoprotein lipase and that they have different binding sites.

  8. Comparative and functional genomics of lipases in holometabolous insects.

    PubMed

    Horne, Irene; Haritos, Victoria S; Oakeshott, John G

    2009-08-01

    Lipases have key roles in insect lipid acquisition, storage and mobilisation and are also fundamental to many physiological processes underpinning insect reproduction, development, defence from pathogens and oxidative stress, and pheromone signalling. We have screened the recently sequenced genomes of five species from four orders of holometabolous insects, the dipterans Drosophila melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae, the hymenopteran Apis mellifera, the moth Bombyx mori and the beetle Tribolium castaneum, for the six major lipase families that are also found in other organisms. The two most numerous families in the insects, the neutral and acid lipases, are also the main families in mammals, albeit not in Caenorhabditis elegans, plants or microbes. Total numbers of the lipases vary two-fold across the five insect species, from numbers similar to those in mammals up to numbers comparable to those seen in C. elegans. Whilst there is a high degree of orthology with mammalian lipases in the other four families, the great majority of the insect neutral and acid lipases have arisen since the insect orders themselves diverged. Intriguingly, about 10% of the insect neutral and acid lipases have lost motifs critical for catalytic function. Examination of the length of lid and loop regions of the neutral lipase sequences suggest that most of the insect lipases lack triacylglycerol (TAG) hydrolysis activity, although the acid lipases all have intact cap domains required for TAG hydrolysis. We have also reviewed the sequence databases and scientific literature for insights into the expression profiles and functions of the insect neutral and acid lipases and the orthologues of the mammalian adipose triglyceride lipase which has a pivotal role in lipid mobilisation. These data suggest that some of the acid and neutral lipase diversity may be due to a requirement for rapid accumulation of dietary lipids. The different roles required of lipases at the four discrete life stages of

  9. Sonochemical Effect on Activity and Conformation of Commercial Lipases.

    PubMed

    Nadar, Shamraja S; Rathod, Virendra K

    2017-04-01

    The enzyme under lower-intensity ultrasonic irradiation leads to favourable conformational changes, thereby enhancing its activity. The augmentation of activity of ultrasound-treated enzyme is strongly dependent on ultrasound intensity, duty cycle and exposure time, which was investigated for commercial lipases. Thermomyces lanuginosus (TL) lipase showed a 1.3-fold enhanced activity after irradiating at 22 kHz and 11.38 W cm(-2) with 50 % duty cycle for 25-min ultrasonic treatment and 1.5-fold enhanced activity was observed for lipozyme (candida antarctica lipase B (CALB)) lipase, at 22 kHz and 15.48 W cm(-2) with 66.67 % duty cycle for 20-min ultrasonic treatment. After sonication, thermodynamic parameters viz. E a, ΔH, ΔS and ΔG were evaluated and values were found to be significantly lower for both lipases. In addition, the changes in secondary structure due to sonication were investigated by using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), which revealed increase in a certain number of random coiled structure, loss of β-sheets, β-turns and α-helix content in TL lipase and CALB lipase. Also, fluorescence spectroscopy exhibited the increased number of tryptophan on surface of both lipases. Moreover, particle size distribution after sonication also helped to improve surface area and enhanced mass transfer, which contributed to improvement in lipase activity.

  10. Covalent functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by lipase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Qing; Yang, Dong; Su, Yanlei; Li, Jian; Jiang, Zhongyi; Jiang, Yanjun; Yuan, Weikang

    2007-12-01

    Lipase from Candida rugosa was covalently anchored onto acid-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) through a self-catalytic mechanism. A variety of characterization techniques including FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, and XPS were employed to demonstrate the formation of the ester linkage between lipase and MWNTs. The MWNTs-lipase biocomposites showed significantly increased solubility in some common-used organic solvents, such as THF, DMF and chloroform. This study may offer a novel and facile route for covalent modification of carbon nanotubes, and expand the potential utilization of both lipases and MWNTs in the fields of biocatalyst and biosensor.

  11. Endothelial lipase is a major determinant of HDL level

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Tatsuro; Choi, Sungshin; Kundu, Ramendra K.; Hirata, Ken-Ichi; Rubin, Edward M.; Cooper, Allen D.; Quertermous, Thomas

    2003-01-30

    For the past three decades, epidemiologic studies have consistently demonstrated an inverse relationship between plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and coronary heart disease (CHD). Population-based studies have provided compelling evidence that low HDL-C levels are a risk factor for CHD, and several clinical interventions that increased plasma levels of HDL-C were associated with a reduction in CHD risk. These findings have stimulated extensive investigation into the determinants of plasma HDL-C levels. Turnover studies using radiolabeled apolipoprotein A-I, the major protein component of HDL, suggest that plasma HDL-C concentrations are highly correlated with the rate of clearance of apolipoprotein AI. However, the metabolic mechanisms by which HDL are catabolized have not been fully defined. Previous studies in humans with genetic deficiency of cholesteryl ester transfer protein, and in mice lacking the scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), have demonstrated that these proteins participate in the removal of cholesterol from HDL, while observations in individuals with mutations in hepatic lipase indicate that this enzyme hydrolyzes HDL triglycerides. In this issue of the JCI, reports from laboratories of Tom Quertermous and Dan Rader now indicate that endothelial lipase (LIPG), a newly identified member of the lipase family, catalyzes the hydrolysis of HDL phospholipids and facilitates the clearance of HDL from the circulation. Endothelial lipase was initially cloned by both of these laboratories using entirely different strategies. Quertermous and his colleagues identified endothelial lipase as a transcript that was upregulated in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells undergoing tube formation, whereas the Rader group cloned endothelial lipase as a transcript that was upregulated in the human macrophage-like cell line THP-1 exposed to oxidized LDL. Database searches revealed that endothelial lipase shows strong sequence similarity to lipoprotein

  12. New tools for exploring "old friends-microbial lipases".

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Saisubramanian

    2012-11-01

    Fat-splitting enzymes (lipases), due to their natural, industrial, and medical relevance, attract enough attention as fats do in our lives. Starting from the paper that we write, cheese and oil that we consume, detergent that we use to remove oil stains, biodiesel that we use as transportation fuel, to the enantiopure drugs that we use in therapeutics, all these applications are facilitated directly or indirectly by lipases. Due to their uniqueness, versatility, and dexterity, decades of research work have been carried out on microbial lipases. The hunt for novel lipases and strategies to improve them continues unabated as evidenced by new families of microbial lipases that are still being discovered mostly by metagenomic approaches. A separate database for true lipases termed LIPABASE has been created recently which provides taxonomic, structural, biochemical information about true lipases from various species. The present review attempts to summarize new approaches that are employed in various aspects of microbial lipase research, viz., screening, isolation, production, purification, improvement by protein engineering, and surface display. Finally, novel applications facilitated by microbial lipases are also presented.

  13. Production of ricinoleic acid from castor oil by immobilised lipases.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Hakki Mevlut; Sagiroglu, Ayten

    2009-01-01

    Porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL), Candida rugosa lipase (CRL), and Castor bean lipase (CBL) were immobilized on celite by deposition from aqueous solution by the addition of hexane. Lipolytic performance of free and immobilized lipases were compared and optimizations of lipolytic enzymatic reactions conditions were performed by free and immobilized derivatives using olive oil as substrate. Afterwards, the influence on lipolysis of castor oil of free lipases and immobilized lipase derivatives have been studied in the case of production of ricinoleic acid. All of the lipases performances were compared and enzyme derivative was selected to be very effective on the production of ricinoleic acid by lipolysis reaction. Various reaction parameters affecting the production of ricinoleic acid were investigated with selected the enzyme derivative. The maximum ricinoleic acid yield was observed at pH 7-8, 50 degrees C, for 3 hours of reaction period with immobilized 1,3-specific PPL on celite. The kinetic constants K(m) and V(max) were calculated as 1.6 x 10(-4) mM and 22.2 mM from a Lineweaver-Burk plot with the same enzyme derivative. To investigate the operational stability of the lipase, the three step lipolysis process was repeated by transferring the immobilized lipase to a substrate mixture. As a result, the percentage of conversion after usage decreased markedly.

  14. Resveratrol regulates lipolysis via adipose triglyceride lipase.

    PubMed

    Lasa, Arrate; Schweiger, Martina; Kotzbeck, Petra; Churruca, Itziar; Simón, Edurne; Zechner, Rudolf; Portillo, María del Puy

    2012-04-01

    Resveratrol has been reported to increase adrenaline-induced lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The general aim of the present work was to gain more insight concerning the effects of trans-resveratrol on lipid mobilization. The specific purpose was to assess the involvement of the two main lipases: adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), in the activation of lipolysis induced by this molecule. For lipolysis experiments, 3T3-L1 and human SGBS adipocytes as well as adipose tissue from wild-type, ATGL knockout and HSL knockout mice were used. Moreover, gene and protein expressions of these lipases were analyzed. Resveratrol-induced free fatty acids release but not glycerol release in 3T3-L1 under basal and isoproterenol-stimulating conditions and under isoproterenol-stimulating conditions in SGBS adipocytes. When HSL was blocked by compound 76-0079, free fatty acid release was still induced by resveratrol. By contrast, in the presence of the compound C, an inhibitor of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, resveratrol effect was totally blunted. Resveratrol increased ATGL gene and protein expressions, an effect that was not observed for HSL. Resveratrol increased fatty acids release in epididymal adipose tissue from wild-type and HSL knockout mice but not in that adipose tissue from ATGL knockout mice. Taking as a whole, the present results provide novel evidence that resveratrol regulates lipolytic activity in human and murine adipocytes, as well as in white adipose tissue from mice, acting mainly on ATGL at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Enzyme activation seems to be induced via adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. First Report on Fusarium Wilt of Zucchini Caused by Fusarium oxysporum, in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, In-Young; Kim, Ju-Hee; Lee, Wang-Hyu; Park, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Hyeon-Dong

    2015-06-01

    Fusarium wilt of zucchini in Jeonju, Korea, was first noticed in May 2013. Symptoms included wilting of the foliage, drying and withering of older leaves, and stunting of plants. Infected plants eventually died during growth. Based on morphological characteristics and phylogenetic analyses of the molecular markers (internal transcribed spacer rDNA and translation elongation factor 1α), the fungus was identified as Fusarium oxysporum. Pathogenicity of a representative isolate was demonstrated via artificial inoculation, and it satisfied Koch's postulates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of F. oxysporum causing wilt of zucchini in Korea.

  16. Etiology and Epidemiological Conditions Promoting Fusarium Root Rot in Sweetpotato.

    PubMed

    Scruggs, A C; Quesada-Ocampo, L M

    2016-08-01

    Sweetpotato production in the United States is limited by several postharvest diseases, and one of the most common is Fusarium root rot. Although Fusarium solani is believed to be the primary causal agent of disease, numerous other Fusarium spp. have been reported to infect sweetpotato. However, the diversity of Fusarium spp. infecting sweetpotato in North Carolina is unknown. In addition, the lack of labeled and effective fungicides for control of Fusarium root rot in sweetpotato creates the need for integrated strategies to control disease. Nonetheless, epidemiological factors that promote Fusarium root rot in sweetpotato remain unexplored. A survey of Fusarium spp. infecting sweetpotato in North Carolina identified six species contributing to disease, with F. solani as the primary causal agent. The effects of storage temperature (13, 18, 23, 29, and 35°C), relative humidity (80, 90, and 100%), and initial inoculum level (3-, 5-, and 7-mm-diameter mycelia plug) were examined for progression of Fusarium root rot caused by F. solani and F. proliferatum on 'Covington' sweetpotato. Fusarium root rot was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) at lower temperatures (13°C), low relative humidity levels (80%), and low initial inoculum levels for both pathogens. Sporulation of F. proliferatum was also reduced under the same conditions. Qualitative mycotoxin analysis of roots infected with one of five Fusarium spp. revealed the production of fumonisin B1 by F. proliferatum when infecting sweetpotato. This study is a step toward characterizing the etiology and epidemiology of Fusarium root rot in sweetpotato, which allows for improved disease management recommendations to limit postharvest losses to this disease.

  17. Biodiesel production by transesterification using immobilized lipase.

    PubMed

    Narwal, Sunil Kumar; Gupta, Reena

    2013-04-01

    Biodiesel can be produced by transesterification of vegetable or waste oil catalysed by lipases. Biodiesel is an alternative energy source to conventional fuel. It combines environmental friendliness with biodegradability, low toxicity and renewability. Biodiesel transesterification reactions can be broadly classified into two categories: chemical and enzymatic. The production of biodiesel using the enzymatic route eliminates the reactions catalysed under acid or alkali conditions by yielding product of very high purity. The modification of lipases can improve their stability, activity and tolerance to alcohol. The cost of lipases and the relatively slower reaction rate remain the major obstacles for enzymatic production of biodiesel. However, this problem can be solved by immobilizing the enzyme on a suitable matrix or support, which increases the chances of re-usability. The main factors affecting biodiesel production are composition of fatty acids, catalyst, solvents, molar ratio of alcohol and oil, temperature, water content, type of alcohol and reactor configuration. Optimization of these parameters is necessary to reduce the cost of biodiesel production.

  18. Immobilization of a Commercial Lipase from Penicillium camembertii (Lipase G) by Different Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Adriano A.; Freitas, Larissa; de Carvalho, Ana Karine F.; de Oliveira, Pedro C.; de Castro, Heizir F.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to select the most suitable procedure to immobilize lipase from Penicillium camembertii (Lipase G). Different techniques and supports were evaluated, including physical adsorption on hydrophobic supports octyl-agarose, poly(hydroxybutyrate) and Amberlite resin XAD-4; ionic adsorption on the anionic exchange resin MANAE-agarose and covalent attachment on glyoxyl-agarose, MANAE-agarose cross-linked with glutaraldehyde, MANAE-agarose-glutaraldehyde, and epoxy-silica-polyvinyl alcohol composite. Among the tested protocols, the highest hydrolytic activity (128.2 ± 8.10 IU·g−1 of support) was achieved when the lipase was immobilized on epoxy-SiO2-PVA using hexane as coupling medium. Lipase immobilized by ionic adsorption on MANAE-agarose also gave satisfactory result, attaining 55.6 ± 2.60 IU·g−1 of support. In this procedure, the maximum loading of immobilized enzyme was 9.3 mg·g−1 of gel, and the highest activity (68.8 ± 2.70 IU·g−1 of support) was obtained when 20 mg of protein·g−1 was offered. Immobilization carried out in aqueous medium by physical adsorption on hydrophobic supports and covalent attachment on MANAE-agarose-glutaraldehyde and glyoxyl-agarose was shown to be unfeasible for Lipase G. Thermal stability tests revealed that the immobilized derivative on epoxy-SiO2-PVA composite using hexane as coupling medium had a slight higher thermal stability than the free lipase. PMID:21811674

  19. Diversity of fusarium species from highland areas in malaysia.

    PubMed

    Manshor, Nurhazrati; Rosli, Hafizi; Ismail, Nor Azliza; Salleh, Baharuddin; Zakaria, Latiffah

    2012-12-01

    Fusarium is a cosmopolitan and highly diversified genus of saprophytic, phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi. However, the existence and diversity of a few species of Fusarium are restricted to a certain area or climatic condition. The present study was conducted to determine the occurrence and diversity of Fusarium species in tropical highland areas in Malaysia and to compare with those in temperate and subtropical regions. A series of sampling was carried out in 2005 to 2009 at several tropical highland areas in Malaysia that is: Cameron Highlands, Fraser Hills and Genting Highlands in Pahang; Penang Hill in Penang; Gunung Jerai in Kedah; Kundasang and Kinabalu Park in Sabah; Kubah National Park and Begunan Hill in Sarawak. Sampling was done randomly from various hosts and substrates. Isolation of Fusarium isolates was done by using pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) agar and 1449 isolates of Fusarium were successfully recovered. Based on morphological characteristics, 20 species of Fusarium were identified. The most prevalent species occurring on the highlands areas was F. solani (66.1%) followed by F. graminearum (8.5%), F. oxysporum (7.8%), F. semitectum (5.7%), F. subglutinans (3.5%) and F. proliferatum (3.4%). Other Fusarium species, namely F. avenaceum, F. camptoceras, F. chlamydosporum, F. compactum, F. crookwellense, F. culmorum, F. decemcellulare, F. equiseti, F. nygamai, F. poae, F. proliferatum, F. sacchari, F. sporotrichioides, F. sterilihyphosum and F. verticillioides accounted for 1% recoveries. The present study was the first report on the occurrences of Fusarium species on highland areas in Malaysia.

  20. Exploring Fusarium head blight disease control by RNA interference

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology provides a novel tool to study gene function and plant protection strategies. Fusarium graminearum is the causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB), which reduces crop yield and quality by producing trichothecene mycotoxins including 3-acetyl deoxynivalenol (3-ADO...

  1. Genomics and evolution of secondary metabolism in Fusarium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium is a species-rich genus that causes disease on virtually all plant crops and produces diverse secondary metabolites (SMs), including pigments, plant hormones, and some of the mycotoxins of greatest concern to food and feed safety. To better understand the potential SM diversity in Fusarium ...

  2. Diversity of the Fusarium graminearum species complex on French cereals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium graminearum is an important pathogen causing Fusarium head blight (FHB) on wheat and barley and Gibberella ear rot (GER) on maize, and harvested grains often are contaminated with trichothecenes such as deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV) that are a major health and food safety concern...

  3. Diversity of Fusarium Species from Highland Areas in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Manshor, Nurhazrati; Rosli, Hafizi; Ismail, Nor Azliza; Salleh, Baharuddin; Zakaria, Latiffah

    2012-01-01

    Fusarium is a cosmopolitan and highly diversified genus of saprophytic, phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi. However, the existence and diversity of a few species of Fusarium are restricted to a certain area or climatic condition. The present study was conducted to determine the occurrence and diversity of Fusarium species in tropical highland areas in Malaysia and to compare with those in temperate and subtropical regions. A series of sampling was carried out in 2005 to 2009 at several tropical highland areas in Malaysia that is: Cameron Highlands, Fraser Hills and Genting Highlands in Pahang; Penang Hill in Penang; Gunung Jerai in Kedah; Kundasang and Kinabalu Park in Sabah; Kubah National Park and Begunan Hill in Sarawak. Sampling was done randomly from various hosts and substrates. Isolation of Fusarium isolates was done by using pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) agar and 1449 isolates of Fusarium were successfully recovered. Based on morphological characteristics, 20 species of Fusarium were identified. The most prevalent species occurring on the highlands areas was F. solani (66.1%) followed by F. graminearum (8.5%), F. oxysporum (7.8%), F. semitectum (5.7%), F. subglutinans (3.5%) and F. proliferatum (3.4%). Other Fusarium species, namely F. avenaceum, F. camptoceras, F. chlamydosporum, F. compactum, F. crookwellense, F. culmorum, F. decemcellulare, F. equiseti, F. nygamai, F. poae, F. proliferatum, F. sacchari, F. sporotrichioides, F. sterilihyphosum and F. verticillioides accounted for 1% recoveries. The present study was the first report on the occurrences of Fusarium species on highland areas in Malaysia. PMID:24575229

  4. Distribution of mycotoxin biosynthetic genes in 200 Fusarium genomes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium is a species-rich genus of fungi that causes disease on most crop plants and produces diverse secondary metabolites (SMs), including some of the mycotoxins of greatest concern to food and feed safety. To determine the potential SM diversity within Fusarium as well as the distribution and ev...

  5. Plant diversity and plant identity influence Fusarium communities in soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium communities play important functional roles in soil and in-planta as pathogens, endophytes, and saprotrophs. This study tests how rhizosphere Fusarium communities may vary according to plant species, differences in species richness of the surrounding plant community, and soil physiochemical...

  6. NIRS method for precise identification of Fusarium damaged wheat kernels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Development of scab resistant wheat varieties may be enhanced by non-destructive evaluation of kernels for Fusarium damaged kernels (FDKs) and deoxynivalenol (DON) levels. Fusarium infection generally affects kernel appearance, but insect damage and other fungi can cause similar symptoms. Also, some...

  7. High speed sorting of Fusarium-damaged wheat kernels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent studies have found that resistance to Fusarium fungal infection can be inherited in wheat from one generation to another. However, there is not yet available a cost effective method to separate Fusarium-damaged wheat kernels from undamaged kernels so that wheat breeders can take advantage of...

  8. Fusarium solani infection in a kidney transplant recipient

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, N. K.; Sahu, S.

    2014-01-01

    Hyalo hypho mycosis due to Fusarium species mainly occurs in immunocompromised hosts. The clinical presentation varies from localized to disseminated involvement. A case of localized cutaneous fusariosis caused by Fusarium solani in a renal transplant patient is described and the skin manifestations of the disease are discussed. PMID:25249722

  9. Metabolomic studies for the interaction Glycine max- Fusarium tucumaniae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sudden-death syndrome (SDS) of soybean can be caused in Argentina by 4 different Fusarium species: F. brasiliense, F. crassistipitatum, F. tucumaniae and F. virguliforme. Fusarium tucumaniae and F. virguliforme are the primary etiological agents of soybean SDS in Argentina and United States, respect...

  10. Causes of cotton Fusarium wilt outbreaks in Georgia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Severe outbreaks of Fusarium wilt of cotton in Georgia since 2011 raised concerns about the genotypes of the causal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. We isolated 492 F. oxysporum isolates from 107 wilted plants collected from 7 fields in 5 counties and determined their population structure utilizing veg...

  11. A diagnostic guide for Fusarium Root Rot of pea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium root rot, caused by Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi, is a major root rot pathogen in pea production areas worldwide. Here we provide a diagnostic guide that describes: the taxonomy of the pathogen, signs and symptoms of the pathogen, host range, geographic distribution, methods used to isolate ...

  12. Purification and biochemical characterization of digestive lipase in whiteleg shrimp.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Pérez, Crisalejandra; García-Carreño, Fernando L; Saborowski, Reinhard

    2011-04-01

    Penaeus vannamei lipase was purified from midgut gland of whiteleg shrimp. Pure lipase (E.C. 3.1.1.3) was obtained after Superdex 200 gel filtration and Resource Q anionic exchange. The pure lipase, which is a glycosylated molecule, is a monomer having a molecular mass of about 44.8 kDa, as determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. The lipase hydrolyses short and long-chain triacylglycerols and naphthol derivates at comparable rates. A specific activity of 1787 U mg(-1) and 475 U mg(-1) was measured with triolein and tributyrin as substrates, respectively, at pH 8.0 and 30°C in the absence of colipase. The lipase showed a K (m, app) of 3.22 mM and k (cat, app)/K (m, app) of 0.303 × 10(3) mM(-1) s(-1) using triolein as substrate. Natural detergents, such as sodium deoxycholate, act as potent inhibitors of the lipase. This inhibition can be reversed by adding fresh oil emulsion. Result with tetrahydrolipstatin, an irreversible inhibitor, suggests that the lipase is a serine enzyme. Peptide sequences of the lipase were determined and compared with the full-length sequence of lipase which was obtained by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends method. The full cDNA of the pvl was 1,186 bp, with a deduced protein of 362 amino acids that includes a consensus sequence (GXSXG) of the lipase superfamily of α/β-hydrolase. The gene exhibits features of conserved catalytic residues and high homology with various mammalian and insect lipase genes. A potential lid sequence is suggested for pvl.

  13. New lipase assay using Pomegranate oil coating in microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Ülker, Serdar; Placidi, Camille; Point, Vanessa; Gadenne, Benoît; Serveau-Avesque, Carole; Canaan, Stéphane; Carrière, Frédéric; Cavalier, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Lipases play various roles in fat digestion, lipoprotein metabolism, and in the mobilization of fat stored in lipid bodies in animals, plants and microorganisms. In association with these physiological functions, there is an important field of research for discovering lipase inhibitors and developing new treatments of diseases such as obesity, atherosclerosis, diabetes and tuberculosis. In this context, the development of convenient, specific and sensitive analytical methods for the detection and assay of lipases and/or lipase inhibitors is of major importance. It is shown here that purified triacylglycerols (TAGs) from Punica granatum (Pomegranate) seed oil coated on microtiter plates can be used for the continuous assay of lipase activity by recording the variations with time of the UV absorption spectra at 275 nm. UV absorption is due the release of punicic acid (9Z,11E,13Z-octadeca-9,11,13-trienoic acid), a conjugated triene contained in Pomegranate oil. This new microtiter plate assay allows to accurately measure the activity of a wider range of lipases compared to the similar assay previously developed with Tung oil containing α-eleostearic acid (9Z,11E,13E-octadeca-9,11,13-trienoic acid), including the LipY lipase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although punicic acid is a diastereoisomer of α-eleostearic acid, the Δ(13)cis double bound found in punicic acid gives a different structure to the acyl chain that probably favours the interaction of Pomegranate TAGs with the lipase active site. The microplate lipase assay using Pomegranate TAGs shows high sensitivity, reproducibility and remarkable relevance for the high-speed screening of lipases and/or lipase inhibitors directly from raw culture media without any purification step. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  14. Release of pea germplasm with Fusarium resistance combined with desirable yield and anti-lodging traits

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium root rot caused by Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi (Fsp) and Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi (Fop) races 1, 2 and 5, negatively impact the pea industry worldwide. Limited pea germplasm with agronomically acceptable characteristics combined with resistance to these disease...

  15. Population of Fusarium graminearum Schwabe associated with head and seedling blight in Slovakia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The growth of Fusarium species associated with Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) varies depending on agronomic characters and edaphic conditions. We have identified 15 Fusarium species during the 10 years of our investigations in the Slovak Republic. The most commonly identified Fusarium species involved...

  16. Adventitious sporulation in Fusarium: The yeast that were not

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Matthew B.; Crescencio, Juan Carlos Rico

    2015-01-01

    In immunocompromised patients, Fusarium species cause infections that lead to high mortality. Our case report describes a case of disseminated fusariosis in a neutropenic patient with AML after myelosuppressive chemotherapy, and a neutropenic multiple myeloma patient with Fusarium fungemia awaiting stem cell collection. Both cases highlight the fact that Fusarium can grow as yeast-like structures in the blood causing a delay in diagnosis, and that Fusarium has a tendency to be a resistant organism. Fusarium was only susceptible to amphotericin B in both cases, but we chose to continue treatment with voriconazole in the first case with disseminated infection, despite culture results, in view of his good clinical response. Despite high mortality rates in disseminated infection, our two patients had good outcomes. PMID:26793480

  17. Isolation and biochemical characterization of Bacillus pumilus lipases from the Antarctic.

    PubMed

    Arifin, Arild Ranlym; Kim, Soon-Ja; Yim, Joung Han; Suwanto, Antonius; Kim, Hyung Kwoun

    2013-05-01

    Lipase-producing bacterial strains were isolated from Antarctic soil samples using the tricaprylin agar plate method. Seven strains with relatively strong lipase activities were selected. All of them turned out to be Bacillus pumilus strains by the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Their corresponding lipase genes were cloned, sequenced, and compared. Finally, three different Bacillus pumilus lipases (BPL1, BPL2, and BPL3) were chosen. Their amino acid sequence identities were in the range of 92-98% with the previous Bacillus pumilus lipases. Their optimum temperatures and pHs were measured to be 40 degrees C and pH 9. Lipase BPL1 and lipase BPL2 were stable up to 30 degrees C, whereas lipase BPL3 was stable up to 20 degrees C. Lipase BPL2 was stable within a pH range of 6-10, whereas lipase BPL1 and lipase BPL3 were stable within a pH range of 5-11, showing strong alkaline tolerance. All these lipases exhibited high hydrolytic activity toward pnitrophenyl caprylate (C8). In addition, lipase BPL1 showed high hydrolytic activity toward tributyrin, whereas lipase BPL2 and lipase BPL3 hydrolyzed tricaprylin and castor oil preferentially. These results demonstrated that the three Antarctic Bacillus lipases were alkaliphilic and had a substrate preference toward short- and mediumchain triglycerides. These Antarctic Bacillus lipases might be used in detergent and food industries.

  18. First report of Fusarium redolens causing Fusarium yellowing and wilt of chickpea in Tunisia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chickpea plants showing wilt symptoms in Tunisia have been attributed solely to race 0 of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris (Foc) in the past. However, chickpea cultivars known to be resistant to race 0 of Foc recently also showed the wilting symptoms. To ascertain the race or species identities re...

  19. Soybean SDS in South Africa is caused by Fusarium brasiliense and a novel undescribed Fusarium sp.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS) was detected in South Africa for the first time during pathogen surveys conducted in 2013-2014. The primary objective of this study was to characterize the 16 slow-growing Fusarium strains that were isolated from the roots of symptomatic plants. Molecular phylogen...

  20. Potential for using Fusarium to control Fusarium disease in forest nurseries

    Treesearch

    Robert L. James; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2007-01-01

    The taxon Fusarium oxysporum contains a complex of fungi that are very important pathogens of many plant species worldwide, including seedlings grown in forest nurseries. All members of this complex appear very similar morphologically, and can often be differentiated only on the basis of genetic analyses. Strains of F. oxysporum...

  1. In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility and Molecular Characterization of Clinical Isolates of Fusarium verticillioides (F. moniliforme) and Fusarium thapsinum▿

    PubMed Central

    Azor, Mónica; Gené, Josepa; Cano, Josep; Sutton, Deanna A.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Guarro, Josep

    2008-01-01

    A microdilution method was used to test 11 antifungal drugs against clinical isolates of Fusarium thapsinum and three different phylogenetic clades of Fusarium verticillioides that were characterized by sequencing a region of the β-tubulin gene. Terbinafine was the most-active drug against both species, followed by posaconazole against F. verticillioides. PMID:18391027

  2. Development and validation of a lipase nasogastric tube position test.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Oliver; Carr, Reuben; Harbinson, Merrilee; Hanna, George Bushra

    2016-01-01

    Nasogastric tube position should be checked every day by either aspirate pH or chest radiography to prevent fatal misplaced feeding into the lungs. Many patients do not have acidic gastric aspirates and require daily chest radiographs. We developed and validated a lipase test that was compatible with non-acidic gastric aspirates. We conducted evaluations of diagnostic test accuracy at a teaching hospital in development and validation stages. We collected gastric and lung aspirates from 34 consecutive patients. We measured pH and human gastric lipase activity in the laboratory. These data helped us develop the lipase test. Ingenza Ltd (Roslin, Scotland) created tributyrin-coated pH test paper, which human gastric lipase converted into butyric acid, thus correcting false negatives. We tested nasogastric feeding tube aspirates from 36 consecutive patients with pH and lipase tests, using chest radiography or trial by use as the reference standard. We demonstrated human gastric lipase activity in the non-acidic stomach aspirates. The accuracy of the lipase test (sensitivity 97.2%, specificity 100%) was significantly better than pH (sensitivity 65.7%, specificity 100%, p<0.05). When nasogastric tube stomach aspirates were not acidic and pH was falsely negative, the lipase test showed a true positive and was significantly more accurate.

  3. Development and validation of a lipase nasogastric tube position test

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Oliver; Carr, Reuben; Harbinson, Merrilee; Hanna, George Bushra

    2016-01-01

    Background Nasogastric tube position should be checked every day by either aspirate pH or chest radiography to prevent fatal misplaced feeding into the lungs. Many patients do not have acidic gastric aspirates and require daily chest radiographs. We developed and validated a lipase test that was compatible with non-acidic gastric aspirates. Methods We conducted evaluations of diagnostic test accuracy at a teaching hospital in development and validation stages. Development: We collected gastric and lung aspirates from 34 consecutive patients. We measured pH and human gastric lipase activity in the laboratory. These data helped us develop the lipase test. Ingenza Ltd (Roslin, Scotland) created tributyrin-coated pH test paper, which human gastric lipase converted into butyric acid, thus correcting false negatives. Validation: We tested nasogastric feeding tube aspirates from 36 consecutive patients with pH and lipase tests, using chest radiography or trial by use as the reference standard. Results Development: We demonstrated human gastric lipase activity in the non-acidic stomach aspirates. Validation: The accuracy of the lipase test (sensitivity 97.2%, specificity 100%) was significantly better than pH (sensitivity 65.7%, specificity 100%, p<0.05). Conclusions When nasogastric tube stomach aspirates were not acidic and pH was falsely negative, the lipase test showed a true positive and was significantly more accurate. PMID:26966548

  4. Surfactant-activated lipase hybrid nanoflowers with enhanced enzymatic performance

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jiandong; Zhao, Yamin; Liu, Ronglin; Zhong, Cheng; Jia, Shiru

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of materials have been extensively used as platforms for enzyme immobilization to improve catalytic performance. However, activity of the most of the enzymes was declined after immobilization. Here, we develop a surfactant-activated lipase-inorganic flowerlike hybrid nanomaterials with rational design based on interfacial activation and self-assembly. The resulting surfactant-activated lipase-inorganic hybird nanoflower (activated hNF-lipase) exhibited 460% and 200% higher activity than native lipase and conventional lipase-inorganic hybird nanoflower (hNF-lipase). Furthermore, the activated hNF-lipase displayed good reusability due to its monodispersity and mechanical properties, and had excellent long-time stability. The superior catalytic performances were attributed to both the conformational modulation of surfactants and hierarchical structure of nanoflowers, which not only anchored lipases in an active form, but also decreased the enzyme-support negative interaction and mass-transfer limitations. This new biocatalytic system is promising to find widespread use in applications related to biomedicine, biosensor, and biodiesel. PMID:27297609

  5. Activation of a bacterial lipase by its chaperone.

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, A H; Buckley, C M; Aamand, J L; Jørgensen, S T; Diderichsen, B; McConnell, D J

    1993-01-01

    The gene lipA of Pseudomonas cepacia DSM 3959 encodes a prelipase from which a signal peptide is cleaved during secretion, producing a mature extracellular lipase. Expression of lipase in several heterologous hosts depends on the presence of another gene, limA, in cis or in trans. Lipase protein has been overproduced in Escherichia coli in the presence and absence of the lipase modulator gene limA. Therefore, limA is not required for the transcription of lipA or for the translation of the lipA mRNA. However, no lipase activity is observed in the absence of limA. limA has been overexpressed and encodes a 33-kDa protein, Lim. If lipase protein is denatured in 8 M urea and the urea is removed by dialysis, lipase activity is quantitatively recovered provided Lim protein is present during renaturation. Lip and Lim proteins form a complex precipitable either by an anti-lipase or anti-Lim antibody. The Lim protein has therefore the properties of a chaperone. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7685908

  6. Marine invertebrate lipases: Comparative and functional genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Perez, Crisalejandra

    2015-09-01

    Lipases are key enzymes involved in lipid digestion, storage and mobilization of reserves during fasting or heightened metabolic demand. This is a highly conserved process, essential for survival. The genomes of five marine invertebrate species with distinctive digestive system were screened for the six major lipase families. The two most common families in marine invertebrates, the neutral an acid lipases, are also the main families in mammals and insects. The number of lipases varies two-fold across analyzed genomes. A high degree of orthology with mammalian lipases was observed. Interestingly, 19% of the marine invertebrate lipases have lost motifs required for catalysis. Analysis of the lid and loop regions of the neutral lipases suggests that many marine invertebrates have a functional triacylglycerol hydrolytic activity as well as some acid lipases. A revision of the expression profiles and functional activity on sequences in databases and scientific literature provided information regarding the function of these families of enzymes in marine invertebrates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Unraveling the rationale behind organic solvent stability of lipases.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Debamitra; Parameswaran, Saravanan; Dubey, Vikash Kumar; Patra, Sanjukta

    2012-06-01

    Organic solvent-stable lipases have pronounced impact on industrial economy as they are involved in synthesis by esterification, interesterification, and transesterification. However, very few of such natural lipases have been isolated till date. A study of the recent past provided few pillars to rely on for this work. The three-dimensional structure, inclusive of the surface and active site, of 29 organic solvent-stable lipases was analyzed by subfamily classification and protein solvent molecular docking based on fast Fourier transform correlation approach. The observations revealed that organic solvent stability of lipases is their intrinsic property and unique with respect to each lipase. In this paper, factors like surface distribution of charged, hydrophobic, and neutral residues, interaction of solvents with catalytically immutable residues, and residues interacting with essential water molecules required for lipase activity, synergistically and by mutualism contribute to render a stable lipase organic solvent. The propensity of surface charge in relation to stability in organic solvents by establishing repulsive forces to exclude solvent molecules from interacting with the surface and prohibiting the same from gaining entry to the protein core, thus stabilizing the active conformation, is a new finding. It was also interesting to note that lipases having equivalent surface-exposed positive and negative residues were stable in a wide range of organic solvents, irrespective of their LogP values.

  8. Substrate specificity and kinetic properties of enzymes belonging to the hormone-sensitive lipase family: comparison with non-lipolytic and lipolytic carboxylesterases.

    PubMed

    Chahinian, Henri; Ali, Yassine Ben; Abousalham, Abdelkarim; Petry, Stefan; Mandrich, Luigi; Manco, Guiseppe; Canaan, Stephane; Sarda, Louis

    2005-12-30

    We have studied the kinetics of hydrolysis of triacylglycerols, vinyl esters and p-nitrophenyl butyrate by four carboxylesterases of the HSL family, namely recombinant human hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), EST2 from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius, AFEST from Archeoglobus fulgidus, and protein RV1399C from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The kinetic properties of enzymes of the HSL family have been compared to those of a series of lipolytic and non-lipolytic carboxylesterases including human pancreatic lipase, guinea pig pancreatic lipase related protein 2, lipases from Mucor miehei and Thermomyces lanuginosus, cutinase from Fusarium solani, LipA from Bacillus subtilis, porcine liver esterase and Esterase A from Aspergilus niger. Results indicate that human HSL, together with other lipolytic carboxylesterases, are active on short chain esters and hydrolyze water insoluble trioctanoin, vinyl laurate and olive oil, whereas the action of EST2, AFEST, protein RV1399C and non-lipolytic carboxylesterases is restricted to solutions of short chain substrates. Lipolytic and non-lipolytic carboxylesterases can be differentiated by their respective value of K(0.5) (apparent K(m)) for the hydrolysis of short chain esters. Among lipolytic enzymes, those possessing a lid domain display higher activity on tributyrin, trioctanoin and olive oil suggesting, then, that the lid structure contributes to enzyme binding to triacylglycerols. Progress reaction curves of the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate by lipolytic carboxylesterases with lid domain show a latency phase which is not observed with human HSL, non-lipolytic carboxylesterases, and lipolytic enzymes devoid of a lid structure as cutinase.

  9. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of ascorbyl oleate in acetone: optimization of reaction conditions and lipase reusability.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Marija; Velićković, Dušan; Dimitrijević, Aleksandra; Milosavić, Nenad; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica; Bezbradica, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    Lipase-catalyzed ascorbyl oleate synthesis is eco-friendly and selective way of production of liposoluble biocompatible antioxidants, but still not present on an industrial level due to the high biocatalyst costs. In this study, response surface methodology was applied in order to estimate influence of individual experimental factors, identify interactions among them, and to determine optimum conditions for enzymatic synthesis of ascorbyl oleate in acetone, in terms of limiting substrate conversion, product yield, and yield per mass of consumed enzyme. As a biocatalyst, commercial immobilized preparation of lipase B from Candida antarctica, Novozym 435, was used. In order to develop cost-effective process, at reaction conditions at which maximum amount of product per mass of biocatalyst was produced (60°C, 0.018 % (v/v) of water, 0.135 M of vitamin C, substrates molar ratio 1:8, and 0.2 % (w/v) of lipase), possibilities for further increase of ester yield were investigated. Addition of molecular sieves at 4(th) hour of reaction enabled increase of yield from 16.7 mmol g⁻¹ to 19.3 mmol g⁻¹. Operational stability study revealed that after ten reaction cycles enzyme retained 48 % of its initial activity. Optimized synthesis with well-timed molecular sieves addition and repeated use of lipase provided production of 153 mmol per gram of enzyme. Further improvement of productivity was achieved using procedure for the enzyme reactivation.

  10. Substrate specificity of lipoprotein lipase and endothelial lipase: studies of lid chimeras.

    PubMed

    Griffon, Nathalie; Budreck, Elaine C; Long, Christopher J; Broedl, Uli C; Marchadier, Dawn H L; Glick, Jane M; Rader, Daniel J

    2006-08-01

    The triglyceride (TG) lipase gene subfamily, consisting of LPL, HL, and endothelial lipase (EL), plays a central role in plasma lipoprotein metabolism. Compared with LPL and HL, EL is relatively more active as a phospholipase than as a TG lipase. The amino acid loop or "lid" covering the catalytic site has been implicated as the basis for the difference in substrate specificity between HL and LPL. To determine the role of the lid in the substrate specificity of EL, we studied EL in comparison with LPL by mutating specific residues of the EL lid and exchanging their lids. Mutation studies showed that amphipathic properties of the lid contribute to substrate specificity. Exchanging lids between LPL and EL only partially shifted the substrate specificity of the enzymes. Studies of a double chimera possessing both the lid and the C-terminal domain (C-domain) of EL in the LPL backbone showed that the role of the lid in determining substrate specificity does not depend on the nature of the C-domain of the lipase. Using a kinetic assay, we showed an additive effect of the EL lid on the apparent affinity for HDL(3) in the presence of the EL C-domain.

  11. Inhibitory activity of benzophenones from Anemarrhena asphodeloides on pancreatic lipase.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yang Hee; Kim, Seon Beom; Ahn, Jong Hoon; Liu, Qing; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Lee, Mi Kyeong

    2013-04-01

    Pancreatic lipase is a key enzyme for lipid absorption by hydrolysis of total dietary fats. Therefore, inhibition of pancreatic lipase is suggested to be an effective therapy in the regulation of obesity. The EtOAc-soluble fraction of Anemarrhena asphodeloides rhizomes significantly inhibited pancreatic lipase activity as assessed using porcine pancreatic lipase as an in vitro assay system. Further fractionation of the EtOAc-soluble fraction of A. asphodeloides led to the isolation of a new benzophenone glycoside, zimoside A (1), together with the eleven known compounds iriflophenone (2), 2,4',6-trihydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone (3), foliamangiferoside A (4), (2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)(4-hydroxyphenyl)-methanone (5), 1,4,5,6,-tetrahydroxyxanthone (6), isosakuranetin (7), 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (8), 4-hydroxyacetophenone (9), vanillic acid (10), tyrosol (11) and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (12). Among the isolated compounds, 3, 5 and 10 showed significant inhibition of pancreatic lipase activity.

  12. Monoolein production by triglycerides hydrolysis using immobilized Rhizopus oryzae lipase.

    PubMed

    Ghattas, Nesrine; Abidi, Ferid; Galai, Said; Marzouki, M Nejib; Salah, Abderraouf Ben

    2014-07-01

    Lipase extracted from Rhizopus oryzae was immobilized in alginate gel beads. The effects of the immobilization conditions, such as, alginate concentration, CaCl2 concentration and amount of initial enzyme on retained activity (specific activity ratio of entrapped active lipase to free lipase) were investigated. The optimal conditions for lipase entrapment were determined: 2% (w/v) alginate concentration, 100mM CaCl2 and enzyme ratio of 2000IU/mL.In such conditions, immobilized lipase by inclusion in alginate showed a highest stability and activity, on olive oil hydrolysis reaction where it could be reused for 10 cycles. After 15min of hydrolysis reaction, the mass composition of monoolein, diolein and triolein were about 78%, 10% and 12%. Hydrolysis' products purification by column chromatography lead to a successful separation of reaction compounds and provide a pure fraction of monoolein which is considered as the widest used emulsifier in food and pharmaceutical industries.

  13. Genomic organization of the murine CTL lipase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, M.H.; Boyer, S.N.; Grusby, M.J.

    1996-08-01

    Murine cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) lipase was originally identified as an IL-4-inducible gene in CD8-positive T cells. To further our understanding of both the function and the regulation of CTL lipase in T cells, we have cloned and characterized the murine gene. Two overlapping phage clones spanning 29 kb contain the entire CTL lipase gene. The exon structure in similar to those characterized for the human and canine pancreatic lipase-related protein 1 genes, with notable differences in the 5{prime} end. Transcripts initiate from a site that matches a consensus for an initiator sequence. Potential cis-regulatory elements in the CTL lipase 5{prime} regulatory region that would confer dual tissue specificity in exocrine pancreas and cytotoxic T lymphocytes are identified. The implications of this promoter organization are discussed. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Mechanism of acetaldehyde-induced deactivation of microbial lipases.

