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Sample records for fusion peptide mutant

  1. La Crosse virus (LACV) Gc fusion peptide mutants have impaired growth and fusion phenotypes, but remain neurotoxic

    SciTech Connect

    Soldan, Samantha S.; Hollidge, Bradley S.; Wagner, Valentina; Weber, Friedemann; Gonzalez-Scarano, Francisco

    2010-09-01

    La Crosse virus is a leading cause of pediatric encephalitis in the Midwestern United States and an emerging pathogen in the American South. The LACV glycoprotein Gc plays a critical role in entry as the virus attachment protein. A 22 amino acid hydrophobic region within Gc (1066-1087) was recently identified as the LACV fusion peptide. To further define the role of Gc (1066-1087) in virus entry, fusion, and neuropathogenesis, a panel of recombinant LACV (rLACV) fusion peptide mutant viruses was generated. Replication of mutant rLACVs was significantly reduced. In addition, the fusion peptide mutants demonstrated decreased fusion phenotypes relative to LACV-WT. Interestingly, these viruses maintained their ability to cause neuronal loss in culture, suggesting that the fusion peptide of LACV Gc is a determinant of properties associated with neuroinvasion (growth to high titer in muscle cells and a robust fusion phenotype), but not necessarily of neurovirulence.

  2. NMR structures of fusion peptide from influenza hemagglutinin H3 subtype and its mutants.

    PubMed

    Du, Tianpeng; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Maili

    2014-04-01

    The influenza fusion peptide located at the N-terminus of the hemagglutinin HA2 subunit initiates the fusing process of the viral membrane with the host cell endosomal membrane. It had been reported that the structure of a 20-residue H3 subtype fusion peptide (H3-HAfp20) was significantly different with that of a H1 subtype 23-residue one (H1-HAfp23). The sequential difference between the 12th and 15th residues of H1 and H3 subtypes could not fully explain the conformational variation. The first and last three amino acids of H3-HAfp23 involved in formation of hydrogen bonds may play an important role in fusion process. To confirm this hypothesis, we investigate the structures of H3-HAfp23 peptide and its mutants, G1S and G1V, in dodecylphosphatidyl choline micelles by using heteronuclear NMR technology. The results demonstrate that, similar to H1-HAfp23 but significantly different with H3-HAfp20, H3-HAfp23 also has tight helical hairpin structure with the N- and C-terminuses linked together because of the hydrogen bonds between Gly1 and the last three amino acids, Trp21―Tyr22―Gly23. Although the ‘hemifusion’ G1S and lethal G1V mutants have hairpin-like helical structures, the distances between the N- and C-terminuses are increased as shortage of the hydrogen bonds and the larger kink angle between the antiparallel helices. The paramagnetic ion titration experiments show that the terminuses are inserted into the dodecylphosphatidyl choline micelles used as solving media. These may imply that the tight helical hairpin structure, especially the closed conformation at terminus, plays an important role in fusion activity.

  3. Anti-synthetic peptide antibody reacting at the fusion junction of deletion-mutant epidermal growth factor receptors in human glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, P.A.; Zalutsky, M.R.; Fuller, G.N.; Archer, G.E.; Friedman, H.S.; Kwatra, M.M.; Bigner, S.H.; Bigner, D.D. ); Wong, A.J. ); Vogelstein, B. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors have investigated human gliomas that amplify and rearrange the epidermal growth factor receptor gene, with generation of an in-frame deletion mutation of 802 nucleotides in the external domain. This in-frame deletion mutation generates a local amino acid sequence at the fusion junction of what normally were distant polypeptide sequences in the intact epidermal growth factor receptor. This 14-amino acid peptide was chemically synthesized, coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, and used as an immunogen in rabbits. The elicited antibody reacted specifically with the fusion peptide in ELISA. The anti-fusion junction peptide antibody was purified by passage of the antiserum over a peptide affinity column with acidic elution. The purified antibody selectively bound the glioma deletion mutant as compared to the intact epidermal growth factor receptor as assessed by immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation with gel electrophoresis, and binding experiments using radioiodinated antibody. These data indicate that it is feasible to generate site-specific anti-peptide antibodies that are highly selective for mutant proteins in human tumors. The anti-peptide antibody described here, and other mutation site-specific antibodies, should be ideal candidates for tumor immunoimaging and immunotherapy.

  4. The dengue virus type 2 envelope protein fusion peptide is essential for membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Butrapet, Siritorn; Moss, Kelly J.; Childers, Thomas; Erb, Steven M.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Silengo, Shawn J.; Kinney, Richard M.; Blair, Carol D.; Roehrig, John T.

    2010-01-20

    The flaviviral envelope (E) protein directs virus-mediated membrane fusion. To investigate membrane fusion as a requirement for virus growth, we introduced 27 unique mutations into the fusion peptide of an infectious cDNA clone of dengue 2 virus and recovered seven stable mutant viruses. The fusion efficiency of the mutants was impaired, demonstrating for the first time the requirement for specific FP AAs in optimal fusion. Mutant viruses exhibited different growth kinetics and/or genetic stabilities in different cell types and adult mosquitoes. Virus particles could be recovered following RNA transfection of cells with four lethal mutants; however, recovered viruses could not re-infect cells. These viruses could enter cells, but internalized virus appeared to be retained in endosomal compartments of infected cells, thus suggesting a fusion blockade. Mutations of the FP also resulted in reduced virus reactivity with flavivirus group-reactive antibodies, confirming earlier reports using virus-like particles.

  5. Determination of the minimal fusion peptide of bovine leukemia virus gp30

    SciTech Connect

    Lorin, Aurelien; Lins, Laurence; Stroobant, Vincent; Brasseur, Robert . E-mail: brasseur.r@fsagx.ac.be; Charloteaux, Benoit

    2007-04-13

    In this study, we determined the minimal N-terminal fusion peptide of the gp30 of the bovine leukemia virus on the basis of the tilted peptide theory. We first used molecular modelling to predict that the gp30 minimal fusion peptide corresponds to the 15 first residues. Liposome lipid-mixing and leakage assays confirmed that the 15-residue long peptide induces fusion in vitro and that it is the shortest peptide inducing optimal fusion since longer peptides destabilize liposomes to the same extent but not shorter ones. The 15-residue long peptide can thus be considered as the minimal fusion peptide. The effect of mutations reported in the literature was also investigated. Interestingly, mutations related to glycoproteins unable to induce syncytia in cell-cell fusion assays correspond to peptides predicted as non-tilted. The relationship between obliquity and fusogenicity was also confirmed in vitro for one tilted and one non-tilted mutant peptide.

  6. Single residue deletions along the length of the influenza HA fusion peptide lead to inhibition of membrane fusion function

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, William A.; Thoennes, Sudha; Bradley, Konrad C.; Galloway, Summer E.; Talekar, Ganesh R.; Cummings, Sandra F.; Vareckova, Eva; Russell, Rupert J.; Steinhauer, David A.

    2009-11-25

    A panel of eight single amino acid deletion mutants was generated within the first 24 residues of the fusion peptide domain of the of the hemagglutinin (HA) of A/Aichi/2/68 influenza A virus (H3N2 subtype). The mutant HAs were analyzed for folding, cell surface transport, cleavage activation, capacity to undergo acid-induced conformational changes, and membrane fusion activity. We found that the mutant DELTAF24, at the C-terminal end of the fusion peptide, was expressed in a non-native conformation, whereas all other deletion mutants were transported to the cell surface and could be cleaved into HA1 and HA2 to activate membrane fusion potential. Furthermore, upon acidification these cleaved HAs were able to undergo the characteristic structural rearrangements that are required for fusion. Despite this, all mutants were inhibited for fusion activity based on two separate assays. The results indicate that the mutant fusion peptide domains associate with target membranes in a non-functional fashion, and suggest that structural features along the length of the fusion peptide are likely to be relevant for optimal membrane fusion activity.

  7. Constancy and diversity in the flavivirus fusion peptide

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    result of a survival advantage accompanying sequence diversity (quasispecies) involving the fusion peptide. Limited clinical data with yellow fever virus suggest that the presence of fusion peptide mutants is not associated with a decreased case fatality rate. The cell-fusing related agents may have substantial differences from other flaviviruses in their mechanism of viral entry into the host cell. PMID:18275613

  8. Side chain packing below the fusion peptide strongly modulates triggering of the Hendra virus F protein.

    PubMed

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2010-10-01

    Triggering of the Hendra virus fusion (F) protein is required to initiate the conformational changes which drive membrane fusion, but the factors which control triggering remain poorly understood. Mutation of a histidine predicted to lie near the fusion peptide to alanine greatly reduced fusion despite wild-type cell surface expression levels, while asparagine substitution resulted in a moderate restoration in fusion levels. Slowed kinetics of six-helix bundle formation, as judged by sensitivity to heptad repeat B-derived peptides, was observed for all H372 mutants. These data suggest that side chain packing beneath the fusion peptide is an important regulator of Hendra virus F triggering.

  9. Peptide and non-peptide HIV fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shibo; Zhao, Qian; Debnath, Asim K

    2002-01-01

    Fusion of the HIV envelope with the target cell membrane is a critical step of HIV entry into the target cell. The HIV envelope glycoprotein gp41 plays an important role in the fusion of viral and target cell membranes and serves as an attractive target for development of HIV fusion inhibitors. The extracellular domain of gp41 contains three important functional regions, i.e. fusion peptide (FP), N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR, respectively). The FP region is composed of hydrophobic, glycine-rich residues that are essential for the initial penetration of the target cell membrane. NHR and CHR regions consist of hydrophobic residues, which have the tendency to form alpha-helical coiled coils. During the process of fusion of HIV or HIV-infected cells with uninfected cells, FP inserts into the target cell membrane and subsequently the NHR and CHR regions change conformations and associate with each other to form a fusion-active gp41 core. Peptides derived from NHR and CHR regions, designated N- and C-peptides, respectively, have potent inhibitory activity against HIV fusion by binding to the CHR and NHR regions, respectively, to prevent the formation of the fusion-active gp41 core. C-peptide may also bind to FP, thereby blocking its insertion into the target cell membrane. One of the C-peptides, T-20, which is in the phase III clinical trials, has potent in vivo activity against HIV infection and is expected to become the first peptide HIV fusion inhibitory drug in the near future. However, this peptide HIV fusion inhibitor lacks oral availability and is sensitive to the proteolytic digestion. Therefore, it is essential to develop small molecular non-peptide HIV fusion inhibitors having a mechanism of action similar to the C-peptides. One of the approaches in identifying the inhibitors is to use an immunological assay to screen chemical libraries for the compounds that potentially block the interaction between the NHR and CHR regions to form a fusion

  10. Neutron diffraction studies of viral fusion peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Jeremy P.; J. M. Darkes, Malcolm; Katsaras, John; Epand, Richard M.

    2000-03-01

    Membrane fusion plays a vital role in a large and diverse number of essential biological processes. Despite this fact, the precise molecular events that occur during fusion are still not known. We are currently engaged on a study of membrane fusion as mediated by viral fusion peptides. These peptides are the N-terminal regions of certain viral envelope proteins that mediate the process of fusion between the viral envelope and the membranes of the host cell during the infection process. As part of this study, we have carried out neutron diffraction measurements at the ILL, BeNSC and Chalk River, on a range of viral fusion peptides. The peptides, from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), influenza A and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV), were incorporated into stacked phospholipid bilayers. Some of the peptides had been specifically deuterated at key amino acids. Lamellar diffraction data were collected and analysed to yield information on the peptide conformation, location and orientation relative to the bilayer.

  11. Sifuvirtide, a potent HIV fusion inhibitor peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rui-Rui; Yang, Liu-Meng; Wang, Yun-Hua; Pang, Wei; Tam, Siu-Cheung; Tien, Po; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2009-05-08

    Enfuvirtide (ENF) is currently the only FDA approved HIV fusion inhibitor in clinical use. Searching for more drugs in this category with higher efficacy and lower toxicity seems to be a logical next step. In line with this objective, a synthetic peptide with 36 amino acid residues, called Sifuvirtide (SFT), was designed based on the crystal structure of gp41. In this study, we show that SFT is a potent anti-HIV agent with relatively low cytotoxicity. SFT was found to inhibit replication of all tested HIV strains. The effective concentrations that inhibited 50% viral replication (EC{sub 50}), as determined in all tested strains, were either comparable or lower than benchmark values derived from well-known anti-HIV drugs like ENF or AZT, while the cytotoxic concentrations causing 50% cell death (CC{sub 50}) were relatively high, rendering it an ideal anti-HIV agent. A GST-pull down assay was performed to confirm that SFT is a fusion inhibitor. Furthermore, the activity of SFT on other targets in the HIV life cycle was also investigated, and all assays showed negative results. To further understand the mechanism of action of HIV peptide inhibitors, resistant variants of HIV-1{sub IIIB} were derived by serial virus passage in the presence of increasing doses of SFT or ENF. The results showed that there was cross-resistance between SFT and ENF. In conclusion, SFT is an ideal anti-HIV agent with high potency and low cytotoxicity, but may exhibit a certain extent of cross-resistance with ENF.

  12. Sifuvirtide, a potent HIV fusion inhibitor peptide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Rui; Yang, Liu-Meng; Wang, Yun-Hua; Pang, Wei; Tam, Siu-Cheung; Tien, Po; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2009-05-01

    Enfuvirtide (ENF) is currently the only FDA approved HIV fusion inhibitor in clinical use. Searching for more drugs in this category with higher efficacy and lower toxicity seems to be a logical next step. In line with this objective, a synthetic peptide with 36 amino acid residues, called Sifuvirtide (SFT), was designed based on the crystal structure of gp41. In this study, we show that SFT is a potent anti-HIV agent with relatively low cytotoxicity. SFT was found to inhibit replication of all tested HIV strains. The effective concentrations that inhibited 50% viral replication (EC(50)), as determined in all tested strains, were either comparable or lower than benchmark values derived from well-known anti-HIV drugs like ENF or AZT, while the cytotoxic concentrations causing 50% cell death (CC(50)) were relatively high, rendering it an ideal anti-HIV agent. A GST-pull down assay was performed to confirm that SFT is a fusion inhibitor. Furthermore, the activity of SFT on other targets in the HIV life cycle was also investigated, and all assays showed negative results. To further understand the mechanism of action of HIV peptide inhibitors, resistant variants of HIV-1(IIIB) were derived by serial virus passage in the presence of increasing doses of SFT or ENF. The results showed that there was cross-resistance between SFT and ENF. In conclusion, SFT is an ideal anti-HIV agent with high potency and low cytotoxicity, but may exhibit a certain extent of cross-resistance with ENF.

  13. Analysis of residues near the fusion peptide in the influenza hemagglutinin structure for roles in triggering membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Thoennes, Sudha; Li Zhunan; Lee, Byeong-Jae; Langley, William A.; Skehel, John J.; Russell, Rupert J.; Steinhauer, David A.

    2008-01-20

    Influenza virus entry occurs in endosomes, where acidification triggers irreversible conformational changes of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein (HA) that are required for membrane fusion. The acid-induced HA structural rearrangements have been well documented, and several models have been proposed to relate these to the process of membrane fusion. However, details regarding the role of specific residues in the initiation of structural rearrangements and membrane fusion are lacking. Here we report the results of studies on the HA of A/Aichi/2/68 virus (H3 subtype), in which mutants with changes at several ionizable residues in the vicinity of the 'fusion peptide' were analyzed for their effects on the pH at which conformational changes and membrane fusion occur. A variety of phenotypes was obtained, including examples of substitutions that lead to an increase in HA stability at reduced pH. Of particular note was the observation that a histidine to tyrosine substitution at HA1 position 17 resulted in a decrease in pH at which HA structural changes and membrane fusion take place by 0.3 relative to WT. The results are discussed in relation to possible mechanisms by which HA structural rearrangements are initiated at low pH and clade-specific differences near the fusion peptide.

  14. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries as driving force for HIV fusion peptide-mediated fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2016-04-01

    Lipids and proteins are organized in cellular membranes in clusters, often called `lipid rafts'. Although raft-constituent ordered lipid domains are thought to be energetically unfavourable for membrane fusion, rafts have long been implicated in many biological fusion processes. For the case of HIV gp41-mediated membrane fusion, this apparent contradiction can be resolved by recognizing that the interfaces between ordered and disordered lipid domains are the predominant sites of fusion. Here we show that line tension at lipid domain boundaries contributes significant energy to drive gp41-fusion peptide-mediated fusion. This energy, which depends on the hydrophobic mismatch between ordered and disordered lipid domains, may contribute tens of kBT to fusion, that is, it is comparable to the energy required to form a lipid stalk intermediate. Line-active compounds such as vitamin E lower line tension in inhomogeneous membranes, thereby inhibit membrane fusion, and thus may be useful natural viral entry inhibitors.

  15. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries as driving force for HIV fusion peptide-mediated fusion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K

    2016-01-01

    Lipids and proteins are organized in cellular membranes in clusters, often called 'lipid rafts'. Although raft-constituent ordered lipid domains are thought to be energetically unfavourable for membrane fusion, rafts have long been implicated in many biological fusion processes. For the case of HIV gp41-mediated membrane fusion, this apparent contradiction can be resolved by recognizing that the interfaces between ordered and disordered lipid domains are the predominant sites of fusion. Here we show that line tension at lipid domain boundaries contributes significant energy to drive gp41-fusion peptide-mediated fusion. This energy, which depends on the hydrophobic mismatch between ordered and disordered lipid domains, may contribute tens of kBT to fusion, that is, it is comparable to the energy required to form a lipid stalk intermediate. Line-active compounds such as vitamin E lower line tension in inhomogeneous membranes, thereby inhibit membrane fusion, and thus may be useful natural viral entry inhibitors. PMID:27113279

  16. A neutron study of the feline leukaemia virus fusion peptide: Implications for biological fusion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Sarah M. A.; Darkes, Malcolm J. M.; Bradshaw, Jeremy P.

    Neutron diffraction studies were performed on stacked phospholipid bilayers to determine the effects of the feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) fusion peptide on membrane structure. Bilayers were composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with 50% (mol) dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol. Neutron scattering profiles with peptide present showed an increase in scattering density in the lipid-tails region, whilst scattering by the lipid headgroup region was decreased. This is interpreted as a lowering of the packing density of the lipid headgroups and an increase in the packing density of the lipid tails. Modelling studies and experimental evidence have suggested that fusion peptides catalyse fusion by increasing the negative curvature of the target membrane's outer monolayer. Our results presented here add support to this hypothesis for the fusion mechanism. The 2H 2O scattering profile was also slightly perturbed in the lipid headgroup region with 1% (mol)FeLV fusion peptide present. The FeLV peptide had no significant effect on the organisation of bilayers containing only dioleoylphosphatidylcholine.

  17. Characterizing the Conformational Landscape of Flavivirus Fusion Peptides via Simulation and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Marzinek, Jan K.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Goh, Eunice; Huber, Roland G.; Panzade, Sadhana; Verma, Chandra; Bond, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Conformational changes in the envelope proteins of flaviviruses help to expose the highly conserved fusion peptide (FP), a region which is critical to membrane fusion and host cell infection, and which represents a significant target for antiviral drugs and antibodies. In principle, extended timescale atomic-resolution simulations may be used to characterize the dynamics of such peptides. However, the resultant accuracy is critically dependent upon both the underlying force field and sufficient conformational sampling. In the present study, we report a comprehensive comparison of three simulation methods and four force fields comprising a total of more than 40 μs of sampling. Additionally, we describe the conformational landscape of the FP fold across all flavivirus family members. All investigated methods sampled conformations close to available X-ray structures, but exhibited differently populated ensembles. The best force field / sampling combination was sufficiently accurate to predict that the solvated peptide fold is less ordered than in the crystallographic state, which was subsequently confirmed via circular dichroism and spectrofluorometric measurements. Finally, the conformational landscape of a mutant incapable of membrane fusion was significantly shallower than wild-type variants, suggesting that dynamics should be considered when therapeutically targeting FP epitopes. PMID:26785994

  18. Characterizing the Conformational Landscape of Flavivirus Fusion Peptides via Simulation and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Marzinek, Jan K; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Goh, Eunice; Huber, Roland G; Panzade, Sadhana; Verma, Chandra; Bond, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Conformational changes in the envelope proteins of flaviviruses help to expose the highly conserved fusion peptide (FP), a region which is critical to membrane fusion and host cell infection, and which represents a significant target for antiviral drugs and antibodies. In principle, extended timescale atomic-resolution simulations may be used to characterize the dynamics of such peptides. However, the resultant accuracy is critically dependent upon both the underlying force field and sufficient conformational sampling. In the present study, we report a comprehensive comparison of three simulation methods and four force fields comprising a total of more than 40 μs of sampling. Additionally, we describe the conformational landscape of the FP fold across all flavivirus family members. All investigated methods sampled conformations close to available X-ray structures, but exhibited differently populated ensembles. The best force field / sampling combination was sufficiently accurate to predict that the solvated peptide fold is less ordered than in the crystallographic state, which was subsequently confirmed via circular dichroism and spectrofluorometric measurements. Finally, the conformational landscape of a mutant incapable of membrane fusion was significantly shallower than wild-type variants, suggesting that dynamics should be considered when therapeutically targeting FP epitopes. PMID:26785994

  19. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins via Fusion Peptides in Intact Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kiaw Kiaw; Motoda, Yoko; Watanabe, Satoru; Sofiman Othman, Ahmad; Kigawa, Takanori; Kodama, Yutaka; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    In current plant biotechnology, the introduction of exogenous DNA encoding desired traits is the most common approach used to modify plants. However, general plant transformation methods can cause random integration of exogenous DNA into the plant genome. To avoid these events, alternative methods, such as a direct protein delivery system, are needed to modify the plant. Although there have been reports of the delivery of proteins into cultured plant cells, there are currently no methods for the direct delivery of proteins into intact plants, owing to their hierarchical structures. Here, we demonstrate the efficient fusion-peptide-based delivery of proteins into intact Arabidopsis thaliana. Bovine serum albumin (BSA, 66 kDa) was selected as a model protein to optimize conditions for delivery into the cytosol. The general applicability of our method to large protein cargo was also demonstrated by the delivery of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, 150 kDa) into the cytosol. The compatibility of the fusion peptide system with the delivery of proteins to specific cellular organelles was also demonstrated using the fluorescent protein Citrine (27 kDa) conjugated to either a nuclear localization signal (NLS) or a peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS). In conclusion, our designed fusion peptide system can deliver proteins with a wide range of molecular weights (27 to 150 kDa) into the cells of intact A. thaliana without interfering with the organelle-targeting peptide conjugated to the protein. We expect that this efficient protein delivery system will be a powerful tool in plant biotechnology. PMID:27100681

  20. Structural characterizations of fusion peptide analogs of influenza virus hemagglutinin. Implication of the necessity of a helix-hinge-helix motif in fusion activity.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chun-Hua; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Chang, Ding-Kwo; Chen, Chinpan

    2002-06-21

    Infection by enveloped viruses initially involves membrane fusion between viral and host cell membranes. The fusion peptide plays a crucial role in triggering this reaction. To clarify how the fusion peptide exerts this specific function, we carried out biophysical studies of three fusion peptide analogs of influenza virus hemagglutinin HA2, namely E5, G13L, and L17A. E5 exhibits an activity similar to the native fusion peptide, whereas G13L and L17A, which are two point mutants of the E5 analog, possess much less fusion activity. Our CD data showed that the conformations of these three analogs in SDS micelles are pH-dependent, with higher alpha-helical contents at acidic pH. Tryptophan fluorescence emission experiments indicated that these three analogs insert deeper into lipid bilayers at acidic pH. The three-dimensional structure of the E5 analog in SDS micelles at pH 4.0 revealed that two segments, Leu(2)-Glu(11) and Trp(14)-Ile(18), form amphipathic helical conformations, with Gly(12)-Gly(13) forming a hinge. The hydrophobic residues in the N- and C-terminal helices form a hydrophobic cluster. At neutral pH, however, the C-terminal helix of Trp(14)-Ile(18) reduces dramatically, and the hydrophobic core observed at acidic pH is severely disrupted. We suggest that the disruption of the C-terminal helix renders the E5 analog fusion-inactive at neutral pH. Furthermore, the decrease of the hinge and the reduction of fusion activity in G13L reveal the importance of the hinge in fusion activity. Also, the decrease in the C-terminal helix and the reduction of fusion activity in L17A demonstrates the importance of the C-terminal helix in fusion activity. Based on these biophysical studies, we propose a model that illustrates the structural change of the HA2 fusion peptide analog and explains how the analog interacts with the lipid bilayer at different pH values.

  1. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries as driving force for HIV fusion peptide-mediated fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2016-01-01

    Lipids and proteins are organized in cellular membranes in clusters, often called ‘lipid rafts'. Although raft-constituent ordered lipid domains are thought to be energetically unfavourable for membrane fusion, rafts have long been implicated in many biological fusion processes. For the case of HIV gp41-mediated membrane fusion, this apparent contradiction can be resolved by recognizing that the interfaces between ordered and disordered lipid domains are the predominant sites of fusion. Here we show that line tension at lipid domain boundaries contributes significant energy to drive gp41-fusion peptide-mediated fusion. This energy, which depends on the hydrophobic mismatch between ordered and disordered lipid domains, may contribute tens of kBT to fusion, that is, it is comparable to the energy required to form a lipid stalk intermediate. Line-active compounds such as vitamin E lower line tension in inhomogeneous membranes, thereby inhibit membrane fusion, and thus may be useful natural viral entry inhibitors. PMID:27113279

  2. Heptad repeat 2-based peptides inhibit avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup a infection and identify a fusion intermediate.

    PubMed

    Netter, Robert C; Amberg, Sean M; Balliet, John W; Biscone, Mark J; Vermeulen, Arwen; Earp, Laurie J; White, Judith M; Bates, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Fusion proteins of enveloped viruses categorized as class I are typified by two distinct heptad repeat domains within the transmembrane subunit. These repeats are important structural elements that assemble into the six-helix bundles characteristic of the fusion-activated envelope trimer. Peptides derived from these domains can be potent and specific inhibitors of membrane fusion and virus infection. To facilitate our understanding of retroviral entry, peptides corresponding to the two heptad repeat domains of the avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A (ASLV-A) TM subunit of the envelope protein were characterized. Two peptides corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat (HR2), offset from one another by three residues, were effective inhibitors of infection, while two overlapping peptides derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (HR1) were not. Analysis of envelope mutants containing substitutions within the HR1 domain revealed that a single amino acid change, L62A, significantly reduced sensitivity to peptide inhibition. Virus bound to cells at 4 degrees C became sensitive to peptide within the first 5 min of elevating the temperature to 37 degrees C and lost sensitivity to peptide after 15 to 30 min, consistent with a transient intermediate in which the peptide binding site is exposed. In cell-cell fusion experiments, peptide inhibitor sensitivity occurred prior to a fusion-enhancing low-pH pulse. Soluble receptor for ASLV-A induces a lipophilic character in the envelope which can be measured by stable liposome binding, and this activation was found to be unaffected by inhibitory HR2 peptide. Finally, receptor-triggered conformational changes in the TM subunit were also found to be unaffected by inhibitory peptide. These changes are marked by a dramatic shift in mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, from a subunit of 37 kDa to a complex of about 80 kDa. Biotinylated HR2 peptide bound specifically to the 80-kDa complex

  3. Fusion peptide of HIV-1 as a site of vulnerability to neutralizing antibody.

    PubMed

    Kong, Rui; Xu, Kai; Zhou, Tongqing; Acharya, Priyamvada; Lemmin, Thomas; Liu, Kevin; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Soto, Cinque; Taft, Justin D; Bailer, Robert T; Cale, Evan M; Chen, Lei; Choi, Chang W; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Gorman, Jason; Huang, Jinghe; Joyce, M Gordon; Louder, Mark K; Ma, Xiaochu; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Pancera, Marie; Yang, Yongping; Blanchard, Scott C; Mothes, Walther; Burton, Dennis R; Koff, Wayne C; Connors, Mark; Ward, Andrew B; Kwong, Peter D; Mascola, John R

    2016-05-13

    The HIV-1 fusion peptide, comprising 15 to 20 hydrophobic residues at the N terminus of the Env-gp41 subunit, is a critical component of the virus-cell entry machinery. Here, we report the identification of a neutralizing antibody, N123-VRC34.01, which targets the fusion peptide and blocks viral entry by inhibiting conformational changes in gp120 and gp41 subunits of Env required for entry. Crystal structures of N123-VRC34.01 liganded to the fusion peptide, and to the full Env trimer, revealed an epitope consisting of the N-terminal eight residues of the gp41 fusion peptide and glycan N88 of gp120, and molecular dynamics showed that the N-terminal portion of the fusion peptide can be solvent-exposed. These results reveal the fusion peptide to be a neutralizing antibody epitope and thus a target for vaccine design. PMID:27174988

  4. A Peptide Permease Mutant of Mycobacterium bovis BCG Resistant to the Toxic Peptides Glutathione and S-Nitrosoglutathione

    PubMed Central

    Green, Renee M.; Seth, Anjali; Connell, Nancy D.

    2000-01-01

    Oligopeptides play important roles in bacterial nutrition and signaling. Using sequences from the available genome database for Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, the oligopeptide permease operon (oppBCDA) of Mycobacterium bovis BCG was cloned from a cosmid library. An opp mutant strain was constructed by homologous recombination with an allele of oppD interrupted by kanamycin and streptomycin resistance markers. The deletion was complemented with a wild-type copy of the opp operon. Two approaches were taken to characterize the peptide transporter defect in this mutant strain. First, growth of wild-type and mutant strains was monitored in media containing a wide variety of peptides as sole source of carbon and/or nitrogen. Among 25 peptides ranging from two to six amino acids in length, none was capable of supporting measurable growth as the sole carbon source in either wild-type or mutant strains. The second approach exploited the resistance of permease mutants to toxic substrates. The tripeptide glutathione (γ-glutamyl-l-cyteinylglycine [GSH]) is toxic to wild-type BCG and was used successfully to characterize peptide uptake in the opp mutant. In 2 mM GSH, growth of the wild-type strain is inhibited, whereas the opp mutant is resistant to concentrations as high as 10 mM. Similar results were found with the tripeptide S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), thought to be a donor of NO in mammalian cells. Using incorporation of [3H]uracil to monitor the effects of GSH and GSNO on macromolecular synthesis in growing cells, it was demonstrated that the opp mutant is resistant, whereas the wild type and the mutant complemented with a wild-type copy of the operon are sensitive to both tripeptides. In uptake measurements, incorporation of [3H]GSH is reduced in the mutant compared with wild type and the complemented mutant. Finally, growth of the three strains in the tripeptides suggests that GSH is bacteriostatic, whereas GSNO is bacteriocidal. PMID:10639400

  5. The immunogenicity of MUC1 peptides and fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Apostolopoulos, V; Pietersz, G A; Xing, P X; Lees, C J; Michael, M; Bishop, J; McKenzie, I F

    1995-03-23

    Mucin 1 (MUC1) is highly expressed in breast cancer, has an ubiquitous distribution and, due to altered glycosylation, peptides within the VNTR are exposed. These peptides are the target for anti-MUC1 antibodies, which give a differential reaction on cancer compared with normal tissue. The amino acids, APDTR or adjacent amino acids, are highly immunogenic in mice for antibody production (after immunisation with either breast cancer cells, human milk fat globule (HMFG) or the VNTR peptide). In addition, human studies show that this region of the MUC1 VNTR functions as target epitopes for cytotoxic T cells. We have performed preclinical and clinical studies to examine the immune responses to MUC1 in mice and humans: (a) MUC1+ 3T3 or P815+ 3T3 cells in syngeneic mice are rejected, with the generation of both cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and DTH responses and a weak antibody response and a weak antibody responses; this type of immunity gives rise to total resistance to re-challenge with high doses of these tumors; (b) immunisation with peptides (VNTR x 2), a fusion protein (VNTR x 5), or HMFG leads to no CTLs, DTH, good antibody production and weak tumour protection (to 10(6) cells, but not 5 x 10(6) cells) (possibly a TH2 type response); (c) immunisation with mannan-fusion protein (MFP) gives rise to good protection (resistance to 50 x 10(6) cells), CTL and DTH responses and weak antibody responses (possibly a TH1 type response, similar in magnitude to that obtained after tumor rejection); (d) established tumors can be rapidly rejected by delayed treatment of MFP; (e) the CTL responses are MHC restricted (in contrast to the human studies); (f) APDTR appears not to be the T cell reactive epitope in mice. On the basis of these findings, two clinical trials are in progress: (a) VNTR x 2 (diphtheria toxoid) which gives rise to some T cell proliferation, DTH and antibody responses in some patients and (b) an MFP trial. The ability to alter the immune response towards

  6. Enhancement of yellow pigment production by intraspecific protoplast fusion of Monascus spp. yellow mutant (ade(-)) and white mutant (prototroph).

    PubMed

    Klinsupa, Worawan; Phansiri, Salak; Thongpradis, Panida; Yongsmith, Busaba; Pothiratana, Chetsada

    2016-01-10

    To breed industrially useful strains of a slow-growing, yellow pigment producing strain of Monascus sp., protoplasts of Monascus purpureus yellow mutant (ade(-)) and rapid-growing M. purpureus white mutant (prototroph) were fused and fusants were selected on minimal medium (MM). Preliminary conventional protoplast fusion of the two strains was performed and the result showed that only white colonies were detected on MM. It was not able to differentiate the fusants from the white parental prototroph. To solve this problem, the white parental prototroph was thus pretreated with 20mM iodoacetamide (IOA) for cytoplasm inactivation and subsequently taken into protoplast fusion with slow-growing Monascus yellow mutant. Under this development technique, only the fusants, with viable cytoplasm from Monascus yellow mutant (ade(-)), could thus grow on MM, whereas neither IOA pretreated white parental prototroph nor yellow auxotroph (ade(-)) could survive. Fifty-three fusants isolated from yellow colonies obtained through this developed technique were subsequently inoculated on complete medium (MY agar). Fifteen distinguished yellow colonies from their parental yellow mutant were then selected for biochemical, morphological and fermentative properties in cassava starch and soybean flour (SS) broth. Finally, three most stable fusants (F7, F10 and F43) were then selected and compared in rice solid culture. Enhancement of yellow pigment production over the parental yellow auxotroph was found in F7 and F10, while enhanced glucoamylase activity was found in F43. The formation of fusants was further confirmed by monacolin K content, which was intermediate between the two parents (monacolin K-producing yellow auxotroph and non-monacolin K producing white prototroph). PMID:26562446

  7. Enhancement of yellow pigment production by intraspecific protoplast fusion of Monascus spp. yellow mutant (ade(-)) and white mutant (prototroph).

    PubMed

    Klinsupa, Worawan; Phansiri, Salak; Thongpradis, Panida; Yongsmith, Busaba; Pothiratana, Chetsada

    2016-01-10

    To breed industrially useful strains of a slow-growing, yellow pigment producing strain of Monascus sp., protoplasts of Monascus purpureus yellow mutant (ade(-)) and rapid-growing M. purpureus white mutant (prototroph) were fused and fusants were selected on minimal medium (MM). Preliminary conventional protoplast fusion of the two strains was performed and the result showed that only white colonies were detected on MM. It was not able to differentiate the fusants from the white parental prototroph. To solve this problem, the white parental prototroph was thus pretreated with 20mM iodoacetamide (IOA) for cytoplasm inactivation and subsequently taken into protoplast fusion with slow-growing Monascus yellow mutant. Under this development technique, only the fusants, with viable cytoplasm from Monascus yellow mutant (ade(-)), could thus grow on MM, whereas neither IOA pretreated white parental prototroph nor yellow auxotroph (ade(-)) could survive. Fifty-three fusants isolated from yellow colonies obtained through this developed technique were subsequently inoculated on complete medium (MY agar). Fifteen distinguished yellow colonies from their parental yellow mutant were then selected for biochemical, morphological and fermentative properties in cassava starch and soybean flour (SS) broth. Finally, three most stable fusants (F7, F10 and F43) were then selected and compared in rice solid culture. Enhancement of yellow pigment production over the parental yellow auxotroph was found in F7 and F10, while enhanced glucoamylase activity was found in F43. The formation of fusants was further confirmed by monacolin K content, which was intermediate between the two parents (monacolin K-producing yellow auxotroph and non-monacolin K producing white prototroph).

  8. Fusing simulation and experiment: The effect of mutations on the structure and activity of the influenza fusion peptide

    PubMed Central

    Lousa, Diana; Pinto, Antónia R. T.; Victor, Bruno L.; Laio, Alessandro; Veiga, Ana S.; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Soares, Cláudio M.

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, the influenza fusion peptide (FP) inserts into the host membrane, playing a crucial role in the fusion process between the viral and host membranes. In this work we used a combination of simulation and experimental techniques to analyse the molecular details of this process, which are largely unknown. Although the FP structure has been obtained by NMR in detergent micelles, there is no atomic structure information in membranes. To answer this question, we performed bias-exchange metadynamics (BE-META) simulations, which showed that the lowest energy states of the membrane-inserted FP correspond to helical-hairpin conformations similar to that observed in micelles. BE-META simulations of the G1V, W14A, G12A/G13A and G4A/G8A/G16A/G20A mutants revealed that all the mutations affect the peptide’s free energy landscape. A FRET-based analysis showed that all the mutants had a reduced fusogenic activity relative to the WT, in particular the mutants G12A/G13A and G4A/G8A/G16A/G20A. According to our results, one of the major causes of the lower activity of these mutants is their lower membrane affinity, which results in a lower concentration of peptide in the bilayer. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the influenza fusion process and open new routes for future studies. PMID:27302370

  9. Generation of New M2e-HA2 Fusion Chimeric Peptide to Development of a Recombinant Fusion Protein Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ameghi, Ali; Baradaran, Behzad; Aghaiypour, Khosrow; Barzegar, Abolfazl; Pilehvar-Soltanahmadi, Yones; Moghadampour, Masood; Taghizadeh, Morteza; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to design a new construction containing influenza virus (H1N1) M2e gene and HA2 gene by bioinformatics approach, cloning the construct in to Escherichia coli and produce M2e-HA2 peptide. Methods: The procedure was done by virus cultivation in SPF eggs, hemagglutination assay (HA), RNA isolation, RT-PCR, primers designed (DNAMAN 4 and Oligo7), virtual fusion construction translation (ExPASy), N-Glycosylated sites prediction (Ensemblegly-Iowa), complete open reading frame (ORF), stop codon studied (NCBI ORF Finder), rare codon determination (GenScript), Solvent accessibility of epitopes (Swiss-PdbViewer), antigenic sites prediction (Protean), fusion PCR of M2e-HA2 gene, sequence analysis, nested PCR, gel electrophoresis, double digestion of pET22b(+) plasmid and the fusion construct, ligation of them, transformation of the ligated vector (pET22b-M2e-HA2) to E.coli (BL21), mass culture the cloned bacterium ,induction the expression by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG), sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), purification the fusion peptide by Ni-NTA column, western blot to verify the purification. Results: In this study we developed a new approach for fusion of Influenza virus M2e (96 nucleotides) and HA2 (663 nucleotides) genes based on fusion PCR strategy and produced a fused fragment with 793 nucleotides. The construct was successfully cloned and expressed. Conclusion: This construct is a 261 amino acid chimeric fusion peptide with about 30 KD molecular weight. According on the latest information; this is the first case of expression and purification M2e-HA2 fusion chimeric peptide, which could be used for development of a recombinant M2e-HA2 fusion protein vaccine. PMID:26793615

  10. Cancer therapeutic approach based on conformational stabilization of mutant p53 protein by small peptides

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Perry; Eizenberger, Shay; Cohen, Elad; Goldfinger, Naomi; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Oren, Moshe; Rotter, Varda

    2016-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor serves as a major barrier against malignant transformation. Over 50% of tumors inactivate p53 by point mutations in its DNA binding domain. Most mutations destabilize p53 protein folding, causing its partial denaturation at physiological temperature. Thus a high proportion of human tumors overexpress a potential potent tumor suppressor in a non-functional, misfolded form. The equilibrium between the properly folded and misfolded states of p53 may be affected by molecules that interact with p53, stabilizing its native folding and restoring wild type p53 activity to cancer cells. To select for mutant p53 (mutp53) reactivating peptides, we adopted the phage display technology, allowing interactions between mutp53 and random peptide libraries presented on phages and enriching for phage that favor the correctly folded p53 conformation. We obtained a large database of potential reactivating peptides. Lead peptides were synthesized and analyzed for their ability to restore proper p53 folding and activity. Remarkably, many enriched peptides corresponded to known p53-binding proteins, including RAD9. Importantly, lead peptides elicited dramatic regression of aggressive tumors in mouse xenograft models. Such peptides might serve as novel agents for human cancer therapy. PMID:26943582

  11. [Expression and adjuvant effects of the fusion peptide TBP5].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Guo, Xiangling; Li, Xiaokang; Wu, Tingcai; Li, Deyuan; Chen, Puyan

    2015-05-01

    Thymopentin (TP5) and bursopentin (BP5) are both immunopotentiators. To explore whether the TP5-BP5 fusion peptide (TBP5) has adjuvant activity or not, we cloned the TBP5 gene and confirmed that the TBP5 gene in a recombinant prokaryotic expression plasmid was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. TBP5 significantly promoted the proliferation of thymic and splenic lymphocytes of mice. The potential adjuvant activity of the TBP5 was examined in mice by coinjecting TBP5 and H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) inactivated vaccine. HI antibody titers, HA antibodies and cytokines levels (IL-4 and IFN-γ) were determined. We found that TBP5 markedly elevated serum HI titers and HA antibody levels, induced the secretion of both IL-4 and IFN-γ cytokines. Furthermore, virus challenge experiments confirmed that TBP5 contributed to inhibition replication of the virus [H9N2 AIV (A/chicken/Jiangsu/NJ07/05)] from mouse lungs. Altogether, these findings suggest that TBP5 may be an effective adjuvant for avian vaccine and that this study provides a reference for further research on new vaccine adjuvants. PMID:26571686

  12. BCR-ABL fusion peptides and cytotoxic T cells in chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Clark, R E; Christmas, S E

    2001-01-01

    The BCR-ABL gene that arises in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a neoantigen. Peptides derived from the BCR-ABL fusion junction may therefore be immunogenic, if appropriately presented to the immune system. This article reviews data demonstrating that certain junctional peptides will bind to HLA molecules, and that these peptides will elicit specific T-lymphocyte responses in vitro, in both normal subjects and in CML patients. The clinical relevance of these observations is discussed.

  13. Stability of Iowa mutant and wild type Aβ-peptide aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alred, Erik J.; Scheele, Emily G.; Berhanu, Workalemahu M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2014-11-01

    Recent experiments indicate a connection between the structure of amyloid aggregates and their cytotoxicity as related to neurodegenerative diseases. Of particular interest is the Iowa Mutant, which causes early-onset of Alzheimer's disease. While wild-type Amyloid β-peptides form only parallel beta-sheet aggregates, the mutant also forms meta-stable antiparallel beta sheets. Since these structural variations may cause the difference in the pathological effects of the two Aβ-peptides, we have studied in silico the relative stability of the wild type and Iowa mutant in both parallel and antiparallel forms. We compare regular molecular dynamics simulations with such where the viscosity of the samples is reduced, which, we show, leads to higher sampling efficiency. By analyzing and comparing these four sets of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we probe the role of the various factors that could lead to the structural differences. Our analysis indicates that the parallel forms of both wild type and Iowa mutant aggregates are stable, while the antiparallel aggregates are meta-stable for the Iowa mutant and not stable for the wild type. The differences result from the direct alignment of hydrophobic interactions in the in-register parallel oligomers, making them more stable than the antiparallel aggregates. The slightly higher thermodynamic stability of the Iowa mutant fibril-like oligomers in its parallel organization over that in antiparallel form is supported by previous experimental measurements showing slow inter-conversion of antiparallel aggregates into parallel ones. Knowledge of the mechanism that selects between parallel and antiparallel conformations and determines their relative stability may open new avenues for the development of therapies targeting familial forms of early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Comparative simulation studies of native and single-site mutant human beta-defensin-1 peptides.

    PubMed

    Toubar, Rabab A; Zhmurov, Artem; Barsegov, Valeri; Marx, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    Human defensins play important roles in a broad range of biological functions, such as microbial defense and immunity. Yet, little is known about their molecular properties, i.e. secondary structure stability, structural variability, important side chain interactions, surface charge distribution, and resistance to thermal fluctuations, and how these properties are related to their functions. To assess these factors, we studied the native human β-defensin-1 monomer and dimer as well as several single-site mutants using molecular dynamics simulations. The results showed that disulfide bonds are important determinants in maintaining the defensins' structural integrity, as no structural transitions were observed at 300 K and only minor structural unfolding was detected upon heating to 500 K. The α-helix was less thermally stable than the core β-sheet structure held together by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The monomer α-helix stability was directly correlated, whereas the end-to-end distance was inversely correlated to the experimentally measured β-defensin-1 chemotactic activity, in the order: mutant 2 (Gln24Glu) > mutant 3 (Lys31Ala) = wild type > mutant 1 (Asn4Ala). The structural stability of the β-defensin-1 dimer species exhibited an inverse correlation to their chemotactic activity. In dimers formed by mutants 2 and 3, we observed sliding of one monomer upon the surface of the other in the absence of unbinding. This dynamic sliding feature may enhance the molecular oligomerization of β-defensin-1 peptides contributing to their antibacterial activity. It could also help these peptides orient correctly in the CC chemokine receptor 6 binding site, thereby initiating their chemotactic activity. In agreement with this notion, the remarkable sliding behavior was observed only for the mutants with the highest chemotactic activity.

  15. Stability of Iowa mutant and wild type Aβ-peptide aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Alred, Erik J.; Scheele, Emily G.; Berhanu, Workalemahu M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2014-11-07

    Recent experiments indicate a connection between the structure of amyloid aggregates and their cytotoxicity as related to neurodegenerative diseases. Of particular interest is the Iowa Mutant, which causes early-onset of Alzheimer's disease. While wild-type Amyloid β-peptides form only parallel beta-sheet aggregates, the mutant also forms meta-stable antiparallel beta sheets. Since these structural variations may cause the difference in the pathological effects of the two Aβ-peptides, we have studied in silico the relative stability of the wild type and Iowa mutant in both parallel and antiparallel forms. We compare regular molecular dynamics simulations with such where the viscosity of the samples is reduced, which, we show, leads to higher sampling efficiency. By analyzing and comparing these four sets of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we probe the role of the various factors that could lead to the structural differences. Our analysis indicates that the parallel forms of both wild type and Iowa mutant aggregates are stable, while the antiparallel aggregates are meta-stable for the Iowa mutant and not stable for the wild type. The differences result from the direct alignment of hydrophobic interactions in the in-register parallel oligomers, making them more stable than the antiparallel aggregates. The slightly higher thermodynamic stability of the Iowa mutant fibril-like oligomers in its parallel organization over that in antiparallel form is supported by previous experimental measurements showing slow inter-conversion of antiparallel aggregates into parallel ones. Knowledge of the mechanism that selects between parallel and antiparallel conformations and determines their relative stability may open new avenues for the development of therapies targeting familial forms of early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Inhibition of Sendai virus fusion with phospholipid vesicles and human erythrocyte membranes by hydrophobic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, D.R.; Flanagan, T.D.; Young, J.E.; Yeagle, P.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Hydrophobic di- and tripeptides which are capable of inhibiting enveloped virus infection of cells are also capable of inhibiting at least three different types of membrane fusion events. Large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of N-methyl dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (N-methyl DOPE), containing encapsulated 1-aminonaphthalene-3,6,8-trisulfonic acid (ANTS) and/or p-xylene bis(pyridinium bromide) (DPX), were formed by extrusion. Vesicle fusion and leakage were then monitored with the ANTS/DPX fluorescence assay. Sendai virus fusion with lipid vesicles and Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes were measured by following the relief of fluorescence quenching of virus labeled with octadecylrhodamine B chloride (R18). This study found that the effectiveness of the peptides carbobenzoxy-L-Phe-L-Phe (Z-L-Phe-L-Phe), Z-L-Phe, Z-D-Phe, and Z-Gly-L-Phe-L-Phe in inhibiting N-methyl DOPE LUV fusion or fusion of virus with N-methyl DOPE LUV also paralleled their reported ability to block viral infectivity. Furthermore, Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly and Z-Gly-L-Phe inhibited Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes with the same relative potency with which they inhibited vesicle-vesicle and virus-vesicle fusion. The evidence suggests a mechanism by which these peptides exert their inhibition of plaque formation by enveloped viruses. This class of inhibitors apparently acts by inhibiting fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane, thereby preventing viral infection. The physical pathway by which these peptides inhibit membrane fusion was investigated. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of proposed intermediates in the pathway for membrane fusion in LUV revealed that the potent fusion inhibitor Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly selectively altered the structure (or dynamics) of the hypothesized fusion intermediates and that the poor inhibitor Z-Gly-L-Phe did not.

  17. Inhibition of the Hantavirus Fusion Process by Predicted Domain III and Stem Peptides from Glycoprotein Gc

    PubMed Central

    Barriga, Gonzalo P.; Villalón-Letelier, Fernando; Márquez, Chantal L.; Bignon, Eduardo A.; Acuña, Rodrigo; Ross, Breyan H.; Monasterio, Octavio; Mardones, Gonzalo A.; Vidal, Simon E.; Tischler, Nicole D.

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses can cause hantavirus pulmonary syndrome or hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans. To enter cells, hantaviruses fuse their envelope membrane with host cell membranes. Previously, we have shown that the Gc envelope glycoprotein is the viral fusion protein sharing characteristics with class II fusion proteins. The ectodomain of class II fusion proteins is composed of three domains connected by a stem region to a transmembrane anchor in the viral envelope. These fusion proteins can be inhibited through exogenous fusion protein fragments spanning domain III (DIII) and the stem region. Such fragments are thought to interact with the core of the fusion protein trimer during the transition from its pre-fusion to its post-fusion conformation. Based on our previous homology model structure for Gc from Andes hantavirus (ANDV), here we predicted and generated recombinant DIII and stem peptides to test whether these fragments inhibit hantavirus membrane fusion and cell entry. Recombinant ANDV DIII was soluble, presented disulfide bridges and beta-sheet secondary structure, supporting the in silico model. Using DIII and the C-terminal part of the stem region, the infection of cells by ANDV was blocked up to 60% when fusion of ANDV occurred within the endosomal route, and up to 95% when fusion occurred with the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the fragments impaired ANDV glycoprotein-mediated cell-cell fusion, and cross-inhibited the fusion mediated by the glycoproteins from Puumala virus (PUUV). The Gc fragments interfered in ANDV cell entry by preventing membrane hemifusion and pore formation, retaining Gc in a non-resistant homotrimer stage, as described for DIII and stem peptide inhibitors of class II fusion proteins. Collectively, our results demonstrate that hantavirus Gc shares not only structural, but also mechanistic similarity with class II viral fusion proteins, and will hopefully help in developing novel therapeutic strategies against hantaviruses

  18. Inhibition of the Hantavirus Fusion Process by Predicted Domain III and Stem Peptides from Glycoprotein Gc.

    PubMed

    Barriga, Gonzalo P; Villalón-Letelier, Fernando; Márquez, Chantal L; Bignon, Eduardo A; Acuña, Rodrigo; Ross, Breyan H; Monasterio, Octavio; Mardones, Gonzalo A; Vidal, Simon E; Tischler, Nicole D

    2016-07-01

    Hantaviruses can cause hantavirus pulmonary syndrome or hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans. To enter cells, hantaviruses fuse their envelope membrane with host cell membranes. Previously, we have shown that the Gc envelope glycoprotein is the viral fusion protein sharing characteristics with class II fusion proteins. The ectodomain of class II fusion proteins is composed of three domains connected by a stem region to a transmembrane anchor in the viral envelope. These fusion proteins can be inhibited through exogenous fusion protein fragments spanning domain III (DIII) and the stem region. Such fragments are thought to interact with the core of the fusion protein trimer during the transition from its pre-fusion to its post-fusion conformation. Based on our previous homology model structure for Gc from Andes hantavirus (ANDV), here we predicted and generated recombinant DIII and stem peptides to test whether these fragments inhibit hantavirus membrane fusion and cell entry. Recombinant ANDV DIII was soluble, presented disulfide bridges and beta-sheet secondary structure, supporting the in silico model. Using DIII and the C-terminal part of the stem region, the infection of cells by ANDV was blocked up to 60% when fusion of ANDV occurred within the endosomal route, and up to 95% when fusion occurred with the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the fragments impaired ANDV glycoprotein-mediated cell-cell fusion, and cross-inhibited the fusion mediated by the glycoproteins from Puumala virus (PUUV). The Gc fragments interfered in ANDV cell entry by preventing membrane hemifusion and pore formation, retaining Gc in a non-resistant homotrimer stage, as described for DIII and stem peptide inhibitors of class II fusion proteins. Collectively, our results demonstrate that hantavirus Gc shares not only structural, but also mechanistic similarity with class II viral fusion proteins, and will hopefully help in developing novel therapeutic strategies against hantaviruses

  19. Swedish mutant APP-based BACE1 binding site peptide reduces APP β-cleavage and cerebral Aβ levels in Alzheimer’s mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song; Hou, Huayan; Mori, Takashi; Sawmiller, Darrell; Smith, Adam; Tian, Jun; Wang, Yanjiang; Giunta, Brian; Sanberg, Paul R.; Zhang, Sheqing; Tan, Jun

    2015-01-01

    BACE1 initiates amyloid-β (Aβ) generation and the resultant cerebral amyloidosis, as a characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Thus, inhibition of BACE1 has been the focus of a large body of research. The most recent clinical trials highlight the difficulty involved in this type of anti-AD therapy as evidenced by side effects likely due to the ubiquitous nature of BACE1, which cleaves multiple substrates. The human Swedish mutant form of amyloid protein precursor (APPswe) has been shown to possess a higher affinity for BACE1 compared to wild-type APP (APPwt). We pursued a new approach wherein harnessing this greater affinity to modulate BACE1 APP processing activity. We found that one peptide derived from APPswe, containing the β-cleavage site, strongly inhibits BACE1 activity and thereby reduces Aβ production. This peptide, termed APPswe BACE1 binding site peptide (APPsweBBP), was further conjugated to the fusion domain of the HIV-1 Tat protein (TAT) at the C-terminus to facilitate its biomembrane-penetrating activity. APPwt and APPswe over-expressing CHO cells treated with this TAT-conjugated peptide resulted in a marked reduction of Aβ and a significant increase of soluble APPα. Intraperitoneal administration of this peptide to 5XFAD mice markedly reduced β-amyloid deposits as well as improved hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. PMID:26091071

  20. Prevention of Measles Virus Infection by Intranasal Delivery of Fusion Inhibitor Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, C.; Huey, D.; Jurgens, E.; Welsch, J. C.; DeVito, I.; Talekar, A.; Horvat, B.; Niewiesk, S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measles virus (MV) infection is undergoing resurgence and remains one of the leading causes of death among young children worldwide despite the availability of an effective measles vaccine. MV infects its target cells by coordinated action of the MV H and the fusion (F) envelope glycoprotein; upon receptor engagement by H, the prefusion F undergoes a structural transition, extending and inserting into the target cell membrane and then refolding into a postfusion structure that fuses the viral and cell membranes. By interfering with this structural transition of F, peptides derived from the heptad-repeat (HR) regions of F can potently inhibit MV infection at the entry stage. We show here that specific features of H's interaction with its receptors modulate the susceptibility of MV F to peptide fusion inhibitors. A higher concentration of inhibitory peptides is required to inhibit F-mediated fusion when H is engaged to its nectin-4 receptor than when H is engaged to its CD150 receptor. Peptide inhibition of F may be subverted by continued engagement of receptor by H, a finding that highlights the ongoing role of H-receptor interaction after F has been activated and that helps guide the design of more potent inhibitory peptides. Intranasal administration of these peptides results in peptide accumulation in the airway epithelium with minimal systemic levels of peptide and efficiently prevents MV infection in vivo in animal models. The results suggest an antiviral strategy for prophylaxis in vulnerable and/or immunocompromised hosts. IMPORTANCE Measles virus (MV) infection causes an acute illness that may be associated with infection of the central nervous system (CNS) and severe neurological disease. No specific treatment is available. We have shown that parenterally delivered fusion-inhibitory peptides protect mice from lethal CNS MV disease. Here we show, using established small-animal models of MV infection, that fusion-inhibitory peptides delivered

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of COMPLEXIN Fusion Clamp Function in Synaptic Exocytosis Revealed in a New Drosophila Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Janani; Wahlmark, Christopher J.; Kuser-Ahnert, Giselle A.; Kawasaki, Fumiko

    2013-01-01

    The COMPLEXIN (CPX) proteins play a critical role in synaptic vesicle fusion and neurotransmitter release. Previous studies demonstrated that CPX functions in both activation of evoked neurotransmitter release and inhibition/clamping of spontaneous synaptic vesicle fusion. Here we report a new cpx mutant in Drosophila melanogaster, cpx1257, revealing spatially defined and separable pools of CPX which make distinct contributions to the activation and clamping functions. In cpx1257, lack of only the last C-terminal amino acid of CPX is predicted to disrupt prenylation and membrane targeting of CPX. Immunocytochemical analysis established localization of wild-type CPX to active zone (AZ) regions containing neurotransmitter release sites as well as broader presynaptic membrane compartments including synaptic vesicles. Parallel biochemical studies confirmed CPX membrane association and demonstrated robust binding interactions of CPX with all three SNAREs. This is in contrast to the cpx1257 mutant, in which AZ localization of CPX persists but general membrane localization and, surprisingly, the bulk of CPX-SNARE protein interactions are abolished. Furthermore, electrophysiological analysis of neuromuscular synapses revealed interesting differences between cpx1257 and a cpx null mutant. The cpx null exhibited a marked decrease in the EPSC amplitude, slowed EPSC rise and decay times and an increased mEPSC frequency with respect to wild-type. In contrast, cpx1257 exhibited a wild-type EPSC with an increased mEPSC frequency and thus a selective failure to clamp spontaneous release. These results indicate that spatially distinct and separable interactions of CPX with presynaptic membranes and SNARE proteins mediate separable activation and clamping functions of CPX in neurotransmitter release. PMID:23769723

  2. DCP-LA neutralizes mutant amyloid beta peptide-induced impairment of long-term potentiation and spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Tetsu; Tomiyama, Takami; Tominaga, Takemi; Mori, Hiroshi; Yaguchi, Takahiro; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2010-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) was monitored from the CA1 region of the intact rat hippocampus by delivering high frequency stimulation (HFS) to the Schaffer collateral commissural pathway. Intraventricular injection with mutant amyloid beta(1-42) peptide lacking glutamate-22 (Abeta(1-42)E22Delta), favoring oligomerization, 10 min prior to HFS, inhibited expression of LTP, with the potency more than wild-type amyloid beta(1-42) peptide. Intraperitoneal injection with the linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) 70 min prior to HFS neutralized mutant Abeta(1-42)E22Delta peptide-induced LTP inhibition. In the water maze test, continuous intraventricular injection with mutant Abeta(1-42)E22Delta peptide for 14 days prolonged the acquisition latency as compared with that for control, with the potency similar to wild-type Abeta(1-42) peptide, and intraperitoneal injection with DCP-LA shortened the prolonged latency to control levels. The results of the present study indicate that DCP-LA neutralizes mutant Abeta(1-42)E22Delta peptide-induced impairment of LTP and spatial learning.

  3. An Investigation on a Novel Anti-tumor Fusion Peptide of FSH33-53-IIKK

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runlin; Liu, Ping; Pan, Donghui; zhang, Pengjun; Bai, Zhicheng; Xu, Yuping; Wang, Lizhen; Yan, Junjie; Yan, Yongjun; Liu, Xingdang; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    A novel fusion peptide FSH33-53-IIKK was designed and expected to combine the follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) targeting and tumor toxicity. In vitro and in vivo study showed the anti-tumor activity of FSH33-53-IIKK was enhanced compared to that of IIKK only. FSH33-53-IIKK could inhibit the growth of tumor via apoptosis and autophagy pathways. In summary, combining the tumor marker-target peptide and anti-tumor peptide together may be an efficient way to search for better anti-tumor candidates. PMID:27313792

  4. An Investigation on a Novel Anti-tumor Fusion Peptide of FSH33-53-IIKK.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runlin; Liu, Ping; Pan, Donghui; Zhang, Pengjun; Bai, Zhicheng; Xu, Yuping; Wang, Lizhen; Yan, Junjie; Yan, Yongjun; Liu, Xingdang; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    A novel fusion peptide FSH33-53-IIKK was designed and expected to combine the follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) targeting and tumor toxicity. In vitro and in vivo study showed the anti-tumor activity of FSH33-53-IIKK was enhanced compared to that of IIKK only. FSH33-53-IIKK could inhibit the growth of tumor via apoptosis and autophagy pathways. In summary, combining the tumor marker-target peptide and anti-tumor peptide together may be an efficient way to search for better anti-tumor candidates. PMID:27313792

  5. Combinatorial Synthetic Peptide Vaccine Strategy Protects against Hypervirulent CovR/S Mutant Streptococci.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manisha; Mortensen, Rasmus; Calcutt, Ainslie; Powell, Jessica; Batzloff, Michael R; Dietrich, Jes; Good, Michael F

    2016-04-15

    Cluster of virulence responder/sensor (CovR/S) mutant group A streptococci (GAS) are serious human pathogens of multiple M protein strains that upregulate expression of virulence factors, including the IL-8 proteaseStreptococcus pyogenescell envelope proteinase (SpyCEP), thus blunting neutrophil-mediated killing and enabling ingress of bacteria from a superficial wound to deep tissue. We previously showed that a combination vaccine incorporating J8-DT (conserved peptide vaccine from the M protein) and a recombinant SpyCEP fragment protects against CovR/S mutants. To enhance the vaccine's safety profile, we identified a minimal epitope (S2) that was the target for anti-SpyCEP Abs that could protect IL-8 from SpyCEP-mediated proteolysis. Abs from healthy humans and from mice experimentally infected with GAS also recognized S2, albeit at low titers. Native SpyCEP may be poorly immunogenic (cryptic or subdominant), and it would be to the organism's advantage if the host did not induce a strong Ab response against it. However, S2 conjugated to diphtheria toxoid is highly immunogenic and induces Abs that recognize and neutralize SpyCEP. Hence, we describe a two-component peptide vaccine that induces Abs (anti-S2) that protect IL-8 from proteolysis and other Abs (anti-J8) that cause strain-independent killing in the presence of neutrophils. We show that either component alone is ineffectual in preventing skin infection and bacteremia due to CovR/S mutants but that the combination induces complete protection. This protection correlated with a significant influx of neutrophils to the infection site. The data strongly suggest that the lack of natural immunity to hypervirulent GAS strains in humans could be rectified by this combination vaccine.

  6. Combinatorial Synthetic Peptide Vaccine Strategy Protects against Hypervirulent CovR/S Mutant Streptococci.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manisha; Mortensen, Rasmus; Calcutt, Ainslie; Powell, Jessica; Batzloff, Michael R; Dietrich, Jes; Good, Michael F

    2016-04-15

    Cluster of virulence responder/sensor (CovR/S) mutant group A streptococci (GAS) are serious human pathogens of multiple M protein strains that upregulate expression of virulence factors, including the IL-8 proteaseStreptococcus pyogenescell envelope proteinase (SpyCEP), thus blunting neutrophil-mediated killing and enabling ingress of bacteria from a superficial wound to deep tissue. We previously showed that a combination vaccine incorporating J8-DT (conserved peptide vaccine from the M protein) and a recombinant SpyCEP fragment protects against CovR/S mutants. To enhance the vaccine's safety profile, we identified a minimal epitope (S2) that was the target for anti-SpyCEP Abs that could protect IL-8 from SpyCEP-mediated proteolysis. Abs from healthy humans and from mice experimentally infected with GAS also recognized S2, albeit at low titers. Native SpyCEP may be poorly immunogenic (cryptic or subdominant), and it would be to the organism's advantage if the host did not induce a strong Ab response against it. However, S2 conjugated to diphtheria toxoid is highly immunogenic and induces Abs that recognize and neutralize SpyCEP. Hence, we describe a two-component peptide vaccine that induces Abs (anti-S2) that protect IL-8 from proteolysis and other Abs (anti-J8) that cause strain-independent killing in the presence of neutrophils. We show that either component alone is ineffectual in preventing skin infection and bacteremia due to CovR/S mutants but that the combination induces complete protection. This protection correlated with a significant influx of neutrophils to the infection site. The data strongly suggest that the lack of natural immunity to hypervirulent GAS strains in humans could be rectified by this combination vaccine. PMID:26969753

  7. Chimeric, mutant orexin receptors show key interactions between orexin receptors, peptides and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tran, Da-Thao; Bonaventure, Pascal; Hack, Michael; Mirzadegan, Taraneh; Dvorak, Curt; Letavic, Michael; Carruthers, Nicholas; Lovenberg, Timothy; Sutton, Steven W

    2011-09-30

    Orexin receptor antagonists are being investigated as therapeutic agents for insomnia and addictive disorders. In this study the interactions between the orexin receptors (orexin 1 receptor and orexin 2 receptor), orexin peptides, and small molecule orexin antagonists were explored. To study these phenomena, a variety of mutant orexin receptors was made and tested using receptor binding and functional assays. Domains of the two orexin receptors were exchanged to show the critical ligand binding domains for orexin peptides and representative selective orexin receptor antagonists. Results from domain exchanges between the orexin receptors suggest that transmembrane domain 3 is crucially important for receptor interactions with small molecule antagonists. These data also suggest that the orexin peptides occupy a larger footprint, interacting with transmembrane domain 1, the amino terminus and transmembrane domain 5 as well as transmembrane domain 3. Transmembrane domain 3 has been shown to be an important part of the small molecule binding pocket common to rhodopsin and β2-adrenergic receptors. Additional orexin receptor 2 point mutations were made based on the common arrangement of receptor transmembrane domains shown in the G-protein coupled receptor crystal structure literature and the impact of orexin 2 receptor residue threonine 135 on the ligand selectivity of the 2 orexin receptors. These data support a model of the orexin receptor binding pocket in which transmembrane domains 3 and 5 are prominent contributors to ligand binding and functional activity. The data also illustrate key contact points for ligand interactions in the consensus small molecule pocket of these receptors.

  8. Transferrin Fusion Technology: A Novel Approach to Prolonging Biological Half-Life of Insulinotropic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung-Joon; Zhou, Jie; Martin, Bronwen; Carlson, Olga D.; Maudsley, Stuart; Greig, Nigel H.; Mattson, Mark P.; Ladenheim, Ellen E.; Wustner, Jay; Turner, Andrew; Sadeghi, Homayoun

    2010-01-01

    Fusion proteins made up of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and exendin-4 (EX-4) fused to a nonglycosylated form of human transferrin (GLP-1-Tf or EX-4-Tf) were produced and characterized. GLP-1-Tf activated the GLP-1 receptor, was resistant to inactivation by peptidases, and had a half-life of approximately 2 days, compared with 1 to 2 min for native GLP-1. GLP-1-Tf retained the acute, glucose-dependent insulin-secretory properties of native GLP-1 in diabetic animals and had a profound effect on proliferation of pancreatic β-cells. In addition, Tf and the fusion proteins did not cross the blood-brain-barrier but still reduced food intake after peripheral administration. EX-4-Tf proved to be as effective as EX-4 but had longer lived effects on blood glucose and food intake. This novel transferrin fusion technology could improve the pharmacology of various peptides. PMID:20498254

  9. FUSION-COMPETENT STATE INDUCED BY A C-TERMINAL HIV-1 FUSION PEPTIDE IN CHOLESTEROL-RICH MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Apellániz, Beatriz; Nieva, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The replicative cycle of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 begins after fusion of the viral and target-cell membranes. The envelope glycoprotein gp41 transmembrane subunit contains conserved hydrophobic domains that engage and perturb the merging lipid bilayers. In this work, we have characterized the fusion-committed state generated in vesicles by CpreTM, a synthetic peptide derived from the sequence connecting the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) and the transmembrane domain (TMD) of gp41. Pre-loading cholesterol-rich vesicles with CpreTM rendered them competent for subsequent lipid-mixing with fluorescently-labeled target vesicles. Highlighting the physiological relevance of the lasting fusion-competent state, the broadly neutralizing antibody 4E10 bound to the CpreTM-primed vesicles and inhibited lipid-mixing. Heterotypic fusion assays disclosed dependence on the lipid composition of the vesicles that acted either as virus or cell membrane surrogates. Lipid-mixing exhibited above all a critical dependence on the cholesterol content in those experiments. We infer that the fusion-competent state described herein resembles bona-fide perturbations generated by the pre-hairpin MPER-TMD connection within the viral membrane. PMID:25617671

  10. Multimerized HIV-gp41-derived peptides as fusion inhibitors and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Wataru; Mizuguchi, Takaaki; Tamamura, Hirokazu

    2016-11-01

    To date, several antigens based on the amino-terminal leucine/isoleucine heptad repeat (NHR) region of an HIV-1 envelope protein gp41 and fusion inhibitors based on the carboxy-terminal leucine/isoleucine heptad repeat (CHR) region of gp41 have been reported. We have developed a synthetic antigen targeting the membrane-fusion mechanism of HIV-1. This uses a template designed with C3-symmetric linkers and mimics the trimeric form of the NHR-derived peptide N36. The antiserum obtained by immunization of the N36 trimeric antigen binds preferentially to the N36 trimer and blocks HIV-1 infection effectively, compared with the antiserum obtained by immunization of the N36 monomer. Using another template designed with different C3-symmetric linkers, we have also developed a synthetic peptide mimicking the trimeric form of the CHR-derived peptide C34, with ∼100 times the inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 fusion mechanism than that of the monomer C34 peptide. A dimeric derivative of C34 has potent inhibitory activity at almost the same levels as this C34 trimer mimic, suggesting that presence of a dimeric form of C34 is structurally critical for fusion inhibitors. As examples of rising mid-size drugs, this review describes an effective strategy for the design of HIV vaccines and fusion inhibitors based on a relationship with the native structure of proteins involved in HIV fusion mechanisms. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 622-628, 2016.

