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Sample records for fuselage acoustic treatment

  1. Laboratory tests on an aircraft fuselage to determine the insertion loss of various acoustic add-on treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heitman, K. E.; Mixson, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory study of add-on acoustic treatments for a propeller-driven light aircraft fuselage. The treatments included: no treatment (i.e., baseline fuselage); a production-type double-wall interior; and various amounts of high density fiberglass added to the baseline fuselage. The sound source was a pneumatic-driver with attached exponential horn, supplied with a broadband signal. Data were acquired at the approximate head positions of the six passenger seats. The results were analyzed on space-averaged narrowband, one-third octave band and overall insertion loss basis. In addition, insertion loss results for the different configurations at specific frequencies representing propeller tone spectra are presented. The propeller tone data includes not only the space-averaged insertion loss, but also the variation of insertion loss at these particular frequencies across the six microphone positions.

  2. Acoustic transmission through a fuselage sidewall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilby, J. F.; Scharton, T. D.

    1973-01-01

    A definition is given of an idealized fuselage sidewall structure and a simplified analytical model for determining acoustical transmission from the exterior to the interior of a fuselage was constructed. The representation of the sidewall structure chosen for the analytical model excludes complicating effects such as cabin pressurization, acoustic transmission through windows or door seal leaks, aerodynamic excitation, and structural vibration excitation of the fuselage skin.

  3. Structural acoustic modeling of aircraft fuselage structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehrle, Ralph; Klos, Jacob; Robinson, Jay; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2002-11-01

    Recent studies at NASA Langley Research Center have examined the development and validation of finite element and boundary element modeling techniques for the prediction of structural acoustic response of aircraft fuselage structures. The goal of this work is to provide increased confidence in the modeling techniques so that interior noise criteria can be incorporated early in the design process. These efforts have focused on the development and validation of high-fidelity physics-based numerical models for structural acoustic predictions into the kilohertz region. Finite element models were developed based on the geometric and material properties of the aircraft fuselage structures. Experimental modal analysis and point force frequency response functions were used to validate and refine the finite element models. Once validated, the finite element predictions of the velocity response were used as boundary condition input for boundary element predictions of the radiated sound power. Experiments in the Structural Acoustic Loads and transmission (SALT) Facility at NASA Langley were used to validate the acoustic predictions. Numerical and experimental results will be presented for conventional aluminum rib and stringer-stiffened aircraft structures, a honey comb composite sidewall panel, and damped acrylic windows. Numerical predictions were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  4. Transport composite fuselage technology: Impact dynamics and acoustic transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. C.; Balena, F. J.; Labarge, W. L.; Pei, G.; Pitman, W. A.; Wittlin, G.

    1986-01-01

    A program was performed to develop and demonstrate the impact dynamics and acoustic transmission technology for a composite fuselage which meets the design requirements of a 1990 large transport aircraft without substantial weight and cost penalties. The program developed the analytical methodology for the prediction of acoustic transmission behavior of advanced composite stiffened shell structures. The methodology predicted that the interior noise level in a composite fuselage due to turbulent boundary layer will be less than in a comparable aluminum fuselage. The verification of these analyses will be performed by NASA Langley Research Center using a composite fuselage shell fabricated by filament winding. The program also developed analytical methodology for the prediction of the impact dynamics behavior of lower fuselage structure constructed with composite materials. Development tests were performed to demonstrate that the composite structure designed to the same operating load requirement can have at least the same energy absorption capability as aluminum structure.

  5. Investigation of fuselage acoustic treatment for a twin-engine turboprop aircraft in flight and laboratory tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, J. S.; Oneal, R. L.; Grosveld, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    A flight and laboratory study of sidewall acoustic treatment for cabin noise control is described. In flight, cabin noise levels were measured at six locations with three treatment configurations. Noise levels from narrow-band analysis are reduced to one-third octave format and used to calculate insertion loss, IL, defined as the reduction of interior noise associated with the addition of a treatment. Laboratory tests used a specially constructed structural panel modeled after the propeller plane section of the aircraft sidewall, and acoustic treatments representing those used in flight. Lab measured transmission loss and absorption values were combined using classical acoustic procedures to obtain a prediction of IL. Comparison with IL values measured in flight for the boundary layer component of the noise indicated general agreement.

  6. Acoustically Tailored Composite Rotorcraft Fuselage Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambric, Stephen; Shepherd, Micah; Koudela, Kevin; Wess, Denis; Snider, Royce; May, Carl; Kendrick, Phil; Lee, Edward; Cai, Liang-Wu

    2015-01-01

    A rotorcraft roof sandwich panel has been redesigned to optimize sound power transmission loss (TL) and minimize structure-borne sound for frequencies between 1 and 4 kHz where gear meshing noise from the transmission has the most impact on speech intelligibility. The roof section, framed by a grid of ribs, was originally constructed of a single honeycomb core/composite face sheet panel. The original panel has coincidence frequencies near 700 Hz, leading to poor TL across the frequency range of 1 to 4 kHz. To quiet the panel, the cross section was split into two thinner sandwich subpanels separated by an air gap. The air gap was sized to target the fundamental mass-spring-mass resonance of the double panel system to less than 500 Hz. The panels were designed to withstand structural loading from normal rotorcraft operation, as well as 'man-on-the-roof' static loads experienced during maintenance operations. Thin layers of VHB 9469 viscoelastomer from 3M were also included in the face sheet ply layups, increasing panel damping loss factors from about 0.01 to 0.05. Measurements in the NASA SALT facility show the optimized panel provides 6-11 dB of acoustic transmission loss improvement, and 6-15 dB of structure-borne sound reduction at critical rotorcraft transmission tonal frequencies. Analytic panel TL theory simulates the measured performance quite well. Detailed finite element/boundary element modeling of the baseline panel simulates TL slightly more accurately, and also simulates structure-borne sound well.

  7. Experimental and analytical investigations of fuselage modal characteristics and structural-acoustic coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Myles A.; Mathur, Gopal P.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements conducted on a DC-9 aircraft test section to define the shell and cavity modes of the fuselage, understand its structural-acoustic coupling characteristics, and measure its response to different types of acoustic and vibration excitations are reported. The data were processed to generate spatial plots and wavenumber maps of the shell acceleration and cabin acoustic pressure field. Analysis and interpretation of the spatial plots and wavenumber maps showed that the only structural-acoustic coupling occurred at 105 Hz between the N=2 circumferential structural mode and the (n=2, p=0) circumferential cavity mode. The fuselage response to vibration excitation was found to be dominated by modes whose order increases with frequency.

  8. Experimental and analytical investigations of fuselage modal characteristics and structural-acoustic coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Myles A.; Mathur, Gopal P.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements conducted on a DC-9 aircraft test section to define the shell and cavity modes of the fuselage, understand its structural-acoustic coupling characteristics, and measure its response to different types of acoustic and vibration excitations are reported. The data were processed to generate spatial plots and wavenumber maps of the shell acceleration and cabin acoustic pressure field. Analysis and interpretation of the spatial plots and wavenumber maps showed that the only structural-acoustic coupling occurred at 105 Hz between the N=2 circumferential structural mode and the (n=2, p=0) circumferential cavity mode. The fuselage response to vibration excitation was found to be dominated by modes whose order increases with frequency.

  9. Nonlinear Acoustic Response of an Aircraft Fuselage Sidewall Structure by a Reduced-Order Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Groen, David S.

    2006-01-01

    A reduced-order nonlinear analysis of a structurally complex aircraft fuselage sidewall panel is undertaken to explore issues associated with application of such analyses to practical structures. Of primary interest is the trade-off between computational efficiency and accuracy. An approach to modal basis selection is offered based upon the modal participation in the linear regime. The nonlinear static response to a uniform pressure loading and nonlinear random response to a uniformly distributed acoustic loading are computed. Comparisons of the static response with a nonlinear static solution in physical degrees-of-freedom demonstrate the efficacy of the approach taken for modal basis selection. Changes in the modal participation as a function of static and random loading levels suggest a means for improvement in the basis selection.

  10. Acoustic design of boundary segments in aircraft fuselages using topology optimization and a specialized acoustic pressure function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radestock, Martin; Rose, Michael; Monner, Hans Peter

    2017-04-01

    In most aviation applications, a major cost benefit can be achieved by a reduction of the system weight. Often the acoustic properties of the fuselage structure are not in the focus of the primary design process, too. A final correction of poor acoustic properties is usually done using insulation mats in the chamber between the primary and secondary shell. It is plausible that a more sophisticated material distribution in that area can result in a substantially reduced weight. Topology optimization is a well-known approach to reduce material of compliant structures. In this paper an adaption of this method to acoustic problems is investigated. The gap full of insulation mats is suitably parameterized to achieve different material distributions. To find advantageous configurations, the objective in the underlying topology optimization is chosen to obtain good acoustic pressure patterns in the aircraft cabin. An important task in the optimization is an adequate Finite Element model of the system. This can usually not be obtained from commercially available programs due to the lack of special sensitivity data with respect to the design parameters. Therefore an appropriate implementation of the algorithm has been done, exploiting the vector and matrix capabilities in the MATLABQ environment. Finally some new aspects of the Finite Element implementation will also be presented, since they are interesting on its own and can be generalized to efficiently solve other partial differential equations as well.

  11. Acoustic emission fatigue crack monitoring of a simulated aircraft fuselage structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Jeremy James

    The purpose of this research was to replicate the fatigue cracking that occurs in aircraft placed under loads from cyclical compression and decompression. As a fatigue crack grows, it releases energy in the form of acoustic emissions. These emissions are transmitted through the structure in waves, which can be recorded using acoustic emission (AE) transducers. This research employed a pressure vessel constructed out of aluminum and placed under cyclical loads at 1 Hz in order to simulate the loads placed on an aircraft fuselage in flight. The AE signals were recorded by four resonant AE transducers. These were placed on the pressure vessel such that it was possible to determine the location of each AE signal. These signals were then classified using a Kohonen self organizing map (SOM) neural network. By using proper data filtering before the SOM was run and using the correct classification parameters, it was shown that this is a highly accurate method of classifying AE waveforms from fatigue crack growth. This initial classification was done using AE waveform quantification parameters. The method was then validated by using both source location and then examining the waveforms in order to ensure that the waveforms classified into each category were the expected waveform types associated with each of the AE sources. Thus, acoustic emission nondestructive testing (NDT), in combination with a SOM neural network, proved to be an excellent means of fatigue crack growth monitoring in a simulated aluminum aircraft structure.

  12. Integration of Mechanics and Acoustics in a Sandwich Fuselage. Part IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tooren, M. J. L.; Krakers, L. A.; Beukers, A.

    2005-01-01

    Until now only the stiffened skin structural concept has been discussed. A different structural concept is the sandwich concept. Sandwiches consist out of layers. The outer layers are called facings and are generally thin and of high density. These facings are supposed to resist most of the edgewise loads and flat-wise bending moments. The inner layer is called the core and is generally rather thick and of low density. The task of the core is to separate and stabilize the two facings, transmit shear between the facings and provide most of the shear rigidity. For sandwich panels no stiffeners are needed. Therefore no mass will be lost in stiffeners resulting in a relative high value of mass per unit area of the skin which results in a better TL according to the mass law. Also the core can be made of a material with high insulation properties (acoustic and thermal). The number of discrete stiffeners can then be minimized, since they are only required at places where high concentrated forces have to be introduced (wing, landing gear, etc.) or diverted (from cut-outs). This can reduce the production and maintenance cost. So it can be concluded that the sandwich concept offers great potential for multidisciplinary fuselage design.

  13. Acoustic Casing Treatment Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-14

    Acoustic Casing Treatment Testing Completed in the W-8 Single Stage Axial Compressor Facility at NASA Glenn. Four different over-the-rotor acoustic casing treatment concepts were tested along with two baseline configurations. Testing included steady-aerodynamic measurements of fan performance, hotfilm turbulence measurements, and inlet acoustic measurements with an in-duct array.

  14. Experimental study using nearfield acoustic holography of sound transmission through fuselage sidewall structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The reduction of cabin noise in lightweight, propeller-driven aircraft is an especially difficult problem in noise control. Nearfield Acoustic Holography (NAH) was used to determine the mode of vibration and acoustic intensity for panels which differed in: construction (number of stiffening ribs, size of stifening ribs, construction material, and panel surface curvature); boundary support condition (free edge condition or clamped edge condition); and mode of excitation (structural-borne forces or airborne forces). The different samples of aircraft panels are described and the measurement of the natural response frequencies was discussed under various boundary support and excitation conditions. The results of the NAH measurements are presented.

  15. Post Treatment of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Identifying an AN Symptoms Acoustic Neuroma Keywords Educational Video Pre-Treatment Treatment Options Summary Treatment Options Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions ...

  16. Measurement of Insertion Loss of an Acoustic Treatment in the Presence of Additional Uncorrelated Sound Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2003-01-01

    A method to intended for measurement of the insertion loss of an acoustic treatment applied to an aircraft fuselage in-situ is documented in this paper. Using this method, the performance of a treatment applied to a limited portion of an aircraft fuselage can be assessed even though the untreated fuselage also radiates into the cabin, corrupting the intensity measurement. This corrupting noise in the intensity measurement incoherent with the panel vibration of interest is removed by correlating the intensity to reference transducers such as accelerometers. Insertion loss of the acoustic treatments is estimated from the ratio of correlated intensity measurements with and without a treatment applied. In the case of turbulent boundary layer excitation of the fuselage, this technique can be used to assess the performance of noise control methods without requiring treatment of the entire fuselage. Several experimental studies and numerical simulations have been conducted, and results from three case studies are documented in this paper. Conclusions are drawn about the use of this method to study aircraft sidewall treatments.

  17. Experimental study using Nearfield Acoustical Holography of sound transmission fuselage sidewall structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    This project involves the development of the Nearfield Acoustic Holography (NAH) technique (in particular its extension from single frequency to wideband noise measurement) and its application in a detailed study of the noise radiation characteristics of several samples of aircraft sidewall panels. With the extensive amount of information provided by the NAH technique, the properties of the sound field radiated by the panels may be correlated with their structure, mounting, and excitation (single frequency or wideband, spatially correlated or uncorrelated, structure-borne). The work accomplished at the beginning of this grant period included: (1) Calibration of the 256 microphone array and test of its accuracy. (2) extension of the facility to permit measurements on wideband noise sources. The extensions incuded the addition of high-speed data acquisition hardware and an array processor, and the development of new software. (3) Installation of motion picture graphics for correlating panel motion with structure, mounting, radiation, etc. (4) Development of new holographic data processing techniques.

  18. Treatment of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... acoustic neuroma. There are several different commercially-available machines that are used to treat acoustic neuromas with ... how the radiation is precisely delivered. Gamma Knife® machines derive their radiation from a fixed-array of ...

  19. Wastewater treatment with acoustic separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambayashi, Takuya; Saeki, Tomonori; Buchanan, Ian

    2017-07-01

    Acoustic separation is a filter-free wastewater treatment method based on the forces generated in ultrasonic standing waves. In this report, a batch-system separator based on acoustic separation was demonstrated using a small-scale prototype acoustic separator to remove suspended solids from oil sand process-affected water (OSPW). By applying an acoustic separator to the batch use OSPW treatment, the required settling time, which was the time that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased to the environmental criterion (<200 mg/L), could be shortened from 10 to 1 min. Moreover, for a 10 min settling time, the acoustic separator could reduce the FeCl3 dose as coagulant in OSPW treatment from 500 to 160 mg/L.

  20. Effects of boundary layer refraction and fuselage scattering on fuselage surface noise from advanced turboprop propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaninch, G. L.; Rawls, J. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An acoustic disturbance's propagation through a boundary layer is discussed with a view to the analysis of the acoustic field generated by a propfan rotor incident to the fuselage of an aircraft. Applying the parallel flow assumption, the resulting partial differential equations are reduced to an ordinary acoustic pressure differential equation by means of the Fourier transform. The methods used for the solution of this equation include those of Frobenius and of analytic continuation; both yield exact solutions in series form. Two models of the aircraft fuselage-boundary layer system are considered, in the first of which the fuselage is replaced by a flat plate and the acoustic field is assumed to be two-dimensional, while in the second the fuselage is a cylinder in a fully three-dimensional acoustic field. It is shown that the boundary layer correction improves theory-data comparisons over simple application of a pressure-doubling rule at the fuselage.

  1. Effects of boundary layer refraction and fuselage scattering on fuselage surface noise from advanced turboprop propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaninch, G. L.; Rawls, J. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An acoustic disturbance's propagation through a boundary layer is discussed with a view to the analysis of the acoustic field generated by a propfan rotor incident to the fuselage of an aircraft. Applying the parallel flow assumption, the resulting partial differential equations are reduced to an ordinary acoustic pressure differential equation by means of the Fourier transform. The methods used for the solution of this equation include those of Frobenius and of analytic continuation; both yield exact solutions in series form. Two models of the aircraft fuselage-boundary layer system are considered, in the first of which the fuselage is replaced by a flat plate and the acoustic field is assumed to be two-dimensional, while in the second the fuselage is a cylinder in a fully three-dimensional acoustic field. It is shown that the boundary layer correction improves theory-data comparisons over simple application of a pressure-doubling rule at the fuselage.

  2. The vibro-acoustic response and analysis of a full-scale aircraft fuselage section for interior noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdic, Peter C.; Houston, Brian H.; Marcus, Martin H.; Williams, Earl G.; Baz, Amr M.

    2005-06-01

    The surface and interior response of a Cessna Citation fuselage section under three different forcing functions (10-1000 Hz) is evaluated through spatially dense scanning measurements. Spatial Fourier analysis reveals that a point force applied to the stiffener grid provides a rich wavenumber response over a broad frequency range. The surface motion data show global structural modes (<~150 Hz), superposition of global and local intrapanel responses (~150-450 Hz), and intrapanel motion alone (>~450 Hz). Some evidence of Bloch wave motion is observed, revealing classical stop/pass bands associated with stiffener periodicity. The interior response (<~150 Hz) is dominated by global structural modes that force the interior cavity. Local intrapanel responses (>~150 Hz) of the fuselage provide a broadband volume velocity source that strongly excites a high density of interior modes. Mode coupling between the structural response and the interior modes appears to be negligible due to a lack of frequency proximity and mismatches in the spatial distribution. A high degree-of-freedom finite element model of the fuselage section was developed as a predictive tool. The calculated response is in good agreement with the experimental result, yielding a general model development methodology for accurate prediction of structures with moderate to high complexity. .

  3. The vibro-acoustic response and analysis of a full-scale aircraft fuselage section for interior noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Herdic, Peter C; Houston, Brian H; Marcus, Martin H; Williams, Earl G; Baz, Amr M

    2005-06-01

    The surface and interior response of a Cessna Citation fuselage section under three different forcing functions (10-1000 Hz) is evaluated through spatially dense scanning measurements. Spatial Fourier analysis reveals that a point force applied to the stiffener grid provides a rich wavenumber response over a broad frequency range. The surface motion data show global structural modes (approximately < 150 Hz), superposition of global and local intrapanel responses (approximately 150-450 Hz), and intrapanel motion alone (approximately > 450 Hz). Some evidence of Bloch wave motion is observed, revealing classical stop/pass bands associated with stiffener periodicity. The interior response (approximately < 150 Hz) is dominated by global structural modes that force the interior cavity. Local intrapanel responses (approximately > 150 Hz) of the fuselage provide a broadband volume velocity source that strongly excites a high density of interior modes. Mode coupling between the structural response and the interior modes appears to be negligible due to a lack of frequency proximity and mismatches in the spatial distribution. A high degree-of-freedom finite element model of the fuselage section was developed as a predictive tool. The calculated response is in good agreement with the experimental result, yielding a general model development methodology for accurate prediction of structures with moderate to high complexity.

  4. [Treatment of giant acoustic neuromas].

    PubMed

    Samprón, Nicolás; Altuna, Xabier; Armendáriz, Mikel; Urculo, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the treatment modality and outcome of a series of patients with giant acoustic neuromas, a particular type of tumour characterised by their size (extracanalicular diameter of 4cm or more) and high morbidity and mortality. This was a retrospective unicentre study of patients with acoustic neuromas treated in a period of 12 years. In our institutional series of 108 acoustic neuromas operated on during that period, we found 13 (12%) cases of giant acoustic neuromas. We reviewed the available data of these cases, including presentation and several clinical, anatomical, and microsurgical aspects. All patients were operated on by the same neurosurgeon and senior author (EU) using the suboccipital retrosigmoid approach and complete microsurgical removal was achieved in 10 cases. In one case, near total removal was deliberately performed, in another case a CSF shunt was placed as the sole treatment measure, and in the remaining case no direct treatment was given. One patient died in the immediate postoperative period. One year after surgery, 4 patients showed facial nerve function of iii or more in the House-Brackman scale. The 4 most important prognostic characteristics of giant acoustic neuromas are size, adhesion to surrounding structures, consistency and vascularity. Only the first of these is evident in neuroimaging. Giant acoustic neuromas are characterised by high morbidity at presentation as well as after treatment. Nevertheless, the objective of complete microsurgical removal with preservation of cranial nerve function is attainable in some cases through the suboccipital retrosigmoid approach. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental modal analysis of the fuselage panels of an Aero Commander aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geisler, D.

    1981-01-01

    The reduction of interior noise in light aircraft was investigated with emphasis the thin fuselage sidewall. The approach used is theoretical and involves modeling of the sidewall panels and stiffeners. Experimental data obtained from tests investigating the effects of mass and stiffness treatments to the sidewalls are presented. The dynamic characteristics of treated panels are contrasted with the untreated sidewall panels using experimental modal analysis techniques. The results include the natural frequencies, modal dampling, and mode shapes of selected panels. Frequency response functions, data relating to the global fuselage response, and acoustic response are also presented.

  6. Design and performance of duct acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motsinger, R. E.; Kraft, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The procedure for designing acoustic treatment panels used to line the walls of aircraft engine ducts and for estimating the resulting suppression of turbofan engine duct noise is discussed. This procedure is intended to be used for estimating noise suppression of existing designs or for designing new acoustic treatment panels and duct configurations to achieve desired suppression levels.

  7. Fuselage ventilation under wind conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    To determine realistic fuselage ventilation rates for post-crash fires and full-scale fire tests, the effects on wind-about fuselage ventilation rate of various parameters were studied. The parameters investigated were fuselage size and shape, fuselage orientation and proximity to ground, fuselage-opening and location, and wind speed and direction.

  8. Fuselage shell and cavity response measurements on a DC-9 test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, M. A.; Mathur, G. P.; Cannon, M. R.; Tran, B. N.; Burge, P. L.

    1991-01-01

    A series of fuselage shell and cavity response measurements conducted on a DC-9 aircraft test section are described. The objectives of these measurements were to define the shell and cavity model characteristics of the fuselage, understand the structural-acoustic coupling characteristics of the fuselage, and measure the response of the fuselage to different types of acoustic and vibration excitation. The fuselage was excited with several combinations of acoustic and mechanical sources using interior and exterior loudspeakers and shakers, and the response to these inputs was measured with arrays of microphones and accelerometers. The data were analyzed to generate spatial plots of the shell acceleration and cabin acoustic pressure field, and corresponding acceleration and pressure wavenumber maps. Analysis and interpretation of the spatial plots and wavenumber maps provided the required information on modal characteristics, structural-acoustic coupling, and fuselage response.

  9. Aerodynamics of the Fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Multhopp, H.

    1942-01-01

    The present report deals with a number of problems, particularly with the interaction of the fuselage with the wing and tail, on the basis of simple calculating method's derived from greatly idealized concepts. For the fuselage alone it affords, in variance with potential theory, a certain frictional lift in yawed flow, which, similar to the lift of a wing of small aspect ratio, is no longer linearly related to the angle of attack. Nevertheless there exists for this frictional lift something like a neutral stability point the position of which on oblong fuselages appears to be associated with the lift increase of the fuselage in proximity to the zero lift, according to the present experiments. The Pitching moments of the fuselage can be determined with comparatively great reliability so far as the flow conditions in the neighborhood of the axis of the fuselage can be approximated if the fuselage were absent, which, in general, is not very difficult. For the unstable contribution of the fuselage to the static longitudinal stability of the airplane it affords comparatively simple formulas, the evaluation of which offers little difficulty. On the engine nacelles there is, in addition a very substantial wing moment contribution induced by the nonuniform distribution of the transverse displacement flow of the nacelle along the wing chord; this also can be represented by a simple formula. A check on a large number of dissimilar aircraft types regarding the unstable fuselage and nacelle moments disclosed an agreement with the wind-tunnel tests, which should be sufficient for practical requirements. The errors remained throughout within the scope of instrumental accuracy.

  10. Noise transmission characteristics of a large scale composite fuselage model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyer, Todd B.; Silcox, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    Results from an experimental test undertaken to study the basic noise transmission characteristics of a realistic, built-up composite fuselage model are presented. The floor-equipped stiffened composite cylinder was exposed to a number of different exterior noise source configurations in a large anechoic chamber. These exterior source configurations included two point sources located in the same plane on opposite sides of the cylinder, a single point source and a propeller simulator. The results indicate that the interior source field is affected strongly by exterior noise source phasing. Sidewall treatment is seen to reduce the overall interior sound pressure levels and dampen dominant acoustic resonances so that other acoustic modes can affect interior noise distribution.

  11. Laboratory study of the effects of sidewall treatment, source directivity and temperature on the interior noise of a light aircraft fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heitman, K. E.; Mixson, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory study of add-on {coustic treatments for a twin-engine, propeller-driven aircraft fuselage. The sound source was a pneumatic-driver, with attached horn to simulate propeller noise distribution, powered by a white noise signal. Treatments included a double-wall, production-line treatment and various fiberglass and lead-vinyl treatments. Insertion losses, space-averaged across six interior microphone positions, were used to evaluate the treatments. In addition, the effects of sound source angle and ambient temperature on interior sound pressure level are presented. The sound source angle is shown to have a significant effect on one-third octave band localized sound pressure level. While changes in ambient temperature are shown to have little effect on one-third octave band localized sound pressure level, the change in narrowband localized sound pressure level may be dramatic.

  12. Home studio acoustic treatments on a budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverstick, Gavin A.

    2003-04-01

    Digital technology in the recording industry has evolved and expanded, allowing it to be widely available to the public at a significantly lower cost than in previous years. Due to this fact, numerous home studios are either being built inside or converted from bedrooms, dens, and basements. Hobbyists and part-time musicians that typically do not have the advantage of a large recording budget operate the majority of these home studios. Along with digital equipment, acoustic treatment has become more affordable over the years giving many musicians the ability to write, record, and produce an entire album in the comfort of their own home without having to sacrifice acoustical quality along the way. Three separate case studies were conducted on rooms with various sizes, applications, and budgets. Acoustical treatment such as absorption, diffusion, and bass trapping were implemented to reduce the effects of issues such as flutter echo, excessive reverberation, and bass build-up among others. Reactions and subjective comments from each individual studio owner were gathered and assessed to determine how effective home studios can be on a personal and professional level if accurately treated acoustically.

  13. Composite fuselage technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Michael J.; Lagace, Paul A.

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective is to identify and understand, via directed experimentation and analysis, the mechanisms which control the structural behavior of fuselages in their response to damage (resistance, tolerance, and arrest). A further objective is to develop straightforward design methodologies which can be employed by structural designers in preliminary design stages to make intelligent choices concerning the material, layup, and structural configuration so that a more efficient structure with structural integrity can be designed and built.

  14. Rotor-Fuselage Interaction: Analysis and Validation with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.; Bettschart, Nicolas

    1997-01-01

    The problem of rotor-fuselage aerodynamic interaction has to be considered in industry applications from various aspects. First, in order to increase helicopter speed and reduce operational costs, rotorcraft tend to be more and more compact, with a main rotor closer to the fuselage surface. This creates significant perturbations both on the main rotor and on the fuselage, including steady and unsteady effects due to blade and wake passage and perturbed inflow at the rotor disk. Furthermore,the main rotor wake affects the tail boom, empennage and anti-torque system. This has important consequences for helicopter control and vibrations at low speeds and also on tail rotor acoustics (main rotor wake-tail rotor interactions). This report describes the US Army-France MOD cooperative work on this problem from both the theoretical and experimental aspects. Using experimental 3D velocity field and fuselage surface pressure measurements, three codes that model the interactions of a helicopter rotor with a fuselage are compared. These comparisons demonstrate some of the strengths and weaknesses of current models for the combined rotor-fuselage analysis.

  15. Advanced composite fuselage technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Smith, Peter J.; Horton, Ray E.

    1993-01-01

    Boeing's ATCAS program has completed its third year and continues to progress towards a goal to demonstrate composite fuselage technology with cost and weight advantages over aluminum. Work on this program is performed by an integrated team that includes several groups within The Boeing Company, industrial and university subcontractors, and technical support from NASA. During the course of the program, the ATCAS team has continued to perform a critical review of composite developments by recognizing advances in metal fuselage technology. Despite recent material, structural design, and manufacturing advancements for metals, polymeric matrix composite designs studied in ATCAS still project significant cost and weight advantages for future applications. A critical path to demonstrating technology readiness for composite transport fuselage structures was created to summarize ATCAS tasks for Phases A, B, and C. This includes a global schedule and list of technical issues which will be addressed throughout the course of studies. Work performed in ATCAS since the last ACT conference is also summarized. Most activities relate to crown quadrant manufacturing scaleup and performance verification. The former was highlighted by fabricating a curved, 7 ft. by 10 ft. panel, with cocured hat-stiffeners and cobonded J-frames. In building to this scale, process developments were achieved for tow-placed skins, drape formed stiffeners, braided/RTM frames, and panel cure tooling. Over 700 tests and supporting analyses have been performed for crown material and design evaluation, including structural tests that demonstrated limit load requirements for severed stiffener/skin failsafe damage conditions. Analysis of tests for tow-placed hybrid laminates with large damage indicates a tensile fracture toughness that is higher than that observed for advanced aluminum alloys. Additional recent ATCAS achievements include crown supporting technology, keel quadrant design evaluation, and

  16. Flying wings / flying fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper has documented the historical relationships between various classes of all lifting vehicles, which includes the flying wing, all wing, tailless, lifting body, and lifting fuselage. The diversity in vehicle focus was to ensure that all vehicle types that map have contributed to or been influenced by the development of the classical flying wing concept was investigated. The paper has provided context and perspective for present and future aircraft design studies that may employ the all lifting vehicle concept. The paper also demonstrated the benefit of developing an understanding of the past in order to obtain the required knowledge to create future concepts with significantly improved aerodynamic performance.

  17. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, L. (Technical Monitor); Parrott, T. (Technical Monitor); Jones, M. (Technical Monitor); Kraft, R. E.; Yu, J.; Kwan, H. W.; Beer, B.; Seybert, A. F.; Tathavadekar, P.

    2003-01-01

    The ability to design, build and test miniaturized acoustic treatment panels on scale model fan rigs representative of full scale engines provides not only cost-savings, but also an opportunity to optimize the treatment by allowing multiple tests. To use scale model treatment as a design tool, the impedance of the sub-scale liner must be known with confidence. This study was aimed at developing impedance measurement methods for high frequencies. A normal incidence impedance tube method that extends the upper frequency range to 25,000 Hz. without grazing flow effects was evaluated. The free field method was investigated as a potential high frequency technique. The potential of the two-microphone in-situ impedance measurement method was evaluated in the presence of grazing flow. Difficulties in achieving the high frequency goals were encountered in all methods. Results of developing a time-domain finite difference resonator impedance model indicated that a re-interpretation of the empirical fluid mechanical models used in the frequency domain model for nonlinear resistance and mass reactance may be required. A scale model treatment design that could be tested on the Universal Propulsion Simulator vehicle was proposed.

  18. Composite Fuselage Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagace, Paul A.

    1999-01-01

    Work was conducted over a ten-year period to address the central issue of damage in primary load-bearing aircraft composite structure, specifically fuselage structure. This included the three facets of damage resistance, damage tolerance, and damage arrest. Experimental, analytical, and numerical work was conducted in order to identify and better understand the mechanisms that control the structural behavior of fuselage structures in their response to the three aspects of damage. Furthermore, work was done to develop straightforward design methodologies that can be employed by structural designers in preliminary design stages to make intelligent choices concerning the material, layup, and structural configurations so that a more efficient structure with structural integrity can be designed and built. Considerable progress was made towards achieving these goals via this work. In regard to damage tolerance considerations, the following were identified as important effects: composite layup and associated orthotropy/structural anisotropy, specifics of initial local damage mechanisms, role of longitudinal versus hoop stress, and large deformation and associated geometric nonlinearity. Means were established to account for effects of radius and for the nonlinear response. In particular, nondimensional parameters were identified to characterize the importance of nonlinearity in the response of pressurized cylinders. This led to the establishment of a iso-nonlinear-error plot for reference in structural design. Finally, in the case of damage tolerance, the general approach of the original methodology to predict the failure pressure involving extending basic plate failure data by accounting for the local stress intensification was accomplished for the general case by accounting for the mechanisms noted by utilizing the capability of the STAGS finite element code and numerically calculating the local stress intensification for the particular configuration to be considered

  19. Advanced technology commercial fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, L. B.; Smith, P. J.; Walker, T. H.; Johnson, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    Boeing's program for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structure (ATCAS) has focused on the manufacturing and performance issues associated with a wide body commercial transport fuselage. The primary goal of ATCAS is to demonstrate cost and weight savings over a 1995 aluminum benchmark. A 31 foot section of fuselage directly behind the wing to body intersection was selected for study purposes. This paper summarizes ATCAS contract plans and review progress to date. The six year ATCAS program will study technical issues for crown, side, and keel areas of the fuselage. All structural details in these areas will be included in design studies that incorporate a design build team (DBT) approach. Manufacturing technologies will be developed for concepts deemed by the DBT to have the greatest potential for cost and weight savings. Assembly issues for large, stiff, quadrant panels will receive special attention. Supporting technologies and mechanical tests will concentrate on the major issues identified for fuselage. These include damage tolerance, pressure containment, splices, load redistribution, post-buckled structure, and durability/life. Progress to date includes DBT selection of baseline fuselage concepts; cost and weight comparisons for crown panel designs; initial panel fabrication for manufacturing and structural mechanics research; and toughened material studies related to keel panels. Initial ATCAS studies have shown that NASA's Advanced Composite Technology program goals for cost and weight savings are attainable for composite fuselage.

  20. W-8 Acoustic Casing Treatment Test Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Rick; Podboy, Gary; Dougherty, Robert

    2017-01-01

    During February 2017, aerodynamic and acoustic testing was performed on a scale-model high bypass ratio turbofan rotor, R4, in an internal flow component test facility. An overview of the testing completed is presented.

  1. Quantitative approach in treatment of tinnitus by acoustical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banimostafa, Maryam; Sadjedi, Hamed

    2011-10-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of phantom sounds in the ears or in the head without external sound sources even in the completely silent environment. There is no known effective medical treatment for tinnitus and acoustical stimulation has provided patients with some measure of relief. In this paper treatment method with acoustical stimulation has been investigated and simulated by neural oscillator model, simulation results are confirmed by clinical and physiological reports.

  2. Noise-reduction measurements of stiffened and unstiffened cylindrical models of an airplane fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, C. M.; Mayes, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    Noise-reduction measurements are presented for a stiffened and an unstiffened model of an airplane fuselage. The cylindrical models were tested in a reverberant-field noise environment over a frequency range from 20 Hz to 6 kHz. An unstiffened metal fuselage provided more noise reduction than a fuselage having the same sidewall weight divided between skin and stiffening stringers and ring frames. The addition of acoustic insulation to the models tended to smooth out the interior-noise spectrum by reducing or masking the noise associated with the structural response at some of the resonant frequencies.

  3. Acoustically Tailored Composite Rotorcraft Fuselage Panels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-02

    to reduce noise transmitted into the passenger cabin of a rotorcraft. The focus is on the structural roof panels, which are mechanically connected...typical methods of reducing cabin noise - applying thin sheets of constrained layer damping (CLD) material and/or layer(s) of fiberglass insulation to the...frequencies between 1 and 4 kHz where gear meshing noise from the transmission has the most impact on speech intelligibility. The roof section, framed

  4. Design of optimum acoustic treatment for rectangular ducts with flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motsinger, R. E.; Kraft, R. E.; Zwick, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A design optimization technique for acoustic treatment in rectangular ducts with uniform mean flow is presented. The technique is based on the acoustic wave solution in terms of series of characteristic duct modes. The analysis allows multiple axial treatment sections along the length of the duct and requires a known modal characterization of the sound source. Conditions of acoustic pressure and acoustic velocity continuity are used to match modal solutions at planes of impedance discontinuity in the duct. Experimental techniques for obtaining this modal characterization are presented. Using duct modes measured at the source plane, the optimization technique is exercised to design an optimized single element liner in a case without mean flow, and optimized single and dual element liners in cases with mean flow. The validity of the program for predicting noise suppression is demonstrated by comparing analytical predictions with measured data for several (non-optimum) cases. Application to treatment design in turbomachinery exhaust ducts is considered.

  5. Ducted fan acoustic radiation including the effects of nonuniform mean flow and acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter; Roy, Indranil Danda

    1993-01-01

    Forward and aft acoustic propagation and radiation from a ducted fan is modeled using a finite element discretization of the acoustic field equations. The fan noise source is introduced as equivalent body forces representing distributed blade loading. The flow in and around the nacelle is assumed to be nonuniform, reflecting the effects of forward flight and flow into the inlet. Refraction due to the fan exit jet shear layer is not represented. Acoustic treatment on the inlet and exhaust duct surfaces provides a mechanism for attenuation. In a region enclosing the fan a pressure formulation is used with the assumption of locally uniform flow. Away from the fan a velocity potential formulation is used and the flow is assumed nonuniform but irrotational. A procedure is developed for matching the two regions by making use of local duct modal amplitudes as transition state variables and determining the amplitudes by enforcing natural boundary conditions at the interface between adjacent regions in which pressure and velocity potential are used. Simple models of rotor alone and rotor/exit guide vane generated noise are used to demonstrate the calculation of the radiated acoustic field and to show the effect of acoustic treatment. The model has been used to assess the success of four techniques for acoustic lining optimization in reducing far field noise.

  6. Ducted fan acoustic radiation including the effects of nonuniform mean flow and acoustic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eversman, Walter; Roy, Indranil Danda

    1993-07-01

    Forward and aft acoustic propagation and radiation from a ducted fan is modeled using a finite element discretization of the acoustic field equations. The fan noise source is introduced as equivalent body forces representing distributed blade loading. The flow in and around the nacelle is assumed to be nonuniform, reflecting the effects of forward flight and flow into the inlet. Refraction due to the fan exit jet shear layer is not represented. Acoustic treatment on the inlet and exhaust duct surfaces provides a mechanism for attenuation. In a region enclosing the fan a pressure formulation is used with the assumption of locally uniform flow. Away from the fan a velocity potential formulation is used and the flow is assumed nonuniform but irrotational. A procedure is developed for matching the two regions by making use of local duct modal amplitudes as transition state variables and determining the amplitudes by enforcing natural boundary conditions at the interface between adjacent regions in which pressure and velocity potential are used. Simple models of rotor alone and rotor/exit guide vane generated noise are used to demonstrate the calculation of the radiated acoustic field and to show the effect of acoustic treatment. The model has been used to assess the success of four techniques for acoustic lining optimization in reducing far field noise.

  7. Prediction and Measurement of the Vibration and Acoustic Radiation of Panels Subjected to Acoustic Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    1995-01-01

    Interior noise and sonic fatigue are important issues in the development and design of advanced subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Conventional aircraft typically employ passive treatments, such as constrained layer damping and acoustic absorption materials, to reduce the structural response and resulting acoustic levels in the aircraft interior. These techniques require significant addition of mass and only attenuate relatively high frequency noise transmitted through the fuselage. Although structural acoustic coupling is in general very important in the study of aircraft fuselage interior noise, analysis of noise transmission through a panel supported in an infinite rigid baffle (separating two semi-infinite acoustic domains) can be useful in evaluating the effects of active/adaptive materials, complex loading, etc. Recent work has been aimed at developing adaptive and/or active methods of controlling the structural acoustic response of panels to reduce the transmitted noise1. A finite element formulation was recently developed to study the dynamic response of shape memory alloy (SMA) hybrid composite panels (conventional composite panel with embedded SMA fibers) subject to combined acoustic and thermal loads2. Further analysis has been performed to predict the far-field acoustic radiation using the finite element dynamic panel response prediction3. The purpose of the present work is to validate the panel vibration and acoustic radiation prediction methods with baseline experimental results obtained from an isotropic panel, without the effect of SMA.

  8. Prediction and Measurement of the Vibration and Acoustic Radiation of Panels Subjected to Acoustic Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    1995-01-01

    Interior noise and sonic fatigue are important issues in the development and design of advanced subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Conventional aircraft typically employ passive treatments, such as constrained layer damping and acoustic absorption materials, to reduce the structural response and resulting acoustic levels in the aircraft interior. These techniques require significant addition of mass and only attenuate relatively high frequency noise transmitted through the fuselage. Although structural acoustic coupling is in general very important in the study of aircraft fuselage interior noise, analysis of noise transmission through a panel supported in an infinite rigid baffle (separating two semi-infinite acoustic domains) can be useful in evaluating the effects of active/adaptive materials, complex loading, etc. Recent work has been aimed at developing adaptive and/or active methods of controlling the structural acoustic response of panels to reduce the transmitted noise1. A finite element formulation was recently developed to study the dynamic response of shape memory alloy (SMA) hybrid composite panels (conventional composite panel with embedded SMA fibers) subject to combined acoustic and thermal loads2. Further analysis has been performed to predict the far-field acoustic radiation using the finite element dynamic panel response prediction3. The purpose of the present work is to validate the panel vibration and acoustic radiation prediction methods with baseline experimental results obtained from an isotropic panel, without the effect of SMA.

  9. Stiffened Composite Fuselage Barrel Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movva, R. G.; Mittal, A.; Agrawal, K.; Upadhyay, C. S.

    2012-07-01

    In a typical commercial transport aircraft, Stiffened skin panels and frames contribute around 40% of the fuselage weight. In the current study a stiffened composite fuselage skin panel optimization engine is developed for optimization of the layups of composite panels and stringers using Genetic Algorithm (GA). The skin and stringers of the fuselage section are optimized for the strength and the stability requirements. The selection of the GA parameters considered for the optimization is arrived by performing case studies on selected problems. The optimization engine facilitates in carrying out trade studies for selection of the optimum ply layup and material combination for the configuration being analyzed. The optimization process is applied on a sample model and the results are presented.

  10. 14 CFR 25.783 - Fuselage doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuselage doors. 25.783 Section 25.783... Fuselage doors. (a) General. This section applies to fuselage doors, which includes all doors, hatches... of tools to open or close. This also applies to each door or hatch through a pressure...

  11. 14 CFR 25.783 - Fuselage doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... station that all required operations to close, latch, and lock the door(s) have been completed. (2) There... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuselage doors. 25.783 Section 25.783... Fuselage doors. (a) General. This section applies to fuselage doors, which includes all doors,...

  12. Lightweight acoustic treatments for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naify, Christina Jeanne

    2011-12-01

    Increase in the use of composites for aerospace applications has the benefit of decreased structural weight, but at the cost of decreased acoustic performance. Stiff, lightweight structures (such as composites) are traditionally not ideal for acoustic insulation applications because of high transmission loss at low frequencies. A need has thus arisen for effective sound insulation materials for aerospace and automotive applications with low weight addition. Current approaches, such as the addition of mass law dominated materials (foams) also perform poorly when scaled to small thickness and low density. In this dissertation, methods which reduce sound transmission without adding significant weight are investigated. The methods presented are intended to be integrated into currently used lightweight structures such as honeycomb sandwich panels and to cover a wide range of frequencies. Layering gasses of differing acoustic impedances on a panel substantially reduced the amount of sound energy transmitted through the panel with respect to the panel alone or an equivalent-thickness single species gas layer. The additional transmission loss derives from successive impedance mismatches at the interfaces between gas layers and the resulting inefficient energy transfer. Attachment of additional gas layers increased the transmission loss (TL) by as much as 17 dB at high (>1 kHz) frequencies. The location and ordering of the gasses with respect to the panel were important factors in determining the magnitude of the total TL. Theoretical analysis using a transfer matrix method was used to calculate the frequency dependence of sound transmission for the different configurations tested. The method accurately predicted the relative increases in TL observed with the addition of different gas layer configurations. To address low-frequency sound insulation, membrane-type locally resonant acoustic materials (LRAM) were fabricated, characterized, and analyzed to understand their

  13. Fuselage upwash effects on RSRA rotor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, J.; Dadone, L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of RSRA fuselage configurations on rotor performance and loads have been quantified analytically by means of currently available potential flow and rotor analysis. Four configurations of the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) were considered in this study. They were: (1) fuselage alone (conventional helicopter); (2) fuselage with auxiliary propulsion; (3) fuselage with wings (auxiliary lift); and (4) fuselage with both auxiliary lift propulsion. The rotor system investigated was identical to a CH-47D front rotor except that it had four instead of three blades. Two scaled-down versions of the same rotor were also analyzed to determine the effect of rotor scale on the fuselage upwash effects. The flight conditions considered for the upwash study are discussed. The potential flow models for the RSRA configuration, with and without the wings and the auxiliary propulsion system, are presented. The results of fuselage/wing/propulsion system upwash on performance and loads are also presented.

  14. Optimizing acoustical treatment. [structural design criteria for theater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuran, N.; Ramboiu, S.; Farcas, I.; Halpert, E.

    1974-01-01

    A mathematical linear programming model is presented for optimizing acoustical treatment and interior decoration of concert and other public halls. This method provides the designer with a range of acoustically correct solutions at increased economical efficiency. The mathematical model uses geometrical data about the room, recommended reverberation time values, the architect's choice of given sound absorbing structures and finishing materials. The model permits inclusion of aesthetical considerations about conditioning, proportioning, or, on the contrary, reciprocal exclusion of any classes of material and/or sound absorbing structure.

  15. Laboratory test and acoustic analysis of cabin treatment for propfan test assessment aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, H. L.; Gatineau, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    An aircraft cabin acoustic enclosure, built in support of the Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) program, is described. Helmholtz resonators were attached to the cabin trim panels to increase the sidewall transmission loss (TL). Resonators (448) were located between the trim panels and fuselage shell. In addition, 152 resonators were placed between the enclosure and aircraft floors. The 600 resonators were each tuned to a 235 Hz resonance frequency. After flight testing on the PTA aircraft, the enclosure was tested in the Kelly Johnson R and D Center Acoustics Lab. Laboratory noise reduction (NR) test results are discussed. The enclosure was placed in a Gulfstream 2 fuselage section. Broadband (138 dB overall SPL) and tonal (149 dB overall SPL) excitations were used in the lab. Tonal excitation simulated the propfan flight test excitation. The fundamental tone was stepped in 2 Hz intervals from 225 through 245 Hz. The resonators increase the NR of the cabin walls around the resonance frequency of the resonator array. The effects of flanking, sidewall absorption, cabin adsorption, resonator loading of trim panels, and panel vibrations are presented. Increases in NR of up to 11 dB were measured.

  16. Fuselage panel noise attenuation by piezoelectric switching control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makihara, Kanjuro; Miyakawa, Takeya; Onoda, Junjiro; Minesugi, Kenji

    2010-08-01

    This paper describes a problem that we encountered in our noise attenuation project and our solution for it. We intend to attenuate low-frequency noise that transmits through aircraft fuselage panels. Our method of noise attenuation is implemented with a piezoelectric semi-active system having a selective switch instead of an active energy-supply system. The semi-active controller is based on the predicted sound pressure distribution obtained from acoustic emission analysis. Experiments and numerical simulations demonstrate that the semi-active method attenuates acoustic levels of not only the simple monochromatic noise but also of broadband noise. We reveal that tuning the electrical parameters in the circuit is the key to effective noise attenuation, to overcome the acoustic excitation problem due to sharp switching actions, as well as to control chattering problems. The results obtained from this investigation provide meaningful insights into designing noise attenuation systems for comfortable aircraft cabin environments.

  17. An unsteady rotor/fuselage interaction method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. Alan; Lorber, Peter F.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical method has been developed to treat unsteady helicopter rotor, wake, and fuselage interaction aerodynamics. An existing lifting line/prescribed wake rotor analysis and a source panel fuselage analysis were modified to predict vibratory fuselage airloads. The analyses were coupled through the induced flow velocities of the rotor and wake on the fuselage and the fuselage on the rotor. A prescribed displacement technique was used to distort the rotor wake about the fuselage. Sensitivity studies were performed to determine the influence of wake and body geometry on the computed airloads. Predicted and measured mean and unsteady pressures on a cylindrical body in the wake of a two-bladed rotor were compared. Initial results show good qualitative agreement.

  18. An unsteady rotor/fuselage interaction method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. Alan; Lorber, Peter F.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical method has been developed to treat unsteady helicopter rotor, wake, and fuselage interaction aerodynamics. An existing lifting line/prescribed wake rotor analysis and a source panel fuselage analysis were modified to predict vibratory fuselage airloads. The analyses were coupled through the induced flow velocities of the rotor and wake on the fuselage and the fuselage on the rotor. A prescribed displacement technique was used to distort the rotor wake about the fuselage. Sensitivity studies were performed to determine the influence of wake and body geometry on the computed airloads. Predicted and measured mean and unsteady pressures on a cylindrical body in the wake of a two-bladed rotor were compared. Initial results show good qualitative agreement.

  19. An unsteady helicopter rotor: Fuselage interaction analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorber, Peter F.; Egolf, T. Alan

    1988-01-01

    A computational method was developed to treat unsteady aerodynamic interactions between a helicopter rotor, wake, and fuselage and between the main and tail rotors. An existing lifting line prescribed wake rotor analysis and a source panel fuselage analysis were coupled and modified to predict unsteady fuselage surface pressures and airloads. A prescribed displacement technique is used to position the rotor wake about the fuselage. Either a rigid blade or an aeroelastic blade analysis may be used to establish rotor operating conditions. Sensitivity studies were performed to determine the influence of the wake fuselage geometry on the computation. Results are presented that describe the induced velocities, pressures, and airloads on the fuselage and on the rotor. The ability to treat arbitrary geometries is demonstrated using a simulated helicopter fuselage. The computational results are compared with fuselage surface pressure measurements at several locations. No experimental data was available to validate the primary product of the analysis: the vibratory airloads on the entire fuselage. A main rotor-tail rotor interaction analysis is also described, along with some hover and forward flight.

  20. Evaluating the Acoustic Benefits of Over-the-Rotor Acoustic Treatments Installed on the Advanced Noise Control Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazella, Matthew R.; Takakura, Tamuto; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Bozak, Richard F.; Tester, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, over-the-rotor acoustic treatments have been evaluated by NASA with varying success. Recently, NASA has been developing the next generation of over-the-rotor acoustic treatments for fan noise reduction. The NASA Glenn Research Centers Advanced Noise Control Fan was used as a Low Technology Readiness Level test bed. A rapid prototyped in-duct array consisting of 50 microphones was employed, and used to correlate the in-duct analysis to the far-field acoustic levels and to validate an existing beam-former method. The goal of this testing was to improve the Technology Readiness Level of various over-the-rotor acoustic treatments by advancing the understanding of the physical mechanisms and projecting the far-field acoustic benefit.

