Science.gov

Sample records for fusion plasma heating

  1. RF plasma heating in toroidal fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Golant, V.E.; Fedorov, V.I. )

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the present book is to provide, in seven chapters, a unified overview of the methods for rf heating of plasmas in toroidal fusion experiments. In Chapter 1 the problem of plasma heating in tokamaks and stellarators is formulated and the requirements for auxiliary heating techniques are described. This chapter also contains a brief review of the results of research on tokamaks and stellarators. Chapter 2 is devoted to a theoretical description of the principal physical effects involved in the rf heating of plasmas, especially the characteristics of wave propagation, of the mechanisms by which waves are absorbed and plasma heating takes place, and of the nonlinear effects that accompany heating. The primary emphasis is on a qualitative physical picture of these effects. Chapters 3-6, in turn, deal with the major rf heating techniques currently under investigation, electron cyclotron (ECH), ion cyclotron (ICH), lower hybrid (LHH), and Alfven wave heating. In each of these chapters the main schemes for heating are described, the results of theoretical analyses and numerical simulations are discussed, the technology of the heating systems is briefly described, and experimental work published through the end of 1984 is reviewed. Finally, in Chapter 7 the different rf heating techniques are compared; they are contrasted with neutral beam injection, and the feasibility of adiabatic compression as a means of heating plasmas is examined. Separate abstracts were prepared for each chapter of this book. 246 refs.

  2. Alpha heating and burning plasmas in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Spears, B. K.; Nora, R.; Bose, A.; Howard, J.; Woo, K. M.; Edwards, M. J.; Sanz, J.

    2015-06-01

    Estimating the level of alpha heating and determining the onset of the burning plasma regime is essential to finding the path towards thermonuclear ignition. In a burning plasma, the alpha heating exceeds the external input energy to the plasma. Using a simple model of the implosion, it is shown that a general relation can be derived, connecting the burning plasma regime to the yield enhancement due to alpha heating and to experimentally measurable parameters such as the Lawson ignition parameter. A general alpha-heating curve is found, independent of the target and suitable to assess the performance of all laser fusion experiments whether direct or indirect drive. The onset of the burning plasma regime inside the hot spot of current implosions on the National Ignition Facility requires a fusion yield of about 50 kJ.

  3. Alpha Heating and Burning Plasmas in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.

    2016-05-01

    Assessing the degree to which fusion alpha particles contribute to the fusion yield is essential to understanding the onset of the thermal runaway process of thermonuclear ignition. It is shown that in inertial confinement fusion, the yield enhancement due to alpha particle heating (before ignition occurs) depends on the generalized Lawson parameter that can be inferred from experimental observables. A universal curve valid for arbitrary laser-fusion targets shows the yield amplification due to alpha heating for a given value of the Lawson parameter. The same theory is used to determine the onset of the burning plasma regime when the alpha heating exceeds the compression work. This result can be used to assess the performance of current ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility.

  4. Particle model for nonlocal heat transport in fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Bufferand, H; Ciraolo, G; Ghendrih, Ph; Lepri, S; Livi, R

    2013-02-01

    We present a simple stochastic, one-dimensional model for heat transfer in weakly collisional media as fusion plasmas. Energies of plasma particles are treated as lattice random variables interacting with a rate inversely proportional to their energy schematizing a screened Coulomb interaction. We consider both the equilibrium (microcanonical) and nonequilibrium case in which the system is in contact with heat baths at different temperatures. The model exhibits a characteristic length of thermalization that can be associated with an interaction mean free path and one observes a transition from ballistic to diffusive regime depending on the average energy of the system. A mean-field expression for heat flux is deduced from system heat transport properties. Finally, it is shown that the nonequilibrium steady state is characterized by long-range correlations.

  5. Plasma Heating and Current Drive for Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtkamp, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    ITER (in Latin ``the way'') is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen - deuterium and tritium - fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q >= 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). In a Tokamak the definition of the functionalities and requirements for the Plasma Heating and Current Drive are relevant in the determination of the overall plant efficiency, the operation cost of the plant and the plant availability. This paper summarise these functionalities and requirements in perspective of the systems under construction in ITER. It discusses the further steps necessary to meet those requirements. Approximately one half of the total heating will be provided by two Neutral Beam injection systems at with energy of 1 MeV and a beam power of 16 MW into the plasma. For ITER specific test facility is being build in order to develop and test the Neutral Beam injectors. Remote handling maintenance scheme for the NB systems, critical during the nuclear phase of the project, will be developed. In addition the paper will give an overview over the general status of ITER. )

  6. Fusion Plasma Theory: Task 3, Auxiliary radiofrequency heating of tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Scharer, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The research performed under this grant during the past year has been concentrated on the following several key tokamak ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) coupling, heating and current drive issues: Efficient coupling during the L- to H- mode transition by analysis and computer simulation of ICRF antennas; analysis of ICRF cavity-backed coil antenna coupling to plasma edge profiles including fast and ion Bernstein wave coupling for heating and current drive; benchmarking the codes to compare with current JET, D-IIID and ASDEX experimental results and predictions for advanced tokamaks such as BPX and SSAT (Steady-State Advanced Tokamak); ICRF full-wave field solutions, power conservation, heating analyses and minority ion current drive; and the effects of fusion alpha particle or ion tail populations on the ICRF absorption. Research progress, publications, and conference and workshop presentations are summarized in this report.

  7. Feasibility study of fusion plasma heating by relativistic high-current electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimenko, V.

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this research will be to study the feasibility of fusion plasma heating using ultra-short high intensity electron beam by dissipating the energy of excited wakes either in linear or nonlinear regimes.

  8. Technological issues of ion cyclotron heating of fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, D.Q.; Fortgang, C.M.

    1985-07-01

    With the recent promising results of plasma heating using electromagnetic waves (EM waves) in the ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) tokamak the feasibility of employing ICRF heating to a reactor-like magnetic confinement device is increasing. The high power ICRF experiments funded on JET (Joint European Torus in England) and JT-60 (in Japan) will have rf source power in the range of 10-30 MW. The time scale for the duration of the RF pulse will range from seconds up to steady-state. The development of new RF components that can transmit and launch such high power, long pulse length, EM waves in a plasma environment is a major technological task. In general, the technology issues may be divided into two categories. The first category concerns the region where the plasma comes in contact with the wave launchers. The problems here are dominated by plasmamaterial interaction, heat deposition by the plasma onto the wave launcher, and erosion of the launcher material. It is necessary to minimize the heat deposition from the plasma, the losses of the RF wave energy in the structure, and to prevent sputtering of the antenna components. A solution involves a combined design using special materials and optimal shaping of the Faraday shield (the electrostatic shields which can be used both for an EM wave polarization adjustment and as a particle shield for the launcher). Recent studies by PPPL and McDonnell Douglas Corp. on the Faraday shield designs will be discussed. The second important area where technology development will be necessary is the transmission of high power RF waves through a gas/vacuum interface region. In the past, the vacuum feedthrough has been the bottle neck which prevented high power operation of the PLT antenna.

  9. An Electrothermal Plasma Source Developed for Simulation of Transient Heat Loads in Future Large Fusion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhart, Trey; Baylor, Larry; Winfrey, Leigh

    2016-10-01

    The realization of fusion energy requires materials that can withstand high heat and particle fluxes at the plasma material interface. In this work, an electrothermal (ET) plasma source has been designed as a possible transient heat flux source for a linear plasma material interaction device. An ET plasma source operates in the ablative arc regime, which is driven by a DC capacitive discharge. The current travels through the 4mm bore of a boron nitride liner and subsequently ablates and ionizes the liner material. This results in a high density plasma with a large unidirectional bulk flow out of the source exit. The pulse length for the ET source has been optimized using a pulse forming network to have a duration of 1ms at full-width half maximum. The peak currents and maximum source energies seen in this system are 2kA and 5kJ. The goal of this work is to show that the ET source produces electron densities and heat fluxes that are comparable to transient events in future large magnetic confinement fusion devices. Heat flux, plasma temperature, and plasma density were determined for each test shot using infrared imaging and optical spectroscopy techniques. This work will compare the ET source output (heat flux, temperature, and density) with and without an applied magnetic field. Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U. S. Department of Energy.

  10. Fusion heating technology

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, A.J.

    1982-06-01

    John Lawson established the criterion that in order to produce more energy from fusion than is necessary to heat the plasma and replenish the radiation losses, a minimum value for both the product of plasma density and confinement time t, and the temperature must be achieved. There are two types of plasma heating: neutral beam and electromagnetic wave heating. A neutral beam system is shown. Main development work on negative ion beamlines has focused on the difficult problem of the production of high current sources. The development of a 30 keV-1 ampere multisecond source module is close to being accomplished. In electromagnetic heating, the launcher, which provides the means of coupling the power to the plasma, is most important. The status of heating development is reviewed. Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), lower hybrid heating (HHH), and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) are reviewed.

  11. Inertially confined fusion plasmas dominated by alpha-particle self-heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O.; Kritcher, A. L.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Albert, F.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Church, J. A.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Hamza, A.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H.; Hohenberger, M.; Hoover, D.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G.; Kozioziemski, B.; Grim, G.; Field, J. E.; Frenje, J.; Izumi, N.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Khan, S. F.; Knauer, J.; Kohut, T.; Landen, O.; Merrill, F.; Michel, P.; Moore, A.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Rygg, R. R.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Shaughnessy, D.; Strozzi, D.; Town, R. P. J.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C.; Yeamans, C.

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-particle self-heating, the process of deuterium-tritium fusion reaction products depositing their kinetic energy locally within a fusion reaction region and thus increasing the temperature in the reacting region, is essential for achieving ignition in a fusion system. Here, we report new inertial confinement fusion experiments where the alpha-particle heating of the plasma is dominant with the fusion yield produced exceeding the fusion yield from the work done on the fuel (pressure times volume change) by a factor of two or more. These experiments have achieved the highest yield (26 +/- 0.5 kJ) and stagnation pressures (≍220 +/- 40 Gbar) of any facility-based inertial confinement fusion experiments, although they are still short of the pressures required for ignition on the National Ignition Facility (~300-400 Gbar). These experiments put us in a new part of parameter space that has not been extensively studied so far because it lies between the no-alpha-particle-deposition regime and ignition.

  12. Development of Quasi-Optical Gyrotrons for Fusion Plasma Heating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-11

    1987 - NRL Invention Award May 1987 - Elected to Sigma Xi 158 W Scientific Projects Managed 1) Toroidal Plasma Modeling, Department of Energy ...OFFICE SYMBOL 9 PROCUREMENT INSTRUMENT IDENTIFICATION NUMBER ORGANIZATION (If applicable) DeDartment of Energy 8c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 10...Introduction The High Power Electromagnetic Radiation Branch (Code 4740) of the U. S. Naval Research Laboratory analyzes here for the Department of Energy a

  13. Development of neutral beams for fusion plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Haselton, H.H.; Pyle, R.V.

    1980-01-01

    A state-of-the-art account of neutral beam technology at the LBL/LLNL and ORNL facilities is given with emphasis on positive-ion-based systems. The advances made in the last few years are elaborated and problem areas are identified. The ORNL program has successfully completed the neutral injection systems for PLT, ISX-B, and most recently, PDX and the ISX-B upgrade. All of these are high current (60 to 100 A), medium energy (40 to 50 keV) systems. This program is also engaged in the development of a reactor-grade advanced positive ion system (150 to 200 kV/100 A/5 to 10 s) and a multimegawatt, long pulse (30 s) heating system for ISX-C. In a joint program, LBL and LLNL are developing and testing neutral beam injection systems based on the acceleration of positive ions for application in the 80- to 160-keV range on MFTF-B, D-III, TFTR/TFM, ETF, MNS, etc. A conceptual design of a 160-keV injection system for the German ZEPHYR project is in progress at LBL/LLNL and independently at ORNL. The laboratories are also engaged in the development of negative-ion-based systems for future applications at higher energies.

  14. Simulation of Fusion Plasmas

    ScienceCinema

    Holland, Chris [UC San Diego, San Diego, California, United States

    2016-07-12

    The upcoming ITER experiment (www.iter.org) represents the next major milestone in realizing the promise of using nuclear fusion as a commercial energy source, by moving into the “burning plasma” regime where the dominant heat source is the internal fusion reactions. As part of its support for the ITER mission, the US fusion community is actively developing validated predictive models of the behavior of magnetically confined plasmas. In this talk, I will describe how the plasma community is using the latest high performance computing facilities to develop and refine our models of the nonlinear, multiscale plasma dynamics, and how recent advances in experimental diagnostics are allowing us to directly test and validate these models at an unprecedented level.

  15. High heat flux issues for plasma-facing components in fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Robert D.

    1993-02-01

    Plasma facing components in tokamak fusion reactors are faced with a number of difficult high heat flux issues. These components include: first wall armor tiles, pumped limiters, diverter plates, rf antennae structure, and diagnostic probes. Peak heat fluxes are 15 - 30 MW/m2 for diverter plates, which will operate for 100 - 1000 seconds in future tokamaks. Disruption heat fluxes can approach 100,000 MW/m2 for 0.1 ms. Diverter plates are water-cooled heat sinks with armor tiles brazed on to the plasma facing side. Heat sink materials include OFHC, GlidcopTM, TZM, Mo-41Re, and niobium alloys. Armor tile materials include: carbon fiber composites, beryllium, silicon carbide, tungsten, and molybdenum. Tile thickness range from 2 - 10 mm, and heat sinks are 1 - 3 mm. A twisted tape insert is used to enhance heat transfer and increase the burnout safety margin from critical heat flux limits to 50 - 60 MW/m2 with water at 10 m/s and 4 MPa. Tests using rastered electron beams have shown thermal fatigue failures from cracks at the brazed interface between tiles and the heat sink after only 1000 cycles at 10 - 15 MW/m2. These fatigue lifetimes need to be increased an order of magnitude to meet future requirements. Other critical issues for plasma facing components include: surface erosion from sputtering and disruption erosion, eddy current forces and runaway electron impact from disruptions, neutron damage, tritium retention and release, remote maintenance of radioactive components, corrosion-erosion, and loss-of-coolant accidents.

  16. Initial confinement studies of ohmically heated plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, P.C.; Bell, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bretz, N.; Cecchi, J.L.; Coonrod, J.; Davis, S.; Dylla, H.F.; Fonck, R.; Furth, H.P.

    1984-06-01

    Initial operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has concentrated upon confinement studies of ohmically heated hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. Total energy confinement times (tau/sub E/) are 0.1 to 0.2 s for a line-average density range (anti n/sub e/) of 1 to 2.5 x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/ with electron temperatures of T/sub e/(o) approx. 1.2 to 2.2 keV, ion temperatures of T/sub i/(o) approx. 0.9 to 1.5 keV, and Z/sub eff/ approx. 3. A comparison of PLT, PDX, and TFTR plasma confinement supports a dimension-cubed scaling law.

  17. High-power microwave transmission and launching systems for fusion plasma heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.

    1989-01-01

    Microwave power in the 30- to 300-GHz frequency range is becoming widely used for heating of plasma in present-day fusion energy magnetic confinement experiments. Microwave power is effective in ionizing plasma and heating electrons through the electron cyclotron heating (ECH) process. Since the power is absorbed in regions of the magnetic field where resonance occurs and launching antennas with narrow beam widths are possible, power deposition location can be highly controlled. This is important for maximizing the power utilization efficiency and improving plasma parameters. Development of the gyrotron oscillator tube has advanced in recent years so that a 1-MW continuous-wave, 140-GHz power source will soon be available. Gyrotron output power is typically in a circular waveguide propagating a circular electric mode (such as TE/sub 0,2/) or a whispering-gallery mode (such as TE/sub 15,2/), depending on frequency and power level. An alternative high-power microwave source currently under development is the free-electron laser (FEL), which may be capable of generating 2-10 MW of average power at frequencies of up to 500 GHz. The FEL has a rectangular output waveguide carrying the TE/sub 0,1/ mode. Because of its higher complexity and cost, the high-average-power FEL is not yet as extensively developed as the gyrotron. In this paper, several types of operating ECH transmission systems are discussed, as well systems currently being developed. The trend in this area is toward higher power and frequency due to the improvements in plasma density and temperature possible. Every system requires a variety of components, such as mode converters, waveguide bends, launchers, and directional couplers. Some of these components are discussed here, along with ongoing work to improve their performance. 8 refs.

  18. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2015-04-15

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter (ω{sub e}τ{sub e}≫1), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ω{sub e}τ{sub e} as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient cT/(16eB), which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  19. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2015-04-01

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ( ωeτe≫1 ), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ωeτe as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient c T /(16 e B ) , which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  20. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

  1. High-heat-flux testing of irradiated tungsten-based materials for fusion applications using infrared plasma arc lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Ohriner, Evan K.; Kiggans, Jim; Schaich, Charles R.; Ueda, Yoshio; Harper, David C.; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Byun, Thak S.

    2014-11-01

    Testing of advanced materials and component mock-ups under prototypical fusion high-heat-flux conditions, while historically a mainstay of fusion research, has proved to be quite challenging, especially for irradiated materials. A new high-heat-flux–testing (HHFT) facility based on water-wall plasma arc lamps (PALs) is now introduced for materials and small-component testing. Two PAL systems, utilizing a 12 000°C plasma arc contained in a quartz tube cooled by a spiral water flow over the inside tube surface, provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over areas of 9×12 and 1×10 cm2, respectively. This paper will present the overall design and implementation of a PAL-based irradiated material target station (IMTS). The IMTS is primarily designed for testing the effects of heat flux or thermal cycling on material coupons of interest, such as those for plasma-facing components. Temperature results are shown for thermal cycling under HHFT of tungsten coupon specimens that were neutron irradiated in HFIR. Finally, radiological surveys indicated minimal contamination of the 36×36×18 cm test section, demonstrating the capability of the new facility to handle irradiated specimens at high temperature.

  2. High-heat-flux testing of irradiated tungsten-based materials for fusion applications using infrared plasma arc lamps

    DOE PAGES

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Ohriner, Evan K.; Kiggans, Jim; ...

    2014-11-01

    Testing of advanced materials and component mock-ups under prototypical fusion high-heat-flux conditions, while historically a mainstay of fusion research, has proved to be quite challenging, especially for irradiated materials. A new high-heat-flux–testing (HHFT) facility based on water-wall plasma arc lamps (PALs) is now introduced for materials and small-component testing. Two PAL systems, utilizing a 12 000°C plasma arc contained in a quartz tube cooled by a spiral water flow over the inside tube surface, provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over areas of 9×12 and 1×10 cm2, respectively. This paper will present the overall design andmore » implementation of a PAL-based irradiated material target station (IMTS). The IMTS is primarily designed for testing the effects of heat flux or thermal cycling on material coupons of interest, such as those for plasma-facing components. Temperature results are shown for thermal cycling under HHFT of tungsten coupon specimens that were neutron irradiated in HFIR. Finally, radiological surveys indicated minimal contamination of the 36×36×18 cm test section, demonstrating the capability of the new facility to handle irradiated specimens at high temperature.« less

  3. Fusion Plasma Theory project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This Project Summary book is a published compilation consisting of short descriptions of each project supported by the Fusion Plasma Theory and Computing Group of the Advanced Physics and Technology Division of the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy. The summaries contained in this volume were written by the individual contractors with minimal editing by the Office of Fusion Energy. Previous summaries were published in February of 1982 and December of 1987. The Plasma Theory program is responsible for the development of concepts and models that describe and predict the behavior of a magnetically confined plasma. Emphasis is given to the modelling and understanding of the processes controlling transport of energy and particles in a toroidal plasma and supporting the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A tokamak transport initiative was begun in 1989 to improve understanding of how energy and particles are lost from the plasma by mechanisms that transport them across field lines. The Plasma Theory program has actively-participated in this initiative. Recently, increased attention has been given to issues of importance to the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Particular attention has been paid to containment and thermalization of fast alpha particles produced in a burning fusion plasma as well as control of sawteeth, current drive, impurity control, and design of improved auxiliary heating. In addition, general models of plasma behavior are developed from physics features common to different confinement geometries. This work uses both analytical and numerical techniques. The Fusion Theory program supports research projects at US government laboratories, universities and industrial contractors. Its support of theoretical work at universities contributes to the office of Fusion Energy mission of training scientific manpower for the US Fusion Energy Program.

  4. Self-organized helical equilibria as a new paradigm for ohmically heated fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzini, R.; Martines, E.; Piovesan, P.; Terranova, D.; Zanca, P.; Zuin, M.; Alfier, A.; Bonfiglio, D.; Bonomo, F.; Canton, A.; Cappello, S.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Escande, D. F.; Fassina, A.; Franz, P.; Gobbin, M.; Innocente, P.; Marrelli, L.; Pasqualotto, R.; Puiatti, M. E.; Spolaore, M.; Valisa, M.; Vianello, N.; Martin, P.; Martin, P.; Apolloni, L.; Puiatti, M. E.; Adamek, J.; Agostini, M.; Alfier, A.; Annibaldi, S. V.; Antoni, V.; Auriemma, F.; Barana, O.; Baruzzo, M.; Bettini, P.; Bolzonella, T.; Bonfiglio, D.; Bonomo, F.; Brombin, M.; Brotankova, J.; Buffa, A.; Buratti, P.; Canton, A.; Cappello, S.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Cavinato, M.; Chapman, B. E.; Chitarin, G.; Dal Bello, S.; de Lorenzi, A.; de Masi, G.; Escande, D. F.; Fassina, A.; Ferro, A.; Franz, P.; Gaio, E.; Gazza, E.; Giudicotti, L.; Gnesotto, F.; Gobbin, M.; Grando, L.; Guazzotto, L.; Guo, S. C.; Igochine, V.; Innocente, P.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lorenzini, R.; Luchetta, A.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Marrelli, L.; Martini, S.; Martines, E.; McCollam, K.; Milani, F.; Moresco, M.; Novello, L.; Ortolani, S.; Paccagnella, R.; Pasqualotto, R.; Peruzzo, S.; Piovan, R.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, L.; Pizzimenti, A.; Pomaro, N.; Predebon, I.; Reusch, J. A.; Rostagni, G.; Rubinacci, G.; Sarff, J. S.; Sattin, F.; Scarin, P.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Soppelsa, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Spizzo, G.; Taliercio, C.; Terranova, D.; Toigo, V.; Valisa, M.; Vianello, N.; Villone, F.; White, R. B.; Yadikin, D.; Zaccaria, P.; Zamengo, A.; Zanca, P.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zilli, E.; Zohm, H.; Zuin, M.

    2009-08-01

    In the quest for new energy sources, the research on controlled thermonuclear fusion has been boosted by the start of the construction phase of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). ITER is based on the tokamak magnetic configuration, which is the best performing one in terms of energy confinement. Alternative concepts are however actively researched, which in the long term could be considered for a second generation of reactors. Here, we show results concerning one of these configurations, the reversed-field pinch (RFP). By increasing the plasma current, a spontaneous transition to a helical equilibrium occurs, with a change of magnetic topology. Partially conserved magnetic flux surfaces emerge within residual magnetic chaos, resulting in the onset of a transport barrier. This is a structural change and sheds new light on the potential of the RFP as the basis for a low-magnetic-field ohmic fusion reactor.

  5. Development of high power radio frequency components for fusion plasma heating. Final report, Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-11

    The purpose of this CRADA was to develop advanced microwave heating systems for both ion cyclotron heating and electron cyclotron heating for magnetic fusion reactors. This involved low-frequency (UHF), high-power (millimeter-wave) microwave components, such as antennas, windows, and matching elements. This CRADA also involved developing conceptual designs for new microwave sources. General Atomics built and tested the distributed cooled window and provided LLNL with transmission and reflection test data in order to then benchmark the EM computer codes. The combline antenna built and analyzed by LLNL was based on a GA design. GA provided LLNL with a number of niobium plates for hot pressing and provided the necessary guidance to allow successful bonding. GA representatives were on site at LLNL on numerous occasions to consult and give guidance on the ferroelectric tuner, combline antenna and distributed window analysis.

  6. Fusion Plasma Theory Grant: Task 3, Auxiliary Radiofrequency Heating of Tokamaks. Annual report, November 16, 1992--November 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Scharer, J.E.

    1993-06-01

    The research performed under this grant during the past year has been concentrated on the following several key tokamak ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) coupling, heating and current drive issues. We have made progress in developing a ``3-D`` cavity backed antenna array code to examine ICRF coupling to general plasma edge profiles. The effects of the finite antenna length and feeders as well as Faraday shield blade angle are being examined. We are also developing an analysis to examine large k{perpendicular}{rho} gyroradius interaction between alpha or beam particles and ICRF waves. This topic has important applications in the areas of ICRF heating for deuterium-tritium fusion plasmas, TAE modes, ash removal and minority ion current drive. Research progress, publications, and conference and workshop presentations are summarized in this report.

  7. Fusion Plasma Theory: Task 3, Auxiliary radiofrequency heating of tokamaks. Annual report, November 16, 1991--November 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Scharer, J.E.

    1992-12-31

    The research performed under this grant during the past year has been concentrated on the following several key tokamak ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) coupling, heating and current drive issues: Efficient coupling during the L- to H- mode transition by analysis and computer simulation of ICRF antennas; analysis of ICRF cavity-backed coil antenna coupling to plasma edge profiles including fast and ion Bernstein wave coupling for heating and current drive; benchmarking the codes to compare with current JET, D-IIID and ASDEX experimental results and predictions for advanced tokamaks such as BPX and SSAT (Steady-State Advanced Tokamak); ICRF full-wave field solutions, power conservation, heating analyses and minority ion current drive; and the effects of fusion alpha particle or ion tail populations on the ICRF absorption. Research progress, publications, and conference and workshop presentations are summarized in this report.

  8. Fusion plasma theory. Task 3: Auxiliary heating in Tokamaks and tandem mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharer, J. E.

    1984-06-01

    The ICRF coupling, heating and breakeven studies for Tokamaks and ECRF fundamental second harmonic heating in tandem mirrors are examined. The studies have included ICRF Fokker-Planck heating and breakeven studies for large Tokamaks such as JET, fundamental work on a new wave power absorption and conservation relation for ICRF in inhomogeneous plasmas, a formulation and code development for ICRF waveguide coupling in Tokamak edge regions. The ECRF ray tracing studies were carried out for fundamental and second harmonic propagation, absorption and whistler microinstabilities in tandem mirror plug and barrier regions of Phaedrus, TMX-U and TASKA. The two-dimensional velocity space, time dependent Fokker-Planck heating studies have concentrated on D-T breakeven scenarios for fundamental minority deuterium and second harmonic tritium regimes.

  9. Design of a tunable 4-MW Free Electron Maser for heating fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, M.; Kamin, G.; Shang, C.C.; Lindquist, W.

    1993-09-01

    There is an ongoing program at the FOM institute, The Netherlands, to develop a 1-MW, long-pulse, 200-Ghz Free Electron Maser (FEM) using a DC accelerator system with depressed collector. We present an extrapolation of this design to more than 4MW of output microwave power in order to reduce the cost per kW and increase the power per module in a plasma heating system.

  10. Plasma-Materials Interactions (PMI) and High-Heat-Flux (HHF) component research and development in the US Fusion Program

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, R.W.

    1986-10-01

    Plasma particle and high heat fluxes to in-vessel components such as divertors, limiters, RF launchers, halo plasma scrapers, direct converters, and wall armor, and to the vacuum chamber itself, represent central technical issues for fusion experiments and reactors. This is well recognized and accepted. It is also well recognized that the conditions at the plasma boundary can directly influence core plasma confinement. This has been seen most dramatically, on the positive side, in the discovery of the H-mode using divertors in tokamaks. It is also reflected in the attention devoted worldwide to the problems of impurity control. Nowadays, impurities are controlled by wall conditioning, special discharge cleaning techniques, special coatings such as carbonization, the use of low-Z materials for limiters and armor, a careful tailoring of heat loads, and in some machines, through the use of divertors. All programs, all experiments, and all designers are now keenly aware that PMI and HHF issues are key to the successful performance of their machines. In this brief report we present general issues in Section 2, critical issues in Section 3, existing US PMI/HHF experiments and facilities in Section 4, US International Cooperative PMI/HHF activities in Section 5, and conclude with a discussion on major tasks in PMI/HHF in Section 6.

  11. Ultrahigh heat flux plasma-facing components for magnetic fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, D. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia and Ultramet partnered to design and test refractory metal plasma-facing components and heat exchangers for advanced, high-temperature power conversion systems. These devices consisted of high-temperature helium-to-helium and lithium-to-helium heat exchangers that operate with high efficiency due to the porous foam inserts used in the gas stream, which promote turbulence and provide extended surface area for enhanced convection. Single- and multi-channel helium panels and the Li-He heat exchanger were fabricated from either pure molybdenum, TZM, or tungsten. The design was carried out through an Ultramet subcontractor. The flow path was carefully tailored to minimize the pressure drop while maximizing the heat transfer. The single- and multi-channel helium panels were tested at Sandia's PMTF using an electron beam system and the closed helium flow loop. In 2006, a single-channel tungsten tube was successfully tested to an average heat flux of 14 MW/m{sup 2} with a localized peak of 22 MW/m{sup 2} along the axial centerline at the outer radius. Under this CRADA, multiple square-channel molybdenum components were successfully tested to heat flux levels approaching 8.5 MW/m{sup 2}. The three multi-channel prototypes experienced mechanical failure due to issues related to the design of the large unsupported span of the heated faceplates in combination with prototype material and braze selection. The Li-He heat exchanger was both designed and partially tested at the PMTF for helium and lithium flow.

  12. Propagation of a laser beam in a time-varying waveguide. [plasma heating for controlled fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, J. M.; Kevorkian, J.

    1978-01-01

    The propagation of an axisymmetric laser beam in a plasma column having a radially parabolic electron density distribution is reported. For the case of an axially uniform waveguide it is found that the basic characteristics of alternating focusing and defocusing beams are maintained. However, the intensity distribution is changed at the foci and outer-beam regions. The features of paraxial beam propagation are discussed with reference to axially varying waveguides. Laser plasma coupling is considered noting the case where laser heating produces a density distribution radially parabolic near the axis and the energy absorbed over the focal length of the plasma is small. It is found that: (1) beam-propagation stability is governed by the relative magnitude of the density fluctuations existing in the axial variation of the waveguides due to laser heating, and (2) for beam propagation in a time-varying waveguide, the global instability of the propagation is a function of the initial fluctuation growth rate as compared to the initial time rate of change in the radial curvature of the waveguide.

  13. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion is an emerging, relatively unexplored approach to fusion for electrical power and propulsion application. The physical principles of the concept are founded upon both inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). It attempts to combine the favorable attributes of both these orthogonal approaches to fusion, but at the same time, avoiding the extreme technical challenges of both by exploiting a fusion regime intermediate between them. It uses a material liner to compress, heat and contain the fusion reacting plasma (the target plasma) mentally. By doing so, the fusion burn could be made to occur at plasma densities as high as six orders of magnitude higher than conventional MCF such as tokamak, thus leading to an approximately three orders of magnitude reduction in the plasma energy required for ignition. It also uses a transient magnetic field, compressed to extremely high intensity (100's T to 1000T) in the target plasma, to slow down the heat transport to the liner and to increase the energy deposition of charged-particle fusion products. This has several compounding beneficial effects. It leads to longer energy confinement time compared with conventional ICF without magnetized target, and thus permits the use of much lower plasma density to produce reasonable burn-up fraction. The compounding effects of lower plasma density and the magneto-insulation of the target lead to greatly reduced compressional heating power on the target. The increased energy deposition rate of charged-particle fusion products also helps to lower the energy threshold required for ignition and increasing the burn-up fraction. The reduction in ignition energy and the compressional power compound to lead to reduced system size, mass and R&D cost. It is a fusion approach that has an affordable R&D pathway, and appears attractive for propulsion application in the nearer term.

  14. Material ejection and surface morphology changes during transient heat loading of tungsten as plasma-facing component in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslova, A.; El-Atwani, O.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the effect of edge-localized mode like transient heat events on pristine samples for two different grades of deformed tungsten with ultrafine and nanocrystalline grains as potential candidates for plasma-facing components. Pulses from a laser beam with durations ∼1 ms and operating in the near infrared wavelength were used for simulating transient heat loading in fusion devices. We specifically focused on investigating and analysis of different mechanisms for material removal from the sample surface under repetitive transient heat loads. Several techniques were applied for analysing different mechanisms leading to material removal from the W surface under repetitive transient heat loads which include witness plates for collected ejected material, and subsequent analysis using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, visible imaging using fast-gated camera, and evaluating thermal emission from the particles using optical emission spectroscopy. Our results show a significantly improved performance of polycrystalline cold-rolled tungsten compared to tungsten produced using an orthogonal machining process under repetitive transient loads for a wide range of the power densities.

  15. Resonance between heat-carrying electrons and Langmuir waves in inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rozmus, W.; Chapman, T.; Berger, R. L.; Brantov, A.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Winjum, B. J.; Brunner, S.; Tableman, A.; Tzoufras, M.; Glenzer, S.

    2016-01-15

    In ignition scale hot plasmas, temperature gradients and thermal transport modify electron distributions in a velocity range resonant with Langmuir waves typical of those produced by stimulated Raman scattering. We examine the resultant changes to the Landau damping experienced by these Langmuir waves and the levels of thermal plasma fluctuations. The form factor and Thomson scattering cross-section in such plasmas display unique characteristics of the background conditions. A theoretical model and high-order Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations are used in our analysis. An experiment to measure changes in thermal plasma fluctuation levels due to a thermal gradient is proposed.

  16. Resonance between heat-carrying electrons and Langmuir waves in inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, W.; Chapman, T.; Brantov, A.; Winjum, B. J.; Berger, R. L.; Brunner, S.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Tableman, A.; Tzoufras, M.; Glenzer, S.

    2016-01-01

    In ignition scale hot plasmas, temperature gradients and thermal transport modify electron distributions in a velocity range resonant with Langmuir waves typical of those produced by stimulated Raman scattering. We examine the resultant changes to the Landau damping experienced by these Langmuir waves and the levels of thermal plasma fluctuations. The form factor and Thomson scattering cross-section in such plasmas display unique characteristics of the background conditions. A theoretical model and high-order Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations are used in our analysis. An experiment to measure changes in thermal plasma fluctuation levels due to a thermal gradient is proposed.

  17. Transport of radial heat flux and second sound in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guercan, Oe. D.; Berionni, V.; Hennequin, P.; Morel, P.; Vermare, L.; Diamond, P. H.; Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Kosuga, Y.

    2013-02-15

    Simple flux-gradient relations that involve time delay and radial coupling are discussed. Such a formulation leads to a rather simple description of avalanches and may explain breaking of gyroBohm transport scaling. The generalization of the flux-gradient relation (i.e., constitutive relation), which involve both time delay and spatial coupling, is derived from drift-kinetic equation, leading to kinetic definitions of constitutive elements such as the flux of radial heat flux. This allows numerical simulations to compute these cubic quantities directly. The formulation introduced here can be viewed as an extension of turbulence spreading to include the effect of spreading of cross-phase as well as turbulence intensity, combined in such a way to give the flux. The link between turbulence spreading and entropy production is highlighted. An extension of this formulation to general quasi-linear theory for the distribution function in the phase space of radial position and parallel velocity is also discussed.

  18. [Fluctuations and transport in fusion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    This research is aimed at furthering the understanding of turbulent fluctuations in fusion plasmas and the anomalous transport of particles, heat, and momentum which results therefrom. This understanding is critical to the design of future plasma confinement devices. This study involves a combination of experimental measurements, from the Caltech and other tokamaks, analysis and interpretation of measurements, computer calculations of basic processes, and comparisons of the latter with experiment.

  19. Dust in fusion plasmas: theory and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, R. D.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Mendis, D. A.; Rosenberg, M.; Rudakov, D.; Tanaka, Y.; Rognlien, T. D.; Soboleva, T. K.; Shukla, P. K.; Bray, B. D.; West, W. P.; Roquemore, A. L.; Skinner, C. H.

    2008-09-07

    Dust may have a large impact on ITER-scale plasma experiments including both safety and performance issues. However, the physics of dust in fusion plasmas is very complex and multifaceted. Here, we discuss different aspects of dust dynamics including dust-plasma, and dust-surface interactions. We consider the models of dust charging, heating, evaporation/sublimation, dust collision with material walls, etc., which are suitable for the conditions of fusion plasmas. The physical models of all these processes have been incorporated into the DUST Transport (DUSTT) code. Numerical simulations demonstrate that dust particles are very mobile and accelerate to large velocities due to the ion drag force (cruise speed >100 m/s). Deep penetration of dust particles toward the plasma core is predicted. It is shown that DUSTT is capable of reproducing many features of recent dust-related experiments, but much more work is still needed.

  20. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Richeson, Jeff; Schmidt, George; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Turchi, Peter J.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) attempts to combine the favorable attributes of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) for energy confinement with the attributes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for efficient compression heating and wall-free containment of the fusing plasma. It uses a material liner to compress and contain a magnetized plasma. For practical applications, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC). For the successful implementation of the scheme, plasma jets of the requisite momentum flux density need to be produced. Their transport over sufficiently large distances (a few meters) needs to be assured. When they collide and merge into a liner, relative differences in velocity, density and temperature of the jets could give rise to instabilities in the development of the liner. Variation in the jet properties must be controlled to ensure that the growth rate of the instabilities are not significant over the time scale of the liner formation before engaging with the target plasma. On impact with the target plasma, some plasma interpenetration might occur between the liner and the target. The operating parameter space needs to be identified to ensure that a reasonably robust and conducting contact surface is formed between the liner and the target. A mismatch in the "impedance" between the liner and the target plasma could give rise to undesirable shock heating of the liner leading to increased entropy (thermal losses) in the liner. Any irregularities in the liner will accentuate the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during the compression of the target plasma by the liner.

  1. Numerical Solution of the Electron Heat Transport Equation and Physics-Constrained Modeling of the Thermal Conductivity via Sequential Quadratic Programming Optimization in Nuclear Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paloma, Cynthia S.

    The plasma electron temperature (Te) plays a critical role in a tokamak nu- clear fusion reactor since temperatures on the order of 108K are required to achieve fusion conditions. Many plasma properties in a tokamak nuclear fusion reactor are modeled by partial differential equations (PDE's) because they depend not only on time but also on space. In particular, the dynamics of the electron temperature is governed by a PDE referred to as the Electron Heat Transport Equation (EHTE). In this work, a numerical method is developed to solve the EHTE based on a custom finite-difference technique. The solution of the EHTE is compared to temperature profiles obtained by using TRANSP, a sophisticated plasma transport code, for specific discharges from the DIII-D tokamak, located at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility in San Diego, CA. The thermal conductivity (also called thermal diffusivity) of the electrons (Xe) is a plasma parameter that plays a critical role in the EHTE since it indicates how the electron temperature diffusion varies across the minor effective radius of the tokamak. TRANSP approximates Xe through a curve-fitting technique to match experimentally measured electron temperature profiles. While complex physics-based model have been proposed for Xe, there is a lack of a simple mathematical model for the thermal diffusivity that could be used for control design. In this work, a model for Xe is proposed based on a scaling law involving key plasma variables such as the electron temperature (Te), the electron density (ne), and the safety factor (q). An optimization algorithm is developed based on the Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) technique to optimize the scaling factors appearing in the proposed model so that the predicted electron temperature and magnetic flux profiles match predefined target profiles in the best possible way. A simulation study summarizing the outcomes of the optimization procedure is presented to illustrate the potential of the

  2. Magnetic reconnection in plasma under inertial confinement fusion conditions driven by heat flux effects in Ohm's law.

    PubMed

    Joglekar, A S; Thomas, A G R; Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A

    2014-03-14

    In the interaction of high-power laser beams with solid density plasma there are a number of mechanisms that generate strong magnetic fields. Such fields subsequently inhibit or redirect electron flows, but can themselves be advected by heat fluxes, resulting in complex interplay between thermal transport and magnetic fields. We show that for heating by multiple laser spots reconnection of magnetic field lines can occur, mediated by these heat fluxes, using a fully implicit 2D Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code. Under such conditions, the reconnection rate is dictated by heat flows rather than Alfvènic flows. We find that this mechanism is only relevant in a high β plasma. However, the Hall parameter ωcτei can be large so that thermal transport is strongly modified by these magnetic fields, which can impact longer time scale temperature homogeneity and ion dynamics in the system.

  3. Plasma physics goes beyond fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Raoul

    2008-11-01

    I was interested to read the fusion supplement published with the October issue of Physics World. However, in asserting that fusion created the need to recognize plasma physics as a separate branch of the subject, Stephen Cowley, the new director of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, was not quite correct. In fact, the word "plasma" was appropriated from the Greek by the chemical physicist (and later Nobel laureate) Irving Langmuir in 1928. It was used to describe the positive column of a gas discharge, which was then the subject of research into better lighting sources and advertising displays, as well as the underlying science.

  4. Vortex Stabilized Compressed Fusion Grade Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2015-03-01

    Inertial confinement fusion schemes comprise of highly compressed dense plasmas. Some involve short pulses of powerful beams (lasers, particles) applied to solid pellets, while others utilize plasma focus to obtain dense pinch plasmas. Although compression factor >1000 has been achieved for starting pressures in the Torr range, the latter is limited by instabilities for initial gas density above 10 Torr. One alternative approach could be shooting electron beams through very dense, atmospheric pressure, vortex stabilized plasma. Large azimuthal magnetic generated by an electron beam can compress and heat the plasma to fusion viable parameters. This configuration is stable against sausage, kink, or beam - plasma instabilities. Based on experimental evidence beam propagation through the plasma is not be an issue. A second possibility is to tangentially squeeze a quasi-neutral plasma focus flow by a surrounding gas vortex. Based on currently available electron beams, the first scheme viability as an electrical power generating reactor does not seem to be promising. But using a plasma cathode electron beam that was developed a while ago, for which DOE has a patent U.S. Patent 4,942,339, could result in net generation of electricity. Calculations will be presented. Work supported by Work supported under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH1-886 with the US Department of Energy.

  5. Wakes in Inertial Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Ian Norman

    Plasma wave wakes, which are the collective oscillatory response near the plasma frequency to the propagation of particles or electromagnetic waves through a plasma, play a critical role in many plasma processes. New results from backwards stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS), in which wakes with phase velocities much less than the speed of light are induced by the beating of counter-propagating light waves, and from electron beam stopping, in which the wakes are produced by the motion of relativistically propagating electrons through the dense plasma, are discussed. Both processes play important roles in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In BSRS, laser light is scattered backwards out of the plasma, decreasing the energy available to compress the ICF capsule and affecting the symmetry of where the laser energy hits the hohlraum wall in indirect drive ICF. The plasma wave wake can also generate superthermal electrons that can preheat the core and/or the ablator. Electron beam stopping plays a critical role in the Fast Ignition (FI) ICF concept, in which a beam of relativistic electrons is used to heat the target core to ignition temperatures after the compression stage. The beam stopping power determines the effectiveness of the heating process. This dissertation covers new discoveries on the importance of plasma wave wakes in both BSRS and electron beam stopping. In the SRS studies, 1D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations using OSIRIS are performed, which model a short-duration (˜500/ω0 --1FWHM) counter-propagating scattered light seed pulse in the presence of a constant pump laser with an intensity far below the absolute instability threshold for plasma waves undergoing Landau damping. The seed undergoes linear convective Raman amplification and dominates over the amplification of fluctuations due to particle discreteness. The simulation results are in good agreement with results from a coupled-mode solver when special relativity and the effects of finite size PIC

  6. Proceedings of 1999 U.S./Japan Workshop (99FT-05) On High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    NYGREN,RICHARD E.; STAVROS,DIANA T.

    2000-06-01

    The 1999 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions in Next Step Fusion Devices was held at the St. Francis Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 1-4, 1999. There were 42 presentations as well as discussion on technical issues and planning for future collaborations. The participants included 22 researchers from Japan and the United States as well as seven researchers from Europe and Russia. There have been important changes in the programs in both the US and Japan in the areas of plasma surface interactions and plasma facing components. The US has moved away from a strong focus on the ITER Project and has introduced new programs on use of liquid surfaces for plasma facing components, and operation of NSTX has begun. In Japan, the Large Helical Device began operation. This is the first large world-class confinement device operating in a magnetic configuration different than a tokamak. In selecting the presentations for this workshop, the organizers sought a balance between research in laboratory facilities or confinement devices related to plasma surface interactions and experimental research in the development of plasma facing components. In discussions about the workshop itself, the participants affirmed their preference for a setting where ''work-in-progress'' could be informally presented and discussed.

  7. Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Interactive and High Heat Flux Components: Volume 5, Technical assessment of critical issues in the steady state operation of fusion confinement devices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Critical issues for the steady state operation of plasma confinement devices exist in both the physics and technology fields of fusion research. Due to the wide range and number of these issues, this technical assessment has focused on the crucial issues associated with the plasma physics and the plasma interactive components. The document provides information on the problem areas that affect the design and operation of a steady state ETR or ITER type confinement device. It discusses both tokamaks and alternative concepts, and provides a survey of existing and planned confinement machines and laboratory facilities that can address the identified issues. A universal definition of steady state operation is difficult to obtain. From a physics point of view, steady state is generally achieved when the time derivatives approach zero and the operation time greatly exceeds the characteristic time constants of the device. Steady state operation for materials depends on whether thermal stress, creep, fatigue, radiation damage, or power removal are being discussed. For erosion issues, the fluence and availability of the machine for continuous operation are important, assuming that transient events such as disruptions do not limit the component lifetimes. The panel suggests, in general terms, that steady state requires plasma operation from 100 to 1000 seconds and an availability of more than a few percent, which is similar to the expectations for an ETR type device. The assessment of critical issues for steady state operation is divided into four sections: physics issues; technology issues; issues in alternative concepts; and devices and laboratory facilities that can address these problems.

  8. Stellarator approach to fusion plasma confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The stellarator is a toroidal fusion plasma confinement device with nested magnetic flux surfaces. The required twist of the field lines is produced by external helical coils rather than by plasma current, as in a tokamak. Stellarator devices are attractive fusion reactor candidates precisely because they offer the prospect of steady-state operation without plasma current. In the last few years the excellent results achieved with currentless stellarator plasmas of modest minor radius (10 to 20 cm) at Kyoto University (Japan) and the Max Planck Institute (West Germany) have made the stellarator second only to the tokamak in its progress toward fusion breakeven, with temperatures T/sub e/, T/sub i/ approx. 1 KeV, Lawson products n tau approx. 2 to 5 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/.s, and volume-averaged beta values approx. = 2%. The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF), now under construction at Oak Ridge Natioal Laboratory (ORNL) and scheduled to operate in 1986, represents a significant advance in stellarator research, with a plasma major radius of 2.1 m, an average minor radius of 0.3 m, and a magnetic field of 2 T for 5 s or 1 T at steady state. ATF replaces the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at ORNL and will use the ISX-B heating and diagnostic system.

  9. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume I. Technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in the plasma materials interaction field

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, R.W.; Gauster, W.B.; Heifetz, D.; Marmar, E.; Wilson, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    A technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in the field of plasma materials interactions (PMI) in magnetic fusion devices shows these problems to be central for near-term experiments, for intermediate-range reactor devices including D-T burning physics experiments, and for long-term reactor machines. Critical technical issues are ones central to understanding and successful operation of existing and near-term experiments/reactors or devices of great importance for the long run, i.e., ones which will require an extensive, long-term development effort and thus should receive attention now. Four subgroups were formed to assess the critical PMI issues along four major lines: (1) PMI and plasma confinement physics experiments; (2) plasma-edge modelling and theory; (3) surface physics; and (4) materials technology for in-vessel components and the first wall. The report which follows is divided into four major sections, one for each of these topics.

  10. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center 1992--1993 report to the President

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at MIT`s plasma fusion center. Some of the areas covered are: plasma diagnostics; rf plasma heating; gyrotron research; treatment of solid waste by arc plasma; divertor experiments; tokamak studies; and plasma and fusion theory.

  11. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Smoothing of ablation pressure nonuniformities in the laser-plasma corona during heating of laser fusion targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhurovich, M. A.; Zhitkova, O. A.; Lebo, I. G.; Mikhailov, Yu A.; Sklizkov, G. V.; Starodub, Aleksandr N.; Tishkin, V. F.

    2009-06-01

    A method for smoothing ablation pressure nonuniformities during heating of laser fusion targets is described which utilises an extra laser pulse preceding the main pulse. Theoretical and experimental data are presented on heating of thin (3-10 μm) foils (simulating the target shell) by a spatially nonuniform laser beam. In the experiments, the laser pulse width at half maximum was 2 ns and the pulse energy was 2-30 J, which ensured a power density on the target surface from 1013 to 1014 W cm-2. The experimental data are analysed using two-dimensional numerical simulations. The experimental and simulation results demonstrate that this approach is sufficiently effective. The optimal laser prepulse parameters are determined.

  12. Plasmas are Hot and Fusion is Cool

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Plasmas are Hot and Fusion is Cold. The DOE Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) collaborates to develop fusion as a safe, clean and abundant energy source for the future. This video discusses PPPL's research and development on plasma, the fourth state of matter.

  13. Computer Modeling of a Fusion Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I

    2000-12-15

    Progress in the study of plasma physics and controlled fusion has been profoundly influenced by dramatic increases in computing capability. Computational plasma physics has become an equal partner with experiment and traditional theory. This presentation illustrates some of the progress in computer modeling of plasma physics and controlled fusion.

  14. Plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Krikorian, R. )

    1989-01-01

    This proceedings contains papers on plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion. Included are the following topics: Plasma focus and Z-pinch, Review of mirror fusion research, Progress in studies of x-ray and ion-beam emission from plasma focus facilities.

  15. Plasma effects on resonant fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, R. F.

    2012-11-01

    I investigate the effects of plasma interactions on resonance-enhanced fusion rates in stars. Starting from basic principles we derive an expression for the fusion rate that can serve as a basis for discussion of approximation schemes The present state-of-the-art correction algorithms, based on the classical correlation function for the fusing particles and the classical energy shift for the resonant state, do not follow from this result, even as an approximation. The results of expanding in a perturbation solution for the case of a weakly coupled plasma are somewhat enlightening. But at this point we are at a loss as to how to do meaningful calculations in systems with even moderate plasma coupling strength. Examples where this can matter are the effect of a possible low-energy 12C+12C resonance on x-ray bursts from accreting neutron stars or on supernova 1A simulations, and the calculation of the triple α rate in some of the more strongly coupled regions in which the process enters, such as accretion onto a neutron star.

  16. Progress In Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Francis Y. C.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Lee, Michael; Smith, James; Martin, Adam; Wu, S. T.; Schmidt, George; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) attempts to combine the favorable attributes of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) for energy confinement with the attributes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for efficient compression heating and wall-free containment of the fusing plasma. It uses a material liner to compress and contain a magnetized plasma. For practical applications, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC).

  17. RF heating for fusion product studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hellsten, T. Johnson, T.; Sharapov, S. E.; Kiptily, V.; Rimini, F.; Eriksson, J.; Mantsinen, M.; Schneider, M.; Tsalas, M.

    2015-12-10

    Third harmonic cyclotron heating is an effective tool for accelerating deuterium (D) beams to the MeV energy range, suitable for studying ITER relevant fast particle physics in plasmas without significant tritium content. Such experiments were recently conducted in JET with an ITER like wall in D plasmas with {sup 3}He concentrations up to 30% in order to boost the fusion reactivity by D-{sup 3}He reactions. The harmonic cyclotron heating produces high-energy tails in the MeV range of D ions by on-axis heating and of {sup 3}He ions by tangential off-axis heating. The discharges are characterized by long sawtooth free periods and a rich spectrum of MHD modes excited by the fast D and {sup 3}He ions. The partitions of the power, which depend on the distribution function of D, vary strongly over several slowing down times. Self-consistent modelling of the distribution function with the SELFO-light code are presented and compared with experimental data from fast particle diagnostics.

  18. Task toward a Realization of Commercial Tokamak Fusion Plants in 2050 -The Role of ITER and the Succeeding Developments- 3.Fusion Plasma Research toward Fusion Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Yutaka; Shimada, Michiya; Miura, Yukitoshi; Ogawa, Yuichi

    This section discusses fusion plasma research that needs to be carried out to develop fusion power plants. Burning plasma, in which self-heating by energetic alph aparticles plays an essential role, should be recognized as autonomous system. This is quite different from present plasma experiments, suggesting a possibility to yield some qualitative changes in fusion plasma research. Research with ITER is strongly expected to contribute to this burning plasma physics. In addition, plasma performance in steady-state and at high beta is very important in fusion power plants from the engineering and economical viewpoints. Plasma parameters expected for fusion power plants are discussed, and present status of experimental research is reviewed. Research in devices other than ITER with unique features would be instrumental for exploring high performance plasmas. A necessity of research complementary to ITER plasma is discussed.

  19. Technical assessment of critical Plasma-Materials Interaction (PMI) and High Heat Flux (HHF) issues for alternative fusion concepts (AFCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, J.N.

    1986-03-01

    A number of approaches to fusion energy are being pursued as alternative fusion concepts (AFCs). The goal of these systems is to provide a more desirable method of producing fusion energy than the mainline programs. Some of the AFCs have both a Low Power Density (LPD) option and a High Power Density (HPD) option. A summary of representative AFC programs and their associated PMI and HHF issues is followed by the technical assessment of the critical issues. These requirements are discussed relative to the mainline and/or HPD components. The HPD options are contrasted with a tabulation of the characteristics of components for the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP), which is representative of the HPD concept.

  20. A fusion based plasma propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, J. A.; Anderson, B.; Bryant, D.; Creese, C.; Djordjevic, V.; Peddicord, K. L.

    1987-01-01

    The Fusion Plasma Propulsion System scoping study was performed to investigate the possibilities of a fusion powered plasma propulsion system for space applications. Specifically, it was to be compared against existing electric propulsion concepts for a manned Mars mission. Design parameters consist of 1000 N thrust for 500 days, and the minimum mass possible. This investigation is briefly presented and conclusions drawn.

  1. Physics of laser fusion. Vol. I. Theory of the coronal plasma in laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.

    1981-12-01

    This monograph deals with the physics of the coronal region in laser fusion targets. The corona consists of hot plasma which has been evaporated from the initially solid target during laser heating. It is in the corona that the laser light is absorbed by the target, and the resulting thermal energy is conducted toward cold high-density regions, where ablation occurs. The topics to be discussed are theoretical mechanisms for laser light absorption and reflection, hot-electron production, and the physics of heat conduction in laser-produced plasmas. An accompanying monograph by H. Ahlstrom (Vol.II) reviews the facilities, diagnostics, and data from recent laser fusion experiments.

  2. Control of Internal Transport Barriers in Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panta, Soma; Newman, David; Sanchez, Raul; Terry, Paul

    2016-10-01

    In magnetic confinement fusion devices the best performance often involves some sort of transport barriers to reduce the energy and particle flow from core to edge. Those barriers create gradients in the temperature and density profiles. If gradients in the profiles are too steep that can lead to instabilities and the system collapses. Control of these barriers is therefore an important challenge for fusion devices (burning plasmas). In this work we focus on the dynamics of internal transport barriers. Using a simple 7 field transport model, extensively used for barrier dynamics and control studies, we explore the use of RF heating to control the local gradients and therefore the growth rates and shearing rates for barrier initiation and control in self-heated fusion plasmas. Ion channel barriers can be formed in self-heated plasmas with some NBI heating but electron channel barriers are very sensitive. They can be formed in self-heated plasmas with additional auxiliary heating i.e. NBI and radio-frequency(RF). Using RF heating on both electrons and ions at proper locations, electron channel barriers along with ion channel barriers can be formed and removed demonstrating a control technique. Investigating the role of pellet injection in controlling the barriers is our next goal. Work supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER54741.

  3. NCSX Plasma Heating Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H. W.; Spong, D.; Majeski, R.; Zarnstorff, M.

    2008-01-18

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral beam injection, and radio-frequency (rf). Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, neutral beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The experimental plan requires 3 MW of 50-keV balanced neutral beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 ms for initial experiments, to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 s. Subsequent upgrades will add 3MW of neutral beam injection (NBI). This paper discusses the NCSX NBI requirements and design issues and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M NBI system. In addition, estimations are given for beam heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size and magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW of rf heating by mode conversion ion Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the rf system lend themselves to current drive, so if current drive became desirable for any reason, only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The rf system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possiblyIBW-generated sheared flows.

  4. Radiative heat transport instability in a laser produced inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Rozmus, W.

    2015-08-15

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation emission and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived, and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability [R. G. Evans, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 27, 751 (1985)]. Under conditions of indirect drive fusion experiments, the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and, in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered. This instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation, thus affecting inertial confinement fusion related experiments.

  5. Fundamental studies of fusion plasmas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Aamodt, R.E.

    1998-01-30

    Lodestar has carried out a vigorous research program in the areas of rf, edge plasma and divertor physics, with emphasis largely geared towards improving the understanding and performance of ion-cyclotron heating and current drive (ICRF) systems. Additionally, a research program in the field of edge plasma and divertor modeling was initiated. Theoretical work on high power rf sheath formation for multi-strap rf arrays was developed and benchmarked against recent experimental data from the new JET A2 antennas. Sophisticated modeling tools were employed to understand the sheath formation taking into account realistic three-dimensional antenna geometry. A novel physics explanation of an observed anomaly in the low power loading of antennas was applied to qualitatively interpret data on DIII-D in terms of rf sheaths, and potential applications of the idea to develop a near-field sheath diagnostic were explored. Other rf-wave related topics were also investigated. Full wave ICRF modeling studies were carried out in support of ongoing and planned tokamaks experiments, including the investigation of low frequency plasma heating and current drive regimes for IGNITOR. In a cross-disciplinary study involving both MHD and ICRF physics, ponderomotive feedback stabilization by rf was investigated as a potential means of controlling external kink mode disruptions. In another study, the instability of the ion hybrid wave (IHW) in the presence of fusion alpha particles was studied. In the field of edge plasma and divertor modeling studies, Lodestar began the development of a theory of generalized ballooning and sheath instabilities in the scrape off layer (SOL) of divertor tokamaks. A detailed summary of the technical progress in these areas during the contract period is included, as well as where references to published work can be found. A separate listing of publications, meeting abstracts, and other presentations is also given at the end of this final report.

  6. Ultra-wideband coaxial hybrid coupler for load resilient ion cyclotron range of frequency heating at fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H. J.; Bae, Y. S.; Yang, H. L.; Kwak, J.-G.; Wang, S. J.; Kim, B. K.; Choi, J. J.

    2012-06-25

    We designed a high power and ultra-wideband two-section 3 dB coaxial hybrid coupler for load resilient ion cyclotron range of frequency heating by configuring asymmetric impedance matching using a three-dimensional simulation code, hfss. By adjusting the characteristic impedances of main and coupled lines of the hybrid coupler, we realized that the bandwidth of the proposed circuit is not only wider than that of a conventional three-section coupler, but also that the bandwidth is almost twice as wide compared to the conventional two-section hybrid coupler while maintaining the identical overall size.