    PubMed

    Franken, Benjamin; Eggert, Thorsten; Jaeger, Karl E; Pohl, Martina

    2011-02-22

    Microbial lipases represent the most important class of biocatalysts used for a wealth of applications in organic synthesis. An often applied reaction is the lipase-catalyzed transesterification of vinyl esters and alcohols resulting in the formation of acetaldehyde which is known to deactivate microbial lipases, presumably by structural changes caused by initial Schiff-base formation at solvent accessible lysine residues. Previous studies showed that several lipases were sensitive toward acetaldehyde deactivation whereas others were insensitive; however, a general explanation of the acetaldehyde-induced inactivation mechanism is missing. Based on five microbial lipases from Candida rugosa, Rhizopus oryzae, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus subtilis we demonstrate that the protonation state of lysine ε-amino groups is decisive for their sensitivity toward acetaldehyde. Analysis of the diverse modification products of Bacillus subtilis lipases in the presence of acetaldehyde revealed several stable products such as α,β-unsaturated polyenals, which result from base and/or amino acid catalyzed aldol condensation of acetaldehyde. Our studies indicate that these products induce the formation of stable Michael-adducts at solvent-accessible amino acids and thus lead to enzyme deactivation. Further, our results indicate Schiff-base formation with acetaldehyde to be involved in crosslinking of lipase molecules. Differences in stability observed with various commercially available microbial lipases most probably result from different purification procedures carried out by the respective manufacturers. We observed that the pH of the buffer used prior to lyophilization of the enzyme sample is of utmost importance. The mechanism of acetaldehyde-induced deactivation of microbial lipases involves the generation of α,β-unsaturated polyenals from acetaldehyde which subsequently form stable Michael-adducts with the enzymes. Lyophilization of the enzymes from buffer at pH 6

  15. Mechanism of acetaldehyde-induced deactivation of microbial lipases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Microbial lipases represent the most important class of biocatalysts used for a wealth of applications in organic synthesis. An often applied reaction is the lipase-catalyzed transesterification of vinyl esters and alcohols resulting in the formation of acetaldehyde which is known to deactivate microbial lipases, presumably by structural changes caused by initial Schiff-base formation at solvent accessible lysine residues. Previous studies showed that several lipases were sensitive toward acetaldehyde deactivation whereas others were insensitive; however, a general explanation of the acetaldehyde-induced inactivation mechanism is missing. Results Based on five microbial lipases from Candida rugosa, Rhizopus oryzae, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus subtilis we demonstrate that the protonation state of lysine ε-amino groups is decisive for their sensitivity toward acetaldehyde. Analysis of the diverse modification products of Bacillus subtilis lipases in the presence of acetaldehyde revealed several stable products such as α,β-unsaturated polyenals, which result from base and/or amino acid catalyzed aldol condensation of acetaldehyde. Our studies indicate that these products induce the formation of stable Michael-adducts at solvent-accessible amino acids and thus lead to enzyme deactivation. Further, our results indicate Schiff-base formation with acetaldehyde to be involved in crosslinking of lipase molecules. Conclusions Differences in stability observed with various commercially available microbial lipases most probably result from different purification procedures carried out by the respective manufacturers. We observed that the pH of the buffer used prior to lyophilization of the enzyme sample is of utmost importance. The mechanism of acetaldehyde-induced deactivation of microbial lipases involves the generation of α,β-unsaturated polyenals from acetaldehyde which subsequently form stable Michael-adducts with the enzymes. Lyophilization of

  16. A novel organic solvent tolerant lipase from Bacillus sphaericus 205y: extracellular expression of a novel OST-lipase gene.

    PubMed

    Sulong, Moohamad Ropaning; Abdul Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

    2006-10-01

    An organic solvent tolerant (OST) lipase gene from Bacillus sphaericus 205y was successfully expressed extracellularly. The expressed lipase was purified using two steps purification; ultrafiltration and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) to 8-fold purity and 32% recovery. The purified 205y lipase revealed homogeneity on denaturing gel electrophoresis and the molecular mass was at approximately 30 kDa. The optimum pH for the purified 205y lipase was 7.0-8.0 and its stability showed a broad range of pH value between pH 5.0 to 13.0 at 37 degrees C. The purified 205y lipase exhibited an optimum temperature of 55 degrees C. The activity of the purified lipase was stimulated in the presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) has no effect on its activity; however inhibition was observed with phenylmethane sulfonoyl fluoride (PMSF) a serine hydrolase inhibitor. Organic solvents such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), methanol, p-xylene and n-decane enhanced the activity. Studies on the effect of oil showed that the lipase was most active in the presence of tricaprin (C10). The lipase exhibited 1,3 positional specificity. Bacter

  17. Isolation of lipase producing thermophilic bacteria: optimization of production and reaction conditions for lipase from Geobacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Akshita; Kumar, Rakesh; Gupta, Reena

    2012-12-01

    Lipases catalyze the hydrolysis and the synthesis of esters formed from glycerol and long chain fatty acids. Lipases occur widely in nature, but only microbial lipases are commercially significant. In the present study, thirty-two bacterial strains, isolated from soil sample of a hot spring were screened for lipase production. The strain TS-4, which gave maximum activity, was identified as Geobacillus sp. at MTCC, IMTECH, Chandigarh. The isolated lipase producing bacteria were grown on minimal salt medium containing olive oil. Maximal quantities of lipase were produced when 30 h old inoculum was used at 10% (v/v) in production medium and incubated in shaking conditions (150 rpm) for 72 h. The optimal temperature and pH for the bacterial growth and lipase production were found to be 60°C and 9.5, respectively. Maximal enzyme production resulted when mustard oil was used as carbon source and yeast extract as sole nitrogen source at a concentration of 1% (v/v) and 0.15% (w/v), respectively. The different optimized reaction parameters were temperature 65°C, pH 8.5, incubation time 10 min and substrate p-nitrophenyl palmitate. The Km and Vmax values of enzyme were found to be 14 mM and 17.86 μmol ml-1min-1, respectively, with p-nitrophenyl palmitate as substrate. All metal ions studied (1 mM) increased the lipase activity.

  18. Fusarium Species from Nepalese Rice and Production of Mycotoxins and Gibberellic Acid by Selected Species

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, A. E.; Manandhar, H. K.; Plattner, R. D.; Manandhar, G. G.; Poling, S. M.; Maragos, C. M.

    2000-01-01

    Infection of cereal grains with Fusarium species can cause contamination with mycotoxins that affect human and animal health. To determine the potential for mycotoxin contamination, we isolated Fusarium species from samples of rice seeds that were collected in 1997 on farms in the foothills of the Nepal Himalaya. The predominant Fusarium species in surface-disinfested seeds with husks were species of the Gibberella fujikuroi complex, including G. fujikuroi mating population A (anamorph, Fusarium verticillioides), G. fujikuroi mating population C (anamorph, Fusarium fujikuroi), and G. fujikuroi mating population D (anamorph, Fusarium proliferatum). The widespread occurrence of mating population D suggests that its role in the complex symptoms of bakanae disease of rice may be significant. Other common species were Gibberella zeae (anamorph, Fusarium graminearum) and Fusarium semitectum, with Fusarium acuminatum, Fusarium anguioides, Fusarium avenaceum, Fusarium chlamydosporum, Fusarium equiseti, and Fusarium oxysporum occasionally present. Strains of mating population C produced beauvericin, moniliformin, and gibberellic acid, but little or no fumonisin, whereas strains of mating population D produced beauvericin, fumonisin, and, usually, moniliformin, but no gibberellic acid. Some strains of G. zeae produced the 8-ketotrichothecene nivalenol, whereas others produced deoxynivalenol. Despite the occurrence of fumonisin-producing strains of mating population D, and of 8-ketotrichothecene-producing strains of G. zeae, Nepalese rice showed no detectable contamination with these mycotoxins. Effective traditional practices for grain drying and storage may prevent contamination of Nepalese rice with Fusarium mycotoxins. PMID:10698766

  19. A rare entity in ED: Normal lipase level in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Limon, Onder; Sahin, Erkan; Kantar, Funda Ugur; Oray, Deniz; Ugurhan, Asli Aydinoglu

    2016-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis can have a variable presentation and diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, serum amylase and lipase levels and computed tomography. Negative predictive value of serum lipase in diagnosing acute pancreatitis is approximately to 100 percent and a normal blood lipase level in acute pancreatitis is an extremely rare condition. Here we reported two cases with normal serum amylase and lipase levels.

  20. 21 CFR 184.1420 - Lipase enzyme preparation derived from Rhizopus niveus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lipase enzyme preparation derived from Rhizopus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1420 Lipase enzyme preparation derived from Rhizopus niveus. (a) Lipase enzyme preparation contains lipase enzyme (CAS Reg. No...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1420 - Lipase enzyme preparation derived from Rhizopus niveus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lipase enzyme preparation derived from Rhizopus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1420 Lipase enzyme preparation derived from Rhizopus niveus. (a) Lipase enzyme preparation contains lipase enzyme (CAS Reg. No...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1420 - Lipase enzyme preparation derived from Rhizopus niveus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lipase enzyme preparation derived from Rhizopus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1420 Lipase enzyme preparation derived from Rhizopus niveus. (a) Lipase enzyme preparation contains lipase enzyme (CAS Reg. No...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1420 - Lipase enzyme preparation derived from Rhizopus niveus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Lipase enzyme preparation derived from Rhizopus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1420 Lipase enzyme preparation derived from Rhizopus niveus. (a) Lipase enzyme preparation contains lipase enzyme (CAS Reg. No...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1420 - Lipase enzyme preparation derived from Rhizopus niveus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lipase enzyme preparation derived from Rhizopus... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1420 Lipase enzyme preparation derived from Rhizopus niveus. (a) Lipase enzyme preparation contains lipase enzyme (CAS Reg. No. 9001-62-1), which is obtained from the...

  5. Harmful effect of detergents on lipase.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Sadaf; Ajmal, Rehan; Badr, Gamal; Khan, Rizwan H

    2014-11-01

    In order to study effects of detergents at molecular level, we have done activity measurements of wheat germ lipase in increasing concentration of some commercial detergents. Conformational changes in protein structure using circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy were studied in increasing concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Our study proves that detergents may lead to loss of enzymatic activity and structure of plant enzymes. Since detergents are common source of pollution in water bodies and the water from these resources can be used in fields, our study may prove helpful in creating awareness about harmful action of detergents.

  6. Fusarium pathogenesis investigated using Galleria mellonella as a heterologous host

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Jeffrey J.; Muhammed, Maged; Kasperkovitz, Pia V.; Vyas, Jatin M.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2011-01-01

    Members of the fungal genus Fusarium are capable of manifesting in a multitude of clinical infections, most commonly in immunocompromised patients. In order to better understand the interaction between the fungus and host, we have developed the larvae of the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella, as a heterologous host for fusaria. When conidia are injected into the hemocoel of this Lepidopteran system, both clinical and environmental isolates of the fungus are able to kill the larvae at 37°C, although killing occurs more rapidly when incubated at 30°C. This killing was dependent on several other factors besides temperature, including the Fusarium strain, the number of conidia injected, and the conidia morphology, where macroconidia are more virulent than their microconidia counterpart. There was a correlation in the killing rate of Fusarium spp. when evaluated in G. mellonella and a murine model. In vivo studies indicated G. mellonella hemocytes were capable of initially phagocytosing both conidial morphologies. The G. mellonella system was also used to evaluate antifungal agents, and amphotericin B was able to confer a significant increase in survival to Fusarium infected-larvae. The G. mellonella-Fusarium pathogenicity system revealed that virulence of Fusarium spp. is similar, regardless of the origin of the isolate, and that mammalian endothermy is a major deterrent for Fusarium infection and therefore provides a suitable alternative to mammalian models to investigate the interaction between the host and this increasingly important fungal pathogen. PMID:22115447

  7. Molecular characterization of a proteolysis-resistant lipase from Bacillus pumilus SG2.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, R; Arulpandi, I; Geetha, A

    2014-01-01

    Proteolysis-resistant lipases can be well exploited by industrial processes which employ both lipase and protease as biocatalysts. A proteolysis resistant lipase from Bacillus pumilus SG2 was isolated, purified and characterized earlier. The lipase was resistant to native and commercial proteases. In the present work, we have characterized the lip gene which encodes the proteolysis-resistant lipase from Bacillus pumilus SG2. The parameters and structural details of lipase were analysed. The lip gene consisted of 650 bp. The experimental molecular weight of SG2 lipase was nearly double that of its theoretical molecular weight, thus suggesting the existence of the functional lipase as a covalent dimer. The proteolytic cleavage sites of the lipase would have been made inaccessible by dimerisation, thus rendering the lipase resistant to protease.

  8. Molecular characterization of a proteolysis-resistant lipase from Bacillus pumilus SG2

    PubMed Central

    Sangeetha, R.; Arulpandi, I.; Geetha, A.

    2014-01-01

    Proteolysis-resistant lipases can be well exploited by industrial processes which employ both lipase and protease as biocatalysts. A proteolysis resistant lipase from Bacillus pumilus SG2 was isolated, purified and characterized earlier. The lipase was resistant to native and commercial proteases. In the present work, we have characterized the lip gene which encodes the proteolysis-resistant lipase from Bacillus pumilus SG2. The parameters and structural details of lipase were analysed. The lip gene consisted of 650 bp. The experimental molecular weight of SG2 lipase was nearly double that of its theoretical molecular weight, thus suggesting the existence of the functional lipase as a covalent dimer. The proteolytic cleavage sites of the lipase would have been made inaccessible by dimerisation, thus rendering the lipase resistant to protease. PMID:25242920

  9. Effects of Regioselectivity and Lipid Class Specificity of Lipases on Transesterification, Exemplified by Biodiesel Production.

    PubMed

    Sinkūnienė, Dovilė; Adlercreutz, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Lipase-catalyzed ethanolysis of triolein was studied as a model for biodiesel production. Four lipases were immobilized on porous polypropylene, and ethanolysis reactions were carried out in methyl t-butyl ether. The reaction products were analyzed using gas chromatography. Three of the four lipases studied were efficient in the conversion of triolein to 2-monoolein, but slow in the final step of producing glycerol. However, Candida antarctica lipase B was slow in the conversion of triolein, but more efficient in the subsequent two steps than the other lipases. The 1,3-selectivity of the lipases was less pronounced for the monooleins than for triolein. Silica gel was investigated as a catalyst for acyl migration, showing an increase in biodiesel yield with three of the lipases, but a reduction in yield when C. antarctica lipase B was used. The highest biodiesel yield (96 %) was obtained with a combination of Rhizopus arrhizus lipase and C. antarctica lipase B.

  10. Molecular Characterization of Fusarium oxysporum and Fusarium commune Isolates from a Conifer Nursery.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Jane E; Kim, Mee-Sook; James, Robert L; Dumroese, R Kasten; Klopfenstein, Ned B

    2006-10-01

    ABSTRACT Fusarium species can cause severe root disease and damping-off in conifer nurseries. Fusarium inoculum is commonly found in most container and bareroot nurseries on healthy and diseased seedlings, in nursery soils, and on conifer seeds. Isolates of Fusarium spp. can differ in virulence; however, virulence and colony morphology are not correlated. Forty-one isolates of Fusarium spp., morphologically indistinguishable from F. oxysporum, were collected from nursery samples (soils, healthy seedlings, and diseased seedlings). These isolates were characterized by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and DNA sequencing of nuclear rDNA (internal transcribed spacer including 5.8S rDNA), mitochon-drial rDNA (small subunit [mtSSU]), and nuclear translation elongation factor 1-alpha. Each isolate had a unique AFLP phenotype. Out of 121 loci, 111 (92%) were polymorphic; 30 alleles were unique to only highly virulent isolates and 33 alleles were unique to only isolates nonpathogenic on conifers. Maximum parsimony and Bayesian analyses of DNA sequences from all three regions and the combined data set showed that all highly virulent isolates clearly separated into a common clade that contained F. commune, which was recently distinguished from its sister taxon, F. oxysporum. Interestingly, all but one of the nonpathogenic isolates grouped into a common clade and were genetically similar to F. oxysporum. The AFLP cladograms had similar topologies when compared with the DNA-based phylograms. Although all tested isolates were morphologically indistinguishable from F. oxysporum based on currently available monographs, some morphological traits can be plastic and unreliable for identification of Fusarium spp. We consider the highly virulent isolates to be F. commune based on strong genetic evidence. To our knowledge, this is the first reported evidence that shows F. commune is a cause of Fusarium disease (root rot and dampingoff) on Douglas-fir seedlings. Furthermore

  11. Bile salt-stimulated lipase and pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 are the dominating lipases in neonatal fat digestion in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaonan; Lindquist, Susanne; Lowe, Mark; Noppa, Laila; Hernell, Olle

    2007-11-01

    During infancy, the basic conditions for digestion of dietary fat differ from later in life. The bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL) is an enzyme expressed in the exocrine pancreas and in some species (including human) also in the lactating mammary gland and secreted with the milk. The aim of this study was to compare the ontogeny of four pancreatic lipases [BSSL, pancreatic triglyceride lipase (PL), pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (PLRP2), and phospholipase A2 (PLA2)] in one species that supplies BSSL with milk (the mouse) and one that does not (the rat). We followed expression of the four pancreatic lipases from postnatal d 1 until after weaning in both species. We found that BSSL and PLRP2, two lipases with broad substrate specificity, dominated. It was not until weaning that significant expression of PL and PLA2 were induced. Thus, BSSL and PLRP2 seem to be responsible for fat digestion as long as milk is the main food. Moreover, the early temporal pattern of BSSL expression differed between species. We speculate that the milk-borne BSSL is able to compensate for a slower ontogeny of pancreatic BSSL expression in the mouse.

  12. Antibiofilm activity of propolis extract on Fusarium species from onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Galletti, Juliana; Tobaldini-Valerio, Flávia K; Silva, Sónia; Kioshima, Érika Seki; Trierveiler-Pereira, Larissa; Bruschi, Marcos; Negri, Melyssa; Estivalet Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez

    2017-10-04

    The present study evaluated the capacity of three species of Fusarium isolated from onychomycosis to form biofilms and the antibiofilm effect of propolis extract on these biofilms. The biofilms and antibiofilm effects were evaluated by quantifying the colony-forming units, mitochondrial metabolic activity assays, total biomass by crystal violet staining and scanning electron microscopy. Propolis extract demonstrated significant antibiofilm efficiency on Fusarium spp. isolates and reduced F. solani, F. oxysporum and F. subglutinans mature biofilms. Propolis extract can be an alternative topical treatment of onychomycosis caused by Fusarium spp.

  13. Pathogenicity of seed transmittedFusarium spp. to triticale seedlings.

    PubMed

    Arseniuk, E; Scharen, A L; Czembor, H J

    1991-09-01

    In the conducted studies 13 species ofFusarium were isolated into pure culture from triticale seed. Their pathogenicity was assessed under laboratory and greenhouse conditions. Most of the species studied were highly pathogenic to the first leaf see-dlings of triticale 'Grado' and 'Lasko' under both sets of conditions. It was shown, that seed-transmitted Fusarium spp. considerably reduced the ability of seeds to germinate and incited seedling blight. On average, triticale 'Lasko' was more resistant toFusarium spp. than 'Grado', but in some instances a reverse reaction was observed.

  14. Production of lipases by four anoxygenic purple non-sulphur phototrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Munjam, Srinivas; Girisham, S; Reddy, S M

    Production of lipases by Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodocyclus gelatinosus and Rhodocyclus tenuis in different synthetic media was investigated. Rc. gelatinosus followed by Rb. sphaeroides were good producers of lipases, while Rps. palustris and Rc. tenuis were poor in lipase secretion. Lipase secretion by Rc. gelatinosus was adaptive in nature, while other three bacterial behavior was inconsistent. No positive correlation could be observed between growth and lipase production.

  15. Lipase production in lipolytic yeast from Wonorejo mangrove area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alami, Nur Hidayatul; Nasihah, Liziyatin; Umar, Rurin Luswidya Artaty; Kuswytasari, Nengah Dwianita; Zulaika, Enny; Shovitri, Maya

    2017-06-01

    Lipase is an enzyme that is often used in industry and become a commercial enzyme. One group of microorganisms capable of producing lipase is a yeast. This study aims to screen yeast from Wonorejo mangrove that potential to produce lipase and to optimize the production of these enzymes. Screening test include the measurement of lipolytic index and value of fatty acid. Yeast with the best value of fatty acid will be continued to the measurement of lipase activity. It is affected by several environmental factors, such as pH, temperature, and incubation time. This research was conducted to observe the optimization variation on environmental factors combination to produce lipase. Lipase activity was tested by using p-Nitrophenyl Palmitate (pNPP). Absorbency was measured by spectrofotometer on wavelength of 410 nm. Measurement of the enzyme activity was done by interpolating the absorbance values on the p-nitrophenol standard curve then calculated by the formula. All data were analyzed by using descriptive quantitative method. The results show that the highest lypolityc index was 2.08. The highest value of fatty acid was 0.49 that was reached on 168 hours of incubation. Candida W3.8 expressed the highest lypolylitic potential. The optimum environment to produce lipase by Candida W 3.8 was on 120 hours of incubation time, in temperature range of 27°C - 45°C and pH range of 4,5 - 7.

  16. Investigation of deactivation thermodynamics of lipase immobilized on polymeric carrier.

    PubMed

    Badgujar, Kirtikumar C; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2017-05-01

    In the present work, we have investigated biochemical thermo-kinetic stability of lipases immobilized on a biocompatible polymeric material. Immobilization of lipase Candida rugosa (CRL) was carried out on biocompatible blend of poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) and chitosan (CHY) support via entrapment and glutardehyde (Glu) cross-linking method to produce PVA:CHY:CRL and PVA:CHY:Glu:CRL as robust biocatalyst. These immobilized lipases were characterized by various physico-biochemical characterization techniques. Later on, thermal and solvent stability of polymer immobilized lipase was determined in term of half-life time (t 0.5), D values, enthalpy (ΔH°), entropy (ΔS°), and free energy (ΔG°) of deactivation at different temperatures and in various solvents. The thermodynamic deactivation stability trend was found as: cross-linked lipase CRL > entrapped lipase CRL > free lipase CRL. Moreover, kinetic parameters, such as K m, V max, and catalytic efficiency, were also determined to understand the kinetic features. The polymer immobilized enzyme was reused to investigate the economic viability of the developed biocatalyst.

  17. Environmental Influences on Pigeonpea-Fusarium udum Interactions and Stability of Genotypes to Fusarium Wilt

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mamta; Ghosh, Raju; Telangre, Rameshwar; Rathore, Abhishek; Saifulla, Muhammad; Mahalinga, Dayananda M.; Saxena, Deep R.; Jain, Yogendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium wilt (Fusarium udum Butler) is an important biotic constraint to pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.) production worldwide. Breeding for fusarium wilt resistance continues to be an integral part of genetic improvement of pigeonpea. Therefore, the study was aimed at identifying and validating resistant genotypes to fusarium wilt and determining the magnitude of genotype × environment (G × E) interactions through multi-environment and multi-year screening. A total of 976 genotypes including germplasm and breeding lines were screened against wilt using wilt sick plot at Patancheru, India. Ninety two genotypes resistant to wilt were tested for a further two years using wilt sick plot at Patancheru. A Pigeonpea Wilt Nursery (PWN) comprising of 29 genotypes was then established. PWN was evaluated at nine locations representing different agro-climatic zones of India for wilt resistance during two crop seasons 2007/08 and 2008/09. Genotypes (G), environment (E), and G × E interactions were examined by biplot which partitioned the main effect into G, E, and G × E interactions with significant levels (p ≤ 0.001) being obtained for wilt incidence. The genotype contributed 36.51% of resistance variation followed by the environment (29.32%). A GGE biplot integrated with a boxplot and multiple comparison tests enabled us to identify seven stable genotypes (ICPL 20109, ICPL 20096, ICPL 20115, ICPL 20116, ICPL 20102, ICPL 20106, and ICPL 20094) based on their performance across diverse environments. These genotypes have broad based resistance and can be exploited in pigeonpea breeding programs. PMID:27014287

  18. Environmental Influences on Pigeonpea-Fusarium udum Interactions and Stability of Genotypes to Fusarium Wilt.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mamta; Ghosh, Raju; Telangre, Rameshwar; Rathore, Abhishek; Saifulla, Muhammad; Mahalinga, Dayananda M; Saxena, Deep R; Jain, Yogendra K

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium wilt (Fusarium udum Butler) is an important biotic constraint to pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.) production worldwide. Breeding for fusarium wilt resistance continues to be an integral part of genetic improvement of pigeonpea. Therefore, the study was aimed at identifying and validating resistant genotypes to fusarium wilt and determining the magnitude of genotype × environment (G × E) interactions through multi-environment and multi-year screening. A total of 976 genotypes including germplasm and breeding lines were screened against wilt using wilt sick plot at Patancheru, India. Ninety two genotypes resistant to wilt were tested for a further two years using wilt sick plot at Patancheru. A Pigeonpea Wilt Nursery (PWN) comprising of 29 genotypes was then established. PWN was evaluated at nine locations representing different agro-climatic zones of India for wilt resistance during two crop seasons 2007/08 and 2008/09. Genotypes (G), environment (E), and G × E interactions were examined by biplot which partitioned the main effect into G, E, and G × E interactions with significant levels (p ≤ 0.001) being obtained for wilt incidence. The genotype contributed 36.51% of resistance variation followed by the environment (29.32%). A GGE biplot integrated with a boxplot and multiple comparison tests enabled us to identify seven stable genotypes (ICPL 20109, ICPL 20096, ICPL 20115, ICPL 20116, ICPL 20102, ICPL 20106, and ICPL 20094) based on their performance across diverse environments. These genotypes have broad based resistance and can be exploited in pigeonpea breeding programs.

  19. Obtaining lipases from byproducts of orange juice processing.

    PubMed

    Okino-Delgado, Clarissa Hamaio; Fleuri, Luciana Francisco

    2014-11-15

    The presence of lipases was observed in three byproducts of orange juice processing: peel, core and frit. The enzymes were characterised biochemically over a wide pH range from neutral (6-7) to alkaline (8-9). The optimal temperature for the activity of these byproducts showed wide range at 20°C to 70°C, indicating fairly high thermostability. The activities were monitored on p-NP-butyrate, p-NP-laurate and p-NP-palmitate. For the first time, lipase activity was detected in these residues, reaching 68.5 lipase U/g for the crude extract from fractions called frit.

  20. Superparamagnetic nanotraps containing MIP based mimic lipase for biotransformations uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keçili, Rüstem; Özcan, Ayça Atılır; Ersöz, Arzu; Hür, Deniz; Denizli, Adil; Say, Rıdvan

    2011-05-01

    The nanoparticle comprises a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle core conjugated with trimethoxylsilyl propylmethacrylate (TMSPM) and methacryloylamido serine (MASE), methacryloylamido histidine (MAH), methacryloylamido glutamic acid (MAGA) monomers, and p-nitrophenyl palmitate ( p-NPP) which is a substrate of lipase as a template molecule, which enables the creation of lipase active region. The resulting hybrid superparamagnetic nanotraps are magnetically separable, highly active, and stable under harsh conditions. In this study, the advantages of high selectivity of molecular imprinting technique have used to get mimic lipase for the synthesis of methyl jasmonate and methyl oleate.

  1. Lipase-catalyzed aza-Michael reaction on acrylate derivatives.

    PubMed

    Steunenberg, Peter; Sijm, Maarten; Zuilhof, Han; Sanders, Johan P M; Scott, Elinor L; Franssen, Maurice C R

    2013-04-19

    A methodology has been developed for an efficient and selective lipase-catalyzed aza-Michael reaction of various amines (primary and secondary) with a series of acrylates and alkylacrylates. Reaction parameters were tuned, and under the optimal conditions it was found that Pseudomonas stutzeri lipase and Chromobacterium viscosum lipase showed the highest selectivity for the aza-Michael addition to substituted alkyl acrylates. For the first time also, some CLEAs were examined that showed a comparable or higher selectivity and yield than the free enzymes and other formulations.

  2. Cutinase of Fusarium solani F. sp. pisi: mechanism of induction and relatedness to other Fusarium species

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshuk, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    Three studies were made on the extracellular cutinase of the phytopathogenic fungus Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi. I. The production of cutinase was found to be induced in spores of F. solani f. sp. pisi, strain T-8, by cutin and cutin hydrolysate. Fractionation and analysis of the cutin hydrolysate indicated that dihydroxy-C/sub 16/ acid and trihydroxy-C/sub 18/ acid were the cutin monomers most active for inducing cutinase. Measurement of cutinase-specific RNA levels by dot-blot hybridization with a (/sup 32/P)-labeled cutinase cDNA showed that the cutinase gene transcripts could be detected within 15 min after addition of the inducers. The results indicated that the fungal spores have the capacity to recognize the unique monomer components of the plant cuticle and rapidly respond by the synthesis of cutinase. II. Analysis of the genomic DNA's of seven strains of F. solani f. sp. pisi indicated that both high and low cutinase-producing strains contain at least one copy of the cutinase structural gene and a homologous promoter region. The data suggest a different promoter sequence exists in these additional copies. III. Relatedness of five phytopathogenic Fusarium species to F. solani f. sp. pisi was determined by their cutinase antigenic properties and gene homologies of cutinase cDNA from F. solani f. sp. pisi. The results suggest that formae specialis of F. solani are phylogenetically identical and that F. solani is quite distinct from the other Fusarium species tested.

  3. [Heterologous expression and characterization of Yarrowia lipolytica lipase 4 and lipase 5 in Pichia pastoris].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Heyun; Xiao, Xiao; Xu, Li; Liu, Yun; Yan, Yunjun

    2011-10-01

    To clone cDNA sequences of lipase 4 (LIP4) and lipase 5 (LIPS), analyze gene structures and express them in Pichia pastoris so as to investigate their enzymatic characteristics. We first cloned cDNA sequences of LIP4 and LIP5 by reverse transcription PCR and analyzed their gene structures by SignalP 3.0. Then, intracellular expression vectors pPIC3. 5K-Lip4, pPIC3. 5K-Lip5 and inducible secretion vectors pPIC9K-Lip4, pPIC9K-Lip5 were constructed. All vectors were transformed into Pichia pastoris GS115 by electroporation, resulting in a series of engineered strains. After fermentation and NTA-Ni resin purification, the enzymatic properties of LIP4 and LIP5 were examined. The cloned cDNA sequences revealed that there was no intron in both of Lip4 and Lip5. The two lipases both contained catalytic triads and conserved GHSLG motifs. Their optimal substrate, pH, temperature were respectively pNP-caprylate (C8), 7.0 and 40 degrees C. The activities of LIP4 and LIPS were 10.16 U/mg and 5.1 U/mg, respectively. It was found that LIP4 was more sensitive to the variations of pH and temperature than LIP5. LIP4 and LIP5 could both be stimulated by Ca2+, besides LIPS could also be activated by Mg2+. They were both strongly inhibited by Hg2+, Phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and Dithiothreitol (DTT). The cloning of Lip4 and Lip5, expression in P. pastoris and characterization of their properties would offer a solid basis for their large-scale production and future application. In addition, the results also enriched the data for a systematic research on the lipase gene family of Y. lipolytica.

  4. Controlled lid-opening in Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase- An engineered switch for studying lipase function.

    PubMed

    Skjold-Jørgensen, Jakob; Vind, Jesper; Moroz, Olga V; Blagova, Elena; Bhatia, Vikram K; Svendsen, Allan; Wilson, Keith S; Bjerrum, Morten J

    2017-01-01

    Here, we present a lipase mutant containing a biochemical switch allowing a controlled opening and closing of the lid independent of the environment. The closed form of the TlL mutant shows low binding to hydrophobic surfaces compared to the binding observed after activating the controlled switch inducing lid-opening. We directly show that lipid binding of this mutant is connected to an open lid conformation demonstrating the impact of the exposed amino acid residues and their participation in binding at the water-lipid interface. The switch was created by introducing two cysteine residues into the protein backbone at sites 86 and 255. The crystal structure of the mutant shows the successful formation of a disulfide bond between C86 and C255 which causes strained closure of the lid-domain. Control of enzymatic activity and binding was demonstrated on substrate emulsions and natural lipid layers. The locked form displayed low enzymatic activity (~10%) compared to wild-type. Upon release of the lock, enzymatic activity was fully restored. Only 10% binding to natural lipid substrates was observed for the locked lipase compared to wild-type, but binding was restored upon adding reducing agent. QCM-D measurements revealed a seven-fold increase in binding rate for the unlocked lipase. The TlL_locked mutant shows structural changes across the protein important for understanding the mechanism of lid-opening and closing. Our experimental results reveal sites of interest for future mutagenesis studies aimed at altering the activation mechanism of TlL and create perspectives for generating tunable lipases that activate under controlled conditions.

  5. In vitro lipolysis tests on lipid nanoparticles: comparison between lipase/co-lipase and pancreatic extract.

    PubMed

    Jannin, Vincent; Dellera, Eleonora; Chevrier, Stéphanie; Chavant, Yann; Voutsinas, Christophe; Bonferoni, Cristina; Demarne, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) are lipid nanocarriers aimed to the delivery of drugs characterized by a low bioavailability, such as poorly water-soluble drugs and peptides or proteins. The oral administration of these lipid nanocarriers implies the study of their lipolysis in presence of enzymes that are commonly involved in dietary lipid digestion in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, a comparison between two methods was performed: on one hand, the lipase/co-lipase assay, commonly described in the literature to study the digestion of lipid nanocarriers, and on the other hand, the lipolysis test using porcine pancreatic extract and the pH-stat apparatus. This pancreatic extract contains both the pancreatic lipase and carboxyl ester hydrolase (CEH) that permit to mimic in a biorelevant manner the duodenal digestive lipolysis. The test was performed by means of a pH-stat apparatus to work at constant pH, 5.5 or 6.25, representing respectively the fasted or fed state pH conditions. The evolution of all acylglycerol entities was monitored during the digestion by sampling the reaction vessel at different time points, until 60 min, and the lipid composition of the digest was analyzed by gas chromatography. SLN and NLC systems obtained with long-chain saturated acylglycerols were rapidly and completely digested by pancreatic enzymes. The pH-stat titration method appears to be a powerful technique to follow the digestibility of these solid lipid-based nanoparticles.

  6. Genetic diversity and pathogenicity of Fusarium species associated with fruit rot disease in banana across Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Abd Murad, Nur Baiti; Nik Mohamed, Nik Mohd Izham; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Mohd Zainudin, Nur Ain Izzati

    2017-09-11

    The aims of this study are to identify the Fusarium isolates based on translation elongation factor (tef) 1α sequence, to determine the genetic diversity among isolates and species using selected microsatellite markers, and to examine the pathogenicity of Fusarium isolates causing fruit rot disease of banana. One-hundred thirteen microfungi isolates were obtained from fruit rot infected banana in Peninsular Malaysia. However, this study was focused on the dominant number of the discovered microfungi that belongs to the genus Fusarium. There were 48 isolates of the microfungi have been identified belonging to 11 species of Fusarium namely Fusarium incarnatum, Fusarium equiseti, Fusarium camptoceras, Fusarium solani, Fusarium concolor, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium proliferatum, Fusarium verticillioides, Fusarium sacchari, Fusarium concentricum, and Fusarium fujikuroi. All Fusarium isolates were grouped into their respective clades indicating their similarities and differences in genetic diversity among isolates. Out of 48 Fusarium isolates tested, 42 isolates causing the fruit rot symptom at different levels of severity based on Disease Severity Index (DSI). The most virulent isolate was F. proliferatum B2433B with DSI of 100%. All the isolated Fusarium species were successfully identified with some of them were confirmed as the causal agents of pre- and post-harvest fruit rot in banana across Peninsular Malaysia. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Cloning and characterization of a novel lipase from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia GS11: The first member of a new bacterial lipase family XVI.

    PubMed

    Li, Mu; Yang, Li-Rong; Xu, Gang; Wu, Jian-Ping

    2016-06-20

    Bacterial lipases are an important group of enzymes that offer enormous potential in organic synthesis, and there is considerable interest in identifying and developing novel bacterial lipases. In previous studies, strains of the genus Stenotrophomonas were proved to be potential source of lipases, but there is little genetic information describing lipase from the genus Stenotrophomonas. We have cloned and characterized a novel lipase (LipSM54), the first lipase described from the genus Stenotrophomonas. Enzymatic study showed that LipSM54 was a cold-active, solvent-tolerant and alkaline lipase. Using bioinformatics tools, LipSM54 was found to be related only to several putative lipases from different bacterial origins, none of which could be assigned to any previously described bacterial lipase family. LipSM54 and these related putative lipases share four conserved motifs around the catalytic residues. These motifs clearly distinguish them from the known bacterial lipase families. Consequently, LipSM54 is the first characterized member of the novel bacterial lipase family. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluating Fumonisin Gene Expression in Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Scala, Valeria; Visentin, Ivan; Cardinale, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Transcript levels of key genes in a biosynthetic pathway are often taken as a proxy for metabolite production. This is the case of FUM1, encoding the first dedicated enzyme in the metabolic pathway leading to the production of the mycotoxins Fumonisins by fungal species belonging to the genus Fusarium. FUM1 expression can be quantified by different methods; here, we detail a protocol based on quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), by which relative or absolute transcript abundance can be estimated in Fusaria grown in vitro or in planta. As very seldom commercial kits for RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis are optimized for fungal samples, we developed a protocol tailored for these organisms, which stands alone but can be also easily integrated with specific reagents and kits commercially available.

  9. Bioactive dihydronaphthoquinone derivatives from Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Kenji; Kamisuki, Shinji; Chia, Pei Thing; Kuriyama, Isoko; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Sugawara, Fumio

    2014-09-26

    New dihydronaphthoquinone derivatives, karuquinone A (1), karuquinone B (2), and karuquinone C (3), were isolated from a fungal culture broth of Fusarium solani. The structures were determined by interpretation of spectroscopic data (1D/2D NMR, MS, and IR). Three known compounds, javanicin (4), 2,3-dihydro-5-hydroxy-8-methoxy-2,4-dimethylnaphtho[1,2-b]furan-6,9-dione (5), and 5-hydroxydihydrofusarubin C (6), were also isolated. The six isolated compounds were tested for cytotoxicity against three human cancer cell lines and a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) line. Of these, karuquinone A exhibited the strongest cytotoxic activity. Karuquinone B did not affect the proliferation of the cancer cell lines but did inhibit the proliferation of HUVEC. Additionally, we demonstrated that karuquinone A induces apoptosis in cancer cells through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  10. Production of Alanine by Fusarium moniliforme

    PubMed Central

    Carito, Sebastian L.; Pisano, Michael A.

    1966-01-01

    Fusarium moniliforme grown in a chemically defined medium in submerged culture accumulated amino acids extracellularly. Alanine and glutamic acid were present in greatest amounts, with traces of glycine, lysine, threonine, and valine detectable. Increasing the glucose and urea concentrations of the medium increased yields of alanine. Further increases in alanine production occurred with elevated levels of mineral salts in the medium, whereas the addition of a vitamin mixture proved to be inhibitory. Chemical changes resulting from the growth of F. moniliforme in the final fermentation medium disclosed maximal alanine production, mycelial weight, and glucose consumption after 72 hr of incubation at 28.5 C. Total soluble nitrogen, by contrast, was minimal at the same time period. The pH remained in the alkaline range throughout the fermentation. PMID:5914495

  11. Densitometry based microassay for the determination of lipase depolymerizing activity on polyhydroxyalkanoate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for the assay of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA)-degrading ability of triacylglycerol lipases was developed. By applying the natural affinity of lipases towards hydrophobic interfaces, a sensitive and rapid densitometry analysis for the evaluation of hydrolytic activity of lipase droplets towards PHA-coated surface was successfully carried out. We found that 12 out of 14 tested lipases which are of fungal, bacterial and animal origin were able to hydrolyze P(3HB-co-92 mol% 4HB) thin film. The patterns and opacity of the hydrolysis spots of lipases on PHA films allowed easy comparison of PHA-hydrolytic strength of lipases. Lipase from the bacterium Chromobacterium viscosum exhibited the highest PHA-degrading activity. The hydrolytic activity of lipases on water insoluble PHA, emulsified p-nitrophenyl laurate and olive oil were also compared and interestingly some lipases showed better activity when PHA was used as a substrate. PMID:23657221

  12. Lipase Activity among Bacteria Isolated from Amazonian Soils

    PubMed Central

    Willerding, André Luis; de Oliveira, Luiz Antonio; Moreira, Francisco Wesen; Germano, Mariana Gomes; Chagas, Aloísio Freitas

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to select lipase-producing bacteria collected from different counties of the Amazon region. Of the 440 bacteria strains, 181 were selected for the lipase assay in qualitative tests at Petri dishes, being 75 (41%) lipase positive. The enzymatic index was determined during fifteen days at different temperatures (30°, 35°, 40°, and 45°C). The highest lipase activity was observed within 72 hours at 30°C. Twelve bacteria strains presented an index equal to or greater than the standard used like reference, demonstrating the potential of microbial resource. After the bioassay in Petri dishes, the selected bacteria strains were analyzed in quantitative tests on p-nitrophenyl palmitate (p-NPP). A group of the strains was selected for other phases of study with the use in oleaginous substrates of the Amazonian flora, aiming for the application in processes like oil biotransformation. PMID:22007294

  13. Lipase-catalyzed ethanolysis of borage oil: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carlos F; Hill, Charles G; Otero, Cristina

    2004-01-01

    Ethanolysis of borage oil catalyzed by two commercial lipases (from Pseudomonas cepacia and Candida antarctica) was studied using two different methodologies. Multiresponse models derived from a generalized Michaelis-Menten mechanism were utilized to describe the rates of formation of ethyl esters of the primary fatty acids present in the precursor oil. The relative rate constants determined for each of the fatty acid residues indicated that both lipases discriminate against release of gamma-linolenic acid residues under the reaction conditions studied. However, both lipases also released some of the residues located at the sn-2 position, indicating that for the experimental conditions studied, both lipases are nonspecific. Moreover, inactivation of Novozym 435 was rapid. Because the half-life of this enzyme (ca. 2.2 h) is comparable to the half-life of the reaction, the intrinsic reaction rate and enzyme deactivation must both be considered in modeling the kinetics.

  14. Monoacylglycerol lipase – a target for drug development?

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, CJ

    2012-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system is involved in processes as diverse as control of appetite, perception of pain and the limitation of cancer cell growth and invasion. The enzymes responsible for eCB breakdown are attractive pharmacological targets, and fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors, which potentiate the levels of the eCB anandamide, are now undergoing pharmaceutical development. ‘Drugable’ selective inhibitors of monoacylglycerol lipase, a key enzyme regulating the levels of the other main eCB, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, were however not identified until very recently. Their availability has resulted in a large expansion of our knowledge concerning the pharmacological consequences of monoacylglycerol lipase inhibition and hence the role(s) played by the enzyme in the body. In this review, the pharmacology of monoacylglycerol lipase will be discussed, together with an analysis of the therapeutic potential of monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitors as analgesics and anticancer agents. PMID:22428756

  15. Tetracycline Inhibition of a Lipase from Corynebacterium acnes

    PubMed Central

    Weaber, K.; Freedman, R.; Eudy, W. W.

    1971-01-01

    A lipase which hydrolyzes triglycerides (tricaprylin and trilaurin) and naphthyl laurate was obtained from the broth of Corynebacterium acnes cultures by ammonium sulfate fractionation. Ca2+ and sodium taurocholate stimulated activity of the enzyme. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) did not inhibit activity of the Ca2+-activated enzyme, but lipolytic activity was inhibited by EDTA in the absence of Ca2+. Tetracycline (10−4m) produced a slight inhibition of the lipase activity with 5 × 10−5m or less showing no effect on the lipase activity. However, complete inhibition by tetracycline at 10−4m was observed for Ca2+-activated enzyme. Tetracycline inhibition of the C. acnes lipase could be demonstrated at concentrations as low as 10−6m. PMID:4252558

  16. Lipolysis and lipases in white adipose tissue - An update.

    PubMed

    Bolsoni-Lopes, Andressa; Alonso-Vale, Maria Isabel C

    2015-08-01

    Lipolysis is defined as the sequential hydrolysis of triacylglycerol (TAG) stored in cell lipid droplets. For many years, it was believed that hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL) were the main enzymes catalyzing lipolysis in the white adipose tissue. Since the discovery of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) in 2004, many studies were performed to investigate and characterize the actions of this lipase, as well as of other proteins and possible regulatory mechanisms involved, which reformulated the concept of lipolysis. Novel findings from these studies include the identification of lipolytic products as signaling molecules regulating important metabolic processes in many non-adipose tissues, unveiling a previously underestimated aspect of lipolysis. Thus, we present here an updated review of concepts and regulation of white adipocyte lipolysis with a special emphasis in its role in metabolism homeostasis and as a source of important signaling molecules.

  17. Immobilization of Yarrowia lipolytica Lipase on Macroporous Resin Using Different Methods: Characterization of the Biocatalysts in Hydrolysis Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingjing; Chen, Yiling; Sheng, Jun; Sun, Mi

    2015-01-01

    To improve the reusability and organic solvent tolerance of microbial lipase and expand the application of lipase (hydrolysis, esterification, and transesterification), we immobilized marine microbial lipase using different methods and determined the properties of immobilized lipases. Considering the activity and cost of immobilized lipase, the concentration of lipase was fixed at 2 mg/mL. The optimal temperature of immobilized lipases was 40°C and 5°C higher than free lipase. The activities of immobilized lipases were much higher than free lipase at alkaline pH (more than 50% at pH 12). The free lipase lost most activity (35.3%) and immobilized lipases retained more than 46.4% of their initial activity after 3 h heat treatment at 70°C. At alkaline pH, immobilized lipases were more stable than free lipase (more than 60% residue activity at pH 11 for 3 h). Immobilized lipases retained 80% of their activity after 5 cycles and increased enzyme activity (more than 108.7%) after 3 h treatment in tert-butanol. Immobilization of lipase which improved reusability of lipase and provided a chance to expand the application of marine microbial lipase in organic system expanded the application range of lipase to catalyze hydrolysis and esterification in harsh condition. PMID:26240816

  18. Immobilization of Yarrowia lipolytica Lipase on Macroporous Resin Using Different Methods: Characterization of the Biocatalysts in Hydrolysis Reaction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingjing; Chen, Yiling; Sheng, Jun; Sun, Mi

    2015-01-01

    To improve the reusability and organic solvent tolerance of microbial lipase and expand the application of lipase (hydrolysis, esterification, and transesterification), we immobilized marine microbial lipase using different methods and determined the properties of immobilized lipases. Considering the activity and cost of immobilized lipase, the concentration of lipase was fixed at 2 mg/mL. The optimal temperature of immobilized lipases was 40°C and 5°C higher than free lipase. The activities of immobilized lipases were much higher than free lipase at alkaline pH (more than 50% at pH 12). The free lipase lost most activity (35.3%) and immobilized lipases retained more than 46.4% of their initial activity after 3 h heat treatment at 70°C. At alkaline pH, immobilized lipases were more stable than free lipase (more than 60% residue activity at pH 11 for 3 h). Immobilized lipases retained 80% of their activity after 5 cycles and increased enzyme activity (more than 108.7%) after 3 h treatment in tert-butanol. Immobilization of lipase which improved reusability of lipase and provided a chance to expand the application of marine microbial lipase in organic system expanded the application range of lipase to catalyze hydrolysis and esterification in harsh condition.