  1. Spinning mode sound propagation in ducts with acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    Recent acoustic data have shown larger noise attenuations than predicted for acoustically treated aircraft engine inlets without splitter rings. These data have stimulated a more detailed theoretical study of the acoustic propagation of spinning modes in acoustically treated open circular ducts. In addition, the suppressor with splitter rings was modeled by using the rectangular approximation to the annular duct. The theoretical models were used to determine optimum impedance and maximum attenuation for several spinning lobe numbers from 0 to 50. It is found that for circular ducts the maximum possible attenuation and the optimum wall impedance are strong functions of the lobe number. For annular ducts the attenuation and optimum wall impedance are insensitive to the spinning lobe number for well cut-on modes. The results help explain why suppressors with splitter rings have been quite effective in spite of the lack of detailed information on the noise-source modal structure. Conversely, effective use of outer-wall treatment alone will require expanded knowledge of the noise-source structure. Approximate solutions are presented to help interpret the more exact theoretical results.

  2. Spinning mode sound propagation in ducts with acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    Recent acoustic data show larger noise attenuations than predicted for acoustically treated aircraft engine inlets without splitter rings. A theoretical study of the acoustic propagation of spinning modes in acoustically treated open circular ducts is presented, and a suppressor with splitter rings was modeled by using the rectangular approximation to the annular duct. Theoretical models were used to determine optimum impedance and maximum attenuation for several spinning lobe numbers from 0 to 50. Results of the analysis indicate that for circular ducts the maximum possible attenuation and the optimum wall impedance are strong functions of the lobe number, and for annular ducts the attenuation and optimum wall impedance are insensitive to the spinning lobe number for well cut-on modes. These results explain why suppressors with splitter rings were quite effective in spite of the lack of detailed information on the noise source modal structure. Conversely, effective use of outer wall treatment alone will require expanded knowledge of the noise source structure. Approximate solutions are presented to help interpret the more exact theoretical results.

  3. Radiosurgery as treatment for acoustic neuroma. Ten years' experience.

    PubMed

    Llópez Carratalá, Ignacio; Escorihuela García, Vicente; Orts Alborch, Miguel; de Paula Vernetta, Carlos; Marco Algarra, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic neuroma is a benign tumour that usually affects the vestibular portion of the vestibulocochlear nerve. It represents 8% of all intracranial tumours and 80% of those arising at the cerebellopontine angle. There are 3 treatment options: microsurgery (the technique of choice), radiosurgery and observation. The objective of the study was to evaluate the results and side effects obtained using radiosurgery as treatment for acoustic neuroma. We performed a review of all patients treated with radiosurgery (Gamma Knife and linear accelerator) at doses of 1200-1300 cGy for unilateral acoustic neuroma in our hospital from January 1999 until January 2010. In all patients we evaluated the overall state, tumour growth control rate (tumour smaller or remaining the same size), the involvement of v and vii cranial nerves and central nervous system disorders. We also assessed follow-up time and changes in hearing thresholds after radiosurgery. From a total of 35 patients studied, with a mean age of 58.29 years and lacking statistically significant differences in gender, the tumour growth control rate was over 90%. The main reason for visit (65.71%) was unilateral and progressive hearing loss. After treatment, 34.28% of patients had hearing loss. The involvement of the cranial nerves (v-vii) was transitory in 100% of cases. Gamma Knife radiosurgery was administered in 82.85% of patients. Although microsurgery is the treatment of choice for acoustic neuroma, we consider radiosurgery as a valid alternative in selected patients (elderly, comorbidity, small tumour size and sensorineural hearing loss, among others). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  4. Acoustic hemostasis device for automated treatment of bleeding in limbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekins, K. Michael; Zeng, Xiaozheng; Barnes, Stephen; Hopple, Jerry; Kook, John; Moreau-Gobard, Romain; Hsu, Stephen; Ahiekpor-Dravi, Alexis; Lee, Chi-Yin; Ramachandran, Suresh; Maleke, Caroline; Eaton, John; Wong, Keith; Keneman, Scott

    2012-10-01

    A research prototype automated image-guided acoustic hemostasis system for treatment of deep bleeding was developed and tested in limb phantoms. The system incorporated a flexible, conformal acoustic applicator cuff. Electronically steered and focused therapeutic arrays (Tx) populated the cuff to enable dosing from multiple Tx's simultaneously. Similarly, multiple imaging arrays (Ix) were deployed on the cuff to enable 3D compounded images for targeting and treatment monitoring. To affect a lightweight cuff, highly integrated Tx electrical circuitry was implemented, fabric and lightweight structural materials were used, and components were minimized. Novel cuff and Ix and Tx mechanical registration approaches were used to insure targeting accuracy. Two-step automation was implemented: 1) targeting (3D image volume acquisition and stitching, Power and Pulsed Wave Doppler automated bleeder detection, identification of bone, followed by closed-loop iterative Tx beam targeting), and 2) automated dosing (auto-selection of arrays and Tx dosing parameters, power initiation and then monitoring by acoustic thermometry for power shut-off). In final testing the device automatically detected 65% of all bleeders (with various bleeder flow rates). Accurate targeting was achieved in HIFU phantoms with end-dose (30 sec) temperature rise reaching the desired 33-58°C. Automated closed-loop targeting and treatment was demonstrated in separate phantoms.

  5. Non-waisted fuselage design for supersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, James O. (Inventor); Agrawal, Shreekant (Inventor); Antani, Dhamanshu L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method for designing a non-waisted fuselage for supersonic wing/fuselage configurations that increases the fuselage volume and improves the supersonic aerodynamic performance compared to a conventional waisted-fuselage configuration. The method entails removing the waisted region of an existing waisted-fuselage configuration by linearly reconstructing cross-sections between the endpoints representing the waisted cross-sectional area portion to create a modified fuselage configuration without waisting. This configuration will have increased fuselage volume and improved supersonic aerodynamic performance. The fuselage camber can then be optimized using non-linear aerodynamic methods to further increase the supersonic aerodynamic performance.

  6. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilden, K. S.; Harris, C. G.; Flynn, B. W.; Gessel, M. G.; Scholz, D. B.; Stawski, S.; Winston, V.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program is to develop the technology required for cost-and weight-efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements, and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of stringer-stiffened and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant-section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements cocured to skin structures. Significant process development efforts included AFP, braiding, RTM, autoclave cure, and core blanket fabrication for both sandwich and stiffened-skin structure. Outer-mold-line and inner-mold-line tooling was developed for sandwich structures and stiffened-skin structure. The effect of design details, process control and tool design on repeatable, dimensionally stable, structure for low cost barrel assembly was assessed. Subcomponent panels representative of crown, keel, and side quadrant panels were fabricated to assess scale-up effects and manufacturing anomalies for full-scale structures. Manufacturing database including time studies, part quality, and manufacturing plans were generated to support the development of designs and analytical models to access cost, structural performance, and dimensional tolerance.

  7. A comparison between acoustic mode measurements and acoustic finite element analysis performed for SAAB SF 340

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeransson, P.; Green, I.

    1986-03-01

    In order to verify an acoustic finite element package, measured and calculated eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies for Saab SF 340 cabin acoustics were compared. The measurements were performed in an acoustic mockup. For the analysis, a two dimensional model of the cross section of the fuselage was used. The comparison shows quite good agreement, the discrepancies being due to the representation of the flexible wall of the fuselage as rigid in the analysis.

  8. Simulation of propfan noise impact on a fuselage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, A. B.

    1983-04-01

    The modification of aircraft fuselage structures to withstand and shield against strong acoustic waves generated by propfan engines presents major difficulties in that a full-size propfan has yet to be built. The present paper describes a siren that may be used for the ground-based or in-flight simulation of propfan noise in the development of suitable fuselage structures. The siren is powered by compressed air, and is configured in such a way that the ejected air generates a rotating acoustic wave that is much like the rotating rave attached to a two-bladed propfan. In contrast to the conventional high-energy siren, the rotating-wave-pattern siren can simulate the propfan and its high-speed (up to supersonic) blade rotation. The new device is capable of providing sound pressure levels equal to those projected for an advanced propfan design, yet is economical to build and maintain, requiring only mechanical parts operating at speeds well below sonic.

  9. Acoustic Wave Treatment For Cellulite—A New Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russe-Wilflingseder, Katharina; Russe, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    Background and Objectives: Cellulite is a biological caused modification of the female connective tissue. In extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) pulses are penetrating into the tissue without causing a thermal effect or micro lesions, but leading to a stimulation of tissue metabolism and blood circulation, inducing a natural repair process with cell activation and stem cells proliferation. Recently ESWT treatment showed evidence of remodelling collagen within the dermis and of stimulating microcirculation in fatty tissue. Study Design and Methods: The study was designed to assess acoustic wave treatment for cellulite by comparison treated vs. untreated side (upper-leg and buttock). Each individual served as its own control. 11 females with a BMI less then 30 and an age over 18 years were included. 6 treatments were given weekly with radial acoustic waves. Documentation was done before and 1, 4, 12 weeks after last treatment by standardized photo documentation, relaxed and with muscle contraction, measurement of body weight and circumference of the thigh, pinch test, and evaluation of hormonal status and lifestyle. The efficacy of AWT/EPAT was evaluated before and 1, 4, 12 weeks after last treatment. Patients rated the improvement of cellulite, overall satisfaction and acceptance. The therapist assessed improvement of cellulite, side effects and photo documentation treated vs. untreated side, before vs. after treatment. The blinded investigator evaluated the results using photo documentation right vs. left leg, before vs. after treatment in a frontal, lateral and dorsal view, relaxed and with muscle contraction. Results: The improvement of cellulite at the treated side was rated by patients with 27,3% at week 4 and 12, by the therapist with 34,1% at week 4 and 31,2% at week 12 after the last treatment The blinded investigator could verify an improvement of cellulite in an increasing number of patients with increasing time interval after treatment. No side

  10. Investigation on Sound Field Model of Propeller AIRCRAFT—THE Effect of Rigid Fuselage Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T. Q.; Zhou, S.

    1998-01-01

    An improved sound field model with multiple propeller noise sources and finite fuselage boundary has been developed for the prediction of propeller aircraft noise by using the acoustic analogy method. It involves the effects of fuselage boundary with arbitrary shape and coupling of multiple propeller sources. It is also applicable to solving the interaction between any known boundary and harmonic sound source. The model has been used to calculate the sound field of propeller aircraft Y12 with rigid fuselage boundary and the sound field of rigid sphere in planar harmonic sound wave. The latter has an analytical solution which could be used to check the present method. The calculation results show that the model is reasonable and valuable.

  11. Performance of fuselage pressure structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maclin, James R.

    1992-01-01

    There are currently more than 1,000 Boeing airplanes around the world over 20 years old. That number is expected to double by the year 1995. With these statistics comes the reality that structural airworthiness will be in the forefront of aviation issues well into the next century. The results of previous and recent test programs Boeing has implemented to study the structural performance of older airplanes relative to pressurized fuselage sections are described. Included in testing were flat panels with multiple site damage (MSD), a full-scale 737 and 2 747s as well as panels representing a 737 and 777, and a generic aircraft in large pressure-test fixtures. Because damage is a normal part of aging, focus is on the degree to which structural integrity is maintained after failure or partial failure of any structural element, including multiple site damage (MSD), and multiple element damage (MED).

  12. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  13. 14 CFR 25.856 - Thermal/Acoustic insulation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Thermal/Acoustic insulation materials. 25....856 Thermal/Acoustic insulation materials. (a) Thermal/acoustic insulation material installed in the.../acoustic insulation materials (including the means of fastening the materials to the fuselage) installed in...

  14. 14 CFR 25.856 - Thermal/Acoustic insulation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Thermal/Acoustic insulation materials. 25....856 Thermal/Acoustic insulation materials. (a) Thermal/acoustic insulation material installed in the.../acoustic insulation materials (including the means of fastening the materials to the fuselage) installed in...

  15. 14 CFR 25.856 - Thermal/Acoustic insulation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Thermal/Acoustic insulation materials. 25....856 Thermal/Acoustic insulation materials. (a) Thermal/acoustic insulation material installed in the.../acoustic insulation materials (including the means of fastening the materials to the fuselage) installed in...

  16. 14 CFR 25.856 - Thermal/Acoustic insulation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Thermal/Acoustic insulation materials. 25....856 Thermal/Acoustic insulation materials. (a) Thermal/acoustic insulation material installed in the.../acoustic insulation materials (including the means of fastening the materials to the fuselage) installed in...

  17. 14 CFR 25.856 - Thermal/Acoustic insulation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Thermal/Acoustic insulation materials. 25....856 Thermal/Acoustic insulation materials. (a) Thermal/acoustic insulation material installed in the.../acoustic insulation materials (including the means of fastening the materials to the fuselage) installed in...

  18. Acoustic Characteristics of Various Treatment Panel Designs for HSCT Ejector Liner Acoustic Technology Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Kraft, R. E.; Syed, A. a.; Vu, D. D.; Mungur, P.; Langenbrunner, L. E.; Majjigi, R. K.

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of the initial effort (Phase I) of HSR Liner Technology Program, the selection of promising liner concepts, design and fabrication of these concepts for laboratory tests, testing these liners in the laboratory by using impedance tube and flow ducts, and developing empirical impedance/suppression correlation, are successfully completed. Acoustic and aerodynamic criteria for the liner design are established. Based on these criteria several liners are designed. The liner concepts designed and fabricated include Single-Degree-of-Freedom (SDOF), Two-Degree-of-Freedom (2DOF), and Bulk Absorber. Two types of SDOF treatment are fabricated, one with a perforated type face plate and the other with a wiremesh (woven) type faceplate. In addition, special configurations of these concepts are also included in the design. Several treatment panels are designed for parametric study. In these panels the facesheets of different porosity, hole diameter, and sheet thickness are utilized. Several deep panels (i.e., 1 in. deep) are designed and instrumented to measure DC flow resistance and insitu impedance in the presence of grazing flow. Basic components of these panels (i.e., facesheets, bulk materials, etc.) are also procured and tested. The results include DC flow resistance, normal impedance, and insertion loss.

  19. Analytical prediction of the interior noise for cylindrical models of aircraft fuselages for prescribed exterior noise fields. Phase 2: Models for sidewall trim, stiffened structures and cabin acoustics with floor partition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, L. D.; Wilby, E. G.

    1982-01-01

    An airplane interior noise prediction model is developed to determine the important parameters associated with sound transmission into the interiors of airplanes, and to identify apropriate noise control methods. Models for stiffened structures, and cabin acoustics with floor partition are developed. Validation studies are undertaken using three test articles: a ring stringer stiffened cylinder, an unstiffened cylinder with floor partition, and ring stringer stiffened cylinder with floor partition and sidewall trim. The noise reductions of the three test articles are computed using the heoretical models and compared to measured values. A statistical analysis of the comparison data indicates that there is no bias in the predictions although a substantial random error exists so that a discrepancy of more than five or six dB can be expected for about one out of three predictions.

  20. Perceptual and acoustic evaluation of individuals with laryngopharyngeal reflux pre- and post-treatment.

    PubMed

    Selby, Julia C; Gilbert, Harvey R; Lerman, J W

    2003-12-01

    Thirteen individuals with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) were studied pre- and post-treatment. The effect of treatment on perceptual ratings of voice quality and frequency and intensity measures was examined. Relationships between perceptual and acoustic parameters were assessed descriptively. Results showed a small, but significant improvement in the perception of voice quality post-treatment. No significant differences were found between pre- and post-treatment means for any of the acoustic measures except harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR). Descriptive analyses showed some association between perceptual ratings and acoustic measures. Discussion of results focuses on severity of LPR.

  1. Full scale GLARE fuselage panel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vercammen, Roland W. A.; Ottens, Harold H.

    1996-01-01

    A GLARE fuselage panel, representative of the crown section of the Fokker 100 fuselage in front of the wing, was tested. The panels were loaded by air pressure resulting in tangential stress in the panel by axial loading, representative of both the cabin pressure and the fuselage bending due to taxiing and gust loading. A fatigue test, simulating 180000 flights, followed by static tests were performed. The panel was loaded to failure at 1.32 ultimate load. The test set-up, the uniform strain distribution of the panel, and the fatigue loads applied at high test frequency are described. The use of GLARE leads to a substantial weight reduction without affecting the fatigue static strength.

  2. Enhancement of Focused Ultrasound Treatment by Acoustically Generated Microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Takagi, Ryo; Inaba, Yuta; Yasuda, Jun

    2013-07-01

    Microbubbles, whether introduced from outside the body or ultrasonically generated in situ, are known to significantly enhance the biological effects of ultrasound, including the mechanical, thermal, and sonochemical effects. Phase-change nanodroplets, which selectively accumulate in tumor tissue and whose phase changes to microbubbles can be induced by ultrasonic stimulation, have been proposed for high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) tumor treatment with enhanced selectivity and efficiency. In this paper, a purely acoustic approach to generate microbubble clouds in the tissue to be treated is proposed. Short pulses of focused ultrasound with extremely high intensity, named trigger pulses, are used for exposure. They are immediately followed by focused ultrasound for heating with an intensity similar to or less than that of normal HIFU treatment. The localized generation of microbubble clouds by the trigger pulses is observed in a polyarylamide gel by a high-speed camera, and the effectiveness of the generated clouds in accelerating ultrasonically induced thermal coagulation is confirmed in excised chicken breast tissue. The use of second-harmonic superimposed waves as the trigger pulses is also proposed. The highly reproducible initiation of cavitation by waves with the negative peak pressure emphasized and the efficient expansion of the generated microbubble clouds by waves with the positive peak pressure emphasized are also observed by a high-speed camera in partially degassed water.

  3. The Acoustic Voice Quality Index: Toward Improved Treatment Outcomes Assessment in Voice Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryn, Youri; De Bodt, Marc; Roy, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    Voice practitioners require an objective index of dysphonia severity as a means to reliably track treatment outcomes. To ensure ecological validity however, such a measure should survey both sustained vowels and continuous speech. In an earlier study, a multivariate acoustic model referred to as the Acoustic Voice Quality Index (AVQI), consisting…

  4. The Acoustic Voice Quality Index: Toward Improved Treatment Outcomes Assessment in Voice Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryn, Youri; De Bodt, Marc; Roy, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    Voice practitioners require an objective index of dysphonia severity as a means to reliably track treatment outcomes. To ensure ecological validity however, such a measure should survey both sustained vowels and continuous speech. In an earlier study, a multivariate acoustic model referred to as the Acoustic Voice Quality Index (AVQI), consisting…

  5. Fuselage boundary-layer refraction of fan tones radiated from an installed turbofan aero-engine.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, James; McAlpine, Alan; Kingan, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    A distributed source model to predict fan tone noise levels of an installed turbofan aero-engine is extended to include the refraction effects caused by the fuselage boundary layer. The model is a simple representation of an installed turbofan, where fan tones are represented in terms of spinning modes radiated from a semi-infinite circular duct, and the aircraft's fuselage is represented by an infinitely long, rigid cylinder. The distributed source is a disk, formed by integrating infinitesimal volume sources located on the intake duct termination. The cylinder is located adjacent to the disk. There is uniform axial flow, aligned with the axis of the cylinder, everywhere except close to the cylinder where there is a constant thickness boundary layer. The aim is to predict the near-field acoustic pressure, and in particular, to predict the pressure on the cylindrical fuselage which is relevant to assess cabin noise. Thus no far-field approximations are included in the modelling. The effect of the boundary layer is quantified by calculating the area-averaged mean square pressure over the cylinder's surface with and without the boundary layer included in the prediction model. The sound propagation through the boundary layer is calculated by solving the Pridmore-Brown equation. Results from the theoretical method show that the boundary layer has a significant effect on the predicted sound pressure levels on the cylindrical fuselage, owing to sound radiation of fan tones from an installed turbofan aero-engine.

  6. An electromagnetic finite difference time domain analog treatment of small signal acoustic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, K.; Steich, D.; Lewis, K.; Landrum, C.; Barth, M.

    1994-03-25

    Hyperbolic partial differential equations encompass an extremely important set of physical phenomena including electromagnetics and acoustics. Small amplitude acoustic interactions behave much the same as electromagnetic interactions for longitudinal acoustic waves because of the similar nature of the governing hyperbolic equations. Differences appear when transverse acoustic waves are considered, nonetheless the strong analogy between the acoustic and electromagnetic phenomena prompted the development of a Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) acoustic analog to the existing electromagnetic FDTD technique. The advantage of an acoustic FDTD (AFDTD) code are as follows: (1) Boundary condition-free treatment of the acoustic scatterer -- only the intrinsic properties of the scatterer`s material are needed, no shell treatment or other set of special equations describing the macroscopic behavior of a sheet of material or a junction, etc. are required; this allows completely general geometries and materials in the model. (2) Advanced outer radiation boundary condition analogs -- in the electromagnetics arena, highly absorbing outer radiation boundary conditions have been developed that can be applied with little modification to the acoustics arena with equal success. (3) A suite of preexisting capabilities related to electromagnetic modeling -- this includes automated model generation and interaction visualization as its most important components and is best exemplified by the capabilities of the LLNL generated TSAR electromagnetic FDTD code.

  7. Multi-body aircraft with an all-movable center fuselage actively controlling fuselage pressure drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A multi-body aircraft with an all-movable center fuselage which translates relative to two side fuselages is described. At subsonic and transonic flight the center fuselage is in a forward position. At supersonic speeds the center fuselage moves aft so as to ensure optimum aerodynamic interference at particular Mach numbers. This provides an increased shock strength and greater surface areas so the significant reductions in zero-lift wave drag can be achieved. This concept allows for a significant increase in the wing aspect ratio which would improve high-lift performance at all speeds without incurring a significant supersonic zero-lift wave drag penalty. In addition to an improved low-fineness ratio, high-speed performance is achieved at all speeds and for all flight conditions.

  8. A Requirements-Driven Optimization Method for Acoustic Treatment Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic treatment designers have long been able to target specific noise sources inside turbofan engines. Facesheet porosity and cavity depth are key design variables of perforate-over-honeycomb liners that determine levels of noise suppression as well as the frequencies at which suppression occurs. Layers of these structures can be combined to create a robust attenuation spectrum that covers a wide range of frequencies. Looking to the future, rapidly-emerging additive manufacturing technologies are enabling new liners with multiple degrees of freedom, and new adaptive liners with variable impedance are showing promise. More than ever, there is greater flexibility and freedom in liner design. Subject to practical considerations, liner design variables may be manipulated to achieve a target attenuation spectrum. But characteristics of the ideal attenuation spectrum can be difficult to know. Many multidisciplinary system effects govern how engine noise sources contribute to community noise. Given a hardwall fan noise source to be suppressed, and using an analytical certification noise model to compute a community noise measure of merit, the optimal attenuation spectrum can be derived using multidisciplinary systems analysis methods. The subject of this paper is an analytical method that derives the ideal target attenuation spectrum that minimizes noise perceived by observers on the ground.

  9. LINAC radiosurgery and radiotherapy treatment of acoustic neuromas. 2007.

    PubMed

    Likhterov, Ilya; Allbright, Robert M; Selesnick, Samuel H

    2008-04-01

    This article provides an introduction to radiation therapy as it applies to intracranial tumors. It also provides a review of the natural growth progression of acoustic neuromas and accuracy of tumor size determination. Literature on the use of linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated radiotherapy in acoustic neuroma management is reviewed and summarized. Specifically, the rates of reported tumor control, hearing preservation, facial and trigeminal nerve complications, and hydrocephalus are analyzed. Although the complication rates associated with linear accelerator therapy are relatively low, hearing preservation is poor and acoustic neuroma control is variable.

  10. LINAC radiosurgery and radiotherapy treatment of acoustic neuromas.

    PubMed

    Likhterov, Ilya; Allbright, Robert M; Selesnick, Samuel H

    2007-06-01

    This article provides an introduction to radiation therapy as it applies to intracranial tumors. It also provides a review of the natural growth progression of acoustic neuromas and accuracy of tumor size determination. Literature on the use of linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated radiotherapy in acoustic neuroma management is reviewed and summarized. Specifically, the rates of reported tumor control, hearing preservation, facial and trigeminal nerve complications, and hydrocephalus are analyzed. Although the complication rates associated with linear accelerator therapy are relatively low, hearing preservation is poor and acoustic neuroma control is variable.

  11. On the Strength of Box Type Fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathar, J

    1929-01-01

    The present investigation relates to a box-type fuselage with sides consisting of thin smooth sheet metal, stiffened by longitudinal members riveted to the flanged channel-section bulkheads or transverse frames and to the semicircular corrugated corner stiffenings. The results obtained in this particular case can be applied to a great number of similar structures.

  12. 14 CFR 25.783 - Fuselage doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuselage doors. 25.783 Section 25.783 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... not latch after closing; and (ii) With jamming as a result of mechanical failure or blocking debris...

  13. 14 CFR 25.783 - Fuselage doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuselage doors. 25.783 Section 25.783 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... not latch after closing; and (ii) With jamming as a result of mechanical failure or blocking debris...

  14. Influence of fuselage on propeller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troller, Theodor

    1928-01-01

    In the present paper I shall not consider the problem of the best arrangement of airplane and propeller, but only a simple method for designing a propeller for a given arrangement of airplane parts. The inflow to the propeller and hence the efficiency of the propeller is affected most by the fuselage.

  15. A Novel Therapeutic for the Treatment and Prevention of Hearing Loss from Acoustic Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0077 TITLE: A NOVEL THERAPEUTIC FOR THE TREATMENT AND PREVENTION OF HEARING LOSS FROM ACOUSTIC TRAUMA PRINCIPAL...2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Novel Therapeutic for the Treatment and Prevention of Hearing Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER: Loss from Acoustic Trauma WB l XW...noise induced hearing loss . Using a steady-state model of noise exposure (117 db for 2 hours), T1/P13 was administered one hour after noise using a

  16. Structural Configuration Systems Analysis for Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Welstead, Jason R.; Quinlan, Jesse R.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Structural configuration analysis of an advanced aircraft fuselage concept is investigated. This concept is characterized by a double-bubble section fuselage with rear mounted engines. Based on lessons learned from structural systems analysis of unconventional aircraft, high-fidelity finite-element models (FEM) are developed for evaluating structural performance of three double-bubble section configurations. Structural sizing and stress analysis are applied for design improvement and weight reduction. Among the three double-bubble configurations, the double-D cross-section fuselage design was found to have a relatively lower structural weight. The structural FEM weights of these three double-bubble fuselage section concepts are also compared with several cylindrical fuselage models. Since these fuselage concepts are different in size, shape and material, the fuselage structural FEM weights are normalized by the corresponding passenger floor area for a relative comparison. This structural systems analysis indicates that an advanced composite double-D section fuselage may have a relative structural weight ratio advantage over a conventional aluminum fuselage. Ten commercial and conceptual aircraft fuselage structural weight estimates, which are empirically derived from the corresponding maximum takeoff gross weight, are also presented and compared with the FEM- based estimates for possible correlation. A conceptual full vehicle FEM model with a double-D fuselage is also developed for preliminary structural analysis and weight estimation.

  17. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  18. Unsteady transonic potential flow over a flexible fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    A flexible fuselage capability has been developed and implemented within version 1.2 of the CAP-TSD code. The capability required adding time dependent terms to the fuselage surface boundary conditions and the fuselage surface pressure coefficient. The new capability will allow modeling the effect of a flexible fuselage on the aeroelastic stability of complex configurations. To assess the flexible fuselage capability several steady and unsteady calculations have been performed for slender fuselages with circular cross-sections. Steady surface pressures are compared with experiment at transonic flight conditions. Unsteady cross-sectional lift is compared with other analytical results at a low subsonic speed and a transonic case has been computed. The comparisons demonstrate the accuracy of the flexible fuselage modifications.

  19. Unsteady transonic potential flow over a flexible fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    A flexible fuselage capability has been developed and implemented within version 1.2 of the CAP-TSD code. The capability required adding time dependent terms to the fuselage surface boundary conditions and the fuselage surface pressure coefficient. The new capability will allow modeling the effect of a flexible fuselage on the aeroelastic stability of complex configurations. To assess the flexible fuselage capability several steady and unsteady calculations have been performed for slender fuselages with circular cross-sections. Steady surface pressures are compared with experiment at transonic flight conditions. Unsteady cross-sectional lift is compared with other analytical results at a low subsonic speed and a transonic case has been computed. The comparisons demonstrate the accuracy of the flexible fuselage modifications.

  20. Study and development of acoustic treatment for jet engine tailpipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, M. D.; Linscheid, L. L.; Dinwiddie, B. A., III; Hall, O. J., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    A study and development program was accomplished to attenuate turbine noise generated in the JT3D turbofan engine. Analytical studies were used to design an acoustic liner for the tailpipe. Engine ground tests defined the tailpipe environmental factors and laboratory tests were used to support the analytical studies. Furnace-brazed, stainless steel, perforated sheet acoustic liners were designed, fabricated, installed, and ground tested in the tailpipe of a JT3D engine. Test results showed the turbine tones were suppressed below the level of the jet exhaust for most far field polar angles.

  1. Novel Composites for Wing and Fuselage Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, J. A.; Buttitta, C.

    1996-01-01

    Design development was successfully completed for textile preforms with continuous cross-stiffened epoxy panels with cut-outs. The preforms developed included 3-D angle interlock weaving of graphite structural fibers impregnated by resin film infiltration (RFI) and shown to be structurally suitable under conditions requiring minimum acquisition costs. Design guidelines/analysis methodology for such textile structures are given. The development was expanded to a fuselage side-panel component of a subsonic commercial airframe and found to be readily scalable. The successfully manufactured panel was delivered to NASA Langley for biaxial testing. This report covers the work performed under Task 3 -- Cross-Stiffened Subcomponent; Task 4 -- Design Guidelines/Analysis of Textile-Reinforced Composites; and Task 5 -- Integrally Woven Fuselage Panel.

  2. Composite fuselage technology (summary of year 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Michael J.; Lagace, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of this work is to identify and understand, via directed experimentation and analysis, the mechanisms which control the structural behavior of fuselages in their response to damage (resistance, tolerance, and arrest). A further objective is to develop straightforward design methodologies which can be employed by structural designers in preliminary design stages to make intelligent choices concerning the material, layup, and structural configuration so that a more efficient structure with structural integrity can be designed and built.

  3. Structural analysis of Aircraft fuselage splice joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udaya Prakash, R.; Kumar, G. Raj; Vijayanandh, R.; Senthil Kumar, M.; Ramganesh, T.

    2016-09-01

    In Aviation sector, composite materials and its application to each component are one of the prime factors of consideration due to the high strength to weight ratio, design flexibility and non-corrosive so that the composite materials are widely used in the low weight constructions and also it can be treated as a suitable alternative to metals. The objective of this paper is to estimate and compare the suitability of a composite skin joint in an aircraft fuselage with different joints by simulating the displacement, normal stress, vonmises stress and shear stress with the help of numerical solution methods. The reference Z-stringer component of this paper is modeled by CATIA and numerical simulation is carried out by ANSYS has been used for splice joint presents in the aircraft fuselage with three combinations of joints such as riveted joint, bonded joint and hybrid joint. Nowadays the stringers are using to avoid buckling of fuselage skin, it has joined together by rivets and they are connected end to end by splice joint. Design and static analysis of three-dimensional models of joints such as bonded, riveted and hybrid are carried out and results are compared.

  4. Composite fuselage crown panel manufacturing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willden, Kurtis; Metschan, S.; Grant, C.; Brown, T.

    1992-01-01

    Commercial fuselage structures contain significant challenges in attempting to save manufacturing costs with advanced composite technology. Assembly issues, material costs, and fabrication of elements with complex geometry are each expected to drive the cost of composite fuselage structures. Boeing's efforts under the NASA ACT program have pursued key technologies for low-cost, large crown panel fabrication. An intricate bond panel design and manufacturing concepts were selected based on the efforts of the Design Build Team (DBT). The manufacturing processes selected for the intricate bond design include multiple large panel fabrication with the Advanced Tow Placement (ATP) process, innovative cure tooling concepts, resin transfer molding of long fuselage frames, and utilization of low-cost material forms. The process optimization for final design/manufacturing configuration included factory simulations and hardware demonstrations. These efforts and other optimization tasks were instrumental in reducing cost by 18 percent and weight by 45 percent relative to an aluminum baseline. The qualitative and quantitative results of the manufacturing demonstrations were used to assess manufacturing risks and technology readiness.

  5. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage: Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, L. B.; Smith, P. J.; Hanson, C. T.; Walker, T. H.; Metschan, S. L.; Mabson, G. E.; Wilden, K. S.; Flynn, B. W.; Scholz, D. B.; Polland, D. R.; Fredrikson, H. G.; Olson, J. T.; Backman, B. F.

    1997-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program has studied transport fuselage structure with a large potential reduction in the total direct operating costs for wide-body commercial transports. The baseline fuselage section was divided into four 'quadrants', crown, keel, and sides, gaining the manufacturing cost advantage possible with larger panels. Key processes found to have savings potential include (1) skins laminated by automatic fiber placement, (2) braided frames using resin transfer molding, and (3) panel bond technology that minimized mechanical fastening. The cost and weight of the baseline fuselage barrel was updated to complete Phase B of the program. An assessment of the former, which included labor, material, and tooling costs, was performed with the help of design cost models. Crown, keel, and side quadrant cost distributions illustrate the importance of panel design configuration, area, and other structural details. Composite sandwich panel designs were found to have the greatest cost savings potential for most quadrants. Key technical findings are summarized as an introduction to the other contractor reports documenting Phase A and B work completed in functional areas. The current program status in resolving critical technical issues is also highlighted.

  6. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Materials and Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, D. B.; Dost, E. F.; Flynn, B. W.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Nelson, K. M.; Sawicki, A. J.; Walker, T. H.; Lakes, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program was to develop the technology required for cost and weight efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. This contractor report describes results of material and process selection, development, and characterization activities. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of monolithic and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential frames and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements. Significant development efforts were expended on the AFP, braiding, and RTM processes. Sandwich core materials and core edge close-out design concepts were evaluated. Autoclave cure processes were developed for stiffened skin and sandwich structures. The stiffness, strength, notch sensitivity, and bearing/bypass properties of fiber-placed skin materials and braided/RTM'd circumferential frame materials were characterized. The strength and durability of cocured and cobonded joints were evaluated. Impact damage resistance of stiffened skin and sandwich structures typical of fuselage panels was investigated. Fluid penetration and migration mechanisms for sandwich panels were studied.

  7. Spinning mode sound propagation in ducts with acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed theoretical study of the acoustic propagation of spinning modes in acoustically treated open circular ducts is described. The suppressor with splitter rings was modeled by using the rectangular approximation to the annular duct. The theoretical models were used to determine optimum impedance and maximum attenuation for several spinning lobe numbers from 0 to 50. Some interesting results of the analysis are that for circular ducts the maximum possible attenuation and the optimum wall impedance are strong functions of the lobe number. For annular ducts the attenuation and optimum wall impedance are insensitive to the spinning lobe number for well cut-on modes. The above results help explain why suppressors with splitter rings were quite effective in spite of the lack of detailed information on the noise source modal structure.

  8. Acoustic Duration Changes Associated with Two Types of Treatment for Children Who Stutter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Glyndon D.; Ingham, Janis Costello

    2000-01-01

    This study examined acoustic durations in 12 children (ages 3 to 9) who stuttered and received treatment based either on speech motor training (SMT) or extended length of utterance (ELU). Although the ELU treatment reduced stuttering more than the SMT, the SMT was more effective in increasing vowel duration and decreasing stop gap duration.…

  9. Acoustic Duration Changes Associated with Two Types of Treatment for Children Who Stutter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Glyndon D.; Ingham, Janis Costello

    2000-01-01

    This study examined acoustic durations in 12 children (ages 3 to 9) who stuttered and received treatment based either on speech motor training (SMT) or extended length of utterance (ELU). Although the ELU treatment reduced stuttering more than the SMT, the SMT was more effective in increasing vowel duration and decreasing stop gap duration.…

  10. Study of utilization of advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. C.; Campion, M. C.; Pei, G.

    1984-01-01

    The effort required by the transport aircraft manufacturers to support the introduction of advanced composite materials into the fuselage structure of future commercial and military transport aircraft is investigated. Technology issues, potential benefits to military life cycle costs and commercial operating costs, and development plans are examined. The most urgent technology issues defined are impact dynamics, acoustic transmission, pressure containment and damage tolerance, post-buckling, cutouts, and joints and splices. A technology demonstration program is defined and a rough cost and schedule identified. The fabrication and test of a full-scale fuselage barrel section is presented. Commercial and military benefits are identified. Fuselage structure weight savings from use of advanced composites are 16.4 percent for the commercial and 21.8 percent for the military. For the all-composite airplanes the savings are 26 percent and 29 percent, respectively. Commercial/operating costs are reduced by 5 percent for the all-composite airplane and military life cycle costs by 10 percent.

  11. Acoustic and vibration response of a structure with added noise control treatment under various excitations.

    PubMed

    Rhazi, Dilal; Atalla, Noureddine

    2014-02-01

    The evaluation of the acoustic performance of noise control treatments is of great importance in many engineering applications, e.g., aircraft, automotive, and building acoustics applications. Numerical methods such as finite- and boundary elements allow for the study of complex structures with added noise control treatment. However, these methods are computationally expensive when used for complex structures. At an early stage of the acoustic trim design process, many industries look for simple and easy to use tools that provide sufficient physical insight that can help to formulate design criteria. The paper presents a simple and tractable approach for the acoustic design of noise control treatments. It presents and compares two transfer matrix-based methods to investigate the vibroacoustic behavior of noise control treatments. The first is based on a modal approach, while the second is based on wave-number space decomposition. In addition to the classical rain-on-the-roof and diffuse acoustic field excitations, the paper also addresses turbulent boundary layer and point source (monopole) excitations. Various examples are presented and compared to a finite element calculation to validate the methodology and to confirm its relevance along with its limitations.

  12. Advanced fiber placement of composite fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert L.; Grant, Carroll G.

    1991-01-01

    The Hercules/NASA Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) program will demonstrate the low cost potential of the automated fiber placement process. The Hercules fiber placement machine was developed for cost effective production of composite aircraft structures. The process uses a low cost prepreg tow material form and achieves equivalent laminate properties to structures fabricated with prepreg tape layup. Fiber placement demonstrations planned for the Hercules/NASA program include fabrication of stiffened test panels which represent crown, keel, and window belt segments of a typical transport aircraft fuselage.

  13. A Novel Therapeutic for the Treatment and Prevention of Hearing Loss from Acoustic Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0077 TITLE: A Novel Therapeutic for the Treatment and Prevention of Hearing Loss from Acoustic Trauma PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Novel Therapeutic for the Treatment and Prevention of Hearing Loss from Acoustic Trauma 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0077... loss . Using a steady-state model of noise exposure (117 db for 2 hours), T1/P13 was administered one hour after noise using a variety of doses and

  14. [Strategy of the diagnosis and treatment for hydrocephalus associated with acoustic neuroma].

    PubMed

    Zhang, M S; Zhang, H W; Gu, C Y; Wang, H R; Ren, M; Qu, Y M; Yu, C J; Zhu, M S

    2016-06-07

    To describe and analyze the strategy of the diagnosis and treatment for acoustic neuroma associated with hydrocephalus. A retrospective review was performed in 29 patients with hydrocephalus associated with acoustic neuroma form Apr. 2004 to Apr. 2015. The patients' clinical information, the types of the hydrocephalus, the treatment and the prognosis of the hydrocephalus were recorded. There were 20 patients with obstructive hydrocephalus and 9 patients with communicating hydrocephalus preoperatively. Among the 29 cases, 3 patients had ventriculoperitoneal shunts, 5 patients had external ventricular drains, the remaining 21 patients had no further managements for hydrocephalus; after removing the acoustic neuroma, the hydrocephalus improved in 10 cases, the ventricle unchanged in 10 cases among the obstructive hydrocephalus group, the ventricle unchanged in all 9 cases among the communicating hydrocephalus group. Nineteen cases were diagnosed with communicating hydrocephalus and 10 cases with obstructive hydrocephalus postoperatively. Among the patients of acoustic neuroma associated with hydrocephalus, communicating hydrocephalus is more common than obstructive hydrocephalus. The optimal management of acoustic neuroma associated with hydrocephalus is complete removal of the tumor, with treatment only for patients with persistent hydrocephalus.

  15. Acoustic testing of a supersonic tip speed fan with acoustic treatment and rotor casting slots. Quiet engine program scale model fan C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.

    1973-01-01

    Acoustic tests were conducted on a high tip speed (1550 ft/sec, 472.44 m/sec) single stage fan with varying amounts of wall acoustic treatment and with circumferential slots over the rotor blade tips. The slots were also tested with acoustic treatment placed behind the slots. The wall treatment results show that the inlet treatment is more effective at high fan speeds and aft duct treatment is more effective at low fan speeds. Maximum PNL's on a 200-foot (60.96 m) sideline show the untreated slots to have increased the rear radiated noise at approach. However, when the treatment was added to the slots inlet radiated noise was decreased, resulting in little change relative to the solid casing on an EPNL basis.

  16. VIEW OF BOEING 737200 FUSELAGE FROM TOP LEVEL OF TAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BOEING 737-200 FUSELAGE FROM TOP LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK AND. A NEW SAFETY CABLE FROM THE TAIL DOCK WILL ALLOW INSPECTORS TO WALK UP AND DOWN THE FUSELAGE TO CHECK FOR CRACKS OR MISSING FASTENERS. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  17. Experiments with a built-in or fuselage radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesselsberger, C

    1923-01-01

    The experiments discussed here were performed to determine whether radiators having similar cooling properties offer less resistance when incorporated into the fuselage, than when the hitherto customary arrangement is employed, with the radiator in the free air current more or less independent of the fuselage. The experiments indicated that the quantity of air flowing through the radiator is greatest when the fuselage and the radiator are separate. However, separate radiators cause more air resistance. When the radiator is incorporated into the fuselage, it is only possible to obtain a quantity equal to that which flows through the radiator in the free air current if the lateral outlet vents are widened or the quantity of air in increased by some special means, such as fans. Whether it is possible, in practice, to obtain the necessary cooling effect in this way, together with reduced resistance of the fuselage, is not decided here, since it is a question of construction.

  18. Theoretical design of acoustic treatment for cabin noise control of a light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, R.; Mixson, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical procedure has been used to design an acoustic treatment for cabin noise control of a light aircraft. Using this approach acoustic add-on treatments capable of reducing the average noise levels in the cabin by about 17 dB from the untreated condition are developed. The added weight of the noise control package is about 2 percent of the total gross take-off weight of the aircraft. The analytical model uses modal solutions wherein the structural modes of the sidewall and the acoustic modes of the receiving space are accounted for. The additional noise losses due to add-on treatments are calculated by the impedance transfer method. The input noise spectral levels are selected utilizing experimental flight data. The add-on treatments considered for cabin noise control include aluminum honeycomb panels, constrained layer damping tape, porous acoustic materials, noise barriers and limp trim panels. To reduce the noise transmitted through the double wall aircraft windows to acceptable levels, changes in the design of the aircraft window are recommended.

  19. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 3; Test Plans, Hardware, Results, and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, J.; Kwan, H. W.; Echternach, D. K.; Kraft, R. E.; Syed, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to design, build, and test miniaturized acoustic treatment panels on scale-model fan rigs representative of the full-scale engine provides not only a cost-savings, but an opportunity to optimize the treatment by allowing tests of different designs. To be able to use scale model treatment as a full-scale design tool, it is necessary that the designer be able to reliably translate the scale model design and performance to an equivalent full-scale design. The primary objective of the study presented in this volume of the final report was to conduct laboratory tests to evaluate liner acoustic properties and validate advanced treatment impedance models. These laboratory tests include DC flow resistance measurements, normal incidence impedance measurements, DC flow and impedance measurements in the presence of grazing flow, and in-duct liner attenuation as well as modal measurements. Test panels were fabricated at three different scale factors (i.e., full-scale, half-scale, and one-fifth scale) to support laboratory acoustic testing. The panel configurations include single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) perforated sandwich panels, SDOF linear (wire mesh) liners, and double-degree-of-freedom (DDOF) linear acoustic panels.

  20. SU-E-T-536: Inhomogeneity Correction in Planning of Gamma Knife Treatments for Acoustic Schwannoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, L; Gupta, N; Hessler, J; Liu, A; Weldon, M; McGregor, J; Ammirati, M; Guiou, M; Xia, F; Grecula, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To find out the dose difference on targets and organs at risk for the treatment of acoustic schwannoma if the inhomogeneity correction (Convolution algorithm) is applied. Methods: Images of patients treated for acoustic schwannoma with Gamma Knife using TMR 10 algorithm were retrieved from database and replanned with Convolution and TMR 10 algorithm respectively. These patients were treated using a preplan scheme in following: (1) Before the actual treatment day, using the MRI image that was taken without a head frame on the patient's skull, a pre-treatment plan was made based on the default skull coordinates in the Gamma Knife treatment planning system (LGP); (2) then on treatment day, a head frame was placed on the patient's skull, and a CT image was taken. The CT image with head frame was registered and fused with the completed preplan; (3) the treatment plan was finalized and the treatment was delivered. To find out the dosimetry impact of inhomogeneity correction, we used the retrieved CT images to replan the treatment using Convolution algorithm in LGP software version 10.1.1. The dose distributions and the dose volume histograms for targets and OARs were compared for these two dose calculation algorithms. Results: The dose calculated with the Convolution algorithm in general is slightly lower than the one from TMR 10 around the boney area. The effect from the inhomogeneity correction is observable but not significant, and varies with the location of the tumor. Conclusion: Inhomogeneity correction slightly improve the dose accuracy for acoustic schwannoma Gamma Knife treatments although the correction may not be very significant. Our Result provides evidence for dose prescription adjustment to treat acoustic schwannoma. The actual clinical outcome of switching from using TMR10 to using Convolution needs to be further investigated.

  1. Vibro-Acoustics Modal Testing at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes on-going modal testing activities at the NASA Langley Research Center for two aircraft fuselage structures: a generic "aluminum testbed cylinder" (ATC) and a Beechcraft Starship fuselage (BSF). Subsequent acoustic tests will measure the interior noise field created by exterior mechanical and acoustic sources. These test results will provide validation databases for interior noise prediction codes on realistic aircraft fuselage structures. The ATC is a 12-ft-long, all-aluminum, scale model assembly. The BSF is a 40-ft-long, all-composite, complete aircraft fuselage. To date, two of seven test configurations of the ATC and all three test configurations of the BSF have been completed. The paper briefly describes the various test configurations, testing procedure, and typical results for frequencies up to 250 Hz.

  2. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 2; Advanced Treatment Impedance Models for High Frequency Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.; Yu, J.; Kwan, H. W.

    1999-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to develop improved models for the acoustic impedance of treatment panels at high frequencies, for application to subscale treatment designs. Effects that cause significant deviation of the impedance from simple geometric scaling are examined in detail, an improved high-frequency impedance model is developed, and the improved model is correlated with high-frequency impedance measurements. Only single-degree-of-freedom honeycomb sandwich resonator panels with either perforated sheet or "linear" wiremesh faceplates are considered. The objective is to understand those effects that cause the simple single-degree-of- freedom resonator panels to deviate at the higher-scaled frequency from the impedance that would be obtained at the corresponding full-scale frequency. This will allow the subscale panel to be designed to achieve a specified impedance spectrum over at least a limited range of frequencies. An advanced impedance prediction model has been developed that accounts for some of the known effects at high frequency that have previously been ignored as a small source of error for full-scale frequency ranges.

  3. Recommendations for numerical solution of reinforced-panel and fuselage-ring problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoff, N J; Libby, Paul A

    1949-01-01

    Procedures are recommended for solving the equations of equilibrium of reinforced panels and isolated fuselage rings as represented by the external loads and the operations table established according to Southwell's method. From the solution of these equations the stress distribution can be easily determined. The method of systematic relaxations, the matrix-calculus method, and several other methods applicable in special cases are discussed. Definite recommendations are made for obtaining the solution of reinforced-panel problems which are generally designated as shear lag problems. The procedures recommended are demonstrated in the analysis of a number of panels. In the case of fuselage rings it is not possible to make definite recommendations for the solution of the equilibrium equations for all rings and loadings. However, suggestions based on the latest experience are made and demonstrated on several rings.

  4. Acoustic treatment of the NASA Langley 4- by 7-meter tunnel: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, J. C.; Abrahamson, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    A feasibility study for upgrading the NASA Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel so that it may be used for aeroacoustic research related to helicopters is described. The requirements for noise research leading to the design of the next generation of helicopters impose a set of acoustic test criteria that no existing wind tunnel in the United States can presently meet. Included in this feasibility study are the following considerations: (1) an evaluation of general wind-tunnel requirements and desired tunnel background noise levels for helicopter aeroacoustic research; (2) an assessment of the present acoustic environment for testing model rotors; (3) a diagnostic investigation of tunnel background noise sources and paths; (4) acoustic treatment options for tunnel background noise reduction and a trade-off study between these options; (5) an engineering feasibility assessment of the selected option; and (6) an integrated analysis of study components and recommendations of treatment for an approach to meet the tunnel background noise reduction goal. It is concluded that the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel is a fundamentally suitable facility for helicopter aeroacoustic research. It is also concluded that acoustic treatment of this facility for meeting the required tunnel background noise goal can be accomplished technically at reasonable risk and cost.

  5. In-ear medical devices for acoustic therapies in tinnitus treatments, state of the art.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, David; Tavira-Sanchez, Francisco; Recuero-Lopez, Manuel; Anthony, Brian W

    2017-04-21

    Cochrane reviews indicate there is very limited support for all forms of sound therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy has the strongest support. American Academy of Otolaryngology (AAO) recently published some guidelines which recommends Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for tinnitus intervention, and only indicates that sound therapy should be considered an "option" for intervention. Nevertheless, acoustic therapy could lead to cause changes in the tinnitus perception and has been appreciated by the affected people for years. In the last decades, the use of sound or sound enrichment has become a central part of many tinnitus management programs used by audiologists, whether the intention was to mask tinnitus, suppress tinnitus, or interrupt the tinnitus generating neural activity. Several acoustic therapies have been developed and implemented in the last 40 years, but how can we determine which one is the most effective? We can determine the effects based on the results reported in many research studies, but in those studies are many factors that differ from one study to another, like in-ear medical devices used to apply acoustic therapy for tinnitus treatment. In this article, we review and analyze the different types of in-ear medical devices used in the most recently acoustic therapies in treatments against tinnitus, allowing us to identify the pros and cons. By our analysis, an optimal medical device could be characterized to enhance the application of acoustic therapies and in consequence the global results of the sound therapies that already exist. In this review, it was considered acoustic therapies, the technology implemented in medical devices and the clinical needs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Design-Oriented Analysis of Aircraft Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Gary L.

    1998-01-01

    A design-oriented analysis capability for aircraft fuselage structures that utilizes equivalent plate methodology is described. This new capability is implemented as an addition to the existing wing analysis procedure in the Equivalent Laminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) computer code. The wing and fuselage analyses are combined to model entire airframes. The paper focuses on the fuselage model definition, the associated analytical formulation and the approach used to couple the wing and fuselage analyses. The modeling approach used to minimize the amount of preparation of input data by the user and to facilitate the making of design changes is described. The fuselage analysis is based on ring and shell equations but the procedure is formulated to be analogous to that used for plates in order to take advantage of the existing code in ELAPS. Connector springs are used to couple the wing and fuselage models. Typical fuselage analysis results are presented for two analytical models. Results for a ring-stiffened cylinder model are compared with results from conventional finite-element analyses to assess the accuracy of this new analysis capability. The connection of plate and ring segments is demonstrated using a second model that is representative of the wing structure for a channel-wing aircraft configuration.

