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Sample records for fusion plasma turbulence

  1. Turbulent particle transport in magnetized fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdelle, C.

    2005-05-01

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for particle transport is of the utmost importance for magnetized fusion plasmas. A peaked density profile is attractive to improve the fusion rate, which is proportional to the square of the density, and to self-generate a large fraction of non-inductive current required for continuous operation. Experiments in various tokamak devices (ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, JET, TCV, TEXT, TFTR) indicate the existence of a turbulent particle pinch. Recently, such a turbulent pinch has been unambiguously identified in Tore Supra very long discharges, in the absence of both collisional particle pinch and central particle source, for more than 4 min (Hoang et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 155002). This turbulent pinch is predicted by a quasilinear theory of particle transport (Weiland J et al 1989 Nucl. Fusion 29 1810), and confirmed by non-linear turbulence simulations (Garbet et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 035001) and general considerations based on the conservation of motion invariants (Baker et al 2004 Phys. Plasmas 11 992). Experimentally, the particle pinch is found to be sensitive to the magnetic field gradient in many cases (Hoang et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 135003, Zabolotsky et al 2003 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 45 735, Weisen et al 2004 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 46 751, Baker et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 1003), to the temperature profile (Hoang et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 135003, Angioni et al 2004 Nucl. Fusion 44 827) and also to the collisionality that changes the nature of the microturbulence (Angioni et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 205003, Garzotti et al 2003 Nucl. Fusion 43 1829, Weisen et al 2004 31st EPS Conf. on Plasma Phys. (London) vol 28G (ECA) P-1.146, Lopes Cardozo N J 1995 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 37 799). The consistency of some of the observed dependences with the theoretical predictions gives us a clearer understanding of the particle pinch in tokamaks, allowing us to predict more accurately the density

  2. Multidimensional Visualization of MHD and Turbulence in Fusion Plasmas [Multi-dimensional Visualization of Turbulence in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Muscatello, Christopher M.; Domier, Calvin W.; Hu, Xing; Luhmann, Neville C.; Ren, Xiaoxin; Riemenschneider, Paul; Spear, Alexander; Yu, Liubing; Tobias, Benjamin

    2014-08-13

    Here, quasi-optical imaging at sub-THz frequencies has had a major impact on fusion plasma diagnostics. Mm-wave imaging reflectometry utilizes microwaves to actively probe fusion plasmas, inferring the local properties of electron density fluctuations. Electron cyclotron emission imaging is a multichannel radiometer that passively measures the spontaneous emission of microwaves from the plasma to infer local properties of electron temperature fluctuations. These imaging diagnostics work together to diagnose the characteristics of turbulence. Important quantities such as amplitude and wavenumber of coherent fluctuations, correlation lengths and decor relation times of turbulence, and poloidal flow velocity of the plasma are readily inferred.

  3. Fusion plasma turbulence described by modified sandpile dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ghendrih, Philippe; Ciraolo, Guido; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Norscini, Claudia; Sarazin, Yanick; Abiteboul, Jérémie; Cartier-Michaud, Thomas; Garbet, Xavier; Grandgirard, Virginie; Strugarek, Antoine

    2014-04-01

    Transport in fusion plasmas is investigated with modified sandpile models. Based on results from more complete simulations, the sandpile model is modified in steps. Models with a constant source are obtained by coupling two sandpiles. Decoupling the mean field from the bursts allows one to develop a reduced model which captures some of the key features of flux-driven simulations. In the latter sandpile model, turbulent transport is mediated by the burst field while the mean-field gradient governs the transfer to the bursts. This allows one to investigate spreading, namely turbulent transport into stable regions, and transport barriers, regions where the transfer from the mean field to turbulence is reduced. Both cases are found to exhibit intermittent behaviors when the system undergoes spontaneous transitions between different transport regimes. Finally, one couples to the sandpile algorithm a species evolution algorithm that assigns a quality factor to each site. The latter appears to self-generate corrugations, or micro-barriers. These are found to naturally cluster radially in structures that are large enough to impact confinement. The mechanisms introduced to alleviate the clustering, destabilization of the corrugation by overloading and by secondary instabilities at critical radial extents, are shown to generate long-range relaxation events in space and in time with quasiperiodic reorganization of the corrugation pattern.

  4. Interplay between fast ions and turbulence in magnetic fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, R. J.; Zarzoso, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Strugarek, A.; Abiteboul, J.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, Ph; Girardo, J.-B.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Passeron, C.; Thomine, O.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence for the impact of energetic particles (EPs) on turbulence is given in this paper. Firstly, the excitation of electrostatic instabilities in linear gyrokinetic simulations performed with the global GYSELA code by introducing distribution functions typical of fast ions in tokamak plasmas is presented. The obtained mode is unambiguously characterized as an EGAM, i.e. a geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) excited by EPs. The influence of EGAMs on turbulence and associated transport is then analyzed by implementing a source adapted to the inclusion of fast particle populations in non-linear simulations. This source successfully excites EGAMs in the presence of turbulence, which leads to a drastic reduction of the turbulent transport. However, this reduction is only transient; it is followed by an increase of the turbulent activity, characterized by a complex interaction between the EGAMs and the turbulence. In the subsequent steady-state regime, turbulent transport appears to be modulated at the EGAM frequency.

  5. Nonlinear phenomena, turbulence and anomalous transport in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hidalgo, C.; Estrada, T.; Sanchez, E.; Branas, B.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Van Milligen, B.P.; Balbin, R.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Sanchez, J.; Carreras, B.A.

    1995-02-01

    The nonlinear nature of the plasma turbulence, as measured by bicoherence analysis, has been studied in stellarator (ATF and W7AS) and tokamak (PBXM) devices. In ATF, little nonlinear interaction is found in the scrape-off layer region whereas the strength of the coupling is enhanced in the edge plasma region where the level of fluctuations is consistent with the theoretical expectations from resistive interchange modes. In W7AS the level of bicoherence is significantly smaller than in ATF. The comparison ATF/W7AS/PBXM suggest the important role of the magnetic shear to determine nonlinear behavior of the turbulence. The level of bicoherence also depends on the plasma conditions: in particular, it increases at the H-mode transition. The comparison between the nonlinear behavior of the turbulence in tokamaks and stellarators allows experimental verification of theoretical turbulence models.

  6. Scattering of radio frequency waves by turbulence in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Abhay K.

    2016-10-01

    In tokamak fusion plasmas, coherent fluctuations in the form of blobs or filaments and incoherent fluctuations due to turbulence are routinely observed in the scrape-off layer. Radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic waves, excited by antenna structures placed near the wall of a tokamak, have to propagate through the scrape-off layer before reaching the core of the plasma. While the effect of fluctuations on RF waves has not been quantified experimentally, there are telltale signs, arising from differences between results from simulations and from experiments, that fluctuations can modify the spectrum of RF waves. Any effect on RF waves in the scrape-off layer can have important experimental consequences. For example, electron cyclotron waves are expected to stabilize the deleterious neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) in ITER. Spectral and polarization changes due to scattering will modify the spatial location and profile of the current driven by the RF waves, thereby affecting the control of NTMs. Pioneering theoretical studies and complementary computer simulations have been pursued to elucidate the impact of fluctuations on RF waves. From the full complement of Maxwell's equations for cold, magnetized plasmas, it is shown that the Poynting flux in the wake of filaments develops spatial structure due to diffraction and shadowing. The uniformity of power flow into the plasma is affected by side-scattering, modifications to the wave spectrum, and coupling to plasma waves other than the incident RF wave. The Snell's law and the Fresnel equations have been reformulated within the context of magnetized plasmas. They are distinctly different from their counterparts in scalar dielectric media, and reveal new and important physical insight into the scattering of RF waves. The Snell's law and Fresnel equations are the basis for the Kirchhoff approximation necessary to determine properties of the scattered waves. Furthermore, this theory is also relevant for studying back

  7. Phase space structures in gyrokinetic simulations of fusion plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghendrih, Philippe; Norscini, Claudia; Cartier-Michaud, Thomas; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Abiteboul, Jérémie; Dong, Yue; Garbet, Xavier; Gürcan, Ozgür; Hennequin, Pascale; Grandgirard, Virginie; Latu, Guillaume; Morel, Pierre; Sarazin, Yanick; Storelli, Alexandre; Vermare, Laure

    2014-10-01

    Gyrokinetic simulations of fusion plasmas give extensive information in 5D on turbulence and transport. This paper highlights a few of these challenging physics in global, flux driven simulations using experimental inputs from Tore Supra shot TS45511. The electrostatic gyrokinetic code GYSELA is used for these simulations. The 3D structure of avalanches indicates that these structures propagate radially at localised toroidal angles and then expand along the field line at sound speed to form the filaments. Analysing the poloidal mode structure of the potential fluctuations (at a given toroidal location), one finds that the low modes m = 0 and m = 1 exhibit a global structure; the magnitude of the m = 0 mode is much larger than that of the m = 1 mode. The shear layers of the corrugation structures are thus found to be dominated by the m = 0 contribution, that are comparable to that of the zonal flows. This global mode seems to localise the m = 2 mode but has little effect on the localisation of the higher mode numbers. However when analysing the pulsation of the latter modes one finds that all modes exhibit a similar phase velocity, comparable to the local zonal flow velocity. The consequent dispersion like relation between the modes pulsation and the mode numbers provides a means to measure the zonal flow. Temperature fluctuations and the turbulent heat flux are localised between the corrugation structures. Temperature fluctuations are found to exhibit two scales, small fluctuations that are localised by the corrugation shear layers, and appear to bounce back and forth radially, and large fluctuations, also readily observed on the flux, which are associated to the disruption of the corrugations. The radial ballistic velocity of both avalanche events if of the order of 0.5ρ∗c0 where ρ∗ = ρ0/a, a being the tokamak minor radius and ρ0 being the characteristic Larmor radius, ρ0 = c0/Ω0. c0 is the reference ion thermal velocity and Ω0 = qiB0/mi the reference

  8. Steady State Turbulent Transport in Magnetic Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W. W.; Ethier, S.; Kolesnikov, R.; Wang, W. X.; Tang, W. M.

    2007-12-20

    For more than a decade, the study of microturbulence, driven by ion temperature gradient (ITG) drift instabilities in tokamak devices, has been an active area of research in magnetic fusion science for both experimentalists and theorists alike. One of the important impetus for this avenue of research was the discovery of the radial streamers associated the ITG modes in the early nineties using a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code. Since then, ITG simulations based on the codes with increasing realism have become possible with the dramatic increase in computing power. The notable examples were the demonstration of the importance of nonlinearly generated zonal flows in regulating ion thermal transport and the transition from Bohm to GyroBoham scaling with increased device size. In this paper, we will describe another interesting nonlinear physical process associated with the parallel acceleration of the ions, that is found to play an important role for the steady state turbulent transport. Its discovery is again through the use of the modern massively parallel supercomputers.

  9. Invited Review Article: Gas puff imaging diagnostics of edge plasma turbulence in magnetic fusion devices

    DOE PAGES

    Zweben, S. J.; Terry, J. L.; Stotler, D. P.; ...

    2017-04-27

    Gas puff imaging (GPI) is a diagnostic of plasma turbulence which uses a puff of neutral gas at the plasma edge to increase the local visible light emission for improved space-time resolution of plasma fluctuations. This paper reviews gas puff imaging diagnostics of edge plasma turbulence in magnetic fusion research, with a focus on the instrumentation, diagnostic cross-checks, and interpretation issues. The gas puff imaging hardware, optics, and detectors are described for about 10 GPI systems implemented over the past similar to 15 years. Comparison of GPI results with other edge turbulence diagnostic results is described, and many common featuresmore » are observed. Here, several issues in the interpretation of GPI measurements are discussed, and potential improvements in hardware and modeling are suggested.« less

  10. A coarse-grained kinetic equation for neutral particles in turbulent fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mekkaoui, A.; Marandet, Y.; Genesio, P.; Rosato, J.; Stamm, R.; Capes, H.; Koubiti, M.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Catoire, F.

    2012-06-15

    A coarse-grained kinetic equation for neutral particles (atoms, molecules) in magnetized fusion plasmas, valid on time scales large compared to the turbulence correlation time, is presented. This equation includes the effects of plasma density fluctuations, described by gamma statistics, on the transport of neutral particles. These effects have so far been neglected in plasma edge modeling, in spite of the fact that the amplitude of fluctuations can be of order unity. Density fluctuations are shown to have a marked effect on the screening of neutrals and on the spatial localization of the ionization source, in particular at high density. The coarse-grained equations obtained in this work are readily implemented in edge code suites currently used for fusion plasma analysis and future divertor design (ITER, DEMO).

  11. Computational Plasma Physics at the Bleeding Edge: Simulating Kinetic Turbulence Dynamics in Fusion Energy Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, William

    2013-04-01

    Advanced computing is generally recognized to be an increasingly vital tool for accelerating progress in scientific research in the 21st Century. The imperative is to translate the combination of the rapid advances in super-computing power together with the emergence of effective new algorithms and computational methodologies to help enable corresponding increases in the physics fidelity and the performance of the scientific codes used to model complex physical systems. If properly validated against experimental measurements and verified with mathematical tests and computational benchmarks, these codes can provide more reliable predictive capability for the behavior of complex systems, including fusion energy relevant high temperature plasmas. The magnetic fusion energy research community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale very well with the number of processors on massively parallel supercomputers. A good example is the effective usage of the full power of modern leadership class computational platforms from the terascale to the petascale and beyond to produce nonlinear particle-in-cell simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of plasma turbulence in magnetically-confined high temperature plasmas. Illustrative results provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics in extreme-scale computing campaigns to enable predictive simulations with unprecedented physics fidelity. Some illustrative examples will be presented of the algorithmic progress from the magnetic fusion energy sciences area in dealing with low memory per core extreme scale computing challenges for the current top 3 supercomputers worldwide. These include advanced CPU systems (such as the IBM-Blue-Gene-Q system and the Fujitsu K Machine) as well as the GPU-CPU hybrid system (Titan).

  12. Optical and electrical diagnostics for the investigation of edge turbulence in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cavazzana, R.; Scarin, P.; Serianni, G.; Agostini, M.; Degli Agostini, F.; Cervaro, V.; Lotto, L.; Yagi, Y.; Sakakita, H.; Koguchi, H.; Hirano, Y.

    2004-10-01

    A new, two dimensional and fast diagnostic system has been developed for studying the dynamic structure of plasma turbulence; it will be used in the edge of the reversed-field pinch devices TPE-RX and RFX. The system consists of a gas-puffing nozzle, 32 optical channels measuring H{sub {alpha}} emitted from the puffed gas (to study the optical emissivity of turbulent patterns and to analyze structures in two dimensions), and an array of Langmuir probes (to compare the turbulent pattern with the optical method and to measure the local plasma parameters). The signals can be acquired at 10 Msamples/s with 2 MHz band width. The design of the system, calibrations, and tests of the electronic circuitry and the optical sensors are presented.

  13. The nonlinear coupling between gyroradius scale turbulence and mesoscale magnetic islands in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hornsby, W. A.; Peeters, A. G.; Snodin, A. P.; Casson, F. J.; Camenen, Y.; Szepesi, G.; Siccinio, M.; Poli, E.

    2010-09-15

    The interaction between small scale turbulence (of the order of the ion Larmor radius) and mesoscale magnetic islands is investigated within the gyrokinetic framework. Turbulence, driven by background temperature and density gradients, over nonlinear mode coupling, pumps energy into long wavelength modes, and can result in an electrostatic vortex mode that coincides with the magnetic island. The strength of the vortex is strongly enhanced by the modified plasma flow response connected with the change in topology, and the transport it generates can compete with the parallel motion along the perturbed magnetic field. Despite the stabilizing effect of sheared plasma flows in and around the island, the net effect of the island is a degradation of the confinement. When density and temperature gradients inside the island are below the threshold for turbulence generation, turbulent fluctuations still persist through turbulence convection and spreading. The latter mechanisms then generate a finite transport flux and, consequently, a finite pressure gradient in the island. A finite radial temperature gradient inside the island is also shown to persist due to the trapped particles, which do not move along the field around the island. In the low collisionality regime, the finite gradient in the trapped population leads to the generation of a bootstrap current, which reduces the neoclassical drive.

  14. Gyrokinetic Simulation of Energetic Particles Turbulence and Transport in Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenlu; Lin, Zhihong; Holod, Ihor; Xiao, Yong; Bierwage, Andreas; Spong, Donald; Chu, Ming

    2009-05-01

    The confinement of the energetic particles (EP) is a critical issue in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), since that ignition relies on the self-heating by the fusion products. Shear Alfven wave excitations by EP in toroidal systems, for example Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) and Energetic Particle Mode (EPM) have been investigated as primary candidate for fluctuation-induced transport of EP in fusion plasma. In this work, TAE excitations by energetic particles are investigated in large scale first-principle simulations of fusion plasmas using the global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) [Lin, Science 1998]. Comprehensive linear benchmarking results are reported between GTC, GYRO, fluid code TAEFL, and Magnetohydrodynamic-gyrokinetic hybrid code HMGC.

  15. Turbulent Transport in Fusion Plasmas, Effects of Toroidicity and Fluid Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Jan

    2009-11-10

    Basic aspects of turbulent transport in toroidal magnetized plasmas are discussed. In particular Kadomtsev's mixing length estimate is found to work well for the Cyclone base case at the experimental gradient. Generalizations to include non-Markovian effects and off diagonal fluxes are given. The importance of toroidal effects is stressed These enter particularly strongly in convective or off diagonal fluxes. This feature applies also to momentum ttransport.

  16. Cyclokinetic models and simulations for high-frequency turbulence in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhao; Waltz, R. E.; Wang, Xiaogang

    2016-10-01

    Gyrokinetics is widely applied in plasma physics. However, this framework is limited to weak turbulence levels and low drift-wave frequencies because high-frequency gyro-motion is reduced by the gyro-phase averaging. In order to test where gyrokinetics breaks down, Waltz and Zhao developed a new theory, called cyclokinetics [R. E. Waltz and Zhao Deng, Phys. Plasmas 20, 012507 (2013)]. Cyclokinetics dynamically follows the high-frequency ion gyro-motion which is nonlinearly coupled to the low-frequency drift-waves interrupting and suppressing gyro-averaging. Cyclokinetics is valid in the high-frequency (ion cyclotron frequency) regime or for high turbulence levels. The ratio of the cyclokinetic perturbed distribution function over equilibrium distribution function δf/ F can approach 1. This work presents, for the first time, a numerical simulation of nonlinear cyclokinetic theory for ions, and describes the first attempt to completely solve the ion gyro-phase motion in a nonlinear turbulence system. Simulations are performed [Zhao Deng and R. E. Waltz, Phys. Plasmas 22(5), 056101 (2015)] in a local flux-tube geometry with the parallel motion and variation suppressed by using a newly developed code named rCYCLO, which is executed in parallel by using an implicit time-advanced Eulerian (or continuum) scheme [Zhao Deng and R. E. Waltz, Comp. Phys. Comm. 195, 23 (2015)]. A novel numerical treatment of the magnetic moment velocity space derivative operator guarantee saccurate conservation of incremental entropy. By comparing the more fundamental cyclokinetic simulations with the corresponding gyrokinetic simulations, the gyrokinetics breakdown condition is quantitatively tested. Gyrokinetic transport and turbulence level recover those of cyclokinetics at high relative ion cyclotron frequencies and low turbulence levels, as required. Cyclokinetic transport and turbulence level are found to be lower than those of gyrokinetics at high turbulence levels and low- Ω* values

  17. Plasma fusion and cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hideo, Kozima

    1996-12-31

    Fundamental problems of plasma fusion (controlled thermonuclear fusion) due to the contradicting demands of the magnetic confinement of plasma and suppression of instabilities occurring on and in plasma are surveyed in contrast with problems of cold fusion. Problems in cold fusion due to the complicated constituents and types of force are explained. Typical cold fusion events are explained by a model based on the presence of trapped neutrons in cold fusion materials. The events include Pons-Fleishmann effect, tritium anomaly, helium 4 production, and nuclear transmutation. Fundamental hypothesis of the model is an effectiveness of a new concept--neutron affinity of elements. The neutron affinity is defined and some bases supporting it are explained. Possible justification of the concept by statistical approach is given.

  18. Turbulent complex (dusty) plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Sergey; Schwabe, Mierk

    2017-04-01

    As a paradigm of complex system dynamics, solid particles immersed into a weakly ionized plasma, so called complex (dusty) plasmas, were (and continue to be) a subject of many detailed studies. Special types of dynamical activity have been registered, in particular, spontaneous pairing, entanglement and cooperative action of a great number of particles resulting in formation of vortices, self-propelling, tunneling, and turbulent movements. In the size domain of 1-10 mkm normally used in experiments with complex plasmas, the characteristic dynamic time-scale is of the order of 0.01-0.1 s, and these particles can be visualized individually in real time, providing an atomistic (kinetic) level of investigations. The low-R turbulent flow induced either by the instability in a complex plasma cloud or formed behind a projectile passing through the cloud is a typical scenario. Our simulations showed formation of a fully developed system of vortices and demonstrated that the velocity structure functions scale very close to the theoretical predictions. As an important element of self-organization, cooperative and turbulent particle motions are present in many physical, astrophysical, and biological systems. Therefore, experiments with turbulent wakes and turbulent complex plasma oscillations are a promising mean to observe and study in detail the anomalous transport on the level of individual particles.

  19. Electromagnetic strong plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.; Jenet, F. A.; Robinson, P. A.

    2007-02-15

    The first large-scale simulations of continuously driven, two-dimensional electromagnetic strong plasma turbulence are performed, for electron thermal speeds 0.01c{<=}v{<=}0.57c, by integrating the Zakharov equations for coupled Langmuir and transverse (T) waves near the plasma frequency. Turbulence scalings and wave number spectra are calculated, a transition is found from a mix of trapped and free T eigenstates for v{>=}0.1c to just free eigenstates for v{<=}0.1c, and wave energy densities are observed to undergo slow quasiperiodic oscillations.