  11. Functional analysis of N-linked glycosylation mutants of the measles virus fusion protein synthesized by recombinant vaccinia virus vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Alkhatib, G; Shen, S H; Briedis, D; Richardson, C; Massie, B; Weinberg, R; Smith, D; Taylor, J; Paoletti, E; Roder, J

    1994-01-01

    The role of N-linked glycosylation in the biological activity of the measles virus (MV) fusion (F) protein was analyzed by expressing glycosylation mutants with recombinant vaccinia virus vectors. There are three potential N-linked glycosylation sites located on the F2 subunit polypeptide of MV F, at asparagine residues 29, 61, and 67. Each of the three potential glycosylation sites was mutated separately as well as in combination with the other sites. Expression of mutant proteins in mammalian cells showed that all three sites are used for the addition of N-linked oligosaccharides. Cell surface expression of mutant proteins was reduced by 50% relative to the wild-type level when glycosylation at either Asn-29 or Asn-61 was abolished. Despite the similar levels of cell surface expression, the Asn-29 and Asn-61 mutant proteins had different biological activities. While the Asn-61 mutant was capable of inducing syncytium formation, the Asn-29 mutant protein did not exhibit any significant cell fusion activity. Inactivation of the Asn-67 glycosylation site also reduced cell surface transport of mutant protein but had little effect on its ability to cause cell fusion. However, when the Asn-67 mutation was combined with mutations at either of the other two sites, cleavage-dependent activation, cell surface expression, and cell fusion activity were completely abolished. Our data show that the loss of N-linked oligosaccharides markedly impaired the proteolytic cleavage, stability, and biological activity of the MV F protein. The oligosaccharide side chains in MV F are thus essential for optimum conformation of the extracellular F2 subunit that is presumed to bind cellular membranes. Images PMID:8107215

  12. Mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the fusion peptide of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus F protein.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Manli; Yin, Feifei; Deng, Fei; Liu, Maili; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Hualin

    2008-08-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into cells is normally mediated by fusion between viral and cellular membranes, in which the fusion peptide plays a crucial role. The fusion peptides of group II nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) F proteins are quite conserved, with a hydrophobic region located at the N terminal of the F(1) fragment. For this report, we used mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study the structure and function of the fusion peptide of the Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid NPV (HearNPV) F protein (HaF). Five mutations in the fusion peptide of HaF, N(1)G, N(1)L, I(2)N, G(3)L, and D(11)L, were generated separately, and the mutated f genes were transformed into the f-null HearNPV bacmid. The mutations N(1)L, I(2)N, and D(11)L were found to completely abolish the ability of the recombinant bacmids to produce infectious budded virus, while the mutations N(1)G and G(3)L did not. The low-pH-induced envelope fusion assay demonstrated that the N(1)G substitution increased the fusogenicity of HaF, while the G(3)L substitution reduced its fusogenicity. NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of a synthetic fusion peptide of HaF in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles at pH 5.0. The fusion peptide appeared to be an amphiphilic structure composed of a flexible coil in the N terminus from N(1) to N(5), a 3(10)-helix from F(6) to G(8), a turn at S(9), and a regular alpha-helix from V(10) to D(19). The data provide the first NMR structure of a baculovirus fusion peptide and allow us to further understand the relationship of structure and function of the fusion peptide.

  13. A rationally engineered anti-HIV peptide fusion inhibitor with greatly reduced immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Frances; Schmidt, Kerstin; Zahn, Roland C; Richter, Cornelia; Radeke, Heinfried H; Schmitz, Jörn E; von Laer, Dorothee; Egerer, Lisa

    2013-02-01

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat 2 (HR2) region of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope glycoprotein, so-called C peptides, are very efficient HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. We previously developed innovative gene therapeutic approaches aiming at the direct in vivo production of C peptides from genetically modified host cells and found that T cells expressing membrane-anchored or secreted C peptides are protected from HIV-1 infection. However, an unwanted immune response against such antiviral peptides may significantly impair clinical efficacy and pose safety risks to patients. To overcome this problem, we engineered a novel C peptide, V2o, with greatly reduced immunogenicity and excellent antiviral activity. V2o is based on the chimeric C peptide C46-EHO, which is derived from the HR2 regions of HIV-2(EHO) and HIV-1(HxB2) and has broad anti-HIV and anti-simian immunodeficiency virus activity. Antibody and major histocompatibility complex class I epitopes within the C46-EHO peptide sequence were identified by in silico and in vitro analyses. Using rational design, we removed these epitopes by amino acid substitutions and thus minimized antigenicity and immunogenicity considerably. At the same time, the antiviral activity of the deimmunized peptide V2o was preserved or even enhanced compared to that of the parental C46-EHO peptide. Thus, V2o is an ideal candidate, especially for those novel therapeutic approaches for HIV infection that involve direct in vivo production of antiviral C peptides. PMID:23147734

  14. A defective signal peptide in the maize high-lysine mutant floury 2.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, C E; Lopes, M A; Gillikin, J W; Boston, R S; Larkins, B A

    1995-01-01

    The maize floury 2 (fl2) mutation enhances the lysine content of the grain, but the soft texture of the endosperm makes it unsuitable for commercial production. The mutant phenotype is linked with the appearance of a 24-kDa alpha-zein protein and increased synthesis of binding protein, both of which are associated with irregularly shaped protein bodies. We have cloned the gene encoding the 24-kDa protein and show that it is expressed as a 22-kDa alpha-zein with an uncleaved signal peptide. Comparison of the deduced N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 24-kDa alpha-zein protein with other alpha-zeins revealed an alanine to valine substitution at the C-terminal position of the signal peptide, a histidine insertion within the seventh alpha-helical repeat, and an alanine to threonine substitution with the same alpha-helical repeat of the protein. Structural defects associated with this alpha-zein explain many of the phenotypic effects of the fl2 mutation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:7624327

  15. Assembly of Influenza Hemagglutinin Fusion Peptides in a Phospholipid Bilayer by Coarse-grained Computer Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Collu, Francesca; Spiga, Enrico; Lorenz, Christian D.; Fraternali, Franca

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is critical to eukaryotic cellular function and crucial to the entry of enveloped viruses such as influenza and human immunodeficiency virus. Influenza viral entry in the host cell is mediated by a 20–23 amino acid long sequence, called the fusion peptide (FP). Recently, possible structures for the fusion peptide (ranging from an inverted V shaped α-helical structure to an α-helical hairpin, or to a complete α-helix) and their implication in the membrane fusion initiation have been proposed. Despite the large number of studies devoted to the structure of the FP, the mechanism of action of this peptide remains unclear with several mechanisms having been suggested, including the induction of local disorder, promoting membrane curvature, and/or altering local membrane composition. In recent years, several research groups have employed atomistic and/or coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the matter. In all previous works, the behavior of a single FP monomer was studied, while in this manuscript, we use a simplified model of a tripeptide (TP) monomer of FP (TFP) instead of a single FP monomer because each Influenza Hemagglutinin contains three FP molecules in the biological system. In this manuscript we report findings targeted at understanding the fusogenic properties and the collective behavior of these trimers of FP peptides on a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine model membrane. Here we show how the TFP monomers self-assemble into differently sized oligomers in the presence of the membrane. We measure the perturbation to the structure of the phospholipid membrane caused by the presence of these TFP oligomers. Our work (i) shows how self-assembly of TFP in the presence of the membrane induces non negligible deformation to the membrane and (ii) could be a useful starting point to stimulate discussion and further work targeted to fusion pore formation. PMID:26636093

  16. Inhibitory effects of a peptide-fusion protein (Latarcin-PAP1-Thanatin) against chikungunya virus.

    PubMed

    Rothan, Hussin A; Bahrani, Hirbod; Shankar, Esaki M; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Yusof, Rohana

    2014-08-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) outbreaks have led to a serious economic burden, as the available treatment strategies can only alleviate disease symptoms, and no effective therapeutics or vaccines are currently available for human use. Here, we report the use of a new cost-effective approach involving production of a recombinant antiviral peptide-fusion protein that is scalable for the treatment of CHIKV infection. A peptide-fusion recombinant protein LATA-PAP1-THAN that was generated by joining Latarcin (LATA) peptide with the N-terminus of the PAP1 antiviral protein, and the Thanatin (THAN) peptide to the C-terminus, was produced in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies. The antiviral LATA-PAP1-THAN protein showed 89.0% reduction of viral plaque formation compared with PAP1 (46.0%), LATA (67.0%) or THAN (79.3%) peptides alone. The LATA-PAP1-THAN protein reduced the viral RNA load that was 0.89-fold compared with the untreated control cells. We also showed that PAP1 resulted in 0.44-fold reduction, and THAN and LATA resulting in 0.78-fold and 0.73-fold reductions, respectively. The LATA-PAP1-THAN protein inhibited CHIKV replication in the Vero cells at an EC50 of 11.2μg/ml, which is approximately half of the EC50 of PAP1 (23.7μg/ml) and protected the CHIKV-infected mice at the dose of 0.75mg/ml. We concluded that production of antiviral peptide-fusion protein in E. coli as inclusion bodies could accentuate antiviral activities, enhance cellular internalisation, and could reduce product toxicity to host cells and is scalable to epidemic response quantities.

  17. Universal antibodies against the highly conserved influenza fusion peptide cross-neutralize several subtypes of influenza A virus

    SciTech Connect

    Hashem, Anwar M.; Van Domselaar, Gary; Li, Changgui; Wang, Junzhi; She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry D.; Sui, Jianhua; He, Runtao; Marasco, Wayne A.; Li, Xuguang

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} The fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza viral hemagglutinins. {yields} Anti-fusion peptide antibodies are universal antibodies that cross-react with all influenza HA subtypes. {yields} The universal antibodies cross-neutralize different influenza A subtypes. {yields} The universal antibodies inhibit the fusion process between the viruses and the target cells. -- Abstract: The fusion peptide of influenza viral hemagglutinin plays a critical role in virus entry by facilitating membrane fusion between the virus and target cells. As the fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza A and B viruses, it could be an attractive target for vaccine-induced immune responses. We previously reported that antibodies targeting the first 14 amino acids of the N-terminus of the fusion peptide could bind to virtually all influenza virus strains and quantify hemagglutinins in vaccines produced in embryonated eggs. Here we demonstrate that these universal antibodies bind to the viral hemagglutinins in native conformation presented in infected mammalian cell cultures and neutralize multiple subtypes of virus by inhibiting the pH-dependant fusion of viral and cellular membranes. These results suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral hemagglutinin is exposed sufficiently to be attacked by the antibodies during the course of infection and merits further investigation because of potential importance in the protection against diverse strains of influenza viruses.

  18. Capturing Spontaneous Membrane Insertion of the Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Fusion Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Baylon, Javier L.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) is a protein located on the surface of the influenza virus that mediates viral fusion to the host cellular membrane. During the fusion process the HA fusion peptide (HAfp), formed by the first 23 N-terminal residues of HA and structurally characterized by two alpha helices (Helix A and Helix B) tightly packed in a hairpin-like arrangement, is the only part of the virus in direct contact with the host membrane. After encountering the host cell HAfp is believed to insert into the membrane, thereby initiating the fusion of the viral and host membranes. Detailed characterization of the interactions between the HAfp and cellular membrane is therefore of high relevance to the mechanism of viral entry into the host cell. Employing HMMM membrane representation with enhanced lipid mobility, we have performed a large set of independent simulations of unbiased membrane binding of HAfp. We have been able to capture spontaneous binding and insertion of HAfp consistently in nearly all the simulations. A reproducible membrane-bound configuration emerges from these simulations, despite employing a diverse set of initial configurations. Extension of several of the simulations into full membrane systems confirms the stability of the membrane-bound form obtained from HMMM binding simulations. The resulting model allows for the characterization of important interactions between the peptide and the membrane, and the details of the binding process of the peptide for the first time. Upon membrane binding, Helix A inserts much deeper into the membrane than Helix B, suggesting that the former is responsible for hydrophobic anchoring of the peptide into the membrane. Helix B, in contrast, is found to establish major amphipathic interactions at the interfacial region thereby contributing to binding strength of HAfp. PMID:25996559

  19. Impact of peptide clustering on unbinding forces in the context of fusion mimetics

    SciTech Connect

    Pähler, Gesa; Lorenz, Bärbel; Janshoff, Andreas

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Coiled-coil peptides as SNARE mimetics for membrane fusion. ► Interaction forces assessed by colloidal probe microscopy. ► Lateral organization of lipopeptides visualized by atomic force microscopy. -- Abstract: Coiled-coil zipping and unzipping is a pivotal process in SNARE-regulated membrane fusion. In this study we examine this process mediated by a minimal model for coiled-coil formation employing force spectroscopy in the context of membrane-coated surfaces and probes. The interaction forces of several hundred pN are surprisingly low considering the proposed amount of molecular bonds in the contact zone. However, by means of high-resolution imaging employing atomic force microscopy and studying the lateral mobility of lipids and peptides as a function of coiled-coil formation, we are able to supply a detailed view on processes occurring on the membrane surfaces during force measurements. The interaction forces determined here are not only dependent on the peptide concentration on the surface, but also on the regional organization of lateral peptide clusters found prior to coiled-coil formation.

  20. Overexpression of Antimicrobial, Anticancer, and Transmembrane Peptides in Escherichia coli through a Calmodulin-Peptide Fusion System.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Nguyen, Leonard T; Gopal, Ramamourthy; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Vogel, Hans J

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the increasing number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has become a serious health concern. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important component of the innate immune system of most organisms. A better understanding of their structures and mechanisms of action would lead to the design of more potent and safer AMPs as alternatives for current antibiotics. For detailed investigations, effective recombinant production which allows the facile modification of the amino acid sequence, the introduction of unnatural amino acids, and labeling with stable isotopes for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies is desired. Several expression strategies have been introduced in previous reports; however, their effectiveness has been limited to a select few AMPs. Here, we have studied calmodulin (CaM) as a more universal carrier protein to express many types of AMPs in E. coli. We have discovered that the unique architecture of CaM, consisting of two independent target binding domains with malleable methionine-rich interaction surfaces, can accommodate numerous amino acid sequences containing basic and hydrophobic residues. This effectively masks the toxic antimicrobial activities of many amphipathic AMPs and protects them from degradation during expression and purification. Here, we demonstrate the expression of various AMPs using a CaM-fusion expression system, including melittin, fowlicidin-1, tritrpticin, indolicidin, puroindoline A peptide, magainin II F5W, lactoferrampin B, MIP3α51-70, and human β-defensin 3 (HBD-3), the latter requiring three disulfide bonds for proper folding. In addition, our approach was extended to the transmembrane domain of the cell adhesion protein l-selectin. We propose the use of the CaM-fusion system as a universal approach to express many cationic amphipathic peptides that are normally toxic and would kill the bacterial host cells. PMID:27502305

  1. Secretory production of antimicrobial peptides in Escherichia coli using the catalytic domain of a cellulase as fusion partner.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huili; Li, Haoran; Gao, Dongfang; Gao, Cuijuan; Qi, Qingsheng

    2015-11-20

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small molecules which serve as essential components of the innate immune system in various organisms. AMPs possess a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities. However, the scaled production of such peptides in Escherichia coli faces many difficulties because of their small size and toxicity to the host. Here, we described a new fusion strategy to extracellularly produce significant amounts of these antimicrobial peptides in recombinant E. coli at significant amount. Employing the catalytic domain of a cellulase (Cel-CD) from Bacillus subtilis KSM-64 as the fusion partner, five recombinant antimicrobial peptides were confirmed to accumulate in the culture medium at concentrations ranging from 184 mg/L to 297 mg/L. The radical diffusion experiment demonstrated that the released model antimicrobial peptide, bombinin, had antibacterial activities against both E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus. This strategy will be suitable for the production of antimicrobial peptides and other toxicity proteins.

  2. Evidence that a BCR-ABL fusion peptide does not induce lymphocyte proliferation or cytokine production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Abu-Eisha, Hazem M; Butt, Nauman M; Clark, Richard E; Christmas, Stephen E

    2007-12-01

    The BCR-ABL fusion protein is characteristic of chronic myeloid leukaemia and may be an effective tumour-specific antigen. CD8+ T cell responses to BCR-ABL fusion peptides have been reported in normal subjects and CML patients but CD4+ T cell responses have been less well characterised. Here, the 23-mer e14a2 fusion peptide VHSATGFKQSSKALQRPVASDFE has been used to stimulate T cell responses. Most normal subjects and CML patients showed no proliferative responses to this peptide, with stimulation indices not significantly greater than 1.0. Following a second stimulation with the same peptide, small proliferative responses were obtained in normal subjects but not CML patients. These responses were not improved following a third stimulation with 23-mer peptide, nor by using mature autologous dendritic cells to present the peptide. Intracellular interferon-gamma production by CD4+ T cells was also not induced by the 23-mer e14a2 peptide. Hence, this e14a2 peptide does not stimulate CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro in most normal subjects or CML patients. The precise sequence of amino acids may be critical in defining immunogenicity for CD4+ T cell responses against BCR-ABL peptides.

  3. Transmembrane Peptides Stabilize Inverted Cubic Phases in a Biphasic Length-Dependent Manner: Implications for Protein-Induced Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, D. P.; Cherezov, V.; Greathouse, D. V.; Koeppe, R. E.; Killian, J. Antoinette; Caffrey, M.

    2006-01-01

    WALP peptides consist of repeating alanine-leucine sequences of different lengths, flanked with tryptophan “anchors” at each end. They form membrane-spanning α-helices in lipid membranes, and mimic protein transmembrane domains. WALP peptides of increasing length, from 19 to 31 amino acids, were incorporated into N-monomethylated dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE-Me) at concentrations up to 0.5 mol % peptide. When pure DOPE-Me is heated slowly, the lamellar liquid crystalline (Lα) phase first forms an inverted cubic (QII) phase, and the inverted hexagonal (HII) phase at higher temperatures. Using time-resolved x-ray diffraction and slow temperature scans (1.5°C/h), WALP peptides were shown to decrease the temperatures of QII and HII phase formation (TQ and TH, respectively) as a function of peptide concentration. The shortest and longest peptides reduced TQ the most, whereas intermediate lengths had weaker effects. These findings are relevant to membrane fusion because the first step in the Lα/QII phase transition is believed to be the formation of fusion pores between pure lipid membranes. These results imply that physiologically relevant concentrations of these peptides could increase the susceptibility of biomembrane lipids to fusion through an effect on lipid phase behavior, and may explain one role of the membrane-spanning domains in the proteins that mediate membrane fusion. PMID:16214859

  4. Mutagenesis of the La Crosse Virus glycoprotein supports a role for Gc (1066-1087) as the fusion peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Plassmeyer, Matthew L.; Soldan, Samantha S.; Stachelek, Karen M.; Roth, Susan M.; Martin-Garcia, Julio; Gonzalez-Scarano, Francisco . E-mail: scarano@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2007-02-20

    The La Crosse Virus (LACV) M segment encodes two glycoproteins (Gn and Gc), and plays a critical role in the neuropathogenesis of LACV infection as the primary determinant of neuroinvasion. A recent study from our group demonstrated that the region comprising the membrane proximal two-thirds of Gc, amino acids 860-1442, is critical in mediating LACV fusion and entry. Furthermore, computational analysis identified structural similarities between a portion of this region, amino acids 970-1350, and the E1 fusion protein of two alphaviruses: Sindbis virus and Semliki Forrest virus (SFV). Within the region 970-1350, a 22-amino-acid hydrophobic segment (1066-1087) is predicted to correlate structurally with the fusion peptides of class II fusion proteins. We performed site-directed mutagenesis of key amino acids in this 22-amino acid segment and determined the functional consequences of these mutations on fusion and entry. Several mutations within this hydrophobic domain affected glycoprotein expression to some extent, but all mutations either shifted the pH threshold of fusion below that of the wild-type protein, reduced fusion efficiency, or abrogated cell-to-cell fusion and pseudotype entry altogether. These results, coupled with the aforementioned computational modeling, suggest that the LACV Gc functions as a class II fusion protein and support a role for the region Gc 1066-1087 as a fusion peptide.

  5. Dutch and arctic mutant peptides of β amyloid1–40 differentially affect the FGF-2 pathway in brain endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Solito, Raffaella; Corti, Federico; Fossati, Silvia; Mezhericher, Emiliya; Donnini, Sandra; Ghiso, Jorge; Giachetti, Antonio; Rostagno, Agueda; Ziche, Marina

    2009-01-01

    Single point mutations of the amyloid precursor protein generate Aβ variants bearing amino acid substitutions at positions 21–23. These mutants are associated with distinct hereditary phenotypes of cerebral amyloid angiopathy, manifesting varying degrees of tropism for brain vessels, and impaired microvessel remodeling and angiogenesis. We examined the differential effects of E22Q (Dutch), and E22G (Arctic) variants in comparison to WT Aβ on brain endothelial cell proliferation, angiogenic phenotype expression triggered by fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2), pseudo-capillary sprouting, and induction of apoptosis. E22Q exhibited a potent anti-angiogenic profile in contrast to E22G, which had a much weaker effect. Investigations on the FGF-2 signaling pathway revealed the greatest differences among the peptides: E22Q andWT peptides suppressed FGF-2 expression while E22G had barely any effect. Phosphorylation of the FGF-2 receptor, FGFR-1, and the survival signal Akt were abolished by E22Q and WT peptides, but not by E22G. The biological dissimilar effect of the mutant and WT peptides on cerebral EC cannot be assigned to a particular Aβ structure, suggesting that the toxic effect of the Aβ assemblies goes beyond mere multimerization. PMID:19061884

  6. Spectroscopic studies of wild-type and mutant "zinc finger" peptides: determinants of domain folding and structure.

    PubMed

    Párraga, G; Horvath, S; Hood, L; Young, E T; Klevit, R E

    1990-01-01

    The "zinc finger" model [Miller, J., McLachlan, A. D. & Klug, A. (1985) EMBO J. 4, 1609-1614; Brown, R. S., Sander, C. & Argos, P. (1985) FEBS Lett. 186, 271-274] makes both specific structural and specific functional predictions about zinc finger consensus sequences that can be tested with a combination of genetic, molecular biological, and biophysical techniques. The yeast transcription factor ADR1 contains two adjacent zinc finger domains; genetic and deletion analyses showed that amino acid substitutions and deletions in the zinc finger domains resulted in the loss of protein activity. To test the structural and folding predictions of the zinc finger model, peptides encompassing each of the ADR1 fingers were synthesized (ADR1a and ADR1b) as well as a mutant finger peptide (del138) deleted for a single amino acid residue. The folding and metal-binding characteristics of these were assessed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and visible spectroscopy. While a single unique conformational species was detected for the two wild-type peptides upon tetrahedral binding of zinc, the deletion peptide did not bind zinc with tetrahedral geometry, nor did it fold into a zinc finger domain. The metal-binding and folding results found with the mutant peptide were similar to those obtained when thiol alkylation or imidazole protonation of the wild-type peptides was performed. These data indicate that ligand spacing and both thiol and imidazole participation in zinc binding are specific and necessary requirements for zinc finger folding, which provides direct support for the initial predictions of the model.

  7. Spectroscopic studies of wild-type and mutant "zinc finger" peptides: determinants of domain folding and structure.

    PubMed Central

    Párraga, G; Horvath, S; Hood, L; Young, E T; Klevit, R E

    1990-01-01

    The "zinc finger" model [Miller, J., McLachlan, A. D. & Klug, A. (1985) EMBO J. 4, 1609-1614; Brown, R. S., Sander, C. & Argos, P. (1985) FEBS Lett. 186, 271-274] makes both specific structural and specific functional predictions about zinc finger consensus sequences that can be tested with a combination of genetic, molecular biological, and biophysical techniques. The yeast transcription factor ADR1 contains two adjacent zinc finger domains; genetic and deletion analyses showed that amino acid substitutions and deletions in the zinc finger domains resulted in the loss of protein activity. To test the structural and folding predictions of the zinc finger model, peptides encompassing each of the ADR1 fingers were synthesized (ADR1a and ADR1b) as well as a mutant finger peptide (del138) deleted for a single amino acid residue. The folding and metal-binding characteristics of these were assessed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and visible spectroscopy. While a single unique conformational species was detected for the two wild-type peptides upon tetrahedral binding of zinc, the deletion peptide did not bind zinc with tetrahedral geometry, nor did it fold into a zinc finger domain. The metal-binding and folding results found with the mutant peptide were similar to those obtained when thiol alkylation or imidazole protonation of the wild-type peptides was performed. These data indicate that ligand spacing and both thiol and imidazole participation in zinc binding are specific and necessary requirements for zinc finger folding, which provides direct support for the initial predictions of the model. PMID:2104978

  8. Effects of sequence changes in the HIV-1 gp41 fusion peptide on CCR5 inhibitor resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Johan Klasse, Per; Moore, John P.

    2012-07-05

    A rare pathway of HIV-1 resistance to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors such as Vicriviroc (VCV) involves changes solely in the gp41 fusion peptide (FP). Here, we show that the G516V change is critical to VCV resistance in PBMC and TZM-bl cells, although it must be accompanied by either M518V or F519I to have a substantial impact. Modeling VCV inhibition data from the two cell types indicated that G516V allows both double mutants to use VCV-CCR5 complexes for entry. The model further identified F519I as an independent determinant of preference for the unoccupied, high-VCV affinity form of CCR5. From inhibitor-free reversion cultures, we also identified a substitution in the inner domain of gp120, T244A, which appears to counter the resistance phenotype created by the FP substitutions. Examining the interplay of these changes will enhance our understanding of Env complex interactions that influence both HIV-1 entry and resistance to CCR5 inhibitors.

  9. Structure and Dynamics of a Fusion Peptide Helical Hairpin on the Membrane Surface: Comparison of Molecular Simulations and NMR

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The conserved N-terminal residues of the HA2 subunit of influenza hemagglutinin (fusion peptide) are essential for membrane fusion and viral entry. Recent NMR studies showed that the 23-residue fusion peptide forms a helical hairpin that undergoes rocking motion relative to the membrane surface on a nanosecond time scale. To compare with NMR and to obtain a detailed molecular picture of the peptide–membrane interaction, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the fusion peptide in explicit dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and with the IMM1 implicit membrane model. To account for low and neutral pH conditions, simulations were performed with acidic groups (E11 and D19) protonated and unprotonated, respectively. The hairpin structure was stable in the simulations, with the N-terminal helix buried more deeply into the hydrophobic membrane interior than the C-terminal helix. Interactions between the tryptophans in the fusion peptide and phospholipid residues contribute to peptide orientation. Higher flexibility of the hairpin was observed in the implicit membrane simulations. Internal correlation functions of backbone N–H vectors were fit to the extended Lipari–Szabo model-free approach to obtain order parameters and correlation times. Good agreement with the NMR results was obtained for orientational fluctuations around the hairpin axis (rotation), but those around the perpendicular axis (tilting) were more limited in the simulations than inferred from the NMR experiments. PMID:24712538

  10. Mutant Fusion Proteins with Enhanced Fusion Activity Promote Measles Virus Spread in Human Neuronal Cells and Brains of Suckling Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Shirogane, Yuta; Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Ikegame, Satoshi; Koga, Ritsuko

    2013-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a fatal degenerative disease caused by persistent measles virus (MV) infection in the central nervous system (CNS). From the genetic study of MV isolates obtained from SSPE patients, it is thought that defects of the matrix (M) protein play a crucial role in MV pathogenicity in the CNS. In this study, we report several notable mutations in the extracellular domain of the MV fusion (F) protein, including those found in multiple SSPE strains. The F proteins with these mutations induced syncytium formation in cells lacking SLAM and nectin 4 (receptors used by wild-type MV), including human neuronal cell lines, when expressed together with the attachment protein hemagglutinin. Moreover, recombinant viruses with these mutations exhibited neurovirulence in suckling hamsters, unlike the parental wild-type MV, and the mortality correlated with their fusion activity. In contrast, the recombinant MV lacking the M protein did not induce syncytia in cells lacking SLAM and nectin 4, although it formed larger syncytia in cells with either of the receptors. Since human neuronal cells are mainly SLAM and nectin 4 negative, fusion-enhancing mutations in the extracellular domain of the F protein may greatly contribute to MV spread via cell-to-cell fusion in the CNS, regardless of defects of the M protein. PMID:23255801

  11. Dendritic-tumor fusion cells derived heat shock protein70-peptide complex has enhanced immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfei; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Jun; Liu, Yunyan; Luo, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-derived heat shock protein70-peptide complexes (HSP70.PC-Tu) have shown great promise in tumor immunotherapy due to numerous advantages. However, large-scale phase III clinical trials showed that the limited immunogenicity remained to be enhanced. In previous research, we demonstrated that heat shock protein 70-peptide complexes (HSP70.PC-Fc) derived from dendritic cell (DC)-tumor fusions exhibit enhanced immunogenicity compared with HSP70.PCs from tumor cells. However, the DCs used in our previous research were obtained from healthy donors and not from the patient population. In order to promote the clinical application of these complexes, HSP70.PC-Fc was prepared from patient-derived DC fused directly with patient-derived tumor cells in the current study. Our results showed that compared with HSP70.PC-Tu, HSP70.PC-Fc elicited much more powerful immune responses against the tumor from which the HSP70 was derived, including enhanced T cell activation, and CTL responses that were shown to be antigen specific and HLA restricted. Our results further indicated that the enhanced immunogenicity is related to the activation of CD4+ T cells and increased association with other heat shock proteins, such as HSP90. Therefore, the current study confirms the enhanced immunogenicity of HSP70.PC derived from DC-tumor fusions and may provide direct evidence promoting their future clinical use.

  12. Membrane Fusion Mediated by pH-Low-Insertion-Peptide (pHLIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Jennifer; Yao, Lan; Engelman, Donald; Andreev, Oleg; Reshetnyak, Yana

    2012-02-01

    Liposomes are traditionally used as drug delivery carriers. The major mechanism of liposome entry into cell is endocytotic. First, the endocytotic pathway of cellular entry is non-specific: the delivery of therapeutics occurs to cells in both diseased and healthy tissues. Second, liposomes are usually trapped in endosome/lysosome, which prevents delivery of therapeutics to cytoplasm. We proposed to use pHLIP (pH-Low-Insertion-Peptide) to promote selective delivery of the liposome content to cytoplasm of cancer cells. We showed that liposomes coated with PEG polymer and pHLIP peptide enhance membrane fusion in acidic environments. pHLIP promotes fusion between lipid bilayer of liposome and plasma membrane or membrane of endosome/lysosome, which results in intracellular delivery of payload. Liposomes composed of 5 % pHLIP and 5 % PEG were ideal for the delivery. Since cancer and other pathological states produce an acid extracellular environment, this allows the liposome to target diseased tissue while avoiding healthy tissue (with neutral pH in extracellular space). The work is supported by NIH grants CA133890 to OAA, DME, YRK.

  13. Purification of inclusion body-forming peptides and proteins in soluble form by fusion to Escherichia coli thermostable proteins.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Arjun; Shahnawaz, Md; Karki, Pratap; Raj Dahal, Giri; Sharoar, Md Golam; Yub Shin, Song; Sup Lee, Jung; Cho, Byungyun; Park, Il-Seon

    2008-05-01

    Proteins and peptides expressed in the prokaryotic system often form inclusion bodies. Solubilization and refolding procedures can be used for their recovery, but this process remains difficult. One strategy for improving the solubility of a protein of interest is to fuse it to a highly soluble protein. To select a suitable fusion partner capable of solubilizing the aggregation-prone (inclusion body-forming) proteins and peptides, Escherichia coli thermostable proteins were identified and tested. Among them, trigger factor (TF) protein was selected because of its high expression and stability. Using an expression system based on fusion to TF, selected proteins and peptides that otherwise form inclusion bodies were expressed in soluble state and were purified like other soluble proteins. This system provides a convenient method for production of aggregation-prone proteins and peptides. PMID:18476832

  14. Application of REDOR subtraction for filtered MAS observation of labeled backbone carbons of membrane-bound fusion peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Parkanzky, Paul D.; Bodner, Michele L.; Duskin, Craig A.; Weliky, David P.

    2002-12-01

    Clean MAS observation of 13C-labeled carbons in membrane-bound HIV-1 and influenza fusion peptides was made by using a rotational-echo double-resonance spectroscopy (REDOR) filter of directly bonded 13C- 15N pairs. The clean filtering achieved with the REDOR approach is superior to filtering done with sample difference spectroscopy. In one labeling approach, the peptide had labels at a single 13C carbonyl and its directly bonded 15N. The resulting chemical shift distribution of the filtered signal is used to assess the distribution of local secondary structures at the labeled carbonyl. For the influenza peptide, the Leu-2 carbonyl chemical shift distribution is shown to vary markedly with lipid and detergent composition, as well as peptide:lipid ratio, suggesting that the local peptide structure also has a strong dependence on these factors. Because most carboxylic- and amino-labeled amino acids are commercially available, this REDOR approach should have broad applicability to chemically synthesized peptides as well as bacterially synthesized proteins. In a second labeling approach, the HIV-1 fusion peptide had U- 13C, 15N labeling over three sequential residues. When a 1.6 ms REDOR dephasing time is used, only backbone 13C signals are observed. The resulting spectra are used to determine spectral linewidths and to assess feasibility of assignment of uniformly labeled peptide.

  15. Reconstitution of membrane proteins into giant unilamellar vesicles via peptide-induced fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Kahya, N; Pécheur, E I; de Boeij, W P; Wiersma, D A; Hoekstra, D

    2001-01-01

    In this work, we present a protocol to reconstitute membrane proteins into giant unilamellar vesicles (GUV) via peptide-induced fusion. In principle, GUV provide a well-defined lipid matrix, resembling a close-to-native state for biophysical studies, including optical microspectroscopy, of transmembrane proteins at the molecular level. Furthermore, reconstitution in this manner would also eliminate potential artifacts arising from secondary interactions of proteins, when reconstituted in planar membranes supported on solid surfaces. However, assembly procedures of GUV preclude direct reconstitution. Here, for the first time, a method is described that allows the controlled incorporation of membrane proteins into GUV. We demonstrate that large unilamellar vesicles (LUV, diameter 0.1 microm), to which the small fusogenic peptide WAE has been covalently attached, readily fuse with GUV, as revealed by monitoring lipid and contents mixing by fluorescence microscopy. To monitor contents mixing, a new fluorescence-based enzymatic assay was devised. Fusion does not introduce changes in the membrane morphology, as shown by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Analysis of fluorescence confocal imaging intensity revealed that approximately 6 to 10 LUV fused per microm(2) of GUV surface. As a model protein, bacteriorhodopsin (BR) was reconstituted into GUV, using LUV into which BR was incorporated via detergent dialysis. BR did not affect GUV-LUV fusion and the protein was stably inserted into the GUV and functionally active. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy experiments show that BR inserted into GUV undergoes unrestricted Brownian motion with a diffusion coefficient of 1.2 microm(2)/s. The current procedure offers new opportunities to address issues related to membrane-protein structure and dynamics in a close-to-native state. PMID:11509360

  16. Characterization of a highly conserved domain within the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus spike protein S2 domain with characteristics of a viral fusion peptide.

    PubMed

    Madu, Ikenna G; Roth, Shoshannah L; Belouzard, Sandrine; Whittaker, Gary R

    2009-08-01

    Many viral fusion proteins are primed by proteolytic cleavage near their fusion peptides. While the coronavirus (CoV) spike (S) protein is known to be cleaved at the S1/S2 boundary, this cleavage site is not closely linked to a fusion peptide. However, a second cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). Here, we investigated whether this internal cleavage of S2 exposes a viral fusion peptide. We show that the residues immediately C-terminal to the SARS-CoV S2 cleavage site SFIEDLLFNKVTLADAGF are very highly conserved across all CoVs. Mutagenesis studies of these residues in SARS-CoV S, followed by cell-cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for residues L803, L804, and F805 in membrane fusion. Mutation of the most N-terminal residue (S798) had little or no effect on membrane fusion. Biochemical analyses of synthetic peptides corresponding to the proposed S2 fusion peptide also showed an important role for this region in membrane fusion and indicated the presence of alpha-helical structure. We propose that proteolytic cleavage within S2 exposes a novel internal fusion peptide for SARS-CoV S, which may be conserved across the Coronaviridae.

  17. Development of a peptide-based vaccine targeting TMPRSS2:ERG fusion positive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kissick, Haydn Thomas; Sanda, Martin George; Dunn, Laura Kathleen; Arredouani, Mohamed Simo

    2013-01-01

    Identification of novel vaccine targets is critical for the design and advancement of prostate cancer (PCa) immunotherapy. Ideal targets are proteins that are abundant in prostate tumors while absent in extra-prostatic tissues. The fusion of the androgen-regulated TMPRSS2 gene with the ETS transcription factor ERG occurs in approximately 50% of prostate cancer cases and results in aberrant ERG expression. Because expression of ERG is very low in peripheral tissue, we evaluated the suitability of this protein as an antigen target in PCa vaccines. ERG-derived HLA-A*0201-restricted immunogenic epitopes were identified through a 3-step strategy that included in silico, in vitro, and in vivo validation. Algorithms were used to predict potential HLA-A*0201-binding epitopes. High scoring epitopes were tested for binding to HLA-A*0201 using the T2-based stabilization assay in vitro. Five peptides were found to bind HLA-A*0201 and were subsequently tested for immunogenicity in humanized HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. The in vivo screening identified three immunogenic peptides. One of these peptides, ERG295, overcame peripheral tolerance in HLA-A*0201 mice that expressed prostate restricted ERG. Also, this peptide induced an antigen specific response against ERG-expressing human prostate tumor cells. Finally, tetramer assay showed detectable and responsive ERG295-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes in peripheral blood of HLA-A*0201+ prostate cancer patients. Detection of ERG-specific CTLs in both mice and the blood of prostate cancer patients indicates that ERG-specific tolerance can be overcome. Additionally, these data suggest that ERG is a suitable target antigen for PCa immunotherapy. PMID:24149465

  18. Prediction of Signal Peptide Cleavage Sites with Subsite-Coupled and Template Matching Fusion Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Wu; Zhang, Ting-He; Zhang, Jun-Nan; Huang, Yufei

    2014-03-01

    Fast and effective prediction of signal peptides (SP) and their cleavage sites is of great importance in computational biology. The approaches developed to predict signal peptide can be roughly divided into machine learning based, and sliding windows based. In order to further increase the prediction accuracy and coverage of organism for SP cleavage sites, we propose a novel method for predicting SP cleavage sites called Signal-CTF that utilizes machine learning and sliding windows, and is designed for N-termial secretory proteins in a large variety of organisms including human, animal, plant, virus, bacteria, fungi and archaea. Signal-CTF consists of three distinct elements: (1) a subsite-coupled and regularization function with a scaled window of fixed width that selects a set of candidates of possible secretion-cleavable segment for a query secretory protein; (2) a sum fusion system that integrates the outcomes from aligning the cleavage site template sequence with each of the aforementioned candidates in a scaled window of fixed width to determine the best candidate cleavage sites for the query secretory protein; (3) a voting system that identifies the ultimate signal peptide cleavage site among all possible results derived from using scaled windows of different width. When compared with Signal-3L and SignalP 4.0 predictors, the prediction accuracy of Signal-CTF is 4-12 %, 10-25 % higher than that of Signal-3L for human, animal and eukaryote, and SignalP 4.0 for eukaryota, Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria, respectively. Comparing with PRED-SIGNAL and SignalP 4.0 predictors on the 32 archaea secretory proteins of used in Bagos's paper, the prediction accuracy of Signal-CTF is 12.5 %, 25 % higher than that of PRED-SIGNAL and SignalP 4.0, respectively. The predicting results of several long signal peptides show that the Signal-CTF can better predict cleavage sites for long signal peptides than SignalP, Phobius, Philius, SPOCTOPUS, Signal

  19. Characterisation and evaluation of antiviral recombinant peptides based on the heptad repeat regions of NDV and IBV fusion glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaojia Li Chuangen; Chi Xiaojing; Wang Ming

    2011-06-20

    Mixed virus infections can cause livestock losses that are more devastating than those caused by single virus infections. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), serious threats to the poultry industry, can give rise to complex mixed infections that hinder diagnosis and prevention. In this study, we show that newly designed peptides, which are based on the heptad repeat (HR) region of the fusion glycoproteins from NDV and IBV, have more potent antiviral activity than the mother HR peptides. Plaque formation and chicken embryo infectivity assays confirmed these results. The novel peptides completely inhibited single virus infections and mixed infections caused by NDV and IBV. Furthermore, we assessed cell toxicity and possible targets for the peptides, thereby strengthening the notion that HR2 is an attractive site for therapeutic intervention. These results suggest the possibility of designing a relatively broad-spectrum class of antiviral peptides that can reduce the effects of mixed-infections.

  20. Fusion mutants of Newcastle disease virus selected with monoclonal antibodies to the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase.

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, R M; Glickman, R L

    1992-01-01

    The Australia-Victoria (AV) isolate of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) induces fusion from within but not fusion from without. L1, a neuraminidase (NA)-deficient virus derived from AV, has the opposite fusion phenotype from the wild-type virus. It fails to induce the former mode of fusion, but has gained a limited ability to promote the latter. Monoclonal antibodies to antigenic site 23 on the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein have previously been shown to select variants of the AV isolate that have altered NA activity or receptor-binding affinity. By using an antibody to this site, variants of L1 have been selected. Three of the variants have gained an increased affinity for sialic acid-containing receptors, as evidenced by the resistance of their hemagglutinating activity to the presence of reduced amounts of sialic acid on the surface of chicken erythrocytes. All four variants still have very low levels of NA activity, comparable to that of the parent virus, L1. The alteration in receptor-binding affinity results in a decreased potential for elution from cellular receptors and correlates with an increased ability to promote both modes of fusion. A single amino acid substitution in the HN protein of each variant, responsible for its escape from neutralization, has been identified. These studies identify two HN residues, 193 and 203, at which monoclonal antibody-selected substitution influences the receptor recognition properties of NDV and may influence its ability to promote syncytium formation. Images PMID:1404607

  1. An ALS-mutant TDP-43 neurotoxic peptide adopts an anti-parallel β-structure and induces TDP-43 redistribution.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Xu, Meng; Yang, Mengxue; Yang, Yanlian; Li, Yang; Deng, Jianwen; Ruan, Linhao; Liu, Jianghong; Du, Sidan; Liu, Xuehui; Feng, Wei; Fushimi, Kazuo; Bigio, Eileen H; Mesulam, Marsel; Wang, Chen; Wu, Jane Y

    2014-12-20

    TDP-43 proteinopathies are clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases that had been considered distinct from classical amyloid diseases. Here, we provide evidence for the structural similarity between TDP-43 peptides and other amyloid proteins. Atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy examination of peptides spanning a previously defined amyloidogenic fragment revealed a minimal core region that forms amyloid fibrils similar to the TDP-43 fibrils detected in FTLD-TDP brain tissues. An ALS-mutant A315E amyloidogenic TDP-43 peptide is capable of cross-seeding other TDP-43 peptides and an amyloid-β peptide. Sequential Nuclear Overhauser Effects and double-quantum-filtered correlation spectroscopy in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses of the A315E-mutant TDP-43 peptide indicate that it adopts an anti-parallel β conformation. When added to cell cultures, the amyloidogenic TDP-43 peptides induce TDP-43 redistribution from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Neuronal cultures in compartmentalized microfluidic-chambers demonstrate that the TDP-43 peptides can be taken up by axons and induce axonotoxicity and neuronal death, thus recapitulating key neuropathological features of TDP-43 proteinopathies. Importantly, a single amino acid change in the amyloidogenic TDP-43 peptide that disrupts fibril formation also eliminates neurotoxicity, supporting that amyloidogenesis is critical for TDP-43 neurotoxicity.

  2. Identification of a Potent and Broad-Spectrum Hepatitis C Virus Fusion Inhibitory Peptide from the E2 Stem Domain

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Xiaojing; Niu, Yuqiang; Cheng, Min; Liu, Xiuying; Feng, Yetong; Zheng, Fuxiang; Fan, Jingjing; Li, Xiang; Jin, Qi; Zhong, Jin; Li, Yi-Ping; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope proteins E1 and E2 play an essential role in virus entry. However, the fusion mechanisms of HCV remain largely unclear, hampering the development of efficient fusion inhibitors. Here, we developed two cell-based membrane fusion models that allow for screening a peptide library covering the full-length E1 and E2 amino acid sequences. A peptide from the E2 stem domain, named E27, was found to possess the ability to block E1E2-mediated cell-cell fusion and inhibit cell entry of HCV pseudoparticles and infection of cell culture-derived HCV at nanomolar concentrations. E27 demonstrated broad-spectrum inhibition of the major genotypes 1 to 6. A time-of-addition experiment revealed that E27 predominantly functions in the late steps during HCV entry, without influencing the expression and localization of HCV co-receptors. Moreover, we demonstrated that E27 interfered with hetero-dimerization of ectopically expressed E1E2 in cells, and mutational analysis suggested that E27 might target a conserved region in E1. Taken together, our findings provide a novel candidate as well as a strategy for developing potent and broad-spectrum HCV fusion inhibitors, which may complement the current direct-acting antiviral medications for chronic hepatitis C, and shed light on the mechanism of HCV membrane fusion. PMID:27121372

  3. On the mechanism of targeting of phage fusion protein-modified nanocarriers: only the binding peptide sequence matters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Kulkarni, Nikita; D'Souza, Gerard G M; Petrenko, Valery A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2011-10-01

    The integration of pharmaceutical nanocarriers with phage display techniques is emerging as a new paradigm for targeted cancer nanomedicines. We explored the direct use of landscape phage fusion proteins for the self-assembly of phage-derived binding peptides to liposomes for cancer cell targeting. The primary purpose of this study was to elucidate the targeting mechanism with a particular emphasis on the relative contributions of the two motifs that make up the landscape phage fusion protein (a binding peptide and the phage pVIII coat protein) to the targeting efficiency. Using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we confirmed the formation of phage-liposomes. Using FACS analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence photospectrometry, we found that liposomes modified with MCF-7-specific phage fusion proteins (MCF-7 binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, fused to the phage PVIII coat protein) provided a strong and specific association with target MCF-7 cancer cells but not with cocultured, nontarget cells including C166-GFP and NIH3T3. The substitution for the binding peptide fused to phage pVIII coat protein abolished the targeting specificity. The addition of free binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, competitively inhibited the interaction of MCF-7-specific phage-liposomes with target MCF-7 cells but showed no reduction of MCF-7-associated plain liposomes. The proteolysis of the binding peptide reduced MCF-7 cell-associated phage-liposomes in a proteinase K (PK) concentration-dependent manner with no effect on the binding of plain liposomes to MCF-7 cells. Overall, only the binding peptide motif was involved in the targeting specificity of phage-liposomes. The presence of phage pVIII coat protein did not interfere with the targeting efficiency. PMID:21675738

  4. On the mechanism of targeting of phage fusion protein-modified nanocarriers: only the binding peptide sequence matters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Kulkarni, Nikita; D’Souza, Gerard G.M.; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of pharmaceutical nanocarriers with phage display techniques is emerging as a new paradigm for targeted cancer nanomedicines. We explored the direct use of landscape phage fusion proteins for the self-assembly of phage-derived binding peptides to liposomes for cancer cell targeting. The primary purpose of this study was to elucidate the targeting mechanism with a particular emphasis on the relative contributions of the two motifs that make up the landscape phage fusion protein (a binding peptide and the phage pVIII coat protein) to the targeting efficiency. Using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we confirmed the formation of phage-liposomes. Using FACS analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence photospectrometry, we found that liposomes modified with MCF-7-specific phage fusion proteins (MCF-7 binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, fused to the phage PVIII coat protein) provided a strong and specific association with target MCF-7 cancer cells but not with co-cultured, non-target cells including C166-GFP and NIH3T3. The substitution for the binding peptide fused to phage pVIII coat protein abolished the targeting specificity. The addition of free binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, competitively inhibited the interaction of MCF-7-specific phage-liposomes with target MCF-7 cells but showed no reduction of MCF-7-associated plain liposomes. The proteolysis of the binding peptide reduced MCF-7 cell-associated phage-liposomes in a proteinase K (PK) concentration-dependent manner with no effect on the binding of plain liposomes to MCF-7 cells. Overall, only the binding peptide motif was involved in the targeting specificity of phage-liposomes. The presence of phage pVIII coat protein did not interfere with the targeting efficiency. PMID:21675738

  5. Improved Pharmacological and Structural Properties of HIV Fusion Inhibitor AP3 over Enfuvirtide: Highlighting Advantages of Artificial Peptide Strategy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Xiaojie; Zhu, Yun; Ye, Sheng; Wang, Qian; Xu, Wei; Su, Shan; Sun, Zhiwu; Yu, Fei; Liu, Qi; Wang, Chao; et al

    2015-08-19

    Enfuvirtide (T20), is the first HIV fusion inhibitor approved for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients who fail to respond to the current antiretroviral drugs. However, its clinical application is limited because of short half-life, drug resistance and cross-reactivity with the preexisting antibodies in HIV-infected patients. Using an artificial peptide strategy, we designed a peptide with non-native protein sequence, AP3, which exhibited potent antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains, including those resistant to T20, and had remarkably longer in vivo half-life than T20. While the preexisting antibodies in HIV-infected patients significantly suppressed T20’s antiviral activity, these antibodies neither recognizedmore » AP3, nor attenuated its anti-HIV-1 activity. Structurally different from T20, AP3 could fold into single-helix and interact with gp41 NHR. The two residues, Met and Thr, at the N-terminus of AP3 form a hook-like structure to stabilize interaction between AP3 and NHR helices. Therefore, AP3 has potential for further development as a new HIV fusion inhibitor with improved antiviral efficacy, resistance profile and pharmacological properties over enfuvirtide. Meanwhile, this study highlighted the advantages of artificially designed peptides, and confirmed that this strategy could be used in developing artificial peptide-based viral fusion inhibitors against HIV and other enveloped viruses.« less

  6. Triepitopic antibody fusions inhibit cetuximab-resistant BRAF- and KRAS-mutant tumors via EGFR signal repression

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, Jamie B.; Manzari, Mandana T.; Rosalia, Elizabeth K.; Chen, Tiffany F.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a hallmark of many epithelial cancers, rendering this receptor an attractive target for cancer therapy. Much effort has been focused on the development of EGFR-directed antibody-based therapeutics, culminating in the clinical approval of the drugs cetuximab and panitumumab. Unfortunately, the clinical efficacy of these drugs has been disappointingly low and a particular challenge to targeting EGFR with antibody therapeutics has been resistance resulting from mutations in the downstream raf and ras effector proteins. Recent work demonstrating antibody cocktail-induced synergistic downregulation of EGFR motivated our design of cetuximab-based antibody-fibronectin domain fusion proteins that exploit downregulation-based EGFR inhibition by simultaneously targeting multiple receptor epitopes. We establish that amongst our engineered multiepitopic formats, trans-triepitopic antibody fusions demonstrate optimal efficacy, inducing rapid EGFR clustering and internalization, and consequently ablating downstream signaling. The combined effects of EGFR downregulation, ligand competition, and immune effector function conspire to inhibit tumor growth in xenograft models of cetuximab-resistant BRAF- and KRAS-mutant cancers. Our designed triepitopic constructs have the potential to enhance the efficacy and expand the scope of EGFR-directed therapies and our multiepitopic may be readily applied to other receptor targets to formulate a new class of antibody-based therapeutics. PMID:22706026

  7. A turquoise mutant genetically separates expression of genes encoding phycoerythrin and its associated linker peptides.

    PubMed

    Seib, Laura Ort; Kehoe, David M

    2002-02-01

    During complementary chromatic adaptation (CCA), cyanobacterial light harvesting structures called phycobilisomes are restructured in response to ambient light quality shifts. Transcription of genes encoding components of the phycobilisome is differentially regulated during this process: red light activates cpcB2A2, whereas green light coordinately activates the cpeCDE and cpeBA operons. Three signal transduction components that regulate CCA have been isolated to date: a sensor-photoreceptor (RcaE) and two response regulators (RcaF and RcaC). Mutations in the genes encoding these components affect the accumulation of both cpcB2A2 and cpeBA gene products. We have isolated and characterized a new pigmentation mutant called Turquoise 1. We demonstrate that this mutant phenotype is due to a dramatic decrease in cpeBA transcript abundance and results from a lesion in the cpeR gene. However, in this mutant cpeCDE RNA levels remain near those found in wild-type cells. Our results show that the coordinate regulation of cpeBA and cpeCDE by green light can be uncoupled by the loss of CpeR, and we furnish the first genetic evidence that different regulatory mechanisms control these two operons. Sequence analysis of CpeR reveals that it shares limited sequence similarity to members of the PP2C class of protein serine/threonine phosphatases. We also demonstrate that cpeBA and cpeCDE retain light quality responsiveness in a mutant lacking the RcaE photoreceptor. This provides compelling evidence for the partial control of CCA through an as-yet-uncharacterized second light quality sensing system.

  8. Line-Tension Controlled Mechanism for Influenza Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Risselada, Herre Jelger; Smirnova, Yuliya G.; Grubmüller, Helmut; Marrink, Siewert Jan; Müller, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Our molecular simulations reveal that wild-type influenza fusion peptides are able to stabilize a highly fusogenic pre-fusion structure, i.e. a peptide bundle formed by four or more trans-membrane arranged fusion peptides. We rationalize that the lipid rim around such bundle has a non-vanishing rim energy (line-tension), which is essential to (i) stabilize the initial contact point between the fusing bilayers, i.e. the stalk, and (ii) drive its subsequent evolution. Such line-tension controlled fusion event does not proceed along the hypothesized standard stalk-hemifusion pathway. In modeled influenza fusion, single point mutations in the influenza fusion peptide either completely inhibit fusion (mutants G1V and W14A) or, intriguingly, specifically arrest fusion at a hemifusion state (mutant G1S). Our simulations demonstrate that, within a line-tension controlled fusion mechanism, these known point mutations either completely inhibit fusion by impairing the peptide’s ability to stabilize the required peptide bundle (G1V and W14A) or stabilize a persistent bundle that leads to a kinetically trapped hemifusion state (G1S). In addition, our results further suggest that the recently discovered leaky fusion mutant G13A, which is known to facilitate a pronounced leakage of the target membrane prior to lipid mixing, reduces the membrane integrity by forming a ‘super’ bundle. Our simulations offer a new interpretation for a number of experimentally observed features of the fusion reaction mediated by the prototypical fusion protein, influenza hemagglutinin, and might bring new insights into mechanisms of other viral fusion reactions. PMID:22761674

  9. Detection of closed influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion peptide structures in membranes by backbone (13)CO- (15)N rotational-echo double-resonance solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ujjayini; Xie, Li; Weliky, David P

    2013-02-01

    The influenza virus fusion peptide is the N-terminal ~20 residues of the HA2 subunit of the hemagglutinin protein and this peptide plays a key role in the fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes during initial infection of a cell. The fusion peptide adopts N-helix/turn/C-helix structure in both detergent and membranes with reports of both open and closed interhelical topologies. In the present study, backbone (13)CO-(15)N REDOR solid-state NMR was applied to the membrane-associated fusion peptide to detect the distribution of interhelical distances. The data clearly showed a large fraction of closed and semi-closed topologies and were best-fitted to a mixture of two structures that do not exchange. One of the earlier open structural models may have incorrect G13 dihedral angles derived from TALOS analysis of experimentally correct (13)C shifts.

  10. Topical and Targeted Delivery of siRNAs to Melanoma Cells Using a Fusion Peptide Carrier.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Renquan; Chen, Ming; Sun, Sijie; Wei, Pengfei; Zou, Lili; Liu, Jing; Gao, Dayong; Wen, Longping; Ding, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Topical application of siRNAs through the skin is a potentially effective strategy for the treatment of melanoma tumors. In this study, we designed a new and safe fusion peptide carrier SPACE-EGF to improve the skin and cell penetration function of the siRNAs and their targeting ability to B16 cells, such that the apoptosis of B16 cells can be induced. The results show that the carrier is stable and less toxic. The EGF motif does not affect the skin and cell penetration function of the SPACE. Because EGF can strongly bind EGFR, which is overexpressed in cancer cells, the targeting ability of the SPACE-EGF-siRNA complex is increased. In vitro experiments indicate that GAPDH siRNAs conjugated with SPACE-EGF can significantly reduce the GAPDH concentration in B16 cells, and c-Myc siRNAs can cause the gene silencing of c-Myc and thus the apoptosis of cells. In vivo experiments show that the topical application of c-Myc siRNAs delivered by SPACE-EGF through the skin can significantly inhibit the growth of melanoma tumors. This work may provide insight into the development of new transdermal drug carriers to treat a variety of skin disorders. PMID:27374619

  11. Topical and Targeted Delivery of siRNAs to Melanoma Cells Using a Fusion Peptide Carrier

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Renquan; Chen, Ming; Sun, Sijie; Wei, Pengfei; Zou, Lili; Liu, Jing; Gao, Dayong; Wen, Longping; Ding, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Topical application of siRNAs through the skin is a potentially effective strategy for the treatment of melanoma tumors. In this study, we designed a new and safe fusion peptide carrier SPACE-EGF to improve the skin and cell penetration function of the siRNAs and their targeting ability to B16 cells, such that the apoptosis of B16 cells can be induced. The results show that the carrier is stable and less toxic. The EGF motif does not affect the skin and cell penetration function of the SPACE. Because EGF can strongly bind EGFR, which is overexpressed in cancer cells, the targeting ability of the SPACE-EGF-siRNA complex is increased. In vitro experiments indicate that GAPDH siRNAs conjugated with SPACE-EGF can significantly reduce the GAPDH concentration in B16 cells, and c-Myc siRNAs can cause the gene silencing of c-Myc and thus the apoptosis of cells. In vivo experiments show that the topical application of c-Myc siRNAs delivered by SPACE-EGF through the skin can significantly inhibit the growth of melanoma tumors. This work may provide insight into the development of new transdermal drug carriers to treat a variety of skin disorders. PMID:27374619

  12. b3a2 BCR-ABL fusion peptides as targets for cytotoxic T cells in chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Norbury, L C; Clark, R E; Christmas, S E

    2000-06-01

    Peptide sequences spanning the BCR-ABL protein junction potentially constitute novel leukaemia-specific antigens. 9-mer b3a2 fusion peptides have been reported to bind with high affinity to HLA-A3, -A11 and -B8. We have studied the effect of b3a2 BCR-ABL junctional peptides on the cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) response against normal and chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) cells. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) were prepared from HLA-A3- or -B8-positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by incubation with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and interleukin (IL)-2 for 7 d. These APCs were pulsed with the respective b3a2 junctional peptide in the presence of beta2-microglobulin and were then used to challenge autologous PBMCs at 7-d intervals in the presence of IL-2, IL-6, IL-7 and IL-12. On subsequent exposure to target cells (either further pulsed normal APCs or unpulsed CML cells), specific HLA-restricted CTL responses were observed against all HLA-A3/-B8 matched normal target cells tested, but not to targets that were HLA mismatched. Cytotoxicity was also induced against HLA-A3/-B8 unpulsed CML cells, but not against unmatched CML cells. These data indicate (i) that endogenous BCR-ABL junctional peptides may be presented by CML cells and (ii) that exogenous peptides are potential stimulators of autologous antileukaemic CTLs.

  13. Expression and purification of chimeric peptide comprising EGFR B-cell epitope and measles virus fusion protein T-cell epitope in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meizhi; Zhao, Lin; Zhu, Lei; Chen, Zhange; Li, Huangjin

    2013-03-01

    Chimeric peptide MVF-EGFR(237-267), comprising a B-cell epitope from the dimerization interface of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and a promiscuous T-cell epitope from measles virus fusion protein (MVF), is a promising candidate antigen peptide for therapeutic vaccine. To establish a high-efficiency preparation process of this small peptide, the coding sequence was cloned into pET-21b and pET-32a respectively, to be expressed alone or in the form of fusion protein with thioredoxin (Trx) and His(6)-tag in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The chimeric peptide failed to be expressed alone, but over-expressed in the fusion form, which presented as soluble protein and took up more than 30% of total proteins of host cells. The fusion protein was seriously degraded during the cell disruption, in which endogenous metalloproteinase played a key role. Degradation of target peptide was inhibited by combined application of EDTA in the cell disruption buffer and a step of Source 30Q anion exchange chromatography (AEC) before metal-chelating chromatography (MCAC) for purifying His(6)-tagged fusion protein. The chimeric peptide was recovered from the purified fusion protein by enterokinase digestion at a yield of 3.0 mg/L bacteria culture with a purity of more than 95%. Immunogenicity analysis showed that the recombinant chimeric peptide was able to arouse more than 1×10(4) titers of specific antibody in BALB/c mice. Present work laid a solid foundation for the development of therapeutic peptide vaccine targeting EGFR dimerization and provided a convenient and low-cost preparation method for small peptides.

  14. Full-length trimeric influenza virus hemagglutinin II membrane fusion protein and shorter constructs lacking the fusion peptide or transmembrane domain: Hyperthermostability of the full-length protein and the soluble ectodomain and fusion peptide make significant contributions to fusion of membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, Punsisi U; Prabodha Ekanayaka, E A; Komanduru, Sweta S; Weliky, David P

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus is a class I enveloped virus which is initially endocytosed into a host respiratory epithelial cell. Subsequent reduction of the pH to the 5-6 range triggers a structural change of the viral hemagglutinin II (HA2) protein, fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes, and release of the viral nucleocapsid into the cytoplasm. HA2 contains fusion peptide (FP), soluble ectodomain (SE), transmembrane (TM), and intraviral domains with respective lengths of ∼ 25, ∼ 160, ∼ 25, and ∼ 10 residues. The present work provides a straightforward protocol for producing and purifying mg quantities of full-length HA2 from expression in bacteria. Biophysical and structural comparisons are made between full-length HA2 and shorter constructs including SHA2 ≡ SE, FHA2 ≡ FP+SE, and SHA2-TM ≡ SE+TM constructs. The constructs are helical in detergent at pH 7.4 and the dominant trimer species. The proteins are highly thermostable in decylmaltoside detergent with Tm>90 °C for HA2 with stabilization provided by the SE, FP, and TM domains. The proteins are likely in a trimer-of-hairpins structure, the final protein state during fusion. All constructs induce fusion of negatively-charged vesicles at pH 5.0 with much less fusion at pH 7.4. Attractive protein/vesicle electrostatics play a role in fusion, as the proteins are positively-charged at pH 5.0 and negatively-charged at pH 7.4 and the pH-dependence of fusion is reversed for positively-charged vesicles. Comparison of fusion between constructs supports significant contributions to fusion from the SE and the FP with little effect from the TM.

  15. Epidermal growth factor impairs palatal shelf adhesion and fusion in the Tgf-β 3 null mutant.

    PubMed

    Barrio, M Carmen; Del Río, Aurora; Murillo, Jorge; Maldonado, Estela; López-Gordillo, Yamila; Paradas-Lara, Irene; Hernandes, Luzmarina; Catón, Javier; Martínez-Álvarez, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    The cleft palate presented by transforming growth factor-β3 (Tgf-β3) null mutant mice is caused by altered palatal shelf adhesion, cell proliferation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation and cell death. The expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-β1 (Tgf-β1) and muscle segment homeobox-1 (Msx-1) is modified in the palates of these knockout mice, and the cell proliferation defect is caused by the change in EGF expression. In this study, we aimed to determine whether this change in EGF expression has any effect on the other mechanisms altered in Tgf-β3 knockout mouse palates. We tested the effect of inhibiting EGF activity in vitro in the knockout palates via the addition of Tyrphostin AG 1478. We also investigated possible interactions between EGF, Tgf-β1 and Msx-1 in Tgf-β3 null mouse palate cultures. The results show that the inhibition of EGF activity in Tgf-β3 null mouse palate cultures improves palatal shelf adhesion and fusion, with a particular effect on cell death, and restores the normal distribution pattern of Msx-1 in the palatal mesenchyme. Inhibition of TGF-β1 does not affect either EGF or Msx-1 expression.

  16. Dissection of the Role of the Stable Signal Peptide of the Arenavirus Envelope Glycoprotein in Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Emily L.; York, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    The arenavirus envelope glycoprotein (GPC) retains a stable signal peptide (SSP) as an essential subunit in the mature complex. The 58-amino-acid residue SSP comprises two membrane-spanning hydrophobic regions separated by a short ectodomain loop that interacts with the G2 fusion subunit to promote pH-dependent membrane fusion. Small-molecule compounds that target this unique SSP-G2 interaction prevent arenavirus entry and infection. The interaction between SSP and G2 is sensitive to the phylogenetic distance between New World (Junín) and Old World (Lassa) arenaviruses. For example, heterotypic GPC complexes are unable to support virion entry. In this report, we demonstrate that the hybrid GPC complexes are properly assembled, proteolytically cleaved, and transported to the cell surface but are specifically defective in their membrane fusion activity. Chimeric SSP constructs reveal that this incompatibility is localized to the first transmembrane segment of SSP (TM1). Genetic changes in TM1 also affect sensitivity to small-molecule fusion inhibitors, generating resistance in some cases and inhibitor dependence in others. Our studies suggest that interactions of SSP TM1 with the transmembrane domain of G2 may be important for GPC-mediated membrane fusion and its inhibition. PMID:22438561

  17. SARS Coronavirus Fusion Peptide-Derived Sequence Suppresses Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DBA/1J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zu T.; Sigalov, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    During the co-evolution of viruses and their hosts, the viruses have evolved numerous strategies to counter and evade host antiviral immune responses in order to establish a successful infection, replicate and persist in the host. Recently, based on our model of immune signaling, the Signaling Chain HOmoOLigomerization (SCHOOL) model, we suggested specific molecular mechanisms used by different viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) to modulate the host immune response mediated by members of the family of multichain immune recognition receptors (MIRRs). This family includes T cell receptor (TCR) that is critically involved in immune diseases such as autoimmune arthritis. In the present study, we provide compelling experimental in vivo evidence in support of our hypothesis. Using the SCHOOL approach and the SARS-CoV fusion peptide sequence, we rationally designed a novel immunomodulatory peptide that targets TCR. We showed that this peptide ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and protects against bone and cartilage damage. Incorporation of the peptide into self-assembling lipopeptide nanoparticles that mimic native human high density lipoproteins significantly increases peptide dosage efficacy. Together, our data further confirm that viral immune evasion strategies that target MIRRs can be transferred to therapeutic strategies that require similar functionalities. PMID:27349522

  18. SARS Coronavirus Fusion Peptide-Derived Sequence Suppresses Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DBA/1J Mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zu T; Sigalov, Alexander B

    2016-01-01

    During the co-evolution of viruses and their hosts, the viruses have evolved numerous strategies to counter and evade host antiviral immune responses in order to establish a successful infection, replicate and persist in the host. Recently, based on our model of immune signaling, the Signaling Chain HOmoOLigomerization (SCHOOL) model, we suggested specific molecular mechanisms used by different viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) to modulate the host immune response mediated by members of the family of multichain immune recognition receptors (MIRRs). This family includes T cell receptor (TCR) that is critically involved in immune diseases such as autoimmune arthritis. In the present study, we provide compelling experimental in vivo evidence in support of our hypothesis. Using the SCHOOL approach and the SARS-CoV fusion peptide sequence, we rationally designed a novel immunomodulatory peptide that targets TCR. We showed that this peptide ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and protects against bone and cartilage damage. Incorporation of the peptide into self-assembling lipopeptide nanoparticles that mimic native human high density lipoproteins significantly increases peptide dosage efficacy. Together, our data further confirm that viral immune evasion strategies that target MIRRs can be transferred to therapeutic strategies that require similar functionalities. PMID:27349522

  19. Half-life extension of the HIV-fusion inhibitor peptide TRI-1144 using a novel linker technology.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Eric L; Ashley, Gary W; Dillen, Lieve; Stoops, Bart; Austin, Nigel E; Malcolm, Bruce A; Santi, Daniel V

    2015-06-01

    We have previously developed a linker technology for half-life extension of peptides, proteins and small molecule drugs (1). The linkers undergo β-elimination reactions with predictable cleavage rates to release the native drug. Here we utilize this technology for half-life extension of the 38 amino acid HIV-1 fusion inhibitor TRI-1144. Conjugation of TRI-1144 to 40 kDa PEG by an appropriate β-eliminative linker and i.v. administration of the conjugate increased the in vivo half-life of the released peptide from 4 to 34 h in the rat, and the pharmacokinetic parameters were in excellent accord with a one-compartment model. From these data we simulated the pharmacokinetics of the PEG-TRI-1144 conjugate in humans, predicting a t1/2,β of 70 h for the released peptide, and that a serum concentration of 25 nM could be maintained by weekly doses of 8 μmol of the conjugate. Using a non-circulating carrier (2) similar simulations indicated a t1/2,β of 150 h for the peptide released from the conjugate and that dosing of only 1.8 μmol/week could maintain serum concentrations of TRI-1144 above 25 nM. Hence, releasable β-eliminative linkers provide significant half-life extension to TRI-1144 and would be expected to do likewise for related peptides.