  19. Higher Fusarium Toxin Accumulation in Grain of Winter Triticale Lines Inoculated with Fusarium culmorum as Compared with Wheat †

    PubMed Central

    Góral, Tomasz; Wiśniewska, Halina; Ochodzki, Piotr; Walentyn-Góral, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to Fusarium head blight in 32 winter triticale and 34 winter wheat accessions was evaluated. Triticale and wheat were sown in field experiments in two locations. At the time of flowering, heads were inoculated with three Fusarium culmorum isolates. Fusarium head blight index was scored and after the harvest percentage of Fusarium damaged kernels was assessed. Grain was analysed for type B trichothecenes (deoxynivalenol and derivatives, nivalenol) and zearalenone (ZEN) content. The average Fusarium head blight indexes were 28.0% for wheat and 19.2% for triticale accessions. The percentage of Fusarium damaged kernels was also higher for wheat and came to 55.6%, while for triticale this figure was 40.2%. The average content of deoxynivalenol (DON) for wheat amounted to 11.65 mg/kg and was lower than the result for triticale which was 14.12 mg/kg. The average contents of nivalenol were similar in both cereals: 4.13 mg/kg and 5.19 mg/kg for wheat and triticale respectively. Considerable amounts of DON derivatives in the cereals were also detected. The ZEN content in the grain was 0.60 mg/kg for wheat and 0.66 mg/kg for triticale. Relationships between Fusarium head blight index, Fusarium damaged kernels and mycotoxin contents were statistically significant for wheat and mostly insignificant for triticale. Triticale proved to have less infected heads and kernels than wheat. However, the content of type B trichothecenes was higher in triticale grain than in wheat grain. PMID:27763547

  20. Genus-Specific Primers for Study of Fusarium Communities in Field Samples

    PubMed Central

    Edel-Hermann, Véronique; Gautheron, Nadine; Durling, Mikael Brandström; Kolseth, Anna-Karin; Steinberg, Christian; Persson, Paula; Friberg, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium is a large and diverse genus of fungi of great agricultural and economic importance, containing many plant pathogens and mycotoxin producers. To date, high-throughput sequencing of Fusarium communities has been limited by the lack of genus-specific primers targeting regions with high discriminatory power at the species level. In the present study, we evaluated two Fusarium-specific primer pairs targeting translation elongation factor 1 (TEF1). We also present the new primer pair Fa+7/Ra+6. Mock Fusarium communities reflecting phylogenetic diversity were used to evaluate the accuracy of the primers in reflecting the relative abundance of the species. TEF1 amplicons were subjected to 454 high-throughput sequencing to characterize Fusarium communities. Field samples from soil and wheat kernels were included to test the method on more-complex material. For kernel samples, a single PCR was sufficient, while for soil samples, nested PCR was necessary. The newly developed primer pairs Fa+7/Ra+6 and Fa/Ra accurately reflected Fusarium species composition in mock DNA communities. In field samples, 47 Fusarium operational taxonomic units were identified, with the highest Fusarium diversity in soil. The Fusarium community in soil was dominated by members of the Fusarium incarnatum-Fusarium equiseti species complex, contradicting findings in previous studies. The method was successfully applied to analyze Fusarium communities in soil and plant material and can facilitate further studies of Fusarium ecology. PMID:26519387

  1. Genus-Specific Primers for Study of Fusarium Communities in Field Samples.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Ida; Edel-Hermann, Véronique; Gautheron, Nadine; Durling, Mikael Brandström; Kolseth, Anna-Karin; Steinberg, Christian; Persson, Paula; Friberg, Hanna

    2015-10-30

    Fusarium is a large and diverse genus of fungi of great agricultural and economic importance, containing many plant pathogens and mycotoxin producers. To date, high-throughput sequencing of Fusarium communities has been limited by the lack of genus-specific primers targeting regions with high discriminatory power at the species level. In the present study, we evaluated two Fusarium-specific primer pairs targeting translation elongation factor 1 (TEF1). We also present the new primer pair Fa+7/Ra+6. Mock Fusarium communities reflecting phylogenetic diversity were used to evaluate the accuracy of the primers in reflecting the relative abundance of the species. TEF1 amplicons were subjected to 454 high-throughput sequencing to characterize Fusarium communities. Field samples from soil and wheat kernels were included to test the method on more-complex material. For kernel samples, a single PCR was sufficient, while for soil samples, nested PCR was necessary. The newly developed primer pairs Fa+7/Ra+6 and Fa/Ra accurately reflected Fusarium species composition in mock DNA communities. In field samples, 47 Fusarium operational taxonomic units were identified, with the highest Fusarium diversity in soil. The Fusarium community in soil was dominated by members of the Fusarium incarnatum-Fusarium equiseti species complex, contradicting findings in previous studies. The method was successfully applied to analyze Fusarium communities in soil and plant material and can facilitate further studies of Fusarium ecology.

  2. Discrimination of thermostable and thermophilic lipases using support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Xunzhang; Deng, Riqiang; Wang, Jinwen; Zhou, Hongbo

    2011-07-01

    Discriminating thermophilic lipases from their similar thermostable counterparts is a challenging task and it would help to design stable proteins. In this study, the distributions of N (N=2, 3) neighboring amino acids and the non-adjacent di-residue coupling patterns in the sequences of 65 thermostable and 77 thermophilic lipases had been systematically analyzed. It was found that the hydrophobic residues Leu, Pro, Met, Phe, Trp, as well as the polar residue Tyr had higher occurrence in thermophilic lipases than thermostable ones. The occurrence frequencies of KC EE KE RE, VE, YI, EK, VK, EV, YV, EY, KY, VY and YY in thermophilic proteins were significantly higher, while the occurrence frequencies of QC, QH, QN, HQ, MQ, NQ, QQ, TQ, QS and QT were significantly lower. CXP or CPX showed significantly positive to lipase thermostability, while XXQ or QXX showed significantly negative to lipase thermostability. Non-adjacent di-residue coupling patterns of PR14, RY32, YR47, LE53, LE64, PP64, RP70 and PP101 were significantly different in thermophilic lipases and their thermostable counterparts. The composition of dipeptide, tripeptide and non-adjacent di-residue patterns contained more information than amino acid composition. A statistical method based on support vector machines (SVMs) was developed for discriminating thermophilic and thermostable lipases. The accuracy of this method for the training dataset was 97.17?. Furthermore, the highest accuracy of the method for testing datasets was 98.41?. The influence of some specific patterns on lipase thermostability was also discussed.

  3. Lipases at interfaces: unique interfacial properties as globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Reis, P; Miller, R; Krägel, J; Leser, M; Fainerman, V B; Watzke, H; Holmberg, K

    2008-06-01

    The adsorption behavior of two globular proteins, lipase from Rhizomucor miehei and beta-lactoglobulin, at inert oil/water and air/water interfaces was studied by the pendant drop technique. The kinetics and adsorption isotherms were interpreted for both proteins in different environments. It was found that the adopted mathematical models well describe the adsorption behavior of the proteins at the studied interfaces. One of the main findings is that unique interfacial properties were observed for lipase as compared to the reference beta-lactoglobulin. A folded drop with a "skinlike" film was formed for the two proteins after aging followed by compression. This behavior is normally associated with protein unfolding and covalent cross-linking at the interface. Despite this, the lipase activity was not suppressed. By highlighting the unique interfacial properties of lipases, we believe that the presented work contributes to a better understanding of lipase interfacial activation and the mechanisms regulating lipolysis. The results indicate that the understanding of the physical properties of lipases can lead to novel approaches to regulate their activity.

  4. Novel lipase purification methods - a review of the latest developments.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chung Hong; Show, Pau Loke; Ooi, Chien Wei; Ng, Eng-Poh; Lan, John Chi-Wei; Ling, Tau Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Microbial lipases are popular biocatalysts due to their ability to catalyse diverse reactions such as hydrolysis, esterification, and acidolysis. Lipases function efficiently on various substrates in aqueous and non-aqueous media. Lipases are chemo-, regio-, and enantio-specific, and are useful in various industries, including those manufacturing food, detergents, and pharmaceuticals. A large number of lipases from fungal and bacterial sources have been isolated and purified to homogeneity. This success is attributed to the development of both conventional and novel purification techniques. This review highlights the use of these techniques in lipase purification, including conventional techniques such as: (i) ammonium sulphate fractionation; (ii) ion-exchange; (iii) gel filtration and affinity chromatography; as well as novel techniques such as (iv) reverse micellar system; (v) membrane processes; (vi) immunopurification; (vi) aqueous two-phase system; and (vii) aqueous two-phase floatation. A summary of the purification schemes for various bacterial and fungal lipases are also provided. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Role of the lid hydrophobicity pattern in pancreatic lipase activity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Annick; Allouche, Maya; Basyn, Frédéric; Brasseur, Robert; Kerfelec, Brigitte

    2005-12-02

    Pancreatic lipase is a soluble globular protein that must undergo structural modifications before it can hydrolyze oil droplets coated with bile salts. The binding of colipase and movement of the lipase lid open access to the active site. Mechanisms triggering lid mobility are unclear. The *KNILSQIVDIDGI* fragment of the lid of the human pancreatic lipase is predicted by molecular modeling to be a tilted peptide. Tilted peptides are hydrophobicity motifs involved in membrane fusion and more globally in perturbations of hydrophobic/hydrophilic interfaces. Analysis of this lid fragment predicts no clear consensus of secondary structure that suggests that its structure is not strongly sequence determined and could vary with environment. Point mutations were designed to modify the hydrophobicity profile of the [240-252] fragment and their consequences on the lipase-mediated catalysis were tested. Two mutants, in which the tilted peptide motif was lost, also have poor activity on bile salt-coated oil droplets and cannot be reactivated by colipase. Conversely, one mutant in which a different tilted peptide is created retains colipase dependence. These results suggest that the tilted hydrophobicity pattern of the [240-252] fragment is neither important for colipase binding to lipase, nor for interfacial binding but is important to trigger the maximal catalytic efficiency of lipase in the presence of bile salt.

  6. INOCULATION METHODS TO ASSAY WHEAT SEEDLINGS FOR RESISTANCE TO FUSARIUM CROWN ROT IN A CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adequate Fusarium screening systems must be established to appropriately phenotype mapping populations for accurate QTL identification. The objective of this research was to find an inoculation method with the greatest consistency and least variation for identifying QTL. Two Fusarium pseudograminear...

  7. New cold-adapted lipase from Photobacterium lipolyticum sp. nov. that is closely related to filamentous fungal lipases.

    PubMed

    Ryu, H S; Kim, H K; Choi, W C; Kim, M H; Park, S Y; Han, N S; Oh, T K; Lee, J K

    2006-04-01

    A Photobacterium strain, M37, showing lipolytic activity, was previously isolated from an intertidal flat of the Yellow Sea in Korea and identified as Photobacterium lipolyticum sp. nov. In the present study, the corresponding gene was cloned using the shotgun method. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence (1,023 bp) corresponded to a protein of 340 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 38,026. No sequence similarity was found with any known bacterial lipases/esterases; instead, the most similar enzymes were several filamentous fungal lipases. Although the similarity was very low (less than 16%), there were many conserved regions over the entire sequence and N-terminal oxyanion hole (RG) region, a signature sequence of filamentous fungal lipases. The novel protein M37 was produced in both a soluble and insoluble form when the Escherichia coli cells harboring the gene were cultured at 18 degrees C. The soluble protein exhibited lipase activity in a pH-stat assay using an olive oil emulsion. The M37 lipase also displayed a maximum activity at 25 degrees C and maintained its activity at a low temperature range (5-25 degrees C) with an activation energy (E(a)) of 2.07 kcal/mol. Accordingly, these results indicate that the M37 lipase from P. lipolyticum sp. nov. is a new cold-adapted enzyme.

  8. Screening of lipase inhibitors from Scutellaria baicalensis extract using lipase immobilized on magnetic nanoparticles and study on the inhibitory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wan, Li-Hong; Jiang, Xiao-Lan; Liu, Yi-Ming; Hu, Jin-Jie; Liang, Jian; Liao, Xun

    2016-03-01

    Scutellaria baicalensis is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant possessing a wide variety of biological activities. In this work, lipase immobilized on magnetic nanoparticles (LMNPs) was used as solid phase extract absorbent for screening of lipase inhibitors from this plant. Three flavonoids were found to bind to LMNPs and were identified as baicalin, wogonin, and oroxylin A by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Their IC50 values were determined to be 229.22 ± 12.67, 153.71 ± 9.21, and 56.07 ± 4.90 μM, respectively. Fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking were used to probe the interactions between these flavonoids and lipase. All the flavonoids quenched the fluorescence of lipase statically by forming new complexes, implying their affinities with the enzyme. The thermodynamic analysis suggested that van der Waals force and hydrogen bond were the main forces between wogonin and lipase, while hydrophobic force was the main force for the other two flavonoids. The results from a molecular docking study further revealed that all of them could insert into the pocket of lipase binding to a couple of amino acid residues.

  9. Comparative genomics of the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex: biosynthetic pathways metabolite production and plant pathogenicity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium is a huge genus of filamentous fungi causing plant diseases in a wide range of host plants that result in high economic losses to world agriculture every year. Phylogenetic studies have shown that the genus Fusarium consists of different species complexes. One of them is the “Fusarium fujik...

  10. Effect of soil biochar amendment on grain crop resistance to Fusarium mycotoxin contamination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycotoxin contamination of food and feed is among the top food safety concerns. Fusarium spp. cause serious diseases in cereal crops reducing yield and contaminating grain with mycotoxins that can be deleterious to human and animal health. Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium verticillioides infect whe...

  11. Fusarium Osteomyelitis in a Patient With Pearson Syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hiebert, Rachael M.; Welliver, Robert C.; Yu, Zhongxin

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium species are ubiquitous fungi causing a wide array of infections, including invasive disease in the immunosuppressed. We present a fusarium bone infection in a child with Pearson syndrome and review the literature. Ten cases of fusarium osteomyelitis were reported in the past 40 years, and we review the treatments. PMID:27757410

  12. First report of Fusarium redolens causing crown rot of wheat (Triticum spp.) in Turkey

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium crown rot, caused by a complex of Fusarium spp., is a yield-limiting disease of wheat world-wide, especially in dry Mediterranean climates. In order to identify Fusarium species associated with crown rot of wheat, a survey was conducted in summer 2013 in the major wheat growing regions of T...

  13. Root rot symptoms in sugar beet lines caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soil-borne fungus Fusarium oxysporum may cause both Fusarium yellows and Fusarium root rot diseases with severe yield losses in cultivated sugar beet worldwide. These two diseases cause similar foliar symptoms but different root response and have been proposed to be due to two distinct F. oxyspo...

  14. Near-infrared versus visual sorting of Fusarium-damaged kernels in winter wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight of wheat, caused by Fusarium graminearum, often results in shriveled and/or discolored kernels referred to as Fusarium-damaged kernels (FDK). FDK is one of the major grain grading factors and therefore is routinely determined for purposes of quality assurance. Determination o...

  15. Elite-upland cotton germplasm-pool assessment of Fusarium wilt resistance in California

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Host-plant resistance is currently the most economic and effective strategy for managing Fusarium wilt [Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (FOV)] disease. Over the past nine years, a new race of Fusarium (FOV race 4) has increasingly impacted cotton (Gossypium spp.) in production fields in the Sa...

  16. Candidate genes associated with QTL controlling resistance to fusarium root rot in pea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium root rot (FRR) of pea (Pisum sativum L.) is a serious pathogen in the USA and Europe and genetic resistance offers an effective and economical control for this pathogen. Fusarium root rot is caused by the fungus pathogen (Haematonectria haematococca (Berk. & Broome) (Anamorph): Fusarium sol...

  17. Identification of the infection route of a Fusarium seed pathogen into nondormant Bromus tectorum seeds

    Treesearch

    JanaLynn Franke; Brad Geary; Susan E. Meyer

    2014-01-01

    The genus Fusarium has a wide host range and causes many different forms of plant disease. These include seed rot and seedling blight diseases of cultivated plants. The diseases caused by Fusarium on wild plants are less well-known. In this study, we examined disease development caused by Fusarium sp. n on nondormant seeds of the important rangeland weed Bromus...

  18. Virulence of Fusarium oxysporum and F. commune to Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) seedlings

    Treesearch

    J. E. Stewart; Z. Abdo; R. K. Dumroese; N. B. Klopfenstein; M. -S. Kim

    2012-01-01

    Fusarium species can cause damping-off and root rot of young conifer seedlings, resulting in severe crop and economic losses in forest nurseries. Disease control within tree nurseries is difficult because of the inability to characterize and quantify Fusarium spp. populations with regard to disease potential because of high variability in isolate virulence. Fusarium...

  19. Wildly Growing Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) Hosts Pathogenic Fusarium Species and Accumulates Their Mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Stępień, Łukasz; Waśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Urbaniak, Monika

    2016-05-01

    Asparagus officinalis L. is an important crop in many European countries, likely infected by a number of Fusarium species. Most of them produce mycotoxins in plant tissues, thus affecting the physiology of the host plant. However, there is lack of information on Fusarium communities in wild asparagus, where they would definitely have considerable environmental significance. Therefore, the main scientific aim of this study was to identify the Fusarium species and quantify their typical mycotoxins present in wild asparagus plants collected at four time points of the season. Forty-four Fusarium strains of eight species--Fusarium acuminatum, Fusarium avenaceum, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium equiseti, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium proliferatum, Fusarium sporotrichioides, and Fusarium tricinctum--were isolated from nine wild asparagus plants in 2013 season. It is the first report of F. sporotrichioides isolated from this particular host. Fumonisin B1 was the most abundant mycotoxin, and the highest concentrations of fumonisins B1-B3 and beauvericin were found in the spears collected in May. Moniliformin and enniatins were quantified at lower concentrations. Mycotoxins synthesized by individual strains obtained from infected asparagus tissues were assessed using in vitro cultures on sterile rice grain. Most of the F. sporotrichioides strains synthesized HT-2 toxin and F. equiseti strains were found to be effective zearalenone producers.

  20. Proteomic analysis of Fusarium solani isolated from the Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis.

    PubMed

    Scully, Erin D; Hoover, Kelli; Carlson, John; Tien, Ming; Geib, Scott M

    2012-01-01

    Wood is a highly intractable food source, yet many insects successfully colonize and thrive in this challenging niche. Overcoming the lignin barrier of wood is a key challenge in nutrient acquisition, but full depolymerization of intact lignin polymers has only been conclusively demonstrated in fungi and is not known to occur by enzymes produced by insects or bacteria. Previous research validated that lignocellulose and hemicellulose degradation occur within the gut of the wood boring insect, Anoplophora glabripennis (Asian longhorned beetle), and that a fungal species, Fusarium solani (ATCC MYA 4552), is consistently associated with the larval stage. While the nature of this relationship is unresolved, we sought to assess this fungal isolate's ability to degrade lignocellulose and cell wall polysaccharides and to extract nutrients from woody tissue. This gut-derived fungal isolate was inoculated onto a wood-based substrate and shotgun proteomics using Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) was employed to identify 400 expressed proteins. Through this approach, we detected proteins responsible for plant cell wall polysaccharide degradation, including proteins belonging to 28 glycosyl hydrolase families and several cutinases, esterases, lipases, pectate lyases, and polysaccharide deacetylases. Proteinases with broad substrate specificities and ureases were observed, indicating that this isolate has the capability to digest plant cell wall proteins and recycle nitrogenous waste under periods of nutrient limitation. Additionally, several laccases, peroxidases, and enzymes involved in extracellular hydrogen peroxide production previously implicated in lignin depolymerization were detected. In vitro biochemical assays were conducted to corroborate MudPIT results and confirmed that cellulases, glycosyl hydrolases, xylanases, laccases, and Mn- independent peroxidases were active in culture; however, lignin- and Mn- dependent peroxidase activities were

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Fusarium solani Isolated from the Asian Longhorned Beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Erin D.; Hoover, Kelli; Carlson, John; Tien, Ming; Geib, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    Wood is a highly intractable food source, yet many insects successfully colonize and thrive in this challenging niche. Overcoming the lignin barrier of wood is a key challenge in nutrient acquisition, but full depolymerization of intact lignin polymers has only been conclusively demonstrated in fungi and is not known to occur by enzymes produced by insects or bacteria. Previous research validated that lignocellulose and hemicellulose degradation occur within the gut of the wood boring insect, Anoplophora glabripennis (Asian longhorned beetle), and that a fungal species, Fusarium solani (ATCC MYA 4552), is consistently associated with the larval stage. While the nature of this relationship is unresolved, we sought to assess this fungal isolate's ability to degrade lignocellulose and cell wall polysaccharides and to extract nutrients from woody tissue. This gut-derived fungal isolate was inoculated onto a wood-based substrate and shotgun proteomics using Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) was employed to identify 400 expressed proteins. Through this approach, we detected proteins responsible for plant cell wall polysaccharide degradation, including proteins belonging to 28 glycosyl hydrolase families and several cutinases, esterases, lipases, pectate lyases, and polysaccharide deacetylases. Proteinases with broad substrate specificities and ureases were observed, indicating that this isolate has the capability to digest plant cell wall proteins and recycle nitrogenous waste under periods of nutrient limitation. Additionally, several laccases, peroxidases, and enzymes involved in extracellular hydrogen peroxide production previously implicated in lignin depolymerization were detected. In vitro biochemical assays were conducted to corroborate MudPIT results and confirmed that cellulases, glycosyl hydrolases, xylanases, laccases, and Mn- independent peroxidases were active in culture; however, lignin- and Mn- dependent peroxidase activities were

  2. Control of Fusarium wilt in banana with Chinese leek

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Y.H.; Wang, R.C.; Li, C. H.; Zuo, C.W.; Wei, Y. R.; Zhang, L.; Yi, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of Chinese leek(Allium tuberosum) on Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) and on Fusarium wilt incidence were studied in order to identify a potential efficient way to control the disease. Adopting the rotation system of Chinese leek-banana reduced the Fusarium wilt incidence and disease severity index by 88 %-97 % and 91 %-96 %, respectively, improved the crop value by 36 %-86 %, in an area heavily infested by Foc between 2007 and 2009. As a result of inoculation in the greenhouse, Chinese leek treatment reduced disease incidence and the disease severity index by 58 % and 62 %, respectively in the variety Baxi (AAA) and by 79 % and 81 %, respectively in the variety Guangfen NO.1 (ABB). Crude extracts of Chinese leek completely inhibited the growth of Foc race 4 on Petri dishes, suppressed the proliferation of the spores by 91 % and caused 87 % spore mortality. The findings of this study suggest that Chinese leek has the potential to inhibit Foc growth and Fusarium wilt incidence. This potential may be developed into an environmentally friendly treatment to control Fusarium wilt of banana. PMID:23144534

  3. Taxonomy, biology, and clinical aspects of Fusarium species.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, P E; Dignani, M C; Anaissie, E J

    1994-01-01

    There are several taxonomic systems available for identifying Fusarium species. The philosophy used in each taxonomic system is discussed as well as problems encountered in working with Fusarium species in culture. Fusarium species are toxigenic, and the mycotoxins produced by these organisms are often associated with animal and human diseases. The implications for the association of the carcinogens, fumonisins, produced by Fusarium moniliforme and other Fusarium species with human diseases are discussed. Foreign-body-associated fusarial infection such as keratitis in contact lens wearers, onychomycosis, skin infections, and disseminated multiorgan infections are discussed. Disseminated fusarial hyalohyphomycosis has emerged as a significant, usually fatal infection in the immunocompromised host. Successful outcome is determined by the degree of immunosuppression, the extent of the infection, and the presence of a removable focus such as an indwelling central venous catheter. These infections may be clinically suspected on the basis of a constellation of clinical and laboratory findings, which should lead to prompt therapy, probably with one of the newer antifungal agents. Perhaps the use of such agents or the use of colony-stimulating factors may improve the outcome of this devastating infection. However, until new approaches for treatment develop, effective preventive measures are urgently needed. Images PMID:7834602

  4. Photodynamic treatment with phenothiazinium photosensitizers kills both ungerminated and germinated microconidia of the pathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium moniliforme and Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Henrique Dantas; Tonani, Ludmilla; Bachmann, Luciano; Wainwright, Mark; Braga, Gilberto Úbida Leite; von Zeska Kress, Marcia Regina

    2016-11-01

    The search for alternatives to control microorganisms is necessary both in clinical and agricultural areas. Antimicrobial photodynamic treatment (APDT) is a promising light-based approach that can be used to control both human and plant pathogenic fungi. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of photodynamic treatment with red light and four phenothiazinium photosensitizers (PS): methylene blue (MB), toluidine blue O (TBO), new methylene blue N (NMBN) and the phenothiazinium derivative S137 on ungerminated and germinated microconidia of Fusarium oxysporum, F. moniliforme, and F. solani. APDT with each PS killed efficiently both the quiescent ungerminated microconidia and metabolically active germinated microconidia of the three Fusarium species. Washing away the unbound PS from the microconidia (both ungerminated and germinated) before red light exposure reduced but did not prevent the effect of APDT. Subcelullar localization of PS in ungerminated and germinated microconidia and the effects of photodynamic treatment on cell membranes were also evaluated in the three Fusarium species. APDT with MB, TBO, NMBN or S137 increased the membrane permeability in microconidia and APDT with NMBN or S137 increased the lipids peroxidation in microconidia of the three Fusarium species. These findings expand the understanding of photodynamic inactivation of filamentous fungi with phenothiazinium PS.

  5. Structural and Functional Characterization of the TRI101 Trichothecene 3-O-Acetyltransferase from Fusarium sporotrichioides and Fusarium graminearum: KINETIC INSIGHTS TO COMBATING FUSARIUM HEAD BLIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, Graeme S.; McCormick, Susan P.; Rayment, Ivan

    2008-06-30

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a plant disease with serious economic and health impacts. It is caused by fungal species belonging to the genus Fusarium and the mycotoxins they produce. Although it has proved difficult to combat this disease, one strategy that has been examined is the introduction of an indigenous fungal protective gene into cereals such as wheat barley and rice. Thus far the gene of choice has been tri101 whose gene product catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A to the C3 hydroxyl moiety of several trichothecene mycotoxins. In vitro this has been shown to reduce the toxicity of the toxins by {approx}100-fold but has demonstrated limited resistance to FHB in transgenic cereal. To understand the molecular basis for the differences between in vitro and in vivo resistance the three-dimensional structures and kinetic properties of two TRI101 orthologs isolated from Fusarium sporotrichioides and Fusarium graminearum have been determined. The kinetic results reveal important differences in activity of these enzymes toward B-type trichothecenes such as deoxynivalenol. These differences in activity can be explained in part by the three-dimensional structures for the ternary complexes for both of these enzymes with coenzyme A and trichothecene mycotoxins. The structural and kinetic results together emphasize that the choice of an enzymatic resistance gene in transgenic crop protection strategies must take into account the kinetic profile of the selected protein.

  6. Immobilizing Yarrowia lipolytica Lipase Lip2 via Improvement of Microspheres by Gelatin Modification.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rong; Cui, Caixia; Chen, Biqiang; Tan, Tianwei

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of immobilizing Yarrowia lipolytica lipase lip2 on epoxy microspheres with or without gelatin modifications. The activity of lipase immobilized on gelatin-modified supports was twofold higher than those immobilized on native supports. There was no significant difference in the Michaelis-Menten constant (K M ) between the two immobilized lipases. However, lipase immobilized on gelatin modified supports showed an approximately fourfold higher V max than lipase immobilized on native supports. Lipase immobilization on the gelatin-modified support exhibited a significantly improved operational stability in an esterification system. After it was reused for a total of 35 batches, the ester conversion of lipase immobilized on gelatin-modified and native microspheres was 83 and 60 %, respectively. Furthermore, the immobilized lipase could be stored at 4 °C for 12 months without any loss of activity.

  7. Biochemical characterization of the surface-associated lipase of Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

    PubMed

    Sakinç, Türkân; Kleine, Britta; Gatermann, Sören G

    2007-09-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus, an important cause of urinary tract infections, produces a surface-associated lipase, Ssp. In contrast to other lipases, Ssp is a protein that is present in high amounts on the surface of the bacteria and it was shown that it is a true lipase. Characterization of S. saprophyticus lipase (Ssp) showed that it is more similar to Staphylococcus aureus lipase and Staphylococcus epidermidis lipase than to Staphylococcus hyicus lipase and Staphylococcus simulans lipase. Ssp showed an optimum of lipolytic activity at pH 6 and lost its activity at pH>8 or pH<5. The present results show that Ssp activity is dependent on Ca(2+). Consequently, activity increased c. 10-fold in the presence of 2 mM Ca(2+). Optimal activity was reached at 30 degrees C. It was also observed that the enzymatic activity of Ssp depends strongly on the acyl chain length of the substrate molecule.

  8. A lipid-coated lipase as an enantioselective ester synthesis catalyst in homogeneous organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Okahata, Yoshio; Fujimoto, Yoshitaka; Ijiro, Kuniharu

    1995-04-07

    The authors studied the enantioselective preparation of esters using lipase as catalyst. The surface of the lipase was coated with lipids to assist in directing the formation of the ester by solubilizing the hydrophobic incipient tail of the ester.

  9. Optimisation of combi-lipases from Aspergillus niger for the synergistic and efficient hydrolysis of soybean oil.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Hanzhen; Zhang, Fei; Guan, Wutai; Zuo, Jianjun; Feng, Dingyuan

    2017-05-01

    The enzymatic properties of four lipases (A, B, C and D) from different strains of Aspergillus niger, were investigated, and a 3-factor mixture design and triangular surface analysis were performed to screen the optimal combi-lipase by observing synergistic effects. Lipases B and D differed in optimal pH, temperature and substrate specificity. A combi-lipase with 31.2% lipase B and 68.8% lipase D (w/w, equal to units of 30.36% and 69.64%) exhibited optimal hydrolytic activity on soybean oil, which exceeded the sum of the combined activities of individual lipases (P < 0.05). Free fatty acid from the hydrolyzed soybean oil indicated that the synergistic effect of the combi-lipase resulted from the different fatty acid specificities of the two lipases. Overall, combi-lipase afforded an effective route for the application of lipase enzymes to animal feeds. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  10. Antagonistic Activities of Novel Peptides from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens PT14 against Fusarium solani and Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Gwon; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Kwon, Kee-Deok; Seo, Chang Ho; Lee, Hyang Burm; Park, Yoonkyung

    2015-12-09

    Bacillus species have recently drawn attention due to their potential use in the biological control of fungal diseases. This paper reports on the antifungal activity of novel peptides isolated from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens PT14. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography revealed that B. amyloliquefaciens PT14 produces five peptides (PT14-1, -2, -3, -4a, and -4b) that exhibit antifungal activity but are inactive against bacterial strains. In particular, PT14-3 and PT14-4a showed broad-spectrum antifungal activity against Fusarium solani and Fusarium oxysporum. The PT14-4a N-terminal amino acid sequence was identified through Edman degradation, and a BLAST homology analysis showed it not to be identical to any other protein or peptide. PT14-4a displayed strong fungicidal activity with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 3.12 mg/L (F. solani) and 6.25 mg/L (F. oxysporum), inducing severe morphological deformation in the conidia and hyphae. On the other hand, PT14-4a had no detectable hemolytic activity. This suggests PT14-4a has the potential to serve as an antifungal agent in clinical therapeutic and crop-protection applications.

  11. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Fusarium proliferatum.

    PubMed

    Bernardi-Wenzel, J; Quecine, M C; Azevedo, J L; Pamphile, J A

    2016-06-03

    Fusarium proliferatum is an important pathogen that is associated with plant diseases and primarily affects aerial plant parts by producing different mycotoxins, which are toxic to humans and animals. Within the last decade, this fungus has also been described as one of the causes of red root rot or sudden death syndrome in soybean, which causes extensive damage to this crop. This study describes the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of F. proliferatum as a tool for the disruption of pathogenicity genes. The genetic transformation was performed using two binary vectors (pCAMDsRed and pFAT-GFP) containing the hph (hygromycin B resistance) gene as a selection marker and red and green fluorescence, respectively. The presence of acetosyringone and the use of filter paper or nitrocellulose membrane were evaluated for their effect on the transformation efficiency. A mean processing rate of 94% was obtained with 96 h of co-cultivation only in the presence of acetosyringone and the use of filter paper or nitrocellulose membrane did not affect the transformation process. Hygromycin B resistance and the presence of the hph gene were confirmed by PCR, and fluorescence due to the expression of GFP and DsRed protein was monitored in the transformants. A high rate of mitotic stability (95%) was observed. The efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of F. proliferatum allows the technique to be used for random insertional mutagenesis studies and to analyze fungal genes involved in the infection process.

  12. Biological control of Fusarium moniliforme in maize.

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, C W; Yates, I E; Hinton, D M; Meredith, F

    2001-01-01

    Fusarium moniliforme Sheldon, a biological species of the mating populations within the (italic)Gibberella fujikuroi species complex, i.e., population A [= G. moniliformis (Sheld.) Wineland], is an example of a facultative fungal endophyte. During the biotrophic endophytic association with maize, as well as during saprophytic growth, F. moniliforme produces the fumonisins. The fungus is transmitted vertically and horizontally to the next generation of plants via clonal infection of seeds and plant debris. Horizontal infection is the manner by which this fungus is spread contagiously and through which infection occurs from the outside that can be reduced by application of certain fungicides. The endophytic phase is vertically transmitted. This type infection is important because it is not controlled by seed applications of fungicides, and it remains the reservoir from which infection and toxin biosynthesis takes place in each generation of plants. Thus, vertical transmission of this fungus is just as important as horizontal transmission. A biological control system using an endophytic bacterium, Bacillus subtilis, has been developed that shows great promise for reducing mycotoxin accumulation during the endophytic (vertical transmission) growth phase. Because this bacterium occupies the identical ecological niche within the plant, it is considered an ecological homologue to F. moniliforme, and the inhibitory mechanism, regardless of the mode of action, operates on the competitive exclusion principle. In addition to this bacterium, an isolate of a species of the fungus Trichoderma shows promise in the postharvest control of the growth and toxin accumulation from F. moniliforme on corn in storage. PMID:11359703

  13. Surface interactions of Fusarium graminearum on barley.

    PubMed

    Imboden, Lori; Afton, Drew; Trail, Frances

    2017-09-21

    The filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum, a devastating pathogen of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), produces mycotoxins that pose a health hazard. To investigate the surface interactions of F. graminearum with barley, we focused on barley florets, as the most important infection site leading to grain contamination. The fungus interacted with silica accumulating cells (trichomes and silica/cork cell pairs) on the host surface. We identified variation in trichome-type cells between two-row and six-row barley, and in the role of specific epidermal cells in the ingress of F. graminearum into barley florets. Prickle-type trichomes functioned to trap conidia and were sites of fungal penetration. Infections of more mature florets supported the spread of hyphae into the vascular bundles, whereas younger florets did not show this spread. These differences related directly to the timing and location of increases in silica content during maturation. Focal accumulation of cellulose in infected paleae of two-row and six-row barley indicated that the response is in part linked to trichome type. Overall, silica accumulating epidermal cells had an expanded role in barley, serving to trap conidia, provide sites for fungal ingress, and initiate resistance responses, suggesting a role for silica in pathogen establishment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Immobilization of active lipase B from Candida antarctica on the surface of polyhydroxyalkanoate inclusions.

    PubMed

    Jahns, Anika C; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2015-04-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) beads, recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli, were functionalized to display lipase B from Candida antarctica as translational protein fusion. The respective beads were characterized in respect to protein content, functionality, long term storage capacity and re-usability. The direct fusion of the PHA synthase, PhaC, to lipase B yielded active PHA lipase beads capable of hydrolyzing glycerol tributyrate. Lipase B beads showed stable activity over several weeks and re-usability without loss of function.

  15. Estolides synthesis catalyzed by immobilized lipases.

    PubMed

    Aguieiras, Erika C G; Veloso, Cláudia O; Bevilaqua, Juliana V; Rosas, Danielle O; da Silva, Mônica A P; Langone, Marta A P

    2011-01-01

    Estolides are vegetable-oil-based lubricants obtained from oleic acid or any source of hydroxy fatty acids. In this work, the estolides synthesis from oleic acid and methyl ricinoleate (biodiesel from castor oil), using immobilized commercial lipases (Novozym 435, Lipozyme RM-IM, and Lipozyme TL-IM) in a solvent-free medium was investigated. Acid value was used to monitor the reaction progress by determining the consumption of acid present in the medium. Novozym 435 showed the best performance. Water removal improved the conversion. Novozym 435 was more active at atmospheric pressure. Novozym 435 was reused four times with conversion reaching 15% after the fourth reaction at 80°C. Estolides produced under the reaction conditions used in this work presented good properties, such as, low temperature properties as pour point (-24°C), viscosity (23.9 cSt at 40°C and 5.2 cSt at 100°C), and viscosity index (153).

  16. Endothelial dysfunction in adipose triglyceride lipase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Schrammel, Astrid; Mussbacher, Marion; Wölkart, Gerald; Stessel, Heike; Pail, Karoline; Winkler, Sarah; Schweiger, Martina; Haemmerle, Guenter; Al Zoughbi, Wael; Höfler, Gerald; Lametschwandtner, Alois; Zechner, Rudolf; Mayer, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Systemic knockout of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the pivotal enzyme of triglyceride lipolysis, results in a murine phenotype that is characterized by progredient cardiac steatosis and severe heart failure. Since cardiac and vascular dysfunction have been closely related in numerous studies we investigated endothelium-dependent and -independent vessel function of ATGL knockout mice. Aortic relaxation studies and Langendorff perfusion experiments of isolated hearts showed that ATGL knockout mice suffer from pronounced micro- and macrovascular endothelial dysfunction. Experiments with agonists directly targeting vascular smooth muscle cells revealed the functional integrity of the smooth muscle cell layer. Loss of vascular reactivity was restored ~ 50% upon treatment of ATGL knockout mice with the PPARα agonist Wy14,643, indicating that this phenomenon is partly a consequence of impaired cardiac contractility. Biochemical analysis revealed that aortic endothelial NO synthase expression and activity were significantly reduced in ATGL deficiency. Enzyme activity was fully restored in ATGL mice treated with the PPARα agonist. Biochemical analysis of perivascular adipose tissue demonstrated that ATGL knockout mice suffer from perivascular inflammatory oxidative stress which occurs independent of cardiac dysfunction and might contribute to vascular defects. Our results reveal a hitherto unrecognized link between disturbed lipid metabolism, obesity and cardiovascular disease. PMID:24657704

  17. Estolides Synthesis Catalyzed by Immobilized Lipases

    PubMed Central

    Aguieiras, Erika C. G.; Veloso, Cláudia O.; Bevilaqua, Juliana V.; Rosas, Danielle O.; da Silva, Mônica A. P.; Langone, Marta A. P.

    2011-01-01

    Estolides are vegetable-oil-based lubricants obtained from oleic acid or any source of hydroxy fatty acids. In this work, the estolides synthesis from oleic acid and methyl ricinoleate (biodiesel from castor oil), using immobilized commercial lipases (Novozym 435, Lipozyme RM-IM, and Lipozyme TL-IM) in a solvent-free medium was investigated. Acid value was used to monitor the reaction progress by determining the consumption of acid present in the medium. Novozym 435 showed the best performance. Water removal improved the conversion. Novozym 435 was more active at atmospheric pressure. Novozym 435 was reused four times with conversion reaching 15% after the fourth reaction at 80°C. Estolides produced under the reaction conditions used in this work presented good properties, such as, low temperature properties as pour point (−24°C), viscosity (23.9 cSt at 40°C and 5.2 cSt at 100°C), and viscosity index (153). PMID:21755040

  18. Exploring the Conformational States and Rearrangements of Yarrowia lipolytica Lipase

    PubMed Central

    Bordes, Florence; Barbe, Sophie; Escalier, Pierre; Mourey, Lionel; André, Isabelle; Marty, Alain; Tranier, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    We report the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structure of the Lip2 lipase from Yarrowia lipolytica in its closed conformation. The Lip2 structure is highly homologous to known structures of the fungal lipase family (Thermomyces lanuginosa, Rhizopus niveus, and Rhizomucor miehei lipases). However, it also presents some unique features that are described and discussed here in detail. Structural differences, in particular in the conformation adopted by the so-called lid subdomain, suggest that the opening mechanism of Lip2 may differ from that of other fungal lipases. Because the catalytic activity of lipases is strongly dependent on structural rearrangement of this mobile subdomain, we focused on elucidating the molecular mechanism of lid motion. Using the x-ray structure of Lip2, we carried out extensive molecular-dynamics simulations in explicit solvent environments (water and water/octane interface) to characterize the major structural rearrangements that the lid undergoes under the influence of solvent or upon substrate binding. Overall, our results suggest a two-step opening mechanism that gives rise first to a semi-open conformation upon adsorption of the protein at the water/organic solvent interface, followed by a further opening of the lid upon substrate binding. PMID:20923657

  19. Spectroscopic and kinetic studies of lipases solubilized in reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Walde, P; Han, D; Luisi, P L

    1993-04-20

    The conformation and activity of three different lipases have been studied in reverse micelles formed by sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) in isooctane. In the case of human pancreatic lipase, the conformation of the polypeptide chain--as judged from far-UV circular dichroism measurements--is only slightly altered after the enzyme is transferred from a bulk aqueous solution into the microenvironment of reverse micelles. Significant spectral changes in the near-UV circular dichroism and fluorescence spectrum indicate, however, that the solvation of aromatic amino acid side chains is considerably different in reverse micelles. Conversely, the circular dichroism spectra of the lipases from Candida rugosa and Pseudomonas sp. are considerably different in reverse micelles, compared with the spectra in aqueous solution, indicating that both enzymes loose the native structure at the water/AOT/oil interface. Bound substrate and/or product can prevent this denaturation. While Pseudomonas sp. and human pancreatic lipase are inhibited by tetrahydrolipstatin (THL), the lipase from Candida rugosa is not. These data, together with additional activity and inhibition data, indicate that the micellar microenvironment accentuates the difference between the different enzymes in terms of the relation structure/activity.

  20. Crowding enhances lipase turnover rate on surface-immobilized substrates.

    PubMed

    Balevicius, Zigmas; Ignatjeva, Dalia; Niaura, Gediminas; Ignatjev, Ilja; Vaicikauskas, Viktoras; Babonas, Gintautas Jurgis; Valincius, Gintaras

    2015-07-01

    Utilizing surface-immobilized synthetic lipid substrates containing the redox-active ferrocene groups, the enzymatic activity of lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus was measured by the cyclic voltammetry method. The activity was correlated with the surface density of the protein by the ATR-IR spectroscopy and the total internal reflection ellipsometry. It was found that the lipase turnover rate significantly increases with its surface density. Despite expected hindrance effects due to the crowding of the enzyme molecules in the near surface-saturation range of concentrations, the turnover rate was consistently higher compared with the values measured at low concentrations. The effect was explained by the change in the surface arrangement of the enzyme. In the low concentration range, lipase adsorbs onto a surface adopting a predominantly horizontal position. At high concentrations, as the surface density approaches saturation, the enzyme molecules due to crowding are forced into the predominantly vertical position, which is more favorable for the activation of the lipase through the interaction between the "hydrophobic lid" of the lipase and the hydrophobic adsorbate surface.

  1. Lipase-catalyzed polyester synthesis – A green polymer chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shiro

    2010-01-01

    This article is a short comprehensive review describing in vitro polyester synthesis catalyzed by a hydrolysis enzyme of lipase, most of which has been developed for these two decades. Polyesters are prepared by repeated ester bond-formation reactions; they include two major modes, ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of cyclic monomers such as cyclic esters (lactones) and condensation polymerization via the reaction between a carboxylic acid or its ester group and an alcohol group. Polyester synthesis is, therefore, a reaction in reverse way of in vivo lipase catalysis of ester bond-cleavage with hydrolysis. The lipase-catalyzed polymerizations show very high chemo-, regio-, and enantio-selectivities and involve various advantageous characteristics. Lipase is robust and compatible with other chemical catalysts, which allows novel chemo-enzymatic processes. New syntheses of a variety of functional polyesters and a plausible reaction mechanism of lipase catalysis are mentioned. The polymerization characteristics are of green nature currently demanded for sustainable society, and hence, desirable for conducting ‘green polymer chemistry’. PMID:20431260

  2. Genome shuffling enhances lipase production of thermophilic Geobacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Chalopagorn, Pornchanok; Charoenpanich, Jittima; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee

    2014-10-01

    Thermostable lipases are potential enzymes for biocatalytic application. In this study, the lipase production of Geobacillus sp. CF03 (WT) was improved by genome shuffling. After two rounds of genome shuffling, one fusant strain (FB1) achieved increase lipase activity from the populations generated by ultraviolet irradiation and ethyl methylsulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis. The growth rate and lipase production of FB1 increased highest by 150 and 238 %, respectively, in comparison to the wild type. The fusant enzyme had a significant change in substrate specificity but still prefers the long-chain length substrates. It had an optimum activity at 60 °C, pH at 7.0-8.0, with p-nitrophenyl palmitate (C16) as a substrate and retained about 50 % of their activity after 15 min at 70 °C, pH 8.0. Furthermore, the fusant lipase showed the preference of sesame oil, waste palm oil, and canola oil. Therefore, the genome shuffling strategy has been successful to strain improvement and selecting strain with multiple desirable characteristics.