  20. Self-organized criticality and the dynamics of near-marginal turbulent transport in magnetically confined fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, R.; Newman, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    The high plasma temperatures expected at reactor conditions in magnetic confinement fusion toroidal devices suggest that near-marginal operation could be a reality in future devices and reactors. By near-marginal it is meant that the plasma profiles might wander around the local critical thresholds for the onset of instabilities. Self-organized criticality (SOC) was suggested in the mid 1990s as a more proper paradigm to describe the dynamics of tokamak plasma transport in near-marginal conditions. It advocated that, near marginality, the evolution of mean profiles and fluctuations should be considered simultaneously, in contrast to the more common view of a large separation of scales existing between them. Otherwise, intrinsic features of near-marginal transport would be missed, that are of importance to understand the properties of energy confinement. In the intervening 20 years, the relevance of the idea of SOC for near-marginal transport in fusion plasmas has transitioned from an initial excessive hype to the much more realistic standing of today, which we will attempt to examine critically in this review paper. First, the main theoretical ideas behind SOC will be described. Secondly, how they might relate to the dynamics of near-marginal transport in real magnetically confined plasmas will be discussed. Next, we will review what has been learnt about SOC from various numerical studies and what it has meant for the way in which we do numerical simulation of fusion plasmas today. Then, we will discuss the experimental evidence available from the several experiments that have looked for SOC dynamics in fusion plasmas. Finally, we will conclude by identifying the various problems that still remain open to investigation in this area. Special attention will be given to the discussion of frequent misconceptions and ongoing controversies. The review also contains a description of ongoing efforts that seek effective transport models better suited than traditional

  1. Scaling laws in magnetized plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2015-06-28

    Interactions of plasma motion with magnetic fields occur in nature and in the laboratory in an impressively broad range of scales, from megaparsecs in astrophysical systems to centimeters in fusion devices. The fact that such an enormous array of phenomena can be effectively studied lies in the existence of fundamental scaling laws in plasma turbulence, which allow one to scale the results of analytic and numerical modeling to the sized of galaxies, velocities of supernovae explosions, or magnetic fields in fusion devices. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provides the simplest framework for describing magnetic plasma turbulence. Recently, a number of new features of MHD turbulence have been discovered and an impressive array of thought-provoking phenomenological theories have been put forward. However, these theories have conflicting predictions, and the currently available numerical simulations are not able to resolve the contradictions. MHD turbulence exhibits a variety of regimes unusual in regular hydrodynamic turbulence. Depending on the strength of the guide magnetic field it can be dominated by weakly interacting Alfv\\'en waves or strongly interacting wave packets. At small scales such turbulence is locally anisotropic and imbalanced (cross-helical). In a stark contrast with hydrodynamic turbulence, which tends to ``forget'' global constrains and become uniform and isotropic at small scales, MHD turbulence becomes progressively more anisotropic and unbalanced at small scales. Magnetic field plays a fundamental role in turbulent dynamics. Even when such a field is not imposed by external sources, it is self-consistently generated by the magnetic dynamo action. This project aims at a comprehensive study of universal regimes of magnetic plasma turbulence, combining the modern analytic approaches with the state of the art numerical simulations. The proposed study focuses on the three topics: weak MHD turbulence, which is relevant for laboratory devices, the solar

  2. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  3. Simulation of Fusion Plasmas

    ScienceCinema

    Holland, Chris [UC San Diego, San Diego, California, United States

    2016-07-12

    The upcoming ITER experiment (www.iter.org) represents the next major milestone in realizing the promise of using nuclear fusion as a commercial energy source, by moving into the “burning plasma” regime where the dominant heat source is the internal fusion reactions. As part of its support for the ITER mission, the US fusion community is actively developing validated predictive models of the behavior of magnetically confined plasmas. In this talk, I will describe how the plasma community is using the latest high performance computing facilities to develop and refine our models of the nonlinear, multiscale plasma dynamics, and how recent advances in experimental diagnostics are allowing us to directly test and validate these models at an unprecedented level.

  4. On the interpretation of fluctuation and ExB turbulent transport measured by Langmuir probes in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, E.; Hidalgo, C.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Silva, C.

    2004-10-01

    Plasma fluctuations and fluctuation-induced particle fluxes have been investigated in the plasma edge of the TJ-II stellarator using Langmuir probes. Simultaneous measurements of plasma fluctuations carried out by probes located in and out of the probe body sheath show similar results in the normalized level of fluctuations in the ion saturation current. However, floating potential fluctuations measured in the co and counter direction of the magnetic field on the sheath probe body show slight but significant differences. The local radial electrostatic turbulent driven transport measured in and out of the probe body sheath shows consistent results, within the errors bars due to uncertainties in the determination of the effective probe collecting area; the normalized local radial transport to the average ion saturation current (the effective velocity which is not affected by uncertainties in the probe area) show consistent results. These results and previous findings call into question the recent interpretation of probe measurements on the basis of the influence of the probe's pre-sheath zone [B. Labombard, Phys. Plasmas. 9, 1300 (2002)].

  5. Low-to-High Confinement Transition Mediated by Turbulence Radial Wave Number Spectral Shift in a Fusion Plasma.

    PubMed

    Xu, G S; Wan, B N; Wang, H Q; Guo, H Y; Naulin, V; Rasmussen, J Juul; Nielsen, A H; Wu, X Q; Yan, N; Chen, L; Shao, L M; Chen, R; Wang, L; Zhang, W

    2016-03-04

    A new model for the low-to-high (L-H) confinement transition has been developed based on a new paradigm for turbulence suppression by velocity shear [G. M. Staebler et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 055003 (2013)]. The model indicates that the L-H transition can be mediated by a shift in the radial wave number spectrum of turbulence, as evidenced here, for the first time, by the direct observation of a turbulence radial wave number spectral shift and turbulence structure tilting prior to the L-H transition at tokamak edge by direct probing. This new mechanism does not require a pretransition overshoot in the turbulent Reynolds stress, shunting turbulence energy to zonal flows for turbulence suppression as demonstrated in the experiment.

  6. [Fluctuations and transport in fusion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    This research is aimed at furthering the understanding of turbulent fluctuations in fusion plasmas and the anomalous transport of particles, heat, and momentum which results therefrom. This understanding is critical to the design of future plasma confinement devices. This study involves a combination of experimental measurements, from the Caltech and other tokamaks, analysis and interpretation of measurements, computer calculations of basic processes, and comparisons of the latter with experiment.

  7. Final Report on The Theory of Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Steven C. Cowley

    2008-06-17

    Report describes theoretical research in the theory of fusion plasmas funded under grant DE-FG02-04ER54737. This includes work on: explosive instabilities, plasma turbulence, Alfven wave cascades, high beta (pressure) tokamaks and magnetic reconnection. These studies have lead to abetter understanding of fusion plasmas and in particular the future behavior of ITER. More than ten young researchers were involved in this research -- some were funded under the grant.

  8. Visualization of plasma turbulence with laser-induced fluorescence (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Levinton, Fred M.; Trintchouk, Fedor

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence is a key factor limiting the performance of fusion devices. Plasma edge turbulence determines the boundary values of the plasma density and temperature, which in turn determine the internal gradients and controls global plasma transport. In recent years, significant progress has been made in modeling turbulence behavior in plasmas and its effect on transport. Progress has also been made in diagnostics for turbulence measurement; however, there is still a large gap in our understanding of it. An approach to improve this situation is to experimentally visualize the turbulence, that is, a high resolution 2-D image of the plasma density. Visualization of turbulence can improve the connection to theory and help validate theoretical models. One method that has been successfully developed to visualize turbulence in gases and fluids is planar laser-induced fluorescence. We have recently applied this technique to visualize turbulence and structures in a plasma. This was accomplished using an Alexandrite laser that is tunable between 700 and 800 nm, and from 350 to 400 nm with second harmonic generation. The fluorescence light from an argon ion transition has been imaged onto an intensified charged coupled device camera that is gated in synchronization with the laser. Images from the plasma show a rotating structure at 30 kHz in addition to small scale turbulence.

  9. EDITORIAL: Stochasticity in fusion plasmas Stochasticity in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterberg, Bernhard

    2010-03-01

    Structure formation and transport in stochastic plasmas is a topic of growing importance in many fields of plasma physics from astrophysics to fusion research. In particular, the possibility to control transport in the boundary of confined fusion plasmas by resonant magnetic perturbations has been investigated extensively during recent years. A major research achievement was finding that the intense transient particle and heat fluxes associated with edge localized modes (here type-I ELMs) in magnetically confined fusion plasmas can be mitigated or even suppressed by resonant magnetic perturbation fields. This observation opened up a possible scheme to avoid too large erosion and material damage by such transients in future fusion devices such as ITER. However, it is widely recognized that a more basic understanding is needed to extrapolate the results obtained in present experiments to future fusion devices. The 4th workshop on Stochasticity in Fusion Plasmas was held in Jülich, Germany, from 2 to 4 March 2009. This series of workshops aims at gathering fusion experts from various plasma configurations such as tokamaks, stellarators and reversed field pinches to exchange knowledge on structure formation and transport in stochastic fusion plasmas. The workshops have attracted colleagues from both experiment and theory and stimulated fruitful discussions about the basics of stochastic fusion plasmas. Important papers from the first three workshops in 2003, 2005 and 2007 have been published in previous special issues of Nuclear Fusion (stacks.iop.org/NF/44/i=6, stacks.iop.org/NF/46/i=4 and stacks.iop.org/NF/48/i=2). This special issue comprises contributions presented at the 4th SFP workshop, dealing with the main subjects such as formation of stochastic magnetic layers, energy and particle transport in stochastic magnetic fields, plasma response to external, non-axis-symmetric perturbations and last but not least application of resonant magnetic perturbations for

  10. Multifractality in plasma edge electrostatic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, C. Rodrigues; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Caldas, I. L.; Nascimento, I. C.; Kuznetsov, Yu. K.

    2008-08-01

    Plasma edge turbulence in Tokamak Chauffage Alfvén Brésilien (TCABR) [R. M. O. Galvão et al., Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 43, 1181 (2001)] is investigated for multifractal properties of the fluctuating floating electrostatic potential measured by Langmuir probes. The multifractality in this signal is characterized by the full multifractal spectra determined by applying the wavelet transform modulus maxima. In this work, the dependence of the multifractal spectrum with the radial position is presented. The multifractality degree inside the plasma increases with the radial position reaching a maximum near the plasma edge and becoming almost constant in the scrape-off layer. Comparisons between these results with those obtained for random test time series with the same Hurst exponents and data length statistically confirm the reported multifractal behavior. Moreover, the persistence of these signals, characterized by their Hurst exponent, present radial profile similar to the deterministic component estimated from analysis based on dynamical recurrences.

  11. Fusion Plasma Theory project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This Project Summary book is a published compilation consisting of short descriptions of each project supported by the Fusion Plasma Theory and Computing Group of the Advanced Physics and Technology Division of the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy. The summaries contained in this volume were written by the individual contractors with minimal editing by the Office of Fusion Energy. Previous summaries were published in February of 1982 and December of 1987. The Plasma Theory program is responsible for the development of concepts and models that describe and predict the behavior of a magnetically confined plasma. Emphasis is given to the modelling and understanding of the processes controlling transport of energy and particles in a toroidal plasma and supporting the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A tokamak transport initiative was begun in 1989 to improve understanding of how energy and particles are lost from the plasma by mechanisms that transport them across field lines. The Plasma Theory program has actively-participated in this initiative. Recently, increased attention has been given to issues of importance to the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Particular attention has been paid to containment and thermalization of fast alpha particles produced in a burning fusion plasma as well as control of sawteeth, current drive, impurity control, and design of improved auxiliary heating. In addition, general models of plasma behavior are developed from physics features common to different confinement geometries. This work uses both analytical and numerical techniques. The Fusion Theory program supports research projects at US government laboratories, universities and industrial contractors. Its support of theoretical work at universities contributes to the office of Fusion Energy mission of training scientific manpower for the US Fusion Energy Program.

  12. Nondiffusive transport regimes for suprathermal ions in turbulent plasmas.

    PubMed

    Bovet, A; Fasoli, A; Ricci, P; Furno, I; Gustafson, K

    2015-04-01

    The understanding of the transport of suprathermal ions in the presence of turbulence is important for fusion plasmas in the burning regime that will characterize reactors, and for space plasmas to understand the physics of particle acceleration. Here, three-dimensional measurements of a suprathermal ion beam in the toroidal plasma device TORPEX are presented. These measurements demonstrate, in a turbulent plasma, the existence of subdiffusive and superdiffusive transport of suprathermal ions, depending on their energy. This result stems from the unprecedented combination of uniquely resolved measurements and first-principles numerical simulations that reveal the mechanisms responsible for the nondiffusive transport. The transport regime is determined by the interaction of the suprathermal ion orbits with the turbulent plasma dynamics, and is strongly affected by the ratio of the suprathermal ion energy to the background plasma temperature.

  13. Validation metrics for turbulent plasma transport

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, C.

    2016-06-15

    Developing accurate models of plasma dynamics is essential for confident predictive modeling of current and future fusion devices. In modern computer science and engineering, formal verification and validation processes are used to assess model accuracy and establish confidence in the predictive capabilities of a given model. This paper provides an overview of the key guiding principles and best practices for the development of validation metrics, illustrated using examples from investigations of turbulent transport in magnetically confined plasmas. Particular emphasis is given to the importance of uncertainty quantification and its inclusion within the metrics, and the need for utilizing synthetic diagnostics to enable quantitatively meaningful comparisons between simulation and experiment. As a starting point, the structure of commonly used global transport model metrics and their limitations is reviewed. An alternate approach is then presented, which focuses upon comparisons of predicted local fluxes, fluctuations, and equilibrium gradients against observation. The utility of metrics based upon these comparisons is demonstrated by applying them to gyrokinetic predictions of turbulent transport in a variety of discharges performed on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)], as part of a multi-year transport model validation activity.

  14. Validation metrics for turbulent plasma transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, C.

    2016-06-01

    Developing accurate models of plasma dynamics is essential for confident predictive modeling of current and future fusion devices. In modern computer science and engineering, formal verification and validation processes are used to assess model accuracy and establish confidence in the predictive capabilities of a given model. This paper provides an overview of the key guiding principles and best practices for the development of validation metrics, illustrated using examples from investigations of turbulent transport in magnetically confined plasmas. Particular emphasis is given to the importance of uncertainty quantification and its inclusion within the metrics, and the need for utilizing synthetic diagnostics to enable quantitatively meaningful comparisons between simulation and experiment. As a starting point, the structure of commonly used global transport model metrics and their limitations is reviewed. An alternate approach is then presented, which focuses upon comparisons of predicted local fluxes, fluctuations, and equilibrium gradients against observation. The utility of metrics based upon these comparisons is demonstrated by applying them to gyrokinetic predictions of turbulent transport in a variety of discharges performed on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)], as part of a multi-year transport model validation activity.

  15. Study of edge turbulence in dimensionally similar laboratory plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroth, Ulrich

    2003-10-01

    In recent years, the numerical simulation of turbulence has made considerable progress. Predictions are made for large plasma volumes taking into account realistic magnetic geometries. Because of diagnostic limitations, in fusion plasmas the means of experimental testing of the models are rather limited. Toroidal low-temperature plasmas offer the possibility for detailed comparisons between experiment and simulation. Due to the reduced plasma parameters, the relevant quantities can be measured in the entire plasma. At the same time, the relevant non-dimensional parameters can be comparable to those in the edge of fusion plasmas. This presentation reports on results from the torsatron TJ-K [1,2] operated with a low-temperature plasma. The data are compared with simulations using the drift-Alfven-wave code DALF3 [3]. Langmuir probe arrays with 64 tips are used to measure the spatial structure of the turbulence. The same analyses techniques are applied to experimental and numerical data. The measured properties of spectra and probability density functions are reproduced by the code. Although the plasma in experiment and simulation does not exhibit critical pressure gradients, the radial transport fluctuations are strongly intermittent in both cases. Using Hydrogen, Helium and Argon as working gases, the scale parameter ρs could be varied by more than a factor of ten. As predicted by theory, the size of the turbulent eddies increases with ρ_s. The measured cross-phase between density and potential fluctuations are small, indicating the importance of the drift-wave dynamics for the turbulence in toroidal plasmas. The wave number spectra decay with an exponent of -3 as one would expect for the enstrophy cascade in 2D turbulence. [1] N. Krause et al., Rev. Sci. Instr. 73, 3474 (2002) [2] C. Lechte et al., New J. of Physics 4, 34 (2002) [3] B. Scott, Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 39, 1635 (1997)

  16. Beam Plasma Turbulence Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    Ney, and J . F. Karczewski, Spae Sci. Instrum ., 4, 143 (1978). -- ’.. ...... .. " ’- -’ ... -,,, ,i, ,, - . --. : s v.-’ Z XW , - .. . Ř ’ - ’ " p...interactions with the able plasma theorists, Dr. J . R. Jasperse at the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory, Drs. B. Basu and J . Retterer of the Space Data Analysis...Drs. J . D. Winningham and J . Burch at the Southwest Research Institute, Dr. D. Klumpar of the University of Texas at Dallas, Dr. P. Kintner of the

  17. EDITORIAL: Stochasticity in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finken, K. H.

    2006-04-01

    In recent years the importance of externally imposed resonant magnetic fields on plasma has become more and more recognized. These fields will cause ergodization at well defined plasma layers and can induce large size islands at rational q-surfaces. A hope for future large scale tokamak devices is the development of a reliable method for mitigating the large ELMs of type 1 ELMy-H-modes by modifying the edge transport. Other topics of interest for fusion reactors are the option of distributing the heat to a large area and optimizing methods for heat and particle exhaust, or the understanding of the transport around tearing mode instabilities. The cluster of papers in this issue of Nuclear Fusion is a successor to the 2004 special issue (Nuclear Fusion 44 S1-122 ) intended to raise interest in the subject. The contents of this present issue are based on presentations at the Second Workshop on Stochasticity in Fusion Plasmas (SFP) held in Juelich, Germany, 15-17 March 2005. The SFP workshops have been stimulated by the installation of the Dynamic Ergodic Divertor (DED) in the TEXTOR tokamak. It has attracted colleagues working on various plasma configurations such as tokamaks, stellarators or reversed field pinches. The workshop was originally devoted to phenomena on the plasma edge but it has been broadened to transport questions over the whole plasma cross-section. It is a meeting place for experimental and theoretical working groups. The next workshop is planned for February/March 2007 in Juelich, Germany. For details see http://www.fz-juelich.de/sfp/. The content of the workshop is summarized in the following conference summary (K.H. Finken 2006 Nuclear Fusion 46 S107-112). At the workshop experimental results on the plasma transport resulting from ergodization in various devices were presented. Highlights were the results from DIII-D on the mitigation of ELMs (see also T.E. Evans et al 2005 Nuclear Fusion 45 595 ). Theoretical work was focused around the topics

  18. Trajectory structures in turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, Madalina; Spineanu, Florin

    2006-11-03

    Particle stochastic advection in two dimensional divergence free velocity fields is studied. The special statistical properties of this process (non-Gaussian distribution, memory effects and quasi-coherent behavior) are determined using a new approach, the nested subensemble method. The effect of the statistics of trajectories on the evolution of drift turbulence in magnetized plasmas is studied. It essentialy consists in the tendency of structure formation.

  19. Plasma physics goes beyond fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Raoul

    2008-11-01

    I was interested to read the fusion supplement published with the October issue of Physics World. However, in asserting that fusion created the need to recognize plasma physics as a separate branch of the subject, Stephen Cowley, the new director of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, was not quite correct. In fact, the word "plasma" was appropriated from the Greek by the chemical physicist (and later Nobel laureate) Irving Langmuir in 1928. It was used to describe the positive column of a gas discharge, which was then the subject of research into better lighting sources and advertising displays, as well as the underlying science.

  20. Electromagnetic scattering from turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Resendes, D.G. Instituto Superior Tecnico, Rua Rovisco Pais, Lisboa )

    1992-11-15

    A self-consistent multiple-scattering theory of vector electromagnetic waves scattered from a turbulent plasma is presented. This approach provides a general and systematic treatment to all orders in turbulence of the scattering of electromagnetic waves in terms of the properties of the turbulent structure of the scattering system and is applicable in the full regime from underdense to overdense plasmas. To illustrate the theory, a plasma consisting of a finite number density of discrete scatterers with a simple geometry and statistical properties is chosen. In this approach the exact solution for a single scatterer is obtained first. From it the configuration-dependent solution for {ital N} scatterers is constructed. Rather than solving explicitly for this solution and then averaging, the averaging operation will be taken first in order to find an approximate equation obeyed by the mean or coherent field. The coherent and incoherent scattering are then determined in terms of the coherent field and the backscatter is evaluated. The coherent and incoherent scattering, our principal results, are expressed in a plane-wave basis in a form suitable for numerical computation. A number of interesting phenomena which may readily be incorporated into the theory are indicated.

  1. Quantifying self-organization in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajković, M.; Milovanović, M.; Škorić, M. M.

    2017-05-01

    A multifaceted framework for understanding self-organization in fusion plasma dynamics is presented which concurrently manages several important issues related to the nonlinear and multiscale phenomena involved, namely,(1) it chooses the optimal template wavelet for the analysis of temporal or spatio-temporal plasma dynamics, (2) it detects parameter values at which bifurcations occur, (3) it quantifies complexity and self-organization, (4) it enables short-term prediction of nonlinear dynamics, and (5) it extracts coherent structures in turbulence by separating them from the incoherent component. The first two aspects including the detection of changes in the dynamics of a nonlinear system are illustrated by analyzing Stimulated Raman Scattering in a bounded, weakly dissipative plasma. Self-organization in the fusion plasma is quantitatively analyzed based on the numerical simulations of the Gyrokinetic-Vlasov (GKV) model of plasma dynamics. The parameters for the standard and inward shifted magnetic configurations, relevant for the Large Helical Device, were used in order to quantitatively compare self-organization and complexity in the two configurations. Finally, self-organization is analyzed for three different confinement regimes of the MAST device.

  2. Tungsten Spectroscopy for Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Neu, R.; Puetterich, T.; Dux, R.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Sergienko, G.