  20. Generation of new peptide-Fc fusion proteins that mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against different types of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sioud, Mouldy; Westby, Phuong; Olsen, Julie Kristine E.; Mobergslien, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), a key effector function for the clinical effectiveness of monoclonal antibodies, is triggered by the engagement of the antibody Fc domain with the Fcγ receptors expressed by innate immune cells such as natural killer (NK) cells and macrophages. Here, we fused cancer cell-binding peptides to the Fc domain of human IgG1 to engineer novel peptide-Fc fusion proteins with ADCC activity. The designed fusion proteins were expressed in human embryonic kidney 293T cells, followed by purification and characterization by western blots. One of the engineered variants (WN-Fc), bound with high affinity to a wide range of solid tumor cell lines (e.g., colon, lung, prostate, skin, ovarian, and mammary tumors). Treatment of cancer cells with the engineered peptide-Fc fusions in the presence of effector NK cells potentially enhanced cytotoxicity, degranulation, and interferon-γ production by NK cells when compared to cells treated with the Fc control. The presence of competing peptides inhibited NK cell activation. Furthermore, a bispecific peptide-Fc fusion protein activated NK cells against HER-1- and/or HER-2-expressing cancer cells. Collectively, the engineered peptide-Fc fusions constitute a new promising strategy to recruit and activate NK cells against tumor cells, a primary goal of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26605373

  1. Control of silicification by genetically engineered fusion proteins: Silk–silica binding peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shun; Huang, Wenwen; Belton, David J.; Simmons, Leo O.; Perry, Carole C.; Wang, Xiaoqin; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, an artificial spider silk gene, 6mer, derived from the consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes dragline silk gene, was fused with different silica-binding peptides (SiBPs), A1, A3 and R5, to study the impact of the fusion protein sequence chemistry on silica formation and the ability to generate a silk–silica composite in two different bioinspired silicification systems: solution–solution and solution– solid. Condensed silica nanoscale particles (600–800 nm) were formed in the presence of the recombinant silk and chimeras, which were smaller than those formed by 15mer-SiBP chimeras [1], revealing that the molecular weight of the silk domain correlated to the sizes of the condensed silica particles in the solution system. In addition, the chimeras (6mer-A1/A3/R5) produced smaller condensed silica particles than the control (6mer), revealing that the silica particle size formed in the solution system is controlled by the size of protein assemblies in solution. In the solution–solid interface system, silicification reactions were performed on the surface of films fabricated from the recombinant silk proteins and chimeras and then treated to induce β-sheet formation. A higher density of condensed silica formed on the films containing the lowest β-sheet content while the films with the highest β-sheet content precipitated the lowest density of silica, revealing an inverse correlation between the β-sheet secondary structure and the silica content formed on the films. Intriguingly, the 6mer-A3 showed the highest rate of silica condensation but the lowest density of silica deposition on the films, compared with 6mer-A1 and -R5, revealing antagonistic crosstalk between the silk and the SiBP domains in terms of protein assembly. These findings offer a path forward in the tailoring of biopolymer–silica composites for biomaterial related needs. PMID:25462851

  2. Control of silicification by genetically engineered fusion proteins: silk-silica binding peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shun; Huang, Wenwen; Belton, David J; Simmons, Leo O; Perry, Carole C; Wang, Xiaoqin; Kaplan, David L

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, an artificial spider silk gene, 6mer, derived from the consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes dragline silk gene, was fused with different silica-binding peptides (SiBPs), A1, A3 and R5, to study the impact of the fusion protein sequence chemistry on silica formation and the ability to generate a silk-silica composite in two different bioinspired silicification systems: solution-solution and solution-solid. Condensed silica nanoscale particles (600-800 nm) were formed in the presence of the recombinant silk and chimeras, which were smaller than those formed by 15mer-SiBP chimeras, revealing that the molecular weight of the silk domain correlated to the sizes of the condensed silica particles in the solution system. In addition, the chimeras (6mer-A1/A3/R5) produced smaller condensed silica particles than the control (6mer), revealing that the silica particle size formed in the solution system is controlled by the size of protein assemblies in solution. In the solution-solid interface system, silicification reactions were performed on the surface of films fabricated from the recombinant silk proteins and chimeras and then treated to induce β-sheet formation. A higher density of condensed silica formed on the films containing the lowest β-sheet content while the films with the highest β-sheet content precipitated the lowest density of silica, revealing an inverse correlation between the β-sheet secondary structure and the silica content formed on the films. Intriguingly, the 6mer-A3 showed the highest rate of silica condensation but the lowest density of silica deposition on the films, compared with 6mer-A1 and -R5, revealing antagonistic crosstalk between the silk and the SiBP domains in terms of protein assembly. These findings offer a path forward in the tailoring of biopolymer-silica composites for biomaterial related needs.

  3. Construction and expression of an antimicrobial peptide scolopin 1 from the centipede venoms of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans in Escherichia coli using SUMO fusion partner.

    PubMed

    Hou, Huanhuan; Yan, Weili; Du, Kexing; Ye, Yangjing; Cao, Qianqian; Ren, Wenhua

    2013-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptide scolopin 1 (AMP-scolopin 1) is a small cationic peptide identified from centipede venoms of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans. It has broad-spectrum activities against bacteria, fungi, and tumor cells, which may possibly be used as an antimicrobial agent. We first report here the application of small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) fusion technology to the expression and purification of cationic antimicrobial peptide AMP-scolopin 1. The fusion protein expressed in a soluble form was purified to a purity of 95% by Ni-IDA chromatography. After the SUMO-scolopin 1 fusion protein was cleaved by the SUMO protease at 30°C for 1 h, the cleaved sample was reapplied to a Ni-IDA. The recombinant scolopin1 had similar antimicrobial properties to the synthetic scolopin 1. Thus, we successfully established a system for purifying peptide of centipede, which could be used for further research.

  4. Construction and expression of an antimicrobial peptide scolopin 1 from the centipede venoms of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans in Escherichia coli using SUMO fusion partner.

    PubMed

    Hou, Huanhuan; Yan, Weili; Du, Kexing; Ye, Yangjing; Cao, Qianqian; Ren, Wenhua

    2013-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptide scolopin 1 (AMP-scolopin 1) is a small cationic peptide identified from centipede venoms of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans. It has broad-spectrum activities against bacteria, fungi, and tumor cells, which may possibly be used as an antimicrobial agent. We first report here the application of small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) fusion technology to the expression and purification of cationic antimicrobial peptide AMP-scolopin 1. The fusion protein expressed in a soluble form was purified to a purity of 95% by Ni-IDA chromatography. After the SUMO-scolopin 1 fusion protein was cleaved by the SUMO protease at 30°C for 1 h, the cleaved sample was reapplied to a Ni-IDA. The recombinant scolopin1 had similar antimicrobial properties to the synthetic scolopin 1. Thus, we successfully established a system for purifying peptide of centipede, which could be used for further research. PMID:24145284

  5. Loss of the nodule-specific cysteine rich peptide, NCR169, abolishes symbiotic nitrogen fixation in the Medicago truncatula dnf7 mutant

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Beatrix; Domonkos, Ágota; Szűcs, Attila; Ábrahám, Edit; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Bóka, Károly; Chen, Yuhui; Chen, Rujin; Murray, Jeremy D.; Udvardi, Michael K.; Kondorosi, Éva; Kaló, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Host compatible rhizobia induce the formation of legume root nodules, symbiotic organs within which intracellular bacteria are present in plant-derived membrane compartments termed symbiosomes. In Medicago truncatula nodules, the Sinorhizobium microsymbionts undergo an irreversible differentiation process leading to the development of elongated polyploid noncultivable nitrogen fixing bacteroids that convert atmospheric dinitrogen into ammonia. This terminal differentiation is directed by the host plant and involves hundreds of nodule specific cysteine-rich peptides (NCRs). Except for certain in vitro activities of cationic peptides, the functional roles of individual NCR peptides in planta are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the inability of M. truncatula dnf7 mutants to fix nitrogen is due to inactivation of a single NCR peptide, NCR169. In the absence of NCR169, bacterial differentiation was impaired and was associated with early senescence of the symbiotic cells. Introduction of the NCR169 gene into the dnf7-2/NCR169 deletion mutant restored symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Replacement of any of the cysteine residues in the NCR169 peptide with serine rendered it incapable of complementation, demonstrating an absolute requirement for all cysteines in planta. NCR169 was induced in the cell layers in which bacteroid elongation was most pronounced, and high expression persisted throughout the nitrogen-fixing nodule zone. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of NCR169 in the differentiation and persistence of nitrogen fixing bacteroids in M. truncatula. PMID:26401023

  6. Loss of the nodule-specific cysteine rich peptide, NCR169, abolishes symbiotic nitrogen fixation in the Medicago truncatula dnf7 mutant.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Beatrix; Domonkos, Ágota; Kereszt, Attila; Szűcs, Attila; Ábrahám, Edit; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Bóka, Károly; Chen, Yuhui; Chen, Rujin; Murray, Jeremy D; Udvardi, Michael K; Kondorosi, Éva; Kaló, Péter

    2015-12-01

    Host compatible rhizobia induce the formation of legume root nodules, symbiotic organs within which intracellular bacteria are present in plant-derived membrane compartments termed symbiosomes. In Medicago truncatula nodules, the Sinorhizobium microsymbionts undergo an irreversible differentiation process leading to the development of elongated polyploid noncultivable nitrogen fixing bacteroids that convert atmospheric dinitrogen into ammonia. This terminal differentiation is directed by the host plant and involves hundreds of nodule specific cysteine-rich peptides (NCRs). Except for certain in vitro activities of cationic peptides, the functional roles of individual NCR peptides in planta are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the inability of M. truncatula dnf7 mutants to fix nitrogen is due to inactivation of a single NCR peptide, NCR169. In the absence of NCR169, bacterial differentiation was impaired and was associated with early senescence of the symbiotic cells. Introduction of the NCR169 gene into the dnf7-2/NCR169 deletion mutant restored symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Replacement of any of the cysteine residues in the NCR169 peptide with serine rendered it incapable of complementation, demonstrating an absolute requirement for all cysteines in planta. NCR169 was induced in the cell layers in which bacteroid elongation was most pronounced, and high expression persisted throughout the nitrogen-fixing nodule zone. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of NCR169 in the differentiation and persistence of nitrogen fixing bacteroids in M. truncatula.

  7. Limitations for purification of murine interleukin-18 when expressed as a fusion protein containing the FLAG peptide.

    PubMed

    Elhofy, A; Bost, K L

    1998-09-01

    As a strategy to purify recombinant murine Interleukin (IL)-18, we cloned the mature coding region of this protein into the pFLAG-1 expression system. The intent was to use the FLAG peptide "tag" as an amino terminal addition to IL-18 so that purification of this fusion protein (FLAG-IL-18) on anti-FLAG antibody affinity columns could be performed. While significant amounts of recombinant IL-18 were present in E. coli lysates, only a small portion of this material could be recovered on immunoaffinity columns conjugated with an anti-FLAG antibody. Surprisingly, the majority of recombinant IL-18 present in E. coli (strain JM83) bacterial lysates did not contain the FLAG peptide and therefore did not bind to immunoaffinity columns conjugated with an anti-FLAG antibody. However, we found that the BL21 strain of E. coli, which has reduced endogenous protease activity, could express the majority of recombinant IL-18 as the fusion protein, FLAG-IL-18. Taken together, these studies show that it is necessary to consider whether protease sites formed at the FLAG-protein junction can be easily cleaved by the bacterial strain used to express the fusion protein.

  8. The conserved glycine-rich segment linking the N-terminal fusion peptide to the coiled coil of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein gp21 is a determinant of membrane fusion function.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kirilee A; Bär, Séverine; Maerz, Anne L; Alizon, Marc; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2005-04-01

    Retroviral transmembrane proteins (TMs) contain an N-terminal fusion peptide that initiates virus-cell membrane fusion. The fusion peptide is linked to the coiled-coil core through a conserved sequence that is often rich in glycines. We investigated the functional role of the glycine-rich segment, Met-326 to Ser-337, of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) TM, gp21, by alanine and proline scanning mutagenesis. Alanine substitution for the hydrophobic residue Ile-334 caused an approximately 90% reduction in cell-cell fusion activity without detectable effects on the lipid-mixing and pore formation phases of fusion. Alanine substitutions at other positions had smaller effects (Gly-329, Val-330, and Gly-332) or no effect on fusion function. Proline substitution for glycine residues inhibited cell-cell fusion function with position-dependent effects on the three phases of fusion. Retroviral glycoprotein fusion function thus appears to require flexibility within the glycine-rich segment and hydrophobic contacts mediated by this segment. PMID:15767455

  9. Structural and functional characterization of EIAV gp45 fusion peptide proximal region and asparagine-rich layer.

    PubMed

    Duan, Liangwei; Du, Jiansen; Wang, Xuefeng; Zhou, Jianhua; Wang, Xiaojun; Liu, Xinqi

    2016-04-01

    Equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are members of the lentiviral genus. Similar to HIV gp41, EIAV gp45 is a fusogenic protein that mediates fusion between the viral particle and the host cell membrane. The crystal structure of gp45 reported reveals a different conformation in the here that includes the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR) and neighboring asparagine-rich layer compared with previous HIV-1 gp41 structures. A complicated hydrogen-bond network containing a cluster of solvent molecules appears to be critical for the stability of the gp45 helical bundle. Interestingly, viral replication was relatively unaffected by site-directed mutagenesis of EIAV, in striking contrast to that of HIV-1. Based on these observations, we speculate that EIAV is more adaptable to emergent mutations, which might be important for the evolution of EIAV as a quasi-species, and could potentially contribute to the success of the EIAV vaccine. PMID:26874586

  10. Effect of cholesterol on the interaction of the HIV GP41 fusion peptide with model membranes. Importance of the membrane dipole potential.

    PubMed

    Buzón, Víctor; Cladera, Josep

    2006-12-26

    Fusion of viral and cell membranes is a key event in the process by which the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enters the target cell. Membrane fusion is facilitated by the interaction of the viral gp41 fusion peptide with the cell membrane. Using synthetic peptides and model membrane systems, it has been established that the sequence of events implies the binding of the peptide to the membrane, followed by a conformational change (transformation of unordered and helical structures into beta-aggregates) which precedes lipid mixing. It is known that this process can be influenced by the membrane lipid composition. In the present work we have undertaken a systematic study in order to determine the influence of cholesterol (abundant in the viral membrane) in the sequence of events leading to lipid mixing. Besides its effect on membrane fluidity, cholesterol can affect a less known physical parameter, the membrane dipole potential. Using the dipole potential fluorescent sensor di-8-ANEPPS together with other biophysical techniques, we show that cholesterol increases the affinity of the fusion peptide for the model membranes, and although it lowers the extent of lipid mixing, it increases the mixing rate. The influence of cholesterol on the peptide affinity and the lipid mixing rate are shown to be mainly due to its influence of the membrane dipole potential, whereas the lipid mixing extent and peptide conformational changes seem to be more dependent on other membrane parameters such as membrane fluidity and hydration.

  11. Albiglutide, an albumin-based fusion of glucagon-like peptide 1 for the potential treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tomkin, Gerald H

    2009-10-01

    Albiglutide, under development by GlaxoSmithKline plc for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is an albumin-fusion peptide. The compound is a mimetic of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a hormone that decreases glucose levels, but has a short half-life because of degradation by dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4. Albiglutide has a longer half-life as a result of its fusion with albumin and its resistance to degradation by DPP-4, caused by an amino acid substitution (Ala to Glu) at the DPP-4-sensitive hydrolysis site. Data from phase II clinical trials in patients with T2DM revealed that albiglutide was well tolerated and that the drug significantly reduced HbA1c levels compared with placebo. At the time of publication, phase III trials assessing albiglutide alone and in combination with other antidiabetic drugs were recruiting patients with T2DM. Albiglutide represents a promising new drug for the treatment of patients with T2DM; the results of long-term trials are awaited with interest.

  12. New approach for development of sensitive and environmentally friendly immunoassay for mycotoxin fumonisin B(1) based on using peptide-MBP fusion protein as substitute for coating antigen.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Chen, Bo; He, Qing-hua; Qiu, Yu-Lou; Liu, Xing; He, Zhen-yun; Xiong, Zheng-ping

    2014-08-19

    Here, on the basis of mimotope of small analytes, we demonstrated a new approach for development of sensitive and environmentally friendly immunoassay for toxic small analytes based on the peptide-MBP fusion protein. In this work, using mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1) as a model hapten, phage displayed peptide (mimotope) that binds to the anti-FB1 antibody were selected by biopanning from a 12-mer peptide library. The DNA coding for the sequence of peptide was cloned into Escherichia coli ER2738 as a fusion protein with a maltose binding protein (MBP). The prepared peptide-MBP fusion protein are "clonable" homogeneous and FB1-free products and can be used as a coating antigen in the immunoassay. The half inhibition concentration of the quantitative immunoassay setup with fusion protein (F1-MBP and F15-MBP) was 2.15 ± 0.13 ng/mL and 1.26 ± 0.08 ng/mL, respectively. The fusion protein (F1-MBP) was also used to develop a qualitative Elispot assay with a cutoff level of 2.5 ng/mL, which was 10-fold more sensitive than that measured for chemically synthesized FB1-BSA conjugates based Elispot immunoassay. The peptide-MBP fusion protein not only can be prepared reproducibly as homogeneous and FB1-free products in a large-scale but also can contribute to the development of a highly sensitive immunoassay for analyzing FB1. Furthermore, the novel concept might provide potential applications to a general method for the immunoassay of various toxic small molecules.

  13. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  14. l2 Multiple Kernel Fuzzy SVM-Based Data Fusion for Improving Peptide Identification.

    PubMed

    Jian, Ling; Xia, Zhonghang; Niu, Xinnan; Liang, Xijun; Samir, Parimal; Link, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    SEQUEST is a database-searching engine, which calculates the correlation score between observed spectrum and theoretical spectrum deduced from protein sequences stored in a flat text file, even though it is not a relational and object-oriental repository. Nevertheless, the SEQUEST score functions fail to discriminate between true and false PSMs accurately. Some approaches, such as PeptideProphet and Percolator, have been proposed to address the task of distinguishing true and false PSMs. However, most of these methods employ time-consuming learning algorithms to validate peptide assignments [1] . In this paper, we propose a fast algorithm for validating peptide identification by incorporating heterogeneous information from SEQUEST scores and peptide digested knowledge. To automate the peptide identification process and incorporate additional information, we employ l2 multiple kernel learning (MKL) to implement the current peptide identification task. Results on experimental datasets indicate that compared with state-of-the-art methods, i.e., PeptideProphet and Percolator, our data fusing strategy has comparable performance but reduces the running time significantly. PMID:26394437

  15. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule targeted oxidant-resistant mutant thrombomodulin fusion protein with enhanced potency in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Carnemolla, Ronald; Greineder, Colin F; Chacko, Ann-Marie; Patel, Kruti Rajan; Ding, Bi-Sen; Zaitsev, Sergei; Esmon, Charles T; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2013-11-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is a glycoprotein normally present in the membrane of endothelial cells that binds thrombin and changes its substrate specificity to produce activated protein C (APC) that has antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory features. To compensate for loss of endogenous TM in pathology, we have fused recombinant TM with single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an antibody to mouse platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM). This fusion, anti-PECAM scFv/TM, anchors on the endothelium, stimulates APC production, and provides therapeutic benefits superior to sTM in animal models of acute thrombosis and inflammation. However, in conditions of oxidative stress typical of vascular inflammation, TM is inactivated via oxidation of the methionine 388 (M388) residue. Capitalizing on the reports that M388L mutation renders TM resistant to oxidative inactivation, in this study we designed a mutant anti-PECAM scFv/TM M388L. This mutant has the same APC-producing capacity and binding to target cells, yet, in contrast to wild-type fusion, it retains APC-producing activity in an oxidizing environment in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, oxidant resistant mutant anti-PECAM scFv/TM M388L is a preferable targeted biotherapeutic to compensate for loss of antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory TM functions in the context of vascular oxidative stress. PMID:23965383

  16. Effect of the HIV-1 fusion peptide on the mechanical properties and leaflet coupling of lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchelokovskyy, P.; Tristram-Nagle, S.; Dimova, R.

    2011-02-01

    The fusion peptide (FP) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is part of the N-terminus of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp41 and is believed to play an important role in the viral entry process. To understand the immediate effect of this peptide on the cell membrane, we have studied the influence of the synthetic FP sequence FP23 on the mechanical properties of model lipid bilayers. For this purpose, giant unilamellar vesicles were prepared from the unsaturated lipid dioleoylphosphatidylcholine mixed in various molar ratios with FP23. The bending stiffness of the vesicles was measured with two different methods: fluctuation analysis and aspiration with micropipettes. The data obtained from both of these approaches show that the bending stiffness of the membrane decreases gradually with increasing concentration of the FP23 in the bilayer. Low concentrations of only a few mol% FP23 are sufficient to decrease the bending stiffness of the lipid bilayer by about a factor of 2. Finally, data obtained for the stretching elasticity modulus of the membrane suggest that the peptide insertion decreases the coupling between the two leaflets of the bilayer.

  17. Enhanced antitumor immunity of nanoliposome-encapsulated heat shock protein 70 peptide complex derived from dendritic tumor fusion cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfei; Luo, Wen; Wang, Yucai; Chen, Jun; Liu, Yunyan; Zhang, Yong

    2015-06-01

    Tumor-derived heat shock proteins peptide complex (HSP.PC-Tu) has been regarded as a promising antitumor agent. However, inadequate immunogenicity and low bioavailability limit the clinical uses of this agent. In a previous study, we first produced an improved HSP70.PC-based vaccine purified from dendritic cell (DC)-tumor fusion cells (HSP70.PC-Fc) which had increased immunogenicity due to enhanced antigenic tumor peptides compared to HSP70.PC-Tu. In order to increase the bioavailability of HSP70.PC-Fc, the peptide complex was encapsulated with nanoliposomes (NL-HSP70.PC-Fc) in this study. After encapsulation, the tumor immunogenicity was observed using various assays. It was demonstrated that the NL-HSP70.PC-Fc has acceptable stability. The in vivo antitumor immune response was increased with regard to T-cell activation, CTL response and tumor therapy efficiency compared to that of HSP70.PC-Fc. In addition, it was shown that DC maturation was improved by NL-HSP70.PC-Fc, which added to the antitumor immunity. The results obtained for NL-HSP70.PC-Fc, which improved immunogenicity and increases the bioavailability of HSP70.PC, may represent superior heat shock proteins (HSPs)-based tumor vaccines. Such vaccines deserve further investigation and may provide a preclinical rationale to translate findings into early phase trials for patients with breast tumors.

  18. A depot-forming glucagon-like peptide-1 fusion protein reduces blood glucose for five days with a single injection

    PubMed Central

    Amiram, M.; Luginbuhl, K. M.; Li, X.; Feinglos, M. N.; Chilkoti, A.

    2013-01-01

    Peptide drugs are an exciting class of pharmaceuticals for the treatment of a variety of diseases; however, their short half-life dictates multiple and frequent injections causing undesirable side-effects. Herein, we describe a novel peptide delivery system that seeks to combine the attractive features of prolonged circulation time with a prolonged release formulation. This system consists of glucagon-like peptide-1, a type-2 diabetes drug fused to a thermally responsive, elastin-like-polypeptide (ELP) that undergoes a soluble-insoluble phase transition between room temperature and body temperature, thereby forming an injectable depot. We synthesized a set of GLP-1-ELP fusions and verified their proteolytic stability and potency in vitro. Significantly, a single injection of depot forming GLP-1-ELP fusions reduced blood glucose levels in mice for up to 5 days, 120 times longer than an injection of the native peptide. These findings demonstrate the unique advantages of using ELPs to release peptide-ELP fusions from a depot combined with enhanced systemic circulation to create a tunable peptide delivery system. PMID:23928357

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of certain mutant peptide models from staphylococcal nuclease reveal that initial hydrophobic collapse associated with turn propensity drives β-hairpin folding.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Rashmi Tambe; Kumar, Naveen; Sasidhar, Yellamraju U

    2013-08-01

    An important nucleation event during the folding of staphylococcal nuclease involves the formation of a β-hairpin by the sequence (21) DTVKLMYKGQPMTFR(35) . Earlier studies show that the turn sequence 'YKGQP' has an important role in the folding of this β-hairpin. To understand the active or passive nature of the turn sequence 'YKGQP' in the folding of the aforementioned β-hairpin sequence, we studied glycine mutant peptides Ac-(2) DTVKLMYGGQPMTFR(16) -NMe (K9G:15), Ac-(2) DTVKLMYKGGPMTFR(16) -NMe (Q11G:15), Ac-(2) DTVKLMYGGGPMTFR(16) -NMe (K9G/Q11G:15), and Ac-(2) DTVKLMGGGGGMTFR(16) -NMe (penta-G:15) by using molecular dynamics simulations, starting with two different unfolded states, polyproline II and extended conformational forms. Further, 5mer mutant turn peptides Ac-(2) YGGQP(6) -NMe (K3G:5), Ac-(2) YKGGP(6) -NMe (Q5G:5), Ac-(2) YGGGP(6) -NMe (K3G/Q5G:5), and Ac-(2) GGGGG(6) -NMe (penta-G:5) were also studied individually. Our results show that an initial hydrophobic collapse and loop closure occurs in all 15mer mutants, but only K9G:15 mutant forms a stable native-like β-hairpin. In the other 15mer mutants, the hydrophobic collapsed state would not proceed to β-hairpin formation. Of the different simulations performed for the penta-G:15 mutant, in only one simulation a nonnative β-hairpin conformation is sampled with highly flexible loop region ((8) GGGGG(12) ), which has no specific conformational preference as a 5mer. While the sequence 'YGGQP' in the K3G:5 simulation shows relatively higher β-turn propensity, the presence of this sequence in K9G:15 peptide seems to be driving the β-hairpin formation. Thus, these results seem to suggest that for the formation of a stable β-hairpin, the initial hydrophobic collapse is to be assisted by a turn propensity. Initial hydrophobic collapse alone is not sufficient to guide β-hairpin formation.

  20. Rationally designed anti-HIV peptides containing multifunctional domains as molecule probes for studying the mechanisms of action of the first and second generation HIV fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhi; Shi, Weiguo; Xue, Na; Pan, Chungen; Jing, Weiguo; Liu, Keliang; Jiang, Shibo

    2008-10-31

    We have previously shown that the first generation human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) fusion inhibitor T20 (Fuzeon) contains a critical lipid-binding domain (LBD), whereas C34, another anti-HIV peptide derived from the gp41 C-terminal heptad repeat, consists of an important pocket-binding domain (PBD), and both share a common 4-3 heptad repeat (HR) sequence (Liu, S., Jing, W., Cheung, B., Lu, H., Sun, J., Yan, X., Niu, J., Farmar, J., Wu, S., and Jiang, S. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 9612-9620). T1249, the second generation HIV fusion inhibitor, has both LBD and PBD but a different HR sequence, suggesting that these three anti-HIV peptides may have distinct mechanisms of action. Here we rationally designed a set of peptides that contain multiple copies of a predicted HR sequence (5HR) or the HR sequence plus either LBD (4HR-LBD) or PBD (PBD-4HR) or both (PBD-3HR-LBD), and we compared their anti-HIV-1 activity and biophysical properties. We found that the peptide 5HR exhibited low-to-moderate inhibitory activity on HIV-1-mediated cell-cell fusion, whereas addition of LBD and/or PBD to the HR sequence resulted in a significant increase of the anti-HIV-1 activity. The peptides containing PBD, including PBD-4HR and PBD-3HR-LBD, could form a stable six-helix bundle with the N-peptide N46 and effectively blocked the gp41 core formation, whereas the peptides containing LBD, e.g. 4HR-LBD and PBD-3HR-LBD, could interact with the lipid vehicles. These results suggest that the HR sequence in these anti-HIV peptides acts as a structure domain and is responsible for its interaction with the HR sequence in N-terminal heptad repeat, whereas PBD and LBD are critical for interactions with their corresponding targets. T20, C34, and T1249 may function like 4HR-LBD, PBD-4HR, and PBD-3HR-LBD, respectively, to interact with different target sites for inhibiting HIV fusion and entry. Therefore, this study provides important information for understanding the mechanisms of action of the

  1. Pharmacophore determination of a gp120 C terminal-derived anti-HIV peptide construct interfering with membrane fusion suggesting that processing of the gp120 C terminus is a prelude to fusion.

    PubMed

    Barbouche, R; Feyfant, E; Belhaj, B; Fenouillet, E

    2002-02-10

    A multiple antigen peptide [CLIV; (PTKAKRR1VVQREKR2)4-K2-K-betaA] from the C terminus of the gp120 subunit of HIV Env inhibits Env-mediated cell-to-cell fusion through direct interference with the process (Virology 2000;273:169). We have examined various CLIV analogs using a cell-to-cell fusion assay, receptor binding assays, and molecular modeling to further address the characteristics of the peptide responsible for its anti-HIV activity. We show that (1) CLIV does not interfere with Env binding to CD4 and does not interact with the binding site of Env on CXCR4; (2) CLIV does not inhibit protease activities already reported to play a role in fusion; and (3) the pharmacophore is composed of cleavage site1 with amino acid residues at its C terminal end. Based on our data and on the literature, we propose that CLIV interferes with processing of the gp120 C terminus at site1 by the lymphocyte surface after CD4 binding. Our hypothesis implies that the cleavage region of Env is submitted to a stepwise processing including the known intracellular cleavage of gp160 at site2 in order to set the activation of the fusion peptide and a yet unexplored cleavage at site1 by the target cell surface that triggers fusion.

  2. Effect of specific amino acid substitutions in the putative fusion peptide of structural glycoprotein E2 on Classical Swine Fever Virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-Sainz, I.J.; Largo, E.; Gladue, D.P.; Fletcher, P.; O’Donnell, V.; Holinka, L.G.; Carey, L.B.; Lu, X.; Nieva, J.L.; Borca, M.V.

    2014-05-15

    E2, along with E{sup rns} and E1, is an envelope glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). E2 is involved in several virus functions: cell attachment, host range susceptibility and virulence in natural hosts. Here we evaluate the role of a specific E2 region, {sup 818}CPIGWTGVIEC{sup 828}, containing a putative fusion peptide (FP) sequence. Reverse genetics utilizing a full-length infectious clone of the highly virulent CSFV strain Brescia (BICv) was used to evaluate how individual amino acid substitutions within this region of E2 may affect replication of BICv. A synthetic peptide representing the complete E2 FP amino acid sequence adopted a β-type extended conformation in membrane mimetics, penetrated into model membranes, and perturbed lipid bilayer integrity in vitro. Similar peptides harboring amino acid substitutions adopted comparable conformations but exhibited different membrane activities. Therefore, a preliminary characterization of the putative FP {sup 818}CPIGWTGVIEC{sup 828} indicates a membrane fusion activity and a critical role in virus replication. - Highlights: • A putative fusion peptide (FP) region in CSFV E2 protein was shown to be critical for virus growth. • Synthetic FPs were shown to efficiently penetrate into lipid membranes using an in vitro model. • Individual residues in the FP affecting virus replication were identified by reverse genetics. • The same FP residues are also responsible for mediating membrane fusion.

  3. Familial amyloid precursor protein mutants cause caspase-6-dependent but amyloid β-peptide-independent neuronal degeneration in primary human neuron cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Sivananthan, S N; Lee, A W; Goodyer, C G; LeBlanc, A C

    2010-01-01

    Although familial Alzheimer disease (AD)-associated autosomal dominant mutants have been extensively studied, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration induced by these mutants in AD. Wild-type, Swedish or London amyloid precursor protein (APP) transfection in primary human neurons induced neuritic beading, in which several co-expressed proteins, such as enhanced green fluorescent protein, red fluorescent protein (RFP)-tau and RFP-ubiquitin, accumulated. APP-induced neuritic beading was dependent on caspase-6 (Casp6), because it was inhibited with 5 μM z-VEID-fmk or with dominant-negative Casp6. Neuritic beading was independent from APP-mediated amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) production, because the APPM596V (APPMV) mutant, which cannot generate Aβ, still induced Casp6-dependent neuritic beading. However, the beaded neurons underwent Casp6- and Aβ-dependent cell death. These results indicate that overexpression of wild-type or mutant APP causes Casp6-dependent but Aβ-independent neuritic degeneration in human neurons. Because Casp6 is activated early in AD and is involved in axonal degeneration, these results suggest that the inhibition of Casp6 may represent an efficient early intervention against familial forms of AD. Furthermore, these results indicate that removing Aβ without inhibiting Casp6 may have little effect in preventing the progressive dementia associated with sporadic or familial AD. PMID:21368865

  4. Rapid selection of nonhotspot mutants among hisD+ revertants of Salmonella typhimurium TA98 in Ames test by peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-mediated PCR clamping.

    PubMed

    Takiya, Toshiyuki; Horie, Yoshiaki; Futo, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Yutaka; Kawai, Keiichi; Suzuki, Tohru

    2003-01-01

    Ames test is the most popular method of assessing mutagenicity using Salmonella typhimurium as an indicator. Recently, sequence analyses have been introduced for the investigation of mutation mechanisms. Most revertants (>70%) carry 2-bp deletion within an 8-bp CG repeat in hisD (hotspot mutation) in the Ames test using S. typhimurium TA98. We developed a new specific amplification method for nonhotspot mutants by peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-mediated PCR clamping. It markedly reduces the labor and cost of this kind of studies. PMID:16233580

  5. Structural properties of the putative fusion peptide of hepatitis B virus upon interaction with phospholipids. Circular dichroism and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy studies.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Crespo, I; Gómez-Gutiérrez, J; Encinar, J A; González-Ros, J M; Albar, J P; Peterson, D L; Gavilanes, F

    1996-12-01

    A peptide corresponding to the N-terminal sequence of the S protein from hepatitis B virus (Met-Glu-Asn-Ile-Thr-Ser-Gly-Phe-Leu-Gly-Pro-Leu-Leu-Val-Leu-Gln) has been previously shown to interact with phospholipids and promote vesicle aggregation, phospholipid mixing, and liposome leakage, as well as erythrocyte lysis [Rodríguez-Crespo, I., Núñez, E., Gómez-Gutiérrez, J., Yélamos, B., Albar, J. P., Peterson, D. L. & Gavilanes, F. (1995) J. Gen. Virol. 76, 301-308]. The conformation of this putative fusion peptide has been studied, both at low and high peptide concentrations, by means of circular dichroism and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. When the peptide is dissolved in trifluoroethanol, a significant population of alpha-helical structure is found in spite of the proline residue at position 11. In contrast, this hydrophobic oligopeptide has a high tendency to form large beta-sheet aggregates in aqueous buffers. Most of these aggregates can be eliminated by centrifugation. The peptide remaining in the supernatant adopts a non-ordered conformation. The aggregates can be dissociated by the anionic detergent sodium cholate, but the peptide still maintains an extended conformation. In the presence of acidic phospholipid vesicles, the putative fusion peptide adopts a highly stable beta-sheet conformation. Thus, unlike the fusion peptides of other viruses, an extended conformation seems to be the preferred structure when interacting with phospholipids. Such a conformation should be responsible for its membrane destabilization properties.

  6. A large-scale evaluation of peptide vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease: lack of solid protection in cattle and isolation of escape mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Taboga, O; Tami, C; Carrillo, E; Núñez, J I; Rodríguez, A; Saíz, J C; Blanco, E; Valero, M L; Roig, X; Camarero, J A; Andreu, D; Mateu, M G; Giralt, E; Domingo, E; Sobrino, F; Palma, E L

    1997-01-01

    A large-scale vaccination experiment involving a total of 138 cattle was carried out to evaluate the potential of synthetic peptides as vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease. Four types of peptides representing sequences of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) C3 Argentina 85 were tested: A, which includes the G-H loop of capsid protein VP1 (site A); AT, in which a T-cell epitope has been added to site A; AC, composed of site A and the carboxy-terminal region of VP1 (site C); and ACT, in which the three previous capsid motifs are colinearly represented. Induction of neutralizing antibodies, lymphoproliferation in response to viral antigens, and protection against challenge with homologous infectious virus were examined. None of the tested peptides, at several doses and vaccination schedules, afforded protection above 40%. Protection showed limited correlation with serum neutralization activity and lymphoproliferation in response to whole virus. In 12 of 29 lesions from vaccinated cattle that were challenged with homologous virus, mutant FMDVs with amino acid substitutions at antigenic site A were identified. This finding suggests the rapid generation and selection of FMDV antigenic variants in vivo. In contrast with previous studies, this large-scale vaccination experiment with an important FMDV host reveals considerable difficulties for vaccines based on synthetic peptides to achieve the required levels of efficacy. Possible modifications of the vaccine formulations to increase protective activity are discussed. PMID:9060612

  7. Resistance to lipopolysaccharide mediated by the Yersinia pestis V antigen-polyhistidine fusion peptide: amplification of interleukin-10.

    PubMed Central

    Nedialkov, Y A; Motin, V L; Brubaker, R R

    1997-01-01

    We previously showed that injection of homogenous staphylococcal protein A-V antigen fusion peptide into mice delayed allograft rejection and suppressed the major proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) associated with generation of protective granulomas. This study was undertaken to determine if V antigen could prevent endotoxic shock, known to be mediated by excessive production of certain proinflammatory cytokines. After treatment with 50 microg of homogeneous V antigen-polyhistidine fusion peptide (Vh), the 50% lethal dose of purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in BALB/c mice immediately rose from 63 microg (normal controls) to 318 microg, fell to near baseline (71 microg) in 6 h, and then slowly rose to a maximum of 566 microg at 48 h before again returning to normal. Injected Vh alone (50 microg) promptly induced the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) as well as modest levels of TNF-alpha (an inducer of IL-10) in spleen. Concomitant injection of Vh and an otherwise lethal dose of LPS (200 microg) dramatically decreased levels of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma in the spleen and peritoneal lavage fluid as compared to values determined for LPS alone. These results would be expected if V antigen directly up-regulated IL-10 that is reported to generally down-regulate proinflammatory cytokines. Mice receiving 200 microg of LPS 48 h after injection of Vh exhibited patterns of cytokine synthesis similar to those observed in endotoxin-tolerant mice, a condition also reported to be mediated by IL-10. These findings suggest that V antigen serves as a virulence factor by amplifying IL-10, thereby repressing proinflammatory cytokines required for expression of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:9119451

  8. The influence of class II HLA type on the lymphoproliferative response of normal donors to a bcr-abl fusion peptide.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, A R; Christmas, S E; Clark, R E

    1996-09-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is characterized by a t(9;22) chromosomal translocation resulting in the expression of a novel bcr-abl fusion protein. The region spanning the fusion point is novel to the immune system and hence represents a potential leukemia-specific antigen. The ability of a 21-mer b3a2 fusion peptide to induce an in vitro lymphoproliferative response in a panel of 54 normal donors has been tested. This gave a mean stimulation index of 2.73 (95% CI 2.42-3.05) and 50/54 (93%) of donors gave responses that were greater than those with bcr or abl control peptides. The mean stimulation index relative to that of the control peptides was 1.80 (95% CI 1.63-1.97; p < 0.001). Responses were optimal at concentrations ranging from 0.3-150 micrograms/mL and in most cases peaked at 9 days. There was no clear relationship between level of responsiveness to the b3a2 fusion peptide and the presence of any single HLA-A, -B, -DR, or -DQ allele. HIA-DRB1*0404 was the only allele that was not associated with responsiveness. It is therefore likely that the b3a2 fusion peptide can be presented to T cells during a primary immune response in the context of several different class II HLA allelic products, albeit at low efficiency. The implications for specific active immunotherapy of CML patients are discussed.

  9. Peptide-nanoparticle ligation mediated by cutinase fusion for the development of cancer cell-targeted nanoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, Elisabetta; Cassani, Marco; Verderio, Paolo; Martegani, Enzo; Colombo, Miriam; Tortora, Paolo; Mazzucchelli, Serena; Prosperi, Davide

    2015-04-15

    The relationship between the positioning of ligands on the surface of nanoparticles and the structural features of nanoconjugates has been underestimated for a long time, albeit of primary importance to promote specific biological recognition at the nanoscale. In particular, it has been formerly observed that a proper molecular orientation can play a crucial role, first optimizing ligand immobilization onto the nanoparticles and, second, improving the targeting efficiency of the nanoconjugates. In this work, we present a novel strategy to afford peptide-oriented ligation using genetically modified cutinase fusion proteins, which combines the presence of a site-directed "capture" module based on an enzymatic unit and a "targeting" moiety consisting of the ligand terminal end of a genetically encoded polypeptide chain. As an example, the oriented presentation of U11 peptide, a sequence specific for the recognition of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), was achieved by enzyme-mediated conjugation with an irreversible inhibitor of cutinase, an alkylphosphonate p-nitrophenol ester linker, covalently bound to the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles. The targeting efficiency of the resulting protein-nanoparticle conjugates was assessed using uPAR-positive breast cancer cells exploiting confocal laser scanning microscopy and quantitative fluorescence analysis of confocal images. Ultrastructural analysis of transmission electron micrographs provided evidence of a receptor-mediated pathway of endocytosis. Our results showed that, despite the small average number of targeting peptides presented on the nanoparticles, our ligand-oriented nanoconjugates proved to be very effective in selectively binding to uPAR and in promoting the uptake in uPAR-positive cancer cells.

  10. Deletion of fusion peptide or destabilization of fusion core of HIV gp41 enhances antigenicity and immunogenicity of 4E10 epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing; Chen Xi; Jiang Shibo Chen Yinghua

    2008-11-07

    The human monoclonal antibody 4E10 against the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41 demonstrates broad neutralizing activity across various strains, and makes its epitope an attractive target for HIV-1 vaccine development. Although the contiguous epitope of 4E10 has been identified, attempts to re-elicit 4E10-like antibodies have failed, possibly due to the lack of proper conformation of the 4E10 epitope. Here we used pIg-tail expression system to construct a panel of eukaryotic cell-surface expression plasmids encoding the extracellular domain of gp41 with deletion of fusion peptide and/or introduction of L568P mutation that may disrupt the gp41 six-helix bundle core conformation as DNA vaccines for immunization of mice. We found that these changes resulted in significant increase of the antigenicity and immunogenicity of 4E10 epitope. This information is thus useful for rational design of vaccines targeting the HIV-1 gp41 MPER.

  11. Creation of Apolipoprotein C-II (ApoC-II) Mutant Mice and Correction of Their Hypertriglyceridemia with an ApoC-II Mimetic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Toshihiro; Sakurai, Akiko; Vaisman, Boris L.; Amar, Marcelo J.; Liu, Chengyu; Gordon, Scott M.; Drake, Steven K.; Pryor, Milton; Sampson, Maureen L.; Yang, Ling; Freeman, Lita A.

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) is a cofactor for lipoprotein lipase, a plasma enzyme that hydrolyzes triglycerides (TGs). ApoC-II deficiency in humans results in hypertriglyceridemia. We used zinc finger nucleases to create Apoc2 mutant mice to investigate the use of C-II-a, a short apoC-II mimetic peptide, as a therapy for apoC-II deficiency. Mutant mice produced a form of apoC-II with an uncleaved signal peptide that preferentially binds high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) due to a 3-amino acid deletion at the signal peptide cleavage site. Homozygous Apoc2 mutant mice had increased plasma TG (757.5 ± 281.2 mg/dl) and low HDL cholesterol (31.4 ± 14.7 mg/dl) compared with wild-type mice (TG, 55.9 ± 13.3 mg/dl; HDL cholesterol, 55.9 ± 14.3 mg/dl). TGs were found in light (density < 1.063 g/ml) lipoproteins in the size range of very-low-density lipoprotein and chylomicron remnants (40–200 nm). Intravenous injection of C-II-a (0.2, 1, and 5 μmol/kg) reduced plasma TG in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximum decrease of 90% occurring 30 minutes after the high dose. Plasma TG did not return to baseline until 48 hours later. Similar results were found with subcutaneous or intramuscular injections. Plasma half-life of C-II-a is 1.33 ± 0.72 hours, indicating that C-II-a only acutely activates lipolysis, and the sustained TG reduction is due to the relatively slow rate of new TG-rich lipoprotein synthesis. In summary, we describe a novel mouse model of apoC-II deficiency and show that an apoC-II mimetic peptide can reverse the hypertriglyceridemia in these mice, and thus could be a potential new therapy for apoC-II deficiency. PMID:26574515

  12. Novel β-lactamase-random peptide fusion libraries for phage display selection of cancer cell-targeting agents suitable for enzyme prodrug therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Girja S.; Krag, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Novel phage-displayed random linear dodecapeptide (X12) and cysteine-constrained decapeptide (CX10C) libraries constructed in fusion to the amino-terminus of P99 β-lactamase molecules were used for identifying β-lactamase-linked cancer cell-specific ligands. The size and quality of both libraries were comparable to the standards of other reported phage display systems. Using the single-round panning method based on phage DNA recovery, we identified severalβ-lactamase fusion peptides that specifically bind to live human breast cancer MDA-MB-361 cells. The β-lactamase fusion to the peptides helped in conducting the enzyme activity-based clone normalization and cell-binding screening in a very time- and cost-efficient manner. The methods were suitable for 96-well readout as well as microscopic imaging. The success of the biopanning was indicated by the presence of ~40% cancer cell-specific clones among recovered phages. One of the binding clones appeared multiple times. The cancer cell-binding fusion peptides also shared several significant motifs. This opens a new way of preparing and selecting phage display libraries. The cancer cell-specific β-lactamase-linked affinity reagents selected from these libraries can be used for any application that requires a reporter for tracking the ligand molecules. Furthermore, these affinity reagents have also a potential for their direct use in the targeted enzyme prodrug therapy of cancer. PMID:19751096

  13. A Novel Peptide Derived from the Fusion Protein Heptad Repeat Inhibits Replication of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Virus In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Koichi; Abe, Yusaku; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Nabika, Ryota; Oishi, Shinya; Ohara, Shinichiro; Sato, Masatoki; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Fujii, Nobutaka; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a persistent, progressive, and fatal degenerative disease resulting from persistent measles virus (MV) infection of the central nervous system. Most drugs used to treat SSPE have been reported to have limited effects. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently required. The SSPE virus, a variant MV strain, differs virologically from wild-type MV strain. One characteristic of the SSPE virus is its defective production of cell-free virus, which leaves cell-to-cell infection as the major mechanism of viral dissemination. The fusion protein plays an essential role in this cell-to-cell spread. It contains two critical heptad repeat regions that form a six-helix bundle in the trimer similar to most viral fusion proteins. In the case of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), a synthetic peptide derived from the heptad repeat region of the fusion protein enfuvirtide inhibits viral replication and is clinically approved as an anti-HIV-1 agent. The heptad repeat regions of HIV-1 are structurally and functionally similar to those of the MV fusion protein. We therefore designed novel peptides derived from the fusion protein heptad repeat region of the MV and examined their effects on the measles and SSPE virus replication in vitro and in vivo. Some of these synthetic novel peptides demonstrated high antiviral activity against both the measles (Edmonston strain) and SSPE (Yamagata-1 strain) viruses at nanomolar concentrations with no cytotoxicity in vitro. In particular, intracranial administration of one of the synthetic peptides increased the survival rate from 0% to 67% in an SSPE virus-infected nude mouse model. PMID:27612283

  14. A Novel Peptide Derived from the Fusion Protein Heptad Repeat Inhibits Replication of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Virus In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Koichi; Abe, Yusaku; Kodama, Eiichi N; Nabika, Ryota; Oishi, Shinya; Ohara, Shinichiro; Sato, Masatoki; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Fujii, Nobutaka; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a persistent, progressive, and fatal degenerative disease resulting from persistent measles virus (MV) infection of the central nervous system. Most drugs used to treat SSPE have been reported to have limited effects. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently required. The SSPE virus, a variant MV strain, differs virologically from wild-type MV strain. One characteristic of the SSPE virus is its defective production of cell-free virus, which leaves cell-to-cell infection as the major mechanism of viral dissemination. The fusion protein plays an essential role in this cell-to-cell spread. It contains two critical heptad repeat regions that form a six-helix bundle in the trimer similar to most viral fusion proteins. In the case of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), a synthetic peptide derived from the heptad repeat region of the fusion protein enfuvirtide inhibits viral replication and is clinically approved as an anti-HIV-1 agent. The heptad repeat regions of HIV-1 are structurally and functionally similar to those of the MV fusion protein. We therefore designed novel peptides derived from the fusion protein heptad repeat region of the MV and examined their effects on the measles and SSPE virus replication in vitro and in vivo. Some of these synthetic novel peptides demonstrated high antiviral activity against both the measles (Edmonston strain) and SSPE (Yamagata-1 strain) viruses at nanomolar concentrations with no cytotoxicity in vitro. In particular, intracranial administration of one of the synthetic peptides increased the survival rate from 0% to 67% in an SSPE virus-infected nude mouse model. PMID:27612283

  15. Spontaneous fusion in vivo between normal host and tumor cells: possible contribution to tumor progression and metastasis studied with a lectin-resistant mutant tumor.

    PubMed

    Kerbel, R S; Lagarde, A E; Dennis, J W; Donaghue, T P

    1983-04-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that growth in DBA/2 mice of MDW4, a wheat germ agglutinin-resistant (WGAr) mutant of the highly metastatic MDAY-D2 DBA/2 mouse tumor, led to the emergence of WGA-sensitive (WGAs) revertants having higher ploidy levels at the site of inoculation as well as at distant visceral metastases. The results implied that MDW4 was nonmetastatic but progressed to become metastatic in vivo only after a cellular change took place which was accompanied by extinction of the WGAr phenotype and acquisition of a higher number of chromosomes. Results presented here provide strong and direct evidence for the underlying mechanism being spontaneous cell fusion in vivo between the MDW4 (WGAr) tumor cells and normal host cells, at least some of which are of bone marrow origin. Thus, growth of the H-2d MDW4 tumor cells in (C3H X DBA/2)F1 (H-2k X H-2d) or (C57BL/6 X DBA/2)F1 (H-2b X H-2d) mice led to the appearance of WGAs revertants bearing the H-2k or H-2b major histocompatibility complex antigens associated with the C3H or C57BL/6 parental strains, respectively. Similarly, WGAs revertants of MDW4 were found to express H-2k antigens after growth in CBA/HT6T6 (H-2k) leads to DBA/2 bone marrow radiation chimeras. Attempts to mimic the in vivo hybridization process were successful in that in vitro somatic cell fusion between an ouabain-resistant (OuaR), 6-thioguanine-resistant (Thgr) derivative of the MDW4 mutant and either normal bone marrow or spleen cells resulted in loss of the WGAr phenotype in the hybrids (thus showing its recessive character) and increased malignant properties in vivo. An analysis of spontaneous frequencies of re-expression of various drug resistance genetic markers in several hybrid metastatic cells was also consistent with chromosome segregation of the sensitive alleles. The results show that tumor progression and the emergence of metastatic cell variants could arise as a consequence of tumor X host cell fusion followed by chromosome

  16. Conformational studies of a short linear peptide corresponding to a major conserved neutralizing epitope of human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Toiron, C; López, J A; Rivas, G; Andreu, D; Melero, J A; Bruix, M

    1996-10-01

    The conformational properties of a 21-residue peptide, corresponding to amino acids 255 to 275 (F255-275) of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion (F) glycoprotein have been studied by CD and nmr spectroscopy. This peptide includes residues 262, 268, and 272 of the F polypeptide that are essential for integrity of most epitopes that mapped into a major antigenic site of the F molecule. CD data indicate that F255-275 adopts a random coil conformation in aqueous solution at low peptide concentrations. However, as the concentration of peptide is increased, a higher percentage of peptide molecules adopts an organized structure. This effect can be more easily observed when trifluoroethanol (30%) is added to peptide solutions, giving rise to CD spectra that resemble those of alpha-helix structures. These conformational changes were confirmed by nmr spectroscopy. The nuclear Overhauser effects observed in 30% trifluoroethanol/ water together with the conformational H alpha chemical shift data allowed us to propose a structural model of helix-loop-helix for the peptide in solution. In addition, these helical regions contain the amino acid residues essential for epitope integrity in the native F molecule. These results give new insights into the antigenic structure of the respiratory syncytical virus F glycoprotein. PMID:8837519

  17. Energetics of β-turn formation in a mutant peptide YPGDV from influenza hemagglutinin: an MD simulation study.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Rashmi Tambe; Sasidhar, Yellamraju U

    2013-11-14

    Reverse turns play an important role in protein folding, molecular recognition and in eliciting immune response. While sequence determinants of reverse turns are known, not much is known about their energetics. In this paper we have investigated the thermodynamics of a reverse turn sequence YPGDV, an experimentally well characterized turn sequence, using molecular dynamics simulations performed over a range of temperatures from 280-360 K using GROMACS 4.0.4 software and all atom OPLS-AA/L force field. The change in folding free energy (ΔAfolding) for the β-turn formation in YPGDV peptide shows a linear relationship with temperature. We find that the entropy change (ΔSfolding) for the β-turn formation is close to zero and the internal energy change (ΔUfolding) is a modest -3.8 kJ mol(-1). These thermodynamic quantities are interpreted in terms of intra-molecular (intra-peptide) and inter-molecular (peptide-solvent) hydrogen bonding interactions. Implications for protein folding and peptide immunogenicity are discussed.

  18. Membrane-Dependent Conformation, Dynamics, and Lipid Interactions of the Fusion Peptide of the Paramyxovirus PIV5 from Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hongwei; Hong, Mei

    2014-01-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into cells requires protein-catalyzed fusion of the viral and cell membranes. The structure–function relation of a hydrophobic fusion peptide (FP) in viral fusion proteins is still poorly understood. We report magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR results of the membrane-bound conformation, dynamics, and lipid interactions of the FP of the F protein of the paramyxovirus, parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5). 13C chemical shifts indicate that the PIV5 FP structure depends on the composition of the phospholipid membrane: the peptide is α-helical in palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol-containing anionic membranes but mostly β-sheet in neutral phosphocholine membranes. Other environmental factors, including peptide concentration, cholesterol, membrane reconstitution protocol, and a Lys solubility tag, do not affect the secondary structure. The α-helical and β-sheet states exhibit distinct dynamics and lipid interactions. The β- sheet FP is immobilized, resides on the membrane surface, and causes significant membrane curvature. In contrast, the α-helical FP undergoes intermediate-timescale motion and maintains the lamellar order of the membrane. Two-dimensional 31P–1H correlation spectra show clear 31P–water cross peaks for anionic membranes containing the α-helical FP but weak or no 31P–water cross peak for neutral membranes containing the β-sheet FP. These results suggest that the β-sheet FP may be associated with high-curvature dehydrated fusion intermediates, while the α-helical state may be associated with the extended prehairpin state and the post-fusion state. Conformational plasticity is also a pronounced feature of the influenza and human immunodeficiency virus FPs, suggesting that these Gly-rich sequences encode structural plasticity to generate and sense different membrane morphologies. PMID:23183373

  19. Monoclonal Antibodies against the Fusion Peptide of Hemagglutinin Protect Mice from Lethal Influenza A Virus H5N1 Infection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Nayana; Prabakaran, Mookkan; Ho, Hui-Ting; Velumani, Sumathy; Qiang, Jia; Goutama, Michael; Kwang, Jimmy

    2009-01-01

    The HA2 glycopolypeptide (gp) is highly conserved in all influenza A virus strains, and it is known to play a major role in the fusion of the virus with the endosomal membrane in host cells during the course of viral infection. Vaccines and therapeutics targeting this HA2 gp could induce efficient broad-spectrum immunity against influenza A virus infections. So far, there have been no studies on the possible therapeutic effects of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), specifically against the fusion peptide of hemagglutinin (HA), upon lethal infections with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus. We have identified MAb 1C9, which binds to GLFGAIAGF, a part of the fusion peptide of the HA2 gp. We evaluated the efficacy of MAb 1C9 as a therapy for influenza A virus infections. This MAb, which inhibited cell fusion in vitro when administered passively, protected 100% of mice from challenge with five 50% mouse lethal doses of HPAI H5N1 influenza A viruses from two different clades. Furthermore, it caused earlier clearance of the virus from the lung. The influenza virus load was assessed in lung samples from mice challenged after pretreatment with MAb 1C9 (24 h prior to challenge) and from mice receiving early treatment (24 h after challenge). The study shows that MAb 1C9, which is specific to the antigenically conserved fusion peptide of HA2, can contribute to the cross-clade protection of mice infected with H5N1 virus and mediate more effective recovery from infection. PMID:19109379

  20. Association of the pr Peptides with Dengue Virus at Acidic pH Blocks Membrane Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, I.-M.; Holdaway, H.A.; Chipman, P.R.; Kuhn, R.J.; Rossmann, M.G.; Chen, J.; Purdue

    2010-07-27

    Flavivirus assembles into an inert particle that requires proteolytic activation by furin to enable transmission to other hosts. We previously showed that immature virus undergoes a conformational change at low pH that renders it accessible to furin (I. M. Yu, W. Zhang, H. A. Holdaway, L. Li, V. A. Kostyuchenko, P. R. Chipman, R. J. Kuhn, M. G. Rossmann, and J. Chen, Science 319:1834-1837, 2008). Here we show, using cryoelectron microscopy, that the structure of immature dengue virus at pH 6.0 is essentially the same before and after the cleavage of prM. The structure shows that after cleavage, the proteolytic product pr remains associated with the virion at acidic pH, and that furin cleavage by itself does not induce any major conformational changes. We also show by liposome cofloatation experiments that pr retention prevents membrane insertion, suggesting that pr is present on the virion in the trans-Golgi network to protect the progeny virus from fusion within the host cell.

  1. Switch-like reprogramming of gene expression after fusion of multinucleate plasmodial cells of two Physarum polycephalum sporulation mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Pauline; Hoffmann, Xenia-Katharina; Ebeling, Britta; Haas, Markus; Marwan, Wolfgang

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •We investigate reprogramming of gene expression in multinucleate single cells. •Cells of two differentiation control mutants are fused. •Fused cells proceed to alternative gene expression patterns. •The population of nuclei damps stochastic fluctuations in gene expression. •Dynamic processes of cellular reprogramming can be observed by repeated sampling of a cell. -- Abstract: Nonlinear dynamic processes involving the differential regulation of transcription factors are considered to impact the reprogramming of stem cells, germ cells, and somatic cells. Here, we fused two multinucleate plasmodial cells of Physarum polycephalum mutants defective in different sporulation control genes while being in different physiological states. The resulting heterokaryons established one of two significantly different expression patterns of marker genes while the plasmodial halves that were fused to each other synchronized spontaneously. Spontaneous synchronization suggests that switch-like control mechanisms spread over and finally control the entire plasmodium as a result of cytoplasmic mixing. Regulatory molecules due to the large volume of the vigorously streaming cytoplasm will define concentrations in acting on the population of nuclei and in the global setting of switches. Mixing of a large cytoplasmic volume is expected to damp stochasticity when individual nuclei deliver certain RNAs at low copy number into the cytoplasm. We conclude that spontaneous synchronization, the damping of molecular noise in gene expression by the large cytoplasmic volume, and the option to take multiple macroscopic samples from the same plasmodium provide unique options for studying the dynamics of cellular reprogramming at the single cell level.

  2. Fusion peptide P15-CSP shows antibiofilm activity and pro-osteogenic activity when deposited as a coating on hydrophilic but not hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian; Contreras-Garcia, Angel; LoVetri, Karen; Yakandawala, Nandadeva; Wertheimer, Michael R; De Crescenzo, Gregory; Hoemann, Caroline D

    2015-12-01

    In the context of porous bone void filler for oral bone reconstruction, peptides that suppress microbial growth and promote osteoblast function could be used to enhance the performance of a porous bone void filler. We tested the hypothesis that P15-CSP, a novel fusion peptide containing collagen-mimetic osteogenic peptide P15, and competence-stimulating peptide (CSP), a cationic antimicrobial peptide, has emerging properties not shared by P15 or CSP alone. Peptide-coated surfaces were tested for antimicrobial activity toward Streptoccocus mutans, and their ability to promote human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) attachment, spreading, metabolism, and osteogenesis. In the osteogenesis assay, peptides were coated on tissue culture plastic and on thin films generated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to have hydrophilic or hydrophobic character (water contact angles 63°, 42°, and 92°, respectively). S. mutans planktonic growth was specifically inhibited by CSP, whereas biofilm formation was inhibited by P15-CSP. MSC adhesion and actin stress fiber formation was strongly enhanced by CSP, P15-CSP, and fibronectin coatings and modestly enhanced by P15 versus uncoated surfaces. Metabolic assays revealed that CSP was slightly cytotoxic to MSCs. MSCs developed alkaline phosphatase activity on all surfaces, with or without peptide coatings, and consistently deposited the most biomineralized matrix on hydrophilic surfaces coated with P15-CSP. Hydrophobic thin films completely suppressed MSC biomineralization, consistent with previous findings of suppressed osteogenesis on hydrophobic bioplastics. Collective data in this study provide new evidence that P15-CSP has unique dual capacity to suppress biofilm formation, and to enhance osteogenic activity as a coating on hydrophilic surfaces. PMID:26097095

  3. Fusion peptide P15-CSP shows antibiofilm activity and pro-osteogenic activity when deposited as a coating on hydrophilic but not hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian; Contreras-Garcia, Angel; LoVetri, Karen; Yakandawala, Nandadeva; Wertheimer, Michael R; De Crescenzo, Gregory; Hoemann, Caroline D

    2015-12-01

    In the context of porous bone void filler for oral bone reconstruction, peptides that suppress microbial growth and promote osteoblast function could be used to enhance the performance of a porous bone void filler. We tested the hypothesis that P15-CSP, a novel fusion peptide containing collagen-mimetic osteogenic peptide P15, and competence-stimulating peptide (CSP), a cationic antimicrobial peptide, has emerging properties not shared by P15 or CSP alone. Peptide-coated surfaces were tested for antimicrobial activity toward Streptoccocus mutans, and their ability to promote human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) attachment, spreading, metabolism, and osteogenesis. In the osteogenesis assay, peptides were coated on tissue culture plastic and on thin films generated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to have hydrophilic or hydrophobic character (water contact angles 63°, 42°, and 92°, respectively). S. mutans planktonic growth was specifically inhibited by CSP, whereas biofilm formation was inhibited by P15-CSP. MSC adhesion and actin stress fiber formation was strongly enhanced by CSP, P15-CSP, and fibronectin coatings and modestly enhanced by P15 versus uncoated surfaces. Metabolic assays revealed that CSP was slightly cytotoxic to MSCs. MSCs developed alkaline phosphatase activity on all surfaces, with or without peptide coatings, and consistently deposited the most biomineralized matrix on hydrophilic surfaces coated with P15-CSP. Hydrophobic thin films completely suppressed MSC biomineralization, consistent with previous findings of suppressed osteogenesis on hydrophobic bioplastics. Collective data in this study provide new evidence that P15-CSP has unique dual capacity to suppress biofilm formation, and to enhance osteogenic activity as a coating on hydrophilic surfaces.

  4. Peptide Synthesis through Cell-Free Expression of Fusion Proteins Incorporating Modified Amino Acids as Latent Cleavage Sites for Peptide Release.

    PubMed

    Liutkus, Mantas; Fraser, Samuel A; Caron, Karine; Stigers, Dannon J; Easton, Christopher J

    2016-05-17

    Chlorinated analogues of Leu and Ile are incorporated during cell-free expression of peptides fused to protein, by exploiting the promiscuity of the natural biosynthetic machinery. They then act as sites for clean and efficient release of the peptides simply by brief heat treatment. Dehydro analogues of Leu and Ile are similarly incorporated as latent sites for peptide release through treatment with iodine under cold conditions. These protocols complement enzyme-catalyzed methods and have been used to prepare calcitonin, gastrin-releasing peptide, cholecystokinin-7, and prolactin-releasing peptide prohormones, as well as analogues substituted with unusual amino acids, thus illustrating their practical utility as alternatives to more traditional chemical peptide synthesis. PMID:26918308

  5. Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Binding of Peptides and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins to Their Folded Targets: 2. The Model of Encounter Complex Involving the Double Mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 Domain and Peptide Sos.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Tairan; Xue, Yi; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R

    2016-03-29

    In the first part of this work (paper 1, Xue, Y. et al. Biochemistry 2014 , 53 , 6473 ), we have studied the complex between the 10-residue peptide Sos and N-terminal SH3 domain from adaptor protein c-Crk. In the second part (this paper), we designed the double mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 domain, W169F/Y186L, with the intention to eliminate the interactions responsible for tight peptide-protein binding, while retaining the interactions that create the initial electrostatic encounter complex. The resulting system was characterized experimentally by measuring the backbone and side-chain (15)N relaxation rates, as well as binding shifts and (1)H(N) temperature coefficients. In addition, it was also modeled via a series of ∼5 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations recorded in a large water box under an Amber ff99SB*-ILDN force field. Similar to paper 1, we have found that the strength of arginine-aspartate and arginine-glutamate salt bridges is overestimated in the original force field. To address this problem we have applied the empirical force-field correction described in paper 1. Specifically, the Lennard-Jones equilibrium distance for the nitrogen-oxygen pair across Arg-to-Asp/Glu salt bridges has been increased by 3%. This modification led to MD models in good agreement with the experimental data. The emerging picture is that of a fuzzy complex, where the peptide "dances" over the surface of the protein, making transient contacts via salt-bridge interactions. Every once in a while the peptide assumes a certain more stable binding pose, assisted by a number of adventitious polar and nonpolar contacts. On the other hand, occasionally Sos flies off the protein surface; it is then guided by electrostatic steering to quickly reconnect with the protein. The dynamic interaction between Sos and the double mutant of c-Crk N-SH3 gives rise to only small binding shifts. The peptide retains a high degree of conformational mobility, although it is appreciably slowed down due

  6. Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Binding of Peptides and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins to Their Folded Targets: 2. The Model of Encounter Complex Involving the Double Mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 Domain and Peptide Sos.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Tairan; Xue, Yi; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R

    2016-03-29

    In the first part of this work (paper 1, Xue, Y. et al. Biochemistry 2014 , 53 , 6473 ), we have studied the complex between the 10-residue peptide Sos and N-terminal SH3 domain from adaptor protein c-Crk. In the second part (this paper), we designed the double mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 domain, W169F/Y186L, with the intention to eliminate the interactions responsible for tight peptide-protein binding, while retaining the interactions that create the initial electrostatic encounter complex. The resulting system was characterized experimentally by measuring the backbone and side-chain (15)N relaxation rates, as well as binding shifts and (1)H(N) temperature coefficients. In addition, it was also modeled via a series of ∼5 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations recorded in a large water box under an Amber ff99SB*-ILDN force field. Similar to paper 1, we have found that the strength of arginine-aspartate and arginine-glutamate salt bridges is overestimated in the original force field. To address this problem we have applied the empirical force-field correction described in paper 1. Specifically, the Lennard-Jones equilibrium distance for the nitrogen-oxygen pair across Arg-to-Asp/Glu salt bridges has been increased by 3%. This modification led to MD models in good agreement with the experimental data. The emerging picture is that of a fuzzy complex, where the peptide "dances" over the surface of the protein, making transient contacts via salt-bridge interactions. Every once in a while the peptide assumes a certain more stable binding pose, assisted by a number of adventitious polar and nonpolar contacts. On the other hand, occasionally Sos flies off the protein surface; it is then guided by electrostatic steering to quickly reconnect with the protein. The dynamic interaction between Sos and the double mutant of c-Crk N-SH3 gives rise to only small binding shifts. The peptide retains a high degree of conformational mobility, although it is appreciably slowed down due

  7. Improved Pharmacological and Structural Properties of HIV Fusion Inhibitor AP3 over Enfuvirtide: Highlighting Advantages of Artificial Peptide Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiaojie; Zhu, Yun; Ye, Sheng; Wang, Qian; Xu, Wei; Su, Shan; Sun, Zhiwu; Yu, Fei; Liu, Qi; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Tianhong; Zhang, Zhenqing; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing; Du, Lanying; Liu, Keliang; Lu, Lu; Zhang, Rongguang; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-08-19

    Enfuvirtide (T20), is the first HIV fusion inhibitor approved for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients who fail to respond to the current antiretroviral drugs. However, its clinical application is limited because of short half-life, drug resistance and cross-reactivity with the preexisting antibodies in HIV-infected patients. Using an artificial peptide strategy, we designed a peptide with non-native protein sequence, AP3, which exhibited potent antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains, including those resistant to T20, and had remarkably longer in vivo half-life than T20. While the preexisting antibodies in HIV-infected patients significantly suppressed T20’s antiviral activity, these antibodies neither recognized AP3, nor attenuated its anti-HIV-1 activity. Structurally different from T20, AP3 could fold into single-helix and interact with gp41 NHR. The two residues, Met and Thr, at the N-terminus of AP3 form a hook-like structure to stabilize interaction between AP3 and NHR helices. Therefore, AP3 has potential for further development as a new HIV fusion inhibitor with improved antiviral efficacy, resistance profile and pharmacological properties over enfuvirtide. Meanwhile, this study highlighted the advantages of artificially designed peptides, and confirmed that this strategy could be used in developing artificial peptide-based viral fusion inhibitors against HIV and other enveloped viruses.

  8. Specific expression of GFP{sub uv}-{beta}1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 2 fusion protein in fat body of Bombyx mori silkworm larvae using signal peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y. . E-mail: yspark@agr.shizuoka.ac.jp

    2007-08-03

    Bombyxin (bx) and prophenoloxidase-activating enzyme (ppae) signal peptides from Bombyx mori, their modified signal peptides, and synthetic signal peptides were investigated for the secretion of GFP{sub uv}-{beta}1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 2 (GGT2) fusion protein in B. mori Bm5 cells and silkworm larvae using cysteine protease deficient B. mori multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmMNPV-CP{sup -} ) and its bacmid. The secretion efficiencies of all signal peptides were 15-30% in Bm5 cells and 24-30% in silkworm larvae, while that of the +16 signal peptide was 0% in Bm5 cells and 1% in silkworm larvae. The fusion protein that contained the +16 signal peptide was expressed specifically in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and in the fractions of cell precipitations. Ninety-four percent of total intracellular {beta}1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase ({beta}3GnT) activity was detected in cell precipitations following the 600, 8000, and 114,000g centrifugations. In the case of the +38 signal peptide, 60% of total intracellular activity was detected in the supernatant from the 114,000g spin, and only 1% was found in the precipitate. Our results suggest that the +16 signal peptide might be situated in the transmembrane region and not cleaved by signal peptidase in silkworm or B. mori cells. Therefore, the fusion protein connected to the +16 signal peptide stayed in the fat body of silkworm larvae with biological function, and was not secreted extracellularly.

  9. Switch-like reprogramming of gene expression after fusion of multinucleate plasmodial cells of two Physarum polycephalum sporulation mutants.

    PubMed

    Walter, Pauline; Hoffmann, Xenia-Katharina; Ebeling, Britta; Haas, Markus; Marwan, Wolfgang

    2013-05-24

    Nonlinear dynamic processes involving the differential regulation of transcription factors are considered to impact the reprogramming of stem cells, germ cells, and somatic cells. Here, we fused two multinucleate plasmodial cells of Physarum polycephalum mutants defective in different sporulation control genes while being in different physiological states. The resulting heterokaryons established one of two significantly different expression patterns of marker genes while the plasmodial halves that were fused to each other synchronized spontaneously. Spontaneous synchronization suggests that switch-like control mechanisms spread over and finally control the entire plasmodium as a result of cytoplasmic mixing. Regulatory molecules due to the large volume of the vigorously streaming cytoplasm will define concentrations in acting on the population of nuclei and in the global setting of switches. Mixing of a large cytoplasmic volume is expected to damp stochasticity when individual nuclei deliver certain RNAs at low copy number into the cytoplasm. We conclude that spontaneous synchronization, the damping of molecular noise in gene expression by the large cytoplasmic volume, and the option to take multiple macroscopic samples from the same plasmodium provide unique options for studying the dynamics of cellular reprogramming at the single cell level.

  10. Production of aggregation prone human interferon gamma and its mutant in highly soluble and biologically active form by SUMO fusion technology.