  3. Identification of a triacylglycerol lipase in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Barka, Frederik; Angstenberger, Max; Ahrendt, Tilman; Lorenzen, Wolfram; Bode, Helge B; Büchel, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    Diatoms accumulate triacylglycerols (TAGs) as storage lipids, but the knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of lipid metabolism is still sparse. Starting from a partial sequence for a putative TAG-lipase of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum retrieved from the data bases, we have identified the full length coding sequence, tgl1. The gene encodes an 813 amino acid sequence that shows distinct motifs for so called "true" TAG-lipases [EC 3.1.1.3] that have been functionally characterized in model organisms like Arabidopsis thaliana and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These lipases mediate the first initial step of TAG breakdown from storage lipids. To test whether Tgl1 can act as a TAG-lipase, a His-tagged version was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the protein indeed showed esterase activity. To identify the TAG degrading function of Tgl1 in P. tricornutum, knock-down mutant strains were created using an antisense RNA approach. In the mutant cell lines the relative tgl1-mRNA-level was reduced up to 20% of that of the wild type, accompanied by a strong increase of TAG in the lipid extracts. In spite of the TAG accumulation, the polar lipid species pattern appeared to be unchanged, confirming the TAG-lipase function of Tgl1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. High milk lipase activity associated with breast milk jaundice.

    PubMed

    Poland, R L; Schultz, G E; Garg, G

    1980-12-01

    Human milk samples that inhibit bilirubin-UDP-glucuronyl transferase (UDPGT) activity in vitro have been associated with prolonged unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in newborn infants. We measured the concentration of nonesterified fatty acids (total and individual fatty acids), total fat and protein, and lipase activities (with and without bile salt stimulation) in milk samples from two groups of women. Women whose infants had prolonged unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia and whose milk inhibited the activity of UDPGT were in the first group (N = 9). Volunteers with healthy infants acted as controls. Inhibitory milk contained significantly more nonesterified fatty acids (total, palmitic, and oleic) than did controls. Fat and protein concentrations and bile salt-stimulated lipase activities were similar in the two groups. Unstimulated lipase activity was higher in the inhibitory milks (11.9 +/- 0.8 mM x min-1 x ml-1) than in the controls (6.0 +/- 0.1 mM x min-1 x ml-1) (P less than 0.01). The specific activity (mM x min-1 x mg protein) of unstimulated lipase was also significantly higher in the inhibitory milks (P less than 0.0001). The high nonesterified fatty acid levels in inhibitory milks is accounted for by the elevated unstimulated lipase activities. How these circumstances lead to jaundice in the infants remains to be shown.

  5. Suppression of Fusarium wilt of cucumber by ammonia gas fumigation via reduction of Fusarium population in the field.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Mei, Zhong; Zhang, Xu; Xue, Chao; Zhang, Chenzhi; Ma, Tengfei; Zhang, Shusheng

    2017-02-23

    Cucumber plants subjected to consecutive monoculture for 9 years were found to suffer from severe Fusarium wilt disease, caused by the soil-borne fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. Cucumerinum J. H. Owen. In the present study, greenhouse experiments were performed to evaluate the influence of ammonia gas fumigation on Fusarium wilt suppression, fungal abundance and fungal community composition. Results showed that ammonia gas fumigation remarkably reduced disease incidence from 80% to 27%, resulting in a four-fold increase in yield, compared to the control. Total fungal abundance declined dramatically after fumigation and reached the lowest level at day 32, at 243 times lower than the control. Moreover, fumigation significantly increased soil fungal diversity, though it also decreased considerably coinciding with cucumber growth. Fumigation also significantly altered soil fungal community composition, relative to the control. Fusarium was strongly inhibited by fumigation in both relative abundance (3.8 times lower) and targeted quantification (a decrease of 167 fold). Collectively, the application of ammonia gas fumigation to control Fusarium wilt of cucumber resulted in a re-assembly of the fungal community to resemble that of a non-disease conducive consortium. Additional strategies, such as bioorganic fertilizer application, may still be required to develop sustainable disease suppression following fumigation.

  6. Suppression of Fusarium wilt of cucumber by ammonia gas fumigation via reduction of Fusarium population in the field

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun; Mei, Zhong; Zhang, Xu; Xue, Chao; Zhang, Chenzhi; Ma, Tengfei; Zhang, Shusheng

    2017-01-01

    Cucumber plants subjected to consecutive monoculture for 9 years were found to suffer from severe Fusarium wilt disease, caused by the soil-borne fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. Cucumerinum J. H. Owen. In the present study, greenhouse experiments were performed to evaluate the influence of ammonia gas fumigation on Fusarium wilt suppression, fungal abundance and fungal community composition. Results showed that ammonia gas fumigation remarkably reduced disease incidence from 80% to 27%, resulting in a four-fold increase in yield, compared to the control. Total fungal abundance declined dramatically after fumigation and reached the lowest level at day 32, at 243 times lower than the control. Moreover, fumigation significantly increased soil fungal diversity, though it also decreased considerably coinciding with cucumber growth. Fumigation also significantly altered soil fungal community composition, relative to the control. Fusarium was strongly inhibited by fumigation in both relative abundance (3.8 times lower) and targeted quantification (a decrease of 167 fold). Collectively, the application of ammonia gas fumigation to control Fusarium wilt of cucumber resulted in a re-assembly of the fungal community to resemble that of a non-disease conducive consortium. Additional strategies, such as bioorganic fertilizer application, may still be required to develop sustainable disease suppression following fumigation. PMID:28230182

  7. Characterization of Fusarium secorum, a new species causing Fusarium yellowing decline of sugar beet in north central USA.

    PubMed

    Secor, Gary A; Rivera-Varas, Viviana; Christ, Daniela S; Mathew, Febina M; Khan, Mohamed F R; Varrelmann, Mark; Bolton, Melvin D

    2014-01-01

    This study characterized a novel sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) pathogen from the Red River Valley in north central USA, which was formally named Fusarium secorum. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of three loci (translation elongation factor1α, calmodulin, mitochondrial small subunit) and phenotypic data strongly supported the inclusion of F. secorum in the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex (FFSC). Phylogenetic analyses identified F. secorum as a sister taxon of F. acutatum and a member of the African subclade of the FFSC. Fusarium secorum produced circinate hyphae sometimes bearing microconidia and abundant corkscrew-shaped hyphae in culture. To assess mycotoxin production potential, 45 typical secondary metabolites were tested in F. secorum rice cultures, but only beauvericin was produced in detectable amounts by each isolate. Results of pathogenicity experiments revealed that F. secorum isolates are able to induce half- and full-leaf yellowing foliar symptoms and vascular necrosis in roots and petioles of sugar beet. Inoculation with F. acutatum did not result in any disease symptoms. The sugar beet disease caused by F. secorum is named Fusarium yellowing decline. Since Fusarium yellowing decline incidence has been increasing in the Red River Valley, disease management options are discussed.

  8. [Tinea pedis due to Fusarium solani in Dakar].

    PubMed

    Diongue, K; Ndiaye, M; Badiane, A S; Seck, M C; Ndoye, N W; Diallo, S; Diallo, M A; Ndir, O; Ndiaye, D

    2015-06-01

    A patient presented with intertrigo at the second, third and fourth interdigitals spaces lasting for four years in which Fusarium solani was highlighted. The search for contributing factors revealed a concept of foot washing with water at least five times a day for ablutions, associated with wearing closed shoes all day and the absence of immunosuppression and diabetes. The diagnosis of Fusarium was made on the basis of direct examination and culture. Combined treatment with griseofulvin oral and topical ciclopirox was introduced and allowed healing after 45 days at which an antifungal powder was prescribed for relay. This case adds to the rare cases of intertrigo Fusarium sp. and confirms the frequent practice of ablutions as favoring factor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Less-Frequent Fusarium Species of Clinical Interest: Correlation between Morphological and Molecular Identification and Antifungal Susceptibility▿

    PubMed Central

    Azor, Mónica; Gené, Josepa; Cano, Josep; Manikandan, Palanisamy; Venkatapathy, Narendran; Guarro, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Forty-eight Fusarium isolates morphologically identified as belonging to seven species of clinical interest (i.e., Fusarium chlamydosporum, Fusarium dimerum, Fusarium incarnatum, Fusarium napiforme, Fusarium nygamai, Fusarium proliferatum, and Fusarium sacchari) were characterized molecularly by the analysis of the sequences of the TUB region of the β-tubulin gene. F. chlamydosporum and F. dimerum were the most genetically heterogeneous species. A high degree of correlation between the morphological and molecular identification was shown among the isolates studied. A table with the key morphological features for the identification of these Fusarium species is provided. The antifungal susceptibilities of the Fusarium isolates to 11 antifungal drugs were tested; terbinafine was the most active drug against all the species tested with the exception of F. incarnatum, for which amphotericin B was the most active. PMID:19321723

  10. High cell density fed-batch fermentations for lipase production: feeding strategies and oxygen transfer.

    PubMed

    Salehmin, M N I; Annuar, M S M; Chisti, Y

    2013-11-01

    This review is focused on the production of microbial lipases by high cell density fermentation. Lipases are among the most widely used of the enzyme catalysts. Although lipases are produced by animals and plants, industrial lipases are sourced almost exclusively from microorganisms. Many of the commercial lipases are produced using recombinant species. Microbial lipases are mostly produced by batch and fed-batch fermentation. Lipases are generally secreted by the cell into the extracellular environment. Thus, a crude preparation of lipases can be obtained by removing the microbial cells from the fermentation broth. This crude cell-free broth may be further concentrated and used as is, or lipases may be purified from it to various levels. For many large volume applications, lipases must be produced at extremely low cost. High cell density fermentation is a promising method for low-cost production: it allows a high concentration of the biomass and the enzyme to be attained rapidly and this eases the downstream recovery of the enzyme. High density fermentation enhances enzyme productivity compared with the traditional submerged culture batch fermentation. In production of enzymes, a high cell density is generally achieved through fed-batch operation, not through perfusion culture which is cumbersome. The feeding strategies used in fed-batch fermentations for producing lipases and the implications of these strategies are discussed. Most lipase-producing microbial fermentations require oxygen. Oxygen transfer in such fermentations is discussed.

  11. Influence of cosolvents on the hydrophobic surface immobilization topography of Candida antarctica lipase B

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The presence of cosolvents and co-solutes during the immobilization of lipases on hydrophobic supports may influence the extent of lipase immobilization and the long-term catalytic stability of the biocatalyst. Candida antarctica B lipase immobilization was examined on a hydrophobic surface, i.e., ...

  12. Identification of Fusarium species isolated from stored apple fruit in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Sever, Zdravka; Ivić, Dario; Kos, Tomislav; Miličević, Tihomir

    2012-12-01

    Several species of the genus Fusarium can cause apple fruit to rot while stored. Since Fusarium taxonomy is very complex and has constantly been revised and updated over the last years, the aim of this study was to identify Fusarium species from rotten apples, based on combined morphological characteristics and molecular data. We identified 32 Fusarium isolates from rotten apple fruit of cultivars Golden Delicious, Jonagold, Idared, and Pink Lady, stored in Ultra Low Oxygen (ULO) conditions. Fusarium rot was detected in 9.4 % to 33.2 % of naturally infected apples, depending on the cultivar. The symptoms were similar in all four cultivars: a soft circular brown necrosis of different extent, with or without visible sporulation. Fusarium species were identified by the morphology of cultures grown on potato-dextrose agar (PDA) and carnation leaf agar (CLA). Twenty one isolates were identified as Fusarium avenaceum and confirmed as such with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primer pair FA-ITSF and FA-ITSR. F. pseudograminearum,F. semitectum, F. crookwellense, and F. compactum were identified by morphological characteristics. F.avenaceum can produce several mycotoxins and its dominance in Fusarium rot points to the risk of mycotoxin contamination of apple fruit juices and other products for human consumption. Pathogenicity tests showed typical symptoms of Fusarium rot in most of the inoculated wounded apple fruits. In this respect Fusarium avenaceum, as the dominant cause of Fusarium rot in stored apple fruits is a typical wound parasite.

  13. Development of a selective culture medium for Fusarium moniliforme.

    PubMed

    Castellá, G; Bragulat, M R; Rubiales, M V; Cabañes, F J

    1997-12-01

    Nash and Snyder medium and malachite green agar 2.5 ppm medium, a new selective culture medium designed in our laboratory, were challenged with pure cultures of Fusarium moniliforme strains and two different mixed-conidium suspensions, which included rapidly spreading fungi, for their utility in the isolation and enumeration of F. moniliforme. From the results of this comparative study, malachite green agar 2.5 ppm allowed only the selective growth of F. moniliforme whereas Nash and Snyder medium allowed both the growth of F. moniliforme and other species not belonging to Fusarium spp. The enumeration of F. moniliforme propagules was similar in both culture media.

  14. Nondermatophytic onychomycosis by Fusarium oxysporum in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Shah, S R; Dalal, B D; Modak, M S

    2016-03-01

    Fusarium onychomycosis is not uncommon in tropical countries but is worth reporting. We report a case of nondermatophytic onychomycosis by Fusarium oxysporum in an immunocompetent woman from Buldhana district of Maharashtra (India). Bilateral involvement of great toe nail, chronic duration and acquisition of infection due to peculiar practice of daily pasting floors with mud and dung, is interesting. The case was successfully treated with topical and oral terbinafine with a dose of 250 mg daily for 3 weeks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) deficiencies affect expression of lipolytic activities in mouse adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Morak, Maria; Schmidinger, Hannes; Riesenhuber, Gernot; Rechberger, Gerald N; Kollroser, Manfred; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Kronenberg, Florian; Hermetter, Albin

    2012-12-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) are key enzymes involved in intracellular degradation of triacylglycerols. It was the aim of this study to elucidate how the deficiency in one of these proteins affects the residual lipolytic proteome in adipose tissue. For this purpose, we compared the lipase patterns of brown and white adipose tissue from ATGL (-/-) and HSL (-/-) mice using differential activity-based gel electrophoresis. This method is based on activity-recognition probes possessing the same substrate analogous structure but carrying different fluorophores for specific detection of the enzyme patterns of two different tissues in one electrophoresis gel. We found that ATGL-deficiency in brown adipose tissue had a profound effect on the expression levels of other lipolytic and esterolytic enzymes in this tissue, whereas HSL-deficiency hardly showed any effect in brown adipose tissue. Neither ATGL- nor HSL-deficiency greatly influenced the lipase patterns in white adipose tissue. Enzyme activities of mouse tissues on acylglycerol substrates were analyzed as well, showing that ATGL-and HSL-deficiencies can be compensated for at least in part by other enzymes. The proteins that responded to ATGL-deficiency in brown adipose tissue were overexpressed and their activities on acylglycerols were analyzed. Among these enzymes, Es1, Es10, and Es31-like represent lipase candidates as they catalyze the hydrolysis of long-chain acylglycerols.

  16. Adipose Triglyceride Lipase (ATGL) and Hormone-Sensitive Lipase (HSL) Deficiencies Affect Expression of Lipolytic Activities in Mouse Adipose Tissues*

    PubMed Central

    Morak, Maria; Schmidinger, Hannes; Riesenhuber, Gernot; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Kollroser, Manfred; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Kronenberg, Florian; Hermetter, Albin

    2012-01-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) are key enzymes involved in intracellular degradation of triacylglycerols. It was the aim of this study to elucidate how the deficiency in one of these proteins affects the residual lipolytic proteome in adipose tissue. For this purpose, we compared the lipase patters of brown and white adipose tissue from ATGL (−/−) and HSL (−/−) mice using differential activity-based gel electrophoresis. This method is based on activity-recognition probes possessing the same substrate analogous structure but carrying different fluorophores for specific detection of the enzyme patterns of two different tissues in one electrophoresis gel. We found that ATGL-deficiency in brown adipose tissue had a profound effect on the expression levels of other lipolytic and esterolytic enzymes in this tissue, whereas HSL-deficiency hardly showed any effect in brown adipose tissue. Neither ATGL- nor HSL-deficiency greatly influenced the lipase patterns in white adipose tissue. Enzyme activities of mouse tissues on acylglycerol substrates were analyzed as well, showing that ATGL-and HSL-deficiencies can be compensated for at least in part by other enzymes. The proteins that responded to ATGL-deficiency in brown adipose tissue were overexpressed and their activities on acylglycerols were analyzed. Among these enzymes, Es1, Es10, and Es31-like represent lipase candidates as they catalyze the hydrolysis of long-chain acylglycerols. PMID:22984285

  17. Investigation of the Reuse of Immobilized Lipases in Biodiesel Synthesis: Influence of Different Solvents in Lipase Activity.

    PubMed

    Aguieiras, Erika C G; Ribeiro, Douglas S; Couteiro, Pedro P; Bastos, Caenam M B; de Queiroz, Danielle S; Parreira, Juliana M; Langone, Marta A P

    2016-06-01

    Biodiesel production catalyzed by immobilized lipases offers the possibility of easy reuse of the catalyst, which is very important to minimize costs and to make this process economically feasible. In this study, the reuse of three commercial immobilized lipases (Novozym 435, Lipozyme RM IM, and Lipozyme TL IM) was investigated in ethanolysis of soybean oil. The effect of the use of solvents (ethanol, butanol, and hexane) to wash the immobilized lipases before the enzyme reuse was evaluated, as well as the lipase reuse without solvent washing. The washing with butanol and ethanol led to the lowest decrease in ester yield after the first batch and allowed the highest glycerol removal (>85 %) from biocatalysts. The biocatalysts were incubated at 50 °C for 2 h in these three solvents. Esterification activities of the enzyme preparations, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses of the beads, and protein content in organic phase were evaluated before and after incubation in the solvent. SEM analysis showed a significant change in beads morphology of Novozym 435 after contact with hexane. For Lipozyme TL IM lipase, this effect was visualized with ethanol.

  18. QSAR study and the hydrolysis activity prediction of three alkaline lipases from different lipase-producing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haikuan; Wang, Xiaojie; Li, Xiaolu; Zhang, Yehong; Dai, Yujie; Guo, Changlu; Zheng, Heng

    2012-09-28

    The hydrolysis activities of three alkaline lipases, L-A1, L-A2 and L-A3 secreted by different lipase-producing microorganisms isolated from the Bay of Bohai, P. R. China were characterized with 16 kinds of esters. It was found that all the lipases have the ability to catalyze the hydrolysis of the glycerides, methyl esters, ethyl esters, especially for triglycerides, which shows that they have broad substrate spectra, and this property is very important for them to be used in detergent industry. Three QSAR models were built for L-A1, L-A2 and L-A3 respectively with GFA using Discovery studio 2.1. The models equations 1, 2 and 3 can explain 95.80%, 97.45% and 97.09% of the variances (R(2)(adj)) respectively while they could predict 95.44%, 89.61% and 93.41% of the variances (R(2)(cv)) respectively. With these models the hydrolysis activities of these lipases to mixed esters were predicted and the result showed that the predicted values are in good agreement with the measured values, which indicates that this method can be used as a simple tool to predict the lipase activities for single or mixed esters.

  19. QSAR study and the hydrolysis activity prediction of three alkaline lipases from different lipase-producing microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The hydrolysis activities of three alkaline lipases, L-A1, L-A2 and L-A3 secreted by different lipase-producing microorganisms isolated from the Bay of Bohai, P. R. China were characterized with 16 kinds of esters. It was found that all the lipases have the ability to catalyze the hydrolysis of the glycerides, methyl esters, ethyl esters, especially for triglycerides, which shows that they have broad substrate spectra, and this property is very important for them to be used in detergent industry. Three QSAR models were built for L-A1, L-A2 and L-A3 respectively with GFA using Discovery studio 2.1. The models equations 1, 2 and 3 can explain 95.80%, 97.45% and 97.09% of the variances (R2adj) respectively while they could predict 95.44%, 89.61% and 93.41% of the variances (R2cv) respectively. With these models the hydrolysis activities of these lipases to mixed esters were predicted and the result showed that the predicted values are in good agreement with the measured values, which indicates that this method can be used as a simple tool to predict the lipase activities for single or mixed esters. PMID:23016923

  20. [Structure and Activity of Fungal Lipases in Bile Salt Solutions].

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, L R; Bakirova, D R; Valiullina, Yu A; Idiyatullin, B Z; Faizullin, D A; Zueva, O S; Zuev, Yu F

    2016-01-01

    The changes in structure and catalytic properties of fungal lipases (Candida rugosa, Rhizomucor miehei, Mucor javanicus) were investigated in micellar solutions of bile salts that differ in hydrophilic-lypophilic balance and reaction medium properties. The methods of circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence were applied to estimate the changes in peptide structure within complexes with bile salt micelles. Bile salts do not exert a significant influence on the structure of the enzymes under study: in Rh. miehei and M. javanicus lipases the alpha helix content slightly decreased, the influence of bile salts on the C. rugosa structure was not revealed. Despite negligible structural modifications in the enzymes, in bile salt solutions a considerable change in their catalytic properties was observed: an abrupt decrease in catalytic effectiveness. Substrate-bile salts micelles complex formation was demonstrated by the NMR self-diffusion method. The model of a regulation of fungal lipase activity was proposed.

  1. Adipose triglyceride lipase contributes to cancer-associated cachexia.

    PubMed

    Das, Suman K; Eder, Sandra; Schauer, Silvia; Diwoky, Clemens; Temmel, Hannes; Guertl, Barbara; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Tamilarasan, Kuppusamy P; Kumari, Pooja; Trauner, Michael; Zimmermann, Robert; Vesely, Paul; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Hoefler, Gerald

    2011-07-08

    Cachexia is a multifactorial wasting syndrome most common in patients with cancer that is characterized by the uncontrolled loss of adipose and muscle mass. We show that the inhibition of lipolysis through genetic ablation of adipose triglyceride lipase (Atgl) or hormone-sensitive lipase (Hsl) ameliorates certain features of cancer-associated cachexia (CAC). In wild-type C57BL/6 mice, the injection of Lewis lung carcinoma or B16 melanoma cells causes tumor growth, loss of white adipose tissue (WAT), and a marked reduction of gastrocnemius muscle. In contrast, Atgl-deficient mice with tumors resisted increased WAT lipolysis, myocyte apoptosis, and proteasomal muscle degradation and maintained normal adipose and gastrocnemius muscle mass. Hsl-deficient mice with tumors were also protected although to a lesser degree. Thus, functional lipolysis is essential in the pathogenesis of CAC. Pharmacological inhibition of metabolic lipases may help prevent cachexia.

  2. Effects of methanol on a methanol-tolerant bacterial lipase.

    PubMed

    Santambrogio, Carlo; Sasso, Francesco; Natalello, Antonino; Brocca, Stefania; Grandori, Rita; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Lotti, Marina

    2013-10-01

    Methanol is often employed in biocatalysis with the purpose of increasing substrates solubility or as the acyl acceptor in transesterification reactions, but inhibitory effects are observed in several cases. We have studied the influence of methanol on the catalytic activity and on the conformation of the lipase from Burkholderia glumae, which is reported to be highly methanol tolerant if compared with other lipases. We detected highest activity in the presence of 50-70 % methanol. Under these conditions, however, the enzyme stability is perturbed, leading to gradual protein unfolding and finally to aggregation. These results surmise that, for this lipase, methanol-induced deactivation does not depend on inhibition of catalytic activity but rather on negative effects on the conformational stability of the catalyst.

  3. Biodiesel production from microalgae oil catalyzed by a recombinant lipase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinjin; Xia, Ji; Jiang, Wei; Li, Ying; Li, Jilun

    2015-03-01

    A recombinant Rhizomucor miehei lipase was constructed and expressed in Pichia pastoris. The target enzyme was termed Lipase GH2 and it can be used as a free enzyme for catalytic conversion of microalgae oil mixed with methanol or ethanol for biodiesel production in an n-hexane solvent system. Conversion rates of two major types of biodiesel, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE), reached maximal values (>90%) after 24h. The process of FAME production is generally more simple and economical than that of FAEE production, even though the two processes show similar conversion rates. In spite of the damaging effect of ethanol on enzyme activity, we successfully obtained ethyl ester by the enzymatic method. Our findings indicate that Lipase GH2 is a useful catalyst for conversion of microalgae oil to FAME or FAEE, and this system provides efficiency and reduced costs in biodiesel production.

  4. Lactobacillus sps. lipase mediated poly (ε-caprolactone) degradation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran; Ray Dutta, Jayati; Ganesan, Ramakrishnan

    2017-02-01

    Polymer degradation through lipase appears to be an enthralling alternative to bulk chemical routes. Poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) is an artificial polyester that can be degraded by microbes and enzymes like lipases and esterases. The environmental degradation of PCL is dependent on the activity of bacteria that characterization techniques such as thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal are widely present in the ecosystem. In this study, three different lipases derived from Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus plantarum and their co-culture have been utilized to explore their efficiency towards PCL enzymatic degradation. The effect of parameters such as enzyme loading and degradation time has been explored to understand the efficiency of the enzymes used in this study. Various analysis, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy have been employed to study the enzymatic degradation and its possible mechanistic insight.

  5. Purification and partial characterization of nonspecific lipase from rat pancreas.

    PubMed

    Albron, P W; Corbett, B J; Latimer, A D

    1976-03-26

    Nonspecific lipase (also referred to as micelle lipase and secondary ester hydrolase) has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity starting from acetone powder of rat pancreas. The purified enzyme is found to have a molecular weight (gel filtration) of 64 000 +/- 2000, and an equivalent weight (titration with E-600) of 65 000. Nonspecific lipase is seen to be very sensitive to inhibition by organophosphates but resistant to quinine. Evidence for the presence of sulfhydryl and imidazole groups essential for activity is presented, and some observations on substrate specificity are made. The purified enzyme appears to lack phosphate groups and lipids, and is unstable under conditions of low ionic strength and/or exposure to 2-mercaptoethanol.

  6. Lipoprotein metabolism and lipoprotein lipase in severe cystic acne.

    PubMed

    Pigatto, P; Altomare, G F; Negri, M; Finzi, A F; Vigotti, G; Vergani, C

    1985-01-01

    In severe cystic acne we found low levels of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A (Apo-A) in the presence of normal total lipids. In a larger number of patients, we always observed significantly lower levels of HDL-C and Apo-A than in either age-matched controls or subjects with acne vulgaris. Since lipoprotein lipase is one major determinant of HDL concentration, we assayed the lipase activity in liver and extra-hepatic tissues by the method of Krauss et al. There was highly significant less total and hepatic lipase activity than in age-matched controls. HDL distribution was examined by zonal ultracentrifugation and a decrease in the HDL2 subclass was discovered. Since HDL are inversely correlated to atherosclerosis, cystic acne is one risk factor for atherosclerosis. The linkage between low HDL levels and severe cystic acne should be further investigated.

  7. Lipase-immobilized biocatalytic membranes for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chia-Hung; Peng, Li-Ting; Kan, Shu-Chen; Liu, Yung-Chuan; Shieh, Chwen-Jen

    2013-10-01

    Microbial lipase from Candida rugosa (Amano AY-30) has good transesterification activity and can be used for biodiesel production. In this study, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane was grafted with 1,4-diaminobutane and activated by glutaraldehyde for C. rugosa lipase immobilization. After immobilization, the biocatalytic membrane was used for producing biodiesel from soybean oil and methanol via transesterification. Response Surface Methodology (RSM) in combination with a 5-level-5-factor central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was employed to evaluate the effects of reaction time, reaction temperature, enzyme amount, substrate molar ratio and water content on the yield of soybean oil methyl ester. By ridge max analysis, the predicted and experimental yields under the optimum synthesis conditions were 97% and 95%, respectively. The lipase-immobilized PVDF membrane showed good reuse ability for biodiesel production, enabling operation for at least 165 h during five reuses of the batch, without significant loss of activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The immobilization of lipase on PVDF-co-HFP membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayhan, Naciye; Eyüpoǧlu, Volkan; Adem, Şevki

    2016-04-01

    Lipase is an enzyme having a lot of different industrial applications such as biodiesel production, biopolymer synthesis, enantiopure pharmaceutical productions, agrochemicals, etc. Its immobilized form on different substances is more conventional and useful than its free form. Supporting material was prepared using PVDF-co-HFP in laboratory conditions and attached 1,4-diaminobutane (DA) and epichlorohydrin (EPI) ligands to the membrane to immobilize lipase enzyme. The immobilization conditions such as enzyme amount, pH, the concentration of salt, thermal stability and activity were stabilized for our experimental setup. Then, biochemical characterizations were performed on immobilized lipase PVDF-co-HFP regarding optimal pH activity, temperature and thermal stability. Also, the desorption ratios of immobilized enzyme in two different pathway were investigated to confirm immobilization stability for 24 hours.

  9. Comparison of immunoreactive serum trypsinogen and lipase in Cystic Fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd-Still, J.D.; Weiss, S.; Wessel, H.; Fong, L.; Conway, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The incidence of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is 1 in 2,000. Early detection and treatment of CF may necessitate newborn screening with a reliable and cost-effective test. Serum immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) an enzyme produced by the pancreas, is detectable by radioimmunoassay (RIA) techniques. Recently, it has been shown that IRT is elevated in CF infants for the first few months of life and levels become subnormal as pancreatic insufficiency progresses. Other enzymes produced by the pancreas, such as lipase, are also elevated during this time. The author's earlier work confirmed previous reports of elevated IRT levels in CF infants. The development of a new RIA for lipase (nuclipase) has enabled comparison of these 2 pancreatic enzymes in C.F. Serum IRT and lipase determinations were performed on 2 groups of CF patients; infants under 1 year of age, and children between 1 and 18 years of age. Control populations of the same age groups were included. The results showed that both trypsin (161 +- 92 ng/ml, range 20 to 400) and lipase (167 +- 151 ng/ml, range 29 to 500) are elevated in CF in the majority of infants. Control infants had values of IRT ranging from 20 to 29.5 ng/ml and lipase values ranging from 23 to 34 ng/ml. IRT becomes subnormal in most CF patients by 8 years of age as pancreatic function insufficiency increases. Lipase levels and IRT levels correlate well in infancy, but IRT is a more sensitive indicator of pancreatic insufficiency in older patients with CF.

  10. Fusarial toxins: secondary metabolites of Fusarium fungi.

    PubMed

    Nesic, Ksenija; Ivanovic, Snezana; Nesic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to mycotoxins occurs worldwide, even though there are geographic and climatic differences in the amounts produced and occurrence of these substances.Mycotoxins are secondary chemical metabolites of different fungi. They are natural contaminants of cereals, so their presence is often inevitable. Among many genera that produce mycotoxins, Fusarium fungi are the most widespread in cereal-growing areas of the planet. Fusarium fungi produce a diversity of mycotoxin types, whose distributions are also diverse. What is produced and where it is produced is influenced primarily by environmental conditions, and crop production and storage methods. The amount of toxin produced depends on physical (viz., moisture, relative humidity, temperature, and mechanical damage), chemical (viz., carbon dioxide,oxygen, composition of substrate, insecticides and fungicides), and biological factors (viz., plant variety, stress, insects, spore load, etc.). Moisture and temperature have a major influence on mold growth rate and mycotoxin production.Among the most toxic and prevalent fusaria) toxins are the following: zearalenone,fumonisins, moniliformin and trichothecenes (T-2/HT-2 toxin, deoxynivalenol,diacetoxyscirpenol, nivalenol). Zearalenone (ZEA; ZON, F-2 toxin) isaphy to estrogenic compound, primarily a field contaminant, which exhibits estrogenic activity and has been implicated in numerous mycotoxicoses of farm animals,especially pigs. Recently, evidence suggests that ZEA has potential to stimulate the growth of human breast cancer cells. Fumonisins are also cancer-promoting metabolites,of which Fumonisin 8 I (FBI) is the most important. Moniliformin (MON) isalso highly toxic to both animals and humans. Trichothecenes are classified as gastrointestinal toxins, dermatotoxins, immunotoxins, hematotoxins, and gene toxins.T-2 and HT-2 toxin, and diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS, anguidine) are the most toxic mycotoxins among the trichothecene group. Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) and

  11. Enzymatic Synthesis of Structured Lipids using a Novel Cold-Active Lipase from Pichia lynferdii NRRL Y-7723

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Structured lipids (SL) were synthesized by the acidolysis of borage oil with caprylic acid using lipases. Six commercial lipases from different sources and a novel lipase from Pichia lynferdii NRRL Y-7723 were screened for their acidolysis activities and Lipozyme RM IM and NRRL Y-7723 lipase were s...

  12. A comparison of currently used serum lipase and amylase procedures in the serial detection of enzyme elevations in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, J A; Kitt, D; Wingate, B

    1983-10-14

    Twenty-eight patients having acute pancreatitis were followed during convalescence with serum amylase and lipase determinations. Starch and p-nitrophenyl-oligosaccharide substrates were used for amylase. Dimercaptotributyrate and triolein were employed for lipase. The extreme sensitivity of the lipase procedure using the tributyrate detected a persistent elevation of lipase when other parameters of measurement had returned to normal.

  13. Clinical Features of Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Barbara K.; Deegan, Patrick B.; Enns, Gregory M.; Guardamagna, Ornella; Horslen, Simon; Hovingh, Gerard K.; Lobritto, Steve J.; Malinova, Vera; McLin, Valerie A.; Raiman, Julian; Di Rocco, Maja; Santra, Saikat; Sharma, Reena; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Whitley, Chester B.; Eckert, Stephen; Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Quinn, Anthony G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to characterize key clinical manifestations of lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (LAL D) in children and adults. Methods: Investigators reviewed medical records of LAL D patients ages ≥5 years, extracted historical data, and obtained prospective laboratory and imaging data on living patients to develop a longitudinal dataset. Results: A total of 49 patients were enrolled; 48 had confirmed LAL D. Mean age at first disease-related abnormality was 9.0 years (range 0–42); mean age at diagnosis was 15.2 years (range 1–46). Twenty-nine (60%) were male patients, and 27 (56%) were <20 years of age at the time of consent/assent. Serum transaminases were elevated in most patients with 458 of 499 (92%) of alanine aminotransferase values and 265 of 448 (59%) of aspartate aminotransferase values above the upper limit of normal. Most patients had elevated low-density lipoprotein (64% patients) and total cholesterol (63%) at baseline despite most being on lipid-lowering therapies, and 44% had high-density lipoprotein levels below the lower limit of normal. More than half of the patients with liver biopsies (n = 31, mean age 13 years) had documented evidence of steatosis (87%) and/or fibrosis (52%). Imaging assessments revealed that the median liver volume was ∼1.15 multiples of normal (MN) and median spleen volume was ∼2.2 MN. Six (13%) patients had undergone a liver transplant (ages 9–43.5 years). Conclusion: This study provides the largest longitudinal case review of patients with LAL D and confirms that LAL D is predominantly a pediatric disease causing early and progressive hepatic dysfunction associated with dyslipidemia that often leads to liver failure and transplantation. PMID:26252914

  14. Regulation of adipose triglyceride lipase by rosiglitazone

    PubMed Central

    Liu, L.-F.; Purushotham, A.; Wendel, A. A.; Koba, K.; DeIuliis, J.; Lee, K.; Belury, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim To elucidate the mechanism by which rosiglitazone regulates adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). Methods Male C57Bl/6 mice were treated with rosiglitazone daily (10 mg/kg body weight), and adipose tissues were weighed and preserved for mRNA and protein analysis of ATGL. In parallel, preadipocyte (3T3-L1) cells were differentiated with insulin/dexamethasone/3-isobutyl-1-methlxanthine cocktail or rosiglitazone, and ATGL levels were measured with real-time PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Results Rosiglitazone concomitantly promoted differentiation of pre-adipocytes to functional adipocytes and induced mRNA levels of ATGL. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) antagonist bisphenol A diglycidyl ether significantly abrogated the induction of mRNA, but not protein levels of ATGL by rosiglitazone in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In the presence of epinephrine rosiglitazone stimulated free fatty acid release and increased diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1 (DGAT-1) mRNA suggest that ATGL and DGAT-1 may be cooperatively involved in rosiglitazone-stimulated triglyceride hydrolysis and fatty acid re-esterification in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with rosiglitazone or insulin did not appear to alter localization of ATGL staining surrounding lipid droplets. Finally, we found that rosiglitazone increased ATGL mRNA levels in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in the presence of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, suggesting that rosiglitazone regulation of ATGL occurs at the transcriptional level. Conclusions Rosiglitazone directly regulates transcription of ATGL, likely through a PPARγ-mediated mechanism. PMID:18643838

  15. Inhibition of monoacylglycerol lipase reduces nicotine withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Muldoon, P P; Chen, J; Harenza, J L; Abdullah, R A; Sim-Selley, L J; Cravatt, B F; Miles, M F; Chen, X; Lichtman, A H; Damaj, M I

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Abrupt discontinuation of nicotine, the main psychoactive component in tobacco, induces a withdrawal syndrome in nicotine-dependent animals, consisting of somatic and affective signs, avoidance of which contributes to drug maintenance. While blockade of fatty acid amide hydrolase, the primary catabolic enzyme of the endocannabinoid arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide), exacerbates withdrawal responses in nicotine-dependent mice, the role of monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), the main hydrolytic enzyme of a second endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), in nicotine withdrawal remains unexplored. Experimental Approach To evaluate the role of MAGL enzyme inhibition in nicotine withdrawal, we initially performed a genetic correlation approach using the BXD recombinant inbred mouse panel. We then assessed nicotine withdrawal intensity in the mouse after treatment with the selective MAGL inhibitor, JZL184, and after genetic deletion of the enzyme. Lastly, we assessed the association between genotypes and smoking withdrawal phenotypes in two human data sets. Key Results BXD mice displayed significant positive correlations between basal MAGL mRNA expression and nicotine withdrawal responses, consistent with the idea that increased 2-AG brain levels may attenuate withdrawal responses. Strikingly, the MAGL inhibitor, JZL184, dose-dependently reduced somatic and aversive withdrawal signs, which was blocked by rimonabant, indicating a CB1 receptor-dependent mechanism. MAGL-knockout mice also showed attenuated nicotine withdrawal. Lastly, genetic analyses in humans revealed associations of the MAGL gene with smoking withdrawal in humans. Conclusions and Implications Overall, our findings suggest that MAGL inhibition maybe a promising target for treatment of nicotine dependence. PMID:25258021

  16. Therapeutic potential of monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, Melinda M; Nomura, Daniel K

    2013-03-19

    Marijuana and aspirin have been used for millennia to treat a wide range of maladies including pain and inflammation. Both cannabinoids, like marijuana, that exert anti-inflammatory action through stimulating cannabinoid receptors, and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors, like aspirin, that suppress pro-inflammatory eicosanoid production have shown beneficial outcomes in mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Both cannabinoids and COX inhibitors, however, have untoward effects that discourage their chronic usage, including cognitive deficits and gastrointestinal toxicity, respectively. Recent studies have uncovered that the serine hydrolase monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) links the endocannabinoid and eicosanoid systems together through hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) to provide the major arachidonic acid (AA) precursor pools for pro-inflammatory eicosanoid synthesis in specific tissues. Studies in recent years have shown that MAGL inhibitors elicit anti-nociceptive, anxiolytic, and anti-emetic responses and attenuate precipitated withdrawal symptoms in addiction paradigms through enhancing endocannabinoid signaling. MAGL inhibitors have also been shown to exert anti-inflammatory action in the brain and protect against neurodegeneration through lowering eicosanoid production. In cancer, MAGL inhibitors have been shown to have anti-cancer properties not only through modulating the endocannabinoid-eicosanoid network, but also by controlling fatty acid release for the synthesis of protumorigenic signaling lipids. Thus, MAGL serves as a critical node in simultaneously coordinating multiple lipid signaling pathways in both physiological and disease contexts. This review will discuss the diverse (patho)physiological roles of MAGL and the therapeutic potential of MAGL inhibitors in treating a vast array of complex human diseases.

  17. Clinical Features of Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Burton, Barbara K; Deegan, Patrick B; Enns, Gregory M; Guardamagna, Ornella; Horslen, Simon; Hovingh, Gerard K; Lobritto, Steve J; Malinova, Vera; McLin, Valerie A; Raiman, Julian; Di Rocco, Maja; Santra, Saikat; Sharma, Reena; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Whitley, Chester B; Eckert, Stephen; Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Quinn, Anthony G

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize key clinical manifestations of lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (LAL D) in children and adults. Investigators reviewed medical records of LAL D patients ages ≥5 years, extracted historical data, and obtained prospective laboratory and imaging data on living patients to develop a longitudinal dataset. A total of 49 patients were enrolled; 48 had confirmed LAL D. Mean age at first disease-related abnormality was 9.0 years (range 0-42); mean age at diagnosis was 15.2 years (range 1-46). Twenty-nine (60%) were male patients, and 27 (56%) were <20 years of age at the time of consent/assent. Serum transaminases were elevated in most patients with 458 of 499 (92%) of alanine aminotransferase values and 265 of 448 (59%) of aspartate aminotransferase values above the upper limit of normal. Most patients had elevated low-density lipoprotein (64% patients) and total cholesterol (63%) at baseline despite most being on lipid-lowering therapies, and 44% had high-density lipoprotein levels below the lower limit of normal. More than half of the patients with liver biopsies (n = 31, mean age 13 years) had documented evidence of steatosis (87%) and/or fibrosis (52%). Imaging assessments revealed that the median liver volume was ∼1.15 multiples of normal (MN) and median spleen volume was ∼2.2 MN. Six (13%) patients had undergone a liver transplant (ages 9-43.5 years). This study provides the largest longitudinal case review of patients with LAL D and confirms that LAL D is predominantly a pediatric disease causing early and progressive hepatic dysfunction associated with dyslipidemia that often leads to liver failure and transplantation.

  18. JCL Roundtable: Hypertriglyceridemia due to defects in lipoprotein lipase function.

    PubMed

    Brown, W Virgil; Goldberg, Ira J; Young, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    In this Roundtable, our intent is to discuss those rare genetic disorders that impair the function of lipoprotein lipase. These cause severe hypertriglyceridemia that appears in early childhood with Mendelian inheritance and usually with full penetrance in a recessive pattern. Dr Ira Goldberg from New York University School of Medicine and Dr Stephen Young from the University of California, Los Angeles have agreed to answer my questions about this topic. Both have done fundamental work in recent years that has markedly altered our views on lipoprotein lipase function. I am going to start by asking them to give us a brief history of this enzyme system as a clinical entity.

  19. Genomic organization of the human lysosomal acid lipase gene (LIPA)

    SciTech Connect

    Aslandis, C.; Klima, H.; Lackner, K.J.; Schmitz, G. )

    1994-03-15

    Defects in the human lysosomal acid lipase gene are responsible for cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) and Wolman disease. Exon skipping as the cause for CESD has been demonstrated. The authors present here a summary of the exon structure of the entire human lysosomal acid lipase gene consisting of 10 exons, together with the sizes of genomic EcoRI and SacI fragments hybridizing to each exon. In addition, the DNA sequence of the putative promoter region is presented. The EMBL accession numbers for adjacent intron sequences are given. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Lipase inactivation in wheat germ by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Pankaj Kumar; Kudachikar, V. B.; Kumar, Sourav

    2013-05-01

    An attempt was made to improve the shelf life of wheat germ by optimizing processing conditions involving γ-irradiation. Studies were carried out to investigate the effect of γ-irradiation (0-30 kGy doses) on the chemical composition of wheat germ with respect to variation in moisture, total ash, crude fat, free fatty acid, protein and lipase activity. The results demonstrate that shelf stability of wheat germ was achieved by inactivation of lipase at doses of γ-irradiation greater than 12 kGy.

  1. The allosteric modulation of lipases and its possible biological relevance

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Jens; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    Background During the development of an enantioselective synthesis using the lipase from Mucor miehei an unusual reaction course was observed, which was analyzed precisely. For the first time an allosteric modulation of a lipase changing its selectivity was shown. Theory Considering the biological relevance of the discovered regulation mechanism we developed a theory that describes the regulation of energy homeostasis and fat metabolism. Conclusion This theory represents a new approach to explain the cause of the metabolic syndrome and provides an innovative basis for further research activity. PMID:17825093

  2. Lipases and their inhibitors in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Daniel K; Casida, John E

    2016-11-25

    Lipids play diverse and important biological roles including maintaining cellular integrity, storing fat for energy, acting as signaling molecules, and forming microdomains to support membrane protein signaling. Altering the levels of specific lipid species through activating or inactivating their biosynthetic or degradative pathways has been shown to provide either therapeutic benefit or cause disease. This review focuses on the functional, therapeutic, and (patho)physiological roles of lipases within the serine hydrolase superfamily and their inhibitors, with particular emphasis on the pharmacological tools, drugs, and environmental chemicals that inhibit these lipases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Jasmonate and ethylene dependent defence gene expression and suppression of fungal virulence factors: two essential mechanisms of Fusarium head blight resistance in wheat?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fusarium head blight (FHB) caused by Fusarium species like F. graminearum is a devastating disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum) worldwide. Mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol produced by the fungus affect plant and animal health, and cause significant reductions of grain yield and quality. Resistant varieties are the only effective way to control this disease, but the molecular events leading to FHB resistance are still poorly understood. Transcriptional profiling was conducted for the winter wheat cultivars Dream (moderately resistant) and Lynx (susceptible). The gene expressions at 32 and 72 h after inoculation with Fusarium were used to trace possible defence mechanisms and associated genes. A comparative qPCR was carried out for selected genes to analyse the respective expression patterns in the resistant cultivars Dream and Sumai 3 (Chinese spring wheat). Results Among 2,169 differentially expressed genes, two putative main defence mechanisms were found in the FHB-resistant Dream cultivar. Both are defined base on their specific mode of resistance. A non-specific mechanism was based on several defence genes probably induced by jasmonate and ethylene signalling, including lipid-transfer protein, thionin, defensin and GDSL-like lipase genes. Additionally, defence-related genes encoding jasmonate-regulated proteins were up-regulated in response to FHB. Another mechanism based on the targeted suppression of essential Fusarium virulence factors comprising proteases and mycotoxins was found to be an essential, induced defence of general relevance in wheat. Moreover, similar inductions upon fungal infection were frequently observed among FHB-responsive genes of both mechanisms in the cultivars Dream and Sumai 3. Conclusions Especially ABC transporter, UDP-glucosyltransferase, protease and protease inhibitor genes associated with the defence mechanism against fungal virulence factors are apparently active in different resistant genetic backgrounds

  4. Towards the development of systems for high-yield production of microbial lipases.

    PubMed

    Turki, Saoussen

    2013-10-01

    Microbial lipases are a versatile and attractive class of biocatalysts for a wide variety of applications. Lipases can be produced by bacteria, yeasts or filamentous fungi. Nevertheless, they are often not optimal for direct use in industrial conditions due to low yields, low specific activities and a limited spectrum of activities. Improvements in the productivity of lipases have been made by genetic manipulation of the cell factory production hosts and by optimizing production media and conditions. Advances in protein engineering technology, ranging from directed evolution to rational design, have also been able to tailor lipases to particular applications. This review describes various approaches used to improve lipase production and applications.