  7. Spherically symmetric simulation of plasma liner driven magnetoinertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Samulyak, Roman; Parks, Paul; Wu Lingling

    2010-09-15

    Spherically symmetric simulations of the implosion of plasma liners and compression of plasma targets in the concept of the plasma jet driven magnetoinertial fusion have been performed using the method of front tracking. The cases of single deuterium and xenon liners and double layer deuterium-xenon liners compressing various deuterium-tritium targets have been investigated, optimized for maximum fusion energy gains, and compared with theoretical predictions and scaling laws of [P. Parks, Phys. Plasmas 15, 062506 (2008)]. In agreement with the theory, the fusion gain was significantly below unity for deuterium-tritium targets compressed by Mach 60 deuterium liners. The most optimal setup for a given chamber size contained a target with the initial radius of 20 cm compressed by a 10 cm thick, Mach 60 xenon liner, achieving a fusion energy gain of 10 with 10 GJ fusion yield. Simulations also showed that composite deuterium-xenon liners reduce the energy gain due to lower target compression rates. The effect of heating of targets by alpha particles on the fusion energy gain has also been investigated.

  8. Developing structural, high-heat flux and plasma facing materials for a near-term DEMO fusion power plant: The EU assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stork, D.; Agostini, P.; Boutard, J. L.; Buckthorpe, D.; Diegele, E.; Dudarev, S. L.; English, C.; Federici, G.; Gilbert, M. R.; Gonzalez, S.; Ibarra, A.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Li Puma, A.; Marbach, G.; Morris, P. F.; Packer, L. W.; Raj, B.; Rieth, M.; Tran, M. Q.; Ward, D. J.; Zinkle, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The findings of the EU 'Materials Assessment Group' (MAG), within the 2012 EU Fusion Roadmap exercise, are discussed. MAG analysed the technological readiness of structural, plasma facing and high heat flux materials for a DEMO concept to be constructed in the early 2030s, proposing a coherent strategy for R&D up to a DEMO construction decision. A DEMO phase I with a 'Starter Blanket' and 'Starter Divertor' is foreseen: the blanket being capable of withstanding ⩾2 MW yr m-2 fusion neutron fluence (∼20 dpa in the front-wall steel). A second phase ensues for DEMO with ⩾5 MW yr m-2 first wall neutron fluence. Technical consequences for the materials required and the development, testing and modelling programmes, are analysed using: a systems engineering approach, considering reactor operational cycles, efficient maintenance and inspection requirements, and interaction with functional materials/coolants; and a project-based risk analysis, with R&D to mitigate risks from material shortcomings including development of specific risk mitigation materials. The DEMO balance of plant constrains the blanket and divertor coolants to remain unchanged between the two phases. The blanket coolant choices (He gas or pressurised water) put technical constraints on the blanket steels, either to have high strength at higher temperatures than current baseline variants (above 650 °C for high thermodynamic efficiency from He-gas coolant), or superior radiation-embrittlement properties at lower temperatures (∼290-320 °C), for construction of water-cooled blankets. Risk mitigation proposed would develop these options in parallel, and computational and modelling techniques to shorten the cycle-time of new steel development will be important to achieve tight R&D timescales. The superior power handling of a water-cooled divertor target suggests a substructure temperature operating window (∼200-350 °C) that could be realised, as a baseline-concept, using tungsten on a copper

  9. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume III. Strategy for international collaborations in the areas of plasma materials interactions and high heat flux materials and components development

    SciTech Connect

    Gauster, W.B.; Bauer, W.; Roberto, J.B.; Post, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this summary is to assess opportunities for such collaborations in the specific areas of Plasma Materials Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Development, and to aid in developing a strategy to take advantage of them. After some general discussion of international collaborations, we summarize key technical issues and the US programs to address them. Then follows a summary of present collaborations and potential opportunities in foreign laboratories.

  10. Lithium-based surfaces controlling fusion plasma behavior at the plasma-material interfacea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, Jean Paul; Taylor, Chase N.

    2012-05-01

    The plasma-material interface and its impact on the performance of magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas are considered to be one of the key scientific gaps in the realization of nuclear fusion power. At this interface, high particle and heat flux from the fusion plasma can limit the material's lifetime and reliability and therefore hinder operation of the fusion device. Lithium-based surfaces are now being used in major magnetic confinement fusion devices and have observed profound effects on plasma performance including enhanced confinement, suppression and control of edge localized modes (ELM), lower hydrogen recycling and impurity suppression. The critical spatial scale length of deuterium and helium particle interactions in lithium ranges between 5-100 nm depending on the incident particle energies at the edge and magnetic configuration. Lithium-based surfaces also range from liquid state to solid lithium coatings on a variety of substrates (e.g., graphite, stainless steel, refractory metal W/Mo/etc., or porous metal structures). Temperature-dependent effects from lithium-based surfaces as plasma facing components (PFC) include magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability issues related to liquid lithium, surface impurity, and deuterium retention issues, and anomalous physical sputtering increase at temperatures above lithium's melting point. The paper discusses the viability of lithium-based surfaces in future burning-plasma environments such as those found in ITER and DEMO-like fusion reactor devices.

  11. Improved Heat-of-Fusion Energy Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K. H.; Manvi, R.

    1982-01-01

    Alkali metal/alkali-halide mixtures proposed for preventing solid buildup during energy recovery. When mixture melts (by absorption of heat of fusion), it forms two immiscible liquids. Salt-rich phase is heavier and has higher melting/recrysallization temperature; so during energy recovery salt crystallizes in this phase first. Since heat exchanger for energy recovery is in lighter metal-rich phase, solids do not form and there is no reduction of heat-recovery efficiency.

  12. Turbulent particle transport in magnetized fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdelle, C.

    2005-05-01

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for particle transport is of the utmost importance for magnetized fusion plasmas. A peaked density profile is attractive to improve the fusion rate, which is proportional to the square of the density, and to self-generate a large fraction of non-inductive current required for continuous operation. Experiments in various tokamak devices (ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, JET, TCV, TEXT, TFTR) indicate the existence of a turbulent particle pinch. Recently, such a turbulent pinch has been unambiguously identified in Tore Supra very long discharges, in the absence of both collisional particle pinch and central particle source, for more than 4 min (Hoang et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 155002). This turbulent pinch is predicted by a quasilinear theory of particle transport (Weiland J et al 1989 Nucl. Fusion 29 1810), and confirmed by non-linear turbulence simulations (Garbet et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 035001) and general considerations based on the conservation of motion invariants (Baker et al 2004 Phys. Plasmas 11 992). Experimentally, the particle pinch is found to be sensitive to the magnetic field gradient in many cases (Hoang et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 135003, Zabolotsky et al 2003 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 45 735, Weisen et al 2004 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 46 751, Baker et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 1003), to the temperature profile (Hoang et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 135003, Angioni et al 2004 Nucl. Fusion 44 827) and also to the collisionality that changes the nature of the microturbulence (Angioni et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 205003, Garzotti et al 2003 Nucl. Fusion 43 1829, Weisen et al 2004 31st EPS Conf. on Plasma Phys. (London) vol 28G (ECA) P-1.146, Lopes Cardozo N J 1995 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 37 799). The consistency of some of the observed dependences with the theoretical predictions gives us a clearer understanding of the particle pinch in tokamaks, allowing us to predict more accurately the density

  13. Ignition Regime for Fusion in a Degenerate Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Son, S.; Fisch, N.J.

    2005-12-01

    We identify relevant parameter regimes in which aneutronic fuels can undergo fusion ignition in hot-ion degenerate plasma. Because of relativistic effects and partial degeneracy, the self-sustained burning regime is considerably larger than previously calculated. Inverse bremsstrahlung plays a major role in containing the reactor energy. We solve the radiation transfer equation and obtain the contribution to the heat conductivity from inverse bremsstrahlung.

  14. Nonlinear Laser-Plasma Interaction in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Geissel, Matthias; Awe, Thomas James; Bliss, David E.; Campbell, Edward Michael; Gomez, Matthew R.; Harding, Eric; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Kimmel, Mark W.; Knapp, Patrick; Lewis, Sean M.; McBride, Ryan D.; Peterson, Kyle; Schollmeier, Marius; Scoglietti, Daniel; Sefkow, Adam B.; Shores, Jonathon; Sinars, Daniel; Slutz, Stephen A.; Smith, Ian C.; Speas, Christopher; Vesey, Roger A.; Porter, John L.

    2016-03-04

    Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing a variation of Magneto-Inertial Fusion called Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion, or MagLIF. The MagLIF approach requires magnetization of the deuterium fuel, which is accomplished by an initial external B-Field and laser-driven pre-heat. Although magnetization is crucial to the concept, it is challenging to couple sufficient energy to the fuel, since laser-plasma instabilities exist, and a compromise between laser spot size, laser entrance window thickness, and fuel density must be found. Ultimately, nonlinear processes in laser plasma interaction, or laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), complicate the deposition of laser energy by enhanced absorption, backscatter, filamentation and beam-spray. We determine and discuss key LPI processes and mitigation methods. Results with and without improvement measures are presented.

  15. Nonlinear Laser-Plasma Interaction in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Geissel, Matthias; Awe, Thomas James; Bliss, David E.; ...

    2016-03-04

    Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing a variation of Magneto-Inertial Fusion called Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion, or MagLIF. The MagLIF approach requires magnetization of the deuterium fuel, which is accomplished by an initial external B-Field and laser-driven pre-heat. Although magnetization is crucial to the concept, it is challenging to couple sufficient energy to the fuel, since laser-plasma instabilities exist, and a compromise between laser spot size, laser entrance window thickness, and fuel density must be found. Ultimately, nonlinear processes in laser plasma interaction, or laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), complicate the deposition of laser energy by enhanced absorption, backscatter, filamentation and beam-spray. Wemore » determine and discuss key LPI processes and mitigation methods. Results with and without improvement measures are presented.« less

  16. Radiation reaction in fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Hazeltine, R D; Mahajan, S M

    2004-10-01

    The effects of a radiation reaction on thermal electrons in a magnetically confined plasma, with parameters typical of planned burning plasma experiments, are studied. A fully relativistic kinetic equation that includes the radiation reaction is derived. The associated rate of phase-space contraction is computed and the relative importance of the radiation reaction in phase space is estimated. A consideration of the moments of the radiation reaction force show that its effects are typically small in reactor-grade confined plasmas, but not necessarily insignificant.

  17. Fusion for Space Propulsion and Plasma Liner Driven MTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y.C. Francis; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The need for fusion propulsion for interplanetary flights is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important system attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For human exploration and development of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion cannot meet the requirement in propellant exhaust velocity. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the energy to heat a low atomic weight propellant cannot overcome the problem. Alternatively the energy can be converted into electricity which is then used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. The necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment, however, increases the mass of the propulsion system for the same jet power by more than two orders of magnitude over chemical system, thus greatly limits the thrust-to-weight ratio attainable. If fusion can be developed, fusion appears to have the best of all worlds in terms of propulsion - it can provide the absolute amount, the propellant exhaust velocity, and the high specific jet power. An intermediate step towards pure fusion propulsion is a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. The technical issues related to fusion for space propulsion are discussed. There are similarities as well as differences at the system level between applying fusion to propulsion and to terrestrial electrical power generation. The differences potentially provide a wider window of opportunities for applying fusion to propulsion. For example, pulsed approaches to fusion may be attractive for the propulsion application. This is particularly so

  18. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Lee, Michael; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For practical applications of magnetized target fusion, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Quasi-spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a quasi-spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC). Theoretical analysis and computer modeling of the concept are presented. It is shown that, with the appropriate choice of the flow parameters in the liner and the target, the impact between the liner and the target plasma can be made to be shockless in the liner or to generate at most a very weak shock in the liner. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. A burning plasma program strategy to advance fusion energy. Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, Burning Plasma Strategy Panel

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2002-09-01

    Fusion energy shows great promise to contribute to securing the energy future of humanity. The risk of conflicts arising from energy shortages and supply cutoffs, as well as the risk of severe environmental impacts from existing methods of energy production, are strong reasons to pursue fusion energy now. The world effort to develop fusion energy is at the threshold of a new stage in its research: the investigation of burning plasmas. This investigation, at the frontier of the physics of complex systems, would be a huge step in establishing the potential of magnetic fusion energy to contribute to the world’s energy security. The defining feature of a burning plasma is that it is self-heated: the 100 million degree temperature of the plasma is maintained mainly by the heat generated by the fusion reactions themselves, as occurs in burning stars. The fusion-generated alpha particles produce new physical phenomena that are strongly coupled together as a nonlinear complex system. Understanding all elements of this system poses a major challenge to fundamental plasma physics. The technology needed to produce and control a burning plasma presents challenges in engineering science similarly essential to the development of fusion energy.

  20. Confinement and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R. J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Synakowski, E.

    1994-03-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has performed initial high-power experiments with the plasma fueled by deuterium and tritium to nominally equal densities. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas, the energy stored in the electron and ions increased by ~20%. These increases indicate improvements in confinement associated with the use of tritium and possibly heating of electrons by α-particles.

  1. Gyrokinetic Simulation of TAE in Fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhixuan

    Linear gyrokinetic simulation of fusion plasmas finds a radial localization of the toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) due to the non-perturbative energetic particles (EP) contribution. The EP-driven TAE has a radial mode width much smaller than that predicted by the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The TAE radial position stays around the strongest EP pressure gradients when the EP profile evolves. The non-perturbative EP contribution is also the main cause for the breaking of the radial symmetry of the ballooning mode structure and for the dependence of the TAE frequency on the toroidal mode number. These phenomena are beyond the picture of the conventional MHD theory. Linear gyrokinetic simulation of the electron cyclotron heating (ECH) experiments on DIII-D successfully recover the TAE and RSAE. The EP profile, rather than the electron temperature, is found to be the key factor determining whether TAE or RSAE is the dominant mode in the system in our simulation. Investigation on the nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation model reveals a missing nonlinear term which has important contributions to the zonal magnetic fields. A new fluid-electron hybrid model is proposed to keep this nonlinear term in the lowest order fluid part. Nonlinear simulation of TAE using DIII-D parameters confirms the importance of this new term for the zonal magnetic fields. It is also found that zonal structures dominated by zonal electric fields are forced driven at about twice the linear growth rate of TAE in the linear phase. The zonal flows then limit the nonlinear saturation level by tearing the eigenmode structures apart. In the nonlinear phase of the simulation, the major frequency in the system chirps down by about 30% and stays there.

  2. Radio frequency heating of ceramic windows in fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.D. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    Ceramic windows will be used as material barriers for radio frequency plasma heating in fusion reactors. This report examines the theory behind rf heating phenomena. Heating calculations are presented for various window materials, thicknesses, wavelengths, and power densities. The most pertinent material properties are loss tangent, thermal conductivity, dielectric constant, strength, and radiation resistance. Calculations indicate that among candidate materials, beryllium oxide offers the most promise because of its large thermal conductivity and relatively low loss tangent and dielectric constant. On the other hand, beryllia is susceptible to neutron damage, and this may adversely affect its electrical properties. Another promising candidate is sapphire, particularly at lower temperatures where the thermal conductivity is high. Fused silica suffers from low thermal conductivity and large positive temperature coefficient for loss tangent, but it may be useful under some conditions. In summary, calculations of heating can lead to elimination of some candidate materials and selection of others for further study.

  3. Far infrared fusion plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Peebles, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last several years, reflectometry has grown in importance as a diagnostic for both steady-state density Profiles as well as for the investigation of density fluctuations and turbulence. As a diagnostic for density profile measurement, it is generally believed to be well understood in the tokamak environment. However, its use as a fluctuation diagnostic is hampered by a lack of quantitative experimental understanding of its wavenumber sensitivity and spatial resolution. Several researchers, have theoretically investigated these questions. However, prior to the UCLA laboratory investigation, no group has experimentally investigated these questions. Because of the reflectometer's importance to the world effort in understanding plasma turbulence and transport, UCLA has, over the last year, made its primary Task IIIA effort the resolution of these questions. UCLA has taken the lead in a quantitative experimental understanding of reflectometer data as applied to the measurement of density fluctuations. In addition to this, work has proceeded on the design, construction, and installation of a reflectometer system on UCLA's CCT tokamak. This effort will allow a comparison between the improved confinement regimes (H-mode) observed on both the DIII-D and CCT machines with the goal of achieving a physics understanding of the phenomena. Preliminary investigation of a new diagnostic technique to measure density profiles as a function of time has been initiated at UCLA. The technique promises to be a valuable addition to the range of available plasma diagnostics. Work on advanced holographic reflectometry technique as applied to fluctuation diagnostics has awaited a better understanding of the reflectometer signal itself as discussed above. Efforts to ensure the transfer of the diagnostic developments have continued with particular attention devoted to the preliminary design of a multichannel FIR interferometer for MST.

  4. High fusion performance from deuterium-tritium plasmas in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keilhacker, M.; Gibson, A.; Gormezano, C.; Lomas, P. J.; Thomas, P. R.; Watkins, M. L.; Andrew, P.; Balet, B.; Borba, D.; Challis, C. D.; Coffey, I.; Cottrell, G. A.; DeEsch, H. P. L.; Deliyanakis, N.; Fasoli, A.; Gowers, C. W.; Guo, H. Y.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Jones, T. T. C.; Kerner, W.; König, R. W. T.; Loughlin, M. J.; Maas, A.; Marcus, F. B.; Nave, M. F. F.; Rimini, F. G.; Sadler, G. J.; Sharapov, S. E.; Sips, G.; Smeulders, P.; Söldner, F. X.; Taroni, A.; Tubbing, B. J. D.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Ward, D. J.; JET Team

    1999-02-01

    High fusion power experiments using DT mixtures in ELM-free H mode and optimized shear regimes in JET are reported. A fusion power of 16.1 MW has been produced in an ELM-free H mode at 4.2 MA/3.6 T. The transient value of the fusion amplification factor was 0.95+/-0.17, consistent with the high value of nDT(0)τEdiaTi(0) = 8.7 × 1020+/-20% m-3 s keV, and was maintained for about half an energy confinement time until excessive edge pressure gradients resulted in discharge termination by MHD instabilities. The ratio of DD to DT fusion powers (from separate but otherwise similar discharges) showed the expected factor of 210, validating DD projections of DT performance for similar pressure profiles and good plasma mixture control, which was achieved by loading the vessel walls with the appropriate DT mix. Magnetic fluctuation spectra showed no evidence of Alfvénic instabilities driven by alpha particles, in agreement with theoretical model calculations. Alpha particle heating has been unambiguously observed, its effect being separated successfully from possible isotope effects on energy confinement by varying the tritium concentration in otherwise similar discharges. The scan showed that there was no, or at most a very weak, isotope effect on the energy confinement time. The highest electron temperature was clearly correlated with the maximum alpha particle heating power and the optimum DT mixture; the maximum increase was 1.3+/-0.23 keV with 1.3 MW of alpha particle heating power, consistent with classical expectations for alpha particle confinement and heating. In the optimized shear regime, clear internal transport barriers were established for the first time in DT, with a power similar to that required in DD. The ion thermal conductivity in the plasma core approached neoclassical levels. Real time power control maintained the plasma core close to limits set by pressure gradient driven MHD instabilities, allowing 8.2 MW of DT fusion power with nDT(0)τEdiaTi(0

  5. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume II. Technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in high heat flux materials and component development

    SciTech Connect

    Abdou, M.A.; Boyd, R.D.; Easor, J.R.; Gauster, W.B.; Gordon, J.D.; Mattas, R.F.; Morgan, G.D.; Ulrickson, M.A,; Watson, R.D.; Wolfer, W.G,

    1984-06-01

    A technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas for high heat flux materials and components (HHFMC) in magnetic fusion devices shows these problems to be of critical importance for the successful operation of near-term fusion experiments and for the feasibility and attractiveness of long-term fusion reactors. A number of subgroups were formed to assess the critical HHFMC issues along the following major lines: (1) source conditions, (2) systems integration, (3) materials and processes, (4) thermal hydraulics, (5) thermomechanical response, (6) electromagnetic response, (7) instrumentation and control, and (8) test facilities. The details of the technical assessment are presented in eight chapters. The primary technical issues and needs for each area are highlighted.

  6. Plasma Heating: An Advanced Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Mercury and Apollo spacecraft shields were designed to protect astronauts from high friction temperatures (well over 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit) when re-entering the Earth's atmosphere. It was necessary to test and verify the heat shield materials on Earth before space flight. After exhaustive research and testing, NASA decided to use plasma heating as a heat source. This technique involves passing a strong electric current through a rarefied gas to create a plasma (ionized gas) that produces an intensely hot flame. Although NASA did not invent the concept, its work expanded the market for commercial plasma heating systems. One company, Plasma Technology Corporation (PTC), was founded by a member of the team that developed the Re-entry Heating Simulator at Ames Research Center (ARC). Dr. Camacho, President of PTC, believes the technology has significant environmental applications. These include toxic waste disposal, hydrocarbon, decomposition, medical waste disposal, asbestos waste destruction, and chemical and radioactive waste disposal.

  7. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  8. Negative specific heat of a magnetically self-confined plasma torus

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Michael K.-H.; Neukirch, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that the thermodynamic maximum-entropy principle predicts negative specific heat for a stationary, magnetically self-confined current-carrying plasma torus. Implications for the magnetic self-confinement of fusion plasma are considered. PMID:12576553

  9. Laser-heated emissive plasma probe

    SciTech Connect

    Schrittwieser, Roman; Ionita, Codrina; Balan, Petru; Gstrein, Ramona; Grulke, Olaf; Windisch, Thomas; Brandt, Christian; Klinger, Thomas; Madani, Ramin; Amarandei, George; Sarma, Arun K.

    2008-08-15

    Emissive probes are standard tools in laboratory plasmas for the direct determination of the plasma potential. Usually they consist of a loop of refractory wire heated by an electric current until sufficient electron emission. Recently emissive probes were used also for measuring the radial fluctuation-induced particle flux and other essential parameters of edge turbulence in magnetized toroidal hot plasmas [R. Schrittwieser et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 055004 (2008)]. We have developed and investigated various types of emissive probes, which were heated by a focused infrared laser beam. Such a probe has several advantages: higher probe temperature without evaporation or melting and thus higher emissivity and longer lifetime, no deformation of the probe in a magnetic field, no potential drop along the probe wire, and faster time response. The probes are heated by an infrared diode laser with 808 nm wavelength and an output power up to 50 W. One probe was mounted together with the lens system on a radially movable probe shaft, and radial profiles of the plasma potential and of its oscillations were measured in a linear helicon discharge.

  10. Synthetic diagnostics platform for fusion plasmas (invited)

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, L.; Valeo, E. J.; Tobias, B. J.; ...

    2016-08-26

    A Synthetic Diagnostics Platform (SDP) for fusion plasmas has been developed which provides state of the art synthetic reflectometry, beam emission spectroscopy, and Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) diagnostics. Interfaces to the plasma simulation codes GTC, XGC-1, GTS, and M3D-C-1 are provided, enabling detailed validation of these codes. In this paper, we give an overview of SDP's capabilities, and introduce the synthetic diagnostic modules. A recently developed synthetic ECE Imaging module which self-consistently includes refraction, diffraction, emission, and absorption effects is discussed in detail. Its capabilities are demonstrated on two model plasmas. Finally, the importance of synthetic diagnostics in validation ismore » shown by applying the SDP to M3D-C1 output and comparing it with measurements from an edge harmonic oscillation mode on DIII-D.« less

  11. Synthetic diagnostics platform for fusion plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, L.; Valeo, E. J.; Tobias, B. J.; Kramer, G. J.; Hausammann, L.; Tang, W. M.; Chen, M.

    2016-08-26

    A Synthetic Diagnostics Platform (SDP) for fusion plasmas has been developed which provides state of the art synthetic reflectometry, beam emission spectroscopy, and Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) diagnostics. Interfaces to the plasma simulation codes GTC, XGC-1, GTS, and M3D-C-1 are provided, enabling detailed validation of these codes. In this paper, we give an overview of SDP's capabilities, and introduce the synthetic diagnostic modules. A recently developed synthetic ECE Imaging module which self-consistently includes refraction, diffraction, emission, and absorption effects is discussed in detail. Its capabilities are demonstrated on two model plasmas. Finally, the importance of synthetic diagnostics in validation is shown by applying the SDP to M3D-C1 output and comparing it with measurements from an edge harmonic oscillation mode on DIII-D.

  12. Numerical Studies of Impurities in Fusion Plasmas

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Hulse, R. A.

    1982-09-01

    The coupled partial differential equations used to describe the behavior of impurity ions in magnetically confined controlled fusion plasmas require numerical solution for cases of practical interest. Computer codes developed for impurity modeling at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are used as examples of the types of codes employed for this purpose. These codes solve for the impurity ionization state densities and associated radiation rates using atomic physics appropriate for these low-density, high-temperature plasmas. The simpler codes solve local equations in zero spatial dimensions while more complex cases require codes which explicitly include transport of the impurity ions simultaneously with the atomic processes of ionization and recombination. Typical applications are discussed and computational results are presented for selected cases of interest.

  13. Synthetic diagnostics platform for fusion plasmas (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, L.; Valeo, E. J.; Tobias, B. J.; Kramer, G. J.; Hausammann, L.; Tang, W. M.; Chen, M.

    2016-11-01

    A Synthetic Diagnostics Platform (SDP) for fusion plasmas has been developed which provides state of the art synthetic reflectometry, beam emission spectroscopy, and Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) diagnostics. Interfaces to the plasma simulation codes GTC, XGC-1, GTS, and M3D-C1 are provided, enabling detailed validation of these codes. In this paper, we give an overview of SDP's capabilities, and introduce the synthetic diagnostic modules. A recently developed synthetic ECE Imaging module which self-consistently includes refraction, diffraction, emission, and absorption effects is discussed in detail. Its capabilities are demonstrated on two model plasmas. The importance of synthetic diagnostics in validation is shown by applying the SDP to M3D-C1 output and comparing it with measurements from an edge harmonic oscillation mode on DIII-D.

  14. Dense plasma heating by crossing relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratan, N.; Sircombe, N. J.; Ceurvorst, L.; Sadler, J.; Kasim, M. F.; Holloway, J.; Levy, M. C.; Trines, R.; Bingham, R.; Norreys, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    Here we investigate, using relativistic fluid theory and Vlasov-Maxwell simulations, the local heating of a dense plasma by two crossing electron beams. Heating occurs as an instability of the electron beams drives Langmuir waves, which couple nonlinearly into damped ion-acoustic waves. Simulations show a factor 2.8 increase in electron kinetic energy with a coupling efficiency of 18%. Our results support applications to the production of warm dense matter and as a driver for inertial fusion plasmas.

  15. Dense plasma heating by crossing relativistic electron beams.

    PubMed

    Ratan, N; Sircombe, N J; Ceurvorst, L; Sadler, J; Kasim, M F; Holloway, J; Levy, M C; Trines, R; Bingham, R; Norreys, P A

    2017-01-01

    Here we investigate, using relativistic fluid theory and Vlasov-Maxwell simulations, the local heating of a dense plasma by two crossing electron beams. Heating occurs as an instability of the electron beams drives Langmuir waves, which couple nonlinearly into damped ion-acoustic waves. Simulations show a factor 2.8 increase in electron kinetic energy with a coupling efficiency of 18%. Our results support applications to the production of warm dense matter and as a driver for inertial fusion plasmas.

  16. Penetration Factor for Nuclear Fusion Reaction in Nonthermal Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ki, Dai-Han; Jung, Young-Dae

    2011-02-01

    The nonthermal effects on the nuclear fusion reaction process are investigated in Lorentzian astrophysical plasmas. The closed expression of the classical turning point in Lorentzian plasmas is obtained by the Lambert W-function. Using the WKB analysis with the effective screening length, the closed expressions of the fusion penetration factor and the cross section for the nuclear fusion reaction in Lorentzian plasmas are obtained as functions of the spectral index, relative kinetic energy, and plasma parameters. It is shown that the nonthermal character of the Lorentzian plasma enhances the fusion penetration factor. In addition, the nonthermal effect on the penetration factor is found to be more significant in plasmas with higher densities. It would be expected that the fusion reaction rates of the p-p chain and the CNO cycle in nonthermal plasmas are always greater than those in thermal Maxwellian plasmas.

  17. Plasma-heating by induction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, K.; Thorpe, M. L.

    1969-01-01

    Induction-heated plasma torch operates with an input of 1 Mw of direct current of which 71 percent is transferred to the plasma and the remainder is consumed by electrical losses in the system. Continuous operation of the torch should be possible for as long as 5,000 hours.

  18. Wavelet analysis of fusion plasma transients

    SciTech Connect

    Dose, V.; Venus, G.; Zohm, H.

    1997-02-01

    Analysis of transient signals in the diagnostic of fusion plasmas often requires the simultaneous consideration of their time and frequency information. The newly emerging technique of wavelet analysis contains both time and frequency domains. Therefore it can be a valuable tool for the analysis of transients. In this paper the basic method of wavelet analysis is described. As an example, wavelet analysis is applied to the well-known phenomena of mode locking and fishbone instability. The results quantify the current qualitative understanding of these events in terms of instantaneous frequencies and amplitudes and encourage applications of the method to other problems. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Supplemental heating of conventional Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B. R.; Hughes, S. J.; Garbett, W. J.; Sircombe, N. J.

    2016-03-01

    We report a new ICF scheme whereby a capsule is imploded to near ignition conditions and subsequently flooded with hot electrons generated from a short-pulse laser- plasma interaction so as to heat the whole assembly by a few hundred eV. The cold dense shell pressure is increased by a larger factor than that of the hot spot at the capsule core, so that further heating and compression of the hot spot occurs. We suggest it may be possible to drive the capsule to ignition by the pressure augmentation supplied by this extra deposition of energy.

  20. Dense Plasma Focus - From Alternative Fusion Source to Versatile High Energy Density Plasma Source for Plasma Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF), a coaxial plasma gun, utilizes pulsed high current electrical discharge to heat and compress the plasma to very high density and temperature with energy densities in the range of 1-10 × 1010 J/m3. The DPF device has always been in the company of several alternative magnetic fusion devices as it produces intense fusion neutrons. Several experiments conducted on many different DPF devices ranging over several order of storage energy have demonstrated that at higher storage energy the neutron production does not follow I4 scaling laws and deteriorate significantly raising concern about the device's capability and relevance for fusion energy. On the other hand, the high energy density pinch plasma in DPF device makes it a multiple radiation source of ions, electron, soft and hard x-rays, and neutrons, making it useful for several applications in many different fields such as lithography, radiography, imaging, activation analysis, radioisotopes production etc. Being a source of hot dense plasma, strong shockwave, intense energetic beams and radiation, etc, the DPF device, additionally, shows tremendous potential for applications in plasma nanoscience and plasma nanotechnology. In the present paper, the key features of plasma focus device are critically discussed to understand the novelties and opportunities that this device offers in processing and synthesis of nanophase materials using, both, the top-down and bottom-up approach. The results of recent key experimental investigations performed on (i) the processing and modification of bulk target substrates for phase change, surface reconstruction and nanostructurization, (ii) the nanostructurization of PLD grown magnetic thin films, and (iii) direct synthesis of nanostructured (nanowire, nanosheets and nanoflowers) materials using anode target material ablation, ablated plasma and background reactive gas based synthesis and purely gas phase synthesis of various different types of

  1. ICRF heating in reactor grade plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquinot, J.; Bhatnagar, V.P.; Bures, M.; Cottrell, G.A.; Eriksson, L.G.; Sack, C.H.; Start, D.F.H.; Taroni, A. ); Hellsten, T. ); Koch, R. ); Moreau, D. )

    1990-01-01

    Impurity influxes in JET discharges due to ICRH have been reduced to insignificant levels. This has allowed high quality H-modes to be produced with ICRH alone and has enhanced the density limit which is now the same as the NBI limit. Improvement in the deuterium fuel fraction has led to the generation of 100kW of non thermal {sup 3}He-D fusion power. Alpha-particle simulations using MeV ions created by ICRH show classical energy loss and suggest that {alpha}-heating in a reactor will be highly efficient. A clear demonstration of TTMP damping of the fast wave in high beta plasmas has been achieved. A broadband ICRH system is proposed for NET/ITER which will allow fast wave current drive and central ion heating for burn control and ignition. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Final Report on The Theory of Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Steven C. Cowley

    2008-06-17

    Report describes theoretical research in the theory of fusion plasmas funded under grant DE-FG02-04ER54737. This includes work on: explosive instabilities, plasma turbulence, Alfven wave cascades, high beta (pressure) tokamaks and magnetic reconnection. These studies have lead to abetter understanding of fusion plasmas and in particular the future behavior of ITER. More than ten young researchers were involved in this research -- some were funded under the grant.

  3. Magnetized Plasma Compression for Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnan, James; Grabowski, Christopher; Domonkos, Matthew; Amdahl, David

    2013-10-01

    Magnetized Plasma Compression (MPC) uses magnetic inhibition of thermal conduction and enhancement of charge particle product capture to greatly reduce the temporal and spatial compression required relative to un-magnetized inertial fusion (IFE)--to microseconds, centimeters vs nanoseconds, sub-millimeter. MPC greatly reduces the required confinement time relative to MFE--to microseconds vs minutes. Proof of principle can be demonstrated or refuted using high current pulsed power driven compression of magnetized plasmas using magnetic pressure driven implosions of metal shells, known as imploding liners. This can be done at a cost of a few tens of millions of dollars. If demonstrated, it becomes worthwhile to develop repetitive implosion drivers. One approach is to use arrays of heavy ion beams for energy production, though with much less temporal and spatial compression than that envisioned for un-magnetized IFE, with larger compression targets, and with much less ambitious compression ratios. A less expensive, repetitive pulsed power driver, if feasible, would require engineering development for transient, rapidly replaceable transmission lines such as envisioned by Sandia National Laboratories. Supported by DOE-OFES.

  4. PLASMA HEATING AND CONFINING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Bratenahl, Al.; Kunkel, W.B.

    1962-02-13

    ABS> A device is designed for generating, heating, and containing a very pure electrical plasma. Plasma purity is maintained by preventing the hot plasma from contacting insulators, which are a principal source of impurities in prior constructions. An insulator is disposed at each end of a pair of long coaxial cylinders forming an annular chamber therebetween. High voltage is applied between the cylinders and an axial magnetic field is created therethrough. At a middle position on the inner cylinder, a fastopening valve releases a quantity of gas into the chamber, and before the gas can diffuse to the distant insulators, a discharge occurs between the cylinders and plasma is formed in the central region of the chamber away from the insulators. (AEC)

  5. Review of controlled fusion research using laser heating.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.

    1973-01-01

    Development of methods for generating high laser pulse energy has stimulated research leading to new ideas for practical controlled thermonuclear fusion machines. A review is presented of some important efforts in progress, and two different approaches have been selected as examples for discussion. One involves the concept of very short pulse lasers with power output tailored, in time, to obtain a nearly isentropic compression of a deuterium-tritium pellet to very high densities and temperatures. A second approach utilizing long wavelength, long pulse, efficient gas lasers to heat a column of plasma contained in a solenoidal field is also discussed. The working requirements of the laser and various magnetic field geometries of this approach are described.

  6. On vapor shielding of dust grains of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B. T.; Smirnov, R. D. Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-02-15

    The shielding effects of ablation cloud around a small dust grain composed of iron, molybdenum, or tungsten in fusion plasmas are considered. These include collisional dissipation of momentum flux of impinging plasma ions, heat transfer by secondary plasma created due to electron impact ionization of the ablated atoms, and radiative plasma power losses in the ablation cloud. The maximum radius, which limits applicability of existing dust-plasma interaction models neglecting the cloud shielding effects, for dust grains of the considered high-Z metals is calculated as function of plasma parameters. The thermal bifurcation triggered by thermionic electron emission from dust grains, observed for some of the considered materials, is analyzed. The results are compared with previous calculations for dust composed of low-Z fusion related materials, i.e., lithium, beryllium, and carbon.

  7. Vortex stabilized electron beam compressed fusion grade plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2014-03-19

    Most inertial confinement fusion schemes are comprised of highly compressed dense plasmas. Those schemes involve short, extremely high power, short pulses of beams (lasers, particles) applied to lower density plasmas or solid pellets. An alternative approach could be to shoot an intense electron beam through very dense, atmospheric pressure, vortex stabilized plasma.

  8. CONFERENCE REPORT: 13th EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop on transport in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. W.; Fasoli, A.; Hidalgo, C.; Kirk, A.; Naulin, V.; Peeters, A. G.; Tala, T.

    2009-04-01

    This report summarizes the contributions presented at the 13th EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop on transport in fusion plasmas, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, 1-4 September 2008. There were sessions on core heat and particle transport; core and edge momentum transport; edge and scrape-off-layer transport and MHD and fast particle interaction with transport.

  9. Modular control of fusion power heating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, D. R.

    2012-08-24

    This work is motivated by the growing demand for auxiliary heating on small and large machines worldwide. Numerous present and planned RF experiments (EBW, Lower Hybrid, ICRF, and ECH) are increasingly complex systems. The operational challenges are indicative of a need for components of real-time control that can be implemented with a moderate amount of effort in a time- and cost-effective fashion. Such a system will improve experimental efficiency, enhance experimental quality, and expedite technological advancements. The modular architecture of this control-suite serves multiple purposes. It facilitates construction on various scales from single to multiple controller systems. It enables expandability of control from basic to complex via the addition of modules with varying functionalities. It simplifies the control implementation process by reducing layers of software and electronic development. While conceived with fusion applications in mind, this suite has the potential to serve a broad range of scientific and industrial applications. During the Phase-I research effort we established the overall feasibility of this modular control-suite concept. We developed the fundamental modules needed to implement open-loop active-control and demonstrated their use on a microwave power deposition experiment.

  10. High quality actively cooled plasma facing components for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper interweaves some suggestions for developing actively-cooled PFCs (plasma facing components) for future fusion devices with supporting examples taken from the design, fabrication and operation of Tore Supra`s Phase III Outboard Pump Limiter (OPL). This actively-cooled midplane limiter, designed for heat and particle removal during long pulse operation, has been operated in essentially thermally steady state conditions. From experience with testing to identify braze flaws in the OPL, recommendations are made to analyze the impact of joining flaws on thermal-hydraulic performance of PFCs and to validate a method of inspection for such flaws early in the design development. Capability for extensive in-service monitoring of future PFCs is also recommended and the extensive calorimetry and IR thermography used to confirm and update safe operating limits for power handling of the OPL are reviewed.

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, Marco

    1998-04-01

    general part concludes with a few chapters on waves, again covering a broad spectrum of topics in a very condensed form: cold plasma waves, Landau and cyclotron absorption, quasi-linear theory, power flow and ray tracing in non-uniform plasmas, the main radiofrequency heating scenarios (ion cyclotron, lower hybrid and electron cyclotron) and the most common velocity space instabilities. The second part describes tokamaks, reversed field pinches, stellarators and open ended systems, and ends with a short chapter on inertial fusion. Although more descriptive in nature, this part offers a succinct introduction to relatively advanced topics, particularly for the tokamak: MHD stability and density limits, non-inductive current drive, bootstrap current, improved confinement regimes and scaling laws of the confinement. Reference to the first, general part, allows an introduction to and explanation of many of the formulas in current use for the interpretation of experimental results. A nice feature of this part is also the concise but very readable introduction to the history of fusion research. The level of the presentation corresponds well to what one would expect in a course for postgraduate students: most topics are discussed rather briefly, but always quantitatively, the mathematics being mostly worked out in full. As should be clear from the description of the content, there is a strong bias towards concrete applications, at the expense of general principles: this goes so far that the derivation of the energy principle for ideal MHD instabilities and of the dielectric tensor of the hot plasma are relegated to appendices, in spite of the fact that the mathematics involved is by no means more complex than that of the applications discussed in the main text. The equations of magnetohydrodynamics are derived in Chapter 5 not as a particular closure of the hierarchy of moments of the Vlasov equation, but using a phenomenological approach. The space devoted to comments and

  12. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The objectives of the theoretical science program are: To support the interpretation of present experiments and predict the outcome of future planned experiments; to improve on existing models and codes and validate against experimental results; and to conduct theoretical physics development of advanced concepts with applications for DIII-D and future devices. Major accomplishments in FY91 include the corroboration between theory and experiment on MHD behavior in the second stable regime of operation on DIII-D, and the frequency and mode structure of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes in high beta, shaped plasmas. We have made significant advances in the development of the gyro-Landau fluid approach to turbulence simulation which more accurately models kinetic drive and damping mechanisms. Several theoretical models to explain the bifurcation phenomenon in L- to H-mode transition were proposed providing the theoretical basis for future experimental verification. The capabilities of new rf codes have been upgraded in response to the expanding needs of the rf experiments. Codes are being employed to plan for a fully non-inductive current drive experiment in a high beta, enhanced confinement regime. GA's experimental effort in Applied Physics encompasses two advanced diagnostics essential for the operation of future fusion experiments: Alpha particle diagnostic, and current and density profile diagnostics. This paper discusses research in all these topics.

  13. Fusion power production from TFTR plasmas fueled with deuterium and tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J. D.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J. L.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, Cris W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bretz, N. L.; Budny, R.; Bush, C. E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C. Z.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Darrow, D. S.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ernst, D.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G. Y.; Furth, H. P.; Gentile, C.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G. R.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hill, K. W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D. L.; Jobes, F. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Johnson, L. C.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kugel, H.; Lam, N. T.; LaMarche, P. H.; Loughlin, M. J.; LeBlanc, B.; Leonard, M.; Levinton, F. M.; Machuzak, J.; Mansfield, D. K.; Martin, A.; Mazzucato, E.; Majeski, R.; Marmar, E.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D. C.; McGuire, K. M.; McKee, G.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Nagy, A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Nishitani, T.; Norris, M.; O’Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D. K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Paul, S. F.; Pearson, G.; Perry, E.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Pitcher, S.; Ramsey, A. T.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Redi, M. H.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scott, S. D.; Sissingh, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Snipes, J. A.; Stevens, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stratton, B. C.; Synakowski, E.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Terry, J. L.; Thompson, M. E.; Tuszewski, M.; Vannoy, C.; von Halle, A.; von Goeler, S.; Voorhees, D.; Walters, R. T.; Wieland, R.; Wilgen, J. B.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Wong, K. L.; Wurden, G. A.; Yamada, M.; Young, K. M.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zweben, S. J.

    1994-05-01

    Peak fusion power production of 6.2 ± 0.4 MW has been achieved in TFTR plasmas heated by deuterium and tritium neutral beams at a total power of 29.5 MW. These plasmas have an inferred central fusion alpha particle density of 1.2 x 1017 m ₋3 without the appearance of either disruptive magnetohydrodynamics events or detectable changes in Alfvén wave activity. The measured loss rate of energetic alpha particles agreed with the approximately 5% losses expected from alpha particles which are born on unconfined orbits.

  14. Fusion power production from TFTR plasmas fueled with deuterium and tritium*

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J. D.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Synakowski, E.

    1994-03-01

    Peak fusion power production of 6.2 ± 0.4 MW has been achieved in TFTR plasmas heated by deuterium and tritium neutral beams at a total power of 29.5 MW. These plasmas have an inferred central fusion alpha particle density of 1.2 x 1017 m₋3 without the appearance of either disruptive MHD events or detectable changes in Alfvén wave activity. The measured loss rate of energetic alpha particles agreed with the approximately 5% losses expected from alpha particles which are born on unconfined orbits.

  15. Target Plasma Formation for Magnetic Compression/Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemuth, I. R.; Reinovsky, R. E.; Chrien, R. E.; Christian, J. M.; Ekdahl, C. A.; Goforth, J. H.; Haight, R. C.; Idzorek, G.; King, N. S.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Larson, R. E.; Morgan, G. L.; Olinger, B. W.; Oona, H.; Sheehey, P. T.; Shlachter, J. S.; Smith, R. C.; Veeser, L. R.; Warthen, B. J.; Younger, S. M.; Chernyshev, V. K.; Mokhov, V. N.; Demin, A. N.; Dolin, Y. N.; Garanin, S. F.; Ivanov, V. A.; Korchagin, V. P.; Mikhailov, O. D.; Morozov, I. V.; Pak, S. V.; Pavlovskii, E. S.; Seleznev, N. Y.; Skobelev, A. N.; Volkov, G. I.; Yakubov, V. A.

    1995-09-01

    Experimental observations of plasma behavior in a novel plasma formation chamber are reported. Experimental results are in reasonable agreement with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computations suggesting that the plasma could subsequently be adiabatically compressed by a magnetically driven pusher to yield 1 GJ of fusion energy. An explosively driven helical flux compression generator mated with a unique closing switch/opening switch combination delivered a 2.7 MA, 347 μs magnetization current and an additional 5 MA, 2.5 μs electrical pulse to the chamber. A hot plasma was produced and 1013 D-T fusion reactions were observed.

  16. Heat flux measurement in a high enthalpy plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhle, Stefan; Battaglia, Jean-Luc; Gardarein, Jean-Laurent; Jullien, Pierre; van Ootegem, Bruno

    2008-11-01

    It is a widely used approach to measure heat flux in harsh environments like high enthalpy plasma flows, fusion plasma and rocket motor combustion chambers based on solving the inverse heat conduction problem in a semi-infinite environment. This approach strongly depends on model parameters and geometrical aspects of the sensor design. In this work the surface heat flux is determined by solving the inverse heat conduction problem using an identified system as a direct model. The identification of the system is performed using calibration measurements with modern laser technique and advanced data handling. The results of the identified thermo-physical system show that a non-integer model appears most adapted to this particular problem. It is concluded that the new method improves the heat flux sensor significantly and furthermore extend its application to very short measurement times.

  17. Observed Multi-Decade DD and DT Z-Pinch Fusion Rate Scaling in 5 Dense Plasma Focus Fusion Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, E. C.; Lowe, D. R.; O'Brien, R.; Meehan, B. T.

    2013-06-18

    Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) machines are in use worldwide or a wide variety of applications; one of these is to produce intense, short bursts of fusion via r-Z pinch heating and compression of a working gas. We have designed and constructed a series of these, ranging from portable to a maximum energy storage capacity of 2 MJ. Fusion rates from 5 DPF pulsed fusion generators have been measured in a single laboratory using calibrated activation detectors. Measured rates range from ~ 1015 to more than 1019 fusions per second have been measured. Fusion rates from the intense short (20 – 50 ns) periods of production were inferred from measurement of neutron production using both calibrated activation detectors and scintillator-PMT neutron time of flight (NTOF) detectors. The NTOF detectors are arranged to measure neutrons versus time over flight paths of 30 Meters. Fusion rate scaling versus energy and current will be discussed. Data showing observed fusion cutoff at D-D fusion yield levels of approximately 1*1012, and corresponding tube currents of ~ 3 MA will be shown. Energy asymmetry of product neutrons will also be discussed. Data from the NTOF lines of sight have been used to measure energy asymmetries of the fusion neutrons. From this, center of mass energies for the D(d,n)3He reaction are inferred. A novel re-entrant chamber that allows extremely high single pulse neutron doses (> 109 neutrons/cm2 in 50 ns) to be supplied to samples will be described. Machine characteristics and detector types will be discussed.

  18. Fission-detector determination of D-D triton burnup fraction in beam-heated TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Hendel, H.W.; Barnes, C.W.; Bosch, S.; Cecil, F.E.; McCune, D.C.; Nieschmidt, E.B.; Strachan, J.D.

    1987-06-01

    After the end of a neutral-beam injection pulse into a low-density TFTR plasma, once the beam-injected deuterons have thermalized, the neutron emission is dominated by the 14-MeV neutron production from D-D triton burnup. Ordinary fission detectors can measure the 14-MeV emission rate, which can be extrapolated back in time to estimate the equilibrium triton burnup fraction. The fractional burnup determined by this method is in the range of 0.3 to 1.5% for TFTR discharges to date, and is consistent with classical confinement and slowing down. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Edge ambipolar potential in toroidal fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Spizzo, G. Vianello, N.; Agostini, M.; Puiatti, M. E.; Scarin, P.; Spolaore, M.; Terranova, D.; White, R. B.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Schmitz, O.; Cavazzana, R.; Ciaccio, G.

    2014-05-15

    A series of issues with toroidally confined fusion plasmas are related to the generation of 3D flow patterns by means of edge magnetic islands, embedded in a chaotic field and interacting with the wall. These issues include the Greenwald limit in Tokamaks and reversed-field pinches, the collisionality window for ELM mitigation with the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in Tokamaks, and edge islands interacting with the bootstrap current in stellarators. Measurements of the 2D map of the edge electric field E{sup r}(r=a,θ,ϕ) in the RFX reversed-field pinch show that E{sup r} has the same helicity of the magnetic islands generated by a m/n perturbation: in fact, defining the helical angle u=mθ−nϕ+ωt, maps show a sinusoidal dependence as a function of u, E{sup r}=E{sup ~r}sin u. The associated E × B flow displays a huge convective cell with v(a)≠0 which, in RFX and near the Greenwald limit, determines a stagnation point for density and a reversal of the sign of E{sup r}. From a theoretical point of view, the question is how a perturbed toroidal flux of symmetry m/n gives rise to an ambipolar potential Φ=Φ{sup ~}sin u. On the basis of a model developed with the guiding center code ORBIT and applied to RFX and the TEXTOR tokamak, we will show that the presence of an m/n perturbation in any kind of device breaks the toroidal symmetry with a drift proportional to the gyroradius ρ, thus larger for ions (ρ{sub i} ≫ ρ{sub e}). Immediately, an ambipolar potential arises to balance the drifts, with the same symmetry as the original perturbation.

  20. Magnetized Target Fusion Propulsion: Plasma Injectors for MTF Guns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2003-01-01

    To achieve increased payload size and decreased trip time for interplanetary travel, a low mass, high specific impulse, high thrust propulsion system is required. This suggests the need for research into fusion as a source of power and high temperature plasma. The plasma would be deflected by magnetic fields to provide thrust. Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) research consists of several related investigations into these topics. These include the orientation and timing of the plasma guns and the convergence and interface development of the "pusher" plasma. Computer simulations of the gun as it relates to plasma initiation and repeatability are under investigation. One of the items under development is the plasma injector. This is a surface breakdown driven plasma generator designed to function at very low pressures. The performance, operating conditions and limitations of these injectors need to be determined.

  1. Compressibility and heat capacity of rotating plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyko, V. I.; Fisch, N. J.

    2017-02-01

    A rotating plasma column is shown to exhibit unusual heat capacity effects under compression. For near equilibrium thermodynamics and smooth wall conditions, the heat capacity depends on the plasma density, on the speed of the rotation, and on the mass ratio. For a certain range of parameters, the storage of energy in the electric field produces a significant increase in the heat capacity.

  2. Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating

    DOEpatents

    Perkins, F.W. Jr.; Chiu, S.C.; Parks, P.; Rawls, J.M.

    1984-01-10

    This invention relates generally to a method and apparatus for transferring energy to a plasma immersed in a magnetic field, and relates particularly to an apparatus for heating a plasma of low atomic number ions to high temperatures by transfer of energy to plasma resonances, particularly the fundamental and harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency of the plasma ions. This invention transfers energy from an oscillating radio-frequency field to a plasma resonance of a plasma immersed in a magnetic field.

  3. Fission and activation of uranium by fusion-plasma neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.; Mcfarland, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Fusion-fission hybrid reactors are discussed in terms of two main purposes: to breed fissile materials (Pu 233 and Th 233 from U 238 or Th 232) for use in low-reactivity breeders, and to produce tritium from lithium to refuel fusion plasma cores. Neutron flux generation is critical for both processes. Various methods for generating the flux are described, with attention to new geometries for multiple plasma focus arrays, e.g., hypocycloidal pinch and staged plasma focus devices. These methods are evaluated with reference to their applicability to D-D fusion reactors, which will ensure a virtually unlimited energy supply. Accurate observations of the neutron flux from such schemes are obtained by using different target materials in the plasma focus.

  4. Interaction of plasmas with lithium and tungsten fusion plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiflis, Peter Robert

    One of the largest outstanding issues in magnetic confinement fusion is the interaction of the fusion plasma with the first wall of the device; an interaction which is strongest in the divertor region. Erosion, melting, sputtering, and deformation are all concerns which inform choices of divertor material. Of the many materials proposed for use in the divertor, only a few remain as promising choices. Tungsten has been chosen as the material for the ITER divertor, and liquid lithium stands poised as its replacement in higher heat flux devices. As a refractory metal, tungsten's large melting point and thermal conductivity as well as its low sputtering yield have led to its selection as the material of choice of the ITER divertor. Experiments have reinforced this choice demonstrating tungsten's ability to withstand large heat fluxes when adequately cooled. However, tungsten has shown a propensity to nanostructure under exposure within a certain temperature range to large fluxes of helium ions. These nanostructures if disrupted into the plasma as dust by an off-normal event would cause quenching of the plasma from the generated dust. Liquid lithium, meanwhile, has gathered growing interest within the fusion community in recent years as a divertor, limiter, and alternative first wall material. Liquid lithium is attractive as a low-Z material replacement for refractory metals due to its ability to getter impurities, while also being self-healing in nature. However, concerns exist about the stability of a liquid metal surface at the edge of a fusion device. Liquid metal pools, such as the Li-DiMes probe, have shown evidence of macroscopic lithium displacement as well as droplet formation and ejection into the plasma. These issues must be mitigated in future implementations of liquid lithium divertor concepts. Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT) and Kelvin-Helmholtz-like (KH) instabilities have been claimed as the initiators of droplet ejection, yet not enough data exists to

  5. First fusion proton measurements in TEXTOR plasmas using activation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Bonheure, G.; Wassenhove, G. Van; Mlynar, J.; Hult, M.; Gonzalez de Orduna, R.; Lutter, G.; Vermaercke, P.; Huber, A.; Schweer, B.; Esser, G.; Biel, W.

    2012-10-15

    MeV particle loss measurements from fusion plasmas, in particular alpha particles, remain difficult in large fusion devices and further R and D is needed for ITER. This paper describes the first attempt to measure 3 MeV escaping fusion protons emitted from TEXTOR tokamak plasmas using activation technique. This technique was successfully demonstrated, initially, in 2006 on the JET tokamak. An ion camera equipped with a collimator and several types of activation detectors was installed inside the TEXTOR vacuum vessel to perform these measurements. After irradiation, the detectors were analyzed using ultra low level gamma-ray spectrometry at the HADES underground laboratory. 3 MeV escaping fusion protons were detected in larger number -{approx}6 times more - compared to earlier measurements using this technique on JET. Another major progress was the reduction of the cooling time by a factor of 50, which made possible to detect radionuclides with half-life of less than 90 min.

  6. First fusion proton measurements in TEXTOR plasmas using activation technique.

    PubMed

    Bonheure, G; Mlynar, J; Van Wassenhove, G; Hult, M; González de Orduña, R; Lutter, G; Vermaercke, P; Huber, A; Schweer, B; Esser, G; Biel, W

    2012-10-01

    MeV particle loss measurements from fusion plasmas, in particular alpha particles, remain difficult in large fusion devices and further R&D is needed for ITER. This paper describes the first attempt to measure 3 MeV escaping fusion protons emitted from TEXTOR tokamak plasmas using activation technique. This technique was successfully demonstrated, initially, in 2006 on the JET tokamak. An ion camera equipped with a collimator and several types of activation detectors was installed inside the TEXTOR vacuum vessel to perform these measurements. After irradiation, the detectors were analyzed using ultra low level gamma-ray spectrometry at the HADES underground laboratory. 3 MeV escaping fusion protons were detected in larger number -~6 times more--compared to earlier measurements using this technique on JET. Another major progress was the reduction of the cooling time by a factor of 50, which made possible to detect radionuclides with half-life of less than 90 min.

  7. First fusion proton measurements in TEXTOR plasmas using activation techniquea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonheure, G.; Mlynar, J.; Wassenhove, G. Van; Hult, M.; González de Orduña, R.; Lutter, G.; Vermaercke, P.; Huber, A.; Schweer, B.; Esser, G.; Biel, W.

    2012-10-01

    MeV particle loss measurements from fusion plasmas, in particular alpha particles, remain difficult in large fusion devices and further R&D is needed for ITER. This paper describes the first attempt to measure 3 MeV escaping fusion protons emitted from TEXTOR tokamak plasmas using activation technique. This technique was successfully demonstrated, initially, in 2006 on the JET tokamak. An ion camera equipped with a collimator and several types of activation detectors was installed inside the TEXTOR vacuum vessel to perform these measurements. After irradiation, the detectors were analyzed using ultra low level gamma-ray spectrometry at the HADES underground laboratory. 3 MeV escaping fusion protons were detected in larger number -˜6 times more - compared to earlier measurements using this technique on JET. Another major progress was the reduction of the cooling time by a factor of 50, which made possible to detect radionuclides with half-life of less than 90 min.

  8. Deuterium-tritium plasmas in novel regimes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.G.; Beer, M.; Batha, S.

    1997-02-01

    Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have explored several novel regimes of improved tokamak confinement in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas, including plasmas with reduced or reversed magnetic shear in the core and high-current plasmas with increased shear in the outer region (high-l{sub i}). New techniques have also been developed to enhance the confinement in these regimes by modifying the plasma-limiter interaction through in-situ deposition of lithium. In reversed-shear plasmas, transitions to enhanced confinement have been observed at plasma currents up to 2.2 MA (q{sub a} {approx} 4.3), accompanied by the formation of internal transport barriers, where large radial gradients develop in the temperature and density profiles. Experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the barrier formation and its relationship with the magnetic configuration and with the heating characteristics. The increased stability of high-current, high-l{sub i} plasmas produced by rapid expansion of the minor cross-section, coupled with improvement in the confinement by lithium deposition has enabled the achievement of high fusion power, up to 8.7 MW, with D-T neutral beam heating. The physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement has been investigated in these regimes, including the interactions of the alphas with endogenous plasma instabilities and externally applied waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In D-T plasmas with q{sub 0} > 1 and weak magnetic shear in the central region, a toroidal Alfven eigenmode instability driven purely by the alpha particles has been observed for the first time. The interactions of energetic ions with ion Bernstein waves produced by mode-conversion from fast waves in mixed-species plasmas have been studied as a possible mechanism for transferring the energy of the alphas to fuel ions.

  9. Gyrokinetic Simulation of Energetic Particles Turbulence and Transport in Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenlu; Lin, Zhihong; Holod, Ihor; Xiao, Yong; Bierwage, Andreas; Spong, Donald; Chu, Ming

    2009-05-01

    The confinement of the energetic particles (EP) is a critical issue in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), since that ignition relies on the self-heating by the fusion products. Shear Alfven wave excitations by EP in toroidal systems, for example Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) and Energetic Particle Mode (EPM) have been investigated as primary candidate for fluctuation-induced transport of EP in fusion plasma. In this work, TAE excitations by energetic particles are investigated in large scale first-principle simulations of fusion plasmas using the global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) [Lin, Science 1998]. Comprehensive linear benchmarking results are reported between GTC, GYRO, fluid code TAEFL, and Magnetohydrodynamic-gyrokinetic hybrid code HMGC.