    2007-04-06

    Tungsten is one of very few candidate materials for plasma facing components in future fusion devices. Therefore, investigations have been started at fusion devices and EBITs to provide atomic data for W in fusion plasmas. Usually the influx of impurities is deduced from the intensity of spectral lines from neutrals or ions in a low ionisation state. For this purpose the appropriate ionisation rates and excitation rates have to be known. At the moment, a WI transition (7S-7P) at 400.9 nm is used, but an extension of the method to other lines is under investigation. In the core of present day plasmas ionisation states up to W56+ can be reached and in a reactor states up to around W68+ will be present. In order to extract information on the local W concentrations over the whole plasma radius atomic data (wavelength, excitation, ionisation, recombination) for all the charge states up to the maximum ionisation state are necessary. Similarly, a high sensitivity has to be achieved since the central W concentrations should stay below 10-4. For an unambiguous identification of the transitions EBIT measurements are of great advantage, but due to the lower electron density compared to fusion plasmas, investigations there are indispensable.

  3. Turbulence in solar wind and laboratory plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, V.

    2010-06-16

    Recent studies of plasma turbulence based on measurements within solar wind and laboratory plasmas has been discussed. Evidences for the presence of a turbulent energy cascade, using the Yaglom's law for MHD turbulence, has been provided through data from the Ulysses spacecraft. This allows, for the first time, a direct estimate of the turbulent energy transfer rate, which can contribute to the in situ heating of the solar wind. The energy cascade has been evidenced also for ExB electrostatic turbulence in laboratory magnetized plasmas using measurements of intermittent transport (bursty turbulence) at the edge of the RFX-mod reversed field pinch plasma device. Finally the problem of the dispersive region of turbulence in solar wind above the ion-cyclotron frequency, where a spectral break is usually observed, and the problem of dissipation in a collisionless fluid as the solar wind, are briefly discussed.

  4. Strong turbulence of plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, M. V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews recent work related to modulational instability and wave envelope self-focusing in dynamical and statistical systems. After introductory remarks pertinent to nonlinear optics realizations of these effects, the author summarizes the status of the subject in plasma physics, where it has come to be called 'strong Langmuir turbulence'. The paper treats the historical development of pertinent concepts, analytical theory, numerical simulations, laboratory experiments, and spacecraft observations. The role of self-similar self-focusing Langmuir envelope wave packets is emphasized, both in the Zakharov equation model for the wave dynamics and in a statistical theory based on this dynamical model.

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelmann, F.

    2007-07-01

    This new book by Kenro Miyamoto provides an up-to-date overview of the status of fusion research and the important parts of the underlying plasma physics at a moment where, due to the start of ITER construction, an important step in fusion research has been made and many new research workers will enter the field. For them, and also for interested graduate students and physicists in other fields, the book provides a good introduction into fusion physics as, on the whole, the presentation of the material is quite appropriate for getting acquainted with the field on the basis of just general knowledge in physics. There is overlap with Miyamoto's earlier book Plasma Physics for Nuclear Fusion (MIT Press, Cambridge, USA, 1989) but only in a few sections on subjects which have not evolved since. The presentation is subdivided into two parts of about equal length. The first part, following a concise survey of the physics basis of thermonuclear fusion and of plasmas in general, covers the various magnetic configurations studied for plasma confinement (tokamak; reversed field pinch; stellarator; mirror-type geometries) and introduces the specific properties of plasmas in these devices. Plasma confinement in tokamaks is treated in particular detail, in compliance with the importance of this field in fusion research. This includes a review of the ITER concept and of the rationale for the choice of ITER's parameters. In the second part, selected topics in fusion plasma physics (macroscopic instabilities; propagation of waves; kinetic effects such as energy transfer between waves and particles including microscopic instabilities as well as plasma heating and current drive; transport phenomena induced by turbulence) are presented systematically. While the emphasis is on displaying the essential physics, deeper theoretical analysis is also provided here. Every chapter is complemented by a few related problems, but only partial hints for their solution are given. A selection of

  6. Role of Plasma Elongation on Turbulent Transport in Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Angelino, P.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Bottino, A.

    2009-05-15

    The theoretical study of plasma turbulence is of central importance to fusion research. Experimental evidence indicates that the confinement time results mainly from the turbulent transport of energy, the magnitude of which depends on the turbulent state resulting from nonlinear saturation mechanisms, in particular, the self-generation of coherent macroscopic structures and large scale flows. Plasma geometry has a strong impact on the structure and magnitude of these flows and also modifies the mode linear growth rates. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations in realistic tokamak magnetohydrodynamic equilibria show how plasma shape can control the turbulent transport. Results are best described in terms of an effective temperature gradient. With increasing plasma elongation, the nonlinear critical effective gradient is not modified while the stiffness of transport is decreasing.

  7. Role of plasma elongation on turbulent transport in magnetically confined plasmas.

    PubMed

    Angelino, P; Garbet, X; Villard, L; Bottino, A; Jolliet, S; Ghendrih, Ph; Grandgirard, V; McMillan, B F; Sarazin, Y; Dif-Pradalier, G; Tran, T M

    2009-05-15

    The theoretical study of plasma turbulence is of central importance to fusion research. Experimental evidence indicates that the confinement time results mainly from the turbulent transport of energy, the magnitude of which depends on the turbulent state resulting from nonlinear saturation mechanisms, in particular, the self-generation of coherent macroscopic structures and large scale flows. Plasma geometry has a strong impact on the structure and magnitude of these flows and also modifies the mode linear growth rates. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations in realistic tokamak magnetohydrodynamic equilibria show how plasma shape can control the turbulent transport. Results are best described in terms of an effective temperature gradient. With increasing plasma elongation, the nonlinear critical effective gradient is not modified while the stiffness of transport is decreasing.

  8. Role of Plasma Elongation on Turbulent Transport in Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelino, P.; Garbet, X.; Villard, L.; Bottino, A.; Jolliet, S.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Grandgirard, V.; McMillan, B. F.; Sarazin, Y.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Tran, T. M.

    2009-05-01

    The theoretical study of plasma turbulence is of central importance to fusion research. Experimental evidence indicates that the confinement time results mainly from the turbulent transport of energy, the magnitude of which depends on the turbulent state resulting from nonlinear saturation mechanisms, in particular, the self-generation of coherent macroscopic structures and large scale flows. Plasma geometry has a strong impact on the structure and magnitude of these flows and also modifies the mode linear growth rates. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations in realistic tokamak magnetohydrodynamic equilibria show how plasma shape can control the turbulent transport. Results are best described in terms of an effective temperature gradient. With increasing plasma elongation, the nonlinear critical effective gradient is not modified while the stiffness of transport is decreasing.

  9. Global Variation of Meteor Trail Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyrud, L. P.; Hinrichs, J.; Urbina, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first global simulations on the occurrence of meteor trail plasma irregularities. These results seek to answer the following questions: when a meteoroid disintegrates in the atmosphere will the resulting trail become plasma turbulent, what are the factors influencing the development of turbulence, and how do they vary on a global scale. Understanding meteor trail plasma turbulence is important because turbulent meteor trails are visible as non-specular trails to coherent radars, and turbulence influences the evolution of specular radar meteor trails, particularly regarding the inference of mesospheric temperatures from trail diffusion rates, and their usage for meteor burst communication. We provide evidence of the significant effect that neutral atmospheric winds and density, and ionospheric plasma density have on the variability of meteor trail evolution and the observation of nonspecular meteor trails, and demonstrate that trails are far less likely to become and remain turbulent in daylight, explaining several observational trends using non-specular and specular meteor trails.

  10. Two-Dimensional Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendl, A.

    2008-01-01

    In an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma the transport of energy and particles perpendicular to the magnetic field is in general mainly caused by quasi two-dimensional turbulent fluid mixing. The physics of turbulence and structure formation is of ubiquitous importance to every magnetically confined laboratory plasma for experimental or industrial…

  11. Two-Dimensional Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendl, A.

    2008-01-01

    In an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma the transport of energy and particles perpendicular to the magnetic field is in general mainly caused by quasi two-dimensional turbulent fluid mixing. The physics of turbulence and structure formation is of ubiquitous importance to every magnetically confined laboratory plasma for experimental or industrial…

  12. Plasma turbulence, suprathermal ion dynamics and code validation on the basic plasma physics device TORPEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furno, I.; Avino, F.; Bovet, A.; Diallo, A.; Fasoli, A.; Gustafson, K.; Iraji, D.; Labit, B.; Loizu, J.; Müller, S. H.; Plyushchev, G.; Podestà, M.; Poli, F. M.; Ricci, P.; Theiler, C.

    2015-06-01

    The TORPEX basic plasma physics device at the Center for Plasma Physics Research (CRPP) in Lausanne, Switzerland is described. In TORPEX, simple magnetized toroidal configurations, a paradigm for the tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL), as well as more complex magnetic geometries of direct relevance for fusion are produced. Plasmas of different gases are created and sustained by microwaves in the electron-cyclotron (EC) frequency range. Full diagnostic access allows for a complete characterization of plasma fluctuations and wave fields throughout the entire plasma volume, opening new avenues to validate numerical codes. We detail recent advances in the understanding of basic aspects of plasma turbulence, including its development from linearly unstable electrostatic modes, the formation of filamentary structures, or blobs, and its influence on the transport of energy, plasma bulk and suprathermal ions. We present a methodology for the validation of plasma turbulence codes, which focuses on quantitative assessment of the agreement between numerical simulations and TORPEX experimental data.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and turbulent dynamo in partially ionized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Siyao; Lazarian, A.

    2017-06-01

    Astrophysical fluids are turbulent, magnetized, and frequently partially ionized. As an example of astrophysical turbulence, the interstellar turbulence extends over a remarkably large range of spatial scales and participates in key astrophysical processes happening on different ranges of scales. Significant progress has been achieved in the understanding of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence since the turn of the century, and this enables us to better describe turbulence in magnetized and partially ionized plasmas. In fact, the modern revolutionized picture of MHD turbulence physics facilitates the development of various theoretical domains, including the damping process for dissipating MHD turbulence and the dynamo process for generating MHD turbulence with many important astrophysical implications. In this paper, we review some important findings from our recent theoretical works to demonstrate the interconnection between the properties of MHD turbulence and those of turbulent dynamo in a partially ionized gas. We also briefly exemplify some new tentative studies on how the revised basic processes influence the associated outstanding astrophysical problems in areas such as magnetic reconnection, cosmic ray scattering, and magnetic field amplification in both the early and present-day universe.

  14. Turbulence modelling of thermal plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigeta, Masaya

    2016-12-01

    This article presents a discussion of the ideas for modelling turbulent thermal plasma flows, reviewing the challenges, efforts, and state-of-the-art simulations. Demonstrative simulations are also performed to present the importance of numerical methods as well as physical models to express turbulent features. A large eddy simulation has been applied to turbulent thermal plasma flows to treat time-dependent and 3D motions of multi-scale eddies. Sub-grid scale models to be used should be able to express not only turbulent but also laminar states because both states co-exist in and around thermal plasmas which have large variations of density as well as transport properties under low Mach-number conditions. Suitable solution algorithms and differencing schemes must be chosen and combined appropriately to capture multi-scale eddies and steep gradients of temperature and chemical species, which are turbulent features of thermal plasma flows with locally variable Reynolds and Mach numbers. Several simulations using different methods under different conditions show commonly that high-temperature plasma regions exhibit less turbulent structures, with only large eddies, whereas low-temperature regions tend to be more turbulent, with numerous small eddies. These numerical results agree with both theoretical insight and photographs that show the characteristics of eddies. Results also show that a turbulence transition of a thermal plasma jet through a generation-breakup process of eddies in a torch is dominated by fluid dynamic instability after ejection rather than non-uniform or unsteady phenomena.

  15. Computer Modeling of a Fusion Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I

    2000-12-15

    Progress in the study of plasma physics and controlled fusion has been profoundly influenced by dramatic increases in computing capability. Computational plasma physics has become an equal partner with experiment and traditional theory. This presentation illustrates some of the progress in computer modeling of plasma physics and controlled fusion.

  16. Plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Krikorian, R. )

    1989-01-01

    This proceedings contains papers on plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion. Included are the following topics: Plasma focus and Z-pinch, Review of mirror fusion research, Progress in studies of x-ray and ion-beam emission from plasma focus facilities.

  17. Plasmas are Hot and Fusion is Cool

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Plasmas are Hot and Fusion is Cold. The DOE Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) collaborates to develop fusion as a safe, clean and abundant energy source for the future. This video discusses PPPL's research and development on plasma, the fourth state of matter.

  18. Plasma effects on resonant fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, R. F.

    2012-11-01

    I investigate the effects of plasma interactions on resonance-enhanced fusion rates in stars. Starting from basic principles we derive an expression for the fusion rate that can serve as a basis for discussion of approximation schemes The present state-of-the-art correction algorithms, based on the classical correlation function for the fusing particles and the classical energy shift for the resonant state, do not follow from this result, even as an approximation. The results of expanding in a perturbation solution for the case of a weakly coupled plasma are somewhat enlightening. But at this point we are at a loss as to how to do meaningful calculations in systems with even moderate plasma coupling strength. Examples where this can matter are the effect of a possible low-energy 12C+12C resonance on x-ray bursts from accreting neutron stars or on supernova 1A simulations, and the calculation of the triple α rate in some of the more strongly coupled regions in which the process enters, such as accretion onto a neutron star.

  19. Energy transfer and dual cascade in kinetic magnetized plasma turbulence.

    PubMed

    Plunk, G G; Tatsuno, T

    2011-04-22

    The question of how nonlinear interactions redistribute the energy of fluctuations across available degrees of freedom is of fundamental importance in the study of turbulence and transport in magnetized weakly collisional plasmas, ranging from space settings to fusion devices. In this Letter, we present a theory for the dual cascade found in such plasmas, which predicts a range of new behavior that distinguishes this cascade from that of neutral fluid turbulence. These phenomena are explained in terms of the constrained nature of spectral transfer in nonlinear gyrokinetics. Accompanying this theory are the first observations of these phenomena, obtained via direct numerical simulations using the gyrokinetic code AstroGK. The basic mechanisms that are found provide a framework for understanding the turbulent energy transfer that couples scales both locally and nonlocally.

  20. Development of turbulence in a dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwabe, Mierk; Zhdanov, Sergey; Räth, Christoph

    2016-10-01

    Complex or dusty plasmas are low temperature plasmas which contain micrometer-sized particles (``dust''). The microparticles obtain high charges and interact with each other, effectively forming a solid, liquid or gas state in which the microparticles take over the role of molecules in conventional systems. Complex plasmas often are in a turbulent state, for instance when instabilities like the ``heartbeat'' instability or intense waves are present. The movement of the microparticles, the carriers of the turbulent interactions in complex plasmas, can be directly followed, unlike that of atoms and molecules in conventional experiments on turbulence. Here we present results of an experiment on the development of turbulence in a complex plasma in the PK-3 Plus laboratory on board the International Space Station. The microparticle cloud was first stabilized against an instability. Once the stabilization was turned off, the cloud became unstable, and the movement of the particles became turbulent. In the report, we show how the energy spectra evolve during the development of turbulence. In the case of fully developed turbulence, the spectra display multiple cascades explaining well the transport of turbulent energy and enstrophy.

  1. Recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.

    1997-09-22

    This report contains viewgraphs of recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport. Localized nonlinear structures occur under a variety of circumstances in turbulent, magnetically confined plasmas, arising in both kinetic and fluid descriptions, i.e., in either wave-particle or three-wave coupling interactions. These structures are non wavelike. They cannot be incorporated in the collective wave response, but interact with collective modes through their shielding by the plasma dielectric. These structures are predicted to modify turbulence-driven transport in a way that in consistent with, or in some cases are confirmed by recent experimental observations. In kinetic theory, non wavelike structures are localized perturbations of phase space density. There are two types of structures. Holes are self-trapped, while clumps have a self-potential that is too weak to resist deformation and mixing by ambient potential fluctuations. Clumps remain correlated in turbulence if their spatial extent is smaller than the correlation length of the scattering fields. In magnetic turbulence, clumps travel along stochastic magnetic fields, shielded by the plasma dielectric. A drag on the clump macro-particle is exerted by the shielding, inducing emission into the collective response. The emission in turn damps back on the particle distribution via Landau dampling. The exchange of energy between clumps and particles, as mediated by the collective mode, imposes constraints on transport. For a turbulent spectrum whose mean wavenumber along the equilibrium magnetic field is nonzero, the electron thermal flux is proportional to the ion thermal velocity. Conventional predictions (which account only for collective modes) are larger by the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. Recent measurements are consistent with the small flux. In fluid plasma,s localized coherent structures can occur as intense vortices.

  2. Observations of velocity shear driven plasma turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Electrostatic and magnetic turbulence observations from HAWKEYE-1 during the low altitude portion of its elliptical orbit over the Southern Hemisphere are presented. The magnetic turbulence is confined near the auroral zone and is similar to that seen at higher altitudes by HEOS-2 in the polar cusp. The electrostatic turbulence is composed of a background component with a power spectral index of 1.89 + or - .26 and an intense component with a power spectral index of 2.80 + or - .34. The intense electrostatic turbulence and the magnetic turbulence correlate with velocity shears in the convective plasma flow. Since velocity shear instabilities are most unstable to wave vectors perpendicular to the magnetic field, the shear correlated turbulence is anticipated to be two dimensional in character and to have a power spectral index of 3 which agrees with that observed in the intense electrostatic turbulence.

  3. Plasma sheet turbulence observed by Cluster II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weygand, James M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K. K.; Schwarzl, H. K.; Thompson, S. M.; McPherron, R. L.; Balogh, A.; Kistler, L. M.; Goldstein, M. L.; Borovsky, J.

    2005-01-01

    Cluster fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) and ion spectrometer (CIS) data are employed to analyze magnetic field fluctuations within the plasma sheet during passages through the magnetotail region in the summers of 2001 and 2002 and, in particular, to look for characteristics of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Power spectral indices determined from power spectral density functions are on average larger than Kolmogorov's theoretical value for fluid turbulence as well as Kraichnan's theoretical value for MHD plasma turbulence. Probability distribution functions of the magnetic fluctuations show a scaling law over a large range of temporal scales with non-Gaussian distributions at small dissipative scales and inertial scales and more Gaussian distribution at large driving scales. Furthermore, a multifractal analysis of the magnetic field components shows scaling behavior in the inertial range of the fluctuations from about 20 s to 13 min for moments through the fifth order. Both the scaling behavior of the probability distribution functions and the multifractal structure function suggest that intermittent turbulence is present within the plasma sheet. The unique multispacecraft aspect and fortuitous spacecraft spacing allow us to examine the turbulent eddy scale sizes. Dynamic autocorrelation and cross correlation analysis of the magnetic field components allow us to determine that eddy scale sizes fit within the plasma sheet. These results suggest that magnetic field turbulence is occurring within the plasma sheet resulting in turbulent energy dissipation.

  4. Non-Linear Dynamics and Emergence in Laboratory Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hnat, B.

    2011-09-22

    Turbulent behaviour of laboratory fusion plasma system is modelled using extended Hasegawa-Wakatani equations. The model is solved numerically using finite difference techniques. We discuss non-linear effects in such a system in the presence of the micro-instabilities, specifically a drift wave instability. We explore particle dynamics in different range of parameters and show that the transport changes from diffusive to non-diffusive when large directional flows are developed.

  5. Controlled thermonuclear fusion, high temperature plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-05-01

    The primary source of nuclear energy comes from the fission process of heavy nuclei. To utilize the energy released by a thermonuclear fusion process, methods of controlling the fusion reaction were studied. This is controlled thermonuclear fusion technology. The fuel used in a thermonuclear fusion process are isotopes of hydrogen: deuterium and tritium. They can be extracted from the almost unlimited seawater. Nuclear fusion also produces very little radioactive waste. Thermonuclear fusion is a promising energy source with an almost unlimited supply; it is economical, safe, and relatively clean. Ways to raise plasma temperature to a very high level and to maintain it to allow fusion reactions to take place are studied. The physical laws of high temperature plasma was studied to reach this goal which resulted in the development of high temperature plasma physics.

  6. Experimental Achievements on Plasma Confinement and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, A.

    2009-02-19

    This article presents a brief review of the experimental studies on turbulence and resultant transport in toroidal plasmas. The article focuses on two topics, physics of transport barrier and the role of mesoscale structure on plasma confinement, i.e. zonal flows. The two topics show the important roles of the mutual interactions between sheared flows, zonal flows and drift waves for plasma turbulence and transport. The findings can lead us to further generalized concept of the disparate scale interactions which could give a fundamental understanding of the plasma confinement from the first principle.

  7. Far infrared fusion plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Peebles, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last several years, reflectometry has grown in importance as a diagnostic for both steady-state density Profiles as well as for the investigation of density fluctuations and turbulence. As a diagnostic for density profile measurement, it is generally believed to be well understood in the tokamak environment. However, its use as a fluctuation diagnostic is hampered by a lack of quantitative experimental understanding of its wavenumber sensitivity and spatial resolution. Several researchers, have theoretically investigated these questions. However, prior to the UCLA laboratory investigation, no group has experimentally investigated these questions. Because of the reflectometer's importance to the world effort in understanding plasma turbulence and transport, UCLA has, over the last year, made its primary Task IIIA effort the resolution of these questions. UCLA has taken the lead in a quantitative experimental understanding of reflectometer data as applied to the measurement of density fluctuations. In addition to this, work has proceeded on the design, construction, and installation of a reflectometer system on UCLA's CCT tokamak. This effort will allow a comparison between the improved confinement regimes (H-mode) observed on both the DIII-D and CCT machines with the goal of achieving a physics understanding of the phenomena. Preliminary investigation of a new diagnostic technique to measure density profiles as a function of time has been initiated at UCLA. The technique promises to be a valuable addition to the range of available plasma diagnostics. Work on advanced holographic reflectometry technique as applied to fluctuation diagnostics has awaited a better understanding of the reflectometer signal itself as discussed above. Efforts to ensure the transfer of the diagnostic developments have continued with particular attention devoted to the preliminary design of a multichannel FIR interferometer for MST.

  8. A fusion based plasma propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, J. A.; Anderson, B.; Bryant, D.; Creese, C.; Djordjevic, V.; Peddicord, K. L.

    1987-01-01

    The Fusion Plasma Propulsion System scoping study was performed to investigate the possibilities of a fusion powered plasma propulsion system for space applications. Specifically, it was to be compared against existing electric propulsion concepts for a manned Mars mission. Design parameters consist of 1000 N thrust for 500 days, and the minimum mass possible. This investigation is briefly presented and conclusions drawn.