  5. Pancreas-specific lipase concentrations and amylase and lipase activities in the peritoneal fluid of dogs with suspected pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Marie A; Hill, Steve L; Sunico, Sarena; Suchodolski, Jan S; Robertson, Jane E; Steiner, Joerg M

    2014-09-01

    Diagnosing acute pancreatitis in the dog can be challenging. The aim of this study was to determine the concentrations of pancreas-specific lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI), and the activities of amylase and lipase, in the peritoneal fluid from a population of dogs diagnosed with acute pancreatitis based on clinical signs, ultrasonographic findings and serum cPLI concentrations. In a prospective study, cPLI concentrations, and amylase and lipase activities, were measured in the peritoneal fluid of 14 dogs with pancreatitis and 19 dogs with non-pancreatic disease. The sensitivity and specificity of peritoneal fluid cPLI concentration (cut-off value 500 µg/L) were 100.0% (95% confidence interval, CI, 80.7-100.0%) and 94.7% (95% CI 76.7-99.7%), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of peritoneal fluid amylase (cut-off value 1050 U/L) and lipase activities (cut-off value 500 U/L) were 71.4% (95% CI 44.5-90.2%) and 84.2% (95% CI 62.8-95.8%) for amylase activity, and 92.9% (95% CI 69.5-99.6%) and 94.7% (95% CI 76.7-99.7%) for lipase activity, respectively. In conclusion, peritoneal fluid cPLI concentration was highly sensitive as a complementary diagnostic tool in a group of dogs with suspected acute pancreatitis. Peritoneal fluid lipase activity was not as sensitive as cPLI concentration, but may also support a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in dogs. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Root Rot of Balloon Flower (Platycodon grandiflorum) Caused by Fusarium solani and Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Chi Sung; Kim, Gyoung Hee; Son, Kyeong In; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Jeon, Kwon-Seok; Yoon, Jun-Hyuck; Koh, Young Jin

    2013-12-01

    Balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorum) is a kind of mountain herbs whose roots have restorative properties and the cultivating acreage of balloon flower has been steadily increasing in Korea. More frequent rain and high amount of rainfalls as a result of climate changes predisposed balloon flower to the outbreaks of root rot at high-density cultivation area in recent years. Root crowns were usually discolored into brown to blackish brown at first and the infected plants showed slight wilting symptom at early infection stage. Severely infected roots were entirely rotted and whole plants eventually died at late infection stage. The overall disease severities of root rot of balloon flower were quite variable according to the surveyed fields in Jeonnam, Gyeongnam and Jeju Provinces, which ranged from 0.1% to 40%. The root rot occurred more severely at the paddy or clay soils than the sandy soils and their severities were much higher at lowland than upland in the same localty. The disease increased with aging of the balloon flower. The causal fungi were identified as Fusarium solani and F. oxysporum on the basis of their mycological characteristics. The optimum temperature ranges of their mycelial growths was found to be 24°C. The pathogenic characters of F. solani and F. oxysporum treated by artificial wounding inoculation on healthy roots of balloon flower revealed that F. solani was more virulent than F. oxysporum. This study identified the causal agents of root rot of balloon flower as Fusarium solani and F. oxysporum, probably for the first time.

  7. Mycotoxin production of Fusarium langsethiae and Fusarium sporotrichioides on cereal-based substrates.

    PubMed

    Kokkonen, M; Jestoi, M; Laitila, A

    2012-02-01

    The present study investigated and compared the mycotoxin production of two Fusarium species, F. sporotrichioides and F. langsethiae, isolated from grain samples. Fusarium strains were cultivated at 25°C for 7 days on two types of solid media, i.e. rice-flour and cereal-flour agar. Toxins produced were measured after the incubation period with a multi-mycotoxin method based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Both F. sporotrichioides and F. langsethiae synthesised type-A trichothecenes, i.e. T-2 and HT-2 toxins, diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS) and neosolaniol (NEO). In addition, both species could be verified as beauvericin producers. The toxin production occurred in both cereal-based assays but was more predominant on the carbohydrate-rich rice-flour medium. The two species were potent producers of T-2 toxin, the highest amounts measured being at a level of 20,000 μg/kg after 7 days' incubation. Differences between the species were observed regarding the quantitative production of the other trichothecenes: F. sporotrichioides was a more prolific producer of HT-2 toxin and beauvericin, whereas F. langsethiae produced higher amounts of DAS and NEO. On rice-flour assay, the toxin production was monitored during the growth period. The production started rapidly at an early growth phase and several toxins could be detected already after the 1st day of incubation, the highest concentrations being at mg/kg level. The results also indicated that the biosynthesis by F. sporotrichioides and F. langsethiae shifted towards the other type-A trichothecenes at the expense of T-2 toxin at the end of the cultivation.

  8. SECRETION OF LIPASES IN THE DIGESTIVE TRACT OF THE CRICKET Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Weidlich, Sandy; Hoffmann, Klaus H; Woodring, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Little is known concerning the sites and the ratios of the lipase secretions in insects, therefore we undertook an examination of the lipase secretion of fed and unfed adult female Gryllus bimaculatus. The ratio of triacylglyceride lipase, diacylglyceride lipase, and phosphatidylcholine lipase secreted by fed females in the caecum and ventriculus is 1:1.4:0.4. These activities decrease in the caecum by 30-40% in unfed females. The total lipase activity (TLA) in the caecum is about 10 times that in the ventriculus. Minimal lipase secretion occurs before and during the final moult, and remains at this level in unfed crickets, indicating a basal secretion rate. In 2-day-old fed females, about 10% of the TLA in the entire gut is found in the crop, about 70% in the caecum, 20% in the ventriculus, and 3% in the ileum. Lipases in the ventriculus are recycled back to the caecum and little is lost in the feces. Oleic acid stimulated in vitro lipase secretion, but lipids did not. Feeding stimulated lipase secretion, starvation reduced lipase secretion, but this does not prove a direct prandal regulation of secretion, because feeding also induced a size and volume increase of the caecum.

  9. Metabolic engineering of Lactococcus lactis influence of the overproduction of lipase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Raftari, Mohammad; Ghafourian, Sobhan; Bakar, Fatimah Abu

    2013-11-01

    The dairy industry uses lipase extensively for hydrolysis of milk fat. Lipase is used in the modification of the fatty acid chain length, to enhance the flavours of various chesses. Therefore finding the unlimited source of lipase is a concern of dairy industry. Due to the importance of lipase, this study was an attempt to express the lipase from Burkholderia cepacia in Lactococcus lactis. To achieve this, a gene associated with lipase transport was amplified and subcloned in inducible pNZ8148 vector, and subsequently transformed into Lc. lactis NZ9000. The enzyme assay as well as SDS-PAGE and western blotting were carried out to analysis the recombinant lipase expression. Nucleotide sequencing of the DNA insert from the clone revealed that the lipase activity corresponded to an open reading frame consisting of 1092 bp coding for a 37·5-kDa size protein. Blue colour colonies on nile blue sulphate agar and sharp band on 37·5-kD size on SDS-PAGE and western blotting results confirm the successful expression of lipase by Lc. lactis. The protein assay also showed high expression, approximately 152·2 μg/ml.h, of lipase by recombinant Lc. lactis. The results indicate that Lc. lactis has high potential to overproduce the recombinant lipase which can be used commercially for industrially purposes.

  10. Colorimetric assay for heterogeneous-catalyzed lipase activity: enzyme-regulated gold nanoparticle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Tang, Yan; Liu, Jia; Jiang, Ling; Huang, Wei; Huo, Feng-Wei; Tian, Danbi

    2015-01-14

    Lipase is a neglected enzyme in the field of gold nanoparticle-based enzyme assays. This paper reports a novel colorimetric probe to rapidly visualize lipase activities by using Tween 20 functioned GNPs (Tween 20-GNPs) as a reporter. The present strategy hence could overcome the limitations caused by the heterogeneous interface in lipase assay. Catalytic hydrolytic cleavage of the ester bond in Tween 20-GNPs by lipase will trigger the rapid aggregation of GNPs at a high salt solution. The color change from red to purple could be used to sense the activity of lipase. The detection limit (3σ) is as low as 2.8 × 10-2 mg/mL. A preliminary enzyme activity screening was carried out for seven commercially purchased lipase samples. It also has been successfully applied to detecting lipase in fermentation broth of Bacillus subtilis without any pretreatment.

  11. Effector profiles distinguish formae speciales of Fusarium oxysporum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Formae speciales (ff. spp.) of the fungus Fusarium oxysporum are often polyphyletic in their origin, meaning that strains that infect a particular plant species are not necessarily more closely related to each other than to strains that cause disease in another host. Nevertheless, since strains of t...

  12. Lignin Degradation by Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS), caused by the soilborne fungal pathogen Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines, is one of the most important diseases of soybean. Lignin degradation may play a role in the infection, colonization, and survival of the fungus in root tissue . Lignin degradation by F. solani f. sp...

  13. Molecular Exploration of Beta-Lactamases in Fusarium verticillioides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mycotoxigenic fungus Fusarium verticillioides (Fv) is one of the most prevalent maize fungal pathogens. Fv mycotoxins are a significant food safety issue and have given rise to exposure concerns worldwide. The FDB1 locus, a beta-lactamase-containing Fv gene cluster, was previously shown to be in...

  14. The depudecin cluster – a genetic curiosity in Fusarium langsethiae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium langsethiae is a consistent fungal contaminant on oat cereals in the Nordic region, the UK, as well as other parts of Europe. Leaving few symptoms of disease on the plant, the fungus is, however, the main producer of T-2 and HT-2 mycotoxins which can be found contaminating food and feed der...

  15. Global Analysis of Horizontal Gene Transfer in Fusarium verticillioides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The co-occurrence of microbes within plants and other specialized niches may facilitate horizontal gene transfer (HGT) affecting host-pathogen interactions. We recently identified fungal-to-fungal HGTs involving metabolic gene clusters. For a global analysis of HGTs in the maize pathogen Fusarium ve...

  16. Proposal for a new ISHAM Working group on Clinical Fusarium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infections caused by Fusarium species can be classified in three classes: 1) Superficial infections of skin and nails; 2) Keratitis of the cornea; and 3) Deep and disseminated infections. Whereas the first two types of these opportunistic infections are generally seen in immunocompetent hosts, the d...

  17. Labelling studies on the biosynthesis of terpenes in Fusarium fujikuroi.

    PubMed

    Citron, Christian A; Brock, Nelson L; Tudzynski, Bettina; Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2014-05-25

    Synthetic [2-(13)C]mevalonolactone was fed to the gibberellin producer Fusarium fujikuroi and its incorporation into four known terpenoids was investigated by (13)C NMR analysis of crude culture extracts. The experiments gave detailed insights into the mechanisms of terpene biosynthesis by this fungus.

  18. VeA regulates some secondary metabolism in Fusarium fujikuroi

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium fujikuroi is a pathogen of rice that causes hyper elongation of seedling stalks and leaves due to the fungal production of gibberellic acids (GAs). During infection of rice or after growth on other cereals, F. fujikuroi may also synthesize other toxins (e.g. fumonisins, fusarin C, and bika...

  19. Spore development and trichothecene mutants of Fusarium graminearum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Efforts are ongoing to understand the population structure of Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto (Fg) in the U.S., its dynamics and its significance for small grain production. At previous FHB forums, we described the existence of genetically divergent populations of Fg in some regions of Minnesota ...

  20. Incidence of Fusarium species and mycotoxins in silage maize.

    PubMed

    Eckard, Sonja; Wettstein, Felix E; Forrer, Hans-Rudolf; Vogelgsang, Susanne

    2011-08-01

    Maize is frequently infected by the Fusarium species producing mycotoxins. Numerous investigations have focused on grain maize, but little is known about the Fusarium species in the entire plant used for silage. Furthermore, mycotoxins persist during the ensiling process and thus endanger feed safety. In the current study, we analyzed 20 Swiss silage maize samples from growers' fields for the incidence of Fusarium species and mycotoxins. The species spectrum was analyzed morphologically and mycotoxins were measured by LC-MS/MS. A pre-harvest visual disease rating showed few disease symptoms. In contrast, the infection rate of two-thirds of the harvest samples ranged from 25 to 75% and twelve different Fusarium species were isolated. The prevailing species were F. sporotrichioides, F. verticillioides and F. graminearum. No infection specificity for certain plant parts was observed. The trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) was found in each sample (ranging from 780 to 2990 µg kg(-1)). Other toxins detected in descending order were zearalenone, further trichothecenes (nivalenol, HT-2 and T-2 toxin, acetylated DON) and fumonisins. A generalized linear regression model containing the three cropping factors harvest date, pre-precrop and seed treatment was established, to explain DON contamination of silage maize. Based on these findings, we suggest a European-wide survey on silage maize.

  1. Fusarium keratitis: genotyping, in vitro susceptibility and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Oechsler, Rafael A; Feilmeier, Michael R; Miller, Darlene; Shi, Wei; Hofling-Lima, Ana Luisa; Alfonso, Eduardo C

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine differences in the clinical characteristics and antifungal susceptibility patterns among molecularly characterized ocular Fusarium sp isolates. Methods 58 Fusarium isolates obtained from 52 eyes of 52 patients were retrieved from the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute’s (BPEI) ocular microbiology laboratory and grown in pure culture. These isolates were characterized based on DNA sequence analysis of the ITS1/2 and rDNA regions. Antifungal susceptibilities were determined for each isolate using broth microdilution methods and the corresponding medical records were reviewed to determine clinical outcomes. Results Fusarium (F.) solani isolates had significantly higher voriconazole MIC90 values than F. non-solani organisms (16 and 4ug/ml, respectively). F. solani isolates also exhibited a significantly longer time to cure (65 vs 40.5 days), a worse follow up BCVA (20/118 vs 20/36), and increased need for urgent surgical management (7 vs 0 penetrating keratoplasties) when compared to F. non-solani isolates. Conclusions This is the first report to examine the correlation between ocular genotyped Fusarium species and clinical outcomes. It supports the overall worse prognosis for F. solani versus F. non-solani isolates, including higher voriconazole resistance by the former. The clinical implementation of molecular-based diagnostics and antifungal efficacy testing, may yield important prognostic and therapeutic information that could improve the management of fungal ocular infections. PMID:23343947

  2. Effects of xanthotoxin treatment on trichothecene production in Fusarium sporotrichioides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are four P450 oxygenases involved in the biosynthesis of T-2 toxin in Fusarium sporotrichioides. Exactly how these enzymes react to antimicrobial plant defense compounds is unknown. Xanthotoxin (8-methoxypsoralen), a phototoxic furanocoumarin, is a P450 oxygenase inhibitor. A previous study...

  3. [Fusarium pleural effusion after a ventricular assist device].

    PubMed

    Villacorta, J; Blancard, A; Kerbaul, F; Guidon, C; Gouin, F

    2002-05-01

    We report the case of a 36-year-old man with a pleural effusion that complicates the postoperative period after the implantation of a ventricular assist device (VAD). The epidemiological, etiologic and therapeutic features of Fusarium infections were reviewed. Complete recovery of the infection was obtained after a treatment by liposomal amphotericine B (AmBisome) and 5 fluorocytosine.

  4. Presence of Fusarium graminearum in air associated with sorghum fields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sorghum can be included in crop rotations with wheat. However, there are no known reports on the effects of sorghum grown in rotation with wheat on the epidemiology of head scab caused by Fusarium graminearum. Conidia in air samples within two sorghum fields were collected by passive spore trapping ...

  5. Antifungal Effect of Essential Oils against Fusarium Keratitis Isolates.

    PubMed

    Homa, Mónika; Fekete, Ildikó Pálma; Böszörményi, Andrea; Singh, Yendrembam Randhir Babu; Selvam, Kanesan Panneer; Shobana, Coimbatore Subramanian; Manikandan, Palanisamy; Kredics, László; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Galgóczy, László

    2015-09-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the antifungal effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Citrus limon, Juniperus communis, Eucalyptus citriodora, Gaultheria procumbens, Melaleuca alternifolia, Origanum majorana, Salvia sclarea, and Thymus vulgaris essential oils against Fusarium species, the most common etiologic agents of filamentous fungal keratitis in South India. C. zeylanicum essential oil showed strong anti-Fusarium activity, whereas all the other tested essential oils proved to be less effective. The main component of C. zeylanicum essential oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde, was also tested and showed a similar effect as the oil. The in vitro interaction between trans-cinnamaldehyde and natamycin, the first-line therapeutic agent of Fusarium keratitis, was also investigated; an enhanced fungal growth inhibition was observed when these agents were applied in combination. Light and fluorescent microscopic observations revealed that C. zeylanicum essential oil/trans-cinnamaldehyde reduces the cellular metabolism and inhibits the conidia germination. Furthermore, necrotic events were significantly more frequent in the presence of these two compounds. According to our results, C. zeylanicum essential oil/trans-cinnamaldehyde provides a promising basis to develop a novel strategy for the treatment of Fusarium keratitis.

  6. Annotation of Fusarium graminearum (PH-1) Version 5.0

    PubMed Central

    Hammond-Kosack, Kim E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fusarium graminearum floral infections are a major risk to the global supply of safe cereal grains. We report updates to the PH-1 reference genome and significant improvements to the annotation. Changes include introduction of legacy annotation identifiers, new gene models, secretome and effectorP predictions, and inclusion of extensive untranslated region (UTR) annotations. PMID:28082505

  7. Incidence of Fusarium Species and Mycotoxins in Silage Maize

    PubMed Central

    Eckard, Sonja; Wettstein, Felix E.; Forrer, Hans-Rudolf; Vogelgsang, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Maize is frequently infected by the Fusarium species producing mycotoxins. Numerous investigations have focused on grain maize, but little is known about the Fusarium species in the entire plant used for silage. Furthermore, mycotoxins persist during the ensiling process and thus endanger feed safety. In the current study, we analyzed 20 Swiss silage maize samples from growers’ fields for the incidence of Fusarium species and mycotoxins. The species spectrum was analyzed morphologically and mycotoxins were measured by LC-MS/MS. A pre-harvest visual disease rating showed few disease symptoms. In contrast, the infection rate of two-thirds of the harvest samples ranged from 25 to 75% and twelve different Fusarium species were isolated. The prevailing species were F. sporotrichioides, F. verticillioides and F. graminearum. No infection specificity for certain plant parts was observed. The trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) was found in each sample (ranging from 780 to 2990 µg kg−1). Other toxins detected in descending order were zearalenone, further trichothecenes (nivalenol, HT-2 and T-2 toxin, acetylated DON) and fumonisins. A generalized linear regression model containing the three cropping factors harvest date, pre-precrop and seed treatment was established, to explain DON contamination of silage maize. Based on these findings, we suggest a European-wide survey on silage maize. PMID:22069750

  8. Fusarium verticillioides gene expression profiling by microarray analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium verticillioides is a pathogen of maize and it can produce the toxic polyketide derived secondary metabolites called fumonisins. Fumonisins have been shown to cause animal diseases and are epidemiologically correlated to esophageal cancer and neural tube defects in humans. The genes necess...

  9. Investigations of Fusarium diseases within Inland Pacific Northwest forest nurseries

    Treesearch

    Robert L. James; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2007-01-01

    Fusarium spp. cause important diseases that limit production of seedlings in forest nurseries worldwide. Several aspects of these diseases have been investigated for many years within Inland Pacific Northwest nurseries to better understand disease etiology, pathogen inoculum sources, and epidemiology. Investigations have also involved improving...

  10. Contamination of Pinus radiata Seeds in California by Fusarium circinatum

    Treesearch

    L. David Dwinell

    1999-01-01

    The pitch canker fugus, Fusarium circinatum (= F. subglutinans f sp. pini), causes several serious diseases of pines. The pathogen infects a variety of vegetative and reproductive pine structures at diierent stages of maturity and produces a diversity of symptoms. In addition to producing resinous cankers on the...

  11. The transcriptome of Fusarium graminearum during the infection of wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium graminearum causes head blight disease in wheat and barley. To help understand the infection process on wheat we studied global gene expression of F. graminearum in a time series from 24 to 196 hours after inoculation, compared to a water control. The infection is rapid and already after 48...

  12. Controlling fusarium wilt of California strawberries by anaerobic soil disinfestation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the 2014-15 season, the ASD-treated berry acreage exceeded 1,000 acres in California; more than doubled from the previous season. Fusarium wilt an emerging lethal disease of strawberries in California, can also be controlled by ASD. However, a study has shown that higher soil temperatures are n...

  13. Distribution and evolution of fusarin mycotoxin biosynthetic genes in Fusarium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In Fusarium/Gibberella, secondary metabolite biosynthetic (SMB) genes that have a narrow distribution within the genus can have complex evolutionary histories. Whether more widely distributed SMB genes have similarly complex histories is not known. Genes responsible for production of fusarin mycot...

  14. Cytotoxicity and Phytotoxicity of Trichothecene Mycotoxins Produced by Fusarium spp.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Trichothecenes, a major class of mycotoxins produced by Fusarium, Myrothecium, and Stachybotrys species, are toxic to plants, causing blights, wilts and other economically-important plant diseases, and to mammals, for example feed-refusal caused by deoxynivalenol (vomitoxin). Macrocyclic trichothec...

  15. Phylogenomic and functional domain analysis of polyketide synthases in Fusarium

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Daren W.; Butchko, Robert A.; Baker, Scott E.; Proctor, Robert H.

    2012-02-01

    Fusarium species are ubiquitous in nature, cause a range of plant diseases, and produce a variety of chemicals often referred to as secondary metabolites. Although some fungal secondary metabolites affect plant growth or protect plants from other fungi and bacteria, their presence in grain based food and feed is more often associated with a variety of diseases in plants and in animals. Many of these structurally diverse metabolites are derived from a family of related enzymes called polyketide synthases (PKSs). A search of genomic sequence of Fusarium verticillioides, F. graminearum, F. oxysporum and Nectria haematococca (anamorph F. solani) identified a total of 58 PKS genes. To gain insight into how this gene family evolved and to guide future studies, we conducted a phylogenomic and functional domain analysis. The resulting genealogy suggested that Fusarium PKSs represent 34 different groups responsible for synthesis of different core metabolites. The analyses indicate that variation in the Fusarium PKS gene family is due to gene duplication and loss events as well as enzyme gain-of-function due to the acquisition of new domains or of loss-of-function due to nucleotide mutations. Transcriptional analysis indicate that the 16 F. verticillioides PKS genes are expressed under a range of conditions, further evidence that they are functional genes that confer the ability to produce secondary metabolites.

  16. Compartmentalized gene regulatory network of the pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Head blight caused by Fusarium graminearum (Fg) is a major limiting factor of wheat production with both yield loss and mycotoxin contamination. Here we report a model for global Fg gene regulatory networks (GRNs) inferred from a large collection of transcriptomic data using a machine-learning appro...

  17. Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Biomarkers in Fusarium verticillioides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study, a combination HPLC-DART-TOF-MS system was utilized to identify and quantitatively analyze carbohydrates in wild type and mutant strains of Fusarium verticillioides. Carbohydrate fractions were isolated from F. verticillioides cellular extracts by HPLC using a cation-exchange size-excl...

  18. Comparative Genomics Reveals Mobile Pathogenicity Chromosomes in Fusarium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium species are among the most important phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi, having significant impact on crop production and animal health. Distinctively, strains of F. oxysporum exhibit wide host range and are pathogenic to both plant and animal species, reflecting remarkable genetic adapta...

  19. A novel rat contact lens model for Fusarium keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Abou Shousha, Mohamed; Santos, Andrea Rachelle C.; Oechsler, Rafael A.; Iovieno, Alfonso; Maestre-Mesa, Jorge; Ruggeri, Marco; Echegaray, Jose J.; Dubovy, Sander R.; Perez, Victor L.; Miller, Darlene; Alfonso, Eduardo C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to develop and characterize a new contact lens–associated fungal keratitis rat model and to assess the ability of non-invasive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to detect pathological changes in vivo in fungal keratitis. Methods We used SD-OCT to image and measure the cornea of Sprague Dawley rats. Fusarium infection was initiated in the rat eye by fitting Fusarium solani–soaked contact lenses on the experimental eye, while the control animals received contact lenses soaked in sterile saline. The fungal infection was monitored with periodic slit-lamp examination and in vivo SD-OCT imaging of the rat eye, and confirmed by histology, counting of viable fungi in the infected rat cornea, and PCR with specific primers for Fusarium sp. Results We imaged and measured the rat cornea with SD-OCT. Custom-made contact lenses were developed based on the OCT measurements. Incubation of contact lenses in a F. solani suspension resulted in biofilm formation. We induced contact lens–associated Fusarium keratitis by fitting the rat eyes for 4 h with the Fusarium-contaminated contact lenses. The SD-OCT images of the cornea correlated well with the slit-lamp and histopathological results and clearly defined clinical signs of infection, namely, increased corneal thickening, loss of epithelial continuity, hyper-reflective areas representing infiltrates, and endothelial plaques characteristic of fungal infection. Moreover, in three cases, SD-OCT detected the infection without any clear findings on slit-lamp examination. Infection was confirmed with histological fungal staining, PCR, and microbiological culture positivity. Conclusions We developed a highly reproducible rat contact lens model and successfully induced contact lens–associated Fusarium keratitis in this model. The clinical presentation of contact lens–associated Fusarium keratitis in the rat model is similar to the human condition. SD-OCT is a valuable tool that

  20. Competition of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase with its hydrolysis products at the oil-water interface.

    PubMed

    Muth, Marco; Rothkötter, Stefanie; Paprosch, Steven; Schmid, Reiner P; Schnitzlein, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of triglycerides yields glycerol and free fatty-acids, provided that the enzyme is non-regioselective. For an Sn-1,3 regioselective enzyme, such as lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus, the final product is no longer glycerol but Sn-2 monoglyceride instead. However, surface active molecules generated by lipolysis may have a detrimental effect on the interfacial biocatalysis since it is known that low molecular weight surfactants can displace proteins from interfaces. By using drop profile analysis tensiometry, we evaluated the interfacial properties of the lipase-generated molecules and their competitive effect on the adsorption behavior of the lipase and on the proceeding lipolysis. Our results show that even at concentration ratios of 8.64×10(-4)M (Sn-2 monoglyceride) to 2.5×10(-7)M (lipase), the final interfacial pressure values are very similar as for the system containing the lipase alone (i.e. ∼26 mN/m). This is a strong indication that monoglycerides, as the most interfacially active products generated during regioselective lipolysis, are expelled from the oil-water interface by the lipase. We attribute this effect to intermolecular lipase-lipase interactions, resulting in a low desorption probability of the lipase. For low oleic acid concentrations, the interfacial tension is solely determined by the lipase, while for higher concentrations, lipase and oleic acid both contribute to the tension values. We propose a hypothesis based on the preferential interaction of oleic acid molecules with hydrophobic sites on the lipase. The pH dependence of the adsorption rate and the interfacial activity of the lipase were also investigated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hexadecane and Tween 80 stimulate lipase production in Burkholderia glumae by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Boekema, Bouke K H L; Beselin, Anke; Breuer, Michael; Hauer, Bernhard; Koster, Margot; Rosenau, Frank; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Tommassen, Jan

    2007-06-01

    Burkholderia glumae strain PG1 produces a lipase of biotechnological relevance. Lipase production by this strain and its derivative LU8093, which was obtained through classical strain improvement, was investigated under different conditions. When 10% hexadecane was included in the growth medium, lipolytic activity in both strains could be increased approximately 7-fold after 24 h of growth. Hexadecane also stimulated lipase production in a strain containing the lipase gene fused to the tac promoter, indicating that hexadecane did not affect lipase gene expression at the transcriptional level, which was confirmed using lipA-gfp reporter constructs. Instead, hexadecane appeared to enhance lipase secretion, since the amounts of lipase in the culture supernatant increased in the presence of hexadecane, with a concomitant decrease in the cells, even when protein synthesis was inhibited with chloramphenicol. In the presence of olive oil as a carbon source, nonionic detergents, such as Tween 80, increased extracellular lipase activity twofold. Like hexadecane, Tween 80 appeared to stimulate lipase secretion, although in a more disruptive manner, since other, normally nonsecreted proteins were found in the culture supernatant. Additionally, like olive oil, Tween 80 was found to induce lipase gene expression in strain PG1 in medium containing sucrose as a carbon source but not in glucose-containing medium, suggesting that lipase gene expression is prone to catabolite repression. In contrast, lipase production in the lipase-overproducing strain LU8093 was independent of the presence of an inducer and was not inhibited by glucose. In conclusion, hexadecane and Tween 80 enhance lipase production in B. glumae, and they act via different mechanisms.

  2. Hexadecane and Tween 80 Stimulate Lipase Production in Burkholderia glumae by Different Mechanisms▿

    PubMed Central

    Boekema, Bouke K. H. L.; Beselin, Anke; Breuer, Michael; Hauer, Bernhard; Koster, Margot; Rosenau, Frank; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Tommassen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae strain PG1 produces a lipase of biotechnological relevance. Lipase production by this strain and its derivative LU8093, which was obtained through classical strain improvement, was investigated under different conditions. When 10% hexadecane was included in the growth medium, lipolytic activity in both strains could be increased ∼7-fold after 24 h of growth. Hexadecane also stimulated lipase production in a strain containing the lipase gene fused to the tac promoter, indicating that hexadecane did not affect lipase gene expression at the transcriptional level, which was confirmed using lipA-gfp reporter constructs. Instead, hexadecane appeared to enhance lipase secretion, since the amounts of lipase in the culture supernatant increased in the presence of hexadecane, with a concomitant decrease in the cells, even when protein synthesis was inhibited with chloramphenicol. In the presence of olive oil as a carbon source, nonionic detergents, such as Tween 80, increased extracellular lipase activity twofold. Like hexadecane, Tween 80 appeared to stimulate lipase secretion, although in a more disruptive manner, since other, normally nonsecreted proteins were found in the culture supernatant. Additionally, like olive oil, Tween 80 was found to induce lipase gene expression in strain PG1 in medium containing sucrose as a carbon source but not in glucose-containing medium, suggesting that lipase gene expression is prone to catabolite repression. In contrast, lipase production in the lipase-overproducing strain LU8093 was independent of the presence of an inducer and was not inhibited by glucose. In conclusion, hexadecane and Tween 80 enhance lipase production in B. glumae, and they act via different mechanisms. PMID:17468265

  3. [Effect of chemical modification of lipase on the regulation of its lipolytic activity in reversed micelles].

    PubMed

    Pavlenko, I M; Kliachko, N L; Levashov, A V

    2005-01-01

    Hydrophilized and hydrophobized forms of the lipase from Mucor miehei were obtained by its chemical modification with cellobiose and N-hydroxysuccinimidyl palmitate with a modification degree of 4 in both cases. A comparative analysis of the regulation of the catalytic activities of the native and modified lipases was carried out in the system of reversed micelles of OT aerosol (AOT) in isooctane. The level of catalytic activity of all the lipase preparations in the micellar medium was found to be higher than that in aqueous solution. The chemical modification of lipase did not result in a change in the regulation of the oligomeric composition of the enzyme controlled by the degree of micelle hydration omega0 (micelle size). The kcat dependences on omega0 for each lipase preparation exhibit two maxima, corresponding to the functioning of lipase monomers and tetramers. The changes in the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance of the lipase surface significantly affect the character of the regulation of enzyme activity due to changes in the surfactant concentration (the number of micelles). The lipase hydrophobization results in a decrease in the enzyme activation effect with an increase in the AOT concentration in comparison with the native lipase. The lipase hydrophilization dramatically decreases the activity of lipase tetramer when the AOT concentration is increased. The catalytic activity of the monomer of hydrophilized lipase is practically independent of the AOT concentration. Kinetic data indicate a mixed type of activation of both oligomeric forms of the native and the hydrophobized lipase by AOT molecules and the noncompetitive type of the activation and AOT inhibition of the monomer and the tetramer of the hydrophilized lipase, respectively. The English version of the paper: Russian Journal of Bioorganic Chemistry, 2005, vol. 31, no. 6; see also http://www.maik.ru.

  4. Glycerol Monolaurate Inhibits Lipase Production by Clinical Ocular Isolates Without Affecting Bacterial Cell Viability.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Judith Louise; Khandekar, Neeta; Zhu, Hua; Watanabe, Keizo; Markoulli, Maria; Flanagan, John Terence; Papas, Eric

    2016-02-01

    We sought to determine the relative lipase production of a range of ocular bacterial isolates and to assess the efficacy of glycerol monolaurate (GML) in inhibiting this lipase production in high lipase-producing bacteria without affecting bacterial cell growth. Staphylococcus aureus,Staphylococcus epidermidis,Propionibacterium acnes, and Corynebacterium spp. were inoculated at a density of 10(6)/mL in varying concentrations of GML up to 25 μg/mL for 24 hours at 37 °C with constant shaking. Bacterial suspensions were centrifuged, bacterial cell density was determined, and production of bacterial lipase was quantified using a commercial lipase assay kit. Staphylococcus spp. produced high levels of lipase activity compared with P. acnes and Corynebacterium spp. GML inhibited lipase production by Staphylococcal spp. in a dose-dependent manner, with S. epidermidis lipase production consistently more sensitive to GML than S. aureus. Glycerol monolaurate showed significant (P < 0.05) lipase inhibition above concentrations of 15 μg/mL in S. aureus and was not cytotoxic up to 25 μg/mL. For S. epidermidis, GML showed significant (P < 0.05) lipase inhibition above 7.5 μg/mL. Lipase activity varied between species and between strains. Staphylococcal spp. produced higher lipase activity compared with P. acnes and Corynebacterium spp. Glycerol monolaurate inhibited lipase production by S. aureus and S. epidermidis at concentrations that did not adversely affect bacterial cell growth. GML can be used to inhibit ocular bacterial lipase production without proving detrimental to commensal bacteria viability.

  5. Cyber infrastructure for Fusarium: three integrated platforms supporting strain identification, phylogenetics, comparative genomics and knowledge sharing.

    PubMed

    Park, Bongsoo; Park, Jongsun; Cheong, Kyeong-Chae; Choi, Jaeyoung; Jung, Kyongyong; Kim, Donghan; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Ward, Todd J; O'Donnell, Kerry; Geiser, David M; Kang, Seogchan

    2011-01-01

    The fungal genus Fusarium includes many plant and/or animal pathogenic species and produces diverse toxins. Although accurate species identification is critical for managing such threats, it is difficult to identify Fusarium morphologically. Fortunately, extensive molecular phylogenetic studies, founded on well-preserved culture collections, have established a robust foundation for Fusarium classification. Genomes of four Fusarium species have been published with more being currently sequenced. The Cyber infrastructure for Fusarium (CiF; http://www.fusariumdb.org/) was built to support archiving and utilization of rapidly increasing data and knowledge and consists of Fusarium-ID, Fusarium Comparative Genomics Platform (FCGP) and Fusarium Community Platform (FCP). The Fusarium-ID archives phylogenetic marker sequences from most known species along with information associated with characterized isolates and supports strain identification and phylogenetic analyses. The FCGP currently archives five genomes from four species. Besides supporting genome browsing and analysis, the FCGP presents computed characteristics of multiple gene families and functional groups. The Cart/Favorite function allows users to collect sequences from Fusarium-ID and the FCGP and analyze them later using multiple tools without requiring repeated copying-and-pasting of sequences. The FCP is designed to serve as an online community forum for sharing and preserving accumulated experience and knowledge to support future research and education.

  6. Molecular characterization of pathogenic Fusarium species in cucurbit plants from Kermanshah province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Chehri, K.; Salleh, B.; Yli-Mattila, T.; Reddy, K.R.N.; Abbasi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Fusarium is one of the important phytopathogenic genera of microfungi causing serious losses on cucurbit plants in Kermanshah province, the largest area of cucurbits plantation in Iran. Therefore, the objectives in this study were to isolate and identify disease-causing Fusarium spp. from infected cucurbit plants, to ascertain their pathogenicity, and to determine their phylogenetic relationships. A total of 100 Fusarium isolates were obtained from diseased cucurbit plants collected from fields in different geographic regions in Kermanshah province, Iran. According to morphological characters, all isolates were identified as Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium proliferatum, Fusarium equiseti, Fusarium semitectum and Fusarium solani. All isolates of the five Fusarium spp. were evaluated for their pathogenicity on healthy cucumber (Cucumis sativus) and honeydew melon (Cucumis melo) seedlings in the glasshouse. F. oxysporum caused damping-off in 20–35 days on both cucurbit seedlings tested. Typical stem rot symptoms were observed within 15 days after inoculation with F. solani on both seedlings. Based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, the five Fusarium species were divided into two major groups. In particular, isolates belonging to the F. solani species complex (FSSC) were separated into two RFLP types. Grouping among Fusarium strains derived from restriction analysis was in agreement with criteria used in morphological classification. Therefore, the PCR-ITS-RFLP method provides a simple and rapid procedure for the differentiation of Fusarium strains at species level. This is the first report on identification and pathogenicity of major plant pathogenic Fusarium spp. causing root and stem rot on cucurbits in Iran. PMID:23961146

  7. [Evaluation of Fusarium spp. pathogenicity in plant and murine models].

    PubMed

    Forero-Reyes, Consuelo M; Alvarado-Fernández, Angela M; Ceballos-Rojas, Ana M; González-Carmona, Lady C; Linares-Linares, Melva Y; Castañeda-Salazar, Rubiela; Pulido-Villamarín, Adriana; Góngora-Medina, Manuel E; Cortés-Vecino, Jesús A; Rodríguez-Bocanegra, María X

    2017-10-05

    The genus Fusarium is widely recognized for its phytopathogenic capacity. However, it has been reported as an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. Thus, it can be considered a microorganism of interest in pathogenicity studies on different hosts. Therefore, this work evaluated the pathogenicity of Fusarium spp. isolates from different origins in plants and animals (murine hosts). Twelve isolates of Fusarium spp. from plants, animal superficial mycoses, and human superficial and systemic mycoses were inoculated in tomato, passion fruit and carnation plants, and in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed BALB/c mice. Pathogenicity tests in plants did not show all the symptoms associated with vascular wilt in the three plant models; however, colonization and necrosis of the vascular bundles, regardless of the species and origin of the isolates, showed the infective potential of Fusarium spp. in different plant species. Moreover, the pathogenicity tests in the murine model revealed behavioral changes. It was noteworthy that only five isolates (different origin and species) caused mortality. Additionally, it was observed that all isolates infected and colonized different organs, regardless of the species and origin of the isolates or host immune status. In contrast, the superficial inoculation test showed no evidence of epidermal injury or colonization. The observed results in plant and murine models suggest the pathogenic potential of Fusarium spp. isolates in different types of hosts. However, further studies on pathogenicity are needed to confirm the multihost capacity of this genus. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Microplate Bioassay for Determining Substrate Selectivity of "Candida rugosa" Lipase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shi-zhen; Fang, Bai-shan

    2012-01-01

    Substrate selectivity of "Candida rugosa" lipase was tested using "p"-nitrophenyl esters of increasing chain length (C[subscript 1], C[subscript 7], C[subscript 15]) using the high-throughput screening method. A fast and easy 96-well microplate bioassay was developed to help students learn and practice biotechnological specificity screen. The…

  9. [Cytophysiology of Penicillium solitum: a producer of lipase].

    PubMed

    Toskueva, E P; Araviĭskiĭ, R A; Efimova, T P

    1988-09-01

    The cell population of Penicillin solitum was studied during maximum accumulation of lipase in the medium with electron microscopic and immunofluorescence methods. The data provided a conclusion that 2 types of lypolytic enzymes with various substrate and antigenic characteristics formed in the cells of P. solitum. It is likely that there is a specific inductor for exolipase synthesis as well as relationship endoenzymatic systems.

  10. Fatty Acid Signaling: The New Function of Intracellular Lipases

    PubMed Central

    Papackova, Zuzana; Cahova, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, intracellular triacylglycerols (TAG) stored in the form of cytoplasmic lipid droplets have been considered to be only passive “energy conserves”. Nevertheless, degradation of TAG gives rise to a pleiotropic spectrum of bioactive intermediates, which may function as potent co-factors of transcription factors or enzymes and contribute to the regulation of numerous cellular processes. From this point of view, the process of lipolysis not only provides energy-rich equivalents but also acquires a new regulatory function. In this review, we will concentrate on the role that fatty acids liberated from intracellular TAG stores play as signaling molecules. The first part provides an overview of the transcription factors, which are regulated by fatty acids derived from intracellular stores. The second part is devoted to the role of fatty acid signaling in different organs/tissues. The specific contribution of free fatty acids released by particular lipases, hormone-sensitive lipase, adipose triacylglycerol lipase and lysosomal lipase will also be discussed. PMID:25674855

  11. 21 CFR 862.1465 - Lipase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lipase test system. 862.1465 Section 862.1465 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1465...

  12. Safety evaluation of a lipase expressed in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Greenough, R J; Perry, C J; Stavnsbjerg, M

    1996-02-01

    A programme of studies was conducted to establish the safety of a lipase artificially expressed in Aspergillus oryzae to be used in the detergent industry and as a processing aid in the baking industry. Laboratory animal studies were used to assess general and inhalation toxicity, skin sensitization, and skin and eye irritation. Its potential to cause mutagenicity and chromosomal aberrations was assessed in microbial and tissue culture in vitro studies. The pathogenicity of A. oryzae, the organism used to produce the lipase, was also assessed in laboratory animals. Basic ecotoxicity in a variety of test species was studied. General and inhalation toxicity was low. There was evidence of mild skin irritation. There was no evidence of eye irritation, skin sensitization, mutagenic potential, chromosomal aberrations, exotoxicity or notable pathogenicity. Comparison of these results with human exposure levels and previously published data indicates that the lipase appears safe for consumers in the given applications, requires no special occupational health precautions in manufacture and is of low environmental impact. Furthermore, the organism used in production of the lipase hs no notable pathogenicity.

  13. Synthesis of Triptorelin Lactate Catalyzed by Lipase in Organic Media

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Hong; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Jiaxin; Zhang, Hong; Xun, Erna; Chen, Ge; Yue, Hong; Tang, Ning; Wang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Triptorelin lactate was successfully synthesized by porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) in organic solvents. The effects of acyl donor, substrate ratio, organic solvent, temperature, and water activity were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, a yield of 30% for its ester could be achieved in the reaction for about 48 h. PMID:22949842

  14. Synthesis of triptorelin lactate catalyzed by lipase in organic media.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Hong; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Jiaxin; Zhang, Hong; Xun, Erna; Chen, Ge; Yue, Hong; Tang, Ning; Wang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Triptorelin lactate was successfully synthesized by porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) in organic solvents. The effects of acyl donor, substrate ratio, organic solvent, temperature, and water activity were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, a yield of 30% for its ester could be achieved in the reaction for about 48 h.

  15. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of partial acylglycerols of acetoacetate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A commercially available immobilized preparation of Rhizomucor miehei lipase (Lipozyme RMIM) has been employed in the synthesis of partial glycerides of acetoacetate. Due to the chemical reactivitity of the acetoacetyl group, these glycerides could have novel uses in e.g. polymer formation. Both 1...

  16. Burkholderia cepacia lipase is a promising biocatalyst for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Sasso, Francesco; Natalello, Antonino; Castoldi, Simone; Lotti, Marina; Santambrogio, Carlo; Grandori, Rita

    2016-07-01

    Lipases resistant to inhibition and denaturation by methanol are valuable tools for biotechnological applications, in particular for biofuel production. Microbial lipases have attracted a great deal of interest because of their stability at high concentrations of organic solvents. Burkholderia cepacia lipase (BCL) is tested here for robustness towards methanol in terms of conformational stability and catalytic activity in transesterification assays. This lipase turns out to be even more tolerant than the homologous and better characterized enzyme from Burkholderia glumae. BCL unfolding transition, as monitored by far-UV circular dichroism (CD) and intrinsic fluorescence, displays a Tm above 60°C in the presence of 50% methanol. The protein unfolds at low pH, and the organic solvent affects the nature of the denatured state under acidic conditions. The protein performs well in transesterification assays upon prolonged incubations at high methanol concentrations. BCL is highly tolerant to methanol and displays particularly high conformational stability under conditions employed for transesterification reactions. These features depict BCL as a promising enzyme for biofuel industry.