  10. Heavy particle collisions in astrophysical, fusion, and other plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, David

    2013-09-01

    Contemporary computational methods to treat few-body, atomic-scale interactions have opened opportunities to study them at a new level of detail to both uncover unexpected phenomena and to create data of unprecedented accuracy and scope for applications. Such interactions within gaseous, plasma, and even material environments are fundamental to such diverse phenomena as low temperature plasma processing of semiconductors, collapsing giant molecular clouds forming stars, fluorescent lighting, radiation treatment of disease, and the chemistry of earth's atmosphere. I will illustrate progress using examples from recent work treating heavy particle collision systems, for which our knowledge has been both subtly refined and significantly changed. Examples will include elastic and transport-related processes in fusion and solar-system plasmas, charge transfer leading to diagnostic light emission in planetary atmospheres and fusion plasmas, and excitation and ionization processes needed for plasma modeling and diagnostics.

  11. Tritium Plasma Experiment Upgrade for Fusion Tritium and Nuclear Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Taylor, Chase N.; Kolasinski, Robert D.; Buchenauer, Dean A.

    2015-11-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) is a unique high-flux linear plasma device that can handle beryllium, tritium, and neutron-irradiated plasma facing materials, and is the only existing device dedicated to directly study tritium retention and permeation in neutron-irradiated materials [M. Shimada et.al., Rev. Sci. Instru. 82 (2011) 083503 and and M. Shimada, et.al., Nucl. Fusion 55 (2015) 013008]. Recently the TPE has undergone major upgrades in its electrical and control systems. New DC power supplies and a new control center enable remote plasma operations from outside of the contamination area for tritium, minimizing the possible exposure risk with tritium and beryllium. We discuss the electrical upgrade, enhanced operational safety, improved plasma performance, and development of tritium plasma-driven permeation and optical spectrometer system. This upgrade not only improves operational safety of the worker, but also enhances plasma performance to better simulate extreme plasma-material conditions expected in ITER, Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF), and Demonstration reactor (DEMO). This work was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under the DOE Idaho Field Office contract number DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  12. Heat deposition into the superconducting central column of a spherical tokamak fusion plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windsor, C. G.; Morgan, J. G.; Buxton, P. F.

    2015-02-01

    A key challenge in designing a fusion power plant is to manage the heat deposition into the central core containing superconducting toroidal field coils. Spherical tokamaks have limited space for shielding the central core from fast neutrons produced by fusion and the resulting gamma rays. This paper reports a series of three-dimensional computations using the Monte Carlo N-particle code to calculate the heat deposition into the superconducting core. For a given fusion power, this is considered as a function of plasma major radius R0, core radius rsc and shield thickness d. Computations over the ranges 0.6 m ⩽ R0 ⩽ 1.6 m, 0.15 m ⩽ rsc ⩽ 0.25 m and 0.15 m ⩽ d ⩽ 0.4 m are presented. The deposited power shows an exponential dependence on all three variables to within around 2%. The additional effects of source profile, the outer shield and shield material are all considered. The results can be interpolated to 2% accuracy and have been successfully incorporated into a system code. A possible pilot plant with 174 MW of fusion is shown to lead to a heat deposition into the superconducting core of order 30 kW. An estimate of 1.7 MW is made for the cryogenic plant power necessary for heat removal, and of 88 s running time for an adiabatic experiment where the heat deposition is absorbed by a 10 K temperature rise.

  13. Sputtering, Plasma Chemistry, and RF Sheath Effects in Low-Temperature and Fusion Plasma Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.; McGugan, James M.; Pankin, Alexei Y.; Roark, Christine M.; Smithe, David N.; Stoltz, Peter H.

    2016-09-01

    A new sheath boundary condition has been implemented in VSim, a plasma modeling code which makes use of both PIC/MCC and fluid FDTD representations. It enables physics effects associated with DC and RF sheath formation - local sheath potential evolution, heat/particle fluxes, and sputtering effects on complex plasma-facing components - to be included in macroscopic-scale plasma simulations that need not resolve sheath scale lengths. We model these effects in typical ICRF antenna operation scenarios on the Alcator C-Mod fusion device, and present comparisons of our simulation results with experimental data together with detailed 3D animations of antenna operation. Complex low-temperature plasma chemistry modeling in VSim is facilitated by MUNCHKIN, a standalone python/C++/SQL code that identifies possible reaction paths for a given set of input species, solves 1D rate equations for the ensuing system's chemical evolution, and generates VSim input blocks with appropriate cross-sections/reaction rates. These features, as well as principal path analysis (to reduce the number of simulated chemical reactions while retaining accuracy) and reaction rate calculations from user-specified distribution functions, will also be demonstrated. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's SBIR program, Award DE-SC0009501.

  14. Preface to Special Topic: Advances in Radio Frequency Physics in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tuccillo, Angelo A.; Ceccuzzi, Silvio; Phillips, Cynthia K.

    2014-06-15

    It has long been recognized that auxiliary plasma heating will be required to achieve the high temperature, high density conditions within a magnetically confined plasma in which a fusion “burn” may be sustained by copious fusion reactions. Consequently, the application of radio and microwave frequency electromagnetic waves to magnetically confined plasma, commonly referred to as RF, has been a major part of the program almost since its inception in the 1950s. These RF waves provide heating, current drive, plasma profile control, and Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) stabilization. Fusion experiments employ electromagnetic radiation in a wide range of frequencies, from tens of MHz to hundreds of GHz. The fusion devices containing the plasma are typically tori, axisymmetric or non, in which the equilibrium magnetic fields are composed of a strong toroidal magnetic field generated by external coils, and a poloidal field created, at least in the symmetric configurations, by currents flowing in the plasma. The waves are excited in the peripheral regions of the plasma, by specially designed launching structures, and subsequently propagate into the core regions, where resonant wave-plasma interactions produce localized heating or other modification of the local equilibrium profiles. Experimental studies coupled with the development of theoretical models and advanced simulation codes over the past 40+ years have led to an unprecedented understanding of the physics of RF heating and current drive in the core of magnetic fusion devices. Nevertheless, there are serious gaps in our knowledge base that continue to have a negative impact on the success of ongoing experiments and that must be resolved as the program progresses to the next generation devices and ultimately to “demo” and “fusion power plant.” A serious gap, at least in the ion cyclotron (IC) range of frequencies and partially in the lower hybrid frequency ranges, is the difficulty in coupling large amount of

  15. Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In fusion welding, parts are joined together by melting and subsequent solidification. Although this principle is simple, complex transport phenomena take place during fusion welding, and they determine the final weld quality and performance. The heat and mass transfer in the weld pool directly affect the size and shape of the pool, the solidification microstructure, the formation of weld defects such as porosity and humping, and the temperature distribution in the fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ). Furthermore, the temperature evolution affects the kinetics and extent of various solid-state phase transformations, which in turn determine the final weld microstructure and mechanical properties. The formation of residual stresses and distortion originates from the thermal expansion and contraction during welding heating and cooling, respectively.

  16. Predictive Calculation of Neutral Beam Heating Plasmas in EAST Tokamak by NUBEAM Code for Certain Parameter Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qionglin; Fan, Tieshuan; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Cheng; Ren, Qilong; Hu, Chundong

    2010-12-01

    A predictive calculation is carried out for neutral beam heating of fusion plasmas in EAST by using NUBEAM code under certain plasma conditions. Results calculated are analyzed for different plasma parameters. Relations between major plasma parameters, such as density and temperature, are obtained and key physical processes in the neutral beam heating, including beam power deposition, trapped fraction, heating efficiency, and power loss, are simulated. Other physical processes, such as current-drive, toroidal rotation and neutron emission, are also discussed.

  17. Fusion Science Outreach at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Censabella, V.; Rivenberg, P.; Granville, J.; Nachtrieb, R.; Gangadhara, S.

    1997-11-01

    Educational Outreach at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center is organized and energized by volunteers working together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion and plasma-related experiments. The PSFC holds a number of outreach activities throughout the year, such as Middle and High School Outreach Days. Included in these days is a demonstration of how magnets affect plasma using the ``Plasma Demo," an educational tool which will be on display for the first time outside the MIT area. Also featured is ``C-Mod Jr.," a video game which helps students discover how computers manipulate magnetic pulses to keep a plasma confined in the C-Mod tokamak for as long as possible. The PSFC maintains a Home Page on the World Wide Web, which can be reached at HTTP://PFC.MIT.EDU.

  18. Heat sink effects in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Shuttle External Tank is fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process. In VPPA welding, a noble gas, usually argon, is directed through an arc to emerge from the torch as a hot plasma jet. This jet is surrounded by a shielding gas, usually helium, to protect the weld from contamination with air. The high velocity, hot plasma jet completely penetrates the workpiece (resembling a line heat source) when operated in the 'keyhole' mode. The metal melts on touching the side of the jet, as the torch travels in the perpendicular direction to the direction of the jet, and melted metal moves around the plasma jet in the keyhole forming a puddle which solidifies behind the jet. Heat sink effects are observed when there are irregularities in the workpiece configuration, especially, if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, i.e., in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of this research is to study the effect of irregularities in workpiece configuration and fixture differences (heat sink effects) on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld. Experiments were performed on different workpiece geometries and compared to approximate models.

  19. Application of amorphous filler metals in production of fusion reactor high heat flux components

    SciTech Connect

    Kalin, B.A.; Fedotov, V.T.; Grigoriev, A.E.

    1994-12-31

    The technology of Al-Si, Zr-Ti-Be and Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni amorphous filler metals for Be and graphite brazing with Cu, Mo and V was developed. The fusion reactor high heat flux components from Cu-Be, Cu-graphite, Mo-Be, Mo-graphite, V-Re and V-graphite materials were produced by brazing. Every component represents metallic base, to which Be or graphite plates are brazed. The distance between plates was equal 0.2 times the plate height. These components were irradiated by hydrogen plasma with 5 x 10{sup 6} W/m{sup 2} power. The microstructure and the element distribution in the brazed zone were investigated before and after heat plasma irradiation. Topography graphite plate surfaces and topography of metal surfaces between plates were also investigated after heat plasma irradiation. The results of microstructure investigation and material erosion are discussed.

  20. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjan, Ram Rout, R. K. Srivastava, R. Gupta, Satish C.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Patel, N. N.; Alex, P.

    2014-04-24

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  1. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, R.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Patel, N. N.; Alex, P.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2014-04-01

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  2. A fusion power plant without plasma-material interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.A.

    1997-04-01

    A steady-state fusion power plant is described which avoids the deleterious plasma-material interactions found in D-T fueled tokamaks. It is based on driven p-{sup 11}B fusion in a high-beta closed-field device, the field-reversed configuration (FRC), anchored in a gas-dynamic trap (GDT). The plasma outflow on the open magnetic-field lines is cooled by radiation in the GDT, then channeled through a magnetic nozzle, promoting 3-body recombination in the expansion region. The resulting supersonic neutral exhaust stream flows through a turbine, generating electricity.

  3. Laser-plasma interactions relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, K. B.

    1998-11-01

    Research into laser-driven inertial confinement fusion is now entering a critical juncture with the construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Many of the remaining unanswered questions concerning NIF involve interactions between lasers and plasmas. With the eventual goal of fusion power in mind, laser-plasma interactions relevant to laser fusion schemes is an important topic in need of further research. This work experimentally addresses some potential shortcuts and pitfalls on the road to laser-driven fusion power. Current plans on NIF have 192 laser beams directed into a small cylindrical cavity which will contain the fusion fuel; to accomplish this the beams must cross in the entrance holes, and this intersection will be in the presence of outward-flowing plasma. To investigate the physics involved, interactions of crossing laser beams in flowing plasmas are investigated with experiments on the Nova laser facility at LLNL. It was found that in a flowing plasma, energy is transferred between two crossing laser beams, and this may have deleterious consequences for energy balance and ignition in NIF. Possible solutions to this problem are presented. A recently-proposed alternative to standard laser-driven fusion, the ''fast ignitor'' concept, is also experimentally addressed in this dissertation. Many of the laser-plasma interactions necessary for the success of the fast ignitor have not previously been explored at the relevant laser intensities. Specifically, the transfer of high-intensity laser energy to electrons at solid-target interfaces is addressed. 20-30% conversion efficiencies into forward-propagated electrons were measured, along with an average electron energy that varied with the type of target material. The directionality of the electrons was also measured, revealing an apparent beaming of the highest energy electrons. This work was extended to various intensities and pulse lengths and a

  4. Passive Spectroscopic Diagnostics for Magnetically-confined Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B. C.; Biter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hillis, D. L.; Hogan, J. T.

    2007-07-18

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities and hydrogen isotopes plays an important role in the study of magnetically-confined fusion plasmas, both in determining the effects of impurities on plasma behavior and in measurements of plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, particle transport, and particle influx rates. This paper reviews spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma radiation that are excited by collisional processes in the plasma, which are termed 'passive' spectroscopic diagnostics to distinguish them from 'active' spectroscopic diagnostics involving injected particle and laser beams. A brief overview of the ionization balance in hot plasmas and the relevant line and continuum radiation excitation mechanisms is given. Instrumentation in the soft X-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the spectrum is described and examples of measurements are given. Paths for further development of these measurements and issues for their implementation in a burning plasma environment are discussed.

  5. Dense Plasma Heating and Radiation Generation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-02

    34 Computor Investi- ations of Laser-Plasma Interactions", to be submitted to the 1979 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science, Montreal, Canada...Identify by block number) carbon dioxide laser, beat heating, computor code, laser-plasma interactions. A pulsed power 20,ABSTRACT (Cntinue on reverse side

  6. Plasma diagnostics approach to welding heat source/molten pool interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Key, J.F.; McIlwain, M.E.; Isaacson, L.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma diagnostic techniques show that weld fusion zone profile and loss of metal vapors from the molten pool are strongly dependent on both the intensity and distribution of the heat source. These plasma properties, are functions of cathode vertex angle and thermal conductivity of the shielding gas, especially near the anode.

  7. Plasma heating power dissipation in low temperature hydrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Komppula, J. Tarvainen, O.

    2015-10-15

    A theoretical framework for power dissipation in low temperature plasmas in corona equilibrium is developed. The framework is based on fundamental conservation laws and reaction cross sections and is only weakly sensitive to plasma parameters, e.g., electron temperature and density. The theory is applied to low temperature atomic and molecular hydrogen laboratory plasmas for which the plasma heating power dissipation to photon emission, ionization, and chemical potential is calculated. The calculated photon emission is compared to recent experimental results.

  8. High-Gain High-Field Fusion Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ge

    2015-01-01

    A Faraday wheel (FW)—an electric generator of constant electrical polarity that produces huge currents—could be implemented in an existing tokamak to study high-gain high-field (HGHF) fusion plasma, such as the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). HGHF plasma can be realized in EAST by updating its pulsed-power system to compress plasma in two steps by induction fields; high gains of the Lawson trinity parameter and fusion power are both predicted by formulating the HGHF plasma. Both gain rates are faster than the decrease rate of the plasma volume. The formulation is checked by earlier ATC tests. Good agreement between theory and tests indicates that scaling to over 10 T at EAST may be possible by two-step compressions with a compression ratio of the minor radius of up to 3. These results point to a quick new path of fusion plasma study, i.e., simulating the Sun by EAST. PMID:26507314

  9. TRPM7 facilitates cholinergic vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Brauchi, Sebastian; Krapivinsky, Grigory; Krapivinsky, Luba; Clapham, David E

    2008-06-17

    TRPM7, of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family, is both an ion channel and a kinase. Previously, we showed that TRPM7 is located in the membranes of acetylcholine (ACh)-secreting synaptic vesicles of sympathetic neurons, forms a molecular complex with proteins of the vesicular fusion machinery, and is critical for stimulated neurotransmitter release. Here, we targeted pHluorin to small synaptic-like vesicles (SSLV) in PC12 cells and demonstrate that it can serve as a single-vesicle plasma membrane fusion reporter. In PC12 cells, as in sympathetic neurons, TRPM7 is located in ACh-secreting SSLVs. TRPM7 knockdown by siRNA, or abolishing channel activity by expression of a dominant negative TRPM7 pore mutant, decreased the frequency of spontaneous and voltage-stimulated SSLV fusion events without affecting large dense core vesicle secretion. We conclude that the conductance of TRPM7 across the vesicle membrane is important in SSLV fusion.

  10. Plasma Physics Lab and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, 1989

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    From the Princeton University Archives: Promotional video about the Plasma Physics Lab and the new Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), with footage of the interior, machines, and scientists at work. This film is discussed in the audiovisual blog of the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, which holds the archives of Princeton University.

  11. CONFERENCE DESCRIPTION Theory of Fusion Plasmas: Varenna-Lausanne International Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbet, X.; Sauter, O.

    2010-12-01

    The Joint Varenna-Lausanne international workshop on Theory of Fusion Plasmas takes place every other year in a place particularly favourable for informal and in-depth discussions. Invited and contributed papers present state-of-the-art research in theoretical plasma physics, covering all domains relevant to fusion plasmas. This workshop always welcomes a fruitful mix of experienced researchers and students, to allow a better understanding of the key theoretical physics models and applications. Theoretical issues related to burning plasmas Anomalous Transport (Turbulence, Coherent Structures, Microinstabilities) RF Heating and Current Drive Macroinstabilities Plasma-Edge Physics and Divertors Fast particles instabilities Further details: http://Varenna-Lausanne.epfl.ch The conference is organized by: Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Association EURATOM - Confédération Suisse 'Piero Caldirola' International Centre for the Promotion of Science and International School of Plasma Physics Istituto di Fisica del Plasma del CNR, Milano Editors: X Garbet (CEA, Cadarache, France) and O Sauter (CRPP-EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland)

  12. Vortex formation during rf heating of plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on a test plasma show that the linear theory of waveguide coupling to slow plasma waves begins to break down if the rf power flux exceeds approx. 30 W/cm/sup 2/. Probe measurements reveal that within 30 ..mu..s an undulation appears in the surface plasma near the mouth of the twin waveguide. This surface readjustment is part of a vortex, or off-center convective cell, driven by asymmetric rf heating of the plasma column.

  13. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-15

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  14. Electron density measurements in the ITER fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Christopher; Udintsev, Victor; Andrew, Philip; Vayakis, George; Van Zeeland, Michael; Brower, David; Feder, Russell; Mukhin, Eugene; Tolstyakov, Sergey

    2013-08-01

    The operation of ITER requires high-quality estimates of the plasma electron density over multiple regions in the plasma for plasma evaluation, plasma control and machine protection purposes. Although the density regimes of ITER are not very different from those of existing tokamaks (1018-1021 m-3), the severe conditions of the fusion plasma environment present particular challenges to implementing these density diagnostics. In this paper we present an overview of the array of ITER electron density diagnostics designed to measure over the entire ITER domain: plasma core, pedestal, edge, scrape-off layer and divertor. It will focus on the challenges faced in making these measurements, and the technical solutions of the current designs.

  15. Response of materials to high heat fluxes during operation in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.M.

    1988-07-01

    Very high energy deposition on first wall and other components of a fusion reactor is expected due to plasma instabilities during both normal and off-normal operating conditions. Off-normal operating conditions result from plasma disruptions where the plasma loses confinement and dumps its energy on the reactor components. High heat flux may also result from normal operating conditions due to fluctuations in plasma edge conditions. This high energy dump in a short time results in very high surface temperatures and may consequently cause melting and vaporization of these materials. The net erosion rates resulting from melting and vaporization are very important to estimate the lifetime of such components. The response of different candidate materials to this high heat fluxes is determined for different energy densities and deposition times. The analysis used a previously developed model to solve the heat conduction equation in two moving boundaries. One moving boundary is at the surface to account for surface recession due to vaporization and the second moving boundary is to account for the solid-liquid interface inside the material. The calculations are done parametrically for both the expected energy deposited and the deposition time. These ranges of energy and time are based on recent experimental observations in current fusion devices. The candidate materials analyzed are stainless steel, carbon, and tungsten. 8 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Heat flow in variable polarity plasma arc welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1992-01-01

    The space shuttle external tank and the space station Freedom are fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding. Heat sink effects (taper) are observed when there are irregularities in the work-piece configuration especially if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, and in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of the previous, present, and consecutive research studies is to investigate the effect of irregularities in the work-piece configuration and fixture differences on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate automatically for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld.

  17. Review of Burning Plasma Physics. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, Herb; Betti, Riccardo; Dahlburg, Jill; Freidberg, Jeff; Hopper, Bick; Meade, Dale; Navritil, Jerry; Nevins, Bill; Ono, Masa; Perkins, Rip; Prager, Stewart; Schoenburg, Kurt; Taylor, Tony; Uckan, Nermin

    2001-09-01

    The next frontier in the quest for magnetic fusion energy is the development of a basic understanding of plasma behavior in the regime of strong self-heating, the so called “burning plasma” regime. The general consensus in the fusion community is that the exploration of this frontier requires a new, relatively large experimental facility - a burning plasma experiment. The motivation, justification, and steps required to build such a facility are the primary focus of our report. The specific goals of the report are as follows. First, the report describes the critical scientific and engineering phenomena that are expected to arise for the first time, or else in a strongly modified form, in a burning plasma. Second, the report shows that the capabilities of existing experiments are inadequate to investigate these phenomena, thereby providing a major justification for a new facility. Third, the report compares the features and predicted performance of the three major next generation burning plasma experiments under current consideration (ITER-FEAT, FIRE, and IGNITOR), which are aimed at addressing these problems. Deliberately, no selection of the best option is made or attempted since such a decision involves complex scientific and cost issues that are beyond the scope of the present panel report. Fourth, the report makes specific recommendations regarding a process to move the burning plasma program forward, including a procedure for choosing the best option and the future activities of the Next Step Option (NSO) program. Fifth, the report attempts to provide a proper perspective for the role of burning plasmas with respect to the overall U.S. fusion program. The introduction provides the basic background information required for understanding the context in which the U.S. fusion community thinks about burning plasma issues. It “sets the stage” for the remainder of the report.

  18. Immiscible fluid: Heat of fusion heat storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Melsheimer, S. S.; Mullins, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Both heat and mass transfer in direct contact aqueous crystallizing systems were studied as part of a program desig- ned to evaluate the feasibility of direct contact heat transfer in phase change storage using aqueous salt system. Major research areas, discussed include (1) crystal growth velocity study on selected salts; (2) selection of salt solutions; (3) selection of immiscible fluids; (4) studies of heat transfer and system geometry; and (5) system demonstration.

  19. External Heat Transfer Coefficient Measurements on a Surrogate Indirect Inertial Confinement Fusion Target

    DOE PAGES

    Miles, Robin; Havstad, Mark; LeBlanc, Mary; ...

    2015-09-15

    External heat transfer coefficients were measured around a surrogate Indirect inertial confinement fusion (ICF) based on the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) design target to validate thermal models of the LIFE target during flight through a fusion chamber. Results indicate that heat transfer coefficients for this target 25-50 W/m2∙K are consistent with theoretically derived heat transfer coefficients and valid for use in calculation of target heating during flight through a fusion chamber.

  20. External Heat Transfer Coefficient Measurements on a Surrogate Indirect Inertial Confinement Fusion Target

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Robin; Havstad, Mark; LeBlanc, Mary; Golosker, Ilya; Chang, Allan; Rosso, Paul

    2015-09-15

    External heat transfer coefficients were measured around a surrogate Indirect inertial confinement fusion (ICF) based on the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) design target to validate thermal models of the LIFE target during flight through a fusion chamber. Results indicate that heat transfer coefficients for this target 25-50 W/m2∙K are consistent with theoretically derived heat transfer coefficients and valid for use in calculation of target heating during flight through a fusion chamber.

  1. Muon catalyzed fusion in plasma state and high intensity DT fusion neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    dt/mu/ molecular formation rates in a plasma state of DT mixture by d and t ions are, respectively, 63 and 77 times higher than the ones by electrons. High plasma oscillation frequency in a high electron density plasma enhances the formation rate in the high temperature dt mixture. The DT muon catalyzed fusion has the ability to produce much higher intensity 14 MeV neutron source (in order of 5 /times/ 10/sup 16/n/cm/sup 2//sec) than other means of stripping and spallation approaches. Such neutrons can be used for testing of first wall material candidates for magnetic fusion reactors, for incinerating fission products (e.g., Cs/sup 137/) and for creating high thermal flux neutron sources, on the order of 10/sup 17/n/cm/sup 2//sec. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Study of Volumetrically Heated Ultra-High Energy Density Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    2016-10-27

    Heating dense matter to millions of degrees is important for applications, but requires complex and expensive methods. The major goal of the project was to demonstrate using a compact laser the creation of a new ultra-high energy density plasma regime characterized by simultaneous extremely high temperature and high density, and to study it combining experimental measurements and advanced simulations. We have demonstrated that trapping of intense femtosecond laser pulses deep within ordered nanowire arrays can heat near solid density matter into a new ultra hot plasma regime. Extreme electron densities, and temperatures of several tens of million degrees were achieved using laser pulses of only 0.5 J energy from a compact laser. Our x-ray spectra and simulations showed that extremely highly ionized plasma volumes several micrometers in depth are generated by irradiation of gold and Nickel nanowire arrays with femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities. We obtained extraordinarily high degrees of ionization (e.g. we peeled 52 electrons from gold atoms, and up to 26 electrons from nickel atoms). In the process we generated Gigabar pressures only exceeded in the central hot spot of highly compressed thermonuclear fusion plasmas.. The plasma created after the dissolved wires expand, collide, and thermalize, is computed to have a thermal energy density of 0.3 GJ cm-3 and a pressure of 1-2 Gigabar. These are pressures only exceeded in highly compressed thermonuclear fusion plasmas. Scaling these results to higher laser intensities promises to create plasmas with temperatures and pressures exceeding those in the center of the sun.

  3. Fusion Plasma Theory: Task 1, Magnetic confinement Fusion Plasma Theory. Annual progress report, November 16, 1992--November 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    The research performed under this grant during the current year has concentrated on few tokamak plasma confinement issues: applications of our new Chapman-Enskog-like approach for developing hybrid fluid/kinetic descriptions of tokamak plasmas; multi-faceted studies as part of our development of a new interacting island paradigm for the tokamak equilibrium`` and transport; investigations of the resolution power of BES and ECE diagnostics for measuring core plasma fluctuations; and studies of net transport in the presence of fluctuating surfaces. Recent progress and publications in these areas, and in the management of the NERSC node and the fusion theory workstations are summarized briefly in this report.

  4. Differences between single-side and uniform heating for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R.D.; Meng, X.

    1994-12-31

    Many international engineering activities are under way to support fusion reactor implementation for the production of economical energy in the distant future. Among the many key technological issues is the development of plasma-facing components for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the related engineering design activity. Such components will be exposed to single-side (i.e., internal flow channels will be heated externally from one side only) heat flux ranging from 0.1 to 10.0 MW/m{sup 2} over lengths up to 0.3 m. Although other heat-transfer techniques such as liquid-metal and high-velocity-helium cooling are being seriously considered, subcooled flow boiling (with water) is the leading contender for high heat-flux fusion accommodation (HHFFA). Accordingly, interest must be focused on both the local heat transfer and the critical heat-flux (CHF) phenomena. However, irrespective of the convective fluid used (helium, water, or liquid metal) the advantages and adverse consequences associated with single-side heating must be explored and accommodated in future component designs.

  5. Plasma protein denaturation with graded heat exposure.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, R; Larson, D F

    2013-11-01

    During cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), perfusion at tepid temperatures (33-35 °C) is recommended to avoid high temperature cerebral hyperthermia during and after the operation. However, the ideal temperature for uncomplicated adult cardiac surgery is an unsettled question. Typically, the heat exchanger maximum temperature is monitored between 40-42 °C to prevent denaturation of plasma proteins, but studies have not been performed to make these conclusions. Therefore, our hypothesis was to determine the temperature in which blood plasma protein degradation occurs after 2 hours of heat exposure. As a result, blood plasma proteins were exposed to heat in the 37-50 °C range for 2 hours. Plasma protein samples were loaded onto an 8-12% gradient gel for SDS-PAGE and low molecular weight plasma protein degradation was detected with graded heat exposure. Protein degradation was first detected between 43-45 °C of heat exposure. This study supports the practice of monitoring the heat exchanger between 40-42 °C to prevent denaturation of plasma proteins.

  6. The plasma-wall interaction region: a key low temperature plasma for controlled fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Counsell, G. F.

    2002-08-01

    The plasma-wall interaction region of a fusion device provides the interface between the hot core plasma and the material surfaces. To obtain acceptably low levels of erosion from these surfaces requires most of the power leaving the core to be radiated. This is accomplished in existing devices by encouraging plasma detachment, in which the hot plasma arriving in the region is cooled by volume recombination and ion-neutral momentum transfer with a dense population of neutrals recycled from the surface. The result is a low temperature (1 eV1019 m-3) but weakly ionized (n0>1020 m-3, ne/n0<0.1) plasma found nowhere else in the fusion environment. This plasma provides many of the conditions found in industrial plasmas exploiting plasma chemistry and the presence of carbon in the region (in the form of carbon-fibre composite used in the plasma facing materials) can result in the formation of deposited hydrocarbon films. The plasma-wall interaction region is therefore among the most difficult in fusion to model, requiring an understanding of atomic, molecular and surface physics issues.

  7. Transport studies in fusion plasmas: Perturbative experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cardozo, N.J.L.

    1996-03-01

    By subjecting a plasma in steady state to small perturbations and measuring the response, it is possible to determine elements of the matrix of transport coefficients. Experimentally this is difficult, and results are mainly limited to transport driven by the pressure and temperature gradients. Importantly, off-diagonal elements in the transport matrix appear to be important. This has also implications for the interpretation of the so-called `power balance` diffusivity, determined from the steady state fluxes and gradients. Experimental techniques, analysis techniques, basic formulas, etc., are briefly reviewed. Experimental results are summarized. The fundamental question whether the fluxes are linear functions of the gradients or not is discussed. 31 refs.

  8. Component Framework for Coupled Integrated Fusion Plasma Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Elwasif, Wael R; Bernholdt, David E; Berry, Lee A; Batchelor, Donald B

    2007-01-01

    Fusion Successful simulation of the complex physics that affect magnetically confined fusion plasma remains an important target milestone towards the development of viable fusion energy. Major advances in the underlying physics formulations, mathematical modeling, and computational tools and techniques are needed to enable a complete fusion simulation on the emerging class of large scale capability parallel computers that are coming on-line in the next few years. Several pilot projects are currently being undertaken to explore different (partial) code integration and coupling problems, and possible solutions that may guide the larger integration endeavor. In this paper, we present the design and implementation details of one such project, a component based approach to couple existing codes to model the interaction between high power radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic waves, and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) aspects of the burning plasma. The framework and component design utilize a light coupling approach based on high level view of constituent codes that facilitates rapid incorporation of new components into the integrated simulation framework. The work illustrates the viability of the light coupling approach to better understand physics and stand-alone computer code dependencies and interactions, as a precursor to a more tightly coupled integrated simulation environment.

  9. On the efficacy of imploding plasma liners for magnetized fusion target compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, P. B.

    2008-06-01

    A new theoretical model is formulated to study the idea of merging a spherical array of converging plasma jets to form a "plasma liner" that further converges to compress a magnetized plasma target to fusion conditions [Y. C. F. Thio et al., "Magnetized target fusion in a spheroidal geometry with standoff drivers," Current Trends in International Fusion Research II, edited by E. Panarella (National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Canada, 1999)]. For a spherically imploding plasma liner shell with high initial Mach number (M =liner speed/sound speed) the rise in liner density with decreasing radius r goes as ρ ˜1/r2, for any constant adiabatic index γ =dlnp/dlnρ. Accordingly, spherical convergence amplifies the ram pressure of the liner on target by the factor A ˜C2, indicating strong coupling to its radial convergence C =rm/R, where rm(R)=jet merging radius (compressed target radius), and A =compressed target pressure/initial liner ram pressure. Deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma liners with initial velocity ˜100km/s and γ =5/3, need to be hypersonic M ˜60 and thus cold in order to realize values of A ˜104 necessary for target ignition. For optically thick DT liners, T <2eV, n >1019-1020cm-3, blackbody radiative cooling is appreciable and may counteract compressional heating during the later stages of the implosion. The fluid then behaves as if the adiabatic index were depressed below 5/3, which in turn means that the same amplification A =1.6×104 can be accomplished with a reduced initial Mach number M ≈12.7(γ-0.3)4.86, valid in the range (10plasma liners assembled by current and anticipated plasma jets is <4%. A new similarity model for fusion α-particle heating of the collapsed liner indicates that "spark" ignition of the DT liner fuel does not appear to be possible for magnetized fusion targets with typical threshold values of areal density ρR <0.02gcm-2.

  10. On the efficacy of imploding plasma liners for magnetized fusion target compression

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, P. B.

    2008-06-15

    A new theoretical model is formulated to study the idea of merging a spherical array of converging plasma jets to form a 'plasma liner' that further converges to compress a magnetized plasma target to fusion conditions [Y. C. F. Thio et al., 'Magnetized target fusion in a spheroidal geometry with standoff drivers', Current Trends in International Fusion Research II, edited by E. Panarella (National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Canada, 1999)]. For a spherically imploding plasma liner shell with high initial Mach number (M=liner speed/sound speed) the rise in liner density with decreasing radius r goes as {rho}{approx}1/r{sup 2}, for any constant adiabatic index {gamma}=d ln p/d ln {rho}. Accordingly, spherical convergence amplifies the ram pressure of the liner on target by the factor A{approx}C{sup 2}, indicating strong coupling to its radial convergence C=r{sub m}/R, where r{sub m}(R)=jet merging radius (compressed target radius), and A=compressed target pressure/initial liner ram pressure. Deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma liners with initial velocity {approx}100 km/s and {gamma}=5/3, need to be hypersonic M{approx}60 and thus cold in order to realize values of A{approx}10{sup 4} necessary for target ignition. For optically thick DT liners, T<2 eV, n>10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}, blackbody radiative cooling is appreciable and may counteract compressional heating during the later stages of the implosion. The fluid then behaves as if the adiabatic index were depressed below 5/3, which in turn means that the same amplification A=1.6x10{sup 4} can be accomplished with a reduced initial Mach number M{approx_equal}12.7({gamma}-0.3){sup 4.86}, valid in the range (10plasma liners assembled by current and anticipated plasma jets is <4%. A new similarity model for fusion {alpha}-particle heating of the collapsed liner indicates that 'spark' ignition of the DT liner fuel does not appear to be

  11. Characterization of the Inductively Heated Plasma Source IPG6-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2014-10-01

    In close collaboration between the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) at Baylor University, Texas, and the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, two plasma facilities have been established using the Inductively heated Plasma Generator 6 (IPG6). The facility at Baylor University (IPG6-B) works at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and a maximum power of 15 kW. A vacuum pump of 160 m3/h in combination with a butterfly valve allows pressure control over a wide range. Intended fields of research include basic investigation into thermo-chemistry and plasma radiation, space plasma environments and high heat fluxes e.g. those found in fusion devices or during atmospheric re-entry of spacecraft. After moving the IPG6-B facility to the Baylor Research and Innovation Collaborative (BRIC) it was placed back into operation during the summer of 2014. Initial characterization in the new lab, using a heat flux probe, Pitot probe and cavity calorimeter, has been conducted for Air, Argon and Helium. The results of this characterization are presented.

  12. Microwave imaging of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabot, Roland; Elbèze, Didier; Lee, Woochang; Nam, Yoonbum; Park, Hyeon; Shen, Junsong; Yun, Gunsu; Choi, Minjun; Giacalone, Jean-Claude; Nicolas, Timothée; Bottereau, Christine; Clairet, Frédéric; Lotte, Philippe; Molina, Diego

    2016-11-01

    Microwave imaging diagnostics are extremely useful for observing magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in magnetic fusion plasmas. Two imaging diagnostics will be available on the WEST tokamak. A method was developed to reconstruct electron density maps from electron density profiles measured by ultrafast reflectometry, a technique based on FM-CW radar principle. It relies on plasma rotation to perform 2D reconstruction. An Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic will image directly the temperature fluctuations. It will be equivalent to 24 stacked vertically radiometers, each probing a spot of few centimetres. These two complementary techniques will contribute to the validation of MHD models.

  13. Technology Advances in Support of Fusion Plasma Imaging Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qi; Lai, Jiali; Hu, Fengqi; Li, Maijou; Chang, Yu-Ting; Domier, Calvin; Luhmann, Neville, Jr.

    2012-10-01

    Innovative technologies are under investigation in key areas to enhance the performance of microwave and millimeter-wave fusion plasma imaging diagnostics. Novel antenna and mixer configurations are being developed at increasingly higher frequencies, to facilitate the use of electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on high field (> 2.6 T) plasma devices. Low noise preamplifier-based imaging antenna arrays are being developed to increase the sensitivity and dynamic range of microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) diagnostics for the localized measurement of turbulent density fluctuations. High power multi-frequency sources, fabricated using advanced CMOS technology, offer the promise of allowing MIR-based diagnostic instruments to image these density fluctuations in 2-D over an extended plasma volume in high performance tokamak plasmas. Details regarding each of these diagnostic development areas will be presented.

  14. Interactive Plasma Physics Education Using Data from Fusion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, Brisa; Davis, Bill; Zwicker, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    The Internet Plasma Physics Education Experience (IPPEX) website was created in 1996 to give users access to data from plasma and fusion experiments. Interactive material on electricity, magnetism, matter, and energy was presented to generate interest and prepare users to understand data from a fusion experiment. Initially, users were allowed to analyze real-time and archival data from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) experiment. IPPEX won numerous awards for its novel approach of allowing users to participate in ongoing research. However, the latest revisions of IPPEX were in 2001 and the interactive material is no longer functional on modern browsers. Also, access to real-time data was lost when TFTR was shut down. The interactive material on IPPEX is being rewritten in ActionScript3.0, and real-time and archival data from the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) will be made available to users. New tools like EFIT animations, fast cameras, and plots of important plasma parameters will be included along with an existing Java-based ``virtual tokamak.'' Screenshots from the upgraded website and future directions will be presented.

  15. Understanding of Edge Plasmas in Magnetic Fusion Energy Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T

    2004-11-01

    A limited overview is given of the theoretical understanding of edge plasmas in fusion devices. This plasma occupies the thin region between the hot core plasma and material walls in magnetically confinement configurations. The region is often formed by a change in magnetic topology from close magnetic field lines (i.e., the core region) and open field lines that contact material surfaces (i.e., the scrape-off layer [SOL]), with the most common example being magnetically diverted tokamaks. The physics of this region is determined by the interaction of plasma with neutral gas in the presence of plasma turbulence, with impurity radiation being an important component. Recent advances in modeling strong, intermittent micro-turbulent edge-plasma transport is given, and the closely coupled self-consistent evolution of the edge-plasma profiles in tokamaks. In addition, selected new results are given for the characterization of edge-plasmas behavior in the areas of edge-pedestal relaxation and SOL transport via Edge-Localize Modes (ELMs), impurity formation including dust, and magnetic field-line stochasticity in tokamaks.

  16. Magneto-inertial Fusion: An Emerging Concept for Inertial Fusion and Dense Plasmas in Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Thio, Francis Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    An overview of the U.S. program in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is given in terms of its technical rationale, scientific goals, vision, research plans, needs, and the research facilities currently available in support of the program. Magneto-inertial fusion is an emerging concept for inertial fusion and a pathway to the study of dense plasmas in ultrahigh magnetic fields (magnetic fields in excess of 500 T). The presence of magnetic field in an inertial fusion target suppresses cross-field thermal transport and potentially could enable more attractive inertial fusion energy systems. A vigorous program in magnetized high energy density laboratory plasmas (HED-LP) addressing the scientific basis of magneto-inertial fusion has been initiated by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy involving a number of universities, government laboratories and private institutions.

  17. APPARATUS FOR HEATING A PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Stix, T.H.

    1962-01-01

    The system contemplates the use of ion cyclotron motions for transferring energy to a plasma immersed in a confining magnetic field such as is found in thermonuclear reactors of the stellarator class. Oppositely directed windings are provided for producing ion-accelerating fields having a time and spatial periodicity and these have the advantage of producing ion cyclotron motions without the development of space charges which preclude the efficient energy transfer to the plasma. (AEC)

  18. Evaluation of the operational parameters for NBI-driven fusion in low-gain tokamaks with two-component plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirkov, A. Yu.

    2015-09-01

    Low gain (Q ~ 1) fusion plasma systems are of interest for concepts of fusion-fission hybrid reactors. Operational regimes of large modern tokamaks are close to Q  ≈  1. Therefore, they can be considered as prototypes of neutron sources for fusion-fission hybrids. Powerful neutral beam injection (NBI) can support the essential population of fast particles compared with the Maxwellial population. In such two-component plasma, fusion reaction rate is higher than for Maxwellian plasma. Increased reaction rate allows the development of relatively small-size and relatively inexpensive neutron sources. Possible operating regimes of the NBI-heated tokamak neutron source are discussed. In a relatively compact device, the predictions of physics of two-component fusion plasma have some volatility that causes taking into account variations of the operational parameters. Consequent parameter ranges are studied. The feasibility of regimes with Q  ≈  1 is shown for the relatively small and low-power system. The effect of NBI fraction in total heating power is analyzed.

  19. Internet and web projects for fusion plasma science and education. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, Timothy E.

    1999-08-30

    The plasma web site at http://www.plasmas.org provides comprehensive coverage of all plasma science and technology with site links worldwide. Prepared to serve the general public, students, educators, researchers, and decision-makers, the site covers basic plasma physics, fusion energy, magnetic confinement fusion, high energy density physics include ICF, space physics and astrophysics, pulsed-power, lighting, waste treatment, plasma technology, plasma theory, simulations and modeling.

  20. Fusion burning waves in proton-boron-11 plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Val, J. M.; Eliezer, S.; Piera, M.; Velarde, G.

    1996-02-01

    A method is proposed to exploit the aneutronic proton- 11B fusion reaction by means of igniting a heat detonation wave that expands across the fuel from a small heated region. The ignition process is triggered by a particle beam (or a couple of beams) impinging on an inertially compressed target. We determine conditions for ignition and burn propagation. Although the requirements on the igniting beam current are very high, the method is a clear hint how to produce the cleanest energy from nuclear reactions.

  1. Semi-analytical model of plasma-jet-driven magneto-inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langendorf, Samuel; Hsu, Scott

    2016-10-01

    Plasma-jet-driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF) is an MIF concept in which a spherically imploding plasma liner is formed from the convergence of a large number of discrete supersonic plasma jets, and the assembled liner is employed to compress a magnetized fuel target. We formulate a 1D spherical-geometry MIF model and apply it to PJMIF. The model incorporates compressible hydrodynamics, liner ionization, radiation, D-T fusion burn, heat conduction losses, magnetic pressure, magnetic flux losses via the Nernst effect, and charged-particle energy deposition. We study the effects of different transport outcomes (e.g., optically thin vs. optically thick radiation transport, classical vs. Bohm-like thermal diffusivity), and scan the liner-target parameter space for configurations with optimal fusion gain at a given total energy. We find that gain-optimal implosion velocity depends significantly on the liner temperature. For liners at approximately room temperature, an implosion speed of roughly 70 km/s is advantageous over faster speeds due to increased dwell time at stagnation. Supported by ARPA-E ALPHA program.

  2. Laser propagation measurements in long-scale-length underdense plasmas relevant to magnetized liner inertial fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Wei, M. S.; ...

    2016-11-02

    Here, we report experimental results and simulations showing efficient laser energy coupling into plasmas at conditions relevant to the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept. In MagLIF, to limit convergence and increase the hydrodynamic stability of the implosion, the fuel must be efficiently preheated. To determine the efficiency and physics of preheating by a laser, an Ar plasma with n e / n c r i t ~ 0.04 is irradiated by a multi-ns, multi-kJ, 0.35-μm, phase-plate-smoothed laser at spot-averaged intensities ranging from 1.0 × 10 14 to 2.5 × 10 14 W / c m 2 and pulsemore » widths from 2 to 10 ns. Time-resolved x-ray images of the laser-heated plasma are compared to two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that show agreement with the propagating emission front, a comparison that constrains laser energy deposition to the plasma. The experiments show that long-pulse, modest-intensity ( I = 1.5 × 10 14 W / c m 2 ) beams can efficiently couple energy ( ~ 82 % of the incident energy) to MagLIF-relevant long-length (9.5 mm) underdense plasmas. The heating efficiency we demonstrate is significantly higher than it was thought to have been achieved in early integrated MagLIF experiments [A. B. Sefkow et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 072711 (2014)].« less

  3. Laser propagation measurements in long-scale-length underdense plasmas relevant to magnetized liner inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Wei, M. S.; Nagayama, T.; Campbell, E. M.; Blue, B. E.; Heeter, R. F.; Koning, J. M.; Peterson, K. J.; Schmitt, A.

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental results and simulations showing efficient laser energy coupling into plasmas at conditions relevant to the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept. In MagLIF, to limit convergence and increase the hydrodynamic stability of the implosion, the fuel must be efficiently preheated. To determine the efficiency and physics of preheating by a laser, an Ar plasma with ne/nc r i t˜0.04 is irradiated by a multi-ns, multi-kJ, 0.35-μm, phase-plate-smoothed laser at spot-averaged intensities ranging from 1.0 ×1014 to 2.5 ×1014W /c m2 and pulse widths from 2 to 10 ns. Time-resolved x-ray images of the laser-heated plasma are compared to two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that show agreement with the propagating emission front, a comparison that constrains laser energy deposition to the plasma. The experiments show that long-pulse, modest-intensity (I =1.5 ×1014W /c m2 ) beams can efficiently couple energy (˜82 % of the incident energy) to MagLIF-relevant long-length (9.5 mm) underdense plasmas. The demonstrated heating efficiency is significantly higher than is thought to have been achieved in early integrated MagLIF experiments [A. B. Sefkow et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 072711 (2014), 10.1063/1.4890298].

  4. Laser propagation measurements in long-scale-length underdense plasmas relevant to magnetized liner inertial fusion.

    PubMed

    Harvey-Thompson, A J; Sefkow, A B; Wei, M S; Nagayama, T; Campbell, E M; Blue, B E; Heeter, R F; Koning, J M; Peterson, K J; Schmitt, A

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental results and simulations showing efficient laser energy coupling into plasmas at conditions relevant to the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept. In MagLIF, to limit convergence and increase the hydrodynamic stability of the implosion, the fuel must be efficiently preheated. To determine the efficiency and physics of preheating by a laser, an Ar plasma with n_{e}/n_{crit}∼0.04 is irradiated by a multi-ns, multi-kJ, 0.35-μm, phase-plate-smoothed laser at spot-averaged intensities ranging from 1.0×10^{14} to 2.5×10^{14}W/cm^{2} and pulse widths from 2 to 10 ns. Time-resolved x-ray images of the laser-heated plasma are compared to two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that show agreement with the propagating emission front, a comparison that constrains laser energy deposition to the plasma. The experiments show that long-pulse, modest-intensity (I=1.5×10^{14}W/cm^{2}) beams can efficiently couple energy (∼82% of the incident energy) to MagLIF-relevant long-length (9.5 mm) underdense plasmas. The demonstrated heating efficiency is significantly higher than is thought to have been achieved in early integrated MagLIF experiments [A. B. Sefkow et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 072711 (2014)10.1063/1.4890298].

  5. Dust remobilization in fusion plasmas under steady state conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolias, P.; Ratynskaia, S.; De Angeli, M.; De Temmerman, G.; Ripamonti, D.; Riva, G.; Bykov, I.; Shalpegin, A.; Vignitchouk, L.; Brochard, F.; Bystrov, K.; Bardin, S.; Litnovsky, A.

    2016-02-01

    The first combined experimental and theoretical studies of dust remobilization by plasma forces are reported. The main theoretical aspects of remobilization in fusion devices under steady state conditions are analyzed. In particular, the dominant role of adhesive forces is highlighted and generic remobilization conditions—direct lift-up, sliding, rolling—are formulated. A novel experimental technique is proposed, based on controlled adhesion of dust grains on tungsten samples combined with detailed mapping of the dust deposition profile prior and post plasma exposure. Proof-of-principle experiments in the TEXTOR tokamak and the EXTRAP-T2R reversed-field pinch are presented. The versatile environment of the linear device Pilot-PSI allowed for experiments with different magnetic field topologies and varying plasma conditions that were complemented with camera observations.

  6. Trends in laser-plasma-instability experiments for laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.P. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1991-06-06

    Laser-plasma instability experiments for laser fusion have followed three developments. These are advances in the technology and design of experiments, advances in diagnostics, and evolution of the design of high-gain targets. This paper traces the history of these three topics and discusses their present state. Today one is substantially able to produce controlled plasma conditions and to diagnose specific instabilities within such plasmas. Experiments today address issues that will matter for future laser facilities. Such facilities will irradiate targets with {approx}1 MJ of visible or UV light pulses that are tens of nanoseconds in duration, very likely with a high degree of spatial and temporal incoherence. 58 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Plasma arc heated secondary combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Haun, R.; Paulson, B.; Schlienger, M.; Goerz, D.; Kerns, J.; Vernazza, J.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes a secondary combustion chamber (SCC) for hazardous waste treatment systems that uses a plasma arc torch as the heat source. Developed under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Retech, Inc. and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the unit is intended primarily to handle the off-gas from a Plasma Arc Centrifugal Treatment (PACT) system. ft is designed to heat the effluent gas which may contain volatile organic compounds, and maintain the gas temperature above 1000 C for two seconds or more. The benefits of using a plasma arc gas heater are described in comparison to a conventional fossil fuel heated SCC. Thermal design considerations are discussed. Analysis and experimental results are presented to show the effectiveness in destroying hazardous compounds and reducing the total volume of gaseous emissions.

  8. The interaction of the near-field plasma with antennas used in magnetic fusion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, John

    2015-09-01

    Plasma heating and current drive using antennas in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) are important elements for the success of magnetic fusion. The antennas must operate in a harsh environment, where local plasma densities can be >1018/m3, magnetic fields can range from 0.2-5 Tesla, and antenna operating voltages can be >40 kV. This environment creates operational issues due to the interaction of the near-field of the antenna with the local plasma. In addition to parasitic losses in this plasma region, voltage and current distributions on the antenna structure lead to the formation of high electric fields and RF plasma sheaths, which can lead to enhanced particle and energy fluxes on the antenna and on surfaces intersected by magnetic field lines connected to or passing near the antenna. These issues are being studied using a simple electrode structure and a single-strap antenna on the Prototype Materials Plasma EXperiment (Proto-MPEX) at ORNL, which is a linear plasma device that uses an electron Bernstein wave heated helicon plasma source to create a high-density plasma suitable for use in a plasma-material interaction test stand. Several diagnostics are being used to characterize the near-field interactions, including double-Langmuir probes, a retarding field energy analyzer, and optical emission spectroscopy. The RF electric field is being studied utilizing Dynamic Stark Effect spectroscopy and Doppler-Free Saturation Spectroscopy. Recent experimental results and future plans will be presented. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  9. Erratum: Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices (2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 123001)

    DOE PAGES

    Evans, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δmore » $$b_⊥^{ext}$$ ≈ $$10^{-4}$$ → $$10^{-3}$$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.« less

  10. Divertor conditions relevant for fusion reactors achieved with linear plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Eck, H. J. N. van; Lof, A.; Meiden, H. J. van der; Rooij, G. J. van; Scholten, J.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P. A.; Kleyn, A. W.

    2012-11-26

    Intense magnetized hydrogen and deuterium plasmas have been produced with electron densities up to 3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} and electron temperatures up to 3.7 eV with a linear plasma generator. Exposure of a W target has led to average heat and particle flux densities well in excess of 4 MW m{sup -2} and 10{sup 24} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, respectively. We have shown that the plasma surface interactions are dominated by the incoming ions. The achieved conditions correspond very well to the projected conditions at the divertor strike zones of fusion reactors such as ITER. In addition, the machine has an unprecedented high gas efficiency.

  11. Use of Polycarbonate Vacuum Vessels in High-Temperature Fusion-Plasma Research

    SciTech Connect

    B. Berlinger, A. Brooks, H. Feder, J. Gumbas, T. Franckowiak and S.A. Cohen

    2012-09-27

    Magnetic fusion energy (MFE) research requires ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) conditions, primarily to reduce plasma contamination by impurities. For radiofrequency (RF)-heated plasmas, a great benefit may accrue from a non-conducting vacuum vessel, allowing external RF antennas which avoids the complications and cost of internal antennas and high-voltage high-current feedthroughs. In this paper we describe these and other criteria, e.g., safety, availability, design flexibility, structural integrity, access, outgassing, transparency, and fabrication techniques that led to the selection and use of 25.4-cm OD, 1.6-cm wall polycarbonate pipe as the main vacuum vessel for an MFE research device whose plasmas are expected to reach keV energies for durations exceeding 0.1 s

  12. Ultrasmooth plasma polymerized coatings for laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Letts, S.A.; Myers, D.W.; Witt, L.A.

    1980-08-26

    Coatings for laser fusion targets were deposited up to 135 ..mu..m thick by plasma polymerization onto 140 ..mu..m diameter DT filled glass microspheres. Ultrasmooth surfaces (no defect higher than 0.1 ..mu..m) were achieved by eliminating particulate contamination. Process generated particles were eliminated by determining the optimum operating conditions of power, gas flow, and pressure, and maintaining these conditions through feedback control. From a study of coating defects grown over known surface irregularities, a quantitative relationship between irregularity size, film thickness, and defect size was determined. This relationship was used to set standards for the maximum microshell surface irregularity tolerable in the production of hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon coated laser fusion targets.

  13. Electron Emission from Nano and Microstructured Materials for Fusion and Plasma Discharge Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patino, Marlene; Raitses, Yevgeny; Wirz, Richard

    2016-10-01

    Secondary electron emission (SEE) from plasma-facing walls can lead to adverse effects (e.g. increased plasma heat flux to the wall) in plasma devices, including plasma processing, confinement fusion, and plasma thrusters. Experimental and computational efforts of engineered materials with nm to mm-sized structures (grooves, pores, fibers) have previously shown a decrease in SEE for primary electrons incident normal and oblique to the material. Here we present SEE measurements from one such engineered material, carbon velvet with μm fibers, and from a plasma-structured material, tungsten fuzz with nm fibers. Results show two trends: (a) significant reduction in SEE at normal incidence for carbon velvet (75% reduction) and tungsten fuzz (40-50% reduction) over smooth graphite and tungsten, respectively, and (b) SEE from tungsten fuzz is nearly independent of incident angle (i.e. not a cosine dependence on incident angle observed for smooth materials). Hence, the reduction in SEE from tungsten fuzz over smooth tungsten is more pronounced (up to 63%) at grazing angles. This is important for many plasma devices since in a negative-going sheath the potential structure leads to relatively high incident angles. This work was supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466; AFOSR Grants FA9550-14-1-0053, FA9550-11-1-0282, AF9550-09-1-0695, and FA9550-14-10317; and DOE Office of Science Graduate Student Research Program.

  14. Taming the heat flux problem: Advanced divertors towards fusion power

    SciTech Connect

    Kotschenreuther, M.; Mahajan, S.; Valanju, P. M.; Covele, B.; Waelbroeck, F. L.; Canik, John M.; LaBombard, Brian

    2015-09-11

    The next generation fusion machines are likely to face enormous heat exhaust problems. In addition to summarizing major issues and physical processes connected with these problems, we discuss how advanced divertors, obtained by modifying the local geometry, may yield workable solutions. We also point out that: (1) the initial interpretation of recent experiments show that the advantages, predicted, for instance, for the X-divertor (in particular, being able to run a detached operation at high pedestal pressure) correlate very well with observations, and (2) the X-D geometry could be implemented on ITER (and DEMOS) respecting all the relevant constraints. As a result, a roadmap for future research efforts is proposed.

  15. Recombination of H atoms on the dust in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtiyari-Ramezani, M. Alinejad, N.; Mahmoodi, J.

    2015-07-15

    We survey a model for theoretical study of the interaction of hydrogen and dust surface and apply our results for dusty plasmas to fusion devices. In this model, considering the mobility of ad-atoms from one physisorbed, or chemisorbed site, to other one by thermal diffusion, we describe the formation of H{sub 2} on grain surfaces. Finally, we calculate the formation rate on the high temperature dust surfaces for a range of temperature and density in typical conditions of divertor of tokamak.

  16. A Vlasov equation with Dirac potential used in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bardos, Claude; Nouri, Anne

    2012-11-15

    Well-posedness of the Cauchy problem is analyzed for a singular Vlasov equation governing the evolution of the ionic distribution function of a quasineutral fusion plasma. The Penrose criterium is adapted to the linearized problem around a time and space homogeneous distribution function showing (due to the singularity) more drastic differences between stable and unstable situations. This pathology appears on the full nonlinear problem, well-posed locally in time with analytic initial data, but generally ill-posed in the Hadamard sense. Eventually with a very different class of solutions, mono-kinetic, which constrains the structure of the density distribution, the problem becomes locally in time well-posed.

  17. PREFACE: Theory of Fusion Plasmas, 13th Joint Varenna-Lausanne International Workshop (2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbet, Xavier; Sauter, Olivier

    2012-12-01

    The 2012 joint Varenna-Lausanne international workshop on the theory of fusion plasmas has been very fruitful. A broad variety of topics were addressed, as usual covering turbulence, MHD, edge physic, RF wave heating and a taste of astrophysics. Moreover the scope of the meeting was extended this year to include the physics of materials and diagnostics for burning plasmas. This evolution reflects the complexity of problems at hand in fusion, in particular in the context of ITER construction. Long-standing problems without immediate consequences have sometimes become an urgent matter in that context. One may quote for instance the choice of plasma facing components or the design of control systems. Another characteristic of the meeting is the interplay between various domains of plasma physics. For instance MHD modes are now currently investigated with gyrokinetic codes, kinetic effects are more and more included in MHD stability analysis, and turbulence is now accounted for in wave propagation problems. This is the proof of cross-fertilization and it is certainly a healthy sign in our community. Finally introducing some novelty in the programme does not prevent us from respecting the traditions of the meeting. As usual a good deal of the presentations were dedicated to numerical simulations. Combining advanced numerical techniques with elaborated analytical theory is certainly a trademark of the Varenna-Lausanne conference, which was respected again this year. The quality and size of the scientific production is illustrated by the 26 papers which appear in the present volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series, all refereed. We would also like to mention another set of 20 papers to be published in Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. We hope the readers will enjoy this special issue of JPCS and the one to come in PPCF. Xavier Garbet and Olivier Sauter October 26, 2012

  18. Educational Outreach at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivenberg, Paul; Thomas, Paul

    2006-10-01

    At the MIT PSFC, student and staff volunteers work together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion science and plasma technology. Seeking to generate excitement in young people about science and engineering, the PSFC hosts a number of educational outreach activities throughout the year, including Middle and High School Outreach Days. The PSFC also has an in-school science demonstration program on the theme of magnetism. The Mr. Magnet Program, headed by Mr. Paul Thomas, has been bringing lively demonstrations on magnetism into local elementary and middle schools for 15 years. This year Mr. Magnet presented the program to nearly 30,000 students at over 67 schools and other events, reaching kindergartners through college freshmen. In addition to his program on magnetism, he is offering an interactive lecture about plasma to high schools. The "Traveling Plasma Lab" encourages students to learn more about plasma science while having fun investigating plasma properties using actual laboratory techniques and equipment. Beyond the classroom, Paul Thomas has provided technical training for Boston Museum of Science staff in preparation for the opening of a Star Wars exhibit. His hands-on demos have also been filmed by the History Channel for a one-hour program about Magnetism, which aired in June 2006.