  7. Structural Concepts Study of Non-circular Fuselage Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivel

    1996-01-01

    A preliminary study of structural concepts for noncircular fuselage configurations is presented. For an unconventional flying-wing type aircraft, in which the fuselage is inside the wing, multiple fuselage bays with non-circular sections need to be considered. In a conventional circular fuselage section, internal pressure is carried efficiently by a thin skin via hoop tension. If the section is non-circular, internal pressure loads also induce large bending stresses. The structure must also withstand additional bending and compression loads from aerodynamic and gravitational forces. Flat and vaulted shell structural configurations for such an unconventional, non-circular pressurized fuselage of a large flying-wing were studied. A deep honeycomb sandwich-shell and a ribbed double-wall shell construction were considered. Combinations of these structural concepts were analyzed using both analytical and simple finite element models of isolated sections for a comparative conceptual study. Weight, stress, and deflection results were compared to identify a suitable configuration for detailed analyses. The flat sandwich-shell concept was found preferable to the vaulted shell concept due to its superior buckling stiffness. Vaulted double-skin ribbed shell configurations were found to be superior due to their weight savings, load diffusion, and fail-safe features. The vaulted double-skin ribbed shell structure concept was also analyzed for an integrated wing-fuselage finite element model. Additional problem areas such as wing-fuselage junction and pressure-bearing spar were identified.

  8. Effects of long-chord acoustically treated stator vanes on fan noise. 2: Effect of acoustical treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.; Scott, J. N.; Leonard, B. R.; Stakolich, E. G.

    1976-01-01

    A set of long chord stator vanes was designed to replace the vanes in an existing fan stage. The long chord stator vanes consisted of a turning section and axial extension pieces, all of which incorporated acoustic damping material. The long chord stator vanes were tested in two lengths, with the long version giving more noise reduction than the short, primarily because of the additional lining material. The noise reduction achieved with the acoustically treated long chord stator vanes was compared with the reduction achieved by an acoustically treated exhaust splitter. The long chord stator was at least as good as the splitter as a method for incorporating acoustic lining material. In addition, comparing an acoustic three ring inlet and an acoustic wall-only inlet discloses that the wall-only inlet could be used in an engine where the noise reduction requirements are not too stringent.

  9. Composite fuselage shell structures research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    Fuselage structures for transport aircraft represent a significant percentage of both the weight and the cost of these aircraft primary structures. Composite materials offer the potential for reducing both the weight and the cost of transport fuselage structures, but only limited studies of the response and failure of composite fuselage structures have been conducted for transport aircraft. The behavior of these important primary structures must be understood, and the structural mechanics methodology for analyzing and designing these complex stiffened shell structures must be validated in the laboratory. The effects of local gradients and discontinuities on fuselage shell behavior and the effects of local damage on pressure containment must be thoroughly understood before composite fuselage structures can be used for commercial aircraft. This paper describes the research being conducted and planned at NASA LaRC to help understand the critical behavior or composite fuselage structures and to validate the structural mechanics methodology being developed for stiffened composite fuselage shell structure subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads. Stiffened shell and curved stiffened panel designs are currently being developed and analyzed, and these designs will be fabricated and then tested at Langley to study critical fuselage shell behavior and to validate structural analysis and design methodology. The research includes studies of the effects of combined internal pressure and mechanical loads on nonlinear stiffened panel and shell behavior, the effects of cutouts and other gradient-producing discontinuities on composite shell response, and the effects of local damage on pressure containment and residual strength. Scaling laws are being developed that relate full-scale and subscale behavior of composite fuselage shells. Failure mechanisms are being identified and advanced designs will be developed based on what is learned from early results from

  10. Aerodynamic Interaction Effects of a Helicopter Rotor and Fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, David D., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A three year Cooperative Research Agreements made in each of the three years between the Subsonic Aerodynamics Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Va. Tech) has been completed. This document presents results from this three year endeavor. The goal of creating an efficient method to compute unsteady interactional effects between a helicopter rotor and fuselage has been accomplished. This paper also includes appendices to support these findings. The topics are: 1) Rotor-Fuselage Interactions Aerodynamics: An Unsteady Rotor Model; and 2) Rotor/Fuselage Unsteady Interactional Aerodynamics: A New Computational Model.

  11. Investigation of acoustic emission and surface treatment to improve tool materials and metal forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Deming

    Silicon nitride and WC-Co cermet tools are used for metal forming processes including extrusion and drawing. These materials are used to make tool dies which are exposed to deformation caused by friction and wear. Surface treatments such as ion implantation, laser blazing and coating have been found to improve surface properties, to optimize tribological behavior between the metal and die, as well as to extend service life of the tool dies. Early detection and continuous monitoring processes by non destructive testing (NDT) methods are needed in order to ensure the functionality of the wear process and extend the tool service life. Acoustic emission is one of the promising NDT methods for this application. The surface treatment chosen for this investigation was ion implantation. Three types of wear resistant materials with and without surface treatment were selected for this project; silicon nitride and two tungsten carbides (6% Cobalt and 10% Cobalt). This investigation was conducted using a pin-on-disk device for wear/friction tests of the selected materials with lubrication and/or without lubrication against both a stainless steel disk and an aluminum disk. The acoustic emissions generated during the experiments were recorded and analyzed. The results of this investigation showed that the ion implantation improved the tribological properties of the materials and reduced acoustic emission and coefficient of friction. A linear relationship between the average amplitude of the acoustic emission and the coefficient of friction of the tested materials was found. The investigation demonstrated that the acoustic emission method could be used to monitor the wear/friction processes.

  12. Modal measurements and propeller field excitation on acoustic full scale mockup of SAAB 340 aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Lars

    1992-06-01

    The acoustic mockup of the cabin SAAB 340 aircraft was measured in an anechoic chamber concerning modal parameters and operating deflection shapes. The mockup was excited with vibration shakers at the fuselage for modal estimation and with a ring of loudspeakers around the fuselage to generate propeller fields for operating deflection shapes. Two cases of structure configuration were used at the measurements; one consisting of only the fuselage, without trimpanels and floorpanels and one case with trimpanels and floorpanels. Modal measurements were done with excitation on a frame of the fuselage at the propeller plane. The modes were estimated for the individual components; fuselage, trimpanels, floorpanels, and soundfield in the cabin. The modes of the fuselage were compared with the acoustic models in the cabin concerning possible coupling effects. With the loudspeakering, the sound field from the left and the right propeller were generated at a blade passage frequency of 81.9 Hz and its first harmonic. Operating deflection shapes of fuselage, panels, and cabin acoustic were estimated. The results from the measurements could be used to verify a finite element model and as a tool for developing acoustic noise control systems.

  13. Numerical Study of Bubble Area Evolution During Acoustic Droplet Vaporization-Enhanced HIFU Treatment.

    PubMed

    Xin, Ying; Zhang, Aili; Xu, Lisa X; Brian Fowlkes, J

    2017-09-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization has the potential to shorten treatment time of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) while minimizing the possible effects of microbubbles along the propagation path. Distribution of the bubbles formed from the droplets during the treatment is the major factor shaping the therapeutic region. A numerical model was proposed to simulate the bubble area evolution during this treatment. Using a linear acoustic equation to describe the ultrasound field, a threshold range was defined that determines the amount of bubbles vaporized in the treated area. Acoustic parameters, such as sound speed, acoustic attenuation coefficient, and density, were treated as a function of the bubble size distribution and the gas void fraction, which were related to the vaporized bubbles in the medium. An effective pressure factor was proposed to account for the influence of the existing bubbles on the vaporization of the nearby droplets. The factor was obtained by fitting one experimental result and was then used to calculate bubble clouds in other experimental cases. Comparing the simulation results to these other experiments validated the model. The dynamic change of the pressure and the bubble distribution after exposure to over 20 pulses of HIFU are obtained. It is found that the bubble area grows from a grainlike shape to a "tadpole," with comparable dimensions and shape to those observed in experiments. The process was highly dynamic with the shape of the bubble area changing with successive HIFU pulses and the focal pressure. The model was further used to predict the shape of the bubble region triggered by HIFU when a bubble wall pre-exists. The results showed that the bubble wall helps prevent droplet vaporization on the distal side of the wall and forms a particularly shaped region with bubbles. This simulation model has predictive potential that could be beneficial in applications, such as cancer treatment, by parametrically studying conditions

  14. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 1; Overview, Results, and Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.; Yu, J.

    1999-01-01

    Scale model fan rigs that simulate new generation ultra-high-bypass engines at about 1/5-scale are achieving increased importance as development vehicles for the design of low-noise aircraft engines. Testing at small scale allows the tests to be performed in existing anechoic wind tunnels, which provides an accurate simulation of the important effects of aircraft forward motion on the noise generation. The ability to design, build, and test miniaturized acoustic treatment panels on scale model fan rigs representative of the fullscale engine provides not only a cost-savings, but an opportunity to optimize the treatment by allowing tests of different designs. The primary objective of this study was to develop methods that will allow scale model fan rigs to be successfully used as acoustic treatment design tools. The study focuses on finding methods to extend the upper limit of the frequency range of impedance prediction models and acoustic impedance measurement methods for subscale treatment liner designs, and confirm the predictions by correlation with measured data. This phase of the program had as a goal doubling the upper limit of impedance measurement from 6 kHz to 12 kHz. The program utilizes combined analytical and experimental methods to achieve the objectives.

  15. The characterization of widespread fatigue damage in fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.; Miller, Matthew

    1994-01-01

    The characteristics of widespread fatigue damage (WSFD) in fuselage riveted structure were established by detailed nondestructive and destructive examinations of fatigue damage contained in a full size fuselage test article. The objectives of this were to establish an experimental data base for validating emerging WSFD analytical prediction methodology and to identify first order effects that contribute to fatigue crack initiation and growth. Detailed examinations were performed on a test panel containing four bays of a riveted lap splice joint. The panel was removed from a full scale fuselage test article after receiving 60,000 full pressurization cycles. The results of in situ examinations document the progression of fuselage skin fatigue crack growth through crack linkup. Detailed tear down examinations and fractography of the lap splice joint region revealed fatigue crack initiation sites, crack morphology, and crack linkup geometry. From this large data base, distributions of crack size and locations are presented and discussions of operative damage mechanisms are offered.

  16. The characterization of widespread fatigue damage in fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.; Miller, Matthew

    1994-01-01

    The characteristics of widespread fatigue damage (WSFD) in fuselage riveted structure were established by detailed nondestructive and destructive examinations of fatigue damage contained in a full size fuselage test article. The objectives of this work were to establish an experimental data base for validating emerging WSFD analytical prediction methodology and to identify first order effects that contribute to fatigue crack initiation and growth. Detailed examinations were performed on a test panel containing four bays of a riveted lap splice joint. The panel was removed from a full scale fuselage test article after receiving 60,000 full pressurization cycles. The results of in situ examinations document the progression of fuselage skin fatigue crack growth through crack linkup. Detailed tear down examinations and fractography of the lap splice joint region revealed fatigue crack initiation sites, crack morphology and crack linkup geometry. From this large data base, distributions of crack size and locations are presented and discussions of operative damage mechanisms are offered.

  17. VIEW OF LEFT WING AND FUSELAGE FROM TOP LEVEL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LEFT WING AND FUSELAGE FROM TOP LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK STAND. LEADING AND TRAILING EDGE FLAPS ARE DOWN; AIELERONS ARE IN NEUTRAL. ENGINE COWLING OFF FOR HEAVY INSPECTION. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  18. Design considerations for composite fuselage structure of commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. W.; Sakata, I. F.

    1981-01-01

    The structural, manufacturing, and service and environmental considerations that could impact the design of composite fuselage structure for commercial transport aircraft application were explored. The severity of these considerations was assessed and the principal design drivers delineated. Technical issues and potential problem areas which must be resolved before sufficient confidence is established to commit to composite materials were defined. The key issues considered are: definition of composite fuselage design specifications, damage tolerance, and crashworthiness.

  19. Composite fuselage shell structures research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    Fuselage structures for transport aircraft represent a large portion of both the weight and cost of these aircraft primary structures. Composite materials offer the potential for reducing both the weight and cost of these structures, but only limited studies of the response and failure of composite fuselage structures have been conducted. The research is described which is being conducted and planned at NASA Langley to understand the critical behavior of composite fuselage structures and to validate the structural mechanics methodology being developed for stiffened composite fuselage shell structure subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads. Stiffened shell and curved stiffened panel designs are currently being developed and analyzed, and these designs will be fabricated and then tested to study critical fuselage behavior and to validate structural analysis and design methodology. The research includes studies of the effects of combined internal pressure and mechanical loads on nonlinear stiffened panel and shell behavior, the effects of cutouts and other gradient producing discontinuities on composite shell response, and the effects of local damage on pressure containment and residual strength. Scaling laws are being developed that relate full scale and subscale behavior of composite fuselage shells.

  20. Crack Growth Simulation and Residual Strength Prediction in Airplane Fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuin-Shan; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives were to create a capability to simulate curvilinear crack growth and ductile tearing in aircraft fuselages subjected to widespread fatigue damage and to validate with tests. Analysis methodology and software program (FRANC3D/STAGS) developed herein allows engineers to maintain aging aircraft economically, while insuring continuous airworthiness, and to design more damage-tolerant aircraft for the next generation. Simulations of crack growth in fuselages were described. The crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion, obtained from laboratory tests, was used to predict fracture behavior of fuselage panel tests. Geometrically nonlinear, elastic-plastic, thin shell finite element crack growth analyses were conducted. Comparisons of stress distributions, multiple stable crack growth history, and residual strength between measured and predicted results were made to assess the validity of the methodology. Incorporation of residual plastic deformations and tear strap failure was essential for accurate residual strength predictions. Issue related to predicting crack trajectory in fuselages were also discussed. A directional criterion, including T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy, was developed. Curvilinear crack growth was simulated in coupon and fuselage panel tests. Both T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy were essential to predict the observed crack paths. Flapping of fuselages were predicted. Measured and predicted results agreed reasonable well.

  1. Al-Li Alloy 1441 for Fuselage Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. K.; Dicus, D. L.; Fridlyander, J. N.; Sandler, V. S.

    2000-01-01

    A cooperative investigation was conducted to evaluate Al-Cu-Mg-Li alloy 1441 for long service life fuselage applications. Alloy 1441 is currently being used for fuselage applications on the Russian Be-103 amphibious aircraft, and is expected to be used for fuselage skin on a new Tupolev business class aircraft. Alloy 1441 is cold-rollable and has several attributes that make it attractive for fuselage skin applications. These attributes include lower density and higher specific modulus with similar strength as compared to conventional Al-Cu-Mg alloys. Cold-rolled 1441 Al-Li sheet specimens were tested at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and at the All-Russia Institute of Aviation Materials (VIAM) in Russia to evaluate tensile properties, fracture toughness, impact resistance, fatigue life and fatigue crack growth rate. In addition, fuselage panels were fabricated by Tupolev Design Bureau (TDB) using 1441 skins and Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy stiffeners. The panels were subjected to cyclic pressurization fatigue tests at TDB and at LaRC to simulate fuselage pressurization/depressurization during aircraft service. This paper discusses the results from this investigation.

  2. Effect of acoustically assisted treatments on vitamins, antioxidant activity, organic acids and drying kinetics of pineapple.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Óscar; Gomes, Wesley; Rodrigues, Sueli; Fernandes, Fabiano A N

    2017-03-01

    The effects of the application of an acoustically assisted treatment on the vitamins (C, B1, B2, B3, and B5), the antioxidant activity (DPPH, FRAP), the polyphenol and flavonoid contents, the organic acid contents (citric and malic) and drying kinetics of pineapple (Ananas comosus var. Perola) have been studied. Treatments were carried out using two different soaking media: distilled water and pineapple juice at 30°C during 10, 20 and 30min without and with acoustic assistance (23.2W/L). After treatment, samples were dried at 60°C and 0.5m/s during 8h. The quality parameters were determined in untreated, treated, and treated-dried samples. The acoustic assistance promoted an increment of vitamins B1, B2, B3 and B5, total flavonoid and malic acid contents, and a reduction of vitamin C, total polyphenol content, antioxidant activity and citric acid content in treated samples. However, in all treated-dried samples the final content of those quality parameters was higher than the observed in the untreated dried sample.

  3. Classification of fatigue cracking data in a simulated aircraft fuselage using a self-organizing map

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, M.L.; Hill, E.V.K.

    1994-12-31

    Many aircraft are being flown beyond their design lifespans and have therefore fallen victim to fatigue cracking. In some cases, such as the 1988 Aloha Airlines 737-200 incident, catastrophic fatigue growth has caused the loss of life. Acoustic emission (AE) nondestructive testing has been used to detect and classical the growth of fatigue cracks in complex structures, such as aircraft fuselages and wings since as early as 1979. In order to simulate an aircraft fuselage undergoing pressurization cycle fatigue, a test was developed in which a thin-walled aluminum pressure vessel was instrumented with AE sensors and cyclically fatigued to promote crack growth at a stress concentration built into the vessel. The AE data acquisition system. extracted the six AE parameters - amplitude, counts, duration, energy, risetime, and count-to-peak from each of the sensor signals. One-third of these parameter data sets were used to tram a Kohonen self-organizing map (SOM) neural network. The remaining data sets were used to test the SOM. The SOM output is a two-dimensional map with similar input data sets located at similar coordinates on the map. Because the continuous AE parameter data are grouped into discrete bands or intervals, e.g., all the events having amplitudes between 51.00 dB and 51.99 dB are classified as 51 dB events, the initial SOM output showed no distinct clustering. However, when the output was transformed into three-dimensions, with the third dimension being the frequency of occurrence of each two-dimensional coordinate, several distinct peaks were evident. These peaks correspond to the three AE source in the vessel: metal rubbing, rivet fretting, and fatigue cracking. Thus, the three-dimensional SOM was able to unambiguously classify fatigue crack growth events in a simulated aircraft fuselage structure.

  4. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage-Structural Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, T. H.; Minguet, P. J.; Flynn, B. W.; Carbery, D. J.; Swanson, G. D.; Ilcewicz, L. B.

    1997-01-01

    Boeing is studying the technologies associated with the application of composite materials to commercial transport fuselage structure under the NASA-sponsored contracts for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) and Materials Development Omnibus Contract (MDOC). This report addresses the program activities related to structural performance of the selected concepts, including both the design development and subsequent detailed evaluation. Design criteria were developed to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements and typical company objectives. Accurate analysis methods were selected and/or developed where practical, and conservative approaches were used where significant approximations were necessary. Design sizing activities supported subsequent development by providing representative design configurations for structural evaluation and by identifying the critical performance issues. Significant program efforts were directed towards assessing structural performance predictive capability. The structural database collected to perform this assessment was intimately linked to the manufacturing scale-up activities to ensure inclusion of manufacturing-induced performance traits. Mechanical tests were conducted to support the development and critical evaluation of analysis methods addressing internal loads, stability, ultimate strength, attachment and splice strength, and damage tolerance. Unresolved aspects of these performance issues were identified as part of the assessments, providing direction for future development.

  5. Applications of advanced fracture mechanics to fuselage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanninen, M. F.; O'Donoghue, P. E.; Green, S. T.; Leung, C. P.; Roy, S.; Burnside, O. H.

    Multi-site damage (MSD) in the form of cracking at rivet holes in lap splice joints has been identified as a serious threat to the integrity of commercial aircraft nearing their design life targets. Consequently, to assure the safety of aircraft that have accumulated large numbers of flights, flight hours and years in service requires requires inspection procedures that are based on the possibility that MSD may be present. For inspections of aircraft components to be properly focused on me defect sizes that are critical for structural integrity, fracture analyses are needed. The current methods are essentially those of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) which are strictly valid only for cracks that extend in a quasi-static manner under small-scale crack tip plasticity conditions. While LEFM is very likely to be appropriate for subcritical crack growth, quantifying the conditions for fracture instability and subsequent propagation may require advanced fracture mechanics techniques. The specific focus in this paper was to identify the conditions in which inelastic-dynamic effects occur in (1) the linking up Of local damage in a lap splice joint to form a major crack, and (2) large-scale fuselage failure by a rapidly occurring fluid structure interaction process.

  6. Vibroacoustic Tailoring of a Rod-Stiffened Composite Fuselage Panel with Multidisciplinary Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Albert R.; Przekop, Adam

    2015-01-01

    An efficient multi-objective design tailoring procedure seeking to improve the vibroacoustic performance of a fuselage panel while maintaining or reducing weight is presented. The structure considered is the pultruded rod stitched efficient unitized structure, a highly integrated composite structure concept designed for a noncylindrical, next-generation flight vehicle fuselage. Modifications to a baseline design are evaluated within a six-parameter design space including spacing, flange width, and web height for both frame and stringer substructure components. The change in sound power radiation attributed to a design change is predicted using finite-element models sized and meshed for analyses in the 500 Hz, 1 kHz, and 2 kHz octave bands. Three design studies are carried out in parallel while considering a diffuse acoustic field excitation and two types of turbulent boundary-layer excitation. Kriging surrogate models are used to reduce the computational costs of resolving the vibroacoustic and weight objective Pareto fronts. The resulting Pareto optimal designs are then evaluated under a static pressurization ultimate load to assess structural strength and stability. Results suggest that choosing alternative configurations within the considered design space can reduce weight and improve vibroacoustic performance without compromising strength and stability of the structure under the static load condition considered, but the tradeoffs are significantly influenced by the spatial characteristics of the assumed excitation field.

  7. INVITED PAPER: On the interaction of a fan stator and acoustic treatments using the transfer element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2010-02-01

    In the present investigation, a theoretical model is suggested to study the interaction of a fan stator and acoustic treatments using the transfer element method. Firstly, the solution of an acoustic field caused by a fan stator in an infinite duct is extended to that in a finite domain with all knowns and unknowns on the interface plane. Secondly, the related numerical results for an annular cascade are compared with the data obtained by directly solving an integral equation based on the blade boundary condition, which have good agreement with each other. Finally, more emphasis is placed on studying how a fan stator interacts with both upstream and downstream acoustic treatments. It is found that the interaction has an important influence on sound attenuation. In addition, optimal sound attenuation will depend on the combined design of both acoustic treatment and the fan stator.

  8. Improved facial nerve outcomes using an evolving treatment method for large acoustic neuromas.

    PubMed

    Porter, Ryan G; LaRouere, Michael J; Kartush, Jack M; Bojrab, Dennis I; Pieper, Daniel R

    2013-02-01

    To describe a successful paradigm for the treatment of large acoustic neuromas (vestibular schwannomas). Retrospective case review. Tertiary referral center. The charts of 2,875 acoustic neuroma patients at Michigan Ear Institute were reviewed to identify 153 patients who underwent surgical resection for large acoustic neuromas (>=3 cm) between 2000 and 2009. Staged surgical resection or single stage surgery with or without adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery. Postoperative facial nerve outcomes are reported using the House-Brackmann (HB) facial nerve grading scale and compared with historical controls from a literature review. Rates of adverse outcomes are also reported. Seventy-five patients underwent staged surgical resection of their tumors, whereas 78 patients underwent either single stage surgery or surgery with subsequent stereotactic radiosurgery. Eighty-one percent of patients in the staged surgical resection group had a postoperative HB Grade I or II facial nerve function compared with 75% in the single stage surgical group. Overall, 78% of patients in the current study had HB Grade I or II after treatment compared with a mean of 53% in the literature for similar sized tumors. Our methods including the decision to use staged surgery when necessary, dissection of tumor with stimulating dissector-directed intraoperative monitoring, and use of adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery are described. Using the described paradigm, large acoustic neuromas can be successfully treated with either staged or single-stage surgical resection with or without adjuvant radiosurgery to obtain more favorable facial nerve outcomes than historically reported controls while minimizing morbidity for the patient. (C) 2013 Otology & Neurotology, Inc.

  9. Acoustic pressure wound therapy in the treatment of stage II pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Raenell

    2008-11-01

    Pressure ulcers are localized skin injuries secondary to unrelieved pressure or friction. Patients with immobility issues are at increased risk for developing pressure ulcers. In 2004, stricter federal regulations for prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in institutional settings--eg, long-term care facilities--were introduced. Effective, low-cost treatments for pressure ulcers are needed; acoustic pressure wound therapy (APWT), a noncontact, low-frequency, therapeutic ultrasound system, is one option. A retrospective case series of six long-term care patients (two men and one woman, age range 61 to 92 years), each with one Stage II pressure ulcer, is presented. Acoustic pressure wound therapy was provided as an adjunct to standard treatment that included balsam of Peru/castor oil/trypsin ointment, hydrogel, hydrocolloid dressings, silver dressings, and offloading. Outcomes (days to healing) were determined through changes in wound dimensions. Study participants each received APWT for 3 to 4 minutes three to four times weekly. In four of the six wounds, the average number of days to healing was 22. One of the two remaining patients discontinued treatment at 95% healed; treatment for the sixth patient was ongoing due to hospitalization that delayed APWT. In a long-term care setting, APWT added to standard of care may accelerate healing of Stage II pressure ulcers.

  10. Full-scale testing and progressive damage modeling of sandwich composite aircraft fuselage structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    A comprehensive experimental and computational investigation was conducted to characterize the fracture behavior and structural response of large sandwich composite aircraft fuselage panels containing artificial damage in the form of holes and notches. Full-scale tests were conducted where panels were subjected to quasi-static combined pressure, hoop, and axial loading up to failure. The panels were constructed using plain-weave carbon/epoxy prepreg face sheets and a Nomex honeycomb core. Panel deformation and notch tip damage development were monitored during the tests using several techniques, including optical observations, strain gages, digital image correlation (DIC), acoustic emission (AE), and frequency response (FR). Additional pretest and posttest inspections were performed via thermography, computer-aided tap tests, ultrasound, x-radiography, and scanning electron microscopy. The framework to simulate damage progression and to predict residual strength through use of the finite element (FE) method was developed. The DIC provided local and full-field strain fields corresponding to changes in the state-of-damage and identified the strain components driving damage progression. AE was monitored during loading of all panels and data analysis methodologies were developed to enable real-time determination of damage initiation, progression, and severity in large composite structures. The FR technique has been developed, evaluating its potential as a real-time nondestructive inspection technique applicable to large composite structures. Due to the large disparity in scale between the fuselage panels and the artificial damage, a global/local analysis was performed. The global FE models fully represented the specific geometries, composite lay-ups, and loading mechanisms of the full-scale tests. A progressive damage model was implemented in the local FE models, allowing the gradual failure of elements in the vicinity of the artificial damage. A set of modifications

  11. Comparison between design and installed acoustic characteristics of NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot low-speed wind tunnel acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Woodward, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    The test section of the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel was acoustically treated to allow the measurement of sound under simulated free-field conditions. The treatment was designed for high sound absorption at frequencies above 250 Hz and for withstanding the environmental conditions in the test section. In order to achieve the design requirements, a fibrous, bulk-absorber material was packed into removable panel sections. Each section was divided into two equal-depth layers packed with material to different bulk densities. The lower density was next to the facing of the treatment. The facing consisted of a perforated plate and screening material layered together. Sample tests for normal-incidence acoustic absorption were also conducted in an impedance tube to provide data to aid in the treatment design. Tests with no airflow, involving the measurement of the absorptive properties of the treatment installed in the 9- by 15-foot wind tunnel test section, combined the use of time-delay spectrometry with a previously established free-field measurement method. This new application of time-delay spectrometry enabled these free-field measurements to be made in nonanechoic conditions. The results showed that the installed acoustic treatment had absorption coefficients greater than 0.95 over the frequency range 250 Hz to 4 kHz. The measurements in the wind tunnel were in good agreement with both the analytical prediction and the impedance tube test data.

  12. Fuselage ventilation due to wind flow about a postcrash aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Postcrash aircraft fuselage fire development, dependent on the internal and external fluid dynamics is discussed. The natural ventilation rate, a major factor in the internal flow patterns and fire development is reviewed. The flow about the fuselage as affected by the wind and external fire is studied. An analysis was performend which estimated the rates of ventilation produced by the wind for a limited idealized environmental configuration. The simulation utilizes the empirical pressure coefficient distribution of an infinite circular cylinder near a wall with its boundary later flow to represent the atmospheric boundary layer. The resulting maximum ventilation rate for two door size openings, with varying circumferential location in a common 10 mph wind was an order of magnitude greater than the forced ventilation specified in full scale fire testing. The parameter discussed are: (1) fuselage size and shape, (2) fuselage orientation and proximity to the ground, (3) fuselage-openings size and location, (4) wind speed and direction, and (5) induced flow of the external fire plume is recommended. The fire testing should be conducted to a maximum ventilation rate at least an order of magnitude greater than the inflight air conditioning rates.

  13. Composite Structure Modeling and Analysis of Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Sorokach, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project and the Boeing Company are collabrating to advance the unitized damage arresting composite airframe technology with application to the Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) aircraft. The testing of a HWB fuselage section with Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) construction is presently being conducted at NASA Langley. Based on lessons learned from previous HWB structural design studies, improved finite-element models (FEM) of the HWB multi-bay and bulkhead assembly are developed to evaluate the performance of the PRSEUS construction. In order to assess the comparative weight reduction benefits of the PRSEUS technology, conventional cylindrical skin-stringer-frame models of a cylindrical and a double-bubble section fuselage concepts are developed. Stress analysis with design cabin-pressure load and scenario based case studies are conducted for design improvement in each case. Alternate analysis with stitched composite hat-stringers and C-frames are also presented, in addition to the foam-core sandwich frame and pultruded rod-stringer construction. The FEM structural stress, strain and weights are computed and compared for relative weight/strength benefit assessment. The structural analysis and specific weight comparison of these stitched composite advanced aircraft fuselage concepts demonstrated that the pressurized HWB fuselage section assembly can be structurally as efficient as the conventional cylindrical fuselage section with composite stringer-frame and PRSEUS construction, and significantly better than the conventional aluminum construction and the double-bubble section concept.

  14. Acoustically accessible window determination for ultrasound mediated treatment of glycogen storage disease type Ia patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shutao; Raju, Balasundar I.; Leyvi, Evgeniy; Weinstein, David A.; Seip, Ralf

    2012-10-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) is caused by an inherited single-gene defect resulting in an impaired glycogen to glucose conversion pathway. Targeted ultrasound mediated delivery (USMD) of plasmid DNA (pDNA) to liver in conjunction with microbubbles may provide a potential treatment for GSDIa patients. As the success of USMD treatments is largely dependent on the accessibility of the targeted tissue by the focused ultrasound beam, this study presents a quantitative approach to determine the acoustically accessible liver volume in GSDIa patients. Models of focused ultrasound beam profiles for transducers of varying aperture and focal lengths were applied to abdomen models reconstructed from suitable CT and MRI images. Transducer manipulations (simulating USMD treatment procedures) were implemented via transducer translations and rotations with the intent of targeting and exposing the entire liver to ultrasound. Results indicate that acoustically accessible liver volumes can be as large as 50% of the entire liver volume for GSDIa patients and on average 3 times larger compared to a healthy adult group due to GSDIa patients' increased liver size. Detailed descriptions of the evaluation algorithm, transducer-and abdomen models are presented, together with implications for USMD treatments of GSDIa patients and transducer designs for USMD applications.

  15. Noise of a model counterrotation propeller with simulated fuselage and support pylon at takeoff/approach conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    1989-01-01

    Two modern high-speed advanced counterrotation propellers, F7/A7 and F7/A3 were tested in the NASA Lewis Research Centers's 9- by 15-foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel at simulated takeoff/approach conditions of 0.2 Mach number. Both rotors were of similar diameter on the F7/A7 propeller, while the aft rotor diameter of the F7/A3 propeller was 85 percent of the forward propeller to reduce tip vortex-aft rotor interaction. The two propellers were designed for similar performance. The propellers were tested in both the clean configuration, and installed configuration consisting of a simulated upstream nacelle support pylon and fuselage section. Acoustic measurements were made with an axially translating microphone probe, and with a polar microphone probe which was fixed to the propeller nacelle and could make both sideline and circumferential acoustic surveys. Aerodynamic measurements were also made to establish propeller operating conditions. The propellers were run at blade setting angles (front angle/rear angle) of 41.1/39.4 deg for the F7/A7 propeller, and 41.1/46.4 deg for the F7/A3 propeller. The forward rotors were tested over a range of tip speeds from 165 to 259 m/sec (540 to 850 ft/sec), and both propellers were tested at the maximum rotor-rotor spacing, based on pitch change axis separation, of 14.99 cm (5.90 in.). The data presented in this paper are for 0 deg propeller axis angle of attack. Results are presented for the baseline, pylon-alone, and strut + fuselage configurations. The presence of the simulated fuselage resulted in higher rotor-alone tone levels in a direction normal to the advancing propeller blade near the fuselage. A corresponding rotor-alone tone reduction was often observed 180 deg circumferentially from this region of increased noise. A significant rotor-alone increase for both rotors was observed diametrically opposite the fuselage. In some cases, interaction tone levels were likewise affected by the simulated installation.

  16. Noise of a model counterrotation propeller with simulated fuselage and support pylon at takeoff/approach conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    1989-01-01

    Two modern high-speed advanced counterrotation propellers, F7/A7 and F7/A3 were tested in the NASA Lewis Research Centers's 9- by 15-foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel at simulated takeoff/approach conditions of 0.2 Mach number. Both rotors were of similar diameter on the F7/A7 propeller, while the aft rotor diameter of the F7/A3 propeller was 85 percent of the forward propeller to reduce tip vortex-aft rotor interaction. The two propellers were designed for similar performance. The propellers were tested in both the clean configuration, and installed configuration consisting of a simulated upstream nacelle support pylon and fuselage section. Acoustic measurements were made with an axially translating microphone probe, and with a polar microphone probe which was fixed to the propeller nacelle and could make both sideline and circumferential acoustic surveys. Aerodynamic measurements were also made to establish propeller operating conditions. The propellers were run at blade setting angles (fron angle/rear angle) of 41.1/39.4 deg for the F7/A7 propeller, and 41.1/46.4 deg for the F7/A3 propeller. The forward rotors were tested over a range of tip speeds from 165 to 259 m/sec (540 to 850 ft/sec), and both propellers were tested at the maximum rotor-rotor spacing, based on pitch change axis separation, of 14.99 cm (5.90 in.). The data presented in this paper are for 0 deg propeller axis angle of attack. Results are presented for the baseline, pylon-alone, and strut + fuselage configurations. The presence of the simulated fuselage resulted in higher rotor-alone tone levels in a direction normal to the advancing propeller blade near the fuselage. A corresponding rotor-alone tone reduction was often observed 180 deg circumferentially from this region of increased noise. A significant rotor-alone increase for both rotors was observed diametrically opposite the fuselage. In some cases, interaction tone levels were likewise affected by the simulated installation.

  17. Fatigue Analysis and Design Optimization of Aircraft’s Central Fuselage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbishek, R.; Kumar, B. Ravi; Sankara Subramanian, H.

    2017-08-01

    The centre fuselage of an aircraft plays a very crucial role as most of the important parts such as the front fuselage, aft fuselage and the wings are connected to it. So any load applied on these parts will be transferred to the centre fuselage. Hence it was essential to study the centre fuselage briefly in order to attain high design safety. Fatigue is the process of repeated cyclic loading of a component, which leads to an early failure of the same. The sources of fatigue in an aircraft are the parts connected to it, such as the wings, and the differential pressure between the inside of the fuselage and the outside atmosphere as a result of cabin pressurization. The high pressure inside the fuselage tries to expand the fuselage, whereas the stringers and bulk head prevent it from happening. This change in pressure happens frequently and this results in the fatigue of the centre fuselage. The vibratory loads acting on the other parts are transferred to the centre fuselage, which are also major contributors to the fatigue. The centre fuselage of an aircraft was designed using Pro-E software. The standard aluminium alloy was selected for the material. The various loads acting on the centre fuselage were studied and added to the centre fuselage, along with a differential pressure in a cyclic manner.

  18. Multifactor Influences of Shared Decision-Making in Acoustic Neuroma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Nellis, Jason C; Sharon, Jeff D; Pross, Seth E; Ishii, Lisa E; Ishii, Masaru; Dey, Jacob K; Francis, Howard W

    2017-03-01

    To identify factors associated with treatment modality selection in acoustic neuromas. Prospective observational study. Tertiary care neurotology clinic. Data were prospectively collected from patients initially presenting to a tertiary care neurotology clinic between 2013 and 2016. Patients who did not have magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), demographic, psychometric, or audiometric data were excluded from analysis. Demographic information, clinical symptoms, tumor characteristics, and psychometric data were collected to determine factors associated with undergoing acoustic neuroma surgical resection using univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis. The decision to pursue acoustic neuroma surgical resection versus active surveillance. A total of 216 patients with acoustic neuroma (mean age 55 years, 58% women) were included. Ninety eight patients (45.4%) pursued surgical resection, 118 patients (54.6%) pursued active surveillance. Surgical treatment was significantly associated with patient age less than 65, higher grade tumors, growing tumors, larger volume tumors, lower word discrimination scores, Class D hearing, headache, and vertigo as presenting symptoms, higher number of total symptoms, and higher headache severity scores (p < 0.05). There was no significant association between surgical intervention and preoperative quality of life, depression, and self-esteem scores. On multiple logistic regression analysis, the likelihood of undergoing surgical resection significantly decreased for patients older than age 65 (odds ratio [OR] 0.19; 0.05-0.69) and increased in patients with medium (OR 4.34; 1.36-13.81), moderately large (OR 33.47; 5.72-195.83), large grade tumors (OR 56.63; 4.02-518.93), tumor growth present (OR 4.51; 1.66-12.28), Class D hearing (OR 3.96; 1.29-12.16), and higher headache severity scores (OR 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.05). The likelihood of undergoing surgical resection was completely predictive for giant grade

  19. Characterization of Retrogression and Re-Aging Heat Treatment of AA7075-T6 Using Nonlinear Acoustics and Eddy Current

    SciTech Connect

    Ananthula, Rajeshwar; Ko, Ray T.; Sathish, Shamachary; Blodgett, Mark

    2004-02-26

    Nonlinear acoustic parameter and eddy current methods have been utilized to characterize the heat treatment process of retrogression and re-aging of aluminum 7075-T6. The results of nonlinear acoustic parameter measurements show two distinct peaks at 30 minutes and 45 minutes of retrogression time. The phase of the through-thickness eddy current signal shows a minimum at 42 minutes of retrogression time. Application of combined methods for identifying the optimized properties in the material is discussed.

  20. Surface grid generation for wing-fuselage bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.; Kudlinski, R. A.; Pitts, J. I.

    1984-01-01

    In the application of finite-difference methods to obtain numerical solutions of viscous compressible fluid flow about wing-fuselage bodies, it is advantageous to transform the governing equations to an idealized boundary-fitted coordinate system. The advantages are reduced computational complexity and added accuracy in the application of boundary conditions. The solution process requires that a grid be superimposed on the physical solution domain which corresponds to a uniform grid on a rectangular computational domain (uniform rectangular parallel-epiped). Grid generation is the determination of a one to one relationship between grid points in the physical domain and grid points in the computational domain. A technique for computing wing-fuselage surface grids using the Harris geometry and software for smooth-surface representation is described. Grid spacing control concepts which govern the relationship between the wing-fuselage surface and the computational grid are also presented.

  1. Experimental investigation of the crashworthiness of scaled composite sailplane fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kampf, Karl-Peter; Crawley, Edward F.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The crash dynamics and energy absorption of composite sailplane fuselage segments undergoing nose-down impact were investigated. More than 10 quarter-scale structurally similar test articles, typical of high-performance sailplane designs, were tested. Fuselages segments were fabricated of combinations of fiberglass, graphite, Kevlar, and Spectra fabric materials. Quasistatic and dynamic tests were conducted. The quasistatic tests were found to replicate the strain history and failure modes observed in the dynamic tests. Failure modes of the quarter-scale model were qualitatively compared with full-scale crash evidence and quantitatively compared with current design criteria. By combining material and structural improvements, substantial increases in crashworthiness were demonstrated.

  2. Axial crack propagation and arrest in pressurized fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosai, M.; Shimamoto, A.; Yu, C.-T.; Walker, S. I.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Tan, P.

    1994-01-01

    The crack arrest capability of a tear strap in a pressurized precracked fuselage was studied through instrumented axial rupture tests of small scale models of an idealized fuselage. Upon pressurization, rapid crack propagation initiated at an axial through crack along the stringer and immediately kinked due to the mixed modes 1 and 2 state caused by the one-sided opening of the crack flap. The diagonally running crack further turned at the tear straps. Dynamic finite element analysis of the rupturing cylinder showed that the crack kinked and also ran straight in the presence of a mixed mode state according to a modified two-parameter crack kinking criterion.

  3. Closeup oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery looking forward and starboard with the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) and Orbiter Maneuvering System/Reaction Control System pods removed. The openings for the SSMEs have been covered with a flexible barrier to create a positive pressure envelope inside of the aft fuselage. This image was taken inside the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  4. Closeup oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery looking forward and port with the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) and Orbiter Maneuvering System/Reaction Control System pods still in place. However. the heat shields have been removed from the SSMEs providing a good view toward the interior of the aft fuselage. This image was taken inside the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  5. Detail view of the port side of the aft fuselage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the port side of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery in the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center with a lifting frame attached to the aft attach points of the orbiter. In this view, the Orbiter Maneuvering/Reaction Control Systems pod is in place. Also note the darker-colored trapezoidal aft fuselage access door and the T-0 umbilical panel to its right in the view. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  6. Closeup oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery looking forward and starboard with the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) and Orbiter Maneuvering System/Reaction Control System pods still in place. However. the heat shields have been removed from the SSMEs providing a good view toward the interior of the aft fuselage. This image was taken inside the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  7. Detail view of the starboard side of the aft fuselage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the starboard side of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery in the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center with the Orbiter Maneuvering/Reaction Control Systems Pod removed and exposing the insulating foil used to protect the orbiter structure from the heat generated by the maneuvering and reaction control engines. Also note in the view that the aft fuselage access door has bee removed and also note the ground support equipment attached to the T-0 umbilical plate in the lower left of the view. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  8. 14 CFR 27.549 - Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures. 27.549 Section 27.549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements § 27.549 Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures. (a) Each fuselage, landing gear,...

  9. Numerical Investigation of Rotorcraft Fuselage Drag Reduction Using Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Schaeffler, Norman W.

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of unsteady zero-net-mass-flux jets for fuselage drag reduction was evaluated numerically on a generic rotorcraft fuselage in forward flight with a rotor. Previous efforts have shown significant fuselage drag reduction using flow control for an isolated fuselage by experiment and numerical simulation. This work will evaluate a flow control strategy, that was originally developed on an isolated fuselage, in a more relevant environment that includes the effects of a rotor. Evaluation of different slot heights and jet velocity ratios were performed. Direct comparisons between an isolated fuselage and rotor/fuselage simulations were made showing similar flow control performance at a -3deg fuselage angle-of-attack condition. However, this was not the case for a -5deg angle-of-attack condition where the performance between the isolated fuselage and rotor/fuselage were different. The fuselage flow control resulted in a 17% drag reduction for a peak C(sub mu) of 0.0069 in a forward flight simulation where mu = 0:35 and CT/sigma = 0:08. The CFD flow control results also predicted a favorable 22% reduction of the fuselage download at this same condition, which can have beneficial compounding effects on the overall performance of the vehicle. This numerical investigation was performed in order to provide guidance for a future 1/3 scale wind tunnel experiment to be performed at the NASA 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel.

  10. 14 CFR 27.549 - Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon... Requirements § 27.549 Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures. (a) Each fuselage, landing gear, and... accelerated flight and landing conditions, including engine torque. (Secs. 604, 605, 72 Stat. 778, 49...

  11. 14 CFR 27.549 - Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon... Requirements § 27.549 Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures. (a) Each fuselage, landing gear, and... accelerated flight and landing conditions, including engine torque. (Secs. 604, 605, 72 Stat. 778, 49...

  12. 14 CFR 27.549 - Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon... Requirements § 27.549 Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures. (a) Each fuselage, landing gear, and... accelerated flight and landing conditions, including engine torque. (Secs. 604, 605, 72 Stat. 778, 49...

  13. 14 CFR 27.549 - Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon... Requirements § 27.549 Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures. (a) Each fuselage, landing gear, and... accelerated flight and landing conditions, including engine torque. (Secs. 604, 605, 72 Stat. 778, 49...

  14. CFD Analysis of an Installation Used to Measure the Skin-Friction Penalty of Acoustic Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalart, Philippe R.; Garbaruk, Andrey; Howerton, Brian M.

    2017-01-01

    There is a drive to devise acoustic treatments with reduced skin-friction and therefore fuel-burn penalty for engine nacelles on commercial airplanes. The studies have been experimental, and the effects on skin-friction are deduced from measurements of the pressure drop along a duct. We conduct a detailed CFD analysis of the installation, for two purposes. The first is to predict the effects of the finite size of the rig, including its near-square cross-section and the moderate length of the treated patch; this introduces transient and blockage effects, which have not been included so far in the analysis. In addition, the flow is compressible, so that even with homogeneous surface conditions, it is not homogeneous in the streamwise direction. The second purpose is to extract an effective sand-grain roughness size for a particular liner, which in turn can be used in a CFD analysis of the aircraft, leading to actual predictions of the effect of acoustic treatments on fuel burn in service. The study is entirely based on classical turbulence models, with an appropriate modification for effective roughness effects, rather than directly modeling the liners.

  15. Evaluation of the Acoustic Measurement Capability of the NASA Langley V/STOL Wind Tunnel Open Test Section with Acoustically Absorbent Ceiling and Floor Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theobald, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    The single source location used for helicopter model studies was utilized in a study to determine the distances and directions upstream of the model accurate at which measurements of the direct acoustic field could be obtained. The method used was to measure the decrease of sound pressure levels with distance from a noise source and thereby determine the Hall radius as a function of frequency and direction. Test arrangements and procedures are described. Graphs show the normalized sound pressure level versus distance curves for the glass fiber floor treatment and for the foam floor treatment.

  16. An experimental study of the effects of water repellant treatment on the acoustic properties of Kevlar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. D.; Parrott, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    The treatment consisted of immersing samples of Kevlar in a solution of distilled water and Zepel. The samples were then drained, dried in a circulating over, and cured. Flow resistance tests showed approximately one percent decrease in flow resistance of the samples. Also there was a density increase of about three percent. It was found that the treatment caused a change in the texture of the samples. There were significant changes in the acoustic properties of the treated Kevlar over the frequency range 0.5 to 3.5 kHz. In general it was found that the propagation constant and characteristic impedance increased with increasing frequency. The real and imaginary components of the propagation constant for the treated Kevlar exhibited a decrease of 8 to 12 percent relative to that for the untreated Kevlar at the higher frequencies. The magnitude of the reactance component of the characteristic impedance decreased by about 40 percent at the higher frequencies.

  17. Treatment of Tinnitus With a Customized, Dynamic Acoustic Neural Stimulus: Underlying Principles and Clinical Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Peter J.; Davis, Paul B.

    2008-01-01

    Tinnitus has been challenging to treat with consistently positive results. The Neuromonics Tinnitus Treatment is a newly available approach to the treatment of clinically significant, problematic tinnitus (and reduced sound tolerance) that was developed with the intention of simultaneously addressing the auditory, attentional, and emotional processes underlying the condition. It uses a prescribed acoustic stimulus, customized for each patient's individual audiometric profile, which provides a broad frequency stimulus to address the effects of auditory deprivation, promotes relief and relaxation with the intention of reducing engagement of the limbic system/amygdala and autonomic nervous system, and applies the principles of systematic desensitization to address the attentional processes. This article describes the underlying principles behind this approach. It also summarizes evidence for clinical efficacy from controlled clinical studies and from a private practice clinical setting, where it has been shown to provide consistently positive outcomes for patients meeting suitability criteria. PMID:18614554

  18. Fuselage structure using advanced technology fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. K.; Tomlinson, H. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fuselage structure is described in which the skin is comprised of layers of a matrix fiber reinforced composite, with the stringers reinforced with the same composite material. The high strength to weight ratio of the composite, particularly at elevated temperatures, and its high modulus of elasticity, makes it desirable for use in airplane structures.

  19. 6. Detail of forward fuselage showing open cockpit hatch and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail of forward fuselage showing open cockpit hatch and ladder. View to southeast. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  20. Evaluation of the concept of pressure proof testing fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Orringer, Oscar

    1991-01-01

    The FAA and NASA have recently completed independent technical evaluations of the concept of pressure proof testing the fuselage of commercial transport airplanes. The results of these evaluations are summarized. The objectives of the evaluations were to establish the potential benefit of the pressure proof test, to quantify the most desirable proof test pressure, and to quantify the required proof test interval. The focus of the evaluations was on multiple-site cracks extending from adjacent rivet holes of a typical fuselage longitudinal lap splice joint. The FAA and NASA do not support pressure proof testing the fuselage of aging commercial transport aircraft. The argument against proof testing is as follows: (1) a single proof test does not insure an indefinite life; therefore, the proof test must be repeated at regular intervals; (2) for a proof factor of 1.33, the required proof test interval must be below 300 flights to account for uncertainties in the evaluation; (3) conducting the proof test at a proof factor of 1.5 would considerably exceed the fuselage design limit load; therefore, it is not consistent with accepted safe practices; and (4) better safety can be assured by implementing enhanced nondestructive inspection requirements, and adequate reliability can be achieved by an inspection interval several times longer than the proof test interval.

  1. LEFT WING AND FUSELAGE FROM THIRD LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LEFT WING AND FUSELAGE FROM THIRD LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK STAND. THE WING IS PREPARED FOR BASIC LUBRICATION WITH E SPOILER BOARDS UP AND ALL SAFETY LOCKS IN PLACE TO PROTECT MECHANICS FROM INJURY. ON THE WING AN INSPECTOR CHECKS THE ACTUATORS. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  2. RWF rotor-wake-fuselage code software reference guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.

    1991-01-01

    The RWF (Rotor-Wake-Fuselage) code was developed from first principles to compute the aerodynamics associated with the complex flow field of helicopter configurations. The code is sized for a single, multi-bladed main rotor and any configuration of non-lifting fuselage. The mathematical model for the RWF code is based on the integration of the momentum equations and Green's theorem. The unknowns in the problem are the strengths of prescribed singularity distributions on the boundaries of the flow. For the body (fuselage) a surface of constant strength source panels is used. For the rotor blades and rotor wake a surface of constant strength doublet panels is used. The mean camber line of the rotor airfoil is partitioned into surface panels. The no-flow boundary condition at the panel centroids is modified at each azimuthal step to account for rotor blade cyclic pitch variation. The geometry of the rotor wake is computers at each time step of the solution. The code produces rotor and fuselage surface pressures, as well as the complex geometry of the evolving rotor wake.

  3. Manufacturing scale-up of composite fuselage crown panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willden, Kurtis; Gessel, M.; Grant, Carroll G.; Brown, T.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of the Boeing effort under the NASA ACT program is to reduce manufacturing costs of composite fuselage structure. Materials, fabrication of complex subcomponents and assembly issues are expected to drive the costs of composite fuselage structure. Several manufacturing concepts for the crown section of the fuselage were evaluated through the efforts of a Design Build Team (DBT). A skin-stringer-frame intricate bond design that required no fasteners for the panel assembly was selected for further manufacturing demonstrations. The manufacturing processes selected for the intricate bond design include Advanced Tow Placement (ATP) for multiple skin fabrication, resin transfer molding (RTM) of fuselage frames, innovative cure tooling, and utilization of low-cost material forms. Optimization of these processes for final design/manufacturing configuration was evaluated through the fabrication of several intricate bond panels. Panels up to 7 ft. by 10 ft. in size were fabricated to simulate half scale production parts. The qualitative and quantitative results of these manufacturing demonstrations were used to assess manufacturing risks and technology readiness for production.