  9. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisch, N. J.

    2010-01-01

    Already while making his famous contributions in uncontrolled nuclear fusion for wartime uses, Edward Teller contemplated how the abundant energy release through nuclear fusion might serve peacetime uses as well. His legacy in controlled nuclear fusion, and the associated physics of plasmas, spans both magnetic and inertial confinement approaches. His contributions in plasma physics, both the intellectual and the administrative, continue to impact the field.

  10. Comparing simulation of plasma turbulence with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, David W.; Bravenec, Ronald V.; Dorland, William; Beer, Michael A.; Hammett, G. W.; McKee, George R.; Fonck, Raymond J.; Murakami, Masanori; Burrell, Keith H.; Jackson, Gary L.; Staebler, Gary M.

    2002-01-01

    The direct quantitative correspondence between theoretical predictions and the measured plasma fluctuations and transport is tested by performing nonlinear gyro-Landau-fluid simulations with the GRYFFIN (or ITG) code [W. Dorland and G. W. Hammett, Phys. Fluids B 5, 812 (1993); M. A. Beer and G. W. Hammett, Phys. Plasmas 3, 4046 (1996)]. In an L-mode reference discharge in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)], which has relatively large fluctuations and transport, the turbulence is dominated by ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes. Trapped electron modes and impurity drift waves also play a role. Density fluctuations are measured by beam emission spectroscopy [R. J. Fonck, P. A. Duperrex, and S. F. Paul, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 61, 3487 (1990)]. Experimental fluxes and corresponding diffusivities are analyzed by the TRANSP code [R. J. Hawryluk, in Physics of Plasmas Close to Thermonuclear Conditions, edited by B. Coppi, G. G. Leotta, D. Pfirsch, R. Pozzoli, and E. Sindoni (Pergamon, Oxford, 1980), Vol. 1, p. 19]. The shape of the simulated wave number spectrum is close to the measured one. The simulated ion thermal transport, corrected for E×B low shear, exceeds the experimental value by a factor of 1.5 to 2.0. The simulation overestimates the density fluctuation level by an even larger factor. On the other hand, the simulation underestimates the electron thermal transport, which may be accounted for by modes that are not accessible to the simulation or to the BES measurement.

  11. Pedestal transport in H-mode plasmas for fusion gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotschenreuther, M.; Hatch, D. R.; Mahajan, S.; Valanju, P.; Zheng, L.; Liu, X.

    2017-06-01

    The first high fidelity gyrokinetic simulations of the energy losses in the transport barriers of large tokamaks in pursuit of fusion gain are presented. These simulations calculate the turbulent energy losses with an extensive treatment of relevant physical effects—fully kinetic, non-linear, electromagnetic—inclusive of all major plasma species, and in equilibria with relevant shape and local bootstrap current for fusion-relevant cases. We find that large plasmas with a small normalized gyroradius lie in an unexpected regime of enhanced losses that can prevent the projected energy gain. Our simulations are qualitatively consistent with recent experiments on JET with an ITER-like wall. Interestingly and very importantly, the simulations predict parameter regimes of reduced transport that are quite fusion-favorable.

  12. Turbulent transport of alpha particles in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croitoru, A.; Palade, D. I.; Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the \\boldsymbol{E}× \\boldsymbol{B} diffusion of fusion born α particles in tokamak plasmas. We determine the transport regimes for a realistic model that has the characteristics of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) or of the trapped electron mode (TEM) driven turbulence. It includes a spectrum of potential fluctuations that is modeled using the results of the numerical simulations, the drift of the potential with the effective diamagnetic velocity and the parallel motion. Our semi-analytical statistical approach is based on the decorrelation trajectory method (DTM), which is adapted to the gyrokinetic approximation. We obtain the transport coefficients as a function of the parameters of the turbulence and of the energy of the α particles. According to our results, significant turbulent transport of the α particles can appear only at energies of the order of 100 KeV. We determine the corresponding conditions.

  13. Hall MHD Stability and Turbulence in Magnetically Accelerated Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    H. R. Strauss

    2012-11-27

    The object of the research was to develop theory and carry out simulations of the Z pinch and plasma opening switch (POS), and compare with experimental results. In the case of the Z pinch, there was experimental evidence of ion kinetic energy greatly in excess of the ion thermal energy. It was thought that this was perhaps due to fine scale turbulence. The simulations showed that the ion energy was predominantly laminar, not turbulent. Preliminary studies of a new Z pinch experiment with an axial magnetic field were carried out. The axial magnetic is relevant to magneto - inertial fusion. These studies indicate the axial magnetic field makes the Z pinch more turbulent. Results were also obtained on Hall magnetohydrodynamic instability of the POS.

  14. Turbulence in laboratory and natural plasmas: Connecting the dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenko, Frank

    2015-11-01

    It is widely recognized that turbulence is an important and fascinating frontier topic of both basic and applied plasma physics. Numerous aspects of this paradigmatic example of self-organization in nonlinear systems far from thermodynamic equilibrium remain to be better understood. Meanwhile, for both laboratory and natural plasmas, an impressive combination of new experimental and observational data, new theoretical concepts, and new computational capabilities (on the brink of the exascale era) have become available. Thus, it seems fair to say that we are currently facing a golden age of plasma turbulence research, characterized by fundamental new insights regarding the role and nature of turbulent processes in phenomena like cross-field transport, particle acceleration and propagation, plasma heating, magnetic reconnection, or dynamo action. At the same time, there starts to emerge a more unified view of this key topic of basic plasma physics, putting it into the much broader context of complex systems research and connecting it, e.g., to condensed matter physics and biophysics. I will describe recent advances and future challenges in this vibrant area of plasma physics, highlighting novel insights into the redistribution and dissipation of energy in turbulent plasmas at kinetic scales, using gyrokinetic, hybrid, and fully kinetic approaches in a complementary fashion. In this context, I will discuss, among other things, the influence of damped eigenmodes, the importance of nonlocal interactions, the origin and nature of non-universal power law spectra, as well as the role of coherent structures. Moreover, I will outline exciting new research opportunities on the horizon, combining extreme scale simulations with basic plasma and fusion experiments as well as with observations from satellites.

  15. Fusion-fission-fusion fast ignition plasma focus [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2005-03-01

    A crucial advancement in the problem for the controlled release of energy by nuclear fusion appears possible by an autocatalytic fusion-fission-fusion microexplosion, where the deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion reaction of a dense magnetized DT plasma placed inside a thin liner made up of U238, Th232 (perhaps B10) releases a sufficient number of 14 MeV fusion neutrons which by fission reactions in the liner implode the liner on the DT plasma. The liner implosion increases the DT plasma density and with it the neutron output accelerating the fast fission reactions. Following the fast fission assisted ignition, a thermonuclear detonation wave can propagate into unburnt DT to reach a high gain. The simplest way for the realization of this concept appears to be the dense plasma focus configuration, amended with a nested high voltage magnetically insulated transmission line for the heating of the DT. The large magnetic field needed for the α-particle entrapment of the DT fusion reaction is here generated by the thermomagnetic Nernst effect, amplifying the magnetic field of the plasma focus current sheet.

  16. Transport phenomena in a turbulent plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychenkov, V. Iu.; Gradov, O. M.; Silin, V. P.

    1984-04-01

    The results of a theory of ion-sound turbulence in a plasma which takes into account the electron quasilinear relaxation effect and the nonlinear wave interaction are presented. The transport coefficients characterizing the electrical current and heat flux in the plasma are obtained. A new point of view on the anomalous collision frequency is given.

  17. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion is an emerging, relatively unexplored approach to fusion for electrical power and propulsion application. The physical principles of the concept are founded upon both inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). It attempts to combine the favorable attributes of both these orthogonal approaches to fusion, but at the same time, avoiding the extreme technical challenges of both by exploiting a fusion regime intermediate between them. It uses a material liner to compress, heat and contain the fusion reacting plasma (the target plasma) mentally. By doing so, the fusion burn could be made to occur at plasma densities as high as six orders of magnitude higher than conventional MCF such as tokamak, thus leading to an approximately three orders of magnitude reduction in the plasma energy required for ignition. It also uses a transient magnetic field, compressed to extremely high intensity (100's T to 1000T) in the target plasma, to slow down the heat transport to the liner and to increase the energy deposition of charged-particle fusion products. This has several compounding beneficial effects. It leads to longer energy confinement time compared with conventional ICF without magnetized target, and thus permits the use of much lower plasma density to produce reasonable burn-up fraction. The compounding effects of lower plasma density and the magneto-insulation of the target lead to greatly reduced compressional heating power on the target. The increased energy deposition rate of charged-particle fusion products also helps to lower the energy threshold required for ignition and increasing the burn-up fraction. The reduction in ignition energy and the compressional power compound to lead to reduced system size, mass and R&D cost. It is a fusion approach that has an affordable R&D pathway, and appears attractive for propulsion application in the nearer term.

  18. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion is an emerging, relatively unexplored approach to fusion for electrical power and propulsion application. The physical principles of the concept are founded upon both inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). It attempts to combine the favorable attributes of both these orthogonal approaches to fusion, but at the same time, avoiding the extreme technical challenges of both by exploiting a fusion regime intermediate between them. It uses a material liner to compress, heat and contain the fusion reacting plasma (the target plasma) mentally. By doing so, the fusion burn could be made to occur at plasma densities as high as six orders of magnitude higher than conventional MCF such as tokamak, thus leading to an approximately three orders of magnitude reduction in the plasma energy required for ignition. It also uses a transient magnetic field, compressed to extremely high intensity (100's T to 1000T) in the target plasma, to slow down the heat transport to the liner and to increase the energy deposition of charged-particle fusion products. This has several compounding beneficial effects. It leads to longer energy confinement time compared with conventional ICF without magnetized target, and thus permits the use of much lower plasma density to produce reasonable burn-up fraction. The compounding effects of lower plasma density and the magneto-insulation of the target lead to greatly reduced compressional heating power on the target. The increased energy deposition rate of charged-particle fusion products also helps to lower the energy threshold required for ignition and increasing the burn-up fraction. The reduction in ignition energy and the compressional power compound to lead to reduced system size, mass and R&D cost. It is a fusion approach that has an affordable R&D pathway, and appears attractive for propulsion application in the nearer term.

  19. Wakes in Inertial Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Ian Norman

    Plasma wave wakes, which are the collective oscillatory response near the plasma frequency to the propagation of particles or electromagnetic waves through a plasma, play a critical role in many plasma processes. New results from backwards stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS), in which wakes with phase velocities much less than the speed of light are induced by the beating of counter-propagating light waves, and from electron beam stopping, in which the wakes are produced by the motion of relativistically propagating electrons through the dense plasma, are discussed. Both processes play important roles in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In BSRS, laser light is scattered backwards out of the plasma, decreasing the energy available to compress the ICF capsule and affecting the symmetry of where the laser energy hits the hohlraum wall in indirect drive ICF. The plasma wave wake can also generate superthermal electrons that can preheat the core and/or the ablator. Electron beam stopping plays a critical role in the Fast Ignition (FI) ICF concept, in which a beam of relativistic electrons is used to heat the target core to ignition temperatures after the compression stage. The beam stopping power determines the effectiveness of the heating process. This dissertation covers new discoveries on the importance of plasma wave wakes in both BSRS and electron beam stopping. In the SRS studies, 1D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations using OSIRIS are performed, which model a short-duration (˜500/ω0 --1FWHM) counter-propagating scattered light seed pulse in the presence of a constant pump laser with an intensity far below the absolute instability threshold for plasma waves undergoing Landau damping. The seed undergoes linear convective Raman amplification and dominates over the amplification of fluctuations due to particle discreteness. The simulation results are in good agreement with results from a coupled-mode solver when special relativity and the effects of finite size PIC

  20. Nusselt number scaling in tokamak plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, K.; Benkadda, S.; Hamaguchi, S.; Wakatani, M.

    2005-05-15

    Anomalous heat transport caused by ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence in tokamak plasmas is evaluated from numerical simulations of the two-dimensional (2D) partial-differential equations of the ITG model and of a reduced 1D version derived from a quasilinear approximation. In the strongly turbulent state, intermittent bursts of thermal transport are observed in both cases. In the strongly turbulent regime, the reduced model as well as the direct numerical simulation show that the Nusselt number Nu (normalized heat flux) scales with the normalized ion pressure gradient K{sub i} as Nu{proportional_to}K{sub i}{sup 1/3}. Since the Rayleigh number for ITG turbulence is proportional to K{sub i}, the Nusselt number scaling for ITG turbulence is thus similar to the classical thermal transport scaling for Rayleigh-Benard convections in neutral fluids.

  1. The time evolution of turbulent parameters in reversed-field pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, J. B.; Alexander, Brandon; Johnson, J. A. III

    2013-04-28

    Turbulence is abundant in fully ionized fusion plasmas, with unique turbulent characteristics in different phases of the discharge. Using Fourier and chaos-based techniques, a set of parameters have been developed to profile the time evolution of turbulence in high temperature, fusion plasmas, specifically in self-organized, reversed-field pinch plasma in the Madison Symmetric Torus. With constant density and plasma current, the turbulence profile is measured during ramp-up, magnetic reconnection, and increased confinement phases. During magnetic reconnection, a scan of plasma current is performed with a constant density. Analysis revealed that the energy associated with turbulence (turbulent energy) is found to increase when changes in magnetic energy occur and is correlated to edge ion temperatures. As the turbulent energy increases with increasing current, the rate at which this energy flow between scales (spectral index) and anti-persistence of the fluctuations increases (Hurst exponent). These turbulent parameters are then compared to the ramp-up phase and increased confinement regime.

  2. Origin and turbulence spreading of plasma blobs

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Birkenmeier, G.; Stroth, U.; Ribeiro, T. T.; Scott, B. D.; Carralero, D.; Müller, S. H.; Müller, H. W.; Wolfrum, E.; Fuchert, G.

    2015-02-15

    The formation of plasma blobs is studied by analyzing their trajectories in a gyrofluid simulation in the vicinity of the separatrix. Most blobs arise at the maximum radial electric field outside the separatrix. In general, blob generation is not bound to one particular radial position or instability. A simple model of turbulence spreading for the scrape-off layer is derived. The simulations show that the blob dynamics can be represented by turbulence spreading, which constitutes a substantial energy drive for far scrape-off layer turbulence and is a more suitable quantity to study blob generation compared to the skewness.

  3. Evolution of ion-acoustic plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychenkov, V. Iu.; Gradov, O. M.

    1986-03-01

    The evolution of ion-acoustic turbulence is studied on the basis of a numerical solution of the nonstationary equation for in-acoustic waves. Consideration is given to conditions under which the excitation threshold of long-wave ion-acoustic oscillations is exceeded as the result of instability saturation due to quasi-linear relaxation of electrons on turbulent pulsations and the induced scattering of ions by the ion sound. Distributed spectra of ion-acoustic turbulence are established in the plasma under these conditions.

  4. The turbulent bremsstrahlung (plasma-maser) effect

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimirov, S. V.

    2011-01-04

    Because of nonlinear interaction between particles and waves, energy conversion between waves of large frequency difference can occur without particle population inversion or resonant wave-wave interaction. The effect involves the nonresonant interaction of the plasma particles with a pair of plasma modes of large frequency difference, and wave energy is converted into particle energy. This effect can appear in laboratory as well as astrophysical plasmas and is important in determining the transport properties of weakly turbulent plasmas. Here, the most important aspects of the plasma-maser theory is discussed.

  5. Applications of continuous and orthogonal wavelet transforms to MHD and plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farge, Marie; Schneider, Kai

    2016-10-01

    Wavelet analysis and compression tools are presented and different applications to study MHD and plasma turbulence are illustrated. We use the continuous and the orthogonal wavelet transform to develop several statistical diagnostics based on the wavelet coefficients. We show how to extract coherent structures out of fully developed turbulent flows using wavelet-based denoising and describe multiscale numerical simulation schemes using wavelets. Several examples for analyzing, compressing and computing one, two and three dimensional turbulent MHD or plasma flows are presented. Details can be found in M. Farge and K. Schneider. Wavelet transforms and their applications to MHD and plasma turbulence: A review. Support by the French Research Federation for Fusion Studies within the framework of the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) is thankfully acknowledged.

  6. A basic plasma test for gyrokinetics: GDC turbulence in LAPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueschel, M. J.; Rossi, G.; Told, D.; Terry, P. W.; Jenko, F.; Carter, T. A.

    2017-02-01

    Providing an important step towards validating gyrokinetics under comparatively little-explored conditions, simulations of pressure-gradient-driven plasma turbulence in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) are compared with experimental observations. The corresponding signatures confirm the existence of a novel regime of turbulence, based on the recently-discovered gradient-driven drift coupling (GDC) instability, which is thus confirmed as a candidate mechanism for turbulence in basic, space and astrophysical plasmas. Despite the limitations of flux-tube gyrokinetics for this scenario, when accounting for box size scaling by applying a scalar factor η =6, agreement between simulations and experiment improves to within a factor of two for key observables: compressional magnetic, density, and temperature fluctuations, both in amplitude and structure. Thus, a first, strong indication is presented that the GDC instability seen in gyrokinetics appears to operate in the experiment and that the essential instability physics is present in the numerical model. Overall, the gyrokinetic framework and its numerical implementation in the Gene code therefore perform well for LAPD plasmas very different from their brethren in fusion experiments.

  7. A Tutorial on Basic Principles of Microwave Reflectometry Applied to Fluctuation Measurements in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nazikian, R.; Kramer, G.J.; Valeo, E.

    2001-02-16

    Microwave reflectometry is now routinely used for probing the structure of magnetohydrodynamic and turbulent fluctuations in fusion plasmas. Conditions specific to the core of tokamak plasmas, such as small amplitude of density irregularities and the uniformity of the background plasma, have enabled progress in the quantitative interpretation of reflectometer signals. In particular, the extent of applicability of the 1-D [one-dimensional] geometric optics description of the reflected field is investigated by direct comparison to 1-D full wave analysis. Significant advances in laboratory experiments are discussed which are paving the way towards a thorough understanding of this important measurement technique. Data is presented from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [R. Hawryluk, Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion 33 (1991) 1509] identifying the validity of the geometric optics description of the scattered field and demonstrating the feasibility of imaging turbulent fluctuations in fusion scale devices.

  8. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The objectives of the theoretical science program are: To support the interpretation of present experiments and predict the outcome of future planned experiments; to improve on existing models and codes and validate against experimental results; and to conduct theoretical physics development of advanced concepts with applications for DIII-D and future devices. Major accomplishments in FY91 include the corroboration between theory and experiment on MHD behavior in the second stable regime of operation on DIII-D, and the frequency and mode structure of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes in high beta, shaped plasmas. We have made significant advances in the development of the gyro-Landau fluid approach to turbulence simulation which more accurately models kinetic drive and damping mechanisms. Several theoretical models to explain the bifurcation phenomenon in L- to H-mode transition were proposed providing the theoretical basis for future experimental verification. The capabilities of new rf codes have been upgraded in response to the expanding needs of the rf experiments. Codes are being employed to plan for a fully non-inductive current drive experiment in a high beta, enhanced confinement regime. GA's experimental effort in Applied Physics encompasses two advanced diagnostics essential for the operation of future fusion experiments: Alpha particle diagnostic, and current and density profile diagnostics. This paper discusses research in all these topics.

  9. Understanding of Edge Plasmas in Magnetic Fusion Energy Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T

    2004-11-01

    A limited overview is given of the theoretical understanding of edge plasmas in fusion devices. This plasma occupies the thin region between the hot core plasma and material walls in magnetically confinement configurations. The region is often formed by a change in magnetic topology from close magnetic field lines (i.e., the core region) and open field lines that contact material surfaces (i.e., the scrape-off layer [SOL]), with the most common example being magnetically diverted tokamaks. The physics of this region is determined by the interaction of plasma with neutral gas in the presence of plasma turbulence, with impurity radiation being an important component. Recent advances in modeling strong, intermittent micro-turbulent edge-plasma transport is given, and the closely coupled self-consistent evolution of the edge-plasma profiles in tokamaks. In addition, selected new results are given for the characterization of edge-plasmas behavior in the areas of edge-pedestal relaxation and SOL transport via Edge-Localize Modes (ELMs), impurity formation including dust, and magnetic field-line stochasticity in tokamaks.

  10. Understanding L-H transition in tokamak fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guosheng; Wu, Xingquan

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews the current state of understanding of the L-H transition phenomenon in tokamak plasmas with a focus on two central issues: (a) the mechanism for turbulence quick suppression at the L-H transition; (b) the mechanism for subsequent generation of sheared flow. We briefly review recent advances in the understanding of the fast suppression of edge turbulence across the L-H transition. We uncover a comprehensive physical picture of the L-H transition by piecing together a number of recent experimental observations and insights obtained from 1D and 2D simulation models. Different roles played by diamagnetic mean flow, neoclassical-driven mean flow, turbulence-driven mean flow, and turbulence-driven zonal flows are discussed and clarified. It is found that the L-H transition occurs spontaneously mediated by a shift in the radial wavenumber spectrum of edge turbulence, which provides a critical evidence for the theory of turbulence quench by the flow shear. Remaining questions and some key directions for future investigations are proposed. This work was supported by National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China under Contracts No. 2015GB101000, No. 2013GB106000, and No. 2013GB107000 and National Natural Science Foundation of China under Contracts No. 11575235 and No. 11422546.

  11. Stable Modes in Saturation of Instability-Driven Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, P. W.

    2016-10-01

    Saturation of instability-driven plasma turbulence, apart from cases with quasilinear flattening, has been treated almost universally as an energy-transfer or wavenumber scattering process, with the Kolmogorov cascade as the idealized paradigm. This view is being modified by the realization that for a broad parameter range wavenumber transfer is subjected to heavy damping at the same scales as the instability through transfer to a separate space of stable modes. The densely populated, nonlinearly driven stable-mode space can be represented by roots of the linear dielectric or empirically extracted modes of a singular value decomposition. This new understanding of instability-driven turbulence brings to light fluctuation characteristics, transport processes, and saturation mechanisms that cannot be anticipated solely from analysis of the linear instability or the related quasilinear transport approximation. This tutorial describes key aspects of the new paradigm, including characterization of stable modes, quantitative measures of the branching ratio between wavenumber transfer and transfer to stable modes, simultaneity of transfer to stable modes as contrasted to wavenumber cascades, equipartition of energy dissipation rate among stable modes, and zonal-flow regulation of ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence by catalyzing transfer to stable modes. It is shown that ballooning-parity ITG turbulence creates a stochastic magnetic field by exciting a stable microtearing mode and that zonal-flow catalyzed transfer to stable modes yields a turbulence level proportional to zonal flow damping. In stellarator trapped electron mode turbulence, stable ion modes become energy driving sources via cross correlations between non orthogonal modes. Stable mode effects are shown to arise for a range of fusion plasmas systems and for astrophysically relevant Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Supported by USDOE.