  19. The Inverse Z-Pinch as a Physics Test Bed, and a Possible Target Plasma for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemuth, Irvin; Bauer, Bruno; Fuelling, Stephen; Kirkpatrick, Ronald; Makhin, Volodymyr; Presura, Radu; Sheehey, Peter; Siemon, Richard

    2002-12-01

    From an overall fusion system perspective, there remains an untested and interesting possibility of compressing a magnetized target plasma with beta greater than unity by a magnetically driven imploding liner, or other target pusher driver. This approach, known as Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), operates in an intermediate density regime and time scale between magnetic and inertial fusion, which are separated by twelve orders of magnitude. Even if magnetized plasma transport is Bohm-like, fusion gain in the MTF parameter space appears accessible with existing drivers, which means MTF does not require a major financial investment in driver technology. The physics of plasma confinement by material walls, and the thermal transport of magnetized high-beta plasma in the MTF regime, has received relatively little study theoretically, computationally, or experimentally. This paper describes a proposed experiment to test wall confinement in a regime of plasma parameters relevant to MTF. The geometry being considered is an inverse pinch designed to heat plasma to 100-eV temperatures. By using a current crowbar, the plasma formed in the pinch can be held against an outer wall (the return conductor) and the rate of cooling can be measured and compared with predictions from theory and numerical models. The well-benchmarked two-dimensional radiation-MHD code MHRDR is being used to guide the design activity. The existing 2-terawatt Zebra generator at the Nevada Terawatt Facility is the power supply under consideration. Results from the code show adequate heating, formation of a quasi-static magnetic equilibrium, and a near-classical cooling rate to a room temperature boundary, even in the presence of substantial plasma convection.

  20. Interplay of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Inertial Fusion Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, D. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Michel, P.; Divol, L.; Sepke, S. M.; Kerbel, G. D.; Thomas, C. A.; Ralph, J. E.; Moody, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of laser-plasma interactions (LPI) on the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion hohlraums are investigated via a new approach that self-consistently couples reduced LPI models into radiation-hydrodynamics numerical codes. The interplay between hydrodynamics and LPI—specifically stimulated Raman scatter and crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET)—mostly occurs via momentum and energy deposition into Langmuir and ion acoustic waves. This spatially redistributes energy coupling to the target, which affects the background plasma conditions and thus, modifies laser propagation. This model shows reduced CBET and significant laser energy depletion by Langmuir waves, which reduce the discrepancy between modeling and data from hohlraum experiments on wall x-ray emission and capsule implosion shape.

  1. Interplay of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Inertial Fusion Hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Strozzi, D. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Michel, P.; ...

    2017-01-12

    The effects of laser-plasma interactions (LPI) on the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion hohlraums are investigated in this work via a new approach that self-consistently couples reduced LPI models into radiation-hydrodynamics numerical codes. The interplay between hydrodynamics and LPI—specifically stimulated Raman scatter and crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET)—mostly occurs via momentum and energy deposition into Langmuir and ion acoustic waves. This spatially redistributes energy coupling to the target, which affects the background plasma conditions and thus, modifies laser propagation. In conclusion, this model shows reduced CBET and significant laser energy depletion by Langmuir waves, which reduce the discrepancy between modeling andmore » data from hohlraum experiments on wall x-ray emission and capsule implosion shape.« less

  2. Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, F.W. Jr.; Chiu, S.C.; Rawls, J.M.

    1987-04-28

    This patent describes a magnetic confinement plasma device having a plasma. The plasma is immersed in a strong magnetic field and confined within an evacuated plasma chamber. A wave launcher for launching electromagnetic waves in the range of frequencies of 10 MHz to 200 MHz energizes and thereby heats the plasma. The wave launcher is spaced-apart from the plasma. The wave launcher comprises: a resonant cavity, including resonant chamber walls for containing electromagnetic fields; connection means connecting the resonant cavity to a transmission line carrying electromagnetic wave energy to the resonant cavity; at least one capacitive reactive element, and at least one inductive reactive element disposed within the resonant cavity; the capacitive reactive member separated from the chamber walls of the resonant cavity by a first predefined gap, with the capacitive reactive member and the chamber walls of the resonant cavity oriented approximately tangential to the strong magnetic field; the capacitive and the inductive reactive elements spaced apart from the plasma a second predetermined distance which at least partially determines the frequency of the launched waves; and the resonant cavity cooperating with the capacitive and the inductive reactive elements so as to launch electromagnetic waves in the range of frequencies, toward the plasma.

  3. Plasma Heating of Titan's Exobase and Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karn, M.; Smith, H. T.; Tucker, O. J.; Johnson, R. E.; de La Haye, V.; Waite, J. H.; Young, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Cassini data have shown that the dominant heating process for Titan's atmospheric corona and exobase region is as yet uncertain (DeLaHaye et al. 2007). We have speculated that the incident plasma, both the slowed and deflected ambient ions and the pick-up ions, may be responsible for all or a significant fraction of the non-thermal component of Titan's corona (De La Haye et al. 2007). Our earlier models of the net incident plasma heating (Michael et al. 2004; 2005) fall short in describing the coronal structure seen by INMS on Ta, Tb and T5. Since heating of the corona and exobase affects atmospheric escape, it is critical for describing the evolution of Titan's atmosphere (Johnson 2004). Here we describe an empirical approach to this problem. INMS data and the preliminary CAPS flux data clearly indicate, not surprisingly, that the heating is spatially non-uniform and is variable, but there is as yet no correlation with the plasma flow models. Therefore, we haev analyzed INMS data for the atmospheric structure near the exobase for a large number of Cassini passes through the exobase region and we have analyzed certain CAPS data for the plasma flow near the exobase. The goal is to develop a model for the spatial variations in the plasma heating near the exobase with the goal of improving our knowledge of atmospheric escape. De La Haye, V.. et al., JGR 112, A07309, doi:10.1029/2006JA012222, 2007 Johnson, R.E. ApJ 609, L99, 2004 Michael, M., and R. E. Johnson. PSS 53, 1510, 2005. Michael, M., et al. Icarus, 175, 263, 2005.

  4. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions.

    PubMed

    Garrison, L M; Zenobia, S J; Egle, B J; Kulcinski, G L; Santarius, J F

    2016-08-01

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000 °C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ion gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA-500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 10(14) ions/(cm(2) s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. The MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials.

  5. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, L. M.; Zenobia, S. J.; Egle, B. J.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F.

    2016-08-01

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000 °C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ion gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA-500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 1014 ions/(cm2 s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. The MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials.

  6. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, L. M.; Zenobia, Samuel J.; Egle, Brian J.; Kulcinski, Gerald L.; Santarius, John F.

    2016-08-01

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000°C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ion gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA–500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 1014 ions/(cm2 s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. In conclusion, the MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials.

  7. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Garrison, L. M.; Zenobia, Samuel J.; Egle, Brian J.; ...

    2016-08-01

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000°C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ionmore » gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA–500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 1014 ions/(cm2 s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. In conclusion, the MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials.« less

  8. Laser beam propagation through inertial confinement fusion hohlraum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D. H.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N. B.; Dixit, S.; Neumayer, P.; Moody, J. D.; Pollock, B. B.; Ross, J. S.; Suter, L.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2007-05-15

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes have been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. The plasma emulator is produced in a gas-filled hohlraum; a blue 351-nm laser beam propagates along the axis of the hohlraum interacting with a high-temperature (T{sub e}=3.5 keV), dense (n{sub e}=5x10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}), long-scale length (L{approx}2 mm) plasma. Experiments at these conditions have demonstrated that the interaction beam produces less than 1% total backscatter resulting in transmission greater than 90% for laser intensities less than I<2x10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}. The bulk plasma conditions have been independently characterized using Thomson scattering where the peak electron temperatures are shown to scale with the hohlraum heater beam energy in the range from 2 keV to 3.5 keV. This feature has allowed us to determine the thresholds for both backscattering and filamentation instabilities; the former measured with absolutely calibrated full aperture backscatter and near backscatter diagnostics and the latter with a transmitted beam diagnostics. Comparing the experimental results with detailed gain calculations for the onset of significant laser scattering processes shows a stimulated Brillouin scattering threshold (R=10%) for a linear gain of 15; these high temperature, low density experiments produce plasma conditions comparable to those along the outer beams in ignition hohlraum designs. By increasing the gas fill density (n{sub e}=10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}) in these targets, the inner beam ignition hohlraum conditions are accessed. In this case, stimulated Raman scattering dominates the backscattering processes and we show that scattering is small for gains less than 20 which can be achieved through proper choice of the laser beam intensity.

  9. Alpha-Heating and a Burning Plasma State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Doeppner, T.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O.; Kritcher, A. L.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A.; Milovich, J.; Moody, J.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.

    2014-10-01

    L. R. BENEDETTI, D. BRADLEY, D. FITTINGHOFF, N. IZUMI, S. KHAN, R. TOWN (LLNL) G. GRIM, N. GULER, G. KYRALA, F. MERRILL, C. WILDE, P. VOLEGOV (LANL) High-foot implosions show net fuel gains and significant alpha-heating [Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)] using a per shot analysis of NIF data with a static reconstruction of the implosion energetics [e.g. Cerjan et al., PoP 20 (2013)]. Inference of the alpha-heating contribution to the yield is made using a simulation database of DT implosions and the one-to-one correspondence of yield amplification and normalized Lawson criteria [Patel et al., APS-DPP, (2013); Patel et al. this conf.]. A dynamic semi-analytic model for the DT self-heating rate can be constructed that can more directly be used, with data, to determine the degree of bootstrapping occuring in implosions. Here we propose that the suite of high-foot data demonstrate a scaling of fusion yield performance versus energy absorbed that provides an alternate proof of significant alpha-particle self-heating. This analysis shows that recent high-foot implosions are alpha-heating dominated and thus have achieved a `burning-plasma' state. Work performed under the auspices of U.S. Dept. of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Experimental investigation of opacity models for stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and high energy density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James

    2008-11-01

    Theoretical opacities are required for calculating energy transport in plasmas. In particular, understanding stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and Z-pinches depends on the opacities of mid-atomic-number elements in the 150-300 eV temperature range. These models are complex and experimental validation is crucial. For example, solar models presently disagree with helioseismology and one possible explanation is inadequate opacities. Testing these opacities requires a uniform plasma at temperatures high enough to produce the ion charge states that exist in the sun. Typical opacity experiments heat a sample using x-rays and measure the spectrally resolved transmission with a backlight. The difficulty grows as the temperature increases because the heating x-ray source must supply more energy and the backlighter source must be bright enough to overwhelm the plasma self emission. These problems were overcome using the dynamic hohlraum x-ray source at Sandia's Z facility to measure the transmission of a mixed Mg-Fe plasma heated above 150 eV. This capability will also advance opacity science for other high energy density plasmas. This tutorial describes opacity experiment challenges including accurate transmission measurements, plasma diagnostics, and quantitative model comparisons. The solar interior serves as a focal problem and Z facility experiments are used to illustrate the techniques. **In collaboration with C. Iglesias (LLNL), R. Mancini (U. Nevada), J.MacFarlane, I. Golovkin and P. Wang (Prism), C. Blancard, Ph. Cosse, G. Faussurier, F. Gilleron, and J.C. Pain (CEA), J. Abdallah Jr. (LANL), and G.A. Rochau and P.W. Lake (Sandia). ++Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Plasma heating effects during laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, G. K.; Dixon, R. D.

    Laser welding is a relatively low heat input process used in joining precisely machined components with minimum distortion and heat affects to surrounding material. The CO2 (10.6 (MU)m) and Nd-YAG (1.06 (MU)m) lasers are the primary lasers used for welding in industry today. Average powers range up to 20 kW for CO2 and 400 W for Nd-YAG with pulse lengths of milliseconds to continuous wave. Control of the process depends on an understanding of the laser-plasma-material interaction and characterization of the laser beam being used. Inherent plasma formation above the material surface and subsequent modulation of the incident laser radiation directly affect the energy transfer to the target material. The temporal and spatial characteristics of the laser beam affect the available power density incident on the target, which is important in achieving repeatability in the process. Other factors such as surface texture, surface contaminants, surface chemistry, and welding environment affect plasma formation which determines the weld penetration. This work involves studies of the laser-plasma-material interaction process and particularly the effect of the plasma on the coupling of laser energy to a material during welding. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser was used with maximum average power of 400 W.

  12. High-speed surface temperature measurements on plasma facing materials for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, M.; Kobayashi, M.

    1996-01-01

    For the lifetime evaluation of plasma facing materials in fusion experimental machines, it is essential to investigate their surface behavior and their temperature responses during an off-normal event such as the plasma disruptions. An infrared thermometer with a sampling speed as fast as 1{times}10{sup {minus}6} s/data, namely, the high-speed infrared thermometer (HSIR), has been developed by the National Research Laboratory of Metrology in Japan. To evaluate an applicability of the newly developed HSIR on the surface temperature measurement of plasma facing materials, high heat flux beam irradiation experiments have been performed with three different materials under the surface heat fluxes up to 170 MW/m{sup 2} for 0.04 s in a hydrogen ion beam test facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. As for the results, HSIR can be applicable for measuring the surface temperature responses of the armor tile materials with a little modification. It is also confirmed that surface temperatures measured with the HSIR thermometer show good agreement with the analytical results for stainless steel and carbon based materials at a temperature range of up to 2500{degree}C. However, for aluminum the HSIR could measure the temperature of the high dense vapor cloud which was produced during the heating due to lower melting temperature. Based on the result, a multichannel arrayed HSIR thermometer has been designed and fabricated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Diagnosing laser-preheated magnetized plasmas relevant to magnetized liner inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Sefkow, Adam B.; Nagayama, Taisuke N.; Wei, Mingsheng; Campbell, Edward Michael; Fiksel, Gennady; Chang, Po -Yu; Davies, Jonathan R.; Barnak, Daniel H.; Glebov, Vladimir Y.; Fitzsimmons, Paul; Fooks, Julie; Blue, Brent E.

    2015-12-22

    In this paper, we present a platform on the OMEGA EP Laser Facility that creates and diagnoses the conditions present during the preheat stage of the MAGnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept. Experiments were conducted using 9 kJ of 3ω (355 nm) light to heat an underdense deuterium gas (electron density: 2.5 × 1020 cm-3 = 0.025 of critical density) magnetized with a 10 T axial field. Results show that the deuterium plasma reached a peak electron temperature of 670 ± 140 eV, diagnosed using streaked spectroscopy of an argon dopant. The results demonstrate that plasmas relevant to the preheat stage of MagLIF can be produced at multiple laser facilities, thereby enabling more rapid progress in understanding magnetized preheat. Results are compared with magneto-radiation-hydrodynamics simulations, and plans for future experiments are described.

  14. Diagnosing laser-preheated magnetized plasmas relevant to magnetized liner inertial fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Sefkow, Adam B.; Nagayama, Taisuke N.; ...

    2015-12-22

    In this paper, we present a platform on the OMEGA EP Laser Facility that creates and diagnoses the conditions present during the preheat stage of the MAGnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept. Experiments were conducted using 9 kJ of 3ω (355 nm) light to heat an underdense deuterium gas (electron density: 2.5 × 1020 cm-3 = 0.025 of critical density) magnetized with a 10 T axial field. Results show that the deuterium plasma reached a peak electron temperature of 670 ± 140 eV, diagnosed using streaked spectroscopy of an argon dopant. The results demonstrate that plasmas relevant to the preheatmore » stage of MagLIF can be produced at multiple laser facilities, thereby enabling more rapid progress in understanding magnetized preheat. Results are compared with magneto-radiation-hydrodynamics simulations, and plans for future experiments are described.« less

  15. Verification of particle simulation of radio frequency waves in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kuley, Animesh; Lin, Z.; Wang, Z. X.; Wessel, F.

    2013-10-15

    Radio frequency (RF) waves can provide heating, current and flow drive, as well as instability control for steady state operations of fusion experiments. A particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the RF nonlinear interactions with plasmas. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation. This model has been implemented in a global gyrokinetic toroidal code using real electron-to-ion mass ratio. To verify the model, linear simulations of ion plasma oscillation, ion Bernstein wave, and lower hybrid wave are carried out in cylindrical geometry and found to agree well with analytic predictions.

  16. Surface modifications of fusion reactor relevant materials on exposure to fusion grade plasma in plasma focus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, R.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Mishra, P.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2015-11-01

    An 11.5 kJ plasma focus (PF) device was used here to irradiate materials with fusion grade plasma. The surface modifications of different materials (W, Ni, stainless steel, Mo and Cu) were investigated using various available techniques. The prominent features observed through the scanning electron microscope on the sample surfaces were erosions, cracks, blisters and craters after irradiations. The surface roughness of the samples increased multifold after exposure as measured by the surface profilometer. The X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the changes in the microstructures and the structural phase transformation in surface layers of the samples. We observed change in volumes of austenite and ferrite phases in the stainless steel sample. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis suggested alloying of the surface layer of the samples with elements of the PF anode. We report here the comparative analysis of the surface damages of materials with different physical, thermal and mechanical properties. The investigations will be useful to understand the behavior of the perspective materials for future fusion reactors (either in pure form or in alloy) over the long operations.

  17. FREQUENCY CONTROL OF RF HEATING OF GASEOUS PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Herold, E.W.

    1962-09-01

    This invention relates to the heating of gaseous plasma by radiofrequency ion-cyclotron resonance heating. The cyclotron resonance frequencies are varied and this invention provides means for automatically controlling the frequency of the radiofrequency to maximize the rate of heating. To this end, a servo-loop is provided to sense the direction of plasma heating with frequency and a control signal is derived to set the center frequency of the radiofrequency energy employed to heat the plasma. (AEC)

  18. Explosive-Driven Hemispherical Implosions for Generating Fusion Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    facility in order to provide a small region of extremely high pressures and temperatures (13-25). The implosion chamber had originally been used as a...exploding wire) and reflects, leaving behind a very small pocket (1 mm3 ) of extremely high-temperature, high- pressure and high-density plasma. In the present...Fig. 1.4). The cavity in the capsule serves to produce a second compression and heating stage in order to produce extremely high temperatures, pressures

  19. Laser Beam Propagation through Inertial Confinement Fusion Hohlraum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Meezan, N B; DIxit, S; Neumayer, P; Moody, J D; Pollock, B B; Ross, J S; Glenzer, S H

    2006-10-26

    A study of the relevant laser-plasma interaction processes has been performed in long-scale length plasmas that emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Experiments in this high-temperature (T{sub e} = 3.5 keV), dense (n{sub e} = 0.5 - 1 x 10{sup -3}) hohlraum plasma have demonstrated that blue 351-nm laser beams produce less than 1% total backscatter resulting in transmission greater than 90% for ignition relevant laser intensities (I < 2 x 10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}). The bulk plasma conditions have been independently characterized using Thomson scattering where the peak electron temperatures are shown to scale with the hohlraum heater beam energy in the range from 2 keV to 3.5 keV. This feature has allowed us to determine the thresholds for both backscattering and filamentation instabilities; the former measured with absolutely calibrated full aperture backscatter and near backscatter diagnostics and the latter with a transmitted beam diagnostics. Comparing the experimental results with detailed gain calculations for the onset of significant laser scattering processes shows that these results are relevant for the outer beams in ignition hohlraum experiments corresponding to a gain threshold for stimulated Brillouin scattering of 15. By increasing the gas fill density in these experiments further accesses inner beam ignition hohlraum conditions. In this case, stimulated Raman scattering dominates the backscattering processes. They show that scattering is small for gains smaller than 20, which can be achieved through proper choice of the laser beam intensity.

  20. Educational Outreach at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivenberg, Paul; Thomas, Paul

    2004-11-01

    At the MIT PSFC student and staff volunteers work together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion science and plasma technology. Seeking to generate excitement in young people about science and engineering, the PSFC hosts a number of educational outreach activities and tours throughout the year, including Middle and High School Outreach Days. The PSFC also has an in-school science demonstration program on the theme of magnetism. As ''Mr. Magnet'' Technical Supervisor Paul Thomas brings a truck-load of hands-on demonstrations to K-12 schools, challenging students to help him with experiments. While teaching fundamentals of magnetism and electricity he shows that science is fun for all, and that any student can have a career in science. This year he taught at 75 schools and other events, reaching 30,000 teachers and students. He has expanded his teaching to include an interactive demonstration of plasma, encouraging participants to investigate plasma properties with audiovisual, electromagnetic, and spectroscopic techniques. The PSFC's continuing involvement with the MIT Museum and the Boston Museum of Science also helps familiarize the public with the fourth state of matter.

  1. Educational Outreach at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P.; Rivenberg, P.; Censabella, V.

    2002-11-01

    At the MIT PSFC, student and staff volunteers work together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion science and plasma technology. Seeking to generate excitement in young people about science and engineering, the PSFC hosts a number of educational outreach activities throughout the year, including Middle and High School Outreach Days. The PSFC also has an in-school science-demonstration program on the theme of magnetism. As ``Mr. Magnet," Technical Supervisor Paul Thomas brings a truck-load of hands-on demonstrations to K-12 schools, challenging students to help him with experiments. While teaching fundamentals of magnetism and electricity he shows that science is fun for all, and that any student can have a career in science. This year he reached 82 schools -- 30,000 teachers and students. He has recently expanded his teaching to include an interactive demonstration of plasma, encouraging participants to investigate plasma properties with audiovisual, electromagnetic, and spectroscopic techniques. He has also developed a workshop for middle school on how to build an electromagnet.

  2. Fast ion generation and bulk plasma heating with three-ion ICRF scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Van Eester, D.; Dumont, R.; Ongena, J.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A.

    2015-12-01

    Launching electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is an efficient method of plasma heating, actively employed in most of fusion machines. ICRF has a number of important supplementary applications, including the generation of high-energy ions. In this paper, we discuss a new set of three-ion ICRF scenarios and the prospect of their use as a dedicated tool for fast ion generation in tokamaks and stellarators. A distinct feature of these scenarios is a strong absorption efficiency possible at very low concentrations of resonant minority ions (˜ 1% or even below). Such concentration levels are typical for impurities contaminating fusion plasmas. An alternative ICRF scenario for maximizing the efficiency of bulk D-T ion heating is suggested for JET and ITER tokamaks, which is based on three-ion ICRF heating of intrinsic Beryllium impurities.

  3. Fast ion generation and bulk plasma heating with three-ion ICRF scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, Ye. O. Van Eester, D.; Ongena, J.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A.

    2015-12-10

    Launching electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is an efficient method of plasma heating, actively employed in most of fusion machines. ICRF has a number of important supplementary applications, including the generation of high-energy ions. In this paper, we discuss a new set of three-ion ICRF scenarios and the prospect of their use as a dedicated tool for fast ion generation in tokamaks and stellarators. A distinct feature of these scenarios is a strong absorption efficiency possible at very low concentrations of resonant minority ions (∼ 1% or even below). Such concentration levels are typical for impurities contaminating fusion plasmas. An alternative ICRF scenario for maximizing the efficiency of bulk D-T ion heating is suggested for JET and ITER tokamaks, which is based on three-ion ICRF heating of intrinsic Beryllium impurities.

  4. 1991 US-Japan workshop on Nuclear Fusion in Dense Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimaru, S. . Dept. of Physics); Tajima, T. . Inst. for Fusion Studies)

    1991-10-01

    The scientific areas covered at the Workshop may be classified into the following subfields: (1) basic theory of dense plasma physics and its interface with atomic physics and nuclear physics; (2) physics of dense z-pinches, ICF plasmas etc; (3) stellar interior plasmas; (4) cold fusion; and (5) other dense plasmas.

  5. 1991 US-Japan workshop on Nuclear Fusion in Dense Plasmas. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimaru, S.; Tajima, T.

    1991-10-01

    The scientific areas covered at the Workshop may be classified into the following subfields: (1) basic theory of dense plasma physics and its interface with atomic physics and nuclear physics; (2) physics of dense z-pinches, ICF plasmas etc; (3) stellar interior plasmas; (4) cold fusion; and (5) other dense plasmas.

  6. Final Report: Safety of Plasma Components and Aerosol Transport During Hard Disruptions and Accidental Energy Release in Fusion Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bourham, Mohamed A.; Gilligan, John G.

    1999-08-14

    Safety considerations in large future fusion reactors like ITER are important before licensing the reactor. Several scenarios are considered hazardous, which include safety of plasma-facing components during hard disruptions, high heat fluxes and thermal stresses during normal operation, accidental energy release, and aerosol formation and transport. Disruption events, in large tokamaks like ITER, are expected to produce local heat fluxes on plasma-facing components, which may exceed 100 GW/m{sup 2} over a period of about 0.1 ms. As a result, the surface temperature dramatically increases, which results in surface melting and vaporization, and produces thermal stresses and surface erosion. Plasma-facing components safety issues extends to cover a wide range of possible scenarios, including disruption severity and the impact of plasma-facing components on disruption parameters, accidental energy release and short/long term LOCA's, and formation of airborne particles by convective current transport during a LOVA (water/air ingress disruption) accident scenario. Study, and evaluation of, disruption-induced aerosol generation and mobilization is essential to characterize database on particulate formation and distribution for large future fusion tokamak reactor like ITER. In order to provide database relevant to ITER, the SIRENS electrothermal plasma facility at NCSU has been modified to closely simulate heat fluxes expected in ITER.

  7. In vitro fusion of lung lamellar bodies and plasma membrane is augmented by lung synexin.

    PubMed

    Chander, A; Wu, R D

    1991-11-05

    Lamellar bodies of lung epithelial type II cells undergo fusion with plasma membrane prior to exocytosis of surfactant into the alveolar lumen. Since synexin from adrenal glands promotes aggregation and fusion of chromaffin granules, we purified synexin-like proteins from bovine lung cytosolic fraction, and evaluated their effect on the fusion of isolated lamellar bodies and plasma membrane fractions. Synexin activity, which co-purified with an approx. 47 kDa protein (pI 6.8), was assessed by following calcium-dependent aggregation of liposomes prepared from a mixture of phosphatidylcholine:phosphatidylserine (PC:PS, 3:1, mol/mol). Lung synexin caused aggregation of liposomes approximating lung surfactant lipid-like composition, isolated lamellar bodies, or isolated plasma membrane fraction. Lung synexin promoted fusion only in the presence of calcium. It augmented fusion between lamellar bodies and plasma membranes, lamellar bodies and liposomes, or between two populations of liposomes. However, selectivity with regard to synexin-mediated fusion was observed as synexin did not promote fusion between plasma membrane and liposomes, or between liposomes of surfactant lipid-like composition and other liposomes. These observations support a role for lung synexin in membrane fusion between the plasma membrane and lamellar bodies during exocytosis of lung surfactant, and suggest that such fusion is dependent on composition of interacting membranes.

  8. Phase space structures in gyrokinetic simulations of fusion plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghendrih, Philippe; Norscini, Claudia; Cartier-Michaud, Thomas; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Abiteboul, Jérémie; Dong, Yue; Garbet, Xavier; Gürcan, Ozgür; Hennequin, Pascale; Grandgirard, Virginie; Latu, Guillaume; Morel, Pierre; Sarazin, Yanick; Storelli, Alexandre; Vermare, Laure

    2014-10-01

    Gyrokinetic simulations of fusion plasmas give extensive information in 5D on turbulence and transport. This paper highlights a few of these challenging physics in global, flux driven simulations using experimental inputs from Tore Supra shot TS45511. The electrostatic gyrokinetic code GYSELA is used for these simulations. The 3D structure of avalanches indicates that these structures propagate radially at localised toroidal angles and then expand along the field line at sound speed to form the filaments. Analysing the poloidal mode structure of the potential fluctuations (at a given toroidal location), one finds that the low modes m = 0 and m = 1 exhibit a global structure; the magnitude of the m = 0 mode is much larger than that of the m = 1 mode. The shear layers of the corrugation structures are thus found to be dominated by the m = 0 contribution, that are comparable to that of the zonal flows. This global mode seems to localise the m = 2 mode but has little effect on the localisation of the higher mode numbers. However when analysing the pulsation of the latter modes one finds that all modes exhibit a similar phase velocity, comparable to the local zonal flow velocity. The consequent dispersion like relation between the modes pulsation and the mode numbers provides a means to measure the zonal flow. Temperature fluctuations and the turbulent heat flux are localised between the corrugation structures. Temperature fluctuations are found to exhibit two scales, small fluctuations that are localised by the corrugation shear layers, and appear to bounce back and forth radially, and large fluctuations, also readily observed on the flux, which are associated to the disruption of the corrugations. The radial ballistic velocity of both avalanche events if of the order of 0.5ρ∗c0 where ρ∗ = ρ0/a, a being the tokamak minor radius and ρ0 being the characteristic Larmor radius, ρ0 = c0/Ω0. c0 is the reference ion thermal velocity and Ω0 = qiB0/mi the reference

  9. Simulation of plasma-surface interactions in a fusion reactor by means of QSPA plasma streams: recent results and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garkusha, I. E.; Aksenov, N. N.; Byrka, O. V.; Makhlaj, V. A.; Herashchenko, S. S.; Malykhin, S. V.; Petrov, Yu V.; Staltsov, V. V.; Surovitskiy, S. V.; Wirtz, M.; Linke, J.; Sadowski, M. J.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.

    2016-09-01

    This paper is devoted to plasma-surface interaction issues at high heat-loads which are typical for fusion reactors. For the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which is now under construction, the knowledge of erosion processes and the behaviour of various constructional materials under extreme conditions is a very critical issue, which will determine a successful realization of the project. The most important plasma-surface interaction (PSI) effects in 3D geometry have been studied using a QSPA Kh-50 powerful quasi-stationary plasma accelerator. Mechanisms of the droplet and dust generation have been investigated in detail. It was found that the droplets emission from castellated surfaces has a threshold character and a cyclic nature. It begins only after a certain number of the irradiating plasma pulses when molten and shifted material is accumulated at the edges of the castellated structure. This new erosion mechanism, connected with the edge effects, results in an increase in the size of the emitted droplets (as compared with those emitted from a flat surface). This mechanism can even induce the ejection of sub-mm particles. A concept of a new-generation QSPA facility, the current status of this device maintenance, and prospects for further experiments are also presented.

  10. Repetitive tabletop plasma focus to produce a tunable damage factor on materials for fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Pavez, Cristian; Inestrosa-Izurieta, Maria Jose; Moreno, Jose; Davis, Sergio; Bora, Biswajit; Avaria, Gonzalo; Jain, Jalaj; Altamirano, Luis; Panizo, Miguel; Gonzalez, Raquel; Rivera, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Future thermonuclear reactors, both magnetic and inertial confinement approaches, need materials capable of withstanding the extreme radiation and heat loads expected from high repetition rate plasma. A damage factor (F = qτ1/2) in the order of 104 (W/cm2) s1/2 is expected. The axial plasma dynamics after the pinch in a tabletop plasma focus of hundred joules, PF-400J, was characterized by means of pulsed optical refractive diagnostics. The energy, interaction time and power flux of the plasma burst interacting with targets was obtained. Results show a high dependence of the damage factor with the distance from the anode top where the sample is located. A tunable damage factor in the range 10- 105(W/cm2) s1/2 can be obtained. At present the PF-400J operating at 0.077 Hz is being used to study the effects of fusion-relevant pulses on material target, including nanostructured materials. A new tabletop device to be operated up to 1Hz including tunable damage factor has been designed and is being constructed, thus thousand cumulative shots on materials could be obtained in few minutes. The scaling of the damage factor for plasma foci operating at different energies is discussed. Supported by CONICYT: PIA ACT-1115, PAI 79130026.

  11. Secondary Nuclear Reactions in Magneto-Inertial Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    The goal of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) is to relax the extreme pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion by magnetizing the fuel. Understanding the level of magnetization at stagnation is critical for charting the performance of any MIF concept. We show here that the secondary nuclear reactions in magnetized deuterium plasma can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product (BR), the critical confinement parameter for MIF. The secondary neutron yields and spectra are examined and shown to be extremely sensitive to BR. In particular, embedded magnetic fields are shown to affect profoundly the isotropy of the secondary neutron spectra. Detailed modeling of these spectra along with the ratio of overall secondary to primary neutron yields is used to form the basis of a diagnostic technique used to infer BR at stagnation. Effects of gradients in density, temperature and magnetic field strength are examined, as well as other possible non-uniform fuel configurations. Computational results employing a fully kinetic treatment of charged reaction product transport and Monte Carlo treatment of secondary reactions are compared to results from recent experiments at Sandia National Laboratories' Z machine testing the MAGnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept. The technique reveals that the charged reaction products were highly magnetized in these experiments. Implications for eventual ignition-relevant experiments with deuterium-tritium fuel are discussed. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Stabilization effect of Weibel modes in relativistic laser fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belghit, Slimen; Sid, Abdelaziz

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the Weibel instability (WI) due to inverse bremsstrahlung (IB) absorption in a laser fusion plasma has been investigated. The stabilization effect due to the coupling of the self-generated magnetic field by WI with the laser wave field is explicitly shown. In this study, the relativistic effects are taken into account. Here, the basic equation is the relativistic Fokker-Planck (F-P) equation. The main obtained result is that the coupling of self-generated magnetic field with the laser wave causes a stabilizing effect of excited Weibel modes. We found a decrease in the spectral range of Weibel unstable modes. This decreasing is accompanied by a reduction of two orders in the growth rate of instable Weibel modes or even stabilization of these modes. It has been shown that the previous analysis of the Weibel instability due to IB has overestimated the values of the generated magnetic fields. Therefore, the generation of magnetic fields by the WI due to IB should not affect the experiences of an inertial confinement fusion.

  13. Induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifiers for plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong, R. A.

    1988-08-01

    We describe an induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifier that is presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is designed to produce up to 2 MW of average power at a frequency of 250 GHz for plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment. In addition, we shall describe a FEL amplifier design for plasma heating of advanced tokamak fusion devices. This system is designed to produce average power levels of about 10 MW at frequencies ranging from 280 to 560 GHz.

  14. Induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifiers for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, R.A.

    1988-08-22

    We describe an induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifier that is presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is designed to produce up to 2 MW of average power at a frequency of 250 GHz for plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment. In addition, we shall describe a FEL amplifier design for plasma heating of advanced tokamak fusion devices. This system is designed to produce average power levels of about 10 MW at frequencies ranging form 280 to 560 GHz. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Atomic data of tungsten for current and future uses in fusion and plasma science

    SciTech Connect

    Clementson, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Lennartsson, T.

    2013-04-19

    Atomic physics has played an important role throughout the history of experimental plasma physics. For example, accurate knowledge of atomic properties has been crucial for understanding the plasma energy balance and for diagnostic development. With the shift in magnetic fusion research toward high-temperature burning plasmas like those expected to be produced in the ITER tokamak, the atomic physics of tungsten has become important. Tungsten will be a constituent of ITER plasmas because of its use as a plasma-facing material able to withstand high heat loads with lower tritium retention than other possible materials. Already, ITER diagnostics are being developed based on using tungsten radiation. In particular, the ITER Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (CIXS), which is designed to measure the core ion temperature and bulk plasma motion, is being based on the x-ray emission of neonlike tungsten ions (W{sup 64+}). In addition, tungsten emission will at ITER be measured by extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and optical spectrometers to determine its concentration in the plasma and to assess power loss and tungsten sputtering rates. On present-day tokamaks tungsten measurements are therefore being performed in preparation of ITER. Tungsten has very complex spectra and most are still unknown. The WOLFRAM project at Livermore aims to produce data for tungsten in various spectral bands: Lshell x-ray emission for CIXS development, soft x-ray and EUV M- and N-shell tungsten emission for understanding the edge radiation from ITER plasmas as well as from contemporary tokamaks, and O-shell emission for developing spectral diagnostics of the ITER divertor.

  16. Laser propagation measurements in long-scale-length underdense plasmas relevant to magnetized liner inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Wei, M. S.; Nagayama, T.; Campbell, E. M.; Blue, B. E.; Heeter, R. F.; Koning, J. M.; Peterson, K. J.; Schmitt, A.

    2016-11-02

    Here, we report experimental results and simulations showing efficient laser energy coupling into plasmas at conditions relevant to the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept. In MagLIF, to limit convergence and increase the hydrodynamic stability of the implosion, the fuel must be efficiently preheated. To determine the efficiency and physics of preheating by a laser, an Ar plasma with n e / n c r i t ~ 0.04 is irradiated by a multi-ns, multi-kJ, 0.35-μm, phase-plate-smoothed laser at spot-averaged intensities ranging from 1.0 × 10 14 to 2.5 × 10 14 W / c m 2 and pulse widths from 2 to 10 ns. Time-resolved x-ray images of the laser-heated plasma are compared to two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that show agreement with the propagating emission front, a comparison that constrains laser energy deposition to the plasma. The experiments show that long-pulse, modest-intensity ( I = 1.5 × 10 14 W / c m 2 ) beams can efficiently couple energy ( ~ 82 % of the incident energy) to MagLIF-relevant long-length (9.5 mm) underdense plasmas. The heating efficiency we demonstrate is significantly higher than it was thought to have been achieved in early integrated MagLIF experiments [A. B. Sefkow et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 072711 (2014)].

  17. Disassembly time of deuterium-cluster-fusion plasma irradiated by an intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.

    2015-07-02

    Energetic deuterium ions from large deuterium clusters (>10 nm diameter) irradiated by an intense laser pulse (>10¹⁶ W/cm²) produce DD fusion neutrons for a time interval determined by the geometry of the resulting fusion plasma. We show an analytical solution of this time interval, the plasma disassembly time, for deuterium plasmas that are cylindrical in shape. Assuming a symmetrically expanding deuterium plasma, we calculate the expected fusion neutron yield and compare with an independent calculation of the yield using the concept of a finite confinement time at a fixed plasma density. The calculated neutron yields agree quantitatively with the available experimental data. Our one-dimensional simulations indicate that one could expect a tenfold increase in total neutron yield by magnetically confining a 10 - keV deuterium fusion plasma for 10 ns.

  18. Disassembly time of deuterium-cluster-fusion plasma irradiated by an intense laser pulse

    DOE PAGES

    Bang, W.

    2015-07-02

    Energetic deuterium ions from large deuterium clusters (>10 nm diameter) irradiated by an intense laser pulse (>10¹⁶ W/cm²) produce DD fusion neutrons for a time interval determined by the geometry of the resulting fusion plasma. We show an analytical solution of this time interval, the plasma disassembly time, for deuterium plasmas that are cylindrical in shape. Assuming a symmetrically expanding deuterium plasma, we calculate the expected fusion neutron yield and compare with an independent calculation of the yield using the concept of a finite confinement time at a fixed plasma density. The calculated neutron yields agree quantitatively with the availablemore » experimental data. Our one-dimensional simulations indicate that one could expect a tenfold increase in total neutron yield by magnetically confining a 10 - keV deuterium fusion plasma for 10 ns.« less

  19. Atomic, Molecular and Plasma-Surface Interaction Data for Fusion Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. E. H.; Humbert, D.

    2009-05-02

    Research on fusion energy requires a large amount of data in order to predict the behaviour of complex plasma devices. As plasma systems are updated and new machines are designed, data are required for a variety of different materials over a wide range of plasma conditions. The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency works to coordinate multinational efforts to establish databases for this fusion research effort.

  20. Scattering of radio frequency waves by turbulence in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Abhay K.

    2016-10-01

    In tokamak fusion plasmas, coherent fluctuations in the form of blobs or filaments and incoherent fluctuations due to turbulence are routinely observed in the scrape-off layer. Radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic waves, excited by antenna structures placed near the wall of a tokamak, have to propagate through the scrape-off layer before reaching the core of the plasma. While the effect of fluctuations on RF waves has not been quantified experimentally, there are telltale signs, arising from differences between results from simulations and from experiments, that fluctuations can modify the spectrum of RF waves. Any effect on RF waves in the scrape-off layer can have important experimental consequences. For example, electron cyclotron waves are expected to stabilize the deleterious neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) in ITER. Spectral and polarization changes due to scattering will modify the spatial location and profile of the current driven by the RF waves, thereby affecting the control of NTMs. Pioneering theoretical studies and complementary computer simulations have been pursued to elucidate the impact of fluctuations on RF waves. From the full complement of Maxwell's equations for cold, magnetized plasmas, it is shown that the Poynting flux in the wake of filaments develops spatial structure due to diffraction and shadowing. The uniformity of power flow into the plasma is affected by side-scattering, modifications to the wave spectrum, and coupling to plasma waves other than the incident RF wave. The Snell's law and the Fresnel equations have been reformulated within the context of magnetized plasmas. They are distinctly different from their counterparts in scalar dielectric media, and reveal new and important physical insight into the scattering of RF waves. The Snell's law and Fresnel equations are the basis for the Kirchhoff approximation necessary to determine properties of the scattered waves. Furthermore, this theory is also relevant for studying back

  1. RF PLASMA SOURCE FOR A HEAVY ION FUSION INJECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G A; Grote, D P; Halaxi, E; Kwan, J W; Waldron, W L

    2004-06-25

    We are developing high-current ion sources for Heavy Ion Fusion applications. Our proposed RF plasma source starts with an array of high current density mini-beamlets (of a few mA each at {approx}100 mA/cm{sup 2}) that are kept separated from each other within a set of acceleration grids. After they have gained sufficient kinetic energy (>1.2 MeV), the mini-beamlets are allowed to merge together to form a high current beam (about 0.5 A) with low emittance. Simulations have been done to maximize the beam brightness within the physical constraints of the source. We have performed a series of experiments on an RF plasma source. A 80-kV 20-{micro}s source has produced up to 5 mA of Ar{sup +} in a single beamlet and we measured the emittance of a beamlet, its energy spread, and the fraction of ions in higher charge states. We have also tested a 50-kV 61-hole multi-beamlet array. Two upcoming experiments are being prepared: the first experiment will test full-gradient extraction and transport of 61 beamlets though the first four electrodes, and the second experiment will converge 119 beamlets into an ESQ channel at one-quarter scaled voltage of a 1.6 MV HIF injector.

  2. Transmission Grating Imaging Spectrometer for Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagojevic, B.; Stutman, D.; Vero, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H. W.

    2001-10-01

    The Johns Hopkins Plasma Spectroscopy Group is developing a transmission grating (TG) based imaging spectrometer for the soft and ultrasoft X-ray (USXR) ranges. The spectrometer will be integrated into a multi-purpose impurity diagnostic package for Magnetically Confined Fusion experiments, which will provide time and space resolved information about radiation losses, Zeff profiles and particle transport. The package will also include 2-D filtered USXR diode arrays and atomic physics and impurity transport computational capability. The spectrometer has a very simple layout, consisting of two collimating and space resolving slits, a TG and a 2-D imaging detector. As detector we are developing phosphor (P45) coated fiber optic plates with CCD and intensified CCD image readout. The performance of a test 5000 l/mm, 2:1 bar to open area ratio TG has been evaluated in the laboratory using a K-alpha Manson source and the emission from a Penning Discharge. The incident and diffracted photon flux was recorded in the 10-300 Å range with a gas flow proportional counter. The measurements show that spectral resolution and efficiency agree well with the predicted values. A device optimized for spectral resolution and higher order suppression will be tested on the CDX-U and NSTX tokamak at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Work supported by DoE grant No. DE-FG02-86ER52314ATDoE

  3. Spectra of heliumlike krypton from tokamak fusion test reactor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M.; Hsuan, H.; Bush, C.; Cohen, S.; Cummings, C.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Schivell, J.; Zarnstorff, M.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Osterheld, A.; Smith, A.; Fraenkel, B.

    1993-04-01

    Krypton has been injected into ohmically-heated TFTR plasmas with peak electron temperatures of 6 key to study the effects of krypton on the plasma performance and to investigate the emitted krypton line radiation, which is of interest for future-generation tokamaks such as ITER, both as a diagnostic of the central ion temperature and for the control of energy release from the plasma by radiative cooling. The emitted radiation was monitored with a bolometer array, an X-ray pulse height analysis system, and a high-resolution Johann-type crystal spectrometer; and it was found to depend very sensitively on the electron temperature profile. Satellite spectra of heliumlike krypton, KrXXXV, near 0.95 {Angstrom} including lithiumlike, berylliumlike and boronlike features were recorded in second order Bragg reflection. Radiative cooling and reduced particle recycling at the plasma edge region were observed as a result of the krypton injection for all investigated discharges. The observations are in reasonable agreement with modeling calculations of the krypton ion charge state distribution including radial transport.

  4. Spectra of heliumlike krypton from tokamak fusion test reactor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M.; Hsuan, H.; Bush, C.; Cohen, S.; Cummings, C.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Schivell, J.; Zarnstorff, M. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Beiersdorfer, P.; Osterheld, A. ); Smith, A. ); Fraenkel, B. )

    1993-04-01

    Krypton has been injected into ohmically-heated TFTR plasmas with peak electron temperatures of 6 key to study the effects of krypton on the plasma performance and to investigate the emitted krypton line radiation, which is of interest for future-generation tokamaks such as ITER, both as a diagnostic of the central ion temperature and for the control of energy release from the plasma by radiative cooling. The emitted radiation was monitored with a bolometer array, an X-ray pulse height analysis system, and a high-resolution Johann-type crystal spectrometer; and it was found to depend very sensitively on the electron temperature profile. Satellite spectra of heliumlike krypton, KrXXXV, near 0.95 [Angstrom] including lithiumlike, berylliumlike and boronlike features were recorded in second order Bragg reflection. Radiative cooling and reduced particle recycling at the plasma edge region were observed as a result of the krypton injection for all investigated discharges. The observations are in reasonable agreement with modeling calculations of the krypton ion charge state distribution including radial transport.

  5. On the structure of plasma liners for plasma jet induced magnetoinertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyoungkeun; Zhang, Lina; Samulyak, Roman; Parks, Paul

    2013-02-15

    The internal structure and self-collapse properties of plasma liners, formed by the merger of argon plasma jets, have been studied via 3-dimensional numerical simulations using the FronTier code. We have shown that the jets merger process is accomplished through a cascade of oblique shock waves that heat the liner and reduce its Mach number. Oblique shock waves and the adiabatic compression heating have led to the 10 times reduction of the self-collapse pressure of a 3-dimensional argon liner compared to a spherically symmetric liner with the same pressure and density profiles at the merging radius. We have also observed a factor of 10 variations of pressure and density in the leading edge of the liner along spherical surfaces close to the interaction with potential plasma targets. Such a non-uniformity of imploding plasma liners presents problems for the stability of targets during compression.

  6. Modeling of transient dust events in fusion edge plasmas with DUSTT-UEDGE code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that dust can be produced in fusion devices due to various processes involving structural damage of plasma exposed materials. Recent computational and experimental studies have demonstrated that dust production and associated with it plasma contamination can present serious challenges in achieving sustained fusion reaction in future fusion devices, such as ITER. To analyze the impact, which dust can have on performance of fusion plasmas, modeling of coupled dust and plasma transport with DUSTT-UEDGE code is used by the authors. In past, only steady-state computational studies, presuming continuous source of dust influx, were performed due to iterative nature of DUSTT-UEDGE code coupling. However, experimental observations demonstrate that intermittent injection of large quantities of dust, often associated with transient plasma events, may severely impact fusion plasma conditions and even lead to discharge termination. In this work we report on progress in coupling of DUSTT-UEDGE codes in time-dependent regime, which allows modeling of transient dust-plasma transport processes. The methodology and details of the time-dependent code coupling, as well as examples of simulations of transient dust-plasma transport phenomena will be presented. These include time-dependent modeling of impact of short out-bursts of different quantities of tungsten dust in ITER divertor on the edge plasma parameters. The plasma response to the out-bursts with various duration, location, and ejected dust sizes will be analyzed.

  7. Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) - parameters and potentials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Masashi Shimada; Robert D. Kolasinski; J. Phillip Sharpe; Rion A. Causey

    2011-08-01

    The Tritium plasma experiment (TPE) is a unique facility devoted to experiments on the behavior of deuterium/tritium in toxic (e.g. beryllium) and radioactive materials for fusion plasma-wall interaction (PWI) studies. A Langmuir probe was added to the system to characterize the plasma conditions in TPE. With this new diagnostic, we found the achievable electron temperature ranged from 5.0 to 10.0 eV, the electron density varied from 5.0 x 10{sup 16} to 2.5 x 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}, and the ion flux density varied between 5.0 x 10{sup 20} to 2.5 x 10{sup 22} m{sup -2}s{sup -1} along the centerline of the plasma. A comparison of these plasma parameters with the conditions expected for the plasma facing components (PFCs) in ITER shows that TPE is capable of achieving most (approximately 800 m{sup 2} of 850 m{sup 2} total PFCs area) of the expected ion flux density and electron density conditions.

  8. Tritium plasma experiment: Parameters and potentials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Masashi; Sharpe, J. Phillip; Kolasinski, Robert D.; Causey, Rion A.

    2011-08-15

    The tritium plasma experiment (TPE) is a unique facility devoted to experiments on the behavior of deuterium/tritium in toxic (e.g., beryllium) and radioactive materials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies. A Langmuir probe was added to the system to characterize the plasma conditions in TPE. With this new diagnostic, we found the achievable electron temperature ranged from 5.0 to 10.0 eV, the electron density varied from 5.0 x 10{sup 16} to 2.5 x 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}, and the ion flux density varied between 5.0 x 10{sup 20} to 2.5 x 10{sup 22} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} along the centerline of the plasma. A comparison of these plasma parameters with the conditions expected for the plasma facing components (PFCs) in ITER shows that TPE is capable of achieving most ({approx}800 m{sup 2} of 850 m{sup 2} total PFCs area) of the expected ion flux density and electron density conditions.

  9. Integrated Prediction and Mitigation Methods of Materials Damage and Lifetime Assessment during Plasma Operation and Various Instabilities in Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, Ahmed

    2015-03-31

    This report describes implementation of comprehensive and integrated models to evaluate plasma material interactions during normal and abnormal plasma operations. The models in full3D simulations represent state-of-the art worldwide development with numerous benchmarking of various tokamak devices and plasma simulators. In addition, significant number of experimental work has been performed in our center for materials under extreme environment (CMUXE) at Purdue to benchmark the effect of intense particle and heat fluxes on plasma-facing components. This represents one-year worth of work and resulted in more than 23 Journal Publications and numerous conferences presentations. The funding has helped several students to obtain their M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees and many of them are now faculty members in US and around the world teaching and conducting fusion research. Our work has also been recognized through many awards.

  10. Hot ion plasma heating experiments in SUMMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.; Lauver, M. R.; Patch, R. W.; Posta, S. J.; Snyder, A.; Englert, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Initial results are presented for the hot-ion plasma heating experiments conducted in the new SUMMA (superconducting magnetic mirror apparatus) at NASA Lewis Research Center. A discharge is formed by applying a radially inward dc electric field between cylindrical anodes and hallow cathodes located at the peak of the mirrors. Data were obtained at midplane magnetic field strengths from 1.0 to 3.5 tesla. Charge-exchange neutral particle energy analyzer data were reduced to ion temperatures using a plasma model that included a Maxwellian energy distribution superimposed on an azimuthal drift, finite ion orbits, and radial variations in density and electric field. The best ion temperatures in a helium plasma were 5 keV and in hydrogen the H2(+) and H(+) ions were 1.2 keV and 1 keV respectively. Optical spectroscopy line broadening measurements yielded ion temperatures about 50 percent higher than the charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer results. Spectroscopically obtained electron temperature ranged from 3 to 30 eV. Ion temperature was found to scale roughly linearly with the ratio of power input-to-magnetic field strength, P/B.

  11. Computational modeling of magentically driven liner-on-plasma fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehey, P.T.; Faehl, R.J.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.

    1996-12-31

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is an approach to controlled fusion which potentially avoids the difficulties of the traditional magnetic and inertial confinement approaches. It appears possible to investigate the critical issues for MTF at low cost, relative to traditional fusion programs, utilizing pulsed power drivers much less expensive than ICF drivers, and plasma configurations much less expensive than those needed for full magnetic confinement. Computational and experimental research into MTF is proceeding at Los Alamos, VNIIEF, and other laboratories.

  12. Fast electron heating of dense plasma relevant to shock ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, T. E.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Pasley, J.

    2013-10-01

    With an intensity in the range of 1016 W/cm2, the ignitor pulse in shock-ignition inertial confinement fusion is well above the threshold of parametric instabilities. Simulations (e.g. Klimo et al. 2011 Phys. Plasmas 18, 082709) indicate that a significant amount of energy will be deposited in energetic electrons with energies <100 keV and it has been proposed that these may play a beneficial role in enhancing the ignitor shock. Simulations by Gus'kov et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 255004 (2012)) show that, under shock-ignition relevant conditions, a mono-energetic electron beam can drive strong shocks in a uniform plasma. We extend this study to the more realistic case of a Maxwellian energy distribution in the fast electron population. Having a distribution of electron mean-free-paths results in a more extended heating profile compared to a mono-energetic beam. However, we show it is still possible to launch strong shocks in this more realistic scenario and achieve equivalent pressures. The peak pressures achieved compare well with analytic scalings. We thank AWE for their financial assistance in support of the doctoral research of T. E. F.

  13. Understanding L–H transition in tokamak fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guosheng, XU; Xingquan, WU

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews the current state of understanding of the L–H transition phenomenon in tokamak plasmas with a focus on two central issues: (a) the mechanism for turbulence quick suppression at the L–H transition; (b) the mechanism for subsequent generation of sheared flow. We briefly review recent advances in the understanding of the fast suppression of edge turbulence across the L–H transition. We uncover a comprehensive physical picture of the L–H transition by piecing together a number of recent experimental observations and insights obtained from 1D and 2D simulation models. Different roles played by diamagnetic mean flow, neoclassical-driven mean flow, turbulence-driven mean flow, and turbulence-driven zonal flows are discussed and clarified. It is found that the L–H transition occurs spontaneously mediated by a shift in the radial wavenumber spectrum of edge turbulence, which provides a critical evidence for the theory of turbulence quench by the flow shear. Remaining questions and some key directions for future investigations are proposed. This work was supported by National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China under Contracts No. 2015GB101000, No. 2013GB106000, and No. 2013GB107000 and National Natural Science Foundation of China under Contracts No. 11575235 and No. 11422546.

  14. Calculation of atomic structures and radiative properties of fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrah, Walid; Pain, Jean-Christophe; Benredjem, Djamel

    2017-03-01

    The opacity is an important issue in the knowledge of the radiative properties of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and astrophysical plasmas. In this work we present the opacity of the mixture C+Si, composing the ablator of some ICF capsules. We have used Cowan's code to calculate the atomic structure of carbon and silicon. We also have developed a collisional-radiative model in order to obtain the opacity of the mixture. Line broadening, line shift and ionization potential depression are taken into account in the opacity profile. Comparisons to other calculations are carried out. NLTE and LTE opacity calculations show discrepancies mainly in the range 1900-2000 eV for the bound-bound contribution to the total opacity and in the range 50-350 eV for the bound-free contribution. We have also accounted for photoexcitation and photoionization processes. The corresponding rates are obtained by modeling the Hohlraum radiation by a Planckian distribution at a radiative temperature of 300 eV.

  15. The Fifth Workshop on Stochasticity in Fusion Plasmas (Jülich, Germany, 11-14 April 2011) The Fifth Workshop on Stochasticity in Fusion Plasmas (Jülich, Germany, 11-14 April 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Oliver

    2012-05-01

    'Fusion meets chaotic dynamics'—this was the headline for the Fifth International Workshop on Stochasticity in Fusion Plasmas (SFP) held in Jülich, Germany from 11-14 April 2011. This headline reflects a landmark as the generic topic of chaotic dynamical systems has emerged a prominent application by controlling the plasma stability and transport. The workshop facilitated once more gathering of expertise from basic research in the field of non-linear dynamic systems and experts on plasma stability and transport from magnetically confined high temperature plasmas. Resonant magnetic perturbations are used in most large-scale fusion experiments for control of the cyclic high heat flux pulses caused by edge-localized modes in high performance plasmas. This is one of the most prominent applications of non-linear perturbation schemes in modern plasma physics. It was experimentally shown that the edge transport in toroidal magnetic confinement systems as tokamaks and stellarators can be improved towards elimination of transient events, reduction of steady state heat flux densities and reduction of impurity inflow with improvement of the particle confinement. These results sketch the versatile application space of small-scale perturbations for optimization of the rigid magnetic cages used in magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas. At the same time, these experimental observations represent a challenge to theory. The understanding of the experimental observations for extrapolation to future devices is a root requirement in this field of research. Two aspects were dominant in the workshop. First, the question of how the high temperature plasma as highly conductive media with potentially high rotation and plasma drift speeds reacts to a stationary external perturbation was central in all discussions on structural formation, related transport effects and interaction to plasma stability. Second, the topic was highlighted in how far the perturbed system and the final plasma

  16. Quantifying Fusion Born Ion Populations in Magnetically Confined Plasmas using Ion Cyclotron Emission

    DOE PAGES

    Carbajal, L.; Warwick Univ., Coventry; Dendy, R. O.; ...

    2017-03-07

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) offers unique promise as a diagnostic of the fusion born alpha-particle population in magnetically confined plasmas. Pioneering observations from JET and TFTR found that ICE intensity P ICE scales approximately linearly with the measured neutron flux from fusion reactions, and with the inferred concentration, n /n i , of fusion-born alpha-particles confined within the plasma. We present fully nonlinear self-consistent kinetic simulations that reproduce this scaling for the first time. This resolves a longstanding question in the physics of fusion alpha particle confinement and stability in MCF plasmas. It confirms the MCI as the likely emissionmore » mechanism and greatly strengthens the basis for diagnostic exploitation of ICE in future burning plasmas.« less

  17. A Tutorial on Basic Principles of Microwave Reflectometry Applied to Fluctuation Measurements in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nazikian, R.; Kramer, G.J.; Valeo, E.

    2001-02-16

    Microwave reflectometry is now routinely used for probing the structure of magnetohydrodynamic and turbulent fluctuations in fusion plasmas. Conditions specific to the core of tokamak plasmas, such as small amplitude of density irregularities and the uniformity of the background plasma, have enabled progress in the quantitative interpretation of reflectometer signals. In particular, the extent of applicability of the 1-D [one-dimensional] geometric optics description of the reflected field is investigated by direct comparison to 1-D full wave analysis. Significant advances in laboratory experiments are discussed which are paving the way towards a thorough understanding of this important measurement technique. Data is presented from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [R. Hawryluk, Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion 33 (1991) 1509] identifying the validity of the geometric optics description of the scattered field and demonstrating the feasibility of imaging turbulent fluctuations in fusion scale devices.

  18. Plasma heating for containerless and microgravity materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Emily W. (Inventor); Man, Kin F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method for plasma heating of levitated samples to be used in containerless microgravity processing is disclosed. A sample is levitated by electrostatic, electromagnetic, aerodynamic, or acoustic systems, as is appropriate for the physical properties of the particular sample. The sample is heated by a plasma torch at atmospheric pressure. A ground plate is provided to help direct the plasma towards the sample. In addition, Helmholtz coils are provided to produce a magnetic field that can be used to spiral the plasma around the sample. The plasma heating system is oriented such that it does not interfere with the levitation system.