  4. 14 CFR 29.549 - Fuselage and rotor pylon structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... flight conditions, must be considered. (c) Each engine mount and adjacent fuselage structure must be designed to withstand the loads occurring under accelerated flight and landing conditions, including engine torque. (d) (e) If approval for the use of 21/2-minute OEI power is requested, each engine mount...

  5. An oblique view of the forward fuselage and starboard side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    An oblique view of the forward fuselage and starboard side of the Orbiter Discovery while mounted atop the 76-wheeled orbiter transfer system as it is being rolled from the Orbiter Processing Facility to the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  6. An oblique view of the forward fuselage and port side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    An oblique view of the forward fuselage and port side of the Orbiter Discovery while mounted atop the 76-wheeled orbiter transfer system as it is being rolled from the Orbiter Processing Facility to the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  7. Damage Tolerant Repair Techniques for Pressurized Aircraft Fuselages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    34Don’t fight forces, use them.’ R. Buckminster Fuller , Shelter (1932) The finite element analysis method was chosen to complement traditional direct...the model. 32 Damage Tolerant Repair Techniques for Pressurized Aircraft Fuselages 2.4.5 Finite Element Analysis Results The results give a fuller

  8. Sustained acoustic medicine: wearable, long duration ultrasonic therapy for the treatment of tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Best, Thomas M; Moore, Bob; Jarit, Paddy; Moorman, Claude T; Lewis, George K

    2015-11-01

    The effectiveness of sustained acoustic medicine to alleviate pain and improve function in subjects with elbow or Achilles tendinopathy was evaluated through a level IV case series study. Subjects were trained to self-apply the wearable, long-duration, low-intensity ultrasonic device on their affected body part at home for 4 hours a day, at least 5 times per week over 6 weeks. Twenty-five subjects with clinician-diagnosed tendinopathy of the elbow (medial or lateral epicondyle) or Achilles tendon were enrolled. Pain measurements were recorded before, during, and after daily intervention using an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS). Function of the injured limb was assessed biweekly using dynamometry. Repeated measures ANOVAs and paired-samples t-tests were used to examine the effect of treatment over time. Among subjects with elbow tendinopathy (n = 20), a 3.94 ± 2.15 point reduction in pain (p = 0.002) was observed over the 6-week study and a 2.83 ± 5.52 kg improvement in grip strength (p = 0.04) was observed over the first two weeks. In addition, a significant reduction in pain was observed within the 4-h treatment sessions (p < 0.001). Among 5 subjects with Achilles tendinopathy, a reduction in pain and improvement in strength was also observed. Daily multi-hour ultrasonic therapy was associated with improved pain and increased function in subjects with chronic tendon injuries. This trial showed the safety and feasibility of self-administration of sustained acoustic medicine, and suggests that this therapy may be clinically beneficial in the treatment of tendinopathies of the elbow and Achilles tendon. A randomized controlled trial appears warranted to more definitively investigate the therapeutic potential of this treatment modality. Registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02466308.

  9. Cabin-fuselage-wing structural design concept with engine installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ariotti, Scott; Garner, M.; Cepeda, A.; Vieira, J.; Bolton, D.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide a fuselage structural assembly and wing structural design that will be able to withstand the given operational parameters and loads provided by Federal Aviation Regulation Part 23 (FAR 23) and the Statement of Work (SOW). The goal is to provide a durable lightweight structure that will transfer the applied loads through the most efficient load path. Areas of producibility and maintainability of the structure will also be addressed. All of the structural members will also meet or exceed the desired loading criteria, along with providing adequate stiffness, reliability, and fatigue life as stated in the SOW. Considerations need to be made for control system routing and cabin heating/ventilation. The goal of the wing structure and carry through structure is also to provide a simple, lightweight structure that will transfer the aerodynamic forces produced by the wing, tailboom, and landing gear. These forces will be channeled through various internal structures sized for the pre-determined loading criteria. Other considerations were to include space for flaps, ailerons, fuel tanks, and electrical and control system routing. The difficulties encountered in the fuselage design include expanding the fuselage cabin to accept a third occupant in a staggered configuration and providing ample volume for their safety. By adding a third person the CG of aircraft will move forward so the engine needs to be moved aft to compensate for the difference in the moment. This required the provisions of a ring frame structure for the new position of the engine mount. The difficulties encountered in the wing structural design include resizing the wing for the increased capacity and weight, and compensating for a large torsion produced by the tail boom by placing a great number of stiffeners inside the boom, which will result in the relocation of the fuel tank. Finally, an adequate carry through structure for the wing and fuselage interface will be

  10. Effect of fan outlet guide vane on the acoustic treatment design in aeroengine nacelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Yang, Z.; Wang, X.

    2007-04-01

    The main objective of this study is to clarify the effect of the outlet guide vane (OGV) on the acoustic treatment design in aeroengine nacelle, which received less attention previously. A model of sound propagation through a lining section and a blade row is developed to investigate the interaction between sound sources of blade rows and liners in a channel of parallel walls containing uniform mean flow. The present method makes it possible to evaluate the performance of liner while a blade row is inserted in the channel and the sound attenuation in a duct with both liner section and cascade. Various numerical results show that the effect of the cascade may have diverse effects on sound attenuation of the liner under different conditions, but the existence of the OGV always enhances the total sound attenuation in the duct due to energy dissipation caused by vortex shedding from the tailing edge of the OGV. To pursue a better design of acoustic liner in aeroengine nacelle, it is thus necessary to include the effect of OGV on the sound attenuation.

  11. Acoustic Characteristics of Various Treatment Panel Designs Specific to HSCT Mixer-Ejector Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Kinzie, K.; Vu, D. D.; Langenbrunner, L. E.; Szczepkowski, G. T.

    2006-01-01

    The development process of liner design methodology is described in several reports. The results of the initial effort of concept development, screening, laboratory testing of various liner concepts, and preliminary correlation (generic data) are presented in a report Acoustic Characteristics of Various Treatment Panel Designs for HSCT Ejector Liner Acoustic Technology Development Program. The second phase of laboratory test results of more practical concepts and their data correlations are presented in this report (product specific). In particular, this report contains normal incidence impedance measurements of several liner types in both a static rig and in a high temperature flow duct rig. The flow duct rig allows for temperatures up to 400 F with a grazing flow up to Mach 0.8. Measurements of impedance, DC flow resistance, and in the flow rig cases, impact of the liner on boundary layer profiles are documented. In addition to liner rig tests, a limited number of tests were made on liners installed in a mixer-Ejector nozzle to confirm the performance of the liner prediction in an installed configuration.

  12. Vibro-Acoustic FE Analyses of the Saab 2000 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Inge S.

    1992-01-01

    A finite element model of the Saab 2000 fuselage structure and interior cavity has been created in order to compute the noise level in the passenger cabin due to propeller noise. Areas covered in viewgraph format include the following: coupled acoustic/structural noise; data base creation; frequency response analysis; model validation; and planned analyses.

  13. Vibro-acoustic FE analyses of the Saab 2000 aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Inge S.

    1992-07-01

    A finite element model of the Saab 2000 fuselage structure and interior cavity has been created in order to compute the noise level in the passenger cabin due to propeller noise. Areas covered in viewgraph format include the following: coupled acoustic/structural noise; data base creation; frequency response analysis; model validation; and planned analyses.

  14. Development of a model to assess acoustic treatments to reduce railway noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, H.; Squicciarini, G.; Thompson, D. J.; Ryue, J.

    2016-09-01

    Porous materials have recently been used in absorptive treatments around railway tracks to reduce noise emissions. To investigate the effect of porous materials, a finite element model has been developed. 2D models for porous materials have been considered either as an equivalent fluid or as a poroelastic material based on the Biot theory. The two models have been validated and compared with each other to check the effect of the skeleton vibration. The poroelastic FE model has been coupled with a 2D acoustic boundary element model for use in railway applications. The results show that it may be necessary to include the frame vibration, especially at low frequencies where a frame resonance occurs. A method for the characterization of porous materials is also discussed. From this it is shown that the elastic properties of the material determine the resonance frequency and the magnitude.

  15. TU-G-210-03: Acoustic Simulations in Transcranial MRgFUS: Treatment Prediction and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, U.

    2015-06-15

    Modeling can play a vital role in predicting, optimizing and analyzing the results of therapeutic ultrasound treatments. Simulating the propagating acoustic beam in various targeted regions of the body allows for the prediction of the resulting power deposition and temperature profiles. In this session we will apply various modeling approaches to breast, abdominal organ and brain treatments. Of particular interest is the effectiveness of procedures for correcting for phase aberrations caused by intervening irregular tissues, such as the skull in transcranial applications or inhomogeneous breast tissues. Also described are methods to compensate for motion in targeted abdominal organs such as the liver or kidney. Douglas Christensen – Modeling for Breast and Brain HIFU Treatment Planning Tobias Preusser – TRANS-FUSIMO - An Integrative Approach to Model-Based Treatment Planning of Liver FUS Urvi Vyas – Acoustic Simulations in Transcranial MRgFUS: Treatment Prediction and Analysis Learning Objectives: Understand the role of acoustic beam modeling for predicting the effectiveness of therapeutic ultrasound treatments. Apply acoustic modeling to specific breast, liver, kidney and transcranial anatomies. Determine how to obtain appropriate acoustic modeling parameters from clinical images. Understand the separate role of absorption and scattering in energy delivery to tissues. See how organ motion can be compensated for in ultrasound therapies. Compare simulated data with clinical temperature measurements in transcranial applications. Supported by NIH R01 HL172787 and R01 EB013433 (DC); EU Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under 270186 (FUSIMO) and 611889 (TRANS-FUSIMO)(TP); and P01 CA159992, GE, FUSF and InSightec (UV)

  16. Efficient modeling of flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments for vibroacoustic finite element analysis. Finite size correction by image sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimonti, L.; Atalla, N.

    2017-02-01

    This work is concerned with the hybrid finite element-transfer matrix methodology recently proposed by the authors. The main assumption behind this hybrid method consists in neglecting the actual finite lateral extent of the acoustic treatment. Although a substantial increase of the computational efficiency can be achieved, the effect of the reflected field (i.e. finite size effects) may be sometimes important, preventing the hybrid model from giving quantitative meaningful results. For this reason, a correction to account for wave reflections at the lateral boundaries of the acoustic treatment is sought. It is shown in the present paper that the image source method can be successfully employed to retrieve such finite size effects. Indeed, such methodology is known to be effective when the response of the system is a smooth function of the frequency, like in the case of highly dissipative acoustic treatments. The main concern of this paper is to assess accuracy and feasibility of the image source method in the context of acoustic treatments modeling. Numerical examples show that the performance of the standard hybrid model can be substantially improved by the proposed correction without deteriorating excessively the computational efficiency.

  17. The treatment of a large acoustic tumor with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Shearwood; Gerbi, Bruce J; Cho, Kwan H; Hall, Walter A

    2007-01-01

    The treatment of acoustic neuromas (AN) usually involves surgical excision or stereotactic radiosurgery. However, for large AN (mean diameter > 3 cm), stereotactic radiosurgery is rarely used, leaving patients with limited noninvasive treatment options. Recently, the use of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) has been effective in treating small to medium-sized AN. We present a patient with a large AN treated with FSRT. The patient was a 43-year-old man presenting with imbalance, tinnitus, vertigo, and right-sided hearing decline associated with vomiting and hydrocephalus. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a large, 3.8-cm, right cerebellopontine-angle tumor compressing the fourth ventricle. Following right frontal ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement, the patient underwent FSRT for treatment of the tumor. Using the Radionics X-Knife 4.0 3D treatment planning system, a total of 54 Gy was delivered in 1.8-Gy daily fractions with the prescription isodose line of 90%. Treatments were delivered using a dedicated Varian 6/100 linear accelerator, and head immobilization was achieved with the Gill-Thomas-Cosman relocatable stereotactic frame. The patient was subsequently evaluated with serial contrast-enhanced MR imaging. Following FSRT, local control (defined as the absence of tumor progression) was achieved, and treatment was well tolerated. There was no hearing-related, trigeminal, or facial-nerve morbidity following FSRT at 63-month follow-up. Treating a patient with a large AN with FSRT resulted in local tumor control, with no trigeminal nerve, facial nerve, or hearing-related morbidity. These results support FSRT as a potential noninvasive treatment modality for AN some would consider too large for single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS).

  18. An evaluation of proposed acoustic treatments for the NASA LaRC 4 x 7 meter wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrahamson, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA LaRC 4 x 7 Meter Wind Tunnel is an existing facility specially designed for powered low speed (V/STOL) testing of large scale fixed wing and rotorcraft models. The enhancement of the facility for scale model acoustic testing is examined. The results are critically reviewed and comparisons are drawn with a similar wind tunnel (the DNW Facility in the Netherlands). Discrepancies observed in the comparison stimulated a theoretical investigation using the acoustic finite element ADAM System, of the ways in which noise propagating around the tunnel circuit radiates into the open test section. The reasons for the discrepancies noted above are clarified and assists in the selection of acoustic treatment options for the facility.

  19. Transonic Flow Field Analysis for Wing-Fuselage Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boppe, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    A computational method for simulating the aerodynamics of wing-fuselage configurations at transonic speeds is developed. The finite difference scheme is characterized by a multiple embedded mesh system coupled with a modified or extended small disturbance flow equation. This approach permits a high degree of computational resolution in addition to coordinate system flexibility for treating complex realistic aircraft shapes. To augment the analysis method and permit applications to a wide range of practical engineering design problems, an arbitrary fuselage geometry modeling system is incorporated as well as methodology for computing wing viscous effects. Configuration drag is broken down into its friction, wave, and lift induced components. Typical computed results for isolated bodies, isolated wings, and wing-body combinations are presented. The results are correlated with experimental data. A computer code which employs this methodology is described.

  20. Global cost and weight evaluation of fuselage keel design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, B. W.; Morris, M. R.; Metschan, S. L.; Swanson, G. D.; Smith, P. J.; Griess, K. H.; Schramm, M. R.; Humphrey, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    The Boeing program entitled Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structure (ATCAS) is focused on the application of affordable composite technology to pressurized fuselage structure of future aircraft. As part of this effort, a design study was conducted on the keel section of the aft fuselage. A design build team (DBT) approach was used to identify and evaluate several design concepts which incorporated different material systems, fabrication processes, structural configurations, and subassembly details. The design concepts were developed in sufficient detail to accurately assess their potential for cost and weight savings as compared with a metal baseline representing current wide body technology. The cost and weight results, along with an appraisal of performance and producibility risks, are used to identify a globally optimized keel design; one which offers the most promising cost and weight advantages over metal construction. Lastly, an assessment is given of the potential for further cost and weight reductions of the selected keel design during local optimization.

  1. Algebraic grid generation for wing-fuselage bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.; Everton, E. L.; Kudlinski, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    An algebraic procedure for the generation of boundary-fitted grids about wing-fuselage configurations is presented. A wing-fuselage configuration is specified by cross sections and mathematically represented by Coons' patches. A configuration is divided into sections so that several grid blocks that either adjoin each other or partially overlap each other can be generated, and each grid has six surfaces that map into a computational cube. Grids are first determined on the six boundary surfaces and then in the interior. Grid curves that are on the surface of the configuration are derived using plane-patch intersections, and single-valued functions relating approximate arc lengths along the curves to computational coordinates define the distribution of grid points. The two-boundary technique and transfinite interpolation are used to determine the boundary surface grids that are not on the configuration, and transfinite interpolation with linear blending functions is used to determine the interior grids.

  2. Algebraic grid generation about wing-fuselage bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R.E.; Kudlinski, R. A.; Everton, E. L.; Wiese, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    An algebraic procedure for generating boundary-fitted grids about wing-fuselage configurations is presented. A wing-fuselage configuration consists of two aircraft components specified by cross sections and mathematically represented by Coons' patches. Several grid blocks are constructed to cover the entire region surrounding the configuration, and each grid block maps into a computational cube. Grid points are first determined on the six boundary surfaces of a block and then in the interior. Grid points on the surface of the configuration are derived from the intersection of planes with the Coons' patch definition. Approximate arc length distributions along the resulting grid curves concentrate and disperse grid points. The two-boundary technique and transfinite interpolation are used to determine grid points on the remaining boundary surfaces and block interiors.

  3. Design and analysis of a stiffened composite fuselage panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, J. N.; Biggers, S. B.

    1980-01-01

    The design and analysis of stiffened composite panel that is representative of the fuselage structure of existing wide bodied aircraft is discussed. The panel is a minimum weight design, based on the current level of technology and realistic loads and criteria. Several different stiffener configurations were investigated in the optimization process. The final configuration is an all graphite/epoxy J-stiffened design in which the skin between adjacent stiffeners is permitted to buckle under design loads. Fail safe concepts typically employed in metallic fuselage structure have been incorporated in the design. A conservative approach has been used with regard to structural details such as skin/frame and stringer/frame attachments and other areas where sufficient design data was not available.

  4. Design and Analysis of a Stiffened Composite Fuselage Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, J. N.; Biggers, S. B.

    1980-01-01

    A stiffened composite panel has been designed that is representative of the fuselage structure of existing wide bodied aircraft. The panel is a minimum weight design, based on the current level of technology and realistic loads and criteria. Several different stiffener configurations were investigated in the optimization process. The final configuration is an all graphite epoxy J-stiffened design in which the skin between adjacent stiffeners is permitted to buckle under design loads. Fail-safe concepts typically employed in metallic fuselage structure have been incorporated in the design. A conservative approach has been used with regard to structural details such as skin frame and stringer frame attachments and other areas where sufficient design data was not available.

  5. Design of fuselage shapes for natural laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodbele, S. S.; Vandam, C. P.; Vijgen, P. M. H. W.

    1986-01-01

    Recent technological advances in airplane construction techniques and materials allow for the production of aerodynamic surfaces without significant waviness and roughness, permitting long runs of natural laminar flow (NLF). The present research effort seeks to refine and validate computational design tools for use in the design of axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric natural-laminar-flow bodies. The principal task of the investigation involves fuselage body shaping using a computational design procedure. Analytical methods were refined and exploratory calculations conducted to predict laminar boundary-layer on selected body shapes. Using a low-order surface-singularity aerodynamic analysis program, pressure distribution, boundary-layer development, transition location and drag coefficient have been obtained for a number of body shapes including a representative business-aircraft fuselage. Extensive runs of laminar flow were predicted in regions of favorable pressure gradient on smooth body surfaces. A computational design procedure was developed to obtain a body shape with minimum drag having large extent of NLF.

  6. Aerodynamic analysis of a helicopter fuselage with rotating rotor head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reß, R.; Grawunder, M.; Breitsamter, Ch.

    2015-06-01

    The present paper describes results of wind tunnel experiments obtained during a research programme aimed at drag reduction of the fuselage of a twin engine light helicopter configuration. A 1 : 5 scale model of a helicopter fuselage including a rotating rotor head and landing gear was investigated in the low-speed wind tunnel A of Technische Universität a München (TUM). The modelled parts of the helicopter induce approxiu mately 80% of the total parasite drag thus forming a major potential for shape optimizations. The present paper compares results of force and moment measurements of a baseline configuration and modified variants with an emphasis on the aerodynamic drag, lift, and yawing moment coefficients.

  7. Algebraic grid generation about wing-fuselage bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R.E.; Kudlinski, R. A.; Everton, E. L.; Wiese, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    An algebraic procedure for generating boundary-fitted grids about wing-fuselage configurations is presented. A wing-fuselage configuration consists of two aircraft components specified by cross sections and mathematically represented by Coons' patches. Several grid blocks are constructed to cover the entire region surrounding the configuration, and each grid block maps into a computational cube. Grid points are first determined on the six boundary surfaces of a block and then in the interior. Grid points on the surface of the configuration are derived from the intersection of planes with the Coons' patch definition. Approximate arc length distributions along the resulting grid curves concentrate and disperse grid points. The two-boundary technique and transfinite interpolation are used to determine grid points on the remaining boundary surfaces and block interiors.

  8. Computing induced velocity perturbations due to a helicopter fuselage in a free stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.; Althoff, Susan L.

    1989-01-01

    The velocity field of a representative helicopter fuselage in a free stream is computed. Perturbation velocities due to the fuselage are computed in a plan above the location of the helicopter rotor (rotor removed). The velocity perturbations computed by a source-panel model of the fuselage are compared with experimental measurements taken with a laser velocimeter. Three paneled fuselage models are studied: fuselage shape, fuselage shape with hub shape, and a body of revolution. The velocity perturbations computed for both fuselage shape models agree well with the measured velocity field except in the close vicinity of the rotor hub. In the hub region, without knowing the extent of separation, modeling of the effective source shape is difficult. The effects of the fuselage perturbations are not well-predicted with a simplified ellipsoid fuselage. The velocity perturbations due to the fuselage at the plane of the measurements have magnitudes of less than 8 percent of free-stream velocity. The velocity perturbations computed by the panel method are tabulated for the same locations at which previously reported rotor-inflow velocity measurements were made.

  9. Automated design of minimum drag light aircraft fuselages and nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, F. O.; Fox, S. R.; Karlin, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    The constrained minimization algorithm of Vanderplaats is applied to the problem of designing minimum drag faired bodies such as fuselages and nacelles. Body drag is computed by a variation of the Hess-Smith code. This variation includes a boundary layer computation. The encased payload provides arbitrary geometric constraints, specified a priori by the designer, below which the fairing cannot shrink. The optimization may include engine cooling air flows entering and exhausting through specific port locations on the body.

  10. Detailed view inside the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detailed view inside the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery showing the network of supply, distribution and feed lines to deliver fuel, oxidizer and other vital gasses and fluids to the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs). This photograph was taken in the Orbiter Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  11. General view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery looking forward showing Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs) installed in positions one and three and an SSME on the process of being installed in position two. This photograph was taken in the Orbiter Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  12. View of the forward fuselage and the reinforced carboncarbon nose ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the forward fuselage and the reinforced carbon-carbon nose of the Orbiter Discovery looking aft while mounted atop the 76-wheeled orbiter transfer system as it is being rolled from the Orbiter Processing Facility to the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  13. Closeup view of the upper exterior of the forward fuselage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the upper exterior of the forward fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery in the Orbiter Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The view show a detail of the flight deck windows with protective covers installed to protect the window surfaces during processing. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  14. Design development tests for composite crashworthy helicopter fuselage

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, J.K.; Dremann, C.C.

    1985-10-01

    Design development tests were conducted to investigate the crashworthy characteristics of composite helicopter fuselage subcomponents, and to design helicopter center beam/bulkhead specimens lighter than structural elements of honeycomb sandwich construction. Skinstringer designs of center beams - made of carbon, and hybrids of carbon and Kevlar - were fabricated and tested in axial compression. Crashworthy design parameters of specific energy, operating load and stroke efficiency were investigated. 8 references, 15 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Risk of a second cancer from scattered radiation in acoustic neuroma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Hyunho; Sung, Jiwon; Shin, Dongoh; Park, Sungho; Chung, Weon Kuu; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Kim, Dong Wook

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to compare the risk of a secondary cancer from scattered and leakage doses in patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of a secondary cancer were estimated using the corresponding secondary doses measured at various organs by using radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, liver, bowel, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were 14.6, 1.7, 0.9, 0.8, 0.6, 0.6, and 0.6 cGy, respectively, for IMRT whereas they were 19.1, 1.8, 2.0, 0.6, 0.4, 0.4, and 0.4 cGy, respectively, for VMAT, and 22.8, 4.6, 1.4, 0.7, 0.5, 0.5, and 0.5 cGy, respectively, for SRS. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A lifetime attributable risk evaluation estimated that more than 0.03% of acoustic neuroma (AN) patients would get radiation-induced cancer within 20 years of receiving radiation therapy. The organ with the highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN was the thyroid. We found that the LAR could be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  16. Analytical Fuselage and Wing Weight Estimation of Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Mark C.; Ardema, Mark D.; Patron, Anthony P.; Hahn, Andrew S.; Miura, Hirokazu; Moore, Mark D.

    1996-01-01

    A method of estimating the load-bearing fuselage weight and wing weight of transport aircraft based on fundamental structural principles has been developed. This method of weight estimation represents a compromise between the rapid assessment of component weight using empirical methods based on actual weights of existing aircraft, and detailed, but time-consuming, analysis using the finite element method. The method was applied to eight existing subsonic transports for validation and correlation. Integration of the resulting computer program, PDCYL, has been made into the weights-calculating module of the AirCraft SYNThesis (ACSYNT) computer program. ACSYNT has traditionally used only empirical weight estimation methods; PDCYL adds to ACSYNT a rapid, accurate means of assessing the fuselage and wing weights of unconventional aircraft. PDCYL also allows flexibility in the choice of structural concept, as well as a direct means of determining the impact of advanced materials on structural weight. Using statistical analysis techniques, relations between the load-bearing fuselage and wing weights calculated by PDCYL and corresponding actual weights were determined.

  17. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Repair and Damage Assessment Supporting Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, B. W.; Bodine, J. B.; Dopker, B.; Finn, S. R.; Griess, K. H.; Hanson, C. T.; Harris, C. G.; Nelson, K. M.; Walker, T. H.; Kennedy, T. C.; hide

    1997-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored contracts for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) and Materials Development Omnibus Contract (MDOC), Boeing is studying the technologies associated with the application of composite materials to commercial transport fuselage structure. Included in the study is the incorporation of maintainability and repairability requirements of composite primary structure into the design. This contractor report describes activities performed to address maintenance issues in composite fuselage applications. A key aspect of the study was the development of a maintenance philosophy which included consideration of maintenance issues early in the design cycle, multiple repair options, and airline participation in design trades. Fuselage design evaluations considered trade-offs between structural weight, damage resistance/tolerance (repair frequency), and inspection burdens. Analysis methods were developed to assess structural residual strength in the presence of damage, and to evaluate repair design concepts. Repair designs were created with a focus on mechanically fastened concepts for skin/stringer structure and bonded concepts for sandwich structure. Both a large crown (skintstringer) and keel (sandwich) panel were repaired. A compression test of the keel panel indicated the demonstrated repairs recovered ultimate load capability. In conjunction with the design and manufacturing developments, inspection methods were investigated for their potential to evaluate damaged structure and verify the integrity of completed repairs.

  18. Skin, Stringer, and Fastener Loads in Buckled Fuselage Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The results of a numerical study to assess the effect of skin buckling on the internal load distribution in a stiffened fuselage panel, with and without longitudinal cracks, are presented. In addition, the impact of changes in the internal loads on the fatigue life and residual strength of a fuselage panel is assessed. A generic narrow-body fuselage panel is considered. The entire panel is modeled using shell elements and considerable detail is included to represent the geometric-nonlinear response of the buckled skin, cross section deformation of the stiffening components, and details of the skin-string attachment with discrete fasteners. Results are presented for a fixed internal pressure and various combinations of axial tension or compression loads. Results illustrating the effect of skin buckling on the stress distribution in the skin and stringer, and fastener loads are presented. Results are presented for the pristine structure, and for cases where damage is introduced in the form of a longitudinal crack adjacent to the stringer, or failed fastener elements. The results indicate that axial compression loads and skin buckling can have a significant effect on the circumferential stress in the skin, and fastener loads, which will influence damage initiation, and a comparable effect on stress intensity factors for cases with cracks. The effects on stress intensity factors will influence damage propagation rates and the residual strength of the panel.

  19. Experimental measurement of structural power flow on an aircraft fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental technique is used to measure structural intensity through an aircraft fuselage with an excitation load applied near one of the wing attachment locations. The fuselage is a relatively large structure, requiring a large number of measurement locations to analyze the whole of the structure. For the measurement of structural intensity, multiple point measurements are necessary at every location of interest. A tradeoff is therefore required between the number of measurement transducers, the mounting of these transducers, and the accuracy of the measurements. Using four transducers mounted on a bakelite platform, structural intensity vectors are measured at locations distributed throughout the fuselage. To minimize the errors associated with using the four transducer technique, the measurement locations are selected to be away from bulkheads and stiffeners. Furthermore, to eliminate phase errors between the four transducer measurements, two sets of data are collected for each position, with the orientation of the platform with the four transducers rotated by 180 degrees and an average taken between the two sets of data. The results of these measurements together with a discussion of the suitability of the approach for measuring structural intensity on a real structure are presented.

  20. Experimental measurement of structural power flow on an aircraft fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental technique is used to measure the structural power flow through an aircraft fuselage with the excitation near the wing attachment location. Because of the large number of measurements required to analyze the whole of an aircraft fuselage, it is necessary that a balance be achieved between the number of measurement transducers, the mounting of these transducers, and the accuracy of the measurements. Using four transducers mounted on a bakelite platform, the structural intensity vectors at locations distributed throughout the fuselage are measured. To minimize the errors associated with using a four transducers technique the measurement positions are selected away from bulkheads and stiffeners. Because four separate transducers are used, with each transducer having its own drive and conditioning amplifiers, phase errors are introduced in the measurements that can be much greater than the phase differences associated with the measurements. To minimize these phase errors two sets of measurements are taken for each position with the orientation of the transducers rotated by 180 deg and an average taken between the two sets of measurements. Results are presented and discussed.

  1. Cabin fuselage structural design with engine installation and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, Tanapaal; Bishop, Mike; Gumus, Ilker; Gussy, Joel; Triggs, Mike

    1994-01-01

    Design requirements for the cabin, cabin system, flight controls, engine installation, and wing-fuselage interface that provide adequate interior volume for occupant seating, cabin ingress and egress, and safety are presented. The fuselage structure must be sufficient to meet the loadings specified in the appropriate sections of Federal Aviation Regulation Part 23. The critical structure must provide a safe life of 10(exp 6) load cycles and 10,000 operational mission cycles. The cabin seating and controls must provide adjustment to account for various pilot physiques and to aid in maintenance and operation of the aircraft. Seats and doors shall not bind or lockup under normal operation. Cabin systems such as heating and ventilation, electrical, lighting, intercom, and avionics must be included in the design. The control system will consist of ailerons, elevator, and rudders. The system must provide required deflections with a combination of push rods, bell cranks, pulleys, and linkages. The system will be free from slack and provide smooth operation without binding. Environmental considerations include variations in temperature and atmospheric pressure, protection against sand, dust, rain, humidity, ice, snow, salt/fog atmosphere, wind and gusts, and shock and vibration. The following design goals were set to meet the requirements of the statement of work: safety, performance, manufacturing and cost. To prevent the engine from penetrating the passenger area in the event of a crash was the primary safety concern. Weight and the fuselage aerodynamics were the primary performance concerns. Commonality and ease of manufacturing were major considerations to reduce cost.

  2. Impact damage resistance of composite fuselage structure, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dost, E. F.; Avery, W. B.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Grande, D. H.; Coxon, B. R.

    1992-01-01

    The impact damage resistance of laminated composite transport aircraft fuselage structures was studied experimentally. A statistically based designed experiment was used to examine numerous material, laminate, structural, and extrinsic (e.g., impactor type) variables. The relative importance and quantitative measure of the effect of each variable and variable interactions on responses including impactor dynamic response, visibility, and internal damage state were determined. The study utilized 32 three-stiffener panels, each with a unique combination of material type, material forms, and structural geometry. Two manufacturing techniques, tow placement and tape lamination, were used to build panels representative of potential fuselage crown, keel, and lower side-panel designs. Various combinations of impactor variables representing various foreign-object-impact threats to the aircraft were examined. Impacts performed at different structural locations within each panel (e.g., skin midbay, stiffener attaching flange, etc.) were considered separate parallel experiments. The relationship between input variables, measured damage states, and structural response to this damage are presented including recommendations for materials and impact test methods for fuselage structure.

  3. Structural integrity of fuselage panels with multisite damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jai H.; Singh, Ripudaman; Pyo, Chang R.; Atluris, Satya N.

    1995-05-01

    Structural integrity assessment of aging flight vehicles is extremely important to ensure their economic and safe operation. A two-step analytical approach, developed to estimate the residual strength of pressurized fuselage stiffened shell panels with multi-bay fatigue cracking is presented in this article. Conventional finite element analysis of the damaged multibay panel is first carried out to obtain the load flow pattern through it. The Schwartz-Neumann alternating method is then applied to the fuselage skin with multiple site damage, to obtain stresses and the relevant crack tip parameters that govern the onset of fracture. Fracture mechanics as well as net section yield criteria are used to evaluate the static residual strength. The presence of holes with or without multisite damage ahead of a dominant crack is found to significantly degrade the capacity of the fuselage shell panels to sustain static internal pressure. An elastic-plastic alternating method is newly developed and applied to evaluate the residual strength of flat panels with multiple cracks. The computational methodologies presented herein are marked improvements to the present state-of-the-art, and are extremely efficient, both from engineering manpower as well as computational costs point of view. Once verified, they can very well complement the experimental requirements, reducing the cost of structural integrity assessment programs.

  4. Test results from large wing and fuselage panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madan, Ram C.; Voldman, Mike

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the first results in an assessment of the strength, stiffness, and damage tolerance of stiffened wing and fuselage subcomponents. Under this NASA funded program, 10 large wing and fuselage panels, variously fabricated by automated tow placement and dry-stitched preform/resin transfer molding, are to be tested. The first test of an automated tow placement six-longeron fuselage panel under shear load was completed successfully. Using NASTRAN finite-element analysis the stiffness of the panel in the linear range prior to buckling was predicted within 3.5 percent. A nonlinear analysis predicted the buckling load within 10 percent and final failure load within 6 percent. The first test of a resin transfer molding six-stringer wing panel under compression was also completed. The panel failed unexpectedly in buckling because of inadequate supporting structure. The average strain was 0.43 percent with a line load of 20.3 kips per inch of width. This strain still exceeds the design allowable strains. Also, the stringers did not debond before failure, which is in contrast to the general behavior of unstitched panels.

  5. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor; Hearing loss - acoustic; Tinnitus - acoustic ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  6. Study for prediction of rotor/wake/fuselage interference. Part 2: Program users guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, D. R.; Maskew, B.

    1985-01-01

    A method was developed which permits the fully coupled calculation of fuselage and rotor airloads for typical helicopter configurations in forward flight. To do this, an iterative solution is carried out based on a conventional panel representation of the fuselage and a blade element representation of the rotor where fuselage and rotor singularity strengths are determined simultaneously at each step and the rotor wake is allowed to relax (deform) in response to changes in rotor wake loading and fuselage presence. On completion of the iteration, rotor loading and inflow, fuselage singularity strength (and, hence, pressure and velocity distributions) and rotor wake are all consistent. The results of a fully coupled calculation of the flow around representative helicopter configurations are presented. The effect of fuselage components on the rotor flow field and the overall wake structure is discussed as well as the aerodynamic interference between the different parts of the aircraft. Details of the computer program are given.

  7. Study for prediction of rotor/wake/fuselage interference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, D. R.; Maskew, B.

    1985-01-01

    A method was developed which allows the fully coupled calculation of fuselage and rotor airloads for typical helicopter configurations in forward flight. To do this, an iterative solution is carried out based on a conventional panel representation of the fuselage and a blade element representation of the rotor where fuselage and rotor singularity strengths are determined simultaneously at each step and the rotor wake is allowed to relax (deform) in response to changes in rotor wake loading and fuselage presence. On completion of the iteration, rotor loading and inflow, fuselage singularity strength (and, hence, pressure and velocity distributions) and rotor wake are all consistent. The results of a fully coupled calculation of the flow around representative helicopter configurations are presented. The effect of fuselage components on the rotor flow field and the overall wake structure is detailed and the aerodynamic interference between the different parts of the aircraft is discussed.

  8. Attenuation of sound in ducts with acoustic treatment - A generalized approximate equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    A generalized approximate equation for duct lining sound attenuation is presented. The specification of two parameters, the maximum possible attenuation and the optimum wall acoustic impedance is shown to completely determine the sound attenuation for any acoustic mode at any selected wall impedance. The equation is based on the nearly circular shape of the constant attenuation contours in the wall acoustic impedance plane. For impedances far from the optimum, the equation reduces to Morse's approximate expression. The equation can be used for initial acoustic liner design. Not least important is the illustrative nature of the solutions which provide an understanding of the duct propagation problem usually obscured in the exact calculations. Sample calculations using the approximate attenuation equation show that the peak and the bandwidth of the sound attenuation spectrum can be represented by quite simple functions of the ratio of actual wall acoustic resistance to optimum resistance.

  9. Attenuation of sound in ducts with acoustic treatment: A generalized approximate equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    A generalized approximate equation for duct lining sound attenuation is presented. The specification of two parameters, the maximum possible attenuation and the optimum wall acoustic impedance is shown to completely determine the sound attenuation for any acoustic mode at any selected wall impedance. The equation is based on the nearly circular shape of the constant attenuation contours in the wall acoustic impedance plane. For impedances far from the optimum, the equation reduces to Morse's approximate expression. The equation can be used for initial acoustic liner design. Not least important is the illustrative nature of the solutions which provide an understanding of the duct propagation problem usually obscured in the exact calculations. Sample calculations using the approximate attenuation equation show that the peak and the bandwidth of the sound attenuation spectrum can be represented by quite simple functions of the ratio of actual wall acoustic resistance to optimum resistance.

  10. Investigation of the Effect of Fuselage Dents on Compressive Failure Load

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Aluminum Alloy 2024 - T3 , a typical material used for fuselages of older transport aircrafts. Our finite element model consisted of impact analysis...SUBJECT TERMS Fuselage, Dents, Damages, Buckling, Al- 2024 - T3 , Impact, Stiffened Plate, Stiffened Panel 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY...finite element models is Aluminum Alloy 2024 - T3 , a typical material used for fuselages of older transport aircrafts. Our finite element model

  11. Wind tunnel investigation of helicopter-rotor wake effects on three helicopter fuselage models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Mineck, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of rotor wake on helicopter fuselage aerodynamic characteristics were investigated in the Langley V/STOL tunnel. Force, moment, and pressure data were obtained on three fuselage models at various combinations of windspeed, sideslip angle, and pitch angle. The data show that the influence of rotor wake on the helicopter fuselage yawing moment imposes a significant additional thrust requirement on the tail rotor of a single-rotor helicopter at high sideslip angles.

  12. Analysis and Design of Fuselage Structures Including Residual Strength Prediction Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research project is to develop and assess methodologies for the design and analysis of fuselage structures accounting for residual strength. Two primary objectives are included in this research activity: development of structural analysis methodology for predicting residual strength of fuselage shell-type structures; and the development of accurate, efficient analysis, design and optimization tool for fuselage shell structures. Assessment of these tools for robustness, efficient, and usage in a fuselage shell design environment will be integrated with these two primary research objectives.

  13. Reconstruction of the Acoustic Field Using a Conformal Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdivia, Nichlas P.; Williams, Earl G.; Klos, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    Near-field acoustical holography (NAH) requires the measurement of the near-field pressure field over a conformal and closed surface in order to recover the acoustic field on a nearby surface. We are interested in the reconstruction of the acoustic field over the fuselage of a Boeing 757 airplane when pressure data is available over an array of microphones that are conformal to the fuselage surface. In this case the strict NAH theory does not hold, but still there are techniques used to overcome this difficulty. The best known is patch NAH, which has been used for planar surfaces. In this work we will discuss two new techniques used for surfaces with an arbitrarily shape: patch inverse boundary element methods (IBEM) and patch equivalent sources method (ESM). We will discuss the theoretical justification of the method and show reconstructions for in-flight data taken inside a Boeing 757 airplane.

  14. SU-E-T-208: Incidence Cancer Risk From the Radiation Treatment for Acoustic Neuroma Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D; Chung, W; Shin, D; Yoon, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to compare the incidence risk of a secondary cancer from therapeutic doses in patients receiving intensitymodulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their incidnece excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) were estimated using the corresponding therapeutic doses measured at various organs by radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. Results: When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, normal liver, colon, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were measured. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A LAR were estimated that more than 0.03% of AN patients would get radiation-induced cancer. Conclusion: The tyroid was highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN. We found that LAR can be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  15. Investigation of the level difference between sound pressure and sound intensity in an aircraft cabin under different fuselage conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M. S.; Crocker, M. J.; Heitman, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    Problems in using two-microphone sound-intensity (SI) measurements to measure structural transmission losses are investigated in experiments involving light-aircraft fuselage panels and windows. Both sound pressure (SP) and SI are measured near the passenger and door windows and panels of a single-engine aircraft and with these barriers removed, and the effect of increasing interior acoustic absorption and blocking flanking transmission paths is also tested. The results are presented graphically, and the SP measurements are used to indicate frequency ranges in which the two-microphone technique significantly underestimates SI. It is inferred that flanking paths and interior reverberation must be effectively suppressed in order to obtain accurate transmission-loss measurements.

  16. Effects of cavity resonances on sound transmission into a thin cylindrical shell. [noise reduction in aircraft fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koval, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    In the context of the transmission of airborne noise into an aircraft fuselage, a mathematical model is presented for the effects of internal cavity resonances on sound transmission into a thin cylindrical shell. The 'noise reduction' of the cylinder is defined and computed, with and without including the effects of internal cavity resonances. As would be expected, the noise reduction in the absence of cavity resonances follows the same qualitative pattern as does transmission loss. Numerical results show that cavity resonances lead to wide fluctuations and a general decrease of noise reduction, especially at cavity resonances. Modest internal absorption is shown to greatly reduce the effect of cavity resonances. The effects of external airflow, internal cabin pressurization, and different acoustical properties inside and outside the cylinder are also included and briefly examined.

  17. Investigation of the level difference between sound pressure and sound intensity in an aircraft cabin under different fuselage conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M. S.; Crocker, M. J.; Heitman, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    Problems in using two-microphone sound-intensity (SI) measurements to measure structural transmission losses are investigated in experiments involving light-aircraft fuselage panels and windows. Both sound pressure (SP) and SI are measured near the passenger and door windows and panels of a single-engine aircraft and with these barriers removed, and the effect of increasing interior acoustic absorption and blocking flanking transmission paths is also tested. The results are presented graphically, and the SP measurements are used to indicate frequency ranges in which the two-microphone technique significantly underestimates SI. It is inferred that flanking paths and interior reverberation must be effectively suppressed in order to obtain accurate transmission-loss measurements.

  18. Alleviation of fuselage form drag using vortex flows: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wortman, A.

    1987-09-15

    The concept of using vortex generators to reduce the fuselage form drag of transport aircraft combines the outflow from the plane of symmetry which is induced by the rotational component of the vortex flow with the energization of the boundary layer to reduce the momentum thickness and to delay or eliminate flow separation. This idea was first advanced by the author in 1981. Under a DOE grant, the concept was validated in wind tunnel tests of approximately 1:17 scale models of fuselages of Boeing 747 and Lockheed C-5 aircraft. The search for the minimum drag involved three vortex generator configurations with three sizes of each in six locations clustered in the aft regions of the fuselages at the beginning of the tail upsweep. The local Reynolds number, which is referred to the length of boundary layer run from the nose, was approximately 10{sup 7} so that a fully developed turbulent boundary layer was present. Vortex generator planforms ranged from swept tapered, through swept straight, to swept reverse tapered wings whose semi-spans ranged from 50% to 125% of the local boundary layer thickness. Pitch angles of the vortex generators were varied by inboard actuators under the control of an external proportional digital radio controller. It was found that certain combinations of vortex generator parameters increased drag. However, with certain configurations, locations, and pitch angles of vortex generators, the highest drag reductions were 3% for the 747 and about 6% for the C-5, thus confirming the arguments that effectiveness increases with the rate of upsweep of the tail. Greatest gains in performance are therefore expected on aft loading military transports. 10 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Experimental study of noise reduction for an unstiffened cylindrical model of an airplane fuselage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, C. M.; Daniels, E. F.

    1981-12-01

    Noise reduction measurements were made for a simplified model of an airplane fuselage consisting of an unstiffened aluminum cylinder 0.5 m in diameter by 1.2 m long with a 1.6-mm-thick wall. Noise reduction was first measured with a reverberant field pink-noise load on the cylinder exterior. Next, noise reduction was measured by using a propeller to provide a more realistic noise load on the cylinder. Structural resonance frequencies and acoustic reverberation times for the cylinder interior volume were also measured. Comparison of data from the relatively simple test using reverberant-field noise with data from the more complex propeller-noise tests indicates some similarity in both the overall noise reduction and the spectral distribution. However, all of the test parameters investigated (propeller speed, blade pitch, and tip clearance) had some effect on the noise-reduction spectra. Thus, the amount of noise reduction achieved appears to be somewhat dependent upon the spectral and spatial characteristics of the flight conditions. Information is also presented on cyclinder resonance frequencies, damping, and characteristics of propeller-noise loads.

  20. Experimental study of noise reduction for an unstiffened cylindrical model of an airplane fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, C. M.; Daniels, E. F.

    1981-01-01

    Noise reduction measurements were made for a simplified model of an airplane fuselage consisting of an unstiffened aluminum cylinder 0.5 m in diameter by 1.2 m long with a 1.6-mm-thick wall. Noise reduction was first measured with a reverberant field pink-noise load on the cylinder exterior. Next, noise reduction was measured by using a propeller to provide a more realistic noise load on the cylinder. Structural resonance frequencies and acoustic reverberation times for the cylinder interior volume were also measured. Comparison of data from the relatively simple test using reverberant-field noise with data from the more complex propeller-noise tests indicates some similarity in both the overall noise reduction and the spectral distribution. However, all of the test parameters investigated (propeller speed, blade pitch, and tip clearance) had some effect on the noise-reduction spectra. Thus, the amount of noise reduction achieved appears to be somewhat dependent upon the spectral and spatial characteristics of the flight conditions. Information is also presented on cyclinder resonance frequencies, damping, and characteristics of propeller-noise loads.

  1. Finite Element Model Development For Aircraft Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Fleming, Gary A.; Pappa, Richard S.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to extend the valid frequency range for finite element based structural dynamic predictions using detailed models of the structural components and attachment interfaces is examined for several stiffened aircraft fuselage structures. This extended dynamic prediction capability is needed for the integration of mid-frequency noise control technology. Beam, plate and solid element models of the stiffener components are evaluated. Attachment models between the stiffener and panel skin range from a line along the rivets of the physical structure to a constraint over the entire contact surface. The finite element models are validated using experimental modal analysis results.

  2. Closeup view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery on the starboard side looking forward. This view is of the attach surface for the Orbiter Maneuvering System/Reaction Control System (OMS/RCS) Pod. The OMS/RCS pods are removed for processing and reconditioning at another facility. This view was taken from a service platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  3. Closeup view of the underside of the forward fuselage of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the underside of the forward fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery looking at the nose landing-gear and into the landing-gear well. The vehicle is elevated and supported by jack stands attached to the hoist attach points and the rear External Tank attach points on the propellant disconnect plate assemblies. This photo was taken inside the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  4. Closeup view of the aft fuselage looking forward along the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the aft fuselage looking forward along the approximate centerline of the Orbiter Discovery looking at the expansion nozzles of the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) and the Orbiter Maneuvering System. Also in the view is the orbiter's body flap with a protective covering over the High-temperature Reusable Surface Insulation tiles on the surface facing the SSMEs. This image was taken inside the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  5. Probabilistic evaluation of fuselage-type composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology is developed to computationally simulate the uncertain behavior of composite structures. The uncertain behavior includes buckling loads, natural frequencies, displacements, stress/strain etc., which are the consequences of the random variation (scatter) of the primitive (independent random) variables in the constituent, ply, laminate and structural levels. This methodology is implemented in the IPACS (Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures) computer code. A fuselage-type composite structure is analyzed to demonstrate the code's capability. The probability distribution functions of the buckling loads, natural frequency, displacement, strain and stress are computed. The sensitivity of each primitive (independent random) variable to a given structural response is also identified from the analyses.

  6. Crack Growth Simulation and Residual Strength Prediction in Airplane Fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuin-Shan; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report for the NASA funded project entitled "Crack Growth Prediction Methodology for Multi-Site Damage." The primary objective of the project was to create a capability to simulate curvilinear fatigue crack growth and ductile tearing in aircraft fuselages subjected to widespread fatigue damage. The second objective was to validate the capability by way of comparisons to experimental results. Both objectives have been achieved and the results are detailed herein. In the first part of the report, the crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion, obtained and correlated from coupon tests to predict fracture behavior and residual strength of built-up aircraft fuselages, is discussed. Geometrically nonlinear, elastic-plastic, thin shell finite element analyses are used to simulate stable crack growth and to predict residual strength. Both measured and predicted results of laboratory flat panel tests and full-scale fuselage panel tests show substantial reduction of residual strength due to the occurrence of multi-site damage (MSD). Detailed comparisons of n stable crack growth history, and residual strength between the predicted and experimental results are used to assess the validity of the analysis methodology. In the second part of the report, issues related to crack trajectory prediction in thin shells; an evolving methodology uses the crack turning phenomenon to improve the structural integrity of aircraft structures are discussed, A directional criterion is developed based on the maximum tangential stress theory, but taking into account the effect of T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy. Possible extensions of the current crack growth directional criterion to handle geometrically and materially nonlinear problems are discussed. The path independent contour integral method for T-stress evaluation is derived and its accuracy is assessed using a p- and hp-version adaptive finite element method. Curvilinear crack growth is simulated in

  7. Progress Towards Fuselage Drag Reduction via Active Flow Control: A Combined CFD and Experimental Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffler, Norman W.; Allan, Brian G.; Lienard, Caroline; LePape, Arnaud

    2010-01-01

    A combined computational and experimental effort has been undertaken to study fuselage drag reduction on a generic, non-proprietary rotorcraft fuselage by the application of active ow control. Fuselage drag reduction is an area of research interest to both the United States and France and this area is being worked collaboratively as a task under the United States/France Memorandum of Agreement on Helicopter Aeromechanics. In the first half of this task, emphasis is placed on the US generic fuselage, the ROBIN-mod7, with the experimental work being conducted on the US side and complementary US and French CFD analysis of the baseline and controlled cases. Fuselage simulations were made using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes ow solvers and with multiple turbulence models. Comparisons were made to experimental data for numerical simulations of the isolated fuselage and for the fuselage as installed in the tunnel, which includes modeling of the tunnel contraction, walls, and support fairing. The numerical simulations show that comparisons to the experimental data are in good agreement when the tunnel and model support are included. The isolated fuselage simulations compare well to each other, however, there is a positive shift in the centerline pressure when compared to the experiment. The computed flow separation locations on the rear ramp region had only slight differences with and without the tunnel walls and model support. For the simulations, the flow control slots were placed at several locations around the flow separation lines as a series of eight slots that formed a nearly continuous U-shape. Results from the numerical simulations resulted in an estimated 35% fuselage drag reduction from a steady blowing flow control configuration and a 26% drag reduction for unsteady zero-net-mass flow control configuration. Simulations with steady blowing show a delayed flow separation at the rear ramp of the fuselage that increases the surface pressure acting on the ramp

  8. General Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Research Model with High Disk Loading Direct Lifting Fan Mounted in Fuselage

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1960-10-26

    3/4 Low front view of fuselage and fan. Showing jet engine hanging below. Lift fan powered by jet exhaust. General Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Research Model with High Disk Loading Direct Lifting Fan Mounted in Fuselage

  9. Bubbles trapped at the coupling surface of the treatment head significantly reduce acoustic energy delivered in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Beard, Spencer; Williams, James C.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2006-05-01

    The coupling efficiency of a "dry head" electromagnetic lithotripter (Dornier Compact Delta) was studied in vitro. A fiber-optic probe hydrophone (FOPH-500) was positioned in a test tank filled with degassed water. The tank was coupled through a semi-transparent latex membrane to the water-filled cushion of the lithotripter head, so that bubbles (air pockets) trapped between the two coupling surfaces could be easily observed and photographed. When gel was applied to both the latex membrane and the water cushion, numerous bubbles (some several millimeters in diameter) could be seen at the coupling interface. Hydrophone measurements in the geometric focus of the lithotripter showed that the acoustic pressure could be two times lower when bubbles were present than when they were manually removed. In our in vitro design, trapped bubbles could be easily observed and therefore removed from the acoustic path. However, during patient treatment with a dry-head lithotripter one cannot see whether bubbles are trapped against the skin. This study provides a demonstration of the dramatic effect that trapped bubbles can have on the amount of acoustic energy actually delivered for treatment.