  12. Technology Advances in Support of Fusion Plasma Imaging Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qi; Lai, Jiali; Hu, Fengqi; Li, Maijou; Chang, Yu-Ting; Domier, Calvin; Luhmann, Neville, Jr.

    2012-10-01

    Innovative technologies are under investigation in key areas to enhance the performance of microwave and millimeter-wave fusion plasma imaging diagnostics. Novel antenna and mixer configurations are being developed at increasingly higher frequencies, to facilitate the use of electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on high field (> 2.6 T) plasma devices. Low noise preamplifier-based imaging antenna arrays are being developed to increase the sensitivity and dynamic range of microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) diagnostics for the localized measurement of turbulent density fluctuations. High power multi-frequency sources, fabricated using advanced CMOS technology, offer the promise of allowing MIR-based diagnostic instruments to image these density fluctuations in 2-D over an extended plasma volume in high performance tokamak plasmas. Details regarding each of these diagnostic development areas will be presented.

  13. Plasma instrumentation for fusion power reactor control

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, G.T.; Bauer, J.F.; Maya, I.; Miley, G.H.

    1985-07-01

    Feedback control will be implemented in fusion power reactors to guard against unpredicted behavior of the plant and to assure desirable operation. In this study, plasma state feedback requirements for plasma control by systems strongly coupled to the plasma (magnet sets, RF, and neutral beam heating systems, and refueling systems) are estimated. Generic considerations regarding the impact of the power reactor environment on plasma instrumentation are outlined. Solutions are proposed to minimize the impact of the power reactor environment on plasma instrumentation. Key plasma diagnostics are evaluated with respect to their potential for upgrade and implementation as power reactor instruments.

  14. Global simulations of plasma turbulence in laboratory plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, P.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Jolliet, S.; Loizu, J.; Mosetto, A.; Rogers, B. N.; Theiler, C.

    2012-04-01

    The Global Braginskii Solver (GBS) code has been developed in the last few years to simulate plasma turbulence in laboratory plasmas [1]. By solving the drift-reduced Braginkii equation in magnetic configurations of increasing complexity, from linear devices to the Simple Magnetized Toroidal (SMT) configuration, GBS performs non-linear self-consistent global three-dimensional simulations of the plasma dynamics, as the result of the interplay among the plasma source, the turbulent transport, and the plasma losses at the vessel. This gradual approach has allowed gaining a deep understanding of the turbulence dynamics, by identifying the instabilities responsible for driving plasma turbulence and to estimate the turbulence saturation amplitude. In particular, simulation results have pointed out the need of global simulations to correctly represent the dynamics of laboratory plasmas, as well as the importance of not separating fluctuations and equilibrium quantities. A code validation development project has been conducted side by side with the GBS development [2]. Such validation project has lead to the establishment of a rigorous methodology to carry out experiment-simulation comparison, and has allowed quantifying precisely the level of agreement between the GBS results and the experimental data from the TORPEX experiment at CRPP. [1] P. Ricci, B.N. Rogers, S. Brunner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 225002 (2008); P. Ricci and B. N. Rogers, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 145001 (2010); B. N. Rogers and P. Ricci, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 225002 (2010); B. Li et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 056406 (2011). [2] P. Ricci et al, Phys. Plasmas 16, 055703 (2009); P. Ricci et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 032109 (2011).

  15. Applications of spectral methods to turbulent magnetofluids in space and fusion research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Voigt, R. G. (Editor); Gottlieb, D. (Editor); Hussaini, M. Y. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Recent and potential applications of spectral method computation to incompressible, dissipative magnetohydrodynamics are surveyed. Linear stability problems for one dimensional, quasi-equilibria are approachable through a close analogue of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation. It is likely that for Reynolds-like numbers above certain as-yet-undetermined thresholds, all magnetofluids are turbulent. Four recent effects in MHD turbulence are remarked upon, as they have displayed themselves in spectral method computations: (1) inverse cascades; (2) small-scale intermittent dissipative structures; (3) selective decays of ideal global invariants relative to each other; and (4) anisotropy induced by a mean dc magnetic field. Two more conjectured applications are suggested. All the turbulent processes discussed are sometimes involved in current carrying confined fusion magnetoplasmas and in space plasmas.

  16. Structure of nonlocality of plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürcan, Ö. D.; Vermare, L.; Hennequin, P.; Berionni, V.; Diamond, P. H.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; McDevitt, C. J.; Morel, P.; Sarazin, Y.; Storelli, A.; Bourdelle, C.; the Tore Supra Team

    2013-07-01

    Various indications on the weakly nonlocal character of turbulent plasma transport both from experimental fluctuation measurements from Tore Supra and observations from the full-f, flux-driven gyrokinetic code GYSELA are reported. A simple Fisher equation model of this weakly nonlocal dynamics can be formulated in terms of an evolution equation for the turbulent entropy density, which contains the basic phenomenon of radial turbulence spreading in addition to avalanche-like dynamics via coupling to profile modulations. A derivation of this model, which contains the so-called beach effect, a diffusive and convective flux components for the flux of turbulence intensity, in addition to linear group propagation is given, starting from the drift-kinetic equation. The proposed model has the form of a transport equation for turbulence intensity, and may be considered as an addition to transport modelling. The kinetic fluxes given, can be computed using model closures, or local gyrokinetics. The model is also used in a particular setup that represents the near edge region as a relatively stable zone between the core and edge region where the energy injection is locally more substantial. It is observed that with constant, physical coefficients, the model gives a convincing qualitative profile of fluctuation intensity when the turbulence is coming from the core region with either a group velocity or a convective flux.

  17. Complexity and Intermittent Turbulence in Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tom; Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Wu, Cheng-Chin

    2004-01-01

    Sporadic and localized interactions of coherent structures arising from plasma resonances can be the origin of "complexity" of the coexistence of non- propagating spatiotemporal fluctuations and propagating modes in space plasmas. Numerical simulation results are presented to demonstrate the intermittent character of the non-propagating fluctuations. The technique of the dynamic renormalization-group is introduced and applied to the study of scale invariance of such type of multiscale fluctuations. We also demonstrate that the particle interactions with the intermittent turbulence can lead to the efficient energization of the plasma populations. An example related to the ion acceleration processes in the auroral zone is provided.

  18. Magnetic curvature effects on plasma interchange turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B. Liao, X.; Sun, C. K.; Ou, W.; Liu, D.; Gui, G.; Wang, X. G.

    2016-06-15

    The magnetic curvature effects on plasma interchange turbulence and transport in the Z-pinch and dipole-like systems are explored with two-fluid global simulations. By comparing the transport levels in the systems with a different magnetic curvature, we show that the interchange-mode driven transport strongly depends on the magnetic geometry. For the system with large magnetic curvature, the pressure and density profiles are strongly peaked in a marginally stable state and the nonlinear evolution of interchange modes produces the global convective cells in the azimuthal direction, which lead to the low level of turbulent convective transport.

  19. Extreme Scale Plasma Turbulence Simulations on Top Supercomputers Worldwide

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, William; Wang, Bei; Ethier, Stephane; ...

    2016-11-01

    The goal of the extreme scale plasma turbulence studies described in this paper is to expedite the delivery of reliable predictions on confinement physics in large magnetic fusion systems by using world-class supercomputers to carry out simulations with unprecedented resolution and temporal duration. This has involved architecture-dependent optimizations of performance scaling and addressing code portability and energy issues, with the metrics for multi-platform comparisons being 'time-to-solution' and 'energy-to-solution'. Realistic results addressing how confinement losses caused by plasma turbulence scale from present-day devices to the much larger $25 billion international ITER fusion facility have been enabled by innovative advances in themore » GTC-P code including (i) implementation of one-sided communication from MPI 3.0 standard; (ii) creative optimization techniques on Xeon Phi processors; and (iii) development of a novel performance model for the key kernels of the PIC code. Our results show that modeling data movement is sufficient to predict performance on modern supercomputer platforms.« less

  20. Extreme Scale Plasma Turbulence Simulations on Top Supercomputers Worldwide

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, William; Wang, Bei; Ethier, Stephane; Kwasniewski, Grzegorz; Hoefler, Torsten; Ibrahim, Khaled Z.; Madduri, Kamesh; Williams, Samuel; Oliker, Leonid; Rosales-Fernandez, Carlos; Williams, Tim

    2016-11-01

    The goal of the extreme scale plasma turbulence studies described in this paper is to expedite the delivery of reliable predictions on confinement physics in large magnetic fusion systems by using world-class supercomputers to carry out simulations with unprecedented resolution and temporal duration. This has involved architecture-dependent optimizations of performance scaling and addressing code portability and energy issues, with the metrics for multi-platform comparisons being 'time-to-solution' and 'energy-to-solution'. Realistic results addressing how confinement losses caused by plasma turbulence scale from present-day devices to the much larger $25 billion international ITER fusion facility have been enabled by innovative advances in the GTC-P code including (i) implementation of one-sided communication from MPI 3.0 standard; (ii) creative optimization techniques on Xeon Phi processors; and (iii) development of a novel performance model for the key kernels of the PIC code. Our results show that modeling data movement is sufficient to predict performance on modern supercomputer platforms.

  1. Experimental investigation of dynamical coupling between turbulent transport and parallel flows in the JET plasma-boundary region.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, C; Gonçalves, B; Silva, C; Pedrosa, M A; Erents, K; Hron, M; Matthews, G F

    2003-08-08

    The dynamical coupling between turbulent transport and parallel flows has been investigated in the plasma boundary region of the Joint European Torus tokamak. Experimental results show that there is a dynamical relationship between transport and parallel flows. As the size of transport events increases, parallel flows also increase. These results show that turbulent transport can drive parallel flows in the plasma boundary of fusion plasmas. This new type of measurement is an important element to unravel the overall picture connecting radial transport and flows in fusion plasmas.

  2. Strong Turbulence in Alkali Halide Negative Ion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Daniel

    1999-11-01

    Negative ion plasmas (NIPs) are charge-neutral plasmas in which the negative charge is dominated by negative ions rather than electrons. They are found in laser discharges, combustion products, semiconductor manufacturing processes, stellar atmospheres, pulsar magnetospheres, and the Earth's ionosphere, both naturally and man-made. They often display signatures of strong turbulence^1. Development of a novel, compact, unmagnetized alkali halide (MX) NIP source will be discussed, it incorporating a ohmically-heated incandescent (2500K) tantulum solenoid (3cm dia, 15 cm long) with heat shields. The solenoid ionizes the MX vapor and confines contaminant electrons, allowing a very dry (electron-free) source. Plasma densities of 10^10 cm-3 and positive to negative ion mass ratios of 1 <= fracm_+m- <= 20 are achievable. The source will allow tests of strong turbulence theory^2. 1 Sheehan, D.P., et al., Phys. Fluids B5, 1593 (1993). 2 Tsytovich, V. and Wharton, C.W., Comm. Plasma Phys. Cont. Fusion 4, 91 (1978).

  3. Magnetic field amplification in turbulent astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federrath, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in astrophysical accretion discs and in the interstellar and intergalactic medium. They drive jets, suppress fragmentation in star-forming clouds and can have a significant impact on the accretion rate of stars. However, the exact amplification mechanisms of cosmic magnetic fields remain relatively poorly understood. Here, I start by reviewing recent advances in the numerical and theoretical modelling of the turbulent dynamo, which may explain the origin of galactic and intergalactic magnetic fields. While dynamo action was previously investigated in great detail for incompressible plasmas, I here place particular emphasis on highly compressible astrophysical plasmas, which are characterised by strong density fluctuations and shocks, such as the interstellar medium. I find that dynamo action works not only in subsonic plasmas, but also in highly supersonic, compressible plasmas, as well as for low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers. I further present new numerical simulations from which I determine the growth of the turbulent (un-ordered) magnetic field component ( turb$ ) in the presence of weak and strong guide fields ( 0$ ). I vary 0$ over five orders of magnitude and find that the dependence of turb$ on 0$ is relatively weak, and can be explained with a simple theoretical model in which the turbulence provides the energy to amplify turb$ . Finally, I discuss some important implications of magnetic fields for the structure of accretion discs, the launching of jets and the star-formation rate of interstellar clouds.

  4. INTERPRETING POWER ANISOTROPY MEASUREMENTS IN PLASMA TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. H. K.; Wicks, R. T.; Horbury, T. S.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2010-03-10

    A relationship is derived between power anisotropy and wavevector anisotropy in turbulent fluctuations. This can be used to interpret plasma turbulence measurements, for example, in the solar wind. If fluctuations are spatially anisotropic, then the ion gyroscale break point in measured spectra in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field would not occur at the same frequency, and similarly for the electron gyroscale break point. This is an important consideration when interpreting solar wind measurements in terms of anisotropic turbulence theories. Model magnetic field power spectra are presented assuming a cascade of critically balanced Alfven waves in the inertial range and kinetic Alfven waves in the dissipation range. The variation of power anisotropy with scale is compared to existing solar wind measurements, and the similarities and differences are discussed.

  5. Dust in fusion plasmas: theory and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, R. D.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Mendis, D. A.; Rosenberg, M.; Rudakov, D.; Tanaka, Y.; Rognlien, T. D.; Soboleva, T. K.; Shukla, P. K.; Bray, B. D.; West, W. P.; Roquemore, A. L.; Skinner, C. H.

    2008-09-07

    Dust may have a large impact on ITER-scale plasma experiments including both safety and performance issues. However, the physics of dust in fusion plasmas is very complex and multifaceted. Here, we discuss different aspects of dust dynamics including dust-plasma, and dust-surface interactions. We consider the models of dust charging, heating, evaporation/sublimation, dust collision with material walls, etc., which are suitable for the conditions of fusion plasmas. The physical models of all these processes have been incorporated into the DUST Transport (DUSTT) code. Numerical simulations demonstrate that dust particles are very mobile and accelerate to large velocities due to the ion drag force (cruise speed >100 m/s). Deep penetration of dust particles toward the plasma core is predicted. It is shown that DUSTT is capable of reproducing many features of recent dust-related experiments, but much more work is still needed.

  6. Turbulent dynamo in a collisionless plasma

    PubMed Central

    Rincon, François; Califano, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander A.; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire universe and affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. The generation and dynamical amplification of extragalactic magnetic fields through cosmic times (up to microgauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions, and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs) are major puzzles largely unconstrained by observations. A dynamo effect converting kinetic flow energy into magnetic energy is often invoked in that context; however, extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic field growth and sustainment through an efficient turbulent dynamo instability are possible in such plasmas is not established. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a 6D-phase space necessary to answer this question have, until recently, remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic field amplification by dynamo instability does occur in a stochastically driven, nonrelativistic subsonic flow of initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma. We also find that the dynamo self-accelerates and becomes entangled with kinetic instabilities as magnetization increases. The results suggest that such a plasma dynamo may be realizable in laboratory experiments, support the idea that intracluster medium turbulence may have significantly contributed to the amplification of cluster magnetic fields up to near-equipartition levels on a timescale shorter than the Hubble time, and emphasize the crucial role of multiscale kinetic physics in high-energy astrophysical plasmas. PMID:27035981

  7. Turbulent dynamo in a collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon, François; Califano, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander A.; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire universe and affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. The generation and dynamical amplification of extragalactic magnetic fields through cosmic times (up to microgauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions, and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs) are major puzzles largely unconstrained by observations. A dynamo effect converting kinetic flow energy into magnetic energy is often invoked in that context; however, extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic field growth and sustainment through an efficient turbulent dynamo instability are possible in such plasmas is not established. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a 6D-phase space necessary to answer this question have, until recently, remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic field amplification by dynamo instability does occur in a stochastically driven, nonrelativistic subsonic flow of initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma. We also find that the dynamo self-accelerates and becomes entangled with kinetic instabilities as magnetization increases. The results suggest that such a plasma dynamo may be realizable in laboratory experiments, support the idea that intracluster medium turbulence may have significantly contributed to the amplification of cluster magnetic fields up to near-equipartition levels on a timescale shorter than the Hubble time, and emphasize the crucial role of multiscale kinetic physics in high-energy astrophysical plasmas.

  8. Generation of quasistationary magnetic fields in a turbulent laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychenkov, V. Iu.; Gradov, O. M.; Chokparova, G. A.

    1984-07-01

    A theory is derived for the generation of quasi-stationary magnetic fields in a laser plasma with well developed ion-acoustic turbulence. Qualitative changes are caused in the nature of the magnetic-field generation by an anomalous anisotropic transport in the turbulent plasma. The role played by turbulent diffusion and thermodiffusive transport in the magnetic-field saturation is discussed.

  9. Plasma turbulence measured with fast frequency swept reflectometry in JET H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clairet, F.; Sirinelli, A.; Meneses, L.; Contributors, JET

    2016-12-01

    In this work we present recent achievements to provide precise measurements of turbulence on JET H-mode plasmas using frequency sweeping reflectometry diagnostic. The plasma density fluctuations retrieved from swept reflected signals, first initiated with the Tore Supra reflectometry (Heuraux et al 2003 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74 1501, Vermare et al 2006 Nucl. Fusion 46 S743, Gerbaud et al 2006 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77 10E928), provides a radial profile of the density fluctuation level and its spectral structure. Using the complete set of the JET X-mode fast sweeping heterodyne reflectometers we have determined the temporal dynamic of the density fluctuation profile from the edge to the center during an H-mode discharge. At the L-H transition, the turbulence reduction seems to occur, at first, simultaneously from the edge to the center then deepens at the edge at ρ ~ 0.95 and this deepening propagates toward the center with a steepening of the wavenumber spectra. During an edge localized mode (ELM) event, a substantial density fluctuations increase has been observed with a localized turbulent wave front propagating toward the center accompanying a particle transport. We also show that type-III ELMs sustain a steady and high level of plasma turbulence compare to type-I.

  10. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Richeson, Jeff; Schmidt, George; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Turchi, Peter J.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) attempts to combine the favorable attributes of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) for energy confinement with the attributes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for efficient compression heating and wall-free containment of the fusing plasma. It uses a material liner to compress and contain a magnetized plasma. For practical applications, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC). For the successful implementation of the scheme, plasma jets of the requisite momentum flux density need to be produced. Their transport over sufficiently large distances (a few meters) needs to be assured. When they collide and merge into a liner, relative differences in velocity, density and temperature of the jets could give rise to instabilities in the development of the liner. Variation in the jet properties must be controlled to ensure that the growth rate of the instabilities are not significant over the time scale of the liner formation before engaging with the target plasma. On impact with the target plasma, some plasma interpenetration might occur between the liner and the target. The operating parameter space needs to be identified to ensure that a reasonably robust and conducting contact surface is formed between the liner and the target. A mismatch in the "impedance" between the liner and the target plasma could give rise to undesirable shock heating of the liner leading to increased entropy (thermal losses) in the liner. Any irregularities in the liner will accentuate the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during the compression of the target plasma by the liner.

  11. Studies of Zonal Flows Driven by Drift Mode Turbulence in Laboratory and Space Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, R.; Trines, R.; Mendonça, J. T.; Silva, L. O.; Shukla, P. K.; Dunlop, M. W.; Vaivads, A.; Davies, J. A.; Bamford, R. A.; Mori, W. B.; Tynan, G.

    2008-10-01

    The interaction between broadband drift mode turbulence and zonal flows is an important topic associated with transport at plasma boundaries. The generation of zonal flows by the modulational instability of broad band drift waves has resulted in the observation of self organized solitary wave structures at the magnetopause. To understand these structures and their importance to future burning plasmas and space plasmas we have developed a unique numerical simulation code that describes drift wave—zonal flow turbulence. We show that observations by cluster spacecraft confirms the role of drift wave zonal flow turbulence at the Earth's magnetopause and further demonstrates that the magnetopause boundary acts in a s similar manner to transport barriers in tokamak fusion devices. Thus cementing the relationship between the plasma physics of laboratory devices and space plasmas.

  12. PLASMA EMISSION BY WEAK TURBULENCE PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Yoon, P. H.; Pavan, J. E-mail: rudi.gaelzer@ufrgs.br E-mail: joel.pavan@ufpel.edu.br

    2014-11-10

    The plasma emission is the radiation mechanism responsible for solar type II and type III radio bursts. The first theory of plasma emission was put forth in the 1950s, but the rigorous demonstration of the process based upon first principles had been lacking. The present Letter reports the first complete numerical solution of electromagnetic weak turbulence equations. It is shown that the fundamental emission is dominant and unless the beam speed is substantially higher than the electron thermal speed, the harmonic emission is not likely to be generated. The present findings may be useful for validating reduced models and for interpreting particle-in-cell simulations.

  13. Vortex Stabilized Compressed Fusion Grade Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2015-03-01

    Inertial confinement fusion schemes comprise of highly compressed dense plasmas. Some involve short pulses of powerful beams (lasers, particles) applied to solid pellets, while others utilize plasma focus to obtain dense pinch plasmas. Although compression factor >1000 has been achieved for starting pressures in the Torr range, the latter is limited by instabilities for initial gas density above 10 Torr. One alternative approach could be shooting electron beams through very dense, atmospheric pressure, vortex stabilized plasma. Large azimuthal magnetic generated by an electron beam can compress and heat the plasma to fusion viable parameters. This configuration is stable against sausage, kink, or beam - plasma instabilities. Based on experimental evidence beam propagation through the plasma is not be an issue. A second possibility is to tangentially squeeze a quasi-neutral plasma focus flow by a surrounding gas vortex. Based on currently available electron beams, the first scheme viability as an electrical power generating reactor does not seem to be promising. But using a plasma cathode electron beam that was developed a while ago, for which DOE has a patent U.S. Patent 4,942,339, could result in net generation of electricity. Calculations will be presented. Work supported by Work supported under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH1-886 with the US Department of Energy.