  19. Controlled Fusion with Hot-ion Mode in a Degenerate Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    S. Son and N.J. Fisch

    2005-12-01

    n a Fermi-degenerate plasma, the rate of electron physical processes is much reduced from the classical prediction, possibly enabling new regimes for controlled nuclear fusion, including the hot-ion mode, a regime in which the ion temperature exceeds the electron temperature. Previous calculations of these processes in dense plasmas are now corrected for partial degeneracy and relativistic effects, leading to an expanded regime of self-sustained fusion.

  20. Controlling the Expansion of Laser-Fusion Plasma to Minimize Impact Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.

    1999-03-18

    I propose to analytically model the rapid, nonequilibrium expansion of laser-fusion plasma from an initial diameter of 1 mm to a final diameter of 10 m. The aim is to devise a counterforce that minimizes the impact damage on optics by laser-plasma debris. This flow model is the basis of an idea for a dynamic target that efficiently converts laser energy to x-rays while minimizing the total mass propelled as debris. Also, the flow model is the basis of an idea to magnetically deflect material away from the optic ports in the vacuum chamber wall. The model combines results for supersonic one-dimensional gas flow of cylindrical-hemispherical symmetry, with a transition from thermal to nonequilibrium (''frozen'') plasma flow, which is set differently along each characteristic line (the ''Bray criterion'' as a Riemann invariant). The model shows how density, pressure, velocity, ionization fraction, electron temperature, and electrical conductivity vary over space and time, given an impulsively-heated source mass. The model is analytical, and examples are calculated on a desktop computer. This ease-of-use makes it possible to iterate quickly when refining ideas, such as a dynamic metal-vapor target that propels minimal debris, and a magnetohydrodynamic generator as a brake on the flow speed directed at the optic ports. The work involved here is that of an individual refining his analysis.

  1. PREFACE: 30th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, R.; Lebedev, S.

    2003-12-01

    The 30th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics took place in St Petersburg, Russian Federation, on 7th--11th July 2003. It was jointly organized by the Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, the St Petersburg State Polytechnical University and Technical University Applied Physics Ltd, on behalf of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society (EPS). The members of the local organizing committee were drawn from these institutions: B Kuteev, Chair, Polytechnical University S Lebedev, Vice-Chair, Ioffe Institute A Lebedev, Scientific Secretary, Ioffe Institute V Bakharev, TUAP Ltd V Grigor'yants, Ioffe Institute V Sergeev, Polytechnical University N Zhubr, Ioffe Institute Over the years, the annual conference of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society has widened its scope. Contributions to the present conference covered widely diversified fields of plasma physics, ranging from magnetic and inertial fusion to low temperature plasmas. Plasma sizes under investigation ranged from tiny to astronomical. The topics covered during the conference were distributed over the following categories: tokamaks, stellarators, high intensity laser produced plasmas and inertial confinement, alternative magnetic confinement, plasma edge physics, plasma heating and current drive, diagnostics, basic plasma physics, astrophysical and geophysical plasmas and low temperature plasmas. The scientific programme and paper selection were the responsibility of the Programme Committee appointed by the Board of the EPS Plasma Physics Division. The committee was composed of: R Koch, Chairman, ERM/KMS Brussels, Belgium E Ascasibar, CIEMAT Madrid, Spain S Atzeni, Università di Roma, Italy G Bonhomme, LPMI Nancy, France C Chiuderi, Università di Firenze, Italy B Kuteev, St Petersburg State Polytechnical,University, Russian Federation M Mauel, Contact person APS-DPP, Columbia University New York, USA R A Pitts, EPFL/CRPP Lausanne, Switzerland R Salomaa

  2. Dust dynamics and diagnostic applications in quasi-neutral plasmas and magnetic fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhehui; Ticos, Catalin M.; Si, Jiahe; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Lapenta, Gianni; Wurden, Glen

    2007-11-01

    Little is known about dust dynamics in highly ionized quasi-neutral plasmas with ca. 1.0 e+20 per cubic meter density and ion temperature at a few eV and above, including in magnetic fusion. For example, dust motion in fusion, better known as UFO's, has been observed since 1980's but not explained. Solid understanding of dust dynamics is also important to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) because of concerns about safety and dust contamination of fusion core. Compared with well studied strongly-coupled dusty plasma regime, new physics may arise in the higher density quasi-neutral plasma regime because of at least four orders of magnitude higher density and two orders of magnitude hotter ion temperature. Our recent laboratory experiments showed that plasma-flow drag force dominates over other forces in a quasi-neutral flowing plasma. In contrast, delicate balance among different forces in dusty plasma has led to many unique phenomena, in particular, the formation of dust crystal. Based on our experiments, we argue that 1) dust crystal will not form in the highly ionized plasmas with flows; 2) the UFO's are moving dust dragged by plasma flows; 3) dust can be used to measure plasma flow. Two diagnostic applications using dust for laboratory quasi-neutral plasmas and magnetic fusion will also be presented.

  3. Plasma networking in magnetically confined plasmas and diagnostics of nonlocal heat transport in tokamak filamentary plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, A. B.; Rantsev-Kartinov, V. A.

    1999-02-01

    The method of multilevel dynamical contrasting is applied to analyzing available data from tokamak plasmas. The results illustrate a possibility of extending the concept of the plasma percolating networks in dense Z pinches (and other inertially confined plasmas) to the case of magnetically confined plasmas. This extension suggests a necessity to append the conventional picture of the nonfilamentary plasma (which is nearly a fluid described by conventional magnetohydrodynamics) with a "network" component which is formed by the strongest long-living filaments of electric current and penetrate the "fluid" component. Signs of networking are found in visible light and soft x-ray images, and magnetic probing data. A diagnostic algorithm is formulated for identifying the role of plasma networking in observed phenomena of nonlocal (non-diffusive) heat transport in a tokamak.

  4. Fusion of Multi-Pinched Plasma Beams Converging with Spatial Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Feng; Zheng, Xianjun; Deng, Baiquan

    2015-07-01

    Fusion reactions can be achieved by using deuterium from sea water as the fuel. The amount of deuterium in one gallon of sea water contains energy equivalent to three hundred gallons of gasoline. Satisfactory conditions of plasma temperature and density necessary to initiate fusion have been achieved in various research facilities. However, the confinement time is not sufficient for ignition due to plasma instabilities. Here we show that fatal plasma instabilities could be suppressed by the ingenious arrangement of multi-pinched plasma beams converging symmetrically in space based on the minimization principle of plasma potential energy. Confirmation tests are proposed using tiny wires containing deuterium. If successful, the results could lead to a feasible approach to obtaining commercial fusion power from sea water, hence without the need to use expensive and radioactive tritium as the fuel. supported by the Fund for the Construction of Graduate Degree, China (No. 2014XWD-S0805)

  5. Effect of different tritium fractions on some plasma parameters in deuterium-tritium magnetic confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, S. M.; Mohsenpour, T.; Dashtban, N.

    2016-09-01

    Nearly all reactor projects have considered deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion. The cross section of D-T reaction is larger than those of other fusion reactions, thus it is considered to be a more favorable reaction. The mix of fuel can vary. In this work, a comparison between the effects of different mixture of D-T fuel on the plasma parameters is made. A time dependence calculation of the fusion process is performed using the zero-dimensional model based on a coupled set of particle and energy balance equations in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). The time evolution of plasma parameters is also analyzed numerically.

  6. Theoretical studies on plasma heating and confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    Three principal topics are covered in this final report: Stabilization of low frequency modes of an axisymmetric compact torus plasma confinement system, such as, spheromaks and FRC'S, by a population of large orbit axis encircling energetic ions. Employing an extension of the energy principle' which utilizes a Vlasov description for the energetic 'ion component, it has been demonstrated that short wavelength MHD type modes are stabilized while the long wavelength tilt and precessional modes are marginally stable. The deformation of the equilibrium configuration by the energetic ions results in the stabilization of the tilt mode for spheromaks. Formation of Ion Rings and their coalescence with spheromaks. A two dimensional electromagnetic PIC codes has been developed for the study of ion ring formation and its propagation, deformation and slowing down in a cold plasma. It has been shown that a ring moving at a speed less than the Alfven velocity can merge with a stationary spheromak. Anomalous transport from drift waves in a Tokomak. The Direct Interaction Approximation in used to obtain incremental transport coefficients for particles and heat for drift waves in a Tokomak. It is shown that the transport matrix does not obey Onsager's principle.

  7. Device for plasma confinement and heating by high currents and nonclassical plasma transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Coppi, B.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1973-12-11

    A toroidal plasma containment device having means for inducing high total plasma currents and current densities and at the same time emhanced plasma heating, strong magnetic confinement, high energy density containment, magnetic modulation, microwaveinduced heating, and diagnostic accessibility is described. (Official Gazette)

  8. Ion distribution in the hot spot of an inertial confinement fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xianzhu; Guo, Zehua; Berk, Herb

    2012-10-01

    Maximizing the fusion gain of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for inertial fusion energy (IFE) applications leads to the standard scenario of central hot spot ignition followed by propagating burn wave through the cold/dense assembled fuel. The fact that the hot spot is surrounded by cold but dense fuel layer introduces subtle plasma physics which requires a kinetic description. Here we perform Fokker-Planck calculations and kinetic PIC simulations for an ICF plasma initially in pressure balance but having large temperature gradient over a narrow transition layer. The loss of the fast ion tail from the hot spot, which is important for fusion reactivity, is quantified by Fokker-Planck models. The role of electron energy transport and the ambipolar electric field is investigated via kinetic simulations and the fluid moment models. The net effect on both hot spot ion temperature and the ion tail distribution, and hence the fusion reactivity, is elucidated.

  9. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.; Chan, A.A.; England, A.C.; Hendel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; Nieschmidt, E.; Roquemore, A.L.; Scott, S.D.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and /sup 3/He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n)/sup 3/He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the /sup 3/He(d,p)/sup 4/He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling.

  10. System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bers, Abraham

    1981-01-01

    A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave RF energy is injected into said plasma to estalish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected RF energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected RF energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range .DELTA.. The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width .DELTA. in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated inthe plasma.

  11. System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    1981-01-01

    A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave RF energy is injected into said plasma to establish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected RF energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected RF energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range .DELTA.. The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width .DELTA. in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated in the plasma.

  12. Suppression of Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in multiple-ion species inertial confinemen fusion Hohlraum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Neumayer, P

    2007-05-14

    A long-standing problem in the field of laser-plasma interactions is to successfully employ multiple-ion species plasmas to reduce stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraum conditions. Multiple-ion species increase significantly the linear Landau damping for acoustic waves. Consequently, recent hohlraum designs for indirect-drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility investigate wall liner material options so that the liner gain for parametric instabilities will be below threshold for the onset SBS. Although the effect of two-ion species plasmas on Landau damping has been directly observed with Thomson scattering, early experiments on SBS in these plasmas have suffered from competing non-linear effects or laser beam filamentation. In this study, a reduction of SBS scattering to below the percent level has been observed in hohlraums at Omega that emulate the plasma conditions in an indirect drive ICF experiments. These experiments have measured the laser-plasma interaction processes in ignition-relevant high-electron temperature regime demonstrating Landau damping as a controlling process for SBS. The hohlraums have been filled with various fractions of CO{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 8} varying the ratio of the light (H) to heavy (C and O) ion density from 0 to 2.6. They have been heated by 14.5 kJ of 351-nm light, thus increasing progressively Landau damping by an order of magnitude at constant electron density and temperature. A delayed 351-nm interaction beam, spatially smoothed to produce a 200-{micro}m laser spot at best focus, has propagated along the axis of the hohlraum. The backscattered light, both into the lens and outside, the transmitted light through the hohlraum plasma and the radiation temperature of the hohlraum has been measured. For ignition relevant laser intensities (3-9 10{sup 14} Wcm{sup -2}), we find that the SBS reflectivity scales as predicted with Landau damping from >30% to <1%. Simultaneously

  13. Refraction-Enhanced X-ray Radiography for Inertial Confinement Fusion and Laser-Produced Plasma Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Kozioziemski, B J; Izumi, N; Dewald, E L; Salmonson, J D; Hammel, B A

    2008-08-26

    We explore various laser-produced plasma and inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) applications of phase-contrast x-ray radiography, and we show how the main features of these enhancements can be considered from a geometrical optics perspective as refraction enhancements. This perspective simplifies the analysis, and often permits simple analytical formulae to be derived that predict the enhancements. We explore a raytrace approach to various material interface applications, and we explore a more general example of refractive bending of x-rays by an implosion plasma. We find that refraction-enhanced x-ray radiography of implosions may provide a means to quantify density differences across shock fronts as well as density variations caused by local heating due to high-Z dopants. We also point out that refractive bending by implosions plasmas can blur fine radiograph features, and can also provide misleading contrast information in area-backlit pinhole imaging experiments unless its effects are taken into consideration.

  14. MM-wave cyclotron auto-resonance maser for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccuzzi, S.; Ravera, G. L.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Dattoli, G.; Di Palma, E.; Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E.; Spassovsky, I.; Surrenti, V.; Mirizzi, F.

    2014-02-12

    Heating and Current Drive systems are of outstanding relevance in fusion plasmas, magnetically confined in tokamak devices, as they provide the tools to reach, sustain and control burning conditions. Heating systems based on the electron cyclotron resonance (ECRH) have been extensively exploited on past and present machines DEMO, and the future reactor will require high frequencies. Therefore, high power (≥1MW) RF sources with output frequency in the 200 - 300 GHz range would be necessary. A promising source is the so called Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser (CARM). Preliminary results of the conceptual design of a CARM device for plasma heating, carried out at ENEA-Frascati will be presented together with the planned R and D development.

  15. MM-wave cyclotron auto-resonance maser for plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccuzzi, S.; Dattoli, G.; Di Palma, E.; Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E.; Mirizzi, F.; Spassovsky, I.; Ravera, G. L.; Surrenti, V.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    Heating and Current Drive systems are of outstanding relevance in fusion plasmas, magnetically confined in tokamak devices, as they provide the tools to reach, sustain and control burning conditions. Heating systems based on the electron cyclotron resonance (ECRH) have been extensively exploited on past and present machines DEMO, and the future reactor will require high frequencies. Therefore, high power (≥1MW) RF sources with output frequency in the 200 - 300 GHz range would be necessary. A promising source is the so called Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser (CARM). Preliminary results of the conceptual design of a CARM device for plasma heating, carried out at ENEA-Frascati will be presented together with the planned R&D development.

  16. Ion cyclotron heating experiments in magnetosphere plasma device RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Mushiake, T.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2015-12-01

    The ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating with 3 MHz and ˜10 kW is being prepared in RT-1. The operation regime for electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating is surveyed as the target plasmas. ECRH with 8.2 GHz and ˜50 kW produces the plasmas with high energy electrons in the range of a few ten keV, but the ions still remain cold at a few ten eV. Ion heating is expected to access high ion beta state and to change the aspect of plasma confinement theoretically. The ICRF heating is applied to the target plasma as an auxiliary heating. The preliminary result of ICRF heating is reported.

  17. Ion cyclotron heating experiments in magnetosphere plasma device RT-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M. Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Mushiake, T.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2015-12-10

    The ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating with 3 MHz and ∼10 kW is being prepared in RT-1. The operation regime for electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating is surveyed as the target plasmas. ECRH with 8.2 GHz and ∼50 kW produces the plasmas with high energy electrons in the range of a few ten keV, but the ions still remain cold at a few ten eV. Ion heating is expected to access high ion beta state and to change the aspect of plasma confinement theoretically. The ICRF heating is applied to the target plasma as an auxiliary heating. The preliminary result of ICRF heating is reported.

  18. A new ion cyclotron range of frequency scenario for bulk ion heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas: How to utilize intrinsic impurities in our favour

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Ongena, J.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A.; Dumont, R.; Mantsinen, M.

    2015-08-15

    A fusion reactor requires plasma pre-heating before the rate of deuterium-tritium fusion reactions becomes significant. In ITER, radio frequency (RF) heating of {sup 3}He ions, additionally puffed into the plasma, is one of the main options considered for increasing bulk ion temperature during the ramp-up phase of the pulse. In this paper, we propose an alternative scenario for bulk ion heating with RF waves, which requires no extra {sup 3}He puff and profits from the presence of intrinsic Beryllium impurities in the plasma. The discussed method to heat Be impurities in D-T plasmas is shown to provide an even larger fraction of fuel ion heating.

  19. Predictions of Alpha Heating in ITER L-mode and H-mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny

    2011-01-06

    Predictions of alpha heating in L-mode and H-mode DT plasmas in ITER are generated using the PTRANSP code. The baseline toroidal field of 5.3 T, plasma current ramped to 15 MA and a flat electron density profile ramped to Greenwald fraction 0.85 are assumed. Various combinations of external heating by negative ion neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron resonance, and electron cyclotron resonance are assumed to start half-way up the density ramp. The time evolution of plasma temperatures and, for some cases, toroidal rotation are predicted assuming GLF23 and boundary parameters. Significant toroidal rotation and flow-shearing rates are predicted by GLF23 even in the L-mode phase with low boundary temperatures, and the alpha heating power is predicted to be significant if the power threshold for the transition to H-mode is higher than the planned total heating power. The alpha heating is predicted to be 8-76 MW in L-mode at full density. External heating mixes with higher beam injection power have higher alpha heating power. Alternatively if the toroidal rotation is predicted assuming that the ratio of the momentum to thermal ion energy conductivity is 0.5, the flow-shearing rate is predicted to have insignificant effects on the GLF23- predicted temperatures, and alpha heating is predicted to be 8-20 MW. In H-mode plasmas the alpha heating is predicted to depend sensitively on the assumed pedestal temperatures. Cases with fusion gain greater than 10 are predicted to have alpha heating greater than 80 MW.

  20. ICRF heating and transport of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bush, C.E.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes results of the first experiments utilizing high-power ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) to heat deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in reactor-relevant regimes on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Results from these experiments have demonstrated efficient core, second harmonic, tritium heating of D-T supershot plasmas with tritium concentrations ranging from 6%--40%. Significant direct ion heating on the order of 60% of the input radio frequency (rf) power has been observed. The measured deposition profiles are in good agreement with two-dimensional modeling code predictions. Confinement in an rf-heated supershot is at least similar to that without rf, and possibly better in the electron channel. Efficient electron heating via mode conversion of fast waves to ion Bernstein waves (IBW) has been demonstrated in ohmic, deuterium-deuterium and DT-neutral beam injection plasmas with high concentrations of minority {sup 3}He (n{sub {sup 3}He}/n{sub e} > 10%). By changing the {sup 3}He concentration or the toroidal field strength, the location of the mode-conversion radius was varied. The power deposition profile measured with rf power modulation showed that up to 70% of the power can be deposited on electrons at an off-axis position. Preliminary results with up to 4 MW coupled into the plasma by 90-degree phased antennas showed directional propagation of the mode-converted IBW. Heat wave propagation showed no strong inward thermal pinch in off-axis heating of an ohmically-heated (OH) target plasma in TFIR.

  1. Radio Frequency Field Calculations for Plasma Heating Simulations in VASIMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilin, A. V.; Díaz, F. R. Chang; Squire, J. P.; Carter, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    (VASIMR)1 is plasma heating by ion-cyclotron RF heating (ICRF). Mathematical simulation helps to design an ICRF antenna, i.e. make maximal absorption of RF power into the plasma in the resonance area. Another goal of a particle simulation is design of a magnetic nozzle and optimize the performance of VASIMR2. field in the plasma, 2) ion density and velocity, 3) ion-cyclotron radio-frequency electromagnetic field. The assumptions of quasineutral and collisionless plasma are based on the range of operating VASIMR parameters. Carlo simulations for systems of million of particles in a reasonable time and without the need for a powerful supercomputer. The particle to grid weighting method is used for calculating the ion density, which is used for recalculation of the electric potential and RF field. dimensional problem to a weighted sum over two-dimensional solutions. Absorption is introduced in the cold plasma model by adding an imaginary collision frequency to the RF driven frequency, which is equivalent to adding an imaginary particle mass in the dielectric tensor elements. static and RF fields using the VASIMR code2. The VASIMR and EMIR codes are then iterated to estimate the ICRF effects on the plasma density. The iteration is performed by calculating the RF fields with the EMIR code, and using these fields to follow nonlinear ion trajectories with the VASIMR code on the gyro-frequency time scale. The ion trajectories are used to generate RF power absorption values and a density input for the next EMIR calculation. The codes are iterated until the density profile becomes reasonably stable, then the collisional absorption parameter in the EMIR code is adjusted and the iteration is continued until the power deposited by the RF system matches the power absorbed by the ion trajectories in a global sense. electric field. The solved algebraic system of equations is represented by ill-conditioned 18-diagonal matrix with complex elements. Since early development of the

  2. 2012 Joint Varenna-Lausanne International Workshop on the theory of fusion plasmas (Varenna, Italy, 27-31 August 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabet, Xavier; Sauter, Olivier

    2013-07-01

    The 2012 Joint Varenna-Lausanne International Workshop on the theory of fusion plasmas was very fruitful. A broad variety of topics was addressed, covering turbulence, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), edge physics, and radio frequency (RF) wave heating. Moreover, the scope of the meeting was extended this year to include the physics of materials and diagnostics for burning plasmas. This evolution reflects the complexity of problems at hand in fusion, some of them triggered by the construction of ITER and JT-60SA. Long-standing problems without immediate consequences have sometimes become an urgent matter in that context. One may refer to, for instance, the choice of plasma facing components or the design of control systems. Another characteristic of these workshops is the interplay between various domains of plasma physics. For instance, MHD modes are currently investigated with gyrokinetic codes, kinetic effects are included in MHD stability analysis more and more, and turbulence is now accounted for in wave propagation problems. This is proof of cross-fertilization and is certainly a healthy sign for our community. Finally, introducing some novelty in the programme does not prevent from us respecting old traditions. As usual, many presentations were dedicated to numerical simulations. Combining advanced numerical techniques with elaborated analytical theory is certainly a trademark of the Varenna-Lausanne Workshop, which was respected again this year. The quality and size of the scientific output from this workshop is shown in this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion; a further 26 papers have already appeared in Journal of Physics: Conference Series in December 2012. We hope the readers will enjoy this special issue, and find therein knowledge and inspiration.

  3. Strongly-coupled plasmas formed from laser-heated solids

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, M.; Bergeson, S. D.; Hart, G.; Murillo, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of ion temperatures in laser-produced plasmas formed from solids with different initial lattice structures. We show that the equilibrium ion temperature is limited by a mismatch between the initial crystallographic configuration and the close-packed configuration of a strongly-coupled plasma, similar to experiments in ultracold neutral plasmas. We propose experiments to demonstrate and exploit this crystallographic heating in order to produce a strongly coupled plasma with a coupling parameter of several hundred. PMID:26503293

  4. Critical heat flux investigations for fusion-relevant conditions with the use of a rastered electron beam apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J.A.; Croessmann, C.D.

    1988-01-01

    With the use of a rastered electron beam apparatus, investigations of critical heat flux (CH) and associated noise, pressure and flow spectra have been completed for water-cooled test targets under conditions relevant to the design of high-heat-flux components for fusion energy applications. Targets tested were copper tubes with attached graphite armor tiles. Water flows with velocities ranging from 3 to 10 m/s were used, with axially uniform heat fluxes ranging from 10 to 60 MW/m/sup 2/ applied along only one side of the tube to simulate the heating pattern often encountered by plasma facing components in fusion applications. Targets included stainless steel twisted tapes mechanically locked into the tube bore to increase CH levels. Exit conditions typical of highly subcooled flow boiling were considered, e.g., exit qualities of about /minus/0.3, with exit pressures near 1 MPa, and exit temperatures in the 30 to 40 C range. Besides observation of CHF and the comparison to CHF correlations, the studies also examined possible means for predicting and preventing tube burnout. Diagnostics tried included acoustic amplitude and spectra in both the audible and above audible frequency ranges, exit pressure amplitude and spectra, and flow variations and spectra. During testing, signals from the diagnostics showed a large increase in amplitude before CHF occurred. 13 refs., 9 figs.

  5. Thermionic plasma injection for the Lockheed Martin T4 Compact Fusion Reactor experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Jonathon

    2015-11-01

    Lockheed Martin's Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) concept relies on diamagnetic confinement in a magnetically encapsulated linear ring cusp geometry. Plasma injection into cusp field configurations requires careful deliberation. Previous work has shown that axial injection via a plasma gun is capable of achieving high-beta conditions in cusp configurations. We present a pulsed, high power thermionic plasma source and the associated magnetic field topology for plasma injection into the caulked-cusp magnetic field. The resulting plasma fueling and cross-field diffusion is discussed.

  6. Nonadiabatic heating of the central plasma sheet at substorm onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Frank, L. A.; Rostoker, G.; Fennell, J.; Mitchell, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    Heating events in the plasma sheet boundary layer and central plasma sheet are found to occur at the onset of expansive phase activity. The main effect is a dramatic increase in plasma temperature, coincident with a partial dipolarization of the magnetic field. Fluxes of energetic particles increase without dispersion during these events which occur at all radial distances up to 23 RE, the apogee of the ISEE spacecraft. A major difference between these heating events and those observed at geosynchronous distances lies in the heating mechanism which is nonadiabatic beyond 10 RE but may be adiabatic closer to earth. The energy required to account for the increase in plasma thermal energy is comparable with that required for Joule heating of the ionosphere. The plasma sheet must be considered as a major sink in the energy balance of a substorm. Lobe magnetic pressures during these events are estimated. Change in lobe pressure are generally not correlated with onsets or intensifications of expansive phase activity.

  7. Erratum: Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices (2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 123001)

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δ$b_⊥^{ext}$ ≈ $10^{-4}$ → $10^{-3}$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.

  8. Fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams in a laser-produced plasma.

    PubMed

    Labaune, C; Baccou, C; Depierreux, S; Goyon, C; Loisel, G; Yahia, V; Rafelski, J

    2013-01-01

    The advent of high-intensity-pulsed laser technology enables the generation of extreme states of matter under conditions that are far from thermal equilibrium. This in turn could enable different approaches to generating energy from nuclear fusion. Relaxing the equilibrium requirement could widen the range of isotopes used in fusion fuels permitting cleaner and less hazardous reactions that do not produce high-energy neutrons. Here we propose and implement a means to drive fusion reactions between protons and boron-11 nuclei by colliding a laser-accelerated proton beam with a laser-generated boron plasma. We report proton-boron reaction rates that are orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously. Beyond fusion, our approach demonstrates a new means for exploring low-energy nuclear reactions such as those that occur in astrophysical plasmas and related environments.

  9. Heating effects on modifying carbon surface by reactive plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Yori; Katoh, Masaaki; Ohte, Takeo; Ohtani, Sugio; Kojima, Akira; Saitoh, Naoya

    1996-07-01

    In the surface modification by plasma, surface properties changes with time after the plasma treatment. Such changes should be avoided for practical application. Glassy carbon (GC) was subjected to simultaneous plasma and heat treatments in order to investigate the respective effects. Source gases were tetrafluoromethane (CF 4) and oxygen (O 2). Treatment time and heating temperature of the GC plate were 30 min and 200-500°C, respectively. The surface properties before and after plasma treatment were studied with contact angle measurements and ESCA. When the GC was heated at 400°C during CF 4 plasma treatment, the contact angle after plasma treatment was 133° and constant even after 24 h. At 500°C during O 2 plasma treatment, the contact angle after plasma treatment was 0° and constant even after 24 h. It is found that heating carbon surface during CF 4 or O 2 plasma treatment is effective to stop the change with time after plasma treatment.

  10. MAGNETIC END CLOSURES FOR PLASMA CONFINING AND HEATING DEVICES

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1963-08-20

    More effective magnetic closure field regions for various open-ended containment magnetic fields used in fusion reactor devices are provided by several spaced, coaxially-aligned solenoids utilized to produce a series of nodal field regions of uniform or, preferably, of incrementally increasing intensity separated by lower intensity regions outwardly from the ends of said containment zone. Plasma sources may also be provided to inject plasma into said lower intensity areas to increase plasma density therein. Plasma may then be transported, by plasma diffusion mechanisms provided by the nodal fields, into the containment field. With correlated plasma densities and nodal field spacings approximating the mean free partl cle collision path length in the zones between the nodal fields, optimum closure effectiveness is obtained. (AEC)

  11. ICRF Heated Long-Pulse Plasma Discharges in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazawa, R.; Seki, T.; Mutoh, T.; Saito, K.; Watari, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Watanabe, T.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Oka, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Osakabe, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Kaneko, O.; Miyazawa, J.; Morita, S.; Narihara, K.; Shoji, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Goto, M.; Morisaki, T.; Peterson, B. J.; Sato, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Ashikawa, N.; Nishimura, K.; Funaba, H.; Chikaraishi, H.; Notake, T.; Torii, Y.; Okada, H.; Ichimura, M.; Higaki, H.; Takase, Y.; Kasahara, H.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.; Takahashi, C.; Yokota, M.; Kato, A.; Zhao, Yanping; Yoon, J. S.; Kwak, J. G.; Yamada, H.; Kawahata, K.; Ohyabu, N.; Ida, K.; Nagayama, Y.; Noda, N.; Komori, A.; Sudo, S.; Motojima, O.; LHD Experimental Group

    2006-01-01

    A long-pulse plasma discharge for more than 30 min. was achieved on the Large Helical Device (LHD). A plasma of ne = 0.8× 1019 m-3 and Ti0 = 2.0 keV was sustained with PICH = 0.52 MW, PECH = 0.1 MW and averaged PNBI = 0.067 MW. Total injected heating energy was 1.3 GJ, which was a quarter of the prepared RF heating energy. One of the keys to the success of the experiment was a dispersion of the local plasma heat load to divertors, accomplished by shifting the magnetic axis inward and outward.

  12. CONFERENCE REPORT: 11th EU-US Transport Task Force workshop on transport in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. W.; Angioni, C.; Diamond, P. H.; Hammett, G. W.; Hidalgo, C.; Loarte, A.; Mantica, P.

    2007-04-01

    This report summarizes the contributions presented at the 11th EU-US Transport Task Force workshop on transport in fusion plasmas, held in Marseilles, France, 4-7 September, 20068The present workshop: http://www-fusion-magnetique.cea.fr/ttf2006.. There were sessions on momentum transport, multi-scale physics, electron transport, particle transport and transport in the scrape-off layer.

  13. ICRF heating and transport of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J.E.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J.R.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Bretz, N.L.; Darrow, D.; Fredrickson, E.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes results of the first experiments utilizing high-power ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) to heat deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in reactor-relevant regimes on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Results from these experiments have demonstrated efficient core, second harmonic, tritium beating of D-T supershot plasmas with tritium concentrations ranging from 6%-40%. Significant direct ion heating on the order of 60% of the input radio frequency (rf) power has been observed. The measured deposition profiles are in good agreement with two-dimensional modeling code predictions. Energy confinement in an rf-heated supershot is at least similar to that without rf, and possibly better in the electron channel. Efficient electron heating via mode conversion of fast waves to ion Bernstein waves (IBW) has been demonstrated in ohmic, deuterium-deuterium and DT-neutral beam injection plasmas with high concentrations of minority {sup 3}He (n{sub 3He}/n{sub e} = 15% - 30%). By changing the {sup 3}He concentration or the toroidal field strength, the location of the mode-conversion radius was varied. The power deposition profile measured with rf power modulation indicated that up to 70% of the power can be deposited on electrons at an off-axis position. Preliminary results with up to 4 MW coupled into the plasma by 90-degree phased antennas showed directional propagation of the mode-converted IBW. Analysis of heat wave propagation showed no strong inward thermal pinch in off-axis heating of an ohmically-heated target plasma in TFTR.

  14. Radiation-MHD Simulations of Plasma-Jet-Driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion Gain Using USim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltz, Peter; Beckwith, Kristian; Kundrapu, Mahdusudhan; Hsu, Scott; Langendorf, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    One goal of the modeling effort for the PLX- α project is to identify plasma-jet-driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF) configurations with potential net fusion-energy gain. We use USim, which is a tool for modeling high-energy-density plasmas using multi-fluid models coupled to electromagnetics using fully-implicit iterative solvers, combined with finite volume discretizations on unstructured meshes. We include physical viscosity and advanced-EOS modeling capability, and are investigating the effects of different radiation (including flux-limited diffusion) and alpha-transport models. We compare 2D and 1D gain calculations for various liner geometries, parameters, and plasma species, and consider the effects of liner non-uniformities on fusion-gain degradation. Supported by the ARPA-E ALPHA Program.

  15. Helium-3 Generation from the Interaction of Deuterium Plasma inside a Hydrogenated Lattice: Red Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Quiros, Edbertho; Leal-Escalante, David A.

    2015-03-01

    Helium-3 has been created in a nuclear fusion reaction by fusing deuterium ions from deuterium plasma with hydrogen ions in a “RED” (the Spanish word for net) or crystal lattice, a method we called red fusion ("Fusion en la red cristalina"), because is a new method to make nuclear fusion reaction. In this paper, it will be show the experimental results where the helium-3 has been generated for the first time in this kind of new method to confine deuterium and hydrogen inside the RED or lattice of the hydrogenated crystal and that confinement inside the RED facilitated overcoming the Coulomb barrier between them and helium-3 and phonons are produced in this fusion reaction. The results of a long time research in which helium-3, has been created in a fusion reaction inside the lattice or RED of the crystal that contained hydrogen after adequate interaction of deuterium plasma at appropriate high temperature and magnetic confinement of the Mirror/Cusp Plasma Machine at Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, designed by the authors. Several mass spectra and visible light spectrum where the presence of helium-3 was detected are shown. The experiment was repeated more than 200 times showing always the generation of helium-3. In this experiment no gamma rays were detected. For this experiment several diagnostic instruments were used. The data collection with these control instrumentation are shown. Thus, it is an important new way to generate Helium-3. reserved.

  16. Differential cargo mobilisation within Weibel-Palade bodies after transient fusion with the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Kiskin, Nikolai I; Babich, Victor; Knipe, Laura; Hannah, Matthew J; Carter, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory chemokines can be selectively released from Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) during kiss-and-run exocytosis. Such selectivity may arise from molecular size filtering by the fusion pore, however differential intra-WPB cargo re-mobilisation following fusion-induced structural changes within the WPB may also contribute to this process. To determine whether WPB cargo molecules are differentially re-mobilised, we applied FRAP to residual post-fusion WPB structures formed after transient exocytosis in which some or all of the fluorescent cargo was retained. Transient fusion resulted in WPB collapse from a rod to a spheroid shape accompanied by substantial swelling (>2 times by surface area) and membrane mixing between the WPB and plasma membranes. Post-fusion WPBs supported cumulative WPB exocytosis. To quantify diffusion inside rounded organelles we developed a method of FRAP analysis based on image moments. FRAP analysis showed that von Willebrand factor-EGFP (VWF-EGFP) and the VWF-propolypeptide-EGFP (Pro-EGFP) were immobile in post-fusion WPBs. Because Eotaxin-3-EGFP and ssEGFP (small soluble cargo proteins) were largely depleted from post-fusion WPBs, we studied these molecules in cells preincubated in the weak base NH4Cl which caused WPB alkalinisation and rounding similar to that produced by plasma membrane fusion. In these cells we found a dramatic increase in mobilities of Eotaxin-3-EGFP and ssEGFP that exceeded the resolution of our method (∼ 2.4 µm2/s mean). In contrast, the membrane mobilities of EGFP-CD63 and EGFP-Rab27A in post-fusion WPBs were unchanged, while P-selectin-EGFP acquired mobility. Our data suggest that selective re-mobilisation of chemokines during transient fusion contributes to selective chemokine secretion during transient WPB exocytosis. Selective secretion provides a mechanism to regulate intravascular inflammatory processes with reduced risk of thrombosis.

  17. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Samulyak, Roman V.; Parks, Paul

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  18. Simulation of High Power ICRF Wave Heating in the ITER Burning Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Barrett, R. F.; D'Azevedo, E. F.

    2007-11-01

    ITER relies on Ion-cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF) power to heat the plasma to fusion temperatures. To heat effectively, the waves must couple efficiently to the core plasma. Recent simulations using AORSA [1] on the 120 TF Cray XT-4 (Jaguar) at ORNL show that the waves propagate radially inward and are rapidly absorbed with little heating of the plasma edge. AORSA has achieved 87.5 trillion calculations per second (87.5 teraflops) on Jaguar, which is 73 percent of the system's theoretical peak. Three dimensional visualizations show ``hot spots'' near the antenna surface where the wave amplitude is high. AORSA simulations are also being used to study how to best use ICRF to drive plasma currents for optimizing ITER performance and pulse length. Results for Scenario 4 show a maximum current of 0.54 MA for 20 MW of power at 57 MHz. [1] E.F. Jaeger, L.A. Berry, E. D'Azevedo, et al., Phys. Plasmas. 8, 1573 (2001).

  19. Magnetic-Nozzle Studies for Fusion Propulsion Applications: Gigawatt Plasma Source Operation and Magnetic Nozzle Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James H.; Mikekkides, Ioannis; Mikellides, Pavlos; Gregorek, Gerald; Marriott, Darin

    2004-01-01

    This project has been a multiyear effort to assess the feasibility of a key process inherent to virtually all fusion propulsion concepts: the expansion of a fusion-grade plasma through a diverging magnetic field. Current fusion energy research touches on this process only indirectly through studies of plasma divertors designed to remove the fusion products from a reactor. This project was aimed at directly addressing propulsion system issues, without the expense of constructing a fusion reactor. Instead, the program designed, constructed, and operated a facility suitable for simulating fusion reactor grade edge plasmas, and to examine their expansion in an expanding magnetic nozzle. The approach was to create and accelerate a dense (up to l0(exp 20)/m) plasma, stagnate it in a converging magnetic field to convert kinetic energy to thermal energy, and examine the subsequent expansion of the hot (100's eV) plasma in a subsequent magnetic nozzle. Throughout the project, there has been a parallel effort between theoretical and numerical design and modelling of the experiment and the experiment itself. In particular, the MACH2 code was used to design and predict the performance of the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) plasma accelerator, and to design and predict the design and expected behavior for the magnetic field coils that could be added later. Progress to date includes the theoretical accelerator design and construction, development of the power and vacuum systems to accommodate the powers and mass flow rates of interest to out research, operation of the accelerator and comparison to theoretical predictions, and computational analysis of future magnetic field coils and the expected performance of an integrated source-nozzle experiment.

  20. “The Marshall Rosenbluth International Summer School – 2007: Plasma Thermonuclear Fusion and Plasma Astrophysics – 2007”

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Vladislav Alexander

    2007-10-01

    Contents: H. Berk: Frequency Sweeping Due to Phase Space Structure Formation in Plasmas M. Campbell : The Legacy of Marshall Rosenbluth in the Development of the Laser Fusion Program in the United States J. Candy: Gyrokinetic Simulations of Fusion Plasmas P. Diamond: The Legacy of Marshall Rosenbluth in Magnetic Confinement Theory G-Y. Fu: Nonlinear Hybrid Simulations of Multiple Energetic Particle Driven Alfven Modes in Toroidal Plasmas O. Gurcan: Theory of Intrinsic Rotation and Momentum Transport V. L. Jacobs: Kinetic and Spectral Descriptions for Atomic Processes in Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas C. F. Kennel: Marshall Rosenbluth and Roald Sagdeev in Trieste:The Birth of Modern Space Plasma N. A. Krall: The Contribution of Marshall Rosenbluth in the Development of Plasma Drift Wave and Universal Instability Theories C. S. Liu: The Legacy of Marshall Rosenbluth in Laser-Plasma Interaction Research N. Rostoker: Plasma Physics Research With Marshall Rosenbluth - My Teacher R. Z. Sagdeev: The Legacy of Marshall Rosenbluth in Plasma Physics V. Alexander Stefan A Note on the Rosenbluth Paper: Phys. Rev. Letters, 29, 565 (1972), and the Research in Parametric Plasma Theory Thereupon J. W. Van Dam: The Role of Marshall Rosenbluth in the Development of the Thermonuclear Fusion Program in the U.S.A. E. P. Velikhov: Problems in Plasma Astrophysics R. White: The Role of Marshall Rosenbluth in the Development of the Particle and MHD Interaction in Plasmas X. Xu: Edge Gyrokinetic Theory and Continuum Simulations Marshall Nicholas ROSENBLUTH (A Brief Biography) b. February 5,1927 - Albany, New York. d. September 28, 2003 - San Diego, California. M. N. Rosenbluth, a world-acclaimed scientist, is one of the ultimate authorities in plasma and thermonuclear fusion research, often indicated by the sobriquet the "Pope of Plasma Physics." His theoretical contributions have been central to the development of controlled thermonuclear fusion. In the 1950s his pioneering work in

  1. Neutron Damage in the Plasma Chamber First Wall of the GCFTR-2 Fusion-Fission Hybrid Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, L. N.; Gonnelli, E.; Rossi, P. C. R.; Carluccio, T.; dos Santos, A.

    2015-07-01

    The successful development of energy-conversion machines based on either nuclear fission or fusion is completely dependent on the behaviour of the engineering materials used to construct the fuel containment and primary heat extraction systems. Such materials must be designed in order to maintain their structural integrity and dimensional stability in an environment involving high temperatures and heat fluxes, corrosive media, high stresses and intense neutron fluxes. However, despite the various others damage issues, such as the effects of plasma radiation and particle flux, the neutron flux is sufficiently energetic to displace atoms from their crystalline lattice sites. It is clear that the understanding of the neutron damage is essential for the development and safe operation of nuclear systems. Considering this context, the work presents a study of neutron damage in the Gas Cooled Fast Transmutation Reactor (GCFTR-2) driven by a Tokamak D-T fusion neutron source of 14.03 MeV. The theoretical analysis was performed by MCNP-5 and the ENDF/B-VII.1 neutron data library. A brief discussion about the determination of the radiation damage is presented, along with an analysis of the total neutron energy deposition in seven points through the material of the plasma source wall (PSW), in which was considered the HT-9 steel. The neutron flux was subdivided into three energy groups and their behaviour through the material was also examined.

  2. Impact of Gas Heating in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, D. B.; Bose, D.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cruden, B. A.; Meyyappan, M.; Sharma, S. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently it has been recognized that the neutral gas in inductively coupled plasma reactors heats up significantly during processing. The resulting gas density variations across the reactor affect reaction rates, radical densities, plasma characteristics, and uniformity within the reactor. A self-consistent model that couples the plasma generation and transport to the gas flow and heating has been developed and used to study CF4 discharges. A Langmuir probe has been used to measure radial profiles of electron density and temperature. The model predictions agree well with the experimental results. As a result of these comparisons along with the poorer performance of the model without the gas-plasma coupling, the importance of gas heating in plasma processing has been verified.

  3. Ballooning Instability: A Possible Mechanism for Impulsive Heating of Plasma Trapped in a Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibasaki, K.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma confined in curved magnetic field are unstable when the plasma beta (= gas pressure / magnetic pressure) exceeds a critical value determined mainly by the loop geometry (~ loop thickness / curvature radius). In TOKAMAK (one type of fusion experiment device), sudden disruption of confined plasma are observed when plasma beta is high and is called high-beta disruption. The main cause of the disruption is ballooning instability (or localized interchange instability). This instability can happen also in the solar atmosphere when conditions are satisfied. Not only high gas pressure but also plasma flow along curved magnetic field triggers ballooning instability. The most probable location of the instability is around the loop top where the magnetic field is the weakest. Impulsive heating of confined plasma and particle acceleration can be expected by discharge process of the space charge which is created by drift motion of plasma particles perpendicular to the magnetic field. Associated with disruption, shock waves and turbulences will be generated due to sudden expansion of plasma. Recent high-resolution, high-cadence and multiple wavelength (visible-UV-EUV) observations by SDO show many of these events.

  4. Initial Operation of the Miniaturized Inductively Heated Plasma Generator IPG6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Herdrich, Georg; Laufer, Rene; Koch, Helmut; Gomringer, Chris; Cook, Mike; Schmoke, Jimmy; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2012-10-01

    In close collaboration between the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) at Baylor University, Texas, and the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, two plasma wind tunnel facilities of similar type have been established using the inductively heated plasma source IPG6 which is based on proven IRS designs. The facility at Baylor University (IPG6-B) works at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and a maximum power of 15 kW. A vacuum pump of 160m^3/h in combination with a butterfly valve allows pressure control in a wide range. First experiments have been conducted with Air, O2 and N2 as working gases and volumetric flow rates of up to 14 L/min at pressures of a few 100 Pa, although pressures below 1 Pa are achievable at lower flow rates. The maximum tested electric power so far was 8 kW. Plasma powers and total pressures in the plasma jet have been obtained. In the near future the set up of additional diagnostics, the use of other gases (i.e. H2, He), and the integration of a dust particle accelerator are planned. The intended fields of research are basic investigation in thermo-chemistry and plasma radiation, space plasma environments and high heat fluxes e.g. in fusion devices or during atmospheric entry of spacecraft.

  5. Magnetic Probe to Study Plasma Jets for Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Daniel; Hsu, Scott C.

    2012-08-16

    A probe has been constructed to measure the magnetic field of a plasma jet generated by a pulsed plasma rail-gun. The probe consists of two sets of three orthogonally-oriented commercial chip inductors to measure the three-dimensional magnetic field vector at two separate positions in order to give information about the magnetic field evolution within the jet. The strength and evolution of the magnetic field is one of many factors important in evaluating the use of supersonic plasma jets for forming imploding spherical plasma liners as a standoff driver for magneto-inertial fusion.

  6. Plasma Heating and Flow in an Auroral Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Pollock, C. J.; Reasoner, D. L.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Austin, B.; Kintner, P. M.; Bonnell, J.

    1996-01-01

    We report direct observations of the three-dimensional velocity distribution of selected topside ionospheric ion species in an auroral context between 500 and 550 km altitude. We find heating transverse to the local magnetic field in the core plasma, with significant heating of 0(+), He(+), and H(+), as well as tail heating events that occur independently of the core heating. The 0(+) velocity distribution departs from bi-Maxwellian, at one point exhibiting an apparent ring-like shape. However, these observations are shown to be aliased within the auroral arc by temporal variations that arc not well-resolved by the core plasma instrument. The dc electric field measurements reveal superthermal plasma drifts that are consistent with passage of the payload through a series of vortex structures or a larger scale circularly polarized hydromagnetic wave structure within the auroral arc. The dc electric field also shows that impulsive solitary structures, with a frequency spectrum in the ion cyclotron frequency range, occur in close correlation with the tail heating events. The drift and core heating observations lend support to the idea that core ion heating is driven at low altitudes by rapid convective motions imposed by the magnetosphere. Plasma wave emissions at ion frequencies and parallel heating of the low-energy electron plasma are observed in conjunction with this auroral form; however, the conditions are much more complex than those typically invoked in previous theoretical treatments of superthermal frictional heating. The observed ion heating within the arc clearly exceeds that expected from frictional heating for the light ion species H(+) and He(+), and the core distributions also contain hot transverse tails, indicating an anomalous transverse heat source.

  7. Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating

    DOEpatents

    Perkins, Jr., Francis W.; Chiu, Shiu-Chu; Parks, Paul; Rawls, John M.

    1987-01-01

    Disclosed is a resonant coil cavity wave launcher for energizing a plasma immersed in a magnetic field. Energization includes launching fast Alfven waves to excite ion cyclotron frequency resonances in the plasma. The cavity includes inductive and capacitive reactive members spaced no further than one-quarter wavelength from a first wall confinement chamber of the plasma. The cavity wave launcher is energized by connection to a waveguide or transmission line carrying forward power from a remote radio frequency energy source.

  8. Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) Fusion using Helicon Injected Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George; Ahern, Drew; Bowman, Jaerd

    2016-10-01

    The use of an external plasma source with the IEC has the advantage that the background pressure in the IEC chamber can be low. This then enables a deep potential well formation for ion confinement. Also unit efficiency is increase due to minimization of ion losses through charge exchange. This technique is under study experimentally for use in a plasma jet propulsion unit and as an IEC type neutron source. Current work has studied the effect of locating the IEC grids off-center in the vacuum chamber, near the plasma entrance from the Helicon. With double grids, the relative potentials employed are also key factors in device performance. Electron emitters are added for space charge neutralization in the case of plasma jet propulsion. Plasma simulations are used to supplement the experiments. Specifically, the electric field and the magnetic field effects on energetic ion trajectories are examined for varying configurations. Funding by NASA, Air Force Research Lab and NPL Associates.

  9. LiWall Fusion - The New Concept of Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Zakharov

    2011-01-12

    Utilization of the outstanding abilities of a liquid lithium layer in pumping hydrogen isotopes leads to a new approach to magnetic fusion, called the LiWall Fusion. It relies on innovative plasma regimes with low edge density and high temperature. The approach combines fueling the plasma by neutral injection beams with the best possible elimination of outside neutral gas sources, which cools down the plasma edge. Prevention of cooling the plasma edge suppresses the dominant, temperature gradient related turbulence in the core. Such an approach is much more suitable for controlled fusion than the present practice, relying on high heating power for compensating essentially unlimited turbulent energy losses.

  10. Plasma Heating During Magnetic Reconnection: Implications for Turbulent Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, M. A.; Parashar, T.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Haggerty, C. C.

    2015-12-01

    Current sheets and associated intermittency are known to be prevalent in many turbulent plasmas and have been shown to be correlated with heating in observations of solar wind turbulence [1] and dissipation in kinetic particle-in-cell simulations [5]. Most intriguing, recent PIC simulations have found that the relative ion to electron heating ratio is strongly dependent on the turbulence amplitude [3]. An important question is whether magnetic reconnection is an important mechanism responsible for this heating. Studies focused on laminar reconnection have made significant progress recently on the magnitude and physics responsible for heating during magnetic reconnection [2,4]. The ambient Alfven speed of plasma flowing into the reconnection region plays a critical role, with heating initially taking the form of counterstreaming beams generated by non-local acceleration mechanism. However, there are significant uncertainties with how to link this basic reconnection heating with generic heating in a turbulent plasma. In this presentation, our current understanding of heating due to reconnection will be reviewed, and the factors determining the applicability of this heating to turbulent dissipation and heating will be discussed. These ideas will be explored through the comparison of kinetic PIC simulations of turbulence with reconnection heating models. Key aspects that will be examined are the effect of differing turbulent conditions on the magnitude and anisotropy of the heating, as well as the ion to electron heating ratio. [1] Osman et al., ApJ Letters, 727, L11, 2011. [2] Phan, et al., GRL, 40, 50917, 2013. [3] Wu et al., ApJ Letters, 763, L30, 2013. [4] Shay et al., Phys. Plasmas, 21, 122902, 2014. [5] Wan et al., PRL, 114, 175002, 2015.

  11. High Heat Flux Interactions and Tritium Removal from Plasma Facing Components by a Scanning Laser

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; C.A. Gentile; A. Hassanein

    2002-01-28

    A new technique for studying high heat flux interactions with plasma facing components is presented. The beam from a continuous wave 300 W neodymium laser was focused to 80 W/mm2 and scanned at high speed over the surface of carbon tiles. These tiles were previously used in the TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] inner limiter and have a surface layer of amorphous hydrogenated carbon that was codeposited during plasma operations. Laser scanning released up to 84% of the codeposited tritium. The temperature rise of the codeposit on the tiles was significantly higher than that of the manufactured material. In one experiment, the codeposit surface temperature rose to 1,770 C while for the same conditions, the manufactured surface increased to only 1,080 C. The peak temperature did not follow the usual square-root dependence on heat pulse duration. Durations of order 100 ms resulted in brittle destruction and material loss from the surface, while a duration of approximately 10 ms showed minimal change. A digital microscope imaged the codeposit before, during, and after the interaction with the laser and revealed hot spots on a 100-micron scale. These results will be compared to analytic modeling and are relevant to the response of plasma facing components to disruptions and vertical displacement events (VDEs) in next-step magnetic fusion devices.

  12. VAMP8-dependent fusion of recycling endosomes with the plasma membrane facilitates T lymphocyte cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Misty R.; Pattu, Varsha; Halimani, Mahantappa; Maier-Peuschel, Monika; Müller, Martha-Lena; Becherer, Ute; Hong, Wanjin; Hoth, Markus; Tschernig, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) eliminate infected and neoplastic cells through directed release of cytotoxic granule contents. Although multiple SNARE proteins have been implicated in cytotoxic granule exocytosis, the role of vesicular SNARE proteins, i.e., vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs), remains enigmatic. VAMP8 was posited to represent the cytotoxic granule vesicular SNARE protein mediating exocytosis in mice. In primary human CTLs, however, VAMP8 colocalized with Rab11a-positive recycling endosomes. Upon stimulation, these endosomes rapidly trafficked to and fused with the plasma membrane, preceding fusion of cytotoxic granules. Knockdown of VAMP8 blocked both recycling endosome and cytotoxic granule fusion at immune synapses, without affecting activating signaling. Mechanistically, VAMP8-dependent recycling endosomes deposited syntaxin-11 at immune synapses, facilitating assembly of plasma membrane SNARE complexes for cytotoxic granule fusion. Hence, cytotoxic granule exocytosis is a sequential, multivesicle fusion process requiring VAMP8-mediated recycling endosome fusion before cytotoxic granule fusion. Our findings imply that secretory granule exocytosis pathways in other cell types may also be more complex than previously appreciated. PMID:26124288

  13. Plasma diagnostic techniques in thermal-barrier tandem-mirror fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, E.H.; Clauser, J.F.; Carter, M.R.; Failor, B.H.; Foote, J.H.; Hornady, R.S.; James, R.A.; Lasnier, C.J.; Perkins, D.E.

    1986-08-29

    We review two classes of plasma diagnostic techniques used in thermal-barrier tandem-mirror fusion experiments. The emphasis of the first class is to study mirror-trapped electrons at the thermal-barrier location. The focus of the second class is to measure the spatial and temporal behavior of the plasma space potential at various axial locations. The design and operation of the instruments in these two categories are discussed and data that are representative of their performance is presented.

  14. A new table of Balmer line shapes for the diagnostic of magnetic fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, J.; Marandet, Y.; Stamm, R.

    2017-01-01

    A new table of Stark-Zeeman line shapes is provided for plasma diagnostics in the framework of magnetic fusion research. Spectral profiles of Dα, Dβ, Dγ, Dδ, and Dε have been calculated using computer simulations in conditions relevant to tokamak edge and divertor plasmas. After a brief presentation of the calculation method, we propose an interpolation formula and we give a routine for diagnostic applications. Analyses of experimental and synthetic spectra are performed as an illustration.

  15. In vitro fusion between Saccharomyces cerevisiae secretory vesicles and cytoplasmic-side-out plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Arrastua, Lorena; San Sebastian, Eider; Quincoces, Ana F; Antony, Claude; Ugalde, Unai

    2003-01-01

    The final step in the secretory pathway, which is the fusion event between secretory vesicles and the plasma membrane, was reconstructed using highly purified secretory vesicles and cytoplasmic-side-out plasma membrane vesicles from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both organelle preparations were obtained from a sec 6-4 temperature-sensitive mutant. Fusion was monitored by means of a fluorescence assay based on the dequenching of the lipophilic fluorescent probe octadecylrhodamine B-chloride (R18). The probe was incorporated into the membrane of secretory vesicles, and it diluted in unlabelled cytoplasmic-side-out plasma membrane vesicles as the fusion process took place. The obtained experimental dequenching curves were found by mathematical analysis to consist of two independent but simultaneous processes. Whereas one of them reflected the fusion process between both vesicle populations as confirmed by its dependence on the assay conditions, the other represented a non-specific transfer of the probe. The fusion process may now be examined in detail using the preparation, validation and analytical methods developed in this study. PMID:12435271

  16. Stark broadening of hydrogen lines in magnetic fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, J.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Koubiti, M.; Marandet, Y.; Stamm, R.

    2017-03-01

    We report on a Stark line shape model for the diagnostic of tokamak edge plasmas. In specific scenarios, plasma discharges are carried out at high density regimes, sufficiently so that the spectral lines emitted by the neutral atoms present in the edge and in the divertor region are affected by the plasma microscopic electric field (Stark broadening). We present new line shape calculations, carried out for diagnostic purposes in the context of the MST1 (Medium Sized Tokamak) European campaign. The role of the magnetic field (Zeeman effect) on line spectra is discussed.

  17. Properties of radio-frequency heated argon confined uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon confined, steady state, rf-heated plasma within a fused silica peripheral wall test chamber. Exploratory tests conducted using an 80 kW rf facility and different test chamber flow configurations permitted selection of the configuration demonstrating the best confinement characteristics and minimum uranium compound wall coating. The overall test results demonstrated applicable flow schemes and associated diagnostic techniques were developed for the fluid mechanical confinement and characterization of uranium within an rf plasma discharge when pure UF6 is injected for long test times into an argon-confined, high-temperature, high-pressure, rf-heated plasma.

  18. Predicting high harmonic ion cyclotron heating efficiency in Tokamak plasmas.

    PubMed

    Green, D L; Berry, L A; Chen, G; Ryan, P M; Canik, J M; Jaeger, E F

    2011-09-30

    Observations of improved radio frequency (rf) heating efficiency in ITER relevant high-confinement (H-)mode plasmas on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment are investigated by whole-device linear simulation. The steady-state rf electric field is calculated for various antenna spectra and the results examined for characteristics that correlate with observations of improved or reduced rf heating efficiency. We find that launching toroidal wave numbers that give fast-wave propagation in the scrape-off plasma excites large amplitude (∼kV m(-1)) coaxial standing modes between the confined plasma density pedestal and conducting vessel wall. Qualitative comparison with measurements of the stored plasma energy suggests that these modes are a probable cause of degraded heating efficiency.

  19. Plasma Heating Simulation in the VASIMR System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.; ChangDiaz, Franklin R.; Squire, Jared P.; Carter, Mark D.

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes the recent development in the simulation of the ion-cyclotron acceleration of the plasma in the VASIMR experiment. The modeling is done using an improved EMIR code for RF field calculation together with particle trajectory code for plasma transport calculat ion. The simulation results correlate with experimental data on the p lasma loading and predict higher ICRH performance for a higher density plasma target. These simulations assist in optimizing the ICRF anten na so as to achieve higher VASIMR efficiency.

  20. High Power Ion Heating in Helium and Hydrogen Plasmas for Advanced Plasma Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Akira; Hagiwara, Tatsuya; Domon, Masakazu; Taguchi, Takahiro

    High power ion cyclotron resonance heating is performed in a fast-flowing plasma operated with hydrogen and helium gases. Ion heating is clearly observed in hydrogen plasma as well as in helium plasma. The resonance region of magnetic field is broader and wave absorption efficiency is higher in hydrogen plasma than those in helium plasma. The thermal energy of the heated ions is converted to the kinetic energy of the exhaust plume by passing through a diverging magnetic nozzle set in a downstream region. In the magnetic nozzle energy conversion occurred as keeping the magnetic moment constant, but some discrepancy was observed in larger gradient of magnetic field. The kinetic energy of the exhaust plume is successfully controlled by an input power of radio-frequency wave, which is one of the key technologies for the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) type plasma thruster.