  10. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Aircraft design evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobe, T.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross sections and structural members on the performance of hypersonic cruise aircraft are evaluated. Representative fuselage/tank area structure was analyzed for strength, stability, fatigue and fracture mechanics. Various thermodynamic and structural tradeoffs were conducted to refine the conceptual designs with the primary objective of minimizing weight and maximizing aircraft range.

  11. Finite Element Model Development and Validation for Aircraft Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Fleming, Gary A.; Pappa, Richard S.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to extend the valid frequency range for finite element based structural dynamic predictions using detailed models of the structural components and attachment interfaces is examined for several stiffened aircraft fuselage structures. This extended dynamic prediction capability is needed for the integration of mid-frequency noise control technology. Beam, plate and solid element models of the stiffener components are evaluated. Attachment models between the stiffener and panel skin range from a line along the rivets of the physical structure to a constraint over the entire contact surface. The finite element models are validated using experimental modal analysis results. The increased frequency range results in a corresponding increase in the number of modes, modal density and spatial resolution requirements. In this study, conventional modal tests using accelerometers are complemented with Scanning Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Electro-Optic Holography measurements to further resolve the spatial response characteristics. Whenever possible, component and subassembly modal tests are used to validate the finite element models at lower levels of assembly. Normal mode predictions for different finite element representations of components and assemblies are compared with experimental results to assess the most accurate techniques for modeling aircraft fuselage type structures.

  12. Local design optimization for composite transport fuselage crown panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. D.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Walker, T. H.; Graesser, D.; Tuttle, M.; Zabinsky, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Composite transport fuselage crown panel design and manufacturing plans were optimized to have projected cost and weight savings of 18 percent and 45 percent, respectively. These savings are close to those quoted as overall NASA ACT program goals. Three local optimization tasks were found to influence the cost and weight of fuselage crown panels. This paper summarizes the effect of each task and describes in detail the task associated with a design cost model. Studies were performed to evaluate the relationship between manufacturing cost and design details. A design tool was developed to aid in these investigations. The development of the design tool included combining cost and performance constraints with a random search optimization algorithm. The resulting software was used in a series of optimization studies that evaluated the sensitivity of design variables, guidelines, criteria, and material selection on cost. The effect of blending adjacent design points in a full scale panel subjected to changing load distributions and local variations was shown to be important. Technical issues and directions for future work were identified.

  13. Algebraic grid generation about wing-fuselage bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    An algebraic procedure for the generation of boundary-fitted grids about wing-fuselage configurations is presented. A wing-fuselage configuration is specified by cross sections and mathematically represented by Coons' patches. A configuration is divided into sections so that several grid blocks that either adjoin each other or partially overlap each other can be generated. Each grid has six exterior surfaces that map into a computational cube. Grids are first determined on the six boundary surfaces and then in the interior. Grid curves that are on the surface of the configuration are derived from the intersection of planes with the Coons' patch definition. Single-valued functions relating approximate arc lengths along the grid curves to a computational coordinate define the distribution of grid points. The two-boundary technique and transfinite interpolation are used to determine the boundary surface grids that are not on the configuration, and transfinite interpolation with linear blending functions is used to determine the interior grid.

  14. Inspection of fabricated fuselage panels using electronic shearography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, John, II; Feferman, Ben

    1992-07-01

    The results of a proof of principle demonstration of using electronic shearography to detect induced damage in fabricated aircraft panels are presented. The demonstration was performed at the FAA's Aircraft Panel Test Facility in Waltham, Massachusetts and all shearography equipment and its operational support was provided by Laser Technology, Inc. (LTI) under a separate contract from the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center. The test panels that were inspected using the electronic shearography were constructed to closely simulate the fuselage and skin structure of Boeing 727 and 737 aircraft. These panels contained programmed flaws intended to simulate two major types of defects associated with aging aircraft, namely cracks along fastener rows, and disbonded tear strap doublers and lap joints. The proof of principle consisted of a series of inspections that demonstrated shearography's capability to detect cracks and disbonds in the fuselage panel specimens. The sensitivity of shearography to detect short, simulated fatigue cracks that would correspond to a multiple site damage situation was too low to provide sufficient confidence that the method could economically replace existing eddy current surface methods. The sensitivity of the method to detect panel disbonding, however, is sufficient to encourage further development of the technique.

  15. Vertical Drop Test of a YS-11 Fuselage Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minegishi, Masakatsu; Kumakura, Ikuo; Iwasaki, Kazuo; Shoji, Hirokazu; Yoshimoto, Norio; Terada, Hiroyuki; Sashikuma, Hirofumi; Isoe, Akira; Yamaoka, Toshihiro; Katayama, Noriaki; Hayashi, Toru; Akaso, Tetsuya

    The Structures and Materials Research Center of the National Aerospace Laboratory of Japan (NAL) and Kawasaki Heavy Industories, Ltd. (KHI) conducted a vertical drop test of a fuselage section cut from a NAMIC YS-11 transport airplane at NAL vertical drop test facility in December 2001. The main objectives of this program were to obtain background data for aircraft cabin safety by drop test of a full-scale fuselage section and to develop computational method for crash simulation. The test article including seats and anthropomorphic test dummies was dropped to a rigid impact surface at a velocity of 6.1 m/s (20 ft/s). The test condition and result were considered to be severe but potentially survivable. A finite element model of this test article was also developed using the explicit nonlinear transient-dynamic analysis code, LS-DYNA3D. An outline of analytical method and comparison of analysis result with drop test data are presented in this paper.

  16. Numerical Investigation of a Fuselage Boundary Layer Ingestion Propulsion Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Fredericks, William J.; Guynn, Mark D.; Campbell, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, a numerical assessment of the performance of fuselage boundary layer ingestion (BLI) propulsion techniques was conducted. This study is an initial investigation into coupling the aerodynamics of the fuselage with a BLI propulsion system to determine if there is sufficient potential to warrant further investigation of this concept. Numerical simulations of flow around baseline, Boundary Layer Controlled (BLC), and propelled boundary layer controlled airships were performed. Computed results showed good agreement with wind tunnel data and previous numerical studies. Numerical simulations and sensitivity analysis were then conducted on four BLI configurations. The two design variables selected for the parametric study of the new configurations were the inlet area and the inlet to exit area ratio. Current results show that BLI propulsors may offer power savings of up to 85% over the baseline configuration. These interim results include the simplifying assumption that inlet ram drag is negligible and therefore likely overstate the reduction in power. It has been found that inlet ram drag is not negligible and should be included in future analysis.

  17. Helicopter anti-torque system using fuselage strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Henry L. (Inventor); Wilson, John C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The improvement of the helicopter torque control system is discussed. At low to medium forward speeds helicopter performance is limited by the effectiveness of the means for counteracting main rotor torque and controlling sideslip airloads. These problems may be overcome by mounting strakes on the aft fuselage section. For single rotor helicopters whose main rotor rotates counter-clockwise as viewed from above, one of the strakes would be mounted in the upper lefthand quadrant and the second in the lower left hand quadrant. The strakes alter the air flow around the fuselage by separating the flow so as to produce lateral airloads on the tail boom which oppose main-rotor torque. The upper strake operates in a right crosswind to oppose main rotor torque, and the lower strake has effect in left crosswinds. The novelty of this invention resides in the simple and economical manner in which the helicopter tail boom may be modified by the addition of strakes in order to increase torque control, and reduce the need for supplemental mechanical means of torque control.

  18. Interference of Wing and Fuselage from Tests of 28 Combinations in the NACA Variable-Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, Albert

    1937-01-01

    Report presents the results of tests conducted on 28 wing-fuselage combinations made in the variable-density wind tunnel as a part of the wing-fuselage interference program being conducted therein and in addition to the 209 combinations previously reported in NACA-TR-540. These tests practically complete the study of combinations with a rectangular fuselage and continue the study of combinations with a round fuselage and a tapered wing.

  19. Heavy Class Helicopter Fuselage Model Drag Reduction by Active Flow Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gregorio, F.

    2017-08-01

    A comprehensive experimental investigation of helicopter blunt fuselage drag reduction using active flow control is being carried out within the European Clean Sky program. The objective is to demonstrate the capability of several active flow technologies to decrease fuselage drag by alleviating the flow separation occurring in the rear area of some helicopters. The work is performed on a simplified blunt fuselage at model-scale. Two different flow control actuators are considered for evaluation: steady blowing, unsteady blowing (or pulsed jets). Laboratory tests of each individual actuator are first performed to assess their performance and properties. The fuselage model is then equipped with these actuators distributed in 3 slots located on the ramp bottom edge. This paper addresses the promising results obtained during the wind-tunnel campaign, since significant drag reductions are achieved for a wide range of fuselage angles of attack and yaw angles without detriment of the other aerodynamic characteristics.

  20. Correlation of AH-1G airframe flight vibration data with a coupled rotor-fuselage analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangha, K.; Shamie, J.

    1990-01-01

    The formulation and features of the Rotor-Airframe Comprehensive Analysis Program (RACAP) is described. The analysis employs a frequency domain, transfer matrix approach for the blade structural model, a time domain wake or momentum theory aerodynamic model, and impedance matching for rotor-fuselage coupling. The analysis is applied to the AH-1G helicopter, and a correlation study is conducted on fuselage vibration predictions. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the state-of-the-art in helicopter fuselage vibration prediction technology. The fuselage vibration predicted using RACAP are fairly good in the vertical direction and somewhat deficient in the lateral/longitudinal directions. Some of these deficiencies are traced to the fuselage finite element model.

  1. The vibration characteristics of a coupled helicopter rotor-fuselage by a finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutkowski, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamic coupling between the rotor system and the fuselage of a simplified helicopter model in hover was analytically investigated. Mass, aerodynamic damping, and elastic and centrifugal stiffness matrices are presented for the analytical model; the model is based on a beam finite element, with polynomial mass and stiffness distributions for both the rotor and fuselage representations. For this analytical model, only symmetric fuselage and collective blade degrees of freedom are treated. Real and complex eigen-analyses are carried out to obtain coupled rotor-fuselage natural modes and frequencies as a function of rotor speed. Vibration response results are obtained for the coupled system subjected to a radially uniform, harmonic blade loading. The coupled response results are compared with response results from an uncoupled analysis in which hub loads for an isolated rotor system subjected to the same sinusoidal blade loading as the coupled system are applied to a free-free fuselage.

  2. Study on utilization of advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; Thomson, L. W.; Wilson, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    The potential for utilizing advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports was assessed. Six fuselage design concepts were selected and evaluated in terms of structural performance, weight, and manufacturing development and costs. Two concepts were selected that merit further consideration for composite fuselage application. These concepts are: (1) a full depth honeycomb design with no stringers, and (2) an I section stringer stiffened laminate skin design. Weight reductions due to applying composites to the fuselages of commercial and military transports were calculated. The benefits of applying composites to a fleet of military transports were determined. Significant technology issues pertinent to composite fuselage structures were identified and evaluated. Program plans for resolving the technology issues were developed.

  3. Magnetic nanoparticles-based acoustical detection and hyperthermic treatment of cancer, in vitro and in vivo studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoval, Asaf; Tepper, Michal; Tikochkiy, Jenny; Gur, Leah Ben; Markovich, Gil; Keisari, Yona; Gannot, Israel

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes a minimally invasive method for detection and growth inhibition of tumors that utilizes the unique properties of super paramagnetic nanoparticles. To demonstrate the feasibility of this method, dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles were successfully fabricated and used. Those nanoparticles were simultaneously used for magnetoacoustic detection of tumors and for specific hyperthermia treatment in C57BL/J mice injected with Lewis lung carcinoma cells. The in vivo acoustic signal attributed to the nanoparticles was 4.4 dB, while the single session hyperthermia treatment caused a reduction of 50% in tumor growing rate. In addition, a thermography-based method was applied to monitor the efficacy of the hyperthermia treatment. The presented method has the potential to revolutionize current cancer treatment by enabling diagnosis and treatment under real-time feedback in one session.

  4. Effects of floor location on response of composite fuselage frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, Huey D.; Jones, Lisa E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental and analytical results are presented which show the effect of floor placement on the structural response and strength of circular fuselage frames constructed of graphite-epoxy composite material. The research was conducted to study the behavior of conventionally designed advanced composite aircraft components. To achieve desired new designs which incorporate improved energy absorption capabilities requires an understanding of how these conventional designs behave under crash type loadings. Data are presented on the static behavior of the composite structure through photographs of the frame specimen, experimental strain distributions, and through analytical data from composite structural models. An understanding of this behavior can aid dynamist in predicting the crash behavior of these structures and may assist the designer achieve improved designs for energy absorption and crash behavior of future structures.

  5. Effects of floor location on response of composite fuselage frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, Huey D.; Jones, Lisa E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and analytical results are presented which show the effect of floor placement on the structural response and strength of circular fuselage frames constructed of graphite-epoxy composite material. The research was conducted to study the behavior of conventionally designed advanced composite aircraft components. To achieve desired new designs which incorporate improved energy absorption capabilities requires an understanding of how these conventional designs behave under crash type loadings. Data are presented on the static behavior of the composite structure through photographs of the frame specimen, experimental strain distributions, and through analytical data from composite structural models. An understanding of this behavior can aid the dynamist in predicting the crash behavior of these structures and may assist the designer in achieving improved designs for energy absorption and crash behavior of future structures.

  6. Computational investigation of slot blowing for fuselage forebody flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Rizk, Yehia M.; Schiff, Lewis B.; Cummings, Russell M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a computational investigation of a tangential slot blowing concept for generating lateral control forces on an aircraft fuselage forebody. The effects of varying both the jet width and jet exit velocity for a fixed location slot are analyzed. This work is aimed at aiding researchers in designing future experimental and computational models of tangential slot blowing. The primary influence on the resulting side force of the forebody is seen to be the jet mass flow rate. This influence is sensitive to different combinations of slot widths and jet velocities over the range of variables considered. Both an actuator plane and an overset grid technique are used to model the tangential slot. The overset method successfully resolves the details of the actual slot geometry, extending the generality of the numerical method. The actuator plane concept predicts side forces similar to those produced by resolving the actual slot geometry.

  7. Closeup oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery looking forward and port as the last Space Shuttle Main Engine is being removed, it can be seen on the left side of the image frame. Note that one of the Orbiter Maneuvering System/ Reaction Control System has been removed while one of them remains. Also note that the body flap, below the engine positions has a protective covering to prevent damage to the High-temperature Reusable Surface Insulation tiles. This image was taken inside the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  8. Closeup oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery looking forward and starboard as the last Space Shuttle Main Engine is being removed, it can be seen on the right side of the image frame. Note that one of the Orbiter Maneuvering System/ Reaction Control System has been removed while one of them remains. Also note that the body flap, below the engine positions has a protective covering to prevent damage to the High-temperature Reusable Surface Insulation tiles. This image was taken inside the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  9. Effect of fuselage upwash on the supersonic longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of 2 fighter configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R. M.; Miller, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of fuselage incidence effects on two fighter aircraft models, which differed in wing planform only, has been conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.6, 1.8, and 2.0. Results were obtained on the two models at fuselage incidence angles of 0 deg, 2 deg, and 5 deg. The fuselage geometry included two side-mounted, flow-through, half-axisymmetric inlets and twin vertical tails. The two planforms tested were cranked wings with 70 deg/66 deg and 70 deg/30 deg leading-edge sweep angles. Experimental data showed that fuselage incidence resulted in positive increments in configuration lift and pitching moment; most of the lift increment can be attributed to the fuselage-induced upwash acting on the wing and most of the pitching-moment increment is due to the fuselage. Theoretical analysis indicates that linear-theory methods can adequately predict the overall configuration forces and moments resulting from fuselage upwash, but a higher order surface-panel method (PAN AIR) more accurately predicted the distribution of forces and resulting moments between the components.

  10. Drop test analysis of fuselage section of R80 commuter aircraft by using finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggono, Agus Dwi; Ardianto, Adik Nofa Rochma Wahyu

    2017-04-01

    In commercial aerospace development, feasibility accidents design or crashworthiness is a major concern in aviation safety. Fuselage structure plays an important role in absorbing energy during an accident. The research aims are to determine drop test phenomenon on the fuselage, to investigate deformation occurred in the structure of the fuselage, and to know the influence of the airframe falls position to the stress strain which occurred in the structure of the fuselage. This research was conducted by varying the fall angle of the fuselage in a vertical position or 0° and 15°. Fuselage design was modeled by using SolidWorks. Then the model is imported to the Abaqus for drop test simulation. From the simulation results, it can be obtained the phenomenon of deformation on the structure of the fuselage when it comes in contact with the rigid ground. The high deformation occurs shows the structure capabilities in order to absorb the impact. It could be happened because the deformation is influenced by internal energy and strain energy. The various positions shows the structure capability in order to withstand impact loads during periods of 4-8 seconds and the maximum deformation was reached in 12 seconds. The experiment on the vertical position and the position falls of 15° angle was delivered the highest stress strain. The stress was 483 MPa in struts section, 400.78 MPa in skin section, 358.28 MPa in the floor and 483 MPa in the cargo frame section.

  11. Acoustic measurements of F-4E aircraft operating in hush house, NSN 4920-02-070-2721

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, V. R.; Plzak, G. A.; Chinn, J. M.

    1981-09-01

    The primary purpose of this test program was to measure the acoustic environment in the hush house facility located at Kelly Air Force Base, Texas, during operation of the F-4E aircraft to ensure that aircraft structural acoustic design limits were not exceeded. The acoustic measurements showed that sonic fatigue problems are anticipated with the F-4E aircraft aft fuselage structure during operation in the hush house. The measured acoustic levels were less than those measured in an F-4E aircraft water cooled hush house at Hill AFB in the lower frequencies, but were increased over that measured during ground run up on some areas of the aircraft. It was recommended that the acoustic loads measured in this program should be specified in the structural design criteria for aircraft which will be subjected to hush house operation or defining requirements for associated equipment. Recommendations were also made to increase the fatigue life of the aft fuselage.

  12. Impact damage resistance of composite fuselage structure, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dost, Ernest F.; Finn, Scott R.; Murphy, Daniel P.; Huisken, Amy B.

    1993-01-01

    The strength of laminated composite materials may be significantly reduced by foreign object impact induced damage. An understanding of the damage state is required in order to predict the behavior of structure under operational loads or to optimize the structural configuration. Types of damage typically induced in laminated materials during an impact event include transverse matrix cracking, delamination, and/or fiber breakage. The details of the damage state and its influence on structural behavior depend on the location of the impact. Damage in the skin may act as a soft inclusion or affect panel stability, while damage occurring over a stiffener may include debonding of the stiffener flange from the skin. An experiment to characterize impact damage resistance of fuselage structure as a function of structural configuration and impact threat was performed. A wide range of variables associated with aircraft fuselage structure such as material type and stiffener geometry (termed, intrinsic variables) and variables related to the operating environment such as impactor mass and diameter (termed, extrinsic variables) were studied using a statistically based design-of-experiments technique. The experimental design resulted in thirty-two different 3-stiffener panels. These configured panels were impacted in various locations with a number of impactor configurations, weights, and energies. The results obtained from an examination of impacts in the skin midbay and hail simulation impacts are documented. The current discussion is a continuation of that work with a focus on nondiscrete characterization of the midbay hail simulation impacts and discrete characterization of impact damage for impacts over the stiffener.

  13. Comparison of Different Measurement Technologies for the In-Flight Assessment of Radiated Acoustic Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Williams, Earl G.; Valdivia, Nicolas; Herdic, Peter C.; Sklanka, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    A series of tests was planned and conducted in the Interior Noise Test Facility at Boeing Field, on the NASA Aries 757 flight research aircraft, and in the Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. These tests were designed to answer several questions concerning the use of array methods in flight. One focus of the tests was determining whether and to what extent array methods could be used to identify the effects of an acoustical treatment applied to a limited portion of an aircraft fuselage. Another focus of the tests was to verify that the arrays could be used to localize and quantify a known source purposely placed in front of the arrays. Thus the issues related to backside sources and flanking paths present in the complicated sound field were addressed during these tests. These issues were addressed through the use of reference transducers, both accelerometers mounted to the fuselage and microphones in the cabin, that were used to correlate the pressure holograms. measured by the microphone arrays using either SVD methods or partial coherence methods. This correlation analysis accepts only energy that is coherent with the sources sensed by the reference transducers, allowing a noise control engineer to only identify and study those vibratory sources of interest. The remainder of this paper will present a detailed description of the test setups that were used in this test sequence and typical results of the NAH/IBEM analysis used to reconstruct the sound fields. Also, a comparison of data obtained in the laboratory environments and during flights of the 757 aircraft will be made.

  14. Finite element modeling of acoustic wave propagation and energy deposition in bone during extracorporeal shock wave treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Matula, Thomas J.; Ma, Yong; Liu, Zheng; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong

    2013-06-01

    It is well known that extracorporeal shock wave treatment is capable of providing a non-surgical and relatively pain free alternative treatment modality for patients suffering from musculoskeletal disorders but do not respond well to conservative treatments. The major objective of current work is to investigate how the shock wave (SW) field would change if a bony structure exists in the path of the acoustic wave. Here, a model of finite element method (FEM) was developed based on linear elasticity and acoustic propagation equations to examine SW propagation and deflection near a mimic musculoskeletal bone. High-speed photography experiments were performed to record cavitation bubbles generated in SW field with the presence of mimic bone. By comparing experimental and simulated results, the effectiveness of FEM model could be verified and strain energy distributions in the bone were also predicted according to numerical simulations. The results show that (1) the SW field will be deflected with the presence of bony structure and varying deflection angles can be observed as the bone shifted up in the z-direction relative to SW geometric focus (F2 focus); (2) SW deflection angels predicted by the FEM model agree well with experimental results obtained from high-speed photographs; and (3) temporal evolutions of strain energy distribution in the bone can also be evaluated based on FEM model, with varied vertical distance between F2 focus and intended target point on the bone surface. The present studies indicate that, by combining MRI/CT scans and FEM modeling work, it is possible to better understand SW propagation characteristics and energy deposition in musculoskeletal structure during extracorporeal shock wave treatment, which is important for standardizing the treatment dosage, optimizing treatment protocols, and even providing patient-specific treatment guidance in clinic.

  15. Effects of inescapable stress and treatment with pyridostigmine bromide on plasma butyrylcholinesterase and the acoustic startle response in rats.

    PubMed

    Servatius, R J; Ottenweller, J E; Guo, W; Beldowicz, D; Zhu, G; Natelson, B H

    2000-05-01

    Pyridostigmine bromide (PB) is a reversible, peripherally active inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, and is recommended by the military as a pretreatment against potential nerve gas exposure. Recent evidence suggests that exposure to inescapable stressors allows PB to cross the blood-brain barrier, and thereby affect central AChE activity in mice. Here, we evaluated the functional impact of a stress/PB treatment interaction on acoustic startle responding and plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) activity in male Sprague-Dawley rats. To model the treatment protocol used by the military, PB was delivered in the drinking water of rats for 7 consecutive days. The morning after the start of PB treatment, and for the next 6 days, half the rats were exposed to 1 h of supine restraint stress. We therefore employed a 2 x 2 (stress x PB treatment) between-groups design. Exposure to supine stress alone induced a persistent decrease in plasma BuChE activity. Further decreases in BuChE activity were not observed in rats exposed to supine restraint and PB treatment. Exposure to stress also induced an exaggerated startle response, evident on the last day of stress and 24 h after stressor cessation. Treatment with PB alone produced an exaggerated startle response over the same time period, albeit to a lesser degree. Although treatment with PB concurrent with stress did not produce further changes in either BuChE activity or acoustic startle responding, stress-induced alterations in drinking behavior (and thereby the dose of PB ingested) may have affected these results. Persistent stress-induced reductions in BuChE activity may increase the risk of adverse reactions to cholinomimetics.

  16. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms ... effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a ...

  17. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms ... effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a ...

  18. Diagnosing Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms ... effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a ...

  19. Effects of compressibility on design of subsonic fuselages for natural laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijgen, P. M. H. W.; Dodbele, S. S.; Holmes, B. J.; Van Dam, C. P.

    1988-01-01

    Compressible linear boundary-layer stability analyses of two representative axisymmetric fuselage geometries indicate that a favorable effect will be exerted on the characteristics of a fuselage's axisymmetric boundary layer by compressibility. A freestream Mach number increase from 0.6 to 0.8 significantly reduces TS wave growth rates in the laminar boundary layer of the fuselages analyzed. The generally destabilizing effect of increasing length Re number on boundary layer stability can be overpowered by the favorable effects of compressibility on the fluid.

  20. On the prediction of auto-rotational characteristics of light airplane fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, B. N.; Taylor, L. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A semi-empirical theory is presented for the estimation of aerodynamic forces and moments acting on a steadily rotating (spinning) airplane fuselage, with a particular emphasis on the prediction of its auto-rotational behavior. This approach is based on an extension of the available analytical methods for high angle of attack and side-slip and then coupling this procedure with strip theory for application to a rotating airplane fuselage. The analysis is applied to the fuselage of a light general aviation airplane and the results are shown to be in fair agreement with experimental data.

  1. Experimental and numerical analyses of laminar boundary-layer flow stability over an aircraft fuselage forebody

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijgen, Paul M. H. W.; Holmes, Bruce J.

    1987-01-01

    Fuelled by a need to reduce viscous drag of airframes, significant advances have been made in the last decade to design lifting surface geometries with considerable amounts of laminar flow. In contrast to the present understanding of practical limits for natural laminar flow over lifting surfaces, limited experimental results are available examining applicability of natural laminar flow over axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric fuselage shapes at relevantly high length Reynolds numbers. The drag benefits attainable by realizing laminar flow over nonlifting aircraft components such as fuselages and nacelles are shown. A flight experiment to investigate transition location and transition mode over the forward fuselage of a light twin engine propeller driven airplane is examined.

  2. Some computational tools for the analysis of through cracks in stiffened fuselage shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, C. C.; Brogan, F. A.; Riks, E.

    1992-10-01

    A method for computing the energy release rate for cracks of varying length in a typical stiffened metallic fuselage under general loading conditions is presented. Reliable analytical methods that predict the structural integrity and residual strength of aircraft fuselage structures containing cracks are needed to help to understand the behavior of pressurized stiffened shells with damage, to determine the safe life of such a shell. The models used in the simulation are derived from an extensive analysis of a fuselage barrel section subjected to operational flight loads. Energy release rates are computed as a function of the length of the crack, its location, and the crack propagation mode.

  3. Development of pressure containment and damage tolerance technology for composite fuselage structures in large transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. J.; Thomson, L. W.; Wilson, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    NASA sponsored composites research and development programs were set in place to develop the critical engineering technologies in large transport aircraft structures. This NASA-Boeing program focused on the critical issues of damage tolerance and pressure containment generic to the fuselage structure of large pressurized aircraft. Skin-stringer and honeycomb sandwich composite fuselage shell designs were evaluated to resolve these issues. Analyses were developed to model the structural response of the fuselage shell designs, and a development test program evaluated the selected design configurations to appropriate load conditions.

  4. Subjective, laryngoscopic, and acoustic measurements of laryngeal reflux before and after treatment with omeprazole.

    PubMed

    Shaw, G Y; Searl, J P; Young, J L; Miner, P B

    1996-12-01

    Laryngeal manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux is felt to be prevalent in our society. In general, diagnosis has been based primarily on symptoms. Historically, additional testing included laryngoscopy, barium swallow, manometry, and more recently, single- and double-probe pH monitoring. We evaluated 68 patients who were symptomatically suggestive of having reflux laryngitis. We administered surveys grading their symptoms. All patients underwent standardized videolaryngostroboscopic evaluation and computerized acoustic analysis. Patients then underwent a uniform therapy of dietary restrictions and omeprazole, a hydrogen ion inhibitor, for 12 weeks. Patients were then retested. This regimen demonstrated an 85% success of relieving symptoms. Utilizing the new laryngoscopic grading system, improvement was found to be statistically significant in improvement of all findings except granulomas. In patients with the pretherapy complaint of hoarseness, acoustic measures of jitter, shimmer, habitual frequency, and frequency range all showed significant improvement. The authors conclude that in patients with symptomatic reflux laryngitis, standardized videolaryngoscopy and, if hoarse, acoustic analysis are useful exam techniques to aide diagnosis and monitor therapy. Anti-reflux therapy with omeprazole is effective and improvement can be objectively demonstrated with the techniques described.

  5. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... search IRSA's site Unique Hits since January 2003 Acoustic Neuroma Click Here for Acoustic Neuroma Practice Guideline ... to microsurgery. One doctor's story of having an acoustic neuroma In August 1991, Dr. Thomas F. Morgan ...

  6. Experimental effects of fuselage camber on longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a series of wing-fuselage configurations at a Mach number of 1.41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollyhigh, S. M.; Morris, O. A.; Adams, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate a method for the integration of a fighter-type fuselage with a theoretical wing to preserve desirable wing aerodynamic characteristics for efficient maneuvering. The investigation was conducted by using semispan wing fuselage models mounted on a splitter plate. The models were tested through an angle of attack range at a Mach number of 1.41. The wing had a leading edge sweep angle of 50 deg and an aspect ratio of 2.76; the wing camber surface was designed for minimum drag due to lift and was to be self trimming at a lift coefficient of 0.2 and at a Mach number of 1.40. A series of five fuselages of various camber was tested on the wing.

  7. Application of a design-build-team approach to low cost and weight composite fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, L. B.; Walker, T. H.; Willden, K. S.; Swanson, G. D.; Truslove, G.; Metschan, S. L.; Pfahl, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Relationships between manufacturing costs and design details must be understood to promote the application of advanced composite technologies to transport fuselage structures. A team approach, integrating the disciplines responsible for aircraft structural design and manufacturing, was developed to perform cost and weight trade studies for a twenty-foot diameter aft fuselage section. Baseline composite design and manufacturing concepts were selected for large quadrant panels in crown, side, and keel areas of the fuselage section. The associated technical issues were also identified. Detailed evaluation of crown panels indicated the potential for large weight savings and costs competitive with aluminum technology in the 1995 timeframe. Different processes and material forms were selected for the various elements that comprise the fuselage structure. Additional cost and weight savings potential was estimated for future advancements.

  8. Coupled rotor-flexible fuselage vibration reduction using open loop higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papavassiliou, I.; Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.

    1991-01-01

    A fundamental study of vibration prediction and vibration reduction in helicopters using active controls was performed. The nonlinear equations of motion for a coupled rotor/flexible fuselage system have been derived using computer algebra on a special purpose symbolic computer facility. The trim state and vibratory response of the helicopter are obtained in a single pass by applying the harmonic balance technique and simultaneously satisfying the trim and the vibratory response of the helicopter for all rotor and fuselage degrees of freedom. The influence of the fuselage flexibility on the vibratory response is studied. It is shown that the conventional single frequency higher harmonic control is capable of reducing either the hub loads or only the fuselage vibrations but not both simultaneously. It is demonstrated that for simultaneous reduction of hub shears and fuselae vibrations a new scheme called multiple higher harmonic control is required.

  9. Coupled rotor-flexible fuselage vibration reduction using open loop higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papavassiliou, I.; Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.

    1991-01-01

    A fundamental study of vibration prediction and vibration reduction in helicopters using active controls was performed. The nonlinear equations of motion for a coupled rotor/flexible fuselage system have been derived using computer algebra on a special purpose symbolic computer facility. The trim state and vibratory response of the helicopter are obtained in a single pass by applying the harmonic balance technique and simultaneously satisfying the trim and the vibratory response of the helicopter for all rotor and fuselage degrees of freedom. The influence of the fuselage flexibility on the vibratory response is studied. It is shown that the conventional single frequency higher harmonic control is capable of reducing either the hub loads or only the fuselage vibrations but not both simultaneously. It is demonstrated that for simultaneous reduction of hub shears and fuselae vibrations a new scheme called multiple higher harmonic control is required.

  10. Vertical Drop Test of a YS-11 Fuselage Section (Part 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Kazuo; Kumakura, Ikuo; Minegishi, Masakutsu; Shoji, Hirokazu; Yoshimoto, Norio; Miyaki, Hiromitsu; Terada, Hiroyuki; Isoe, Akira; Yamaoka, Toshihiro; Katayama, Noriaki; Hayashi, Toru; Akaso, Tetsuya; Kosaka, Hideyuki

    The Structures and Materials Research Center of the National Aerospace Laboratory of Japan (NAL) and Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (KHI) conducted the 2nd vertical drop test of a fuselage section cut from a NAMC YS-11 transport airplane in July 2002. The main objective of this test program was to obtain background data for aircraft cabin safety by drop test of a full-scale fuselage section and to develop computational tool for crash simulation of aircraft fuselage structure. The test article including seats and anthropomorphic test dummies was dropped to a rigid impact surface by free-fall method at a velocity of 7.6m/s (25ft/s). The impact environment and the resultant response of the fuselage structure and the passenger dummies were considered to be severe but potentially survivable. A description of the results of the 1st drop test and the 2nd drop test is presented in this paper.

  11. Crash Simulation of a Boeing 737 Fuselage Section Vertical Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Jones, Yvonne T.; Frings, Gary; Vu, Tong

    2004-01-01

    A 30-ft/s vertical drop test of a fuselage section of a Boeing 737 aircraft was conducted in October of 1999 at the FAA Technical Center in Atlantic City, NJ. This test was performed to evaluate the structural integrity of a conformable auxiliary fuel tank mounted beneath the floor and to determine its effect on the impact response of the airframe structure and the occupants. The test data were used to compare with a finite element simulation of the fuselage structure and to gain a better understanding of the impact physics through analytical/experimental correlation. To perform this simulation, a full-scale 3-dimensional finite element model of the fuselage section was developed using the explicit, nonlinear transient-dynamic finite element code, MSC.Dytran. The emphasis of the simulation was to predict the structural deformation and floor-level acceleration responses obtained from the drop test of the B737 fuselage section with the auxiliary fuel tank.

  12. Evaluation of Pressurization Fatigue Life of 1441 Al-li Fuselage Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. Keith; Dicus, Dennis I.; Fridlyander, Joseph; Davydov, Valentin

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the pressurization fatigue life of fuselage panels with skins fabricated from 1441 Al-Li, an attractive new Russian alloy. The study indicated that 1441 Al-Li has several advantages over conventional aluminum fuselage skin alloy with respect to fatigue behavior. Smooth 1441 Al-Li sheet specimens exhibited a fatigue endurance limit similar to that for 1163 Al (Russian version of 2024 Al) sheet. Notched 1441 Al-Li sheet specimens exhibited greater fatigue strength and longer fatigue life than 1163 Al. In addition, Tu-204 fuselage panels fabricated by Tupolev Design Bureau using Al-Li skin and ring frames with riveted 7000-series aluminum stiffeners had longer pressurization fatigue lives than did panels constructed from conventional aluminum alloys. Taking into account the lower density of this alloy, the results suggest that 1441 Al-Li has the potential to improve fuselage performance while decreasing structural weight.

  13. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage section located forward of the wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. S.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    A Boeing 707 fuselage section was drop tested at the NASA Langley Research Center to measure structural, seat, and occupant response to vertical crack loads. Post-test inspection showed that the section bottom collapsed inward approximately 2 ft. Preliminary data traces indicated maximum normal accelerations of 20 g on the fuselage bottom, 10 to 12 g on the cabin floor, and 6.5 to 8 g in the pelvises of the anthropomorphic dummies.

  14. Low-Speed Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Fuselage Model with Various Arrangements of Elongated Lift Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogler, R. D.; Goodson, K. W.

    1973-01-01

    Data were obtained for a round jet located on the center of the bottom of a fuselage and for elongated slots separated spanwise by distances of 0.8 and 1.2 of the fuselage width. The effect of yawing the slots, inclining the jets laterally, and combining slot yaw with jet inclination was determined. Data were obtained in and out of ground effect through a range of effective velocity ratios and through a range of sideslip angles.

  15. Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Submerged-Engine Fuselage Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1940-10-01

    pursuit-type fuselage with a practicable internal dust arrangement deralgned to meet all of the air requirements of a 1000-horsepower radial en%ine... radial type, it was de- cided to include two tail outlets in this investigation even though they could obvlouslr not be used ~lth a Pusher. propeller...the bmslo streamline body. 3. Because of the low 10CR1 velocities over the noee shapes tested, the criticnl comprese ~billty speed of the fuselage

  16. Transepidermal retinoic acid delivery using ablative fractional radiofrequency associated with acoustic pressure ultrasound for stretch marks treatment.

    PubMed

    Issa, Maria Cláudia Almeida; de Britto Pereira Kassuga, Luiza Erthal; Chevrand, Natalia Stroligo; do Nascimento Barbosa, Livia; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Pantaleão, Luciana; Vilar, Enoi Guedes; Rochael, Mayra Carrijo

    2013-02-01

    Striae distensae (SD) treatment still remains a therapeutic challenge to dermatologists. Ablative fractional laser and radiofrequency (RF) enhance skin-drug permeability for SD treatment. To clinically evaluate the efficacy and safety as well as patient's satisfaction in relation to a method using ablative fractional RF associated with retinoic acid 0.05% cream and an acoustic pressure wave ultrasound (US) in patients with alba-type SD on the breast. Eight patients with alba-type SD on the breast were treated with three step procedure: (1) fractional ablative RF for skin perforation; (2) topical application of retinoic acid 0.05% on the perforated skin; and (3) US was applied to enhance the retinoic acid penetration into the skin. Other eight patients with alba-type SD on the abdominal area were submitted to RF treatment isolated without retinoic acid or US. Three of them were submitted to skin biopsies. Three patients with SD on the breast area improved from "severe" to "moderate;" two patients improved from "severe" to "mild;" two patients from "moderate" to "mild;" one patient from "marked" to "mild." Clinical assessment demonstrated significant improvement in the appearance of SD in all patients treated with RF associated with retinoic acid 0.05% cream and US (P = 0.008), with low incidence of side effects and high level of patient's satisfaction. Among the patients treated only with RF, two patients improved from "severe" to "marked;" one patient from "marked" to "moderate;" and one patient improved from "marked" to "mild." Four patients did not show any sort of improvement. Clinical assessment demonstrated no significant improvement in the appearance of SD treated with RF isolated with low incidence of side effects, but low-level of patient's satisfaction. Ablative fractional RF and acoustic pressure US associated with retinoic acid 0.05% cream is safe and effective for alba-type SD treatment. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Initial evaluation of acoustic reflectors for the preservation of sensitive abdominal skin areas during MRgFUS treatment.

    PubMed

    Gorny, Krzysztof R; Chen, Shigao; Hangiandreou, Nicholas J; Hesley, Gina K; Woodrum, David A; Brown, Douglas L; Felmlee, Joel P

    2009-04-21

    During MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) treatments of uterine fibroids using ExAblate(R)2000 (InSightec, Haifa, Israel), individual tissue ablations are performed extracorporeally through the patient's abdomen using an annular array FUS transducer embedded within the MR table. Ultrasound intensities in the near field are below therapeutic levels and, under normal conditions, heating of the patient skin is minimal. However, increased absorption of ultrasound energy within sensitive skin areas or areas with differing acoustic properties, such as scars, may lead to skin burns and therefore these areas must be kept outside the near field of the FUS beam. Depending on their location and size the sensitive areas may either obstruct parts of the fibroid from being treated or prevent the entire MRgFUS treatment altogether. The purpose of this work is to evaluate acoustic reflector materials that can be applied to protect skin and the underlying sensitive areas. Reflection coefficients of cork (0.88) and foam (0.91) based materials were evaluated with a hydrophone. An ExAblate 2000 MRgFUS system was used to simulate clinical treatment with discs of reflector materials placed in a near field underneath a gel phantom. MR thermometry was used to monitor temperature elevations as well as the integrity of the focal spot. The phantom measurements showed acoustic shadow zones behind the reflectors with zone depths changing between 7 and 27 mm, for reflector disc diameters increasing from 10 to 30 mm (40 mm diameter discs completely blocked the FUS beam at the depth evaluated). The effects on thermal lesions due to the presence of the reflectors in the FUS beam were found to diminish with decreasing disc diameter and increasing sonication depth. For a 20 mm diameter disc and beyond 50 mm sonication depth, thermal lesions were minimally affected by the presence of the disc. No heating was observed on the skin side of the foam reflectors, as confirmed by measurements performed

  18. A Study of the Utilization of Advanced Composites in Fuselage Structures of Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, D. J.; Sumida, P. T.; Bunin, B. L.; Janicki, G. S.; Walker, J. V.; Fox, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to define the technology and data needed to support the introduction of advanced composites in the future production of fuselage structure in large transport aircraft. Fuselage structures of six candidate airplanes were evaluated for the baseline component. The MD-100 was selected on the basis of its representation of 1990s fuselage structure, an available data base, its impact on the schedule and cost of the development program, and its availability and suitability for flight service evaluation. Acceptance criteria were defined, technology issues were identified, and a composite fuselage technology development plan, including full-scale tests, was identified. The plan was based on composite materials to be available in the mid to late 1980s. Program resources required to develop composite fuselage technology are estimated at a rough order of magnitude to be 877 man-years exclusive of the bird strike and impact dynamic test components. A conceptual composite fuselage was designed, retaining the basic MD-100 structural arrangement for doors, windows, wing, wheel wells, cockpit enclosure, major bulkheads, etc., resulting in a 32 percent weight savings.

  19. Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects: A CFD Validation Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    A rotorcraft fuselage is typically designed with an emphasis on operational functionality with aerodynamic efficiency being of secondary importance. This results in a significant amount of drag during high-speed forward flight that can be a limiting factor for future high-speed rotorcraft designs. To enable higher speed flight, while maintaining a functional fuselage design (i.e., a large rear cargo ramp door), the NASA Rotary Wing Project has conducted both experimental and computational investigations to assess active flow control as an enabling technology for fuselage drag reduction. This paper will evaluate numerical simulations of a flow control system on a generic rotorcraft fuselage with a rotor in forward flight using OVERFLOW, a structured mesh Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver developed at NASA. The results are compared to fuselage forces, surface pressures, and PN flow field data obtained in a wind tunnel experiment conducted at the NASA Langley 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel where significant drag and download reductions were demonstrated using flow control. This comparison showed that the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver was unable to predict the fuselage forces and pressure measurements on the ramp for the baseline and flow control cases. While the CFD was able to capture the flow features, it was unable to accurately predict the performance of the flow control.

  20. Crashworthy Evaluation of a 1/5-Scale Model Composite Fuselage Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    1999-01-01

    A 1/5-scale model composite fuselage concept for light aircraft and rotorcraft has been developed to satisfy structural and flight loads requirements and to satisfy design goals for improved crashworthiness. The 1/5-scale model fuselage consists of a relatively rigid upper section which forms the passenger cabin, a stiff structural floor, and an energy absorbing subfloor which is designed to limit impact forces during a crash event. The focus of the present paper is to describe the crashworthy evaluation of the fuselage concept through impact testing and finite element simulation using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic code, MSC/DYTRAN. The energy absorption behavior of two different subfloor configurations was determined through quasi-static crushing tests. For the dynamic evaluation, each subfloor configuration was incorporated into a 1/5-scale model fuselage section, which was impacted at 31 ft/s vertical velocity onto a rigid surface. The experimental data demonstrate that the fuselage section with a foam-filled subfloor configuration satisfied the impact design requirement. In addition, the fuselage section maintained excellent energy absorption behavior for a 31 ft/s vertical drop test with a 15 deg-roll impact attitude. Good correlation was obtained between the experimental data and analytical results for both impact conditions.

  1. Pressure Distribution Over the Fuselage of a PW-9 Pursuit Airplane in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhode, Richard V; Lundquist, Eugene E

    1932-01-01

    This report presents the results obtained from pressure distribution tests on the fuselage of a PW-9 pursuit airplane in a number of conditions of flight. The investigation was made to determine the contribution of the fuselage to the total lift in conditions considered critical for the wing structure, and also to determine whether the fuselage loads acting simultaneously with the maximum tail loads were of such a character as to be of concern with respect to the structural design of other parts of the airplane. The results show that the contribution of the fuselage toward the total lift is small on this airplane. Aerodynamic loads on the fuselage are, in general, unimportant from the structural viewpoint, and in most cases they are of such character that, if neglected, a conservative design results. In spins, aerodynamic forces on the fuselage produce diving moments of appreciable magnitude and yawing moments of small magnitude, but opposing the rotation of the airplane. A table of cowling pressures for various maneuvers is included in the report.

  2. Detailed design of a lattice composite fuselage structure by a mixed optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Toropov, V.; Hühne, C.; Armani, U.

    2016-10-01

    In this article, a procedure for designing a lattice fuselage barrel is developed. It comprises three stages: first, topology optimization of an aircraft fuselage barrel is performed with respect to weight and structural performance to obtain the conceptual design. The interpretation of the optimal result is given to demonstrate the development of this new lattice airframe concept for the fuselage barrel. Subsequently, parametric optimization of the lattice aircraft fuselage barrel is carried out using genetic algorithms on metamodels generated with genetic programming from a 101-point optimal Latin hypercube design of experiments. The optimal design is achieved in terms of weight savings subject to stability, global stiffness and strain requirements, and then verified by the fine mesh finite element simulation of the lattice fuselage barrel. Finally, a practical design of the composite skin complying with the aircraft industry lay-up rules is presented. It is concluded that the mixed optimization method, combining topology optimization with the global metamodel-based approach, allows the problem to be solved with sufficient accuracy and provides the designers with a wealth of information on the structural behaviour of the novel anisogrid composite fuselage design.

  3. Effect of low-level laser treatment on cochlea hair-cell recovery after acute acoustic trauma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Chung-Ku; Bahk, Chan Woong; Kim, Se Hyung; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Jung, Jae Yun; Chung, Phil-Sang; Suh, Myung-Whan

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the effect of low-level laser radiation on rescuing hair cells of the cochlea after acute acoustic trauma and hearing loss. Nine rats were exposed to noise. Starting the following day, the left ears (NL ears) of the rats were irradiated at an energy output of 100 to 165 mW/cm2 for 60 min for 12 days in a row. The right ears (N ears) were considered as the control group. Frequency-specific hearing levels were measured before the noise exposure and also after the 1st, 3rd to 5th, 8th to 10th and 12th irradiations. After the 12th treatment, hair cells were observed using a scanning electron microscope. Compared to initial hearing levels at all frequencies, thresholds increased markedly after noise exposure. After the 12th irradiation, hearing threshold was significantly lower for the NL ears compared to the N ears. When observed using an electron microscope, the number of hair cells in the middle turn of the NL ears was significantly larger than that of the N ears. Our findings suggest that low-level laser irradiation promotes recovery of hearing thresholds after acute acoustic trauma.

  4. Virtual Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokki, Tapio; Savioja, Lauri

    The term virtual acoustics is often applied when sound signal is processed to contain features of a simulated acoustical space and sound is spatially reproduced either with binaural or with multichannel techniques. Therefore, virtual acoustics consists of spatial sound reproduction and room acoustics modeling.

  5. SmEdA vibro-acoustic modelling in the mid-frequency range including the effect of dissipative treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, H. D.; Maxit, L.; Ege, K.; Gerges, Y.; Guyader, J.-L.

    2017-04-01

    Vibro-acoustic simulation in the mid-frequency range is of interest for automotive and truck constructors. The dissipative treatments used for noise and vibration control such as viscoelastic patches and acoustic absorbing materials must be taken into account in the problem. The Statistical modal Energy distribution Analysis (SmEdA) model consists in extending Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) to the mid-frequency range by establishing power balance equations between the modes of the different subsystems. The modal basis of uncoupled-subsystems that can be estimated by the finite element method in the mid-frequency range is used as input data. SmEdA was originally developed by considering constant modal damping factors for each subsystem. However, this means that it cannot describe the local distribution of dissipative materials. To overcome this issue, a methodology is proposed here to take into account the effect of these materials. This methodology is based on the finite element models of the subsystems that include well-known homogenized material models of dissipative treatments. The Galerkin method with subsystem normal modes is used to estimate the modal damping loss factors. Cross-modal coupling terms which appear in the formulation due to the dissipative materials are assumed to be negligible. An approximation of the energy sharing between the subsystems damped by dissipative materials is then described by SmEdA. The different steps of the method are validated experimentally by applying it to a laboratory test case composed of a plate-cavity system with different configurations of dissipative treatments. The comparison between the experimental and the simulation results shows good agreement in the mid-frequency range.

  6. Good acoustics central to recovery.

    PubMed

    Budd, Richard

    2009-04-01

    Good acoustic conditions in hospitals and other healthcare facilities are known not only to benefit patients by creating an environment that facilitates rest, sleeping, consultation and treatment, but also clinical and nursing staff. At the recent Healthcare Estates conference, Richard Budd of acoustic engineering and noise and vibration consultants Sound Research Laboratories, discussed the revised guidance on good acoustic design in a recently published Health Technical Memorandum, HTM 08-01-Acoustics.

  7. Interference drag in a simulated wing-fuselage juncture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubendran, L. R.; Mcmahon, H.; Hubbartt, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    The interference drag in a wing fuselage juncture as simulated by a flat plate and a body of constant thickness having a 1.5:1 elliptical leading edge is evaluated experimentally. The experimental measurements consist of mean velocity data taken with a hot wire at a streamwise location corresponding to 16 body widths downstream of the body leading edge. From these data, the interference drag is determined by calculating the total momentum deficit (momentum area) in the juncture and also in the two dimensional turbulent boundary layers on the flat plate and body at locations sufficiently far from the juncture flow effect. The interference drag caused by the juncture drag as measured at this particular streamwise station is -3% of the total drag due to the flat plate and body boundary layers in isolation. If the body is considered to be a wing having a chord and span equal to 16 body widths, the interference drag due to the juncture is only -1% of the frictional drag of one surface of such a wing.

  8. Residual Strength Prediction of Fuselage Structures with Multiple Site Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuin-Shan; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent results on simulating full-scale pressure tests of wide body, lap-jointed fuselage panels with multiple site damage (MSD). The crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion and the FRANC3D/STAGS software program were used to analyze stable crack growth under conditions of general yielding. The link-up of multiple cracks and residual strength of damaged structures were predicted. Elastic-plastic finite element analysis based on the von Mises yield criterion and incremental flow theory with small strain assumption was used. A global-local modeling procedure was employed in the numerical analyses. Stress distributions from the numerical simulations are compared with strain gage measurements. Analysis results show that accurate representation of the load transfer through the rivets is crucial for the model to predict the stress distribution accurately. Predicted crack growth and residual strength are compared with test data. Observed and predicted results both indicate that the occurrence of small MSD cracks substantially reduces the residual strength. Modeling fatigue closure is essential to capture the fracture behavior during the early stable crack growth. Breakage of a tear strap can have a major influence on residual strength prediction.