  14. New Thermodynamical Force in Plasma Phase Space that Controls Turbulence and Turbulent Transport

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Sanae-I.; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2012-01-01

    Physics of turbulence and turbulent transport has been developed on the central dogma that spatial gradients constitute the controlling parameters, such as Reynolds number and Rayleigh number. Recent experiments with the nonequilibrium plasmas in magnetic confinement devices, however, have shown that the turbulence and transport change much faster than global parameters, after an abrupt change of heating power. Here we propose a theory of turbulence in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas, showing that the heating power directly influences the turbulence. New mechanism, that an external source couples with plasma fluctuations in phase space so as to affect turbulence, is investigated. A new thermodynamical force in phase-space, i.e., the derivative of heating power by plasma pressure, plays the role of new control parameter, in addition to spatial gradients. Following the change of turbulence, turbulent transport is modified accordingly. The condition under which this new effect can be observed is also evaluated. PMID:23155481

  15. Transport Bifurcation in Plasma Interchange Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Transport bifurcation and mean shear flow generation in plasma interchange turbulence are explored with self-consistent two-fluid simulations in a flux-driven system with both closed and open field line regions. The nonlinear evolution of interchange modes shows the presence of two confinement regimes characterized by the low and high mean flow shear. By increasing the input heat flux above a certain threshold, large-amplitude oscillations in the turbulent and mean flow energy are induced. Both clockwise and counter-clockwise types of oscillations are found before the transition to the second regime. The fluctuation energy is decisively transferred to the mean flows by large-amplitude Reynolds power as turbulent intensity increases. Consequently, a transition to the second regime occurs, in which strong mean shear flows are generated in the plasma edge. The peak of the spectrum shifts to higher wavenumbers as the large-scale turbulent eddies are suppressed by the mean shear flow. The transition back to the first regime is then triggered by decreasing the input heat flux to a level much lower than the threshold for the forward transition, showing strong hysteresis. During the back transition, the mean flow decreases as the energy transfer process is reversed. This transport bifurcation, based on a field-line-averaged 2D model, has also been reproduced in our recent 3D simulations of resistive interchange turbulence, in which the ion and electron temperatures are separated and the parallel current is involved. Supported by the MOST of China Grant No. 2013GB112006, US DOE Contract No. DE-FC02-08ER54966, US DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734.

  16. Laser diagnostics for plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The purpose of this effort is to further develop the multiple-beam laser scattering diagnostic for tokamak plasmas. Present laser scattering diagnostics have very poor spatial resolution. Yet good spatial resolution is necessary if adequate comparison of theory and experiment is to occur. The proposed multiple beam scattering diagnostic promises a spatial resolution of approximately 10 cm at a fluctuation wave number of 5 cm(exp -1) when the angular envelope of the beams is 0.1 radians. A larger angular envelope would further improve the spatial resolution. This kind of spatial resolution is impossible with current laser scattering diagnostics. Enclosed are two items. These items constitute the major results of this study. Appendix A is a draft of a paper being prepared for submission to the journal on the review of scientific instruments. This paper consists of three sections. Section 1 compares the proposed diagnostic to conventional laser scattering diagnostics and argues for the need of increased spatial resolution. Section 2 presents a thorough rendering of the conceptual basis of the proposed multiple beam diagnostic. Section 3 presents an optical design suitable for use on the TEXT upgrade tokamak. Appendix B is a schematic of a proposed proof-of-principle bench-top experiment of the multiple beam scattering diagnostic. It is designed to demonstrate the concept thoroughly at a greatly reduced cost. An actual multiple beam CO2 laser scattering experiment on a controlled laboratory plasma would be a good follow-up before attempting construction of the diagnostic on a major tokamak.

  17. EDITORIAL: Plasma Surface Interactions for Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-05-01

    Because plasma-boundary physics encompasses some of the most important unresolved issues for both the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and future fusion power reactors, there is a strong interest in the fusion community for better understanding and characterization of plasma wall interactions. Chemical and physical sputtering cause the erosion of the limiters/divertor plates and vacuum vessel walls (made of C, Be and W, for example) and degrade fusion performance by diluting the fusion fuel and excessively cooling the core, while carbon redeposition could produce long-term in-vessel tritium retention, degrading the superior thermo-mechanical properties of the carbon materials. Mixed plasma-facing materials are proposed, requiring optimization for different power and particle flux characteristics. Knowledge of material properties as well as characteristics of the plasma material interaction are prerequisites for such optimizations. Computational power will soon reach hundreds of teraflops, so that theoretical and plasma science expertise can be matched with new experimental capabilities in order to mount a strong response to these challenges. To begin to address such questions, a Workshop on New Directions for Advanced Computer Simulations and Experiments in Fusion-Related Plasma Surface Interactions for Fusion (PSIF) was held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 21 to 23 March, 2005. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together researchers in fusion related plasma wall interactions in order to address these topics and to identify the most needed and promising directions for study, to exchange opinions on the present depth of knowledge of surface properties for the main fusion-related materials, e.g., C, Be and W, especially for sputtering, reflection, and deuterium (tritium) retention properties. The goal was to suggest the most important next steps needed for such basic computational and experimental work to be facilitated

  18. Weak Turbulence Effects in Space Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, Chris

    2012-10-01

    With the advent of multi-satellite missions such as Cluster and the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) space plasmas have become a rich laboratory for the detailed and fundamental study of plasma turbulence. Space offers a diversity of plasma environments to directly test theory and simulation, from high-β plasmas in the solar-wind and the Earth's magnetotail, to low-β multi-species plasmas in the radiation belts and ionosphere. Recent theoretical work has demonstrated that by considering the effects of induced non-linear scattering (non-linear Landau damping, to be referred to as NL scattering) of electromagnetic waves leads to testable predictions in both storm-time radiation belt plasmas and the solar wind turbulent spectrum at scales below the ion gyroradius. In the radiation belts, VLF waves (with frequencies between the ion and electron gyrofrequencies) of sufficient amplitude may be nonlinearly scattered near the lower-hybrid surface inside the plasmasphere. Upon scattering a portion of these waves can return to the ionosphere where they may be reflected. This process can lead to the formation of a VLF wave cavity [1] that can efficiently resonate with the energetic (MeV) trapped electron population and quickly precipitate these particles into the ionosphere [2]. In the solar wind, the large-scale Alfvenic fluctuations can be shown to lead to a plateau in the electron distribution function that reduces the Landau damping of kinetic Alfven waves (KaWs). With the reduction of the linear damping the NL scattering of KAWs becomes important and leads to a non-local redistribution of energy in k-space and results in a steeper turbulent spectrum [3]. The edges of the plateaus are also unstable to electromagnetic left hand polarized ion cyclotron-Alfven waves as well as right hand polarized magnetosonic-whistler waves. These waves can pitch angle scatter the ion super-thermal velocity component to provide perpendicular ion heating [4]. [4pt] [1] C. Crabtree, L

  19. Plasma Turbulence in the Local Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven R.

    Turbulence in the Local Bubble could play an important role in the thermodynamics of the gas that is there. This turbulence could also determine the transport of cosmic rays and perhaps heat flow through this phase of the interstellar medium. The best astronomical technique for measuring turbulence in astrophysical plasmas is radio scintillation. Scintillation measurements yield information on the intensity and spectral characteristics of plasma turbulence between the source of the radio waves and the observer. Measurements of the level of scattering to the nearby pulsar B0950+08 by Philips and Clegg in 1992 showed a markedly lower value for the line-of-sight averaged turbulent intensity parameter than is observed for other pulsars, qualitatively consistent with radio wave propagation through a highly rarefied plasma. In this paper, we discuss the observational progress that has been made since that time. The main development has been improved measurements of pulsar parallaxes with the Very Long Baseline Array. This provides better knowledge of the media along the lines of sight. At present, there are four pulsars (B0950+08, B1133+16, J0437-4715, and B0809+74) whose lines of sight seem to lie mainly within the local bubble. The mean densities and line of sight components of the interstellar magnetic field along these lines of sight are smaller than nominal values for pulsars, but not by as large a factor as might be expected. Three of the four pulsars also have measurements of interstellar scintillation. The value of the parameter is smaller than normal for two of them, but is completely nominal for the third. This inconclusive status of affairs could be improved by measurements and analysis of "arcs" in "secondary spectra" of pulsars, which contain information on the location and intensity of localized screens of turbulence along the lines of sight. Similar data could be obtained from observations of highly compact extragalactic radio sources

  20. Plasma Turbulence in the Local Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven R.

    2009-03-01

    Turbulence in the Local Bubble could play an important role in the thermodynamics of the gas that is there. This turbulence could also determine the transport of cosmic rays and perhaps heat flow through this phase of the interstellar medium. The best astronomical technique for measuring turbulence in astrophysical plasmas is radio scintillation. Scintillation measurements yield information on the intensity and spectral characteristics of plasma turbulence between the source of the radio waves and the observer. Measurements of the level of scattering to the nearby pulsar B0950+08 by Philips and Clegg in 1992 showed a markedly lower value for the line-of-sight averaged turbulent intensity parameter < C {/N 2}> than is observed for other pulsars, qualitatively consistent with radio wave propagation through a highly rarefied plasma. In this paper, we discuss the observational progress that has been made since that time. The main development has been improved measurements of pulsar parallaxes with the Very Long Baseline Array. This provides better knowledge of the media along the lines of sight. At present, there are four pulsars (B0950+08, B1133+16, J0437-4715, and B0809+74) whose lines of sight seem to lie mainly within the local bubble. The mean densities and line of sight components of the interstellar magnetic field along these lines of sight are smaller than nominal values for pulsars, but not by as large a factor as might be expected. Three of the four pulsars also have measurements of interstellar scintillation. The value of the parameter < C {/N 2}> is smaller than normal for two of them, but is completely nominal for the third. This inconclusive status of affairs could be improved by measurements and analysis of “arcs” in “secondary spectra” of pulsars, which contain information on the location and intensity of localized screens of turbulence along the lines of sight. Similar data could be obtained from observations of highly compact extragalactic

  1. Approaching the investigation of plasma turbulence through a rigorous verification and validation procedure: A practical example

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, P. Riva, F.; Theiler, C.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Halpern, F. D.; Loizu, J.

    2015-05-15

    In the present work, a Verification and Validation procedure is presented and applied showing, through a practical example, how it can contribute to advancing our physics understanding of plasma turbulence. Bridging the gap between plasma physics and other scientific domains, in particular, the computational fluid dynamics community, a rigorous methodology for the verification of a plasma simulation code is presented, based on the method of manufactured solutions. This methodology assesses that the model equations are correctly solved, within the order of accuracy of the numerical scheme. The technique to carry out a solution verification is described to provide a rigorous estimate of the uncertainty affecting the numerical results. A methodology for plasma turbulence code validation is also discussed, focusing on quantitative assessment of the agreement between experiments and simulations. The Verification and Validation methodology is then applied to the study of plasma turbulence in the basic plasma physics experiment TORPEX [Fasoli et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 055902 (2006)], considering both two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations carried out with the GBS code [Ricci et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 124047 (2012)]. The validation procedure allows progress in the understanding of the turbulent dynamics in TORPEX, by pinpointing the presence of a turbulent regime transition, due to the competition between the resistive and ideal interchange instabilities.

  2. Stellarator approach to fusion plasma confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The stellarator is a toroidal fusion plasma confinement device with nested magnetic flux surfaces. The required twist of the field lines is produced by external helical coils rather than by plasma current, as in a tokamak. Stellarator devices are attractive fusion reactor candidates precisely because they offer the prospect of steady-state operation without plasma current. In the last few years the excellent results achieved with currentless stellarator plasmas of modest minor radius (10 to 20 cm) at Kyoto University (Japan) and the Max Planck Institute (West Germany) have made the stellarator second only to the tokamak in its progress toward fusion breakeven, with temperatures T/sub e/, T/sub i/ approx. 1 KeV, Lawson products n tau approx. 2 to 5 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/.s, and volume-averaged beta values approx. = 2%. The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF), now under construction at Oak Ridge Natioal Laboratory (ORNL) and scheduled to operate in 1986, represents a significant advance in stellarator research, with a plasma major radius of 2.1 m, an average minor radius of 0.3 m, and a magnetic field of 2 T for 5 s or 1 T at steady state. ATF replaces the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at ORNL and will use the ISX-B heating and diagnostic system.

  3. Fusion Reaction Rate in an Inhomogeneous Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    S. Son; N.J. Fisch

    2004-09-03

    The local fusion rate, obtained from the assumption that the distribution is a local Maxwellian, is inaccurate if mean-free-paths of fusing particles are not sufficiently small compared with the inhomogeneity length of the plasma. We calculate the first order correction of P0 in terms of the small spatial gradient and obtain a non-local modification of P(sub)0 in a shock region when the gradient is not small. Use is made of the fact that the fusion reaction cross section has a relatively sharp peak as a function of energy.

  4. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Lee, Michael; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For practical applications of magnetized target fusion, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Quasi-spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a quasi-spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC). Theoretical analysis and computer modeling of the concept are presented. It is shown that, with the appropriate choice of the flow parameters in the liner and the target, the impact between the liner and the target plasma can be made to be shockless in the liner or to generate at most a very weak shock in the liner. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Lee, Michael; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For practical applications of magnetized target fusion, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Quasi-spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a quasi-spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC). Theoretical analysis and computer modeling of the concept are presented. It is shown that, with the appropriate choice of the flow parameters in the liner and the target, the impact between the liner and the target plasma can be made to be shockless in the liner or to generate at most a very weak shock in the liner. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Plasma flow, turbulence and magnetic islands in TJ-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, T.; Ascasíbar, E.; Blanco, E.; Cappa, A.; Hidalgo, C.; Ida, K.; López-Fraguas, A.; van Milligen, B. Ph

    2016-02-01

    The effect of magnetic islands on plasma flow and turbulence has been experimentally investigated in ohmically induced magnetic configuration scans at the stellarator TJ-II. This operational mode allows sweeping the radial position of a low order rational surface from the plasma core towards the edge in a controlled way, what reveals effects that are difficult to notice in scans performed on a shot to shot basis. The main diagnostic used in the present work is a two-channel Doppler reflectometer that allows the measurement of the perpendicular rotation velocity of the turbulence and density fluctuations with good spatial and temporal resolution. A characteristic signature of the n/m  =  3/2 magnetic island as it crosses the measurement position is clearly detected: the perpendicular flow reverses at the center of the magnetic island and a flow shear develops at the island boundaries. Fluctuations of the perpendicular flow and density have been also measured along the 3/2 magnetic island. An increase in the low frequency flow oscillations is measured at the magnetic island boundaries together with a reduction in the density fluctuation level; the later being more pronounced at the inner island boundary. These observations could explain the link between magnetic islands and transport barriers observed in a number of fusion devices.

  7. Generation of a magnetic island by edge turbulence in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Poyé, A.; Agullo, O.; Muraglia, M.; Benkadda, S.; Dubuit, N.; Garbet, X.; Sen, A.

    2015-03-15

    We investigate, through extensive 3D magneto-hydro-dynamics numerical simulations, the nonlinear excitation of a large scale magnetic island and its dynamical properties due to the presence of small-scale turbulence. Turbulence is induced by a steep pressure gradient in the edge region [B. D. Scott, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 49, S25 (2007)], close to the separatrix in tokamaks where there is an X-point magnetic configuration. We find that quasi-resonant localized interchange modes at the plasma edge can beat together and produce extended modes that transfer energy to the lowest order resonant surface in an inner stable zone and induce a seed magnetic island. The island width displays high frequency fluctuations that are associated with the fluctuating nature of the energy transfer process from the turbulence, while its mean size is controlled by the magnetic energy content of the turbulence.

  8. Space plasma turbulent dissipation - Reality or myth?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1985-01-01

    A prevalent approach to understanding magnetospheric dynamics is to combine a hydromagnetic description of the large scale magnetic structure and convection flows with a locally determined anomalous dissipation which develops in boundary layers. Three problems (nose and tail reconnection, auroral field-aligned currents, and diffuse auroral precipitation) are critically examined to test the validity of this theoretical philosophy. Although the expected plasma wave turbulence is observed for each case, the concept of local anomalous dissipation fails to provide an adequate or complete description of the phenomenae.

  9. Development of the Megahertz Planar Laser-induced Fluorescence Diagnostic for Plasma Turbulence Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksey Kuritsyn; Fred M. Levinton

    2004-04-27

    A megahertz LIF-based diagnostic system for measuring ion density fluctuations in two spatial dimensions is described. Well resolved spatial and temporal 2D images of turbulent structures will be useful in understanding ion turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas which is a key factor in the performance of fusion experimental devices. A sheet beam of a megahertz repetition rate tunable Alexandrite laser is used to excite ion emission from argon plasma. The fluorescence emitted from the plane of the laser beam is detected with a narrow band interference filter and intensified ultra-fast CCD camera providing 2D images of relative ion density fluctuations every microsecond. It is expected that the edge plasma on fusion devices will be accessible to this technique.

  10. Development of the megahertz planar laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic for plasma turbulence visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Kuritsyn, Aleksey; Levinton, Fred M.

    2004-10-01

    A megahertz laser-induced fluorescence-based diagnostic system for measuring ion density fluctuations in two spatial dimensions is described. Well resolved spatial and temporal two-dimensional (2D) images of turbulent structures will be useful in understanding ion turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas which is a key factor in the performance of fusion experimental devices. A sheet beam of a megahertz repetition rate tunable Alexandrite laser is used to excite ion emission from argon plasma. The fluorescence emitted from the plane of the laser beam is detected with a narrow band interference filter and intensified ultrafast charge coupled device camera providing 2D images of relative ion density fluctuations every microsecond. It is expected that the edge plasma on fusion devices will be accessible to this technique.

  11. Development of the megahertz planar laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic for plasma turbulence visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuritsyn, Aleksey; Levinton, Fred M.

    2004-10-01

    A megahertz laser-induced fluorescence-based diagnostic system for measuring ion density fluctuations in two spatial dimensions is described. Well resolved spatial and temporal two-dimensional (2D) images of turbulent structures will be useful in understanding ion turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas which is a key factor in the performance of fusion experimental devices. A sheet beam of a megahertz repetition rate tunable Alexandrite laser is used to excite ion emission from argon plasma. The fluorescence emitted from the plane of the laser beam is detected with a narrow band interference filter and intensified ultrafast charge coupled device camera providing 2D images of relative ion density fluctuations every microsecond. It is expected that the edge plasma on fusion devices will be accessible to this technique.

  12. Weak turbulence theory for collisional plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, P. H.; Ziebell, L. F.; Kontar, E. P.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2016-03-01

    Plasma is an ionized gas in which the collective behavior dominates over the individual particle interactions. For this reason, plasma is often treated as collisionless or collision-free. However, the discrete nature of the particles can be important, and often, the description of plasmas is incomplete without properly taking the discrete particle effects into account. The weak turbulence theory is a perturbative nonlinear theory, whose essential formalism was developed in the late 1950s and 1960s and continued on through the early 1980s. However, the standard material found in the literature does not treat the discrete particle effects and the associated fluctuations emitted spontaneously by thermal particles completely. Plasma particles emit electromagnetic fluctuations in all frequencies and wave vectors, but in the standard literature, the fluctuations are approximately treated by considering only those frequency-wave number regimes corresponding to the eigenmodes (or normal modes) satisfying the dispersion relations, while ignoring contributions from noneigenmodes. The present paper shows that the noneigenmode fluctuations modify the particle kinetic equation so that the generalized equation includes the Balescu-Lénard-Landau collision integral and also modify the wave kinetic equation to include not only the collisional damping term but also a term that depicts the bremsstrahlung emission of plasma normal modes.

  13. Weak turbulence theory for collisional plasmas.

    PubMed

    Yoon, P H; Ziebell, L F; Kontar, E P; Schlickeiser, R

    2016-03-01

    Plasma is an ionized gas in which the collective behavior dominates over the individual particle interactions. For this reason, plasma is often treated as collisionless or collision-free. However, the discrete nature of the particles can be important, and often, the description of plasmas is incomplete without properly taking the discrete particle effects into account. The weak turbulence theory is a perturbative nonlinear theory, whose essential formalism was developed in the late 1950s and 1960s and continued on through the early 1980s. However, the standard material found in the literature does not treat the discrete particle effects and the associated fluctuations emitted spontaneously by thermal particles completely. Plasma particles emit electromagnetic fluctuations in all frequencies and wave vectors, but in the standard literature, the fluctuations are approximately treated by considering only those frequency-wave number regimes corresponding to the eigenmodes (or normal modes) satisfying the dispersion relations, while ignoring contributions from noneigenmodes. The present paper shows that the noneigenmode fluctuations modify the particle kinetic equation so that the generalized equation includes the Balescu-Lénard-Landau collision integral and also modify the wave kinetic equation to include not only the collisional damping term but also a term that depicts the bremsstrahlung emission of plasma normal modes.

  14. Thomson Scattering of Plasma Turbulence in PSI-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubeny, Michael; Schweer, Bernd; Luggenhölscher, Dirk; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Unterberg, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    Linear plasma devices are widely used to study fundamental plasma characteristics and to simulate particle and heat loads representing first wall/divertor conditions of fusion reactors. In high power discharges at PSI-2 the plasma edge exhibits turbulence with intermittent transport events. The combination of Thomson Scattering by a photon counting method and a fast framing CMOS camera in conjunction with conditional averaging gives access to the evolution of density and temperature profiles during transient plasma dynamics. Radial density and temperature profiles in Ar, D2, He and Ne discharges were measured and compared with existing diagnostics. In high power, low gas-feed Argon discharges the dominating m=1 rotation was found to correspond to a 20% Te fluctuation amplitude around the temporal mean at the profile maxima. In the edge of D2 discharges transients are selected by conditional averaging and a significant temperature increase was found in the edge of TS profiles upon ejection accompanied by a 20% drop in bulk density.

  15. Gyrokinetic continuum simulation of turbulence in a straight open-field-line plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, E. L.; Hammett, G. W.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; ...