  17. Microplate Bioassay for Determining Substrate Selectivity of "Candida rugosa" Lipase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shi-zhen; Fang, Bai-shan

    2012-01-01

    Substrate selectivity of "Candida rugosa" lipase was tested using "p"-nitrophenyl esters of increasing chain length (C[subscript 1], C[subscript 7], C[subscript 15]) using the high-throughput screening method. A fast and easy 96-well microplate bioassay was developed to help students learn and practice biotechnological specificity screen. The…

  18. Study of microwave effects on the lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Chen; Reddy, P Muralidhar; Devi, C Shobha; Chang, Po-Chi; Ho, Yen-Peng

    2016-01-01

    The effect of microwave heating on lipase-catalyzed reaction remains controversial. It is not clear whether the reaction rate enhancements are purely due to thermal/heating effects or to non-thermal effects. Therefore, quantitative mass spectrometry was used to conduct accurate kinetic analysis of lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of triolein by microwave and conventional heating. Commercial lipases from Candida rugosa (CRL), Porcine Pancreas (PPL), and Burkholderia cepacia (BCL) were used. Hydrolysis reactions were performed at various temperatures and pH levels, along with various amounts of buffer and enzymes. Hydrolysis product yields at each time point using an internal-standard method showed no significant difference between microwave and conventional heating conditions when the reaction was carried out at the same temperature. CRL showed optimum catalytic activity at 37 °C, while PPL and BCL had better activities at 50 °C. The phosphate buffer was found to give a better hydrolysis yield than the Tris-HCl buffer. Overall results prove that a non-thermal effect does not exist in microwave-assisted lipase hydrolysis of triolein. Therefore, conventional heating at high temperatures (e.g., 50 °C) can be also used to accelerate hydrolysis reactions.

  19. Tuning Lipase Reaction for Production of Fatty Acids from Oil.

    PubMed

    Odaneth, Annamma A; Vadgama, Rajeshkumar N; Bhat, Anuradha D; Lali, Arvind M

    2016-10-01

    Fats or oils are split partially or completely to obtain fatty acids that find wide applications in oleo-chemical industries. Lipase-mediated complete splitting (hydrolysis) of oils is a green process having great potential to replace the traditional methods of oil splitting. However, cost of lipases, mechanistic kinetic equilibrium and associated operational limitations prove to be deterrents for scale up of the enzymatic oil splitting process. In the present study, we demonstrate the use of immobilised 1,3-regioselective lipase (HyLIP) for complete hydrolysis of oil in monophasic reaction medium. Incorporation of a polar organic solvent (tert-butanol, 1:5, v/v) homogenises the oil-water mixture and contributes positively towards complete hydrolysis. The monophasic oil hydrolysis reaction with optimised water concentration (0.05 %, v/v) gave Free Fatty Acid (FFA) yield of 88 % (HyLIP and Novozym-435) and 66 % (TLIM and RMIM). Smart reaction engineering and modification of the reaction intermediates to favourable substrate lead to ∼99 % degree of hydrolysis of triglycerides with ∼90 % FFA yield using 1,3-regioselective lipase. The present work becomes basic platform for developing technologies for synthesis of fatty acids, monoglycerides, diglycerides and glycerol.

  20. Lipase production by Aspergillus ibericus using olive mill wastewater.

    PubMed

    Abrunhosa, Luís; Oliveira, Felisbela; Dantas, Danielle; Gonçalves, Cristiana; Belo, Isabel

    2013-03-01

    Olive mill wastewater (OMW) characteristics make it a suitable resource to be used as a microbial culture media to produce value-added compounds, such as enzymes. In this work, the ability of the novel species Aspergillus ibericus to discolor OMW and produce lipase was studied. An initial screening on plates containing an OMW-based agar medium and an emulsified olive oil/rhodamine-B agar medium was employed to select the strain A. ibericus MUM 03.49. Then, experiments in conical flasks with liquid OMW-based media showed that the fungus could growth on undiluted OMW, with a chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 97 ± 2 g/L, and to produce up to 2,927 ± 54 U/L of lipase. When pure OMW was used in the media, the maximum COD and color reduction achieved were 45 and 97 %, respectively. When OMW diluted to 10 % was used, A. ibericus was able to reduce phenolic and aromatic compounds by 37 and 39 %, respectively. Additionally, lipase production was found to be promoted by the addition of mineral nutrients. When the fermentations were scaled up to a 2-L bioreactor, A. ibericus produced up to 8,319 ± 33 U/L of lipase, and the maximum COD and color reduction were 57 and 24 %, respectively.

  1. Fusarium paranaense sp. nov., a member of the Fusarium solani species complex causes root rot on soybean in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sarah S; Matos, Kedma S; Tessmann, Dauri J; Seixas, Claudine D S; Pfenning, Ludwig H

    2016-01-01

    Isolates of Fusarium obtained from soybean plants showing symptoms of root rot collected in subtropical southern and tropical central Brazil were characterized based on phylogenetic analyses, sexual crossing, morphology, and pathogenicity tests. A novel species within the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) causing soybean root rot is formally described herein as Fusarium paranaense. This species can be distinguished from the other soybean root rot pathogens in the FSSC, which are commonly associated with soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS) based on analyses of the combined DNA sequences of translation elongation factor 1-α and the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and on interspecies mating compatibility. Bayesian and maximum parsimony phylogenetic analyses showed that isolates of F. paranaense formed a distinct group in clade 3 of the FSSC in contrast to the pathogens currently known to cause SDS, which are in clade 2. Female fertile tester strains were developed that can be used for the identification of this new species in the FSSC based on sexual crosses. All isolates were heterothallic and belonged to a distinct mating population. Fusarium tucumaniae, a known SDS pathogen, was found in the subtropical southern region of the country.

  2. Characterization of Fusarium secorum, a new species causing Fusarium yellowing decline of sugar beet in North Central USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study characterized a novel sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) pathogen from the Red River Valley in north central USA, which was formally named Fusarium secorum. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of three loci (translation elongation factor1a, calmodulin, mitochondrial small subunit) and the morphol...

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of an Isolate of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melongenae, the Causal Agent of Fusarium Wilt of Eggplant

    PubMed Central

    Hsiang, Tom; Luo, Mei

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we present the genome sequence of an isolate (14004) of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melongenae, an eggplant pathogen. The final assembly consists of 1,631 scaffolds with 53,986,354 bp (G+C content, 46.4%) and 16,485 predicted genes. PMID:28209821

  4. Identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to Fusarium crown rot (Fusarium pseudograminearum) in two spring wheat populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium crown rot (FCR), caused by F. pseudograminearum and F. culmorum, reduces wheat yields in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the U.S. by as much as 35%. Currently there is no consistent durable resistance to FCR in PNW wheat cultivars. Significant QTL for crown rot resistance have been documente...

  5. Medium-chain versus long-chain triacylglycerol emulsion hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase: Implications for the mechanisms of lipase action

    SciTech Connect

    Deckelbaum, R.J. ); Hamilton, J.A.; Butbul, E.; Gutman, A. ); Moser, A. ); Bengtsson-Olivecrona, G.; Olivecrona, T. ); Carpentier, Y.A. )

    1990-02-06

    To explore how enzyme affinities and enzyme activities regulate hydrolysis of water-insoluble substrates, the authors compared hydrolysis of phospholipid-stabilized emulsions of medium-chain (MCT) versus long-chain triacylglycerols (LCT). Because substrate solubility at the emulsion surface might modulate rates of hydrolysis, the ability of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine to solubilize MCT was examined by NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shift measurements showed that 11 mol % of ({sup 13}C)carbonyl enriched trioctanoin was incorporated into phospholipid vesicles as a surface component. Line widths of trioctanoin surface peaks were half that of LCT, and relaxation times, T{sub 1}, were also shorter for trioctanoin, showing greater mobility for MCT in phospholipid. In assessing the effects of these differences in solubility on lipolysis, they found that both purified bovine milk lipoprotein lipase and human hepatic lipase hydrolyzed MCT at rates at least 2-fold higher than for LCT. Differences in affinity were also demonstrated in mixed incubations where increasing amounts of LCT emulsion resulted in decreased hydrolysis of MCT emulsions. These results suggest that despite lower enzyme affinity for MCT emulsions, shorter chain triacylglycerols are more readily hydrolyzed by lipoprotein and hepatic lipases than long-chain triacylglycerols because of greater MCT solubility and mobility at the emulsion-water interface.

  6. Fusarium sibiricum sp. nov, a novel type A trichothecene-producing Fusarium from northern Asia closely related to F. sporotrichioides and F. langsethiae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Production of type A trichothecenes has been reported in the closely related species Fusarium langsethiae and F. sporotrichioides. Here, we characterized a collection of Fusarium isolates from Siberia and the Russian Far East (hereafter Asian isolates) that produce high levels of the type A trichoth...

  7. Climate change impacts on the ecology of Fusarium graminearum species complex and susceptibility of wheat to Fusarium head blight: a review

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat caused mainly by members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) is a major threat to agricultural grain production, food safety, and animal health. The severity of disease epidemics and accumulation of associated trichothecene mycotoxins in wheat kerne...

  8. Thymol-based sub-micron emulsions exhibit antifungal activity against Fusarium graminearum and inhibit Fusarium head blight (FHB) in wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium graminearum is a very destructive fungal pathogen that leads to Fusarium head blight (FHB) in wheat, a disease that costs growers millions of dollars annually both in crop losses and control measures. Current countermeasures include the deployment of wheat varieties with some resistance to ...

  9. Environmental conditions that contribute to development and severity of Sugar Beet Fusarium Yellows caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae: temperature

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium yellows in sugar beet, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae, continues to cause significant problems to sugar beet production by causing considerable reductions in root yield, sucrose percentage, and juice purity in affected sugar beets. Environment plays a critical role in pathogen i...

  10. Different Covalent Immobilizations Modulate Lipase Activities of Hypocrea pseudokoningii.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marita G; Velasco-Lozano, Susana; Moreno-Perez, Sonia; Polizeli, Aline M; Heinen, Paulo R; Facchini, Fernanda D A; Vici, Ana C; Cereia, Mariana; Pessela, Benevides C; Fernandez-Lorente, Gloria; Guisan, Jose M; Jorge, João A; Polizeli, Maria de Lourdes T M

    2017-09-04

    Enzyme immobilization can promote several advantages for their industrial application. In this work, a lipase from Hypocrea pseudokoningii was efficiently linked to four chemical supports: agarose activated with cyanogen bromide (CNBr), glyoxyl-agarose (GX), MANAE-agarose activated with glutaraldehyde (GA) and GA-crosslinked with glutaraldehyde. Results showed a more stable lipase with both the GA-crosslinked and GA derivatives, compared to the control (CNBr), at 50 °C, 60 °C and 70 °C. Moreover, all derivatives were stabilized when incubated with organic solvents at 50%, such as ethanol, methanol, n-propanol and cyclohexane. Furthermore, lipase was highly activated (4-fold) in the presence of cyclohexane. GA-crosslinked and GA derivatives were more stable than the CNBr one in the presence of organic solvents. All derivatives were able to hydrolyze sardine, açaí (Euterpe oleracea), cotton seed and grape seed oils. However, during the hydrolysis of sardine oil, GX derivative showed to be 2.3-fold more selectivity (eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)/docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ratio) than the control. Additionally, the types of immobilization interfered with the lipase enantiomeric preference. Unlike the control, the other three derivatives preferably hydrolyzed the R-isomer of 2-hydroxy-4-phenylbutanoic acid ethyl ester and the S-isomer of 1-phenylethanol acetate racemic mixtures. On the other hand, GX and CNBr derivatives preferably hydrolyzed the S-isomer of butyryl-2-phenylacetic acid racemic mixture while the GA and GA-crosslink derivatives preferably hydrolyzed the R-isomer. However, all derivatives, including the control, preferably hydrolyzed the methyl mandelate S-isomer. Moreover, the derivatives could be used for eight consecutive cycles retaining more than 50% of their residual activity. This work shows the importance of immobilization as a tool to increase the lipase stability to temperature and organic solvents, thus enabling the possibility of their

  11. Alterations in Kernel Proteome after Infection with Fusarium culmorum in Two Triticale Cultivars with Contrasting Resistance to Fusarium Head Blight

    PubMed Central

    Perlikowski, Dawid; Wiśniewska, Halina; Kaczmarek, Joanna; Góral, Tomasz; Ochodzki, Piotr; Kwiatek, Michał; Majka, Maciej; Augustyniak, Adam; Kosmala, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Highlight: The level of pathogen alpha-amylase and plant beta-amylase activities could be components of plant-pathogen interaction associated with the resistance of triticale to Fusarium head blight. Triticale was used here as a model to recognize new components of molecular mechanism of resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) in cereals. Fusarium-damaged kernels (FDK) of two lines distinct in levels of resistance to FHB were applied into a proteome profiling using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to create protein maps and mass spectrometry (MS) to identify the proteins differentially accumulated between the analyzed lines. This proteomic research was supported by a measurement of alpha- and beta-amylase activities, mycotoxin content, and fungal biomass in the analyzed kernels. The 2-DE analysis indicated a total of 23 spots with clear differences in a protein content between the more resistant and more susceptible triticale lines after infection with Fusarium culmorum. A majority of the proteins were involved in a cell carbohydrate metabolism, stressing the importance of this protein group in a plant response to Fusarium infection. The increased accumulation levels of different isoforms of plant beta-amylase were observed for a more susceptible triticale line after inoculation but these were not supported by a total level of beta-amylase activity, showing the highest value in the control conditions. The more resistant line was characterized by a higher abundance of alpha-amylase inhibitor CM2 subunit and simultaneously a lower activity of alpha-amylase after inoculation. We suggest that the level of pathogen alpha-amylase and plant beta-amylase activities could be components of plant-pathogen interaction associated with the resistance of triticale to FHB. PMID:27582751

  12. Comparative studies with regard to the influence of carbon and nitrogen ratio on sporulation in Fusarium oxysporum and Fusarium moniliforme v. subglutinans.

    PubMed

    Prasad, M

    1979-01-01

    Carbon/nitrogen ratio as a factor for sporulation, expressed in terms of magnitude of population variation of macroconidia and microconidia in the cultures of Eusarium oxysporum Schlecht ex. Fr., Fusarium moniliforme v. subglutinans Wr. and Rg., and of chlamydospores (only in Fusarium oxysporum) was investigated. It has been found that the amount of carbon source shapes the course of macro- and micro. conidial production in a linear fashion, being enhanced parallel to the increase in its amount-Nitrogen level, limiting proliferation and effectively diminishing the macro- and micro-conidial population, varies for the two species, namely Fusarium oxysporum and Fusarium moniliforme v-subglutinans. For chlamydomspore production, higher carbon and still higher nitrogen concentration favours profuse proliferation in case of Fusarium oxysporum.

  13. Adipose triglyceride lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase are the major enzymes in adipose tissue triacylglycerol catabolism.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Martina; Schreiber, Renate; Haemmerle, Guenter; Lass, Achim; Fledelius, Christian; Jacobsen, Poul; Tornqvist, Hans; Zechner, Rudolf; Zimmermann, Robert

    2006-12-29

    The mobilization of free fatty acids from adipose triacylglycerol (TG) stores requires the activities of triacylglycerol lipases. In this study, we demonstrate that adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) are the major enzymes contributing to TG breakdown in in vitro assays and in organ cultures of murine white adipose tissue (WAT). To differentiate between ATGL- and HSL-specific activities in cytosolic preparations of WAT and to determine the relative contribution of these TG hydrolases to the lipolytic catabolism of fat, mutant mouse models lacking ATGL or HSL and a mono-specific, small molecule inhibitor for HSL (76-0079) were used. We show that 76-0079 had no effect on TG catabolism in HSL-deficient WAT but, in contrast, essentially abolished free fatty acid mobilization in ATGL-deficient fat. CGI-58, a recently identified coactivator of ATGL, stimulates TG hydrolase activity in wild-type and HSL-deficient WAT but not in ATGL-deficient WAT, suggesting that ATGL is the sole target for CGI-58-mediated activation of adipose lipolysis. Together, ATGL and HSL are responsible for more than 95% of the TG hydrolase activity present in murine WAT. Additional known or unknown lipases appear to play only a quantitatively minor role in fat cell lipolysis.

  14. Pancreatic lipase and pancreatic lipase-related protein 2, but not pancreatic lipase-related protein 1, hydrolyze retinyl palmitate in physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Emmanuelle; Berton, Amélie; Moussa, Myriam; Kreuzer, Corinne; Crenon, Isabelle; Borel, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The major sources of vitamin A in the human diet are retinyl esters (mainly retinyl palmitate) and provitamin A carotenoids. It has been shown that classical pancreatic lipase (PL) is involved in the luminal hydrolysis of retinyl palmitate (RP), but it is not known whether pancreatic lipase-related proteins 1 (PLRP1) and 2 (PLRP2), two other lipases recovered in the human pancreatic juice, are also involved. The aim of this study was to assess whether RP acts a substrate for these lipase-related proteins. Pure horse PL, horse PLRP2 and dog PLRP1 were incubated with RP solubilized in its physiological vehicles, i.e., triglyceride-rich lipid droplets, mixed micelles and vesicles. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to assess RP hydrolysis by the free retinol released in the incubation medium. Incubation of RP-containing emulsions with horse PL and colipase resulted in RP hydrolysis (0.051+/-0.01 micromol/min/mg). This hydrolysis was abolished when colipase was not added to the medium. PLRP2 and PLRP1 were unable to hydrolyze RP solubilized in emulsions, regardless of whether colipase was added to the medium. PL hydrolyzed RP solubilized in mixed micelles as well (0.074+/-0.014 micromol/min/mg). Again, this hydrolysis was abolished in the absence of colipase. PLRP2 hydrolyzed RP solubilized in micelles but less efficiently than PL (0.023+/-0.005 micromol/min/mg). Colipase had no effect on this hydrolysis. PLRP1 was unable to hydrolyze RP solubilized in micelles, regardless of whether colipase was present or absent. Both PL and PLRP2 hydrolyzed RP solubilized in a vesicle rich-solution, and a synergic phenomenon between the two lipases was enlighten. Taken together, these results show that (1) PL hydrolyzes RP whether RP is solubilized in emulsions or in mixed micelles, (2) PLRP2 hydrolyzes RP only when RP is solubilized in mixed micelles, and (3) PLRP1 is unable to hydrolyze RP regardless of whether RP is solubilized in emulsions or in mixed

  15. Fabrication of enzyme-immobilized halloysite nanotubes for affinity enrichment of lipase inhibitors from complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Zhao, Xiaoping; Wang, Shufang; Tao, Shan; Ai, Ni; Wang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Lipase is the key enzyme for catalyzing triglyceride hydrolysis in vivo, and lipase inhibitors have been used in the management of obesity. We present the first report on the use of lipase-adsorbed halloysite nanotubes as an efficient medium for the selective enrichment of lipase inhibitors from natural products. A simple and rapid approach was proposed to fabricate lipase-adsorbed nanotubes through electrostatic interaction. Results showed that more than 85% lipase was adsorbed into nanotubes in 90 min, and approximately 80% of the catalytic activity was maintained compared with free lipase. The specificity and reproducibility of the proposed approach were validated by screening a known lipase inhibitor (i.e., orlistat) from a mixture that contains active and inactive compounds. Moreover, we applied this approach with high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technique to screen lipase inhibitors from the Magnoliae cortex extract, a medicinal plant used for treating obesity. Two novel biphenyl-type natural lipase inhibitors magnotriol A and magnaldehyde B were identified, and their IC50 values were determined as 213.03 and 96.96 μM, respectively. The ligand-enzyme interactions of magnaldehyde B were further investigated by molecular docking. Our findings proved that enzyme-adsorbed nanotube could be used as a feasible and selective affinity medium for the rapid screening of enzyme inhibitors from complex mixtures.

  16. Structure of product-bound SMG1 lipase: active site gating implications.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shaohua; Xu, Jinxin; Pavlidis, Ioannis V; Lan, Dongming; Bornscheuer, Uwe T; Liu, Jinsong; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-12-01

    Monoacylglycerol and diacylglycerol lipases are industrially interesting enzymes, due to the health benefits that arise from the consumption of diglycerides compared to the traditional triglyceride oils. Most lipases possess an α-helix (lid) directly over the catalytic pocket which regulates the activity of the enzyme. Generally, lipases exist in active and inactive conformations, depending on the positioning of this lid subdomain. However, lipase SMG1, a monoacylglycerol and diacylglycerol specific lipase, has an atypical activation mechanism. In the present study we were able to prove by crystallography, in silico analysis and activity tests that only two positions, residues 102 and 278, are responsible for a gating mechanism that regulates the active and inactive states of the lipase, and that no significant structural changes take place during activation except for oxyanion hole formation. The elucidation of the gating effect provided data enabling the rational design of improved lipases with 6-fold increase in the hydrolytic activity toward diacylglycerols, just by providing additional substrate stabilization with a single mutation (F278N or F278T). Due to the conservation of F278 among the monoacylglycerol and diacylglycerol lipases in the Rhizomucor miehei lipase-like family, the gating mechanism described herein might represent a general mechanism applicable to other monoacylglycerol and diacylglycerol lipases as well. Database: Structural data are available in the Protein Data Bank under the accession numbers 4ZRE (F278D mutant) and 4ZRD (F278N mutant). © 2015 FEBS.

  17. Lipases from the genus Rhizopus: Characteristics, expression, protein engineering and application.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Wei; Xu, Yan; Xiao, Rong

    2016-10-01

    Lipases are versatile catalysts that hydrolyze ester bonds of water-insoluble glycerides or carry out reversible reactions at the water/lipid interface. The remarkable characteristics of lipases from the genus Rhizopus are their high sn-1,3-positional specificity, enantioselectivity and activity in nonaqueous media, which make them one of the most desirable enzymes for many applications, including lipid modification and biodiesel and chiral organic compound synthesis. sn-1,3-Position-specific Rhizopus lipases are particularly useful for the production of structured triacylglycerols. Significant progress has been made regarding lipases from the genus Rhizopus, including gene sequencing, elucidation of the protein structure and catalytic function, heterologous expression and redesigning Rhizopus lipases for valuable properties, which is receiving increasing academic and industrial attention. In this review, we present a comprehensive overview of Rhizopus lipases, focusing on (a) the characteristics of Rhizopus lipases, (b) Rhizopus lipase genes and structural features, (c) strategies for heterologous expression of Rhizopus lipase genes in yeast system, (d) progress in protein engineering for the improvement of the properties of Rhizopus lipases, and (e) development of biotechnological applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Solvent-induced lid opening in lipases: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Sascha; Trodler, Peter; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2010-11-01

    In most lipases, a mobile lid covers the substrate binding site. In this closed structure, the lipase is assumed to be inactive. Upon activation of the lipase by contact with a hydrophobic solvent or at a hydrophobic interface, the lid opens. In its open structure, the substrate binding site is accessible and the lipase is active. The molecular mechanism of this interfacial activation was studied for three lipases (from Candida rugosa, Rhizomucor miehei, and Thermomyces lanuginosa) by multiple molecular dynamics simulations for 25 ns without applying restraints or external forces. As initial structures of the simulations, the closed and open structures of the lipases were used. Both the closed and the open structure were simulated in water and in an organic solvent, toluene. In simulations of the closed lipases in water, no conformational transition was observed. However, in three independent simulations of the closed lipases in toluene the lid gradually opened. Thus, pathways of the conformational transitions were investigated and possible kinetic bottlenecks were suggested. The open structures in toluene were stable, but in water the lid of all three lipases moved towards the closed structure and partially unfolded. Thus, in all three lipases opening and closing was driven by the solvent and independent of a bound substrate molecule.

  19. Lipase applications in oil hydrolysis with a case study on castor oil: a review.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Debajyoti; Basu, Jayanta Kumar; De, Sirshendu

    2013-03-01

    Lipase (triacylglycerol acylhydrolase) is a unique enzyme which can catalyze various types of reactions such as hydrolysis, esterification, alcoholysis etc. In particular, hydrolysis of vegetable oil with lipase as a catalyst is widely studied. Free lipase, lipase immobilized on suitable support, lipase encapsulated in a reverse micelle and lipase immobilized on a suitable membrane to be used in membrane reactor are the most common ways of employing lipase in oil hydrolysis. Castor oil is a unique vegetable oil as it contains high amounts (90%) of a hydroxy monounsaturated fatty acid named ricinoleic acid. This industrially important acid can be obtained by hydrolysis of castor oil. Different conventional hydrolysis processes have certain disadvantages which can be avoided by a lipase-catalyzed process. The degree of hydrolysis varies widely for different lipases depending on the operating range of process variables such as temperature, pH and enzyme loading. Immobilization of lipase on a suitable support can enhance hydrolysis by suppressing thermal inactivation and estolide formation. The presence of metal ions also affects lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of castor oil. Even a particular ion has different effects on the activity of different lipases. Hydrophobic organic solvents perform better than hydrophilic solvents during the reaction. Sonication considerably increases hydrolysis in case of lipolase. The effects of additives on the same lipase vary with their types. Nonionic surfactants enhance hydrolysis whereas cationic and anionic surfactants decrease it. A single variable optimization method is used to obtain optimum conditions. In order to eliminate its disadvantages, a statistical optimization method is used in recent studies. Statistical optimization shows that interactions between any two of the following pH, enzyme concentration and buffer concentration become significant in presence of a nonionic surfactant named Span 80.

  20. Identification of lipase encoding genes from Antarctic seawater bacteria using degenerate primers: expression of a cold-active lipase with high specific activity.

    PubMed

    Parra, Loreto P; Espina, Giannina; Devia, Javier; Salazar, Oriana; Andrews, Barbara; Asenjo, Juan A

    2015-01-01

    Cold-active enzymes are valuable catalysts showing high activity at low and moderate temperatures and low thermostability. Among cold-active enzymes, lipases offer a great potential in detergent, cosmetic, biofuel and food or feed industries. In this paper we describe the identification of novel lipase coding genes and the expression of a lipase with high activity at low temperatures. The genomic DNA from Antarctic seawater bacteria showing lipolytic activity at 4°C was used to amplify five DNA fragments that partially encode novel lipases using specifically designed COnsensus-DEgenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primers (CODEHOP). All the fragments were found to have a high identity with an α/β-hydrolase domain-containing protein identified by the sequencing of the complete genome of Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400. The complete sequence of one of the lipase-coding gene fragments, lipE13, was obtained by genome walking. Considering that the other fragments had a high identity to the putative lipase from S. frigidimarina NCIMB 400, the complete lipase genes were amplified using oligonucleotide primers designed based on the 5' and 3' regions of the coding sequence of the related protein. This strategy allowed the amplification of 3 lipase-encoding genes of which one was expressed in the periplasm using the Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)/pET-22b(+) expression system. The recombinant protein was obtained with activity toward p-nitrophenyl caproate showing a high specific activity between 15 and 25°C.

  1. Cloning and Expression of a Subfamily 1.4 Lipase from Bacillus licheniformis IBRL-CHS2

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Nidyaletchmy Subba; Rahim, Rashidah Abdul; Ibrahim, Darah; Kumar, K. Sudesh

    2016-01-01

    We report on the cloning of the lipase gene from Bacillus licheniformis IBRL-CHS2 and the expression of the recombinant lipase. DNA sequencing analysis of the cloned lipase gene showed that it shares 99% identity with the lipase gene from B. licheniformis ATCC 14580 and belongs to subfamily 1.4 of true lipases based on amino acid sequence alignment of various Bacillus lipases. The 612 bp lipase gene was then cloned into the pET-15b(+) expression vector and the construct was transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) for bulk expression of the lipase. Expression was analysed by SDS-PAGE where the lipase was found to have a molecular weight of about 23 kDa. PMID:27965753

  2. Cloning and Expression of a Subfamily 1.4 Lipase from Bacillus licheniformis IBRL-CHS2.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Nidyaletchmy Subba; Rahim, Rashidah Abdul; Ibrahim, Darah; Kumar, K Sudesh

    2016-11-01

    We report on the cloning of the lipase gene from Bacillus licheniformis IBRL-CHS2 and the expression of the recombinant lipase. DNA sequencing analysis of the cloned lipase gene showed that it shares 99% identity with the lipase gene from B. licheniformis ATCC 14580 and belongs to subfamily 1.4 of true lipases based on amino acid sequence alignment of various Bacillus lipases. The 612 bp lipase gene was then cloned into the pET-15b(+) expression vector and the construct was transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) for bulk expression of the lipase. Expression was analysed by SDS-PAGE where the lipase was found to have a molecular weight of about 23 kDa.

  3. Analysis of Comparative Sequence and Genomic Data to Verify Phylogenetic Relationship and Explore a New Subfamily of Bacterial Lipases

    PubMed Central

    Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

    2016-01-01

    Thermostable and organic solvent-tolerant enzymes have significant potential in a wide range of synthetic reactions in industry due to their inherent stability at high temperatures and their ability to endure harsh organic solvents. In this study, a novel gene encoding a true lipase was isolated by construction of a genomic DNA library of thermophilic Aneurinibacillus thermoaerophilus strain HZ into Escherichia coli plasmid vector. Sequence analysis revealed that HZ lipase had 62% identity to putative lipase from Bacillus pseudomycoides. The closely characterized lipases to the HZ lipase gene are from thermostable Bacillus and Geobacillus lipases belonging to the subfamily I.5 with ≤ 57% identity. The amino acid sequence analysis of HZ lipase determined a conserved pentapeptide containing the active serine, GHSMG and a Ca2+-binding motif, GCYGSD in the enzyme. Protein structure modeling showed that HZ lipase consisted of an α/β hydrolase fold and a lid domain. Protein sequence alignment, conserved regions analysis, clustal distance matrix and amino acid composition illustrated differences between HZ lipase and other thermostable lipases. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this lipase represented a new subfamily of family I of bacterial true lipases, classified as family I.9. The HZ lipase was expressed under promoter Plac using IPTG and was characterized. The recombinant enzyme showed optimal activity at 65°C and retained ≥ 97% activity after incubation at 50°C for 1h. The HZ lipase was stable in various polar and non-polar organic solvents. PMID:26934700

  4. Cloning and expression of gene, and activation of an organic solvent-stable lipase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa LST-03.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hiroyasu; Katou, Yoshikazu; Akagi, Rieko; Mimitsuka, Takashi; Hiroshima, Shinichi; Gemba, Yuichi; Doukyu, Noriyuki; Yasuda, Masahiro; Ishimi, Kosaku; Ishikawa, Haruo

    2007-11-01

    Organic solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas aeruginosa LST-03 secretes an organic solvent-stable lipase, LST-03 lipase. The gene of the LST-03 lipase (Lip9) and the gene of the lipase-specific foldase (Lif9) were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. In the cloned 2.6 kbps DNA fragment, two open reading frames, Lip9 consisting of 933 nucleotides which encoded 311 amino acids and Lif9 consisting of 1,020 nucleotides which encoded 340 amino acids, were found. The overexpression of the lipase gene (lip9) was achieved when T7 promoter was used and the signal peptide of the lipase was deleted. The expressed amount of the lipase was greatly increased and overexpressed lipase formed inclusion body in E. coli cell. The collected inclusion body of the lipase from the cell was easily solubilized by urea and activated by using lipase-specific foldase of which 52 or 58 amino acids of N-terminal were deleted. Especially, the N-terminal methionine of the lipase of which the signal peptide was deleted was released in E. coli and the amino acid sequence was in agreement with that of the originally-produced lipase by P. aeruginosa LST-03. Furthermore, the overexpressed and solubilized lipase of which the signal peptide was deleted was more effectively activated by lipase-specific foldase.

  5. Analysis of Comparative Sequence and Genomic Data to Verify Phylogenetic Relationship and Explore a New Subfamily of Bacterial Lipases.

    PubMed

    Masomian, Malihe; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

    2016-01-01

    Thermostable and organic solvent-tolerant enzymes have significant potential in a wide range of synthetic reactions in industry due to their inherent stability at high temperatures and their ability to endure harsh organic solvents. In this study, a novel gene encoding a true lipase was isolated by construction of a genomic DNA library of thermophilic Aneurinibacillus thermoaerophilus strain HZ into Escherichia coli plasmid vector. Sequence analysis revealed that HZ lipase had 62% identity to putative lipase from Bacillus pseudomycoides. The closely characterized lipases to the HZ lipase gene are from thermostable Bacillus and Geobacillus lipases belonging to the subfamily I.5 with ≤ 57% identity. The amino acid sequence analysis of HZ lipase determined a conserved pentapeptide containing the active serine, GHSMG and a Ca(2+)-binding motif, GCYGSD in the enzyme. Protein structure modeling showed that HZ lipase consisted of an α/β hydrolase fold and a lid domain. Protein sequence alignment, conserved regions analysis, clustal distance matrix and amino acid composition illustrated differences between HZ lipase and other thermostable lipases. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this lipase represented a new subfamily of family I of bacterial true lipases, classified as family I.9. The HZ lipase was expressed under promoter Plac using IPTG and was characterized. The recombinant enzyme showed optimal activity at 65 °C and retained ≥ 97% activity after incubation at 50 °C for 1h. The HZ lipase was stable in various polar and non-polar organic solvents.

  6. Fusarium diversity in soil using a specific molecular approach and a cultural approach.

    PubMed

    Edel-Hermann, Véronique; Gautheron, Nadine; Mounier, Arnaud; Steinberg, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Fusarium species are ubiquitous in soil. They cause plant and human diseases and can produce mycotoxins. Surveys of Fusarium species diversity in environmental samples usually rely on laborious culture-based methods. In the present study, we have developed a molecular method to analyze Fusarium diversity directly from soil DNA. We designed primers targeting the translation elongation factor 1-alpha (EF-1α) gene and demonstrated their specificity toward Fusarium using a large collection of fungi. We used the specific primers to construct a clone library from three contrasting soils. Sequence analysis confirmed the specificity of the assay, with 750 clones identified as Fusarium and distributed among eight species or species complexes. The Fusarium oxysporum species complex (FOSC) was the most abundant one in the three soils, followed by the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC). We then compared our molecular approach results with those obtained by isolating Fusarium colonies on two culture media and identifying species by sequencing part of the EF-1α gene. The 750 isolates were distributed into eight species or species complexes, with the same dominant species as with the cloning method. Sequence diversity was much higher in the clone library than in the isolate collection. The molecular approach proved to be a valuable tool to assess Fusarium diversity in environmental samples. Combined with high throughput sequencing, it will allow for in-depth analysis of large numbers of samples. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Diagnosis of Fusarium keratitis in an animal model using the polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrakis, G.; Jalali, S.; Gloor, P.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—The purpose of this study was apply the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to develop a sensitive, specific, and rapid test to diagnose Fusarium keratitis. Fusarium is the most common cause of fungal corneal infection in some parts of the world. It is often difficult to establish that a keratitis is due to fungal infection.
METHODS—Fusarium solani keratitis was induced in three eyes of three rabbits by injection of a suspension of the fungus into the anterior corneal stroma. In one rabbit the contralateral eye served as a control. From four to 28 days after inoculation, the corneas were scraped for culture, then scraped and swabbed for PCR analysis. The PCR was performed with primers directed against a portion of the Fusarium cutinase gene, and the presence or absence of this amplified target sequence was determined by agarose gel.
RESULTS—The amplified DNA sequence was detected in 25 of 28 samples from the corneas infected with Fusarium, for a sensitivity of 89%. Only three of the 14 samples from these eyes with Fusarium keratitis were positive by culture, for a sensitivity of 21%. Seven of eight control samples were negative by the PCR based test, for a specificity of 88%.
CONCLUSION—This PCR based test holds promise of being an effective method of diagnosing Fusarium keratitis as well as Fusarium infections at other sites.

 Keywords: keratitis; Fusarium; ulcer; cornea; polymerase chain reaction PMID:9602631

  8. Spectrum of Fusarium infections in tropical dermatology evidenced by multilocus sequencing typing diagnostics.

    PubMed

    van Diepeningen, Anne D; Feng, Peiying; Ahmed, Sarah; Sudhadham, Montarop; Bunyaratavej, Sumanas; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium species are emerging causative agents of superficial, cutaneous and systemic human infections. In a study of the prevalence and genetic diversity of 464 fungal isolates from a dermatological ward in Thailand, 44 strains (9.5%) proved to belong to the genus Fusarium. Species identification was based on sequencing a portion of translation elongation factor 1-alpha (tef1-α), rDNA internal transcribed spacer and RNA-dependent polymerase subunit II (rpb2). Our results revealed that 37 isolates (84%) belonged to the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC), one strain matched with Fusarium oxysporum (FOSC) complex 33, while six others belonged to the Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti species complex. Within the FSSC two predominant clusters represented Fusarium falciforme and recently described F. keratoplasticum. No gender differences in susceptibility to Fusarium were noted, but infections on the right side of the body prevailed. Eighty-nine per cent of the Fusarium isolates were involved in onychomycosis, while the remaining ones caused paronychia or severe tinea pedis. Comparing literature data, superficial infections by FSSC appear to be prevalent in Asia and Latin America, whereas FOSC is more common in Europe. The available data suggest that Fusarium is a common opportunistic human pathogens in tropical areas and has significant genetic variation worldwide.

  9. Morphological and molecular characterization of Fusarium spp pathogenic to pecan tree in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lazarotto, M; Milanesi, P M; Muniz, M F B; Reiniger, L R S; Beltrame, R; Harakava, R; Blume, E

    2014-11-11

    The occurrence of Fusarium spp associated with pecan tree (Carya illinoinensis) diseases in Brazil has been observed in recent laboratory analyses in Rio Grande do Sul State. Thus, in this study, we i) obtained Fusarium isolates from plants with disease symptoms; ii) tested the pathogenicity of these Fusarium isolates to pecan; iii) characterized and grouped Fusarium isolates that were pathogenic to the pecan tree based on morphological characteristics; iv) identified Fusarium spp to the species complex level through TEF-1α sequencing; and v) compared the identification methods used in the study. Fifteen isolates collected from the inflorescences, roots, and seeds of symptomatic plants (leaf necrosis or root rot) were used for pathogenicity tests. Morphological characterization was conducted using only pathogenic isolates, for a total of 11 isolates, based on the mycelial growth rate, sporulation, colony pigmentation, and conidial length and width variables. Pathogenic isolates were grouped based on morphological characteristics, and molecular characterization was performed by sequencing TEF-1α genes. Pathogenic isolates belonging to the Fusarium chlamydosporum species complex, Fusarium graminearum species complex, Fusarium proliferatum, and Fusarium oxysporum were identified based on the TEF-1α region. Morphological characteristics were used to effectively differentiate isolates and group the isolates according to genetic similarity, particularly conidial width, which emerged as a key morphological descriptor in this study.

  10. Lipase production by yeasts from extra virgin olive oil.

    PubMed

    Ciafardini, G; Zullo, B A; Iride, A

    2006-02-01

    Newly produced olive oil has an opalescent appearance due to the presence of solid particles and micro-drops of vegetation water from the fruits. Some of our recent microbiological research has shown that a rich micro-flora is present in the suspended fraction of the freshly produced olive oil capable of improving the quality of the oil through the hydrolysis of the oleuropein. Present research however has, for the first time, demonstrated the presence of lipase-positive yeasts in some samples of extra virgin olive oil which can lower the quality of the oil through the hydrolysis of the triglycerides. The tests performed with yeasts of our collection, previously isolated from olive oil, demonstrated that two lipase-producing yeast strains named Saccharomyces cerevisiae 1525 and Williopsis californica 1639 were able to hydrolyse different specific synthetic substrates represented by p-nitrophenyl stearate, 4-nitrophenyl palmitate, tripalmitin and triolein as well as olive oil triglycerides. The lipase activity in S. cerevisiae 1525 was confined to the whole cells, whereas in W. californica 1639 it was also detected in the extracellular fraction. The enzyme activity in both yeasts was influenced by the ratio of the aqueous to the organic phase reaching its maximum value in S. cerevisiae 1525 when the water added to the olive oil was present in a ratio of 0.25% (v/v), whereas in W. californica 1639 the optimal ratio was 1% (v/v). Furthermore, the free fatty acids of olive oil proved to be good inducers of lipase activity in both yeasts. The microbiological analysis carried out on commercial extra virgin olive oil, produced in four different geographic areas, demonstrated that the presence of lipase-producing yeast varied from zero to 56% of the total yeasts detected, according to the source of oil samples. The discovery of lipase-positive yeasts in some extra virgin olive oils leads us to believe that yeasts are able to contribute in a positive or negative way towards

  11. Cloning, expression and characterization of a new lipase from Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Heyun; Zheng, Lina; Wang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Yun; Xu, Li; Yan, Yunjun

    2011-12-01

    Bioinformatic analysis of the Yarrowia lipolytica CLIB122 genome has revealed 18 putative lipase genes all of which were expressed in Escherichia coli and screened for hydrolyzing activities against p-nitrophenyl-palmitate. One positive transformant containing an ORF of 1,098 bp encoding a protein of 365 amino acids was obtained. To characterize its enzymatic properties, the lipase gene was functionally expressed in Pichia pastoris. The resulting lipase exhibited the highest activity towards p-NP-decanoate at pH 7 and 35 °C. In addition, the new lipase had a lower optimal temperature and pH compared to other Y. lipolytica lipases. It was noticeably enhanced by Ca(2+), but was inhibited by PMSF, Hg(2+) and Ni(2+). The new lipase displayed the 1,3-specificity for triolein. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  12. Covalent immobilization of lipases on monodisperse magnetic microspheres modified with PAMAM-dendrimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weiwei; Zhang, Yimei; Hou, Chen; Pan, Duo; He, Jianjun; Zhu, Hao

    2016-02-01

    This paper reported an immobilization of Candida rugosa lipase (CRL) onto PAMAM-dendrimer-grafted magnetic nanoparticles synthesized by a modified solvothermal reduction method. The dendritic magnetic nanoparticles were amply characterized by several instrumental measurements, and the CRL was covalently anchored on the three generation supports with glutaraldehyde as coupling reagent. The amount of immobilized enzyme was up to 150 mg/g support and the factors related with the enzyme activity were investigated. The immobilization of lipase improved their performance in wider ranges of pH and temperature. The immobilized lipase exhibited excellent thermal stability and reusability in comparison with free enzyme and can be reused 10 cycles with the enzymatic activity remained above 90 %. The properties of lipase improved obviously after being immobilized on the dendritic supports. The inactive immobilized lipase could be regenerated with glutaraldehyde and Cu2+, respectively. This synthetic strategy was facile and eco-friendly for applications in lipase immobilization.

  13. Novel magnetic cross-linked lipase aggregates for improving the resolution of (R, S)-2-octanol.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Guo, Chen; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Novel magnetic cross-linked lipase aggregates were fabricated by immobilizing the cross-linked lipase aggregates onto magnetic particles with a high number of -NH2 terminal groups using p-benzoquinone as the cross-linking agent. At the optimal fabrication conditions, 100% of immobilization efficiency and 139% of activity recovery of the magnetic cross-linked lipase aggregates were achieved. The magnetic cross-linked lipase aggregates were able to efficiently resolve (R, S)-2-octanol, and retained 100% activity and 100% enantioselectivity after 10 cycles of reuse, whereas the cross-linked lipase aggregates only retained about 50% activity and 70% enantioselectivity due to insufficient cross-linking. These results provide a great potential for industrial applications of the magnetic cross-linked lipase aggregates.

  14. Lipase entrapment in PVA/Chitosan biodegradable film for reactor coatings.

    PubMed

    Batista, Karla A; Lopes, Flavio Marques; Yamashita, Fabio; Fernandes, Kátia Flávia

    2013-04-01

    This study reports the development and characterization of novel biodegradable film, based on chitosan and polyvinyl alcohol containing lipase entrapped. The films showed a thickness of 70.4 and 79 μm to PVA/Chitosan and PVA/Chitosan/Lipase, respectively. The entrapment of lipase in PVA/Chitosan film resulted in increasing of 69.4% tensile strength (TS), and 52.4% of elongation. SEM images showed the formation of a continuous film, without pores or cracks. The lipase entrapment efficiency was estimated in 92% and the films were repeatedly used for 25 hydrolytic cycles, maintaining 62% of initial activity. The PVA/Chitosan/Lipase film was used for olive oil hydrolysis of high performance. These results indicate that PVA/Chitosan/Lipase is a promising material for biotechnology applications such as triacylglycerol hydrolysis and biodiesel production.

  15. Biodiesel production from Jatropha oil catalyzed by immobilized Burkholderia cepacia lipase on modified attapulgite.

    PubMed

    You, Qinghong; Yin, Xiulian; Zhao, Yuping; Zhang, Yan

    2013-11-01

    Lipase from Burkholderia cepacia was immobilized on modified attapulgite by cross-linking reaction for biodiesel production with jatropha oil as feedstock. Effects of various factors on biodiesel production were studied by single-factor experiment. Results indicated that the best conditions for biodiesel preparation were: 10 g jatropha oil, 2.4 g methanol (molar ratio of oil to methanol is 1:6.6) being added at 3h intervals, 7 wt% water, 10 wt% immobilized lipase, temperature 35°C, and time 24h. Under these conditions, the maximum biodiesel yield reached 94%. The immobilized lipase retained 95% of its relative activity during the ten repeated batch reactions. The half-life time of the immobilized lipase is 731 h. Kinetics was studied and the Vmax of the immobilized lipases were 6.823 mmol L(-1). This immobilized lipase catalyzed process has potential industrial use for biodiesel production to replace chemical-catalyzed method.