  9. Closeup view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery looking at the thrust structure that supports the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs). In this view, SSME number two position is on the left and SSME number three position is on the right. The thrust structure transfers the forces produce by the engines into and through the airframe of the orbiter. The thrust structure includes the SSMEs load reaction truss structure, engine interface fittings and the hydraulic-actuator support structure. The propellant feed lines are the plugged and capped orifices within the engine bays. Note that SSME position two is rotated ninety degrees from position three and one. This was needed to enable enough clearance for the engines to fit and gimbal. Note in engine bay three is a clear view of the actuators that control the gambling of that engine. This view was taken from a service platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  10. The Dornier 328 Acoustic Test Cell (ATC) for interior noise tests and selected test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackstein, H. Josef; Borchers, Ingo U.; Renger, Klaus; Vogt, Konrad

    1992-01-01

    To perform acoustic studies for achieving low noise levels for the Dornier 328, an acoustic test cell (ATC) of the Dornier 328 has been built. The ATC consists of a fuselage section, a realistic fuselage suspension system, and three exterior noise simulation rings. A complex digital 60 channel computer/amplifier noise generation system as well as multichannel digital data acquisition and evaluation system have been used. The noise control tests started with vibration measurements for supporting acoustic data interpretation. In addition, experiments have been carried out on dynamic vibration absorbers, the most important passive noise reduction measure for low frequency propeller noise. The design and arrangement of the current ATC are presented. Furthermore, exterior noise simulation as well as data acquisition are explained. The most promising results show noise reduction due to synchrophasing and dynamic vibration absorbers.

  11. Methods for the treatment of acoustic and absorptive/dispersive wave field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innanen, Kristopher Albert Holm

    Many recent methods of seismic wave field processing and inversion concern themselves with the fine detail of the amplitude and phase characteristics of measured events. Processes of absorption and dispersion have a strong impact on both; the impact is particularly deleterious to the effective resolution of images created from the data. There is a need to understand the dissipation of seismic wave energy as it affects such methods. I identify: algorithms based on the inverse scattering series, algorithms based on multiresolution analysis, and algorithms based on the estimation of the order of the singularities of seismic data, as requiring this kind of study. As it turns out, these approaches may be cast such that they deal directly with issues of attenuation, to the point where they can be seen as tools for viscoacoustic forward modelling, Q estimation; viscoacoustic inversion, and/or Q compensation. In this thesis I demonstrate these ideas in turn. The forward scattering series is formulated such that a viscoacoustic wave field is represented as an expansion about an acoustic reference; analysis of the convergence properties and scattering diagrams are carried out, and it is shown that (i) the attenuated wave field may be generated by the nonlinear interplay of acoustic reference fields, and (ii) the cumulative effect of certain scattering types is responsible for macroscopic wave field properties: also, the basic form of the absorptive/dispersive inversion problem is predicted. Following this, the impact of Q on measurements of the local regularity of a seismic trace, via Lipschitz exponents, is discussed, with the aim of using these exponents as a means to estimate local Q values. The problem of inverse scattering based imaging and inversion is treated next: I present a simple, computable form for the simultaneous imaging and wavespeed inversion of 1D acoustic wave field data. This method is applied to 1D, normal incidence synthetic data: its sensitivity with

  12. Kinetic treatment of nonlinear ion-acoustic waves in multi-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Qamar, A.

    2017-09-01

    By applying the kinetic theory of the Valsove-Poisson model and the reductive perturbation technique, a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived for small but finite amplitude ion acoustic waves in multi-ion plasma composed of positive and negative ions along with the fraction of electrons. A correspondent equation is also derived from the basic set of fluid equations of adiabatic ions and isothermal electrons. Both kinetic and fluid KdV equations are stationary solved with different nature of coefficients. Their differences are discussed both analytically and numerically. The criteria of the fluid approach as a limiting case of kinetic theory are also discussed. The presence of negative ion makes some modification in the solitary structure that has also been discussed with its implication at the laboratory level.

  13. Spinning mode sound propagation in ducts with acoustic treatment and sheared flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    The propagation of spinning mode sound was considered for a cylindrical duct with sheared steady flow. Calculations concentrated on the determination of the wall optimum acoustic impedance and the maximum possible attenuation. Both the least attenuated and higher radial modes for spinning lobe patterns were considered. A parametric study was conducted over a wide range of Mach numbers, spinning lobe numbers, sound frequency, and boundary layer thickness. A correlation equation was developed from theoretical considerations starting with the thin boundary layer approximation of Eversman. This correlation agrees well with the more exact calculations for inlets and provides a single boundary layer refraction parameter which determines the change in optimum wall impedance due to refraction effects.

  14. Spinning mode sound propagation in ducts with acoustic treatment and sheared flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    The propagation of spinning mode sound was considered for a cylindrical duct with sheared steady flow. The calculations concentrated on the determination of the wall optimum acoustic impedance and the maximum possible attenuation. Both the least attenuated and higher radial modes for spinning lobe patterns were considered. A parametric study was conducted over a wide range of Mach numbers, spinning lobe numbers, sound frequency, and boundary layer thickness. A correlation equation was developed from theoretical considerations starting with the thin boundary layer approximation of Eversman. This correlation agrees well with the more exact calculations for inlets and provides a single boundary layer refraction parameter which determines the change in optimum wall impedance due to refraction effects.

  15. Weight Assessment for Fuselage Shielding on Aircraft With Open-Rotor Engines and Composite Blade Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Kelly; Pereira, Michael; Kohlman, Lee; Goldberg, Robert; Envia, Edmane; Lawrence, Charles; Roberts, Gary; Emmerling, William

    2013-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been engaged in discussions with airframe and engine manufacturers concerning regulations that would apply to new technology fuel efficient "openrotor" engines. Existing regulations for the engines and airframe did not envision features of these engines that include eliminating the fan blade containment systems and including two rows of counter-rotating blades. Damage to the airframe from a failed blade could potentially be catastrophic. Therefore the feasibility of using aircraft fuselage shielding was investigated. In order to establish the feasibility of this shielding, a study was conducted to provide an estimate for the fuselage shielding weight required to provide protection from an open-rotor blade loss. This estimate was generated using a two-step procedure. First, a trajectory analysis was performed to determine the blade orientation and velocity at the point of impact with the fuselage. The trajectory analysis also showed that a blade dispersion angle of 3deg bounded the probable dispersion pattern and so was used for the weight estimate. Next, a finite element impact analysis was performed to determine the required shielding thickness to prevent fuselage penetration. The impact analysis was conducted using an FAA-provided composite blade geometry. The fuselage geometry was based on a medium-sized passenger composite airframe. In the analysis, both the blade and fuselage were assumed to be constructed from a T700S/PR520 triaxially-braided composite architecture. Sufficient test data on T700S/PR520 is available to enable reliable analysis, and also demonstrate its good impact resistance properties. This system was also used in modeling the surrogate blade. The estimated additional weight required for fuselage shielding for a wing- mounted counterrotating open-rotor blade is 236 lb per aircraft. This estimate is based on the shielding material serving the dual use of shielding and fuselage structure. If the

  16. Nonlinear coupled rotor-fuselage helicopter vibration studies with higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.; Papavassiliou, I.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of vibration prediction and vibration reduction in helicopters by means of active control methodologies. The nonlinear equations of a coupled rotor/flexible-fuselage system have been derived using computer algebra, thus relegating this tedious task to the computer. In the solution procedure the trim state and vibratory response of the helicopter are obtained in a single pass by using a harmonic balance technique and simultaneously satisfying the trim and the vibratory response of the helicopter in all the rotor and fuselage degrees of freedom. Using this solution procedure, the influence of the fuselage flexibility on the vibratory response is studied. In addition, it is shown that the conventional single frequency HHC is capable of reducing either the hub loads or only the fuselage vibrations but not both simultaneously. A new scheme called MHHC, having multiple higher harmonic pitch inputs, was used to accomplish this task of simultaneously reducing both the vibratory hub loads and fuselage vibratory response. In addition, the uniqueness of this MHHC scheme is explained in detail.

  17. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  18. XSECT: A computer code for generating fuselage cross sections - user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, K. R.

    1982-01-01

    A computer code, XSECT, has been developed to generate fuselage cross sections from a given area distribution and wing definition. The cross sections are generated to match the wing definition while conforming to the area requirement. An iterative procedure is used to generate each cross section. Fuselage area balancing may be included in this procedure if desired. The code is intended as an aid for engineers who must first design a wing under certain aerodynamic constraints and then design a fuselage for the wing such that the contraints remain satisfied. This report contains the information necessary for accessing and executing the code, which is written in FORTRAN to execute on the Cyber 170 series computers (NOS operating system) and produces graphical output for a Tektronix 4014 CRT. The LRC graphics software is used in combination with the interface between this software and the PLOT 10 software.

  19. Thermal Inspection of a Composite Fuselage Section Using a Fixed Eigenvector Principal Component Analysis Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Bolduc, Sean; Harman, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    A composite fuselage aircraft forward section was inspected with flash thermography. The fuselage section is 24 feet long and approximately 8 feet in diameter. The structure is primarily configured with a composite sandwich structure of carbon fiber face sheets with a Nomex(Trademark) honeycomb core. The outer surface area was inspected. The thermal data consisted of 477 data sets totaling in size of over 227 Gigabytes. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to process the data sets for substructure and defect detection. A fixed eigenvector approach using a global covariance matrix was used and compared to a varying eigenvector approach. The fixed eigenvector approach was demonstrated to be a practical analysis method for the detection and interpretation of various defects such as paint thickness variation, possible water intrusion damage, and delamination damage. In addition, inspection considerations are discussed including coordinate system layout, manipulation of the fuselage section, and the manual scanning technique used for full coverage.

  20. A coupled rotor-fuselage vibration analysis for helicopter rotor system fault detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mao

    A coupled rotor-fuselage vibration analysis for helicopter rotor system fault detection is developed. The coupled rotor/fuselage/vibration absorbers (bifilar type) system incorporates consistent structural, aerodynamic and inertial couplings. The aeroelastic analysis is based on finite element methods in space and time. The coupled rotor, absorbers and fuselage equations are transformed into the modal space and solved in the fixed coordinate system. A coupled trim procedure is used to solve the responses of rotor, fuselage and vibration absorber, rotor trim control and vehicle orientation simultaneously. Rotor system faults are modeled by changing blade structural, inertial and aerodynamic properties. Both adjustable and component faults, such as misadjusted trim-tab, misadjusted pitch-control rod (PCR), imbalanced mass and pitch-control bearing freeplay, are investigated. Detailed SH-60 helicopter fuselage NASTRAN model is integrated into the analysis. Validation study was performed using SH-60 helicopter flight test data. The prediction of fuselage natural frequencies show fairly large error compared to shake test data. Analytical predictions of fuselage baseline (without fault) 4/rev vibration and fault-induced 1/rev vibration and blade displacement deviations are compared with SH-60 flight test (with prescribed fault) data. The fault-induced 1/rev fuselage vibration (magnitude and phase) predicted by present analysis generally capture the trend of the flight test data, although prediction under-predicts. The large discrepancy of fault-induced 1/rev vibration magnitude at hover between prediction and flight test data partially comes from the variation of flight condition (not perfect hover) and partially due to the effect of the rotor-fuselage aerodynamic interaction (wake effect) at low speed which is not considered in the analysis. Also the differences in the phase prediction is not clear since only the magnitude and phase information were given instead of the

  1. Noniterative grid generation using parabolic difference equations for fuselage-wing flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, S.

    1982-01-01

    A fast method for generating three-dimensional grids for fuselage-wing transonic flow calculations using parabolic difference equations is described. No iterative scheme is used in the three-dimensional sense; grids are generated from one grid surface to the next starting from the fuselage surface. The computational procedure is similar to the iterative solution of the two-dimensional heat conduction equation. The proposed method is at least 10 times faster than the elliptic grid generation method and has much smaller memory requirements. Results are presented for a fuselage and wing of NACA-0012 section and thickness ratio of 10 percent. Although only H-grids are demonstrated, the present technique should be applicable to C-grids and O-grids in three dimensions.

  2. Noniterative grid generation using parabolic difference equations for fuselage-wing flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, S.

    1982-01-01

    A fast method for generating three-dimensional grids for fuselage-wing transonic flow calculations using parabolic difference equations is described. No iterative scheme is used in the three-dimensional sense; grids are generated from one grid surface to the next starting from the fuselage surface. The computational procedure is similar to the iterative solution of the two-dimensional heat conduction equation. The proposed method is at least 10 times faster than the elliptic grid generation method and has much smaller memory requirements. Results are presented for a fuselage and wing of NACA-0012 section and thickness ratio of 10 percent. Although only H-grids are demonstrated, the present technique should be applicable to C-grids and O-grids in three dimensions.

  3. Thermal inspection of a composite fuselage section using a fixed eigenvector principal component analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Bolduc, Sean; Harman, Rebecca

    2017-05-01

    A composite fuselage aircraft forward section was inspected with flash thermography. The fuselage section is 24 feet long and approximately 8 feet in diameter. The structure is primarily configured with a composite sandwich structure of carbon fiber face sheets with a Nomex® honeycomb core. The outer surface area was inspected. The thermal data consisted of 477 data sets totaling in size of over 227 Gigabytes. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to process the data sets for substructure and defect detection. A fixed eigenvector approach using a global covariance matrix was used and compared to a varying eigenvector approach. The fixed eigenvector approach was demonstrated to be a practical analysis method for the detection and interpretation of various defects such as paint thickness variation, possible water intrusion damage, and delamination damage. In addition, inspection considerations are discussed including coordinate system layout, manipulation of the fuselage section, and the manual scanning technique used for full coverage.

  4. Multi-Terrain Impact Testing and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Lyle, Karen H.; Sparks, Chad E.; Sareen, Ashish K.

    2007-01-01

    Comparisons of the impact performance of a 5-ft diameter crashworthy composite fuselage section were investigated for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts. The fuselage concept, which was originally designed for impacts onto a hard surface only, consisted of a stiff upper cabin, load bearing floor, and an energy absorbing subfloor. Vertical drop tests were performed at 25-ft/s onto concrete, soft-soil, and water at NASA Langley Research Center. Comparisons of the peak acceleration values, pulse durations, and onset rates were evaluated for each test at specific locations on the fuselage. In addition to comparisons of the experimental results, dynamic finite element models were developed to simulate each impact condition. Once validated, these models can be used to evaluate the dynamic behavior of subfloor components for improved crash protection for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts.

  5. Multi-Terrain Impact Testing and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Sparks, Chad E.; Sareen, Ashish K.

    2004-01-01

    Comparisons of the impact performance of a 5-ft diameter crashworthy composite fuselage section were investigated for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts. The fuselage concept, which was originally designed for impacts onto a hard surface only, consisted of a stiff upper cabin, load bearing floor, and an energy absorbing subfloor. Vertical drop tests were performed at 25-ft/s onto concrete, soft-soil, and water at NASA Langley Research Center. Comparisons of the peak acceleration values, pulse durations, and onset rates were evaluated for each test at specific locations on the fuselage. In addition to comparisons of the experimental results, dynamic finite element models were developed to simulate each impact condition. Once validated, these models can be used to evaluate the dynamic behavior of subfloor components for improved crash protection for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts.

  6. Some computational tools for the analysis of through cracks in stiffened fuselage shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, C. C.; Brogan, F. A.; Riks, E.

    1993-12-01

    Reliable analytical methods that predict the structural integrity and residual strength of aircraft fuselage structures containing cracks are needed to help to understand the behavior of pressurized stiffened shells with damage, so that it becomes possible to determine the safe life of such a shell. Of special importance is the ability to determine under what conditions local failure, once initiated, will propagate. In this paper we shall present a reliable and efficient method for computing the energy release rate for cracks of varying length in a typical stiffened metallic fuselage under general loading conditions. The models used in the simulation are derived from an extensive analysis of a fuselage barrel section subjected to operational flight loads. Energy release rates are computed as a function of the length of the crack, its location, and the crack propagation mode.

  7. Acoustic Seaglider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-07

    a national naval responsibility. Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial...problem and acoustic navigation and communications within the context of distributed autonomous persistent undersea surveillance sensor networks...Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial coherence and the description of ambient

  8. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  9. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  10. Development of Rene' 41 honeycomb structure as an integral cryogenic tankage/fuselage concept for future space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shideler, J. J.; Swegle, A. R.; Fields, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The status of the structural development of an integral cryogenic-tankage/hot-fuselage concept for future space transportation systems (STS) is discussed. The concept consists of a honeycomb sandwich structure which serves the combined functions of containment of cryogenic fuel, support of vehicle loads, and thermal protection from an entry heating environment. The inner face sheet is exposed to a cryogenic (LH2) temperature of -423 F during boost; and the outer face sheet, which is slotted to reduce thermal stress, is exposed to a maximum temperature of 1400 F during a high altitude, gliding entry. A fabrication process for a Rene' 41 honeycomb sandwich panel with a core density less than 1 percent was developed which is consistent with desirable heat treatment processes for high strength.

  11. Development of Rene 41 honeycomb structure as an integral cryogenic tankage/fuselage concept for future space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shideler, J. L.; Swegle, A. R.; Fields, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The status of the structural development of an integral cryogenic-tankage/hot-fuselage concept for future space transportation systems is reviewed. The concept comprises a honeycomb sandwich structure that serves the combined functions of containing the cryogenic fuel, supporting the vehicle loads, and protecting the spacecraft from entry heating. The inner face sheet is exposed to cryogenic temperature of -423 F during boost; the outer face sheet, which is slotted to reduce thermal stress, is exposed to a maximum temperature of 1400 F during a high-altitude gliding entry. Attention is given to the development of a fabrication process for a Rene 41 honeycomb sandwich panel with a core density of less than 1 percent that is consistent with desirable heat treatment processes for high strength.

  12. a Reciprocity Technique for the Characterisation of Sound Transmission Into Aircraft Fuselages.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, James Meredith

    1990-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Experimental determination of the sound insulation of propfan aircraft fuselage structures is problematic. The use of full-scale flight tests to investigate and optimise sidewall design is expensive, while the use of simplified excitation tests is questionable, due to the complicated nature of propeller sound fields and their interaction with the fuselage. This thesis describes the development and evaluation of a new experimental reciprocity technique for calibrating a fuselage as a transmitter of pressure acting on the external surface to the interior: it is based upon the use of a transducer which measures the volume velocity of the vibrating fuselage surface. The data generated may be combined with any impinging sound field to obtain a prediction of cabin sound pressure level. In the first instance, the technique is validated for sound transmission through flat panels into a rigid walled box and the results presented demonstrate the validity of the approach. Tests are then conducted on a set of four quarter-scale 'green' fuselage model configurations, constructed to investigate the influence of ring frame bending-stiffness, stringers and floor on airborne sound transmission. Interior noise predictions are obtained for plane wave excitation and a representation of propeller sound field excitation. The important features relating to correct representation of the excitation field and the fuselage structure are isolated, within the scope of the models evaluated. In addition, a statistical perturbation technique is described which demonstrates confidence in the predictions. The technique is recommended for evaluation on a full size airframe.

  13. Evaluation of the fuselage lap joint fatigue and terminating action repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samavedam, Gopal; Thomson, Douglas; Jeong, David Y.

    1994-01-01

    Terminating action is a remedial repair which entails the replacement of shear head countersunk rivets with universal head rivets which have a larger shank diameter. The procedure was developed to eliminate the risk of widespread fatigue damage (WFD) in the upper rivet row of a fuselage lap joint. A test and evaluation program has been conducted by Foster-Miller, Inc. (FMI) to evaluate the terminating action repair of the upper rivet row of a commercial aircraft fuselage lap splice. Two full scale fatigue tests were conducted on fuselage panels using the growth of fatigue cracks in the lap joint. The second test was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the terminating action repair. In both tests, cyclic pressurization loading was applied to the panels while crack propagation was recorded at all rivet locations at regular intervals to generate detailed data on conditions of fatigue crack initiation, ligament link-up, and fuselage fracture. This program demonstrated that the terminating action repair substantially increases the fatigue life of a fuselage panel structure and effectively eliminates the occurrence of cracking in the upper rivet row of the lap joint. While high cycle crack growth was recorded in the middle rivet row during the second test, failure was not imminent when the test was terminated after cycling to well beyond the service life. The program also demonstrated that the initiation, propagation, and linkup of WFD in full-scale fuselage structures can be simulated and quantitatively studied in the laboratory. This paper presents an overview of the testing program and provides a detailed discussion of the data analysis and results. Crack distribution and propagation rates and directions as well as frequency of cracking are presented for both tests. The progression of damage to linkup of adjacent cracks and to eventual overall panel failure is discussed. In addition, an assessment of the effectiveness of the terminating action repair and the

  14. Evaluation of the fuselage lap joint fatigue and terminating action repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samavedam, Gopal; Thomson, Douglas; Jeong, David Y.

    1994-09-01

    Terminating action is a remedial repair which entails the replacement of shear head countersunk rivets with universal head rivets which have a larger shank diameter. The procedure was developed to eliminate the risk of widespread fatigue damage (WFD) in the upper rivet row of a fuselage lap joint. A test and evaluation program has been conducted by Foster-Miller, Inc. (FMI) to evaluate the terminating action repair of the upper rivet row of a commercial aircraft fuselage lap splice. Two full scale fatigue tests were conducted on fuselage panels using the growth of fatigue cracks in the lap joint. The second test was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the terminating action repair. In both tests, cyclic pressurization loading was applied to the panels while crack propagation was recorded at all rivet locations at regular intervals to generate detailed data on conditions of fatigue crack initiation, ligament link-up, and fuselage fracture. This program demonstrated that the terminating action repair substantially increases the fatigue life of a fuselage panel structure and effectively eliminates the occurrence of cracking in the upper rivet row of the lap joint. While high cycle crack growth was recorded in the middle rivet row during the second test, failure was not imminent when the test was terminated after cycling to well beyond the service life. The program also demonstrated that the initiation, propagation, and linkup of WFD in full-scale fuselage structures can be simulated and quantitatively studied in the laboratory. This paper presents an overview of the testing program and provides a detailed discussion of the data analysis and results. Crack distribution and propagation rates and directions as well as frequency of cracking are presented for both tests. The progression of damage to linkup of adjacent cracks and to eventual overall panel failure is discussed. In addition, an assessment of the effectiveness of the terminating action repair and the

  15. Interference of Wing and Fuselage from Tests of 209 Combinations in the NACA Variable-Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Ward, Kenneth E

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests of 209 simple wing-fuselage combinations made in the NACA variable-density wind tunnel to provide information regarding the effects of aerodynamic interference between wings and fuselages at a large value of Reynolds number.

  16. Wind tunnel investigation of helicopter rotor wake effects on three helicopter fuselage models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Mineck, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of rotor downwash on helicopter fuselage aerodynamic characteristics were investigated. A rotor model for generating the downwash was mounted close to each of three fuselage models. The main report presents the force and moment data in both graphical and tabular form and the pressure data in graphical form. This supplement presents the pressure data in tabular form. Each run or parameter sweep is identified by a unique run number. The data points in each run are identified by a point number. The pressure data can be matched to the force data by matching the run and point number.

  17. Interactive Inverse Design Optimization of Fuselage Shape for Low-Boom Supersonic Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Shields, Elwood; Le, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces a tool called BOSS (Boom Optimization using Smoothest Shape modifications). BOSS utilizes interactive inverse design optimization to develop a fuselage shape that yields a low-boom aircraft configuration. A fundamental reason for developing BOSS is the need to generate feasible low-boom conceptual designs that are appropriate for further refinement using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based preliminary design methods. BOSS was not developed to provide a numerical solution to the inverse design problem. Instead, BOSS was intended to help designers find the right configuration among an infinite number of possible configurations that are equally good using any numerical figure of merit. BOSS uses the smoothest shape modification strategy for modifying the fuselage radius distribution at 100 or more longitudinal locations to find a smooth fuselage shape that reduces the discrepancies between the design and target equivalent area distributions over any specified range of effective distance. For any given supersonic concept (with wing, fuselage, nacelles, tails, and/or canards), a designer can examine the differences between the design and target equivalent areas, decide which part of the design equivalent area curve needs to be modified, choose a desirable rate for the reduction of the discrepancies over the specified range, and select a parameter for smoothness control of the fuselage shape. BOSS will then generate a fuselage shape based on the designer's inputs in a matter of seconds. Using BOSS, within a few hours, a designer can either generate a realistic fuselage shape that yields a supersonic configuration with a low-boom ground signature or quickly eliminate any configuration that cannot achieve low-boom characteristics with fuselage shaping alone. A conceptual design case study is documented to demonstrate how BOSS can be used to develop a low-boom supersonic concept from a low-drag supersonic concept. The paper also contains a study

  18. Continued development and correlation of analytically based weight estimation codes for wings and fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, J., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The implementation of the changes to the program for Wing Aeroelastic Design and the development of a program to estimate aircraft fuselage weights are described. The equations to implement the modified planform description, the stiffened panel skin representation, the trim loads calculation, and the flutter constraint approximation are presented. A comparison of the wing model with the actual F-5A weight material distributions and loads is given. The equations and program techniques used for the estimation of aircraft fuselage weights are described. These equations were incorporated as a computer code. The weight predictions of this program are compared with data from the C-141.

  19. Results of uniaxial and biaxial tests on riveted fuselage lap joint specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlieger, H.

    1994-01-01

    As part of an FAA-NLR collaborative program on structural integrity of aging aircraft, NLR carried out uniaxial and biaxial fatigue tests on riveted lap joint specimens being representative for application in a fuselage. All tests were constant amplitude tests with maximum stresses being representative for fuselage pressurization cycles and R-values of 0.1. The parameters selected in the testing program were the stress level (sigma(sub max) = 14 and 16 ksi) and the rivet spacing (0.75 and 1.0 inch). All specimens contained 3 rows of countersunk rivets, the rivet row spacing was 1 inch and the rivet orientation continuous.

  20. The Growth of Multi-Site Fatigue Damage in Fuselage Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1999-01-01

    Destructive examinations were performed to document the progression of multi-site damage (MSD) in three lap joint panels that were removed from a full scale fuselage test article that was tested to 60,000 full pressurization cycles. Similar fatigue crack growth characteristics were observed for small cracks (50 microns to 10 mm) emanating from counter bore rivets, straight shank rivets, and 100 deg counter sink rivets. Good correlation of the fatigue crack growth data base obtained in this study and FASTRAN Code predictions show that the growth of MSD in the fuselage lap joint structure can be predicted by fracture mechanics based methods.

  1. Test and analysis results for composite transport fuselage and wing structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Madan, Ram C.; Chen, Victor L.

    1992-01-01

    Automated tow placement (ATP) and stitching of dry textile composite preforms followed by resin transfer molding (RTM) are being studied as cost effective manufacturing processes for obtaining damage tolerant fuselage and wing structures for transport aircraft. Data are presented to assess the damage tolerance of ATP and RTM fuselage elements with stitched-on stiffeners from compression tests of impacted three J-stiffened panels and from stiffener pull-off tests. Data are also presented to assess the damage tolerance of RTM wing elements which had stitched skin and stiffeners from impacted single stiffener and three blade stiffened compression tests and stiffener pull-off tests.

  2. Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) Fuselage Structural Design for Weight Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, V.

    2005-01-01

    Structural analysis and design of efficient pressurized fuselage configurations for the advanced Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) flight vehicle is a challenging problem. Unlike a conventional cylindrical pressurized fuselage, stress level in a box type BWB fuselage is an order of magnitude higher, because internal pressure primarily results in bending stress instead of skin-membrane stress. In addition, resulting deformation of aerodynamic surface could significantly affect performance advantages provided by lifting body. The pressurized composite conformal multi-lobe tanks of X-33 type space vehicle also suffered from similar problem. In the earlier BWB design studies, Vaulted Ribbed Shell (VLRS), Flat Ribbed Shell (FRS); Vaulted shell Honeycomb Core (VLHC) and Flat sandwich shell Honeycomb Core (FLHC) concepts were studied. The flat and vaulted ribbed shell concepts were found most efficient. In a recent study, a set of composite sandwich panel and cross-ribbed panel were analyzed. Optimal values of rib and skin thickness, rib spacing, and panel depth were obtained for minimal weight under stress and buckling constraints. In addition, a set of efficient multi-bubble fuselage (MBF) configuration concept was developed. The special geometric configuration of this concept allows for balancing internal cabin pressure load efficiently, through membrane stress in inner-stiffened shell and inter-cabin walls, while the outer-ribbed shell prevents buckling due to external resultant compressive loads. The initial results from these approximate finite element analyses indicate progressively lower maximum stresses and deflections compared to the earlier study. However, a relative comparison of the FEM weight per unit floor area of the segment unit indicates that the unit weights are still relatively higher that the conventional B777 type cylindrical or A380 type elliptic fuselage design. Due to the manufacturing concern associated with multi-bubble fuselage, a Y braced box

  3. Interior and exterior fuselage noise measured on NASA's C-8a augmentor wing jet-STOL research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shovlin, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    Interior and exterior fuselage noise levels were measured on NASA's C-8A Augmentor Wing Jet-STOL Research Aircraft in order to provide design information for the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA), which will use a modified C-8A fuselage. The noise field was mapped by 11 microphones located internally and externally in three areas: mid-fuselage, aft fuselage, and on the flight deck. Noise levels were recorded at four power settings varying from takeoff to flight idle and were plotted in one-third octave band spectra. The overall sound pressure levels of the external noise field were compared to previous tests and found to correlate well with engine primary thrust levels. Fuselage values were 145 + or - 3 dB over the aircraft's normal STOL operating range.

  4. Interference of Wing and Fuselage From Tests of 30 Combinations with Triangular and Elliptical Fuselages in the NACA Variable-Density Tunnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1947-05-01

    zero lift about wing quarter- 0 chord axis Cj. lift coefficient at interference burble , that is, value ik of lift coefficient beyond...to the elliptical fuselage axis as shown in figure h are easily predictable from the results of reference 1. The interference burble occurs earlier...interference have proved that the use of special fillets may entirely eliminate the interference burble . Hence, any discussion of this flow breakdown is to be

  5. Treatment of a sloping fluid-solid interface and sediment layering with the seismo-acoustic parabolic equation.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michael D; Siegmann, William L

    2015-01-01

    The parabolic equation method is extended to handle problems in seismo-acoustics that have multiple fluid and solid layers, continuous depth dependence within layers, and sloping interfaces between layers. The medium is approximated in terms of a series of range-independent regions, and a single-scattering approximation is used to compute transmitted fields across the vertical interfaces between regions. The approach is implemented in terms of a set of dependent variables that is well suited to piecewise continuous depth dependence in the elastic parameters, but one of the fluid-solid interface conditions in that formulation involves a second derivative that complicates the treatment of sloping interfaces. This issue is resolved by using a non-centered, four-point difference formula for the second derivative. The approach is implemented using a matrix decomposition that is efficient when the parameters of the medium have a general dependence within the upper layers of the sediment but only depend on depth in the water column and deep within the sediment.

  6. Effects of forward velocity and acoustic treatment on inlet fan noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiler, C. E.; Merriman, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Flyover and static noise data from several engines are presented that show inlet fan noise measured in flight can be lower than that projected from static tests for some engines. The differences between flight and static measurements appear greatest when the fan fundamental tone due to rotor-stator interaction or to the rotor-alone field is below cutoff. Data from engine and fan tests involving inlet treatment on the walls only are presented that show the attenuation from this treatment is substantially larger than expected from previous theories or flow duct experience. Data showing noise shielding effects due to the location of the engine on the airplane are also presented. These observations suggest that multiringed inlets may not be necessary to achieve the desired noise reduction in many applications.

  7. Volumetric Acoustic Vector Intensity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    A new measurement tool capable of imaging the acoustic intensity vector throughout a large volume is discussed. This tool consists of an array of fifty microphones that form a spherical surface of radius 0.2m. A simultaneous measurement of the pressure field across all the microphones provides time-domain near-field holograms. Near-field acoustical holography is used to convert the measured pressure into a volumetric vector intensity field as a function of frequency on a grid of points ranging from the center of the spherical surface to a radius of 0.4m. The volumetric intensity is displayed on three-dimensional plots that are used to locate noise sources outside the volume. There is no restriction on the type of noise source that can be studied. The sphere is mobile and can be moved from location to location to hunt for unidentified noise sources. An experiment inside a Boeing 757 aircraft in flight successfully tested the ability of the array to locate low-noise-excited sources on the fuselage. Reference transducers located on suspected noise source locations can also be used to increase the ability of this device to separate and identify multiple noise sources at a given frequency by using the theory of partial field decomposition. The frequency range of operation is 0 to 1400Hz. This device is ideal for the study of noise sources in commercial and military transportation vehicles in air, on land and underwater.

  8. Impact of Fuselage Cross Section on the Stability of a Generic Fighter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    Many traditional data bases, which involved smooth-sided forebodies, are no longer relevant for designing advanced aircraft. The current work provides data on the impact of chined-shaped fuselage cross section on the stability of a generic fighter configuration. Two different chined-shaped fuselages were tested upright and inverted. It was found that a fuselage with a 30" included chine angle resulted in significantly higher values of fuselage with a 100" included chine angle. This difference was attributed to the more beneficial vortical interaction between the stronger forebody vortices coming off of the sharper chine edges and the wing vortices. The longitudinal stability of the configuration with the sharper chine angle was also better because, based on pressures and flow visualization, the vortex burst over the wing was delayed until significantly higher values of a. Unstable rolling moment derivatives were also delayed to higher values of a for the sharper chine angle cross section. Furthermore, it was found that directional stability of both of the upright configurations, which had larger lofts in cross section above the chine lines than below the chine lines. was better than for the inverted configurations.

  9. Mechanisms of Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffler, Norman W.; Allan, Brian G.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Bartram, Scott M.; Mace, W. Derry; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of the aerodynamic load that acts on a generic rotorcraft fuselage by the application of active flow control was investigated in a wind tunnel test conducted on an approximately 1/3-scale powered rotorcraft model simulating forward flight. The aerodynamic mechanisms that make these reductions, in both the drag and the download, possible were examined in detail through the use of the measured surface pressure distribution on the fuselage, velocity field measurements made in the wake directly behind the ramp of the fuselage and computational simulations. The fuselage tested was the ROBIN-mod7, which was equipped with a series of eight slots located on the ramp section through which flow control excitation was introduced. These slots were arranged in a U-shaped pattern located slightly downstream of the baseline separation line and parallel to it. The flow control excitation took the form of either synthetic jets, also known as zero-net-mass-flux blowing, and steady blowing. The same set of slots were used for both types of excitation. The differences between the two excitation types and between flow control excitation from different combinations of slots were examined. The flow control is shown to alter the size of the wake and its trajectory relative to the ramp and the tailboom and it is these changes to the wake that result in a reduction in the aerodynamic load.

  10. A Short Method of Calculating Torsional Stresses in an Airplane Fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younger, John E

    1924-01-01

    This report deals with an investigation carried out in the Civil Engineering Laboratory of the University of California, to determine the accuracy of existing methods of computing the stresses in an airplane fuselage when subjected to torsion, and to derive a simple approximate formula for the rapid calculation of these stresses.

  11. Hybrid-Wing-Body Vehicle Composite Fuselage Analysis and Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in the structural analysis of a Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) fuselage concept is presented with the objective of structural weight reduction under a set of critical design loads. This pressurized efficient HWB fuselage design is presently being investigated by the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project in collaboration with the Boeing Company, Huntington Beach. The Pultruded Rod-Stiffened Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) composite concept, developed at the Boeing Company, is approximately modeled for an analytical study and finite element analysis. Stiffened plate linear theories are employed for a parametric case study. Maximum deflection and stress levels are obtained with appropriate assumptions for a set of feasible stiffened panel configurations. An analytical parametric case study is presented to examine the effects of discrete stiffener spacing and skin thickness on structural weight, deflection and stress. A finite-element model (FEM) of an integrated fuselage section with bulkhead is developed for an independent assessment. Stress analysis and scenario based case studies are conducted for design improvement. The FEM model specific weight of the improved fuselage concept is computed and compared to previous studies, in order to assess the relative weight/strength advantages of this advanced composite airframe technology

  12. Study of multiple cracks in airplane fuselage by micromechanics and complex variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denda, Mitsunori; Dong, Y. F.

    1994-01-01

    Innovative numerical techniques for two dimensional elastic and elastic-plastic multiple crack problems are presented using micromechanics concepts and complex variables. The simplicity and the accuracy of the proposed method will enable us to carry out the multiple-site fatigue crack propagation analyses for airplane fuselage by incorporating such features as the curvilinear crack path, plastic deformation, coalescence of cracks, etc.

  13. Transonic perturbation analysis of wing-fuselage-nacelle-pylon configurations with powered jet exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wai, J. C.; Sun, C. C.; Yoshihara, H.

    1982-01-01

    A method using a transonic small disturbance code with successive line over-relaxation is described for treating wing/fuselage configurations with a nacelle/pylon/powered jet. Examples illustrating its use for the NASA transport research model are given. Reasonable test/theory comparisons were obtained.

  14. Twenty years' experience in the treatment of acoustic neuromas with fractionated radiotherapy: A review of 45 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Maire, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: jean-philippe.maire@chu-bordeaux.fr; Huchet, Aymeri; Milbeo, Yann; Darrouzet, Vincent; Causse, Nicole; Celerier, Denis; Liguoro, Dominique; Bebear, Jean-Pierre

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate very long-term results of fractionated radiotherapy (FRT) of acoustic neuromas (AN). Methods and Materials: From January 1986 to January 2004, FRT was performed in 45 consecutive patients (46 AN). Indications were as follows: poor general condition contraindicating surgery, hearing preservation in bilateral neuromas, partial resection, nonsurgical recurrence. A 3-field to 5-field technique with static beams was used. A mean total dose of 51 Gy was given (1.80 Gy/fraction). The median tumor diameter was 31 mm (range, 11-55 mm). The median follow-up from FRT was 80 months (range, 4-227 months). Results: The particularity of our series consists of a very long-term follow-up of FRT given to selected patients. Nineteen patients died, two with progressive disease, and 17 from non-AN causes. A serviceable level of hearing was preserved in 7/9 hearing patients. No patient had facial or trigeminal neuropathy. Tumor shrinkage was observed in 27 (59%) and stable disease in 16 (35%). Tumor progression occurred in three patients, 12 to 15 months after FRT. Two additional tumors recurred after shrinkage 20 and 216 months after treatment and were operated on. Actuarial local tumor control rates at 5 and 15 years were 86%. For the patient who had a tumor recurrence at 216 months, histologic examination documented transformation to a low-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Conclusion: Very long-term efficacy of FRT is well documented in this series. However, our results suggest that malignant transformation can occur many years after FRT so we advocate caution when using this treatment for young patients.

  15. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms ... effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a ...

  16. A Brief History of Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossing, Thomas

    Although there are certainly some good historical treatments of acoustics in the literature, it still seems appropriate to begin a handbook of acoustics with a brief history of the subject. We begin by mentioning some important experiments that took place before the 19th century. Acoustics in the 19th century is characterized by describing the work of seven outstanding acousticians: Tyndall, von Helmholtz, Rayleigh, Stokes, Bell, Edison, and Koenig. Of course this sampling omits the mention of many other outstanding investigators.

  17. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 5; Analytical and Experimental Data Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, W. E.; Kraft, R. E.; Syed, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    The primary purpose of the study presented in this volume is to present the results and data analysis of in-duct transmission loss measurements. Transmission loss testing was performed on full-scale, 1/2-scale, and 115-scale treatment panel samples. The objective of the study was to compare predicted and measured transmission loss for full-scale and subscale panels in an attempt to evaluate the variations in suppression between full- and subscale panels which were ostensibly of equivalent design. Generally, the results indicated an unsatisfactory agreement between measurement and prediction, even for full-scale. This was attributable to difficulties encountered in obtaining sufficiently accurate test results, even with extraordinary care in calibrating the instrumentation and performing the test. Test difficulties precluded the ability to make measurements at frequencies high enough to be representative of subscale liners. It is concluded that transmission loss measurements without ducts and data acquisition facilities specifically designed to operate with the precision and complexity required for high subscale frequency ranges are inadequate for evaluation of subscale treatment effects.

  18. Analysis, design, and test of acoustic treatment in a laboratory inlet duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.; Motsinger, R. E.; Gauden, W. H.; Link, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    A suppression prediction program based on the method of modal analysis for spinning mode propagation in a circular duct was used in the analytical design of optimized, multielement, Kevlar bulk-absorber treatment configurations for an inlet duct. The NASA-Langley ANRL anechoic chamber using the spinning mode synthesizer as a sound source was used to obtain in-duct spinning mode measurements, radial mode measurements, and far-field traverses, as well as aerodynamic measurements. The measured suppression values were compared to predicted values, using the in-duct, forward-traveling, radial-mode content as the source for the prediction. The performance of the treatment panels was evaluated from the predicted and measured data. Although experimental difficulties were encountered at the design condition, sufficient information was obtained to confirm the expectation that it is the panel impedance components which are critical to suppression at a single frequency, not the particular construction materials. The agreement obtained between measurement and prediction indicates that the analytical program can be used as an accurate, reliable, and useful design tool.

  19. Water Impact Test and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Sparks, Chad; Sareen, Ashish

    2003-01-01

    In March 2002, a 25-ft/s vertical drop test of a composite fuselage section was conducted onto water. The purpose of the test was to obtain experimental data characterizing the structural response of the fuselage section during water impact for comparison with two previous drop tests that were performed onto a rigid surface and soft soil. For the drop test, the fuselage section was configured with ten 100-lb. lead masses, five per side, that were attached to seat rails mounted to the floor. The fuselage section was raised to a height of 10-ft. and dropped vertically into a 15-ft. diameter pool filled to a depth of 3.5-ft. with water. Approximately 70 channels of data were collected during the drop test at a 10-kHz sampling rate. The test data were used to validate crash simulations of the water impact that were developed using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic codes, MSC.Dytran and LS-DYNA. The fuselage structure was modeled using shell and solid elements with a Lagrangian mesh, and the water was modeled with both Eulerian and Lagrangian techniques. The fluid-structure interactions were executed using the fast general coupling in MSC.Dytran and the Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) coupling in LS-DYNA. Additionally, the smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) meshless Lagrangian technique was used in LS-DYNA to represent the fluid. The simulation results were correlated with the test data to validate the modeling approach. Additional simulation studies were performed to determine how changes in mesh density, mesh uniformity, fluid viscosity, and failure strain influence the test-analysis correlation.

  20. Summary of AH-1G flight vibration data for validation of coupled rotor-fuselage analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dompka, R. V.; Cronkhite, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    Under a NASA research program designated DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS), four U. S. helicopter industry participants (Bell Helicopter, Boeing Vertol, McDonnell Douglas Helicopter, and Sikorsky Aircraft) are to apply existing analytical methods for calculating coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations of the AH-1G helicopter for correlation with flight test data from an AH-1G Operational Load Survey (OLS) test program. Bell Helicopter, as the manufacturer of the AH-1G, was asked to provide pertinent rotor data and to collect the OLS flight vibration data needed to perform the correlations. The analytical representation of the fuselage structure is based on a NASTRAN finite element model (FEM) developed by Bell which has been extensively documented and correlated with ground vibration tests.The AH-1G FEM was provided to each of the participants for use in their coupled rotor-fuselage analyses. This report describes the AH-1G OLS flight test program and provides the flight conditions and measured vibration data to be used by each participant in their correlation effort. In addition, the mechanical, structural, inertial and aerodynamic data for the AH-1G two-bladed teetering main rotor system are presented. Furthermore, modifications to the NASTRAN FEM of the fuselage structure that are necessary to make it compatible with the OLS test article are described. The AH-1G OLS flight test data was found to be well documented and provide a sound basis for evaluating currently existing analysis methods used for calculation of coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations.

  1. Acoustic measurements of F-16 aircraft operating in hush house, NSN 4920-02-070-2721

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, V. R.; Plzak, G. A.; Chinn, J. M.

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this test program was to measure the acoustic environment in the hush house facility located at Kelly Air Force Base, Texas, during operation of the F-16 aircraft to ensure that aircraft structural acoustic design limits were not exceeded. The acoustic measurements showed that no sonic fatigue problems are anticipated with the F-16 aircraft aft fuselage structure during operation in the hush house. The measured acoustic levels were less than those measured in an F-16 aircraft water cooled hush house at Hill AFB, but were increased over that measured during ground run up. It was recommended that the acoustic loads measured in this program should be specified in the structural design criteria for aircraft which will be subjected to hush house operation or defining requirements for associated equipment.

  2. Azelastine and budesonide (nasal sprays): Effect of combination therapy monitored by acoustic rhinometry and clinical symptom score in the treatment of allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Natalia Zanellato; Abib-Jr, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively evaluate the effects of intranasal therapy with azelastine (AZE), budesonide (BUD), and combined AZE plus BUD (AZE/BUD) using a nasal provocation test (NPT) and acoustic rhinometry in patients with allergic rhinitis. A randomized, single-blind, crossover study with three treatment sequences was used. Thirty patients with persistent AR received the three treatments using a nasal spray twice daily for 30 days and were evaluated by an NPT with histamine before and after each period of treatment. The treatment comparison, assessed by the nasal responsiveness to histamine, was monitored based on subjective (symptom score) and objective parameters (acoustic rhinometry). The minimal cross-area 2 (MCA2) was measured by acoustic rhinometry at 1, 4, 8, and 12 minutes after NPT for each histamine concentration administered (0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 6 mg/mL) up to at least a 20% reduction in the MCA2 from baseline (NPT20). The subjects were scored regarding nasal response encompassing histamine dose and time after histamine administration that caused nasal obstruction (NPT20 score) to assess the treatments' effects. Combination therapy produced a significant increase in baseline MCA2, viz., the improvement of nasal patency (p = 0.005). The symptoms score was significantly decreased after treatment with AZE (p = 0.03), BUD (p < 0.0001), and AZE/BUD (p < 0.0001), compared with pretreatment. The NPT20 score was significantly higher (p = 0.0009) after AZE/BUD, compared with AZE and BUD on their own. Thus, AZE therapy combined with BUD might provide more therapeutic benefits than the isolated drugs for improving nasal patency. PMID:24988550

  3. Comment on 'Acoustic plasma modes'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva, J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1984-01-01

    In a recent treatment of the T = 0 acoustic plasma modes of a two-component Fermi liquid with Coulomb forces, Appel and Overhauser conclude that there exist three generally damped longitudinal acoustic branches. It is observed that this conclusion results from an inapplicable analytic continuation in their solution of the transport equations. There is only one longitudinal acoustic branch, and, in fact, when applied to the standard one-component Fermi-liquid model, the method of Appel and Overhauser also leads to the incorrect conclusion that there exist two longitudinal acoustic branches.

  4. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  5. Acoustical oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Acoustical Society of America has formed a Technical Specialty Group on Acoustical Oceanography. At ASA meetings the new group will have special sessions where they will give invited and contributed papers and have panel discussions about ocean parameters that are measured effectively by acoustical techniques.The first special sessions will be May 22-23, 1990, at the ASA meeting at Pennsylvania State University, University Park. The focus on May 22 will be acoustical techniques for detection and measurement of internal waves and turbulence; conveners are Robert Pinkel of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif., and Herman Medwin of the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, Calif. Acoustical studies of the physical and biological characteristics of ocean mass boundaries are the discussion topic on May 23. The convener is C. S. Clay, University of Wisconsin, Madison.

  6. Evaluation of aero commander propeller acoustic data: Taxi operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piersol, A. G.; Wilby, E. G.; Wilby, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The acoustic data from ground tests performed on an Aero Commander propeller driven aircraft are analyzed. An array of microphones flush mounted on the side of the fuselage were used to record data. The propeller blade passage noise during operations at several different taxi speeds is considered and calculations of the magnitude and phase of the blade passage tones, the amplitude stability of the tones, and the spatial phase and coherence of the tones are included. The measured results are compared to theoretical predictions for propeller noise and various evaluations which reveal important details of propeller noise characteristics are presented.

  7. Recurrent laryngeal nerve reinnervation in children: Acoustic and endoscopic characteristics pre-intervention and post-intervention. A comparison of treatment options.

    PubMed

    Zur, Karen B; Carroll, Linda M

    2015-12-01

    To establish the benefit of ansa cervicalis-recurrent laryngeal nerve reinnervation (ANSA-RLN) for the management of dysphonia secondary to unilateral vocal cord paralysis (UVCP) in children. Children treated with ANSA-RLN for the management of dysphonia secondary to unilateral vocal fold immobility will have superior acoustic, perceptual, and stroboscopic outcomes compared to injection laryngoplasty and observation. Retrospective case-series chart review. Laryngeal, perceptual, and acoustic analysis of dysphonia was performed in 33 children (age 2-16 years) diagnosed with UVCP. Comparison of pre-post function for treatment groups (no treatment, injection laryngoplasty, ANSA-RLN) with additional comparison between gestational ages, age at initial evaluation, and gender were examined. Perceptual measures included Pediatric Voice Handicap Index (pVHI) and Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, Strain (GBRAS) perceptual rating. Objective measures included semitone (ST) range, jitter%, shimmer%, noise-to-harmonic ratio, voicing, and maximum phonation time. Post-treatment, pVHI, jitter%, and ST were significantly improved for ANSA-RLN subjects compared to injection subjects. Improved function (laryngeal diadochokinesis, pVHI, GRBAS, and/or acoustic) was observed in all ANSA-RLN subjects who had vocal fold paralysis as the only laryngeal diagnosis. This study presents one of the largest studies of pediatric vocal fold paralysis diagnosis and treatment. The study looks at the spectrum of function in patients with UVCP and looks at the outcomes of options: no treatment, injection laryngoplasty, and ANSA-RLN. Although surgical outcomes vary, both injection laryngoplasty and ANSA-RLN show benefit in laryngeal function, voice stability, voice capacity, perceptual rating, and pVHI scores. Both injection laryngoplasty and ANSA-RLN showed improvements post-treatment, and should be considered for management of pediatric UVCP. However, the ANSA-RLN group showed better and longer

  8. Optimization of real-time acoustical and mechanical monitoring of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment using harmonic motion imaging for high focused ultrasound (HMIFU).

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2013-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in silica, in vitro and in vivo. Its principle is based on emission of an Amplitude-modulated therapeutic ultrasound beam utilizing a therapeutic transducer to induce an oscillatory radiation force while tracking the focal tissue mechanical response during the HIFU treatment using a confocally-aligned diagnostic transducer. In order to translate towards the clinical implementation of HMIFU, a complete assessment study is required in order to investigate the optimal radiation force threshold for reliable monitoring the local tissue mechanical property changes, i.e., the estimation HMIFU displacement under thermal, acoustical, and mechanical effects within focal medium (i.e., boiling, cavitation, and nonlinearity) using biological specimen. In this study, HMIFU technique is applied on HIFU treatment monitoring on freshly excised ex vivo canine liver specimens. In order to perform the multi-characteristic assessment, the diagnostic transducer was operated as either a pulse-echo imager or Passive Cavitation Detector (PCD) to assess the acoustic and mechanical response, while a bare-wire thermocouple was used to monitor the focal temperature change. As the acoustic power of HIFU treatment was ranged from 2.3 to 11.4 W, robust HMI displacement was observed across the entire range. Moreover, an optimized range for high quality displacement monitoring was found to be between 3.6 to 5.2W, where displacement showed an increase followed by significant decrease, indicating a stiffening of focal medium due to thermal lesion formation, while the correlation coefficient was maintained above 0.95.

  9. Distribution of pressure on fuselage of airplane model: communication from Rijks-Studiedienst voor de Luchtvaart of Amsterdam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    In order to study the distribution of the pressure on the surfaces of a fuselage and the influence of the wing on the air flow along these surfaces, we have made tests pertaining to the bottom and one side.