  1. The Measurement of the Specific Latent Heat of Fusion of Ice: Two Improved Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, S. Y.; Chun, C. K. W.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests two methods for measuring the specific latent heat of ice fusion for high school physics laboratories. The first method is an ice calorimeter which is made from simple materials. The second method improves the thermal contact and allows for a more accurate measurement. Lists instructions for both methods. (Author/YDS)

  2. Plasma Physics/Fusion Energy Education at the Liberty Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, Andrew; Delooper, John; Carpe, Andy; Amara, Joe; Butnick, Nancy; Lynch, Ellen; Osowski, Jeff

    2007-11-01

    The Liberty Science Center (LSC) is the largest (300,000 sq. ft.) education resource in the New Jersey-New York City region. A major 109 million expansion and renewal was recently completed. Accordingly, PPPL has expanded the science education collaboration with the Center into three innovative, hands-on programs. On the main floor, a new fusion exhibit is one of the focuses of ``Energy Quest.'' This includes a DC glow discharge tube with a permanent external magnet allowing visitors to manipulate the plasma while reading information on plasma creation and fusion energy. In the section of LSC dedicated to intensive science investigations (20,000 sq. ft) we have added ``Live from NSTX'' which will give students an opportunity to connect via video-conferencing to the NSTX control room during plasma operations. A prototype program was completed in May, 2007 with three high school physics classes and will be expanded when NSTX resumes operation. Finally, a plasma physics laboratory in this area will have a fully functioning, research-grade plasma source that will allow long-term visitors an opportunity to perform experiments in plasma processing, plasma spectroscopy, and dusty plasmas.

  3. Energetic particle physics with applications in fusion and space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1997-05-01

    Energetic particle physics is the study of the effects of energetic particles on collective electromagnetic (EM) instabilities and energetic particle transport in plasmas. Anomalously large energetic particle transport is often caused by low frequency MHD instabilities, which are driven by these energetic particles in the presence of a much denser background of thermal particles. The theory of collective energetic particle phenomena studies complex wave-particle interactions in which particle kinetic physics involving small spatial and fast temporal scales can strongly affect the MHD structure and long-time behavior of plasmas. The difficulty of modeling kinetic-MHD multiscale coupling processes stems from the disparate scales which are traditionally analyzed separately: the macroscale MHD phenomena are studied using the fluid MHD framework, while microscale kinetic phenomena are best described by complicated kinetic theories. The authors have developed a kinetic-MHD model that properly incorporates major particle kinetic effects into the MHD fluid description. For tokamak plasmas a nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code, the NOVA-K code, has been successfully developed and applied to study problems such as the excitation of fishbone and Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) and the sawtooth stabilization by energetic ions in tokamaks. In space plasmas the authors have employed the kinetic-MHD model to study the energetic particle effects on the ballooning-mirror instability which explains the multisatellite observation of the stability and field-aligned structure of compressional Pc 5 waves in the magnetospheric ring current plasma.

  4. Nonlinear phenomena, turbulence and anomalous transport in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hidalgo, C.; Estrada, T.; Sanchez, E.; Branas, B.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Van Milligen, B.P.; Balbin, R.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Sanchez, J.; Carreras, B.A.

    1995-02-01

    The nonlinear nature of the plasma turbulence, as measured by bicoherence analysis, has been studied in stellarator (ATF and W7AS) and tokamak (PBXM) devices. In ATF, little nonlinear interaction is found in the scrape-off layer region whereas the strength of the coupling is enhanced in the edge plasma region where the level of fluctuations is consistent with the theoretical expectations from resistive interchange modes. In W7AS the level of bicoherence is significantly smaller than in ATF. The comparison ATF/W7AS/PBXM suggest the important role of the magnetic shear to determine nonlinear behavior of the turbulence. The level of bicoherence also depends on the plasma conditions: in particular, it increases at the H-mode transition. The comparison between the nonlinear behavior of the turbulence in tokamaks and stellarators allows experimental verification of theoretical turbulence models.

  5. Pre-formed plasma channels for ion beam fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, R. R.; Olson, C. L.

    1997-04-01

    The transport of driver ions to the target in an IFE power plant is an important consideration in IFE target chamber design. Pre-formed laser-guided plasma discharge channels have been considered for light ions because they reduce the beam microdivergence constraints, allow long transport lengths, and require a target chamber fill gas that can help protect the target chamber from the target explosion. Here, pre-formed plasma discharge channels are considered for heavy ion transport. The channel formation parameters are similar to those for light ions. The allowable ion power per channel is limited by the onset of plasma instabilities and energy loss due to a reverse emf from the rapid channel expansion driven by the ion beam.

  6. Highly charged ions in magnetic fusion plasmas: research opportunities and diagnostic necessities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.

    2015-07-01

    Highly charged ions play a crucial role in magnetic fusion plasmas. These plasmas are excellent sources for producing highly charged ions and copious amounts of radiation for studying their atomic properties. These studies include calibration of density diagnostics, x-ray production by charge exchange, line identifications and accurate wavelength measurements, and benchmark data for ionization balance calculations. Studies of magnetic fusion plasmas also consume a large amount of atomic data, especially in order to develop new spectral diagnostics. Examples we give are the need for highly accurate wavelengths as references for measurements of bulk plasma motion, the need for accurate line excitation rates that encompass both electron-impact excitation and indirect line formation processes, for accurate position and resonance strength information of dielectronic recombination satellite lines that may broaden or shift diagnostic lines or that may provide electron temperature information, and the need for accurate ionization balance calculations. We show that the highly charged ions of several elements are of special current interest to magnetic fusion, notably highly charged ions of argon, iron, krypton, xenon, and foremost of tungsten. The electron temperatures thought to be achievable in the near future may produce W70+ ions and possibly ions with even higher charge states. This means that all but a few of the most highly charged ions are of potential interest as plasma diagnostics or are available for basic research.

  7. Spectra of heliumlike krypton from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M.; Hsuan, H.; Bush, C.; Cohen, S.; Cummings, C.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Schivell, J.; Zarnstorff, M. ); Beiersdorfer, P.; Osterheld, A. ); Smith, A. ); Fraenkel, B. )

    1993-08-16

    Experiments were conducted on TFTR to study the radiation of krypton which will be important for future tokamaks, such as ITER, for the diagnostic of the central ion temperature and for the control of the energy release from the plasma by radiative cooling. The total krypton radiation was monitored, and satellite spectra of Kr XXXV were recorded with a high-resolution crystal spectrometer. Radiative cooling and reduced particle recycling at the plasma edge region were observed, in reasonable agreement with modeling calculations which included radial transport.

  8. Semi-analytic model of plasma-jet-driven magneto-inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langendorf, Samuel J.; Hsu, Scott C.

    2017-03-01

    A semi-analytic model for plasma-jet-driven magneto-inertial fusion is presented. Compressions of a magnetized plasma target by a spherically imploding plasma liner are calculated in one dimension (1D), accounting for compressible hydrodynamics and ionization of the liner material, energy losses due to conduction and radiation, fusion burn and alpha deposition, separate ion and electron temperatures in the target, magnetic pressure, and fuel burn-up. Results show 1D gains of 3-30 at spherical convergence ratio <15 and 20-40 MJ of liner energy, for cases in which the liner thickness is 1 cm and the initial radius of a preheated magnetized target is 4 cm. Some exploration of parameter space and physics settings is presented. The yields observed suggest that there is a possibility of igniting additional dense fuel layers to reach high gain.

  9. Educational Outreach at the M.I.T. Plasma Fusion Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Censabella, V.

    1996-11-01

    Educational outreach at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center consists of volunteers working together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion and plasma-related experiments. Seeking to generate excitement about science, engineering and mathematics, the PFC holds a number of outreach activities throughout the year, such as Middle and High School Outreach Days. Outreach also includes the Mr. Magnet Program, which uses an interactive strategy to engage elementary school children. Included in this year's presentation will be a new and improved C-MOD Jr, a confinement video game which helps students to discover how computers manipulate magnetic pulses to keep a plasma confined for as long as possible. Also on display will be an educational toy created by the Cambridge Physics Outlet, a PFC spin-off company. The PFC maintains a Home Page on the World Wide Web, which can be reached at http://cmod2.pfc.mit.edu/.

  10. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in MagLIF-like plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovich, A. L. Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2014-12-15

    The MagLIF approach to inertial confinement fusion involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a DT plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot plasma to the cold liner is dominated by the transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ω{sub e}τ{sub e} effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux are both shown to decrease with ω{sub e}τ{sub e} as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient, which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. This family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  11. Predicting high harmonic ion cyclotron heating efficiency in Tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Green, David L; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, Lee A; Chen, Guangye; Ryan, Philip Michael; Canik, John

    2011-01-01

    Observations of improved radio frequency (RF) heating efficiency in high-confinement (H-) mode plasmas on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) are investigated by whole-device linear simulation. We present the first full-wave simulation to couple kinetic physics of the well confined core plasma to the poorly confined scrape-off plasma. The new simulation is used to scan the launched fast-wave spectrum and examine the steady-state electric wave field structure for experimental scenarios corresponding to both reduced, and improved RF heating efficiency. We find that launching toroidal wave-numbers that required for fast-wave propagation excites large amplitude (kVm 1 ) coaxial standing modes in the wave electric field between the confined plasma density pedestal and conducting vessel wall. Qualitative comparison with measurements of the stored plasma energy suggest these modes are a probable cause of degraded heating efficiency. Also, the H-mode density pedestal and fast-wave cutoff within the confined plasma allow for the excitation of whispering gallery type eigenmodes localised to the plasma edge.

  12. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J.

    2014-06-15

    Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance.

  13. High-frequency plasma-heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brambilla, Marco; Lallia, Pascal

    1978-01-01

    An array of adjacent wave guides feed high-frequency energy into a vacuum chamber in which a toroidal plasma is confined by a magnetic field, the wave guide array being located between two toroidal current windings. Waves are excited in the wave guide at a frequency substantially equal to the lower frequency hybrid wave of the plasma and a substantially equal phase shift is provided from one guide to the next between the waves therein. For plasmas of low peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TE.sub.01 mode and the output electric field is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. For exciting waves in plasmas of high peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TM.sub.01 mode and the magnetic field at the wave guide outlets is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. The wave excited at the outlet of the wave guide array is a progressive wave propagating in the direction opposite to that of the toroidal current and is, therefore, not absorbed by so-called "runaway" electrons.

  14. An effect of nuclear electric quadrupole moments in thermonuclear fusion plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De, B. R.; Srnka, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration of the nuclear electric quadrupole terms in the expression for the fusion Coulomb barrier suggests that this electrostatic barrier may be substantially modified from that calculated under the usual plasma assumption that the nuclei are electric monopoles. This effect is a result of the nonspherical potential shape and the spatial quantization of the nuclear spins of the fully stripped ions in the presence of a magnetic field. For monopole-quadrupole fuel cycles like p-B-11, the fusion cross-section may be substantially increased at low energies if the protons are injected at a small angle relative to the confining magnetic field.

  15. Office of Fusion Energy Sciences/Division of Plasma Physics Partnership in Education and Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markevich, Darlene

    2008-11-01

    Education and Outreach (E/O) activities in fusion and plasma physics have benefited greatly from the contributions of the American Physical Society-Division of Plasma Physics (APS-DPP) members, most of whom are researchers funded by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES), a part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science. The E/O activities that take place each year at the annual meeting of the APS-DPP have, in many cases, grown out of the E/O work funded at laboratories, universities, and industries engaged in OFES research. The E/O partnership between the APS-DPP and DOE began with a Science Teachers Day held at the 1988 APS-DPP meeting in Hollywood, Fl. The next major step was the addition of the Plasma Expo at the 1994 APS-DPP meeting in Minneapolis, which helped to galvanize the entire DPP community. Researchers at General Atomics, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and the University of Wisconsin, along with their colleagues from other institutions, were encouraged to help both OFES and DPP realize their education goals. The E/O activities have been highly visible and greatly valued at the DPP annual meetings and have become a hallmark of these meetings. While there are several programs specifically supported by OFES for the purpose of education and outreach, there is strong encouragement by OFES that all of its research programs contain a recognition of the importance of real-life fusion examples to enhance science education and to raise public awareness of fusion energy. As with the OFES E/O programs, the DPP E/O efforts are extremely dependent on voluntary work by personnel from across the fusion community. These outstanding E/O contributions, anchored by the OFES/DPP partnership, will be presented.

  16. Primary heat transfer loop design for the Cascade inertial confinement fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, K.A.; McDowell, M.W.

    1984-05-01

    This study investigates a heat exchanger and balance of plant design to accompany the Cascade inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber concept. The concept uses solid Li/sub 2/O or other lithium-ceramic granules, held to the wall of a rotating reaction chamber by centrifugal action, as a tritium breeding blanket and first wall protection. The Li/sub 2/O granules enter the chamber at 800 K and exit at 1200 K after absorbing the thermal energy produced by the fusion process.

  17. Heat flow diagnostics for helicon plasmas.

    PubMed

    Berisford, Daniel F; Bengtson, Roger D; Raja, Laxminarayan L; Cassady, Leonard D; Chancery, William J

    2008-10-01

    We present experimental studies of power balance in an argon helicon discharge. An infrared camera measures the heating of the dielectric tube containing a helicon discharge based on measurement of temperature profiles of the tube surface before and after a rf pulse. Using this diagnostic, we have measured surface heating trends at a variety of operating conditions on two helicon systems: the 10 kW VASIMR VX-50 experiment and the University of Texas at Austin 1 kW helicon experiment. Power losses downstream from the antenna are measured using thermocouples and probes. The heating of the dielectric tube increases with decreasing magnetic fields, higher gas flow rates, and higher molecular mass of the gas. These preliminary results suggest that cross-field particle diffusion contributes a significant proportion of the energy flux to the wall.

  18. Heat flow diagnostics for helicon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berisford, Daniel F.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Cassady, Leonard D.; Chancery, William J.

    2008-10-15

    We present experimental studies of power balance in an argon helicon discharge. An infrared camera measures the heating of the dielectric tube containing a helicon discharge based on measurement of temperature profiles of the tube surface before and after a rf pulse. Using this diagnostic, we have measured surface heating trends at a variety of operating conditions on two helicon systems: the 10 kW VASIMR VX-50 experiment and the University of Texas at Austin 1 kW helicon experiment. Power losses downstream from the antenna are measured using thermocouples and probes. The heating of the dielectric tube increases with decreasing magnetic fields, higher gas flow rates, and higher molecular mass of the gas. These preliminary results suggest that cross-field particle diffusion contributes a significant proportion of the energy flux to the wall.

  19. Numerical simulation of plasma processes driven by transverse ion heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Chan, C. B.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma processes driven by transverse ion heating in a diverging flux tube are investigated with numerical simulation. The heating is found to drive a host of plasma processes, in addition to the well-known phenomenon of ion conics. The downward electric field near the reverse shock generates a doublestreaming situation consisting of two upflowing ion populations with different average flow velocities. The electric field in the reverse shock region is modulated by the ion-ion instability driven by the multistreaming ions. The oscillating fields in this region have the possibility of heating electrons. These results from the simulations are compared with results from a previous study based on a hydrodynamical model. Effects of spatial resolutions provided by simulations on the evolution of the plasma are discussed.

  20. Atomic and Molecular Collisional Radiative Modeling for Spectroscopy of Low Temperature and Magnetic Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fantz, U.; Wuenderlich, D.

    2011-05-11

    The quantitative analysis of spectroscopic data from low temperature plasmas is strongly supported from collisional radiative (CR) modeling. Low pressure plasmas for basic research in the lab and for industrial use have several aspects in common with the cold edge of magnetic fusion plasmas. On the basis of applications of CR modeling for atomic and molecular hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and diatomic radicals such as CH and C{sub 2}, the relevance of individual processes for data interpretation is demonstrated for ionizing and recombining plasmas. Examples of such processes are opacity, dissociative excitation, dissociative recombination, mutual neutralization, and energy pooling. It is shown that the benchmark of CR modeling with experimental data can be used to identify problems in the ingoing data set of cross sections and rate coefficients. Using the flexible solver Yacora, the capability of CR modeling of low temperature plasmas is highlighted.

  1. Heat generation above break-even from laser-induced fusion in ultra-dense deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Holmlid, Leif

    2015-08-15

    Previous results from laser-induced processes in ultra-dense deuterium D(0) give conclusive evidence for ejection of neutral massive particles with energy >10 MeV u{sup −1}. Such particles can only be formed from nuclear processes like nuclear fusion at the low laser intensity used. Heat generation is of interest for future fusion energy applications and has now been measured by a small copper (Cu) cylinder surrounding the laser target. The temperature rise of the Cu cylinder is measured with an NTC resistor during around 5000 laser shots per measured point. No heating in the apparatus or the gas feed is normally used. The fusion process is suboptimal relative to previously published studies by a factor of around 10. The small neutral particles H{sub N}(0) of ultra-dense hydrogen (size of a few pm) escape with a substantial fraction of the energy. Heat loss to the D{sub 2} gas (at <1 mbar pressure) is measured and compensated for under various conditions. Heat release of a few W is observed, at up to 50% higher energy than the total laser input thus a gain of 1.5. This is uniquely high for the use of deuterium as fusion fuel. With a slightly different setup, a thermal gain of 2 is reached, thus clearly above break-even for all neutronicity values possible. Also including the large kinetic energy which is directly measured for MeV particles leaving through a small opening gives a gain of 2.3. Taking into account the lower efficiency now due to the suboptimal fusion process, previous studies indicate a gain of at least 20 during long periods.

  2. Impeding hohlraum plasma stagnation in inertial-confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Frenje, J A; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Zylstra, A B; Petrasso, R D; Amendt, P A; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A J; Town, R P J; Wilks, S C; Betti, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Soures, J M; Hund, J; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A

    2012-01-13

    This Letter reports the first time-gated proton radiography of the spatial structure and temporal evolution of how the fill gas compresses the wall blowoff, inhibits plasma jet formation, and impedes plasma stagnation in the hohlraum interior. The potential roles of spontaneously generated electric and magnetic fields in the hohlraum dynamics and capsule implosion are discussed. It is shown that interpenetration of the two materials could result from the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability occurring as the lighter, decelerating ionized fill gas pushes against the heavier, expanding gold wall blowoff. This experiment showed new observations of the effects of the fill gas on x-ray driven implosions, and an improved understanding of these results could impact the ongoing ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility.

  3. High Power LaB6 Plasma Source Performance for the Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Jonathon

    2016-10-01

    Lockheed Martin's Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) concept is a linear encapsulated ring cusp. Due to the complex field geometry, plasma injection into the device requires careful consideration. A high power thermionic plasma source (>0.25MW; >10A/cm2) has been developed with consideration to phase space for optimal coupling. We present the performance of the plasma source, comparison with alternative plasma sources, and plasma coupling with the CFR field configuration. ©2016 Lockheed Martin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Parallel resistivity and ohmic heating of laboratory dipole plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, W.

    2012-08-01

    The parallel resistivity is calculated in the long-mean-free-path regime for the dipole plasma geometry; this is shown to be a neoclassical transport problem in the limit of a small number of circulating electrons. In this regime, the resistivity is substantially higher than the Spitzer resistivity due to the magnetic trapping of a majority of the electrons. This suggests that heating the outer flux surfaces of the plasma with low-frequency parallel electric fields can be substantially more efficient than might be naively estimated. Such a skin-current heating scheme is analyzed by deriving an equation for diffusion of skin currents into the plasma, from which quantities such as the resistive skin-depth, lumped-circuit impedance, and power deposited in the plasma can be estimated. Numerical estimates indicate that this may be a simple and efficient way to couple power into experiments in this geometry.

  5. Parallel resistivity and ohmic heating of laboratory dipole plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, W.

    2012-08-15

    The parallel resistivity is calculated in the long-mean-free-path regime for the dipole plasma geometry; this is shown to be a neoclassical transport problem in the limit of a small number of circulating electrons. In this regime, the resistivity is substantially higher than the Spitzer resistivity due to the magnetic trapping of a majority of the electrons. This suggests that heating the outer flux surfaces of the plasma with low-frequency parallel electric fields can be substantially more efficient than might be naively estimated. Such a skin-current heating scheme is analyzed by deriving an equation for diffusion of skin currents into the plasma, from which quantities such as the resistive skin-depth, lumped-circuit impedance, and power deposited in the plasma can be estimated. Numerical estimates indicate that this may be a simple and efficient way to couple power into experiments in this geometry.

  6. Investigating the laser heating of underdense plasmas at conditions relevant to MagLIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Thompson, Adam

    2015-11-01

    The magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) scheme has achieved thermonuclear fusion yields on Sandia's Z Facility by imploding a cylindrical liner filled with D2 fuel that is preheated with a multi-kJ laser and pre-magnetized with an axial field Bz = 10 T. The challenge of fuel preheating in MagLIF is to deposit several kJ's of energy into an underdense (ne/ncrit<0.1) fusion fuel over ~ 10 mm target length efficiently and without introducing contaminants that could contribute to unacceptable radiative losses during the implosion. Very little experimental work has previously been done to investigate laser heating of gas at densities, scale lengths, modest intensities (Iλ2 ~ 1014 watts- μm2 /cm2) and magnetization parameters (ωceτe ~ 10) necessary for MagLIF. In particular, magnetization of the preheated plasma suppresses electron thermal conduction, which can modify laser energy coupling. Providing an experimental dataset in this regime is essential to not only understand the dynamics of a MagLIF implosion and stagnation, but also to validate magnetized transport models and better understand the physics of laser propagation in magnetized plasmas. In this talk, we present data and analysis of several experiments conducted at OMEGA-EP and at Z to investigate laser propagation and plasma heating in underdense D2 plasmas under a range of conditions, including densities (ne = 0.05-0.1 nc) and magnetization parmaters (ωceτe ~ 0-10). The results show differences in the electron temperature of the heated plasma and the velocity of the laser burn wave with and without an applied magnetic field. We will show comparisons of these experimental results to 2D and 3D HYDRA simulations, which show that the effect of the magnetic field on the electron thermal conduction needs to be taken into account when modeling laser preheat. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration

  7. Plasma-material Interactions in Current Tokamaks and their Implications for Next-step Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.; Coad, J.P.; Grisolia, C.

    2001-01-10

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT [deuterium-tritium] fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety, and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimeters from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally coordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and significant progress has been made in better under standing these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modeling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D [Research and Development] avenues for their resolution are presented.

  8. FOREWORD: 12th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications 12th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreter, Arkadi; Linke, Jochen; Rubel, Marek

    2009-12-01

    knowledge is still limited, especially in relation to the behaviour of these metals in environments containing multiple species. There are many appealing issues related to material mixing and fuel retention that call for robust and comprehensive studies. In this sense, the aim of the workshop is not only to discuss hot topics, but also to identify the most important research areas and those that need urgent solutions. Another topic of foremost relevance to ITER is the development of plasma-facing components that are able to withstand extreme power fluxes, in particular, those during transient phases. Materials and production methods for high-heat-flux components have to be further developed and industrialized. A key requirement in this field is the development of non-destructive testing methods for the qualification of methods and quality assessment during production. Invited talks and contributed presentations therefore dealt with aspects of fundamental processes, experimental findings, advanced modelling and the technology of fusion reactor components. Several areas were selected as the major topics of PFMC-12: materials for the ITER-divertor (erosion, redeposition, fuel retention) carbon-based materials tungsten and tungsten coatings beryllium mixed materials (intentional and non-intentional) the ITER-Like Wall Project materials under high-heat-flux loads including transients (ELMs, disruptions) technology and testing of plasma-facing components neutron effects in plasma-facing materials. 26 invited lectures and oral contributions, and 131 posters were presented by participants from research laboratories and industrial companies. 210 researchers from 24 countries from all over the world participated in a lively and intense exchange of knowledge and ideas. The workshop was hosted by Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ), a centre where the integration of science and technology for fusion reactor materials has been a focus for decades. This is reflected by the operation of

  9. An RF heated tandem mirror plasma propulsion study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. F.; Yao, X.; Peng, S.; Krueger, W. A.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental results on a tandem mirror hybrid plume rocket involving a three-stage system of plasma injection, heating, and subsequent injection through a magnetic nozzle are presented. In the experiments, a plasma is created by breaking down the gas with electron cyclotron resonance heating at 2 kW in the central cell, and the ion species is then heated to high temperatures with ion cyclotron resonance heating at 10 kW in the end cell. A Langmuir probe measured an electron density of 2.5 x 10 to the 16th/cu m and a temperature of 100 eV in the central cell and an ion density of 1.25 x 10 to the 17th/cu m and a temperature of 500 eV in the end cell.

  10. Plasma heating and current drive by an obliquely propagating upper-hybrid cyclotron beat wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, M. R.; Cairns, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Excitation of an obliquely propagating upper-hybrid cyclotron beat wave is considered for plasma heating and current drive in tokamaks. The beat wave is excited by the interaction of two intense free-electron laser (FEL) pulses at their difference frequency. The three-wave nonlinear interaction equations in a magnetized plasma are solved numerically in a steady-state two-dimensional (2-D) geometry for this purpose. The 2-D toroidal inhomogeneity effect and the effect of finite spatial width of the pump microwave pulses are taken into account for the beat wave excitation. To illustrate the principle, the microwave tokamak experiment (MTX) [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30, 57 (1988)] is considered. It has been found that the fraction of total input power of the pump microwaves deposited in the cyclotron beat wave is lower than the case of a Langmuir type beat wave considered by Amin and Cairns [Nucl. Fusion 30, 327 (1990)]. However, increasing the input powers of the pump microwaves, a substantial amount of input power can be deposited in the excited beat wave. The beat wave eventually transfers this power to the electrons by cyclotron damping. It has also been found that for the same input parameters, right-hand polarized pumps are more efficient than left-hand polarized pump microwaves for beat wave excitation.

  11. Development of Field-Reversed Configuration Plasma Gun Formation Techniques for Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Alan; Gilmore, Mark; Wynkoop, Tyler; Intrator, Thomas; Weber, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is an innovative approach for a relatively fast and cheap path to the production of fusion energy that utilizes magnetic confinement to assist in the compression of a hot plasma to thermonuclear conditions by an external driver. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently pursing demonstration of the MTF concept via compression of an FRC (field-reversed configuration) plasma by a metal liner z-pinch in conjunction with the Air Force Research Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM. A key physics issue for the FRC as an MTF target lies in the initial pre-ionization (PI) stage. The PI formation process determines the amount of magnetic flux that can be trapped to form the FRC. This trapped flux plays an important role in the FRC's final equilibrium, transport, and stability properties. It also provides the route to greatest potential gains in FRC lifetime, which is essential to provide enough time to translate and compress the FRC effectively. In conjunction with LANL we plan to test and characterize a new system to improve the initial PI plasma formation. This system will use an array of plasma guns to form the initial plasma. Initial characterization of the plasma gun behavior will be presented.

  12. Laser production and heating of plasma for MHD application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments have been made on the production and heating of plasmas by the absorption of laser radiation. These experiments were performed to ascertain the feasibility of using laser-produced or laser-heated plasmas as the input for a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator. Such a system would have a broad application as a laser-to-electricity energy converter for space power transmission. Experiments with a 100-J-pulsed CO2 laser were conducted to investigate the breakdown of argon gas by a high-intensity laser beam, the parameters (electron density and temperature) of the plasma produced, and the formation and propagation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. Experiments were also carried out using a 1-J-pulsed CO2 laser to heat the plasma produced in a shock tube. The shock-tube hydrogen plasma reached electron densities of approximately 10 to the 17th/cu cm and electron temperatures of approximately 1 eV. Absorption of the CO2 laser beam by the plasma was measured, and up to approximately 100 percent absorption was observed. Measurements with a small MHD generator showed that the energy extraction efficiency could be very large with values up to 56 percent being measured.

  13. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  14. Steady State Turbulent Transport in Magnetic Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W. W.; Ethier, S.; Kolesnikov, R.; Wang, W. X.; Tang, W. M.

    2007-12-20

    For more than a decade, the study of microturbulence, driven by ion temperature gradient (ITG) drift instabilities in tokamak devices, has been an active area of research in magnetic fusion science for both experimentalists and theorists alike. One of the important impetus for this avenue of research was the discovery of the radial streamers associated the ITG modes in the early nineties using a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code. Since then, ITG simulations based on the codes with increasing realism have become possible with the dramatic increase in computing power. The notable examples were the demonstration of the importance of nonlinearly generated zonal flows in regulating ion thermal transport and the transition from Bohm to GyroBoham scaling with increased device size. In this paper, we will describe another interesting nonlinear physical process associated with the parallel acceleration of the ions, that is found to play an important role for the steady state turbulent transport. Its discovery is again through the use of the modern massively parallel supercomputers.

  15. Fokker–Planck kinetic modeling of suprathermal α-particles in a fusion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Peigney, B.E.

    2014-12-01

    We present an ion kinetic model describing the transport of suprathermal α-particles in inertial fusion targets. The analysis of the underlying physical model enables us to develop efficient numerical methods to simulate the creation, transport and collisional relaxation of fusion reaction products (α-particles) at a kinetic level. The model assumes spherical symmetry in configuration space and axial symmetry in velocity space around the mean flow velocity. A two-energy-scale approach leads to a self-consistent modeling of the coupling between suprathermal α-particles and the thermal bulk of the imploding plasma. This method provides an accurate numerical treatment of energy deposition and transport processes involving suprathermal particles. The numerical tools presented here are then validated against known analytical results. This enables us to investigate the potential role of ion kinetic effects on the physics of ignition and thermonuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion schemes.

  16. Observations of rotation in JET plasmas with electron heating by ion cyclotron resonance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellsten, T.; Johnson, T. J.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Lin, Y.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Ongena, J.; Calabro, G.; Crombé, K.; Frigione, D.; Giroud, C.; Lennholm, M.; Mantica, P.; Nave, M. F. F.; Naulin, V.; Sozzi, C.; Studholme, W.; Tala, T.; Versloot, T.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2012-07-01

    The rotation of L-mode plasmas in the JET tokamak heated by waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) damped on electrons, is reported. The plasma in the core is found to rotate in the counter-current direction with a high shear and in the outer part of the plasma with an almost constant angular rotation. The core rotation is stronger in magnitude than observed for scenarios with dominating ion cyclotron absorption. Two scenarios are considered: the inverted mode conversion scenarios and heating at the second harmonic 3He cyclotron resonance in H plasmas. In the latter case, electron absorption of the fast magnetosonic wave by transit time magnetic pumping and electron Landau damping (TTMP/ELD) is the dominating absorption mechanism. Inverted mode conversion is done in (3He)-H plasmas where the mode converted waves are essentially absorbed by electron Landau damping. Similar rotation profiles are seen when heating at the second harmonic cyclotron frequency of 3He and with mode conversion at high concentrations of 3He. The magnitude of the counter-rotation is found to decrease with an increasing plasma current. The correlation of the rotation with the electron temperature is better than with coupled power, indicating that for these types of discharges the dominating mechanism for the rotation is related to indirect effects of electron heat transport, rather than to direct effects of ICRF heating. There is no conclusive evidence that mode conversion in itself affects rotation for these discharges.

  17. Plasma-Jet-Driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion (PJMIF): Physics and Design for a Plasma Liner Formation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Scott; Cassibry, Jason; Witherspoon, F. Douglas

    2014-10-01

    Spherically imploding plasma liners are a potential standoff compression driver for magneto-inertial fusion, which is a hybrid of and operates in an intermediate density between those of magnetic and inertial fusion. We propose to use an array of merging supersonic plasma jets to form a spherically imploding plasma liner. The jets are to be formed by pulsed coaxial guns with contoured electrodes that are placed sufficiently far from the location of target compression such that no hardware is repetitively destroyed. As such, the repetition rate can be higher (e.g., 1 Hz) and ultimately the power-plant economics can be more attractive than most other MIF approaches. During the R&D phase, a high experimental shot rate at reasonably low cost (e.g., < 1 k/shot) may be achieved with excellent diagnostic access, thus enabling a rapid learning rate. After some background on PJMIF and its prospects for reactor-relevant energy gain, this poster describes the physics objectives and design of a proposed 60-gun plasma-liner-formation experiment, which will provide experimental data on: (i) scaling of peak liner ram pressure versus initial jet parameters, (ii) liner non-uniformity characterization and control, and (iii) control of liner profiles for eventual gain optimization.

  18. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center FY97--FY98 work proposal

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    Alcator C-Mod is the high-field, high-density divertor tokamak in the world fusion program. It is one of five divertor experiments capable of plasma currents exceeding one megamp. Because of its compact dimensions, Alcator C-Mod investigates an essential area in parameter space, which complements the world`s larger experiments, in establishing the tokamak physics database. Three key areas of investigation have been called out in which Alcator C-Mod has a vital role to play: (1) divertor research on C-Mod takes advantage of the advanced divertor shaping, the very high scrap-off-layer power density, unique abilities in impurity diagnosis, and the High-Z metal wall, to advance the physics understanding of this critical topic; (2) in transport studies, C-Mod is making critical tests of both empirical scalings and theoretically based interpretations of tokamak transport, at dimensional parameters that are unique but dimensionless parameters often comparable to those in much larger experiments; (3) in the area of Advanced Tokamak research, so important to concept optimization, the high-field design of the device also provides long pulse length, compared to resistive skin time, which provides an outstanding opportunity to investigate the extent to which enhanced confinement and stability can be sustained in steady-state, using active profile control. In addition to these main programmatic emphasis, important enabling research is being performed in MHD stability and control, which has great significance for the immediate design of ITER, and in the physics and engineering of ICRF, which is the main auxiliary heating method on C-Mod.

  19. Model-independent determination of the astrophysical S factor in laser-induced fusion plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Lattuada, D.; Barbarino, M.; Bonasera, A.; ...

    2016-04-19

    In this paper, we present a new and general method for measuring the astrophysical S factor of nuclear reactions in laser-induced plasmas and we apply it to 2H(d,n)3He. The experiment was performed with the Texas Petawatt Laser, which delivered 150–270 fs pulses of energy ranging from 90 to 180 J to D2 or CD4 molecular clusters (where D denotes 2H). After removing the background noise, we used the measured time-of-flight data of energetic deuterium ions to obtain their energy distribution. We derive the S factor using the measured energy distribution of the ions, the measured volume of the fusion plasma,more » and the measured fusion yields. This method is model independent in the sense that no assumption on the state of the system is required, but it requires an accurate measurement of the ion energy distribution, especially at high energies, and of the relevant fusion yields. In the 2H(d,n)3He and 3He(d,p)4He cases discussed here, it is very important to apply the background subtraction for the energetic ions and to measure the fusion yields with high precision. While the available data on both ion distribution and fusion yields allow us to determine with good precision the S factor in the d+d case (lower Gamow energies), for the d+3He case the data are not precise enough to obtain the S factor using this method. Our results agree with other experiments within the experimental error, even though smaller values of the S factor were obtained. This might be due to the plasma environment differing from the beam target conditions in a conventional accelerator experiment.« less

  20. Dense Plasma Heating and Radiation Generation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-30

    INSTRUCTIONS ~~~~~~ B OUET ~iNPGEFORE COMPLETING FORM I. RPORTmumsZ. GVT AC INNo.i S. ACCIPIENT’S CATALOG MUM694 ~~ 80-0981 F,6-~IS~ � 4. r r~ejandsw... p M. Kristiansen and M.O. Hagler AFOSR 74-2639 ~ 9. 9%RFOR4fpN ORGAMIZAT1om NAME ANO ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMEN T. DRO.IECT, TASK Plasma Laboratory...8217AA P ’t1JIMIS Dept. of Electrical Engineering 2301/A Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409, 61102F 20Il It. CONTROLLING OFFICE MAMIE AND AOhESS

  1. Final Report on Development of Optimized Field-Reversed Configuration Plasma Formation Techniques for Magnetized Target Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, Alan

    2013-11-01

    The University of New Mexico (UNM) proposed a collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop and test methods for improved formation of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas relevant to magnetized target fusion (MTF) energy research. MTF is an innovative approach for a relatively fast and cheap path to the production of fusion energy that utilizes magnetic confinement to assist in the compression of a hot plasma to thermonuclear conditions by an external driver. LANL is currently pursing demonstration of the MTF concept via compression of an FRC plasma by a metal liner z-pinch in conjunction with the Air Force Research Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM. A key physics issue for the FRC's ultimate success as an MTF target lies in the initial pre-ionization (PI) stage. The PI plasma sets the initial conditions from which the FRC is created. In particular, the PI formation process determines the amount of magnetic flux that can be trapped to form the FRC. A ringing theta pinch ionization (RTPI) technique, such as currently used by the FRX-L device at LANL, has the advantages of high ionization fraction, simplicity (since no additional coils are required), and does not require internal electrodes which can introduce impurities into the plasma. However RTPI has been shown to only trap 50% of the initial bias flux at best and imposes additional engineering constraints on the capacitor banks. The amount of trapped flux plays an important role in the FRC's final equilibrium, transport, and stability properties, and provides increased ohmic heating of the FRC through induced currents as the magnetic field decays. Increasing the trapped flux also provides the route to greatest potential gains in FRC lifetime, which is essential to provide enough time to translate and compress the FRC effectively. In conjunction with LANL we initially planned to develop and test a microwave break- down system to improve the initial PI plasma formation. The UNM team would

  2. Ion Heating Experiments in a Supersonic Plasma Flow for an Advanced Plasma Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Akira; Hosokawa, Yohei; Hatanaka, Motoi; Yagai, Tsuyoshi; Tobari, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Kunihiko; Inutake, Masaaki

    2003-10-01

    In the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) project in NASA, the combined system of the ion cyclotron heating and the magnetic nozzle is proposed to control a ratio od specific impulse to thrust at constant power. By now, few attempt of a direct ion heating for fast flowing plasma by waves has been done. Ion heating in a fast flowing plasma might be difficult because of the short transit time for ions to pass through a heating region only once and the modification of ion cyclotron resonance due to the effect of Doppler shift. Ion heating experiments are performed in a fast flowing plasma produced by Magneto-Plasma-Dynamic Arcjet (MPDA) operated with an externally-applied magnetic field. RF waves with an ion cyclotron range of frequency is excited by a pair of loop antennas or a helical antenna. An increase of plasma stored energy measured by a diamagnetic loop coil is observed when the waves are excited with various azimuthal mode numbers in several magnetic nozzle configurations. It is most effective to heat ions to excite the waves with an azimuthal mode number of m=±1. Dispersion relations of the propagating wave are obtained and compared with theoretical ones.

  3. Development of a hybrid kinetic-fluid model for line radiation transport in magnetic fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, J.; Marandet, Y.; Reiter, D.; Stamm, R.

    2017-03-01

    We report on a transport model for the Lyman line radiation in optically thick divertor plasma conditions encountered in exhaust systems in magnetic fusion devices. The model is designed to switch automatically between a kinetic and a continuum description according to the plasma conditions and to the spectral range. A kinetic treatment is retained for photons with a large mean free path (line wings), whereas a continuum description of the radiation field is invoked in highly absorbing or scattering regions (core photons). Prototypical calculations of this so-called δf Monte Carlo type of the Lyman α photo-excitation rate in slab geometry are performed as an illustration. The hybrid method is suggested as a candidate for speeding up the kinetic transport codes currently involved in magnetic fusion research for ITER and DEMO divertor (power and particle exhaust system) design.

  4. Noise temperature improvement for magnetic fusion plasma millimeter wave imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, J.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-03-01

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas [B. Tobias et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 6, 2106042 (2011)]. Of particular importance have been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry systems for imaging Te and ne fluctuations. These instruments have employed heterodyne receiver arrays with Schottky diode mixer elements directly connected to individual antennas. Consequently, the noise temperature has been strongly determined by the conversion loss with typical noise temperatures of ˜60 000 K. However, this can be significantly improved by making use of recent advances in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit chip low noise amplifiers to insert a pre-amplifier in front of the Schottky diode mixer element. In a proof-of-principle design at V-Band (50-75 GHz), significant improvement of noise temperature from the current 60 000 K to measured 4000 K has been obtained.

  5. Developing a plasma focus research training system for the fusion energy age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.

    2014-08-01

    The 3 kJ UNU/ICTP Plasma Focus Facility is the most significant device associated with the AAAPT (Asian African Association for Plasma Training). In original and modified/upgraded form it has trained generations of plasma focus (PF) researchers internationally, producing many PhD theses and peer-reviewed papers. The Lee Model code was developed for the design of this PF. This code has evolved to cover all PF machines for design, interpretation and optimization, for derivation of radiation scaling laws; and to provide insights into yield scaling limitations, radiative collapse, speed-enhanced and current-stepped PF variants. As example of fresh perspectives derivable from this code, this paper presents new results on energy transfers of the axial and radial phases of generalized PF devices. As the world moves inexorably towards the Fusion Energy Age it becomes ever more important to train plasma fusion researchers. A recent workshop in Nepal shows that demand for such training continues. Even commercial project development consultants are showing interest. We propose that the AAAPT-proven research package be upgraded, by modernizing the small PF for extreme modes of operation, switchable from the typical strong-focus mode to a slow-mode which barely pinches, thus producing a larger, more uniform plasma stream with superior deposition properties. Such a small device would be cost-effective and easily duplicated, and have the versatility of a range of experiments from intense multi-radiation generation and target damage studies to superior advanced-materials deposition. The complementary code is used to reference experiments up to the largest existing machine. This is ideal for studying machine limitations and scaling laws and to suggest new experiments. Such a modernized versatile PF machine complemented by the universally versatile code would extend the utility of the PF experience; so that AAAPT continues to provide leadership in pulsed plasma research training in

  6. Dust particles in controlled fusion devices: morphology, observations in the plasma and influence on the plasma performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubel, M.; Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J. A.; Sergienko, G.; Biel, W.; Drake, J. R.; Hedqvist, A.; Huber, A.; Philipps, V.

    2001-08-01

    The formation and release of particle agglomerates, i.e. debris and dusty objects, from plasma facing components and the impact of such materials on plasma operation in controlled fusion devices has been studied in the Extrap T2 reversed field pinch and the TEXTOR tokamak. Several plasma diagnostic techniques, camera observations and surface analysis methods were applied for in situ and ex situ investigation. The results are discussed in terms of processes that are decisive for dust transfer: localized power deposition connected with wall locked modes causing emission of carbon granules, brittle destruction of graphite and detachment of thick flaking co-deposited layers. The consequences for large next step devices are also addressed.

  7. Tests of local transport theory and reduced wall impurity influx with highly radiative plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. W.; Scott, S. D.; Bell, M.; Budny, R.; Bush, C. E.; Clark, R. E. H.; Denne-Hinnov, B.; Ernst, D. R.; Hammett, G. W.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mueller, D.; Ongena, J.; Park, H. K.; Ramsey, A. T.; Synakowski, E. J.; Taylor, G.; Zarnstorff, M. C.

    1999-03-01

    The electron temperature (Te) profile in neutral beam-heated supershot plasmas (Te0˜6-7 keV ion temperature Ti0˜15-20 keV, beam power Pb˜16 MW) was remarkably invariant when radiative losses were increased significantly through gas puffing of krypton and xenon in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [McGuire et al., Phys. Plasmas 2, 2176 (1995)]. Trace impurity concentrations (nz/ne˜10-3) generated almost flat and centrally peaked radiation profiles, respectively, and increased the radiative losses to 45%-90% of the input power (from the normal ˜25%). Energy confinement was not degraded at radiated power fractions up to 80%. A 20%-30% increase in Ti, in spite of an increase in ion-electron power loss, implies a factor of ˜3 drop in the local ion thermal diffusivity. These experiments form the basis for a nearly ideal test of transport theory, since the change in the beam heating power profile is modest, while the distribution of power flow between (1) radiation and (2) conduction plus convection changes radically and is locally measurable. The decrease in Te was significantly less than predicted by two transport models and may provide important tests of more complete transport models. At input power levels of 30 MW, the increased radiation eliminated the catastrophic carbon influx (carbon "bloom") and performance (energy confinement and neutron production) was improved significantly relative to that of matched shots without impurity gas puffing.

  8. Estimated heats of fusion of fluoride salt mixtures suitable for thermal energy storage applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, A. K.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The heats of fusion of several fluoride salt mixtures with melting points greater than 973 K were estimated from a coupled analysis of the available thermodynamic data and phase diagrams. Simple binary eutectic systems with and without terminal solid solutions, binary eutectics with congruent melting intermediate phases, and ternary eutectic systems were considered. Several combinations of salts were identified, most notable the eutectics LiF-22CaF2 and NaF-60MgF2 which melt at 1039 and 1273 K respectively which posses relatively high heats of fusion/gm (greater than 0.7 kJ/g). Such systems would seemingly be ideal candidates for the light weight, high energy storage media required by the thermal energy storage unit in advanced solar dynamic power systems envisioned for the future space missions.

  9. Possible energy gain for a plasma-liner-driven magneto-inertial fusion concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, C. E.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.

    2014-07-01

    A one-dimensional parameter study of a Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) concept indicates that significant gain may be achievable. This concept uses a dynamically formed plasma shell with inwardly directed momentum to drive a magnetized fuel to ignition, which in turn partially burns an intermediate layer of unmagnetized fuel. The concept is referred to as Plasma Jet MIF or PJMIF. The results of an adaptive mesh refinement Eulerian code (Crestone) are compared to those of a Lagrangian code (LASNEX). These are the first published results using the Crestone and LASNEX codes on the PJMIF concept.

  10. Possible energy gain for a plasma-liner-driven magneto-inertial fusion concept

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, C. E.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.

    2014-07-15

    A one-dimensional parameter study of a Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) concept indicates that significant gain may be achievable. This concept uses a dynamically formed plasma shell with inwardly directed momentum to drive a magnetized fuel to ignition, which in turn partially burns an intermediate layer of unmagnetized fuel. The concept is referred to as Plasma Jet MIF or PJMIF. The results of an adaptive mesh refinement Eulerian code (Crestone) are compared to those of a Lagrangian code (LASNEX). These are the first published results using the Crestone and LASNEX codes on the PJMIF concept.

  11. Prospects for x-ray polarimetry measurements of magnetic fields in magnetized liner inertial fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, Alan G. Gilmore, Mark

    2014-11-15

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments, where a metal liner is imploded to compress a magnetized seed plasma may generate peak magnetic fields ∼10{sup 4} T (100 Megagauss) over small volumes (∼10{sup −10}m{sup 3}) at high plasma densities (∼10{sup 28}m{sup −3}) on 100 ns time scales. Such conditions are extremely challenging to diagnose. We discuss the possibility of, and issues involved in, using polarimetry techniques at x-ray wavelengths to measure magnetic fields under these extreme conditions.

  12. Nuclear Fusion Within Extremely Dense Plasma Enhanced by Quantum Particle Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Feng; Zheng, Xianjun; Deng, Baiquan

    2015-05-01

    Quantum effects play an enhancement role in p-p chain reactions occurring within stars. Such an enhancement is quantified by a wave penetration factor that is proportional to the density of the participating fuel particles. This leads to an innovative theory for dense plasma, and its result shows good agreement with independent data derived from the solar energy output. An analysis of the first Z-pinch machine in mankind's history exhibiting neutron emission leads to a derived deuterium plasma beam density greater than that of water, with plasma velocities exceeding 10000 km/s. Fusion power could be achieved by the intersection of four such pinched plasma beams with powerful head-on collisions in their common focal region due to the beam and target enhanced reaction. supported by the Fund for the Construction of Graduate Degree of China (No. 2014XWD-S0805)

  13. Delay time embedding of mass loss avalanches in a fusion plasma-oriented sandpile model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowie, C. A.; Dendy, R. O.; Hole, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    The sandpile paradigm is widely used to model aspects of the phenomenology of magnetically confined fusion (MCF) plasmas, including enhanced confinement, edge pedestals and, potentially, the impulsive energy and particle release process known as ELMing. Here we identify new points of contact between ELMing and the systemwide avalanches in a sandpile. We compare the quantified response [Calderon et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 042306 (2014)] to increased fuelling of the time sequence of edge localised mode events in a series of similar Joint European Torus plasmas with the response to increased fuelling of the time sequence of systemwide avalanches in a sandpile model [Chapman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 2814 (2001)] that has well established links to MCF plasma phenomenology. Both the probability density functions of inter-event time intervals, and delay time embeddings of event time sequences, at different fuelling rates, show common features and point to shared underlying physics.

  14. Reaching High-Yield Fusion with a Slow Plasma Liner Compressing a Magnetized Target

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D; Parks, P B

    2008-03-18

    Dynamics of the compression of a magnetized plasma target by a heavy liner made of partially ionized high high-Z material is discussed. A 'soft-landing' (shockless) mode of the liner deceleration is analyzed. Conclusion is drawn that such mode is possible for the liners whose thickness at the time of the first contact with the target is smaller than, roughly, 10% of the initial (un-compressed) target radius. A combination of the plasma liner with one or two glide cones allows for a direct access to the area near the center of the reactor chamber. One can then generate plasma target inside the plasma liner at the optimum time. The other advantage of the glide cones is that they can be used to deliver additional fuel to the center of the target near the point of a maximum compression and thereby increase the fusion yield.

  15. Fusion in the Era of Burning Plasma Studies: Workforce Planning for 2004 to 2014. Final report to FESA C

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2004-03-29

    This report has been prepared in response to Dr. R. Orbach’s request of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) to “address the issue of workforce development in the U.S. fusion program.” The report addresses three key questions: what is the current status of the fusion science, technology, and engineering workforce; what is the workforce that will be needed and when it will be needed to ensure that the U.S. is an effective partner in ITER and to enable the U.S. to successfully carry out the fusion program; and, what can be done to ensure a qualified, diversified, and sufficiently large workforce and a pipeline to maintain that workforce? In addressing the charge, the Panel considers a workforce that allows for a vigorous national program of fusion energy research that includes participation in magnetic fusion (ITER) and inertial fusion (NIF) burning plasma experiments.

  16. Electron Heating in Microwave-Assisted Helicon Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, John; Siddiqui, Umair; Jemiolo, Andrew; McIlvain, Julianne; Scime, Earl

    2016-10-01

    The use of two (or more) rf sources at different frequencies is a common technique in the plasma processing industry to control ion energy characteristics separately from plasma generation. A similar approach is presented here with the focus on modifying the electron population in argon and helium plasmas. The plasma is generated by a helicon source at a frequency f 0 = 13.56 MHz. Mcrowaves of frequency f 1 = 2.45 GHz are then injected into the helicon source chamber perpendicular to the background magnetic field. The microwaves damp on the electrons via X-mode Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) at the upper hybrid resonance, providing additional energy input into the electrons. The effects of this secondary-source heating on electron density, temperature, and energy distribution function are examined and compared to helicon-only single source plasmas as well as numeric models suggesting that the heating is not evenly distributed but spatially localized. Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) is used to examine the impact of the energetic tail of the electron distribution on ion and neutral species via collisional excitation. Large enhancements of neutral spectral lines are observed with little to no enhancement of ion lines.

  17. Heating of the plasma sheet by broadband electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaston, C. C.; Bonnell, J. W.; Salem, C.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate that broadband low-frequency electromagnetic field fluctuations embedded within fast flows throughout the Earth's plasma sheet may drive significant ion heating. This heating is nearly entirely in the direction perpendicular to the background magnetic field and is estimated to occur at an average rate of ~1 eV/s with rates in excess of 10 eV/s within one standard deviation of the average value over all observed events. For an Earthward flow the total change in temperature along a flow path may exceed one keV and for "wave-rich" flows can be comparable to that expected due to conservation of the first adiabatic invariant. The consequent increase in plasma pressure and flux tube entropy may lead to braking of inward motion and the suppression of plasma interchange.

  18. Numerical analysis of the heat transfer and fluid flow in the butt-fusion welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jae Hyun; Choi, Sunwoong; Nam, Jaewook; Ahn, Kyung Hyun; Oh, Ju Seok

    2017-02-01

    Butt-fusion welding is an effective process for welding polymeric pipes. The process can be simplified into two stages. In heat soak stage, the pipe is heated using a hot plate contacted with one end of the pipe. In jointing stage, a pair of heated pipes is compressed against one another so that the melt regions become welded. In previous works, the jointing stage that is highly related to the welding quality was neglected. However, in this study, a finite element simulation is conducted including the jointing stage. The heat and momentum transfer are considered altogether. A new numerical scheme to describe the melt flow and pipe deformation for the butt-fusion welding process is introduced. High density polyethylene (HDPE) is used for the material. Flow via thermal expansion of the heat soak stage, and squeezing and fountain flow of the jointing stage are well reproduced. It is also observed that curling beads are formed and encounter the pipe body. The unique contribution of this study is its capability of directly observing the flow behaviors that occur during the jointing stage and relating them to welding quality.

  19. Plasma guns for controlled fusion at megagauss energy-densities

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, Peter J; Roderick, Norman F; Degnan, James H; Frese, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    Electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at a low power level has been used on Tore Supra to induce local perturbations of the current density profile. Regimes with strong MHD activity have been analysed, and compared with similar stable discharges, in order to investigate the possible causes of their instability and relate the evolution of the discharge to the localization of EC power deposition. Both co- and counter-current drive pulses have been applied to dominantly or fully non-inductive discharges, sustained by a lower hybrid current drive. Detailed reconstructions by current diffusion calculations have been performed and the error bars evaluated. This method has proved valuable for shedding light on the complex interplay between the evolutions of temperature and safety factor profiles in steady-state tokamak plasmas. The crucial role of the dynamic evolution of rational surfaces has been identified. Moreover, we demonstrate that the operational domain in which ECCD can be employed must cope with the overall current profile characteristics, in particular the position where the safety factor has a minimum.

  20. Experience with deuterium-tritium plasmas heated by high power neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Kamperschroer, J.H.; O`Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Stevenson, T.; Von Halle, A.

    1996-12-31

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor has operated since November of 1993 with a deuterium-tritium fuel mixture for selected discharges. The majority of the tritium has been introduced as energetic neutral atoms of up to 120 keV injected by the neutral beam systems, with some of the twelve ion sources run on pure tritium and some on deuterium to optimize the fuel mixture in the core plasma. A maximum beam power of 39.6 megawatts has been injected, and deuterium-tritium fusion power production has reached 10.7 megawatts, achieving central fusion power densities comparable to or greater than those expected for the International Thermonuclear Reactor, and allowing the first studies of fusion-produced alpha particle behavior in reactor grade plasmas. Energy confinement in deuterium-tritium plasmas is better than in similar deuterium plasmas for most plasma regimes. Innovative techniques to manipulate the plasma current and pressure profiles are permitting studies of enhanced confinement regimes.

  1. Super-diffusion scalings - space versus fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Sergey; Budaev, Vyacheslav; Silin, Victor

    2016-07-01

    In the plasma kinetics, looking at the plasma waves interactions with the particles, most people use the Boltzman nonlinear approach for a variate of the waves, which could be interpreted as a "turbulence". We have now a theory for ion-sound turbulence [Silin e. a., 2011] that predicts fast heating of the ions: it can be either in fusion devices , magnetosphere or solar plasma. The ion heating could result into the power lowers for the turbulent spectra. We compare the theory predictions with the experimental data both from the fusion laboratory devices and from space plasma data, discussing their applicability to the solar plasma.

  2. Designing a tokamak fusion reactor—How does plasma physics fit in?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidberg, J. P.; Mangiarotti, F. J.; Minervini, J.

    2015-07-01

    This paper attempts to bridge the gap between tokamak reactor design and plasma physics. The analysis demonstrates that the overall design of a tokamak fusion reactor is determined almost entirely by the constraints imposed by nuclear physics and fusion engineering. Virtually, no plasma physics is required to determine the main design parameters of a reactor: a , R 0 , B 0 , T i , T e , p , n , τ E , I . The one exception is the value of the toroidal current I , which depends upon a combination of engineering and plasma physics. This exception, however, ultimately has a major impact on the feasibility of an attractive tokamak reactor. The analysis shows that the engineering/nuclear physics design makes demands on the plasma physics that must be satisfied in order to generate power. These demands are substituted into the well-known operational constraints arising in tokamak physics: the Troyon limit, Greenwald limit, kink stability limit, and bootstrap fraction limit. Unfortunately, a tokamak reactor designed on the basis of standard engineering and nuclear physics constraints does not scale to a reactor. Too much current is required to achieve the necessary confinement time for ignition. The combination of achievable bootstrap current plus current drive is not sufficient to generate the current demanded by the engineering design. Several possible solutions are discussed in detail involving advances in plasma physics or engineering. The main contribution of the present work is to demonstrate that the basic reactor design and its plasma physics consequences can be determined simply and analytically. The analysis thus provides a crisp, compact, logical framework that will hopefully lead to improved physical intuition for connecting plasma physic to tokamak reactor design.

  3. Advances in High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating of NSTX H-mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Philip Michael; Ahn, Joonwook; Bell, R. E.; Bonoli, P.; Chen, Guangye; Green, David L; Harvey, R. W.; Hosea, J.; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Kaye, S.; LeBlanc, B; Maingi, Rajesh; Phillips, Cynthia; Podesta, M.; Taylor, G.; Wilgen, John B; Wilson, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    High-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive is being developed in NSTX to provide bulk electron heating and q(0) control during non-inductively sustained Hmode plasmas fuelled by deuterium neutral-beam injection (NBI). In addition, it is used to assist the plasma current ramp-up. A major modification to increase the RF power limit was made in 2009; the original end-grounded, single end-powered current straps of the 12- element array were replaced with center-grounded, double end-powered straps. Greater than 3 MW have been coupled into NBI-driven, ELMy H-mode plasmas with this upgraded antenna. Improved core HHFW heating, particularly at longer wavelengths and during low-density start-up and plasma current ramp-up, has been obtained by lowering the edge density with lithium wall conditioning, thereby moving the critical density for fast-wave propagation away from the vessel wall [1]. Significant core electron heating of NBI-fuelled H-modes has been observed for the first time over a range of launched wavelengths and H-modes can be accessed by HHFW alone. Visible and IR camera images of the antenna and divertor indicate that fast wave interactions can deposit considerable RF energy on the outboard divertor plate, especially at longer wavelengths that begin to propagate closer to the vessel walls. Edge power loss can also arise from HHFWgenerated parametric decay instabilities; edge ion heating is observed that is wavelength dependent. During plasmas where HHFW is combined with NBI, there is a significant enhancement in neutron rate, and fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) emission measurements clearly show broadening of the fast-ion profile in the plasma core. Large edge localized modes (ELMs) have been observed immediately following the termination of RF power, whether the power turn off is programmed or due to antenna arcing. Causality has not been established but new experiments are planned and will be reported. Fast digitization of the reflected power signal

  4. Application of spatially resolved high resolution crystal spectrometry to inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Pablant, N. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Zhang, L.

    2012-10-15

    High resolution ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}{approx} 10 000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixel array detector is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature and plasma flow-velocity profiles in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Meter sized plasmas are diagnosed with cm spatial resolution and 10 ms time resolution. This concept can also be used as a diagnostic of small sources, such as inertial confinement fusion plasmas and targets on x-ray light source beam lines, with spatial resolution of micrometers, as demonstrated by laboratory experiments using a 250-{mu}m {sup 55}Fe source, and by ray-tracing calculations. Throughput calculations agree with measurements, and predict detector counts in the range 10{sup -8}-10{sup -6} times source x-rays, depending on crystal reflectivity and spectrometer geometry. Results of the lab demonstrations, application of the technique to the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and predictions of performance on NIF will be presented.