  16. Collagen-Immobilized Lipases Show Good Activity and Reusability for Butyl Butyrate Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dewei, Song; Min, Chen; Haiming, Cheng

    2016-11-01

    Candida rugosa lipases were immobilized onto collagen fibers through glutaraldehyde cross-linking method. The immobilization process has been optimized. Under the optimal immobilization conditions, the activity of the collagen-immobilized lipase reached 340 U/g. The activity was recovered of 28.3 % by immobilization. The operational stability of the obtained collagen-immobilized lipase for hydrolysis of olive oil emulsion was determined. The collagen-immobilized lipase showed good tolerance to temperature and pH variations in comparison to free lipase. The collagen-immobilized lipase was also applied as biocatalyst for synthesis of butyl butyrate from butyric acid and 1-butanol in n-hexane. The conversion yield was 94 % at the optimal conditions. Of its initial activity, 64 % was retained after 5 cycles for synthesizing butyl butyrate in n-hexane.

  17. Development of a bioautographic method for the detection of lipase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bayineni, Venkata Krishna; Suresh, Sukrutha; Singh, Gurmeet; Kadeppagari, Ravi-Kumar

    2014-10-31

    An autobiographic method based on the thin layer chromatogram was developed by using the chemical system that comprises p-Nitrophenyl butyrate and bromothymol blue for detecting the lipase inhibitor. Lipase inhibitory zones were visualized as blue spots against the greenish yellow background. This method could able to detect the well known lipase inhibitor, orlistat up to the concentration of 1ng which is better than the earlier method. This method could also able to detect the lipase inhibition activities from the un-explored species of Streptomyces. The developed method can be used not only for the screening of unknown samples for the lipase inhibitors but also for the purification of the lipase inhibitors from the unknown samples.

  18. Dry fermented sausages elaborated with lipase from Candida cylindracea. Comparison with traditional formulations.

    PubMed

    Zalacain, I; Zapelena, M J; Astiasarán, I; Bello, J

    1995-01-01

    The addition of microbial lipase to fermented sausages was studied. A sausage with lipase from Candida cylindracea and a control sausage with starter (Lactobacillus plantarum and Staphylococcus carnosus) were produced in a pilot plant. The acidity value and the amounts of the different free fatty acids (FFA) showed a higher intensity of lipolytic activity in sausages with lipase than in sausages with starter. In sausages with lipase, the percentage of saturated FFA was greater and that of polyunsaturated FFA was lower than in sausage with starter. Mono-unsaturated FFA percentage was similar in both sausages. TBA and peroxide values indicated that the increase of FFA produced by lipase action did not increase the rancidity. A slight increase in acetic, propionic and butyric acids was observed in sausage with lipase but this was not sufficient to develop excessive acidity in the product.

  19. In vitro susceptibility of opportunistic Fusarium spp. to essential oils.

    PubMed

    Rai, M K; Qureshi, S; Pandey, A K

    1999-04-01

    The inhibitory effects of essential oils extracted from 10 Indian plants were evaluated against five fungi. The plants used for extraction of essential oils were six species of the genus Eucalyptus and Ocimum basilicum, Prosopis cineraria and Derris indica. The fungi used in the experiments were Fusarium solani, F. oxysporum, F. pallidoroseum, F. acuminatum and F. chlamydosporum. The susceptibility of the Fusarium species was tested by the paper disc method and the serial dilution technique. The results were compared with the inhibitory effects of miconazole on the fungi. The essential oils extracted from the Eucalyptus species markedly inhibited fungal growth. Prosopis cineraria did not show inhibiting properties. Among the fungi, F. oxysporum proved to be the most resistant species.

  20. Antifungal Activity of Eugenol against Penicillium, Aspergillus, and Fusarium Species.

    PubMed

    Campaniello, Daniela; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2010-06-01

    The antifungal activity of eugenol in a model system against aspergilli (Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus, and Emericella nidulans), penicilli (Penicillium expansum, Penicillium glabrum, and Penicillium italicum), and fusaria (Fusarium oxysporum and Fusarium avenaceum) was investigated. Minimum detection time (time to attain a colony diameter of 1 cm) and the kinetic parameters were evaluated. The effectiveness of the active compound seemed to be strain or genus dependent; 100 mg/liter represented a critical value for P. expansum, P. glabrum, P. italicum, A. niger, and E. nidulans because a further increase of eugenol resulted in fungistatic activity. The radial growth of A. terreus and F. avenaceum was inhibited at 140 mg/liter, and growth of F. oxysporum was completely inhibited at 150 mg/liter.

  1. Benzene derivatives produced by Fusarium graminearum - Short communication.

    PubMed

    Ntushelo, Khayalethu; Setshedi, Itumeleng

    2015-06-01

    Using NMR spectroscopy benzene derivatives were detected in mycelia of Fusarium graminearum, a pathogen of wheat and maize. In previous studies F. graminearum was found to cause cancer to humans and benzene derivatives were detected in breath of cancer sufferers. Surprisingly, no study found benzene derivatives to be the cancerous agents in F. graminearum. In this study we detected benzene derivatives in F. graminearum and propose to study their role as cancer agents.

  2. The changes in pectin metabolism in flax infected with Fusarium.

    PubMed

    Wojtasik, Wioleta; Kulma, Anna; Kostyn, Kamil; Szopa, Jan

    2011-08-01

    Fusarium culmorum and Fusarium oxysporum are the most common fungal pathogens of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), thus leading to the greatest losses in crop yield. A subtractive cDNA library was constructed from flax seedlings exposed for two days to F. oxysporum. This revealed a set of genes that are potentially involved in the flax defense responses. Two of those genes directly participate in cell wall sugar polymer metabolism: UDP-D-glucuronate 4-epimerase (GAE; EC 5.1.3.6) and formate dehydrogenase (FDH; EC 1.2.1.2). GAE delivers the main substrate for pectin biosynthesis, and decreases were detected in its mRNA level after Fusarium infection. FDH participates in the metabolism of formic acid, and the expression level of its gene increased after Fusarium infection. However, metabolite profiling analysis disclosed that the pectin content in the infected plants remained unchanged, but that there were reductions in both the levels of the soluble sugars that serve as pectin precursors, and in the level of formic acid. Since formic acid is the product of pectin demethylesterification, the level of mRNAs coding for pectin methylesterase (EC 3.1.1.11) in the infected flax was measured, revealing a decrease in its expression upon plant infection. Transgenic flax plants overexpressing fungal polygalacturonase (EC 3.2.1.15) and rhamnogalacturonase (EC 3.2.1.-) showed a decrease in the pectin content and an elevated level of formic acid, but the level of expression of the FDH gene remained unchanged. It is suspected that the expression of the formate dehydrogenase gene is directly controlled by the pathogen in the early stage of infection, and additionally by pectin degradation in the later stages. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Mycotoxin Production by Fusarium Species Isolated from Bananas

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, M.; Huerta, T.; Mateo, R.

    1997-01-01

    The ability of Fusarium species isolated from bananas to produce mycotoxins was studied with 66 isolates of the following species: F. semitectum var. majus (8 isolates), F. camptoceras (3 isolates), a Fusarium sp. (3 isolates), F. moniliforme (16 isolates), F. proliferatum (9 isolates), F. subglutinans (3 isolates), F. solani (3 isolates), F. oxysporum (5 isolates), F. graminearum (7 isolates), F. dimerum (3 isolates), F. acuminatum (3 isolates), and F. equiseti (3 isolates). All isolates were cultured on autoclaved corn grains. Their toxicity to Artemia salina L. larvae was examined. Some of the toxic effects observed arose from the production of known mycotoxins that were determined by thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography, or high-performance liquid chromatography. All F. camptoceras and Fusarium sp. isolates proved toxic to A. salina larvae; however, no specific toxic metabolites could be identified. This was also the case with eight isolates of F. moniliforme and three of F. proliferatum. The following mycotoxins were encountered in the corn culture extracts: fumonisin B(inf1) (40 to 2,900 (mu)g/g), fumonisin B(inf2) (150 to 320 (mu)g/g), moniliformin (10 to 1,670 (mu)g/g), zearalenone (5 to 470 (mu)g/g), (alpha)-zearalenol (5 to 10 (mu)g/g), deoxynivalenol (8 to 35 (mu)g/g), 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (5 to 10 (mu)g/g), neosolaniol (50 to 180 (mu)g/g), and T-2 tetraol (5 to 15 (mu)g/g). Based on the results, additional compounds produced by the fungal isolates may play prominent roles in the toxic effects on larvae observed. This is the first reported study on the mycotoxin-producing abilities of Fusarium species that contaminate bananas. PMID:16535503

  4. Lectin activity in mycelial extracts of Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Bhari, Ranjeeta; Kaur, Bhawanpreet; Singh, Ram S

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunogenic carbohydrate-recognizing proteins that bind to glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides with high affinity and exhibit remarkable ability to agglutinate erythrocytes and other cells. In the present study, ten Fusarium species previously not explored for lectins were screened for the presence of lectin activity. Mycelial extracts of F. fujikuroi, F. beomiformii, F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, F. incarnatum, and F. tabacinum manifested agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes. Neuraminidase treatment of rabbit erythrocytes increased lectin titers of F. nisikadoi and F. tabacinum extracts, whereas the protease treatment resulted in a significant decline in agglutination by most of the lectins. Results of hapten inhibition studies demonstrated unique carbohydrate specificity of Fusarium lectins toward O-acetyl sialic acids. Activity of the majority of Fusarium lectins exhibited binding affinity to d-ribose, l-fucose, d-glucose, l-arabinose, d-mannitol, d-galactosamine hydrochloride, d-galacturonic acid, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine, N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, 2-deoxy-d-ribose, fetuin, asialofetuin, and bovine submaxillary mucin. Melibiose and N-glycolyl neuraminic acid did not inhibit the activity of any of the Fusarium lectins. Mycelial extracts of F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, and F. incarnatum interacted with most of the carbohydrates tested. F. fujikuroi and F. anthophilum extracts displayed strong interaction with starch. The expression of lectin activity as a function of culture age was investigated. Most species displayed lectin activity on the 7th day of cultivation, and it varied with progressing of culture age.

  5. Fusarium keratitis at a tertiary eye care centre in India.

    PubMed

    Das, Sujata; Sharma, Savitri; Mahapatra, Samir; Sahu, Srikant K

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to report the clinical and microbiological profiles of Fusarium keratitis. In this single-centre, retrospective, non-comparative case series, 47 laboratory-confirmed cases of keratitis caused by Fusarium species treated at the L V Prasad Eye Institute, Bhubaneswar, India, between November 2006 and October 2009, were reviewed. The analysis included predisposing factors, clinical characteristics, microbiological findings, treatment and outcome. Forty-seven samples of 47 patients were included in the study. The mean age of the 47 patients was 46 ± 17 years. Twelve eyes had a history of injury. Corneal scraping could not be done in one of the cases due to large perforation. Fungal filaments were detected in corneal scraping in 41 cases, and in three cases microconidia were observed in microscopy. Fusarium solani was the most common species (44.7 %). All three cases where microconidia were present in smear were identified as F. solani in culture. The mean time to positive culture was 2.4 ± 1.5 days. Twenty-three patients underwent adjunctive surgical procedure. Visual acuity of <20/200 at presentation and final follow-up was noted in 80.9 and 51.4 % patients, respectively. One-half (23/47) of the patients had improvement in visual acuity. Fusarium keratitis may present after trauma without any satellite lesion, and the response to medical therapy is generally poor. Rapid diagnosis can be made by smear examination of corneal scrapings in a majority of the cases and confirmed by culture within 2-3 days. Presence of microconidia in smear examination may be suggestive of F. solani.

  6. An inordinate fondness for Fusarium: Phylogenetic diversity of fusaria cultivated by Euwallacea ambrosia beetles on avocado and other plant hosts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ambrosia beetle fungiculture represents one of the most ecologically and evolutionarily successful symbioses. Here we document the evolution of a clade within Fusarium associated with ambrosia beetles in the genus Euwallacea (Coleoptera: Scolytinae). Ambrosia Fusarium Clade (AFC) symbionts are unusu...

  7. Cyber-infrastructure for Fusarium (CiF): Three integrated platforms supporting strain identification, phylogenetics, comparative genomics, and knowledge sharing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The fungal genus Fusarium includes many plant and/or animal pathogenic species and produces diverse toxins. Although accurate identification is critical for managing such threats, it is difficult to identify Fusarium morphologically. Fortunately, extensive molecular phylogenetic studies, founded on ...

  8. DNA barcoding, MALDI-TOF, and AFLP data support Fusarium ficicrescens as a distinct species within the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex.

    PubMed

    Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; Mirabolfathy, Mansoureh; Hagen, Ferry; Normand, Anne-Cécile; Stielow, J Benjamin; Karami-Osbo, Rouhollah; van Diepeningen, Anne D; Meis, Jacques F; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2016-02-01

    The Fusarium fujikuroi species complex (FFSC) is one of the most common groups of fusaria associated with plant diseases, mycotoxin production and traumatic and disseminated human infections. Here we present the description and taxonomy of a new taxon, Fusarium ficicrescens sp. nov., collected from contaminated fig fruits in Iran. Initially this species was identified as Fusarium andiyazi by morphology. In the present study the species was studied by multilocus sequence analysis, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and phenotypic characters. Multilocus analyses were based on translation elongation factor 1α (TEF1), RNA polymerase subunit (RPB2) and beta-tubulin (BT2) and proved F. ficicrescens as a member of the FFSC. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the fungus is closely related to Fusarium lactis, Fusarium ramigenum, and Fusarium napiforme; known plant pathogens, mycotoxin producers, and occasionally occurring multidrug resistant opportunists. The new species differed by being able to grow at 37 °C and by the absence of mycotoxin production. TEF1 was confirmed as an essential barcode for identifying Fusarium species. In addition to TEF1, we evaluated BT2 and RPB2 in order to provide sufficient genetic and species boundaries information for recognition of the novel species.

  9. Structure of a membrane-based steric chaperone in complex with its lipase substrate.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Kris; Lustig, Ariel; Wyns, Lode; Tommassen, Jan; Savvides, Savvas N; Van Gelder, Patrick

    2006-04-01

    Secretion via the type II secretion pathway in Gram-negative bacteria often relies crucially on steric chaperones in the periplasm. Here, we report the crystal structure of the soluble form of a lipase-specific foldase (Lif) from Burkholderia glumae in complex with its cognate lipase. The structure reveals how Lif uses a novel alpha-helical scaffold to embrace lipase, thereby creating an unusually extensive folding platform.

  10. Amylase and Lipase Detection in Hemorrhaged Animals Treated with HBOC-201

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    4184 online DOl: 10.3109/10731199.2010.516260 inform a healthcare Amylase and Lipase Detection in Hemorrhaged Animals Treated with HBOC-201 Fran...Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA Abstract: HBOC-201 may alter lipase and amylase detection on chemistry analyzers using optical methods and affect...pancreatic function after trauma. Amylase and lipase measurements were correlated against HBOC-201 to evaluate interference on samples spiked with

  11. New member of the hormone-sensitive lipase family from the permafrost microbial community.

    PubMed

    Petrovskaya, Lada E; Novototskaya-Vlasova, Ksenia A; Gapizov, Sultan Sh; Spirina, Elena V; Durdenko, Ekaterina V; Rivkina, Elizaveta M

    2016-10-18

    Siberian permafrost is a unique environment inhabited with diverse groups of microorganisms. Among them, there are numerous producers of biotechnologically relevant enzymes including lipases and esterases. Recently, we have constructed a metagenomic library from a permafrost sample and identified in it several genes coding for potential lipolytic enzymes. In the current work, properties of the recombinant esterases obtained from this library are compared with the previously characterized lipase from Psychrobacter cryohalolentis and other representatives of the hormone-sensitive lipase family.

  12. Characterization of lipases from Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from human facial sebaceous skin.

    PubMed

    Xie, Winny; Khosasih, Vivia; Suwanto, Antonius; Kim, Hyung Kwoun

    2012-01-01

    Two staphylococcal lipases were obtained from Staphylococcus epidermidis S2 and Staphylococcus aureus S11 isolated from sebaceous areas on the skin of the human face. The molecular mass of both enzymes was estimated to be 45 kDa by SDS-PAGE. S2 lipase displayed its highest activity in the hydrolysis of olive oil at 32 degrees C and pH 8, whereas S11 lipase showed optimal activity at 31 degrees C and pH 8.5. The S2 lipase showed the property of cold-adaptation, with activation energy of 6.52 kcal/mol. In contrast, S11 lipase's activation energy, at 21 kcal/mol, was more characteristic of mesophilic lipases. S2 lipase was stable up to 45° C and within the pH range from 5 to 9, whereas S11 lipase was stable up to 50 degrees C and from pH 6 to 10. Both enzymes had high activity against tributyrin, waste soybean oil, and fish oil. Sequence analysis of the S2 lipase gene showed an open reading frame of 2,067 bp encoding a signal peptide (35 aa), a pro-peptide (267 aa), and a mature enzyme (386 aa); the S11 lipase gene, at 2,076 bp, also encoded a signal peptide (37 aa), pro-peptide (255 aa), and mature enzyme (399 aa). The two enzymes maintained amino acid sequence identity of 98-99% with other similar staphylococcal lipases. Their microbial origins and biochemical properties may make these staphylococcal lipases isolated from facial sebaceous skin suitable for use as catalysts in the cosmetic, medicinal, food, or detergent industries.

  13. Diversity of Fusarium species and mycotoxins contaminating pineapple.

    PubMed

    Stępień, Łukasz; Koczyk, Grzegorz; Waśkiewicz, Agnieszka

    2013-08-01

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus var. comosus) is an important perennial crop in tropical and subtropical areas. It may be infected by various Fusarium species, contaminating the plant material with mycotoxins. The aim of this study was to evaluate Fusarium species variability among the genotypes isolated from pineapple fruits displaying fungal infection symptoms and to evaluate their mycotoxigenic abilities. Forty-four isolates of ten Fusarium species were obtained from pineapple fruit samples: F. ananatum, F. concentricum, F. fujikuroi, F. guttiforme, F. incarnatum, F. oxysporum, F. polyphialidicum, F. proliferatum, F. temperatum and F. verticillioides. Fumonisins B1-B3, beauvericin (BEA) and moniliformin (MON) contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in pineapple fruit tissue. Fumonisins are likely the most dangerous metabolites present in fruit samples (the maximum FB1 content was 250 μg g(-1) in pineapple skin and 20 μg ml(-1) in juice fraction). In both fractions, BEA and MON were of minor significance. FUM1 and FUM8 genes were identified in F. fujikuroi, F. proliferatum, F. temperatum and F. verticillioides. Cyclic peptide synthase gene (esyn1 homologue) from the BEA biosynthetic pathway was identified in 40 isolates of eight species. Based on the gene-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, none of the isolates tested were found to be able to produce trichothecenes or zearalenone.

  14. Identification of a Chitinase-modifying Protein from Fusarium verticillioides

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Todd A.; Wicklow, Donald T.; Price, Neil P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Chitinase-modifying proteins (cmps) are proteases secreted by fungal pathogens that truncate the plant class IV chitinases ChitA and ChitB during maize ear rot. cmp activity has been characterized for Bipolaris zeicola and Stenocarpella maydis, but the identities of the proteases are not known. Here, we report that cmps are secreted by multiple species from the genus Fusarium, that cmp from Fusarium verticillioides (Fv-cmp) is a fungalysin metalloprotease, and that it cleaves within a sequence that is conserved in class IV chitinases. Protein extracts from Fusarium cultures were found to truncate ChitA and ChitB in vitro. Based on this activity, Fv-cmp was purified from F. verticillioides. N-terminal sequencing of truncated ChitA and MALDI-TOF-MS analysis of reaction products showed that Fv-cmp is an endoprotease that cleaves a peptide bond on the C-terminal side of the lectin domain. The N-terminal sequence of purified Fv-cmp was determined and compared with a set of predicted proteins, resulting in its identification as a zinc metalloprotease of the fungalysin family. Recombinant Fv-cmp also truncated ChitA, confirming its identity, but had reduced activity, suggesting that the recombinant protease did not mature efficiently from its propeptide-containing precursor. This is the first report of a fungalysin that targets a nonstructural host protein and the first to implicate this class of virulence-related proteases in plant disease. PMID:21878653

  15. A RALDH-like enzyme involved in Fusarium verticillioides development.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Sánchez, Violeta; Limón, M Carmen; Schaub, Patrick; Al-Babili, Salim; Avalos, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Retinaldehyde dehydrogenases (RALDHs) convert retinal to retinoic acid, an important chordate morphogen. Retinal also occurs in some fungi, such as Fusarium and Ustilago spp., evidenced by the presence of rhodopsins and β-carotene cleaving, retinal-forming dioxygenases. Based on the assumption that retinoic acid may also be formed in fungi, we searched the Fusarium protein databases for RALDHs homologs, focusing on Fusarium verticillioides. Using crude lysates of Escherichia coli cells expressing the corresponding cDNAs, we checked the capability of best matches to convert retinal into retinoic acid in vitro. Thereby, we identified an aldehyde dehydrogenase, termed CarY, as a retinoic acid-forming enzyme, an activity that was also exerted by purified CarY. Targeted mutation of the carY gene in F. verticillioides resulted in alterations of mycelia development and conidia morphology in agar cultures, and reduced capacity to produce perithecia as a female in sexual crosses. Complementation of the mutant with a wild-type carY allele demonstrated that these alterations are caused by the lackof CarY. However, retinoic acid could not be detected by LC-MS analysis either in the wild type or the complemented carY strain in vivo, making elusive the connection between CarY enzymatic activity and retinoic acid formation in the fungus.

  16. Effects of Phospholipase C on Fusarium graminearum Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qili; Zhou, Benguo; Gao, Zhengliang; Liang, Yuancun

    2015-12-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) plays important roles in regulating various biological processes in eukaryotes. Currently, little is known about the function of PLC in filamentous fungi, especially the plant pathogenic fungi. Fusarium graminearum is the causal agent of Fusarium head blight in many cereal crops. BLAST search revealed that Fusarium genome contains six FgPLC genes. Using quantitative RT-PCR, different FgPLC gene expressions in mycelia were analyzed. To investigate the role of FgPLC in F. graminearum biology, a pharmacological study using a known inhibitor of PLC (U73122) was conducted. Results showed that inhibition of FgPLC resulted in significant alterations of mycelial growth, conidiation, conidial germination, perithecium formation, and expressions of Tri5 and Tri6 genes. As expected, the treatment of F. graminearum with U73343, an inactive analog of U73122, showed no effect on F. graminearum biology. Our results suggested strongly that FgPLC plays important roles in F. graminearum growth and development.

  17. A small molecule species specifically inhibits Fusarium myosin I.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengqi; Chen, Yun; Yin, Yanni; Ji, Huan-Hong; Shim, Won-Bo; Hou, Yiping; Zhou, Mingguo; Li, Xiang-Dong; Ma, Zhonghua

    2015-08-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) caused by Fusarium graminearum is a devastating disease of cereal crops worldwide. Recently, a novel fungicide JS399-19 has been launched into the marketplace to manage FHB. It is compelling that JS399-19 shows highly inhibitory activity towards some Fusarium species, but not to other fungi, indicating that it is an environmentally compatible fungicide. To explore the mode of action of this species-specific compound, we conducted a whole-genome transcript profiling together with genetic and biochemical assays, and discovered that JS399-19 targets the myosin I of F. graminearum (FgMyo1). FgMyo1 is essential for F. graminearum growth. A point mutation S217L or E420K in FgMyo1 is responsible for F. graminearum resistance to JS399-19. In addition, transformation of F. graminearum with the myosin I gene of Magnaporthe grisea, the causal agent of rice blast, also led to JS399-19 resistance. JS399-19 strongly inhibits the ATPase activity of the wild-type FgMyo1, but not the mutated FgMyo1(S217L/E420K) . These results provide us a new insight into the design of species-specific antifungal compounds. Furthermore, our strategy can be applied to identify novel drug targets in various pathogenic organisms. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Fusarium brain abscess: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Raquel Ramos; Min, Zaw; Narasimhan, Supriya; Bhanot, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Severely immunocompromised patients such as those with haematological malignancies and haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients are at an increased risk of acquiring invasive mould infections. Fusarium, a ubiquitous fungus, can cause potentially fatal infections in such hosts. It usually manifests as skin lesions, fevers and sino-pulmonary infections. Brain abscesses have been reported, but are relatively uncommon. We report a case of a 50-year-old patient with acute lymphocytic leukaemia and failed autologous peripheral stem cell transplant that presented with new onset seizures and was found to have Fusarium solani brain abscess. Nasal route was the presumed mode of entry of the fungus into the cerebrum. Treatment comprised surgical excision of the lesion, and antimycotic therapy with liposomal amphotericin B and voriconazole. Despite aggressive therapy, patient succumbed to the disease. We have provided an overview of infections secondary to Fusarium, along with a review of the central nervous system involvement by this pathogenic mould. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Cell-bound lipase and esterase of Brevibacterium linens.

    PubMed

    Sorhaug, T; Ordal, Z J

    1974-03-01

    The activities of glycerol ester hydrolase, lipase (EC 3.1.1.3) and carboxylesterase, and esterase (EC 3.1.1.1) were determined for whole cell preparations of Brevibacterium linens by using the pH-stat assay. The culture growth liquors were inactive against the three substrates, tributyrin emulsion, triacetin, and methyl butyrate. Cells washed in water had less activity than cells washed in 5% NaCl; the ratio of activities was close to 1:2 for all strains using tributyrin emulsion as the substrate. For the esterase substrates, this relationship varied widely and was strain dependent. The ability to hydrolyze the two esterase substrates varied independently of the level of lipase activity.

  20. The role of triglyceride lipases in cancer associated cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Das, Suman K.; Hoefler, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Cancer associated cachexia (CAC) is a complex multiorgan syndrome frequently associated with various forms of cancer. Affected patients suffer from a dramatic loss of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Most cases are accompanied by anorexia, and nutritional supplements are not sufficient to stop or reverse its course. CAC impairs many forms of therapeutic interventions and accounts for 15–20% of all deaths of cancer patients. Recently, several studies have recognized the importance of lipid metabolism and triglyceride hydrolysis as a major metabolic pathway involved in the initiation and/or progression of CAC. In this review, we explore the contributions of the triglyceride lipases to CAC and discuss various factors modulating lipase activity. PMID:23499576

  1. Enzymatic modification of cassava starch by bacterial lipase.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Akhila; Abraham, T Emilia

    2006-06-01

    Enzymatic modification of starch using long chain fatty acid makes it thermoplastic suitable for a myriad of industrial applications. An industrial lipase preparation produced by Burkholderia cepacia (lipase PS) was used for modification of cassava starch with two acyl donors, lauric acid and palmitic acid. Reactions performed with palmitic acid by liquid-state and microwave esterification gave a degree of substitution (DS) of 62.08% (DS 1.45) and 42.06% (DS 0.98), respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that onset of decomposition is at a higher temperature (above 600 degrees Celsius) for modified starch than the unmodified starch (280 degrees Celsius). Modified starch showed reduction in alpha-amylase digestibility compared to native starch (76.5-18%). Swelling power lowered for modified starch as esterification renders starch more hydrophobic, making it suitable for biomedical applications as materials for bone fixation and replacements, carriers for controlled release of drugs and bioactive agents. Thus enzymatic esterification is ecofriendly.

  2. Biodiesel production with special emphasis on lipase-catalyzed transesterification.

    PubMed

    Bisen, Prakash S; Sanodiya, Bhagwan S; Thakur, Gulab S; Baghel, Rakesh K; Prasad, G B K S

    2010-08-01

    The production of biodiesel by transesterification employing acid or base catalyst has been industrially accepted for its high conversion and reaction rates. Downstream processing costs and environmental problems associated with biodiesel production and byproducts recovery have led to the search for alternative production methods. Recently, enzymatic transesterification involving lipases has attracted attention for biodiesel production as it produces high purity product and enables easy separation from the byproduct, glycerol. The use of immobilized lipases and immobilized whole cells may lower the overall cost, while presenting less downstream processing problems, to biodiesel production. The present review gives an overview on biodiesel production technology and analyzes the factors/methods of enzymatic approach reported in the literature and also suggests suitable method on the basis of evidence for industrial production of biodiesel.

  3. Covalent immobilization of Pseudomonas cepacia lipase on semiconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Renny Edwin; Bhattacharya, Enakshi; Chadha, Anju

    2008-05-01

    Lipase from Pseudomonas cepacia was covalently immobilized on crystalline silicon, porous silicon and silicon nitride surfaces. The various stages of immobilization were characterized using FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy. The surface topography of the enzyme immobilized surfaces was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The quantity of the immobilized active enzyme was estimated by the para-nitrophenyl palmitate (pNPP) assay. The immobilized lipase was used for triglyceride hydrolysis and the acid produced was detected by a pH sensitive silicon nitride surface as a shift in the C- V (capacitance-voltage) characteristics of an electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor capacitor (EISCAP) thus validating the immobilization method for use as a biosensor.

  4. Regioselective Alcoholysis of Silychristin Acetates Catalyzed by Lipases

    PubMed Central

    Vavříková, Eva; Gavezzotti, Paolo; Purchartová, Kateřina; Fuksová, Kateřina; Biedermann, David; Kuzma, Marek; Riva, Sergio; Křen, Vladimír

    2015-01-01

    A panel of lipases was screened for the selective acetylation and alcoholysis of silychristin and silychristin peracetate, respectively. Acetylation at primary alcoholic group (C-22) of silychristin was accomplished by lipase PS (Pseudomonas cepacia) immobilized on diatomite using vinyl acetate as an acetyl donor, whereas selective deacetylation of 22-O-acetyl silychristin was accomplished by Novozym 435 in methyl tert-butyl ether/n-butanol. Both of these reactions occurred without diastereomeric discrimination of silychristin A and B. Both of these enzymes were found to be capable to regioselective deacetylation of hexaacetyl silychristin to afford penta-, tetra- and tri-acetyl derivatives, which could be obtained as pure synthons for further selective modifications of the parent molecule. PMID:26016503

  5. Development of a PCR-RFLP method based on the transcription elongation factor 1-a gene to differentiate Fusarium graminearum from other species within the Fusarium graminearum species complex

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a destructive disease of cereals crops worldwide and a major food safety concern due to grain contamination with trichothecenes and other mycotoxins. Fusarium graminearum, a member of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) is the dominant FHB pathogen in many p...

  6. Effects of Rosiglitazone and High Fat Diet on Lipase/Esterase Expression in Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wen‐Jun; Patel, Shailja; Yu, Zaixin; Jue, Dyron; Kraemer, Fredric B.

    2007-01-01

    A number of intracellular lipase/esterase have been reported in adipose tissue either by functional assays of activity or through proteomic analysis. In the current work, we have studied the relative expression level of 12 members of the lipase/esterase family that are found in white adipose tissue. We found that the relative mRNA levels of ATGL and HSL are the most abundant, being 2–3 fold greater than TGH or ADPN; whereas other intracellular neutral lipase/esterases were expressed at substantially lower levels. High fat feeding did not alter the mRNA expression levels of most lipase/esterases, but did reduce CGI‐58 and WBSCR21. Likewise, rosiglitazone treatment did not alter the mRNA expression levels of most lipase/esterases, but did increase ATGL, TGH, CGI‐58 and WBSCR21, while reducing ADPN. WAT from HSL−/− mice showed no compensatory increase in any lipase/esterases, rather mRNA levels of most lipase/esterases were reduced. In contrast, BAT from HSL−/− mice showed an increase in ATGL and CGI‐58 expression, as well as a decrease in ES‐1, APEH and WBSCR21. Analysis of the immunoreactive protein levels of some of the lipases confirmed the results seen with mRNA. In conclusion, these data highlight the complexity of the regulation of the expression of intracellular neutral lipase/esterases involved in lipolysis. PMID:17215164

  7. Effects of rosiglitazone and high fat diet on lipase/esterase expression in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wen-Jun; Patel, Shailja; Yu, Zaixin; Jue, Dyron; Kraemer, Fredric B

    2007-02-01

    A number of intracellular lipase/esterase have been reported in adipose tissue either by functional assays of activity or through proteomic analysis. In the current work, we have studied the relative expression level of 12 members of the lipase/esterase family that are found in white adipose tissue. We found that the relative mRNA levels of ATGL and HSL are the most abundant, being 2-3 fold greater than TGH or ADPN; whereas other intracellular neutral lipase/esterases were expressed at substantially lower levels. High fat feeding did not alter the mRNA expression levels of most lipase/esterases, but did reduce CGI-58 and WBSCR21. Likewise, rosiglitazone treatment did not alter the mRNA expression levels of most lipase/esterases, but did increase ATGL, TGH, CGI-58 and WBSCR21, while reducing ADPN. WAT from HSL-/- mice showed no compensatory increase in any lipase/esterases, rather mRNA levels of most lipase/esterases were reduced. In contrast, BAT from HSL-/- mice showed an increase in ATGL expression, as well as a decrease in ES-1, APEH and WBSCR21. Analysis of the immunoreactive protein levels of some of the lipases confirmed the results seen with mRNA. In conclusion, these data highlight the complexity of the regulation of the expression of intracellular neutral lipase/esterases involved in lipolysis.

  8. Acid Lipase from Candida viswanathii: Production, Biochemical Properties, and Potential Application

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Alex Fernando; Carmona, Eleonora Cano

    2013-01-01

    Influences of environmental variables and emulsifiers on lipase production of a Candida viswanathii strain were investigated. The highest lipase activity (101.1 U) was observed at 210 rpm, pH 6.0, and 27.5°C. Other fermentation parameters analyzed showed considerable rates of biomass yield (YL/S = 1.381 g/g), lipase yield (YL/S = 6.892 U/g), and biomass productivity (PX = 0.282 g/h). Addition of soybean lecithin increased lipase production in 1.45-fold, presenting lipase yield (YL/S) of 10.061 U/g. Crude lipase presented optimal activity at acid pH of 3.5, suggesting a new lipolytic enzyme for this genus and yeast in general. In addition, crude lipase presented high stability in acid conditions and temperature between 40 and 45°C, after 24 h of incubation in these temperatures. Lipase remained active in the presence of organic solvents maintaining above 80% activity in DMSO, methanol, acetonitrile, ethanol, acetone, 1-propanol, isopropanol, and 2-propanol. Effectiveness for the hydrolysis of a wide range of natural triglycerides suggests that this new acid lipase has high potential application in the oleochemical and food industries for hydrolysis and/or modification of triacylglycerols to improve the nutritional properties. PMID:24350270

  9. Characterization of biotechnologically relevant extracellular lipase produced by Aspergillus terreus NCFT 4269.10.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Bijay Kumar; Nanda, Prativa Kumari; Sahoo, Santilata

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme production by Aspergillus terreus NCFT 4269.10 was studied under liquid static surface and solid-state fermentation using mustard oil cake as a substrate. The maximum lipase biosynthesis was observed after incubation at 30°C for 96h. Among the domestic oils tested, the maximum lipase biosynthesis was achieved using palm oil. The crude lipase was purified 2.56-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity, with a yield of 8.44%, and the protein had a molecular weight of 46.3kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE. Enzyme characterization confirmed that the purified lipase was most active at pH 6.0, temperature of 50°C, and substrate concentration of 1.5%. The enzyme was thermostable at 60°C for 1h, and the optimum enzyme-substrate reaction time was 30min. Sodium dodecyl sulfate and commercial detergents did not significantly affect lipase activity during 30-min incubation at 30°C. Among the metal ions tested, the maximum lipase activity was attained in the presence of Zn(2+), followed by Mg(2+) and Fe(2+). Lipase activity was not significantly affected in the presence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, sodium lauryl sulfate and Triton X-100. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (1mM) and the reducing, β-mercaptoethanol significantly inhibited lipase activity. The remarkable stability in the presence of detergents, additives, inhibitors and metal ions makes this lipase unique and a potential candidate for significant biotechnological exploitation.

  10. Lipase cocktail for efficient conversion of oils containing phospholipids to biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Amoah, Jerome; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Hama, Shinji; Yoshida, Ayumi; Nakanishi, Akihito; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-07-01

    The presence of phospholipid has been a challenge in liquid enzymatic biodiesel production. Among six lipases that were screened, lipase AY had the highest hydrolysis activity and a competitive transesterification activity. However, it yielded only 21.1% FAME from oil containing phospholipids. By replacing portions of these lipases with a more robust bioFAME lipase, CalT, the combination of lipase AY-CalT gave the highest FAME yield with the least amounts of free fatty acids and partial glycerides. A higher methanol addition rate reduced FAME yields for lipase DF-CalT and A10D-CalT combinations while that of lipase AY-CalT combination improved. Optimizing the methanol addition rate for lipase AY-CalT resulted in a FAME yield of 88.1% at 2h and more than 95% at 6h. This effective use of lipases could be applied for the rapid and economic conversion of unrefined oils to biodiesel.

  11. Lipases production by solid-state fermentation: the case of Rhizopus homothallicus in perlite.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Lozano, Susana; Volke-Sepulveda, Tania; Favela-Torres, Ernesto

    2012-01-01

    Lipases are widely used in the industry for different purposes. Although these enzymes are mainly produced by submerged fermentation, lipase production by solid-state fermentation (SSF) has been gaining interest due to the advantages of this type of culture. Major advantages are higher production titers and productivity, less catabolite repression, and use of the dried fermented material as biocatalyst. This chapter describes a traditional methodology to produce fungal (Rhizopus homothallicus) lipases by SSF using perlite as inert support. The use of different devices (glass columns or Erlenmeyer flasks) and type of inoculum (spores or growing mycelium) is considered so that lipase production by SSF could be easily performed in any laboratory.

  12. Cold-adapted organic solvent tolerant alkalophilic family I.3 lipase from an Antarctic Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Ganasen, Menega; Yaacob, Norhayati; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Leow, Adam Thean Chor; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Ali, Mohd Shukuri Mohamad

    2016-11-01

    Lipolytic enzymes with cold adaptation are gaining increasing interest due to their biotechnological prospective. Previously, a cold adapted family I.3 lipase (AMS8 lipase) was isolated from an Antarctic Pseudomonas. AMS8 lipase was largely expressed in insoluble form. The refolded His-tagged recombinant AMS8 lipase was purified with 23.0% total recovery and purification factor of 9.7. The purified AMS8 lipase migrated as a single band with a molecular weight approximately 65kDa via electrophoresis. AMS8 lipase was highly active at 30°C at pH 10. The half-life of AMS8 lipase was reported at 4 and 2h under the incubation of 30 and 40°C, respectively. The lipase was stable over a broad range of pH. It showed enhancement effect in its relative activity under the presence of Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+) and Cs(+) after 30min treatment. Heavy metal ions such as Cu(2+), Fe(3+) and Zn(2+) inhibited AMS8 activity. This cold adapted alkalophilic AMS lipase was also active in various organic solvent of different polarity. These unique properties of this biological macromolecule will provide considerable potential for many biotechnological applications and organic synthesis at low temperature.

  13. Stability studies of immobilized lipase on rice husk and eggshell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulla, R.; Sanny, S. A.; Derman, E.

    2017-06-01

    Lipase immobilization for biodiesel production is gaining importance day by day. In this study, lipase from Burkholderia cepacia was immobilized on activated support materials namely rice husk and egg shell membrane. Both rice husk and eggshell membrane are natural wastes that holds a lot of potential as immobilization matrix. Rice husk and eggshell membrane were activated with glutaraldehyde. Lipase was immobilized on the glutaraldehyde-activated support material through adsorption. Immobilization efficiency together with enzyme activity was observed to choose the highest enzyme loading for further stability studies. Immobilization efficiency of lipase on rice husk was 81 as compared to an immobilization efficiency of 87 on eggshell membrane. Immobilized lipase on eggshell membrane exhibited higher enzyme activity as compared to immobilized lipase on rice husk. Eggshell membrane also reported higher stability than rice husk as immobilization matrix. Both types of immobilized lipase retatined its activity after ten cycles of reuse. In short, eggshell membrane showed to be a better immobilization platform for lipase as compared to rice husk. However, with further improvement in technique of immobilization, the stability of both types of immobilized lipase can be improved to a greater extent.

  14. Purification and characterization of an intracellular lipase from pleopods of whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei).

    PubMed

    Rivera-Pérez, Crisalejandra; del Toro, M de Los Ángeles Navarrete; García-Carreño, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    An intracellular lipase present in the whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei was detected in pleopods. The lipase from pleopods was purified and characterized by biochemical and kinetic parameters. Purified intracellular lipase has a molecular mass of 196kDa, the polypeptide is assembled by two monomers, 95.26 and 63.36kDa. The enzyme lacks glycosylation, and it has an isoelectric point of 5.0. The enzyme showed the highest activity at a temperature range of 30-40°C at pH 8.0-10.0. Activity was completely inhibited by tetrahydrolipstatin and diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate, suggesting that the intracellular lipase is a serine lipase. The lipase hydrolyzes short and long-chain triacylglycerides, as well as naphthol derivatives at comparable rates in contrast to other sources of lipases. Specific activity of 930U mg(-1) and 416.56U mg(-1) was measured using triolein and tristearin at pH 8.0 at 30°C as substrates, respectively. The lipase showed a K(M,app) of 41.03mM and k(cat)/K(M,app) ratio of 4.88 using MUF-butyrate as the substrate. The intracellular lipase described for shrimp has a potential role in hydrolysis of triacylglycerides stored as fat body, as has been shown in humans. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Extraction and Characteristics of Anti-obesity Lipase Inhibitor from Phellinus linteus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Kug; Jang, Jeong-Hoon; Lee, Jong-Tae; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2010-03-01

    To develop a potent anti-obesity lipase inhibitor from mushroom, the lipase inhibitory activities of various mushroom extracts were determined. Methanol extracts from Phellinus linteus fruiting body exhibited the highest lipase inhibitory activity (72.8%). The inhibitor was maximally extracted by treatment of a P. linteus fruiting body with 80% methanol at 40℃ for 24 hr. After partial purification by systematic solvent extraction, the inhibitor was stable in the range of 40~80℃ and pH 2.0~9.0. In addition to lipase inhibitory activity, the inhibitor showed 59.4% of superoxide dismutase-like activity and 56.3% of acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

  16. Structure prediction and functional analyses of a thermostable lipase obtained from Shewanella putrefaciens.

    PubMed

    Khan, Faez Iqbal; Nizami, Bilal; Anwer, Razique; Gu, Ke-Ren; Bisetty, Krishna; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Wei, Dong-Qing

    2017-08-01

    Previous experimental studies on thermostable lipase from Shewanella putrefaciens suggested the maximum activity at higher temperatures, but with little information on its conformational profile. In this study, the three-dimensional structure of lipase was predicted and a 60 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was carried out at temperatures ranging from 300 to 400 K to better understand its thermostable nature at the molecular level. MD simulations were performed in order to predict the optimal activity of thermostable lipase. The results suggested strong conformational temperature dependence. The thermostable lipase maintained its bio-active conformation at 350 K during the 60 ns MD simulations.

  17. Acid lipase from Candida viswanathii: production, biochemical properties, and potential application.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Alex Fernando; Tauk-Tornisielo, Sâmia Maria; Carmona, Eleonora Cano

    2013-01-01

    Influences of environmental variables and emulsifiers on lipase production of a Candida viswanathii strain were investigated. The highest lipase activity (101.1 U) was observed at 210 rpm, pH 6.0, and 27.5°C. Other fermentation parameters analyzed showed considerable rates of biomass yield (Y L/S = 1.381 g/g), lipase yield (Y L/S = 6.892 U/g), and biomass productivity (P X = 0.282 g/h). Addition of soybean lecithin increased lipase production in 1.45-fold, presenting lipase yield (Y L/S ) of 10.061 U/g. Crude lipase presented optimal activity at acid pH of 3.5, suggesting a new lipolytic enzyme for this genus and yeast in general. In addition, crude lipase presented high stability in acid conditions and temperature between 40 and 45°C, after 24 h of incubation in these temperatures. Lipase remained active in the presence of organic solvents maintaining above 80% activity in DMSO, methanol, acetonitrile, ethanol, acetone, 1-propanol, isopropanol, and 2-propanol. Effectiveness for the hydrolysis of a wide range of natural triglycerides suggests that this new acid lipase has high potential application in the oleochemical and food industries for hydrolysis and/or modification of triacylglycerols to improve the nutritional properties.

  18. Improved catalytic properties of Penicillium notatum lipase immobilized in nanoscale silicone polymeric films.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Saima; Wang, Ping; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad

    2017-04-01

    Lipases are one of the most proficient biocatalysts having enormous biotechnological prospective. Immobilization offers a potential solution to improve the stability and recycling characteristics of lipases. An extracellular lipase from Penicillium notatum (PNL) was immobilized in silicon polymers (SiP) through entrapment, and subsequently coated this matrix on the network of fibers in the sponges. The silicone polymers-immobilized lipase (SiP-lipase) displayed highest apparent activity and entrapment efficiency of 1.19Ug(-1) polymers and 92.3%, respectively. It also exhibited greater catalytic activity in broad-working pHs and higher temperature than equivalent free-state of enzyme. Immobilization caused an improvement in thermo-stability of the lipase with an increase in energy of activation. The recycling potential of SiP-lipase was investigated. After reusing the sponge pieces for ten reaction cycles, the SiP preserved its structure without leakage of enzyme, and retained around 90% of its original activity. The SiP surface analysis was envisaged by scanning electron microscopy that further confirmed the recycling efficiency of SiP-lipase. Overall, SiP-lipase displayed a number of useful properties that make it a promising candidate for future applications in different chemical processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of activities and conformation of lipases treated with sub- and supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dawei; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Houjin; Yan, Yunjun

    2013-04-01

    In order to illustrate the underlining mechanism of the effect of high pressure on lipases from different resources, the influence of compressed carbon dioxide treatment on the esterification activities and conformation of the three lipases Candida rugosa lipase (CRL), Pseudomonas fluorescens lipase, and Rhizopus oryzae lipase was investigated in the present work. The results showed that the lipases activities were significantly enhanced in most of high-pressure treatments, except the pressure had a negative effect on CRL activity in supercritical condition. Mild depressurization rate could remain the lipase's activity by protecting its rigid structure under supercritical fluid. Conformational analysis by Fourier transform-infrared spectrometry and fluorescence emission spectra revealed that the variances of lipase activity after high-pressure treatment were correlated with the changes of its α-helix content and fluorescence intensity. Additionally, transesterification catalyzed by three lipases in supercritical carbon dioxide were conducted, and 87.2 % biodiesel conversion was obtained by CRL after 3 h, resulting in a great reduction of reaction time.