  10. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Air Load Distribution on Two Combinations of LIfting Surface and Fuselage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1947-05-01

    angles of yaw of ±10°, ± 5 °, and 0°. The unsymmetric distribution of fuselage orifices necessitated tests at equal positive and negative angles of yaw...measured drag. The fuselage pressure distribution for different angles of attack and yaw for configurations F and FWST are shown in figures 3 to 5 . The...configurations F. and FW drawn for the vertical plane of symmetry and for a parallel plane displaced 5 inches. The total difference_ in the areas of

  11. STAGS Developments for Residual Strength Analysis Methods for Metallic Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    A summary of advances in the Structural Analysis of General Shells (STAGS) finite element code for the residual strength analysis of metallic fuselage structures, that were realized through collaboration between the structures group at NASA Langley, and Dr. Charles Rankin is presented. The majority of the advancements described were made in the 1990's under the NASA Airframe Structural Integrity Program (NASIP). Example results from studies that were conducted using the STAGS code to develop improved understanding of the nonlinear response of cracked fuselage structures subjected to combined loads are presented. An integrated residual strength analysis methodology for metallic structure that models crack growth to predict the effect of cracks on structural integrity is demonstrated

  12. Analysis, Design and Optimization of Non-Cylindrical Fuselage for Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, V.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.; Kosaka, I.; Quinn, G.; Charpentier, C.

    2002-01-01

    Initial results of an investigation towards finding an efficient non-cylindrical fuselage configuration for a conceptual blended-wing-body flight vehicle were presented. A simplified 2-D beam column analysis and optimization was performed first. Then a set of detailed finite element models of deep sandwich panel and ribbed shell construction concepts were analyzed and optimized. Generally these concepts with flat surfaces were found to be structurally inefficient to withstand internal pressure and resultant compressive loads simultaneously. Alternatively, a set of multi-bubble fuselage configuration concepts were developed for balancing internal cabin pressure load efficiently, through membrane stress in inner-stiffened shell and inter-cabin walls. An outer-ribbed shell was designed to prevent buckling due to external resultant compressive loads. Initial results from finite element analysis appear to be promising. These concepts should be developed further to exploit their inherent structurally efficiency.

  13. Application study of filamentary composites in a commercial jet aircraft fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; June, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    A study of applications of filamentary composite materials to aircraft fuselage structure was performed. General design criteria were established and material studies conducted using the 727-200 forebody as the primary structural component. Three design approaches to the use of composites were investigated: uniaxial reinforcement of metal structure, uniaxial and biaxial reinforcement of metal structure, and an all-composite design. Materials application studies for all three concepts were conducted on fuselage shell panels, keel beam, floor beams, floor panels, body frames, fail-safe straps, and window frames. Cost benefit studies were conducted and developmental program costs estimated. On the basis of weight savings, cost effectiveness, developmental program costs, and potential for early application on commercial aircraft, the unaxial design is recommended for a 5-year flight service evaluation program.

  14. Mechanical and analytical screening of braided composites for transport fuselage applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedro, Mark J.; Gunther, Christian; Ko, Frank K.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanics of materials progress in support of the goal of understanding the application of braided composites in a transport aircraft fuselage are summarized. Composites consisting of both 2-D and 3-D braid patterns are investigated. Both consolidation of commingled graphite/PEEK and resin transfer molding of graphite-epoxy braided composite processes are studied. Mechanical tests were used to examine unnotched tension, open hole tension, compression, compression after impact, in-plane shear, out-of-plane tension, bearing, and crippling. Analytical methods are also developed and applied to predict the stiffness and strengths of test specimens. A preliminary study using the test data and analytical results is performed to assess the applicability of braided composites to a commercial aircraft fuselage.

  15. Implementation and verification of a comprehensive helicopter coupled rotor - Fuselage analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, E. R.; Banerjee, D.; Shamie, J.; Straub, F.; Dinyavari, M. A. H.

    1985-01-01

    The analytical basis and the application of a Rotor/Airframe Comprehensive Aeroelastic Program (RACAP) are described in detail. The rationale behind each analytical choice is outlined and the modular procedure is described. The program is verified by application to the AH-1G helicopter. The applicability of various airload prediction models is examined, and both the steady and vibratory responses of the blade are compared with flight test data. Reasonable correlation is found between measured and calculated blade response, with excellent correlation for vibration amplitudes at various locations on the fuselage such as engine, pilot seat, and gunner. Within the analytical model, comparisons are drawn between an isolated blade analysis and a coupled rotor/fuselage model. The deficiency of the former in the context of the AH-1G is highlighted.

  16. Significance of the dihedral-effect for a combat aircraft in rapid fuselage-reorientation maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bocvarov, Spiro; Cliff, Eugene M.; Lutze, Frederick H.

    1992-01-01

    In the quest for understanding problems of supermaneuverability for combat aircraft, a study is presented about the role the dihedral-effect can have in fuselage-reorientation maneuvers that involve high angles of attack. A mathematical model for attitude maneuvers is developed, which accurately represents the High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle, including thrust-vectoring generated propulsive moments. The fuselage-reorientation problem is posed as an unconstrained time-optimal control problem. Results for a few families of extremal trajectories are obtained, and the global role of the dihedral effect in the course of the corresponding maneuvers is discussed. In addition, a detailed case-study is presented for an extremal trajectory which utilizes the dihedral effect with considerable benefit.

  17. Fatigue crack initiation in riveted lap joints and in pressurized fuselages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Richard P. G.

    1993-06-01

    Riveted joints in pressurized fuselages are exposed to severe fatigue loading. The study was carried out to increase fundamental understanding of the behavior of riveted fuselage joints. Areas of interest include rivet flexibility, load transfer, residual stress distribution, fatigue crack location, secondary bending and inter-sheet friction. These aspects depend on the squeezing force used to drive the rivet. Flat uniaxially loaded riveted lap joint specimens show longer fatigue lives than curved riveted panels loaded by internal pressure in a barrel test setup. Strain gauge measurements on a barrel test setup show more severe loading of the non-countersunk inner sheet compared to the countersunk outer sheet. Finite element calculations gave insight to the improved fatigue crack initiation performance for increased sqeezing force and to the crack initiation location. The early crack initiation at the edges of flat riveted lap joint panels is explained.

  18. The effects of design details on cost and weight of fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. D.; Metschan, S. L.; Morris, M. R.; Kassapoglou, C.

    1993-01-01

    Crown panel design studies showing the relationship between panel size, cost, weight, and aircraft configuration are compared to aluminum design configurations. The effects of a stiffened sandwich design concept are also discussed. This paper summarizes the effect of a design cost model in assessing the cost and weight relationships for fuselage crown panel designs. Studies were performed using data from existing aircraft to assess the effects of different design variables on the cost and weight of transport fuselage crown panel design. Results show a strong influence of load levels, panel size, and material choices on the cost and weight of specific designs. A design tool being developed under the NASA ACT program is used in the study to assess these issues. The effects of panel configuration comparing postbuckled and buckle resistant stiffened laminated structure is compared to a stiffened sandwich concept. Results suggest some potential economy with stiffened sandwich designs for compression dominated structure with relatively high load levels.

  19. Test and analysis results for composite transport fuselage and wing structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Madan, Ram C.; Chen, Victor L.

    1992-01-01

    Automated tow placement (ATP) and stitching of dry textile composite preforms followed by resin transfer molding (RTM) are being investigated by researchers at NASA LaRC and Douglas Aircraft Company as cost-effective manufacturing processes for obtaining damage tolerant fuselage and wing structures for transport aircraft. The Douglas work is being performed under a NASA contract entitled 'Innovative Composites Aircraft Primary Structures (ICAPS)'. Data are presented in this paper to assess the damage tolerance of ATP and RTM fuselage elements with stitched-on stiffeners from compression tests of impacted three-J-stiffened panels and from stiffener pull-off tests. Data are also presented to assess the damage tolerance of RTM wing elements which had stitched skin and stiffeners from impacted single stiffener and three blade-stiffened compression tests and stiffener pull-off tests.

  20. Acoustic boundary control for quieter aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Scott Michael

    1999-08-01

    There is a strong interest in reducing the volume of low- frequency noise in aircraft cabins. Active noise control (ANC), in which loudspeakers placed in the cabin are used to generate a sound field which will cancel these disturbances, is now a commercially available solution. A second control approach is active structural acoustic control (ASAC), which uses structural control forces to reduce sound transmitted into the cabin through the fuselage. Some of the goals of current research are to reduce the cost, weight, and bulk of these control systems, along with improving global control performance. This thesis introduces an acoustic boundary control (ABC) concept for active noise control in aircraft. This control strategy uses distributed actuator arrays along enclosure boundaries to reduce noise transmitted into the enclosure through the boundaries and to reduce global noise levels due to other disturbances. The motivation is to provide global pressure attenuation with small, lightweight control actuators. Analytical studies are conducted of acoustic boundary in two-dimensional and three-dimensional rectangular enclosures and in a finite cylindrical enclosure. The simulations provide insight into the control mechanisms of ABC and demonstrate potential advantages of ABC over traditional ANC and ASAC implementations. A key component of acoustic boundary control is the ``smart'' trim panel, a structurally modified aircraft trim panel for use as an acoustic control source. A prototype smart trim panel is built and tested. The smart trim panel is used as the control source in a real-time active noise control system in a laboratory- scale fuselage model. It is shown that the smart trim panel works as well as traditional loudspeakers for this application. A control signal scheduling approach is proposed which allows for a reduction in the computational burden of the real-time controller used in active noise control applications. This approach uses off-line system

  1. Automatic computation of Euler-marching and subsonic grids for wing-fuselage configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, Raymond L.; Adams, Mary S.; Krishnan, Ramki R.

    1994-01-01

    Algebraic procedures are described for the automatic generation of structured, single-block flow computation grids for relatively simple configurations (wing, fuselage, and fin). For supersonic flows, a quasi two-dimensional grid for Euler-marching codes is developed, and some sample results in graphical form are included. A type of grid for subsonic flow calculation is also described. The techniques are algebraic and are based on a generalization of the method of transfinite interpolation.

  2. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage center section including the wheel wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. S.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    A Boeing 707 fuselage section was drop tested to measure structural, seat, and anthropomorphic dummy response to vertical crash loads. The specimen had nominally zero pitch, roll and yaw at impact with a sink speed of 20 ft/sec. Results from this drop test and other drop tests of different transport sections will be used to prepare for a full-scale crash test of a B-720.

  3. Slender body theory programmed for bodies with arbitrary cross section. [including fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, J.; Krenkel, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program developed for determining the subsonic pressure, force, and moment coefficients for a fuselage-type body using slender body theory is described. The program is suitable for determining the angle of attack and sideslipping characteristics of such bodies in the linear range where viscous effects are not predominant. Procedures developed which are capable of treating cross sections with corners or regions of large curvature are outlined.

  4. STS-40 Commander O'Connor with trainer outside JSC's Full Fuselage Trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-40 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Commander Bryan D. O'Connor reviews instructions with training personnel as he fastens a clip on his launch and entry helmet (LEH). Wearing his launch and entry suit (LES), O'Connor is ready to begin emergency egress exercises from the side hatch of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) (in background). The FFT is located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A.

  5. Multi-Site Fatigue Testing and Characterization of Fuselage Panels from Aging Aircraft Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-07

    Multi-site fatigue damage is a common problem in the riveted lap joint structure of aging aircraft. Modeling and characterization of such damage is...an especially daunting task. In this effort we present the results from fatigue tests which were performed on fuselage lap joints extracted from...in the lap joint . Some spot welded lap joint panels were also tested during the larger program; however, only the results from mechanically fastened

  6. Simulation of transonic viscous wing and wing-fuselage flows using zonal methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, Jolen

    1987-01-01

    The thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are coupled with a zonal scheme (or domain-decomposition method) to develop the Transonic Navier-Stokes (TNS) wing-alone code. The TNS has a total of 4 zones and is extended to a total of 16 zones for the wing-fuselage version of the code. Results are compared on the Cray X-MP-48 and compared with experimental data.

  7. Crash Simulation of a Vertical Drop Test of a B737 Fuselage Section with Overhead Bins and Luggage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2004-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to describe a crash simulation of a 30-ft/s vertical drop test of a Boeing 737 (B737) fuselage section. The drop test of the 10-ft. long fuselage section of a B737 aircraft was conducted in November of 2000 at the FAA Technical Center in Atlantic City, NJ. The fuselage section was outfitted with two different commercial overhead stowage bins. In addition, 3,229-lbs. of luggage were packed in the cargo hold to represent a maximum take-off weight condition. The main objective of the test was to evaluate the response and failure modes of the overhead stowage bins in a narrow-body transport fuselage section when subjected to a severe, but survivable, impact. A secondary objective of the test was to generate experimental data for correlation with the crash simulation. A full-scale 3-dimensional finite element model of the fuselage section was developed and a crash simulation was conducted using the explicit, nonlinear transient dynamic code, MSC.Dytran. Pre-test predictions of the fuselage and overhead bin responses were generated for correlation with the drop test data. A description of the finite element model and an assessment of the analytical/experimental correlation are presented. In addition, suggestions for modifications to the model to improve correlation are proposed.

  8. Coupled rotor/fuselage dynamic analysis of the AH-1G helicopter and correlation with flight vibrations data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, J. C.; Cronkhite, J. D.; Dompka, R. V.; Perry, K. S.; Rogers, J. P.; Sadler, S. G.

    1989-01-01

    Under a research program designated Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS (DAMVIBS), existing analytical methods are used for calculating coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations of the AH-1G helicopter for correlation with flight test data from an AH-1G Operational Load Survey (OLS) test program. The analytical representation of the fuselage structure is based on a NASTRAN finite element model (FEM), which has been developed, extensively documented, and correlated with ground vibration test. One procedure that was used for predicting coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations using the advanced Rotorcraft Flight Simulation Program C81 and NASTRAN is summarized. Detailed descriptions of the analytical formulation of rotor dynamics equations, fuselage dynamic equations, coupling between the rotor and fuselage, and solutions to the total system of equations in C81 are included. Analytical predictions of hub shears for main rotor harmonics 2p, 4p, and 6p generated by C81 are used in conjunction with 2p OLS measured control loads and a 2p lateral tail rotor gearbox force, representing downwash impingement on the vertical fin, to excite the NASTRAN model. NASTRAN is then used to correlate with measured OLS flight test vibrations. Blade load comparisons predicted by C81 showed good agreement. In general, the fuselage vibration correlations show good agreement between anslysis and test in vibration response through 15 to 20 Hz.

  9. Crash Simulation of a Vertical Drop Test of a B737 Fuselage Section with Overhead Bins and Luggage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2004-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to describe a crash simulation of a 30-ft/s vertical drop test of a Boeing 737 (B737) fuselage section. The drop test of the 10-ft. long fuselage section of a B737 aircraft was conducted in November of 2000 at the FAA Technical Center in Atlantic City, NJ. The fuselage section was outfitted with two different commercial overhead stowage bins. In addition, 3,229-lbs. of luggage were packed in the cargo hold to represent a maximum take-off weight condition. The main objective of the test was to evaluate the response and failure modes of the overhead stowage bins in a narrow-body transport fuselage section when subjected to a severe, but survivable, impact. A secondary objective of the test was to generate experimental data for correlation with the crash simulation. A full-scale 3-dimensional finite element model of the fuselage section was developed and a crash simulation was conducted using the explicit, nonlinear transient dynamic code, MSC.Dytran. Pre-test predictions of the fuselage and overhead bin responses were generated for correlation with the drop test data. A description of the finite element model and an assessment of the analytical/experimental correlation are presented. In addition, suggestions for modifications to the model to improve correlation are proposed.

  10. Comparison of Hard Surface and Soft Soil Impact Performance of a Crashworthy Composite Fuselage Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sareen, Ashish K.; Sparks, Chad; Mullins, B. R., Jr.; Fasanella, Edwin; Jackson, Karen

    2002-01-01

    A comparison of the soft soil and hard surface impact performance of a crashworthy composite fuselage concept has been performed. Specifically, comparisons of the peak acceleration values, pulse duration, and onset rate at specific locations on the fuselage were evaluated. In a prior research program, the composite fuselage section was impacted at 25 feet per second onto concrete at the Impact Dynamics Research Facility (IDRF) at NASA Langley Research Center. A soft soil test was conducted at the same impact velocity as a part of the NRTC/RITA Crashworthy and Energy Absorbing Structures project. In addition to comparisons of soft soil and hard surface test results, an MSC. Dytran dynamic finite element model was developed to evaluate the test analysis correlation. In addition, modeling parameters and techniques affecting test analysis correlation are discussed. Once correlated, the analytical methodology will be used in follow-on work to evaluate the specific energy absorption of various subfloor concepts for improved crash protection during hard surface and soft soil impacts.

  11. High transonic speed transport aircraft study. [aerodynamic characteristics of single-fuselage, yawed-wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulfan, R. M.; Neumann, F. D.; Nisbet, J. W.; Mulally, A. R.; Murakami, J. K.; Noble, E. C.; Mcbarron, J. P.; Stalter, J. L.; Gimmestad, D. W.; Sussman, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    An initial design study of high-transonic-speed transport aircraft has been completed. Five different design concepts were developed. These included fixed swept wing, variable-sweep wing, delta wing, double-fuselage yawed-wing, and single-fuselage yawed-wing aircraft. The boomless supersonic design objectives of range=5560 Km (3000 nmi), payload-18 143 kg (40 000lb), Mach=1.2, and FAR Part 36 aircraft noise levels were achieved by the single-fuselage yawed-wing configuration with a gross weight of 211 828 Kg (467 000 lb). A noise level of 15 EPNdB below FAR Part 36 requirements was obtained with a gross weight increase to 226 796 Kg (500 000 lb). Although wing aeroelastic divergence was a primary design consideration for the yawed-wing concepts, the graphite-epoxy wings of this study were designed by critical gust and maneuver loads rather than by divergence requirements. The transonic nacelle drag is shown to be very sensitive to the nacelle installation. A six-degree-of-freedom dynamic stability analysis indicated that the control coordination and stability augmentation system would require more development than for a symmetrical airplane but is entirely feasible. A three-phase development plan is recommended to establish the full potential of the yawed-wing concept.

  12. Application of Carbon Fibre Truss Technology to the Fuselage Structure of the SKYLON Spaceplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varvill, R.; Bond, A.

    A reusable SSTO spaceplane employing dual mode airbreathing/rocket engines, such as SKYLON, has a voluminous fuselage in order to accommodate the considerable quantities of hydrogen fuel needed for the ascent. The loading intensity which this fuselage has to withstand is relatively low due to the modest in-flight inertial accelerations coupled with the very low density of liquid hydrogen. Also the requirement to accommo- date considerable temperature differentials between the internal cryogenic tankage and the aerodynamically heated outer skin of the vehicle imposes an additional design constraint that results in an optimum fuselage structural concept very different to conventional aircraft or rocket practice. Several different structural con- cepts exist for the primary loadbearing structure. This paper explores the design possibilities of the various types and explains why an independent near ambient temperature CFRP truss structure was selected for the SKYLON vehicle. The construction of such a truss structure, at a scale not witnessed since the days of the airship, poses a number of manufacturing and design difficulties. In particular the construction of the nodes and their attachment to the struts is considered to be a key issue. This paper describes the current design status of the overall truss geometry, strut construction and manufacturing route, and the final method of assembly. The results of a preliminary strut and node test programme are presented which give confidence that the design targets will eventually be met.

  13. Multi-terrain Vertical Drop Tests of a Composite Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sotirios, Kellas; Jackson, Karen E.

    2008-01-01

    A 5-ft-diameter composite fuselage section was retrofitted with four identical blocks of deployable honeycomb energy absorber and crash tested on two different surfaces: soft soil, and water. The drop tests were conducted at the 70-ft. drop tower at the Landing and Impact Research (LandIR) Facility of NASA Langley. Water drop tests were performed into a 15-ft-diameter pool of water that was approximately 42-in. deep. For the soft soil impact, a 15-ft-square container filled with fine-sifted, unpacked sand was located beneath the drop tower. All drop tests were vertical with a nominally flat attitude with respect to the impact surface. The measured impact velocities were 37.4, and 24.7-fps for soft soil and water, respectively. A fuselage section without energy absorbers was also drop tested onto water to provide a datum for comparison with the test, which included energy absorbers. In order to facilitate this type of comparison and to ensure fuselage survivability for the no-energy-absorber case, the velocity of the water impact tests was restricted to 25-fps nominal. While all tests described in this paper were limited to vertical impact velocities, the implications and design challenges of utilizing external energy absorbers during combined forward and vertical impact velocities are discussed. The design, testing and selection of a honeycomb cover, which was required in soft surface and water impacts to transmit the load into the honeycomb cell walls, is also presented.

  14. An Airplane Design having a Wing with Fuselage Attached to Each Tip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, Leroy M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design of an airplane having a low aspect ratio wing with fuselages that are attached to each wing tip. The concept is proposed for a high-capacity transport as an alternate to progressively increasing the size of a conventional transport design having a single fuselage with cantilevered wing panels attached to the sides and tail surfaces attached at the rear. Progressively increasing the size of conventional single body designs may lead to problems in some area's such as manufacturing, ground-handling and aerodynamic behavior. A limited review will be presented of some past work related to means of relieving some size constraints through the use of multiple bodies. Recent low-speed wind-tunnel tests have been made of models representative of the inboard-wing concept. These models have a low aspect ratio wing with a fuselage attached to each tip. Results from these tests, which included force measurements, surface pressure measurements, and wake surveys, will be presented herein.

  15. Sound Transmission Loss Prediction of the Composite Fuselage with Different Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chongxin; Bergsma, Otto; Beukers, Adriaan

    2012-12-01

    Increase of sound transmission loss(TL) of the fuselage is vital to build a comfortable cabin environment. In this paper, to find a convenient and accurate means for predicting the fuselage TL, the fuselage is modeled as a composite cylinder, and its TL is predicted with the analytical, the statistic energy analysis (SEA) and the hybrid FE&SEA method. The TL results predicted by the three methods are compared to each other and they show good agreement, but in terms of model building the SEA method is the most convenient one. Therefore, the parameters including the layup, the materials, the geometry, and the structure type are studied with the SEA method. It is observed that asymmetric laminates provide better sound insulation in general. It is further found that glass fiber laminates result in the best sound insulation as compared with graphite and aramid fiber laminates. In addition, the cylinder length has little influence on the sound insulation, while an increase of the radius considerably reduces the TL at low frequencies. Finally, by a comparison among an unstiffened laminate, a sandwich panel and a stiffened panel, the sandwich panel presents the largest TL at high frequencies and the stiffened panel demonstrates the poorest sound insulation at all frequencies.

  16. Multi-Terrain Vertical Drop Tests of a Composite Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Jackson, Karen E.

    2008-01-01

    A 5-ft-diameter composite fuselage section was retrofitted with four identical blocks of deployable honeycomb energy absorber and crash tested on two different surfaces: soft soil, and water. The drop tests were conducted at the 70-ft. drop tower at the Landing and Impact Research (LandIR) Facility of NASA Langley. Water drop tests were performed into a 15-ft-diameter pool of water that was approximately 42-in. deep. For the soft soil impact, a 15-ft-square container filled with fine-sifted, unpacked sand was located beneath the drop tower. All drop tests were vertical with a nominally flat attitude with respect to the impact surface. The measured impact velocities were 37.4, and 24.7-fps for soft soil and water, respectively. A fuselage section without energy absorbers was also drop tested onto water to provide a datum for comparison with the test, which included energy absorbers. In order to facilitate this type of comparison and to ensure fuselage survivability for the no-energy-absorber case, the velocity of the water impact tests was restricted to 25-fps nominal. While all tests described in this paper were limited to vertical impact velocities, the implications and design challenges of utilizing external energy absorbers during combined forward and vertical impact velocities are discussed. The design, testing and selection of a honeycomb cover, which was required in soft surface and water impacts to transmit the load into the honeycomb cell walls, is also presented.

  17. Design and Evaluation of Composite Fuselage Panels Subjected to Combined Loading Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Rouse, Marshall

    1998-01-01

    Methodologies used in industry for designing transport aircraft composite fuselage structures are discussed. Several aspects of the design methodologies are based on assumptions from metallic fuselage technology which requires that full-scale structures be tested with the actual loading conditions to validate the designs. Composite panels which represent crown and side regions of a fuselage structure are designed using this approach and tested in biaxial tension. Descriptions of the state-of-the-art test facilities used for this structural evaluation are presented. These facilities include a pressure-box test machine and a D-box test fixture in a combined loads test machine which are part of a Combined Loads Test System (COLTS). Nonlinear analysis results for a reference shell and a stiffened composite panel tested in the pressure-box test machine with and without damage are presented. The analytical and test results are compared to assess the ability of the pressure-box test machine to simulate a shell stress state with and without damage. A combined loads test machine for testing aircraft primary structures is described. This test machine includes a D-box test fixture to accommodate curved stiffened panels and the design features of this test fixture are presented. Finite element analysis results for a curved panel to be tested in the D-box test fixture are also discussed.

  18. Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) Pressurized Fuselage Modeling, Analysis, and Design for Weight Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the interim progress for an in-house study that is directed toward innovative structural analysis and design of next-generation advanced aircraft concepts, such as the Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) and the Advanced Mobility Concept-X flight vehicles, for structural weight reduction and associated performance enhancement. Unlike the conventional, skin-stringer-frame construction for a cylindrical fuselage, the box-type pressurized fuselage panels in the HWB undergo significant deformation of the outer aerodynamic surfaces, which must be minimized without significant structural weight penalty. Simple beam and orthotropic plate theory is first considered for sizing, analytical verification, and possible equivalent-plate analysis with appropriate simplification. By designing advanced composite stiffened-shell configurations, significant weight reduction may be possible compared with the sandwich and ribbed-shell structural concepts that have been studied previously. The study involves independent analysis of the advanced composite structural concepts that are presently being developed by The Boeing Company for pressurized HWB flight vehicles. High-fidelity parametric finite-element models of test coupons, panels, and multibay fuselage sections, were developed for conducting design studies and identifying critical areas of potential failure. Interim results are discussed to assess the overall weight/strength advantages.

  19. Hybrid Wing-Body Pressurized Fuselage and Bulkhead, Design and Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    The structural weight reduction of a pressurized Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) fuselage is a serious challenge. Hence, research and development are presently being continued at NASA under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) and Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) projects in collaboration with the Boeing Company, Huntington Beach and Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). In this paper, a structural analysis of the HWB fuselage and bulkhead panels is presented, with the objectives of design improvement and structural weight reduction. First, orthotropic plate theories for sizing, and equivalent plate analysis with appropriate simplification are considered. Then parametric finite-element analysis of a fuselage section and bulkhead are conducted using advanced stitched composite structural concepts, which are presently being developed at Boeing for pressurized HWB flight vehicles. With this advanced stiffened-shell design, structural weights are computed and compared to the thick sandwich, vaulted-ribbed-shell, and multi-bubble stiffened-shell structural concepts that had been studied previously. The analytical and numerical results are discussed to assess the overall weight/strength advantages.

  20. Compression Response of a Sandwich Fuselage Keel Panel With and Without Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, David M.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    1997-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental and analytical study of a sandwich fuselage keel panel with and without damage. The fuselage keel panel is constructed of graphite-epoxy skins bonded to a honeycomb core, and is representative of a highly loaded fuselage keel structure. The face sheets of the panel contain several terminated or dropped plies along the length of the panel. The results presented provide a better understanding of the load distribution in damaged and undamaged thick-face-sheet composite sandwich structure with dropped plies and of the failure mechanisms of such structure in the presence of low-speed impact damage and discrete-source damage. The impact-damage condition studied corresponds to barely visible impact damage (BVID), and the discrete-source damage condition studied is a notch machined through both face sheets. Results are presented from an impact-damage screening study conducted on another panel of the same design to determine the impact energy necessary to inflict BVID on the panel. Results are presented from compression tests of the panel in three conditions: undamaged; BVID in two locations; and BVID in two locations and a notch through both face sheets. Surface strains in the face sheets of the undamaged panel and the notched panel obtained experimentally are compared with finite element analysis results. The experimental and analytical results suggest that for the damage conditions studied, discrete-source damage influences the structural performance more than BVID.

  1. Impact of insurance status and race on receipt of treatment for acoustic neuroma: A national cancer database analysis.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Shearwood; Kim, Ellen; Murphy, James D; Jaboin, Jerry J

    2017-03-23

    Acoustic neuroma (AN) management involves surgery, radiation, or observation. Previous studies have demonstrated that patient race and insurance status impact in-hospital morbidity/mortality following surgery; however the nationwide impact of these demographics on the receipt of each treatment modality has not been examined. The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) from 2004 to 2013 identified AN patients. Multivariate analysis adjusted for several variables within each treatment modality, including patient age, race, sex, income, primary payer for care, tumor size, and medical comorbidities. Patients who were African-American (OR=0.7; 95%CI=0.5-0.9; p=0.01), elderly (minimum age 65) (OR=0.4; 95%CI=0.4-0.6; p<0.0001), on Medicare (OR=0.6; 95% CI=0.4-0.7; p=0.0005), or treated at a community hospital (OR=0.4; 95%CI=0.2-0.7; p=0.007) were less likely to receive surgery. Patients on Medicaid (OR=1.2; 95%CI=0.8-1.8; p=0.04) or treated at an integrated network (OR=1.2; 95%CI=0.9-1.6; p=0.0004) were more likely to receive surgery. Patients who were elderly (OR=2.2; 95%CI=1.7-2.9; p<0.0001) or treated in a comprehensive cancer center (OR=1.5; 95%CI=1.3-1.9; p=0.02) were more likely and Medicaid patients (OR=0.8; 95%CI=0.5-1.2; p=0.04) were less likely to receive radiation. Patients who were elderly (OR=2.2; 95%CI=1.7-2.7; p<0.0001), African-American (OR=1.5; 95%CI=1.1-2.0; p=0.01), on Medicare (OR=1.8; 95%CI=1.4-2.3; p=0.0003), or treated in a community hospital (OR=3.0; 95%CI=1.6-5.6; p=0.0007) were more likely to receive observation. Patients on Medicaid (OR=0.8; 95%CI=0.5-1.2; p=0.04) or treated in an integrated network (OR=0.8; 95%CI=0.6-1.0; p=0.0001) were less likely to receive observation. African-American race, elderly age, and community hospital treatment triaged towards observation/away from surgery; age also triaged towards radiation. Conversely, integrated networks triaged towards surgery/away from observation; comprehensive cancer centers triaged towards

  2. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  3. [Need for rheologically active, vasoactive and metabolically active substances in the initial treatment of acute acoustic trauma].

    PubMed

    Pilgramm, M; Schumann, K

    1986-10-01

    Two rheologically active and 8 vasoactive and metabolically active substances were compared in eight independent studies, some of which were randomised and double blind, on 400 patients who had suffered acute acoustic trauma. The control group was given saline. Spontaneous recovery was excluded as far as possible. The following substances were tested: Dextran 40, hydroxyethyl starch 40/0.5, naftidrofurylhydrogenoxalate, Vinpocetin, betahistine, pentoxifylline, flunaricine, Regeneresen AU 4 and 0.9% saline. All groups showed superior results to the control group in both long-term and short-term tests with respect to hearing gain and tinnitis improvement. The rheologically effective substances showed no statistically significant variations. None of the vasoactive or metabolically active substances used as adjunctive therapy improved the results achieved with rheologically effective substances alone. These results demonstrate that acute acoustic trauma can be most effectively treated by rheologically active substances; vasoactive and metabolically active substances are unnecessary. Hyperbaric oxygenation is advantageous as an adjunctive therapy.

  4. Noise reduction as affected by the extent and distribution of acoustic treatment in a turbofan engine inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minner, G. L.; Homyak, L.

    1976-01-01

    An inlet noise suppressor for a TF-34 engine designed to have three acoustically treated rings was tested with several different ring arrangements. The configurations included: all three rings; two outer rings; single outer ring; single intermediate ring, and finally no rings. It was expected that as rings were removed, the acoustic performance would be degraded considerably. While a degradation occurred, it was not as large as predictions indicated. In fact, the prediction showed good agreement with the data only for the full-ring inlet configuration. The under-predictions which occurred with ring removal were believed a result of ignoring the presence of spinning modes which are known to damp more rapidly in cylindrical ducts than would be predicted by least attenuated mode or plane wave analysis.

  5. Noise reduction as affected by the extent and distribution of acoustic treatment in a turbofan engine inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minner, G. L.; Homyak, L.

    1976-01-01

    An inlet noise suppressor for a TF-34 engine designed to have three acoustically treated rings was tested with several different ring arrangements. The configurations included: all three rings; two outer rings; single outer ring; single intermediate ring, and finally no rings. It was expected that as rings were removed, the acoustic performance would be degraded considerably. While a degradation occurred, it was not as large as predictions indicated. The prediction showed good agreement with the data only for the full-ring inlet configuration. The underpredictions which occurred with ring removal were believed a result of ignoring the presence of spinning modes which are known to damp more rapidly in cylindrical ducts than would be predicted by least attenuated mode or plane wave analysis.

  6. Analysis of in-flight acoustic data for a twin-engined turboprop airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilby, J. F.; Wilby, E. G.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic measurements were made on the exterior and interior of a general aviation turboprop airplane during four flight tests. The test conditions were carefully controlled and repeated for each flight in order to determine data variability. For the first three flights the cabin was untreated and for the fourth flight the fuselage was treated with glass fiber batts. On the exterior, measured propeller harmonic sound pressure levels showed typical standard deviations of +1.4 dB, -2.3 dB, and turbulent boundary layer pressure levels, +1.2 dB, -1.6. Propeller harmonic levels in the cabin showed greater variability, with typical standard deviations of +2.0 dB, -4.2 dB. When interior sound pressure levels from different flights with different cabin treatments were used to evaluate insertion loss, the standard deviations were typically plus or minus 6.5 dB. This is due in part to the variability of the sound pressure level measurements, but probably is also influenced by changes in the model characteristics of the cabin. Recommendations are made for the planning and performance of future flight tests to measure interior noise of propeller-driven aircraft, either high-speed advanced turboprop or general aviation propellers.

  7. Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT) enhances the therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel and Abraxane® for treatment of human prostate adenocarcinoma in mice.

    PubMed

    van Wamel, Annemieke; Sontum, Per Christian; Healey, Andrew; Kvåle, Svein; Bush, Nigel; Bamber, Jeffrey; de Lange Davies, Catharina

    2016-08-28

    Acoustic cluster therapy (ACT) is a novel approach for ultrasound mediated, targeted drug delivery. In the current study, we have investigated ACT in combination with paclitaxel and Abraxane® for treatment of a subcutaneous human prostate adenocarcinoma (PC3) in mice. In combination with paclitaxel (12mg/kg given i.p.), ACT induced a strong increase in therapeutic efficacy; 120days after study start, 42% of the animals were in stable, complete remission vs. 0% for the paclitaxel only group and the median survival was increased by 86%. In combination with Abraxane® (12mg paclitaxel/kg given i.v.), ACT induced a strong increase in the therapeutic efficacy; 60days after study start 100% of the animals were in stable, remission vs. 0% for the Abraxane® only group, 120days after study start 67% of the animals were in stable, complete remission vs. 0% for the Abraxane® only group. For the ACT+Abraxane group 100% of the animals were alive after 120days vs. 0% for the Abraxane® only group. Proof of concept for Acoustic Cluster Therapy has been demonstrated; ACT markedly increases the therapeutic efficacy of both paclitaxel and Abraxane® for treatment of human prostate adenocarcinoma in mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  9. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors.

  10. Application of the Spectral Element Method to Acoustic Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, James F.; Rizzi, Stephen A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes research to develop a capability for analysis of interior noise in enclosed structures when acoustically excited by an external random source. Of particular interest was the application to the study of noise and vibration transmission in thin-walled structures as typified by aircraft fuselages. Three related topics are focused upon. The first concerns the development of a curved frame spectral element, the second shows how the spectral element method for wave propagation in folded plate structures is extended to problems involving curved segmented plates. These are of significance because by combining these curved spectral elements with previously presented flat spectral elements, the dynamic response of geometrically complex structures can be determined. The third topic shows how spectral elements, which incorporate the effect of fluid loading on the structure, are developed for analyzing acoustic radiation from dynamically loaded extended plates.

  11. Acoustic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.

    1993-01-01

    Pump uses acoustic-radiation forces. Momentum transferred from sound waves to sound-propagating material in way resulting in net pumping action on material. Acoustic pump is solid-state pump. Requires no moving parts, entirely miniaturized, and does not invade pumped environment. Silent, with no conventional vibration. Used as pump for liquid, suspension, gas, or any other medium interacting with radiation pressure. Also used where solid-state pump needed for reliability and controllability. In microgravity environment, device offers unusual control for low flow rates. For medical or other applications in which contamination cannot be allowed, offers noninvasive pumping force.

  12. Noise testing of an advanced design propeller in the Boeing transonic wind tunnel with and without test section acoustic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, B. M., Jr.; Plunkett, E. I.; Simcox, C. D.

    1984-10-01

    Noise tests using the NASA SR-6 advanced design propeller in the Boeing Transonic Wind Tunnel have recently been completed. Measurements were taken both with and without an acoustically treated test section. A wide range of helical tip speeds and power loadings were explored. Noise test techniques, previously not applied to advanced design propeller testing, have shown results indicating an increased level of confidence in the measured signatures. Typical results are presented along with recommendations for future noise tests and elementary empirical prediction methods for the SR-6.

  13. Surface generation and editing operations applied to structural support of aerospace vehicle fuselages. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Susan K.

    1992-01-01

    The Solid Modeling Aerospace Research Tool (SMART) is a computer aided design tool used in aerospace vehicle design. Modeling of structural components using SMART includes the representation of the transverse or cross-wise elements of a vehicle's fuselage, ringframes, and bulkheads. Ringframes are placed along a vehicle's fuselage to provide structural support and maintain the shape of the fuselage. Bulkheads are also used to maintain shape, but are placed at locations where substantial structural support is required. Given a Bezier curve representation of a cross sectional cut through a vehicle's fuselage and/or an internal tank, this project produces a first-guess Bezier patch representation of a ringframe or bulkhead at the cross-sectional position. The grid produced is later used in the structural analysis of the vehicle. The graphical display of the generated patches allows the user to edit patch control points in real time. Constraints considered in the patch generation include maintaining 'square-like' patches and placement of longitudinal, or lengthwise along the fuselage, structural elements called longerons.

  14. Design, analysis, and fabrication of a pressure box test fixture for tension damage tolerance testing of curved fuselage panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. J.; Bodine, J. B.; Preuss, C. H.; Koch, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    A pressure box test fixture was designed and fabricated to evaluate the effects of internal pressure, biaxial tension loads, curvature, and damage on the fracture response of composite fuselage structure. Previous work in composite fuselage tension damage tolerance, performed during NASA contract NAS1-17740, evaluated the above effects on unstiffened panels only. This work extends the tension damage tolerance testing to curved stiffened fuselage crown structure that contains longitudinal stringers and circumferential frame elements. The pressure box fixture was designed to apply internal pressure up to 20 psi, and axial tension loads up to 5000 lb/in, either separately or simultaneously. A NASTRAN finite element model of the pressure box fixture and composite stiffened panel was used to help design the test fixture, and was compared to a finite element model of a full composite stiffened fuselage shell. This was done to ensure that the test panel was loaded in a similar way to a panel in the full fuselage shell, and that the fixture and its attachment plates did not adversely affect the panel.

  15. A study of coupled rotor-fuselage vibration with higher harmonic control using a symbolic computing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papavassiliou, I.; Venkatesan, C.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1990-01-01

    A fundamental study of vibration prediction and vibration reduction in helicopters using active controls was performed. The nonlinear equations of motion for a coupled rotor/flexible fuselage system have been derived using computer algebra on a special purpose symbolic computing facility. The details of the derivation using the MACSYMA program are described. The trim state and vibratory response of the helicopter are obtained in a single pass by applying the harmonic balance technique and simultaneously satisfying the trim and the vibratory response of the helicopter for all rotor and fuselage degrees of freedom. The influence of the fuselage flexibility on the vibratory response is studied. It is shown that the conventional single frequency higher harmonic control (HHC) capable of reducing either the hub loads or only the fuselage vibrations but not both simultaneously. It is demonstrated that for simultaneous reduction of hub shears and fuselage vibrations a new scheme called multiple higher harmonic control (MHHC) is required. The fundamental aspects of this scheme and its uniqueness are described in detail, providing new insight on vibration reduction in helicopters using HHC.

  16. A study of coupled rotor-fuselage vibration with higher harmonic control using a symbolic computing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papavassiliou, I.; Venkatesan, C.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1990-01-01

    A fundamental study of vibration prediction and vibration reduction in helicopters using active controls was performed. The nonlinear equations of motion for a coupled rotor/flexible fuselage system have been derived using computer algebra on a special purpose symbolic computing facility. The details of the derivation using the MACSYMA program are described. The trim state and vibratory response of the helicopter are obtained in a single pass by applying the harmonic balance technique and simultaneously satisfying the trim and the vibratory response of the helicopter for all rotor and fuselage degrees of freedom. The influence of the fuselage flexibility on the vibratory response is studied. It is shown that the conventional single frequency higher harmonic control (HHC) capable of reducing either the hub loads or only the fuselage vibrations but not both simultaneously. It is demonstrated that for simultaneous reduction of hub shears and fuselage vibrations a new scheme called multiple higher harmonic control (MHHC) is required. The fundamental aspects of this scheme and its uniqueness are described in detail, providing new insight on vibration reduction in helicopters using HHC.

  17. The Characteristics of Fatigue Damage in the Fuselage Riveted Lap Splice Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    An extensive data base has been developed to form the physical basis for new analytical methodology to predict the onset of widespread fatigue damage in the fuselage lap splice joint. The results of detailed destructive examinations have been cataloged to describe the physical nature of MSD in the lap splice joint. ne catalog includes a detailed description, e.g., crack initiation, growth rates, size, location, and fracture morphology, of fatigue damage in the fuselage lap splice joint structure. Detailed examinations were conducted on a lap splice joint panel removed from a full scale fuselage test article after completing a 60,000 cycle pressure test. The panel contained a four bay region that exhibited visible outer skin cracks and regions of crack link-up along the upper rivet row. Destructive examinations revealed undetected fatigue damage in the outer skin, inner skin, and tear strap regions. Outer skin fatigue cracks were found to initiate by fretting damage along the faying surface. The cracks grew along the faying surface to a length equivalent to two to three skin thicknesses before penetrating the outboard surface of the outer skin. Analysis of fracture surface marker bands produced during full scale testing revealed that all upper rivet row fatigue cracks contained in a dim bay region grow at similar rates; this important result suggests that fracture mechanics based methods can be used to predict the growth of outer skin fatigue cracks in lap splice structure. Results are presented showing the affects of MSD and out-of-plane pressure loads on outer skin crack link-up.

  18. A Brief History of Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossing, Thomas D.

    Although there are certainly some good historical treatments of acoustics in the literature, it still seems appropriate to begin a handbook of history acoustics with a brief history of the subject. We begin by mentioning some important experiments that took place before the 19th century. Acoustics in the 19th century is characterized by describing the work of seven outstanding acousticians: Tyndall, von Helmholtz, Rayleigh, Stokes, Bell, Edison, and Koenig. Of course this sampling omits the mention of many other outstanding investigators.

  19. Radiation dose to the tongue and velopharynx predicts acoustic-articulatory changes after chemo-IMRT treatment for advanced head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Irene; Navran, Arash; van der Molen, Lisette; Heemsbergen, Wilma D; Hilgers, Frans J M; van den Brekel, Michiel W M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent changes in speech after C-IMRT treatment are related to mean doses to the tongue and velopharynx (VP). In 34 patients with advanced hypopharyngeal, nasopharyngeal, or oropharyngeal cancer, changes in speech from pretreatment to 10 weeks and 1 year posttreatment were correlated with mean doses to the base of tongue (BOT), oral cavity (OC) and tonsillar fossa/soft palate (VP). Differences in anteroposterior tongue position, dorsoventral degree of tongue to palate or pharynx constriction, grooving, strength, nasality, and laryngeal rise, were assessed by acoustic changes in three speech sounds that depend on a (post-) alveolar closure or narrowing (/t/, /s/, /z/), three with a tongue to palate/pharyngeal narrowing (/l/, /r/, /u/), and in vowel /a/ at comfortable and highest pitch. Acoustically assessed changes in tongue positioning, shape, velopharyngeal constriction, and laryngeal elevation were significantly related to mean doses to the tongue and velopharynx. The mean dose to BOT predicted changes in anteroposterior tongue positioning from pre- to 10-weeks posttreatment. From pretreatment to 1-year, mean doses to BOT, OC, and VP were related to changes in grooving, strength, laryngeal height, nasality, palatalization, and degree of pharyngeal constriction. Changes in speech are related to mean doses to the base of tongue and velopharynx. The outcome indicates that strength, motility, and the balance between agonist and antagonist muscle forces change significantly after radiotherapy.

  20. Sound Pressures and Correlations of Noise on the Fuselage of a Jet Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shattuck, Russell D.

    1961-01-01

    Tests were conducted at altitudes of 10,000, 20,000, and 30,000 feet at speeds of Mach 0.4, 0.6, and O.8. It was found that the sound pressure levels on the aft fuselage of a jet aircraft in flight can be estimated using an equation involving the true airspeed and the free air density. The cross-correlation coefficient over a spacing of 2.5 feet was generalized with Strouhal number. The spectrum of the noise in flight is comparatively flat up to 10,000 cycles per second.

  1. Wind tunnel investigation of an unpowered helicopter fuselage model with a V-type empennage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, C. E.; Yeager, W. T., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The applicability of a V-type empennage on an unpowered semiscale helicopter fuselage is considered as design criteria for improved directional control devices. Configuration changes included variations of V-tail dihedral angle, planform area, and incidence angle. Of the configurations tested, a V-tail with a dihedral angle of 55 deg, a total planform area of 0.244 sq cm, and an incidence angle of 5 deg most nearly match the trim and static stability of the baseline conventional empennage.

  2. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Active cooling system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross section and structural arrangement on the performance of actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles are investigated. An active cooling system which maintains the aircraft's entire surface area at temperatures below 394 K at Mach 6 is developed along with a hydrogen fuel tankage thermal protection system. Thermodynamic characteristics of the actively cooled thermal protection systems established are summarized. Design heat loads and coolant flowrate requirements are defined for each major structural section and for the total system. Cooling system weights are summarized at the major component level. Conclusions and recommendations are included.

  3. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross-section (circular and elliptical) and structural arrangement (integral and nonintegral tanks) on the performance of actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles was evaluated. It was found that integrally machined stiffening of the tank walls, while providing the most weight-efficient use of materials, results in higher production costs. Fatigue and fracture mechanics appeared to have little effect on the weight of the three study aircraft. The need for thermal strain relief through insulation is discussed. Aircraft size and magnitude of the internal pressure are seen to be significant factors in tank design.

  4. Numerical simulation of F-18 fuselage forebody flows at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, Lewis B.; Cummings, Russell M.; Sorenson, Reese L.; Rizk, Yehia M.

    1989-01-01

    Fine-grid Navier-Stokes solutions were obtained for flow over the fuselage forebody and wing leading edge extension of the F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle at large incidence. The resulting flows are complex, and exhibit cross flow separation from the sides of the forebody and from the leading edge extension. A well-defined vortex pattern is observed in the leeward-side flow. Results obtained for laminar flow show good agreement with flow visualizations obtained in ground-based experiments. Further, turbulent flows computed at high Reynolds-number flight-test conditions show good agreement with surface and off-surface visualizations obtained in flight.

  5. Nonlinear and progressive failure aspects of transport composite fuselage damage tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Tom; Ilcewicz, L.; Murphy, Dan; Dopker, Bernhard

    1993-01-01

    The purpose is to provide an end-user's perspective on the state of the art in life prediction and failure analysis by focusing on subsonic transport fuselage issues being addressed in the NASA/Boeing Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structure (ATCAS) contract and a related task-order contract. First, some discrepancies between the ATCAS tension-fracture test database and classical prediction methods is discussed, followed by an overview of material modeling work aimed at explaining some of these discrepancies. Finally, analysis efforts associated with a pressure-box test fixture are addressed, as an illustration of modeling complexities required to model and interpret tests.

  6. STS-35 Columbia, OV-102, aft fuselage LRU hydrogen recirculation pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Closeup view shows the aft fuselage line replaceable unit (LRU) hydrogen recirculation pump from Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. The pump is being tested at JSC's Thermochemical Test Area (TTA) Support Laboratory Bldg 350. JSC technicians ran the pump package through the battery of leak tests. Preliminary indications showed only minor, acceptable leakage from the package and Kennedy Space Center (KSC) technicians have replaced a crushed seal on the prevalve of the main propulsion system they believe may have caused the STS-35 hydrogen leak.

  7. Nonlinear analysis of damaged stiffened fuselage shells subjected to combined loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Britt, Vicki O.; Young, Richard D.; Rankin, Charles C.; Shore, Charles P.; Bains, Jane C.

    1994-01-01

    The results of an analytical study of the nonlinear response of stiffened fuselage shells with long cracks are presented. The shells are modeled with a hierarchical modeling strategy that accounts for global and local response phenomena accurately. Results are presented for internal pressure and mechanical bending loads. The effects of crack location and orientation on shell response are described. The effects of mechanical fasteners on the response of a lap joint and the effects of elastic and elastic-plastic material properties on the buckling response of tension-loaded flat panels with cracks are also addressed.

  8. Identification of a linear model of rotor-fuselage dynamics from nonlinear simulation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, R. W.; Mackie, D. B.

    1980-01-01

    Linear regression techniques are used to obtain 9- and 12-degree-of-freedom linear rotorcraft models from the input-output data generated by a nonlinear, blade-element rotorcraft simulation in hover. The resulting models are used to evaluate the coupling of the fuselage modes with the rotor flapping and lead-lag modes at various frequencies. New techniques are proposed and evaluated to improve the identification process, including a method of verifying the assumed model structure by using data sets generated at different input frequencies.

  9. Structural Stability of a Stiffened Aluminum Fuselage Panel Subjected to Combined Mechanical and Internal Pressure Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, Marshall; Young, Richard D.; Gehrki, Ralph R.

    2003-01-01

    Results from an experimental and analytical study of a curved stiffened aluminum panel subjected to combined mechanical and internal pressure loads are presented. The panel loading conditions were simulated using a D-box test fixture. Analytical buckling load results calculated from a finite element analysis are presented and compared to experimental results. Buckling results presented indicate that the buckling load of the fuselage panel is significantly influenced by internal pressure loading. The experimental results suggest that the stress distribution is uniform in the panel prior to buckling. Nonlinear finite element analysis results correlates well with experimental results up to buckling.