    PubMed

    Tileva, M; Krachmarova, E; Ivanov, I; Maskos, K; Nacheva, G

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli expression system is a preferable choice for production of recombinant proteins. A disadvantage of this system is the target protein aggregation in "inclusion bodies" (IBs) that further requires solubilisation and refolding, which is crucial for the properties and the yield of the final product. In order to prevent aggregation, SUMO fusion tag technology has been successfully applied for expression of eukaryotic proteins, including human interferon gamma (hIFNγ) that was reported, however, with no satisfactory biological activity. We modified this methodology for expression and purification of both the wild type hIFNγ and an extremely prone to aggregation mutant hIFNγ-K88Q, whose recovery from IBs showed to be ineffective upon numerous conditions. By expression of the N-terminal His-SUMO fusion proteins in the E. coli strain BL21(DE3)pG-KJE8, co-expressing two chaperone systems, at 24 °C a significant increase in solubility of both target proteins (1.5-fold for hIFNγ and 8-fold for K88Q) was achieved. Two-step chromatography (affinity and ion-exchange) with on-dialysis His-SUMO-tag cleavage was applied for protein purification that yielded 6.0-7.0mg/g wet biomass for both proteins with >95% purity and native N-termini. The optimised protocol led to increased yields from 5.5 times for hIFNγ up to 100 times for K88Q in comparison to their isolation from IBs. Purified hIFNγ showed preserved thermal stability and antiproliferative activity corresponding to that of the native reference sample (3 × 10(7)IU/mg). The developed methodology represents an optimised procedure that can be successfully applied for large scale expression and purification of aggregation-prone proteins in soluble native form.

  11. Fusion Protein of Mutant B7-DC and Fc Enhances the Antitumor Immune Effect of GM-CSF-secreting Whole-cell Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Masatsugu; Murata, Satoshi; Mekata, Eiji; Takebayashi, Katsushi; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Tani, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Summary B7-DC [also known as programmed death ligand 2 (PD-L2)] is a costimulatory molecule expressed predominantly on dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages. In addition to its coinhibitory receptor, programmed death receptor 1 (PD-1), evidence suggests that B7-DC interacts with an unidentified costimulatory receptor on T cells. B7-DC mutants with selective binding capacity for the costimulatory receptor may be effective in stimulating antitumor immune responses, while avoiding the inhibitory effects of PD-1. In this study, we concomitantly administered a GM-CSF-secreting whole cell vaccine together with a fusion protein of mutant B7-DC and Fc portion (mB7-DC-Fc), which binds selectively to the costimulatory receptor. This lead to an increased number of tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes both in the spleen and at the tumor site and complete elimination of established tumors in vivo. In addition, mB7-DC-Fc increased IFN-γ and IL-2 production and decreased IL-4 and IL-10 production in vitro, indicating that mB7-DC-Fc tips the Th1/Th2 balance toward Th1 dominance, which is more favorable for antitumor immunity. Furthermore, mB7-DC-Fc decreased the PD-1 + proportion of CD8 + T cells in vitro and tumor-infiltrating CD8 + T cells in vivo, suggesting that mB7-DC-Fc may maintain tumor-infiltrating CD8 + T cells in a nonexhausted state. In conclusion, mB7-DC-Fc administration during the T-cell priming phase enhances antitumor effects of vaccine by generating more tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes and leading to their accumulation at the tumor site. We suggest that this combination approach may be a promising strategy for antitumor immunotherapy. PMID:24598447

  12. Structure of the Constitutively Active Double Mutant CheY[superscript D13K Y106W] Alone and in Complex with a FliM Peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, Collin M.; Quillin, Michael L.; Campos, Andres; Lu, Justine; McEvoy, Megan M.; Hausrath, Andrew C.; Westbrook, Edwin M.; Matsumura, Philip; Matthews, Brian W.; Dahlquist, Frederick W.

    2010-11-16

    CheY is a member of the response regulator protein superfamily that controls the chemotactic swimming response of motile bacteria. The CheY double mutant D13K Y106W (CheY**) is resistant to phosphorylation, yet is a highly effective mimic of phosphorylated CheY in vivo and in vitro. The conformational attributes of this protein that enable it to signal in a phosphorylation-independent manner are unknown. We have solved the crystal structure of selenomethionine-substituted CheY** in the presence of its target, a peptide (FliM{sub 16}) derived from the flagellar motor switch, FliM, to 1.5 {angstrom} resolution with an R-factor of 19.6%. The asymmetric unit contains four CheY** molecules, two with FliM{sub 16} bound, and two without. The two CheY** molecules in the asymmetric unit that are bound to FliM{sub 16} adopt a conformation similar to BeF{sub 3}{sup -}-activated wild-type CheY, and also bind FliM{sub 16} in a nearly identical manner. The CheY** molecules that do not bind FliM{sub 16} are found in a conformation similar to unphosphorylated wild-type CheY, suggesting that the active phenotype of this mutant is enabled by a facile interconversion between the active and inactive conformations. Finally, we propose a ligand-binding model for CheY and CheY**, in which Ile95 changes conformation in a Tyr/Trp106-dependent manner to accommodate FliM.

  13. The adjuvant effect of a non-toxic mutant of heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli for the induction of measles virus-specific CTL responses after intranasal co-immunization with a synthetic peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Partidos, C D; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R; Steward, M W

    1996-01-01

    The intranasal route has been shown to be effective for immunization. However, immunization via this route may require the use of potent and safe adjuvant. The construction of non-toxic mutants of heat labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (LT), which is a potent mucosal adjuvant, is a major breakthrough for the development of mucosal vaccines. In this study we have assessed the ability of an LT mutant (LTK63) to act as an adjuvant following intranasal co-immunization with a peptide corresponding to a measles virus cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope. LTK63 was more effective at potentiating the in vivo induction of peptide-specific and measles virus-specific CTL responses than was administration of the peptide in saline. A concentration of 10 micrograms/dose of LTK63 was found to be the most effective in potentiating the in vivo priming of peptide-specific and measles virus-specific CTL responses. These findings highlight the potential of the non-toxic mutant of LT as a safe mucosal adjuvant for use in humans. PMID:9014810

  14. Agonistic induction of a covalent dimer in a mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor-A documents a juxtamembrane interaction that accompanies receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, J; Deschênes, J; McNicoll, N; De Léan, A

    2001-03-16

    The natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) is composed of an extracellular domain with a ligand binding site, a transmembrane-spanning domain, a kinase homology domain, and a guanylyl cyclase domain. In response to agonists (atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide), the kinase homology domain-mediated guanylate cyclase repression is removed, which allows the production of cyclic GMP. Previous work from our laboratory strongly indicated that agonists are exerting their effects through the induction of a juxtamembrane dimeric contact. However, a direct demonstration of this mechanism remains to be provided. As a tool, we are now using the properties of a new mutation, D435C. It introduces a cysteine at a position in NPR-A corresponding to a supplementary cysteine found in NPR-C6, another receptor of this family (a disulfide-linked dimer). Although this D435C mutation only leads to trace levels of NPR-A disulfide-linked dimer at basal state, covalent dimerization can be induced by a treatment with rat ANP or with other agonists. The NPR-A(D435C) mutant has not been subjected to significant structural alterations, since it shares with the wild type receptor a similar dose-response pattern of cellular guanylyl cyclase activation. However, a persistent activation accompanies NPR-A(D435C) dimer formation after the removal of the inducer agonist. On the other hand, a construction where the intracellular domain of NPR-A(D435C) has been truncated (DeltaKC(D435C)) displays a spontaneous and complete covalent dimerization. In addition, the elimination of the intracellular domain in wild type DeltaKC and DeltaKC(D435C) is associated with an increase of agonist binding affinity, this effect being more pronounced with the weak agonist pBNP. Also, a D435C secreted extracellular domain remains unlinked even after incubation with rat ANP. In summary, these results demonstrate, in a dynamic fashion, the agonistic induction of a dimeric contact in the

  15. Agonistic induction of a covalent dimer in a mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor-A documents a juxtamembrane interaction that accompanies receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, J; Deschênes, J; McNicoll, N; De Léan, A

    2001-03-16

    The natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) is composed of an extracellular domain with a ligand binding site, a transmembrane-spanning domain, a kinase homology domain, and a guanylyl cyclase domain. In response to agonists (atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide), the kinase homology domain-mediated guanylate cyclase repression is removed, which allows the production of cyclic GMP. Previous work from our laboratory strongly indicated that agonists are exerting their effects through the induction of a juxtamembrane dimeric contact. However, a direct demonstration of this mechanism remains to be provided. As a tool, we are now using the properties of a new mutation, D435C. It introduces a cysteine at a position in NPR-A corresponding to a supplementary cysteine found in NPR-C6, another receptor of this family (a disulfide-linked dimer). Although this D435C mutation only leads to trace levels of NPR-A disulfide-linked dimer at basal state, covalent dimerization can be induced by a treatment with rat ANP or with other agonists. The NPR-A(D435C) mutant has not been subjected to significant structural alterations, since it shares with the wild type receptor a similar dose-response pattern of cellular guanylyl cyclase activation. However, a persistent activation accompanies NPR-A(D435C) dimer formation after the removal of the inducer agonist. On the other hand, a construction where the intracellular domain of NPR-A(D435C) has been truncated (DeltaKC(D435C)) displays a spontaneous and complete covalent dimerization. In addition, the elimination of the intracellular domain in wild type DeltaKC and DeltaKC(D435C) is associated with an increase of agonist binding affinity, this effect being more pronounced with the weak agonist pBNP. Also, a D435C secreted extracellular domain remains unlinked even after incubation with rat ANP. In summary, these results demonstrate, in a dynamic fashion, the agonistic induction of a dimeric contact in the

  16. Selective inhibition of the prothrombinase complex: factor Va alters macromolecular recognition of a tick anticoagulant peptide mutant by factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Betz, A; Vlasuk, G P; Bergum, P W; Krishnaswamy, S

    1997-01-01

    The prothrombinase complex assembles through reversible interactions between the protease, factor Xa, the cofactor, factor Va, and acidic phospholipid membranes in the presence of calcium ions. Changes in macromolecular recognition by factor Xa which may result from its interaction with factor Va in the prothrombinase complex have been probed using a recombinant derivative of tick anticoagulant peptide where Arg3 has been replaced with Ala (R3A-TAP). In contrast to the wild type inhibitor, R3A-TAP was a weak competitive inhibitor of factor Xa (Ki = 794 nM). The inhibition of the prothrombinase complex by R3A-TAP was characterized by slow, tight-binding kinetics with an increased affinity of approximately 4000-fold (Ki* = 0.195 nM) relative to that of solution-phase factor Xa. Stopped-flow measurements using p-aminobenzamidine (PAB) demonstrated that the reaction between solution-phase factor Xa and R3A-TAP could be adequately described by a single reversible step with rate constants that were consistent with equilibrium binding measurements. The rate-limiting bimolecular combination of R3A-TAP and factor Xa was competitive with PAB binding of the protease. In contrast, the reaction of R3A-TAP with prothrombinase measured using PAB yielded biphasic stopped-flow traces, indicating a multistep pathway for the reaction of the inhibitor with the enzyme complex. The kinetic measurements were consistent with the initial formation of a ternary complex between R3A-TAP, prothrombinase, and PAB followed by two unimolecular steps which lead to PAB dissociation from the enzyme. In this case, prior occupation of the active site by PAB had no effect on the bimolecular reaction between R3A-TAP and prothrombinase. Thus, the interaction of factor Xa with factor Va on the membrane surface alters recognition of R3A-TAP by the protease, leading to changes in the thermodynamics as well as in the observed kinetic mechanism for the reaction. Therefore, a single amino acid substitution in

  17. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of HIV fusion peptide 13CO to lipid 31P proximities support similar partially inserted membrane locations of the α helical and β sheet peptide structures.

    PubMed

    Gabrys, Charles M; Qiang, Wei; Sun, Yan; Xie, Li; Schmick, Scott D; Weliky, David P

    2013-10-01

    Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane and the host cell membrane is an initial step of infection of the host cell. Fusion is catalyzed by gp41, which is an integral membrane protein of HIV. The fusion peptide (FP) is the ∼25 N-terminal residues of gp41 and is a domain of gp41 that plays a key role in fusion catalysis likely through interaction with the host cell membrane. Much of our understanding of the FP domain has been accomplished with studies of "HFP", i.e., a ∼25-residue peptide composed of the FP sequence but lacking the rest of gp41. HFP catalyzes fusion between membrane vesicles and serves as a model system to understand fusion catalysis. HFP binds to membranes and the membrane location of HFP is likely a significant determinant of fusion catalysis perhaps because the consequent membrane perturbation reduces the fusion activation energy. In the present study, many HFPs were synthesized and differed in the residue position that was (13)CO backbone labeled. Samples were then prepared that each contained a singly (13)CO labeled HFP incorporated into membranes that lacked cholesterol. HFP had distinct molecular populations with either α helical or oligomeric β sheet structure. Proximity between the HFP (13)CO nuclei and (31)P nuclei in the membrane headgroups was probed by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) measurements. For many samples, there were distinct (13)CO shifts for the α helical and β sheet structures so that the proximities to (31)P nuclei could be determined for each structure. Data from several differently labeled HFPs were then incorporated into a membrane location model for the particular structure. In addition to the (13)CO labeled residue position, the HFPs also differed in sequence and/or chemical structure. "HFPmn" was a linear peptide that contained the 23 N-terminal residues of gp41. "HFPmn_V2E" contained the V2E mutation that for HIV leads to greatly reduced extent of fusion and

  18. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide 13CO to Lipid 31P Proximities Support Similar Partially Inserted Membrane Locations of the α Helical and β Sheet Peptide Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrys, Charles M.; Qiang, Wei; Sun, Yan; Xie, Li; Schmick, Scott D.; Weliky, David P.

    2013-10-01

    Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane and the host cell membrane is an initial step of infection of the host cell. Fusion is catalyzed by gp41, which is an integral membrane protein of HIV. The fusion peptide (FP) is the -25 N-terminal residues of gp41 and is a domain of gp41 that plays a key role in fusion catalysis likely through interaction with the host cell membrane. Much of our understanding of the FP domain has been accomplished with studies of -HFP-, i.e., a -25-residue peptide composed of the FP sequence but lacking the rest of gp41. HFP catalyzes fusion between membrane vesicles and serves as a model system to understand fusion catalysis. HFP binds to membranes and the membrane location of HFP is likely a significant determinant of fusion catalysis perhaps because the consequent membrane perturbation reduces the fusion activation energy. In the present study, many HFPs were synthesized and differed in the residue position that was 13CO backbone labeled. Samples were then prepared that each contained a singly 13CO labeled HFP incorporated into membranes that lacked cholesterol. HFP had distinct molecular populations with either α helical or oligomeric - sheet structure. Proximity between the HFP 13CO nuclei and 31P nuclei in the membrane headgroups was probed by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) measurements. For many samples, there were distinct 13CO shifts for the α helical and - sheet structures so that the proximities to 31P nuclei could be determined for each structure. Data from several differently labeled HFPs were then incorporated into a membrane location model for the particular structure. In addition to the 13CO labeled residue position, the HFPs also differed in sequence and/or chemical structure. -HFPmn- was a linear peptide that contained the 23 N-terminal residues of gp41. -HFPmn_V2E- contained the V2E mutation that for HIV leads to greatly reduced extent of fusion and infection. The

  19. The Transmembrane Domain Peptide of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Promotes Both Intermediate and Pore Formation during PEG-Mediated Vesicle Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Tanusree; Chakraborty, Hirak; Lentz, Barry R.

    2014-01-01

    We propose mechanisms by which the transmembrane domain of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-TMD) promotes both initiation of fusion and formation of a fusion pore. Time courses of polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-mediated fusion of 25 nm small unilamellar vesicles composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), bovine brain sphingomyelin, and cholesterol (35:30:15:20 molar ratio) were recorded at pH 7.4 at five different temperatures (from 17°C to 37°C) and compared with time courses obtained with the same vesicles containing the fusion-active TMD of the G protein of VSV. Multiple time courses were fitted globally to a one-intermediate ensemble kinetic model to estimate the rate constants for conversion of the aggregated state to an intermediate hemifused state (k1, stalk, or I1) that rapidly transits to an unstable intermediate (I2 state) that converts to a final fusion pore state with a combined rate k3. The probabilities of lipid mixing, contents mixing, and contents leakage in the three states were also obtained from this analysis. The activation thermodynamics for each step were consistent with previously published models of lipid rearrangements during intermediate and pore formation. The influences of VSV-TMD, hexadecane, and VSV-TMD + hexadecane on the kinetics, activation thermodynamics, and membrane structure support the hypothesis that these two agents do not catalyze fusion by a common mechanism, except possibly at the lowest temperatures examined. VSV-TMD primarily catalyzed initial intermediate formation, although it substantially increased the probability of contents mixing in the intermediate state. Our results support the hypothesis that the catalytic influence of VSV-TMD on the initial-intermediate- and pore-forming steps of PEG-mediated fusion derives from its ability to impose a positive intrinsic curvature and thereby stress small unilamellar vesicle outer leaflets as well as the periphery of intermediate

  20. Fusion of a Short Peptide that Binds Immunoglobulin G to a Recombinant Protein Substantially Increases Its Plasma Half-Life in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sockolosky, Jonathan T.; Kivimäe, Saul; Szoka, Francis C.

    2014-01-01

    We explore a strategy to substantially increase the half-life of recombinant proteins by genetic fusion to FcIII, a 13-mer IgG-Fc domain binding peptide (IgGBP) originally identified by DeLano and co-workers at Genentech [DeLano WL, et al. (2000) Science 287∶1279–1283]. IgGBP fusion increases the in vivo half-life of proteins by enabling the fusion protein to bind serum IgG, a concept originally introduced by DeLano and co-workers in a patent but that to the best of our knowledge has never been pursued in the scientific literature. To further investigate the in vitro and in vivo properties of IgGBP fusion proteins, we fused FcIII to the C-terminus of a model fluorescent protein, monomeric Katushka (mKate). mKate-IgGBP fusions are easily expressed in Escherichia coli and bind specifically to human IgG with an affinity of ∼40 nM and ∼20 nM at pH 7.4 and pH 6, respectively, but not to mouse or rat IgG isotypes. mKate-IgGBP binds the Fc-domain of hIgG1 at a site overlapping the human neonatal Fc receptor (hFcRn) and as a consequence inhibits the binding of hIgG1 to hFcRn in vitro. High affinity binding to human IgG also endows mKate-IgGBP with a long circulation half-life of ∼8 hr in mice, a 75-fold increase compared to unmodified mKate. Thus, IgGBP fusion significantly reduces protein clearance by piggybacking on serum IgG without substantially increasing protein molecular weight due to the small size of the IgGBP. These attractive features could result in protein therapies with reduced dose frequency and improved patient compliance. PMID:25057984

  1. Response of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar to transgenic poplar, Populus simonii x P. nigra, expressing fusion protein gene of the spider insecticidal peptide and Bt-toxin C-peptide.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chuan-Wang; Liu, Gui-Feng; Wang, Zhi-Ying; Yan, Shan-Chun; Ma, Ling; Yang, Chuan-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The response of the Asian gypsy moth Lymantria dispar (L.) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) to a fusion gene consisting of the spider, Atrax robustus Simon (Araneae: Hexanthelidae) ω-ACTX-Ar1 sequence coding for an ω-atracotoxin and a sequence coding for the Bt-toxin C-peptide, expressed in transgenic poplar Populus simonii x P. nigra L. (Malphigiales: Salicaceae) was investigated. Individual performance, feeding selection, midgut proteinase activity and nutrition utilization were monitored. The growth and development of L. dispar were significantly affected by continually feeding on the transgenic poplar, with the larval instars displaying significantly shorter developmental times than those fed on nontransgenic poplar, but pupation was delayed. Mortality was higher in populations fed transgenic poplar leaves, than for larvae fed nontransgenic poplar leaves. The cumulative mortality during all stages of larvae fed transgenic leaves was 92% compared to 16.7% of larvae on nontransgenic leaves. The highest mortality observed was 71.7% in the last larval instar stage. A two-choice test showed that fifth-instar larvae preferred to feed on nontransgenic leaves at a ratio of 1:1.4. Feeding on transgenic leaves had highly significant negative effects on relative growth of larvae, and the efficiency of conversion of ingested and digested food. Activity of major midgut proteinases was measured using substrates TAME and BTEE showed significant increases in tryptase and chymotrypsinlike activity (9.2- and 9.0-fold, respectively) in fifth-instar larvae fed on transgenic leaves over control. These results suggest transgenic poplar is resistant to L. dispar, and the mature L. dispar may be weakened by the transgenic plants due to Bt protoxins activated by elevated major midgut proteinase activity. The new transgenic poplar expressing fusion protein genes of Bt and a new spider insecticidal peptide are good candidates for managing gypsy moth.

  2. Micropipette manipulation technique for the monitoring of pH-dependent membrane lysis as induced by the fusion peptide of influenza virus.

    PubMed Central

    Soltesz, S A; Hammer, D A

    1995-01-01

    We have assembled a micropipette aspiration assay to measure membrane destabilization events in which large (20-30 microns diameter) unilamellar vesicles are manipulated and exposed to membrane destabilizing agents. Single events can be seen with a light microscope and are recorded using both a video camera and a photomultiplier tube. We have performed experiments with a wild-type fusion peptide from influenza virus (X31) and found that it induces pH-dependent, stochastic lysis of large unilamellar vesicles. The rate and extent of lysis are both maximum at pH 5; the maximum rate of lysis is 0.018 s-1 at pH 5. An analysis of our data indicates that the lysis is not correlated either to the size of the vesicles or to the tension created in the vesicle membranes by aspiration. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:7711257

  3. 13C-13C and 15N-13C correlation spectroscopy of membrane-associated and uniformly labeled human immunodeficiency virus and influenza fusion peptides: Amino acid-type assignments and evidence for multiple conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodner, Michele L.; Gabrys, Charles M.; Struppe, Jochem O.; Weliky, David P.

    2008-02-01

    Many viruses which cause disease including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and influenza are "enveloped" by a membrane and infection of a host cell begins with joining or "fusion" of the viral and target cell membranes. Fusion is catalyzed by viral proteins in the viral membrane. For HIV and for the influenza virus, these fusion proteins contain an ˜20-residue apolar "fusion peptide" that binds to target cell membranes and plays a critical role in fusion. For this study, the HIV fusion peptide (HFP) and influenza virus fusion peptide (IFP) were chemically synthesized with uniform C13, N15 labeling over large contiguous regions of amino acids. Two-dimensional C13-C13 and N15-C13 spectra were obtained for the membrane-bound fusion peptides and an amino acid-type C13 assignment was obtained for the labeled residues in HFP and IFP. The membrane used for the HFP sample had a lipid headgroup and cholesterol composition comparable to that of host cells of the virus, and the C13 chemical shifts were more consistent with β strand conformation than with helical conformation. The membrane used for the IFP sample did not contain cholesterol, and the chemical shifts of the dominant peaks were more consistent with helical conformation than with β strand conformation. There were additional peaks in the IFP spectrum whose shifts were not consistent with helical conformation. An unambiguous C13 and N15 assignment was obtained in an HFP sample with more selective labeling, and two shifts were identified for the Leu-9 CO, Gly-10 N, and Gly-10 Cα nuclei. These sets of two shifts may indicate two β strand registries such as parallel and antiparallel. Although most spectra were obtained on a 9.4T instrument, one C13-C13 correlation spectrum was obtained on a 16.4T instrument and was better resolved than the comparable 9.4T spectrum. More selective labeling and higher field may, therefore, be approaches to obtaining unambiguous assignments for membrane-associated fusion peptides.

  4. Assessment of antibody responses against gp41 in HIV-1-infected patients using soluble gp41 fusion proteins and peptides derived from M group consensus envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Penn-Nicholson, Adam; Han, Dong P.; Kim, Soon J.; Park, Hanna; Ansari, Rais; Montefiori, David C.; Cho, Michael W.

    2008-03-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 is targeted by broadly-reactive neutralizing antibodies 2F5 and 4E10, making it an attractive target for vaccine development. To better assess immunogenic properties of gp41, we generated five soluble glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins encompassing C-terminal 30, 64, 100, 142, or 172 (full-length) amino acids of gp41 ectodomain from M group consensus envelope sequence. Antibody responses in HIV-1-infected patients were evaluated using these proteins and overlapping peptides. We found (i) antibody responses against different regions of gp41 varied tremendously among individual patients, (ii) patients with stronger antibody responses against membrane-proximal external region exhibit broader and more potent neutralizing activity, and (iii) several patients mounted antibodies against epitopes that are near, or overlap with, those targeted by 2F5 or 4E10. These soluble gp41 fusion proteins could be an important source of antigens for future vaccine development efforts.

  5. The Fusion Protein Signal-Peptide-Coding Region of Canine Distemper Virus: A Useful Tool for Phylogenetic Reconstruction and Lineage Identification

    PubMed Central

    Sarute, Nicolás; Calderón, Marina Gallo; Pérez, Ruben; La Torre, José; Hernández, Martín; Francia, Lourdes; Panzera, Yanina

    2013-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV; Paramyxoviridae, Morbillivirus) is the etiologic agent of a multisystemic infectious disease affecting all terrestrial carnivore families with high incidence and mortality in domestic dogs. Sequence analysis of the hemagglutinin (H) gene has been widely employed to characterize field strains, permitting the identification of nine CDV lineages worldwide. Recently, it has been established that the sequences of the fusion protein signal-peptide (Fsp) coding region are extremely variable, suggesting that analysis of its sequence might be useful for strain characterization studies. However, the divergence of Fsp sequences among worldwide strains and its phylogenetic resolution has not yet been evaluated. We constructed datasets containing the Fsp-coding region and H gene sequences of the same strains belonging to eight CDV lineages. Both datasets were used to evaluate their phylogenetic resolution. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that both datasets clustered the same strains into eight different branches, corresponding to CDV lineages. The inter-lineage amino acid divergence was fourfold greater for the Fsp peptide than for the H protein. The likelihood mapping revealed that both datasets display strong phylogenetic signals in the region of well-resolved topologies. These features indicate that Fsp-coding region sequence analysis is suitable for evolutionary studies as it allows for straightforward identification of CDV lineages. PMID:23675493

  6. Determinants of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Baseline Susceptibility to the Fusion Inhibitors Enfuvirtide and T-649 Reside outside the Peptide Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Heil, Marintha L.; Decker, Julie M.; Sfakianos, Jeffrey N.; Shaw, George M.; Hunter, Eric; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    The peptide fusion inhibitor (PFI) enfuvirtide is the first of a new class of entry inhibitors to receive FDA approval. We previously determined the susceptibility of 55 PFI-naïve-patient isolates to enfuvirtide and a second peptide inhibitor, T-649. Seven of the 55 viral isolates were insusceptible to enfuvirtide, T-649, or both inhibitors in the absence of prior exposure. To determine the molecular basis of the insusceptible phenotypes, we PCR amplified and cloned five PFI-insusceptible and one PFI-susceptible, full-length, biologically functional env genes and characterized viruses pseudotyped with the Env proteins in a single-round drug sensitivity assay. Overall, the mean 50% inhibitory concentrations of enfuvirtide and T-649 for the PFI-insusceptible Env pseudotypes were 1.4 to 1.7 log10 and 1.2 to 1.8 log10 greater, respectively, than those for a PFI-susceptible lab strain, NLHX; however, all of the PFI-insusceptible Env proteins conserved the sequence of a critical enfuvirtide interaction site (residues 36 to 38 of gp41, GIV) in HR-1. In contrast, multiple amino acid changes were observed C-terminal to HR-1, many of which were located in regions of HR-2 corresponding to the PFI. Nevertheless, peptides based on patient-derived HR-2 sequences were not more potent inhibitors than enfuvirtide or T-649, arguing that the basis of PFI susceptibility is not a higher-affinity, competitive HR-1/HR-2 interaction. These results demonstrate that regions of Env outside the enfuvirtide interaction site can significantly impact the PFI susceptibility of patient-derived Env, even prior to drug exposure. We hypothesize that both gp120 gene- and gp41 gene-encoded determinants that minimize the window of opportunity for PFI to bind provide a growth advantage and possibly a predisposition to resistance to this new class of drugs in vivo. PMID:15220433

  7. Activity of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein-bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein fusion peptide in an experimental model of Pseudomonas sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Opal, S M; Palardy, J E; Jhung, J W; Donsky, C; Romulo, R L; Parejo, N; Marra, M N

    1995-01-01

    A chimeric protein consisting of the N-terminal domain of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and the C-terminal domain of bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein demonstrated a dose-dependent survival benefit (P = 0.001) and reduced endotoxin levels (P < 0.01) in neutropenic rats with Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis. This lipopolysaccharide-binding protein-bactericidal/ permeability-increasing peptide has favorable pharmacokinetics and antiendotoxin properties which may be of value for human sepsis. PMID:8593028

  8. Revertant analysis of a temperature-sensitive mutant of Newcastle disease virus with defective glycoproteins: implication of the fusion glycoprotein in cell killing and isolation of a neuraminidase-deficient hemagglutinating virus.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G W; Hightower, L E

    1982-01-01

    Biological and molecular properties of a temperature-sensitive mutant (C1) of Newcastle disease virus and its revertants were analyzed. C1 exhibited three temperature-sensitive alterations (plaque formation, virion assembly, and cytopathogenicity) and several defects which were also present at the permissive temperature. C1 virions contained low amounts of hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycopeptides and consequently were deficient in hemagglutinating and neuraminidase activities. These virions also contained defective fusion glycoproteins which rendered them poorly hemolytic and slow to penetrate cultured chicken embryo cells. The biological activities of the membrane glycoproteins were recovered sequentially in a series of plaque-forming revertants. The coreversion of hemolysis, membrane-penetrating activities, and cytopathogenicity in the first-step revertant (S1) suggested that fusion glycoproteins were major contributors to cellular destruction. This revertant also provided evidence of a role for fusion glycoproteins in virion assembly. From S1 we isolated a large-plaque-forming revertant (L1) that assembled wild-type amounts of biologically active hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoproteins into virions. Although it was normal for hemagglutination, L1 had less than 3% of the neuraminidase activity of the wild type, demonstrating that these two activities can be uncoupled genetically. The neuraminidase deficiency of L1 did not impair its virulence in ovo or its reproduction in cultured cells. PMID:6896347

  9. Effects of dietary supplementation with an expressed fusion peptide bovine lactoferricin-lactoferrampin on performance, immune function and intestinal mucosal morphology in piglets weaned at age 21 d.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhiru; Yin, Yulong; Zhang, Youming; Huang, Ruilin; Sun, Zhihong; Li, Tiejun; Chu, Wuying; Kong, Xiangfeng; Li, Lili; Geng, Meimei; Tu, Qiang

    2009-04-01

    Lactoferrin has antimicrobial activity associated with peptide fragments lactoferricin (LFC) and lactoferrampin (LFA) released on digestion. These two fragments have been expressed in Photorhabdus luminescens as a fusion peptide linked to protein cipB. The construct cipB-LFC-LFA was tested as an alternative to antimicrobial growth promoters in pig production. Sixty piglets with an average live body weight of 5.42 (sem 0.59) kg were challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and randomly assigned to four treatment groups fed a maize-soyabean meal diet containing either no addition (C), cipB at 100 mg/kg (C+B), cipB-LFC-LFA at 100 mg/kg (C+L) or colistin sulfate at 100 mg/kg (C+CS) for 3 weeks. Compared with C, dietary supplementation with C+L for 3 weeks increased daily weight gain by 21 %, increased recovery from diarrhoea, enhanced serum glutathione peroxidase (GPx), peroxidase (POD) and total antioxidant content (T-AOC), liver GPx, POD, superoxide dismutase and T-AOC, Fe, total Fe-binding capacity, IgA, IgG and IgM levels (P < 0.05), decreased the concentration of E. coli in the ileum, caecum and colon (P < 0.05), increased the concentration of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in the ileum, caecum and colon (P < 0.05), and promoted development of the villus-crypt architecture of the small intestine. Growth performance was similar between C+L- and C+CS-supplemented pigs. The present results indicate that LFC-LFA is an effective alternative to the feed antibiotic CS for enhancing growth performance in piglets weaned at age 21 d. PMID:18840311

  10. Applications of novel affinity cassette methods: use of peptide fusion handles for the purification of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Hearn, M T; Acosta, D

    2001-01-01

    In this article, recent progress related to the use of different types of polypeptide fusion handles or 'tags' for the purification of recombinant proteins are critically discussed. In addition, novel aspects of the molecular cassette concept are elaborated, together with areas of potential application of these fundamental principles in molecular recognition. As evident from this review, the use of these concepts provides a powerful strategy for the high throughput isolation and purification of recombinant proteins and their derived domains, generated from functional genomic or zeomic studies, as part of the bioprocess technology leading to their commercial development, and in the study of molecular recognition phenomena per se. In addition, similar concepts can be exploited for high sensitivity analysis and detection, for the characterisation of protein bait/prey interactions at the molecular level, and for the immobilisation and directed orientation of proteins for use as biocatalysts/biosensors.

  11. Recombinant expression and purification of a MAP30-cell penetrating peptide fusion protein with higher anti-tumor bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qiang; Yang, Xu-Zhong; Fu, Long-Yun; Lu, Yv-Ting; Lu, Yan-Hua; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Fu-Jun

    2015-07-01

    MAP30 (Momordica Antiviral Protein 30 Kd), a single-stranded type-I ribosome inactivating protein, possesses versatile biological activities including anti-tumor abilities. However, the low efficiency penetrating into tumor cells hampers the tumoricidal effect of MAP30. This paper describes MAP30 fused with a human-derived cell penetrating peptide HBD which overcome the low uptake efficiency by tumor cells and exhibits higher anti-tumor bioactivity. MAP30 gene was cloned from the genomic DNA of Momordica charantia and the recombinant plasmid pET28b-MAP30-HBD was established and transferred into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant MAP30-HBD protein (rMAP30-HBD) was expressed in a soluble form after being induced by 0.5mM IPTG for 14h at 15°C. The recombinant protein was purified to greater than 95% purity with Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The rMAP30-HBD protein not only has topological inactivation and protein translation inhibition activity but also showed significant improvements in cytotoxic activity compared to that of the rMAP30 protein without HBD in the tested tumor cell lines, and induced higher apoptosis rates in HeLa cells analyzed by Annexin V-FITC with FACS. This paper demonstrated a new method for improving MAP30 protein anti-tumor activity and might have potential applications in cancer therapy area.

  12. Viral membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Stephen C

    2015-05-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a "fusion loop" or "fusion peptide") engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics.

  13. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the six-helix bundle of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein as probes of the protein post-fusion conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga; Luque, Daniel; Terrón, María C.; Calder, Lesley J.; Melero, José A.

    2014-07-15

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) has two major surface glycoproteins (G and F) anchored in the lipid envelope. Membrane fusion promoted by hRSV{sub F} occurs via refolding from a pre-fusion form to a highly stable post-fusion state involving large conformational changes of the F trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of hRSV{sub F}, we have prepared polyclonal (α-6HB) and monoclonal (R145) rabbit antibodies specific for the 6HB. Among other applications, these antibodies were used to explore the requirements of 6HB formation by isolated protein segments or peptides and by truncated mutants of the F protein. Site-directed mutagenesis and electron microscopy located the R145 epitope in the post-fusion hRSV{sub F} at a site distantly located from previously mapped epitopes, extending the repertoire of antibodies that can decorate the F molecule. - Highlights: • Antibodies specific for post-fusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein are described. • Polyclonal antibodies were obtained in rabbit inoculated with chimeric heptad repeats. • Antibody binding required assembly of a six-helix bundle in the post-fusion protein. • A monoclonal antibody with similar structural requirements is also described. • Binding of this antibody to the post-fusion protein was visualized by electron microscopy.

  14. Protection against morbillivirus-induced encephalitis by immunization with a rationally designed synthetic peptide vaccine containing B- and T-cell epitopes from the fusion protein of measles virus.

    PubMed Central

    Obeid, O E; Partidos, C D; Howard, C R; Steward, M W

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides representing T- and B-cell epitopes from the fusion (F) protein of measles virus (MV) were tested for their ability to induce a protective immune response against intracerebral challenge with neuroadapted strains of MV and canine distemper virus (CDV) in mice. Of the panel of peptides tested, only a chimeric peptide consisting of two copies of a promiscuous T-cell epitope (representing residues 288 to 302 of MV F protein) synthesized at the amino terminus of a B-cell epitope (representing residues 404 to 414 of MV F protein) was able to induce a protective response against challenge with MV and CDV in inbred mice. The protective response induced by this peptide (TTB) was associated with a significant reduction in mortality, histological absence of acute encephalitis, and greatly reduced titers of virus in the brains of TTB-immune mice following challenge compared with the results for nonimmunized controls. A chimeric peptide comprising one copy of the T-cell epitope and one copy of the B-cell epitope (TB) did not induce a protective response. A comparison of the antibody responses induced by the two chimeras suggested that differences in protective efficacy following immunization may be a result of the higher affinity of the antibody induced by the TTB peptide than that of the antibody induced by the TB peptide. In addition, differences in the immunoglobulin G subclass of the antipeptide antibody responses were observed, and these may play a role in the differences in protection observed. These results indicate that appropriately designed synthetic peptides have potential as vaccines for the induction of cross-reactive protection against morbilliviruses. PMID:7531779

  15. Enhanced cellulase producing mutants developed from heterokaryotic Aspergillus strain.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Baljit; Oberoi, H S; Chadha, B S

    2014-03-01

    A heterokaryon 28, derived through protoplast fusion between Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus tubingensis (Dal8), was subjected cyclic mutagenesis followed by selection on increasing levels of 2-deoxy glucose (2-DG) as selection marker. The derived deregulated cellulase hyper producing mutant '64', when compared to fusant 28, produced 9.83, 7.8, 3.2, 4.2 and 19.74 folds higher endoglucanase, β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, FPase and xylanase, respectively, under shake cultures. The sequence analysis of PCR amplified β-glucosidase gene from wild and mutant showed nucleotide deletion/substitution. The mutants showed highly catalytic efficient β-glucosidase as evident from low Km and high Vmax values. The expression profiling through zymogram analysis also indicated towards over-expression of cellulases. The up/down regulated expressed proteins observed through SDS-PAGE were identified by Peptide mass fingerprinting The cellulase produced by mutants in conjunction with cellulase free xylanase derived from Thermomyces lanuginosus was used for efficient utilization of alkali treated rice straw for obtaining xylo-oligosaccharides and ethanol.

  16. A potential peptide vector that allows targeted delivery of a desired fusion protein into the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231

    PubMed Central

    LIU, WEI QING; YANG, JUN; HONG, MIN; GAO, CHANG E.; DONG, JIAN

    2016-01-01

    Effective control of breast cancer has been primarily hampered by a lack of tumor specificity in treatments. One potential way to improve targeting specificity is to develop novel vectors that specifically bind to and are internalized by tumor cells. Through a phage display library, an 11-L-amino acid peptide, PI (sequence, CASPSGALRSC), was selected. PI was labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and named PI-FITC. Subsequently, the specific affinity of PI-FITC to MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells and other cancer cell lines was observed by confocal microscopy. Our previous study established that PI-FITC also shows affinity to Calu-1 human lung carcinoma cells and major histocompatibility complex class I antigen molecules; therefore, the cytomembrane proteins of the cell lines were analyzed to determine those that were common to the two cell lines and may be associated with transmembrane transduction. To further test the delivery ability of PI to MDA-MB-231 cells, PI-glutathione-S-transferase (GST) was constructed and the internalization of this fusion protein was visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy. The results revealed that PI exhibited specific affinity to MDA-MB-231 cells. Use of membrane transport inhibitors indicated that macropinocytosis and caveolin-mediated endocytosis may be involved in the endocytosis of PI. In addition, 11 membrane proteins common to MDA-MB-231 and Calu-1 may be associated with transmembrane transduction. In summary, PI was able to deliver PI-GST into MDA-MB-231 cells. Thus, PI could be modified to be a potential vector, and may contribute to the development of targeted therapeutic strategies for breast cancer. PMID:27313722

  17. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  18. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  19. MART-1 peptide vaccination plus IMP321 (LAG-3Ig fusion protein) in patients receiving autologous PBMCs after lymphodepletion: results of a Phase I trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunotherapy offers a promising novel approach for the treatment of cancer and both adoptive T-cell transfer and immune modulation lead to regression of advanced melanoma. However, the potential synergy between these two strategies remains unclear. Methods We investigated in 12 patients with advanced stage IV melanoma the effect of multiple MART-1 analog peptide vaccinations with (n = 6) or without (n = 6) IMP321 (LAG-3Ig fusion protein) as an adjuvant in combination with lymphodepleting chemotherapy and adoptive transfer of autologous PBMCs at day (D) 0 (Trial registration No: NCT00324623). All patients were selected on the basis of ex vivo detectable MART-1-specific CD8 T-cell responses and immunized at D0, 8, 15, 22, 28, 52, and 74 post-reinfusion. Results After immunization, a significant expansion of MART-1-specific CD8 T cells was measured in 83% (n = 5/6) and 17% (n = 1/6) of patients from the IMP321 and control groups, respectively (P < 0.02). Compared to the control group, the mean fold increase of MART-1-specific CD8 T cells in the IMP321 group was respectively >2-, >4- and >6-fold higher at D15, D30 and D60 (P < 0.02). Long-lasting MART-1-specific CD8 T-cell responses were significantly associated with IMP321 (P < 0.02). At the peak of the response, MART-1-specific CD8 T cells contained higher proportions of effector (CCR7− CD45RA+/−) cells in the IMP321 group (P < 0.02) and showed no sign of exhaustion (i.e. were mostly PD1−CD160−TIM3−LAG3−2B4+/−). Moreover, IMP321 was associated with a significantly reduced expansion of regulatory T cells (P < 0.04); consistently, we observed a negative correlation between the relative expansion of MART-1-specific CD8 T cells and of regulatory T cells. Finally, although there were no confirmed responses as per RECIST criteria, a transient, 30-day partial response was observed in a patient from the IMP321 group. Conclusions Vaccination with IMP321 as an

  20. Genetically Altered Mutant Mouse Models of Guanylyl Cyclase/Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A Exhibit the Cardiac Expression of Proinflammatory Mediators in a Gene-Dose-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Vellaichamy, Elangovan; Das, Subhankar; Subramanian, Umadevi; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether genetically determined differences in the guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A gene (Npr1) affect cardiac expression of proinflammatory cytokines, hypertrophic markers, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and activating protein-1 (AP-1) in am Npr1 gene-dose–dependent manner. In the present studies, adult male Npr1 gene-disrupted (Npr1−/−), wild-type (Npr1+/+), and gene-duplicated (Npr1++/++) mice were used. The Npr1−/− mice showed 41 mm Hg higher systolic blood pressure and 60% greater heart weight to body weight (HW/BW) ratio; however, Npr1++/++ mice exhibited 15 mm Hg lower systolic blood pressure and 12% reduced HW/BW ratio compared with Npr1+/+ mice. Significant upregulation of gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines and hypertrophic markers along with enhanced NF-κB/AP-1 binding activities were observed in the Npr1−/− mouse hearts. Conversely, hypertrophic markers and proinflammatory cytokines gene expression as well as NF-κB/AP-1 binding activities were markedly decreased in Npr1++/++ mouse hearts compared with wild-type mice. The ventricular guanylyl cyclase activity and cGMP levels were reduced by 96% and 87%, respectively, in Npr1−/− mice; however, these parameters were amplified by 2.8-fold and 3.8-fold, respectively, in Npr1++/++ mice. Echocardiographic analysis revealed significantly increased fractional shortening in Npr1++/++ mice (P < .05) but greatly decreased in Npr1−/− mice (P < .01) hearts compared with Npr1+/+ mice. The present findings suggest that Npr1 represses the expression of cardiac proinflammatory mediators, hypertrophic markers, and NF-κB/AP-1–mediated mechanisms, which seem to be associated in an Npr1 gene-dose–dependent manner. PMID:24424043

  1. Spinal fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anterior spinal fusion; Spine surgery - spinal fusion; Low back pain - fusion; Herniated disk - fusion ... If you had chronic back pain before surgery, you will likely still have some pain afterward. Spinal fusion is unlikely to take away all your pain ...

  2. Deletion of the Leader Peptide of the Mitochondrially Encoded Precursor of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit II

    PubMed Central

    Torello, A. T.; Overholtzer, M. H.; Cameron, V. L.; Bonnefoy, N.; Fox, T. D.

    1997-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (Cox2p) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is synthesized within mitochondria as a precursor, pre-Cox2p. The 15-amino acid leader peptide is processed after export to the intermembrane space. Leader peptides are relatively unusual in mitochondrially coded proteins: indeed mammalian Cox2p lacks a leader peptide. We generated two deletions in the S. cerevisiae COX2 gene, removing either the leader peptide (cox2-20) or the leader peptide and processing site (cox2-21) without altering either the promoter or the mRNA-specific translational activation site. When inserted into mtDNA, both deletions substantially reduced the steady-state levels of Cox2p and caused a tight nonrespiratory phenotype. A respiring pseudorevertant of the cox2-20 mutant was heteroplasmic for the original mutant mtDNA and a ρ(-) mtDNA whose deletion fused the first 251 codons of the mitochondrial gene encoding cytochrome b to the cox2-20 sequence. The resulting fusion protein was processed to yield functional Cox2p. Thus, the presence of amino-terminal cytochrome b sequence bypassed the need for the pre-Cox2p leader peptide. We propose that the pre-Cox2p leader peptide contains a targeting signal necessary for membrane insertion, without which it remains in the matrix and is rapidly degraded. PMID:9093845

  3. Tethering of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) to Beta Tricalcium Phosphate (βTCP) via Fusion to a High Affinity, Multimeric βTCP-Binding Peptide: Effects on Human Multipotent Stromal Cells/Connective Tissue Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Stockdale, Linda; Saini, Sunil; Lee, Richard T.; Griffith, Linda G.

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of freshly-aspirated autologous bone marrow, together with a scaffold, is a promising clinical alternative to harvest and transplantation of autologous bone for treatment of large defects. However, survival proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of the marrow-resident stem and progenitor cells with osteogenic potential can be limited in large defects by the inflammatory microenvironment. Previous studies using EGF tethered to synthetic polymer substrates have demonstrated that surface-tethered EGF can protect human bone marrow-derived osteogenic stem and progenitor cells from pro-death inflammatory cues and enhance their proliferation without detriment to subsequent osteogenic differentiation. The objective of this study was to identify a facile means of tethering EGF to clinically-relevant βTCP scaffolds and to demonstrate the bioactivity of EGF tethered to βTCP using stimulation of the proliferative response of human bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSC) as a phenotypic metric. We used a phage display library and panned against βTCP and composites of βTCP with a degradable polyester biomaterial, together with orthogonal blocking schemes, to identify a 12-amino acid consensus binding peptide sequence, LLADTTHHRPWT, with high affinity for βTCP. When a single copy of this βTCP-binding peptide sequence was fused to EGF via a flexible peptide tether domain and expressed recombinantly in E. coli together with a maltose-binding domain to aid purification, the resulting fusion protein exhibited modest affinity for βTCP. However, a fusion protein containing a linear concatamer containing 10 repeats of the binding motif the resulting fusion protein showed high affinity stable binding to βTCP, with only 25% of the protein released after 7 days at 37oC. The fusion protein was bioactive, as assessed by its abilities to activate kinase signaling pathways downstream of the EGF receptor when presented in soluble form, and to enhance

  4. Streptavidin mutants

    DOEpatents

    Sano, Takeshi; Cantor, Charles R.; Vajda, Sandor; Reznik, Gabriel O.; Smith, Cassandra L.; Pandori, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to streptavidin proteins and peptides having a altered physical properties such as an increased stability or increased or decreased affinity for binding biotin. The invention also relates to methods for the detection, identification, separation and isolation of targets using streptavidin proteins or peptides. Streptavidin with increased or reduced affinity allows for the use of the streptavidin-biotin coupling systems for detection and isolation systems wherein it is necessary to remove of one or the other of the binding partners. Such systems are useful for the purification of functional proteins and viable cells. The invention also relates to nucleic acids which encode these streptavidin proteins and peptides and to recombinant cells such as bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells which contain these nucleic acids.

  5. The C34 Peptide Fusion Inhibitor Binds to the Six-Helix Bundle Core Domain of HIV-1 gp41 by Displacement of the C-Terminal Helical Repeat Region.

    PubMed

    Louis, John M; Baber, James L; Clore, G Marius

    2015-11-17

    The conformational transition of the core domain of HIV-1 gp41 from a prehairpin intermediate to a six-helix bundle is responsible for virus-cell fusion. Several inhibitors which target the N-heptad repeat helical coiled-coil trimer that is fully accessible in the prehairpin intermediate have been designed. One such inhibitor is the peptide C34 derived from the C-heptad repeat of gp41 that forms the exterior of the six-helix bundle. Here, using a variety of biophysical techniques, including dye tagging, size-exclusion chromatography combined with multiangle light scattering, double electron-electron resonance EPR spectroscopy, and circular dichroism, we investigate the binding of C34 to two six-helix bundle mimetics comprising N- and C-heptad repeats either without (core(SP)) or with (core(S)) a short spacer connecting the two. In the case of core(SP), C34 directly exchanges with the C-heptad repeat. For core(S), up to two molecules of C34 bind the six-helix bundle via displacement of the C-heptad repeat. These results suggest that fusion inhibitors such as C34 can target a continuum of transitioning conformational states from the prehairpin intermediate to the six-helix bundle prior to the occurrence of irreversible fusion of viral and target cell membranes.

  6. Peptide and peptide library cyclization via bromomethylbenzene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hacker, David E; Almohaini, Mohammed; Anbazhagan, Aruna; Ma, Zhong; Hartman, Matthew C T

    2015-01-01

    Cyclization confers several advantages to peptides, cumulatively serving to make them more drug-like. In this protocol, cyclic peptides are generated via bis-alkylation of cysteine-containing peptides using α,α'-dibromo-m-xylene. The reactions are robust and high yielding. Multiple reaction platforms for the application of this versatile strategy are described herein: the cyclization of solid-phase-synthesized peptides, both in solution and on resin, as well as the cyclization of in vitro translated mRNA-peptide fusion libraries on oligo(dT) resin.

  7. Escape from R-peptide deletion in a {gamma}-retrovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Irene C.; Eckhardt, Manon; Brynza, Julia; Collins, Mary K.; Cichutek, Klaus; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2011-09-30

    The R peptide in the cytoplasmic tail (C-tail) of {gamma}-retroviral envelope proteins (Env) prevents membrane fusion before budding. To analyse its role in the formation of replication competent, infectious particles, we developed chimeric murine leukaemia viruses (MLV) with unmodified or R-peptide deleted Env proteins of the gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GaLV). While titres of these viruses were unaffected, R-peptide deficiency led to strongly impaired spreading. Most remarkably, we isolated an escape mutant which had restored an open reading frame for a C-terminal extension of the truncated C-tail. A reconstituted virus encoding this escape C-tail replicated in cell culture. In contrast to R-peptide deficient Env, particle incorporation of the escape Env was effective due to an enhanced protein expression and restored intracellular co-localisation with Gag proteins. Our data demonstrate that the R peptide not only regulates membrane fusion but also mediates efficient Env protein particle incorporation in {gamma}-retrovirus infected cells.

  8. Analysis of p53 mutants for transcriptional activity.

    PubMed Central

    Raycroft, L; Schmidt, J R; Yoas, K; Hao, M M; Lozano, G

    1991-01-01

    The wild-type p53 protein functions to suppress transformation, but numerous mutant p53 proteins are transformation competent. To examine the role of p53 as a transcription factor, we made fusion proteins containing human or mouse p53 sequences fused to the DNA binding domain of a known transcription factor, GAL4. Human and mouse wild-type p53/GAL4 specifically transactivated expression of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter in HeLa, CHO, and NIH 3T3 cells. Several mutant p53 proteins, including a mouse p53 mutant which is temperature sensitive for suppression, were also analyzed. A p53/GAL4 fusion protein with this mutation was also transcriptionally active only at the permissive temperature. Another mutant p53/GAL4 fusion protein analyzed mimics the mutation inherited in Li-Fraumeni patients. This fusion protein was as active as wild-type p53/GAL4 in our assay. Two human p53 mutants that arose from alterations of the p53 gene in colorectal carcinomas were 30- to 40-fold less effective at activating transcription than wild-type p53/GAL4 fusion proteins. Thus, functional wild-type p53/GAL4 fusion proteins activate transcription, while several transformation competent mutants do so poorly or not at all. Only one mutant p53/GAL4 fusion protein remained transcriptionally active. Images PMID:1944276

  9. Oral administration of a fusion protein between the cholera toxin B subunit and the 42-amino acid isoform of amyloid-β peptide produced in silkworm pupae protects against Alzheimer's disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Si; Wei, Zhen; Chen, Jian; Chen, Yanhong; Lv, Zhengbing; Yu, Wei; Meng, Qiaohong; Jin, Yongfeng

    2014-01-01

    A key molecule in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a 42-amino acid isoform of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42), which is the most toxic element of senile plaques. In this study, to develop an edible, safe, low-cost vaccine for AD, a cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)-Aβ42 fusion protein was successfully expressed in silkworm pupae. We tested the silkworm pupae-derived oral vaccination containing CTB-Aβ42 in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Anti-Aβ42 antibodies were induced in these mice, leading to a decreased Aβ deposition in the brain. We also found that the oral administration of the silk worm pupae vaccine improved the memory and cognition of mice, as assessed using a water maze test. These results suggest that the new edible CTB-Aβ42 silkworm pupae-derived vaccine has potential clinical application in the prevention of AD.

  10. Direct evidence that leukemic cells present HLA-associated immunogenic peptides derived from the BCR-ABL b3a2 fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Clark, R E; Dodi, I A; Hill, S C; Lill, J R; Aubert, G; Macintyre, A R; Rojas, J; Bourdon, A; Bonner, P L; Wang, L; Christmas, S E; Travers, P J; Creaser, C S; Rees, R C; Madrigal, J A

    2001-11-15

    The BCR-ABL oncogene is central in the pathogenesis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Here, tandem nanospray mass spectrometry was used to demonstrate cell surface HLA-associated expression of the BCR-ABL peptide KQSSKALQR on class I-negative CML cells transfected with HLA-A*0301, and on primary CML cells from HLA-A3-positive patients. These patients mounted a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to KQSSKALQR that also killed autologous CML cells, and tetramer staining demonstrated the presence of circulating KQSSKALQR-specific T cells. The findings are the first demonstration that CML cells express HLA-associated leukemia-specific immunogenic peptides and provide a sound basis for immunization studies against BCR-ABL.

  11. Enhanced functional expression of aquaporin Z via fusion of in situ cleavable leader peptides in Escherichia coli cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Lian, Jiazhang; Kai, Lei; Huang, Lei; Cen, Peilin; Xu, Zhinan

    2014-02-01

    Aquaporin Z (AqpZ) is a water channel protein from Escherichia coli and has attracted many attentions to develop the biomimetic water filtration technology. Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) system, one of the most complex multi-enzymatic systems, has the ability of producing the integral membrane protein in vitro. To enhance the synthesis of AqpZ in E. coli cell-free system, several natural leader peptides were respectively fused at the N-terminus and were verified to enhance the expression level significantly. Moreover, the supplementation of detergents or liposome could activate leader peptidase from the cell-free extract and provide hydrophobic environment for proper folding of AqpZ. Thus, the release of mature AqpZ via the in situ removal of leader peptide was achieved, with a specific water transport activity of (2.1 ± 0.1) × 10⁻¹⁴ cm³ s⁻¹ monomer⁻¹. Using this in situ removable leader peptide strategy, the transcription-translation, leader sequence cleavage and membrane protein folding were integrated into a simple process in the cell-free system, providing a convenient approach to enhance the expression of target proteins, especially those membrane proteins difficult to achieve. PMID:24411442

  12. Enhanced functional expression of aquaporin Z via fusion of in situ cleavable leader peptides in Escherichia coli cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Lian, Jiazhang; Kai, Lei; Huang, Lei; Cen, Peilin; Xu, Zhinan

    2014-02-01

    Aquaporin Z (AqpZ) is a water channel protein from Escherichia coli and has attracted many attentions to develop the biomimetic water filtration technology. Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) system, one of the most complex multi-enzymatic systems, has the ability of producing the integral membrane protein in vitro. To enhance the synthesis of AqpZ in E. coli cell-free system, several natural leader peptides were respectively fused at the N-terminus and were verified to enhance the expression level significantly. Moreover, the supplementation of detergents or liposome could activate leader peptidase from the cell-free extract and provide hydrophobic environment for proper folding of AqpZ. Thus, the release of mature AqpZ via the in situ removal of leader peptide was achieved, with a specific water transport activity of (2.1 ± 0.1) × 10⁻¹⁴ cm³ s⁻¹ monomer⁻¹. Using this in situ removable leader peptide strategy, the transcription-translation, leader sequence cleavage and membrane protein folding were integrated into a simple process in the cell-free system, providing a convenient approach to enhance the expression of target proteins, especially those membrane proteins difficult to achieve.

  13. Big fusion, little fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Frank; ddtuttle

    2016-08-01

    In reply to correspondence from George Scott and Adam Costley about the Physics World focus issue on nuclear energy, and to news of construction delays at ITER, the fusion reactor being built in France.

  14. PhoP/Q regulated genes in Salmonella typhi identification of melittin sensitive mutants.

    PubMed

    Baker, S J; Daniels, C; Morona, R

    1997-03-01

    Many of the genes (pags (phoP activated genes) and prgs (phoP repressed genes)) regulated by the PhoP and PhoQ proteins (PhoP/Q) are necessary for survival of Salmonella typhimurium in murine macrophages and pathogenesis in mice. Although a great deal is known about the S. typhimurium phoP/Q regulon, little has been done with the human specific pathogen S. typhi, prompting us to investigate S. typhi phoP/Q regulated genes. Isogenic phoP12 (null) and phoP24 (constitutive) strains were constructed in S. typhi Ty2 and S. typhimurium C5 strains. Comparison of whole cell proteins from these strains by SDS-PAGE showed differences in both the number and molecular mass of PhoP/Q regulated proteins. This suggested that S. typhi and S. typhimurium may have different PhoP/Q regulated proteins and/or that their regulation may be different. A genetic procedure was developed to isolate mutations in PhoP/Q regulated genes. This involved random MudJ transposon mutagenesis of a phoP12 mutant, creating lacZ-gene fusions, and screening for Lac+ or Lac- colonies. A mobilizable plasmid carrying the phoP24 mutant gene was conjugated into these insertion mutants. Those that changed from Lac- to Lac+ were inferred to be pag::MudJ insertions and those that changed from Lac+ to Lac- were inferred to be prg::MudJ insertions. Five mutants with PhoP/Q regulated MudJ fusions were found by this scheme. The mutations were termed pqa (PhoPQ activated) and pqr (PhoPQ repressed) to distinguish them from other PhoP/Q regulated genes. The pqa/pqr::MudJ mutations were transduced into S. typhi phoP+ and phoP24 strains by Vi-l phage transduction. Characterization of the mutants (Southern blot analysis, beta-galactosidase activity on indicator plates and in liquid cultures) strongly suggested that their MudJ insertion mutations were in five different genes. Further characterization involved determining cationic peptide sensitivity and mouse virulence. Two mutants were found to be sensitive to the

  15. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  16. Closed and Semiclosed Interhelical Structures in Membrane vs Closed and Open Structures in Detergent for the Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Fusion Peptide and Correlation of Hydrophobic Surface Area with Fusion Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ujjayini; Xie, Li; Jia, Lihui; Liang, Shuang; Weliky, David P

    2015-06-24

    The ∼25 N-terminal "HAfp" residues of the HA2 subunit of the influenza virus hemagglutinin protein are critical for fusion between the viral and endosomal membranes at low pH. Earlier studies of HAfp in detergent support (1) N-helix/turn/C-helix structure at pH 5 with open interhelical geometry and N-helix/turn/C-coil structure at pH 7; or (2) N-helix/turn/C-helix at both pHs with closed interhelical geometry. These different structures led to very different models of HAfp membrane location and different models of catalysis of membrane fusion by HAfp. In this study, the interhelical geometry of membrane-associated HAfp is probed by solid-state NMR. The data are well-fitted to a population mixture of closed and semiclosed structures. The two structures have similar interhelical geometries and are planar with hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The different structures of HAfp in detergent vs membrane could be due to the differences in interaction with the curved micelle vs flat membrane with better geometric matching between the closed and semiclosed structures and the membrane. The higher fusogenicity of longer sequences and low pH is correlated with hydrophobic surface area and consequent increased membrane perturbation.

  17. Construction, exploitation and evolution of a new peptide library displayed at high density by fusion to the major coat protein of filamentous phage.

    PubMed

    Iannolo, G; Minenkova, O; Gonfloni, S; Castagnoli, L; Cesareni, G

    1997-06-01

    The amino-terminus of the major coat protein (PVIII) of filamentous phage can be extended, up to 6-7 residues, without interfering with the phage life cycle. We have constructed a library of approximately ten millions different phage each displaying a different octapeptide joined to the amino-terminus of the 2700 copies of PVIII. Most of the resulting clones are able to produce infective particles. This molecular repertoire constituted by the periodic regular decoration of the phage filament surface, can be utilized to search elements that bind proteins or relatively small organic molecules like the textile dye Cibacron blue. By sequential growth cycles we have performed a library evolution experiment to select phage clones that have a growth advantage in the absence of any requirement for binding a specific target. The consensus of the best growers reveals a Pro rich sequence with large hydrophobic residues at position 7 and Asn at position 1 of the random peptide insert. We propose that the assembly secretion process is favoured in phages displaying this family of peptides since they fit the groove between two adjacent PVIII subunits by making advantageous molecular contacts on the phage surface. PMID:9224932

  18. Robust expression and secretion of Xylanase1 in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by fusion to a selection gene and processing with the FMDV 2A peptide.

    PubMed

    Rasala, Beth A; Lee, Philip A; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P; Mendez, Michael; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    Microalgae have recently received attention as a potential low-cost host for the production of recombinant proteins and novel metabolites. However, a major obstacle to the development of algae as an industrial platform has been the poor expression of heterologous genes from the nuclear genome. Here we describe a nuclear expression strategy using the foot-and-mouth-disease-virus 2A self-cleavage peptide to transcriptionally fuse heterologous gene expression to antibiotic resistance in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that strains transformed with ble-2A-GFP are zeocin-resistant and accumulate high levels of GFP that is properly 'cleaved' at the FMDV 2A peptide resulting in monomeric, cytosolic GFP that is easily detectable by in-gel fluorescence analysis or fluorescent microscopy. Furthermore, we used our ble2A nuclear expression vector to engineer the heterologous expression of the industrial enzyme, xylanase. We demonstrate that linking xyn1 expression to ble2A expression on the same open reading frame led to a dramatic (~100-fold) increase in xylanase activity in cells lysates compared to the unlinked construct. Finally, by inserting an endogenous secretion signal between the ble2A and xyn1 coding regions, we were able to target monomeric xylanase for secretion. The novel microalgae nuclear expression strategy described here enables the selection of transgenic lines that are efficiently expressing the heterologous gene-of-interest and should prove valuable for basic research as well as algal biotechnology. PMID:22937037

  19. Induction of androgen formation in the male by a TAT-VDAC1 fusion peptide blocking 14-3-3ɛ protein adaptor and mitochondrial VDAC1 interactions.

    PubMed

    Aghazadeh, Yasaman; Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B; Fan, Jinjiang; Culty, Martine; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2014-10-01

    Low testosterone (T), a major cause of male hypogonadism and infertility, is linked to mood changes, fatigue, osteoporosis, reduced bone-mass index, and aging. The treatment of choice, T replacement therapy, has been linked with increased risk for prostate cancer and luteinizing hormone (LH) suppression, and shown to lead to infertility, cardiovascular diseases, and obesity. Alternate methods to induce T with lower side effects are desirable. In search of the mechanisms regulating T synthesis in the testes, we identified the 14-3-3ɛ protein adaptor as a negative regulator of steroidogenesis. Steroidogenesis begins in mitochondria. 14-3-3ɛ interacts with the outer mitochondrial membrane voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein, forming a scaffold that limits the availability of cholesterol for steroidogenesis. We report the development of a tool able to induce endogenous T formation. Peptides able to penetrate testes conjugated to 14-3-3ɛ site of interaction with VDAC1 blocked 14-3-3ɛ-VDAC1 interactions while at the same time increased VDAC1-translocator protein (18 kDa) interactions that induced steroid formation in rat testes, leading to increased serum T levels. These peptides rescued intratesticular and serum T formation in adult male rats treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist, which dampened LH and T production.

  20. Convergent evolution-guided design of antimicrobial peptides derived from influenza A virus hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shunyi; Aumelas, André; Gao, Bin

    2011-02-24

    Antimicrobial activity and solution structures of four 13-amino acid peptides derived from the fusion domain of viral hemagglutinin proteins are presented. The results show that carboxyl-terminal amidation is a key factor to switch a viral fusion domain-derived sequence into an antimicrobial peptide. Optimization of amphiphilic balance on the amidated analogue largely improves efficacy and enlarges antimicrobial spectra of these peptides. Our work indicates that viral fusion domains have potential to be engineered into potent antimicrobial peptides.

  1. Antagonistic peptide technology for functional dissection of CLE peptides revisited.

    PubMed

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Wildhagen, Mari; Cattaneo, Pietro; Stahl, Yvonne; Pinto, Karine Gustavo; Aalen, Reidunn B; Butenko, Melinka A; Simon, Rüdiger; Hardtke, Christian S; De Smet, Ive

    2015-08-01

    In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, over 1000 putative genes encoding small, presumably secreted, signalling peptides can be recognized. However, a major obstacle in identifying the function of genes encoding small signalling peptides is the limited number of available loss-of-function mutants. To overcome this, a promising new tool, antagonistic peptide technology, was recently developed. Here, this antagonistic peptide technology was tested on selected CLE peptides and the related IDA peptide and its usefulness in the context of studies of peptide function discussed. Based on the analyses, it was concluded that the antagonistic peptide approach is not the ultimate means to overcome redundancy or lack of loss-of-function lines. However, information collected using antagonistic peptide approaches (in the broad sense) can be very useful, but these approaches do not work in all cases and require a deep insight on the interaction between the ligand and its receptor to be successful. This, as well as peptide ligand structure considerations, should be taken into account before ordering a wide range of synthetic peptide variants and/or generating transgenic plants.

  2. Functional characterization of six aspartate (D) recombinant mojastin mutants (r-Moj): A second aspartate amino acid carboxyl to the RGD in r-Moj-D_ peptides is not sufficient to induce apoptosis of SK-Mel-28 cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Carla J; Gutierrez, Daniel A; Aranda, Ana S; Koshlaychuk, Melissa A; Carrillo, David A; Medrano, Rafael; McBride, Terri D; U, Andrew; Medina, Stephanie M; Lombardo, Melissa C; Lucena, Sara E; Sanchez, Elda E; Soto, Julio G

    2016-08-01

    Disintegrins are small peptides produced in viper venom that act as integrin antagonists. When bound to integrins, disintegrins induce altered cellular behaviors, such as apoptotic induction. Disintegrins with RGDDL or RGDDM motifs induce apoptosis of normal and cancer cells. We hypothesized that a second aspartate (D) carboxyl to the RGD is sufficient to induce apoptosis. Five recombinant mojastin D mutants were produced by site-directed mutagenesis (r-Moj-DA, r-Moj-DG, r-Moj-DL, r-Moj-DN, and r-Moj-DV). Stable αv integrin knockdown and shRNA scrambled control SK-Mel-28 cell lines were produced to test a second hypothesis: r-Moj-D_ peptides bind to αv integrin. Only r-Moj-DL, r-Moj-DM, and r-Moj-DN induced apoptosis of SK-Mel-28 cells (at 29.4%, 25.6%, and 36.2%, respectively). Apoptotic induction was significantly reduced in SK-Mel-28 cells with a stable αv integrin knockdown (to 2%, 17%, and 2%, respectively), but not in SK-Mel-28 cells with a stable scrambled shRNA. All six r-Moj-D_ peptides inhibited cell proliferation; ranging from 49.56% (r-Moj-DN) to 75.6% (r-Moj-DA). Cell proliferation inhibition by r-Moj-D_ peptides was significantly reduced in SK-Mel-28 cells with a stable αv integrin knockdown. All six r-Moj-D_ peptides inhibited SK-Mel-28 cell migration at high levels (69%-100%). As a consequence, rac-1 mRNA expression levels were significantly reduced as early as 1 h after treatment, suggesting that rac-1 is involved in the cell migration activity of SK-Mel-28.

  3. The Influenza Hemagglutinin Fusion Domain Is an Amphipathic Helical Hairpin That Functions by Inducing Membrane Curvature*

    PubMed Central

    Smrt, Sean T.; Draney, Adrian W.; Lorieau, Justin L.

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved N-terminal 23 residues of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein, known as the fusion peptide domain (HAfp23), is vital to the membrane fusion and infection mechanism of the influenza virus. HAfp23 has a helical hairpin structure consisting of two tightly packed amphiphilic helices that rest on the membrane surface. We demonstrate that HAfp23 is a new class of amphipathic helix that functions by leveraging the negative curvature induced by two tightly packed helices on membranes. The helical hairpin structure has an inverted wedge shape characteristic of negative curvature lipids, with a bulky hydrophobic region and a relatively small hydrophilic head region. The F3G mutation reduces this inverted wedge shape by reducing the volume of its hydrophobic base. We show that despite maintaining identical backbone structures and dynamics as the wild type HAfp23, the F3G mutant has an attenuated fusion activity that is correlated to its reduced ability to induce negative membrane curvature. The inverted wedge shape of HAfp23 is likely to play a crucial role in the initial stages of membrane fusion by stabilizing negative curvature in the fusion stalk. PMID:25398882

  4. The influenza hemagglutinin fusion domain is an amphipathic helical hairpin that functions by inducing membrane curvature.

    PubMed

    Smrt, Sean T; Draney, Adrian W; Lorieau, Justin L

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved N-terminal 23 residues of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein, known as the fusion peptide domain (HAfp23), is vital to the membrane fusion and infection mechanism of the influenza virus. HAfp23 has a helical hairpin structure consisting of two tightly packed amphiphilic helices that rest on the membrane surface. We demonstrate that HAfp23 is a new class of amphipathic helix that functions by leveraging the negative curvature induced by two tightly packed helices on membranes. The helical hairpin structure has an inverted wedge shape characteristic of negative curvature lipids, with a bulky hydrophobic region and a relatively small hydrophilic head region. The F3G mutation reduces this inverted wedge shape by reducing the volume of its hydrophobic base. We show that despite maintaining identical backbone structures and dynamics as the wild type HAfp23, the F3G mutant has an attenuated fusion activity that is correlated to its reduced ability to induce negative membrane curvature. The inverted wedge shape of HAfp23 is likely to play a crucial role in the initial stages of membrane fusion by stabilizing negative curvature in the fusion stalk.