    2017-05-29

    Here, five-dimensional gyrokinetic continuum simulations of electrostatic plasma turbulence in a straight, open-field-line geometry have been performed using a full- discontinuous-Galerkin approach implemented in the Gkeyll code. While various simplifications have been used for now, such as long-wavelength approximations in the gyrokinetic Poisson equation and the Hamiltonian, these simulations include the basic elements of a fusion-device scrape-off layer: localised sources to model plasma outflow from the core, cross-field turbulent transport, parallel flow along magnetic field lines, and parallel losses at the limiter or divertor with sheath-model boundary conditions. The set of sheath-model boundary conditions used in the model allows currentsmore » to flow through the walls. In addition to details of the numerical approach, results from numerical simulations of turbulence in the Large Plasma Device, a linear device featuring straight magnetic field lines, are presented.« less

  16. Gyrokinetic continuum simulation of turbulence in a straight open-field-line plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, E. L.; Hammett, G. W.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Hakim, A.

    2017-06-01

    Five-dimensional gyrokinetic continuum simulations of electrostatic plasma turbulence in a straight, open-field-line geometry have been performed using a full- discontinuous-Galerkin approach implemented in the Gkeyll code. While various simplifications have been used for now, such as long-wavelength approximations in the gyrokinetic Poisson equation and the Hamiltonian, these simulations include the basic elements of a fusion-device scrape-off layer: localised sources to model plasma outflow from the core, cross-field turbulent transport, parallel flow along magnetic field lines, and parallel losses at the limiter or divertor with sheath-model boundary conditions. The set of sheath-model boundary conditions used in the model allows currents to flow through the walls. In addition to details of the numerical approach, results from numerical simulations of turbulence in the Large Plasma Device, a linear device featuring straight magnetic field lines, are presented.

  17. Inertial fusion features in degenerate plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Pablo T.; Eliezer, Shalom; Piera, Mireia; Martínez-Val, José M.

    2005-04-01

    Very high plasma densities can be obtained at the end of the implosion phase in inertial fusion targets, particularly in the so-called fast-ignition scheme (Tabak et al., 1994; Mulser & Bauer, 2004), where a central hot spark is not needed at all. By properly tailoring the fuel compression stage, degenerate states can be reached (Azechi et al., 1991; Nakai et al., 1991; McCory, 1998). In that case, most of the relevant energy transfer mechanisms involving electrons are affected (Honrubia & Tikhonchuk, 2004; Bibi & Matte, 2004; Bibi et al., 2004). For instance, bremsstrahlung emission is highly suppressed (Eliezer et al., 2003). In fact, a low ignition-temperature regime appears at very high plasma densities, due to radiation leakage reduction (León et al., 2001). Stopping power and ion-electron coulomb collisions are also changed in this case, which are important mechanisms to trigger ignition by the incoming fast jet, and to launch the fusion wave from the igniting region into the colder, degenerate plasma. All these points are reviewed in this paper. Although degenerate states would not be easy to obtain by target implosion, they present a very interesting upper limit that deserves more attention in order to complete the understanding on the different domains for inertial confinement fusion.

  18. The development of magnetic field line wander in gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: dependence on amplitude of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourouaine, Sofiane; Howes, Gregory G.

    2017-06-01

    The dynamics of a turbulent plasma not only manifests the transport of energy from large to small scales, but also can lead to a tangling of the magnetic field that threads through the plasma. The resulting magnetic field line wander can have a large impact on a number of other important processes, such as the propagation of energetic particles through the turbulent plasma. Here we explore the saturation of the turbulent cascade, the development of stochasticity due to turbulent tangling of the magnetic field lines and the separation of field lines through the turbulent dynamics using nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of weakly collisional plasma turbulence, relevant to many turbulent space and astrophysical plasma environments. We determine the characteristic time 2$ for the saturation of the turbulent perpendicular magnetic energy spectrum. We find that the turbulent magnetic field becomes completely stochastic at time 2$ for strong turbulence, and at 2$ for weak turbulence. However, when the nonlinearity parameter of the turbulence, a dimensionless measure of the amplitude of the turbulence, reaches a threshold value (within the regime of weak turbulence) the magnetic field stochasticity does not fully develop, at least within the evolution time interval 22$ . Finally, we quantify the mean square displacement of magnetic field lines in the turbulent magnetic field with a functional form 2\\rangle =A(z/L\\Vert )p$ ( \\Vert $ is the correlation length parallel to the magnetic background field \\mathbf{0}$ , is the distance along \\mathbf{0}$ direction), providing functional forms of the amplitude coefficient and power-law exponent as a function of the nonlinearity parameter.

  19. The transport anisotropy effect in a turbulent plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychenkov, V. Iu.; Gradov, O. M.; Silin, V. P.

    1982-12-01

    The theory of transport phenomena in a plasma with developed ion-acoustic turbulence is formulated. The transport anisotropy effect, caused by a temperature gradient, is observed. The corresponding fluxes across the effective force vector which generates the turbulence are substantially larger than longitudinal fluxes in a plasma with a comparatively low degree of nonisothermality. In a strongly nonisothermal plasma, the suppression of transverse fluxes occurs, corresponding to an increase in the thermal insulation of current-carrying plasma columns.

  20. Turbulence and atomic physics in magnetically confined plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marandet, Y.; Bufferand, H.; Ciraolo, G.; Nace, N.; Serre, E.; Tamain, P.; Valentinuzzi, M.

    2017-03-01

    An overview of issues related to the interplay between atomic process and turbulence in the peripheral regions of magnetically confined fusion devices is presented. Both atomic processes and turbulence play key roles for fusion, but have most of the time been treated separately. The effects of fluctuations on the time averaged ionization balance, on the transport of neutral particles (atoms and molecules) are discussed, using stochastic models to generate fluctuations with statistically relevant properties. Then applications to optical diagnostics of turbulence, namely gas puff imaging and beam emission spectroscopy are discussed.

  1. Characterization of radial turbulent fluxes in the Santander linear plasma machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mier, J. A.; Sánchez, R.; Newman, D. E.; Castellanos, O. F.; Anabitarte, E.; Sentíes, J. M.; van Milligen, B. Ph.

    2014-05-01

    It is shown that the statistical and correlation properties of the local turbulent flux measured at different radial locations of the cold, weakly ionized plasmas inside the Santander Linear Plasma Machine [Castellanos et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 47, 2067 (2005)] are consistent with diffusive-like transport dynamics. This is in contrast to the dynamical behavior inferred from similar measurements taken in hotter, fully ionized tokamak and stellarator edge plasmas, in which long-term correlations and other features characteristic of complex, non-diffusive transport dynamics have been reported in the past. These results may shed some light on a recent controversy regarding the possible universality of the dynamics of turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas.

  2. Characterization of radial turbulent fluxes in the Santander linear plasma machine

    SciTech Connect

    Mier, J. A. Anabitarte, E.; Sentíes, J. M.; Sánchez, R.; Newman, D. E.; Castellanos, O. F.; Milligen, B. Ph. van

    2014-05-15

    It is shown that the statistical and correlation properties of the local turbulent flux measured at different radial locations of the cold, weakly ionized plasmas inside the Santander Linear Plasma Machine [Castellanos et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 47, 2067 (2005)] are consistent with diffusive-like transport dynamics. This is in contrast to the dynamical behavior inferred from similar measurements taken in hotter, fully ionized tokamak and stellarator edge plasmas, in which long-term correlations and other features characteristic of complex, non-diffusive transport dynamics have been reported in the past. These results may shed some light on a recent controversy regarding the possible universality of the dynamics of turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas.

  3. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  4. Measuring plasma turbulence using low coherence microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. R.

    2012-02-20

    Low coherence backscattering (LCBS) is a proposed diagnostic technique for measuring plasma turbulence and fluctuations. LCBS is an adaptation of optical coherence tomography, a biomedical imaging technique. Calculations and simulations show LCBS measurements can achieve centimeter-scale spatial resolution using low coherence microwave radiation. LCBS measurements exhibit several advantages over standard plasma turbulence measurement techniques including immunity to spurious reflections and measurement access in hollow density profiles. Also, LCBS is scalable for 1-D profile measurements and 2-D turbulence imaging.

  5. Suppressed ion-scale turbulence in a hot high-β plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, L.; Fulton, D. P.; Ruskov, E.; Lau, C.; Deng, B. H.; Tajima, T.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Holod, I.; Lin, Z.; Gota, H.; Tuszewski, M.; Dettrick, S. A.; Steinhauer, L. C.

    2016-12-01

    An economic magnetic fusion reactor favours a high ratio of plasma kinetic pressure to magnetic pressure in a well-confined, hot plasma with low thermal losses across the confining magnetic field. Field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas are potentially attractive as a reactor concept, achieving high plasma pressure in a simple axisymmetric geometry. Here, we show that FRC plasmas have unique, beneficial microstability properties that differ from typical regimes in toroidal confinement devices. Ion-scale fluctuations are found to be absent or strongly suppressed in the plasma core, mainly due to the large FRC ion orbits, resulting in near-classical thermal ion confinement. In the surrounding boundary layer plasma, ion- and electron-scale turbulence is observed once a critical pressure gradient is exceeded. The critical gradient increases in the presence of sheared plasma flow induced via electrostatic biasing, opening the prospect of active boundary and transport control in view of reactor requirements.

  6. Suppressed ion-scale turbulence in a hot high-β plasma.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, L; Fulton, D P; Ruskov, E; Lau, C; Deng, B H; Tajima, T; Binderbauer, M W; Holod, I; Lin, Z; Gota, H; Tuszewski, M; Dettrick, S A; Steinhauer, L C

    2016-12-21

    An economic magnetic fusion reactor favours a high ratio of plasma kinetic pressure to magnetic pressure in a well-confined, hot plasma with low thermal losses across the confining magnetic field. Field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas are potentially attractive as a reactor concept, achieving high plasma pressure in a simple axisymmetric geometry. Here, we show that FRC plasmas have unique, beneficial microstability properties that differ from typical regimes in toroidal confinement devices. Ion-scale fluctuations are found to be absent or strongly suppressed in the plasma core, mainly due to the large FRC ion orbits, resulting in near-classical thermal ion confinement. In the surrounding boundary layer plasma, ion- and electron-scale turbulence is observed once a critical pressure gradient is exceeded. The critical gradient increases in the presence of sheared plasma flow induced via electrostatic biasing, opening the prospect of active boundary and transport control in view of reactor requirements.

  7. Suppressed ion-scale turbulence in a hot high-β plasma

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, L.; Fulton, D. P.; Ruskov, E.; Lau, C.; Deng, B. H.; Tajima, T.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Holod, I.; Lin, Z.; Gota, H.; Tuszewski, M.; Dettrick, S. A.; Steinhauer, L. C.

    2016-01-01

    An economic magnetic fusion reactor favours a high ratio of plasma kinetic pressure to magnetic pressure in a well-confined, hot plasma with low thermal losses across the confining magnetic field. Field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas are potentially attractive as a reactor concept, achieving high plasma pressure in a simple axisymmetric geometry. Here, we show that FRC plasmas have unique, beneficial microstability properties that differ from typical regimes in toroidal confinement devices. Ion-scale fluctuations are found to be absent or strongly suppressed in the plasma core, mainly due to the large FRC ion orbits, resulting in near-classical thermal ion confinement. In the surrounding boundary layer plasma, ion- and electron-scale turbulence is observed once a critical pressure gradient is exceeded. The critical gradient increases in the presence of sheared plasma flow induced via electrostatic biasing, opening the prospect of active boundary and transport control in view of reactor requirements. PMID:28000675

  8. Numerical Studies of Impurities in Fusion Plasmas

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Hulse, R. A.

    1982-09-01

    The coupled partial differential equations used to describe the behavior of impurity ions in magnetically confined controlled fusion plasmas require numerical solution for cases of practical interest. Computer codes developed for impurity modeling at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are used as examples of the types of codes employed for this purpose. These codes solve for the impurity ionization state densities and associated radiation rates using atomic physics appropriate for these low-density, high-temperature plasmas. The simpler codes solve local equations in zero spatial dimensions while more complex cases require codes which explicitly include transport of the impurity ions simultaneously with the atomic processes of ionization and recombination. Typical applications are discussed and computational results are presented for selected cases of interest.

  9. Synthetic diagnostics platform for fusion plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, L.; Valeo, E. J.; Tobias, B. J.; Kramer, G. J.; Hausammann, L.; Tang, W. M.; Chen, M.

    2016-08-26

    A Synthetic Diagnostics Platform (SDP) for fusion plasmas has been developed which provides state of the art synthetic reflectometry, beam emission spectroscopy, and Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) diagnostics. Interfaces to the plasma simulation codes GTC, XGC-1, GTS, and M3D-C-1 are provided, enabling detailed validation of these codes. In this paper, we give an overview of SDP's capabilities, and introduce the synthetic diagnostic modules. A recently developed synthetic ECE Imaging module which self-consistently includes refraction, diffraction, emission, and absorption effects is discussed in detail. Its capabilities are demonstrated on two model plasmas. Finally, the importance of synthetic diagnostics in validation is shown by applying the SDP to M3D-C1 output and comparing it with measurements from an edge harmonic oscillation mode on DIII-D.

  10. Synthetic diagnostics platform for fusion plasmas (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, L.; Valeo, E. J.; Tobias, B. J.; Kramer, G. J.; Hausammann, L.; Tang, W. M.; Chen, M.

    2016-11-01

    A Synthetic Diagnostics Platform (SDP) for fusion plasmas has been developed which provides state of the art synthetic reflectometry, beam emission spectroscopy, and Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) diagnostics. Interfaces to the plasma simulation codes GTC, XGC-1, GTS, and M3D-C1 are provided, enabling detailed validation of these codes. In this paper, we give an overview of SDP's capabilities, and introduce the synthetic diagnostic modules. A recently developed synthetic ECE Imaging module which self-consistently includes refraction, diffraction, emission, and absorption effects is discussed in detail. Its capabilities are demonstrated on two model plasmas. The importance of synthetic diagnostics in validation is shown by applying the SDP to M3D-C1 output and comparing it with measurements from an edge harmonic oscillation mode on DIII-D.

  11. Synthetic diagnostics platform for fusion plasmas (invited)

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, L.; Valeo, E. J.; Tobias, B. J.; ...

    2016-08-26

    A Synthetic Diagnostics Platform (SDP) for fusion plasmas has been developed which provides state of the art synthetic reflectometry, beam emission spectroscopy, and Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) diagnostics. Interfaces to the plasma simulation codes GTC, XGC-1, GTS, and M3D-C-1 are provided, enabling detailed validation of these codes. In this paper, we give an overview of SDP's capabilities, and introduce the synthetic diagnostic modules. A recently developed synthetic ECE Imaging module which self-consistently includes refraction, diffraction, emission, and absorption effects is discussed in detail. Its capabilities are demonstrated on two model plasmas. Finally, the importance of synthetic diagnostics in validation ismore » shown by applying the SDP to M3D-C1 output and comparing it with measurements from an edge harmonic oscillation mode on DIII-D.« less

  12. Synthetic diagnostics platform for fusion plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, L. Valeo, E. J.; Tobias, B. J.; Kramer, G. J.; Hausammann, L.; Tang, W. M.; Chen, M.

    2016-11-15

    A Synthetic Diagnostics Platform (SDP) for fusion plasmas has been developed which provides state of the art synthetic reflectometry, beam emission spectroscopy, and Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) diagnostics. Interfaces to the plasma simulation codes GTC, XGC-1, GTS, and M3D-C{sup 1} are provided, enabling detailed validation of these codes. In this paper, we give an overview of SDP’s capabilities, and introduce the synthetic diagnostic modules. A recently developed synthetic ECE Imaging module which self-consistently includes refraction, diffraction, emission, and absorption effects is discussed in detail. Its capabilities are demonstrated on two model plasmas. The importance of synthetic diagnostics in validation is shown by applying the SDP to M3D-C{sup 1} output and comparing it with measurements from an edge harmonic oscillation mode on DIII-D.

  13. Synthetic diagnostics platform for fusion plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, L.; Valeo, E. J.; Tobias, B. J.; Kramer, G. J.; Hausammann, L.; Tang, W. M.; Chen, M.

    2016-08-26

    A Synthetic Diagnostics Platform (SDP) for fusion plasmas has been developed which provides state of the art synthetic reflectometry, beam emission spectroscopy, and Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) diagnostics. Interfaces to the plasma simulation codes GTC, XGC-1, GTS, and M3D-C-1 are provided, enabling detailed validation of these codes. In this paper, we give an overview of SDP's capabilities, and introduce the synthetic diagnostic modules. A recently developed synthetic ECE Imaging module which self-consistently includes refraction, diffraction, emission, and absorption effects is discussed in detail. Its capabilities are demonstrated on two model plasmas. Finally, the importance of synthetic diagnostics in validation is shown by applying the SDP to M3D-C1 output and comparing it with measurements from an edge harmonic oscillation mode on DIII-D.

  14. Effects of Plasma Shaping on Nonlinear Gyrokinetic Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    E. A. Belli; Hammett, G. W.; Dorland, W.

    2008-08-01

    The effects of flux surface shape on the gyrokinetic stability and transport of tokamak plasmas are studied using the GS2 code [M. Kotschenreuther, G. Rewoldt, and W.M. Tang, Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995); W. Dorland, F. Jenko, M. Kotschenreuther, and B.N. Rogers, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5579 (2000)]. Studies of the scaling of nonlinear turbulence with shaping parameters are performed using analytic equilibria based on interpolations of representative shapes of the Joint European Torus (JET) [P.H. Rebut and B.E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)]. High shaping is found to be a stabilizing influence on both the linear ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) instability and the nonlinear ITG turbulence. For the parameter regime studied here, a scaling of the heat flux with elongation of χ ~ κ-1.5 or κ-2.0, depending on the triangularity, is observed at fixed average temperature gradient. While this is not as strong as empirical elongation scalings, it is also found that high shaping results in a larger Dimits upshift of the nonlinear critical temperature gradient due to an enhancement of the Rosenbluth-Hinton residual zonal flows.

  15. Charged-particle transport in turbulent astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, C. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of electromagnetic fluctuations, or plasma turbulence, on the motion of the individual particles in a plasma is investigated. Two alternative methods are used to find a general equation governing the time-evolution of a distribution of charged particles subject to both an external force field and the random fields of the fluctuations. It is found that, for the high-temperature, low-density plasmas frequently encountered in the study of astrophysics, the presence of even a small amount of turbulence can have a very important effect on the behavior of the plasma. Two problems in which turbulence plays an important role are treated.

  16. Optical imaging diagnostics for fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.L.

    1988-04-01

    Imaging diagnostics are used for spatially/emdash/and temporally/emdash/resolved quantitative measurements of plasma properties such as the ionization particle source, particle and energy loss, and impurity radiation in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Diagnostics equipped with multi-element solid-state detectors (often with image intensifiers) are well suited to the environment of large fusion machines with high magnetic field and x-ray and neutron fluxes. We have both conventional (16msframe) and highspeed video cameras to measure neutral deuterium H/sub ..cap alpha../ (6563 /angstrom/) emissions from fusion plasmas. Continuous high-speed measurements are made with video cameras operating at 0.1 to 0.5 msframe; gated cameras provide snapshots of 10 to 100 ..mu..s during each 16-ms video frame. Digital data acquisition and absolute intensity calibrations of the cameras enable detailed quantitative source measurements: these are extremely important in determining the particle balance of the plasma. In a liner confinement device, radial transport can be determined from the total particle balance. In a toroidal confinement device, the details of particle recycling can be determined. Optical imaging in other regions of the spectrum are also important, particularly for the diverter region of large tokamaks. Absolutely calibrated infrared cameras have been used to image to temperature changes in the wall and thereby determine the heat flux. Absolutely calibrated imaging ultraviolet spectrometers measure impurity concentrations; both spatial and spectral imaging instruments are employed. Representative data from each of these diagnostic systems will be presented. 16 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Turbulence-inspired fusion methods for ocean remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbert, M.; Hoareau, N.; Turiel, A.; Ballabrera, J.; Portabella, M.

    2012-04-01

    New techniques for analyzing the structure of remote sensing maps of ocean variables have been developed during recent years [Turiel et al., 2008, and references therein]. These techniques have been designed in the framework of the Multifractal Microcanonical Formalism (MMF), and are appropriate for dealing with scalars submitted to the action of a turbulent flow (in this case, we are considering horizontal, quasi-geostrophic turbulence). Scalars submitted to the action of a turbulent flow develop a complex, intermittent structure: a multifractal hierarchy. The multifractal hierarchy can be evidenced by different means. The classical approach is to study global scaling properties by means of the scaling exponents of the structure functions. A different approach consists of calculating the scaling exponents at each point of the scalar. In the later case, the exponents are called singularity exponents and they are dimensionless measures of the regularity or irregularity of the function at each point. Singularity exponents arise due to differential shear in the flow, and thus they are characteristic to the velocity field, but not to the advected scalar. Experiments with data from numerical simulations and from remote sensing sensors show that singularity exponents are almost independent of the scalar and related to the flow structure: singularity lines align with streamlines. This implies that a part of any scalar signal is common to all other scalars: the common part defines its multifractal structure. Exploiting the redundancy (among different scalars) of the multifractal structure, we have derived a theoretical relation that can be used in data fusion without using any other information. We have applied this relation to fuse microwave SST data with SMOS SSS maps to produce enhanced SSS maps. This technique can also be used to different goals as data assimilation in numerical models, filter noise in low-level remote sensing data, and in completing data series of

  18. Penetration Factor for Nuclear Fusion Reaction in Nonthermal Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ki, Dai-Han; Jung, Young-Dae

    2011-02-01

    The nonthermal effects on the nuclear fusion reaction process are investigated in Lorentzian astrophysical plasmas. The closed expression of the classical turning point in Lorentzian plasmas is obtained by the Lambert W-function. Using the WKB analysis with the effective screening length, the closed expressions of the fusion penetration factor and the cross section for the nuclear fusion reaction in Lorentzian plasmas are obtained as functions of the spectral index, relative kinetic energy, and plasma parameters. It is shown that the nonthermal character of the Lorentzian plasma enhances the fusion penetration factor. In addition, the nonthermal effect on the penetration factor is found to be more significant in plasmas with higher densities. It would be expected that the fusion reaction rates of the p-p chain and the CNO cycle in nonthermal plasmas are always greater than those in thermal Maxwellian plasmas.