  10. A comprehensive vibration analysis of a coupled rotor/fuselage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Hyeonsoo

    A comprehensive vibration analysis of a coupled rotor/fuselage system for a two-bladed teetering rotor using finite element methods in space and time is developed which incorporates consistent rotor/fuselage structural, aerodynamic, and inertial couplings and a modern free wake model. A coordinate system is developed to take into account a teetering rotor's unique characteristics, such as teetering motion and undersling. Coupled nonlinear periodic blade and fuselage equations are transformed to the modal space in the fixed frame and solved simultaneously. The elastic line and detailed 3-D NASTRAN finite element models of the AH-1G helicopter airframe from the DAMVIBS program are integrated into the elastic rotor finite element model. Analytical predictions of rotor control angles, blade loads, hub forces, and vibration are compared with AH-1G Operation Load Survey flight test data. The blade loads predicted by present analysis show generally fair agreement with the flight test data, especially blade chord bending moment estimation shows good agreement. Calculated 2/rev vertical vibration levels at pilot seat show good correlation with the flight test data both in magnitude and phase, but 4/rev vibration levels show fair correlation only in magnitude. Lateral vibration results show more disagreement than vertical vibration results. Pylon flexibility effect is essential in the two-bladed teetering rotor vibration analysis. The pylon flexibility increases the first lag frequency by about 14%, and decreases 2/rev longitudinal and lateral hub forces by more than half. Rotor/fuselage coupling reduces 2/rev vertical and lateral vibration levels by 60% to 70% and has a small effect on 4/rev vibration levels. Modeling of difficult components (secondary structures, doors/panels, etc) is essential in predicting airframe natural frequencies. Refined aerodynamics such as free wake and unsteady aerodynamics have an important role in the prediction of vibration. For example, free

  11. Investigation of Transport Airplane Fuselage Fuel Tank Installations under Crash Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    Hard end points with soft intermediate frames 2 Only soft frames throughout 3-36 The previous analysis of the double -wall cylinder tank in the 300-inch...installation configurations investigated in this study include: -e Conformable tank containing a bladder and supported within a dedicated structure) -*-- Double ...FUSELAGE FUEL TANK INSTALLATIONS 3-1 3.1 DOUBLE -WALL CYLINDRICAL STRAP-IN AUXILIARY TANKS 3-1 3.1.1 KRASH Analyses 3-4 3.1.1.1 Vertical Direction

  12. Placebo controlled, prospectively randomized, double-blinded study for the investigation of the effectiveness and safety of the acoustic wave therapy (AWT(®)) for cellulite treatment.

    PubMed

    Russe-Wilflingseder, Katharina; Russe-Wilfingsleder, Katharina; Russe, Elisabeth; Vester, Johannes C; Haller, Gerd; Novak, Pavel; Krotz, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    Placebo controlled double-blinded, prospectively randomized clinical trial with 17 patients (11 verum, 5 placebo) for evaluation of cellulite treatment with Acoustic Wave Therapy, (AWT(®)) was performed. The patients were treated once a week for 7 weeks, a total of 8 treatments with the D-ACTOR(®) 200 by Storz Medical AG. Data were collected at baseline, before 8th treatment, at 1 month (follow-up 1) and at 3 months (follow-up 2) after the last treatment with a patients' questionnaire, weight control, measurement of circumference and standardized photography. Treatment progress was further documented using a specially designed 3D imaging system (SkinSCAN(3D), 3D-Shape GmbH) providing an objective measure of cellulite (primary efficacy criteria). Patient's questionnaire in the verum group revealed an improvement in number and depth of dimples, skin firmness and texture, in shape and in reduction of circumference. The overall result (of skin waviness, Sq and Sz, surface and volume of depressions and elevations, Vvv and Vmp) at two follow-up visits indicates a more than medium sized superiority (MW = 0.6706) and is statistically significant (pWei-Lachin = 0.0106). The placebo group revealed no statistical significance. No side effects were seen. This indicates the efficacy and safety of AWT(®) for patients with cellulite.

  13. Impact Testing and Simulation of a Crashworthy Composite Fuselage Section with Energy-Absorbing Seats and Dummies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.

    2002-01-01

    A 25-ft/s vertical drop test of a composite fuselage section was conducted with two energy-absorbing seats occupied by anthropomorphic dummies to evaluate the crashworthy features of the fuselage section and to determine its interaction with the seats and dummies. The 5-ft. diameter fuselage section consists of a stiff structural floor and an energy-absorbing subfloor constructed of Rohacel foam blocks. The experimental data from this test were analyzed and correlated with predictions from a crash simulation developed using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic computer code, MSC.Dytran. The anthropomorphic dummies were simulated using the Articulated Total Body (ATB) code, which is integrated into MSC.Dytran.

  14. Impact Testing and Simulation of a Crashworthy Composite Fuselage Section with Energy-Absorbing Seats and Dummies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.

    2002-01-01

    A 25-ft/s vertical drop test of a composite fuselage section was conducted with two energy-absorbing seats occupied by anthropomorphic dummies to evaluate the crashworthy features of the fuselage section and to determine its interaction with the seats and dummies. The 5-ft diameter fuselage section consists of a stiff structural floor and an energy-absorbing subfloor constructed of Rohacel foam blocks. The experimental data from this test were analyzed and correlated with predictions from a crash simulation developed using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic computer code, MSC.Dytran. The anthropomorphic dummies were simulated using the Articulated Total Body (ATB) code, which is integrated into MSC.Dytran.

  15. The numerical calculation for the coupling of multiple propeller discrete noise and its interaction with the fuselage boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongqing; Sheng, Yuansheng; Zhou, Sheng

    This paper presents a numerical method for calculating multiple subsonic propeller discrete noise with the influence of rigid fuselage boundary condition of arbitrary shape, the method described unites the multiple propeller discrete noise coupling effect with the effect caused by its interaction with the fuselage boundary. The interaction of the discrete noise of the Y12 scaled propeller model with a cylindrical fuselage model boundary was calculated. The interpretation of every terms of the governing equation and the discussion of the calculation results illustrated that the mathematical model is acceptable. Substantially, the method can be used to calculate the interaction of any known harmonic sound sources and rigid boundary. The calculation results explain the propeller's sychronizer role, and its applicable principles.

  16. Opto-acoustic cell permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S R; Heredia, N

    2000-03-09

    Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to cultured and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally- impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

  17. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  18. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  19. Interference of Wing and Fuselage from Tests of Eight Combinations in the NACA Variable-density Tunnelcombinations with Tapered Fillets and Straight-side Junctures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, Albert

    1938-01-01

    The round fuselage of an unfilleted low-wing combination was modified to incorporate straight-side junctures. The resulting combination, with or without horizontal tail surfaces, had practically the same aerodynamic characteristics as the corresponding round-fuselage tapered-fillet combination.

  20. A three-dimensional, compressible, laminar boundary-layer method for general fuselages. Volume 1: Numerical method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Yong-Sun

    1990-01-01

    A procedure for calculating 3-D, compressible laminar boundary layer flow on general fuselage shapes is described. The boundary layer solutions can be obtained in either nonorthogonal 'body oriented' coordinates or orthogonal streamline coordinates. The numerical procedure is 'second order' accurate, efficient and independent of the cross flow velocity direction. Numerical results are presented for several test cases, including a sharp cone, an ellipsoid of revolution, and a general aircraft fuselage at angle of attack. Comparisons are made between numerical results obtained using nonorthogonal curvilinear 'body oriented' coordinates and streamline coordinates.

  1. A NASTRAN model of a large flexible swing-wing bomber. Volume 4: NASTRAN model development-fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mock, W. D.; Latham, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The NASTRAN model plan for the fuselage structure was expanded in detail to generate the NASTRAN model for this substructure. The grid point coordinates were coded for each element. The material properties and sizing data for each element were specified. The fuselage substructure model was thoroughly checked out for continuity, connectivity, and constraints. This substructure was processed for structural influence coefficients (SIC) point loadings and the deflections were compared to those computed for the aircraft detail model. Finally, a demonstration and validation processing of this substructure was accomplished using the NASTRAN finite element program. The bulk data deck, stiffness matrices, and SIC output data were delivered.

  2. Global Cost and Weight Evaluation of Fuselage Side Panel Design Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polland, D. R.; Finn, S. R.; Griess, K. H.; Hafenrichter, J. L.; Hanson, C. T.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Metschan, S. L.; Scholz, D. B.; Smith, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents preliminary design trades conducted under NASA contracts NAS1 18889 (Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures, ATCAS) and NAS1-19349 (Task 3, Pathfinder Shell Design) for a subsonic wide body commercial aircraft fuselage side panel section utilizing composite materials. Included in this effort were (1) development of two complete design concepts, (2) generation of cost and weight estimates, (3) identification of technical issues and potential design enhancements, and (4) selection of a single design to be further developed. The first design concept featured an open-section stringer stiffened skin configuration while the second was based on honeycomb core sandwich construction. The trade study cost and weight results were generated from comprehensive assessment of each structural component comprising the fuselage side panel section from detail fabrication through airplane final assembly. Results were obtained in three phases: (1) for the baseline designs, (2) after global optimization of the designs, and (3) the results anticipated after detailed design optimization. A critical assessment of both designs was performed to determine the risk associated with each concept, that is the relative probability of achieving the cost and weight projections. Seven critical technical issues were identified as the first step towards side panel detailed design optimization.

  3. Decentralized active feedback control approach for vibration and noise reduction through an aircraft fuselage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Gopal; Fuller, Christopher R.; Carneal, J.

    2005-09-01

    Active noise control has been commonly implemented with fully coupled, feed-forward approach, which employs reference sensors on the fuselage/source and error microphones in the radiated field. Implementation limitations include: complexity, delay/causality, and use of microphone error sensors. An alternative approach of feedback control utilizing sensors located on each panel may overcome most of these problems. The sensors on each panel should estimate the sound radiation from the panel and also should de-couple the control from the neighbor actuator signals by primarily observing the control signals on the panel to which it is attached. With this sensing arrangement, multiple, independent single input single output feedback loops applied to each panel in conjunction with an actuator and sound radiation sensor can be utilized. Causality problems are overcome by utilizing feedback control approach with sensors located on the panel as feedback sensors. This paper will present results from laboratory tests, conducted on an aircraft fuselage, which showed that a multiple SISO feedback control approach can provide global reductions of broadband interior noise. These tests demonstrated that the actuator, sensor, and control hardware technology is mature and can be integrated into a reliable, compact system.

  4. Use of nondestructive inspection and fiber optic sensing for damage characterization in carbon fiber fuselage structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neidigk, Stephen; Le, Jacqui; Roach, Dennis; Duvall, Randy; Rice, Tom

    2014-04-01

    To investigate a variety of nondestructive inspection technologies and assess impact damage characteristics in carbon fiber aircraft structure, the FAA Airworthiness Assurance Center, operated by Sandia National Labs, fabricated and impact tested two full-scale composite fuselage sections. The panels are representative of structure seen on advanced composite transport category aircraft and measured approximately 56"x76". The structural components consisted of a 16 ply skin, co-cured hat-section stringers, fastened shear ties and frames. The material used to fabricate the panels was T800 unidirectional pre-preg (BMS 8-276) and was processed in an autoclave. Simulated hail impact testing was conducted on the panels using a high velocity gas gun with 2.4" diameter ice balls in collaboration with the University of California San Diego (UCSD). Damage was mapped onto the surface of the panels using conventional, hand deployed ultrasonic inspection techniques, as well as more advanced ultrasonic and resonance scanning techniques. In addition to the simulated hail impact testing performed on the panels, 2" diameter steel tip impacts were used to produce representative impact damage which can occur during ground maintenance operations. The extent of impact damage ranges from less than 1 in2 to 55 in2 of interply delamination in the 16 ply skin. Substructure damage on the panels includes shear tie cracking and stringer flange disbonding. It was demonstrated that the fiber optic distributed strain sensing system is capable of detecting impact damage when bonded to the backside of the fuselage.

  5. Crashworthiness of light aircraft fuselage structures: A numerical and experimental investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanyaro, A. P.; Tennyson, R. C.; Hansen, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of aircraft fuselage structures subject to various impact conditions was investigated. An analytical model was developed based on a self-consistent finite element (CFE) formulation utilizing shell, curved beam, and stringer type elements. Equations of motion were formulated and linearized (i.e., for small displacements), although material nonlinearity was retained to treat local plastic deformation. The equations were solved using the implicit Newmark-Beta method with a frontal solver routine. Stiffened aluminum fuselage models were also tested in free flight using the UTIAS pendulum crash test facility. Data were obtained on dynamic strains, g-loads, and transient deformations (using high speed photography in the latter case) during the impact process. Correlations between tests and predicted results are presented, together with computer graphics, based on the CFE model. These results include level and oblique angle impacts as well as the free-flight crash test. Comparisons with a hybrid, lumped mass finite element computer model demonstrate that the CFE formulation provides the test overall agreement with impact test data for comparable computing costs.

  6. Developpement de methodes analytiques pour un outil de dimensionnement de cadre de fuselage en materiaux composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauve, Jeremie

    The goal of this research project is to prepare a series of analytical formulations to be used by a sizing tool for composite airplane fuselage frames. This tool verifies a series of failure modes related to a frame and calculates their respective margins of safety. The tool follows an iterative process until the optimal frame is reached according to user defined parameters. The failure modes taken into account by the sizing tool are the composite material failure, local buckling, crippling, lateral buckling and global buckling. Each phenomenon is associated with its own mathematical formulations, assumptions and limitations. Existing formulations for the margin of safety calculations of each failure phenomenon was found from a literature review. Also, new formulations were developed within the current project for local and lateral buckling. In particular, an analytical formulation and an approximation method based on results obtained from finite element have been developed. Those two methods, combined, allow the estimation of the lateral buckling load of a fuselage composite frame. Finally, the current project required to create some secondary tools used during the development of the methodology for lateral buckling. Those tools are also presented in this thesis.

  7. Discrete crack growth analysis methodology for through cracks in pressurized fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potyondy, David O.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1994-01-01

    A methodology for simulating the growth of long through cracks in the skin of pressurized aircraft fuselage structures is described. Crack trajectories are allowed to be arbitrary and are computed as part of the simulation. The interaction between the mechanical loads acting on the superstructure and the local structural response near the crack tips is accounted for by employing a hierarchical modeling strategy. The structural response for each cracked configuration is obtained using a geometrically nonlinear shell finite element analysis procedure. Four stress intensity factors, two for membrane behavior and two for bending using Kirchhoff plate theory, are computed using an extension of the modified crack closure integral method. Crack trajectories are determined by applying the maximum tangential stress criterion. Crack growth results in localized mesh deletion, and the deletion regions are remeshed automatically using a newly developed all-quadrilateral meshing algorithm. The effectiveness of the methodology and its applicability to performing practical analyses of realistic structures is demonstrated by simulating curvilinear crack growth in a fuselage panel that is representative of a typical narrow-body aircraft. The predicted crack trajectory and fatigue life compare well with measurements of these same quantities from a full-scale pressurized panel test.

  8. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage section located aft of the wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, E. L.; Alfaro-Bou, E.

    1986-01-01

    A 12-foot long Boeing 707 aft fuselage section with a tapering cross section was drop tested at the NASA Langley Research Center to measure structural, seat, and occupant response to vertical crash laods and to provide data for nonlinear finite element modeling. This was the final test in a series of three different transport fuselage sections tested under identical conditions. The test parameters at impact were: 20 ft/s velocity, and zero pitch, roll, and yaw. In addition, the test was an operational shock test of the data acquisition system used for the Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID) of a remotely piloted Boeing 720 that was crash tested at NASA Ames Dryden Flight Research Facility on December 1, 1984. Post-test measurements of the crush showed that the front of the section (with larger diameter) crushed vertically approximately 14 inches while the rear crushed 18 inches. Analysis of the data traces indicate the maximum peak normal (vertical) accelerations at the bottom of the frames were approximately 109 G at body station 1040 and 64 G at body station 1120. The peak floor acceleration varied from 14 G near the wall to 25 G near the center where high frequency oscillations of the floor were evident. The peak anthropomorphic dummy pelvis normal (vertical) acceleration was 19 G's.

  9. Mean velocities and Reynolds stresses upstream of a simulated wing-fuselage juncture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahon, H.; Hubbartt, J.; Kubendran, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    Values of three mean velocity components and six turbulence stresses measured in a turbulent shear layer upstream of a simulated wing-fuselage juncture and immediately downstream of the start of the juncture are presented nd discussed. Two single-sensor hot-wire probes were used in the measurements. The separated region just upstream of the wing contains an area of reversed flow near the fuselage surface where the turbulence level is high. Outside of this area the flow skews as it passes around the body, and in this skewed region the magnitude and distribution of the turbulent normal and shear stresses within the shear layer are modified slightly by the skewing and deceleration of the flow. A short distance downstream of the wing leading edge the secondary flow vortext is tightly rolled up and redistributes both mean flow and turbulence in the juncture. The data acquisition technique employed here allows a hot wire to be used in a reversed flow region to indicate flow direction.

  10. Response of Composite Fuselage Sandwich Side Panels Subjected to Internal Pressure and Axial Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, Marshall; Ambur, Damodar R.; Dopker, Bernard; Shah, Bharat

    1998-01-01

    The results from an experimental and analytical study of two composite sandwich fuselage side panels for a transport aircraft are presented. Each panel has two window cutouts and three frames and utilizes a distinctly different structural concept. These panels have been evaluated with internal pressure loads that generate biaxial tension loading conditions. Design limit load and design ultimate load tests have been performed on both panels. One of the sandwich panels was tested with the middle frame removed to demonstrate the suitability of this two-frame design for supporting the prescribed biaxial loading conditions with twice the initial frame spacing of 20 inches. A damage tolerance study was conducted on the two-frame panel by cutting a notch in the panel that originates at the edge of a cutout and extends in the panel hoop direction through the window-belt area. This panel with a notch was tested in a combined-load condition to demonstrate the structural damage tolerance at the design limit load condition. Both the sandwich panel designs successfully satisfied all desired load requirements in the experimental part of the study, and experimental results from the two-frame panel with and without damage are fully explained by the analytical results. The results of this study suggest that there is potential for using sandwich structural concepts with greater than the usual 20-in. wide frame spacing to further reduce aircraft fuselage structural weight.

  11. Evaluation of a Composite Sandwich Fuselage Side Panel with Damage and Subjected to Internal Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, Marshall; Ambur, Damodar R.; Bodine, Jerry; Dopker, Bernhard

    1997-01-01

    The results from an experimental and analytical study of a composite sandwich fuselage side panel for a transport aircraft are presented. The panel has two window cutouts and three frames, and has been evaluated with internal pressure loads that generate biaxial tension loading conditions. Design limit load and design ultimate load tests have been performed on the graphite-epoxy sandwich panel with the middle frame removed to demonstrate the suitability of this two-frame design for supporting the prescribed biaxial loading conditions with twice the initial frame spacing of 20 inches. The two-frame panel was damaged by cutting a notch that originates at the edge of a cutout and extends in the panel hoop direction through the window-belt area. This panel with a notch was tested in a combined-load condition to demonstrate the structural damage tolerance at the design limit load condition. The two panel configurations successfully satisfied all design load requirements in the experimental part of the study, and the three-frame and two-frame panel responses are fully explained by the analysis results. The results of this study suggest that there is potential for using sandwich structural concepts with greater than the usual 20-in.-wide frame spacing to further reduce aircraft fuselage structural weight.

  12. Tension fracture of laminates for transport fuselage. Part 1: Material screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, T. H.; Avery, W. B.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Poe, C. C., Jr.; Harris, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    Transport fuselage structures are designed to contain pressure following a large penetrating damage event. Applications of composites to fuselage structures require a database and supporting analysis on tension damage tolerance. Tests with 430 fracture specimens were used to accomplish the following: (1) identify critical material and laminate variables affecting notch sensitivity; (2) evaluate composite failure criteria; and (3) recommend a screening test method. Variables studied included fiber type, matrix toughness, lamination manufacturing process, and intraply hybridization. The laminates found to have the lowest notch sensitivity were manufactured using automated tow placement. This suggests a possible relationship between the stress distribution and repeatable levels of material inhomogeneity that are larger than found in traditional tape laminates. Laminates with the highest notch sensitivity consisted of toughened matrix materials that were resistant to a splitting phenomena that reduces stress concentrations in major load bearing plies. Parameters for conventional fracture criteria were found to increase with crack length for the smallest notch sizes studied. Most material and laminate combinations followed less than a square root singularity for the largest crack sizes studied. Specimen geometry, notch type, and notch size were evaluated in developing a screening test procedure. Traitional methods of correcting for specimen finite width were found to be lacking. Results indicate that a range of notch sizes must be tested to determine notch sensitivity. Data for a single small notch size (0.25 in. diameter) was found to give no indication of the sensitivity of a particular material and laminate layup to larger notch sizes.

  13. Damage-Tolerance Characteristics of Composite Fuselage Sandwich Structures with Thick Facesheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, David M.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    1997-01-01

    Damage tolerance characteristics and results from experimental and analytical studies of a composite fuselage keel sandwich structure subjected to low-speed impact damage and discrete-source damage are presented. The test specimens are constructed from graphite-epoxy skins borided to a honeycomb core, and they are representative of a highly loaded fuselage keel structure. Results of compression-after-impact (CAI) and notch-length sensitivity studies of 5-in.-wide by 10-in.long specimens are presented. A correlation between low-speed-impact dent depth, the associated damage area, and residual strength for different impact-energy levels is described; and a comparison of the strength for undamaged and damaged specimens with different notch-length-to-specimen-width ratios is presented. Surface strains in the facesheets of the undamaged specimens as well as surface strains that illustrate the load redistribution around the notch sites in the notched specimens are presented and compared with results from finite element analyses. Reductions in strength of as much as 53.1 percent for the impacted specimens and 64.7 percent for the notched specimens are observed.

  14. Achieving acoustical performance with fire safe products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Thomas

    2005-09-01

    Recent serious fires in North and South America have pointed out potential problems with attempts to improve acoustical performance in building spaces at the expense of using acoustical treatments that may have poor performance in fire situations. Foam plastic products, sometimes not designed for exposed use in buildings, can ignite quickly and spread fire rapidly throughout a building space, resulting in fire victims being trapped within the building or not being afforded the needed safe egress time. There are ways of achieving equivalent and even superior acoustical performance without sacrificing fire safety. Acoustical products are available which can add comparable or superior acoustical treatment without the fire hazard associated with exposed foam plastic materials. This presentation is a review of the U.S. code requirements of interior finish materials, the various types of fire tests that are applied to these products, and a discussion of the achievable fire and acoustical performance.

  15. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  17. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    PubMed

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  18. Vibro-acoustic modelling of aircraft double-walls with structural links using Statistical Energy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campolina, Bruno L.

    The prediction of aircraft interior noise involves the vibroacoustic modelling of the fuselage with noise control treatments. This structure is composed of a stiffened metallic or composite panel, lined with a thermal and acoustic insulation layer (glass wool), and structurally connected via vibration isolators to a commercial lining panel (trim). The goal of this work aims at tailoring the noise control treatments taking design constraints such as weight and space optimization into account. For this purpose, a representative aircraft double-wall is modelled using the Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) method. Laboratory excitations such as diffuse acoustic field and point force are addressed and trends are derived for applications under in-flight conditions, considering turbulent boundary layer excitation. The effect of the porous layer compression is firstly addressed. In aeronautical applications, compression can result from the installation of equipment and cables. It is studied analytically and experimentally, using a single panel and a fibrous uniformly compressed over 100% of its surface. When compression increases, a degradation of the transmission loss up to 5 dB for a 50% compression of the porous thickness is observed mainly in the mid-frequency range (around 800 Hz). However, for realistic cases, the effect should be reduced since the compression rate is lower and compression occurs locally. Then the transmission through structural connections between panels is addressed using a four-pole approach that links the force-velocity pair at each side of the connection. The modelling integrates experimental dynamic stiffness of isolators, derived using an adapted test rig. The structural transmission is then experimentally validated and included in the double-wall SEA model as an equivalent coupling loss factor (CLF) between panels. The tested structures being flat, only axial transmission is addressed. Finally, the dominant sound transmission paths are

  19. Transonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 45 deg Swept Wing Fuselage Model with a Finned and Unfinned Body Pylon Mounted Beneath the Fuselage or Wing, Including Measurements of Body Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wornom, Dewey E.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation of a model of a standard size body in combination with a representative 45 deg swept-wing-fuselage model has been conducted in the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel over a Mach number range from 0.80 to 1.43. The body, with a fineness ratio of 8.5, was tested with and without fins, and was pylon-mounted beneath the fuselage or wing. Force measurements were obtained on the wing-fuselage model with and without the body, for an angle-of-attack range from -2 deg to approximately 12 deg and an angle-of-sideslip range from -8 deg to 8 deg. In addition, body loads were measured over the same angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip range. The Reynolds number for the investigation, based on the wing mean aerodynamic chord, varied from 1.85 x 10(exp 6) to 2.85 x 10(exp 6). The addition of the body beneath the fuselage or the wing increased the drag coefficient of the complete model over the Mach number range tested. On the basis of the drag increase per body, the under-fuselage position was the more favorable. Furthermore, the bodies tended to increase the lateral stability of the complete model. The variation of body loads with angle of attack for the unfinned bodies was generally small and linear over the Mach number range tested with the addition of fins causing large increases in the rates of change of normal-force coefficient and nose-down pitching-moment coefficient. The variation of body side-force coefficient with sideslip for the unfinned body beneath the fuselage was at least twice as large as the variation of this load for the unfinned body beneath the wing. The addition of fins to the body beneath either the fuselage or the wing approximately doubled the rate of change of body side-force coefficient with sideslip. Furthermore, the variation of body side-force coefficient with sideslip for the body beneath the wing was at least twice as large as the variation of this load with angle of attack.

  20. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  1. Books on acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil A.

    2004-05-01

    The legacy of a man is not limited to just his projects. His writings in many cases are a more lasting, and a definitely more accessible, monument. For 60 years, Leo L. Beranek has produced books on acoustics, acoustic measurements, sound control, music and architecture, noise and vibration control, concert halls, and opera houses in addition to teaching and consulting. His books are standard references and still cited in other books and in technical and professional articles. Many of his books were among, if not, the first comprehensive modern treatment of the subject and many are still foremost. A review of Dr. Beranek's many books as well as some anecdotes about the circumstances and consequences of same will be presented.

  2. Radiosurgery of acoustic neurinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Flickinger, J.C.; Lunsford, L.D.; Coffey, R.J.; Linskey, M.E.; Bissonette, D.J.; Maitz, A.H.; Kondziolka, D. )

    1991-01-15

    Eighty-five patients with acoustic neurinomas underwent stereotactic radiosurgery with the gamma unit at the University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA) during its first 30 months of operation. Neuroimaging studies performed in 40 patients with more than 1 year follow-up showed that tumors were smaller in 22 (55%), unchanged in 17 (43%), and larger in one (2%). The 2-year actuarial rates for preservation of useful hearing and any hearing were 46% and 62%, respectively. Previously undetected neuropathies of the trigeminal (n = 12) and facial nerves (n = 14) occurred 1 week to 1 year after radiosurgery (median, 7 and 6 months, respectively), and improved at median intervals of 13 and 8 months, respectively, after onset. Hearing loss was significantly associated with increasing average tumor diameter (P = 0.04). No deterioration of any cranial nerve function has yet developed in seven patients with average tumor diameters less than 10 mm. Radiosurgery is an important treatment alternative for selected acoustic neurinoma patients.

  3. NASTRAN data generation of helicopter fuselages using interactive graphics. [preprocessor system for finite element analysis using IBM computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sainsbury-Carter, J. B.; Conaway, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    The development and implementation of a preprocessor system for the finite element analysis of helicopter fuselages is described. The system utilizes interactive graphics for the generation, display, and editing of NASTRAN data for fuselage models. It is operated from an IBM 2250 cathode ray tube (CRT) console driven by an IBM 370/145 computer. Real time interaction plus automatic data generation reduces the nominal 6 to 10 week time for manual generation and checking of data to a few days. The interactive graphics system consists of a series of satellite programs operated from a central NASTRAN Systems Monitor. Fuselage structural models including the outer shell and internal structure may be rapidly generated. All numbering systems are automatically assigned. Hard copy plots of the model labeled with GRID or elements ID's are also available. General purpose programs for displaying and editing NASTRAN data are included in the system. Utilization of the NASTRAN interactive graphics system has made possible the multiple finite element analysis of complex helicopter fuselage structures within design schedules.

  4. Simulator study of flight characteristics of a large twin-fuselage cargo transport airplane during approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. D.; Deal, P. L.; Keyser, G. L., Jr.; Smith, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    A six degree-of-freedom, ground-based simulator study was conducted to evaluate the low speed flight characteristics of a twin fuselage cargo transport airplane and to compare these characteristics with those of a large, single fuselage (reference) transport configuration which was similar to the Lockheed C-5C airplane. The primary piloting task was the approach and landing. The results indicated that in order to achieve "acceptable' low speed handling qualities on the twin fuselage concept, considerable stability and control augmentation was required, and although the augmented airplane could be landed safely under adverse conditions, the roll performance of the aircraft had to be improved appreciably before the handling qualities were rated as being "satisfactory.' These ground-based simulation results indicated that a value of t sub phi = 30 (time required to bank 30 deg) less than 6 sec should result in "acceptable' roll response characteristics, and when t sub phi = 30 is less than 3.8 sec, "satisfactory' roll response should be attainable on such large and unusually configured aircraft as the subject twin fuselage cargo transport concept.

  5. The Influence of Feedback on the Aeroelastic Behavior of Tilt Proprotor Aircraft Including the Effects of Fuselage Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtiss, H. C., Jr.; Komatsuzaki, T.; Traybar, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of single loop feedbacks to improve the stability of the system are considered. Reduced order dynamic models are employed where appropriate to promote physical insight. The influence of fuselage freedom on the aeroelastic stability, and the influence of the airframe flexibility on the low frequency modes of motion relevant to the stability and control characteristics of the vehicle were examined.

  6. Pressures measured in flight on the aft fuselage and external nozzle of a twin-jet fighter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nugent, J.; Plant, T. J.; Davis, R. A.; Taillon, N. V.

    1983-01-01

    Fuselage, boundary layer, and nozzle pressures were measured in flight for a twin jet fighter over a Mach number range from 0.60 to 2.00 at test altitudes of 6100, 10,700, and 13,700 meters for angles of attack ranging from 0 deg to 7 deg. Test data were analyzed to find the effects of the propulsion system geometry. The flight variables, and flow interference. The aft fuselage flow field was complex and showed the influence of the vertical tail, nacelle contour, and the wing. Changes in the boattail angle of either engine affected upper fuselage and lower fuselage pressure coefficients upstream of the nozzle. Boundary layer profiles at the forward and aft locations on the upper nacelles were relatively insensitive to Mach number and altitude. Boundary layer thickness decreased at both stations as angle of attack increased above 4 deg. Nozzle pressure coefficient was influenced by the vertical tail, horizontal tail boom, and nozzle interfairing; the last two tended to separate flow over the top of the nozzle from flow over the bottom of the nozzle. The left nozzle axial force coefficient was most affected by Mach number and left nozzle boattail angle. At Mach 0.90, the nozzle axial force coefficient was 0.0013.

  7. A 0.15-scale study of configuration effects on the aerodynamic interaction between main rotor and fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trept, Ted

    1984-01-01

    Hover and forward flight tests were conducted to investigate the mutual aerodynamic interaction between the main motor and fuselage of a conventional helicopter configuration. A 0.15-scale Model 222 two-bladed teetering rotor was combined with a 0.15-scale model of the NASA Ames 40x80-foot wind tunnel 1500 horsepower test stand fairing. Configuration effects were studied by modifying the fairing to simulate a typical helicopter forebody. Separation distance between rotor and body were also investigated. Rotor and fuselage force and moment as well as pressure data are presented in graphical and tabular format. Data was taken over a range of thrust coefficients from 0.002 to 0.007. In forward flight speed ratio was varied from 0.1 to 0.3 with shaft angle varying from +4 to -12 deg. The data show that the rotors effect on the fuselage may be considerably more important to total aircraft performance than the effect of the fuselage on the rotor.

  8. Analysis of Measured and Predicted Acoustics from an XV-15 Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Burley, Casey L.

    2001-01-01

    Flight acoustic and vehicle state data from an XV-15 acoustic flight test are examined. Flight predictions using TRAC are performed for a level flight (repeated) and four descent conditions (including a BVI). The assumptions and procedures used for TRAC flight predictions as well as the variability in flight measurements, which are used for input and comparison to predictions, are investigated in detail. Differences were found in the measured vehicle airspeed, altitude, glideslope, and vehicle orientation (yaw, pitch and roll angle) between each of the repeat runs. These differences violate some of the prediction assumptions and significantly impacted the resulting acoustic predictions. Multiple acoustic pulses, with a variable time between the pulses, were found in the measured acoustic time histories for the repeat runs. These differences could be attributed in part to the variability in vehicle orientation. Acoustic predictions that used the measured vehicle orientation for the repeat runs captured this multiple pulse variability. Thickness noise was found to be dominant on approach for all the cases, except the BVI condition. After the aircraft passed overhead, broadband noise and low frequency loading noise were dominant. The predicted LowSPL time histories compared well with measurement on approach to the array for the non-BVI conditions and poorly for the BVI condition. Accurate prediction of the lift share between the rotor and fuselage must be known in order to improve predictions. At a minimum, measurements of the rotor thrust and tip-path-plane angle are critical to further develop accurate flight acoustic prediction capabilities.

  9. Test and Analyses of a Composite Multi-Bay Fuselage Panel Under Uni-Axial Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian; Baker, Donald J.

    2004-01-01

    A composite panel containing three stringers and two frames cut from a vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded (VaRTM) stitched fuselage article was tested under uni-axial compression loading. The stringers and frames divided the panel into six bays with two columns of three bays each along the compressive loading direction. The two frames were supported at the ends with pins to restrict the out-of-plane translation. The free edges of the panel were constrained by knife-edges. The panel was modeled with shell finite elements and analyzed with ABAQUS nonlinear solver. The nonlinear predictions were compared with the test results in out-of-plane displacements, back-to-back surface strains on stringer flanges and back-to-back surface strains at the centers of the skin-bays. The analysis predictions were in good agreement with the test data up to post-buckling.

  10. Aircraft Engine Noise Scattering by Fuselage and Wings: A Computational Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Stanescu, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents a time-domain method for computation of sound radiation from aircraft engine sources to the far field. The effects of non-uniform flow around the aircraft and scattering of sound by fuselage and wings are accounted for in the formulation. The approach is based on the discretization of the inviscid flow equations through a collocation form of the discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method. An isoparametric representation of the underlying geometry is used in order to take full advantage of the spectral accuracy of the method. Large-scale computations are made possible by a parallel implementation based on message passing. Results obtained for radiation from an axisymmetric nacelle alone are compared with those obtained when the same nacelle is installed in a generic configuration, with and without a wing. 0 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Helicopter Fuselage Active Flow Control in the Presence of a Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Preston B; Overmeyer, Austin D.; Tanner, Philip E.; Wilson, Jacob S.; Jenkins, Luther N.

    2014-01-01

    This work extends previous investigations of active flow control for helicopter fuselage drag and download reduction to include the effects of the rotor. The development of the new wind tunnel model equipped with fluidic oscillators is explained in terms of the previous test results. Large drag reductions greater than 20% in some cases were measured during powered testing without increasing, and in some cases decreasing download in forward flight. As confirmed by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), the optimum actuator configuration that provided a decrease in both drag and download appeared to create a virtual (fluidic) boat-tail fairing instead of attaching flow to the ramp surface. This idea of a fluidic fairing shifts the focus of 3D separation control behind bluff bodies from controlling/reattaching surface boundary layers to interacting with the wake flow.

  12. Analysis for the Progressive Failure Response of Textile Composite Fuselage Frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.; Boitnott, Richard L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A part of aviation accident mitigation is a crash worthy airframe structure, and an important measure of merit for a crash worthy structure is the amount of kinetic energy that can be absorbed in the crush of the structure. Prediction of the energy absorbed from finite element analyses requires modeling the progressive failure sequence. Progressive failure modes may include material degradation, fracture and crack growth, and buckling and collapse. The design of crash worthy airframe components will benefit from progressive failure analyses that have been validated by tests. The subject of this research is the development of a progressive failure analysis for textile composite. circumferential fuselage frames subjected to a quasi-static, crash-type load. The test data for these frames are reported, and these data, along with stub column test data, are to be used to develop and to validate methods for the progressive failure response.

  13. Analysis for the Progressive Failure Response of Textile Composite Fuselage Frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.; Boitnott, Richard L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A part of aviation accident mitigation is a crashworthy airframe structure, and an important measure of merit for a crashworthy structure is the amount of kinetic energy that can be absorbed in the crush of the structure. Prediction of the energy absorbed from finite element analyses requires modeling the progressive failure sequence. Progressive failure modes may include material degradation, fracture and crack growth, and buckling and collapse. The design of crashworthy airframe components will benefit from progressive failure analyses that have been validated by tests. The subject of this research is the development of a progressive failure analysis for a textile composite, circumferential fuselage frame subjected to a quasi-static, crash-type load. The test data for the frame are reported, and these data are used to develop and to validate methods for the progressive failure response.

  14. On sound transmission into a heavily-damped cylinder. [aircraft noise in fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koval, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    A mathematical model for the transmission of sound into a thin monocoque cylindrical shell is discussed. The model is used to evaluate an oblique plane wave incident upon a flexible thin cylindrical shell. The solution is applicable to the transmission of sound under actual flight conditions. The model is then used to determine curves of cylinder-transmission loss for heavily damped cylinders. Numerical results are found for several plane-wave incidence angles for a narrow-bodied jet fuselage made of aluminum. It is noted that damping (i.e., the loss factor) increases, dips because of reduced cylinder resonances, and eventually disappears when the loss factor of the shell is large enough.

  15. Numerical simulation of high-incidence flow over the F-18 fuselage forebody

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, Lewis B.; Cummings, Russell M.; Sorenson, Reese L.; Rizk, Yehia M.

    1989-01-01

    As part of the NASA High Alpha Technology Program, fine-grid Navier-Stokes solutions have been obtained for flow over the fuselage forebody and wing leading-edge extension of the F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle at large incidence. The resulting flows are complex and exhibit cross-flow separation from the sides of the forebody and from the leading-edge extension. A well-defined vortex pattern is observed in the leeward-side flow. Results obtained for laminar flow show good agreement with flow visualizations obtained in ground-based experiments. Further, turbulent flows computed at high-Reynolds-number flight-test conditions show good agreement with surface and off-surface visualizations obtained in flight.

  16. Fuselage Boundary Layer Ingestion Propulsion Applied to a Thin Haul Commuter Aircraft for Optimal Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Gregor Veble; Stoll, Alex; Bevirt, JoeBen; Grah, Rok; Moore, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical aspects of aerodynamic efficiency of propulsion systems are studied. Focus is on types of propulsion that closely couples to the aerodynamics of the complete vehicle. We discuss the effects of local flow fields, which are affected both by conservative flow acceleration as well as total pressure losses, on the efficiency of boundary layer immersed propulsion devices. We introduce the concept of a boundary layer retardation turbine that helps reduce skin friction over the fuselage. We numerically investigate efficiency gains offered by boundary layer and wake interacting devices. We discuss the results in terms of a total energy consumption framework and show that efficiency gains offered depend on all the elements of the propulsion system.

  17. Measurements of fuselage skin strains and displacements near a longitudinal lap joint in a pressurized aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edward P.; Britt, Vicki O.

    1991-01-01

    Strains and displacements in a small area near a longitudinal lap joint in the fuselage skin of a B737 aircraft were measured during a pressurization cycle to a differential pressure of 6.2 psi while the aircraft was on the ground. It was found that hoop strains were higher than longitudinal strains at each location; membrane strains in the unreinforced skin were higher than in the joint; membrane strains in the hoop direction, as well as radial displacements, tended to be highest at the mid-bay location between skin reinforcements; significant bending in the hoop direction occurred in the joint and in the skin near the joint, and the bending was unsymmetrically distributed about the stringer at the middle of the joint; and radial displacements were unsymmetrically distributed across the lap joint. The interpretation of the strain gage data for locations on the bonded and riveted lap joint assumed that the joint did not contain disbonded areas.

  18. Aircraft Engine Noise Scattering By Fuselage and Wings: A Computational Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanescu, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Farassat, F.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents a time-domain method for computation of sound radiation from aircraft engine sources to the far-field. The effects of nonuniform flow around the aircraft and scattering of sound by fuselage and wings are accounted for in the formulation. The approach is based on the discretization of the inviscid flow equations through a collocation form of the Discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method. An isoparametric representation of the underlying geometry is used in order to take full advantage of the spectral accuracy of the method. Large-scale computations are made possible by a parallel implementation based on message passing. Results obtained for radiation from an axisymmetric nacelle alone are compared with those obtained when the same nacelle is installed in a generic configuration, with and without a wing.

  19. Conceptual Design of a Single-Aisle Turboelectric Commercial Transport With Fuselage Boundary Layer Ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welstead, Jason R.; Felder, James L.

    2016-01-01

    A single-aisle commercial transport concept with a turboelectric propulsion system architecture was developed assuming entry into service in 2035 and compared to a similar technology conventional configuration. The turboelectric architecture consisted of two underwing turbofans with generators extracting power from the fan shaft and sending it to a rear fuselage, axisymmetric, boundary layer ingesting fan. Results indicate that the turbo- electric concept has an economic mission fuel burn reduction of 7%, and a design mission fuel burn reduction of 12% compared to the conventional configuration. An exploration of the design space was performed to better understand how the turboelectric architecture changes the design space, and system sensitivities were run to determine the sensitivity of thrust specific fuel consumption at top of climb and propulsion system weight to the motor power, fan pressure ratio, and electrical transmission efficiency of the aft boundary layer ingesting fan.

  20. Helicopter Fuselage Active Flow Control in the Presence of a Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Preston B; Overmeyer, Austin D.; Tanner, Philip E.; Wilson, Jacob S.; Jenkins, Luther N.

    2014-01-01

    This work extends previous investigations of active flow control for helicopter fuselage drag and download reduction to include the effects of the rotor. The development of the new wind tunnel model equipped with fluidic oscillators is explained in terms of the previous test results. Large drag reductions greater than 20% in some cases were measured during powered testing without increasing, and in some cases decreasing download in forward flight. As confirmed by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), the optimum actuator configuration that provided a decrease in both drag and download appeared to create a virtual (fluidic) boat-tail fairing instead of attaching flow to the ramp surface. This idea of a fluidic fairing shifts the focus of 3D separation control behind bluff bodies from controlling/reattaching surface boundary layers to interacting with the wake flow.

  1. Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR) on left rear fuselage of DC-8 Airborne Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A view of the Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR) antenna on the left rear fuselage of the DC-8. The AIRSAR captures images of the ground from the side of the aircraft and can provide precision digital elevation mapping capabilities for a variety of studies. The AIRSAR is one of a number of research systems that have been added to the DC-8. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  2. Technicians test OV-102's aft fuselage LRU hydrogen recirculation pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Donald C. Buckner, a Lockheed mechanical lead technician, installs an aft fuselage line replaceable unit (LRU) liquid hydrogen recirculation pump from Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102 into JSC's Thermochemical Test Area (TTA) Support Laboratory Bldg 350 test stand. Technicians ran the pump package through the battery of leak tests. Preliminary indications showed only minor, acceptable leakage from the package and Kennedy Space Center (KSC) technicians have replaced a crushed seal on the prevalve of the main propulsion system they believe may have caused the STS-35 hydrogen leak. In addition to Buckner, (left to right) Larry Kilbourn, a Rockwell Service Center lead mechanical technician from Cape Canaveral, and John Dickerson, a quality inspector with EBASCO Services, also monitored the test at JSC. Photo taken by JSC photographer Benny Benavides.

  3. An Integrated Fuselage-Sting Balance for a Sonic-Boom Wind-Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    Measured and predicted pressure signatures from a lifting wind-tunnel model can be compared when the lift on the model is accurately known. The model's lift can be set by bending the support sting to a desired angle of attack. This method is simple in practice, but difficult to accurately apply. A second method is to build a normal force/pitching moment balance into the aft end of the sting, and use an angle-of-attack mechanism to set model attitude. In this report, a method for designing a sting/balance into the aft fuselage/sting of a sonic-boom model is described. A computer code is given, and a sample sting design is outlined to demonstrate the method.

  4. Aircraft Engine Noise Scattering by Fuselage and Wings: A Computational Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanescu, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Farassat, F.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents a time-domain method for computation of sound radiation from aircraft engine sources to the far-field. The effects of nonuniform flow around the aircraft and scattering of sound by fuselage and wings are accounted for in the formulation. The approach is based on the discretization of the inviscid flow equations through a collocation form of the Discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method. An isoparametric representation of the underlying geometry is used in order to take full advantage of the spectral accuracy of the method. Large-scale computations are made possible by a parallel implementation based on message passing. Results obtained for radiation from an axisymmetric nacelle alone are compared with those obtained when the same nacelle is installed in a generic configuration, with and without a wing.

  5. STS-26 MS Hilmers during egress training at JSC's MAIL full fuselage trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), tries out the new crew escape system (CES) inflated slide during an emergency egress training exercise in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Technicians stand on either side of the slide ready to help Hilmers to his feet once he reaches the bottom. Watching from floor level at the far left is astronaut Steven R. Nagel. A second crewmember stands in the open side hatch of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) awaiting his turn to slide to 'safety'. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (LESs) and checked out CES slide and other CES configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. The CES pole extends out the side hatch just above Hilmers' head.

  6. STS-26 crew trains in JSC full fuselage trainer (FFT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers are briefed during a training exercise in the Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Seated outside the open side hatch of the full fuselage trainer (FFT) (left to right) are Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, and Pilot Richard O. Covey. Astronaut Steven R. Nagel (left), positioned in the open side hatch, briefs the crew on the pole escape system as he demonstrates some related equipment. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (launch and entry suits (LESs)) and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. The photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

  7. STS-26 crew trains in JSC full fuselage trainer (FFT) shuttle mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers are briefed during a training exercise in the Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Seated outside the open side hatch of the full fuselage trainer (FFT) (left to right) are Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, and Pilot Richard O. Covey. Looking on at right are Astronaut Office Chief Daniel C. Brandenstein (standing) and astronaut James P. Bagian. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (launch and entry suits (LESs)) and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  8. STS-26 Pilot Covey during egress training at JSC's MAIL full fuselage trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot Richard O. Covey, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), slides to safety using the new crew escape system (CES) inflated slide during an emergency egress training exercise in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Technicians stand on either side of the slide ready to help Covey to his feet once he reaches the bottom. The CES pole extends out the open side hatch of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT). During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (LESs) and checked out CES slide and other CES configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  9. Transonic perturbation analysis of wing-fuselage-nacelle-pylon configurations with powered jet exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wai, J. C.; Yoshihara, H.; Abeyounis, W. K.

    1982-01-01

    A transonic small perturbation method has been developed for the analysis of general wing-fuselage-nacelle-pylon configurations with powered jet exhausts. Finite difference successive line relaxation algorithm is used to solve the small disturbance potential equation in conservative form. The nacelle tangency condition and the jet exhaust plume contact conditions are fulfilled in a quasi-cylindrical fashion on a surface fitting the Cartesian grid. The pylon tangency condition is treated in a quasi-planar manner as for the wing. Viscous displacement effects on the wing are modeled by suitable shape changes including the placement of a viscous ramp at the base of the shock. Computed results of a transport configuration show satisfactory correlation with test data.

  10. Test and Analyses of a Composite Multi-Bay Fuselage Panel Under Uni-Axial Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian; Baker, Donald J.

    2004-01-01

    A composite panel containing three stringers and two frames cut from a vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded (VaRTM) stitched fuselage article was tested under uni-axial compression loading. The stringers and frames divided the panel into six bays with two columns of three bays each along the compressive loading direction. The two frames were supported at the ends with pins to restrict the out-of-plane translation. The free edges of the panel were constrained by knife-edges. The panel was modeled with shell finite elements and analyzed with ABAQUS nonlinear solver. The nonlinear predictions were compared with the test results in out-of-plane displacements, back-to-back surface strains on stringer flanges and back-to-back surface strains at the centers of the skin-bays. The analysis predictions were in good agreement with the test data up to post-buckling.

  11. Multicyclic jet-flap control for alleviation of helicopter blade stresses and fuselage vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccloud, J. L., III; Kretz, M.

    1974-01-01

    Results of wind tunnel tests of a 12-meter-diameter rotor utilizing multicyclic jet-flap control deflection are presented. Analyses of these results are shown, and experimental transfer functions are determined by which optimal control vectors are developed. These vectors are calculated to eliminate specific harmonic bending stresses, minimize rms levels (a measure of the peak-to-peak stresses), or minimize vertical vibratory loads that would be transmitted to the fuselage. Although the specific results and the ideal control vectors presented are for a specific jet-flap driven rotor, the method employed for the analyses is applicable to similar investigations. A discussion of possible alternative methods of multicyclic control by mechanical flaps or nonpropulsive jet-flaps is presented.

  12. General-purpose heat source development: Extended series test program SRB fragment/fuselage tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull, Theresa A.

    1989-06-01

    General-Purpose Heat Source radioisotope thermoelectric generators (GPHS-RTGs) will provide electrical power for the NASA Galileo and European Space Agency (ESA) Ulysses missions. Each GPHS-RTG comprises two major components: GPHS modules, which provide thermal energy, and a thermoelectric converter, which converts the thermal energy into electrical power. Each of the 18 GPHS modules in a GPHS-RTG contains four Pu-238O2-fueled capsules. LANL conducted a series of safety verification tests on the GPHS-RTG before the scheduled May 1986 launch of the Galileo spacecraft to assess the ability of the GPHS modules to contain plutonia in potential accident environments. As a result of the Challenger 51-L accident in January 1986, NASA postponed the launch of Galileo; the spacecraft launch vehicle was reconfigured and the spacecraft trajectory modified. These actions prompted NASA to reevaluate potential mission accidents and the extended series safety test program was initiated. This program included a series of solid rocket booster (SRB) fragment/fuselage tests that simulated the interaction of SRB fragments generated in an SRB motor case rupture (or resulting from a range safety officer SRB destruct action) with sections of the Shuttle Orbiter. The test data helped verify and refine the analytical models of the SRB fragment/fuselage interaction. The results showed that the fragment velocity decreased significantly (up to 40 percent) after penetrating the Orbiter section(s). The interactions also reduced, and in some cases eliminated, the original fragment rotational rate and direction and initiated rotation in other directions.

  13. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  14. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  15. Acoustic iridescence.

    PubMed

    Cox, Trevor J

    2011-03-01

    An investigation has been undertaken into acoustic iridescence, exploring how a device can be constructed which alter sound waves, in a similar way to structures in nature that act on light to produce optical iridescence. The main construction had many thin perforated sheets spaced half a wavelength apart for a specified design frequency. The sheets create the necessary impedance discontinuities to create backscattered waves, which then interfere to create strongly reflected sound at certain frequencies. Predictions and measurements show a set of harmonics, evenly spaced in frequency, for which sound is reflected strongly. And the frequency of these harmonics increases as the angle of observation gets larger, mimicking the iridescence seen in natural optical systems. Similar to optical systems, the reflections become weaker for oblique angles of reflection. A second construction was briefly examined which exploited a metamaterial made from elements and inclusions which were much smaller than the wavelength. Boundary element method predictions confirmed the potential for creating acoustic iridescence from layers of such a material.

  16. Acoustic cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.W.; Martin, R.A.; Radebaugh, R.

    1989-09-26

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintain a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K. 3 figs.

  17. Acoustic cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.W.; Martin, R.A.; Radebaugh, R.

    1990-09-04

    This patent describes an acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effect to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15--60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintain a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  18. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  19. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  20. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, L.; Andrew, M.; Bailey, M.; Beach, K.; Brayman, A.; Curra, F.; Kaczkowski, P.; Kargl, S.; Martin, R.; Vaezy, S.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past several years, the Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound (CIMU) at the Applied Physics Laboratory in the University of Washington has undertaken a broad research program in the general area of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Our principal emphasis has been on the use of HIFU to induce hemostasis; in particular, CIMU has sought to develop a small, lightweight, portable device that would use ultrasound for both imaging and therapy. Such a technology is needed because nearly 50% of combat casualty mortality results from exsanguinations, or uncontrolled bleeding. A similar percentage occurs for civilian death due to trauma. In this general review, a presentation of the general problem will be given, as well as our recent approaches to the development of an image-guided, transcutaneous, acoustic hemostasis device. [Work supported in part by the USAMRMC, ONR and the NIH.