  5. Molecular identification and characterization of peptide: N-glycanase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Xin Fengxue; Wang Shengjun; Song Lei; Liang Quanfeng; Qi Qingsheng

    2008-04-18

    Peptide:N-glycanase (PNGase) is an enzyme responsible for deglycosylation of misfolded glycoproteins in so-called endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) system. In this study, we reported the molecular identification and characterization of SpPNGase (Schizosaccharomyces pombe PNGase). Enzymatic analysis revealed that SpPNGase deglycosylated the misfolded glycoproteins and distinguished native and denatured high-mannose glycoproteins in vitro. The deglycosylation activity was lost with the addition of chelating agent EDTA and was not restored by re-addition of metal ions. By construction of deletion mutant, we confirmed that N-terminal {alpha}-helix of SpPNGase was responsible for the protein-protein interaction. Combining the results from ternary structure prediction and dendrogram analysis, we suggested that the N-terminal {alpha}-helices of PNGase are derived from evolutionary motif/peptide fusion.

  6. EKylation: Addition of an Alternating-Charge Peptide Stabilizes Proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Erik J; Sinclair, Andrew; Keefe, Andrew J; Nannenga, Brent L; Coyle, Brandon L; Baneyx, François; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2015-10-12

    For nearly 40 years, therapeutic proteins have been stabilized by chemical conjugation of polyethylene glycol (PEG), but recently zwitterionic materials have proved to be a more effective substitute. In this work, we demonstrate that genetic fusion of alternating-charge extensions consisting of anionic glutamic acid (E) and cationic lysine (K) is an effective strategy for protein stabilization. This bioinspired "EKylation" method not only confers the stabilizing benefits of poly(zwitterions) but also allows for rapid biosynthesis of target constructs. Poly(EK) peptides of different predetermined lengths were appended to the C-terminus of a native β-lactamase and its destabilized TEM-19 mutant. The EK-modified enzymes retained biological activity and exhibited increased stability to environmental stressors such as high temperature and high-salt solutions. This one-step strategy provides a broadly applicable alternative to synthetic polymer conjugation that is biocompatible and degradable. PMID:26407134

  7. Improved affinity at the cost of decreased specificity: a recurring theme in PDZ-peptide interactions

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, O. Andreas; Sundell, Gustav N.; Andersson, Eva; Ivarsson, Ylva; Jemth, Per

    2016-01-01

    The E6 protein from human papillomavirus (HPV) plays an important role during productive infection and is a potential drug target. We have previously designed a high affinity bivalent protein binder for the E6 protein, a fusion between a helix from the E6 associated protein and PDZØ9, an engineered variant (L391F/K392M) of the second PDZ domain from synapse associated protein 97 (SAP97 PDZ2). How the substitutions improve the affinity of SAP97 PDZ2 for HPV E6 is not clear and it is not known to what extent they affect the specificity for cellular targets. Here, we explore the specificity of wild type SAP97 PDZ2 and PDZØ9 through proteomic peptide phage display. In addition, we employ a double mutant cycle of SAP97 PDZ2 in which the binding kinetics for nine identified potential cellular peptide ligands are measured and compared with those for the C-terminal E6 peptide. The results demonstrate that PDZØ9 has an increased affinity for all peptides, but at the cost of specificity. Furthermore, there is a peptide dependent coupling free energy between the side chains at positions 391 and 392. This corroborates our previous allosteric model for PDZ domains, involving sampling of intramolecular energetic pathways. PMID:27694853

  8. Peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hamley, Ian W

    2014-07-01

    The self-assembly of different classes of peptide, including cyclic peptides, amyloid peptides and surfactant-like peptides into nanotube structures is reviewed. The modes of self-assembly are discussed. Additionally, applications in bionanotechnology and synthetic materials science are summarized.

  9. Helical hairpin structure of influenza hemagglutinin fusion peptide stabilized by charge-dipole interactions between the N-terminal amino group and the second helix.

    PubMed

    Lorieau, Justin L; Louis, John M; Bax, Ad

    2011-03-01

    The fusion domain of the influenza coat protein hemagglutinin HA2, bound to dodecyl phosphocholine micelles, was recently shown to adopt a structure consisting of two antiparallel α-helices, packed in an exceptionally tight hairpin configuration. Four interhelical H(α) to C═O aliphatic H-bonds were identified as factors stabilizing this fold. Here, we report evidence for an additional stabilizing force: a strong charge-dipole interaction between the N-terminal Gly(1) amino group and the dipole moment of helix 2. pH titration of the amino-terminal (15)N resonance, using a methylene-TROSY-based 3D NMR experiment, and observation of Gly(1 13)C' show a strongly elevated pK = 8.8, considerably higher than expected for an N-terminal amino group in a lipophilic environment. Chemical shifts of three C-terminal carbonyl carbons of helix 2 titrate with the protonation state of Gly(1)-N, indicative of a close proximity between the N-terminal amino group and the axis of helix 2, providing an optimal charge-dipole stabilization of the antiparallel hairpin fold. pK values of the side-chain carboxylate groups of Glu(11) and Asp(19) are higher by about 1 and 0.5 unit, respectively, than commonly seen for solvent-exposed side chains in water-soluble proteins, indicative of dielectric constants of ε = ∼30 (Glu(11)) and ∼60 (Asp(19)), placing these groups in the headgroup region of the phospholipid micelle.

  10. Nuclear Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, G.

    This chapter is devoted to the fundamental concepts of nuclear fusion. To be more precise, it is devoted to the theoretical basics of fusion reactions between light nuclei such as hydrogen, helium, boron, and lithium. The discussion is limited because our purpose is to focus on laboratory-scale fusion experiments that aim at gaining energy from the fusion process. After discussing the methods of calculating the fusion cross section, it will be shown that sustained fusion reactions with energy gain must happen in a thermal medium because, in beam-target experiments, the energy of the beam is randomized faster than the fusion rate. Following a brief introduction to the elements of plasma physics, the chapter is concluded with the introduction of the most prominent fusion reactions ongoing in the Sun.

  11. Facilitating protein solubility by use of peptide extensions

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I; Zhang, Yian-Biao; Howitt, Jason

    2013-09-17

    Expression vectors for expression of a protein or polypeptide of interest as a fusion product composed of the protein or polypeptide of interest fused at one terminus to a solubility enhancing peptide extension are provided. Sequences encoding the peptide extensions are provided. The invention further comprises antibodies which bind specifically to one or more of the solubility enhancing peptide extensions.

  12. A facile method for expression and purification of (15)N isotope-labeled human Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptides from E. coli for NMR-based structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudhir C; Armand, Tara; Ball, K Aurelia; Chen, Anna; Pelton, Jeffrey G; Wemmer, David E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of people worldwide. AD is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques composed of aggregated/oligomerized β-amyloid peptides with Aβ42 peptide representing a major isoform in the senile plaques. Given the pathological significance of Aβ42 in the progression of AD, there is considerable interest in understanding the structural ensembles for soluble monomer and oligomeric forms of Aβ42. This report describes an efficient method to express and purify high quality (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 for structural studies by NMR. The protocol involves utilization of an auto induction system with (15)N isotope labeled medium, for high-level expression of Aβ42 as a fusion with IFABP. After the over-expression of the (15)N isotope-labeled IFABP-Aβ42 fusion protein in the inclusion bodies, pure (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide is obtained following a purification method that is streamlined and improved from the method originally developed for the isolation of unlabeled Aβ42 peptide (Garai et al., 2009). We obtain a final yield of ∼ 6 mg/L culture for (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide. Mass spectrometry and (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of monomeric Aβ42 peptide validate the uniform incorporation of the isotopic label. The method described here is equally applicable for the uniform isotope labeling with (15)N and (13)C in Aβ42 peptide as well as its other variants including any Aβ42 peptide mutants.

  13. Deletion of mtrC in Haemophilus ducreyi Increases Sensitivity to Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Activates the CpxRA Regulon ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rinker, Sherri D.; Trombley, Michael P.; Gu, Xiaoping; Fortney, Kate R.; Bauer, Margaret E.

    2011-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi resists killing by antimicrobial peptides encountered during human infection, including cathelicidin LL-37, α-defensins, and β-defensins. In this study, we examined the role of the proton motive force-dependent multiple transferable resistance (MTR) transporter in antimicrobial peptide resistance in H. ducreyi. We found a proton motive force-dependent effect on H. ducreyi's resistance to LL-37 and β-defensin HBD-3, but not α-defensin HNP-2. Deletion of the membrane fusion protein MtrC rendered H. ducreyi more sensitive to LL-37 and human β-defensins but had relatively little effect on α-defensin resistance. The mtrC mutant 35000HPmtrC exhibited phenotypic changes in outer membrane protein profiles, colony morphology, and serum sensitivity, which were restored to wild type by trans-complementation with mtrC. Similar phenotypes were reported in a cpxA mutant; activation of the two-component CpxRA regulator was confirmed by showing transcriptional effects on CpxRA-regulated genes in 35000HPmtrC. A cpxR mutant had wild-type levels of antimicrobial peptide resistance; a cpxA mutation had little effect on defensin resistance but led to increased sensitivity to LL-37. 35000HPmtrC was more sensitive than the cpxA mutant to LL-37, indicating that MTR contributed to LL-37 resistance independent of the CpxRA regulon. The CpxRA regulon did not affect proton motive force-dependent antimicrobial peptide resistance; however, 35000HPmtrC had lost proton motive force-dependent peptide resistance, suggesting that the MTR transporter promotes proton motive force-dependent resistance to LL-37 and human β-defensins. This is the first report of a β-defensin resistance mechanism in H. ducreyi and shows that LL-37 resistance in H. ducreyi is multifactorial. PMID:21444663

  14. Deployment of membrane fusion protein domains during fusion.

    PubMed

    Bentz, J; Mittal, A

    2000-01-01

    It is clear that both viral and intracellular membrane fusion proteins contain a minimal set of domains which must be deployed at the appropriate time during the fusion process. An account of these domains and their functions is given here for the four best-described fusion systems: influenza HA, sendai virus F1, HIV gp120/41 and the neuronal SNARE core composed of synaptobrevin (syn), syntaxin (stx) and the N- and C-termini of SNAP25 (sn25), together with the Ca(2+)binding protein synaptotagmin (syt). Membrane fusion begins with the binding of the virion or vesicle to the target membrane via receptors. The committed step in influenza HA- mediated fusion begins with an aggregate of HAs (at least eight) with some of their HA2 N-termini, a.k.a. fusion peptides, embedded into the viral bilayer (Bentz, 2000 a). The hypothesis presented in Bentz (2000 b) is that the conformational change of HA to the extended coiled coil extracts the fusion peptides from the viral bilayer. When this extraction occurs from the center of the site of restricted lipid flow, it exposes acyl chains and parts of the HA transmembrane domains to the aqueous media, i.e. a hydrophobic defect is formed. This is the 'transition state' of the committed step of fusion. It is stabilized by a 'dam' of HAs, which are inhibited from diffusing away by the rest of the HAs in the aggregate and because that would initially expose more acyl chains to water. Recruitment of lipids from the apposed target membrane can heal this hydrophobic defect, initiating lipid mixing and fusion. The HA transmembrane domains are required to be part of the hydrophobic defect, because the HA aggregate must be closely packed enough to restrict lipid flow. This hypothesis provides a simple and direct coupling between the energy released by the formation of the coiled coil to the energy needed to create and stabilize the high energy intermediates of fusion. Several of these essential domains have been described for the viral fusion

  15. Structural constraints for the binding of short peptides to claudin-4 revealed by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jun; Liao, Hailing; Clark, Robin; Wong, Mandy Sze Man; Lo, David D

    2008-11-01

    Claudin family transmembrane proteins play an important role in tight junction structure and function in epithelial cells. Among the 24 isoforms identified in mice and humans, claudin-4 and -3 serve as the receptor for Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (Cpe). The second extracellular loop (Ecl2) of claudin-4 is responsible for the binding to the C-terminal 30 amino acids of Cpe (Cpe30). To define the structural constraints for the claudin-4/Cpe30 interaction, a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) method was developed. GST fusions with claudin-4 revealed that Ecl2 with the downstream transmembrane domain of claudin-4 reconstituted the basic structural requirement for optimal binding activity to Cpe30, with affinity in the nanomolar range. Two 12-mer peptides selected by phage display against claudin-4-transfected CHO cells and a 12-mer Cpe mutant peptide also showed significant affinity for claudin-4 with this SPR assay, suggesting that a short peptide can establish stable contact with Ecl2 with nanomolar affinity. Alignment of these short peptides unveiled a common Ecl2 binding motif: . Whereas the short peptides bound native claudin-4 on transfected CHO cells in pull-down assays, only the larger Cpe30 peptide affected trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TER) in peptide-treated Caco-2BBe monolayers. Importantly, Cpe30 retained its binding to claudin-4 when fused to the C terminus of influenza hemagglutinin, demonstrating that its binding activity can be maintained in a different biochemical context. These studies may help in the design of assays for membrane receptor interactions with soluble ligands, and in applying new targeting ligands to delivering attached "cargo" proteins. PMID:18782762

  16. Antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With increasing antibiotics resistance, there is an urgent need for novel infection therapeutics. Since antimicrobial peptides provide opportunities for this, identification and optimization of such peptides have attracted much interest during recent years. Here, a brief overview of antimicrobial peptides is provided, with focus placed on how selected hydrophobic modifications of antimicrobial peptides can be employed to combat also more demanding pathogens, including multi-resistant strains, without conferring unacceptable toxicity. PMID:24758244

  17. RNA Sequencing Identifies Multiple Fusion Transcripts, Differentially Expressed Genes, and Reduced Expression of Immune Function Genes in BRAF (V600E) Mutant vs BRAF Wild-Type Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chindris, Ana-Maria; Asmann, Yan W.; Casler, John D.; Serie, Daniel J.; Reddi, Honey V.; Cradic, Kendall W.; Rivera, Michael; Grebe, Stefan K.; Necela, Brian M.; Eberhardt, Norman L.; Carr, Jennifer M.; McIver, Bryan; Copland, John A.; Aubrey Thompson, E.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The BRAF V600E mutation (BRAF-MUT) confers an aggressive phenotype in papillary thyroid carcinoma, but unidentified additional genomic abnormalities may be required for full phenotypic expression. Objective: RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) was performed to identify genes differentially expressed between BRAF-MUT and BRAF wild-type (BRAF-WT) tumors and to correlate changes to patient clinical status. Design: BRAF-MUT and BRAF-WT tumors were identified in patients with T1N0 and T2–3N1 tumors evaluated in a referral medical center. Gene expression levels were determined (RNA-Seq) and fusion transcripts were detected. Multiplexed capture/detection and digital counting of mRNA transcripts (nCounter, NanoString Technologies) validated RNA-Seq data for immune system-related genes. Patients: BRAF-MUT patients included nine women, three men; nine were TNM stage I and three were stage III. Three (25%) had tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. BRAF-WT included five women, three men; all were stage I, and five (62.5%) had tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. Results: RNA-Seq identified 560 of 13 085 genes differentially expressed between BRAF-MUT and BRAF-WT tumors. Approximately 10% of these genes were related to MetaCore immune function pathways; 51 were underexpressed in BRAF-MUT tumors, whereas 4 (HLAG, CXCL14, TIMP1, IL1RAP) were overexpressed. The four most differentially overexpressed immune genes in BRAF-WT tumors (IL1B; CCL19; CCL21; CXCR4) correlated with lymphocyte infiltration. nCounter confirmed the RNA-Seq expression level data. Eleven different high-confidence fusion transcripts were detected (four interchromosomal; seven intrachromosomal) in 13 of 20 tumors. All in-frame fusions were validated by RT-PCR. Conclusion: BRAF-MUT papillary thyroid cancers have reduced expression of immune/inflammatory response genes compared with BRAF-WT tumors and correlate with lymphocyte infiltration. In contrast, HLA-G and CXCL14 are overexpressed in BRAF-MUT tumors. Sixty-five percent

  18. Distinct requirements for signal peptidase processing and function in the stable signal peptide subunit of the Junin virus envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    York, Joanne; Nunberg, Jack H. . E-mail: jack.nunberg@umontana.edu

    2007-03-01

    The arenavirus envelope glycoprotein (GP-C) retains a cleaved and stable signal peptide (SSP) as an essential subunit of the mature complex. This 58-amino-acid residue peptide serves as a signal sequence and is additionally required to enable transit of the assembled GP-C complex to the Golgi, and for pH-dependent membrane fusion activity. We have investigated the C-terminal region of the Junin virus SSP to study the role of the cellular signal peptidase (SPase) in generating SSP. Site-directed mutagenesis at the cleavage site (positions - 1 and - 3) reveals a pattern of side-chain preferences consistent with those of SPase. Although position - 2 is degenerate for SPase cleavage, this residue in the arenavirus SSP is invariably a cysteine. In the Junin virus, this cysteine is not involved in disulfide bonding. We show that replacement with alanine or serine is tolerated for SPase cleavage but prevents the mutant SSP from associating with GP-C and enabling transport to the cell surface. Conversely, an arginine mutation at position - 1 that prevents SPase cleavage is fully compatible with GP-C-mediated membrane fusion activity when the mutant SSP is provided in trans. These results point to distinct roles of SSP sequences in SPase cleavage and GP-C biogenesis. Further studies of the unique structural organization of the GP-C complex will be important in identifying novel opportunities for antiviral intervention against arenaviral hemorrhagic disease.

  19. GSE4, a Small Dyskerin- and GSE24.2-Related Peptide, Induces Telomerase Activity, Cell Proliferation and Reduces DNA Damage, Oxidative Stress and Cell Senescence in Dyskerin Mutant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iarriccio, Laura; Manguán-García, Cristina; Pintado-Berninches, Laura; Mancheño, José Miguel; Molina, Antonio; Perona, Rosario; Sastre, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita is an inherited disease caused by mutations in genes coding for telomeric components. It was previously reported that expression of a dyskerin-derived peptide, GSE24.2, increases telomerase activity, regulates gene expression and decreases DNA damage and oxidative stress in dyskeratosis congenita patient cells. The biological activity of short peptides derived from GSE24.2 was tested and one of them, GSE4, that probed to be active, was further characterized in this article. Expression of this eleven amino acids long peptide increased telomerase activity and reduced DNA damage, oxidative stress and cell senescence in dyskerin-mutated cells. GSE4 expression also activated c-myc and TERT promoters and increase of c-myc, TERT and TERC expression. The level of biological activity of GSE4 was similar to that obtained by GSE24.2 expression. Incorporation of a dyskerin nuclear localization signal to GSE24.2 did not change its activity on promoter regulation and DNA damage protection. However, incorporation of a signal that increases the rate of nucleolar localization impaired GSE24.2 activity. Incorporation of the dyskerin nuclear localization signal to GSE4 did not alter its biological activity. Mutation of the Aspartic Acid residue that is conserved in the pseudouridine synthase domain present in GSE4 did not impair its activity, except for the repression of c-myc promoter activity and the decrease of c-myc, TERT and TERC gene expression in dyskerin-mutated cells. These results indicated that GSE4 could be of great therapeutic interest for treatment of dyskeratosis congenita patients. PMID:26571381

  20. GSE4, a Small Dyskerin- and GSE24.2-Related Peptide, Induces Telomerase Activity, Cell Proliferation and Reduces DNA Damage, Oxidative Stress and Cell Senescence in Dyskerin Mutant Cells.

    PubMed

    Iarriccio, Laura; Manguán-García, Cristina; Pintado-Berninches, Laura; Mancheño, José Miguel; Molina, Antonio; Perona, Rosario; Sastre, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita is an inherited disease caused by mutations in genes coding for telomeric components. It was previously reported that expression of a dyskerin-derived peptide, GSE24.2, increases telomerase activity, regulates gene expression and decreases DNA damage and oxidative stress in dyskeratosis congenita patient cells. The biological activity of short peptides derived from GSE24.2 was tested and one of them, GSE4, that probed to be active, was further characterized in this article. Expression of this eleven amino acids long peptide increased telomerase activity and reduced DNA damage, oxidative stress and cell senescence in dyskerin-mutated cells. GSE4 expression also activated c-myc and TERT promoters and increase of c-myc, TERT and TERC expression. The level of biological activity of GSE4 was similar to that obtained by GSE24.2 expression. Incorporation of a dyskerin nuclear localization signal to GSE24.2 did not change its activity on promoter regulation and DNA damage protection. However, incorporation of a signal that increases the rate of nucleolar localization impaired GSE24.2 activity. Incorporation of the dyskerin nuclear localization signal to GSE4 did not alter its biological activity. Mutation of the Aspartic Acid residue that is conserved in the pseudouridine synthase domain present in GSE4 did not impair its activity, except for the repression of c-myc promoter activity and the decrease of c-myc, TERT and TERC gene expression in dyskerin-mutated cells. These results indicated that GSE4 could be of great therapeutic interest for treatment of dyskeratosis congenita patients.

  1. GSE4, a Small Dyskerin- and GSE24.2-Related Peptide, Induces Telomerase Activity, Cell Proliferation and Reduces DNA Damage, Oxidative Stress and Cell Senescence in Dyskerin Mutant Cells.

    PubMed

    Iarriccio, Laura; Manguán-García, Cristina; Pintado-Berninches, Laura; Mancheño, José Miguel; Molina, Antonio; Perona, Rosario; Sastre, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita is an inherited disease caused by mutations in genes coding for telomeric components. It was previously reported that expression of a dyskerin-derived peptide, GSE24.2, increases telomerase activity, regulates gene expression and decreases DNA damage and oxidative stress in dyskeratosis congenita patient cells. The biological activity of short peptides derived from GSE24.2 was tested and one of them, GSE4, that probed to be active, was further characterized in this article. Expression of this eleven amino acids long peptide increased telomerase activity and reduced DNA damage, oxidative stress and cell senescence in dyskerin-mutated cells. GSE4 expression also activated c-myc and TERT promoters and increase of c-myc, TERT and TERC expression. The level of biological activity of GSE4 was similar to that obtained by GSE24.2 expression. Incorporation of a dyskerin nuclear localization signal to GSE24.2 did not change its activity on promoter regulation and DNA damage protection. However, incorporation of a signal that increases the rate of nucleolar localization impaired GSE24.2 activity. Incorporation of the dyskerin nuclear localization signal to GSE4 did not alter its biological activity. Mutation of the Aspartic Acid residue that is conserved in the pseudouridine synthase domain present in GSE4 did not impair its activity, except for the repression of c-myc promoter activity and the decrease of c-myc, TERT and TERC gene expression in dyskerin-mutated cells. These results indicated that GSE4 could be of great therapeutic interest for treatment of dyskeratosis congenita patients. PMID:26571381

  2. Fusion Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Schmidt

    2002-02-20

    If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans.

  3. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Gene Fusion: Detection in Malignant Pleural Effusion by RNA or PNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Lin; Lee, Chung-Ta; Lu, Cheng-Chan; Yang, Shu-Ching; Chen, Wan-Li; Lee, Yang-Cheng; Yang, Chung-Hsien; Peng, Shu-Ling; Su, Wu-Chou; Chow, Nan-Haw; Ho, Chung-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing EGFR mutations and detecting ALK gene fusion are indispensable when planning to treat pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is a devastating complication of lung cancer and sometimes the only source for mutation analysis. The percentage of tumor cells in the pleural effusion may be low; therefore, mutant enrichment is required for a successful analysis. The EGFR mutation status in MPE was determined using three methods: (1) PCR sequencing of genomic DNA (direct sequencing), (2) mutant-enriched PCR sequencing of genomic DNA using peptide nucleic acid (PNA-sequencing), and (3) PCR sequencing of cDNA after reverse transcription for cellular RNA (RNA-sequencing). RT-PCR was also used to test cases for ALK gene fusion. PNA-sequencing and RNA-sequencing had similar analytical sensitivities (< 1%), which indicates similar enrichment capabilities. The clinical sensitivity in 133 cases when detecting the common EGFR exon 19 and exon 21 mutations was 56.4% (75/133) for direct sequencing, 63.2% (84/133) for PNA-sequencing, and 65.4% (87/133) for RNA-sequencing. RT-PCR and sequencing showed 5 cases (3.8%) with ALK gene fusion. All had wild-type EGFR. For EGFR analysis of MPE, RNA-sequencing is at least as sensitive as PNA-sequencing but not limited to specific mutations. Detecting ALK fusion can be incorporated in the same RNA workflow. Therefore, RNA is a better source for comprehensive molecular diagnoses in MPE. PMID:27352172

  4. Image fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavel, M.

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: a system overview of the basic components of a system designed to improve the ability of a pilot to fly through low-visibility conditions such as fog; the role of visual sciences; fusion issues; sensor characterization; sources of information; image processing; and image fusion.

  5. Distinct roles for key karyogamy proteins during yeast nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Melloy, Patricia; Shen, Shu; White, Erin; Rose, Mark D

    2009-09-01

    During yeast mating, cell fusion is followed by the congression and fusion of the two nuclei. Proteins required for nuclear fusion are found at the surface (Prm3p) and within the lumen (Kar2p, Kar5p, and Kar8p) of the nuclear envelope (NE). Electron tomography (ET) of zygotes revealed that mutations in these proteins block nuclear fusion with different morphologies, suggesting that they act in different steps of fusion. Specifically, prm3 zygotes were blocked before formation of membrane bridges, whereas kar2, kar5, and kar8 zygotes frequently contained them. Membrane bridges were significantly larger and occurred more frequently in kar2 and kar8, than in kar5 mutant zygotes. The kinetics of NE fusion in prm3, kar5, and kar8 mutants, measured by live-cell fluorescence microscopy, were well correlated with the size and frequency of bridges observed by ET. However the kar2 mutant was defective for transfer of NE lumenal GFP, but not diffusion within the lumen, suggesting that transfer was blocked at the NE fusion junction. These observations suggest that Prm3p acts before initiation of outer NE fusion, Kar5p may help dilation of the initial fusion pore, and Kar2p and Kar8p act after outer NE fusion, during inner NE fusion. PMID:19570912

  6. Distinct roles for key karyogamy proteins during yeast nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Melloy, Patricia; Shen, Shu; White, Erin; Rose, Mark D

    2009-09-01

    During yeast mating, cell fusion is followed by the congression and fusion of the two nuclei. Proteins required for nuclear fusion are found at the surface (Prm3p) and within the lumen (Kar2p, Kar5p, and Kar8p) of the nuclear envelope (NE). Electron tomography (ET) of zygotes revealed that mutations in these proteins block nuclear fusion with different morphologies, suggesting that they act in different steps of fusion. Specifically, prm3 zygotes were blocked before formation of membrane bridges, whereas kar2, kar5, and kar8 zygotes frequently contained them. Membrane bridges were significantly larger and occurred more frequently in kar2 and kar8, than in kar5 mutant zygotes. The kinetics of NE fusion in prm3, kar5, and kar8 mutants, measured by live-cell fluorescence microscopy, were well correlated with the size and frequency of bridges observed by ET. However the kar2 mutant was defective for transfer of NE lumenal GFP, but not diffusion within the lumen, suggesting that transfer was blocked at the NE fusion junction. These observations suggest that Prm3p acts before initiation of outer NE fusion, Kar5p may help dilation of the initial fusion pore, and Kar2p and Kar8p act after outer NE fusion, during inner NE fusion.

  7. The Yeast Cell Fusion Protein Prm1p Requires Covalent Dimerization to Promote Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Alex; Aguilar, Pablo S.; Walter, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Prm1p is a multipass membrane protein that promotes plasma membrane fusion during yeast mating. The mechanism by which Prm1p and other putative regulators of developmentally controlled cell-cell fusion events facilitate membrane fusion has remained largely elusive. Here, we report that Prm1p forms covalently linked homodimers. Covalent Prm1p dimer formation occurs via intermolecular disulfide bonds of two cysteines, Cys-120 and Cys-545. PRM1 mutants in which these cysteines have been substituted are fusion defective. These PRM1 mutants are normally expressed, retain homotypic interaction and can traffic to the fusion zone. Because prm1-C120S and prm1-C545S mutants can form covalent dimers when coexpressed with wild-type PRM1, an intermolecular C120-C545 disulfide linkage is inferred. Cys-120 is adjacent to a highly conserved hydrophobic domain. Mutation of a charged residue within this hydrophobic domain abrogates formation of covalent dimers, trafficking to the fusion zone, and fusion-promoting activity. The importance of intermolecular disulfide bonding informs models regarding the mechanism of Prm1-mediated cell-cell fusion. PMID:20485669

  8. Immunological Properties of Hepatitis B Core Antigen Fusion Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Michael J.; Hastings, Gillian Z.; Brown, Alan L.; Grace, Ken G.; Rowlands, David J.; Brown, Fred; Clarke, Berwyn E.

    1990-04-01

    The immunogenicity of a 19 amino acid peptide from foot-and-mouth disease virus has previously been shown to approach that of the inactivated virus from which it was derived after multimeric particulate presentation as an N-terminal fusion with hepatitis B core antigen. In this report we demonstrate that rhinovirus peptide-hepatitis B core antigen fusion proteins are 10-fold more immunogenic than peptide coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin and 100-fold more immunogenic than uncoupled peptide with an added helper T-cell epitope. The fusion proteins can be readily administered without adjuvant or with adjuvants acceptable for human and veterinary application and can elicit a response after nasal or oral dosing. The fusion proteins can also act as T-cell-independent antigens. These properties provide further support for their suitability as presentation systems for "foreign" epitopes in the development of vaccines.

  9. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of human immunodeficiency virus gp41 protein that includes the fusion peptide: NMR detection of recombinant Fgp41 in inclusion bodies in whole bacterial cells and structural characterization of purified and membrane-associated Fgp41.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Erica P; Curtis-Fisk, Jaime; Young, Kaitlin M; Weliky, David P

    2011-11-22

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of a host cell begins with fusion of the HIV and host cell membranes and is mediated by the gp41 protein, a single-pass integral membrane protein of HIV. The 175 N-terminal residues make up the ectodomain that lies outside the virus. This work describes the production and characterization of an ectodomain construct containing the 154 N-terminal gp41 residues, including the fusion peptide (FP) that binds to target cell membranes. The Fgp41 sequence was derived from one of the African clade A strains of HIV-1 that have been less studied than European/North American clade B strains. Fgp41 expression at a level of ~100 mg/L of culture was evidenced by an approach that included amino acid type (13)CO and (15)N labeling of recombinant protein and solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy of lyophilized whole cells. The approach did not require any protein solubilization or purification and may be a general approach for detection of recombinant protein. The purified Fgp41 yield was ~5 mg/L of culture. SSNMR spectra of membrane-associated Fgp41 showed high helicity for the residues C-terminal of the FP. This was consistent with a "six-helix bundle" (SHB) structure that is the final gp41 state during membrane fusion. This observation and negligible Fgp41-induced vesicle fusion supported a function for SHB gp41 of membrane stabilization and fusion arrest. SSNMR spectra of residues in the membrane-associated FP provided evidence of a mixture of molecular populations with either helical or β-sheet FP conformation. These and earlier SSNMR data strongly support the existence of these populations in the SHB state of membrane-associated gp41.

  10. Fusion Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dingee, David A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the extraordinary potential, the technical difficulties, and the financial problems that are associated with research and development of fusion power plants as a major source of energy. (GA)

  11. Copper(II) complexes of terminally free alloferon peptide mutants containing two different histidyl (H(1) and H(6) or H(9) or H(12)) binding sites Structure Stability and Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Matusiak, Agnieszka; Kuczer, Mariola; Czarniewska, Elżbieta; Urbański, Arkadiusz; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Kowalik-Jankowska, Teresa

    2015-10-01

    Mono- and dinuclear copper(II) complexes of the alloferon 1 with point mutations H9A/H12A H(1)GVSGH(6)GQA(9)GVA(12)G, H6A/H12A H(1)GVSGA(6)GQH(9)GVA(12)G and H6A/H9A H(1)GVSGA(6)GQA(9)GVH(12)G have been studied by potentiometric, UV-visible, CD, EPR spectroscopic, and mass spectrometry (MS) methods. Complete complex speciation at metal-to-ligand molar ratios 1:1 and 2:1 was obtained. For all systems studied in the 5 - 6.5 pH range, the CuL complex dominates with 3N{NH2,NIm-H(1),NIm-H(6 or 9 or 12)} binding site. The stability of the CuL complexes for the ligands studied varies according to the H9A/H12A>H6A/H12A>H6A/H9A series. For the dinuclear systems the amine/imidazole nitrogen donor atoms of the histidine residue H(1) and the imidazole nitrogen atoms of H(6) or H(9) or H(12) can be considered as independent metal-binding sites in the species formed. The stability of the dinuclear complexes is higher when two coordinated copper(II) ions are closer to each other. The inductions of phenoloxidase activity and apoptosis in vivo in Tenebrio molitor cells by the ligands and their copper(II) complexes at pH7.4 have been studied. The H6A/H9A, H6A/H12A peptides displayed lower hemocytotoxic activity compared to that of alloferon 1, while the H9A/H12A analogue was not active. Among the copper(II) complexes, the most active was the Cu(II)-H9A/H12A complex formed at pH7.4 with 3N{NH2,NIm-H(1),NIm-H(6)} (CuL) and 3N{NH2,N(-),NIm-H(6)} and/or 4N{NH2,NIm-H(1),N(-),NIm-H(6)} (CuH-1L) binding sites. The Cu(II)-H6A/H9A and Cu(II)-H6A/H12A complexes were not active.

  12. Copper(II) complexes of terminally free alloferon peptide mutants containing two different histidyl (H(1) and H(6) or H(9) or H(12)) binding sites Structure Stability and Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Matusiak, Agnieszka; Kuczer, Mariola; Czarniewska, Elżbieta; Urbański, Arkadiusz; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Kowalik-Jankowska, Teresa

    2015-10-01

    Mono- and dinuclear copper(II) complexes of the alloferon 1 with point mutations H9A/H12A H(1)GVSGH(6)GQA(9)GVA(12)G, H6A/H12A H(1)GVSGA(6)GQH(9)GVA(12)G and H6A/H9A H(1)GVSGA(6)GQA(9)GVH(12)G have been studied by potentiometric, UV-visible, CD, EPR spectroscopic, and mass spectrometry (MS) methods. Complete complex speciation at metal-to-ligand molar ratios 1:1 and 2:1 was obtained. For all systems studied in the 5 - 6.5 pH range, the CuL complex dominates with 3N{NH2,NIm-H(1),NIm-H(6 or 9 or 12)} binding site. The stability of the CuL complexes for the ligands studied varies according to the H9A/H12A>H6A/H12A>H6A/H9A series. For the dinuclear systems the amine/imidazole nitrogen donor atoms of the histidine residue H(1) and the imidazole nitrogen atoms of H(6) or H(9) or H(12) can be considered as independent metal-binding sites in the species formed. The stability of the dinuclear complexes is higher when two coordinated copper(II) ions are closer to each other. The inductions of phenoloxidase activity and apoptosis in vivo in Tenebrio molitor cells by the ligands and their copper(II) complexes at pH7.4 have been studied. The H6A/H9A, H6A/H12A peptides displayed lower hemocytotoxic activity compared to that of alloferon 1, while the H9A/H12A analogue was not active. Among the copper(II) complexes, the most active was the Cu(II)-H9A/H12A complex formed at pH7.4 with 3N{NH2,NIm-H(1),NIm-H(6)} (CuL) and 3N{NH2,N(-),NIm-H(6)} and/or 4N{NH2,NIm-H(1),N(-),NIm-H(6)} (CuH-1L) binding sites. The Cu(II)-H6A/H9A and Cu(II)-H6A/H12A complexes were not active. PMID:26184757

  13. Design of cocktail peptide vaccine against Cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Tabaei, Samira; Mashkani, Baratali; Esmaili, Arezoo; Karimi, Reza; Jamehdar, Saeid Amel

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) remains a major morbidity and mortality cause in immuno suppressed patients. Therefore, significant effort has been made towards the development of a vaccine. In this study, the expression of the pp65 and gB fusion peptides and Fc domain of mouse IgG2a as a novel delivery system for selective uptake of antigens by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in Pichia pastoris yeast system were studied. Materials and Method: In this study, four immune dominant sequences in pp65 protein and 3 immuno dominant sequences in gB protein were selected according to literature review. Peptide linker -GGGGS- was used for construction of fusion peptide. This fusion peptide was cloned in the pPICZαA expression vector and transfected into P. pastoris host cells. Results: Dot blot and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) techniques showed that a high level of pp65-gB-Fc fusion peptide was expressed. Conclusion: This CMV pp65-gB-Fc fusion peptide could be a promising candidate for the development of a novel peptide vaccine. PMID:27279990

  14. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  15. Synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Francis, M J

    1996-01-01

    Efforts to produce more stable and defined vaccines have concentrated on studying, in detail, the immune response to many infectious diseases in order to identify the antigenic sites on the pathogens that are involved in stimulating protective immumty. Armed with this knowledge, it is possible to mimic such sites by producing short chains of amino acids (peptides) and to use these as the basis for novel vaccines. The earliest documented work on peptide immunization is actually for a plant virus, tobacco mosaic virus. In 1963, Anderer (1) demonstrated that rabbit antibodies to an isolated hexapeptide fragment from the virus-coat protein coupled to bovine serum albumm would neutralize the infectious vn-us in culture. Two years later, he used a synthetically produced copy of the same peptide to confirm this observation. This was pioneering work, and it was over 10 years before the next example of a peptide that elicited antivirus antibody appeared following work by Sela and his colleagues (2) on a virus, MS2 bacteriophage, which infects bacteria. The emergence of more accessible techniques for sequencing proteins in 1977, coupled with the ability to synthesize readily peptides already developed in 1963, heralded a decade of intensive research into experimental peptide vaccines. The first demonstration that peptides could elicit protective immunity in vivo, in addition to neutralizing activity in vitro, was obtained using a peptide from the VP1 coat protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in 1982, with the guinea pig as a laboratory animal model (3, 4). PMID:21359696

  16. Laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, W.A.; Boskma, P.

    1980-12-01

    Unrestricted laser fusion offers nations an opportunity to circumvent arms control agreements and develop thermonuclear weapons. Early laser weapons research sought a clean radiation-free bomb to replace the fission bomb, but this was deceptive because a fission bomb was needed to trigger the fusion reaction and additional radioactivity was induced by generating fast neutrons. As laser-implosion experiments focused on weapons physics, simulating weapons effects, and applications for new weapons, the military interest shifted from developing a laser-ignited hydrogen bomb to more sophisticated weapons and civilian applications for power generation. Civilian and military research now overlap, making it possible for several countries to continue weapons activities and permitting proliferation of nuclear weapons. These countries are reluctant to include inertial confinement fusion research in the Non-Proliferation Treaty. 16 references. (DCK)

  17. The intracellular domain of Dumbfounded affects myoblast fusion efficiency and interacts with Rolling pebbles and Loner.

    PubMed

    Bulchand, Sarada; Menon, Sree Devi; George, Simi Elizabeth; Chia, William

    2010-02-23

    Drosophila body wall muscles are multinucleated syncytia formed by successive fusions between a founder myoblast and several fusion competent myoblasts. Initial fusion gives rise to a bi/trinucleate precursor followed by more fusion cycles forming a mature muscle. This process requires the functions of various molecules including the transmembrane myoblast attractants Dumbfounded (Duf) and its paralogue Roughest (Rst), a scaffold protein Rolling pebbles (Rols) and a guanine nucleotide exchange factor Loner. Fusion completely fails in a duf, rst mutant, and is blocked at the bi/trinucleate stage in rols and loner single mutants. We analysed the transmembrane and intracellular domains of Duf, by mutating conserved putative signaling sites and serially deleting the intracellular domain. These were tested for their ability to translocate and interact with Rols and Loner and to rescue the fusion defect in duf, rst mutant embryos. Studying combinations of double mutants, further tested the function of Rols, Loner and other fusion molecules. Here we show that serial truncations of the Duf intracellular domain successively compromise its function to translocate and interact with Rols and Loner in addition to affecting myoblast fusion efficiency in embryos. Putative phosphorylation sites function additively while the extreme C terminus including a PDZ binding domain is dispensable for its function. We also show that fusion is completely blocked in a rols, loner double mutant and is compromised in other double mutants. These results suggest an additive function of the intracellular domain of Duf and an early function of Rols and Loner which is independent of Duf.

  18. Fusion proteins as alternate crystallization paths to difficult structure problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Rueker, Florian; Ho, Joseph X.; Lim, Kap; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary; Ji, Xinhua

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a peptide fusion product with glutathione transferase from Schistosoma japonicum (SjGST) has been solved by crystallographic methods to 2.5 A resolution. Peptides or proteins can be fused to SjGST and expressed in a plasmid for rapid synthesis in Escherichia coli. Fusion proteins created by this commercial method can be purified rapidly by chromatography on immobilized glutathione. The potential utility of using SjGST fusion proteins as alternate paths to the crystallization and structure determination of proteins is demonstrated.

  19. Insights on the structural characteristics of Vim-TBS (58-81) peptide for future applications as a cell penetrating peptide.

    PubMed

    Saini, Avneet; Jaswal, Radhika R; Negi, Riteshwari; Nandel, Fateh S

    2013-10-01

    The plasma membrane presents a remarkable barrier for the delivery of peptide and nucleic acid based drugs to the inside of cells. This restraint in the path of their development as therapeutic agents can be offset by their conjugation to cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) that can lead to an improved pharmacological profile. In this context, conformational behavior of Vimentin Tubulin Binding Site (TBS) peptide, Vim-TBS (58-81), was investigated for its acknowledged cell penetrating properties along with Trans-activating Tat (48-60) peptide and a pro-apoptogenic peptide of p21/WAFI protein (p10). Also, the fusion peptides Vim- TBS (58-81)-p10 & Tat (48-60)-p10 were studied using molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) based strategies. MM results revealed formation of stable α-helix like secondary structures in Vim-TBS (58-81), Tat (48-60) and p10 peptides. In water, three peptides adopted either a helical structure or a random conformation; the stability of either of the two states being governed by the formation of polar contacts with the solvent. The fusion peptides formed helical structures after MD simulations but the structure obtained for the fusion peptide, Vim-TBS-p10 is relatively better characterized in terms of its amphipathic nature with a hydrophilic face formed by the positively charged residues facilitating a better interaction of this fusion peptide with the membrane as compared to that of Tat-p10 peptide. This is the first report on the conformational characteristics of the Vim-TBS (58-81) peptide and the fusion peptide, Vim-TBS (58-81)-p10. The results presented here are significant for their potential role in guiding and facilitating the future efforts of designing peptide based cell penetrating drugs.

  20. An antimicrobial peptide essential for bacterial survival in the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsoo; Chen, Yuhui; Xi, Jiejun; Waters, Christopher; Chen, Rujin; Wang, Dong

    2015-12-01

    In the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between legume hosts and rhizobia, the bacteria are engulfed by a plant cell membrane to become intracellular organelles. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, internalization and differentiation of Sinorhizobium (also known as Ensifer) meliloti is a prerequisite for nitrogen fixation. The host mechanisms that ensure the long-term survival of differentiating intracellular bacteria (bacteroids) in this unusual association are unclear. The M. truncatula defective nitrogen fixation4 (dnf4) mutant is unable to form a productive symbiosis, even though late symbiotic marker genes are expressed in mutant nodules. We discovered that in the dnf4 mutant, bacteroids can apparently differentiate, but they fail to persist within host cells in the process. We found that the DNF4 gene encodes NCR211, a member of the family of nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides. The phenotype of dnf4 suggests that NCR211 acts to promote the intracellular survival of differentiating bacteroids. The greatest expression of DNF4 was observed in the nodule interzone II-III, where bacteroids undergo differentiation. A translational fusion of DNF4 with GFP localizes to the peribacteroid space, and synthetic NCR211 prevents free-living S. meliloti from forming colonies, in contrast to mock controls, suggesting that DNF4 may interact with bacteroids directly or indirectly for its function. Our findings indicate that a successful symbiosis requires host effectors that not only induce bacterial differentiation, but also that maintain intracellular bacteroids during the host-symbiont interaction. The discovery of NCR211 peptides that maintain bacterial survival inside host cells has important implications for improving legume crops.

  1. An antimicrobial peptide essential for bacterial survival in the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsoo; Chen, Yuhui; Xi, Jiejun; Waters, Christopher; Chen, Rujin; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    In the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between legume hosts and rhizobia, the bacteria are engulfed by a plant cell membrane to become intracellular organelles. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, internalization and differentiation of Sinorhizobium (also known as Ensifer) meliloti is a prerequisite for nitrogen fixation. The host mechanisms that ensure the long-term survival of differentiating intracellular bacteria (bacteroids) in this unusual association are unclear. The M. truncatula defective nitrogen fixation4 (dnf4) mutant is unable to form a productive symbiosis, even though late symbiotic marker genes are expressed in mutant nodules. We discovered that in the dnf4 mutant, bacteroids can apparently differentiate, but they fail to persist within host cells in the process. We found that the DNF4 gene encodes NCR211, a member of the family of nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides. The phenotype of dnf4 suggests that NCR211 acts to promote the intracellular survival of differentiating bacteroids. The greatest expression of DNF4 was observed in the nodule interzone II-III, where bacteroids undergo differentiation. A translational fusion of DNF4 with GFP localizes to the peribacteroid space, and synthetic NCR211 prevents free-living S. meliloti from forming colonies, in contrast to mock controls, suggesting that DNF4 may interact with bacteroids directly or indirectly for its function. Our findings indicate that a successful symbiosis requires host effectors that not only induce bacterial differentiation, but also that maintain intracellular bacteroids during the host–symbiont interaction. The discovery of NCR211 peptides that maintain bacterial survival inside host cells has important implications for improving legume crops. PMID:26598690

  2. Stabilization of exosome-targeting peptides via engineered glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Michelle E; Leonard, Joshua N

    2015-03-27

    Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles that mediate intercellular transfer of cellular contents and are attractive vehicles for therapeutic delivery of bimolecular cargo such as nucleic acids, proteins, and even drugs. Efficient exosome-mediated delivery in vivo requires targeting vesicles for uptake by specific recipient cells. Although exosomes have been successfully targeted to several cellular receptors by displaying peptides on the surface of the exosomes, identifying effective exosome-targeting peptides for other receptors has proven challenging. Furthermore, the biophysical rules governing targeting peptide success remain poorly understood. To evaluate one factor potentially limiting exosome delivery, we investigated whether peptides displayed on the exosome surface are degraded during exosome biogenesis, for example by endosomal proteases. Indeed, peptides fused to the N terminus of exosome-associated transmembrane protein Lamp2b were cleaved in samples derived from both cells and exosomes. To suppress peptide loss, we engineered targeting peptide-Lamp2b fusion proteins to include a glycosylation motif at various positions. Introduction of this glycosylation motif both protected the peptide from degradation and led to an increase in overall Lamp2b fusion protein expression in both cells and exosomes. Moreover, glycosylation-stabilized peptides enhanced targeted delivery of exosomes to neuroblastoma cells, demonstrating that such glycosylation does not ablate peptide-target interactions. Thus, we have identified a strategy for achieving robust display of targeting peptides on the surface of exosomes, which should facilitate the evaluation and development of new exosome-based therapeutics.

  3. CMPD: cancer mutant proteome database.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Yeh, Yuan-Ming; Julie Chu, Lichieh; Chen, Ting-Wen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Cheng-Yang; Gan, Ruei-Chi; Liu, Hsuan; Tang, Petrus

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing, which centres on the protein coding regions of disease/cancer associated genes, represents the most cost-effective method to-date for deciphering the association between genetic alterations and diseases. Large-scale whole exome/genome sequencing projects have been launched by various institutions, such as NCI, Broad Institute and TCGA, to provide a comprehensive catalogue of coding variants in diverse tissue samples and cell lines. Further functional and clinical interrogation of these sequence variations must rely on extensive cross-platforms integration of sequencing information and a proteome database that explicitly and comprehensively archives the corresponding mutated peptide sequences. While such data resource is a critical for the mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of exomic variants, no database is currently available for the collection of mutant protein sequences that correspond to recent large-scale genomic data. To address this issue and serve as bridge to integrate genomic and proteomics datasets, CMPD (http://cgbc.cgu.edu.tw/cmpd) collected over 2 millions genetic alterations, which not only facilitates the confirmation and examination of potential cancer biomarkers but also provides an invaluable resource for translational medicine research and opportunities to identify mutated proteins encoded by mutated genes.

  4. CMPD: cancer mutant proteome database

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Po-Jung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Yeh, Yuan-Ming; Julie Chu, Lichieh; Chen, Ting-Wen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Cheng-Yang; Gan, Ruei-Chi; Liu, Hsuan; Tang, Petrus

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing, which centres on the protein coding regions of disease/cancer associated genes, represents the most cost-effective method to-date for deciphering the association between genetic alterations and diseases. Large-scale whole exome/genome sequencing projects have been launched by various institutions, such as NCI, Broad Institute and TCGA, to provide a comprehensive catalogue of coding variants in diverse tissue samples and cell lines. Further functional and clinical interrogation of these sequence variations must rely on extensive cross-platforms integration of sequencing information and a proteome database that explicitly and comprehensively archives the corresponding mutated peptide sequences. While such data resource is a critical for the mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of exomic variants, no database is currently available for the collection of mutant protein sequences that correspond to recent large-scale genomic data. To address this issue and serve as bridge to integrate genomic and proteomics datasets, CMPD (http://cgbc.cgu.edu.tw/cmpd) collected over 2 millions genetic alterations, which not only facilitates the confirmation and examination of potential cancer biomarkers but also provides an invaluable resource for translational medicine research and opportunities to identify mutated proteins encoded by mutated genes. PMID:25398898

  5. Lesion mimic mutants

    PubMed Central

    Moeder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade a substantial number of lesion mimic mutants (LMM) have been isolated and a growing number of the genes have been cloned. It is now becoming clear that these mutants are valuable tools to dissect various aspects of programmed cell death (PCD) and pathogen resistance pathways in plants. Together with other forward genetics approaches LMMs shed light on the PCD machinery in plant cells and revealed important roles for sphingolipids, Ca2+ and chloroplast-derived porphyrin-metabolites during cell death development. PMID:19513227

  6. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  7. Enhanced growth of primary tumors in cancer-prone mice after immunization against the mutant region of an inherited oncoprotein.

    PubMed

    Siegel, C T; Schreiber, K; Meredith, S C; Beck-Engeser, G B; Lancki, D W; Lazarski, C A; Fu, Y X; Rowley, D A; Schreiber, H

    2000-06-01

    One major objective of tumor immunologists is to prevent cancer development in individuals at high risk. (TG.AC x C57BL/6)F1 mice serve as a model for testing the feasibility of this objective. The mice carry in the germline a mutant ras oncogene that has an arginine at codon 12 instead of glycine present in the wild-type, and after physical (wounding) or chemical promotion, these mice have a high probability for developing papillomas that progress to cancer. Furthermore, F1 mice immunized with Arg(12) mutant ras peptide in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) develop T cells within 10 d that proliferate in vitro on stimulation with the Arg(12) mutant ras peptide. Within 14 d, these mice have delayed-type hypersensitivity to the peptide. Immunization with CFA alone or with a different Arg(12) mutant ras peptide in CFA induced neither response. To determine the effect of immunization on development of tumors, mice immunized 3 wk earlier were painted on the back with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate every 3 d for 8 wk. The time of appearance and the number of papillomas were about the same in immunized and control mice, but the tumors grew faster and became much larger in the mice immunized with the Arg(12) mutant ras peptide. Thus, the immunization failed to protect against growth of papillomas. The peptide-induced CD4(+) T cells preferentially recognized the peptide but not the native mutant ras protein. On the other hand, mice immunized with Arg(12) mutant ras peptide and bearing papillomas had serum antibodies that did bind native mutant ras protein. Together, these studies indicate that active immunization of cancer-prone individuals may result in immune responses that fail to eradicate mutant oncogene-expressing tumor cells, but rather induce a remarkable enhancement of tumor growth.

  8. Evidence for a novel natriuretic peptide receptor that prefers brain natriuretic peptide over atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Goy, M F; Oliver, P M; Purdy, K E; Knowles, J W; Fox, J E; Mohler, P J; Qian, X; Smithies, O; Maeda, N

    2001-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) exert their physiological actions by binding to natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), a receptor guanylate cyclase (rGC) that synthesizes cGMP in response to both ligands. The family of rGCs is rapidly expanding, and it is plausible that there might be additional, as yet undiscovered, rGCs whose function is to provide alternative signalling pathways for one or both of these peptides, particularly given the low affinity of NPRA for BNP. We have investigated this hypothesis, using a genetically modified (knockout) mouse in which the gene encoding NPRA has been disrupted. Enzyme assays and NPRA-specific Western blots performed on tissues from wild-type mice demonstrate that ANP-activated cGMP synthesis provides a good index of NPRA protein expression, which ranges from maximal in adrenal gland, lung, kidney, and testis to minimal in heart and colon. In contrast, immunoreactive NPRA is not detectable in tissues isolated from NPRA knockout animals and ANP- and BNP-stimulatable GC activities are markedly reduced in all mutant tissues. However, testis and adrenal gland retain statistically significant, high-affinity responses to BNP. This residual response to BNP cannot be accounted for by natriuretic peptide receptor B, or any other known mammalian rGC, suggesting the presence of a novel receptor in these tissues that prefers BNP over ANP. PMID:11513736

  9. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  10. Homotypic vacuole fusion requires VTI11 and is regulated by phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiameng; Han, Sang Won; Rodriguez-Welsh, Maria Fernanda; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela

    2014-06-01

    Most plant cells contain a large central vacuole that is essential to maintain cellular turgor. We report a new mutant allele of VTI11 that implicates the SNARE protein VTI11 in homotypic fusion of protein storage and lytic vacuoles. Fusion of the multiple vacuoles present in vti11 mutants could be induced by treatment with Wortmannin and LY294002, which are inhibitors of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K). We provide evidence that Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) regulates vacuole fusion in vti11 mutants, and that fusion of these vacuoles requires intact microtubules and actin filaments. Finally, we show that Wortmannin also induced the fusion of guard cell vacuoles in fava beans, where vacuoles are naturally fragmented after ABA-induced stomata closure. These results suggest a ubiquitous role of phosphoinositides in vacuole fusion, both during the development of the large central vacuole and during the dynamic vacuole remodeling that occurs as part of stomata movements.

  11. Mutant amyloid-beta-sensitized dendritic cells as Alzheimer's disease vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chuanhai; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Chi; Wahi, Monika M; Wefes, Inge; Arendash, Gary; Potter, Huntington

    2008-08-30

    Vaccines using bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) sensitized to Abeta 1-42 peptide and other mutant peptides were tested on BALB/c and APP(SW) transgenic mice. Wild type Abeta 1-42-sensitized DC vaccine (DCSV) produced no response, but all peptides with a T-cell epitope mutation induced antibody responses without inflammation. DCSV with Abeta 1-25 peptide with mutated T-cell epitope failed to induce antibody response, while DCSV with Abeta 1-35 with mutated T-cell epitope produced a strong antibody response. The entire T-cell epitope is required in a DC vaccine to induce antibody response. DCSV with Abeta peptide carrying the entire mutant T-cell epitope may be an appropriate vaccine against AD.

  12. Protoplast Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Hara, Yasuhiro; Katagi, Hiroaki; Senda, Mitsugi

    1980-01-01

    The relation between the composition of the phospholipid molecular species in a cell membrane and the velocity of protoplast fusion was studied using cells cultured at a low temperature (10 C). Cells cultured at a low temperature contained larger proportions of phospholipids of low phase transition point, the 1,2-dilinoleoyl-type, than those cultured at a normal temperature (25 C). When treated with polyethylene glycol 6000, protoplasts from cells cultured at 10 C fused and progressed to the fused sphere stage more rapidly than did those from cells cultured at 25 C. PMID:16661339

  13. Splenogonadal fusion.

    PubMed

    Tsingoglou, S; Wilkinson, A W

    1976-04-01

    The fusion between splenic tissue and the left gonad or the derivatives of the left mesonephros is a rare congenital anomaly first described in detail by Pommer in 1887/9 and divided into two forms by Putschar and Manion in 1956. In the first or continuous type a cord of splenic or fibrous tissue connects the spleen and the gonadalmesonephric structures. In the second type the fused splenomesonephric structures have lost continuity with the main spleen. An example of the continuous form is presented and the previous reports are briefly reviewed.

  14. Antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling-Juan; Gallo, Richard L

    2016-01-11

    Antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) are a diverse class of naturally occurring molecules that are produced as a first line of defense by all multicellular organisms. These proteins can have broad activity to directly kill bacteria, yeasts, fungi, viruses and even cancer cells. Insects and plants primarily deploy AMPs as an antibiotic to protect against potential pathogenic microbes, but microbes also produce AMPs to defend their environmental niche. In higher eukaryotic organisms, AMPs can also be referred to as 'host defense peptides', emphasizing their additional immunomodulatory activities. These activities are diverse, specific to the type of AMP, and include a variety of cytokine and growth factor-like effects that are relevant to normal immune homeostasis. In some instances, the inappropriate expression of AMPs can also induce autoimmune diseases, thus further highlighting the importance of understanding these molecules and their complex activities. This Primer will provide an update of our current understanding of AMPs. PMID:26766224

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  16. Antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-11-28

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill "superbugs" emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics).

  17. Enhanced adsorption and recovery of uranyl ions by NikR mutant-displaying yeast.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ebisutani, Kazuki; Iida, Katsuya; Nishitani, Takashi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-04-11

    Uranium is one of the most important metal resources, and the technology for the recovery of uranyl ions (UO22+) from aqueous solutions is required to ensure a semi-permanent supply of uranium. The NikR protein is a Ni2+-dependent transcriptional repressor of the nickel-ion uptake system in Escherichia coli, but its mutant protein (NikRm) is able to selectively bind uranyl ions in the interface of the two monomers. In this study, NikRm protein with ability to adsorb uranyl ions was displayed on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To perform the binding of metal ions in the interface of the two monomers, two metal-binding domains (MBDs) of NikRm were tandemly fused via linker peptides and displayed on the yeast cell surface by fusion with the cell wall-anchoring domain of yeast α-agglutinin. The NikRm-MBD-displaying yeast cells with particular linker lengths showed the enhanced adsorption of uranyl ions in comparison to the control strain. By treating cells with citrate buffer (pH 4.3), the uranyl ions adsorbed on the cell surface were recovered. Our results indicate that the adsorption system by yeast cells displaying tandemly fused MBDs of NikRm is effective for simple and concentrated recovery of uranyl ions, as well as adsorption of uranyl ions.

  18. Starch mutants of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Berry-Lowe, S.L.; Schmidt, G.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Wild type Chlamydomonas accumulates starch and triglycerides when grown under nitrogen limiting conditions. Toward elucidation of the mechanisms for control of starch biosynthesis, we isolated mutants impaired int he accumulation of storage carbohydrates. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (strain ya-12) was mutagenized by UV irradiation and colonies were screened by iodine staining after growth in darkness. Mutants, denoted ais for altered in iodine staining, have been characterized by electron microscopy and assays for starch synthease, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), phosphoglucomutase and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and amylase activities. Transcript analysis of wild type and mutant RNAs with PGI, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, and waxy probes have also been carried out. No deficiencies of any of these components have been detected. Furthermore, long-term cultures of ya-12 and ais-1d in nitrogen-limited chemostats have been studied; starch also does not accumulate in ais-1d under these conditions. Thus, the lesion affects an essential factor of unknown identity that is required for starch synthesis.

  19. dysfusion Transcriptional Control of Drosophila Tracheal Migration, Adhesion, and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lan; Crews, Stephen T.

    2006-01-01

    The Drosophila dysfusion basic-helix-loop-helix-PAS transcription factor gene is expressed in specialized fusion cells that reside at the tips of migrating tracheal branches. dysfusion mutants were isolated, and genetic analysis of live embryos revealed that mutant tracheal branches migrate to close proximity but fail to recognize and adhere to each other. Misexpression of dysfusion throughout the trachea further indicated that dysfusion has the ability to both inhibit cell migration and promote ectopic tracheal fusion. Nineteen genes whose expression either increases or decreases in fusion cells during development were analyzed in dysfusion mutant embryos. dysfusion upregulates the levels of four genes, including the shotgun cell adhesion protein gene and the zona pellucida family transmembrane protein gene, CG13196. Misexpression experiments with CG13196 result in ectopic tracheal fusion events, suggesting that it also encodes a cell adhesion protein. Another target gene of dysfusion is members only, which inhibits protein nuclear export and influences tracheal fusion. dysfusion also indirectly downregulates protein levels of Trachealess, an important regulator of tracheal development. These results indicate that fusion cells undergo dynamic changes in gene expression as they switch from migratory to fusion modes and that dysfusion regulates a discrete, but important, set of these genes. PMID:16914738

  20. Simulation of Peptides at Aqueous Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, M.; Chipot, C.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Behavior of peptides at water-membrane interfaces is of great interest in studies on cellular transport and signaling, membrane fusion, and the action of toxins and antibiotics. Many peptides, which exist in water only as random coils, can form sequence-dependent, ordered structures at aqueous interfaces, incorporate into membranes and self-assembly into functional units, such as simple ion channels. Multi -nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to study the mechanism and energetics of interfacial folding of both non-polar and amphiphilic peptides, their insertion into membranes and association into higher-order structures. The simulations indicate that peptides fold non-sequentially, often through a series of amphiphilic intermediates. They further incorporate into the membrane in a preferred direction as folded monomers, and only then aggregate into dimers and, possibly, further into "dimers of dimers".

  1. Interrelationships between mitochondrial fusion, energy metabolism and oxidative stress during development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Kayo; Hartman, Philip S.; Ishii, Takamasa; Suda, Hitoshi; Akatsuka, Akira; Shoyama, Tetsuji; Miyazawa, Masaki; Ishii, Naoaki

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} Growth and development of a fzo-1 mutant defective in the fusion process of mitochondria was delayed relative to the wild type of Caenorhabditis elegans. {yields} Oxygen sensitivity during larval development, superoxide production and carbonyl protein accumulation of the fzo-1 mutant were similar to wild type. {yields} fzo-1 animals had significantly lower metabolism than did N2 and mev-1 overproducing superoxide from mitochondrial electron transport complex II. {yields} Mitochondrial fusion can profoundly affect energy metabolism and development. -- Abstract: Mitochondria are known to be dynamic structures with the energetically and enzymatically mediated processes of fusion and fission responsible for maintaining a constant flux. Mitochondria also play a role of reactive oxygen species production as a byproduct of energy metabolism. In the current study, interrelationships between mitochondrial fusion, energy metabolism and oxidative stress on development were explored using a fzo-1 mutant defective in the fusion process and a mev-1 mutant overproducing superoxide from mitochondrial electron transport complex II of Caenorhabditis elegans. While growth and development of both single mutants was slightly delayed relative to the wild type, the fzo-1;mev-1 double mutant experienced considerable delay. Oxygen sensitivity during larval development, superoxide production and carbonyl protein accumulation of the fzo-1 mutant were similar to wild type. fzo-1 animals had significantly lower metabolism than did N2 and mev-1. These data indicate that mitochondrial fusion can profoundly affect energy metabolism and development.

  2. Cryomicroscopy provides structural snapshots of influenza virus membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Calder, Lesley J; Rosenthal, Peter B

    2016-09-01

    The lipid-enveloped influenza virus enters host cells during infection by binding cell-surface receptors and, after receptor-mediated endocytosis, fusing with the membrane of the endosome and delivering the viral genome and transcription machinery into the host cell. These events are mediated by the hemagglutinin (HA) surface glycoprotein. At the low pH of the endosome, an irreversible conformational change in the HA, including the exposure of the hydrophobic fusion peptide, activates membrane fusion. Here we used electron cryomicroscopy and cryotomography to image the fusion of influenza virus with target membranes at low pH. We visualized structural intermediates of HA and their interactions with membranes during the course of membrane fusion as well as ultrastructural changes in the virus that accompany membrane fusion. Our observations are relevant to a wide range of protein-mediated membrane-fusion processes and demonstrate how dynamic membrane events may be studied by cryomicroscopy. PMID:27501535

  3. Tumor-Specific Peptide, Selected from a Phage Peptide Library, Enhances Antitumor Activity of Lactaptin

    PubMed Central

    Makartsova, Anna A.; Fomin, Alexandr S.; Nushtaeva, Anna A.; Koval, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    A recombinant analogue of lactaptin (RL2), a new potential anticancer molecule, induces apoptosis in cultured tumor cells. The tumor suppression efficacy of RL2 was shown against mouse hepatoma-1 cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast adenocarcinoma cells. The RL2-based therapeutic drug lactaptin is distributed evenly throughout the organism, which reduces its antitumor efficacy. In the current study, we obtained a genetic construct that allows production of the recombinant fusion protein T3-RL2, consisting of RL2 and T3 peptide (YTYDPWLIFPAN), in E. coli cells. T3 peptide was selected from a phage peptide library as a result of two screenings: in vitro using MDA-MB-231 cell culture and in vivo using a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer MDA-MB-231. It was shown that the displayed peptide T3 provides binding and internalization of phage particles by MDA-MB-231 cells and their specific accumulation in MDA-MB-231 tumor tissue. In addition, based on the nucleotide sequences coding RL2 and the known tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, we obtained genetic constructs that provide synthesis of fusion proteins RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His. We studied the cytotoxic activity of fusion proteins T3-RL2, RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His in vitro using MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human adenocarcinoma cells. The in vitro results showed that the fusion proteins inhibit proliferation of both cell cultures, and their cytotoxic activity is higher than that of RL2. In vivo experiments on the study of the antitumor efficacy of the obtained fusion proteins demonstrated that T3-RL2 protein significantly inhibits MDA-MB-231 tumor growth in a xenograft model compared with RL2, while the antitumor effect of RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His proteins is comparable to the effect of RL2. PMID:27513518

  4. Tumor-Specific Peptide, Selected from a Phage Peptide Library, Enhances Antitumor Activity of Lactaptin.

    PubMed

    Nemudraya, Anna A; Makartsova, Anna A; Fomin, Alexandr S; Nushtaeva, Anna A; Koval, Olga A; Richter, Vladimir A; Kuligina, Elena V

    2016-01-01

    A recombinant analogue of lactaptin (RL2), a new potential anticancer molecule, induces apoptosis in cultured tumor cells. The tumor suppression efficacy of RL2 was shown against mouse hepatoma-1 cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast adenocarcinoma cells. The RL2-based therapeutic drug lactaptin is distributed evenly throughout the organism, which reduces its antitumor efficacy. In the current study, we obtained a genetic construct that allows production of the recombinant fusion protein T3-RL2, consisting of RL2 and T3 peptide (YTYDPWLIFPAN), in E. coli cells. T3 peptide was selected from a phage peptide library as a result of two screenings: in vitro using MDA-MB-231 cell culture and in vivo using a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer MDA-MB-231. It was shown that the displayed peptide T3 provides binding and internalization of phage particles by MDA-MB-231 cells and their specific accumulation in MDA-MB-231 tumor tissue. In addition, based on the nucleotide sequences coding RL2 and the known tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, we obtained genetic constructs that provide synthesis of fusion proteins RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His. We studied the cytotoxic activity of fusion proteins T3-RL2, RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His in vitro using MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human adenocarcinoma cells. The in vitro results showed that the fusion proteins inhibit proliferation of both cell cultures, and their cytotoxic activity is higher than that of RL2. In vivo experiments on the study of the antitumor efficacy of the obtained fusion proteins demonstrated that T3-RL2 protein significantly inhibits MDA-MB-231 tumor growth in a xenograft model compared with RL2, while the antitumor effect of RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His proteins is comparable to the effect of RL2. PMID:27513518

  5. Chemical macrocyclization of peptides fused to antibody Fc fragments.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Alessandro; Diderich, Philippe; Morales-Sanfrutos, Julia; Thurnheer, Sarah; Hacker, David; Menin, Laure; Heinis, Christian

    2012-09-19

    To extend the plasma half-life of a bicyclic peptide antagonist, we chose to link it to the Fc fragment of the long-lived serum protein IgG1. Instead of chemically conjugating the entire bicyclic peptide, we recombinantly expressed its peptide moiety as a fusion protein to an Fc fragment and subsequently cyclized the peptide by chemically reacting its three cysteine residues with tris-(bromomethyl)benzene. This reaction was efficient and selective, yielding completely modified peptide fusion protein and no side products. After optimization of the linker and the Fc fragment format, the bicyclic peptide was fully functional as an inhibitor (K(i) = 76 nM) and showed an extended terminal half-life of 1.5 days in mice. The unexpectedly clean reaction makes chemical macrocyclization of peptide-Fc fusion proteins an attractive synthetic approach. Its good compatibility with the Fc fragment may lend the bromomethylbenzene-based chemistry also for the generation of antibody-drug conjugates.

  6. The zebrafish early arrest mutants.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Maischein, H M; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Haffter, P; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kelsh, R N; Mullins, M C; Odenthal, J; Warga, R M; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    This report describes mutants of the zebrafish having phenotypes causing a general arrest in early morphogenesis. These mutants identify a group of loci making up about 20% of the loci identified by mutants with visible morphological phenotypes within the first day of development. There are 12 Class I mutants, which fall into 5 complementation groups and have cells that lyse before morphological defects are observed. Mutants at three loci, speed bump, ogre and zombie, display abnormal nuclei. The 8 Class II mutants, which fall into 6 complementation groups, arrest development before cell lysis is observed. These mutants seemingly stop development in the late segmentation stages, and maintain a body shape similar to a 20 hour embryo. Mutations in speed bump, ogre, zombie, specter, poltergeist and troll were tested for cell lethality by transplanting mutant cells into wild-type hosts. With poltergeist, transplanted mutant cells all survive. The remainder of the mutants tested were autonomously but conditionally lethal: mutant cells, most of which lyse, sometimes survive to become notochord, muscles, or, in rare cases, large neurons, all cell types which become postmitotic in the gastrula. Some of the genes of the early arrest group may be necessary for progression though the cell cycle; if so, the survival of early differentiating cells may be based on having their terminal mitosis before the zygotic requirement for these genes. PMID:9007229

  7. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... C-peptide is a useful marker of insulin production. The following are some purposes of C-peptide ... it nearly impossible to directly evaluate endogenous insulin production. In these cases, C-peptide measurement is a ...