  5. Simultaneous analysis of plasma and CSF by NMR and hierarchical models fusion.

    PubMed

    Smolinska, Agnieszka; Posma, Joram M; Blanchet, Lionel; Ampt, Kirsten A M; Attali, Amos; Tuinstra, Tinka; Luider, Theo; Doskocz, Marek; Michiels, Paul J; Girard, Frederic C; Buydens, Lutgarde M C; Wijmenga, Sybren S

    2012-05-01

    Because cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is the biofluid which interacts most closely with the central nervous system, it holds promise as a reporter of neurological disease, for example multiple sclerosis (MScl). To characterize the metabolomics profile of neuroinflammatory aspects of this disease we studied an animal model of MScl-experimental autoimmune/allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). Because CSF also exchanges metabolites with blood via the blood-brain barrier, malfunctions occurring in the CNS may be reflected in the biochemical composition of blood plasma. The combination of blood plasma and CSF provides more complete information about the disease. Both biofluids can be studied by use of NMR spectroscopy. It is then necessary to perform combined analysis of the two different datasets. Mid-level data fusion was therefore applied to blood plasma and CSF datasets. First, relevant information was extracted from each biofluid dataset by use of linear support vector machine recursive feature elimination. The selected variables from each dataset were concatenated for joint analysis by partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). The combined metabolomics information from plasma and CSF enables more efficient and reliable discrimination of the onset of EAE. Second, we introduced hierarchical models fusion, in which previously developed PLS-DA models are hierarchically combined. We show that this approach enables neuroinflamed rats (even on the day of onset) to be distinguished from either healthy or peripherally inflamed rats. Moreover, progression of EAE can be investigated because the model separates the onset and peak of the disease.

  6. Fusion Studies in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    A new strategic energy plan decided by the Japanese Cabinet in 2014 strongly supports the steady promotion of nuclear fusion development activities, including the ITER project and the Broader Approach activities from the long-term viewpoint. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in Japan formulated the Third Phase Basic Program so as to promote an experimental fusion reactor project. In 2005 AEC has reviewed this Program, and discussed on selection and concentration among many projects of fusion reactor development. In addition to the promotion of ITER project, advanced tokamak research by JT-60SA, helical plasma experiment by LHD, FIREX project in laser fusion research and fusion engineering by IFMIF were highly prioritized. Although the basic concept is quite different between tokamak, helical and laser fusion researches, there exist a lot of common features such as plasma physics on 3-D magnetic geometry, high power heat load on plasma facing component and so on. Therefore, a synergetic scenario on fusion reactor development among various plasma confinement concepts would be important.

  7. Surface Waves and Landau Resonant Heating in Unmagnetized Bounded Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Kevin

    2001-10-01

    Owing to the large areas and high plasma densities found in some recently developed devices [1], electrostatic theories of plasma resonances and surface wave [2-3] propagation in such devices are suspect as the size of the device is much larger than the free space wavelength associated with the peak plasma frequency. Accordingly, an electromagnetic model of surface wave propagation has been developed appropriate for large area plasmas. The predicted wave dispersion of the two models differs for extremely long wavelengths but is degenerate in devices small compared with wavelength. First principles particle-in-cell simulations using new techniques developed for the demanding simulation regime have been conducted which support these results. Given the slow wave character and boundary localized fields of surface waves, a periodic electrode may be used to resonantly excite a strong wave-particle interaction between surface waves and electrons. At saturation, the electron velocity distribution is enhanced above the phase velocity of the applied wave and suppressed below. The use of this technique (``Landau resonant heating'') to selectively heat the electron high energy tail to enhance electron-impact ionization is demonstrated using particle-in-cell simulation. [1] Matsumoto (Sumitomo Metal Industries). Private Communication. July 1999. [2] Nickel, Parker, Gould. Phys. Fluids. 7:1489. 1964. [3] Cooperberg. Phys. Plasmas. Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1998.

  8. Neutral beam heating of a RFP plasma in MST

    SciTech Connect

    Waksman, J.; Anderson, J. K.; Nornberg, M. D.; Parke, E.; Reusch, J. A.; Liu, D.; Fiksel, G.; Davydenko, V. I.; Ivanov, A. A.; Stupishin, N.; Deichuli, P. P.; Sakakita, H.

    2012-12-15

    Electron temperature is observed to rise due to neutral beam injection (NBI) in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). Heating is observed to be 100 {+-} 50 eV in the core of 200 kA plasmas. This is the first definitive measurement of auxiliary heating of a reversed-field pinch (RFP). This heating is consistent with a 1D classical model which was developed. This 1D model calculates the evolving thermal conductivity and ohmic power input profiles during enhanced confinement, and can calculate NBI deposition and classical fast ion diffusion and slowing. The predicted temperature change is consistent with measured beam heating both during and after enhanced confinement, which is consistent with previous observations that fast ions are well confined and behave roughly classically in the RFP.

  9. Laser driven instabilities in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.L.

    1990-06-04

    Parametric instabilities excited by an intense electromagnetic wave in a plasma is a fundamental topic relevant to many applications. These applications include laser fusion, heating of magnetically-confined plasmas, ionospheric modification, and even particle acceleration for high energy physics. In laser fusion, these instabilities have proven to play an essential role in the choice of laser wavelength. Characterization and control of the instabilities is an ongoing priority in laser plasma experiments. Recent progress and some important trends will be discussed. 8 figs.

  10. Optimization of tritium breeding and shielding analysis to plasma in ITER fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indah Rosidah, M.; Suud, Zaki; Yazid, Putranto Ilham

    2015-09-01

    The development of fusion energy is one of the important International energy strategies with the important milestone is ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) project, initiated by many countries, such as: America, Europe, and Japan who agreed to set up TOKAMAK type fusion reactor in France. In ideal fusion reactor the fuel is purely deuterium, but it need higher temperature of reactor. In ITER project the fuels are deuterium and tritium which need lower temperature of the reactor. In this study tritium for fusion reactor can be produced by using reaction of lithium with neutron in the blanket region. With the tritium breeding blanket which react between Li-6 in the blanket with neutron resulted from the plasma region. In this research the material used in each layer surrounding the plasma in the reactor is optimized. Moreover, achieving self-sufficiency condition in the reactor in order tritium has enough availability to be consumed for a long time. In order to optimize Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) value in the fusion reactor, there are several strategies considered here. The first requirement is making variation in Li-6 enrichment to be 60%, 70%, and 90%. But, the result of that condition can not reach TBR value better than with no enrichment. Because there is reduction of Li-7 percent when increasing Li-6 percent. The other way is converting neutron multiplier material with Pb. From this, we get TBR value better with the Be as neutron multiplier. Beside of TBR value, fusion reactor can analyze the distribution of neutron flux and dose rate of neutron to know the change of neutron concentration for each layer in reactor. From the simulation in this study, 97% neutron concentration can be absorbed by material in reactor, so it is good enough. In addition, it is required to analyze spectrum neutron energy in many layers in the fusion reactor such as in blanket, coolant, and divertor. Actually material in that layer can resist in high temperature

  11. Optimization of tritium breeding and shielding analysis to plasma in ITER fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Indah Rosidah, M. Suud, Zaki; Yazid, Putranto Ilham

    2015-09-30

    The development of fusion energy is one of the important International energy strategies with the important milestone is ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) project, initiated by many countries, such as: America, Europe, and Japan who agreed to set up TOKAMAK type fusion reactor in France. In ideal fusion reactor the fuel is purely deuterium, but it need higher temperature of reactor. In ITER project the fuels are deuterium and tritium which need lower temperature of the reactor. In this study tritium for fusion reactor can be produced by using reaction of lithium with neutron in the blanket region. With the tritium breeding blanket which react between Li-6 in the blanket with neutron resulted from the plasma region. In this research the material used in each layer surrounding the plasma in the reactor is optimized. Moreover, achieving self-sufficiency condition in the reactor in order tritium has enough availability to be consumed for a long time. In order to optimize Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) value in the fusion reactor, there are several strategies considered here. The first requirement is making variation in Li-6 enrichment to be 60%, 70%, and 90%. But, the result of that condition can not reach TBR value better than with no enrichment. Because there is reduction of Li-7 percent when increasing Li-6 percent. The other way is converting neutron multiplier material with Pb. From this, we get TBR value better with the Be as neutron multiplier. Beside of TBR value, fusion reactor can analyze the distribution of neutron flux and dose rate of neutron to know the change of neutron concentration for each layer in reactor. From the simulation in this study, 97% neutron concentration can be absorbed by material in reactor, so it is good enough. In addition, it is required to analyze spectrum neutron energy in many layers in the fusion reactor such as in blanket, coolant, and divertor. Actually material in that layer can resist in high temperature

  12. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited).

    PubMed

    Delgado-Aparicio, L F; Maddox, J; Pablant, N; Hill, K; Bitter, M; Rice, J E; Granetz, R; Hubbard, A; Irby, J; Greenwald, M; Marmar, E; Tritz, K; Stutman, D; Stratton, B; Efthimion, P

    2016-11-01

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metal contributions. This technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.

  13. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    DOE PAGES

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; ...

    2016-11-14

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metalmore » contributions. As a result, this technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.« less

  14. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; Hill, K.; Bitter, M.; Rice, J. E.; Granetz, R.; Hubbard, A.; Irby, J.; Greenwald, M.; Marmar, E.; Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Stratton, B.; Efthimion, P.

    2016-11-01

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metal contributions. This technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.

  15. Observation of Multiple Reconnections during Self-organization Process of High Temperature Fusion Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, H. K.; Tobias, B.; Choi, M. J.; Yun, G. S.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Munsat, T.; Donné, A. J. H.; Spakman, G. W.; Textor Team

    2011-10-01

    Images of a high resolution 2-D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic shows evidence of multiple magnetic reconnection processes during the internal disruption of a high temperature tokamak plasmas. The disruption induces magnetic self-organization of the toroidal plasma being accompanied by successive or simultaneous multiple layer reconnection. The degree of asymmetric deformation of the internal magnetic structure (m/n=1/1 mode) prior to temperature crash influences the outcome of the disruptive behavior. The observation is critical for the building block of first principle theoretical modeling of the sawtooth oscillation in current driven toroidal plasmas and the understandings can be applied to the impulsive disruptive behavior in flares of the solar, accretion disk and stellar coronae, Earth magnetospheric storms, and controlled fusion. Work supported by the NRF of Korea, the US DOE, the NWO of the Netherlands, and the EURATOM-FOM association.

  16. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; Hill, K.; Bitter, M.; Rice, J. E.; Granetz, R.; Hubbard, A.; Irby, J.; Greenwald, M.; Marmar, E.; Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Stratton, B.; Efthimion, P.

    2016-11-14

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metal contributions. As a result, this technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.

  17. Observation of Ion Cyclotron Heating in a Fast-flowing Plasma for an Advanced Plasma Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Akira; Hatanaka, Motoi; Shibata, Masaki; Tobari, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Kunihiko; Inutake, Masaaki

    2004-11-01

    In the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) project in NASA, the combined system of the ion cyclotron heating and the magnetic nozzle is proposed to control a ratio of specific impulse to thrust at constant power. In order to establish the advanced plasma thruster, experiments of an ion heating and plasma acceleration by a magnetic nozzle are performed in a fast-flowing plasma in the HITOP device. A fast-flowing He plasma is produced by Magneto-Plasma-Dynamic Arcjet (MPDA) operated with an externally-applied magnetic field up to 1kG. RF waves with an ion cyclotron range of frequency (f=20-300kHz) is excited by a helically-wound antenna located downstream of the MPDA. Increases of an ion temperature and plasma stored energy measured by a diamagnetic coil clearly observed during the RF pulse. The heating efficiency is compared for various magnetic field configurations and strengths. There appears no indication of cyclotron resonance in a high density plasma where the ratio of ion cyclotron frequency to ion-ion collision one is below unity, because an ion-ion collisional effect is dominant. When the density becomes low and the ratio of ion cyclotron frequency to ion-ion collision one becomes high, features of ion cyclotron resonance are clearly appeared. The optimum magnetic field strength for the ion heating is slightly lower than that of the cyclotron resonance, which is caused by the Doppler effect due to the fast-flowing plasma. An ion energy distribution function is measured at a magnetic nozzle region by an electrostatic analyzer and increase of the parallel velocity is also observed.

  18. Application of Laser-Generated Ion Beams for Isochoric Heating to Study Plasma Mix at Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, B. J.; Fernández, J. C.; Bang, W.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Hamilton, C. E.; Palaniyappan, S.; Santiago Cordoba, M. A.; Vold, E. L.; Yin, L.; Hegelich, B. M.; Dyer, G.; Roycroft, R.

    2015-11-01

    The evolution and mixing of high-Z/low-Z interfaces in plasma media is of profound importance to high energy density physics and inertial fusion experiments. Recent experiments performed at the LANL Trident laser facility as part of the Plasma Interfacial Mix project have applied novel, laser-generated ion beams created under conditions of relativistic induced transparency to the heating of solid-density, multi-material targets isochorically and uniformly (over a few tens of ps), attaining plasma temperatures of several eV. Measurements have been made of the evolving plasma, including location of the material interface and the time-history of the temperature of the medium. Recent data and associated radiation hydrodynamic modeling from our Trident campaigns will be reported. Complementary kinetic simulations of interface evolution, showing anomalously rapid atomic mixing under conditions relevant to ICF experiments, will also be discussed. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Funding provided by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  19. Plasma Heating and Ultrafast Semiconductor Laser Modulation Through a Terahertz Heating Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Ning, C. Z.

    2000-01-01

    Electron-hole plasma heating and ultrafast modulation in a semiconductor laser under a terahertz electrical field are investigated using a set of hydrodynamic equations derived from the semiconductor Bloch equations. The self-consistent treatment of lasing and heating processes leads to the prediction of a strong saturation and degradation of modulation depth even at moderate terahertz field intensity. This saturation places a severe limit to bandwidth achievable with such scheme in ultrafast modulation. Strategies for increasing modulation depth are discussed.

  20. Direct Fusion Drive for a Human Mars Orbital Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Paluszek, Michael; Pajer, Gary; Razin, Yosef; Slonaker, James; Cohen, Samuel; Feder, Russ; Griffin, Kevin; Walsh, Matthew

    2014-08-01

    The Direct Fusion Drive (DFD) is a nuclear fusion engine that produces both thrust and electric power. It employs a field reversed configuration with an odd-parity rotating magnetic field heating system to heat the plasma to fusion temperatures. The engine uses deuterium and helium-3 as fuel and additional deuterium that is heated in the scrape-off layer for thrust augmentation. In this way variable exhaust velocity and thrust is obtained.

  1. Runaway electrons as a source of impurity and reduced fusion yield in the dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, Eric J.; Yousefi, Hamid R.

    2014-10-15

    Impurities produced by the vaporization of metals in the electrodes may be a major cause of reduced fusion yields in high-current dense plasma focus devices. We propose here that a major, but hitherto-overlooked, cause of such impurities is vaporization by runaway electrons during the breakdown process at the beginning of the current pulse. This process is sufficient to account for the large amount of erosion observed in many dense plasma focus devices on the anode very near to the insulator. The erosion is expected to become worse with lower pressures, typical of machines with large electrode radii, and would explain the plateauing of fusion yield observed in such machines at higher peak currents. Such runaway electron vaporization can be eliminated by the proper choice of electrode material, by reducing electrode radii and thus increasing fill gas pressure, or by using pre-ionization to eliminate the large fields that create runaway electrons. If these steps are combined with monolithic electrodes to eliminate arcing erosion, large reductions in impurities and large increases in fusion yield may be obtained, as the I{sup 4} scaling is extended to higher currents.

  2. Refined Calculations of Secondary Nuclear Reactions in Magneto-Inertial Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, Paul; Knapp, Patrick; Hansen, Stephanie; Gomez, Matthew; Hahn, Kelly; Sinars, Daniel; Peterson, Kyle; Slutz, Stephen; Sefkow, Adam; Awe, Thomas; Harding, Eric; Jennings, Christopher

    2014-10-01

    Diagnosing the degree of magnetic flux compression at stagnation in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is critical for charting the performance of any MIF concept. In pure deuterium plasma, the transport of high-energy tritons produced by the aneutronic DD fusion reaction depends strongly on the magnetic field. The tritons probe and occasionally react with the fuel, emitting secondary DT neutrons. We show that the DT/DD neutron yield ratio and the secondary DT neutron spectra can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product (BR), the critical confinement parameter for MIF. The amount of fuel-pusher mix also can be constrained by secondary reactions. We discuss the sensitivity to plasma inhomogeneities of the calculations and outline methods to relate secondary yields to alpha particle energy deposition in ignition-relevant experiments employing DT fuel. We compare our calculations to recent tests of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept on the Z Pulsed Power Facility. Supported in part by the SNL Truman Fellowship, which is part of the LDRD Program, and sponsored by Sandia Corporation (a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation) as Operator of SNL under its U.S. DoE Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Generation and compression of a target plasma for magnetized target fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Sheehey, P.T.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is intermediate between the two very different approaches to fusion: inertial and magnetic confinement fusion (ICF and MCF). Results from collaboration with a Russian MTF team on their MAGO experiments suggest they have a target plasma suitable for compression to provide an MTF proof of principle. This LDRD project had tow main objectives: first, to provide a computational basis for experimental investigation of an alternative MTF plasma, and second to explore the physics and computational needs for a continuing program. Secondary objectives included analytic and computational support for MTF experiments. The first objective was fulfilled. The second main objective has several facets to be described in the body of this report. Finally, the authors have developed tools for analyzing data collected on the MAGO a nd LDRD experiments, and have tested them on limited MAGO data.

  4. Two dimensional impinging jet cooling of high heat flux surface in magnetic confinement fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, A.; Tanno, T.; Takahashi, M.

    1994-12-31

    Divertor surface of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor is exposed to strong radiation heating by high flux charged particles. According to standard design of the ITER, the heat flux of the divertor surface becomes average 15MW/m{sup 2} or more. In this study, a cooling by a two dimensional impinging jet flow is proposed to cool such high heat flux surface. For an impinging jet flow to flat heated surface, such as CHF is obtained only in the limited surface region where the jet flow hits directly. Apart from the region, the CHF decreases abruptly with the distance from the center. The main reason is that the pressure decreases abruptly as apart from the center region and the liquid flow is spread away from the heated surface region by the strong boiling. To overcome these difficulties, the authors propose that the impinging jet is applied to the heat transfer wall with a concave surface, because the pressure change becomes mild by the centrifugal force along the curved surface. The increase of the radial pressure gradient in the vertical direction to the curved surface promotes the departure of vapor bubbles near the wall region. It is expected that this mechanism as well as keeping high pressure along the flow works to enhance the CHF. To obtain the high heat flux in the wide region, a use of a two-dimensional impinging jet is suitable instead of a round jet.

  5. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N

    2013-06-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  6. The potential role of electric fields and plasma barodiffusion on the inertial confinement fusion databasea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter; Wilks, S. C.; Bellei, C.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2011-05-01

    The generation of strong, self-generated electric fields (GV/m) in direct-drive, inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) capsules has been reported [Rygg et al., Science 319, 1223 (2008); Li et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 225001 (2008)]. A candidate explanation for the origin of these fields based on charge separation across a plasma shock front was recently proposed [Amendt et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 51 124048 (2009)]. The question arises whether such electric fields in imploding capsules can have observable consequences on target performance. Two well-known anomalies come to mind: (1) an observed ≈2× greater-than-expected deficit of neutrons in an equimolar D3He fuel mixture compared with hydrodynamically equivalent D [Rygg et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)] and DT [Herrmann et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056312 (2009)] fuels, and (2) a similar shortfall of neutrons when trace amounts of argon are mixed with D in indirect-drive implosions [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)]. A new mechanism based on barodiffusion (or pressure gradient-driven diffusion) in a plasma is proposed that incorporates the presence of shock-generated electric fields to explain the reported anomalies. For implosions performed at the Omega laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], the (low Mach number) return shock has an appreciable scale length over which the lighter D ions can diffuse away from fuel center. The depletion of D fuel is estimated and found to lead to a corresponding reduction in neutrons, consistent with the anomalies observed in experiments for both argon-doped D fuels and D3He equimolar mixtures. The reverse diffusional flux of the heavier ions toward fuel center also increases the pressure from a concomitant increase in electron number density, resulting in lower stagnation pressures and larger imploded cores in agreement with gated, self-emission, x-ray imaging data.

  7. Cryogenic heat loads analysis from SST-1 plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairagi, N.; Tanna, V. L.; Pradhan, S.

    2017-02-01

    Cryogenic heat load analysis is an important aspect for stable operation of Tokamaks employing large scale superconducting magnets. Steady State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) at IPR is equipped with superconducting magnets system (SCMS) comprising sixteen numbers of modified ‘D’ shaped toroidal field (TF) and nine poloidal field (PF) superconducting coils which are wound using NbTi/Cu based cable-in conduit conductor (CICC). SST-1 magnets operation has flexibility to cool either in two-phase with sub-cooling, two-phase without sub-cooling or single phase (supercritical) helium using a dedicated 1.3 kW helium refrigerator cum liquefier (HRL). Here, we report gross heat losses for integrated TF superconducting magnets of SST-1 during the plasma campaign using cryogenic helium supply/return thermodynamic data from cryoplant. Heat loads mainly comprising of steady state as well as transient loads are smoothly absorbed by SST-1 cryogenic helium plant during plasma experiments. The corresponding heat produced in the coils is totally released to the helium flowing through the TF coils, which in turn is dumped into liquid helium stored in main control Dewar. These results are very useful reference for heat loss analysis for TF as well as PF coils and provides database for future operation of SST-1 machine.

  8. Restoration of the plasma discharge during density limit disruptions in the T-10 tokamak using electron cyclotron heating and ohmic power supply system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savrukhin, P. V.; Shestakov, E. A.

    2016-11-01

    Experiments in the T-10 tokamak [Alikaev et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30, 381 (1988)] have demonstrated the possibility of control of the plasma current and prevention of formation of the non-thermal (Eγ > 150 keV) electron beams after an energy quench at the density limit disruption using electron cyclotron heating (ECRH) and controlled operation of the Ohmic power supply system. Quasi-stable plasma operation with repetitive sawtooth oscillations can be restored after an energy quench using high auxiliary power Pec > 2-5 Poh. Optimal conditions of the plasma discharge recovery after an energy quench using auxiliary heating are identified. At high auxiliary power, restoration of the plasma discharge can be provided with the location of the EC resonance zone within the whole plasma cross section. The auxiliary power required for discharge restoration is minimal when the power is deposited around the m = 2, n = 1 magnetic island (here m and n poloidal and toroidal wave numbers). The threshold ECRH power increases linearly with plasma current. Prevention of the non-thermal electron beams during density limit disruption is associated with stabilization of bursts of the magnetohydrodynamic modes, creation of the saturated magnetic islands, and heating of the background plasma using ECRH. Plasma discharge recovery after an energy quench in a tokamak reactor using auxiliary heating and controllable reduction of the plasma current is discussed.

  9. Investigation of heat transfer in liquid-metal flows under fusion-reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddubnyi, I. I.; Pyatnitskaya, N. Yu.; Razuvanov, N. G.; Sviridov, V. G.; Sviridov, E. V.; Leshukov, A. Yu.; Aleskovskiy, K. V.; Obukhov, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    The effect discovered in studying a downward liquid-metal flow in vertical pipe and in a channel of rectangular cross section in, respectively, a transverse and a coplanar magnetic field is analyzed. In test blanket modules (TBM), which are prototypes of a blanket for a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) and which are intended for experimental investigations at the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), liquid metals are assumed to fulfil simultaneously the functions of (i) a tritium breeder, (ii) a coolant, and (iii) neutron moderator and multiplier. This approach to testing experimentally design solutions is motivated by plans to employ, in the majority of the currently developed DEMO blanket projects, liquid metals pumped through pipes and/or rectangular channels in a transvers magnetic field. At the present time, experiments that would directly simulate liquid-metal flows under conditions of ITER TBM and/or DEMO blanket operation (irradiation with thermonuclear neutrons, a cyclic temperature regime, and a magnetic-field strength of about 4 to 10 T) are not implementable for want of equipment that could reproduce simultaneously the aforementioned effects exerted by thermonuclear plasmas. This is the reason why use is made of an iterative approach to experimentally estimating the performance of design solutions for liquid-metal channels via simulating one or simultaneously two of the aforementioned factors. Therefore, the investigations reported in the present article are of considerable topical interest. The respective experiments were performed on the basis of the mercury magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) loop that is included in the structure of the MPEI—JIHT MHD experimental facility. Temperature fields were measured under conditions of two- and one-sided heating, and data on averaged-temperature fields, distributions of the wall temperature, and statistical fluctuation features were obtained. A substantial effect of counter thermo gravitational

  10. Recent magneto-inertial fusion experiments on the field reversed configuration heating experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnan, J. H.; Amdahl, D. J.; Domonkos, M.; Lehr, F. M.; Grabowski, C.; Robinson, P. R.; Ruden, E. L.; White, W. M.; Wurden, G. A.; Intrator, T. P.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Waganaar, W. J.; Frese, M. H.; Frese, S. D.; Camacho, J. F.; Coffey, S. K.; Makhin, V.; Roderick, N. F.; Gale, D. G.; Kostora, M.; Lerma, A.; McCullough, J. L.; Sommars, W.; Kiuttu, G. F.; Bauer, B.; Fuelling, S. R.; Siemon, R. E.; Lynn, A. G.; Turchi, P. J.

    2013-09-01

    Magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) approaches take advantage of an embedded magnetic field to improve plasma energy confinement by reducing thermal conduction relative to conventional inertial confinement fusion (ICF). MIF reduces required precision in the implosion and the convergence ratio. Since 2008 (Wurden et al 2008 IAEA 2008 Fusion Energy Conf. (Geneva, Switzerland, 13-18 October) IC/P4-13 LA-UR-08-0796) and since our prior refereed publication on this topic (Degnan et al 2008 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 36 80), AFRL and LANL have developed further one version of MIF. We have (1) reliably formed, translated, and captured field reversed configurations (FRCs) in magnetic mirrors inside metal shells or liners in preparation for subsequent compression by liner implosion; (2) imploded a liner with interior magnetic mirror field, obtaining evidence for compression of a 1.36 T field to 540 T (3) performed a full system experiment of FRC formation, translation, capture, and imploding liner compression operation; (4) identified by comparison of 2D-MHD simulation and experiments factors limiting the closed-field lifetime of FRCs to about half that required for good liner compression of FRCs to multi-keV, 1019 ion cm-3, high energy density plasma (HEDP) conditions; and (5) designed and prepared hardware to increase that closed-field FRC lifetime to the required amount. Those lifetime experiments are now underway, with the goal of at least doubling closed-field FRC lifetimes and performing FRC implosions to HEDP conditions this year. These experiments have obtained imaging evidence of FRC rotation, and of initial rotation control measures slowing and stopping such rotation. Important improvements in fidelity of simulation to experiment have been achieved, enabling improved guidance and understanding of experiment design and performance.

  11. Determination of selenium in biological samples by slurry sampling-electrothermal vaporization-in situ fusion-isotope dilution-microwave-induced nitrogen plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Takafumi; Nishide, Akifumi; Okutsu, Kentaro; Minami, Hirotsugu; Zhang, Qiangbin; Inoue, Sadanobu; Atsuya, Ikuo

    2005-03-01

    Determination of selenium in certified reference biological materials by slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization (ETV)-isotope dilution (ID)-microwave-induced nitrogen plasma mass spectrometry (MIP-MS) was performed. Several parameters such as the heating conditions were studied in order to obtain optimal conditions. A special heating stage called the in situ fusion stage was applied just before the pyrolysis stage in the electrothermal vaporization process in order to fuse the biological sample and to achieve selenium isotope-equilibration between selenium in the sample and the 78Se spike solution. The slurry sample containing an appropriate amount of biological sample, 78Se spike solution, and sodium hydroxide as an alkaline flux was injected into the electrothermal vaporization unit. The slurry sample was in situ fused, pyrolyzed, and then vaporized. The ion counts at m/ z=78 and 80, the spike and reference isotopes, respectively, could be measured accurately without interference caused by argon since nitrogen plasma was used. The analytical utility of the proposed slurry sampling-electrothermal vaporization-in situ fusion-microwave-induced nitrogen plasma mass spectrometry was evaluated by determining the selenium concentration in certified reference biological materials, and the analytical results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values. The limit of detection for selenium was 90 ng g -1. The relative standard deviation of the determination of selenium was 8-15% with a high sample throughput (less than 30 min per sample including a slurry preparation.)

  12. Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic plasma with heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haijun

    2015-10-01

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in an anisotropic tokamak plasma is investigated in fluid approximation. The collisionless anisotropic plasma is described within the 16-momentum magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid closure model, which takes into account not only the pressure anisotropy but also the anisotropic heat flux. It is shown that the GAM frequency agrees better with the kinetic result than the standard Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) MHD model. When zeroing the anisotropy, the 16-momentum result is identical with the kinetic one to the order of 1/q2, while the CGL result agrees with the kinetic result only on the leading order. The discrepancies between the results of the CGL fluid model and the kinetic theory are well removed by considering the heat flux effect in the fluid approximation.

  13. Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic plasma with heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun

    2015-10-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in an anisotropic tokamak plasma is investigated in fluid approximation. The collisionless anisotropic plasma is described within the 16-momentum magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid closure model, which takes into account not only the pressure anisotropy but also the anisotropic heat flux. It is shown that the GAM frequency agrees better with the kinetic result than the standard Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) MHD model. When zeroing the anisotropy, the 16-momentum result is identical with the kinetic one to the order of 1/q{sup 2}, while the CGL result agrees with the kinetic result only on the leading order. The discrepancies between the results of the CGL fluid model and the kinetic theory are well removed by considering the heat flux effect in the fluid approximation.

  14. Properties of the ion-ion hybrid resonator in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, George J.

    2015-10-06

    The project developed theoretical and numerical descriptions of the properties of ion-ion hybrid Alfvén resonators that are expected to arise in the operation of a fusion reactor. The methodology and theoretical concepts were successfully compared to observations made in basic experiments in the LAPD device at UCLA. An assessment was made of the excitation of resonator modes by energetic alpha particles for burning plasma conditions expected in the ITER device. The broader impacts included the generation of basic insight useful to magnetic fusion and space science researchers, defining new avenues for exploration in basic laboratory experiments, establishing broader contacts between experimentalists and theoreticians, completion of a Ph.D. dissertation, and promotion of interest in science through community outreach events and classroom instruction.

  15. Development of effective power supply using electric double layer capacitor for static magnetic field coils in fusion plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    Inomoto, M; Abe, K; Yamada, T; Kuwahata, A; Kamio, S; Cao, Q H; Sakumura, M; Suzuki, N; Watanabe, T; Ono, Y

    2011-02-01

    A cost-effective power supply for static magnetic field coils used in fusion plasma experiments has been developed by application of an electric double layer capacitor (EDLC). A prototype EDLC power supply system was constructed in the form of a series LCR circuit. Coil current of 100 A with flat-top longer than 1 s was successfully supplied to an equilibrium field coil of a fusion plasma experimental apparatus by a single EDLC module with capacitance of 30 F. The present EDLC power supply has revealed sufficient performance for plasma confinement experiments whose discharge duration times are an order of several seconds.

  16. Effect of Viscosity on Growth Rates of Interchange Modes in Magnetic Inertial Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, R. L.; Nachtrieb, R.

    1999-11-01

    Thermal insulating B fields in imploding MIF/MTF confinement systems, as in predecessor static wall confinement systems, must close in the confined plasma and, therefore, have unfavorable curvature for MHD interchange mode stability. Analytic inviscid estimates with typical compressed z-pinch fields Bth=1MG, plasma density n=3.e20 and radius a=1cm give max. m=0 mode growth rates, Gm, of order 1.e8s-1 with wavelengths Lz of .1a to .5a. Thermal conduction to the confining wall increases B there and Gm significantly, as Vekstein discusses in concluding in effect that such confinement would not be useful for fusion. These growth rates and mode forms are confirmed by two supporting compressible models(Freidberg/McCrory). Happily when viscosity(Braginskii) is included; G is reduced, esp. at longer wavelengths, Lz, with scaling Lz**-1, and viscosities of 1e2 to 1e4 poise for the example plasmas give Gm's of order 1.e7s-1 and less with realistic time dependent profiles. We conclude that these Gm's are consistent with significant fusion yields. This work was presented at the UCLA/DoE ICC conference, 3/3-6/97.

  17. Progress in theory and simulation of ion cyclotron emission from magnetic confinement fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, Richard; Chapman, Ben; Chapman, Sandra; Cook, James; Reman, Bernard; McClements, Ken; Carbajal, Leopoldo

    2016-10-01

    Suprathermal ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is detected from all large tokamak and stellarator plasmas. Its frequency spectrum has narrow peaks at sequential cyclotron harmonics of the energetic ion population (fusion-born or neutral beam-injected) at the outer edge of the plasma. ICE was the first collective radiative instability driven by confined fusion-born ions observed in deuterium-tritium plasmas in JET and TFTR, and the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability is the most likely emission mechanism. Contemporary ICE measurements are taken at very high sampling rates from the LHD stellarator and from the conventional aspect ratio KSTAR tokamak. A correspondingly advanced modelling capability for the ICE emission mechanism has been developed using 1D3V PIC and hybrid-PIC codes, supplemented by analytical theory. These kinetic codes simulate the self-consistent full orbit dynamics of energetic and thermal ions, together with the electric and magnetic fields and the electrons. We report recent progress in theory and simulation that addresses: the scaling of ICE intensity with energetic particle density; the transition between super-Alfvénic and sub-Alfvénic regimes for the collectively radiating particles; and the rapid time evolution that is seen for some ICE measurements. This work was supported in part by the RCUK Energy Programme [Grant Number EP/I501045] and by Euratom.

  18. Fast plasma heating by anomalous and inertial resistivity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duijveman, A.; Hoyng, P.; Ionson, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Fast plasma heating by anomalous and inertial resistivity effects is described. A small fraction of the plasma contains strong currents that run parallel to the magnetic field and are driven by an exponentiating electric field. The anomalous character of the current dissipation is caused by the excitation of electrostatic ion cyclotron and/or ion acoustic waves. The role of resistivity due to geometrical effects is considered. Through the use of a marginal stability analysis, equations for the average electron and ion temperatures are derived and numerically solved. The evolution of the plasma is described as a path in the drift velocity diagram, in which the drift velocity is plotted as a function of the electron to ion temperature ratio.

  19. Heat transfer in a fissioning uranium plasma reactor cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, A. F.

    1973-01-01

    Two schemes are investigated by which a fission-heated uranium plasma located in the central cavity of a test reactor could be insulated to keep its temperature above condensation in a neutron flux of 10 to the 15th power neutrons/(sq cm)(sec) or less. The first scheme was to use a mirrored cavity wall to reflect the thermal radiation back into the plasma. The second scheme was to seed the transpirational cavity wall coolant so as to make it opaque to thermal radiation, thus insulating the hot plasma from the cold wall. The analysis showed that a mirrored cavity wall must have a reflectivity of over 95 percent or that seeded argon must be used as the wall coolant to give an acceptable operating margin above fuel condensation conditions.

  20. Computational Plasma Physics at the Bleeding Edge: Simulating Kinetic Turbulence Dynamics in Fusion Energy Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, William

    2013-04-01

    Advanced computing is generally recognized to be an increasingly vital tool for accelerating progress in scientific research in the 21st Century. The imperative is to translate the combination of the rapid advances in super-computing power together with the emergence of effective new algorithms and computational methodologies to help enable corresponding increases in the physics fidelity and the performance of the scientific codes used to model complex physical systems. If properly validated against experimental measurements and verified with mathematical tests and computational benchmarks, these codes can provide more reliable predictive capability for the behavior of complex systems, including fusion energy relevant high temperature plasmas. The magnetic fusion energy research community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale very well with the number of processors on massively parallel supercomputers. A good example is the effective usage of the full power of modern leadership class computational platforms from the terascale to the petascale and beyond to produce nonlinear particle-in-cell simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of plasma turbulence in magnetically-confined high temperature plasmas. Illustrative results provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics in extreme-scale computing campaigns to enable predictive simulations with unprecedented physics fidelity. Some illustrative examples will be presented of the algorithmic progress from the magnetic fusion energy sciences area in dealing with low memory per core extreme scale computing challenges for the current top 3 supercomputers worldwide. These include advanced CPU systems (such as the IBM-Blue-Gene-Q system and the Fujitsu K Machine) as well as the GPU-CPU hybrid system (Titan).

  1. Voyager observations of lower hybrid noise in the Io plasma torus and anomalous plasma heating rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.; Coroniti, F. V.; Kurth, W. S.; Scarf, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    A study of Voyager 1 electric field measurements obtained by the plasma wave instrument in the Io plasma torus has been carried out. A survey of the data has revealed the presence of persistent peaks in electric field spectra in the frequency range 100-600 Hz consistent with their identification as lower hybrid noise for a heavy-ion plasma of sulfur and oxygen. Typical wave intensities are 0.1 mV/m, and the spectra also show significant Doppler broadening, Delta omega/omega approximately 1. A theoretical analysis of lower hybrid wave generation by a bump-on-tail ring distribution of ions is given. The model is appropriate for plasmas with a superthermal pickup ion population present. A general methodology is used to demonstrate that the maximum plasma heating rate possible through anomalous wave-particle heat exchange is less than approximately 10 to the -14th ergs per cu cm per s. Although insufficient to meet the power requirement of the EUV-emitting warm torus, the heating rate is large enough to maintain a low-density (0.01-0.1 percent) superthermal electron population of keV electrons, which may lead to a small but significant anomalous ionization effect.

  2. Apparatus and method for removing particle species from fusion-plasma-confinement devices

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1981-10-26

    In a mirror fusion plasma confinement apparatus, method and apparatus are provided for selectively removing (pumping) trapped low energy (thermal) particle species from the end cell region, without removing the still useful high energy particle species, and without requiring large power input to accomplish the pumping. Perturbation magnets are placed in the thermal barrier region of the end cell region at the turning point characteristic of trapped thermal particles, thus deflecting the thermal particles from their closed trajectory, causing them to drift sufficiently to exit the thermal barrier.

  3. IEFIT - An Interactive Approach to High Temperature Fusion Plasma Magnetic Equilibrium Fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Q.; Schachter, J.; Schissel, D.P.; Lao, L.L.

    1999-06-01

    An interactive IDL based wrapper, IEFIT, has been created for the magnetic equilibrium reconstruction code EFIT written in FORTRAN. It allows high temperature fusion physicists to rapidly optimize a plasma equilibrium reconstruction by eliminating the unnecessarily repeated initialization in the conventional approach along with the immediate display of the fitting results of each input variation. It uses a new IDL based graphics package, GaPlotObj, developed in cooperation with Fanning Software Consulting, that provides a unified interface with great flexibility in presenting and analyzing scientific data. The overall interactivity reduces the process to minutes from the usual hours.

  4. Magnetic field generation in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Dimonte, Guy; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2012-04-20

    Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) in inertial confinement fusion implosions are expected to generate magnetic fields. A Hall-MHD model is used to study the field generation by 2D single-mode and multimode RTI in a stratified two-fluid plasma. Self-generated magnetic fields are predicted and these fields grow as the RTI progresses via the ∇n(e)×∇T(e) term in the generalized Ohm's law. Scaling studies are performed to determine the growth of the self-generated magnetic field as a function of density, acceleration, Atwood number, and perturbation wavelength.

  5. First application of a TES microcalorimeter to a thermonuclear fusion plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, K.; Hoshino, A.; Ishisaki, Y.; Morita, U.; Ohashi, T.; Mihara, T.; Mitsuda, K.; Tanaka, K.; Yagi, Y.; Koguchi, H.; Hirano, Y.; Sakakita, H.

    2006-04-01

    We report the first application of a superconductive transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter to a thermonuclear fusion plasma experiment in the toroidal pinch experiment RX (TPE-RX). The TES microcalorimeter was installed in a portable adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR), which is originally designed for a rocket experiment. The ADR was directly connected to TPE-RX with a vacuum duct, and thin Toray-Lumirror or parylene films were used for entrance windows to allow soft X-rays coming into the detector with good efficiency. The detector box was designed to shield the strong magnetic field produced by ADR and TPE-RX. A total of 3472 counts of X-ray signals were detected in 0.2-3.0 keV for 210 plasma shots during the flat-top phase (35-70 ms) after discarding pile-up events. Combining the data with that measured in the energy range of 1.3-8 keV using a SiLi detector, we examined a wide band X-ray spectrum of the plasma. The obtained spectrum is dominated by thermal plasma emission, although at least four different temperature components are required to account for the whole band spectral shape. Impurities in the deuterium plasma are also investigated.

  6. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, E. L.; Joglekar, A. S.; Ortega, M. I.; Moll, R.; Fenn, D.; Molvig, K.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  7. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, E. L.; Molvig, K.; Joglekar, A. S.; Ortega, M. I.; Moll, R.; Fenn, D.

    2015-11-15

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  8. Inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate for dense plasmas in laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, R.; Roy, A. C.

    2013-07-01

    We report a theoretical analysis of inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate in the eikonal approximation. The present analysis is performed for a dense plasma using the screened electron-ion interaction potential for the ion charge state Zi = 1 and for both the weak and strong plasma screening cases. We have also compared the eikonal results with the first Born approximation (FBA) [M. Moll et al., New J. Phys. 14, 065010 (2012)] calculation. We find that the magnitudes of inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate within the eikonal approximation (EA) are larger than the FBA values in the weak screening case (κ = 0.03 a.u.) in a wide range of field strength for three different initial electron momenta (2, 3, and 4 a.u.). But for strong screening case (κ = 0.3 a.u.), the heating rates predicted by the two approximations do not differ much after reaching their maximum values. Furthermore, the individual contribution of photoemission and photoabsorption processes to heating rate is analysed for both the weak and strong screening cases. We find that the single photoemission and photoabsorption rates are the same throughout the field strength while the multiphoton absorption process dominates over the multiphoton emission process beyond the field strength ≈ 4×108 V/cm. The present study of the dependence of heating rate on the screening parameter ranging from 0.01 to 20 shows that whereas the heating rate predicted by the EA is greater than the FBA up to the screening parameter κ = 0.3 a.u., the two approximation methods yield results which are nearly identical beyond the above value.

  9. Inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate for dense plasmas in laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, R.; Roy, A. C.

    2013-07-15

    We report a theoretical analysis of inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate in the eikonal approximation. The present analysis is performed for a dense plasma using the screened electron-ion interaction potential for the ion charge state Z{sub i} = 1 and for both the weak and strong plasma screening cases. We have also compared the eikonal results with the first Born approximation (FBA) [M. Moll et al., New J. Phys. 14, 065010 (2012)] calculation. We find that the magnitudes of inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate within the eikonal approximation (EA) are larger than the FBA values in the weak screening case (κ = 0.03 a.u.) in a wide range of field strength for three different initial electron momenta (2, 3, and 4 a.u.). But for strong screening case (κ = 0.3 a.u.), the heating rates predicted by the two approximations do not differ much after reaching their maximum values. Furthermore, the individual contribution of photoemission and photoabsorption processes to heating rate is analysed for both the weak and strong screening cases. We find that the single photoemission and photoabsorption rates are the same throughout the field strength while the multiphoton absorption process dominates over the multiphoton emission process beyond the field strength ≈ 4×10{sup 8} V/cm. The present study of the dependence of heating rate on the screening parameter ranging from 0.01 to 20 shows that whereas the heating rate predicted by the EA is greater than the FBA up to the screening parameter κ = 0.3 a.u., the two approximation methods yield results which are nearly identical beyond the above value.

  10. Vapor shield protection of plasma facing components under incident high heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilligan, J.; Bourham, M.; Hankins, O.; Eddy, W.; Hurley, J.; Black, D.

    1992-12-01

    Disruption damage to plasma facing components has been found to be a limiting design constraint in ITER and other large fusion devices. A growing data base is confirming the role of the vapor shield in protecting ablated surfaces under disruption-like conditions, which would imply longer lifetimes for plasma facing components. We present new results for exposure of various material surfaces to high heat fluxes up to 70 GW/m 2 over 100 μs (7 MJ/m 2) in the SIRENS high heat flux test facility. Tested materials are graphite grades, pyrolytic graphite, refractory metals and alloys, refractory coatings on copper substrates, boron nitride and preliminary results of diamond coating on silicon substrates. An empirical scaling law of the energy transmission factor through the vapor shield has been obtained. The application of a strong external magnetic field, to reduce turbulent energy transport in the vapor shield boundary, is shown to decrease f by as much as 35% for fields of 8 T.

  11. Impact of combined transient plasma/heat loads on tungsten performance below and above recrystallization temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewenhoff, Th.; Bardin, S.; Greuner, H.; Linke, J.; Maier, H.; Morgan, T. W.; Pintsuk, G.; Pitts, R. A.; Riccardi, B.; De Temmerman, G.

    2015-11-01

    The influence of recrystallization on thermal shock resistance has been identified as an issue that may influence the long term performance of ITER tungsten (W) divertor components. To investigate this issue a unique series of experiments has been performed on ITER divertor W monoblock mock-ups in three EU high heat flux facilities: GLADIS (neutral beam), JUDITH 2 (electron beam) and Magnum-PSI (plasma beam). To simulate ITER mitigated edge localised modes, heat fluxes between 0.11 and 0.6 GW m-2 were applied for Δt  <  1 ms. Two different base temperatures, Tbase  =  1200 °C and 1500 °C, were chosen on which ~18 000/100 000 transient events were superimposed representing several full ITER burning plasma discharges in terms of number of transients and particle fluence. An increase in roughening for both e-beam and plasma loaded surfaces was observed when loading during or after recrystallization and when loading at higher temperature. However, regarding the formation of cracks and microstructural modifications the response was different for e-beam and plasma loaded surfaces. The samples loaded in Magnum-PSI did not crack nor show any sign of recrystallization, even at Tbase  =  1500 °C. This could be a dynamic hydrogen flux effect, because pre-loading of samples with hydrogen neutrals (GLADIS) or without hydrogen (e-beam JUDITH 2) did not yield this result. These results show clearly that the loading method used when investigating and qualifying the thermal shock performance of materials for ITER and future fusion reactors can play an important role. This should be properly accounted for and in fact should be the subject of further R&D.

  12. A Scaling Law of Plasma Confining Potential Formation with Electron Cyclotron Heating Powers in GAMMA 10

    SciTech Connect

    Numakura, T.; Cho, T.; Kohagura, J.; Hirata, M.; Fukai, T.; Yoshida, M.; Minami, R.; Kiminami, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Imai, T.; Miyoshi, S.

    2005-01-15

    Scaling laws of potential formation and associated effects are theoretically and experimentally investigated in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. In GAMMA 10, the main tandem-mirror operations from 1979 to 2003 are characterized in terms of (i) a high-potential mode having kV-order plasma-confining potentials, and (ii) a hot-ion mode yielding fusion neutrons with 10-20 keV bulk-ion temperatures. In this paper, the externally controllable parameter scaling including electron cyclotron heating (ECH) powers for potential formation covering over these two representative operational modes is investigated; that is, the construction of 'the central-cell plasma-confining potentials' {phi}{sub c} formation scaling with plug ECH is studied on the basis of the electron energy-balance equation and Cohen's strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH) theory for investigating the formation physics of plasma confining potentials.It is found that our proposed scaling formulae are in good agreement with the experimental data in the two representative operational modes of the high-potential and hot-ion modes in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror.This scaling shows a favorable increase in confining potentials with installing more powerful ECH sources by the use of ECH powers over the present 250 kW. On the basis of the scaling prediction, we also report the design of a newly developed 500 kW gyrotron for an application to investigate the validity of the above described {phi}{sub c} formation scaling with plug ECH aiming at achieving higher plasma parameters.

  13. FOREWORD: 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications/1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications/1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Wolfgang; Linsmeier, Christian; Rubel, Marek

    2011-12-01

    subjected to extremely high heat loads and very high particle and neutron fluxes. They must have high thermal conductivity for efficient heat transport, high cohesive energy for low erosion by particle bombardment and low atomic number to minimize plasma cooling. These contradictory requirements make the development of plasma-facing materials one of the greatest challenges ever faced by materials scientists. The erosion of plasma-facing materials is one of the main factors influencing the operational schedule of experimental fusion reactors and future power plants. A number of materials selected for current designs cannot withstand the presently foreseen plasma scenarios of a power plant for a commercially viable period of time. Therefore, further coordinated development of plasma scenarios and materials is essential for the realization of fusion as an energy source. The design and development of plasma-facing materials requires a detailed understanding of the processes that occur when a material surface is bombarded with an intense flux of heat, particles and neutrons simultaneously. These materials-related topics are the focus of this series of workshops which has established itself as a discussion forum for experts from research institutions and industry dealing with materials for plasma-facing components in present and future thermonuclear fusion devices. During the joint conference PFMC-13/FEMaS-1 recent developments and research results in the following fields were addressed: carbon, beryllium, and tungsten based materials mixed materials erosion and redeposition high heat flux component development benchmarking of radiation damage modelling synchrotron and neutron based characterization techniques application of advanced transmission electron microscopy and micro-/nano-mechanical testing. With the approaching technical realization of ITER, the ITER-related PFMC topics are naturally the main focus of research. In this respect the start of the ITER-like wall experiment

  14. Possible generation of heat from nuclear fusion in Earth’s inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, Mikio

    2016-11-01

    The cause and source of the heat released from Earth’s interior have not yet been determined. Some research groups have proposed that the heat is supplied by radioactive decay or by a nuclear georeactor. Here we postulate that the generation of heat is the result of three-body nuclear fusion of deuterons confined in hexagonal FeDx core-centre crystals; the reaction rate is enhanced by the combined attraction effects of high-pressure (~364 GPa) and high-temperature (~5700 K) and by the physical catalysis of neutral pions: 2D + 2D + 2D → 21H + 4He + 2  + 20.85 MeV. The possible heat generation rate can be calculated as 8.12 × 1012 J/m3, based on the assumption that Earth’s primitive heat supply has already been exhausted. The H and He atoms produced and the anti-neutrino are incorporated as Fe-H based alloys in the H-rich portion of inner core, are released from Earth’s interior to the universe, and pass through Earth, respectively.

  15. Possible generation of heat from nuclear fusion in Earth’s inner core

    PubMed Central

    Fukuhara, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    The cause and source of the heat released from Earth’s interior have not yet been determined. Some research groups have proposed that the heat is supplied by radioactive decay or by a nuclear georeactor. Here we postulate that the generation of heat is the result of three-body nuclear fusion of deuterons confined in hexagonal FeDx core-centre crystals; the reaction rate is enhanced by the combined attraction effects of high-pressure (~364 GPa) and high-temperature (~5700 K) and by the physical catalysis of neutral pions: 2D + 2D + 2D → 21H + 4He + 2  + 20.85 MeV. The possible heat generation rate can be calculated as 8.12 × 1012 J/m3, based on the assumption that Earth’s primitive heat supply has already been exhausted. The H and He atoms produced and the anti-neutrino are incorporated as Fe-H based alloys in the H-rich portion of inner core, are released from Earth’s interior to the universe, and pass through Earth, respectively. PMID:27876860

  16. Heat-transfer characteristics of flowing and stationary particle-bed-type fusion-reactor blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Nietert, R.E.

    1983-02-01

    The heat-transfer characteristics of flowing and stationary packed-particle beds have recently become of interest in connection with conceptual designs of fusion reactor blankets. A detailed literature survey has shown that the processes taking place in such beds are not fully understood despite their widespread use in the chemical industry and other engineering disciplines for more than five decades. In this study, two experimental investigations were pursued. In the first, a heat-transfer loop was constructed through which glass microspheres were allowed to flow by rgravity at controlled rates through an electrically heated stainless steel tubular test section. In the second, an annular packed bed was constructed in which heat was applied through the outer wall by electric heating of a stainless steel tube. Cooling occurred at the inner wall of the annular bed by flowing air through the central tube. A second air stream was allowed to flow through the voids of the packed bed. An error-minimization technique was utilized in order to obtain the two-dimensional one-parameter effective conductivity for the bed by comparing the experimental and theoretically predicted temperature profiles. Experiments were conducted for various modified Reynolds numbers less than ten.

  17. Possible generation of heat from nuclear fusion in Earth's inner core.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Mikio

    2016-11-23

    The cause and source of the heat released from Earth's interior have not yet been determined. Some research groups have proposed that the heat is supplied by radioactive decay or by a nuclear georeactor. Here we postulate that the generation of heat is the result of three-body nuclear fusion of deuterons confined in hexagonal FeDx core-centre crystals; the reaction rate is enhanced by the combined attraction effects of high-pressure (~364 GPa) and high-temperature (~5700 K) and by the physical catalysis of neutral pions: (2)D + (2)D + (2)D → 2(1)H + (4)He + 2  + 20.85 MeV. The possible heat generation rate can be calculated as 8.12 × 10(12) J/m(3), based on the assumption that Earth's primitive heat supply has already been exhausted. The H and He atoms produced and the anti-neutrino are incorporated as Fe-H based alloys in the H-rich portion of inner core, are released from Earth's interior to the universe, and pass through Earth, respectively.

  18. Fusion Reactor and Break-Even Experiment Based on Stabilized Liner Compression of Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchi, Peter; Frese, Sherry; Frese, Michael

    2016-10-01

    An optimum regime, known as magnetized-target or magneto-inertial fusion (MTF/MIF), requires magnetic fields at megagauss levels, which are attainable by use of dynamic conductors called liners. The stabilized liner compressor (SLC) provides the basis for controlled implosion and re-capture of the liner for reversible energy exchange between liner kinetic energy and the internal energy of a magnetized-plasma target. This exchange requires rotational stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor modes on the inner surface of the liner and pneumatically driven free-pistons that eliminate such modes at the outer surface. We discuss the implications of the SLC approach for the power reactor, a breakeven experiment, and intermediate experiments to develop the plasma target. Features include the importance of pneumatic drive and the liner-blanket for economic feasibility of MTF/MIF. Supported by ARPA-E ALPHA Program.

  19. Plasma kinetic effects on interfacial mix in settings relevant to inertial confinement fusion and laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bergen, B.; Bowers, K. J.; Vold, E. L.; Molvig, K.; Fernández, J. C.; Bang, W.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Hamilton, C. E.; Palaniyappan, S.; Santiago Cordoba, M. A.; Hegelich, B. M.; Dyer, G.; Roycroft, R.

    2015-11-01

    Mixing of high-Z/low-Z interfaces in dense plasma media is a problem of importance for understanding mix in inertial confinement fusion experiments and recent experiments at the LANL Trident facility. In this presentation, we apply the VPIC particle-in-cell code with a binary collision model to explore kinetic effects of the atomic mixing. Comparisons are made to published analytic theory and hybrid modeling results and conditions are identified under which plasma kinetic behavior may lead to anomalously rapid atomic mixing. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Funding provided by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  20. Spectroscopic Studies of Atomic and Molecular Processes in the Edge Region of Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, J. D.; Brezinsek, S.; Mertens, Ph.; Unterberg, B.

    2006-12-01

    Edge plasma studies are of vital importance for understanding plasma-wall interactions in magnetically confined fusion devices. These interactions determine the transport of neutrals into the plasma, and the properties of the plasma discharge. This presentation deals with optical spectroscopic studies of the plasma boundary, and their role in elucidating the prevailing physical conditions. Recorded spectra are of four types: emission spectra of ions and atoms, produced by electron impact excitation and by charge-exchange recombination, atomic spectra arising from electron impact-induced molecular dissociation and ionisation, visible spectra of molecular hydrogen and its isotopic combinations, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra. The atomic spectra are strongly influenced by the confining magnetic field (Zeeman and Paschen-Back effects), which produces characteristic features useful for species identification, temperature determination by Doppler broadening, and studies of chemical and physical sputtering. Detailed analysis of the Zeeman components in both optical and LIF spectra shows that atomic hydrogen is produced in various velocity classes, some related to the relevant molecular Franck-Condon energies. The latter reflect the dominant electron collision processes responsible for production of atoms from molecules. This assignment has been verified by gas-puffing experiments through special test limiters. The higher-energy flanks of hydrogen line profiles probably also show the influence of charge-exchange reactions with molecular ions accelerated in the plasma sheath ('scrape-off layer') separating limiter surfaces from the edge plasma, in analogy to acceleration in the cathode-fall region of gas discharges. While electron collisions play a vital role in generating the spectra, ion collisions with excited atomic radiators act through re-distribution of population among the atomic fine-structure sublevels, and momentum transfer to the atomic nuclei via

  1. Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Xiaoming

    2012-09-26

    The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

  2. Core conditions for alpha heating attained in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Betti, R.; ...

    2016-07-07

    It is shown that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion [Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117,more » 025001 (2016)] extrapolated to a 1.9 MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions.« less

  3. Core conditions for alpha heating attained in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Betti, R.; Campbell, E. M.; Mangino, D.; Christopherson, A. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Nora, R.; Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.

    2016-07-07

    It is shown that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion [Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 025001 (2016)] extrapolated to a 1.9 MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions.

  4. Core conditions for alpha heating attained in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Betti, R.; Campbell, E. M.; Mangino, D.; Christopherson, A. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Nora, R.; Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion [Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 025001 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.025001] extrapolated to a 1.9 MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions.

  5. Core conditions for alpha heating attained in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Bose, A; Woo, K M; Betti, R; Campbell, E M; Mangino, D; Christopherson, A R; McCrory, R L; Nora, R; Regan, S P; Goncharov, V N; Sangster, T C; Forrest, C J; Frenje, J; Gatu Johnson, M; Glebov, V Yu; Knauer, J P; Marshall, F J; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion [Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 025001 (2016)10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.025001] extrapolated to a 1.9 MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions.