  20. Secreted lipases from Malassezia globosa: recombinant expression and determination of their substrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Bettina; Overy, David P; Haltli, Bradley; Kerr, Russell G

    2016-07-01

    Malassezia globosa, which is associated with skin conditions such as dandruff and seborrhoeic dermatitis, possesses 13 secreted lipases, but only MgLip1, MgMDL2 and MgLip2 have been characterized. To understand the substrate preferences of these lipases and by extension their potential role in colonizing human skin, we expressed all 13 predicted secreted lipases in Pichia pastoris and evaluated their ability to utilize mono-, di- and triolein substrates. The M. globosa family class 3 lipases were shown to be specific for mono- and diacylglycerols, but exhibited no regio-selective production of diacylglycerols, which are of special interest for industrial applications. Lipases belonging to the Lip family utilized all substrates. In a further step, five lipases previously demonstrated to be expressed on human skin were tested against the eight most common di- and triacylglycerols in human sebum. All lipases liberated free fatty acids from three to eight of these substrates, proving their ability to hydrolyse key components of human sebum. Again, only Lip family lipases showed activity on triacylglycerides. Based on the demonstrated activity and expression levels of MgLip2 in M. globosa, the Lip lipase family appears to have the highest impact for the pathogenicity of M. globosa.

  1. Molecular and functional diversity of yeast and fungal lipases: their role in biotechnology and cellular physiology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rani; Kumari, Arti; Syal, Poonam; Singh, Yogesh

    2015-01-01

    Lipase catalyzes hydrolysis of fats in lipid water interphase and perform variety of biotransformation reactions under micro aqueous conditions. The major sources include microbial lipases; among these yeast and fungal lipases are of special interest because they can carry out various stereoselective reactions. These lipases are highly diverse and are categorized into three classes on the basis of oxyanion hole: GX, GGGX and Y. The detailed phylogenetic analysis showed that GX family is more diverse than GGGX and Y family. Sequence and structural comparisons revealed that lipases are conserved only in the signature sequence region. Their characteristic structural determinants viz. lid, binding pocket and oxyanion hole are hotspots for mutagenesis. Few examples are cited in this review to highlight the multidisciplinary approaches for designing novel enzyme variants with improved thermo stability and substrate specificity. In addition, we present a brief account on biotechnological applications of lipases. Lipases have also gained attention as virulence factors, therefore, we surveyed the role of lipases in yeast physiology related to colonization, adhesion, biofilm formation and pathogenesis. The new genomic era has opened numerous possibilities to genetically manipulate lipases for food, fuel and pharmaceuticals.

  2. Lingual lipase activity in the orosensory detection of fat by humans.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Bhushan V; Mattes, Richard D

    2014-06-15

    Lingual lipase generates nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) from dietary fats during oral processing by lipolysis. Lingual lipase in rodents has strong lipolytic activity and plays a critical role in oral detection of fats. The functional activity of lingual lipase during oral processing of high-fat foods in humans remains poorly characterized. Five commonly consumed high-fat foods varying in physical states and fatty acid composition (almond, almond butter, olive oil, walnut, and coconut) were masticated by 15 healthy human subjects at the rate of one chew per second with and without lipase inhibitor orlistat. Salivary NEFA concentrations were measured. To determine the role of lingual lipase in oral fat detection, sensory ratings were obtained from the same 15 human subjects for almond butter with and without orlistat. Lingual lipase was active during oral processing of almond and coconut. No activity of lingual lipase was detected during processing of almond butter. There was only weak evidence lingual lipase is a determinant of oral fat detection. Lingual lipase may only contribute to NEFA generation and oral fat detection of fatty foods that require stronger oral processing effort.

  3. Lingual lipase activity in the orosensory detection of fat by humans

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Bhushan V.

    2014-01-01

    Lingual lipase generates nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) from dietary fats during oral processing by lipolysis. Lingual lipase in rodents has strong lipolytic activity and plays a critical role in oral detection of fats. The functional activity of lingual lipase during oral processing of high-fat foods in humans remains poorly characterized. Five commonly consumed high-fat foods varying in physical states and fatty acid composition (almond, almond butter, olive oil, walnut, and coconut) were masticated by 15 healthy human subjects at the rate of one chew per second with and without lipase inhibitor orlistat. Salivary NEFA concentrations were measured. To determine the role of lingual lipase in oral fat detection, sensory ratings were obtained from the same 15 human subjects for almond butter with and without orlistat. Lingual lipase was active during oral processing of almond and coconut. No activity of lingual lipase was detected during processing of almond butter. There was only weak evidence lingual lipase is a determinant of oral fat detection. Lingual lipase may only contribute to NEFA generation and oral fat detection of fatty foods that require stronger oral processing effort. PMID:24694384

  4. Role of lipase in Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) invasion of lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mullen, T; Markey, K; Murphy, P; McClean, S; Callaghan, M

    2007-12-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a group of ten closely related species associated with life-threatening infection in cystic fibrosis (CF). These bacteria are highly antibiotic resistant, with some strains transmissible, and in a subgroup of patients, they can cause a rapid and fatal necrotising pneumonia. The Bcc organisms produce a range of exoproducts with virulence potential, including exopolysaccharide, proteases and lipases. Many members of the Bcc are also capable of epithelial cell invasion, although the mechanism(s) involved are poorly understood. This study investigates a role for Bcc lipase in epithelial cell invasion by Bcc strains. Lipase activity was measured in eight species of the Bcc. Strains that produced high levels of lipase were predominantly from the B. multivorans and B. cenocepacia species. Pre-treatment of two epithelial cell lines with Bcc lipase significantly increased invasion by two B. multivorans strains and one B. cenocepacia strain and did not affect either plasma membrane or tight junction integrity. Inhibition of Bcc lipase production by the lipase inhibitor Orlistat significantly decreased invasion by both B. multivorans and B. cenocepacia strains in a concentration-dependent manner. This study demonstrates the extent of lipase production across the Bcc and establishes a potential role for lipase in Bcc epithelial cell invasion.

  5. Development of small-molecule inhibitors targeting adipose triglyceride lipase.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Nicole; Schweiger, Martina; Romauch, Matthias; Grabner, Gernot F; Eichmann, Thomas O; Fuchs, Elisabeth; Ivkovic, Jakov; Heier, Christoph; Mrak, Irina; Lass, Achim; Höfler, Gerald; Fledelius, Christian; Zechner, Rudolf; Zimmermann, Robert; Breinbauer, Rolf

    2013-12-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is rate limiting in the mobilization of fatty acids from cellular triglyceride stores. This central role in lipolysis marks ATGL as an interesting pharmacological target as deregulated fatty acid metabolism is closely linked to dyslipidemic and metabolic disorders. Here we report on the development and characterization of a small-molecule inhibitor of ATGL. Atglistatin is selective for ATGL and reduces fatty acid mobilization in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of TG containing acetylenic FA.

    PubMed

    Jie, Marcel S F Lie Ken; Fua, Xun; Lau, Maureen M L; Chye, M L

    2002-10-01

    Hydrolysis of symmetrical acetylenic TG of type AAA [viz., glycerol tri-(4-decynoate), glycerol tri-(6-octadecynoate), glycerol tri-(9-octadecynoate), glycerol tri-(10-undecynoate), and glycerol tri-(13-docosynoate)] in the presence of eight microbial lipases was studied. Novozyme 435 (Candida antarctica), an efficient enzyme for esterification, showed a significant resistance in the hydrolysis of glycerol tri-(9-octadecynoate) and glycerol tri-(13-docosynoate). Hydrolysis of acetylenic TG with Lipolase 100T (Humicola lanuginosa) was rapidly accomplished. Lipase PS-D (Pseudomonas cepacia) showed a fair resistance toward the hydrolysis of glycerol tri-(6-octadecynoate) only, which reflected its ability to recognize the delta6 positional isomer of 18:1. Lipase CCL (Candida cylindracea, syn. C. rugosa) and AY-30 (C. rugosa) were able to catalyze the release of 10-undecynoic acid and 9-octadecynoic acid from the corresponding TG, but less readily the 13-docosynoic acid in the case of glycerol tri-(13-docosynoate). The two lipases CCL and AY-30 were able to distinguish the small difference in structure of fatty acyl moieties in the TG substrate. To confirm this trend, three regioisomers of mixed acetylenic TG of type ABC (containing one each of delta6, delta9, and delta13 acetylenic FA in various positions) were prepared and hydrolyzed with CCL and AY-40. The results reconfirmed the observation that AY-30 and CCL were able to distinguish the slight differences in the molecular structure (position of the acetylenic bond and chain length) of the acyl groups in the TG during the hydrolysis of such TG substrates.

  7. High-throughput screening method for lipases/esterases.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Díaz, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Jorge Alberto; de Los Ángeles Camacho-Ruiz, María; Mateos-Díaz, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) methods for lipases and esterases are generally performed by using synthetic chromogenic substrates (e.g., p-nitrophenyl, resorufin, and umbelliferyl esters) which may be misleading since they are not their natural substrates (e.g., partially or insoluble triglycerides). In previous works, we have shown that soluble nonchromogenic substrates and p-nitrophenol (as a pH indicator) can be used to quantify the hydrolysis and estimate the substrate selectivity of lipases and esterases from several sources. However, in order to implement a spectrophotometric HTS method using partially or insoluble triglycerides, it is necessary to find particular conditions which allow a quantitative detection of the enzymatic activity. In this work, we used Triton X-100, CHAPS, and N-lauroyl sarcosine as emulsifiers, β-cyclodextrin as a fatty acid captor, and two substrate concentrations, 1 mM of tributyrin (TC4) and 5 mM of trioctanoin (TC8), to improve the test conditions. To demonstrate the utility of this method, we screened 12 enzymes (commercial preparations and culture broth extracts) for the hydrolysis of TC4 and TC8, which are both classical substrates for lipases and esterases (for esterases, only TC4 may be hydrolyzed). Subsequent pH-stat experiments were performed to confirm the preference of substrate hydrolysis with the hydrolases tested. We have shown that this method is very useful for screening a high number of lipases (hydrolysis of TC4 and TC8) or esterases (only hydrolysis of TC4) from wild isolates or variants generated by directed evolution using nonchromogenic triglycerides directly in the test.

  8. Novel ciliate lipases for enzyme replacement during exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Brock, Alexander; Aldag, Ingo; Edskes, Stella; Hartmann, Marcus; Herzog, Torsten; Uhl, Waldemar; Schnekenburger, Juergen

    2016-11-01

    Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency caused by inflammation or pancreatic tumors results in nutrient malfunction by a lack of digestive enzymes and neutralization compounds. Despite satisfactory clinical results with current enzyme therapies, a normalization of fat absorption in patients is rare. An individualized therapy is required that includes high dosage of enzymatic units, usage of enteric coating, and addition of gastric proton pump inhibitors. The key goal to improve this therapy is to identify digestive enzymes with high activity and stability in the gastrointestinal tract. We cloned and analyzed three novel ciliate lipases derived from Tetrahymena thermophila. Using highly precise pH-STAT-titration and colorimetric methods, we determined stability and lipolytic activity under physiological conditions in comparison with commercially available porcine and fungal digestive enzyme preparations. We measured from pH 2.0 to 9.0, with different bile salts concentrations, and substrates such as olive oil and fat derived from pig diet. Ciliate lipases CL-120, CL-130, and CL-230 showed activities up to 220-fold higher than Creon, pancreatin standard, and rizolipase Nortase within a pH range from pH 2.0 to 9.0. They are highly active in the presence of bile salts and complex pig diet substrate, and more stable after incubation in human gastric juice compared with porcine pancreatic lipase and rizolipase. The newly cloned and characterized lipases fulfilled all requirements for high activity under physiological conditions. These novel enzymes are therefore promising candidates for an improved enzyme replacement therapy for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

  9. A PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis approach to assess Fusarium diversity in asparagus.

    PubMed

    Yergeau, E; Filion, M; Vujanovic, V; St-Arnaud, M

    2005-02-01

    In North America, asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) production suffers from a crown and root rot disease mainly caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. asparagi and F. proliferatum. Many other Fusarium species are also found in asparagus fields, whereas accurate detection and identification of these organisms, especially when processing numerous samples, is usually difficult and time consuming. In this study, a PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method was developed to assess Fusarium species diversity in asparagus plant samples. Fusarium-specific PCR primers targeting a partial region of the translation elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) gene were designed, and their specificity was tested against genomic DNA extracted from a large collection of closely and distantly related organisms isolated from multiple environments. Amplicons of 450 bp were obtained from all Fusarium isolates, while no PCR product was obtained from non-Fusarium organisms. The ability of DGGE to discriminate between Fusarium taxa was tested over 19 different Fusarium species represented by 39 isolates, including most species previously reported from asparagus fields worldwide. The technique was effective to visually discriminate between the majority of Fusarium species and/or isolates tested in pure culture, while a further sequencing step permitted to distinguish between the few species showing similar migration patterns. Total genomic DNA was extracted from field-grown asparagus plants naturally infested with different Fusarium species, submitted to PCR amplification, DGGE analysis and sequencing. The two to four bands observed for each plant sample were all affiliated with F. oxysporum, F. proliferatum or F. solani, clearly supporting the reliability, sensitivity and specificity of this approach for the study of Fusarium diversity from asparagus plants samples.

  10. Antifungal activity of (KW)n or (RW)n peptide against Fusarium solani and Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Ramamourthy; Na, Hyungjong; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung

    2012-11-15

    The presence of lysine (Lys) or arginine (Arg) and tryptophan (Trp) are important for the antimicrobial effects of cationic peptides. Therefore, we designed and synthesized a series of antimicrobial peptides with various numbers of Lys (or Arg) and Trp repeats [(KW and RW)(n)-NH(2), where n equals 2, 3, 4, or 5]. Antifungal activities of these peptides increased with chain length. Light microscopy demonstrated that longer peptides (n = 4, 5) strongly inhibited in vitro growth of Fusarium solani, and Fusarium oxysporum, at 4-32 μM. Furthermore, longer peptides displayed potent fungicidal activities against a variety of agronomical important filamentous fungi, including F. solani and F. oxysporum, at their minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). However, RW series peptides showed slightly higher fungicidal activities than KW peptides against the two strains. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that these short peptides would be good candidates for use as synthetic or transgenic antifungal agents.

  11. Antifungal Activity of (KW)n or (RW)n Peptide against Fusarium solani and Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ramamourthy; Na, Hyungjong; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung

    2012-01-01

    The presence of lysine (Lys) or arginine (Arg) and tryptophan (Trp) are important for the antimicrobial effects of cationic peptides. Therefore, we designed and synthesized a series of antimicrobial peptides with various numbers of Lys (or Arg) and Trp repeats [(KW and RW)n-NH2, where n equals 2, 3, 4, or 5]. Antifungal activities of these peptides increased with chain length. Light microscopy demonstrated that longer peptides (n = 4, 5) strongly inhibited in vitro growth of Fusarium solani, and Fusarium oxysporum, at 4–32 μM. Furthermore, longer peptides displayed potent fungicidal activities against a variety of agronomical important filamentous fungi, including F. solani and F. oxysporum, at their minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). However, RW series peptides showed slightly higher fungicidal activities than KW peptides against the two strains. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that these short peptides would be good candidates for use as synthetic or transgenic antifungal agents. PMID:23203110

  12. Fusarium Wilt of Banana Is Caused by Several Pathogens Referred to as Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense.

    PubMed

    Ploetz, Randy C

    2006-06-01

    ABSTRACT Fusarium wilt of banana (also known as Panama disease) is caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense. Where susceptible cultivars are grown, management is limited to the use of pathogen-free planting stock and clean soils. Resistant genotypes exist for some applications, but resistance is still needed in other situations. Progress has been made with this recalcitrant crop by traditional and nontraditional improvement programs. The disease was first reported in Australia in 1876, but did the greatest damage in export plantations in the western tropics before 1960. A new variant, tropical race 4, threatens the trades that are now based on Cavendish cultivars, and other locally important types such as the plantains. Phylogenetic studies indicate that F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense had several independent evolutionary origins. The significance of these results and the future impact of this disease are discussed.

  13. Production of diacylglycerols from glycerol monooleate and ethyl oleate through free and immobilized lipase-catalyzed consecutive reactions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Juan; Li, Dan; Zhu, Xue Mei; Adhikari, Prakash; Lee, Ki-Teak; Lee, Jeung-Hee

    2011-02-28

    The ability of free and immobilized lipase on the production of diacylglycerols (DAG) by transesterification of glycerol monooleate (GMO) and ethyl oleate was investigated. Among three free lipases such as lipase G (Penicillium cyclopium), lipase AK (Pseudomonas fluorescens) and lipase PS (Pseudomonas cepacia), lipase PS exhibited the highest DAG productivity, and the DAG content gradually increased up to 24 hours reaction and then remained steady. The comparative result for DAG productivity between free lipase PS and immobilized lipases (lipase PS-D and Lipozyme RM IM) during nine times of 24 hours reaction indicated that total DAG production was higher in immobilized lipase PS-D (183.5mM) and Lipozyme RM IM (309.5mM) than free lipase PS (122.0mM) at the first reaction, and that the DAG production rate was reduced by consecutive reactions, in which more sn-1,3-DAG was synthesized than sn-1,2-DAG. During the consecutive reactions, the activity of lipase PS was relatively steady by showing similar DAG content, whereas DAG production of lipase PS-D and Lipozyme RM IM was gradually decreased to 69.9 and 167.1mM at 9th reaction, respectively, resulting in 62% and 46% reduced production when compared with 1st reaction. Interestingly, from 7th reaction lipase PS produced more DAG than immobilized lipase PS-D, and exhibited a stable activity for DAG production. Therefore, the present study suggested that DAG productivity between GMO and ethyl oleate was higher in immobilized lipases than free lipases, but the activity was reduced with repeated uses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Preliminary studies on immobilization of lipase using chicken eggshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salleh, S.; Serri, N. A.; Hena, S.; Tajarudin, H. A.

    2016-06-01

    A few advantages of enzyme immobilization are reusability of expensive enzyme, improvement of stability and activity compared to crude enzyme. Various organic components can be used as carrier for enzyme immobilization such as chicken eggshell. It can be used as a carrier for immobilization as its mineral component mostly contains of calcium carbonate. In the present study, Tributyrin method was used to test enzyme activity of Rhizomucour Miehei, Candida Antarctica and Candida Rugosa. Rhizomucour Miehei shows the highest enzyme activity (360.8 mol/min/mL lipase) and was used in further experiment. Experiment was continued to study incubation time for lipase immobilization on eggshell (1-4 hours) and reaction time of esterification of sugar ester (0-72 hours). Two hours incubation time for lipase immobilization was observed and gives the highest yield of sugar ester (78.13%). Fructose and stearic acid as substrate was used for the production of sugar ester. The highest percentage of sugar ester production was shown at 36 hours of reaction time.

  15. Isolation and characterization of novel thermophilic lipase-secreting bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rabbani, Mohammed; Bagherinejad, Mohammad Reza; Sadeghi, Hamid MirMohammad; Shariat, Ziaedin Samsam; Etemadifar, Zahra; Moazen, Fatemeh; Rahbari, Manizheh; Mafakher, Ladan; Zaghian, Saeideh

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to screen and identify the lipase-producing microorganisms from various regions of Iran. Samples collected from hot spring, Persian Gulf, desert area and oil-contaminated soil, were analyzed for thermophilic extracellular-lipase producing organisms. Six strains with high activity on rhodamine B plates were selected for chemical identification and further study. Among these isolated bacteria, four strains show higher activity in pH-Stat method at 55 °C. These strains were identified by PCR amplification of 16s rRNA genes using universal primers. Fermentation increased the activity up to 50%. The growth medium, designed for lipase production, increased the activity up to 4.55 folds. The crude supernatant of ZR-5 after fermentation and separation the cells, was lyophilized and the activity was measured. Total activity of this strain was 12 kU/g that shows its potential for industrial uses. Further study is required for purification of enzyme and calculation its specific activity. Immobilization is another approach should be considered. PMID:24688500

  16. Synthesis of naringin 6"-ricinoleate using immobilized lipase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Naringin is an important flavanone with several biological activities, including antioxidant action. However, this compound shows low solubility in lipophilic preparations, such as is used in the cosmetic and food industries. One way to solve this problem is to add fatty acids to the flavonoid sugar unit using immobilized lipase. However, there is limited research regarding hydroxylation of unsaturated fatty acids as an answer to the low solubility challenge. In this work, we describe the reaction of naringin with castor oil containing ricinoleic acid, castor oil's major fatty acid component, using immobilized lipase from Candida antarctica. Analysis of the 1H and 13 C NMR (1D and 2D) spectra and literature comparison were used to characterise the obtained acyl derivative. Results After allowing the reaction to continue for 120 hours (in acetone media, 50°C), the major product obtained was naringin 6″-ricinoleate. In this reaction, either castor oil or pure ricinoleic acid was used as the acylating agent, providing a 33% or 24% yield, respectively. The chemical structure of naringin 6″-ricinoleate was determined using NMR analysis, including bidimensional (2D) experiments. Conclusion Using immobilized lipase from C. antarctica, the best conversion reaction was observed using castor oil containing ricinoleic acid as the acylating agent rather than an isolated fatty acid. Graphical abstract PMID:22578215

  17. Stability of lipase immobilized on O-pentynyl dextran.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Muhammad Nazir; Adnan, Ahmad; Strömberg, Emma; Mischnick, Petra

    2012-05-01

    O-Pentynyl dextran (PyD), an amphiphilic polysaccharide derivative with a degree of substitution (DS) of 0.43 was compared with ion exchange resins Lewatit VP OC 1600, Amberlite XAD 761 and Duolite A568 for immobilization of Lipase from Rhizopus arrhizus by adsorption method. The immobilized enzymes were employed for esterification of octanoic acid with geraniol in n-hexane as model reaction. PyD showed higher lipase adsorption and with 249 μmol min(-1) g(-1) significant higher esterification activity than the other supports (67-83 μmol min(-1) g(-1)). Biocatalysts from all types of supports except PyD became completely inactive within 8 weeks storing at -10 °C while lipase immobilized on PyD retained its full esterification activity for at least 14 weeks. In repeated use, yield decreased rapidly after two cycles for all supports except for PyD. For this biopolymeric support, constantly 90% yield was achieved even after eight cycles, when the biocatalyst was washed with n-hexane and water and then freeze-dried. To achieve this yield, prolonged reaction times were required, partly on the account of an increasing delay period, probably to adapt active conformation, until the reaction starts.

  18. Specificity in lipases: A computational study of transesterification of sucrose

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Gloria; Ballesteros, Anthonio; Verma, Chandra S.

    2004-01-01

    Computational conformational searches of putative transition states of the reaction of sucrose with vinyl laurate catalyzed by lipases from Candida antarctica B and Thermomyces lanuginosus have been carried out. The dielectric of the media have been varied to understand the role of protein plasticity in modulating the observed regioselective transesterification. The binding pocket of lipase from Candida adapts to the conformational variability of the various substates of the substrates by small, local adjustments within the binding pocket. In contrast, the more constrained pocket of the lipase from Thermomyces adapts by adjusting through concerted global motions between subdomains. This leads to the identification of one large pocket in Candida that accommodates both the sucrose and the lauroyl moieties of the transition state, whereas in Thermomyces the binding pocket is smaller, leading to the localization of the two moieties in two distinct pockets; this partly rationalizes the broader specificity of the former relative to the latter. Mutations have been suggested to exploit the differences towards changing the observed selectivities. PMID:15557256

  19. Lipase assay in soils by copper soap colorimetry.

    PubMed

    Saisuburamaniyan, N; Krithika, L; Dileena, K P; Sivasubramanian, S; Puvanakrishnan, R

    2004-07-01

    A simple and sensitive method for the estimation of lipase activity in soils is reported. In this method, 50mg of soil is incubated with emulsified substrate, the fatty acids liberated are treated with cupric acetate-pyridine reagent, and the color developed is measured at 715 nm. Use of olive oil in this protocol leads to an estimation of true lipase activity in soils. The problem of released fatty acids getting adsorbed onto the soil colloids is obviated by the use of isooctane, and separate standards for different soils need not be developed. Among the various surfactants used for emulsification, polyvinyl alcohol is found to be the most effective. Incubation time of 20 min, soil concentration of 50 mg, pH 6.5, and incubation temperature of 37 degrees C were found to be the most suitable conditions for this assay. During the process of enrichment of the soils with oil, interference by the added oil is avoided by the maintenance of a suitable control, wherein 50 mg of soil is added after stopping the reaction. This assay is sensitive and it could be adopted to screen for lipase producers from enriched soils and oil-contaminated soils before resorting to isolation of the microbes by classical screening methods.

  20. Tumor promoting phorbol diesters: substrates for diacylglycerol lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot, M.C.

    1984-08-30

    Enzyme activity in rat serum was examined utilizing the potent tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and various glycerolipids as substrates. The serum activity was specific for hydrolysis of the long chain tetradecanoate moiety of TPA, hydrolyzed mono- and diacylglycerols, but was not effective against triacylglycerols, cholesterylesters, or phospholipids. Heating the enzyme preparation at 56/sup 0/C for 1 min was dually effective in reducing the hydrolysis of both TPA and dioleoylglycerol by 83-86% of control levels. The potent diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor, RHC 80267, inhibited the hydrolysis of TPA in the 0.2-1.0 ..mu..M range and was also a potent blocker of monoacyl- and diacylglycerol hydrolysis. In substrate competition studies, exogenous unlabeled TPA was added to the (/sup 14/C)dioleoylglycerol-containing reaction mixture, however, this produced an approximate 3-fold stimulation of (/sup 14/)dioleoylglycerol hydrolysis. Although we have not established whether the hydrolysis of TPA and diacylglycerol is the work of one enzyme, the effectiveness of the specific lipase inhibitor, RHC 80267, demonstrates that diacylglycerol lipase can utilize TPA as substrate, a finding never before documented. This point is of interest in light of the theory that phorbol esters act by mimicry of the natural lipid mediator, diacylglycerols. 44 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  1. Isolation and characterization of novel thermophilic lipase-secreting bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Mohammed; Bagherinejad, Mohammad Reza; Sadeghi, Hamid MirMohammad; Shariat, Ziaedin Samsam; Etemadifar, Zahra; Moazen, Fatemeh; Rahbari, Manizheh; Mafakher, Ladan; Zaghian, Saeideh

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to screen and identify the lipase-producing microorganisms from various regions of Iran. Samples collected from hot spring, Persian Gulf, desert area and oil-contaminated soil, were analyzed for thermophilic extracellular-lipase producing organisms. Six strains with high activity on rhodamine B plates were selected for chemical identification and further study. Among these isolated bacteria, four strains show higher activity in pH-Stat method at 55 °C. These strains were identified by PCR amplification of 16s rRNA genes using universal primers. Fermentation increased the activity up to 50%. The growth medium, designed for lipase production, increased the activity up to 4.55 folds. The crude supernatant of ZR-5 after fermentation and separation the cells, was lyophilized and the activity was measured. Total activity of this strain was 12 kU/g that shows its potential for industrial uses. Further study is required for purification of enzyme and calculation its specific activity. Immobilization is another approach should be considered.

  2. Iodine-125-labeled lipoprotein lipase as a tool to detect and study spontaneous lipolysis in bovine milk

    SciTech Connect

    Sundheim, G.; Bengtsson-Olivecrona, G.

    1986-07-01

    The distribution of lipoprotein lipase among cream, casein, and milk serum can be evaluated by addition of a trace amount of /sup 125/I-labeled lipoprotein lipase to milk. Radioactive lipase was distributed in parallel to endogenous lipase under several conditions. In some milk samples, binding of lipase to cream increased when the milk was cooled. Correlation was good between bound labeled lipase and degree of cold-induced lipolysis in corresponding milk samples. Binding of lipase to cream or to casein was not saturable by addition of two-to threefold more lipase than is normally present in milk. In milk with a relatively high fraction of lipase bound to cream, a correspondingly lower fraction was associated with casein, whereas the fraction of lipase in milk serum was similar in all milk samples. Cold-induced binding of lipoprotein lipase to cream was not fully reversed when the milk was warmed again. Heparin released lipase from casein and increased the amount of lipase bound to cream after cooling.

  3. Identification of tolerance to Fusarium root rot in wild pea germplasm with high levels of partial resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium root rot, caused by Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi, is a serious root rot pathogen affecting peas in all pea growing areas of the USA and is damaging in both dryland and irrigated pea fields. Partial resistance to Fusarium root rot in 44 accessions from the Pisum Core Collection located in Pu...

  4. Biosynthesis of DON/15-ADON and NX-2 by different variants of TRI1 from Fusarium graminearum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium graminearum is one of the econimically most important plant pathogens causing diseases such as Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) of small grain cereals and ear rot of maize. During a large scale survey of Fusarium graminearum (sensu strictu) in the northern United States strains (termed N-strains)...

  5. Identification of QTL controlling high levels of partial resistance to Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi in pea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium root rot is a common biotic restraint on pea yields worldwide and genetic resistance is the most feasible method for improving pea production. This study was conducted to discover quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling genetic partial resistance to Fusarium root rot caused by Fusarium s...

  6. Methylcitrate cycle activation during adaptation of Fusarium solani and Fusarium verticillioides to propionyl-CoA-generating carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Domin, Nicole; Wilson, Duncan; Brock, Matthias

    2009-12-01

    Propionyl-CoA is an inhibitor of both primary and secondary metabolism in Aspergillus species and a functional methylcitrate cycle is essential for the efficient removal of this potentially toxic metabolite. Although the genomes of most sequenced fungal species appear to contain genes coding for enzymes of the methylcitrate cycle, experimental confirmation of pathway activity in filamentous fungi has only been provided for Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus. In this study we demonstrate that pathogenic Fusarium species also possess a functional methylcitrate cycle. Fusarium solani appears highly adapted to saprophytic growth as it utilized propionate with high efficiency, whereas Fusarium verticillioides grew poorly on this carbon source. In order to elucidate the mechanisms of propionyl-CoA detoxification, we first identified the genes coding for methylcitrate synthase from both species. Despite sharing 96 % amino acid sequence identity, analysis of the two purified enzymes demonstrated that their biochemical properties differed in several respects. Both methylcitrate synthases exhibited low K(m) values for propionyl-CoA, but that of F. verticillioides displayed significantly higher citrate synthase activity and greater thermal stability. Activity determinations from cell-free extracts of F. solani revealed a strong methylcitrate synthase activity during growth on propionate and to a lesser extent on Casamino acids, whereas activity by F. verticillioides was highest on Casamino acids. Further phenotypic analysis confirmed that these biochemical differences were reflected in the different growth behaviour of the two species on propionyl-CoA-generating carbon sources.

  7. Differential transcriptional modulation of biological processes in adipocyte triglyceride lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Pinent, Montserrat; Hackl, Hubert; Burkard, Thomas Rainer; Prokesch, Andreas; Papak, Christine; Scheideler, Marcel; Hämmerle, Günter; Zechner, Rudolf; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Strauss, Juliane Gertrude

    2008-07-01

    Adipocyte triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) are intracellular lipases that mobilize triglycerides, the main energy source in mammals. Deletion of genes encoding ATGL (Pnpla2) or HSL (Lipe) in mice results in striking phenotypic differences, suggesting distinct roles for these lipases. The goal of the present study was to identify the biological processes that are modulated in the metabolic tissues of ATGL- and HSL-deficient mice. DNA microarrays were employed to provide full genome coverage concerning the types of genes that are differentially expressed in wild-type and mutant mice. For both mouse models, transcript signatures were identified in white adipose tissue, brown adipose tissue (BAT), skeletal muscle (SM), cardiac muscle (CM), and liver. Genetic ablation of ATGL and HSL alters the transcript levels of a large number of genes in metabolic tissues. The genes affected in the two models are, however, largely different ones. Indeed, only one biological process was modulated in the same way in both mouse models, namely the down-regulation of fatty acid metabolism in BAT. The most pronounced modulation of biological processes was observed in ATGL-/- CM, in which a concerted down-regulation of transcripts associated with oxidative pathways was observed. In HSL-/- mice, in contrast, the most marked changes were seen in SM, namely, alterations in transcript levels reflecting a change of energy source from lipid to carbohydrate. The transcript signatures also provided novel insights into the metabolic derangements that are characteristic of ATGL-/- mice. Our findings suggest that ATGL and HSL differentially modulate biological processes in metabolic tissues. We hypothesize that the intermediary metabolites of the lipolytic pathways are signaling molecules and activators of a wide range of biochemical and cellular processes in mammals.

  8. Genetic diversity, virulence, and Meloidogyne incognita interactions of Fusarium oxysporum isolates causing cotton wilt in Georgia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Locally severe outbreaks of Fusarium wilt of cotton (Gossypium spp.) in South Georgia raised concerns about the genotypes of the causal pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum. Vegetative complementation tests and DNA sequence analysis were used to determine genetic diversity among 492 F. ox...

  9. Trichothecene chemotype composition of Fusarium graminearum and related species in Finland and Russia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium graminearum and type B trichothecene producers can be divided into three chemotypes. Analysis of 290 single-spore isolates of F. graminearum and related Fusarium species revealed that all F. graminearum isolates from Finland (15) and western Russian (26) possessed the 3ADON chemotype, whil...

  10. Convergent and divergent evolution of the trichothecene mycotoxin biosynthetic gene cluster in the Fusarium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Fusarium trichothecenes nivalenol (NIV) and deoxynivalenol (DON) are among the mycotoxins of greatest concern to agricultural production and food/feed safety worldwide. Previous analyses indicate that during early evolution of the Fusarium incarnatum-F. equiseti species complex (FIESC), the tri...

  11. Fusarium graminearum infection and deoxynivalenol concentrations during development of wheat spikes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) affects whole spikes of small grain plants, yet little is known about the timecourse of FHB development following infection, nor about the concentration or progression of the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) in non-grain spike tissues. Fusarium mycotoxin levels in whole sma...

  12. Fusarium species-a British Columbia perspective in forest seedling production

    Treesearch

    Michael Peterson

    2008-01-01

    This review provides a brief biological outline of some species in the genus Fusarium and how these can be implicated as seedborne organisms leading to conifer seed and seedling losses in British Columbia. Fusarium spp. are implicated with pre- and post-emergence damping-off, seedling wilt, late damping-off, root rot, and seedling mortality after outplanting. Current...

  13. New tricks of an old enemy: Isolates of Fusarium graminearum produce a type A trichothecene mycotoxin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ubiquitous filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum causes the important disease Fusarium head blight on various species of cereals, leading to contamination of grains with mycotoxins. In a survey of F. graminearum (sensu stricto) on wheat in North America several novel strains were isolated, whi...

  14. QTL analysis for Fusarium root rot resistance in snap bean under greenhouse conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium root rot (FRR), caused by Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli (syn.F. phaseoli T. Aoki & O’Donnell, F. cuneirostrum O’Donnell & T. Aoki), is considered as one of the most economically important and widespread fungal diseases of common bean (1). Progress in breeding for FRR resistance has been h...

  15. Evaluation of pea accessions and commercial cultivars for Fusarium Root Rot resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium root rot caused by Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi (Fsp) can result in major yield losses in pea (Pisum sativum L.). Currently no fungicides effectively manage this disease. Previous studies evaluated the Pisum germplasm collection for resistance to Fsp, however, evaluations of commercial marke...

  16. Stalk rot of sugar beet caused by Fusarium solani on the Pacific coast.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium stalk blight can cause loss of seed production in sugar beet. The only known causal agent is Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. betae. In 2006, plants that had been grown as stecklings in Oregon and planted in the greenhouse in California for seed production showed symptoms of stalk blight. In add...

  17. Using barley genomics to develop Fusarium head blight resistant wheat and barley

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight, caused by Fusarium graminearum, is a major problem for wheat and barley growers. During infection, F. graminearum produces trichothecene mycotoxins (e.g., deoxynivalenol or DON) that increases fungal virulence and reduces grain quality and yield. Previous work in Arabidopsis sh...

  18. The nivalenol-producing Fusarium graminearum genotype in scabby North Carolina wheat spikes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (or scab), caused primarily by F. graminearum in the U.S., leads to drastic decreases in yield and test weight of small grains. In addition, Fusarium mycotoxins in grain heads can render the crop unsuitable for human or animal consumption. In livestock, scabby grain can lead t...

  19. Greenhouse studies reveal increased aggressiveness of emergent Canadian Fusarium graminearum chemotypes in wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The role of Fusarium graminearum trichothecene-chemotypes in disease outcomes was evaluated in a series of wheat lines with different levels of resistance to Fusarium Head Blight (FHB). Four inocula, each consisting of a composite of four strains with either 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (ADON) chemotypes...

  20. Validation of Fusarium Head Blight Resistance QTL in US Winter Wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), primarily caused by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe [telemorph: Gibberella zeae Schw. (Petch)], can significantly reduce the grain quality of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) due to mycotoxin contamination. Two US soft red winter wheat cultivars, Bess and NC-Neuse, have moderate...

  1. Comparative population genomics of Fusarium graminearum reveals adaptive divergence among cereal head blight pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study we sequenced the genomes of 60 Fusarium graminearum, the major fungal pathogen responsible for Fusarium head blight (FHB) in cereal crops world-wide. To investigate adaptive evolution of FHB pathogens, we performed population-level analyses to characterize genomic structure, signatures...

  2. New tricks of an old enemy: isolates of Fusarium graminearum produce a type A trichothecene mycotoxin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ubiquitous filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum causes the important disease Fusarium head blight on various species of cereals, leading to contamination of grains with mycotoxins. In a survey of F. graminearum (sensu stricto) on wheat in North America several novel strains were isolated, whi...

  3. Characterization of Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistance and deoxynivalenol accumulation in hulled and hulless winter barley

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), caused by Fusarium graminearum, is one of the most serious diseases impacting the U.S. barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) industry. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) produced by the pathogen renders grain unmarketable if concentrations exceed threshold values set for end-use ma...

  4. Morphological and molecular variation among species of the Fusarium dimerum species group

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The name Fusarium dimerum has been used in the past for saprotrophic fungi and opportunistic human pathogens with up to 3-septate but mostly 0- or 1-septate Fusarium-like conidia. On the basis of narrowly defined morphological characters, the varieties Pusillum, Nectrioides and Violaceum were disti...

  5. Analyses of Fusarium wilt race 3 resistance in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In Uzbekistan, the most northern cotton country, as well as in many others worldwide, Fusarium wilt [Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vasinfectum (FOV) Atk. Sny & Hans] represents a serious threat to cotton (Gossypium spp.) production. At least eight genotypes of FOV, called races, have been described. Thes...

  6. Study on Fusarium wilt disease (F. oxysporum vasinfectum) in Upland cotton (G. hirsutum)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In Uzbekistan, Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) has been increasingly affected by the Fusarium wilt disease [Fusarium oxysporum vasinfectum (FOV)] during the last couple of years. This disease significantly reduces cotton yields. A highly virulent strain of FOV (No. 316) has been isolated from ...

  7. Mapping of Fusarium Head Blight resistance QTL in winter wheat cultivar NC-Neuse

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium Head Blight (FHB), primarily caused by Fusarium graminearum, can significantly reduce the grain quality of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) due to mycotoxin contamination. The objective of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for FHB resistance in the moderately resistant so...

  8. [Fusarium species associated with basal rot of garlic in North Central Mexico and its pathogenicity].

    PubMed

    Delgado-Ortiz, Juan C; Ochoa-Fuentes, Yisa M; Cerna-Chávez, Ernesto; Beltrán-Beache, Mariana; Rodríguez-Guerra, Raúl; Aguirre-Uribe, Luis A; Vázquez-Martínez, Otilio

    Garlic in Mexico is one of the most profitable vegetable crops, grown in almost 5,451ha; out of which more than 83% are located in Zacatecas, Guanajuato, Sonora, Puebla, Baja California and Aguascalientes. Blossom-end rot caused by Fusarium spp is widely distributed worldwide and has been a limiting factor in onion and garlic production regions, not only in Mexico but also in other countries. The presence of Fusarium oxysporum has been reported in Guanajuato and Aguascalientes. Fusarium culmorum has been reported in onion cultivars of Morelos; and Fusarium proliferatum, Fusarium verticillioides, Fusarium solani and Fusarium acuminatum have been previously reported in Aguascalientes. The goal of this work was identifying the Fusarium species found in Zacatecas, Guanajuato and Aguascalientes, to assess their pathogenicity. Plants with disease symptoms were collected from hereinabove mentioned States. The samples resulted in the identification of: F. oxysporum, F. proliferatum, F. verticillioides, F. solani and F. acuminatum species; out of which Aguascalientes AGS1A (F. oxysporum), AGS1B (F. oxysporum) and AGSY-10 (F. acuminatum) strains showed higher severity under greenhouse conditions.

  9. Impact of five cover crop green manures and Actinovate on Fusarium Wilt of watermelon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Triploid watermelon cultivars are grown on more than 2,023 ha in Maryland and in Delaware. Triploid watermelons have little host resistance to Fusarium wilt of watermelon (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum). The effects of four different fall-planted cover crops that were tilled in the spring as gree...

  10. Secondary Metabolites and Toxins of Fusarium - What is Causing Disease Symptoms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium species produce a plethora of phytotoxic secondary metabolites. In the case of various races of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (F.o.v.) that attacks cotton, alfalfa, okra and other crops, many of these metabolites are derived from the polyketide biosynthetic pathway. The recent dis...

  11. Multiple minor QTLs are responsible for Fusarium head blight resistance in Chinese wheat landrace Haiyanzhong

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), caused by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe, is a devastatingve disease in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Use of host resistance is one of the most effective strategies to minimize the disease damage. Haiyanzhong (HYZ) is a Chinese wheat landrace that shows a high level of resi...

  12. Genetic transformation of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. gladioli with Agrobacterium to study pathogenesis in Gladiolus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium rot caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. gladioli (Fog) is one of the most serious diseases of Gladiolus, both in the field and in stored bulbs. In order to study the pathogenesis of this fungus, we have transformed Fog with Agrobacterium tumefaciens binary vectors containing the hygromycin B...

  13. Identification of candidate effector proteins potentially involved in Fusarium graminearum-wheat interactions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pathogen-derived small secreted cysteine-rich proteins (SSCPs) are known to be a common source of fungal effectors that trigger resistance or susceptibility in specific host plants. This group of proteins has not been well studied in Fusarium graminearum, the primary cause of Fusarium head blight (...

  14. Disruption of Genes Involved in Butenolide and Culmorin Synthesis in Fusarium graminearum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Butenolide (4-acetamide-4-hydroxy-2-butenoic acid '-lactone) and culmorin (a tricyclic sesquiterpene diol) are two less-studied mycotoxins produced by several Fusarium species, including Fusarium graminearum. A putative butenolide biosynthetic eight-gene cluster in F. graminearum includes fg08080 w...

  15. First report of F. meridionale causing Fusarium Head Blight of wheat in Mexico

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), also known as scab, is a destructive disease of small grain cereals caused by several species belonging to the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC). Members of the FGSC produce trichothecene toxins that represent a threat to human and animal health (1). Despite the...

  16. Validation of fusarium head blight resistance QTL in US winter wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), primarily caused by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe [telemorph: Gibberella zeae Schw. (Petch)], can significantly reduce the grain quality of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) due to mycotoxin contamination. Two US soft red winter wheat cultivars, Bess and NC-Neuse, have moderate...

  17. Mechanism of disease suppression of Fusarium wilt of watermelon by cover crop green manures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A fall planted Vicia villosa cover crop incorporated in spring as a green manure can suppress Fusarium wilt [Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (FON)] of watermelon in Maryland and Delaware. Experiments were conducted to determine whether the mechanism of this suppression was general or specific, and ...

  18. Diallel analysis of resistance to fusarium ear rot and fumonisin contamination in maize

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The fungus Fusarium verticillioides infects maize ears and kernels, resulting in Fusarium ear rot disease, reduced grain yields, and contamination of grain with the mycotoxin fumonisin. Typical hybrid maize breeding programs involve selection for both favorable inbred and hybrid performance, and the...

  19. Vine kill interval and temperature effects on Fusarium dry rot development in Russet Burbank

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium dry rot disease development in potato storage is universal to all market sectors and regions. The objective of this 2-year study was to evaluate three possible management decisions that may impact Fusarium dry rot development in storage: a) vine kill to harvest time, b) harvested tuber pulp...

  20. The role of trichothecenes in the Triticeae-Fusarium graminearum interactions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium Head Blight (FHB), caused by Fusarium graminearum, is a major disease problem for the small grain crops wheat and barley. During infection, F. graminearum produces trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON) that increase the aggressiveness of the fungus and reduces grain quality....