  8. Dual split protein-based fusion assay reveals that mutations to herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein gB alter the kinetics of cell-cell fusion induced by HSV entry glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Atanasiu, Doina; Saw, Wan Ting; Gallagher, John R; Hannah, Brian P; Matsuda, Zene; Whitbeck, J Charles; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J

    2013-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry and cell-cell fusion require glycoproteins gD, gH/gL, and gB. We propose that receptor-activated changes to gD cause it to activate gH/gL, which then triggers gB into an active form. We employed a dual split-protein (DSP) assay to monitor the kinetics of HSV glycoprotein-induced cell-cell fusion. This assay measures content mixing between two cells, i.e., fusion, within the same cell population in real time (minutes to hours). Titration experiments suggest that both gD and gH/gL act in a catalytic fashion to trigger gB. In fact, fusion rates are governed by the amount of gB on the cell surface. We then used the DSP assay to focus on mutants in two functional regions (FRs) of gB, FR1 and FR3. FR1 contains the fusion loops (FL1 and FL2), and FR3 encompasses the crown at the trimer top. All FL mutants initiated fusion very slowly, if at all. However, the fusion rates caused by some FL2 mutants increased over time, so that total fusion by 8 h looked much like that of the WT. Two distinct kinetic patterns, "slow and fast," emerged for mutants in the crown of gB (FR3), again showing differences in initiation and ongoing fusion. Of note are the fusion kinetics of the gB syn mutant (LL871/872AA). Although this mutant was originally included as an ongoing high-rate-of-fusion control, its initiation of fusion is so rapid that it appears to be on a "hair trigger." Thus, the DSP assay affords a unique way to examine the dynamics of HSV glycoprotein-induced cell fusion.

  9. [Recombinant expression of the fusion antigen based on Treponema pallidum TpN17 and TpN47 epitope peptides and establishment and application of the associated ELISA].

    PubMed

    Sun, Aihua; Fan, Xingli; Shen, Xiangdi; Tang, Renxian; Yan, Jie

    2009-08-01

    Using recombinant TpNs proteins of Treponema pallidum as antigens, ELISAs are proved to be of higher sensitivity and specificity. However, they can be further increased by using multiple TpNs antigens. According to the epitope analysis, we firstly used linking primers PCRs to obtain an artificial fusion gene segment tpE17-47 containing epitopes of both TpN17 and TpN47. Subsequently, we conducted the prokaryotic expression systems of entire tpN17 and tpN47 genes and tpE17-47 fusion gene. SDS-PAGE analysis and BioRad Gel Image Analysis System showed that the recombinant proteins rTpN17, rTpN47 and rTpE17-47 expressed stably, with 36%, 20% and 28% yields of total bacterial protein, respectively. After purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography, all the three recombinant proteins could be recognized by T. pallidum antibody positive sera from syphilis patients. The positive rate of rTpE17-47-ELISA for detecting serum specimens in clinically 630 cases with syphilis was 98.6%. This rate was slightly higher than that by Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) (97.9%) (P > 0.05), but significantly higher than those by rTpN17-ELISA (83.8%), rTpN47-ELISA (83.3%) and rapid plasma reagin (RPR) (72.1%) (P < 0.01). Furthermore, both ELISAs and TPPA for detecting the serum specimens in 25 cases with SLE, 36 cases with RA and 250 healthy cases were all negative. RPR showed positive in 1 case with SLE, 2 cases with RA and 2 healthy cases. This could be a novel serological screening or diagnostic method of syphilis with advantages of quickness, convenience, safety, sensitivity and specificity. PMID:19938456

  10. Interaction of peptides with cell membranes: insights from molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen-lu; Ding, Hong-ming; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2016-03-01

    The investigation of the interaction of peptides with cell membranes is the focus of active research. It can enhance the understanding of basic membrane functions such as membrane transport, fusion, and signaling processes, and it may shed light on potential applications of peptides in biomedicine. In this review, we will present current advances in computational studies on the interaction of different types of peptides with the cell membrane. Depending on the properties of the peptide, membrane, and external environment, the peptide-membrane interaction shows a variety of different forms. Here, on the basis of recent computational progress, we will discuss how different peptides could initiate membrane pores, translocate across the membrane, induce membrane endocytosis, produce membrane curvature, form fibrils on the membrane surface, as well as interact with functional membrane proteins. Finally, we will present a conclusion summarizing recent progress and providing some specific insights into future developments in this field.

  11. Biochemical and genetical characterization of nitrate reductase deficient mutants of Petunia.

    PubMed

    Steffen, A; Schieder, O

    1984-08-01

    Four NR(-) lines were selected by their resistance to 100 mM chlorate from X-ray irradiated protoplasts of haploid Petunia hybrida var. Mitchell. The four cell lines were characterized by the presence of xanthine dehydrogenase activity and by complementation tests via protoplast fusion. One mutant (line 1) was classified as defective in the NR apoprotein (tentatively, nia-type) and the other three (lines 2, 3, 4) in the molybdenum cofactor (tentatively, cnx-type). Some NR activity (15 %) could be restored by adding unphysiologically high concentrations of molybdate to the culture medium in two of the cnx-lines (lines 3 and 4). The third cnx-line (line 2) had no NR activity. A complementation analysis via protoplast fusion confirmed that the mutants comprised 3 non-allelic groups. From these results it can be concluded that these NR(-) mutants are recessive and that two of the cnx-mutants (lines 3, 4) are allelic.

  12. Hybridisation experiments with protoplasts from chlorophyll-deficient mutants of some Solanaceous species.

    PubMed

    Schieder, O

    1977-01-01

    Following fusion between protoplasts from two different chlorophyll-deficient diploid mutants of Datura innoxia Mill. it was possible to select 33 green hybrid calli on agar culture medium. Half of the somatic hybrids gave rise to leaves and some to shoots. The chromosome number of 20 somatic hybrids was determined: five were tetraploid, eight hexaploid, three octoploid, and four showed an aneuploid chromosome number. After transfer of the shoots of the five tetraploid hybrids to soil they developed roots. In control experiments in which protoplasts of the two mutants were cultured either as a mixture without being treated with the fusion agent, or cultured separately, no green callus could be obtained. Similar experiments involving protoplasts from one chlorophyll-deficient mutant of Datura innoxia, on the one hand, and those from similar mutants of Nicotiana sylvestris Spegazz. et Comes and Petunia hybrida, on the other, yielded no green somatic hybrid although hybrid protoplasts could be detected.

  13. Fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989 to 1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R and D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R and D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

  14. Fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the MaxPlanck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989--1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

  15. Identification of Arabidopsis rat Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanmin; Nam, Jaesung; Humara, Jaime M.; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Lee, Lan-Ying; Cao, Hongbin; Valentine, Lisa; Li, Jingling; Kaiser, Anthony D.; Kopecky, Andrea L.; Hwang, Hau-Hsuan; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Rao, Praveen K.; Tzfira, Tzvi; Rajagopal, Jyothi; Yi, HoChul; Veena; Yadav, Badam S.; Crane, Yan M.; Lin, Kui; Larcher, Yves; Gelvin, Matthew J.K.; Knue, Marnie; Ramos, Cynthia; Zhao, Xiaowen; Davis, Susan J.; Kim, Sang-Ic; Ranjith-Kumar, C.T.; Choi, Yoo-Jin; Hallan, Vipin K.; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Sui, Xiangzhen; Ziemienowicz, Alicja; Matthysse, Ann G.; Citovsky, Vitaly; Hohn, Barbara; Gelvin, Stanton B.

    2003-01-01

    Limited knowledge currently exists regarding the roles of plant genes and proteins in the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation process. To understand the host contribution to transformation, we carried out root-based transformation assays to identify Arabidopsis mutants that are resistant to Agrobacterium transformation (rat mutants). To date, we have identified 126 rat mutants by screening libraries of T-DNA insertion mutants and by using various “reverse genetic” approaches. These mutants disrupt expression of genes of numerous categories, including chromatin structural and remodeling genes, and genes encoding proteins implicated in nuclear targeting, cell wall structure and metabolism, cytoskeleton structure and function, and signal transduction. Here, we present an update on the identification and characterization of these rat mutants. PMID:12805582

  16. ECB deacylase mutants

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Shao, Zhixin; Zhao, Huimin; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  17. Furin mediates enhanced production of fibrillogenic ABri peptides in familial British dementia.

    PubMed

    Kim, S H; Wang, R; Gordon, D J; Bass, J; Steiner, D F; Lynn, D G; Thinakaran, G; Meredith, S C; Sisodia, S S

    1999-11-01

    The genetic lesion underlying familial British dementia (FBD), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, is a T-A transversion at the termination codon of the BRI gene. The mutant gene encodes BRI-L, the precursor of ABri peptides that accumulate in amyloid deposits in FBD brain. We now report that both BRI-L and its wild-type counterpart, BRI, were constitutively processed by the proprotein convertase, furin, resulting in the secretion of carboxyl-terminal peptides that encompass all or part of ABri. Elevated levels of peptides were generated from the mutant BRI precursor. Electron microscopic studies revealed that synthetic ABri peptides assembled into irregular, short fibrils. Collectively, our results support the view that enhanced furin-mediated processing of mutant BRI generates fibrillogenic peptides that initiate the pathogenesis of FBD.

  18. HMG CoA Lyase (HL): Mutation detection and development of a bacterial expression system for screening the activity of mutant alleles from HL-deficient patients

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, M.F.; Ashmarina, L.; Poitier, E.

    1994-09-01

    HL catalyzes the last step of ketogenesis, and autosomal recessive HL deficiency in humans can cause episodes of hypoglycemia and coma. Structurally, HL is a dimer of identical 325-residue peptides which requires a reducing environment to maintain activity. We cloned the human and mouse HL cDNAs and genes and have performed mutation analysis on cells from 30 HL-deficient probands. Using SSCP and also genomic Southern analysis we have identified putative mutations on 53/60 alleles of these patients (88%). To date, we have found 20 mutations: 3 large deletions, 4 termination mutations, 5 frameshift mutations, and 8 missense mutations which we suspect to be pathogenic based on evolutionary conservation and/or our previous studies on purified HL protein. We have also identified 3 polymorphic variants. In order to directly test the activity of the missense mutations, we established a pGEX-based system, using a glutathione S transferase (GST)-HL fusion protein. Expressed wild-type GST-HL was insoluble. We previously located a reactive Cys at the C-terminus of chicken HL which is conserved in human HL. We produced a mutant HL peptide, C323S, which replaced Cys323 with Ser. Purified C323S is soluble and has similar kinetics to wild-type HL. C323S-containing GST-HL is soluble and enzymatically active. We are cloning and expressing the 8 missense mutations.

  19. Characterization of a Highly Conserved Domain within the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Protein S2 Domain with Characteristics of a Viral Fusion Peptide▿

    PubMed Central

    Madu, Ikenna G.; Roth, Shoshannah L.; Belouzard, Sandrine; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2009-01-01

    Many viral fusion proteins are primed by proteolytic cleavage near their fusion peptides. While the coronavirus (CoV) spike (S) protein is known to be cleaved at the S1/S2 boundary, this cleavage site is not closely linked to a fusion peptide. However, a second cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). Here, we investigated whether this internal cleavage of S2 exposes a viral fusion peptide. We show that the residues immediately C-terminal to the SARS-CoV S2 cleavage site SFIEDLLFNKVTLADAGF are very highly conserved across all CoVs. Mutagenesis studies of these residues in SARS-CoV S, followed by cell-cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for residues L803, L804, and F805 in membrane fusion. Mutation of the most N-terminal residue (S798) had little or no effect on membrane fusion. Biochemical analyses of synthetic peptides corresponding to the proposed S2 fusion peptide also showed an important role for this region in membrane fusion and indicated the presence of α-helical structure. We propose that proteolytic cleavage within S2 exposes a novel internal fusion peptide for SARS-CoV S, which may be conserved across the Coronaviridae. PMID:19439480

  20. Detection of biosynthetic intermediates in proteoglycan-deficient mutants of Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, R.I.; Esko, J.D.

    1987-05-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cell mutants lacking xylosyltransferase or galactosyltransferase I do not synthesize mature proteoglycans. The authors predicted that the mutants would accumulate biosynthetic intermediates upstream from the block imposed by mutation. Using the fusogenic properties of vesicular stomatitis virus, the authors fused monolayers composed of galactosyltransferase I-deficient cells with virus-infected xylosyltransferase-deficient cells. Immediately following fusion the cells were pulse-labelled with /sup 35/SO/sub 4/ for one hour. Quantification of radioactive products showed that the mutants contained biosynthetically active intermediates that proceeded to mature glycosaminoglycans. The production of glycosaminoglycan was dependent on fusion, and fusion of each mutant to itself did not result in radioactive product. Analysis of the newly made glycosaminoglycans through HPLC anion-exchange chromatography showed that the fused cells synthesized heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate in about the same proportion as wildtype cells. These findings suggest that the mutants accumulate precursors to both families of proteoglycans. They also found that progeny virus from infected CHO cells contain proteoglycans, presumably derived from the plasma membrane. This observation suggests that the virus can be used to isolate intermediates accumulating in the mutants.

  1. Pleiotropic effects of hemagglutinin amino acid substitutions of H5 influenza escape mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Rudneva, Irina A.; Timofeeva, Tatiana A.; Ignatieva, Anna V.; Shilov, Aleksandr A.; Krylov, Petr S.; Ilyushina, Natalia A.; Kaverin, Nikolai V.

    2013-12-15

    In the present study we assessed pleiotropic characteristics of the antibody-selected mutations. We examined pH optimum of fusion, temperatures of HA heat inactivation, and in vitro and in vivo replication kinetics of the previously obtained influenza H5 escape mutants. Our results showed that HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. Mutations of the escape mutants located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability (P<0.05). HA changes at positions 131, 144, 145, and 156 and substitutions at positions 131, 142, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 escape mutants in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Overall, a co-variation between antigenic specificity and different HA phenotypic properties has been demonstrated. We believe that the monitoring of pleiotropic effects of the HA mutations found in H5 escape mutants is essential for accurate prediction of mutants with pandemic potential. - Highlights: • HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. • Mutations located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability. • HA changes at positions 131, 142, 144, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 mutants. • Acquisition of glycosylation site could lead to the emergence of multiple pleiotropic effects.

  2. Inhibition of Nipah Virus Infectin In Vivo: Targeting an Early Stage of Paramyxovirus Fusion Activation during Viral Entry

    SciTech Connect

    M Porotto; B Rockx; C Yokoyama; A Talekar; I DeVito; l Palermo; J Liu; R Cortese; M Lu; et al.

    2011-12-31

    In the paramyxovirus cell entry process, receptor binding triggers conformational changes in the fusion protein (F) leading to viral and cellular membrane fusion. Peptides derived from C-terminal heptad repeat (HRC) regions in F have been shown to inhibit fusion by preventing formation of the fusogenic six-helix bundle. We recently showed that the addition of a cholesterol group to HRC peptides active against Nipah virus targets these peptides to the membrane where fusion occurs, dramatically increasing their antiviral effect. In this work, we report that unlike the untagged HRC peptides, which bind to the postulated extended intermediate state bridging the viral and cell membranes, the cholesterol tagged HRC-derived peptides interact with F before the fusion peptide inserts into the target cell membrane, thus capturing an earlier stage in the F-activation process. Furthermore, we show that cholesterol tagging renders these peptides active in vivo: the cholesterol-tagged peptides cross the blood brain barrier, and effectively prevent and treat in an established animal model what would otherwise be fatal Nipah virus encephalitis. The in vivo efficacy of cholesterol-tagged peptides, and in particular their ability to penetrate the CNS, suggests that they are promising candidates for the prevention or therapy of infection by Nipah and other lethal paramyxoviruses.

  3. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  4. Expression of antimicrobial peptides thanatin(S) in transgenic Arabidopsis enhanced resistance to phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingquan; Tang, Dingzhong; Chen, Weida; Huang, Hexun; Wang, Rui; Chen, Yongfang

    2013-09-15

    Thanatin(S) is an analog of thanatin, an insect antimicrobial peptide possessing strong and broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. In order to investigate if the thanatin could be used in engineering transgenic plants for increased resistance against phytopathogens, the synthetic thanatin(S) was introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana plants. To increase the expression level of thanatin(S) in plants, the coding sequence was optimized by plant-preference codon. To avoid cellular protease degradation, signal peptide of rice Cht1 was fused to N terminal of thanatin(S) for secreting the expressed thanatin(S) into intercellular spaces. To evaluate the application value of thanatin(S) in plant disease control, the synthesized coding sequence of Cht1 signal peptide (Cht1SP)-thanatin(S) was ligated to plant gateway destination binary vectors pGWB11 (with FLAG tag). Meanwhile, in order to observe the subcellular localization of Cht1SP-thanatin(S)-GFP and thanatin(S)-GFP, the sequences of Cht1SP-thanatin(S) and thanatin(S) were respectively linked to pGWB5 (with GFP tag). The constructs were transformed into Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0 and mutant pad4-1 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The transformants with Cht1SP-thanatin(S)-FLAG fusion gene were analyzed by genomic PCR, real-time PCR, and western blots and the transgenic Arabidopsis plants introduced respectively Cht1SP-thanatin(S)-GFP and thanatin(S)-GFP were observed by confocal microscopy. Transgenic plants expressing Cht1SP-thanatin(S)-FLAG fusion protein showed antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea and powdery mildew, as well as antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. And the results from confocal observation showed that the GFP signal from Cht1SP-thanatin(S)-GFP transgenic Arabidopsis plants occurred mainly in intercellular space, while that from thanatin(S)-GFP transgenic plants was mainly detected in the cytoplasm and that from empty vector transgenic plants was distributed

  5. Bacterial expression of self-assembling peptide hydrogelators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonmez, Cem

    For tissue regeneration and drug delivery applications, various architectures are explored to serve as biomaterial tools. Via de novo design, functional peptide hydrogel materials have been developed as scaffolds for biomedical applications. The objective of this study is to investigate bacterial expression as an alternative method to chemical synthesis for the recombinant production of self-assembling peptides that can form rigid hydrogels under physiological conditions. The Schneider and Pochan Labs have designed and characterized a 20 amino acid beta-hairpin forming amphiphilic peptide containing a D-residue in its turn region (MAX1). As a result, this peptide must be prepared chemically. Peptide engineering, using the sequence of MAX1 as a template, afforded a small family of peptides for expression (EX peptides) that have different turn sequences consisting of natural amino acids and amenable to bacterial expression. Each sequence was initially chemically synthesized to quickly assess the material properties of its corresponding gel. One model peptide EX1, was chosen to start the bacterial expression studies. DNA constructs facilitating the expression of EX1 were designed in such that the peptide could be expressed with different fusion partners and subsequently cleaved by enzymatic or chemical means to afford the free peptide. Optimization studies were performed to increase the yield of pure peptide that ultimately allowed 50 mg of pure peptide to be harvested from one liter of culture, providing an alternate means to produce this hydrogel-forming peptide. Recombinant production of other self-assembling hairpins with different turn sequences was also successful using this optimized protocol. The studies demonstrate that new beta-hairpin self-assembling peptides that are amenable to bacterial production and form rigid hydrogels at physiological conditions can be designed and produced by fermentation in good yield at significantly reduced cost when compared to

  6. Increasing hydrophobicity of residues in an anti-HIV-1 Env peptide synergistically improves potency.

    PubMed

    Leung, Michael Y K; Cohen, Fredric S

    2011-04-20

    T-20/Fuzeon/Enfuvirtide (ENF), a peptide inhibitor of HIV-1 infection, targets the grooves created by heptad repeat 2 (HR2) of Env's coiled-coil, but mutants resistant to ENF emerge. In this study, ENF-resistant mutants--V38A, N43D, N43D/S138A, Q40H/L45M--were combined with modified inhibitory peptides to identify what we believe to be novel ways to improve peptide efficacy. V38A did not substantially reduce infectivity, but was relatively resistant to inhibitory peptides. N43D was more resistant to inhibitory peptides than wild-type, but infectivity was reduced. The additional mutation S138A (N43D/S138A) increased infectivity and further reduced peptide inhibitory potency. It is concluded that S138A increased binding of HR2/ENF into grooves and that S138A compensated for electrostatic repulsion between N43D and HR2. The six-helix bundle structure indicated that E148A should increase hydrophobic interactions between the coiled-coil and peptide. Importantly, the modifications S138A and E148A in the same peptide retained potency against ENF-escape mutants. The double mutant's increase in potency was greater than the increases from the sum of S138A and E148A individually, showing that these two altered residues synergistically contributed to peptide binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry established that hydrophobic substitutions at positions S138 and E148 improved potency of inhibitory peptides against escape mutants by increasing enthalpic release of energy upon peptide binding.

  7. Identification and Characterization of the Novel LysM Domain-Containing Surface Protein Sep from Lactobacillus fermentum BR11 and Its Use as a Peptide Fusion Partner in Lactobacillus and Lactococcus

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Mark S.; Hafner, Louise M.; Walsh, Terry; Giffard, Philip M.

    2004-01-01

    Examination of supernatant fractions from broth cultures of Lactobacillus fermentum BR11 revealed the presence of a number of proteins, including a 27-kDa protein termed Sep. The amino-terminal sequence of Sep was determined, and the gene encoding it was cloned and sequenced. Sep is a 205-amino-acid protein and contains a 30-amino-acid secretion signal and has overall homology (between 39 and 92% identity) with similarly sized proteins of Lactobacillus reuteri, Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Lactobacillus plantarum. The carboxy-terminal 81 amino acids of Sep also have strong homology (86% identity) to the carboxy termini of the aggregation-promoting factor (APF) surface proteins of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus johnsonii. The mature amino terminus of Sep contains a putative peptidoglycan-binding LysM domain, thereby making it distinct from APF proteins. We have identified a common motif within LysM domains that is shared with carbohydrate binding YG motifs which are found in streptococcal glucan-binding proteins and glucosyltransferases. Sep was investigated as a heterologous peptide expression vector in L. fermentum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactococcus lactis MG1363. Modified Sep containing an amino-terminal six-histidine epitope was found associated with the cells but was largely present in the supernatant in the L. fermentum, L. rhamnosus, and L. lactis hosts. Sep as well as the previously described surface protein BspA were used to express and secrete in L. fermentum or L. rhamnosus a fragment of human E-cadherin, which contains the receptor region for Listeria monocytogenes. This study demonstrates that Sep has potential for heterologous protein expression and export in lactic acid bacteria. PMID:15184172

  8. Arginine-rich intracellular delivery peptides noncovalently transport protein into living cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Hui; Chen, Chung-Pin; Chan, Ming-Huan; Chang, Microsugar; Hou, Yu-Wun; Chen, Hwei-Hsien; Hsu, Hui-Ru; Liu, Kevin; Lee, Han-Jung

    2006-08-01

    Plasma membranes of plant or animal cells are generally impermeable to peptides or proteins. Many basic peptides have previously been investigated and covalently cross-linked with cargoes for cellular internalization. In the current study, we demonstrate that arginine-rich intracellular delivery (AID) peptides are able to deliver fluorescent proteins or beta-galactosidase enzyme into animal and plant cells, as well as animal tissue. Cellular internalization and transdermal delivery of protein could be mediated by effective and nontoxic AID peptides in a neither fusion protein nor conjugation fashion. Therefore, noncovalent AID peptides may provide a useful strategy to have active proteins function in living cells and tissues in vivo.

  9. Arginine-rich intracellular delivery peptides noncovalently transport protein into living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-H.; Chen, C.-P.; Chan, M.-H.; Chang, M.; Hou, Y.-W.; Chen, H.-H.; Hsu, H.-R.; Liu, Kevin; Lee, H.-J. . E-mail: hjlee@mail.ndhu.edu.tw

    2006-08-04

    Plasma membranes of plant or animal cells are generally impermeable to peptides or proteins. Many basic peptides have previously been investigated and covalently cross-linked with cargoes for cellular internalization. In the current study, we demonstrate that arginine-rich intracellular delivery (AID) peptides are able to deliver fluorescent proteins or {beta}-galactosidase enzyme into animal and plant cells, as well as animal tissue. Cellular internalization and transdermal delivery of protein could be mediated by effective and nontoxic AID peptides in a neither fusion protein nor conjugation fashion. Therefore, noncovalent AID peptides may provide a useful strategy to have active proteins function in living cells and tissues in vivo.

  10. A Genetic Screen for Mutants with Supersized Lipid Droplets in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiwei; Xu, Shibin; Ma, Yanli; Wu, Shuang; Feng, Yu; Cui, Qingpo; Chen, Lifeng; Zhou, Shuang; Kong, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yu, Jialei; Wu, Mengdi; Zhang, Shaobing O.

    2016-01-01

    To identify genes that regulate the dynamics of lipid droplet (LD) size, we have used the genetically tractable model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, whose wild-type LD population displays a steady state of size with an upper limit of 3 μm in diameter. From a saturated forward genetic screen of 6.7 × 105 mutagenized haploid genomes, we isolated 118 mutants with supersized intestinal LDs often reaching 10 μm. These mutants define nine novel complementation groups, in addition to four known genes (maoc-1, dhs-28, daf-22, and prx-10). The nine groups are named drop (lipid droplet abnormal) and categorized into four classes. Class I mutants drop-5 and drop-9, similar to prx-10, are up-regulated in ACS-22-DGAT-2-dependent LD growth, resistant to LD hydrolysis, and defective in peroxisome import. Class II mutants drop-2, drop-3, drop-6, and drop-7 are up-regulated in LD growth, are resistant to LD hydrolysis, but are not defective in peroxisome import. Class III mutants drop-1 and drop-8 are neither up-regulated in LD growth nor resistant to LD hydrolysis, but seemingly up-regulated in LD fusion. Class IV mutant drop-4 is cloned as sams-1 and, different to the other three classes, is ACS-22-independent and hydrolysis-resistant. These four classes of supersized LD mutants should be valuable for mechanistic studies of LD cellular processes including growth, hydrolysis, and fusion. PMID:27261001

  11. A Genetic Screen for Mutants with Supersized Lipid Droplets in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiwei; Xu, Shibin; Ma, Yanli; Wu, Shuang; Feng, Yu; Cui, Qingpo; Chen, Lifeng; Zhou, Shuang; Kong, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yu, Jialei; Wu, Mengdi; Zhang, Shaobing O

    2016-01-01

    To identify genes that regulate the dynamics of lipid droplet (LD) size, we have used the genetically tractable model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, whose wild-type LD population displays a steady state of size with an upper limit of 3 μm in diameter. From a saturated forward genetic screen of 6.7 × 10(5) mutagenized haploid genomes, we isolated 118 mutants with supersized intestinal LDs often reaching 10 μm. These mutants define nine novel complementation groups, in addition to four known genes (maoc-1, dhs-28, daf-22, and prx-10). The nine groups are named drop (lipid droplet abnormal) and categorized into four classes. Class I mutants drop-5 and drop-9, similar to prx-10, are up-regulated in ACS-22-DGAT-2-dependent LD growth, resistant to LD hydrolysis, and defective in peroxisome import. Class II mutants drop-2, drop-3, drop-6, and drop-7 are up-regulated in LD growth, are resistant to LD hydrolysis, but are not defective in peroxisome import. Class III mutants drop-1 and drop-8 are neither up-regulated in LD growth nor resistant to LD hydrolysis, but seemingly up-regulated in LD fusion. Class IV mutant drop-4 is cloned as sams-1 and, different to the other three classes, is ACS-22-independent and hydrolysis-resistant. These four classes of supersized LD mutants should be valuable for mechanistic studies of LD cellular processes including growth, hydrolysis, and fusion. PMID:27261001

  12. Fatal measles virus infection prevented by brain-penetrant fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Jeremy C; Talekar, Aparna; Mathieu, Cyrille; Pessi, Antonello; Moscona, Anne; Horvat, Branka; Porotto, Matteo

    2013-12-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection causes an acute childhood disease that can include infection of the central nervous system and can rarely progress to severe neurological disease for which there is no specific treatment. We generated potent antiviral peptide inhibitors of MV entry and spreading and MV-induced cell fusion. Dimers of MV-specific peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat region of the MV fusion protein, conjugated to cholesterol, efficiently protect SLAM transgenic mice from fatal MV infection. Fusion inhibitors hold promise for the prophylaxis of MV infection in unvaccinated and immunocompromised people, as well as potential for the treatment of grave neurological complications of measles.

  13. Preparation of Tyr-C-peptide from genetically altered human insulin precursor.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Tang, J; Hu, M

    1995-12-01

    C-peptide radioimmunoassay (C-peptide RIA) is widely used in determination of pancreatic B-cell secretion activity. 125I labeled Tyr-C-peptide is indispensable in C-peptide RIA kit. Herein we discuss a way of obtaining recombinant Tyr-C-peptide. Arg32Tyr human pro-insulin mutant (R32Y-proinsulin) gene was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Purified R32Y-proinsulin was converted to insulin and Tyr-C-peptide by trypsin and carboxypeptidase B codigestion. Tyr-C-peptide was isolated through reverse-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) and identified by C-peptide RIA and amino acid analysis.

  14. Preparation of Tyr-C-peptide from genetically altered human insulin presursor

    SciTech Connect

    Huaiyu Sun; Jianguo Tang; Meihao Hu

    1995-12-01

    C-peptide radiommunoassay (C-peptide RIA) is widely used in determination of pancreatic B-cell secretion activity. {sup 125}I labeled Tyr-C-peptide is indispensable in C-peptide RIA kit. Herein we discuss a way of obtaining recombinant Tyr-C-peptide. Arg32Tyr human proinsulin mutant (R32Y-proinsulin) gene was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Purified R32Y-proinsulin was converted to insulin and Tyr-C-peptide by trypsin and carboxypeptidase B codigestion. Tyr-C-peptide was isolated through reverse-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) and identified by C-peptide RIA and amino acid analysis. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Peptide inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin by mRNA display

    SciTech Connect

    Yiadom, Kwabena P.A.B.; Muhie, Seid; Yang, David C.H. . E-mail: yangdc@georgetown.edu

    2005-10-07

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are extremely toxic. The metalloproteases associated with the toxins cleave proteins essential for neurotransmitter secretion. Inhibitors of the metalloprotease are currently sought to control the toxicity of BoNTs. Toward that goal, we produced a synthetic cDNA for the expression and purification of the metalloprotease of BoNT/A in Escherichia coli as a biotin-ubiquitin fusion protein, and constructed a combinatorial peptide library to screen for BoNT/A light chain inhibitors using mRNA display. A protease assay was developed using immobilized intact SNAP-25 as the substrate. The new peptide inhibitors showed a 10-fold increase in affinity to BoNT/A light chain than the parent peptide. Interestingly, the sequences of the new peptide inhibitors showed abundant hydrophobic residues but few hydrophilic residues. The results suggest that mRNA display may provide a general approach in developing peptide inhibitors of BoNTs.

  16. Energy Homeostasis Control in Drosophila Adipokinetic Hormone Mutants.

    PubMed

    Gáliková, Martina; Diesner, Max; Klepsatel, Peter; Hehlert, Philip; Xu, Yanjun; Bickmeyer, Iris; Predel, Reinhard; Kühnlein, Ronald P

    2015-10-01

    Maintenance of biological functions under negative energy balance depends on mobilization of storage lipids and carbohydrates in animals. In mammals, glucagon and glucocorticoid signaling mobilizes energy reserves, whereas adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) play a homologous role in insects. Numerous studies based on AKH injections and correlative studies in a broad range of insect species established the view that AKH acts as master regulator of energy mobilization during development, reproduction, and stress. In contrast to AKH, the second peptide, which is processed from the Akh encoded prohormone [termed "adipokinetic hormone precursor-related peptide" (APRP)] is functionally orphan. APRP is discussed as ecdysiotropic hormone or as scaffold peptide during AKH prohormone processing. However, as in the case of AKH, final evidence for APRP functions requires genetic mutant analysis. Here we employed CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering to create AKH and AKH plus APRP-specific mutants in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster. Lack of APRP did not affect any of the tested steroid-dependent processes. Similarly, Drosophila AKH signaling is dispensable for ontogenesis, locomotion, oogenesis, and homeostasis of lipid or carbohydrate storage until up to the end of metamorphosis. During adulthood, however, AKH regulates body fat content and the hemolymph sugar level as well as nutritional and oxidative stress responses. Finally, we provide evidence for a negative autoregulatory loop in Akh gene regulation. PMID:26275422

  17. Low-Cost Peptide Microarrays for Mapping Continuous Antibody Epitopes.

    PubMed

    McBride, Ryan; Head, Steven R; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Law, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing need for understanding antibody specificity in antibody and vaccine research, pepscan assays provide a rapid method for mapping and profiling antibody responses to continuous epitopes. We have developed a relatively low-cost method to generate peptide microarray slides for studying antibody binding. Using a setup of an IntavisAG MultiPep RS peptide synthesizer, a Digilab MicroGrid II 600 microarray printer robot, and an InnoScan 1100 AL scanner, the method allows the interrogation of up to 1536 overlapping, alanine-scanning, and mutant peptides derived from the target antigens. Each peptide is tagged with a polyethylene glycol aminooxy terminus to improve peptide solubility, orientation, and conjugation efficiency to the slide surface. PMID:26490468

  18. Low-Cost Peptide Microarrays for Mapping Continuous Antibody Epitopes.

    PubMed

    McBride, Ryan; Head, Steven R; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Law, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing need for understanding antibody specificity in antibody and vaccine research, pepscan assays provide a rapid method for mapping and profiling antibody responses to continuous epitopes. We have developed a relatively low-cost method to generate peptide microarray slides for studying antibody binding. Using a setup of an IntavisAG MultiPep RS peptide synthesizer, a Digilab MicroGrid II 600 microarray printer robot, and an InnoScan 1100 AL scanner, the method allows the interrogation of up to 1536 overlapping, alanine-scanning, and mutant peptides derived from the target antigens. Each peptide is tagged with a polyethylene glycol aminooxy terminus to improve peptide solubility, orientation, and conjugation efficiency to the slide surface.

  19. Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wurden, G. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Intrator, T. P.; Grabowski, T. C.; Degnan, J. H.; Domonkos, M.; Turchi, P. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Sinars, D. B.; Herrmann, M. C.; et al

    2015-11-17

    In this community white paper, we describe an approach to achieving fusion which employs a hybrid of elements from the traditional magnetic and inertial fusion concepts, called magneto-inertial fusion (MIF). The status of MIF research in North America at multiple institutions is summarized including recent progress, research opportunities, and future plans.

  20. Hot and cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This article presents an overview of research in cold fusion research and development in cold fusion at the Tokomak Fusion Test Reactor at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, and at the inertial containment facility at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. is described.

  1. Inhibition of Arenavirus Infection by a Glycoprotein-Derived Peptide with a Novel Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Jennifer S.; Melnik, Lilia I.; Badani, Hussain; Wimley, William C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The family Arenaviridae includes a number of viruses of public health importance, such as the category A hemorrhagic fever viruses Lassa virus, Junin virus, Machupo virus, Guanarito virus, and Sabia virus. Current chemotherapy for arenavirus infection is limited to the nucleoside analogue ribavirin, which is characterized by considerable toxicity and treatment failure. Using Pichinde virus as a model arenavirus, we attempted to design glycoprotein-derived fusion inhibitors similar to the FDA-approved anti-HIV peptide enfuvirtide. We have identified a GP2-derived peptide, AVP-p, with antiviral activity and no acute cytotoxicity. The 50% inhibitory dose (IC50) for the peptide is 7 μM, with complete inhibition of viral plaque formation at approximately 20 μM, and its antiviral activity is largely sequence dependent. AVP-p demonstrates activity against viruses with the Old and New World arenavirus viral glycoprotein complex but not against enveloped viruses of other families. Unexpectedly, fusion assays reveal that the peptide induces virus-liposome fusion at neutral pH and that the process is strictly glycoprotein mediated. As observed in cryo-electron micrographs, AVP-p treatment causes morphological changes consistent with fusion protein activation in virions, including the disappearance of prefusion glycoprotein spikes and increased particle diameters, and fluorescence microscopy shows reduced binding by peptide-treated virus. Steady-state fluorescence anisotropy measurements suggest that glycoproteins are destabilized by peptide-induced alterations in viral membrane order. We conclude that untimely deployment of fusion machinery by the peptide could render virions less able to engage in on-pathway receptor binding or endosomal fusion. AVP-p may represent a potent, highly specific, novel therapeutic strategy for arenavirus infection. IMPORTANCE Because the only drug available to combat infection by Lassa virus, a highly pathogenic arenavirus, is toxic

  2. CLE-CLAVATA1 peptide-receptor signaling module regulates the expansion of plant root systems in a nitrogen-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Araya, Takao; Miyamoto, Mayu; Wibowo, Juliarni; Suzuki, Akinori; Kojima, Soichi; Tsuchiya, Yumiko N; Sawa, Shinichiro; Fukuda, Hiroo; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Takahashi, Hideki

    2014-02-01

    Morphological plasticity of root systems is critically important for plant survival because it allows plants to optimize their capacity to take up water and nutrients from the soil environment. Here we show that a signaling module composed of nitrogen (N)-responsive CLE (CLAVATA3/ESR-related) peptides and the CLAVATA1 (CLV1) leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase is expressed in the root vasculature in Arabidopsis thaliana and plays a crucial role in regulating the expansion of the root system under N-deficient conditions. CLE1, -3, -4, and -7 were induced by N deficiency in roots, predominantly expressed in root pericycle cells, and their overexpression repressed the growth of lateral root primordia and their emergence from the primary root. In contrast, clv1 mutants showed progressive outgrowth of lateral root primordia into lateral roots under N-deficient conditions. The clv1 phenotype was reverted by introducing a CLV1 promoter-driven CLV1:GFP construct producing CLV1:GFP fusion proteins in phloem companion cells of roots. The overaccumulation of CLE2, -3, -4, and -7 in clv1 mutants suggested the amplitude of the CLE peptide signals being feedback-regulated by CLV1. When CLE3 was overexpressed under its own promoter in wild-type plants, the length of lateral roots was negatively correlated with increasing CLE3 mRNA levels; however, this inhibitory action of CLE3 was abrogated in the clv1 mutant background. Our findings identify the N-responsive CLE-CLV1 signaling module as an essential mechanism restrictively controlling the expansion of the lateral root system in N-deficient environments.

  3. Hydrazide Reactive Peptide Tags for Site-Specific Protein Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Eldridge, Glenn M.; Weiss, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    New site-specific protein labeling (SSPL) reactions for targeting specific, short peptides could be useful for the real time detection of proteins inside of living cells. One SSPL approach matches bioorthogonal reagents with complementary peptides. Here, hydrazide reactive peptides were selected from phage-displayed libraries using reaction-based selections. Selection conditions included washes of varying pH and treatment with NaCNBH3 in order to specifically select reactive carbonyl containing peptides. Selected peptides were fused to T4 lysozyme or synthesized on filter paper for colorimetric assays of the peptide-hydrazide interaction. A peptide-lysozyme protein fusion demonstrated specific, covalent labeling by the Hydrazide Reactive (HyRe) peptides in crude bacterial cell lysates, sufficient for the specific detection of an over-expressed protein fusion. Chemical synthesis of a short HyRe tag variant and subsequent reaction with two structurally distinct hydrazide probes produced covalent adducts observable by MALDI-TOF MS and MS/MS. Rather than isolating reactive carbonyl-containing peptides, we observed reaction with the N–terminal His of HyRe tag 114, amino acid sequence HKSNHSSKNRE, which attacks the hydrazide carbonyl at neutral pH. However, at the pH used during selection wash steps (<6.0), an alternative imine-containing product is formed that can be reduced with sodium cyanoborohydride. MSMS further reveals that this low pH product forms an adduct on Ser6. Further optimization of the novel bimolecular reaction described here could provide a useful tool for in vivo protein labeling and bioconjugate synthesis. The reported selection and screening methods could be widely applicable to the identification of peptides capable of other site-specific protein labeling reactions with bioorthogonal reagents. PMID:21905743

  4. Perspective of Use of Antiviral Peptides against Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Skalickova, Sylvie; Heger, Zbynek; Krejcova, Ludmila; Pekarik, Vladimir; Bastl, Karel; Janda, Jozef; Kostolansky, Frantisek; Vareckova, Eva; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-10-01

    The threat of a worldwide influenza pandemic has greatly increased over the past decade with the emergence of highly virulent avian influenza strains. The increased frequency of drug-resistant influenza strains against currently available antiviral drugs requires urgent development of new strategies for antiviral therapy, too. The research in the field of therapeutic peptides began to develop extensively in the second half of the 20(th) century. Since then, the mechanisms of action for several peptides and their antiviral prospect received large attention due to the global threat posed by viruses. Here, we discussed the therapeutic properties of peptides used in influenza treatment. Peptides with antiviral activity against influenza can be divided into three main groups. First, entry blocker peptides such as a Flupep that interact with influenza hemagglutinin, block its binding to host cells and prevent viral fusion. Second, several peptides display virucidal activity, disrupting viral envelopes, e.g., Melittin. Finally, a third set of peptides interacts with the viral polymerase complex and act as viral replication inhibitors such as PB1 derived peptides. Here, we present a review of the current literature describing the antiviral activity, mechanism and future therapeutic potential of these influenza antiviral peptides. PMID:26492266

  5. Perspective of Use of Antiviral Peptides against Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Skalickova, Sylvie; Heger, Zbynek; Krejcova, Ludmila; Pekarik, Vladimir; Bastl, Karel; Janda, Jozef; Kostolansky, Frantisek; Vareckova, Eva; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    The threat of a worldwide influenza pandemic has greatly increased over the past decade with the emergence of highly virulent avian influenza strains. The increased frequency of drug-resistant influenza strains against currently available antiviral drugs requires urgent development of new strategies for antiviral therapy, too. The research in the field of therapeutic peptides began to develop extensively in the second half of the 20th century. Since then, the mechanisms of action for several peptides and their antiviral prospect received large attention due to the global threat posed by viruses. Here, we discussed the therapeutic properties of peptides used in influenza treatment. Peptides with antiviral activity against influenza can be divided into three main groups. First, entry blocker peptides such as a Flupep that interact with influenza hemagglutinin, block its binding to host cells and prevent viral fusion. Second, several peptides display virucidal activity, disrupting viral envelopes, e.g., Melittin. Finally, a third set of peptides interacts with the viral polymerase complex and act as viral replication inhibitors such as PB1 derived peptides. Here, we present a review of the current literature describing the antiviral activity, mechanism and future therapeutic potential of these influenza antiviral peptides. PMID:26492266

  6. Identification of a Bacillus subtilis secretion mutant using a beta-galactosidase screening procedure.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, M F; Andersen, J B; Borchert, T V; Kontinen, V P

    1995-07-01

    High-level synthesis of exportable beta-galactosidase (LacZ) fusion proteins in Bacillus subtilis results in a lethal phenotype, and has been suggested as a tool for the selection of secretion mutants. We tested a plasmid-based, inducible lacZ fusion gene system for this purpose, but frequent mutations in cis, which reduced expression of the fusion gene, forced abandonment of the induction-selection strategy. Instead, after modification of the indicator plasmid, a screening procedure for increased basal LacZ activity levels was adopted. This led to the identification of a conditional B. subtilis secretion mutant after nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. At 42 degrees C, but not at 30 degrees C, this mutant displayed extreme growth retardation when the LacZ fusion protein was produced, and and was also defective in the secretion of subtilisin Carlsberg. The processing kinetics and secretion of a subtilisin Carlsberg-alkaline phosphatase fusion derivative were found to be defective specifically at the non-permissive temperature. The secretion defect was not linked to the secA/div locus.

  7. Designing a mutant CCL2-HSA chimera with high glycosaminoglycan-binding affinity and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Gerlza, Tanja; Winkler, Sophie; Atlic, Aid; Zankl, Christina; Konya, Viktoria; Kitic, Nikola; Strutzmann, Elisabeth; Knebl, Kerstin; Adage, Tiziana; Heinemann, Akos; Weis, Roland; Kungl, Andreas J

    2015-08-01

    Chemokines like CCL2 mediate leukocyte migration to inflammatory sites by binding to G-protein coupled receptors on the target cell as well as to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the endothelium of the inflamed tissue. We have recently shown that the dominant-negative Met-CCL2 mutant Y13A/S21K/Q23R with improved GAG binding affinity is highly bio-active in several animal models of inflammatory diseases. For chronic indications, we have performed here a fusion to human serum albumin (HSA) in order to extend the serum half-life of the chemokine mutant. To compensate a potential drop in GAG-binding affinity due to steric hindrance by HSA, a series of novel CCL2 mutants was generated with additional basic amino acids which were genetically introduced at sites oriented towards the GAG ligand. From this set of mutants, the Met-CCL2 variant Y13A/N17K/S21K/Q23K/S34K exhibited high GAG-binding affinity and a similar selectivity as wild type (wt) CCL2. From a set of different HSA-chemokine chimeric constructs, the linked HSA(C34A)(Gly)4Ser-Met-CCL2(Y13A/N17K/S21K/Q23K/S34K) fusion protein was found to show the best overall GAG-binding characteristics. Molecular modeling demonstrated an energetically beneficial fold of this novel protein chimera. This was experimentally supported by GdmCl-induced unfolding studies, in which the fusion construct exhibited a well-defined secondary structure and a transition point significantly higher than both the wt and the unfused CCL2 mutant protein. Unlike the wt chemokine, the quaternary structure of the HSA-fusion protein is monomeric according to size-exclusion chromatography experiments. In competition experiments, the HSA-fusion construct displaced only two of seven unrelated chemokines from heparan sulfate, whereas the unfused CCL2 mutant protein displaced five other chemokines. The most effective concentration of the HSA-fusion protein in inhibiting CCL2-mediated monocyte attachment to endothelial cells, as detected in the flow chamber

  8. Nonchemotactic Mutants of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, John B.; Adler, Julius; Dahl, Margaret M.

    1967-01-01

    We have isolated 40 mutants of Escherichia coli which are nonchemotactic as judged by their failure to swarm on semisolid tryptone plates or to make bands in capillary tubes containing tryptone broth. All the mutants have normal flagella, a fact shown by their shape and reaction with antiflagella serum. All are fully motile under the microscope and all are sensitive to the phage chi. Unlike its parent, one of the mutants, studied in greater detail, failed to show chemotaxis toward oxygen, glucose, serine, threonine, or aspartic acid. The failure to exhibit chemotaxis does not result from a failure to use the chemicals. The swimming of this mutant was shown to be random. The growth rate was normal under several conditions, and the growth requirements were unchanged. Images PMID:5335897

  9. Viral membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  10. Recombinant production, isotope labeling and purification of ENOD40B: a plant peptide hormone.

    PubMed

    Chae, Young Kee; Tonneli, Marco; Markley, John L

    2012-08-01

    The plant peptide hormone ENOD40B was produced in a protein production strain of Escherichia coli harboring an induction controller plasmid (Rosetta(DE3)pLysS) as a His6-tagged ubiquitin fusion protein. The fusion protein product was denatured and refolded as part of the isolation procedure and purified by immobilized metal ion chromatography. The peptide hormone was released from its fusion partner by adding yeast ubiquitin hydrolase (YUH) and subsequently purified by reversed phase chromatography. The purity of the resulting peptide fragment was assayed by MALDITOF mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. The final yields of the target peptide were 7.0 mg per liter of LB medium and 3.4 mg per liter of minimal medium.

  11. Brain natriutetic peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007509.htm Brain natriuretic peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) test is a blood test that measures ...

  12. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  13. Internal deletion mutants of Xenopus transcription factor IIIA.

    PubMed Central

    Hanas, J S; Littell, R M; Gaskins, C J; Zebrowski, R

    1989-01-01

    Xenopus transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) or TFIIIA mutants with internal deletions were expressed in E. coli utilizing a bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase system. TFIIIA or deletion mutant TFIIIAs, isolated from E.coli cell extracts, were identified by SDS PAGE and immunoblotting with rabbit antiserum against native TFIIIA purified from Xenopus immature oocytes. Specific DNA binding of intact or internally deleted TFIIIA was compared by analyzing their abilities to protect the internal control gene (ICR) of the Xenopus 5S RNA gene from DNase I digestion. Intact protein, synthesized from a full-length TFIIIA cDNA, bound specifically to the entire ICR (+96 to +43) and promoted 5S RNA gene transcription in vitro. One TFIIIA deletion mutant, expressed from cDNA lacking the coding sequence for the putative fourth zinc finger (designated from the N-terminus, amino acids 103-132) protected the ICR from DNase I digestion from nucleotide positions +96 to +78. A second TFIIIA mutant resulting from fusion of putative zinc fingers 7 and 8 (deletion of amino acids 200-224) protected the 5S gene ICR from positions +96 to +63. The DNase I protection patterns of these mutant proteins are consistent with the formation of strong ICR contacts by those regions of the protein on the N-terminal side of the mutation but not by those regions on the C-terminal side of the mutation. The regions of the protein comprising the N-terminal 3 fingers and N-terminal six fingers appear to be in contact with approximately 18 and 33 bp of DNA respectively on the 3' side of the 5S gene ICR. These internal deletion mutants promoted 5S RNA synthesis in vitro and DNA renaturation. Images PMID:2690011

  14. The fusion breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, Ralph W.

    1982-10-01

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the U.S. fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the U.S. fusion program and the U.S. nuclear energy program. There is wide agreement that many approaches will work and will produce fuel for five equal-sized LWRs, and some approach as many as 20 LWRs at electricity costs within 20% of those at today's price of uranium (30/lb of U3O8). The blankets designed to suppress fissioning, called symbiotes, fusion fuel factories, or just fusion breeders, will have safety characteristics more like pure fusion reactors and will support as many as 15 equal power LWRs. The blankets designed to maximize fast fission of fertile material will have safety characteristics more like fission reactors and will support 5 LWRs. This author strongly recommends development of the fission suppressed blanket type, a point of view not agreed upon by everyone. There is, however, wide agreement that, to meet the market price for uranium which would result in LWR electricity within 20% of today's cost with either blanket type, fusion components can cost severalfold more than would be allowed for pure fusion to meet the goal of making electricity alone at 20% over today's fission costs. Also widely agreed is that the critical-path-item for the fusion breeder is fusion development itself; however, development of fusion breeder specific items (blankets, fuel cycle) should be started now in order to have the fusion breeder by the time the rise in uranium prices forces other more costly choices.

  15. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested. PMID:27145593

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  17. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  18. The ham-2 locus, encoding a putative transmembrane protein, is required for hyphal fusion in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Qijun; Rasmussen, Carolyn; Glass, N Louise

    2002-01-01

    Somatic cell fusion is common during organogenesis in multicellular eukaryotes, although the molecular mechanism of cell fusion is poorly understood. In filamentous fungi, somatic cell fusion occurs during vegetative growth. Filamentous fungi grow as multinucleate hyphal tubes that undergo frequent hyphal fusion (anastomosis) during colony expansion, resulting in the formation of a hyphal network. The molecular mechanism of the hyphal fusion process and the role of networked hyphae in the growth and development of these organisms are unexplored questions. We use the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa as a model to study the molecular mechanism of hyphal fusion. In this study, we identified a deletion mutant that was restricted in its ability to undergo both self-hyphal fusion and fusion with a different individual to form a heterokaryon. This deletion mutant displayed pleiotropic defects, including shortened aerial hyphae, altered conidiation pattern, female sterility, slow growth rate, lack of hyphal fusion, and suppression of vegetative incompatibility. Complementation with a single open reading frame (ORF) within the deletion region in this mutant restored near wild-type growth rates, female fertility, aerial hyphae formation, and hyphal fusion, but not vegetative incompatibility and wild-type conidiation pattern. This ORF, which we named ham-2 (for hyphal anastomosis), encodes a putative transmembrane protein that is highly conserved, but of unknown function among eukaryotes. PMID:11805054

  19. Materials research for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, J.; Moeslang, A.; Muroga, T.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion materials research started in the early 1970s following the observation of the degradation of irradiated materials used in the first commercial fission reactors. The technological challenges of fusion energy are intimately linked with the availability of suitable materials capable of reliably withstanding the extremely severe operational conditions of fusion reactors. Although fission and fusion materials exhibit common features, fusion materials research is broader. The harder mono-energetic spectrum associated with the deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons (14.1 MeV compared to <2 MeV on average for fission neutrons) releases significant amounts of hydrogen and helium as transmutation products that might lead to a (at present undetermined) degradation of structural materials after a few years of operation. Overcoming the historical lack of a fusion-relevant neutron source for materials testing is an essential pending step in fusion roadmaps. Structural materials development, together with research on functional materials capable of sustaining unprecedented power densities during plasma operation in a fusion reactor, have been the subject of decades of worldwide research efforts underpinning the present maturity of the fusion materials research programme.

  20. Discovery of Novel Peptides Regulating Competence Development in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sang-Joon; Kaspar, Justin; Kim, Jeong Nam; Seaton, Kinda

    2014-01-01

    A MarR-like transcriptional repressor (RcrR) and two predicted ABC efflux pumps (RcrPQ) encoded by a single operon were recently shown to be dominant regulators of stress tolerance and development of genetic competence in the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans. Here, we focused on polar (ΔrcrR-P) and nonpolar (ΔrcrR-NP) rcrR mutants, which are hyper- and nontransformable, respectively, to dissect the mechanisms by which these mutations impact competence. We discovered two open reading frames (ORFs) in the 3′ end of the rcrQ gene that encode peptides of 27 and 42 amino acids (aa) which are also dramatically upregulated in the ΔrcrR-NP strain. Deletion of, or start codon mutations in, the ORFs for the peptides in the ΔrcrR-NP background restored competence and sensitivity to competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) to levels seen in the ΔrcrR-P strain. Overexpression of the peptides adversely affected competence development. Importantly, overexpression of mutant derivatives of the ABC exporters that lacked the peptides also resulted in impaired competence. FLAG-tagged versions of the peptides could be detected in S. mutans, and FLAG tagging of the peptides impaired their function. The competence phenotypes associated with the various mutations, and with overexpression of the peptides and ABC transporters, were correlated with the levels of ComX protein in cells. Collectively, these studies revealed multiple novel mechanisms for regulation of competence development by the components of the rcrRPQ operon. Given their intimate role in competence and stress tolerance, the rcrRPQ-encoded peptides may prove to be useful targets for therapeutics to diminish the virulence of S. mutans. PMID:25135217

  1. Computational peptide vaccinology.

    PubMed

    Söllner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Immunoinformatics focuses on modeling immune responses for better understanding of the immune system and in many cases for proposing agents able to modify the immune system. The most classical of these agents are vaccines derived from living organisms such as smallpox or polio. More modern vaccines comprise recombinant proteins, protein domains, and in some cases peptides. Generating a vaccine from peptides however requires technologies and concepts very different from classical vaccinology. Immunoinformatics therefore provides the computational tools to propose peptides suitable for formulation into vaccines. This chapter introduces the essential biological concepts affecting design and efficacy of peptide vaccines and discusses current methods and workflows applied to design successful peptide vaccines using computers.

  2. Design and expression of a short peptide as an HIV detection probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lines, Jamie A.; Yu, Zhiqiang; Dedkova, Larisa M.; Chen, Shengxi

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We designed a short fusion peptide (FP-50) for in vivo expression. •This peptide is a very promising component for detection of gp120 protein. •The detectable level is about 20–200 times lower than previously published methods. •It is a novel probe to detect HIV-1 gp120 during early stages of HIV infection. -- Abstract: To explore a low-cost novel probe for HIV detection, we designed and prepared a 50-amino acid-length short fusion peptide (FP-50) via Escherichia coli in vivo expression. It was employed as a novel probe to detect HIV-1 gp120 protein. The detectable level of gp120 protein using the FP-50 peptide was approximately 20–200 times lower than previously published methods that used a pair of monoclonal antibodies. Thus, this short peptide is a very promising component for detection of gp120 protein during early stages of HIV infection.

  3. Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armour, Edward A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Muon catalyzed fusion is a process in which a negatively charged muon combines with two nuclei of isotopes of hydrogen, e.g, a proton and a deuteron or a deuteron and a triton, to form a muonic molecular ion in which the binding is so tight that nuclear fusion occurs. The muon is normally released after fusion has taken place and so can catalyze further fusions. As the muon has a mean lifetime of 2.2 microseconds, this is the maximum period over which a muon can participate in this process. This article gives an outline of the history of muon catalyzed fusion from 1947, when it was first realised that such a process might occur, to the present day. It includes a description of the contribution that Drachrnan has made to the theory of muon catalyzed fusion and the influence this has had on the author's research.

  4. Kar5p is required for multiple functions in both inner and outer nuclear envelope fusion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jason V; Rose, Mark D

    2014-12-02

    During mating in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two haploid nuclei fuse via two sequential membrane fusion steps. SNAREs (i.e., soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) and Prm3p mediate outer nuclear membrane fusion, but the inner membrane fusogen remains unknown. Kar5p is a highly conserved transmembrane protein that localizes adjacent to the spindle pole body (SPB), mediates nuclear envelope fusion, and recruits Prm3p adjacent to the SPB. To separate Kar5p's functions, we tested localization, Prm3p recruitment, and nuclear fusion efficiency in various kar5 mutants. All domains and the conserved cysteine residues were essential for nuclear fusion. Several kar5 mutant proteins localized properly but did not mediate Prm3p recruitment; other kar5 mutant proteins localized and recruited Prm3p but were nevertheless defective for nuclear fusion, demonstrating additional functions beyond Prm3p recruitment. We identified one Kar5p domain required for SPB localization, which is dependent on the half-bridge protein Mps3p. Electron microscopy revealed a kar5 mutant that arrests with expanded nuclear envelope bridges, suggesting that Kar5p is required after outer nuclear envelope fusion. Finally, a split-GFP assay demonstrated that Kar5p localizes to both the inner and outer nuclear envelope. These insights suggest a mechanism by which Kar5p mediates inner nuclear membrane fusion.

  5. C peptides as entry inhibitors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Egerer, Lisa; Kiem, Hans-Peter; von Laer, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat 2 region of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope glycoprotein, so-called C peptides, are very potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Antiviral genes encoding either membrane-anchored (ma) or secreted (iSAVE) C peptides have been engineered and allow direct in vivo production of the therapeutic peptides by genetically modified host cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides expressed in the HIV-1 target cells by T-cell or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy efficiently prevent virus entry into the modified cells. Such gene-protection confers a selective survival advantage and allows accumulation of the genetically modified cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides have been successfully tested in a nonhuman primate model of AIDS and were found to be safe in a phase I clinical trial in AIDS patients transplanted with autologous gene-modified T-cells. Secreted C peptides have the crucial advantage of not only protecting genetically modified cells from HIV-1 infection, but also neighboring cells, thus suppressing virus replication even if only a small fraction of cells is genetically modified. Accordingly, various cell types can be considered as potential in vivo producer cells for iSAVE-based gene therapeutics, which could even be modified by direct in vivo gene delivery in future. In conclusion, C peptide gene therapeutics may provide a strong benefit to AIDS patients and could present an effective alternative to current antiretroviral drug regimens. PMID:25757622

  6. C peptides as entry inhibitors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Egerer, Lisa; Kiem, Hans-Peter; von Laer, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat 2 region of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope glycoprotein, so-called C peptides, are very potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Antiviral genes encoding either membrane-anchored (ma) or secreted (iSAVE) C peptides have been engineered and allow direct in vivo production of the therapeutic peptides by genetically modified host cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides expressed in the HIV-1 target cells by T-cell or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy efficiently prevent virus entry into the modified cells. Such gene-protection confers a selective survival advantage and allows accumulation of the genetically modified cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides have been successfully tested in a nonhuman primate model of AIDS and were found to be safe in a phase I clinical trial in AIDS patients transplanted with autologous gene-modified T-cells. Secreted C peptides have the crucial advantage of not only protecting genetically modified cells from HIV-1 infection, but also neighboring cells, thus suppressing virus replication even if only a small fraction of cells is genetically modified. Accordingly, various cell types can be considered as potential in vivo producer cells for iSAVE-based gene therapeutics, which could even be modified by direct in vivo gene delivery in future. In conclusion, C peptide gene therapeutics may provide a strong benefit to AIDS patients and could present an effective alternative to current antiretroviral drug regimens.

  7. High-throughput engineering and analysis of peptide binding to class II MHC.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Boder, Eric T

    2010-07-27

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) proteins govern stimulation of adaptive immunity by presenting antigenic peptides to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Many allelic variants of MHC-II exist with implications in peptide presentation and immunity; thus, high-throughput experimental tools for rapid and quantitative analysis of peptide binding to MHC-II are needed. Here, we present an expression system wherein peptide and MHC-II are codisplayed on the surface of yeast in an intracellular association-dependent manner and assayed by flow cytometry. Accordingly, the relative binding of different peptides and/or MHC-II variants can be assayed by genetically manipulating either partner, enabling the application of directed evolution approaches for high-throughput characterization or engineering. We demonstrate the application of this tool to map the side-chain preference for peptides binding to HLA-DR1 and to evolve novel HLA-DR1 mutants with altered peptide-binding specificity.

  8. Fusion facility siting considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussell, G. T.

    1985-02-01

    Inherent in the fusion program's transition from hydrogen devices to commercial power machines is a general increase in the size and scope of succeeding projects. This growth will lead to increased emphasis on safety, environmental impact, and the external effects of fusion in general, and of each new device in particular. An important consideration in this regard is site selection. Major siting issues that may affect the economics, safety, and environmental impact of fusion are examined.

  9. Status of fusion maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Effective maintenance will be an essential ingredient in determining fusion system productivity. This level of productivity will result only after close attention is paid to the entire system as an entity and appropriate integration of the elements is made. The status of fusion maintenance is reviewed in the context of the entire system. While there are many challenging developmental tasks ahead in fusion maintenance, the required technologies are available in several high-technology industries, including nuclear fission.

  10. Fusion: The controversy continues

    SciTech Connect

    1989-07-01

    Nuclear fusion-the power of the stars that promises mankind an inexhaustible supply of energy-seems concurrently much closer and still distant this month. The recent flurry of announcements concerning the achievement of a cold fusion reaction has-if nothing else-underscored the historic importance of the basic fusion reaction which uses hydrogen ions to fuel an energy-producing reaction.

  11. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  12. Meteorite fusion crust variability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaisen, Kevin G.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2009-06-01

    Two assumptions commonly employed in meteorite interpretation are that fusion crust compositions represent the bulk-rock chemistry of the interior meteorite and that the vesicles within the fusion crust result from the release of implanted solar wind volatiles. Electron microprobe analyses of thin sections from lunar meteorite Miller Range (MIL) 05035 and eucrite Bates Nunataks (BTN) 00300 were performed to determine if the chemical compositions of the fusion crust varied and/or represented the published bulk rock composition. It was determined that fusion crust compositions are significantly influenced by the incorporation of fragments from the substrate, and by the composition and grain size of those minerals. Because of compositional heterogeneities throughout the meteorite, one cannot assume that fusion crust composition represents the bulk rock composition. If the compositional variability within the fusion crust and mineralogical differences among thin sections goes unnoticed, then the perceived composition and petrogenetic models of formation will be incorrect. The formation of vesicles within these fusion crusts were also compared to current theories attributing vesicles to a solar wind origin. Previous work from the STONE-5 experiment, where terrestrial rocks were exposed on the exterior of a spacecraft heatshield, produced a vesicular fusion crust without prolonged exposure to solar wind suggesting that the high temperatures experienced by a meteorite during passage through the Earth's atmosphere are sufficient to cause boiling of the melt. Therefore, the assumption that all vesicles found within a fusion crust are due to the release of implanted volatiles of solar wind may not be justified.

  13. Osh6 overexpression extends the lifespan of yeast by increasing vacuole fusion.

    PubMed

    Gebre, Senetibeb; Connor, Richard; Xia, Yufeng; Jawed, Sanaa; Bush, John M; Bard, Martin; Elsalloukh, Hassan; Tang, Fusheng

    2012-06-01

    In yeast cells, the vacuole divides and fuses in each round of cell cycle. While mutants defective in vacuole fusion are "wild type" for vegetative growth, most have shortened replicative lifespans under caloric restriction (CR) condition, a manipulation that extends lifespan in wild type cells. To explore whether vacuole fusion extends lifespan, we screened for genes that can complement the fusion defect of selected mutants (erg6Δ, a sterol mutant; nyv1Δ,  a mutant involved in the vacuolar SNARE complex and vac8Δ, a vacuolar membrane protein mutant). This screen revealed that Osh6, a member of the oxysterol-binding protein family, can complement the vacuole fusion defect of nyv1Δ, but not erg6Δ or vac8Δ, suggesting that Osh6's function in vacuole fusion is partly dependent on membrane ergosterol and Vac8. To measure the effect of OSH6 on lifespan, we replaced the endogenous promoter of OSH6 with a shorter version of the ERG6 promoter to obtain PERG6-OSH6. This mutant construct significantly extended the replicative lifespan in a wild type background and in a nyv1Δ mutant. Interestingly, PERG6-OSH6 cells were more sensitive to drugs that inhibit the activity of the TOR complex 1 (TORC1) than wild type cells. Moreover, a PERG6-OSH6 tor1Δ double mutant demonstrated a greatly shortened lifespan, suggesting a genetic interaction between Osh6 and Tor1. Since active TORC1 stimulates vacuole scission and CR downregulates TORC1, Osh6 may link these two pathways by adjusting vacuolar membrane organization to extend lifespan.

  14. Multiple vacuoles in impaired tonoplast trafficking3 mutants are independent organelles

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiameng; Han, Sang Won; Munnik, Teun; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    Plant vacuoles are essential and dynamic organelles, and mechanisms of vacuole biogenesis and fusion are not well characterized. We recently demonstrated that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K), induces the fusion of plant vacuoles both in roots of itt3/vti11 mutant alleles and in guard cells of wild type Arabidopsis and Fava bean. Here we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to demonstrate that the vacuoles in itt3/vti11 are independent organelles. Furthermore, we used fluorescent protein reporters that bind specifically to Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) or PtdIns(4)P to show that Wortmannin treatments that induce the fusion of vti11 vacuoles result in the loss of PtdIns(3)P from cellular membranes. These results provided supporting evidence for a critical role of PtdIns(3)P in vacuole fusion in roots and guard cells. PMID:25482812

  15. Multiple vacuoles in impaired tonoplast trafficking3 mutants are independent organelles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiameng; Han, Sang Won; Munnik, Teun; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    Plant vacuoles are essential and dynamic organelles, and mechanisms of vacuole biogenesis and fusion are not well characterized. We recently demonstrated that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K), induces the fusion of plant vacuoles both in roots of itt3/vti11 mutant alleles and in guard cells of wild type Arabidopsis and Fava bean. Here we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to demonstrate that the vacuoles in itt3/vti11 are independent organelles. Furthermore, we used fluorescent protein reporters that bind specifically to Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) or PtdIns(4)P to show that Wortmannin treatments that induce the fusion of vti11 vacuoles result in the loss of PtdIns(3)P from cellular membranes. These results provided supporting evidence for a critical role of PtdIns(3)P in vacuole fusion in roots and guard cells. PMID:25482812

  16. Multiple vacuoles in impaired tonoplast trafficking3 mutants are independent organelles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiameng; Won Han, Sang; Munnik, Teun; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela

    2014-08-13

    Plant vacuoles are essential and dynamic organelles, and mechanisms of vacuole biogenesis and fusion are not well characterized. We recently demonstrated that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase (PI3K), induces the fusion of plant vacuoles both in roots of itt3/vti11 mutant alleles and in guard cells of wild type Arabidopsis and Fava bean. Here we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to demonstrate that the vacuoles in itt3/vti11 are independent organelles. Furthermore, we used fluorescent protein reporters that bind specifically to Phosphatidylinositol-3-Phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) or PtdIns(4)P to show that Wortmannin treatments that induce the fusion of vti11 vacuoles result in the loss of PtdIns(3)P from cellular membranes. These results provided supporting evidence for a critical role of PtdIns(3)P in vacuole fusion in roots and guard cells. PMID:25119109

  17. Multiple vacuoles in impaired tonoplast trafficking3 mutants are independent organelles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiameng; Won Han, Sang; Munnik, Teun; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela

    2014-08-13

    Plant vacuoles are essential and dynamic organelles, and mechanisms of vacuole biogenesis and fusion are not well characterized. We recently demonstrated that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase (PI3K), induces the fusion of plant vacuoles both in roots of itt3/vti11 mutant alleles and in guard cells of wild type Arabidopsis and Fava bean. Here we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to demonstrate that the vacuoles in itt3/vti11 are independent organelles. Furthermore, we used fluorescent protein reporters that bind specifically to Phosphatidylinositol-3-Phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) or PtdIns(4)P to show that Wortmannin treatments that induce the fusion of vti11 vacuoles result in the loss of PtdIns(3)P from cellular membranes. These results provided supporting evidence for a critical role of PtdIns(3)P in vacuole fusion in roots and guard cells.

  18. Multiple vacuoles in impaired tonoplast trafficking3 mutants are independent organelles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiameng; Han, Sang Won; Munnik, Teun; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    Plant vacuoles are essential and dynamic organelles, and mechanisms of vacuole biogenesis and fusion are not well characterized. We recently demonstrated that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K), induces the fusion of plant vacuoles both in roots of itt3/vti11 mutant alleles and in guard cells of wild type Arabidopsis and Fava bean. Here we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to demonstrate that the vacuoles in itt3/vti11 are independent organelles. Furthermore, we used fluorescent protein reporters that bind specifically to Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) or PtdIns(4)P to show that Wortmannin treatments that induce the fusion of vti11 vacuoles result in the loss of PtdIns(3)P from cellular membranes. These results provided supporting evidence for a critical role of PtdIns(3)P in vacuole fusion in roots and guard cells.

  19. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  20. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. PMID:26374891

  1. An Arabidopsis thaliana copper-sensitive mutant suggests a role of phytosulfokine in ethylene production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Kamiya, Takehiro; Yumoto, Hiroko; Sotta, Naoyuki; Katsushi, Yamaguchi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu; Fujiwara, Toru

    2015-07-01

    To increase our understanding of the adaptation for copper (Cu) deficiency, Arabidopsis mutants with apparent alterations under Cu deficiency were identified. In this report, a novel mutant, tpst-2, was found to be more sensitive than wild-type (Col-0) plants to Cu deficiency during root elongation. The positional cloning of tpst-2 revealed that this gene encodes a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST). Moreover, the ethylene production of tpst-2 mutant was higher than that of Col-0 under Cu deficiency, and adding the ethylene response inhibitor AgNO3 partially rescued defects in root elongation. Interestingly, peptide hormone phytosulfokine (PSK) treatment also repressed the ethylene production of tpst-2 mutant plants. Our results revealed that TPST suppressed ethylene production through the action of PSK. PMID:25908239

  2. An Arabidopsis thaliana copper-sensitive mutant suggests a role of phytosulfokine in ethylene production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Kamiya, Takehiro; Yumoto, Hiroko; Sotta, Naoyuki; Katsushi, Yamaguchi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu; Fujiwara, Toru

    2015-07-01

    To increase our understanding of the adaptation for copper (Cu) deficiency, Arabidopsis mutants with apparent alterations under Cu deficiency were identified. In this report, a novel mutant, tpst-2, was found to be more sensitive than wild-type (Col-0) plants to Cu deficiency during root elongation. The positional cloning of tpst-2 revealed that this gene encodes a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST). Moreover, the ethylene production of tpst-2 mutant was higher than that of Col-0 under Cu deficiency, and adding the ethylene response inhibitor AgNO3 partially rescued defects in root elongation. Interestingly, peptide hormone phytosulfokine (PSK) treatment also repressed the ethylene production of tpst-2 mutant plants. Our results revealed that TPST suppressed ethylene production through the action of PSK.