  6. Innovative Divertor Development to Solve the Plasma Heat-Flux Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T; Ryutov, D; Makowski, M; Soukhanovskii, V; Umansky, M; Cohen, R; HIll, D; Joseph, I

    2009-02-26

    Large, localized plasma heat exhaust continues to be one of the critical problems for the development of tokamak fusion reactors. Excessive heat flux erodes and possibly melts plasma-facing materials, thereby dramatically shortening their lifetime and increasing the impurity contamination of the core plasma. A detailed assessment by the ITER team for their divertor has revealed substantial limitations on the operational space imposed by the divertor performance. For a fusion reactor, the problem becomes worse in that the divertor must accommodate 20% of the total fusion power (less any broadly radiated loss), while not allowing excess buildup of tritium in the walls nor excessive impurity production. This is an extremely challenging set of problems that must be solved for fusion to succeed as a power source; it deserves a substantial research investment. Material heat-flux constraints: Results from present-day tokamaks show that there are two major limitations of peak plasma heat exhaust. The first is the continuous flow of power to the divertor plates and nearby surfaces that, for present technology, is limited to 10-20 MW/m{sup 2}. The second is the transient peak heat-flux that can be tolerated in a short time, {tau}{sub m}, before substantial ablation and melting of the surface occurs; such common large transient events are Edge Localized Mode (ELMs) and disruptions. The material limits imposed by these events give a peak energy/{tau}{sub m}{sup 1/2} parameter of {approx} 40 MJ/m{sup 2}s{sup 1/2} [1]. Both the continuous and transient limits can be approached by input powers in the largest present-day devices, and future devices are expected to substantially exceed the limits unless a solution can be found. Since the early 90's LLNL has developed the analytic and computational foundation for analyzing divertor plasmas, and also suggested and studied a number of solid and liquid material concepts for improving divertor/wall performance, with the most recent

  7. Versatile and Rapid Plasma Heating Device for Steel and Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, G.S.

    2006-03-14

    The main objective of the research was to enhance steel and aluminum manufacturing with the development of a new plasma RPD device. During the project (1) plasma devices were manufactured (2) testing for the two metals were carried out and (3) market development strategies were explored. Bayzi Corporation has invented a Rapid Plasma Device (RPD) which produces plasma, comprising of a mixture of ionized gas and free electrons. The ions, when they hit a conducting surface, deposit heat in addition to the convective heat. Two generic models called the RPD-Al and RPD-S have been developed for the aluminum market and the steel market. Aluminum melting rates increased to as high as 12.7 g/s compared to 3 g/s of the current industrial practice. The RPD melting furnace operated at higher energy efficiency of 65% unlike most industrial processes operating in the range of 13 to 50%. The RPD aluminum melting furnace produced environment friendly cleaner melts with less than 1% dross. Dross is the residue in the furnace after the melt is poured out. Cast ingots were extremely clean and shining. Current practices produce dross in the range of 3 to 12%. The RPD furnace uses very low power ~0.2 kWh/Lb to melt aluminum. RPDs operate in one atmosphere using ambient air to produce plasma while the conventional systems use expensive gases like argon, or helium in air-tight chambers. RPDs are easy to operate and do not need intensive capital investment. Narrow beam, as well as wide area plasma have been developed for different applications. An RPD was developed for thermal treatments of steels. Two different applications have been pursued. Industrial air hardening steel knife edges were subjected to plasma beam hardening. Hardness, as measured, indicated uniform distribution without any distortion. The biggest advantage with this method is that the whole part need not be heated in a furnace which will lead to oxidation and distortion. No conventional process will offer localized

  8. Transverse ion heating in multicomponent plasmas. [in ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Okuda, H.; Kim, S. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A new mechanism is proposed for plasma modes which can occur only in a multicomponent plasma and not in pure electron-ion plasma. The addition of ions creates a new instability near the ion-ion hybrid mode whose frequency is adequate for the wave to interact with oxygen ions. To study heating of ions (such as ionospheric oxygen ions) in presence of auroral electrons, several numerical simulations were carried out using a one-dimensional electrostatic code in a magnetic field. It was found that in the presence of electrons drifting along auroral field lines into the ionosphere, the ion-ion hybrid mode can be driven unstable when the electron drift speed is too small to excite the lower hybrid instability. Since the ion-ion mode has a smaller frequency than that of the lower hybrid waves, it can couple to the heavy ions, resulting in a substantial heating of heavy ions; on the other hand, because of their frequencies, the lower hybrid waves can accelerate only light ion species.

  9. Noise temperature improvement for magnetic fusion plasma millimeter wave imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, J.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-03-15

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas [B. Tobias et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 6, 2106042 (2011)]. Of particular importance have been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry systems for imaging T{sub e} and n{sub e} fluctuations. These instruments have employed heterodyne receiver arrays with Schottky diode mixer elements directly connected to individual antennas. Consequently, the noise temperature has been strongly determined by the conversion loss with typical noise temperatures of ∼60 000 K. However, this can be significantly improved by making use of recent advances in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit chip low noise amplifiers to insert a pre-amplifier in front of the Schottky diode mixer element. In a proof-of-principle design at V-Band (50–75 GHz), significant improvement of noise temperature from the current 60 000 K to measured 4000 K has been obtained.

  10. Laser-Plasma Interaction in Presence of an Obliquely External Magnetic Field: Application to Laser Fusion without Radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobaraki, M.; Jafari, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the nonlinear interaction of ultra-high power laser beam with fusion plasma at relativistic regime in the presence of obliquely external magnetic Geld has been studied. Imposing an external magnetic Geld on plasma can modify the density profile of the plasma so that the thermal conductivity of electrons reduces which is considered to be the decrease of the threshold energy for ignition. To achieve the fusion of Hydrogen-Boron (HB) fuel, the block acceleration model of plasma is employed. Energy production by HB isotopes can be of interest, since its reaction does not generate radioactive tritium. By using the inhibit factor in the block model acceleration of plasma and Maxwell's as well as the momentum transfer equations, the electron density distribution and dielectric permittivity of the plasma medium are obtained. Numerical results indicate that with increasing the intensity of the external magnetic field, the oscillation of the laser magnetic field decreases, while the dielectric permittivity increases. Moreover, the amplitude of the electron density becomes highly peaked and the plasma electrons are strongly bunched with increasing the intensity of external magnetic field. Therefore, the magnetized plasma can act as a positive focusing lens to enhance the fusion process. Besides, we find that with increasing θ-angle (from oblique external magnetic field) between 0 and 90°, the dielectric permittivity increases, while for θ between 90° and 180°, the dielectric permittivity decreases with increasing θ.

  11. Solid-State Radio Frequency Plasma Heating Using a Nonlinear Transmission Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenneth; Ziemba, Timothy; Prager, James; Slobodov, Ilia

    2015-11-01

    Radio Frequency heating systems are rarely used by the small-scale validation platform experiments due to the high cost and complexity of these systems, which typically require high power gyrotrons or klystrons, associated power supplies, waveguides and vacuum systems. The cost and complexity of these systems can potentially be reduced with a nonlinear transmission line (NLTL) based system. In the past, NLTLs have lacked a high voltage driver that could produce long duration high voltage pulses with fast rise times at high pulse repetition frequency. Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc. (EHT) has created new high voltage nanosecond pulser, which combined with NLTL technology will produce a low-cost, fully solid-state architecture for the generation of the RF frequencies (0.5 to 10 GHz) and peak power levels (~ 10 MW) necessary for plasma heating and diagnostic systems for the validation platform experiments within the fusion science community. The proposed system does not require the use of vacuum tube technology, is inherently lower cost, and is more robust than traditional high power RF heating schemes. Design details and initial bench testing results for the new RF system will be presented. This work is supported under DOE Grant # DE-SC0013747.

  12. Development of an aqueous-space mixing assay for fusion of granules and plasma membranes from human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Blackwood, R A; Smolen, J E; Hessler, R J; Harsh, D M; Transue, A

    1996-01-01

    Several models have been developed to study neutrophil degranulation. At the most basic level, phospholipid vesicles have been used to investigate the lipid interactions occurring during membrane fusion. The two major forms of assays used to measure phospholipid vesicle fusion are based either on the dilution of tagged phospholipids within the membrane of the two fusing partners or the mixing of the aqueous contents of the vesicles. Although problems exist with both methods, the latter is considered to be more accurate and representative of true fusion. Using 8-aminonaphthalene-1,3,6-trisulphonic acid (ANTS) as a fluorescent marker, we have taken advantage of the quenching properties of p-xylenebispyridinium bromide ('DPX') to develop a simple aqueous-space mixing assay that can be used with any sealed vesicle. We compared our new assay with more conventional assays using liposomes composed of phosphatidic acid (PA) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), obtaining comparable results with respect to Ca2+-dependent fusion. We extended our studies to measure the fusion of neutrophil plasma-membrane vesicles as well as azurophil and specific granules with PA/PE (1:3) liposomes. Both specific granules and plasma-membrane vesicles fused with PA/PE liposomes at [Ca2+] as low as 500 microM, while azurophil granules showed no fusion at [Ca2+] as high as 12 mM. These differences in the ability of Ca2+ to induce fusion may be related to differences observed in whole cells with respect to secretion. PMID:8670059

  13. Laser Channeling in an Inhomogeneous Plasma for Fast-Ignition Laser Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancic, S.; Haberberger, D.; Theobald, W.; Anderson, K. S.; Froula, D. H.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Tanaka, K.; Habara, H.; Iwawaki, T.

    2014-10-01

    The evacuation of a plasma cavity by a high-intensity laser beam is of practical importance to the channeling fast-ignition concept. The channel in the plasma corona of an imploded inertial confinement fusion capsule provides a clear path through the plasma so that the energy from a second high-intensity laser can be deposited close to the dense core of the assembled fuel to achieve ignition. This study reports on experiments that demonstrate the transport of high-intensity (>1017 W/cm2) laser light through an inhomogeneous kilojoule-laser-produced plasma up to overcritical density. The multikilojoule high-intensity light evacuates a cavity inside the focal spot, leaving a parabolic trough that is observed using a novel optical probing technique--angular filter refractometery. The cavity forms in less than 100 ps using a 20-TW laser pulse and bores at a velocity of ~ 2 μm/ps. The experimentally measured depths of the cavity are consistent with a ponderomotive hole-boring model. The experiments show that 100-ps IR pulses with an intensity of ~ 5 ×1017 W/cm2 produced a channel up to the critical density, while 10-ps pulses with the same energy but higher intensity did not propagate as far. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  14. IGNITOR, ITER and NIF in the Context of the World Effort on Fusion Burning Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizov, E.; Coppi, B.; Velikhov, E.

    2012-03-01

    As of last summer, the ITER program has been recognized as being directed at providing an ``International Platform for Fusion Technology.'' Then, the two experimental programs that have the explicit goal to approach ignition conditions with D-T plasmas are NIF and IGNITOR. NIF, the National Ignition Facility, is based on the inertial confinement principle using a laser system capable of delivering 1.6 MJ and is being operated in Livermore. IGNITOR will be operated by the Kurchatov Institute within the research center of Troitzk presently owned by Rosatom and involves a high level collaboration between Italy and Russia. For this, Ignitor has been defined as a Flagship Project by Italy and the construction of its core has been funded. The Ignitor design is based on the experimental results obtained by the high field line of experiments carried out at MIT, within the Alcator Program, and in Italy within the Frascati Torus Program. A wide set of experiments in Japan, on high density plasmas, in the US, Russia and Europe have produced plasma physics results and technology developments that have guided the evolution of the Ignitor design. The main theoretical plasma physics issues to be dealt with in connection with this program are discussed.

  15. Integrated Simulation Studies of Plasma Performances and Fusion Reactions in the Deuterium Experiment of LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Homma, M.; Maeta, S.; Saito, Y.; Fukuyama, A.; Nagaoka, K.; Takahashi, H.; Nakano, H.; Osakabe, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Tanaka, K.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Isobe, M.; Tomita, H.; Ogawa, K.; LHD Exp Group Team

    2016-10-01

    The deuterium experiment project from 2017 is planned in LHD, where the deuterium NBI heating beams with the power more than 30MW are injected into the deuterium plasma. Principal objects of this project are to clarify the isotope effect on the heat and particle transport in the helical plasma and to study energetic particle confinement in a helical magnetic configuration measuring triton burn-up neutrons. We study the deuterium experiment plasma of LHD applying the integrated simulation code, TASK3D [Murakami, PPCF2015], and the 5-D drift kinetic equation solver, GNET [Murakami, NF2006]. (i) More than 20% of ion temperature increment is obtained in the deuterium plasma (nD /nH +nD = 0.8) due to the isotope effect assuming the turbulent transport model based on the H/He plasma experiment of LHD. (ii) The triton burn-up simulation shows the triton slowing down distribution and the strong magnetic configuration dependency of the triton burn-up ratio in LHD. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26420851.

  16. SOLVING THE STAND-OFF PROBLEM FOR MAGNETIZED TARGET FUSION: PLASMA STREAMS AS DISPOSABLE ELECTRODES, PLUS A LOCAL SPHERICAL BLANKET

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D; Thio, Y F

    2006-03-21

    In a fusion reactor based on the Magnetized Target Fusion approach, the permanent power supply has to deliver currents up to a few mega-amperes to the target dropped into the reaction chamber. All the structures situated around the target will be destroyed after every pulse and have to be replaced at a frequency of 1 to 10 Hz. In this paper, an approach based on the use of spherical blanket surrounding the target, and pulsed plasma electrodes connecting the target to the power supply, is discussed. A brief physic analysis of the processes associated with creation of plasma electrodes is discussed.

  17. Plasma heating with multi-MeV neutral atom beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Eubank, H.P.

    1981-10-01

    We explore the utility and feasibility of neutral beams of greater than or equal to 6 AMU formed from negative ions, and also of D/sup 0/ formed from D/sup -/. The negative ions would be accelerated to approx. 1 to 2 MeV/AMU and neutralized, whereupon the neutral atoms would be used to heat and, perhaps, to drive current in magnetically confined plasmas. Such beams appear feasible and offer the promise of significant advantages relative to conventional neutral beams based on positive deuterium ions at approx. 150 keV.

  18. Automatically Identifying Fusion Events between GLUT4 Storage Vesicles and the Plasma Membrane in TIRF Microscopy Image Sequences.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Xu, Yingke; Feng, Zhouyan; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the dynamic behavior about membrane-bound secretory vesicles has proven to be important in biological research. This paper proposes a novel approach to automatically identify the elusive fusion events between VAMP2-pHluorin labeled GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs) and the plasma membrane. The differentiation is implemented to detect the initiation of fusion events by modified forward subtraction of consecutive frames in the TIRFM image sequence. Spatially connected pixels in difference images brighter than a specified adaptive threshold are grouped into a distinct fusion spot. The vesicles are located at the intensity-weighted centroid of their fusion spots. To reveal the true in vivo nature of a fusion event, 2D Gaussian fitting for the fusion spot is used to derive the intensity-weighted centroid and the spot size during the fusion process. The fusion event and its termination can be determined according to the change of spot size. The method is evaluated on real experiment data with ground truth annotated by expert cell biologists. The evaluation results show that it can achieve relatively high accuracy comparing favorably to the manual analysis, yet at a small fraction of time.

  19. Synthetic aperture microwave imaging with active probing for fusion plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, Vladimir F.; Freethy, Simon J.; Huang, Billy K.

    2014-08-21

    A Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) system has been designed and built to obtain 2-D images at several frequencies from fusion plasmas. SAMI uses a phased array of linearly polarised antennas. The array configuration has been optimised to achieve maximum synthetic aperture beam efficiency. The signals received by antennas are down-converted to the intermediate frequency range and then recorded in a full vector form. Full vector signals allow beam focusing and image reconstruction in both real time and a post-processing mode. SAMI can scan over 16 pre-programmed frequencies in the range of 10-35GHz with a switching time of 300ns. The system operates in 2 different modes simultaneously: both a 'passive' imaging of plasma emission and also an 'active' imaging of the back-scattered signal of the radiation launched by one of the antennas from the same array. This second mode is similar to so-called Doppler backscattering (DBS) reflectometry with 2-D resolution of the propagation velocity of turbulent structures. Both modes of operation show good performance in fusion plasma experiments on Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). We have obtained the first ever 2-D images of BXO mode conversion windows. With active probing, first ever turbulence velocity maps have been obtained. We present an overview of the diagnostic and discuss recent results. In contrast to quasi-optical microwave imaging systems SAMI requires neither big aperture viewing ports nor large 2-D detector arrays to achieve the desired imaging resolution. The number of effective 'pixels' of the synthesized image is proportional to the number of receiving antennas squared. Thus only a small number of optimised antennas is sufficient for the majority of applications. Possible implementation of SAMI on ITERand DEMO is discussed.

  20. Robustness of predator-prey models for confinement regime transitions in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2013-04-15

    Energy transport and confinement in tokamak fusion plasmas is usually determined by the coupled nonlinear interactions of small-scale drift turbulence and larger scale coherent nonlinear structures, such as zonal flows, together with free energy sources such as temperature gradients. Zero-dimensional models, designed to embody plausible physical narratives for these interactions, can help to identify the origin of enhanced energy confinement and of transitions between confinement regimes. A prime zero-dimensional paradigm is predator-prey or Lotka-Volterra. Here, we extend a successful three-variable (temperature gradient; microturbulence level; one class of coherent structure) model in this genre [M. A. Malkov and P. H. Diamond, Phys. Plasmas 16, 012504 (2009)], by adding a fourth variable representing a second class of coherent structure. This requires a fourth coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equation. We investigate the degree of invariance of the phenomenology generated by the model of Malkov and Diamond, given this additional physics. We study and compare the long-time behaviour of the three-equation and four-equation systems, their evolution towards the final state, and their attractive fixed points and limit cycles. We explore the sensitivity of paths to attractors. It is found that, for example, an attractive fixed point of the three-equation system can become a limit cycle of the four-equation system. Addressing these questions which we together refer to as 'robustness' for convenience is particularly important for models which, as here, generate sharp transitions in the values of system variables which may replicate some key features of confinement transitions. Our results help to establish the robustness of the zero-dimensional model approach to capturing observed confinement phenomenology in tokamak fusion plasmas.

  1. Experimental and analytical studies of high heat flux components for fusion experimental reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Masanori

    1993-03-01

    In this report, the experimental and analytical results concerning the development of plasma facing components of ITER are described. With respect to developing high heat removal structures for the divertor plates, an externally-finned swirl tube was developed based on the results of critical heat flux (CHF) experiments on various tube structures. As the result, the burnout heat flux, which also indicates incident CHF, of 41 (+/-) 1 MW/sq m was achieved in the externally-finned swirl tube. The applicability of existing CHF correlations based on uniform heating conditions was evaluated by comparing the CHF experimental data with the smooth and the externally-finned tubes under one-sided heating condition. As the results, experimentally determined CHF data for straight tube show good agreement, for the externally-finned tube, no existing correlations are available for prediction of the CHF. With respect to the evaluation of the bonds between carbon-based material and heat sink metal, results of brazing tests were compared with the analytical results by three dimensional model with temperature-dependent thermal and mechanical properties. Analytical results showed that residual stresses from brazing can be estimated by the analytical three directional stress values instead of the equivalent stress value applied. In the analytical study on the separatrix sweeping for effectively reducing surface heat fluxes on the divertor plate, thermal response of the divertor plate was analyzed under ITER relevant heat flux conditions and has been tested. As the result, it has been demonstrated that application of the sweeping technique is very effective for improvement in the power handling capability of the divertor plate and that the divertor mock-up has withstood a large number of additional cyclic heat loads.

  2. Reconstruction of distribution functions of fast ions and runaway electrons in fusion plasmas using gamma-ray spectrometry with applications to ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevelev, A. E.; Khilkevitch, E. M.; Kiptily, V. G.; Chugunov, I. N.; Gin, D. B.; Doinikov, D. N.; Naidenov, V. O.; Litvinov, A. E.; Polunovskii, I. A.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-12-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometry on ITER can provide information both on confined fusion alpha particles for optimization of plasma heating and runaway electrons, which is important for safe reactor operations. For the purpose of deconvolution of gamma-ray spectra recorded in fusion plasma experiments the DeGaSum code has been developed. The code can be applied for processing of both spectra of monoenergetic gamma rays, which are born in nuclear reactions produced by alpha particles and other fast ions, and continuous bremsstrahlung spectra generated by runaway electrons in the MeV range in the plasma and reactor structure materials. Gamma-ray spectrometer response functions and bremsstrahlung spectra generated by electrons in the MeV energy range are calculated and used in the DeGaSum code. The deconvolution of the discrete spectra allows the identification of nuclear reactions, which give rise to gamma rays, and the calculation of their intensities. By applying the code for continuous hard x-ray spectra, the runaway electron energy distribution can be inferred. It can provide the maximal energy of runaway electrons with accuracy, which satisfies the ITER project requirements. The code has been used for processing of spectra recorded in JET experiments. An application of the deconvolution technique for gamma-ray emission measurements on ITER is discussed.

  3. Application of RF Power to Plasma Flow Drive in Fusion Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, D.B.; Berry, L.A.; Carter, M.D.; Jaeger, E.F.

    1999-09-13

    Wave induced flows can produce radially sheared velocity profiles that can in turn stabilize drift wave turbulence and improve plasma confinement. A second-order kinetic theory is developed in one-dimensional slab geometry to treat radio frequency (RF)-driven plasma flows. The Vlasov equation is solved to second order in the RF electric field. Moments of the second-order distribution function give time-averaged expressions for the heating rate, the wave kinetic flux, and the RF force exerted on the plasma. On the collisional or transport time scale, the RF force in the poloidal direction is balanced by neoclassical viscosity, and the force in the radial direction is balanced direction by ambipolar electric fields. Comparison is made with previous theories which have relied on incompressible fluid approximations. Very substantial differences are seen in situations involving the Ion Bernstein Wave, a compressional wave.

  4. Laser-plasma interaction in the context of inertial fusion: experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, C.; Lewis, K.; Bandulet, H.; Depierreux, S.; Hüller, S.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Pesme, D.; Loiseau, P.

    2007-08-01

    Many nonlinear processes may affect the laser beam propagation and the laser energy deposition in the underdense plasma surrounding the pellet. These processes, associated with anomalous and nonlinear absorption mechanisms, are fundamental issues in the context of Inertial Confinement Fusion. The work presented in this article refers to laser-plasma interaction experiments which were conducted under well-controlled conditions, and to their theoretical and numerical modeling. Thanks to important diagnostics improvements, the plasma and laser parameters were sufficiently characterized in these experiments to make it possible to carry out numerical simulations modeling the laser plasma interaction in which the hydrodynamics conditions were very close to the experimental ones. Two sets of experiments were carried out with the LULI 2000 and the six beam LULI laser facilities. In the first series of experiments, the interaction between two single hot spots was studied as a function of their distance, intensity and light polarization. In the second series, the intensity distribution of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) inside the plasma was studied by means of a new temporally resolved imaging system. Two-dimensional (2D) simulations were carried out with our code Harmony2D in order to model these experiments. For both series of experiments, the numerical results show a very good agreement with the experimental ones for what concerns the main SBS features, namely the spatial and temporal behavior of the SBS-driven acoustic waves, as well as the average SBS reflectivities. Thus, these well diagnosed experiments, carried out with well defined conditions, make it possible to benchmark our theoretical and numerical modelings and, hence, to improve our predictive capabilities for future experiments.

  5. Technological requisites of the magnetic fusion energy programme

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    An integral part of magnetic fusion energy research is the development of the technologies necessary for the confinement and heating of reactor-level plasmas. Heating systems based on energetic neutral beam particle injection or radio frequency waves (or both) will be required to heat plasmas to the temperatures at which fusion is self-sustaining. These systems may be used also to drive plasma currents. The magnet systems required to confine reactor-sized plasmas rely on the development of effective superconductors. Issues associated with safety and tritium handling concerns become important considerations in designing reactor concepts.

  6. Ultra-rapid plasma freezing with halocarbon heat transfer liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, P.H.; Comerchero, V.

    1988-03-15

    A process of freezing plasma is described comprising the steps of exposing thin wall containers of plasma to be frozen to direct contact with a heat transfer liquid selected from the group consisting of the chlorofluorocarbon 1,1,2 trichloro-1,2,2, trifluoro-ethane (CFC 113) and mixtures of the chlorofluorocarbon 1,1,2 trichloro-1,2,2, trifluoro-ethane (Freon 113) and at least one of the fluorocarbons perfluoropentane (C/sub 5/F/sub 12/), perfluorohexane (C/sub 6/F/sub 14/), perfluoromethylcyclohexane (C/sub 7/F/sub 14/), perfluoroheptane (C/sub 7/F/sub 16/), perfluoromonomethyldimethylcyclohexanes (C/sub 7/F/sub 14/C/sub 8/F/sub 16/), perfluorodecalin isomers (C/sub 10/F/sub 18/), mixed perfluorodecalin and methyldecalin isomers (C/sub 10/F/sub 18/+C/sub 11/F/sub 20/), and perfluorinatd polyethers ((OCF(CF/sub 3/)CF/sub 2/)/sub n/ - (OCF/sub 2/)/sub m/, and maintaining the liquid at a temperature sufficiently low enough to freeze the plasma in the desired amount of time.

  7. Extension of the Bissell-Johnson plasma-sheath model for application to fusion-relevant and general plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, L.; Jelić, N.; Kuhn, S.; Duhovnik, J.

    2009-09-01

    This article presents an approach to solving a special Fredholm-type integral equation of the first kind with a particular kernel containing a modified Bessel function for applications in plasma physics. From the physical point of view, the problem was defined by Bissell and Johnson (B&J) [Phys. Fluids 30, 779 (1987)] as a task to find the potential profile and the ion velocity distribution function in a plane-parallel discharge with a Maxwellian ion source. The B&J model is a generalization of the well-known Tonks-Langmuir (T&L) [Phys. Rev. 34, 876 (1929)] discharge model characterized by a "cold" ion source. Unlike the T&L model, which can be readily solved analytically, attempts to solve the B&J model with a "warm" ion source have been done only numerically. However, the validity of numerical solutions up to date remains constrained to a rather limited range of a crucial independent parameter of the B&J integral equation, which mathematically is the width of a Gaussian distribution and physically represents the ion temperature. It was solved only for moderately warm ion sources. This paper presents the exact numerical solution of the B&J model, which is valid without any restriction regarding the above-mentioned parameter. It is shown that the ion temperature is very different from the temperature of the ion source. The new results with high-temperature ion sources are not only of particular importance for understanding and describing the plasma-sheath boundary in fusion plasmas, but are of considerable interest for discharge problems in general. The eigenvalue of the problem, found analytically by Harrison and Thompson [Proc. Phys. Soc. 74, 145 (1959)] for the particular case of a cold ion source, is here extended to arbitrary ion-source temperatures.

  8. Characteristics of GTA fusion zones and heat affected zones in superalloy 713C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachowicz, M. B.; Dudziński, W.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, metallographic examinations, characterising microstructural changes in the 713C superalloy subjected to remelting by GTA method, are presented. In the fusion zone, precipitation of M23C6 or M6C carbides based on chromium and molybdenum was observed. Eutectic mixtures of ( γ- gg')-M x C y type with highly developed morphology were also perceived. It was found that, in the matrix areas with non-homogeneous chemical composition, the eutectic reaction γ-γ' can occur at the temperature close to that of the precipitation of the M x C y carbides. The presence of silicon in the carbide phases can be conducive to lowering their solidification point by creating low-melting compound NbSi. Both in the fusion zone (FZ) and in the heat-affected zone (HAZ), the secondary precipitates of the Ni3(AlTi)- γ' phase, varying in size from 50 to 100 nm, were found. The lattice mismatch factor of the γ and γ' particles was +0.48 % to +0.71 %, which is characteristic of the coherent precipitates of the Ni3Al phase enriched with titanium. No dislocations or stacking faults were observed in the microstructure of the FZ. In the HAZ, some primary undissolved γ' precipitates, with a part of aluminium probably replaced with niobium were observed, which raised their melting point.

  9. Off-axis electron cyclotron heating and the sandpile paradigm for transport in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, T. K.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.; Merrifield, J. A.

    2004-02-01

    Previous observations that suggest a substantial role for nondiffusive energy transport in tokamaks subjected to off-axis electron cyclotron heating (ECH) are compared to the output from a sandpile model. The observations considered include local and global aspects of temperature profile evolution in the DIII-D [for example, C. C. Petty and T. C. Luce, Nucl. Fusion 34, 121 (1994)] and RTP (Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project) [for example, M. R. de Baar, M. N. A. Beurskens, G. M. D. Hogeweij, and N. J. Lopes Cardozo, Phys. Plasmas 6, 4645 (1999)] tokamaks. The sandpile model employed is an extension, to incorporate noncentral fueling, of one used previously to address tokamak physics issues [S. C. Chapman, R. O. Dendy, and B. Hnat, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 2814 (2001)]. It is found that there are significant points of resemblance between the phenomenology of the noncentrally fueled sandpile and of the tokamaks with off-axis ECH. This suggests that the essential ingredient of the sandpile model, namely avalanching conditioned by a local critical gradient, may be one of the key transport effects generated by the tokamak plasma physics.

  10. Diagnosing suprathermal ion populations in Z-pinch plasmas using fusion neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, P. F.; Sinars, D. B.; Hahn, K. D.

    2013-06-01

    The existence of suprathermal ion populations gives rise to significant broadening of and modifications to the fusion neutron spectrum. We show that when this population takes the form of a power-law at high energies, specific changes occur to the spectrum which are diagnosable. In particular, the usual Gaussian spectral shape produced by a thermal plasma is replaced by a Lorentz-like spectrum with broad wings extending far from the spectral peak. Additionally, it is found that the full width at half maximum of the spectrum depends on both the ion temperature and the power-law exponent. This causes the use of the spectral width for determination of the ion temperature to be unreliable. We show that these changes are distinguishable from other broadening mechanisms, such as temporal and motional broadening, and that detailed fitting of the spectral shape is a promising method for extracting information about the state of the ions.

  11. Compact Intense Neutron Generators Based on Inertial Electrostatic Confinement of D-D Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, K.; Inoue, K.; Kajiwara, T.; Nakamatsu, R.

    2015-10-01

    A neutron generator based on inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) of fusion plasmas is being developed for a non-destructive inspection system of special nuclear materials hidden in sea containers. The new IEC device is equipped with a multistage feedthrough which was designed aiming at both capability of a high bias voltage and enhancement of ion recirculation by modification of electric fields in the IEC device. Experimental comparison was made with a conventional single-stage IEC device developed in an earlier work. As the results, both the increase in the applied voltage and the modified field symmetry by the new multistage scheme showed significant enhancement in the neutron output. As a consequence, neutron output per input discharge current was enhanced drastically by a factor of ~30 in total. Also, the first pulsing experiments of the newly developed IEC neutron generator showed pulsed neutron output with a rapid pulse fall-off of ~ 1 μsec successfully.

  12. Diagnosing suprathermal ion populations in Z-pinch plasmas using fusion neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, P. F.; Sinars, D. B.; Hahn, K. D.

    2013-01-01

    The existence of suprathermal ion populations gives rise to significant broadening of and modifications to the fusion neutron spectrum. We show that when this population takes the form of a power-law at high energies, specific changes occur to the spectrum which are diagnosable. In particular, the usual Gaussian spectral shape produced by a thermal plasma is replaced by a Lorentz-like spectrum with broad wings extending far from the spectral peak. Additionally, it is found that the full width at half maximum of the spectrum depends on both the ion temperature and the power-law exponent. This causes the use of the spectral width for determination of the ion temperature to be unreliable. We show that these changes are distinguishable from other broadening mechanisms, such as temporal and motional broadening, and that detailed fitting of the spectral shape is a promising method for extracting information about the state of the ions

  13. Diagnosing suprathermal ion populations in Z-pinch plasmas using fusion neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, P. F.; Sinars, D. B.; Hahn, K. D.

    2013-06-15

    The existence of suprathermal ion populations gives rise to significant broadening of and modifications to the fusion neutron spectrum. We show that when this population takes the form of a power-law at high energies, specific changes occur to the spectrum which are diagnosable. In particular, the usual Gaussian spectral shape produced by a thermal plasma is replaced by a Lorentz-like spectrum with broad wings extending far from the spectral peak. Additionally, it is found that the full width at half maximum of the spectrum depends on both the ion temperature and the power-law exponent. This causes the use of the spectral width for determination of the ion temperature to be unreliable. We show that these changes are distinguishable from other broadening mechanisms, such as temporal and motional broadening, and that detailed fitting of the spectral shape is a promising method for extracting information about the state of the ions.

  14. Education Outreach at M.I.T. Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivenberg, P.; Censabella, V.

    2000-10-01

    At the MIT PSFC student and staff volunteers work together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion and plasma-related experiments. Seeking to generate excitement about science, engineering and mathematics, the PSFC holds a number of outreach activities throughout the year, including Middle and High School Outreach Days and the Mr. Magnet program. During the past year, in collaboration with the MIT Museum, the PSFC reprogrammed their C-Mod, Jr Video Game to be operated via the keyboard instead of joysticks. The game will eventually be available on the web and on disc. The PSFC maintains a Home Page on the World Wide Web, which can be reached at http://www.psfc.mit.edu.

  15. Three-dimensional modeling of beam emission spectroscopy measurements in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guszejnov, D.; Pokol, G. I.; Pusztai, I.; Refy, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Nam, Y. U.

    2012-11-15

    One of the main diagnostic tools for measuring electron density profiles and the characteristics of long wavelength turbulent wave structures in fusion plasmas is beam emission spectroscopy (BES). The increasing number of BES systems necessitated an accurate and comprehensive simulation of BES diagnostics, which in turn motivated the development of the Rate Equations for Neutral Alkali-beam TEchnique (RENATE) simulation code that is the topic of this paper. RENATE is a modular, fully three-dimensional code incorporating all key features of BES systems from the atomic physics to the observation, including an advanced modeling of the optics. Thus RENATE can be used both in the interpretation of measured signals and the development of new BES systems. The most important components of the code have been successfully benchmarked against other simulation codes. The primary results have been validated against experimental data from the KSTAR tokamak.

  16. Spatially dependent cluster dynamics model of He plasma surface interaction in tungsten for fusion relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faney, T.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Wirth, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    In fusion reactors, plasma facing components (PFC) and, in particular, the divertor will be irradiated with high fluxes of low-energy (˜100 eV) helium and hydrogen ions. Tungsten is one of the leading candidate divertor materials for ITER and DEMO fusion reactors. However, the behaviour of tungsten under high dose, coupled helium/hydrogen exposure remains to be fully understood. The PFC response and performance changes are intimately related to microstructural changes, such as the formation of point defect clusters, helium and hydrogen bubbles or dislocation loops. Computational materials' modelling results are described here that investigate the mechanisms controlling microstructural evolution in tungsten. The aim of this study is to understand and predict sub-surface helium bubble growth under high flux helium ion implantation (˜1022 m-2 s-1) at high temperatures (>1000 K). We report results from a spatially dependent cluster dynamics model based on reaction-diffusion rate theory to describe the evolution of the microstructure under these conditions. The key input parameters to the model (diffusion coefficients, migration and binding energies, initial defect production) are determined from a combination of atomistic modelling and available experimental data. The results are in good agreement with results of an analytical model that is presented in a separate paper. In particular, it is found that the sub-surface evolution with respect to bubble size and concentration of the helium bubbles strongly depends on the flux and temperature.

  17. Electron Heating in a Relativistic, Weibel-unstable Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rahul; Eichler, David; Gedalin, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of two initially unmagnetized relativistic counter-streaming homogeneous ion-electron plasma beams are simulated in two dimensions (2D) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. It is shown that current filaments, which form due to the Weibel instability, develop a large-scale longitudinal electric field in the direction opposite to the current carried by the filaments as predicted by theory. This field, which is partially inductive and partially electrostatic, is identified as the main source of net electron acceleration, greatly exceeding that due to magnetic field decay at later stages. The transverse electric field, although larger than the longitudinal field, is shown to play a smaller role in heating electrons, contrary to previous claims. It is found that in one dimension, the electrons become strongly magnetized and are not accelerated beyond their initial kinetic energy. Rather, the heating of the electrons is enhanced by the bending and break up of the filaments, which releases electrons that would otherwise be trapped within a single filament and slow the development of the Weibel instability (i.e., the magnetic field growth) via induction as per Lenz’s law. In 2D simulations, electrons are heated to about one quarter of the initial kinetic energy of ions. The magnetic energy at maximum is about 4%, decaying to less than 1% by the end of the simulation. The ions are found to gradually decelerate until the end of the simulation, by which time they retain a residual anisotropy of less than 10%.

  18. High Power, Solid-State RF Generation for Plasma Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth; Pierren, Chris

    2016-10-01

    Radio Frequency heating systems are rarely used by the small-scale validation platform experiments due to the high cost and complexity of these systems. Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT), Inc. is developing an all-solid-state RF plasma heating system that uses EHT's nanosecond pulser technology in an inductive adder configuration to drive nonlinear transmission lines (NLTL). The system under development does not require the use of vacuum tube technology, is inherently lower cost, and is more robust than traditional high power RF heating schemes. The inductive adder can produce 0 to20 kV pulses into 50 Ohms with sub-10 ns rise times. The inductive adder has been used to drive NLTLs near 2 GHz with other frequencies to be tested in the future. EHT will present experimental results, including RF measurements with D-dot probes and capacitve voltage probes. During this program, EHT will test the system on Helicity Injected Torus at the University of Washington and the High Beta Tokamak at Columbia University.

  19. ELECTRON HEATING IN A RELATIVISTIC, WEIBEL-UNSTABLE PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rahul; Eichler, David; Gedalin, Michael

    2015-06-20

    The dynamics of two initially unmagnetized relativistic counter-streaming homogeneous ion–electron plasma beams are simulated in two dimensions (2D) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. It is shown that current filaments, which form due to the Weibel instability, develop a large-scale longitudinal electric field in the direction opposite to the current carried by the filaments as predicted by theory. This field, which is partially inductive and partially electrostatic, is identified as the main source of net electron acceleration, greatly exceeding that due to magnetic field decay at later stages. The transverse electric field, although larger than the longitudinal field, is shown to play a smaller role in heating electrons, contrary to previous claims. It is found that in one dimension, the electrons become strongly magnetized and are not accelerated beyond their initial kinetic energy. Rather, the heating of the electrons is enhanced by the bending and break up of the filaments, which releases electrons that would otherwise be trapped within a single filament and slow the development of the Weibel instability (i.e., the magnetic field growth) via induction as per Lenz’s law. In 2D simulations, electrons are heated to about one quarter of the initial kinetic energy of ions. The magnetic energy at maximum is about 4%, decaying to less than 1% by the end of the simulation. The ions are found to gradually decelerate until the end of the simulation, by which time they retain a residual anisotropy of less than 10%.

  20. Laser-Driven Ultra-Relativistic Plasmas - Nuclear Fusion in Coulomb Shock Waves, Rouge Waves, and Background Matter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-05

    non-relativistic matter , radiation, and dark energy components. - 10 - In application to astrophysics and cosmology, our theory can describe the...AND SUBTITLE LASER-DRIVEN ULTRA-RELATIVISTIC PLASMAS - NUCLEAR FUSION IN COULOMB SHOCK WAVES, ROUGE WAVES, AND BACKGROUND MATTER . 5a.  CONTRACT

  1. Conceptual design of a laser-fusion power plant. Part II. Two technical options: 1. JADE reactor; 2. Heat transfer by heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    A laser fusion reactor concept is described that employs liquid metal walls. The concept envisions a porous medium, called the JADE, of specific geometry lining the reactor cavity. Some advantages and disadvantages of the concept are pointed out. The possibility of using heat pipes for passive cooling in ICF reactors is discussed. Some of the problems are outlined. (MOW)

  2. On the different regimes of gas heating in air plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintassilgo, Carlos D.; Guerra, Vasco

    2015-10-01

    Simulations of the gas temperature in air (N2-20%O2) plasma discharges are presented for different values of the reduced electric field, E/N g, electron density n e, pressure and tube radius. This study is based on the solutions to the time-dependent gas thermal balance in a cylindrical geometry coupled to the electron, vibrational and chemical kinetics, for E/{{N}\\text{g}}=50 and 100 Td (1 Td = 10-17 V cm2), 109  ⩽  n e  ⩽  1011 cm-3, pressure in the range 1-20 Torr, and also considering different tube radius, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 cm. The competing role of different gas heating mechanisms is discussed in detail within the time range 0.01-100 ms. For times below 1 ms, gas heating occurs from O2 dissociation by electron impact through pre-dissociative excited states, e + O2  →  e + \\text{O}2*   →  e + 2O(3P) and …  →  e + O(3P) + O(1D), as well as through the quenching of N2 electronically excited states by O2. For longer times, simulation results show that gas heating comes from processes N(4S) + NO(X)  →  N2(X, v ~ 3) + O, N2(A) + O  →  NO(X) + N(2D), V-T N2-O collisions and the recombination of oxygen atoms at the wall. Depending on the given E/N g and n e values, each one of these processes can be an important gas-heating channel. The contribution of V-T N2-O exchanges to gas heating is important in the analysis of the gas temperature for different pressures and values of the tube radius. A global picture of these effects is given by the study of the fraction of the discharge power spent on gas heating, which is always ~15%. The values for the fractional power transferred to gas heating from vibrational and electronic excitation are also presented and discussed.

  3. Heating of ions by high frequency electromagnetic waves in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zestanakis, P. A.; Kominis, Y.; Hizanidis, K.; Ram, A. K.

    2013-07-15

    The heating of ions by high frequency electrostatic waves in magnetically confined plasmas has been a paradigm for studying nonlinear wave-particle interactions. The frequency of the waves is assumed to be much higher than the ion cyclotron frequency and the waves are taken to propagate across the magnetic field. In fusion type plasmas, electrostatic waves, like the lower hybrid wave, cannot access the core of the plasma. That is a domain for high harmonic fast waves or electron cyclotron waves—these are primarily electromagnetic waves. Previous studies on heating of ions by two or more electrostatic waves are extended to two electromagnetic waves that propagate directly across the confining magnetic field. While the ratio of the frequency of each wave to the ion cyclotron frequency is large, the frequency difference is assumed to be near the ion cyclotron frequency. The nonlinear wave-particle interaction is studied analytically using a two time-scale canonical perturbation theory. The theory elucidates the effects of various parameters on the gain in energy by the ions—parameters such as the amplitudes and polarizations of the waves, the ratio of the wave frequencies to the cyclotron frequency, the difference in the frequency of the two waves, and the wave numbers associated with the waves. For example, the ratio of the phase velocity of the envelope formed by the two waves to the phase velocity of the carrier wave is important for energization of ions. For a positive ratio, the energy range is much larger than for a negative ratio. So waves like the lower hybrid waves will impart very little energy to ions. The theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with numerical simulations of the exact dynamical equations. The analytical results are used to construct mapping equations, simplifying the derivation of the motion of ions, which are, subsequently, used to follow the evolution of an ion distribution function. The heating of ions can then be

  4. [Fluctuations and transport in fusion plasma]: Progress report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-12-31

    In the study of plasma collection by obstacles in a tokamak edge plasma, the effect of anomalous transport have been examined using an extension of the 2D fluid code developed here previously (Appendices A and B). The origin of the anomalous transport is assumed to be a randomly fluctuating electric field such as would be caused by drift waves. As before, the magnetic field is assumed to be uniform and perpendicular to the obstacle, which is taken to be an infinite strip. In the absence of ambient plasma flow, the numerical results indicate that ion viscous heating is important near the tip of the obstacle, where there is a large velocity gradient in the flow. For typical plasma parameters, the maximum ion temperature near the tip is up to 85% higher than the ambient ion temperature. When there is a subsonic plasma flow past the obstacle, the numerical results indicate that, near the tip of the obstacle, the ions on the downstream side are hotter than those on the upstream side. Furthermore, the ion density is higher on the upstream side. A detailed report of this work has been prepared and will be submitted as part of the Annual Progress Report. Recently, the 2D parallel electrostatic plasma particle-in-cell (PIC) code described in reference (9) (Appendix B) has been upgraded to a 2D fully electromagnetic PIC code. This code has been successfully tested on the JPL/Caltech Mark III Hypercube concurrent computers and can be used to simulate interactions of electromagnetic waves with a magnetized plasma. It is currently applied to investigate the decay of large amplitude Alfven waves, such as those observed in the solar wind. Large amplitude Alfven waves, propagating parallel to the magnetic field, are predicted to decay into obliquely propagating daughter waves and standing magnetosonic waves. Results from the simulations will be compared with theoretical predictions.

  5. Characterization of the axial plasma shock in a table top plasma focus after the pinch and its possible application to testing materials for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Leopoldo Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, José; Inestrosa-Izurieta, María José; Veloso, Felipe; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo; Vergara, Julio; Clausse, Alejandro; Bruzzone, Horacio; Castillo, Fermín; and others

    2014-12-15

    The characterization of plasma bursts produced after the pinch phase in a plasma focus of hundreds of joules, using pulsed optical refractive techniques, is presented. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser at 532 nm and 8 ns FWHM pulse duration was used to obtain Schlieren images at different times of the plasma dynamics. The energy, interaction time with a target, and power flux of the plasma burst were assessed, providing useful information for the application of plasma focus devices for studying the effects of fusion-relevant pulses on material targets. In particular, it was found that damage factors on targets of the order of 10{sup 4} (W/cm{sup 2})s{sup 1/2} can be obtained with a small plasma focus operating at hundred joules.

  6. Plasma production and heating in a tandem mirror central cell by radio-frequency waves in the ion cyclotron frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovato, S. N.; Brau, K.; Casey, J.; Coleman, J.; Gerver, M. J.; Guss, W.; Hallock, G.; Horne, S.; Irby, J.; Kumazawa, R.; Kesner, J.; Lane, B.; Machuzak, J.; Moran, T.; Myer, R.; Post, R. S.; Sevillano, E.; Smith, D. K.; Sullivan, J. D.; Torti, R.; Wang, L.; Yasaka, Y.; Yao, X. Z.; Zielinski, J.

    1988-12-01

    Plasma production and heating in the central cell of the Tara tandem mirror [Nucl. Fusion 22, 549 (1982); Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, 1986, Proceedings of the 11th International Conference, Kyoto, Japan (IAEA, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 2, p. 251] have been studied. Using radio-frequency excitation by a slot antenna in the ion cyclotron frequency range (ICRF), plasmas with a peak β⊥ of 3%, density of 4×1012 cm-3, ion temperature of 800 eV, and electron temperature of 75-100 eV were routinely produced. The plasma radius decreased with increasing ICRF power, causing reduced ICRF coupling and saturation of the plasma beta. About 70% of the applied ICRF power can be accounted for in direct heating of both ions and electrons. Wave field measurements have identified the applied ICRF to be the slow, ion cyclotron wave. In operation without end plugging, the plasma parameters were limited by poor axial confinement and the requirements for maintenance of magnetohydrodynamic stability and microstability.

  7. Towards including finite orbit effects in self-consistent calculations of ion cyclotron heating in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. L.; Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Choi, M.

    2008-11-01

    In burning plasma experiments, the combination of neutral beam injection, high power electromagnetic heating and fusion products give rise to significant non-thermal ion populations. The resulting non-Maxwellian plasma affects ICRF wave propagation and heating. Self-consistent simulation of these effects has been achieved by an iterative coupling of a full-wave electromagnetic solver with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck (F-P) code under the zero banana width approximation. Investigating the effects of finite width particle orbits is possible by iterating with a Monte-Carlo calculation of the ion distribution function in place of the F-P code. Here we present progress towards coupling the all-orders global wave solver AORSA with the ORBIT-RF Monte-Carlo code. ORBIT-RF solves the Hamiltonian guiding center equations under coulomb collisions and ICRF quasi-linear (QL) heating taking the QL diffusion coefficients calculated from the AORSA wave fields as inputs. However, completing the self-consistent, time dependent calculation requires adapting the resulting Monte-Carlo particle list to a distribution function suitable for input to AORSA. Issues associated with calculating the differentiable bounce-averaged distribution function from discrete particle data will be discussed. E. F. Jaeger, et al., Phys. of Plasmas, 13, 056101-1, 2006

  8. Fishbones in Joint European Torus plasmas with high ion-cyclotron-resonance-heated fast ions energy content

    SciTech Connect

    Nabais, F.; Borba, D.; Mantsinen, M.; Nave, M.F.F.; Sharapov, S.E.; Joint

    2005-10-01

    In Joint European Torus (JET) [P. J. Lomas, Plasma Phys. Controled Fusion 31, 1481 (1989)], discharges with ion cyclotron resonance heating only, low-density plasmas and high fast ions energy contents provided a scenario where fishbones behavior has been observed to be related with sawtooth activity: Crashes of monster sawteeth abruptly changed the type of observed fishbones from low-frequency fishbones [B. Coppi and F. Porcelli, Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 2272 (1986)] to high-frequency fishbones [L. Chen, R. White, and M. Rosenbluth, Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 1122 (1984)]. During periods between crashes, the type of observed fishbones gradually changed in the opposite way. Two new fishbones regimes have been observed in intermediate stages: Fishbones bursts covering both high and low frequencies and low amplitude bursts of both types occurring simultaneously. Both sawtooth and fishbones behavior have been explained using a variational formalism.

  9. Large Plasma Membrane Disruptions Are Rapidly Resealed by Ca2+-dependent Vesicle–Vesicle Fusion Events

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Mark; Miyake, Katsuya; McNeil, Paul L.

    1997-01-01

    A microneedle puncture of the fibroblast or sea urchin egg surface rapidly evokes a localized exocytotic reaction that may be required for the rapid resealing that follows this breach in plasma membrane integrity (Steinhardt, R.A,. G. Bi, and J.M. Alderton. 1994. Science (Wash. DC). 263:390–393). How this exocytotic reaction facilitates the resealing process is unknown. We found that starfish oocytes and sea urchin eggs rapidly reseal much larger disruptions than those produced with a microneedle. When an ∼40 by 10 μm surface patch was torn off, entry of fluorescein stachyose (FS; 1,000 mol wt) or fluorescein dextran (FDx; 10,000 mol wt) from extracellular sea water (SW) was not detected by confocal microscopy. Moreover, only a brief (∼5–10 s) rise in cytosolic Ca2+ was detected at the wound site. Several lines of evidence indicate that intracellular membranes are the primary source of the membrane recruited for this massive resealing event. When we injected FS-containing SW deep into the cells, a vesicle formed immediately, entrapping within its confines most of the FS. DiI staining and EM confirmed that the barrier delimiting injected SW was a membrane bilayer. The threshold for vesicle formation was ∼3 mM Ca2+ (SW is ∼10 mM Ca2+). The capacity of intracellular membranes for sealing off SW was further demonstrated by extruding egg cytoplasm from a micropipet into SW. A boundary immediately formed around such cytoplasm, entrapping FDx or FS dissolved in it. This entrapment did not occur in Ca2+-free SW (CFSW). When egg cytoplasm stratified by centrifugation was exposed to SW, only the yolk platelet–rich domain formed a membrane, suggesting that the yolk platelet is a critical element in this response and that the ER is not required. We propose that plasma membrane disruption evokes Ca2+ regulated vesicle–vesicle (including endocytic compartments but possibly excluding ER) fusion reactions. The function in resealing of this cytoplasmic fusion

  10. Flow Dynamics and Plasma Heating of Spheromaks in SSX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. R.; Cothran, C. D.; Cohen, D. H.; Horwitz, J.; Chaplin, V.

    2008-06-01

    We report several new experimental results related to flow dynamics and heating from single dipole-trapped spheromaks and spheromak merging studies at SSX. Single spheromaks (stabilized with a pair of external coils, see Brown, Phys. Plasmas 13 102503 (2006)) and merged FRC-like configurations (see Brown, Phys. Plasmas 13, 056503 (2006)) are trapped in our prolate ( R = 0.2 m, L = 0.6 m) copper flux conserver. Local spheromak flow is studied with two Mach probes ( r 1 ≤ ρ i , r 2 ≥ ρ i ) calibrated by time-of-flight with a fast set of magnetic probes at the edge of the device. Both Mach probes feature six ion collectors housed in a boron nitride sheath. The larger Mach probe will ultimately be used in the MST reversed field pinch. Line averaged flow is measured by ion Doppler spectroscopy (IDS) at the midplane. The SSX IDS instrument measures with 1 μ s or better time resolution the width and Doppler shift of the C III impurity (H plasma) 229.7 nm line to determine the temperature and line-averaged flow velocity (see Cothran, RSI 77, 063504 (2006)). We find axial flows up to 100 km/s during formation of the dipole trapped spheromak. Flow returns at the wall to form a large vortex. Recent high-resolution IDS velocity measurements during spheromak merging show bi-directional outflow jets at ±40 km/s (nearly the Alfvén speed). We also measure T i ≥ 80 eV and T e ≥ 20 eV during spheromak merging events after all plasma facing surfaces are cleaned with helium glow discharge conditioning. Transient electron heating is inferred from bursts on a four-channel soft x-ray array. The spheromaks are also characterized by a suite of magnetic probe arrays for magnetic structure B(r,t), and interferometry for n e . Finally, we are designing a new oblate, trapezoidal flux conserver for FRC studies. Equilibrium and dynamical simulations suggest that a tilt-stable, oblate FRC can be formed by spheromak merging in the new flux conserver.

  11. Fast ion motion in the plasma part of a stellarator-mirror fission-fusion hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseenko, V. E.; Nemov, V. V.; Ågren, O.; Kasilov, S. V.; Garkusha, I. E.

    2016-06-01

    Recent developments of a stellarator-mirror (SM) fission-fusion hybrid concept are reviewed. The hybrid consists of a fusion neutron source and a powerful sub-critical fast fission reactor core. The aim is transmutation of spent nuclear fuel and safe fission energy production. In its fusion part, a stellarator-type system with an embedded magnetic mirror is used. The stellarator confines deuterium plasma with moderate temperature, 1-2 keV. In the magnetic mirror, a hot component of sloshing tritium ions is trapped. There, the fusion neutrons are generated. A candidate for a combined SM system is a DRACON magnetic trap. A basic idea behind an SM device is to maintain local neutron production in a mirror part, but at the same time eliminate the end losses by using a toroidal device. A possible drawback is that the stellarator part can introduce collision-free radial drift losses, which is the main topic for this study. For high energy ions of tritium with an energy of 70 keV, comparative computations of collisionless losses in the rectilinear part of a specific design of the DRACON type trap are carried out. Two versions of the trap are considered with different lengths of the rectilinear sections. Also the total number of current-carrying rings in the magnetic system is varied. The results predict that high energy ions from neutral beam injection can be satisfactorily confined in the mirror part during 0.1-1 s. The Uragan-2M experimental device is used to check key points of the SM concept. The magnetic configuration of a stellarator with an embedded magnetic mirror is arranged in this device by switching off one toroidal coil. The motion of particles magnetically trapped in the embedded mirror is analyzed numerically with use of motional invariants. It is found that without radial electric field particles quickly drift out of the SM, even if the particles initially are located on a nested magnetic surface. We will show that a weak radial electric field, which

  12. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy,and Related Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L. R.; Kwan, J. W.

    2008-08-01

    Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons - can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion - ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.

  13. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Kwan, J.W.

    2008-08-01

    Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions [1]could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons -- can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion-ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.

  14. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

    SciTech Connect

    L. Grisham and J.W. Kwan

    2008-08-12

    Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions [1] could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons -- can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion-ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.

  15. FINAL Report on Analysis and direct numerical simulation of RF heating processes and advanced computational methods for fusion application

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, John R.

    2015-02-23

    This completes the description of the work done under the above referenced grant. In brief, we have discovered many nonlinear effects, frequency doubling, nonlinear decays, that can prevent effective use of EBWs for plasma heating.

  16. Rapid heating of matter using high power lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Woosuk

    2015-11-05

    This report describes rapid heating technology with ion sources. LANL calculated the expected heating per atom and temperatures of the target materials, used alumium ion beams to heat gold and diamond, produced deuterium fusion plasmas and then measured the ion temperature at the time of the fusion reactions.

  17. Pulsed, Inductively Generated, Streaming Plasma Ion Source for Heavy Ion Fusion Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Steven C. Glidden; Howard D Sanders; John B. Greenly; Daniel L. Dongwoo

    2006-04-28

    This report describes a compact, high current density, pulsed ion source, based on electrodeless, inductively driven gas breakdown, developed to meet the requirements on normalized emittance, current density, uniformity and pulse duration for an ion injector in a heavy-ion fusion driver. The plasma source produces >10 μs pulse of Argon plasma with ion current densities >100 mA/cm2 at 30 cm from the source and with strongly axially directed ion energy of about 80 eV, and sub-eV transverse temperature. The source has good reproducibility and spatial uniformity. Control of the current density during the pulse has been demonstrated with a novel modulator coil method which allows attenuation of the ion current density without significantly affecting the beam quality. This project was carried out in two phases. Phase 1 used source configurations adapted from light ion sources to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept. In Phase 2 the performance of the source was enhanced and quantified in greater detail, a modulator for controlling the pulse shape was developed, and experiments were conducted with the ions accelerated to >40 kV.

  18. The effect of limiter conditioning on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor edge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kilpatrick, S.J.; Manos, D.M.; Nyberg, I.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stratton, B.C.; Timberlake, J.; Ulrickson, M.J.; Pitcher, C.S.; Dylla, H.F.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements by moveable Langmuir probes and edge spectroscopy diagnostics have documented the conditioning effect of low density helium-initiated discharge sequences on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) edge plasma. Langmuir probe measurements show in general that the edge electron density n{sub e} decreases by less than a factor of 2 while the edge electron temperature T{sub e} doubles. Radial profiles to the plasma boundary show that the density scrape-off length increases somewhat while the temperature scrape-off length decreases substantially. The particle flux density is unaffected. The spectral emission of C 2 decreases by a factor of 2, a much smaller change than that exhibited by the D{sub {alpha}} signal. These results complement previous accounts of the conditioning technique. Comparisons of these He conditioning measurements are made to edge measurements during a deuterium density scan experiment, showing many similarities, and to an existing edge model of the conditioning process, showing qualitative agreement. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  19. The effect of limiter conditioning on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor edge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kilpatrick, S.J.; Pitcher, C.S.; Dylla, H.F.; Manos, D.M.; Nyberg, I.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stratton, B.C.; Timberlake, J.; Ulrickson, M.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Measurements by moveable Langmuir probes and edge spectroscopy diagnostics have documented the conditioning effect of low-density helium-initiated discharge sequences on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor edge plasma. Langmuir probe measurements shown in general that the edge electron density {ital n}{sub {ital e}} decreases by less than a factor of 2 while the edge electron temperature {ital T}{sub {ital e}} doubles. Radial profiles to the plasma boundary show that the density scrape-off length increases somewhat while the temperature scrape-off length decreases substantially. The particle flux density is unaffected. The spectral emission of C II decreases by a factor of 2, a much smaller change than that exhibited by the {ital D}{sub {alpha}} signal. These results complement previous accounts of the conditioning technique. Comparisons of these He conditioning measurements are made to edge measurements during a deuterium density scan experiment, showing many similarities, and to an existing edge model of the conditioning process, showing qualitative agreement.

  20. Additive manufacture (3d printing) of plasma diagnostic components and assemblies for fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieck, Paul; Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James; Romero-Talamas, Carlos; Rivera, William; You, Setthivoine; Card, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) is now becoming sufficiently accurate with a large range of materials for use in printing sensors needed universally in fusion energy research. Decreasing production cost and significantly lowering design time of energy subsystems would realize significant cost reduction for standard diagnostics commonly obtained through research grants. There is now a well-established set of plasma diagnostics, but these expensive since they are often highly complex and require customization, sometimes pace the project. Additive manufacturing (3D printing) is developing rapidly, including open source designs. Basic components can be printed for (in some cases) less than 1/100th costs of conventional manufacturing. We have examined the impact that AM can have on plasma diagnostic cost by taking 15 separate diagnostics through an engineering design using Conventional Manufacturing (CM) techniques to determine costs of components and labor costs associated with getting the diagnostic to work as intended. With that information in hand, we set about optimizing the design to exploit the benefits of AM. Work performed under DOE Contract DE-SC0011858.