  3. An Arabidopsis thaliana copper-sensitive mutant suggests a role of phytosulfokine in ethylene production

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Kamiya, Takehiro; Yumoto, Hiroko; Sotta, Naoyuki; Katsushi, Yamaguchi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu; Fujiwara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    To increase our understanding of the adaptation for copper (Cu) deficiency, Arabidopsis mutants with apparent alterations under Cu deficiency were identified. In this report, a novel mutant, tpst-2, was found to be more sensitive than wild-type (Col-0) plants to Cu deficiency during root elongation. The positional cloning of tpst-2 revealed that this gene encodes a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST). Moreover, the ethylene production of tpst-2 mutant was higher than that of Col-0 under Cu deficiency, and adding the ethylene response inhibitor AgNO3 partially rescued defects in root elongation. Interestingly, peptide hormone phytosulfokine (PSK) treatment also repressed the ethylene production of tpst-2 mutant plants. Our results revealed that TPST suppressed ethylene production through the action of PSK. PMID:25908239

  4. Reconsidering the mechanism of polyglutamine peptide aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christine C; Walters, Robert H; Murphy, Regina M

    2007-11-01

    There are at least nine neurodegenerative diseases associated with proteins that contain an unusually expanded polyglutamine domain, the best known of which is Huntington's disease. In all of these diseases, the mutant protein aggregates into neuronal inclusions; it is generally, although not universally, believed that protein aggregation is an underlying cause of the observed neuronal degeneration. In an effort to examine the role of polyglutamine in facilitating protein aggregation, investigators have used synthetic polyglutamine peptides as model systems. Analysis of kinetic data led to the conclusions that aggregation follows a simple nucleation-elongation mechanism characterized by a significant lag time, during which the peptide is monomeric, and that the nucleus is a monomer in a thermodynamically unfavorable conformation [Chen, S. M., et al. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 11884-11889]. We re-examined this hypothesis by measuring the aggregation kinetics of the polyglutamine peptide K2Q23K2, using sedimentation, static and dynamic light scattering, and size exclusion chromatography. Our data show that during the lag time in sedimentation kinetics, there is substantial organization of the peptide into soluble linear aggregates. These aggregates have no regular secondary structure as measured by circular dichroism but have particle dimensions and morphologies similar to those of mature insoluble aggregates. The soluble aggregates constitute approximately 30% of the total peptide mass, form rapidly, and continue to grow over a period of hours to days, eventually precipitating. Once insoluble aggregates form, loss of monomer from the solution phase continues. Our data support an assembly mechanism for polyglutamine peptide more complex than that previously proposed.

  5. Asp residues of βDELSEED-motif are required for peptide binding in the Escherichia coli ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Tayou, Junior; Laughlin, Thomas F

    2015-04-01

    This study demonstrates the requirement of Asp-380 and Asp-386 in the βDELSEED-motif of Escherichia coli ATP synthase for peptide binding and inhibition. We studied the inhibition profiles of wild-type and mutant E. coli ATP synthase in presence of c-terminal amide bound melittin and melittin related peptide. Melittin and melittin related peptide inhibited wild-type ATPase almost completely while only partial inhibition was observed in single mutations with replacement of Asp to Ala, Gln, or Arg. Additionally, very little or no inhibition occurred among double mutants βD380A/βD386A, βD380Q/βD386Q, or βD380R/βD386R signifying that removal of one Asp residue allows limited peptide binding. Partial or substantial loss of oxidative phosphorylation among double mutants demonstrates the functional requirement of βD380 and βD386 Asp residues. Moreover, abrogation of wild-type E. coli cell growth and normal growth of mutant cells in presence of peptides provides strong evidence for the requirement of βDELSEED-motif Asp residues for peptide binding. It is concluded that while presence of one Asp residue may allow partial peptide binding, both Asp residues, βD380 and βD386, are essential for proper peptide binding and inhibition of ATP synthase.

  6. Asp residues of βDELSEED-motif are required for peptide binding in the Escherichia coli ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Tayou, Junior; Laughlin, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates the requirement of Asp-380 and Asp-386 in the βDELSEED-motif of E. coli ATP synthase for peptide binding and inhibition. We studied the inhibition profiles of wild-type and mutant E. coli ATP synthase in presence of c-terminal amide bound melittin and melittin related peptide. Melittin and melittin related peptide inhibited wild-type ATPase almost completely while only partial inhibition was observed in single mutations with replacement of Asp to Ala, Gln, or Arg. Additionally, very little or no inhibition occurred among double mutants βD380A/βD386A, βD380Q/βD386Q, or βD380R/βD386R signifying that removal of one Asp residue allows limited peptide binding. Partial or substantial loss of oxidative phosphorylation among double mutants demonstrates the functional requirement of βD380 and βD386 Asp residues. Moreover, abrogation of wild-type E. coli cell growth and normal growth of mutant cells in presence of peptides provides strong evidence for the requirement of βDELSEED-motif Asp residues for peptide binding. It is concluded that while presence of one Asp residue may allow partial peptide binding, both Asp residues, βD380 and βD386, are essential for proper peptide binding and inhibition of ATP synthase. PMID:25603139

  7. Mutational analysis of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G for membrane fusion domains.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Drone, C; Sat, E; Ghosh, H P

    1993-07-01

    The spike glycoprotein G of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) induces membrane fusion at low pH. We used linker insertion mutagenesis to characterize the domain(s) of G glycoprotein involved in low-pH-induced membrane fusion. Two or three amino acids were inserted in frame into various positions in the extracellular domain of G, and 14 mutants were isolated. All of the mutants expressed fully glycosylated proteins in COS cells. However, only seven mutant G glycoproteins were transported to the cell surface. Two of these mutants, D1 and A6, showed wild-type fusogenic properties. The mutant A2 had a temperature-sensitive defect in the transport of the mutant G glycoprotein to the cell surface. The other four mutants, H2, H5, H10, and A4, although present in cell surface, failed to induce cell fusion when cells expressing these mutant glycoproteins were exposed to acidic pH. These four mutant G proteins could form trimers, indicating that the defect in fusion was not due to defective oligomerization. One of these mutations, H2, is within a region of conserved, uncharged amino acids that has been proposed as a possible fusogenic sequence. The mutation in H5 was about 70 amino acids downstream of the mutation in H2, while mutations in H10 and A4 were about 300 amino acids downstream of the mutation in H2. Conserved sequences were also noted in the H10 and A4 segment. The results suggest that in the case of VSV G glycoprotein, the fusogenic activity may involve several spatially separated regions in the extracellular domain of the protein.

  8. Transferrin-antibody fusion proteins are effective in brain targeting.

    PubMed Central

    Shin, S U; Friden, P; Moran, M; Olson, T; Kang, Y S; Pardridge, W M; Morrison, S L

    1995-01-01

    In the present study, the receptor binding potential of transferrin (Tf) was linked to an antibody binding specificity. Human Tf was fused to mouse-human chimeric IgG3 at three positions: at the end of heavy chain constant region 1 (CH1), after the hinge, and after CH3. The resulting Tf-antibody fusion proteins were able to bind antigen and the Tf receptor. The CH3-Tf fusion protein showed no complement-mediated cytolysis but possessed IgG receptor I (Fc gamma RI) binding activity. Most importantly, all of the fusion proteins demonstrated significant uptake into brain parenchyma, with 0.3% of the injected dose of the hinge-Tf fusion protein rapidly targeted to the brain. Recovery of iodinated CH3-Tf fusion protein from the brain parenchyma demonstrated that the fusion proteins can cross the blood-brain barrier intact. The binding specificity of these fusion proteins can be used for brain delivery of noncovalently bound ligands, such as drugs and peptides, or for targeting antigens present within the brain. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:7708731

  9. ER-associated SNAREs and Sey1p mediate nuclear fusion at two distinct steps during yeast mating.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jason V; Arlow, Tim; Inkellis, Elizabeth R; Koo, Timothy S; Rose, Mark D

    2013-12-01

    During yeast mating, two haploid nuclei fuse membranes to form a single diploid nucleus. However, the known proteins required for nuclear fusion are unlikely to function as direct fusogens (i.e., they are unlikely to directly catalyze lipid bilayer fusion) based on their predicted structure and localization. Therefore we screened known fusogens from vesicle trafficking (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors [SNAREs]) and homotypic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) fusion (Sey1p) for additional roles in nuclear fusion. Here we demonstrate that the ER-localized SNAREs Sec20p, Ufe1p, Use1p, and Bos1p are required for efficient nuclear fusion. In contrast, Sey1p is required indirectly for nuclear fusion; sey1Δ zygotes accumulate ER at the zone of cell fusion, causing a block in nuclear congression. However, double mutants of Sey1p and Sec20p, Ufe1p, or Use1p, but not Bos1p, display extreme ER morphology defects, worse than either single mutant, suggesting that retrograde SNAREs fuse ER in the absence of Sey1p. Together these data demonstrate that SNAREs mediate nuclear fusion, ER fusion after cell fusion is necessary to complete nuclear congression, and there exists a SNARE-mediated, Sey1p-independent ER fusion pathway.

  10. Energy Homeostasis Control in Drosophila Adipokinetic Hormone Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Gáliková, Martina; Diesner, Max; Klepsatel, Peter; Hehlert, Philip; Xu, Yanjun; Bickmeyer, Iris; Predel, Reinhard; Kühnlein, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of biological functions under negative energy balance depends on mobilization of storage lipids and carbohydrates in animals. In mammals, glucagon and glucocorticoid signaling mobilizes energy reserves, whereas adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) play a homologous role in insects. Numerous studies based on AKH injections and correlative studies in a broad range of insect species established the view that AKH acts as master regulator of energy mobilization during development, reproduction, and stress. In contrast to AKH, the second peptide, which is processed from the Akh encoded prohormone [termed “adipokinetic hormone precursor-related peptide” (APRP)] is functionally orphan. APRP is discussed as ecdysiotropic hormone or as scaffold peptide during AKH prohormone processing. However, as in the case of AKH, final evidence for APRP functions requires genetic mutant analysis. Here we employed CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering to create AKH and AKH plus APRP-specific mutants in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster. Lack of APRP did not affect any of the tested steroid-dependent processes. Similarly, Drosophila AKH signaling is dispensable for ontogenesis, locomotion, oogenesis, and homeostasis of lipid or carbohydrate storage until up to the end of metamorphosis. During adulthood, however, AKH regulates body fat content and the hemolymph sugar level as well as nutritional and oxidative stress responses. Finally, we provide evidence for a negative autoregulatory loop in Akh gene regulation. PMID:26275422

  11. Nuclear inner membrane fusion facilitated by yeast Jem1p is required for spindle pole body fusion but not for the first mitotic nuclear division during yeast mating.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi; Hirata, Aiko; Endo, Toshiya

    2008-11-01

    During mating of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two haploid nuclei fuse to produce a diploid nucleus. The process of nuclear fusion requires two J proteins, Jem1p in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen and Sec63p, which forms a complex with Sec71p and Sec72p, in the ER membrane. Zygotes of mutants defective in the functions of Jem1p or Sec63p contain two haploid nuclei that were closely apposed but failed to fuse. Here we analyzed the ultrastructure of nuclei in jem1 Delta and sec71 Delta mutant zygotes using electron microscope with the freeze-substituted fixation method. Three-dimensional reconstitution of nuclear structures from electron microscope serial sections revealed that Jem1p facilitates nuclear inner-membrane fusion and spindle pole body (SPB) fusion while Sec71p facilitates nuclear outer-membrane fusion. Two haploid SPBs that failed to fuse could duplicate, and mitotic nuclear division of the unfused haploid nuclei started in jem1 Delta and sec71 Delta mutant zygotes. This observation suggests that nuclear inner-membrane fusion is required for SPB fusion, but not for SPB duplication in the first mitotic cell division.

  12. Activation of Developmentally Mutated Human Globin Genes by Cell Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Enver, Tariq; Takegawa, Susumu; Anagnou, Nicholas P.; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    1988-11-01

    Human fetal globin genes are not expressed in hybrid cells produced by the fusion of normal human lymphocytes with mouse erythroleukemia cells. In contrast, when lymphocytes from persons with globin gene developmental mutations (hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin) are used for these fusions, fetal globin is expressed in the hybrid cells. Thus, mutations of developmental origin can be reconstituted in vitro by fusing mutant lymphoid cells with differentiated cell lines of the proper lineage. This system can readily be used for analyses, such as globin gene methylation, that normally require large numbers of pure nucleated erythroid cells, which are difficult to obtain.

  13. Coatings for laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1981-12-18

    Optical coatings are used in lasers systems for fusion research to control beam propagation and reduce surface reflection losses. The performance of coatings is important in the design, reliability, energy output, and cost of the laser systems. Significant developments in coating technology are required for future lasers for fusion research and eventual power reactors.

  14. Fusion Science Education Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, C. A.; DIII-D Education Group

    1996-11-01

    This presentation will focus on education outreach activities at General Atomics that have been expanded to include the general population on science education with a focus on fusion energy. Outreach materials are distributed upon request both nationally and internationally. These materials include a notebook containing copies of DIII--D tour panels, fusion poster, new fusion energy video, new fusion energy brochure, and the electromagnetic spectrum curriculum. The 1996 Fusion Forum (held in the House Caucus Room) included a student/ teacher lunch with Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary and a private visit to the Forum exhibits. The continuing partnership with Kearny High School includes lectures, job shadowing, internship, equipment donations and an award-winning electric car-racing program. Development of distribution by CD of the existing interactive fusion energy kiosk and a virtual reality tour of the DIII--D facility are underway. The DIII--D fusion education WWW site includes e-mail addresses to ``Ask the Wizard,'' and/or receive GA's outreach materials. Steve Rodecker, a local science teacher, aided by DIII--D fusion staff, won his second Tapestry Award; he also was named the ``1995 National Science Teacher of the Year'' and will be present to share his experiences with the DIII--D educational outreach program.

  15. Controlled Nuclear Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasstone, Samuel

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Importance of Fusion Energy; Conditions for Nuclear Fusion; Thermonuclear Reactions in Plasmas; Plasma Confinement by Magnetic Fields; Experiments With Plasmas; High-Temperature…

  16. Two Horizons of Fusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Mun Ling; Chik, Pakey Pui Man

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to differentiate the internal and external horizons of "fusion." "Fusion" in the internal horizon relates to the structure and meaning of the object of learning as experienced by the learner. It clarifies the interrelationships among an object's critical features and aspects. It also illuminates the…

  17. Elevated mutant dynorphin A causes Purkinje cell loss and motor dysfunction in spinocerebellar ataxia type 23.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Cleo J L M; Jezierska, Justyna; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Duarri, Anna; Fokkens, Michiel R; Meijer, Michel; Zhou, Qin; Yakovleva, Tania; Boddeke, Erik; den Dunnen, Wilfred; van Deursen, Jan; Bakalkin, Georgy; Kampinga, Harm H; van de Sluis, Bart; Verbeek, Dineke S

    2015-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 is caused by mutations in PDYN, which encodes the opioid neuropeptide precursor protein, prodynorphin. Prodynorphin is processed into the opioid peptides, α-neoendorphin, and dynorphins A and B, that normally exhibit opioid-receptor mediated actions in pain signalling and addiction. Dynorphin A is likely a mutational hotspot for spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 mutations, and in vitro data suggested that dynorphin A mutations lead to persistently elevated mutant peptide levels that are cytotoxic and may thus play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of spinocerebellar ataxia type 23. To further test this and study spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 in more detail, we generated a mouse carrying the spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 mutation R212W in PDYN. Analysis of peptide levels using a radioimmunoassay shows that these PDYN(R212W) mice display markedly elevated levels of mutant dynorphin A, which are associated with climber fibre retraction and Purkinje cell loss, visualized with immunohistochemical stainings. The PDYN(R212W) mice reproduced many of the clinical features of spinocerebellar ataxia type 23, with gait deficits starting at 3 months of age revealed by footprint pattern analysis, and progressive loss of motor coordination and balance at the age of 12 months demonstrated by declining performances on the accelerating Rotarod. The pathologically elevated mutant dynorphin A levels in the cerebellum coincided with transcriptionally dysregulated ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors and glutamate transporters, and altered neuronal excitability. In conclusion, the PDYN(R212W) mouse is the first animal model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 and our work indicates that the elevated mutant dynorphin A peptide levels are likely responsible for the initiation and progression of the disease, affecting glutamatergic signalling, neuronal excitability, and motor performance. Our novel mouse model defines a critical role for opioid

  18. Elevated mutant dynorphin A causes Purkinje cell loss and motor dysfunction in spinocerebellar ataxia type 23.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Cleo J L M; Jezierska, Justyna; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Duarri, Anna; Fokkens, Michiel R; Meijer, Michel; Zhou, Qin; Yakovleva, Tania; Boddeke, Erik; den Dunnen, Wilfred; van Deursen, Jan; Bakalkin, Georgy; Kampinga, Harm H; van de Sluis, Bart; Verbeek, Dineke S

    2015-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 is caused by mutations in PDYN, which encodes the opioid neuropeptide precursor protein, prodynorphin. Prodynorphin is processed into the opioid peptides, α-neoendorphin, and dynorphins A and B, that normally exhibit opioid-receptor mediated actions in pain signalling and addiction. Dynorphin A is likely a mutational hotspot for spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 mutations, and in vitro data suggested that dynorphin A mutations lead to persistently elevated mutant peptide levels that are cytotoxic and may thus play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of spinocerebellar ataxia type 23. To further test this and study spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 in more detail, we generated a mouse carrying the spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 mutation R212W in PDYN. Analysis of peptide levels using a radioimmunoassay shows that these PDYN(R212W) mice display markedly elevated levels of mutant dynorphin A, which are associated with climber fibre retraction and Purkinje cell loss, visualized with immunohistochemical stainings. The PDYN(R212W) mice reproduced many of the clinical features of spinocerebellar ataxia type 23, with gait deficits starting at 3 months of age revealed by footprint pattern analysis, and progressive loss of motor coordination and balance at the age of 12 months demonstrated by declining performances on the accelerating Rotarod. The pathologically elevated mutant dynorphin A levels in the cerebellum coincided with transcriptionally dysregulated ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors and glutamate transporters, and altered neuronal excitability. In conclusion, the PDYN(R212W) mouse is the first animal model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 and our work indicates that the elevated mutant dynorphin A peptide levels are likely responsible for the initiation and progression of the disease, affecting glutamatergic signalling, neuronal excitability, and motor performance. Our novel mouse model defines a critical role for opioid

  19. Plaque color method for rapid isolation of novel recA mutants of Escherichia coli K-12: new classes of protease-constitutive recA mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Tessman, E S; Peterson, P

    1985-01-01

    As a prerequisite to mutational analysis of functional sites on the RecA protein of Escherichia coli, a method was developed for rapid isolation of recA mutants with altered RecA protease function. The method involves plating mutagenized lambda recA+ cI ind on strains deleted for recA and containing, as indicators of RecA protease activity, Mu d(Ap lac) fusions in RecA-inducible genes. The lambda recA phages were recognized by their altered plaque colors, and the RecA protease activity of the lambda recA mutant lysogens was measured by expression of beta-galactosidase from dinD::lac. One class of recA mutants had constitutive protease activity and was designated Prtc; in these cells the RecA protein was always in the protease form without the usual need for DNA damage to activate it. Some Prtc mutants were recombinase negative and were designated Prtc Rec-. Another class of 65 recA mutants isolated as being protease defective were all also recombinase defective. Unlike the original temperature-dependent Prtc Rec+ mutant (recA441), the new Prtc Rec+ mutants showed constitutive protease activity at any growth temperature, with some having considerably greater activity than the recA441 strain. Study of these strong Prtc Rec+ mutants revealed a new SOS phenomenon, increased permeability to drugs. Use of this new SOS phenomenon as an index of protease strength clearly distinguished 5 Prtc mutants as the strongest among 150. These five strongest Prtc mutants showed the greatest increase in spontaneous mutation frequency and were not inhibited by cytidine plus guanosine, which inhibited the constitutive protease activity of the recA441 strain and of all the other new Prtc mutants. Strong Prtc Rec+ mutants were more UV resistant than recA+ strains and showed indications of having RecA proteins whose specific activity of recombinase function was higher than that of wild-type RecA. A Prt+ Rec- mutant with an anomalous response to effectors is described. PMID:3160686

  20. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  1. Regulation of ferric iron transport in Escherichia coli K12: isolation of a constitutive mutant.

    PubMed

    Hantke, K

    1981-01-01

    The lac genes were inserted with phage Mu(Ap, lac) into the fhuA, fepA, cir and tonB genes which specify components of iron uptake systems. The expression of lac in all these operon fusions was controlled by the availability of iron to the cells, thereby facilitating a quick and simple measurement of the expression of the genes listed above. In an iron rich medium under anaerobic conditions all systems were strongly repressed. fhuA was depressed at higher iron concentration than was fepA or cir, and tonB was repressed only under anaerobic conditions and could be induced by iron limitation. Mutants constitutive for the expression of beta-galactosidase were selected in a fhuA-lac fusion strain. The outer membrane proteins Cir, FhuA, FecA, 76K and 83K were made constitutively in such mutant strains. Therefore, they were termed fur mutants. In these fur mutant strains, the synthesis of a 19K protein was reduced. Furthermore, it was found that transport of ferric enterochelin and ferrichrome was also constitutive in the fur mutant cells, and that ferric citrate uptake could be induced by only 10 microM citrate in the growth medium in contrast to wild-type cells in which at least 100 microM citrate was necessary. The fepA gene was concluded to be under an additional control, because it was not fully derepressed by the fur mutation. PMID:7026976

  2. Mutant p53 proteins counteract autophagic mechanism sensitizing cancer cells to mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cordani, Marco; Oppici, Elisa; Dando, Ilaria; Butturini, Elena; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar; Mariotto, Sofia; Cellini, Barbara; Blandino, Giovanni; Palmieri, Marta; Di Agostino, Silvia; Donadelli, Massimo

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in TP53 gene play a pivotal role in tumorigenesis and cancer development. Here, we report that gain-of-function mutant p53 proteins inhibit the autophagic pathway favoring antiapoptotic effects as well as proliferation of pancreas and breast cancer cells. We found that mutant p53 significantly counteracts the formation of autophagic vesicles and their fusion with lysosomes throughout the repression of some key autophagy-related proteins and enzymes as BECN1 (and P-BECN1), DRAM1, ATG12, SESN1/2 and P-AMPK with the concomitant stimulation of mTOR signaling. As a paradigm of this mechanism, we show that atg12 gene repression was mediated by the recruitment of the p50 NF-κB/mutant p53 protein complex onto the atg12 promoter. Either mutant p53 or p50 NF-κB depletion downregulates atg12 gene expression. We further correlated the low expression levels of autophagic genes (atg12, becn1, sesn1, and dram1) with a reduced relapse free survival (RFS) and distant metastasis free survival (DMFS) of breast cancer patients carrying TP53 gene mutations conferring a prognostic value to this mutant p53-and autophagy-related signature. Interestingly, the mutant p53-driven mTOR stimulation sensitized cancer cells to the treatment with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. All these results reveal a novel mechanism through which mutant p53 proteins promote cancer cell proliferation with the concomitant inhibition of autophagy.

  3. Vacuolar ATPase in Phagosome-Lysosome Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kissing, Sandra; Hermsen, Christina; Repnik, Urska; Nesset, Cecilie Kåsi; von Bargen, Kristine; Griffiths, Gareth; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Lee, Beth S.; Schwake, Michael; De Brabander, Jef; Haas, Albert; Saftig, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The vacuolar H+-ATPase (v-ATPase) complex is instrumental in establishing and maintaining acidification of some cellular compartments, thereby ensuring their functionality. Recently it has been proposed that the transmembrane V0 sector of v-ATPase and its a-subunits promote membrane fusion in the endocytic and exocytic pathways independent of their acidification functions. Here, we tested if such a proton-pumping independent role of v-ATPase also applies to phagosome-lysosome fusion. Surprisingly, endo(lyso)somes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking the V0 a3 subunit of the v-ATPase acidified normally, and endosome and lysosome marker proteins were recruited to phagosomes with similar kinetics in the presence or absence of the a3 subunit. Further experiments used macrophages with a knockdown of v-ATPase accessory protein 2 (ATP6AP2) expression, resulting in a strongly reduced level of the V0 sector of the v-ATPase. However, acidification appeared undisturbed, and fusion between latex bead-containing phagosomes and lysosomes, as analyzed by electron microscopy, was even slightly enhanced, as was killing of non-pathogenic bacteria by V0 mutant macrophages. Pharmacologically neutralized lysosome pH did not affect maturation of phagosomes in mouse embryonic cells or macrophages. Finally, locking the two large parts of the v-ATPase complex together by the drug saliphenylhalamide A did not inhibit in vitro and in cellulo fusion of phagosomes with lysosomes. Hence, our data do not suggest a fusion-promoting role of the v-ATPase in the formation of phagolysosomes. PMID:25903133

  4. Promoting differentiation of cultured myoblasts using biomimetic surfaces that present alpha-laminin-2 peptides.

    PubMed

    Parker, Francine; White, Kathryn; Phillips, Siȏn; Peckham, Michelle

    2016-10-01

    Traditionally, muscle cell lines are cultured on glass coverslips and differentiated to investigate myoblast fusion and differentiation. Efficient differentiation of myoblasts produces a dense network of myotubes with the correct organisation for contraction. Here we have tested the ability of artificially generated, precisely controlled peptide surfaces to enhance the efficiency of myoblast differentiation. We focused on specific short peptides from α-laminin-2 (IKVSV, VQLRNGFPYFSY and GLLFYMARINHA) as well as residues 15-155 from FGF1. We tested if these peptides in isolation, and/or in combination promoted muscle differentiation in culture, by promoting fusion and/or by improving sarcomere organisation. The majority of these peptides promoted fusion and differentiation in two different mouse myogenic cell lines and in primary human myoblasts. The additive effects of all four peptides gave the best results for both mouse cell lines tested, while primary human cell cultures differentiated equally well on most peptide surfaces tested. These data show that a mixture of short biomimetic peptides can reliably promote differentiation in mouse and human myoblasts. PMID:27507643

  5. Recognition of a signal peptide by the signal recognition particle

    PubMed Central

    Janda, Claudia Y.; Li, Jade; Oubridge, Chris; Hernández, Helena; Robinson, Carol V.; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Targeting of proteins to appropriate sub-cellular compartments is a crucial process in all living cells. Secretory and membrane proteins usually contain an N-terminal signal peptide, which is recognised by the signal recognition particle (SRP) when nascent polypeptide chains emerge from the ribosome. The SRP-ribosome nascent chain complex is then targeted through its GTP-dependent interaction with SRP-receptor to the protein-conducting channel on endoplasmic reticulum membrane in eukaryotes or plasma membrane in bacteria. A universally conserved component of SRP1, 2, SRP54 or its bacterial homolog, fifty-four homolog (Ffh), binds the signal peptides which have a highly divergent sequence divisible into a positively charged n-region, an h-region commonly containing 8-20 hydrophobic residues and a polar c-region 3-5. No structure has been reported that exemplified SRP54 binding of any signal sequence. We have produced a fusion protein between Sulfolobus solfataricus SRP54 and a signal peptide connected via a flexible linker. This fusion protein oligomerises in solution, through interaction between the SRP54 and signal peptide moieties belonging to different chains, and it is functional, able to bind SRP RNA and SRP-receptor FtsY. Here we present the crystal structure at 3.5 Å resolution of an SRP54-signal peptide complex in the dimer, which reveals how a signal sequence is recognised by SRP54. PMID:20364120

  6. Peptide inhibition of constitutively activated epithelial Na(+) channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ji, H L; Fuller, C M; Benos, D J

    1999-12-31

    The hypothesis that 30-amino acid peptides corresponding to the C-terminal portion of the beta- and/or gamma-rat epithelial sodium channel (rENaC) subunits block constitutively activated ENaC was tested by examining the effects of these peptides on wild-type (wt) rENaC (alphabetagamma-rENaC), truncated Liddle's mutants (alphabeta(T)gamma-, alphabetagamma(T)-, and alphabeta(T)gamma(T)-rENaC), and point mutants (alphabeta(Y)gamma-, alphabetagamma(Y)-rENaC) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The chord conductances of alphabeta(T)gamma-, alphabetagamma(T)-, and alphabeta(T)gamma(T)-rENaC were 2- or 3-fold greater than for wt alphabetagamma-rENaC. Introduction of peptides into oocytes expressing alphabeta(T)gamma-, alphabetagamma(T)-, and alphabeta(T)gamma(T)-rENaC produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the amiloride-sensitive Na(+) conductances, with apparent dissociation constants (K(d)) ranging from 1700 to 160 microM, depending upon whether individual peptides or their combination was used. Injection of peptides alone or in combination into oocytes expressing wt alphabetagamma-rENaC or single-point mutants did not affect the amiloride-sensitive whole-cell currents. The single channel conductances of all the mutant ENaCs were the same as that of wild type (alphabetagamma-). The single channel activities (N.P(o)) of the mutants were approximately 2.2-2.6-fold greater than wt alphabetagamma-rENaC (1.08 +/- 0.24, n = 7) and were reduced to 1.09 +/- 0.17 by 100 microM peptide mixture (n = 9). The peptides were without effect on the single channel properties of either wt or single-point mutants of rENaC. Our data demonstrate that the C-terminal peptides blocked the Liddle's truncation mutant (alphabeta(T)gamma(T)) expressed in Xenopus oocytes but not the single-point mutants (alphabeta(Y)gamma or alphabetagamma(Y)). Moreover, the blocking effect of both peptides in combination on alphabeta(T)gamma(T)-rENaC was synergistic. PMID:10608827

  7. Apoc2 loss-of-function zebrafish mutant as a genetic model of hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Gates, Keith P; Fang, Longhou; Amar, Marcelo J; Schneider, Dina A; Geng, Honglian; Huang, Wei; Kim, Jungsu; Pattison, Jennifer; Zhang, Jian; Witztum, Joseph L; Remaley, Alan T; Dong, P Duc; Miller, Yury I

    2015-08-01

    Apolipoprotein C-II (APOC2) is an obligatory activator of lipoprotein lipase. Human patients with APOC2 deficiency display severe hypertriglyceridemia while consuming a normal diet, often manifesting xanthomas, lipemia retinalis and pancreatitis. Hypertriglyceridemia is also an important risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease. Animal models to study hypertriglyceridemia are limited, with no Apoc2-knockout mouse reported. To develop a genetic model of hypertriglyceridemia, we generated an apoc2 mutant zebrafish characterized by the loss of Apoc2 function. apoc2 mutants show decreased plasma lipase activity and display chylomicronemia and severe hypertriglyceridemia, which closely resemble the phenotype observed in human patients with APOC2 deficiency. The hypertriglyceridemia in apoc2 mutants is rescued by injection of plasma from wild-type zebrafish or by injection of a human APOC2 mimetic peptide. Consistent with a previous report of a transient apoc2 knockdown, apoc2 mutant larvae have a minor delay in yolk consumption and angiogenesis. Furthermore, apoc2 mutants fed a normal diet accumulate lipid and lipid-laden macrophages in the vasculature, which resemble early events in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions. In addition, apoc2 mutant embryos show ectopic overgrowth of pancreas. Taken together, our data suggest that the apoc2 mutant zebrafish is a robust and versatile animal model to study hypertriglyceridemia and the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of associated human diseases. PMID:26044956

  8. Apoc2 loss-of-function zebrafish mutant as a genetic model of hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Gates, Keith P.; Fang, Longhou; Amar, Marcelo J.; Schneider, Dina A.; Geng, Honglian; Huang, Wei; Kim, Jungsu; Pattison, Jennifer; Zhang, Jian; Witztum, Joseph L.; Remaley, Alan T.; Dong, P. Duc; Miller, Yury I.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apolipoprotein C-II (APOC2) is an obligatory activator of lipoprotein lipase. Human patients with APOC2 deficiency display severe hypertriglyceridemia while consuming a normal diet, often manifesting xanthomas, lipemia retinalis and pancreatitis. Hypertriglyceridemia is also an important risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease. Animal models to study hypertriglyceridemia are limited, with no Apoc2-knockout mouse reported. To develop a genetic model of hypertriglyceridemia, we generated an apoc2 mutant zebrafish characterized by the loss of Apoc2 function. apoc2 mutants show decreased plasma lipase activity and display chylomicronemia and severe hypertriglyceridemia, which closely resemble the phenotype observed in human patients with APOC2 deficiency. The hypertriglyceridemia in apoc2 mutants is rescued by injection of plasma from wild-type zebrafish or by injection of a human APOC2 mimetic peptide. Consistent with a previous report of a transient apoc2 knockdown, apoc2 mutant larvae have a minor delay in yolk consumption and angiogenesis. Furthermore, apoc2 mutants fed a normal diet accumulate lipid and lipid-laden macrophages in the vasculature, which resemble early events in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions. In addition, apoc2 mutant embryos show ectopic overgrowth of pancreas. Taken together, our data suggest that the apoc2 mutant zebrafish is a robust and versatile animal model to study hypertriglyceridemia and the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of associated human diseases. PMID:26044956

  9. Attenuated virulence of a Francisella mutant lacking the lipid A 4′-phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyuan; Ribeiro, Anthony A.; Guan, Ziqiang; Abraham, Soman N.; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2007-01-01

    Francisella tularensis causes tularemia, a highly contagious disease of animals and humans, but the virulence features of F. tularensis are poorly defined. F. tularensis and the related mouse pathogen Francisella novicida synthesize unusual lipid A molecules lacking the 4′-monophosphate group typically found in the lipid A of Gram-negative bacteria. LpxF, a selective phosphatase located on the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane, removes the 4′-phosphate moiety in the late stages of F. novicida lipid A assembly. To evaluate the relevance of the 4′-phosphatase to pathogenesis, we constructed a deletion mutant of lpxF and compared its virulence with wild-type F. novicida. Intradermal injection of 106 wild-type but not 108 mutant F. novicida cells is lethal to mice. The rapid clearance of the lpxF mutant is associated with a stronger local cytokine response and a greater influx of neutrophils compared with wild-type. The F. novicida mutant was highly susceptible to the cationic antimicrobial peptide polymyxin. LpxF therefore represents a kind of virulence factor that confers a distinct lipid A phenotype, preventing Francisella from activating the host innate immune response and preventing the bactericidal actions of cationic peptides. Francisella lpxF mutants may be useful for immunization against tularemia. PMID:17360489

  10. Ipsen 5i is a Novel Potent Pharmacoperone for Intracellularly Retained Melanocortin-4 Receptor Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ya-Xiong; Huang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Inactivating mutations of the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) cause early-onset severe obesity in humans. Comprehensive functional studies show that most of the inactivating mutants of the MC4R are retained intracellularly. In the present study, we investigated whether a small molecule inverse agonist of the MC4R, Ipsen 5i, could act as a pharmacoperone and correct the cell surface expression and function of intracellularly retained mutant MC4Rs using multiple cell lines, including HEK293 and two neuronal cell lines. We showed that Ipsen 5i rescued the cell surface expression of all 11 intracellularly retained mutant MC4Rs studied herein in at least one cell line. Ipsen 5i functionally rescued seven mutants in all cell lines used. One mutant (Y157S) was functionally rescued in HEK293 cells but not in the two neuronal cell lines. Ipsen 5i increased cell surface expression of three mutants (S58C, G98R, and F261S) but did not affect signaling. Ipsen 5i had no effect on mutant MC4Rs with other defects (Δ88-92, D90N, I102S) or no defect (N274S). It also did not affect trafficking of a misrouted MC3R mutant (I335S). Cell impermeable peptide ligands of the MC4R or cell permeable small molecule ligand of δ opioid receptor could not rescue misrouted mutant MC4R. In summary, we demonstrated that Ipsen 5i was a novel potent pharmacoperone of the MC4R, correcting trafficking and signaling of a significant portion (73%) of intracellularly retained mutants. Additional studies are needed to demonstrate its in vivo efficacy. PMID:25136332

  11. Transposon-Derived Brucella abortus Rough Mutants Are Attenuated and Exhibit Reduced Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Chris A.; Adams, L. Garry; Ficht, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    The O antigen of Brucella abortus has been described as a major virulence determinant based on the attenuated survival of fortuitously isolated rough variants. However, the lack of genetic definition of these mutants and the virulence of naturally occurring rough species, Brucella ovis and Brucella canis, has confused interpretation. To better characterize the role of O antigen in virulence and survival, transposon mutagenesis was used to generate B. abortus rough mutants defective in O-antigen presentation. Sequence analysis of DNA flanking the site of Tn5 insertion was used to verify insertion in genes encoding lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthetic functions. Not surprisingly, each of the rough mutants was attenuated for survival in mice, but unexpected differences among the mutants were observed. In an effort to define the basis for the observed differences, the structure of the rough LPS and the sensitivity of these mutants to individual killing mechanisms were examined in vitro. All of the B. abortus rough mutants exhibited a 4- to 5-log-unit increase, compared to the smooth parental strain, in sensitivity to complement-mediated lysis. Little change was evident in the sensitivity of these organisms to hydrogen peroxide, consistent with an inability of O antigen to exclude relatively small molecules. Sensitivity to polymyxin B, which was employed as a model cationic, amphipathic peptide similar to defensins found in phagocytic cells, revealed survival differences among the rough mutants similar to those observed in the mouse. One mutant in particular exhibited hypersensitivity to polymyxin B and reduced survival in mice. This mutant was characterized by a truncated rough LPS. DNA sequence analysis of this mutant revealed a transposon interruption in the gene encoding phosphomannomutase (pmm), suggesting that this activity may be required for the synthesis of a full-length core polysaccharide in addition to O antigen. B. abortus O antigen appears to be essential

  12. Generation of a homozygous fertilization-defective gcs1 mutant by heat-inducible removal of a rescue gene.

    PubMed

    Nagahara, Shiori; Takeuchi, Hidenori; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2015-03-01

    Key message: New gametic homozygous mutants. In angiosperms, a haploid male gamete (sperm cell) fuses with a haploid female gamete (egg cell) during fertilization to form a zygote carrying paternally and maternally derived chromosomes. Several fertilization-defective mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana, including a generative cell-specific 1 (gcs1)/hapless 2 mutant, the sperm cells of which are unable to fuse with female gametes, can only be maintained as heterozygous lines due to the infertile male or female gametes. Here, we report successful generation of a gcs1 homozygous mutant by heat-inducible removal of the GCS1 transgene. Using the gcs1 homozygous mutant as male, the defect in gamete fusion was observed with great frequency; in our direct observation by semi-in vivo fertilization assay using ovules, 100 % of discharged sperm cells in culture failed to show gamete fusion. More than 70 % of ovules in the pistil received a second pollen tube as attempted fertilization recovery. Moreover, gcs1 mutant sperm cells could fertilize female gametes at a low frequency in the pistil. This strategy to generate homozygous fertilization-defective mutants will facilitate novel approaches in plant reproduction research.

  13. Different sets of ER-resident J-proteins regulate distinct polar nuclear-membrane fusion events in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Masaya; Endo, Toshiya; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi

    2014-11-01

    Angiosperm female gametophytes contain a central cell with two polar nuclei. In many species, including Arabidopsis thaliana, the polar nuclei fuse during female gametogenesis. We previously showed that BiP, an Hsp70 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), was essential for membrane fusion during female gametogenesis. Hsp70 function requires partner proteins for full activity. J-domain containing proteins (J-proteins) are the major Hsp70 functional partners. A. thaliana ER contains three soluble J-proteins, AtERdj3A, AtERdj3B, and AtP58(IPK). Here, we analyzed mutants of these proteins and determined that double-mutant ovules lacking AtP58(IPK) and AtERdj3A or AtERdj3B were defective in polar nuclear fusion. Electron microscopy analysis identified that polar nuclei were in close contact, but no membrane fusion occurred in mutant ovules lacking AtP58(IPK) and AtERdj3A. The polar nuclear outer membrane appeared to be connected via the ER remaining at the inner unfused membrane in mutant ovules lacking AtP58(IPK) and AtERdj3B. These results indicate that ER-resident J-proteins, AtP58(IPK)/AtERdj3A and AtP58(IPK)/AtERdj3B, function at distinct steps of polar nuclear-membrane fusion. Similar to the bip1 bip2 double mutant female gametophytes, the aterdj3a atp58(ipk) double mutant female gametophytes defective in fusion of the outer polar nuclear membrane displayed aberrant endosperm proliferation after fertilization with wild-type pollen. However, endosperm proliferated normally after fertilization of the aterdj3b atp58(ipk) double mutant female gametophytes defective in fusion of the inner membrane. Our results indicate that the polar nuclear fusion defect itself does not cause an endosperm proliferation defect.

  14. Fusion Physics Toward ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, R. D.

    2006-04-01

    Stars are powered by fusion, the energy released by fusing together light nuclei, using gravitational confinement of plasma. Fusion on earth will be done in a 100 million degree plasma made of deuterium and tritium and confined by magnetic fields or inertia. The worldwide fusion research community will construct ITER, the first experiment that will burn a DT plasma by copious fusion reactions. ITER's nominal goal is to create 500 MW of fusion power. An energy gain of 10 will mean the plasma is dominantly self-heated by the fusion-produced alpha particles. ITER's all superconducting magnet technology and steady-state heat removal technology will enable nominal 400 s pulses to allow the study of burning plasmas on the longest intrinsic timescale of the confined plasma - diffusive redistribution of the electrical currents in the plasma. The advances in magnetic confinement physics that have led to this opportunity will be described, as well as the research opportunities afforded by ITER. The physics of confining stable plasmas and heating them will produce the high gain state in ITER. Sustained burn will come from the physics of controlling currents in plasmas and how the hot plasma is interfaced to its room temperature surroundings. ITER will provide our first experience with how fusion plasma self-heating will profoundly affect the complex, interlinked physical processes that occur in confined plasmas.

  15. Fusion Studies in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    A new strategic energy plan decided by the Japanese Cabinet in 2014 strongly supports the steady promotion of nuclear fusion development activities, including the ITER project and the Broader Approach activities from the long-term viewpoint. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in Japan formulated the Third Phase Basic Program so as to promote an experimental fusion reactor project. In 2005 AEC has reviewed this Program, and discussed on selection and concentration among many projects of fusion reactor development. In addition to the promotion of ITER project, advanced tokamak research by JT-60SA, helical plasma experiment by LHD, FIREX project in laser fusion research and fusion engineering by IFMIF were highly prioritized. Although the basic concept is quite different between tokamak, helical and laser fusion researches, there exist a lot of common features such as plasma physics on 3-D magnetic geometry, high power heat load on plasma facing component and so on. Therefore, a synergetic scenario on fusion reactor development among various plasma confinement concepts would be important.

  16. Identification of peptide-specific TCR genes by in vitro peptide stimulation and CDR3 length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongwei; Lin, Yanmei; Wang, Teng; Ou, Yusheng; Shen, Han; Tao, Changli; Wu, Fenglin; Zhang, Wenfeng; Bo, Huaben; Wang, Hui; Huang, Shulin

    2015-07-10

    Identification of TCR genes specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) is necessary for TCR gene modification of T cells, which is applied in anti-tumor adoptive T cell therapy (ACT). The usual identification methods are based on isolating single peptide-responding T cells and cloning the TCR gene by in vitro expansion or by single-cell RT-PCR. However, the long and exacting in vitro culture period and demanding operational requirements restrict the application of these methods. Immunoscope is an effective tool that profiles a repertoire of TCRs and identifies significantly expanded clones through CDR3 length analysis. In this study, a survivin-derived mutant peptide optimized for HLA-A2 binding was selected to load DCs and activate T cells. The monoclonal expansion of TCRA and TCRB genes was separately identified by Immunoscope analysis and following sequence identification, the properly paired TCR genes were transferred into T cells. Peptide recognition and cytotoxicity assays indicated that TCR-modified PBMCs could respond to both the mutant and wild type peptides and lyse target cells. These results show that combining Immunoscope with in vitro peptide stimulation provides an alternative and superior method for identifying specific TCR genes, which represents a significant advance for the application of TCR gene-modified T cells. PMID:25890221

  17. Antibody-independent Targeted Quantification of TMPRSS2-ERG Fusion Protein Products in Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jintang; Sun, Xuefei; Shi, Tujin; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Xie, Fang; Zhao, Rui; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Yang, Feng; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Chae, Sung Suk; Rubin, Mark; Siddiqui, Javed; Wei, John; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.

    2014-10-01

    Fusions between the transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) and ETS related gene (ERG) represent one of the most specific biomarkers that define a distinct molecular subtype of prostate cancer. The studies on TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions have seldom been performed at the protein level, primarily due to the lack of high-quality antibodies or an antibody-independent method that is sufficiently sensitive for detecting the truncated ERG protein products resulting from TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions and alternative splicing. Herein, we applied a recently developed PRISM (high-pressure high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing)-SRM (selected reaction monitoring) strategy for quantifying ERG protein in prostate cancer cell lines and tumors. The highly sensitive PRISM-SRM assays led to confident detection of 6 unique ERG peptides in either the TMPRSS2-ERG positive cell lines or tissues but not in the negative controls, indicating that ERG protein expression is highly correlated with TMPRSS2-ERG gene rearrangements. Significantly, our results demonstrated for the first time that at least two groups of ERG protein isoforms were simultaneously expressed at variable levels in TMPRSS2-ERG positive samples as evidenced by concomitant detection of two mutually exclusive peptides. Three peptides shared across almost all fusion protein products were determined to be the most abundant peptides, and hence can be used as “signature” peptides for detecting ERG overexpression resulting from TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. These PRISM-SRM assays provide valuable tools for studying TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion protein products, thus improving our understanding of the role of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in the biology of prostate cancer.

  18. Effect of codon-optimized E. coli signal peptides on recombinant Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase periplasmic localization, yield and activity.

    PubMed

    Samant, Shalaka; Gupta, Gunja; Karthikeyan, Subbulakshmi; Haq, Saiful F; Nair, Ayyappan; Sambasivam, Ganesh; Sukumaran, Sunilkumar

    2014-09-01

    Recombinant proteins can be targeted to the Escherichia coli periplasm by fusing them to signal peptides. The popular pET vectors facilitate fusion of target proteins to the PelB signal. A systematic comparison of the PelB signal with native E. coli signal peptides for recombinant protein expression and periplasmic localization is not reported. We chose the Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase (MA), an industrial enzyme widely used in the baking and brewing industry, as a model protein and analyzed the competence of seven, codon-optimized, E. coli signal sequences to translocate MA to the E. coli periplasm compared to PelB. MA fusions to three of the signals facilitated enhanced periplasmic localization of MA compared to the PelB fusion. Interestingly, these three fusions showed greatly improved MA yields and between 18- and 50-fold improved amylase activities compared to the PelB fusion. Previously, non-optimal codon usage in native E. coli signal peptide sequences has been reported to be important for protein stability and activity. Our results suggest that E. coli signal peptides with optimal codon usage could also be beneficial for heterologous protein secretion to the periplasm. Moreover, such fusions could even enhance activity rather than diminish it. This effect, to our knowledge has not been previously documented. In addition, the seven vector platform reported here could also be used as a screen to identify the best signal peptide partner for other recombinant targets of interest. PMID:25038884

  19. Necessity of the spacer peptide between CA and NC in the Rous sarcoma virus gag protein.

    PubMed

    Craven, R C; Leure-duPree, A E; Erdie, C R; Wilson, C B; Wills, J W

    1993-10-01

    A mutant of Rous sarcoma virus was constructed in which the nine amino acids that separate the CA and NC sequences in the Gag protein were deleted. The spacer peptide deletion mutant produced particles containing the normal complement of viral RNA and all of the viral proteins, including reverse transcriptase. Though electron microscopy revealed particles of normal morphology, the particles were noninfectious. The normally slow maturation of the CA protein, which involves cleavage of the spacer peptide from the carboxy terminus, was bypassed in this mutant, and the association between CA and the internal components of the core appears to have been disrupted. The results suggest that the spacer peptide has an essential role in directing folding and/or oligomerization of the CA subunits within the capsid structure.

  20. Insulin C-peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  1. Expression of the Escherichia coli ftsZ gene: trials and tribulations of gene fusion studies.

    PubMed

    Robin, A; D'Ari, R

    1993-02-01

    The ftsZ gene of Escherichia coli, which codes for an essential cell division protein, is subjected to multiple regulation, as shown in part with studies using an ftsZ::lacZ operon fusion located on phage lambda JFL100. Using this same fusion, we sought to isolate regulatory mutants overexpressing ftsZ by selecting mutants able to grow on lactose. One Lac+ mutant was obtained which overexpressed the ftsZ::lacZ fusion 70-fold. The mutation responsible for the overexpression lies in a new gene, cot, located near 56 min on the E. coli genetic map. The cot mutation probably affects the transcription of a chromosomal open reading frame, ORF1, lying downstream of the bioA gene and adjacent to the ftzZ::lacZ fusion of the lambda JFL100 prophage integrated at att lambda. Using an ftsZ84(Ts) strain, in which there was a double selection for overexpression of both ftsZ::lacZ and ftsZ+, no Lac+Tr mutants were obtained from 3.6 x 10(10) bacteria; the introduction of a mutL allele, increasing spontaneous base substitution mutation rates 75-fold, did not permit us to isolate such a mutant. We conclude that Lac+ ftsZ-constitutive mutations cannot be obtained in lambda JFL100 lysogens by a single base substitution. PMID:8468005

  2. Unfolding, aggregation, and amyloid formation by the tetramerization domain from mutant p53 associated with lung cancer†

    PubMed Central

    Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Asanomi, Yuya; Takakusagi, Satoru; Lewis, Marc S.; Uosaki, Kohei; Durell, Stewart R.; Anderson, Carl W.; Appella, Ettore; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2008-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a tetrameric transcriptional enhancer, and its activity is compromised by mutations that cause amino acid substitutions in its tetramerization domain. Here we analyze the biochemical and biophysical properties of peptides corresponding to amino acids 319 to 358 of wild-type human p53, which includes the tetramerization domain, and that of a cancer-derived mutant with valine substituted for glycine 334. Unlike the wild-type peptide, the G334V peptide forms amyloid fibrils by a two step process under physiological conditions of temperature and pH. Nevertheless, the G334V peptide is capable of forming hetero-oligomers with a wild-type peptide. Computational modeling of the G334V peptide structure suggests that substitution of valine for glycine 334 causes a local distortion that contributes to a β-dominated structural transition leading to amyloid formation. Since the distortion is mostly on the surface, the mutant peptide is still able to form a pseudo-native tetramer complex at higher concentrations and/or lower temperatures. Our study suggests a new potential mechanism by which mutations that compromise tetramer formation inactivate p53 as a tumor suppressor. PMID:16460008

  3. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

    1985-10-03

    The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

  4. Interactions between genes involved in exocytotic membrane fusion in paramecium.

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, H; Gulik-Krzywicki, T; Grandchamp, C; Cohen, J

    1992-03-01

    Crosses between members of two independent collections of Paramecium tetraurelia mutants blocked in the final membrane fusion step of trichocyst release (nd mutants) allowed us to define 13 complementation groups comprising 23 alleles. The mutant nd9a was then used as a target in a mutagenesis experiment designed to screen both revertants and new mutants in order to identify interacting genes. This mutant was chosen because it is the best known of its class to date and seems to be altered in assembly of the material connecting the trichocyst membrane to the plasma membrane and in assembly of the "rosette," a complex array of intramembranous particles in the plasma membrane at the trichocyst insertion sites. No revertants were obtained but two new mutants deficient for rosette assembly were identified, nd16b and nd18, whose gene products appear to interact with that of nd9. Indeed, the double mutants grown at 18 degrees, a permissive temperature for each of the single mutants, are characterized by a deficiency in exocytosis and in rosette assembly, as are also double mutants combining other allelic forms of the same genes. Moreover, aberrant dominance relationships among alleles of nd9 and of nd16 indicate the existence of interactions between identical subunits, which most likely assemble into multimeric structures. The nd16 gene product was shown by microinjection experiments to be a cytosolic factor, as is the nd9 gene product. It is therefore tempting to propose that the nd16 gene product also belongs to the connecting material and is involved in rosette assembly, in cooperation with nd9 and nd18.

  5. Mathematical modeling of the role of mitochondrial fusion and fission in mitochondrial DNA maintenance.

    PubMed

    Tam, Zhi Yang; Gruber, Jan; Halliwell, Barry; Gunawan, Rudiyanto

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations has been implicated in a wide range of human pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases, sarcopenia, and the aging process itself. In cells, mtDNA molecules are constantly turned over (i.e. replicated and degraded) and are also exchanged among mitochondria during the fusion and fission of these organelles. While the expansion of a mutant mtDNA population is believed to occur by random segregation of these molecules during turnover, the role of mitochondrial fusion-fission in this context is currently not well understood. In this study, an in silico modeling approach is taken to investigate the effects of mitochondrial fusion and fission dynamics on mutant mtDNA accumulation. Here we report model simulations suggesting that when mitochondrial fusion-fission rate is low, the slow mtDNA mixing can lead to an uneven distribution of mutant mtDNA among mitochondria in between two mitochondrial autophagic events leading to more stochasticity in the outcomes from a single random autophagic event. Consequently, slower mitochondrial fusion-fission results in higher variability in the mtDNA mutation burden among cells in a tissue over time, and mtDNA mutations have a higher propensity to clonally expand due to the increased stochasticity. When these mutations affect cellular energetics, nuclear retrograde signalling can upregulate mtDNA replication, which is expected to slow clonal expansion of these mutant mtDNA. However, our simulations suggest that the protective ability of retrograde signalling depends on the efficiency of fusion-fission process. Our results thus shed light on the interplay between mitochondrial fusion-fission and mtDNA turnover and may explain the mechanism underlying the experimentally observed increase in the accumulation of mtDNA mutations when either mitochondrial fusion or fission is inhibited.

  6. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  7. Introduction to peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Stawikowski, Maciej; Fields, Gregg B

    2012-08-01

    A number of synthetic peptides are significant commercial or pharmaceutical products, ranging from the dipeptide sugar substitute aspartame to clinically used hormones such as oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and calcitonin. This unit provides an overview of the field of synthetic peptides and proteins. It discusses selecting the solid support and common coupling reagents. Additional information is provided regarding common side reactions and synthesizing modified residues.

  8. Biochemical studies on cell fusion. II. Control of fusion response by lipid alteration

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The preceding communication (Roos, D.S. and P.W. Choppin, 1985, J. Cell Biol. 101:1578-1590) described the lipid composition of a series of mouse fibroblast cell lines which vary in susceptibility to the fusogenic effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG). Two alterations in lipid content were found to be directly correlated with resistance to PEG-induced cell fusion: increases in fatty acyl chain saturation, and the elevation of neutral glycerides, including an unusual ether-linked compound. In this study, we have probed the association between lipid composition and cell fusion through the use of fatty acid supplements to the cellular growth medium, and show that the fusibility of cells can be controlled by altering their acyl chain composition. The parental Clone 1D cells contain moderately unsaturated fatty acids with a ratio of saturates to polyunsaturates (S/P) approximately 1 and fuse virtually to completion following a standard PEG treatment. By contrast, the lipids of a highly fusion-resistant mutant cell line, F40, are highly saturated (S/P approximately 4). When the S/P ratio of Clone 1D cells was increased to approximate that normally found in F40 cells by growth in the presence of high concentrations of saturated fatty acids, they became highly resistant to PEG. Reduction of the S/P ratio of F40 cells by growth in cis-polyunsaturated fatty acids rendered them susceptible to fusion. Cell lines F8, F16, etc., which are normally intermediate between Clone 1D and F40 in both lipid composition and fusion response, can be altered in either direction (towards either increased or decreased susceptibility to fusion) by the addition of appropriate fatty acids to the growth medium. Although trans-unsaturated fatty acids have phase-transition temperatures roughly similar to saturated compounds, and might therefore be expected to affect membrane fluidity in a similar manner, trans-unsaturated fatty acids exerted the same effect as cis-unsaturates on the control of PEG

  9. TnphoA Salmonella abortusovis mutants unable to adhere to epithelial cells and with reduced virulence in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rubino, S; Leori, G; Rizzu, P; Erre, G; Colombo, M M; Uzzau, S; Masala, G; Cappuccinelli, P

    1993-01-01

    Salmonella abortusovis is a pathogenic bacterium highly specific to sheep, causing spontaneous abortion. In order to understand the role of genes involved in pathogenicity, we investigated S. abortusovis with the random mutagenic TnphoA transposon. A total of 95 S. abortusovis TnphoA mutants yielding alkaline phosphatase active fusion protein were obtained. In this way we created a bank of strains in order to identify any phenotypic modification which could affect the periplasmic and/or exported proteins involved in virulence. The TnphoA mutants were screened for the ability to adhere to epithelial cells: a total of 23 mutant strains lost this phenotypic feature. To detect the chromosomal TnphoA insertions, DNA was restricted by the enzyme EcoRV, which does not cleave the TnphoA sequence. Southern blotting analysis revealed the existence of four classes of integration. Colonies of adhesiveless mutants appear to be as smooth as the S. abortusovis wild type, and electrophoretic analysis indicates a normal lipopolysaccharide profile. To identify mutations affecting genes encoding for outer membrane proteins (OMPs), the alkaline phosphatase portion of the fusion proteins was revealed in TnphoA mutants by immunoblotting with specific antibodies. A mutation in OMPs was detected in seven mutants. Restriction analysis identified in four mutants a common region of 2 kb where alterations in genes coding for OMPs occur. We suggested that this region is involved in pathogenicity in mice, since a group of mutant strains has shown reduced virulence in mice and one mutant is completely avirulent. Furthermore, after mice were exposed orally to these mutants, significant protection against oral challenge with the parental virulent strain resulted. Images PMID:8386703

  10. Some new inequalities for continuous fusion frames and fusion pairs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Yun-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses continuous fusion frames and fusion pairs which are extensions of discrete fusion frames and continuous frames. The study of equalities and inequalities for various frames has seen great achievements. In this paper, using operator methods we establish some new inequalities for continuous fusion frames and fusion pairs. Our results extend and improve ones obtained by Balan, Casazza and Găvruţa. PMID:27652173

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  12. Inertial fusion commercial power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, B. Grant

    1994-09-01

    This presentation discusses the motivation for inertial fusion energy, a brief synopsis of five recently-completed inertial fusion power plant designs, some general conclusions drawn from these studies, and an exmaple of an IEE hydrogen synfuel plant to suggest that future fusion studies consider broadening fusion use to low-emission fuels production as well as electricity.

  13. Label fusion strategy selection.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Nicolas; Duchesne, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Label fusion is used in medical image segmentation to combine several different labels of the same entity into a single discrete label, potentially more accurate, with respect to the exact, sought segmentation, than the best input element. Using simulated data, we compared three existing label fusion techniques-STAPLE, Voting, and Shape-Based Averaging (SBA)-and observed that none could be considered superior depending on the dissimilarity between the input elements. We thus developed an empirical, hybrid technique called SVS, which selects the most appropriate technique to apply based on this dissimilarity. We evaluated the label fusion strategies on two- and three-dimensional simulated data and showed that SVS is superior to any of the three existing methods examined. On real data, we used SVS to perform fusions of 10 segmentations of the hippocampus and amygdala in 78 subjects from the ICBM dataset. SVS selected SBA in almost all cases, which was the most appropriate method overall. PMID:22518113

  14. Fusion-power demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, C. D.; Logan, B. G.; Carlson, G. A.; Neef, W. S.; Moir, R. W.; Campbell, R. B.; Botwin, R.; Clarkson, I. R.; Carpenter, T. J.

    1983-03-01

    As a satellite to the MARS (Mirror Advanced Reactor Study) a smaller, near-term device has been scoped, called the FPD (Fusion Power Demonstration). Envisioned as the next logical step toward a power reactor, it would advance the mirror fusion program beyond MFTF-B and provide an intermediate step toward commercial fusion power. Breakeven net electric power capability would be the goal such that no net utility power would be required to sustain the operation. A phased implementation is envisioned, with a deuterium checkout first to verify the plasma systems before significant neutron activation has occurred. Major tritium-related facilities would be installed with the second phase to produce sufficient fusion power to supply the recirculating power to maintain the neutral beams, ECRH, magnets and other auxiliary equipment.

  15. Spinal fusion - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscles hold the graft in place until it fuses with the vertebrae. A fusion will setup within ... hollow threaded titanium or carbon fiber cylinder to fuse two vertebrae together. The diseased disk is removed ...

  16. Magnetized Target Fusion collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, Thomas

    2004-11-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) may be a low cost path to fusion, in a regime that is intermediate between magnetic and inertial fusion energy. It requires compression of a magnetized target plasma and consequent heating to fusion relevant conditions inside a converging flux conserver. We hope to demonstrate the physics basis for MTF, with a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) target plasma to be translated axially to a compression region. We show recent and improved FRC formation data, example deformable liner implosions, and a conceptual design for the upcoming translation experiments, and describe a multi institution collaboration. The FRC is an elongated, compact toroid equilibrium that is extreme among magnetic configurations, and relaxed to a non force free state. There is high plasma beta, small toroidal field, cross-field diamagnetic current and flows, vanishing rotational transform, magnetic shear, helicity and anomalously large resistivity. Scientific issues include MTF with and without FRC's, and fundamental plasma physics beyond MHD, relevant to geophysical and astrophysical phenomena.

  17. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  18. Cell fusion assay by expression of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion protein to analyze the mutation of palivizumab-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Yosuke; Yamaji, Yoshiaki; Sawada, Akihito; Ito, Takashi; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) consists of fusion (F), glyco (G), and small hydrophobic (SH) proteins as envelope proteins, and infects through cell fusion. F protein is expressed on the surface of infected cells, and induces cell fusion. In the present report, expression plasmids of the F, G and SH proteins were constructed and cell fusion activity was investigated under T7 RNA polymerase. F protein alone induced cell fusion at a lower concentration than previously reported, and co-expression of F and SH proteins induced cell fusion more efficiently than F protein alone. Palivizumab is the only prophylactic agent against RSV infection. Palivizumab-resistant strains having mutations of the F protein of K272E and S275F were reported. These mutations were introduced into an F-expression plasmid, and exhibited no inhibition of cell fusion with palivizumab. Among the RSV F protein mutants, N276S has been reported to have partial resistance against palivizumab, but the F expression plasmid with the N276S mutation showed a reduction in cell fusion in the presence of palivizumab, showing no resistance to palivizumab. The present expression system was useful for investigating the mechanisms of RSV cell fusion. PMID:26794681

  19. Human ARF4 expression rescues sec7 mutant yeast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deitz, S B; Wu, C; Silve, S; Howell, K E; Melançon, P; Kahn, R A; Franzusoff, A

    1996-01-01

    Vesicle-mediated traffic between compartments of the yeast secretory pathway involves recruitment of multiple cytosolic proteins for budding, targeting, and membrane fusion events. The SEC7 gene product (Sec7p) is a constituent of coat structures on transport vesicles en route to the Golgi complex in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify mammalian homologs of Sec7p and its interacting proteins, we used a genetic selection strategy in which a human HepG2 cDNA library was transformed into conditional-lethal yeast sec7 mutants. We isolated several clones capable of rescuing sec7 mutant growth at the restrictive temperature. The cDNA encoding the most effective suppressor was identified as human ADP ribosylation factor 4 (hARF4), a member of the GTPase family proposed to regulate recruitment of vesicle coat proteins in mammalian cells. Having identified a Sec7p-interacting protein rather than the mammalian Sec7p homolog, we provide evidence that hARF4 suppressed the sec7 mutation by restoring secretory pathway function. Shifting sec7 strains to the restrictive temperature results in the disappearance of the mutant Sec7p cytosolic pool without apparent changes in the membrane-associated fraction. The introduction of hARF4 to the cells maintained the balance between cytosolic and membrane-associated Sec7p pools. These results suggest a requirement for Sec7p cycling on and off of the membranes for cell growth and vesicular traffic. In addition, overexpression of the yeast GTPase-encoding genes ARF1 and ARF2, but not that of YPT1, suppressed the sec7 mutant growth phenotype in an allele-specific manner. This allele specificity indicates that individual ARFs are recruited to perform two different Sec7p-related functions in vesicle coat dynamics. PMID:8668142

  20. Hantavirus Gc glycoprotein: evidence for a class II fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Nicole D; Gonzalez, Angel; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Rosemblatt, Mario; Valenzuela, Pablo D T

    2005-11-01

    Hantavirus cell entry is promoted by its envelope glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, through cell attachment and by fusion between viral and endosomal membranes at low pH. However, the role of Gn and Gc in receptor binding and cell fusion has not yet been defined. In this work, a sequence presenting characteristics similar to those of class II fusion peptides (FPs) of alphavirus E1 and flavivirus E proteins is identified within the hantavirus Gc glycoprotein. A three-dimensional comparative molecular model based on crystallographic data of tick-borne encephalitis virus E protein is proposed for the Andes virus (ANDV) Gc ectodomain, which supports a feasible class II fusion-protein fold. In vitro experimental evidence is provided for the binding activity of the ANDV FP candidate to artificial membranes, as demonstrated by fluorescence anisotropy assays. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that the Gc glycoprotein of hantaviruses and of other members of the family Bunyaviridae directs the viral fusion activity and that it may be classified as a class II viral fusion protein.

  1. Cold nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E. N.

    2012-02-15

    Recent accelerator experiments on fusion of various elements have clearly demonstrated that the effective cross-sections of these reactions depend on what material the target particle is placed in. In these experiments, there was a significant increase in the probability of interaction when target nuclei are imbedded in a conducting crystal or are a part of it. These experiments open a new perspective on the problem of so-called cold nuclear fusion.

  2. Structure of a flavivirus envelope glycoprotein in its low-pH-induced membrane fusion conformation

    PubMed Central

    Bressanelli, Stéphane; Stiasny, Karin; Allison, Steven L; Stura, Enrico A; Duquerroy, Stéphane; Lescar, Julien; Heinz, Franz X; Rey, Félix A

    2004-01-01

    Enveloped viruses enter cells via a membrane fusion reaction driven by conformational changes of specific viral envelope proteins. We report here the structure of the ectodomain of the tick-borne encephalitis virus envelope glycoprotein, E, a prototypical class II fusion protein, in its trimeric low-pH-induced conformation. We show that, in the conformational transition, the three domains of the neutral-pH form are maintained but their relative orientation is altered. Similar to the postfusion class I proteins, the subunits rearrange such that the fusion peptide loops cluster at one end of an elongated molecule and the C-terminal segments, connecting to the viral transmembrane region, run along the sides of the trimer pointing toward the fusion peptide loops. Comparison with the low-pH-induced form of the alphavirus class II fusion protein reveals striking differences at the end of the molecule bearing the fusion peptides, suggesting an important conformational effect of the missing membrane connecting segment. PMID:14963486

  3. ITER Fusion Energy

    ScienceCinema

    Dr. Norbert Holtkamp

    2016-07-12

    ITER (in Latin “the way”) is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier over one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen – deuterium and tritium – fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q ? 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). The ITER Organization was officially established in Cadarache, France, on 24 October 2007. The seven members engaged in the project – China, the European Union, India, Japan, Korea, Russia and the United States – represent more than half the world’s population. The costs for ITER are shared by the seven members. The cost for the construction will be approximately 5.5 billion Euros, a similar amount is foreseen for the twenty-year phase of operation and the subsequent decommissioning.

  4. Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is under consideration as a means of building a low mass, high specific impulse, and high thrust propulsion system for interplanetary travel. This unique combination is the result of the generation of a high temperature plasma by the nuclear fusion process. This plasma can then be deflected by magnetic fields to provide thrust. Fusion is initiated by a small traction of the energy generated in the magnetic coils due to the plasma's compression of the magnetic field. The power gain from a fusion reaction is such that inefficiencies due to thermal neutrons and coil losses can be overcome. Since the fusion reaction products are directly used for propulsion and the power to initiate the reaction is directly obtained from the thrust generation, no massive power supply for energy conversion is required. The result should be a low engine mass, high specific impulse and high thrust system. The key is to successfully initiate fusion as a proof-of-principle for this application. Currently MSFC is implementing MTF proof-of-principle experiments. This involves many technical details and ancillary investigations. Of these, selected pertinent issues include the properties, orientation and timing of the plasma guns and the convergence and interface development of the "pusher" plasma. Computer simulations of the target plasma's behavior under compression and the convergence and mixing of the gun plasma are under investigation. This work is to focus on the gun characterization and development as it relates to plasma initiation and repeatability.

  5. A New Type of Fusion Analysis Applicable to Many Organisms: Protein Fusions to the URA3 Gene of Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Alani, Eric; Kleckner, Nancy

    1987-01-01

    We have made constructs that join the promoter sequences and a portion of the coding region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HIS4 and GAL1 genes and the E. coli lacZ gene to the sixth codon of the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene (encodes orotidine-5'-phosphate (OMP) decarboxylase) to form three in frame protein fusions. In each case the fusion protein has OMP decarboxylase activity as assayed by complementation tests and this activity is properly regulated. A convenient cassette consisting of the URA3 segment plus some immediately proximal amino acids of HIS4C is available for making URA3 fusions to other proteins of interest. URA3 fusions offer several advantages over other systems for gene fusion analysis: the URA3 specified protein is small and cytosolic; genetic selections exist to identify mutants with either increased or decreased URA3 function in both yeast (S. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium); and a sensitive OMP decarboxylase enzyme assay is available. Also, OMP decarboxylase activity is present in mammals, Drosophila and plants, so URA3 fusions may eventually be applicable in these other organisms as well. PMID:3311876

  6. Calreticulin mutants in mice induce an MPL-dependent thrombocytosis with frequent progression to myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Marty, Caroline; Pecquet, Christian; Nivarthi, Harini; El-Khoury, Mira; Chachoua, Ilyas; Tulliez, Micheline; Villeval, Jean-Luc; Raslova, Hana; Kralovics, Robert; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Plo, Isabelle; Vainchenker, William

    2016-03-10

    Frameshift mutations in the calreticulin (CALR) gene are seen in about 30% of essential thrombocythemia and myelofibrosis patients. To address the contribution of the CALR mutants to the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms, we engrafted lethally irradiated recipient mice with bone marrow cells transduced with retroviruses expressing these mutants. In contrast to wild-type CALR, CALRdel52 (type I) and, to a lesser extent, CALRins5 (type II) induced thrombocytosis due to a megakaryocyte (MK) hyperplasia. Disease was transplantable into secondary recipients. After 6 months, CALRdel52-, in contrast to rare CALRins5-, transduced mice developed a myelofibrosis associated with a splenomegaly and a marked osteosclerosis. Monitoring of virus-transduced populations indicated that CALRdel52 leads to expansion at earlier stages of hematopoiesis than CALRins5. However, both mutants still specifically amplified the MK lineage and platelet production. Moreover, a mutant deleted of the entire exon 9 (CALRdelex9) did not induce a disease, suggesting that the oncogenic property of CALR mutants was related to the new C-terminus peptide. To understand how the CALR mutants target the MK lineage, we used a cell-line model and demonstrated that the CALR mutants, but not CALRdelex9, specifically activate the thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor (MPL) to induce constitutive activation of Janus kinase 2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5/3/1. We confirmed in c-mpl- and tpo-deficient mice that expression of Mpl, but not of Tpo, was essential for the CALR mutants to induce thrombocytosis in vivo, although Tpo contributes to disease penetrance. Thus, CALR mutants are sufficient to induce thrombocytosis through MPL activation. PMID:26608331

  7. Characterization and performance of short cationic antimicrobial peptide isomers.

    PubMed

    Juba, Melanie; Porter, Devin; Dean, Scott; Gillmor, Susan; Bishop, Barney

    2013-07-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) represent an ancient defense mechanism against invading bacteria, with peptides such as the cathelicidins being essential elements of vertebrate innate immunity. CAMPs are typically associated with broad-spectrum antimicrobial potency and limited bacterial resistance. The cathelicidin identified from the elapid snake Naja atra (NA-CATH) contains a semi-conserved repeated 11-residue motif (ATRA motif) with a sequence pattern consistent with formation of an amphipathic helical conformation. Short peptide amides (ATRA-1, -1A, -1P, and -2) generated based on the pair of ATRA motifs in NA-CATH exhibited varied antimicrobial potencies. The small size of the ATRA peptides, coupled with their varied antimicrobial performances, make them interesting models to study the impact various physico-chemical properties have on antimicrobial performance in helical CAMPs. Accordingly, the D- and L-enantiomers of the peptide ATRA-1A, which in earlier studies had shown both good antimicrobial performance and strong helical character, were investigated in order to assess the impact peptide stereochemistry has on antimicrobial performance and interaction with chiral membranes. The ATRA-1A isomers exhibit varied potencies against four bacterial strains, and their conformational properties in the presence of mixed zwitterionic/anionic liposomes are influenced by anionic lipid content. These studies reveal subtle differences in the properties of the peptide isomers. Differences are also seen in the abilities of the ATRA-1A isomers to induce liposome fusion/aggregation, bilayer rearrangement and lysing through turbidity studies and fluorescence microscopy. The similarities and differences in the properties of the ATRA-1A isomers could aid in efforts to develop D-peptide-based therapeutics using high-performing L-peptides as templates.

  8. Engineering cyclic peptide toxins.

    PubMed

    Clark, Richard J; Craik, David J

    2012-01-01

    Peptide-based toxins have attracted much attention in recent years for their exciting potential applications in drug design and development. This interest has arisen because toxins are highly potent and selectively target a range of physiologically important receptors. However, peptides suffer from a number of disadvantages, including poor in vivo stability and poor bioavailability. A number of naturally occurring cyclic peptides have been discovered in plants, animals, and bacteria that have exceptional stability and potentially ameliorate these disadvantages. The lessons learned from studies of the structures, stabilities, and biological activities of these cyclic peptides can be applied to the reengineering of toxins that are not naturally cyclic but are amenable to cyclization. In this chapter, we describe solid-phase chemical synthetic methods for the reengineering of peptide toxins to improve their suitability as therapeutic, diagnostic, or imaging agents. The focus is on small disulfide-rich peptides from the venoms of cone snails and scorpions, but the technology is potentially widely applicable to a number of other peptide-based toxins. PMID:22230565

  9. The role of antimicrobial peptides in animal defenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Robert E. W.; Scott, Monisha G.

    2000-08-01

    It is becoming clear that the cationic antimicrobial peptides are an important component of the innate defenses of all species of life. Such peptides can be constitutively expressed or induced by bacteria or their products. The best peptides have good activities vs. a broad range of bacterial strains, including antibiotic-resistant isolates. They kill very rapidly, do not easily select resistant mutants, are synergistic with conventional antibiotics, other peptides, and lysozyme, and are able to kill bacteria in animal models. It is known that bacterial infections, especially when treated with antibiotics, can lead to the release of bacterial products such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid, resulting in potentially lethal sepsis. In contrast to antibiotics, the peptides actually prevent cytokine induction by bacterial products in tissue culture and human blood, and they block the onset of sepsis in mouse models of endotoxemia. Consistent with this, transcriptional gene array experiments using a macrophage cell line demonstrated that a model peptide, CEMA, blocks the expression of many genes whose transcription was induced by LPS. The peptides do this in part by blocking LPS interaction with the serum protein LBP. In addition, CEMA itself has a direct effect on macrophage gene expression. Because cationic antimicrobial peptides are induced by LPS and are able to dampen the septic response of animal cells to LPS, we propose that, in addition to their role in direct and lysozyme-assisted killing of microbes, they have a role in feedback regulation of cytokine responses. We are currently developing variant peptides as therapeutics against antibiotic-resistant infections.

  10. Oligomerization and toxicity of A{beta} fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Caine, Joanne M.; Bharadwaj, Prashant R.; Sankovich, Sonia E.; Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D.; Streltsov, Victor A.; Varghese, Jose

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} We expressed amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide as a soluble maltose binding protein fusion (MBP-A{beta}42 and MBP-A{beta}16). {yields} The full length A{beta} peptide fusion, MBP-A{beta}42, forms oligomeric species as determined by SDS-PAGE gels, gel filtration and DLS. {yields} The MBP-A{beta}42, but not MBP-A{beta}16 or MBP alone, is toxic to both yeast and mammalian cells as determined by toxicity assays. -- Abstract: This study has found that the Maltose binding protein A{beta}42 fusion protein (MBP-A{beta}42) forms soluble oligomers while the shorter MBP-A{beta}16 fusion and control MBP did not. MBP-A{beta}42, but neither MBP-A{beta}16 nor control MBP, was toxic in a dose-dependent manner in both yeast and primary cortical neuronal cells. This study demonstrates the potential utility of MBP-A{beta}42 as a reagent for drug screening assays in yeast and neuronal cell cultures and as a candidate for further A{beta}42 characterization.

  11. Accelerated Nucleation of Hydroxyapatite Using an Engineered Hydrophobin Fusion Protein.

    PubMed

    Melcher, Melanie; Facey, Sandra J; Henkes, Thorsten M; Subkowski, Thomas; Hauer, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    Calcium phosphate mineralization is of particular interest in dental repair. A biomimetic approach using proteins or peptides is a highly promising way to reconstruct eroded teeth. In this study, the screening of several proteins is described for their binding and nucleating activities toward hydroxyapatite. Out of 27 tested candidates, only two hydrophobin fusion proteins showed binding abilities to hydroxyapatite in a mouthwash formulation and an increased nucleation in artificial saliva. Using a semirational approach, one of the two candidates (DEWA_5), a fusion protein consisting of a truncated section of the Bacillus subtilis synthase YaaD, the Aspergillus nidulans hydrophobin DEWA, and the rationally designed peptide P11-4 described in the literature, could be further engineered toward a faster mineral formation. The variants DEWA_5a (40aaYaaD-SDSDSD-DEWA) and DEWA_5b (40aaYaaD-RDRDRD-DEWA) were able to enhance the nucleation activity without losing the ability to form hydroxyapatite. In the case of variant DEWA_5b, an additional increase in the binding toward hydroxyapatite could be achieved. Especially with the variant DEWA_5a, the protein engineering of the rationally designed peptide sequence resulted in a resemblance of an amino acid motif that is found in nature. The engineered peptide resembles the amino acid motif in dentin phosphoprotein, one of the major proteins involved in dentinogenesis. PMID:27010648

  12. Inhibition of Ebola Virus Entry by a C-peptide Targeted to Endosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Emily Happy; Harrison, Joseph S.; Radoshitzky, Sheli R.; Higgins, Chelsea D.; Chi, Xiaoli; Dong, Lian; Kuhn, Jens H.; Bavari, Sina; Lai, Jonathan R.; Chandran, Kartik

    2011-01-01

    Ebola virus (EboV) and Marburg virus (MarV) (filoviruses) are the causative agents of severe hemorrhagic fever. Infection begins with uptake of particles into cellular endosomes, where the viral envelope glycoprotein (GP) catalyzes fusion between the viral and host cell membranes. This fusion event is thought to involve conformational rearrangements of the transmembrane subunit (GP2) of the envelope spike that ultimately result in formation of a six-helix bundle by the N- and C-terminal heptad repeat (NHR and CHR, respectively) regions of GP2. Infection by other viruses employing similar viral entry mechanisms (such as HIV-1 and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus) can be inhibited with synthetic peptides corresponding to the native CHR sequence (“C-peptides”). However, previously reported EboV C-peptides have shown weak or insignificant antiviral activity. To determine whether the activity of a C-peptide could be improved by increasing its intracellular concentration, we prepared an EboV C-peptide conjugated to the arginine-rich sequence from HIV-1 Tat, which is known to accumulate in endosomes. We found that this peptide specifically inhibited viral entry mediated by filovirus GP proteins and infection by authentic filoviruses. We determined that antiviral activity was dependent on both the Tat sequence and the native EboV CHR sequence. Mechanistic studies suggested that the peptide acts by blocking a membrane fusion intermediate. PMID:21454542

  13. Multimeric Disintegrin Protein Polymer Fusions That Target Tumor Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant protein therapeutics have increased in number and frequency since the introduction of human insulin, 25 years ago. Presently, proteins and peptides are commonly used in the clinic. However, the incorporation of peptides into clinically approved nanomedicines has been limited. Reasons for this include the challenges of decorating pharmaceutical-grade nanoparticles with proteins by a process that is robust, scalable, and cost-effective. As an alternative to covalent bioconjugation between a protein and nanoparticle, we report that biologically active proteins may themselves mediate the formation of small multimers through steric stabilization by large protein polymers. Unlike multistep purification and bioconjugation, this approach is completed during biosynthesis. As proof-of-principle, the disintegrin protein called vicrostatin (VCN) was fused to an elastin-like polypeptide (A192). A significant fraction of fusion proteins self-assembled into multimers with a hydrodynamic radius of 15.9 nm. The A192-VCN fusion proteins compete specifically for cell-surface integrins on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and two breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435. Confocal microscopy revealed that, unlike linear RGD-containing protein polymers, the disintegrin fusion protein undergoes rapid cellular internalization. To explore their potential clinical applications, fusion proteins were characterized using small animal positron emission tomography (microPET). Passive tumor accumulation was observed for control protein polymers; however, the tumor accumulation of A192-VCN was saturable, which is consistent with integrin-mediated binding. The fusion of a protein polymer and disintegrin results in a higher intratumoral contrast compared to free VCN or A192 alone. Given the diversity of disintegrin proteins with specificity for various cell-surface integrins, disintegrin fusions are a new source of biomaterials with potential diagnostic and

  14. High-affinity Cyclic Peptide Matriptase Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Quimbar, Pedro; Malik, Uru; Sommerhoff, Christian P.; Kaas, Quentin; Chan, Lai Y.; Huang, Yen-Hua; Grundhuber, Maresa; Dunse, Kerry; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The type II transmembrane serine protease matriptase is a key activator of multiple signaling pathways associated with cell proliferation and modification of the extracellular matrix. Deregulated matriptase activity correlates with a number of diseases, including cancer and hence highly selective matriptase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. The plant-derived cyclic peptide, sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1), is a promising drug scaffold with potent matriptase inhibitory activity. In the current study we have analyzed the structure-activity relationships of SFTI-1 and Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II (MCoTI-II), a structurally divergent trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis that also contains a cyclic backbone. We show that MCoTI-II is a significantly more potent matriptase inhibitor than SFTI-1 and that all alanine mutants of both peptides, generated using positional scanning mutagenesis, have decreased trypsin affinity, whereas several mutations either maintain or result in enhanced matriptase inhibitory activity. These intriguing results were used to design one of the most potent matriptase inhibitors known to date with a 290 pm equilibrium dissociation constant, and provide the first indication on how to modulate affinity for matriptase over trypsin in cyclic peptides. This information might be useful for the design of more selective and therapeutically relevant inhibitors of matriptase. PMID:23548907

  15. [Composition of cell walls of 2 mutant strains of Streptomyces chrysomallus].

    PubMed

    Zaretskaia, M Sh; Nefelova, M V; Baratova, L A; Polin, A N

    1984-12-01

    The cell walls and peptidoglycans of two mutant strains, Streptomyces chrysomallus var. carotenoides and Streptomyces chrysomallus var. macrotetrolidi, were studied. The strains are organisms producing carotenes and antibiotics of the macrotetrolide group. By the qualitative composition of the peptidoglycans the mutants belong to Streptomyces and are similar. Their glycan portion consists of equimolar quantities of N-acetyl glucosamine and muramic acid. The peptide subunit is presented by glutamic acid, L, L-diaminopimelic acid, glycine and alanine. The molar ratio of alanine is 1.2-1.3. The mutant strains differ in the content of carbohydrates, total phosphorus and phosphorus belonging to teichoic acids. Teichoic acids of the cell walls of the both strains are of the ribitolhosphate nature. The cell walls of the mutants contain polysaccharides differing from teichoic acids and consisting of glucose, galactose, arabinose and fucose. The influence of the cell wall composition of the mutant strains on their morphology and metabolism and comparison of the data relative to the mutant strains with those relative to the starting strain are discussed.

  16. Molecular Dynamics of Peptide Folding at Aqueous Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Chipot, Christophe; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Even though most monomeric peptides are disordered in water they can adopt sequence-dependent, ordered structures, such as a-helices, at aqueous interfaces. This property is relevant to cellular signaling, membrane fusion, and the action of toxins and antibiotics. The mechanism of folding nonpolar peptides at the water-hexane interface was studied in the example of an 11-mer, of poly-L-leucine. Initially placed as a random coil on the water side of the interface, the peptide folded into an a-helix in 36 ns. Simultaneously, the peptide translocated into the hexane side of the interface. Folding was not sequential and involved a 3/10-helix as an intermediate. The folded peptide was either parallel to the interface or had its C-terminus exposed to water. An 11-mer, LQQLLQQLLQL, composed of leucine (L) and glutamine (G), was taken as a model amphiphilic peptide. It rapidly adopted an amphiphilic, disordered structure at the interface. Further folding proceeded through a series of amphiphilic intermediates.

  17. Drosophila Kette coordinates myoblast junction dissolution and the ratio of Scar-to-WASp during myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Hamp, Julia; Löwer, Andreas; Dottermusch-Heidel, Christine; Beck, Lothar; Moussian, Bernard; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Önel, Susanne-Filiz

    2016-09-15

    The fusion of founder cells and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs) is crucial for muscle formation in Drosophila Characteristic events of myoblast fusion include the recognition and adhesion of myoblasts, and the formation of branched F-actin by the Arp2/3 complex at the site of cell-cell contact. At the ultrastructural level, these events are reflected by the appearance of finger-like protrusions and electron-dense plaques that appear prior to fusion. Severe defects in myoblast fusion are caused by the loss of Kette (a homolog of Nap1 and Hem-2, also known as NCKAP1 and NCKAP1L, respectively), a member of the regulatory complex formed by Scar or WAVE proteins (represented by the single protein, Scar, in flies). kette mutants form finger-like protrusions, but the electron-dense plaques are extended. Here, we show that the electron-dense plaques in wild-type and kette mutant myoblasts resemble other electron-dense structures that are known to function as cellular junctions. Furthermore, analysis of double mutants and attempts to rescue the kette mutant phenotype with N-cadherin, wasp and genes of members of the regulatory Scar complex revealed that Kette has two functions during myoblast fusion. First, Kette controls the dissolution of electron-dense plaques. Second, Kette controls the ratio of the Arp2/3 activators Scar and WASp in FCMs. PMID:27521427

  18. Drosophila Kette coordinates myoblast junction dissolution and the ratio of Scar-to-WASp during myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hamp, Julia; Löwer, Andreas; Dottermusch-Heidel, Christine; Beck, Lothar; Moussian, Bernard; Flötenmeyer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The fusion of founder cells and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs) is crucial for muscle formation in Drosophila. Characteristic events of myoblast fusion include the recognition and adhesion of myoblasts, and the formation of branched F-actin by the Arp2/3 complex at the site of cell–cell contact. At the ultrastructural level, these events are reflected by the appearance of finger-like protrusions and electron-dense plaques that appear prior to fusion. Severe defects in myoblast fusion are caused by the loss of Kette (a homolog of Nap1 and Hem-2, also known as NCKAP1 and NCKAP1L, respectively), a member of the regulatory complex formed by Scar or WAVE proteins (represented by the single protein, Scar, in flies). kette mutants form finger-like protrusions, but the electron-dense plaques are extended. Here, we show that the electron-dense plaques in wild-type and kette mutant myoblasts resemble other electron-dense structures that are known to function as cellular junctions. Furthermore, analysis of double mutants and attempts to rescue the kette mutant phenotype with N-cadherin, wasp and genes of members of the regulatory Scar complex revealed that Kette has two functions during myoblast fusion. First, Kette controls the dissolution of electron-dense plaques. Second, Kette controls the ratio of the Arp2/3 activators Scar and WASp in FCMs. PMID:27521427

  19. Drosophila Kette coordinates myoblast junction dissolution and the ratio of Scar-to-WASp during myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Hamp, Julia; Löwer, Andreas; Dottermusch-Heidel, Christine; Beck, Lothar; Moussian, Bernard; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Önel, Susanne-Filiz

    2016-09-15

    The fusion of founder cells and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs) is crucial for muscle formation in Drosophila Characteristic events of myoblast fusion include the recognition and adhesion of myoblasts, and the formation of branched F-actin by the Arp2/3 complex at the site of cell-cell contact. At the ultrastructural level, these events are reflected by the appearance of finger-like protrusions and electron-dense plaques that appear prior to fusion. Severe defects in myoblast fusion are caused by the loss of Kette (a homolog of Nap1 and Hem-2, also known as NCKAP1 and NCKAP1L, respectively), a member of the regulatory complex formed by Scar or WAVE proteins (represented by the single protein, Scar, in flies). kette mutants form finger-like protrusions, but the electron-dense plaques are extended. Here, we show that the electron-dense plaques in wild-type and kette mutant myoblasts resemble other electron-dense structures that are known to function as cellular junctions. Furthermore, analysis of double mutants and attempts to rescue the kette mutant phenotype with N-cadherin, wasp and genes of members of the regulatory Scar complex revealed that Kette has two functions during myoblast fusion. First, Kette controls the dissolution of electron-dense plaques. Second, Kette controls the ratio of the Arp2/3 activators Scar and WASp in FCMs.

  20. Fusion for Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There is little doubt that humans will attempt to explore and develop the solar system in this century. A large amount of energy will be required for accomplishing this. The need for fusion propulsion is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important thermodynamical attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For human exploration and development of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion can produce exhaust velocity up to about 5 km/s. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the energy to heat a hydrogen propellant increases the exhaust velocity by only a factor of about two. Alternatively the energy can be converted into electricity which is then used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. The necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment, however, increases the mass of the propulsion system for the same jet power by more than two orders of magnitude over chemical system, thus greatly limits the thrust-to-weight ratio attainable. The principal advantage of the fission process is that its development is relatively mature and is available right now. If fusion can be developed, fusion appears to have the best of all worlds in terms of propulsion - it can provide the absolute amount, the propellant exhaust velocity, and the high specific jet power. An intermediate step towards pure fusion propulsion is a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. The technical issues related to fusion for space propulsion are discussed. The technical priorities for developing and applying fusion for propulsion are

  1. Improvements of image fusion methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Shoshan, Yotam; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak

    2014-03-01

    Fusion of images from different imaging modalities, obtained by conventional fusion methods, may cause artifacts, including destructive superposition and brightness irregularities, in certain cases. This paper proposes two methods for improving image multimodal fusion quality. Based on the finding that a better fusion can be achieved when the images have a more positive correlation, the first method is a decision algorithm that runs at the preprocessing fusion stage and determines whether a complementary gray level of one of the input images should be used instead of the original one. The second method is suitable for multiresolution fusion, and it suggests choosing only one image from the lowest-frequency sub-bands in the pyramids, instead of combining values from both sub-bands. Experimental results indicate that the proposed fusion enhancement can reduce fusion artifacts. Quantitative fusion quality measures that support this conclusion are shown.

  2. Isolation of Camelid Single-Domain Antibodies Against Native Proteins Using Recombinant Multivalent Peptide Ligands.

    PubMed

    Alturki, Norah A; Henry, Kevin A; MacKenzie, C Roger; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Generation of antibodies against desired epitopes on folded proteins may be hampered by various characteristics of the target protein, including antigenic and immunogenic dominance of irrelevant epitopes and/or steric occlusion of the desired epitope. In such cases, peptides encompassing linear epitopes of the native protein represent attractive alternative reagents for immunization and screening. Peptide antigens are typically prepared by fusing or conjugating the peptide of interest to a carrier protein. The utility of such antigens depends on many factors including the peptide's amino acid sequence, display valency, display format (synthetic conjugate vs. recombinant fusion) and characteristics of the carrier. Here we provide detailed protocols for: (1) preparation of DNA constructs encoding peptides fused to verotoxin (VT) multimerization domain; (2) expression, purification, and characterization of the multivalent peptide-VT ligands; (3) concurrent panning of a non-immune phage-displayed camelid VHH library against the peptide-VT ligands and native protein; and (4) identification of VHHs enriched via panning using next-generation sequencing techniques. These methods are simple, rapid and can be easily adapted to yield custom peptide-VT ligands that appear to maintain the antigenic structures of the peptide. However, we caution that peptide sequences should be chosen with great care, taking into account structural, immunological, and biophysical information on the protein of interest.

  3. A West Nile virus mutant with increased resistance to acid-induced inactivation.

    PubMed

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2011-04-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for epidemics of febrile illness, meningitis, encephalitis and flaccid paralysis. WNV gains entry into host cells through endocytosis. The acid pH inside endosomes triggers rapid conformational rearrangements of the flavivirus envelope (E) glycoprotein that result in fusion of the endosomal membrane with the virion envelope. Conformational rearrangements of the E glycoprotein can be induced by acid exposure in solution in the absence of target membranes, thus causing a loss of infectivity. Following a genetic approach to study this process, a WNV mutant with increased resistance to acid-induced inactivation was isolated and its complete genome was sequenced. A single amino acid substitution, T70I, in the E glycoprotein was found to be responsible for the increased acid resistance, which was linked to an increase in the sensitivity of infection to the chemical rise of endosomal pH, suggesting that the mutant required a more acid pH inside the endosomes for fusion. No alterations in viral infection kinetics, plaque size or induced mortality rates in mice of the mutant were noted. However, by means of virus competition assays, a reduction in viral fitness under standard culture conditions was observed for the mutant. These results provide new evidence of the adaptive flexibility to environmental factors--pH variation in this case--of WNV populations. Implications of the T70I replacement on the E glycoprotein structure-function relationship are discussed.

  4. Thermodynamics of peptide inhibitor binding to HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Cole, J L; Garsky, V M

    2001-05-15

    The gp41 subunit of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein mediates fusion of the cellular and viral membranes. The gp41 ectodomain is a trimer of alpha-helical hairpins, where N-terminal helices form a parallel three-stranded coiled-coil core and C-terminal helices pack around the core. A deep hydrophobic pocket on the N-terminal core represents an attractive target for antiviral therapeutics. We have employed a soluble derivative of the gp41 core ectodomain and small cyclic disulfide D-peptide inhibitors to define the stoichiometry, affinity, and thermodynamics of ligand binding to this pocket using isothermal titration calorimetry. These inhibitors bind with micromolar affinity to the pocket with the expected stoichiometry of three peptides per gp41 core trimer. There are no cooperative interactions among the three binding sites. Linear eight- or nine-residue D-peptides derived from the pocket-binding domain of the cyclic molecules also bind specifically. A negative heat capacity change is observed and is consistent with burial of hydrophobic surface upon binding. Contrary to expectations for a reaction dominated by the classical hydrophobic effect, peptide binding is enthalpically driven and is opposed by an unfavorable negative entropy change. The calorimetry data support models whereby dominant negative inhibitors bind to a transiently exposed surface on the prefusion intermediate state of gp41 and disrupt subsequent resolution to the fusion-active six-stranded hairpin conformation.

  5. Intracellular delivery of functional proteins via decoration with transporter peptides.

    PubMed

    Siprashvili, Zurab; Reuter, Jason A; Khavari, Paul A

    2004-05-01

    Despite numerous attractive intracellular targets, protein therapeutics have been principally confined to the extracellular space due to the lack of a straightforward way to deliver functional polypeptides to the cell interior. Peptide sequences facilitating intracellular protein delivery have been identified; however, current strategies to apply them require problematic steps, such as generation of new in-frame fusion proteins, covalent chemical conjugation, and denaturation. We have developed a new approach to protein transfer into cells and tissues that relies on single-step decoration by cysteine-flanked, arginine-rich transporter peptides. This approach facilitated cell and tissue delivery of a variety of functional proteins, including antibodies and enzymes. Decoration with transporter peptides thus provides an attractive general means of intracellular delivery of functional proteins in vitro and in tissue.

  6. Paranodal permeability in `myelin mutants'

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, S.; Mierzwa, A.; Scherer, S.S.; Peles, E.; Arevalo, J.C.; Chao, M.V.; Rosenbluth, J.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent dextran tracers of varying sizes have been used to assess paranodal permeability in myelinated sciatic nerve fibers from control and three `myelin mutant' mice, Caspr-null, cst-null and shaking. We demonstrate that in all of these the paranode is permeable to small tracers (3kDa, 10kDa), which penetrate most fibers, and to larger tracers (40kDa, 70kDa), which penetrate far fewer fibers and move shorter distances over longer periods of time. Despite gross diminution in transverse bands in the Caspr-null and cst-null mice, the permeability of their paranodal junctions is equivalent to that in controls. Thus, deficiency of transverse bands in these mutants does not increase the permeability of their paranodal junctions to the dextrans we used, moving from the perinodal space through the paranode to the internodal periaxonal space. In addition, we show that the shaking mice, which have thinner myelin and shorter paranodes, show increased permeability to the same tracers despite the presence of transverse bands. We conclude that the extent of penetration of these tracers does not depend on the presence or absence of transverse bands but does depend on the length of the paranode and, in turn, on the length of `pathway 3', the helical extracellular pathway that passes through the paranode parallel to the lateral edge of the myelin sheath. PMID:21618613

  7. Paranodal permeability in "myelin mutants".

    PubMed

    Shroff, Seema; Mierzwa, Amanda; Scherer, Steven S; Peles, Elior; Arevalo, Juan C; Chao, Moses V; Rosenbluth, Jack

    2011-10-01

    Fluorescent dextran tracers of varying sizes have been used to assess paranodal permeability in myelinated sciatic nerve fibers from control and three "myelin mutant" mice, Caspr-null, cst-null, and shaking. We demonstrate that in all of these the paranode is permeable to small tracers (3 kDa and 10 kDa), which penetrate most fibers, and to larger tracers (40 kDa and 70 kDa), which penetrate far fewer fibers and move shorter distances over longer periods of time. Despite gross diminution in transverse bands (TBs) in the Caspr-null and cst-null mice, the permeability of their paranodal junctions is equivalent to that in controls. Thus, deficiency of TBs in these mutants does not increase the permeability of their paranodal junctions to the dextrans we used, moving from the perinodal space through the paranode to the internodal periaxonal space. In addition, we show that the shaking mice, which have thinner myelin and shorter paranodes, show increased permeability to the same tracers despite the presence of TBs. We conclude that the extent of penetration of these tracers does not depend on the presence or absence of TBs but does depend on the length of the paranode and, in turn, on the length of "pathway 3," the helical extracellular pathway that passes through the paranode parallel to the lateral edge of the myelin sheath. PMID:21618613

  8. Tumor-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC), contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor-homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR) motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular “zip code” of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies, and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is present in the

  9. De Novo Peptide Design and Experimental Validation of Histone Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Smadbeck, James; Peterson, Meghan B.; Zee, Barry M.; Garapaty, Shivani; Mago, Aashna; Lee, Christina; Giannis, Athanassios; Trojer, Patrick; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Floudas, Christodoulos A.

    2014-01-01

    Histones are small proteins critical to the efficient packaging of DNA in the nucleus. DNA–protein complexes, known as nucleosomes, are formed when the DNA winds itself around the surface of the histones. The methylation of histone residues by enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) maintains gene repression over successive cell generations. Overexpression of EZH2 can silence important tumor suppressor genes leading to increased invasiveness of many types of cancers. This makes the inhibition of EZH2 an important target in the development of cancer therapeutics. We employed a three-stage computational de novo peptide design method to design inhibitory peptides of EZH2. The method consists of a sequence selection stage and two validation stages for fold specificity and approximate binding affinity. The sequence selection stage consists of an integer linear optimization model that was solved to produce a rank-ordered list of amino acid sequences with increased stability in the bound peptide-EZH2 structure. These sequences were validated through the calculation of the fold specificity and approximate binding affinity of the designed peptides. Here we report the discovery of novel EZH2 inhibitory peptides using the de novo peptide design method. The computationally discovered peptides were experimentally validated in vitro using dose titrations and mechanism of action enzymatic assays. The peptide with the highest in vitro response, SQ037, was validated in nucleo using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. This peptide had an IC50 of 13.5 M, demonstrated greater potency as an inhibitor when compared to the native and K27A mutant control peptides, and demonstrated competitive inhibition versus the peptide substrate. Additionally, this peptide demonstrated high specificity to the EZH2 target in comparison to other histone methyltransferases. The validated peptides are the first computationally designed peptides that directly inhibit EZH2. These inhibitors should

  10. The chromatography-free release, isolation and purification of recombinant peptide for fibril self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, B M; Kaar, W; Yoo, I K; Lua, L H L; Falconer, R J; Middelberg, A P J

    2009-12-01

    One of the major expenses associated with recombinant peptide production is the use of chromatography in the isolation and purification stages of a bioprocess. Here we report a chromatography-free isolation and purification process for recombinant peptide expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Initial peptide release is by homogenization and then by enzymatic cleavage of the peptide-containing fusion protein, directly in the E. coli homogenate. Release is followed by selective solvent precipitation (SSP) to isolate and purify the peptide away from larger cell contaminants. Specifically, we expressed in E. coli the self-assembling beta-sheet forming peptide P(11)-2 in fusion to thioredoxin. Homogenate was heat treated (55 degrees C, 15 min) and then incubated with tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) to release P(11)-2 having a native N-terminus. SSP with ethanol at room temperature then removed contaminating proteins in an integrated isolation-purification step; it proved necessary to add 250 mM NaCl to homogenate to prevent P(11)-2 from partitioning to the precipitate. This process structure gave recombinant P(11)-2 peptide at 97% polypeptide purity and 40% overall yield, without a single chromatography step. Following buffer-exchange of the 97% pure product by bind-elute chromatography into defined chemical conditions, the resulting peptide was shown to be functionally active and able to form self-assembled fibrils. To the best of our knowledge, this manuscript reports the first published process for chromatography-free recombinant peptide release, isolation and purification. The process proved able to deliver functional recombinant peptide at high purity and potentially low cost, opening cost-sensitive materials applications for peptide-based materials.

  11. Introduction to peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fields, Gregg B

    2002-05-01

    A number of synthetic peptides are significant commercial or pharmaceutical products, ranging from the dipeptide sugar-substitute aspartame to clinically used hormones, such as oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and calcitonin. This unit provides an overview of the field of synthetic peptides and proteins, including their purification. It discusses selecting the solid support and common coupling reagents. Additional information is provided regarding common side reactions and synthesizing modified residues.

  12. Introduction to peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fields, Gregg B

    2002-02-01

    A number of synthetic peptides are significant commercial or pharmaceutical products, ranging from the dipeptide sugar-substitute aspartame to clinically used hormones, such as oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and calcitonin. This unit provides an overview of the field of synthetic peptides and proteins, including their purification. It discusses selecting the solid support and common coupling reagents. Additional information is provided regarding common side reactions and synthesizing modified residues.

  13. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit; Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-12-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  14. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Haralalka, Shruti; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2010-11-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  15. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  16. Fusion, magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-08-06

    An overview is presented of the principles of magnetic confinement of plasmas for the purpose of achieving controlled fusion conditions. Sec. 1 discusses the different nuclear fusion reactions which can be exploited in prospective fusion reactors and explains why special technologies need to be developed for the supply of tritium or {sup 3}He, the probable fuels. In Sec. 2 the Lawson condition, a criterion that is a measure of the quality of confinement relative to achieving fusion conditions, is explained. In Sec. 3 fluid equations are used to describe plasma confinement. Specific confinement configurations are considered. In Sec. 4 the orbits of particle sin magneti and electric fields are discussed. In Sec. 5 stability considerations are discussed. It is noted that confinement systems usually need to satisfy stability constraints imposed by ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The paper culminates with a summary of experimental progress in magnetic confinement. Present experiments in tokamaks have reached the point that the conditions necessary to achieve fusion are being satisfied.

  17. A protein/peptide assay using peptide-resin adduct: application to the calmodulin/RS20 complex.

    PubMed

    Guimard, L; Afshar, M; Haiech, J; Calas, B

    1994-08-15

    To obtain equilibrium and kinetic constants of a protein/peptide complex, we have developed a rapid procedure which uses peptides specifically linked to a resin. With this peptide-resin adduct, bound and free 125I-labeled protein could be easily separated by simple centrifugation. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated with the calmodulin/RS20 complex, where RS20 is the putative calmodulin binding peptide of the smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK). In addition to the wild-type calmodulin (SYNCAM) expressed in Escherichia coli, we also examined calmodulin mutants with charge reversals called SYNCAM12A (DEE 118-120-->KKK) and SYNCAM18A (EEE 82-84-->KKK and DEE 118-120-->KKK). The kinetic analysis of the interaction between SYNCAM and RS20 associated with titration experiments allowed us to measure dissociation constants (KD) in the range of 10(-9) M, in good agreement with previously published data. Moreover, the binding assays showed that SYN-CAM18A did not interact with RS20, whereas SYN-CAM12A did with a KD around 10(-8) M. The lack of binding of SYNCAM18A to RS20 provides an explanation for the lack of smMLCK activation by SYNCAM18A. Altogether, these results demonstrate that peptide-resin can be used as a tool for separating bound from free protein, thus enabling a rapid and reliable quantification of the protein/peptide interaction.

  18. Pronuclear fusion failure: an alternate conjugational pathway in Tetrahymena thermophila, induced by vinblastine

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, E.P.; Suhr-Jessen, P.B.; Orias, E.

    1988-04-01

    Vinblastine is shown to induce pronuclear fusion failure in conjugating Tetrahymena thermophila. In this alternate conjugational pathway gametic pronuclei are exchanged between conjugants but do not fuse. Each pronucleus undergoes one mitotic division to produce a new macro- and micronucleus. Genetic consequences of pronuclear fusion failure include the following: (1) the progeny are whole genome homozygotes with nuclei derived from single meiotic products, and (2) half of the progeny are heterokaryons with micro- and macronuclei of different genetic origins. These facts make this process extremely useful in strain construction and mutant isolation. The induction of pronuclear fusion failure by vinblastine suggests that microtubules play an essential role in pronuclear fusion. In this paper the authors present autoradiographic and genetic evidence that vinblastine induces pronuclear fusion failure in T. thermophila.

  19. Dynamic assembly of brambleberry mediates nuclear envelope fusion during early development.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Elliott W; Zhang, Hong; Marlow, Florence L; Kapp, Lee; Lu, Sumei; Mullins, Mary C

    2012-08-01

    To accommodate the large cells following zygote formation, early blastomeres employ modified cell divisions. Karyomeres are one such modification, mitotic intermediates wherein individual chromatin masses are surrounded by nuclear envelope; the karyomeres then fuse to form a single mononucleus. We identified brambleberry, a maternal-effect zebrafish mutant that disrupts karyomere fusion, resulting in formation of multiple micronuclei. As karyomeres form, Brambleberry protein localizes to the nuclear envelope, with prominent puncta evident near karyomere-karyomere interfaces corresponding to membrane fusion sites. brambleberry corresponds to an unannotated gene with similarity to Kar5p, a protein that participates in nuclear fusion in yeast. We also demonstrate that Brambleberry is required for pronuclear fusion following fertilization in zebrafish. Our studies provide insight into the machinery required for karyomere fusion and suggest that specialized proteins are necessary for proper nuclear division in large dividing blastomeres.

  20. Positively charged amino acids at the SNAP-25 C terminus determine fusion rates, fusion pore properties, and energetics of tight SNARE complex zippering.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qinghua; Zhao, Ying; Herbst, Adam Drew; Kim, Brian N; Lindau, Manfred

    2015-02-18

    SNAP-25 is a Q-SNARE protein mediating exocytosis of neurosecretory vesicles including chromaffin granules. Previous results with a SNAP-25 construct lacking the nine C terminal residues (SNAP-25Δ9) showed changed fusion pore properties (Fang et al., 2008), suggesting a model for fusion pore mechanics that couple C terminal zipping of the SNARE complex to the opening of the fusion pore. The deleted fragment contains the positively charged residues R198 and K201, adjacent to layers 7 and 8 of the SNARE complex. To determine how fusion pore conductance and dynamics depend on these residues, single exocytotic events in bovine chromaffin cells expressing R198Q, R198E, K201Q, or K201E mutants were investigated by carbon fiber amperometry and cell-attached patch capacitance measurements. Coarse grain molecular dynamics simulations revealed spontaneous transitions between a loose and tightly zippered state at the SNARE complex C terminus. The SNAP-25 K201Q mutant showed no changes compared with SNAP-25 wild-type. However, K201E, R198Q, and R198E displayed reduced release frequencies, slower release kinetics, and prolonged fusion pore duration that were correlated with reduced probability to engage in the tightly zippered state. The results show that the positively charged amino acids at the SNAP-25 C terminus promote tight SNARE complex zippering and are required for high release frequency and rapid release in individual fusion events.

  1. Nonhemolytic Cell-Penetrating Peptides: Site Specific Introduction of Glutamine and Lysine Residues into the α-Helical Peptide Causes Deletion of Its Direct Membrane Disrupting Ability but Retention of Its Cell Penetrating Ability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seoyeon; Hyun, Soonsil; Lee, Yuri; Lee, Yan; Yu, Jaehoon

    2016-09-12

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) often have cationic and amphipathic characteristics that are commonly associated with α-helical peptides. These features give CPPs both membrane demolishing and penetrating abilities. To make CPPs safe for biomedical applications, their toxicities resulting from their membrane demolishing abilities must be removed while their cell penetrating abilities must be retained. In this study, we systematically constructed mutants of the amphipathic α-helical model peptide (LKKLLKLLKKLLKLAG, LK peptide). The hydrophobic amino acid leucine in the LK peptide was replaced with hydrophilic amino acids to reduce hemolytic or cell toxicity. Most of the mutants were found to have weakened membrane disrupting abilities, but their cell penetrating abilities were also weakened. However, the L8Q and L8K mutants were found to have low micromolar range cell penetrating ability and almost no membrane disrupting ability. These selected mutants utilize energy-dependent endocytosis mechanisms instead of an energy-independent direct cell penetrating mechanism to enter cells. In addition, the mutants can be used to deliver the anticancer drug methotrexate (MTX) to cells, thereby overcoming resistance to this drug. To determine if the effect of these mutations on the membrane disrupting and cell penetrating abilities is general, Q and K mutations of the natural amphipathic α-helical antimicrobial peptide (AMP), LL37, were introduced. Specific positional Q and K mutants of LL37 were found to have lower hemolytic toxicities and preserved the ability to penetrate eukaryotic cells such as MDA-MB-231 cells. Taken together, observations made in this work suggest that interrupting the global hydrophobicity of amphipathic α-helical CPPs and AMPs, by replacing hydrophobic residues with mildly hydrophilic amino acids such as Q and K, might be an ideal strategy for constructing peptides that have strong cell penetrating abilities and weak cell membrane disrupting

  2. Nonhemolytic Cell-Penetrating Peptides: Site Specific Introduction of Glutamine and Lysine Residues into the α-Helical Peptide Causes Deletion of Its Direct Membrane Disrupting Ability but Retention of Its Cell Penetrating Ability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seoyeon; Hyun, Soonsil; Lee, Yuri; Lee, Yan; Yu, Jaehoon

    2016-09-12

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) often have cationic and amphipathic characteristics that are commonly associated with α-helical peptides. These features give CPPs both membrane demolishing and penetrating abilities. To make CPPs safe for biomedical applications, their toxicities resulting from their membrane demolishing abilities must be removed while their cell penetrating abilities must be retained. In this study, we systematically constructed mutants of the amphipathic α-helical model peptide (LKKLLKLLKKLLKLAG, LK peptide). The hydrophobic amino acid leucine in the LK peptide was replaced with hydrophilic amino acids to reduce hemolytic or cell toxicity. Most of the mutants were found to have weakened membrane disrupting abilities, but their cell penetrating abilities were also weakened. However, the L8Q and L8K mutants were found to have low micromolar range cell penetrating ability and almost no membrane disrupting ability. These selected mutants utilize energy-dependent endocytosis mechanisms instead of an energy-independent direct cell penetrating mechanism to enter cells. In addition, the mutants can be used to deliver the anticancer drug methotrexate (MTX) to cells, thereby overcoming resistance to this drug. To determine if the effect of these mutations on the membrane disrupting and cell penetrating abilities is general, Q and K mutations of the natural amphipathic α-helical antimicrobial peptide (AMP), LL37, were introduced. Specific positional Q and K mutants of LL37 were found to have lower hemolytic toxicities and preserved the ability to penetrate eukaryotic cells such as MDA-MB-231 cells. Taken together, observations made in this work suggest that interrupting the global hydrophobicity of amphipathic α-helical CPPs and AMPs, by replacing hydrophobic residues with mildly hydrophilic amino acids such as Q and K, might be an ideal strategy for constructing peptides that have strong cell penetrating abilities and weak cell membrane disrupting

  3. Fusion Proteins for Half-Life Extension of Biologics as a Strategy to Make Biobetters.

    PubMed

    Strohl, William R

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of making a "biobetter" biologic is to improve on the salient characteristics of a known biologic for which there is, minimally, clinical proof of concept or, maximally, marketed product data. There already are several examples in which second-generation or biobetter biologics have been generated by improving the pharmacokinetic properties of an innovative drug, including Neulasta(®) [a PEGylated, longer-half-life version of Neupogen(®) (filgrastim)] and Aranesp(®) [a longer-half-life version of Epogen(®) (epoetin-α)]. This review describes the use of protein fusion technologies such as Fc fusion proteins, fusion to human serum albumin, fusion to carboxy-terminal peptide, and other polypeptide fusion approaches to make biobetter drugs with more desirable pharmacokinetic profiles.

  4. Isolation of transposon mutants and characterization of genes involved in biofilm formation by Pseudomonas fluorescens TC222.

    PubMed

    Nian, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jie; Song, Fuping; Fan, Liqiang; Huang, Dafang

    2007-09-01

    Biofilm formation mutants are often found to have defective or altered motility. The motility phenotype was exploited to identify Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilm formation mutants. Fourteen motility mutants were obtained from P. fluorescens isolate TC222 and eight stable mutants were studied further. The eight transposon insertion mutants showed altered ability to form biofilm compared with the parent. Five Tn5-inserted genes from these mutants were cloned and sequenced. Genetic analysis showed that two insertions were located in genes affecting multiple cell surface characteristics, including lipopolysaccharide (rfbD) and polar flagella (fliR). Three genes encoding for a putative Mig-14 family protein (epsB), a probable bacteriophage signal peptide protein (bspA) and a soluble pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase (pyrA) were reported for the first time to be involved in biofilm formation. Complementation experiments of rfbD and epsB genes proved that biofilm formation of the corresponding mutants could be restored. Further semi-quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed that both rfbD and epsB can express their transcripts much higher in the complemented strains than that in wild-type strains. The transcripts of both genes in their mutants could not be detected.

  5. Ceramics for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle, and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, BeO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying response to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today which will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications.

  6. Peaceful Uses of Fusion

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Teller, E.

    1958-07-03

    Applications of thermonuclear energy for peaceful and constructive purposes are surveyed. Developments and problems in the release and control of fusion energy are reviewed. It is pointed out that the future of thermonuclear power reactors will depend upon the construction of a machine that produces more electric energy than it consumes. The fuel for thermonuclear reactors is cheap and practically inexhaustible. Thermonuclear reactors produce less dangerous radioactive materials than fission reactors and, when once brought under control, are not as likely to be subject to dangerous excursions. The interaction of the hot plasma with magnetic fields opens the way for the direct production of electricity. It is possible that explosive fusion energy released underground may be harnessed for the production of electricity before the same feat is accomplished in controlled fusion processes. Applications of underground detonations of fission devices in mining and for the enhancement of oil flow in large low-specific-yield formations are also suggested.

  7. Simulation of Fusion Plasmas

    ScienceCinema

    Holland, Chris [UC San Diego, San Diego, California, United States

    2016-07-12

    The upcoming ITER experiment (www.iter.org) represents the next major milestone in realizing the promise of using nuclear fusion as a commercial energy source, by moving into the “burning plasma” regime where the dominant heat source is the internal fusion reactions. As part of its support for the ITER mission, the US fusion community is actively developing validated predictive models of the behavior of magnetically confined plasmas. In this talk, I will describe how the plasma community is using the latest high performance computing facilities to develop and refine our models of the nonlinear, multiscale plasma dynamics, and how recent advances in experimental diagnostics are allowing us to directly test and validate these models at an unprecedented level.

  8. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Yueng-Kay M.

    1989-04-04

    A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

  9. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Yueng-Kay M.

    1989-01-01

    A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

  10. CRYOGENICS FOR FUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Dauguet, P.; Bonneton, M.; Fauve, E.; Bernhardt, J. M.; Beauvisage, J.; Andrieu, F.; Gistau-Baguer, G. M.; Boissin, J. C.

    2008-03-16

    Fusion of Hydrogen to produce energy is one of the technologies under study to meet the mankind raising need in energy and as a substitute to fossil fuels for the future. This technology is under investigation for more than 30 years already, with, for example, the former construction of the experimental reactors Tore Supra, DIII-D and JET. With the construction of ITER to start, the next step to 'fusion for energy' will be done. In these projects, an extensive use of cryogenic systems is requested. Air Liquide has been involved as cryogenic partner in most of former and presently constructed fusion reactors. In the present paper, a review of the cryogenic systems we delivered to Tore Supra, JET, IPR and KSTAR will be presented.

  11. A Yersinia pestis tat mutant is attenuated in bubonic and small-aerosol pneumonic challenge models of infection but not as attenuated by intranasal challenge.

    PubMed

    Bozue, Joel; Cote, Christopher K; Chance, Taylor; Kugelman, Jeffrey; Kern, Steven J; Kijek, Todd K; Jenkins, Amy; Mou, Sherry; Moody, Krishna; Fritz, David; Robinson, Camenzind G; Bell, Todd; Worsham, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial proteins destined for the Tat pathway are folded before crossing the inner membrane and are typically identified by an N-terminal signal peptide containing a twin arginine motif. Translocation by the Tat pathway is dependent on the products of genes which encode proteins possessing the binding site of the signal peptide and mediating the actual translocation event. In the fully virulent CO92 strain of Yersinia pestis, the tatA gene was deleted. The mutant was assayed for loss of virulence through various in vitro and in vivo assays. Deletion of the tatA gene resulted in several consequences for the mutant as compared to wild-type. Cell morphology of the mutant bacteria was altered and demonstrated a more elongated form. In addition, while cultures of the mutant strain were able to produce a biofilm, we observed a loss of adhesion of the mutant biofilm structure compared to the biofilm produced by the wild-type strain. Immuno-electron microscopy revealed a partial disruption of the F1 antigen on the surface of the mutant. The virulence of the ΔtatA mutant was assessed in various murine models of plague. The mutant was severely attenuated in the bubonic model with full virulence restored by complementation with the native gene. After small-particle aerosol challenge in a pneumonic model of infection, the mutant was also shown to be attenuated. In contrast, when mice were challenged intranasally with the mutant, very little difference in the LD50 was observed between wild-type and mutant strains. However, an increased time-to-death and delay in bacterial dissemination was observed in mice infected with the ΔtatA mutant as compared to the parent strain. Collectively, these findings demonstrate an essential role for the Tat pathway in the virulence of Y. pestis in bubonic and small-aerosol pneumonic infection but less important role for intranasal challenge.

  12. Embryo and endosperm development is disrupted in the female gametophytic capulet mutants of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Grini, Paul E; Jürgens, Gerd; Hülskamp, Martin

    2002-01-01

    The female gametophyte of higher plants gives rise, by double fertilization, to the diploid embryo and triploid endosperm, which develop in concert to produce the mature seed. What roles gametophytic maternal factors play in this process is not clear. The female-gametophytic effects on embryo and endosperm development in the Arabidopsis mea, fis, and fie mutants appear to be due to gametic imprinting that can be suppressed by METHYL TRANSFERASE1 antisense (MET1 a/s) transgene expression or by mutation of the DECREASE IN DNA METHYLATION1 (DDM1) gene. Here we describe two novel gametophytic maternal-effect mutants, capulet1 (cap1) and capulet2 (cap2). In the cap1 mutant, both embryo and endosperm development are arrested at early stages. In the cap2 mutant, endosperm development is blocked at very early stages, whereas embryos can develop to the early heart stage. The cap mutant phenotypes were not rescued by wild-type pollen nor by pollen from tetraploid plants. Furthermore, removal of silencing barriers from the paternal genome by MET1 a/s transgene expression or by the ddm1 mutation also failed to restore seed development in the cap mutants. Neither cap1 nor cap2 displayed autonomous seed development, in contrast to mea, fis, and fie mutants. In addition, cap2 was epistatic to fis1 in both autonomous endosperm and sexual development. Finally, both cap1 and cap2 mutant endosperms, like wild-type endosperms, expressed the paternally inactive endosperm-specific FIS2 promoter GUS fusion transgene only when the transgene was introduced via the embryo sac, indicating that imprinting was not affected. Our results suggest that the CAP genes represent novel maternal functions supplied by the female gametophyte that are required for embryo and endosperm development. PMID:12524359

  13. Intense fusion neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  14. Characterization of echinocandin-resistant mutants of Candida albicans: genetic, biochemical, and virulence studies.

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, M B; Abruzzo, G; Flattery, A; Bartizal, K; Marrinan, J A; Li, W; Milligan, J; Nollstadt, K; Douglas, C M

    1996-01-01

    The pneumocandins are potent antifungal agents of the echinocandin class which are under development for use as broad-spectrum antimycotic therapy. One important consideration for any new therapeutic class for treating serious fungal infections is the potential for drug resistance development. In this study we have isolated and characterized four independent spontaneous Candida albicans mutants resistant to the potent semisynthetic pneumocandin L-733,560. These mutants have many of the properties of FKS1/ETG1 echinocandin-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including (i) cross-resistance to other 1,3-beta-D-glucan synthase inhibitors, such as papulacandin and echinocandins, but no change in sensitivity to other antifungal agents; (ii) in vitro glucan synthase activity that is more resistant to pneumocandins than the wild-type parent enzyme; and (iii) semidominant drug resistance in spheroplast fusion strains. The mutants were compared with C. albicans echinocandin-resistant mutants isolated by mutagenesis by L. Beckford and D. Kerridge (mutant M-2) (abstr. PS3.11, in Proceedings of the XI Congress of the International Society for Human and Animal Mycology, Montreal, Canada, 1992) and by A. Cassone, R. E. Mason, and D. Kerridge (mutant CA-2) (Sabouraudia 19:97-110, 1981). All of the strains had resistant enzyme activity in vitro. M-2 grew poorly and had low levels of enzyme activity. In contrast, CA-2 and the spontaneous mutants grew as well as the parents and had normal levels of glucan synthase activity. These results suggest that these resistant mutants may have alterations in glucan synthase. CA-2 was unable to form germ tubes, an ability retained by the spontaneous mutants. The virulence of the spontaneous mutants was unimpaired in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis, while M-2 and CA-2 were 2 orders of magnitude less virulent than their parent strains. Significantly, mice challenged with the spontaneous mutant CAI4R1 responded therapeutically

  15. Yeast lipin 1 orthologue pah1p regulates vacuole homeostasis and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Sasser, Terry; Qiu, Quan-Sheng; Karunakaran, Surya; Padolina, Mark; Reyes, Anna; Flood, Blake; Smith, Sheena; Gonzales, Chad; Fratti, Rutilio A

    2012-01-13

    Vacuole homotypic fusion requires a group of regulatory lipids that includes diacylglycerol, a fusogenic lipid that is produced through multiple metabolic pathways including the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid (PA). Here we examined the relationship between membrane fusion and PA phosphatase activity. Pah1p is the single yeast homologue of the Lipin family of PA phosphatases. Deletion of PAH1 was sufficient to cause marked vacuole fragmentation and abolish vacuole fusion. The function of Pah1p solely depended on its phosphatase activity as complementation studies showed that wild type Pah1p restored fusion, whereas the phosphatase dead mutant Pah1p(D398E) had no effect. We discovered that the lack of PA phosphatase activity blocked fusion by inhibiting the binding of SNAREs to Sec18p, an N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor homologue responsible for priming inactive cis-SNARE complexes. In addition, pah1Δ vacuoles were devoid of the late endosome/vacuolar Rab Ypt7p, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase Vps34p, and Vps39p, a subunit of the HOPS (homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting) tethering complex, all of which are required for vacuole fusion. The lack of Vps34p resulted in the absence of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, a lipid required for SNARE activity and vacuole fusion. These findings demonstrate that Pah1p and PA phosphatase activity are critical for vacuole homeostasis and fusion.

  16. Structural Basis for the Recognition of Mutant Self by a Tumor-Specific, MHC Class II-Restricted T Cell Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Deng,L.; Langley, R.; Brown, P.; Xu, G.; Teng, L.; Wang, Q.; Gonzales, M.; Callender, G.; Nishimura, M.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Structural studies of complexes of T cell receptor (TCR) and peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) have focused on TCRs specific for foreign antigens or native self. An unexplored category of TCRs includes those specific for self determinants bearing alterations resulting from disease, notably cancer. We determined here the structure of a human melanoma-specific TCR (E8) bound to the MHC molecule HLA-DR1 and an epitope from mutant triosephosphate isomerase. The structure had features intermediate between 'anti-foreign' and autoimmune TCR-peptide-MHC class II complexes that may reflect the hybrid nature of altered self. E8 manifested very low affinity for mutant triosephosphate isomerase-HLA-DR1 despite the highly tumor-reactive properties of E8 cells. A second TCR (G4) had even lower affinity but underwent peptide-specific formation of dimers, suggesting this as a mechanism for enhancing low-affinity TCR-peptide-MHC interactions for T cell activation.

  17. Fusion welding process

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Jones, Eric D.; McBride, Marvin A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  18. Fusion for Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schmidt, George R.; Santarius, John F.; Turchi, Peter J.; Siemon, Richard E.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The need for fusion propulsion for interplanetary flights is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important system attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For efficient and affordable human exploration of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion obviously cannot meet the requirement in propellant exhaust velocity. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the fission energy to heat a low atomic weight propellant produces propellant velocity of the order of 10 kinds. Alternatively the fission energy can be converted into electricity that is used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. However, the necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment greatly increases the mass of the propulsion system. Fundamental considerations in waste heat rejection and power conditioning in a fission electric propulsion system place a limit on its jet specific power to the order of about 0.2 kW/kg. If fusion can be developed for propulsion, it appears to have the best of all worlds - it can provide the largest absolute amount of energy, the propellant exhaust velocity (> 100 km/s), and the high specific jet power (> 10 kW/kg). An intermediate step towards fusion propulsion might be a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. There are similarities as well as differences between applying fusion to propulsion and to terrestrial electrical power generation. The similarities are the underlying plasma and fusion physics, the enabling component technologies, the computational and the diagnostics capabilities. These physics and

  19. Atomic data for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  20. Isolation and characterization of Salmonella typhimurium glyoxylate shunt mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, R B; Maloy, S R

    1987-01-01

    Growth of Salmonella typhimurium on acetate as a sole carbon source requires expression of the glyoxylate shunt; however, the genes for the glyoxylate shunt enzymes have not been previously identified in S. typhimurium. In this study, we isolated transposon insertions in the genes for the two unique enzymes of this pathway, aceA (isocitrate lyase) and aceB (malate synthase). The aceA and aceB genes were located at 89.5 min on the S. typhimurium genetic map. Genetic linkage to nearby loci indicated that the relative gene order is purDJ metA aceB aceA. Transposon insertions in aceB were polar on aceA, suggesting that the genes form an operon transcribed from aceB to aceA. Transcriptional regulation of the aceBA operon was studied by constructing mini-Mu d(lac Kan) operon fusions. Analysis of these fusions indicated that expression of the aceBA operon is regulated at the level of transcription; the aceBA genes were induced when acetate was present and repressing carbon sources were absent. Although glucose represses expression of the aceBA operon, repression does not seem to be mediated solely by cyclic AMP-cyclic AMP receptor protein complex. Mutants with altered regulation of the aceBA operon were isolated. PMID:3298210

  1. Pyrin gene and mutants thereof, which cause familial Mediterranean fever

    DOEpatents

    Kastner, Daniel L.; Aksentijevichh, Ivona; Centola, Michael; Deng, Zuoming; Sood, Ramen; Collins, Francis S.; Blake, Trevor; Liu, P. Paul; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Gumucio, Deborah L.; Richards, Robert I.; Ricke, Darrell O.; Doggett, Norman A.; Pras, Mordechai

    2003-09-30

    The invention provides the nucleic acid sequence encoding the protein associated with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). The cDNA sequence is designated as MEFV. The invention is also directed towards fragments of the DNA sequence, as well as the corresponding sequence for the RNA transcript and fragments thereof. Another aspect of the invention provides the amino acid sequence for a protein (pyrin) associated with FMF. The invention is directed towards both the full length amino acid sequence, fusion proteins containing the amino acid sequence and fragments thereof. The invention is also directed towards mutants of the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences associated with FMF. In particular, the invention discloses three missense mutations, clustered in within about 40 to 50 amino acids, in the highly conserved rfp (B30.2) domain at the C-terminal of the protein. These mutants include M6801, M694V, K695R, and V726A. Additionally, the invention includes methods for diagnosing a patient at risk for having FMF and kits therefor.

  2. Multisensor data fusion algorithm development

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, D.A.; Chadwick, M.D.; Goudy, S.P.; Johnson, D.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents a two-year LDRD research effort into multisensor data fusion. We approached the problem by addressing the available types of data, preprocessing that data, and developing fusion algorithms using that data. The report reflects these three distinct areas. First, the possible data sets for fusion are identified. Second, automated registration techniques for imagery data are analyzed. Third, two fusion techniques are presented. The first fusion algorithm is based on the two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform. Using test images, the wavelet algorithm is compared against intensity modulation and intensity-hue-saturation image fusion algorithms that are available in commercial software. The wavelet approach outperforms the other two fusion techniques by preserving spectral/spatial information more precisely. The wavelet fusion algorithm was also applied to Landsat Thematic Mapper and SPOT panchromatic imagery data. The second algorithm is based on a linear-regression technique. We analyzed the technique using the same Landsat and SPOT data.

  3. Construction of mouse adenovirus type 1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Cauthen, Angela N; Welton, Amanda R; Spindler, Katherine R

    2007-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus provides a model for studying adenovirus pathogenesis in the natural host. The ability to make viral mutants allows the investigation of specific mouse adenoviral gene contributions to virus-host interactions. Methods for propagation and titration of wild-type mouse adenovirus, production of viral DNA and viral DNA-protein complex, and transfection of mouse cells to obtain mouse adenovirus mutants are described in this chapter. Plaque purification, propagation, and titration of the mutant viruses are also presented.

  4. Novel anti-HIV peptides containing multiple copies of artificially designed heptad repeat motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Weiguo; Qi Zhi; Pan Chungen; Xue Na; Debnath, Asim K.; Qie Jiankun; Jiang Shibo Liu Keliang

    2008-10-03

    The peptidic anti-HIV drug T20 (Fuzeon) and its analog C34 share a common heptad repeat (HR) sequence, but they have different functional domains, i.e., pocket- and lipid-binding domains (PBD and LBD, respectively). We hypothesize that novel anti-HIV peptides may be designed by using artificial sequences containing multiple copies of HR motifs plus zero, one or two functional domains. Surprisingly, we found that the peptides containing only the non-natural HR sequences could significantly inhibit HIV-1 infection, while addition of PBD and/or LBD to the peptides resulted in significant improvement of anti-HIV-1 activity. These results suggest that these artificial HR sequences, which may serve as structural domains, could be used as templates for the design of novel antiviral peptides against HIV and other viruses with class I fusion proteins.

  5. Regulated vesicular fusion in neurons: snapping together the details.

    PubMed Central

    Bark, I C; Wilson, M C

    1994-01-01

    In the past year major strides have been made toward our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in regulated vesicle fusion and exocytosis in neurons and neuroendocrine cells. Much of this advance has come from the identification of proteins participating in these events and of their potential roles mediated by interactions with each other, the constituent membranes, and, in some cases, Ca2+ signaling. The involvement of vesicle fusion in elongation of neuronal processes during development and release of transmitters and neuromodulatory peptides in the mature nervous system indicates, however, that refinements in the fusion machinery may be required for each of these acts. For many of the participants in synaptic membrane fusion, variant isoforms have been identified that exhibit modifications that might alter interactive properties of these proteins. We discuss the idea that diversification of isoforms, as illustrated by the expression of alternatively spliced variants of SNAP-25, is likely to be an important component in providing the detail necessary to differentiate the physiology of regulated fusion of different classes of vesicles employed in development, neurotransmission, and secretion. Images PMID:8197108

  6. Identification of Drosophila Mutants Affecting Defense to an Entomopathogenic Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hsiao-Ling; Wang, Jonathan B.; Brown, Markus A.; Euerle, Christopher; St. Leger, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi cause the majority of insect disease. However, to date attempts to model host–fungal interactions with Drosophila have focused on opportunistic human pathogens. Here, we performed a screen of 2,613 mutant Drosophila lines to identify host genes affecting susceptibility to the natural insect pathogen Metarhizium anisopliae (Ma549). Overall, 241 (9.22%) mutant lines had altered resistance to Ma549. Life spans ranged from 3.0 to 6.2 days, with females being more susceptible than males in all lines. Speed of kill correlated with within-host growth and onset of sporulation, but total spore production is decoupled from host genotypes. Results showed that mutations affected the ability of Drosophila to restrain rather than tolerate infections and suggested trade-offs between antifungal and antibacterial genes affecting cuticle and gut structural barriers. Approximately, 13% of mutations where in genes previously associated with host pathogen interactions. These encoded fast-acting immune responses including coagulation, phagocytosis, encapsulation and melanization but not the slow-response induction of anti-fungal peptides. The non-immune genes impact a wide variety of biological functions, including behavioral traits. Many have human orthologs already implicated in human disorders; while others were mutations in protein and non-protein coding genes for which disease resistance was the first biological annotation. PMID:26202798

  7. Phospholipid membrane-interaction of a peptide from S4 segment of KvAP K(+) channel and the influence of the positive charges and an identified heptad repeat in its interaction with a S3 peptide.

    PubMed

    Verma, Richa; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2011-06-01

    In order to examine the ability of S3 and S4 segments of a Kv channel to interact with each other, two wild type short peptides derived from the S3 and S4 segments of KvAP channel were synthesized. Additionally, to evaluate the role of positive charges and an identified heptad repeat in the S4 segment, two S4 mutants of the same size as the S4 peptide, one with substitution of two leucine residues in the heptad repeat sequence by two alanine residues and in the other two arginine residues replaced by two glutamines residues were synthesized. Our results show that only the wild type S4 peptide, but not its mutants, self-assembled and permeabilized negatively charged phospholipid vesicles. The S3 peptide showed lesser affinity toward the same kind of lipid vesicles and localized onto its surface. However, the S3 peptide interacted only with S4 wild type peptide, but not with S4 mutants, and altered its localization onto the phospholipid membrane with increased resistance against the proteolytic enzyme, proteinase-k, in the presence of the S4 peptide. The results demonstrate that the selected, synthetic S3 and S4 segments possess the required amino acid sequences to interact with each other and show that the positive charges and the identified heptad repeat in S4 contribute to its assembly and interaction with S3 segment.

  8. Preventing neurodegeneration in the Drosophila mutant bubblegum.

    PubMed

    Min, K T; Benzer, S

    1999-06-18

    The Drosophila melanogaster recessive mutant bubblegum (bgm) exhibits adult neurodegeneration, with marked dilation of photoreceptor axons. The bubblegum mutant shows elevated levels of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), as seen in the human disease adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD). In ALD, the excess can be lowered by dietary treatment with "Lorenzo's oil," a mixture of unsaturated fatty acids. Feeding the fly mutant one of the components, glyceryl trioleate oil, blocked the accumulation of excess VLCFAs as well as development of the pathology. Mutant flies thus provide a potential model system for studying mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease and screening drugs for treatment.

  9. Melanin-deficient mutants of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Torres-Guererro, H; Edman, J C

    1994-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a significant fungal pathogen in immunocompromised patients. The ability of C. neoformans to produce melanin has been correlated with virulence. The role of melanin in promoting virulence is unclear, although an anti-oxidant function has been suggested. To begin to define the genetic mechanisms responsible for melanin production in C. neoformans, we describe the isolation of seven melanin-deficient mutant classes. Some of the mutants can be suppressed by addition of Cu2+ to media, suggesting that the phenoloxidase of C. neoformans, like other fungal phenoloxidases, contains copper. Other mutants display a recessive sterile phenotype. A genetic and phenotypic characterisation of these mutants is presented. PMID:7983575

  10. Fusion engineering device design description

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein.

  11. Fusion Engineering Device design description

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein.

  12. scyllo-Inositol promotes robust mutant Huntingtin protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Aaron Y; Lan, Cynthia P; Hasan, Salwa; Brown, Mary E; McLaurin, Joanne

    2014-02-01

    Huntington disease is characterized by neuronal aggregates and inclusions containing polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin protein and peptide fragments (polyQ-Htt). We have used an established cell-based assay employing a PC12 cell line overexpressing truncated exon 1 of Htt with a 103-residue polyQ expansion that yields polyQ-Htt aggregates to investigate the fate of polyQ-Htt-drug complexes. scyllo-Inositol is an endogenous inositol stereoisomer known to inhibit accumulation and toxicity of the amyloid-β peptide and α-synuclein. In light of these properties, we investigated the effect of scyllo-inositol on polyQ-Htt accumulation. We show that scyllo-inositol lowered the number of visible polyQ-Htt aggregates and robustly decreased polyQ-Htt protein abundance without concomitant cellular toxicity. We found that scyllo-inositol-induced polyQ-Htt reduction was by rescue of degradation pathways mediated by the lysosome and by the proteasome but not autophagosomes. The rescue of degradation pathways was not a direct result of scyllo-inositol on the lysosome or proteasome but due to scyllo-inositol-induced reduction in mutant polyQ-Htt protein levels.

  13. Human-Centered Fusion Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Posse, Christian; White, Amanda M.; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2007-05-16

    In recent years the benefits of fusing signatures extracted from large amounts of distributed and/or heterogeneous data sources have been largely documented in various problems ranging from biological protein function prediction to cyberspace monitoring. In spite of significant progress in information fusion research, there is still no formal theoretical framework for defining various types of information fusion systems, defining and analyzing relations among such types, and designing information fusion systems using a formal method approach. Consequently, fusion systems are often poorly understood, are less than optimal, and/or do not suit user needs. To start addressing these issues, we outline a formal humancentered fusion framework for reasoning about fusion strategies. Our approach relies on a new taxonomy for fusion strategies, an alternative definition of information fusion in terms of parameterized paths in signature related spaces, an algorithmic formalization of fusion strategies and a library of numeric and dynamic visual tools measuring the impact as well as the impact behavior of fusion strategies. Using a real case of intelligence analysis we demonstrate that the proposed framework enables end users to rapidly 1) develop and implement alternative fusion strategies, 2) understand the impact of each strategy, 3) compare the various strategies, and 4) perform the above steps without having to know the mathematical foundations of the framework. We also demonstrate that the human impact on a fusion system is critical in the sense that small changes in strategies do not necessarily correspond to small changes in results.

  14. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants.

    PubMed

    Tam, James P; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  15. Electron transfer in peptides.

    PubMed

    Shah, Afzal; Adhikari, Bimalendu; Martic, Sanela; Munir, Azeema; Shahzad, Suniya; Ahmad, Khurshid; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2015-02-21

    In this review, we discuss the factors that influence electron transfer in peptides. We summarize experimental results from solution and surface studies and highlight the ongoing debate on the mechanistic aspects of this fundamental reaction. Here, we provide a balanced approach that remains unbiased and does not favor one mechanistic view over another. Support for a putative hopping mechanism in which an electron transfers in a stepwise manner is contrasted with experimental results that support electron tunneling or even some form of ballistic transfer or a pathway transfer for an electron between donor and acceptor sites. In some cases, experimental evidence suggests that a change in the electron transfer mechanism occurs as a result of donor-acceptor separation. However, this common understanding of the switch between tunneling and hopping as a function of chain length is not sufficient for explaining electron transfer in peptides. Apart from chain length, several other factors such as the extent of the secondary structure, backbone conformation, dipole orientation, the presence of special amino acids, hydrogen bonding, and the dynamic properties of a peptide also influence the rate and mode of electron transfer in peptides. Electron transfer plays a key role in physical, chemical and biological systems, so its control is a fundamental task in bioelectrochemical systems, the design of peptide based sensors and molecular junctions. Therefore, this topic is at the heart of a number of biological and technological processes and thus remains of vital interest.

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central