  19. Simulation of edge-plasma profiles and turbulence related to L-H transitions in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R H; Rognlien, T D; Xu, X Q

    1999-09-21

    Understanding plasma profile evolution and plasma turbulence are two important aspects of developing a predictive model for edge-plasma in tokamaks and other fusion-related devices. Here they describe results relevant to the L-H transition phenomena observed in tokamaks obtained from two simulations codes which emphasize the two aspects of the problem. UEDGE solves for the two-dimensional (2-D) profiles of a multi-species plasma and neutrals given some anomalous cross-field diffusion coefficients, and BOUT solves for the three-dimensional (3-D) turbulence that gives rise to the anomalous diffusion. These two codes are thus complementary in solving different aspects of the edge-plasma transport problem; ultimately, they want to couple the codes so that UEDGE uses BOUT's turbulence transport results, and BOUT uses UEDGE's plasma profiles with a fully automated iteration procedure. This goal is beyond the present paper; here they show how each aspect of the problem, i.e., profiles and turbulent transport, can contribute to L-H type transitions.

  20. Particle pinch and collisionality in gyrokinetic simulations of tokamak plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Angioni, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.; Fable, E.; Maslov, M.; Weisen, H.; Peeters, A. G.

    2009-06-15

    The generic problem of how, in a turbulent plasma, the experimentally relevant conditions of a particle flux very close to the null are achieved, despite the presence of strong heat fluxes, is addressed. Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of plasma turbulence in tokamaks reveal a complex dependence of the particle flux as a function of the turbulent spatial scale and of the velocity space as collisionality is increased. At experimental values of collisionality, the particle flux is found close to the null, in agreement with the experiment, due to the balance between inward and outward contributions at small and large scales, respectively. These simulations provide full theoretical support to the prediction of a peaked density profile in a future nuclear fusion reactor.

  1. Wavelet analysis of fusion plasma transients

    SciTech Connect

    Dose, V.; Venus, G.; Zohm, H.

    1997-02-01

    Analysis of transient signals in the diagnostic of fusion plasmas often requires the simultaneous consideration of their time and frequency information. The newly emerging technique of wavelet analysis contains both time and frequency domains. Therefore it can be a valuable tool for the analysis of transients. In this paper the basic method of wavelet analysis is described. As an example, wavelet analysis is applied to the well-known phenomena of mode locking and fishbone instability. The results quantify the current qualitative understanding of these events in terms of instantaneous frequencies and amplitudes and encourage applications of the method to other problems. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. RF plasma heating in toroidal fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Golant, V.E.; Fedorov, V.I. )

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the present book is to provide, in seven chapters, a unified overview of the methods for rf heating of plasmas in toroidal fusion experiments. In Chapter 1 the problem of plasma heating in tokamaks and stellarators is formulated and the requirements for auxiliary heating techniques are described. This chapter also contains a brief review of the results of research on tokamaks and stellarators. Chapter 2 is devoted to a theoretical description of the principal physical effects involved in the rf heating of plasmas, especially the characteristics of wave propagation, of the mechanisms by which waves are absorbed and plasma heating takes place, and of the nonlinear effects that accompany heating. The primary emphasis is on a qualitative physical picture of these effects. Chapters 3-6, in turn, deal with the major rf heating techniques currently under investigation, electron cyclotron (ECH), ion cyclotron (ICH), lower hybrid (LHH), and Alfven wave heating. In each of these chapters the main schemes for heating are described, the results of theoretical analyses and numerical simulations are discussed, the technology of the heating systems is briefly described, and experimental work published through the end of 1984 is reviewed. Finally, in Chapter 7 the different rf heating techniques are compared; they are contrasted with neutral beam injection, and the feasibility of adiabatic compression as a means of heating plasmas is examined. Separate abstracts were prepared for each chapter of this book. 246 refs.

  3. Non-thermal Dupree diffusivity and shielding effects on atomic collisions in Lorentzian turbulent plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-05-01

    The influence of non-thermal Dupree turbulence and the plasma shielding on the electron-ion collision is investigated in Lorentzian turbulent plasmas. The second-order eikonal analysis and the effective interaction potential including the Lorentzian far-field term are employed to obtain the eikonal scattering phase shift and the eikonal collision cross section as functions of the diffusion coefficient, impact parameter, collision energy, Debye length and spectral index of the astrophysical Lorentzian plasma. It is shown that the non-thermal effect suppresses the eikonal scattering phase shift. However, it enhances the eikonal collision cross section in astrophysical non-thermal turbulent plasmas. The effect of non-thermal turbulence on the eikonal atomic collision cross section is weakened with increasing collision energy. The variation of the atomic cross section due to the non-thermal Dupree turbulence is also discussed. This research was supported by Nuclear Fusion Research Program through NRF funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (Grant No. 2015M1A7A1A01002786).

  4. A Concept of Cross-Ferroic Plasma Turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kosuga, Y.; Itoh, S.-I.; Mitsuzono, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Arakawa, H.; Yamada, T.; Miwa, Y.; Kasuya, N.; Sasaki, M.; Lesur, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, K.

    2016-01-01

    The variety of scalar and vector fields in laboratory and nature plasmas is formed by plasma turbulence. Drift-wave fluctuations, driven by density gradients in magnetized plasmas, are known to relax the density gradient while they can generate flows. On the other hand, the sheared flow in the direction of magnetic fields causes Kelvin-Helmholtz type instabilities, which mix particle and momentum. These different types of fluctuations coexist in laboratory and nature, so that the multiple mechanisms for structural formation exist in extremely non-equilibrium plasmas. Here we report the discovery of a new order in plasma turbulence, in which chained structure formation is realized by cross-interaction between inhomogeneities of scalar and vector fields. The concept of cross-ferroic turbulence is developed, and the causal relation in the multiple mechanisms behind structural formation is identified, by measuring the relaxation rate and dissipation power caused by the complex turbulence-driven flux. PMID:26917218

  5. Mass dependency of turbulent parameters in stationary glow discharge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, J. B.; Alexander, A. B.; Wiggins, D. L.; Johnson, J. A. III

    2013-05-15

    A direct current glow discharge tube is used to determine how mass changes the effects of certain turbulence characteristics in a weakly ionized gas. Helium, neon, argon, and krypton plasmas were created, and an axial magnetic field, varied from 0.0 to 550.0 Gauss, was used to enhance mass dependent properties of turbulence. From the power spectra of light emission variations associated with velocity fluctuations, determination of mass dependency on turbulent characteristic unstable modes, energy associated with turbulence, and the rate at which energy is transferred from scale to scale are measured. The magnetic field strength is found to be too weak to overcome particle diffusion to the walls to affect the turbulence in all four types of plasmas, though mass dependency is still detected. Though the total energy and the rate at which the energy moves between scales are mass invariant, the amplitude of the instability modes that characterize each plasma are dependent on mass.

  6. A dynamical model of plasma turbulence in the solar wind

    PubMed Central

    Howes, G. G.

    2015-01-01

    A dynamical approach, rather than the usual statistical approach, is taken to explore the physical mechanisms underlying the nonlinear transfer of energy, the damping of the turbulent fluctuations, and the development of coherent structures in kinetic plasma turbulence. It is argued that the linear and nonlinear dynamics of Alfvén waves are responsible, at a very fundamental level, for some of the key qualitative features of plasma turbulence that distinguish it from hydrodynamic turbulence, including the anisotropic cascade of energy and the development of current sheets at small scales. The first dynamical model of kinetic turbulence in the weakly collisional solar wind plasma that combines self-consistently the physics of Alfvén waves with the development of small-scale current sheets is presented and its physical implications are discussed. This model leads to a simplified perspective on the nature of turbulence in a weakly collisional plasma: the nonlinear interactions responsible for the turbulent cascade of energy and the formation of current sheets are essentially fluid in nature, while the collisionless damping of the turbulent fluctuations and the energy injection by kinetic instabilities are essentially kinetic in nature. PMID:25848075

  7. A dynamical model of plasma turbulence in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Howes, G G

    2015-05-13

    A dynamical approach, rather than the usual statistical approach, is taken to explore the physical mechanisms underlying the nonlinear transfer of energy, the damping of the turbulent fluctuations, and the development of coherent structures in kinetic plasma turbulence. It is argued that the linear and nonlinear dynamics of Alfvén waves are responsible, at a very fundamental level, for some of the key qualitative features of plasma turbulence that distinguish it from hydrodynamic turbulence, including the anisotropic cascade of energy and the development of current sheets at small scales. The first dynamical model of kinetic turbulence in the weakly collisional solar wind plasma that combines self-consistently the physics of Alfvén waves with the development of small-scale current sheets is presented and its physical implications are discussed. This model leads to a simplified perspective on the nature of turbulence in a weakly collisional plasma: the nonlinear interactions responsible for the turbulent cascade of energy and the formation of current sheets are essentially fluid in nature, while the collisionless damping of the turbulent fluctuations and the energy injection by kinetic instabilities are essentially kinetic in nature.

  8. Turbulence studies in Tokamak boundary plasmas with realistic divertor geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.Q.

    1998-10-14

    Results are presented from the 3D nonlocal electromagnetic turbulence code BOUT [1] and the linearized shooting code BAL[2] to study turbulence in tokamak boundary plasmas and its relationship to the L-H transition, in a realistic divertor plasma geometry. The key results include: (1) the identification of the dominant, resistive X-point mode in divertor geometry and (2) turbulence suppression in the L-H transition by shear in the ExB drift speed, ion diamagnetism and finite polarization. Based on the simulation results, a parameterization of the transport is given that includes the dependence on the relevant physical parameters.

  9. A soliton gas model for astrophysical magnetized plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, S. R.; Sheerin, J. P.

    1982-06-01

    Plasma turbulence is considered as an ensemble of solitons. The derivation of the Alfven soliton by Spangler and Sheering (1981) is reviewed, and expressions are derived for the magnetic irregularity spectrum and the relationship between the magnetic and density irregularity power spectra. A derived expression also provides the answer to the question of the correlation between magnetic field and density enhancements. The properties of the turbulence model are compared with observations of plasma turbulence in the solar wind, and are found to reasonably account for them.

  10. The energetic coupling of scales in gyrokinetic plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Teaca, Bogdan; Jenko, Frank

    2014-07-15

    In magnetized plasma turbulence, the couplings of perpendicular spatial scales that arise due to the nonlinear interactions are analyzed from the perspective of the free-energy exchanges. The plasmas considered here, with appropriate ion or electron adiabatic electro-neutrality responses, are described by the gyrokinetic formalism in a toroidal magnetic geometry. Turbulence develops due to the electrostatic fluctuations driven by temperature gradient instabilities, either ion temperature gradient (ITG) or electron temperature gradient (ETG). The analysis consists in decomposing the system into a series of scale structures, while accounting separately for contributions made by modes possessing special symmetries (e.g., the zonal flow modes). The interaction of these scales is analyzed using the energy transfer functions, including a forward and backward decomposition, scale fluxes, and locality functions. The comparison between the ITG and ETG cases shows that ETG turbulence has a more pronounced classical turbulent behavior, exhibiting a stronger energy cascade, with implications for gyrokinetic turbulence modeling.

  11. The energetic coupling of scales in gyrokinetic plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teaca, Bogdan; Navarro, Alejandro Bañón; Jenko, Frank

    2014-07-01

    In magnetized plasma turbulence, the couplings of perpendicular spatial scales that arise due to the nonlinear interactions are analyzed from the perspective of the free-energy exchanges. The plasmas considered here, with appropriate ion or electron adiabatic electro-neutrality responses, are described by the gyrokinetic formalism in a toroidal magnetic geometry. Turbulence develops due to the electrostatic fluctuations driven by temperature gradient instabilities, either ion temperature gradient (ITG) or electron temperature gradient (ETG). The analysis consists in decomposing the system into a series of scale structures, while accounting separately for contributions made by modes possessing special symmetries (e.g., the zonal flow modes). The interaction of these scales is analyzed using the energy transfer functions, including a forward and backward decomposition, scale fluxes, and locality functions. The comparison between the ITG and ETG cases shows that ETG turbulence has a more pronounced classical turbulent behavior, exhibiting a stronger energy cascade, with implications for gyrokinetic turbulence modeling.

  12. Toward the Theory of Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2013-07-26

    The goal of the project was to develop a theory of turbulence in magnetized plasmas at large scales, that is, scales larger than the characteristic plasma microscales (ion gyroscale, ion inertial scale, etc.). Collisions of counter-propagating Alfven packets govern the turbulent cascade of energy toward small scales. It has been established that such an energy cascade is intrinsically anisotropic, in that it predominantly supplies energy to the modes with mostly field-perpendicular wave numbers. The resulting energy spectrum of MHD turbulence, and the structure of the fluctuations were studied both analytically and numerically. A new parallel numerical code was developed for simulating reduced MHD equations driven by an external force. The numerical setting was proposed, where the spectral properties of the force could be varied in order to simulate either strong or weak turbulent regimes. It has been found both analytically and numerically that weak MHD turbulence spontaneously generates a “condensate”, that is, concentration of magnetic and kinetic energy at small k{sub {parallel}}. A related topic that was addressed in the project is turbulent dynamo action, that is, generation of magnetic field in a turbulent flow. We were specifically concentrated on the generation of large-scale magnetic field compared to the scales of the turbulent velocity field. We investigate magnetic field amplification in a turbulent velocity field with nonzero helicity, in the framework of the kinematic Kazantsev-Kraichnan model.

  13. Current Sheet Formation and Self-Organization in Turbulent Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven

    2009-05-01

    Self-Organization can be defined as the process by which a physical system, in the course of its evolution, changes its spatial structure, the form of its equations of motion, or key coefficients in those equations. A turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid can exhibit self-organization, so defined. A turbulent MHD fluid with collisional resistivity has a low rate of dissipation of turbulent energy. However, as the turbulence develops, it forms thin current sheets in which the current density increases exponentially. When the electron drift speed becomes comparable to or exceeds the ion acoustic speed, plasma instabilities can enhance the resistivity, and thus the dissipation rate. In turbulent evolution of this kind, an MHD fluid can transform itself from a low dissipation to a high dissipation state. Calculations show that it is plausible that turbulence in the solar corona could exhibit this behavior.

  14. A weakened cascade model for turbulence in astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, G. G.; TenBarge, J. M.; Dorland, W.

    2011-10-15

    A refined cascade model for kinetic turbulence in weakly collisional astrophysical plasmas is presented that includes both the transition between weak and strong turbulence and the effect of nonlocal interactions on the nonlinear transfer of energy. The model describes the transition between weak and strong MHD turbulence and the complementary transition from strong kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence to weak dissipating KAW turbulence, a new regime of weak turbulence in which the effects of shearing by large scale motions and kinetic dissipation play an important role. The inclusion of the effect of nonlocal motions on the nonlinear energy cascade rate in the dissipation range, specifically the shearing by large-scale motions, is proposed to explain the nearly power-law energy spectra observed in the dissipation range of both kinetic numerical simulations and solar wind observations.

  15. CENTORI: A global toroidal electromagnetic two-fluid plasma turbulence code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, P. J.; Thyagaraja, A.; Edwards, T. D.; Hein, J.; Romanelli, M.; McClements, K. G.

    2012-11-01

    A new global two-fluid electromagnetic turbulence code, CENTORI, has been developed for the purpose of studying magnetically-confined fusion plasmas on energy confinement timescales. This code is used to evolve the combined system of electron and ion fluid equations and Maxwell equations in toroidal configurations with axisymmetric equilibria. Uniquely, the equilibrium is co-evolved with the turbulence, and is thus modified by it. CENTORI is applicable to tokamaks of arbitrary aspect ratio and high plasma beta. A predictor-corrector, semi-implicit finite difference scheme is used to compute the time evolution of fluid quantities and fields. Vector operations and the evaluation of flux surface averages are speeded up by choosing the Jacobian of the transformation from laboratory to plasma coordinates to be a function of the equilibrium poloidal magnetic flux. A subroutine, GRASS, is used to co-evolve the plasma equilibrium by computing the steady-state solutions of a diffusion equation with a pseudo-time derivative. The code is written in Fortran 95 and is efficiently parallelised using Message Passing Interface (MPI). Illustrative examples of output from simulations of a tearing mode in a large aspect ratio tokamak plasma and of turbulence in an elongated conventional aspect ratio tokamak plasma are provided.

  16. Fundamental studies of fusion plasmas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Aamodt, R.E.

    1998-01-30

    Lodestar has carried out a vigorous research program in the areas of rf, edge plasma and divertor physics, with emphasis largely geared towards improving the understanding and performance of ion-cyclotron heating and current drive (ICRF) systems. Additionally, a research program in the field of edge plasma and divertor modeling was initiated. Theoretical work on high power rf sheath formation for multi-strap rf arrays was developed and benchmarked against recent experimental data from the new JET A2 antennas. Sophisticated modeling tools were employed to understand the sheath formation taking into account realistic three-dimensional antenna geometry. A novel physics explanation of an observed anomaly in the low power loading of antennas was applied to qualitatively interpret data on DIII-D in terms of rf sheaths, and potential applications of the idea to develop a near-field sheath diagnostic were explored. Other rf-wave related topics were also investigated. Full wave ICRF modeling studies were carried out in support of ongoing and planned tokamaks experiments, including the investigation of low frequency plasma heating and current drive regimes for IGNITOR. In a cross-disciplinary study involving both MHD and ICRF physics, ponderomotive feedback stabilization by rf was investigated as a potential means of controlling external kink mode disruptions. In another study, the instability of the ion hybrid wave (IHW) in the presence of fusion alpha particles was studied. In the field of edge plasma and divertor modeling studies, Lodestar began the development of a theory of generalized ballooning and sheath instabilities in the scrape off layer (SOL) of divertor tokamaks. A detailed summary of the technical progress in these areas during the contract period is included, as well as where references to published work can be found. A separate listing of publications, meeting abstracts, and other presentations is also given at the end of this final report.

  17. Reverse Energy Cascade in Turbulent Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Kyron; Appartaim, R.; Belay, K.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1998-01-01

    For systems far from equilibrium, the neglect of a role for viscous effects in turbulence may be generally inappropriate when the relaxation time for the molecular process approaches the local flow time (Orou et al. (1996)). Furthermore, for stationary collisional plasmas, the conventional Reynolds number is irrelevant under circumstances where the standard features of turbulence in ordinary gases are observed in the plasma (Johnson et al. (1987)). The current theoretical understanding of these turbulent phenomenon is particularly inadequate for turbulence associated with ionizing shock waves; generally speaking, thermodynamic, acoustic and pressure fluctuations are all seen as amplified across the shock wave followed by a dramatic decay (relaminarization) usually attributed to a lack of importance of viscosity in the turbulent regions. This decay would be accelerated when the flow speed is also reduced due to the importance usually given to the conventional Reynolds number (which is directly proportional to velocity) as a quality of turbulence index. However, evidence supporting this consensus is lacking. By contrast, recent evidence of vanishing triple correlations form De Silva et al. (1996) provides strong support for early theoretical speculation of inherently molecular effects in macroscopic turbulence in Tsuge (1974). This specifically suggests that the role of compressive effects ordinarily associated with the shock wave could be significantly muted by the existence of a strongly turbulent local environment. There is also more recent theoretical speculation (Frisch et al. (1984)) of an inherently and previously unsuspected non-dissipative nature to turbulence, with energy conservation being nurtured by reverse energy cascades in the turbulent fluctuation spectra. Furthermore, the role which might be played by fluctuations on quantum mechanical phenomena and variations in molecular parameters is completely unknown, especially of the sort which might be found

  18. Reverse Energy Cascade in Turbulent Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Kyron; Appartaim, R.; Belay, K.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1998-01-01

    For systems far from equilibrium, the neglect of a role for viscous effects in turbulence may be generally inappropriate when the relaxation time for the molecular process approaches the local flow time (Orou et al. (1996)). Furthermore, for stationary collisional plasmas, the conventional Reynolds number is irrelevant under circumstances where the standard features of turbulence in ordinary gases are observed in the plasma (Johnson et al. (1987)). The current theoretical understanding of these turbulent phenomenon is particularly inadequate for turbulence associated with ionizing shock waves; generally speaking, thermodynamic, acoustic and pressure fluctuations are all seen as amplified across the shock wave followed by a dramatic decay (relaminarization) usually attributed to a lack of importance of viscosity in the turbulent regions. This decay would be accelerated when the flow speed is also reduced due to the importance usually given to the conventional Reynolds number (which is directly proportional to velocity) as a quality of turbulence index. However, evidence supporting this consensus is lacking. By contrast, recent evidence of vanishing triple correlations form De Silva et al. (1996) provides strong support for early theoretical speculation of inherently molecular effects in macroscopic turbulence in Tsuge (1974). This specifically suggests that the role of compressive effects ordinarily associated with the shock wave could be significantly muted by the existence of a strongly turbulent local environment. There is also more recent theoretical speculation (Frisch et al. (1984)) of an inherently and previously unsuspected non-dissipative nature to turbulence, with energy conservation being nurtured by reverse energy cascades in the turbulent fluctuation spectra. Furthermore, the role which might be played by fluctuations on quantum mechanical phenomena and variations in molecular parameters is completely unknown, especially of the sort which might be found

  19. Magnetized Plasma Compression for Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnan, James; Grabowski, Christopher; Domonkos, Matthew; Amdahl, David

    2013-10-01

    Magnetized Plasma Compression (MPC) uses magnetic inhibition of thermal conduction and enhancement of charge particle product capture to greatly reduce the temporal and spatial compression required relative to un-magnetized inertial fusion (IFE)--to microseconds, centimeters vs nanoseconds, sub-millimeter. MPC greatly reduces the required confinement time relative to MFE--to microseconds vs minutes. Proof of principle can be demonstrated or refuted using high current pulsed power driven compression of magnetized plasmas using magnetic pressure driven implosions of metal shells, known as imploding liners. This can be done at a cost of a few tens of millions of dollars. If demonstrated, it becomes worthwhile to develop repetitive implosion drivers. One approach is to use arrays of heavy ion beams for energy production, though with much less temporal and spatial compression than that envisioned for un-magnetized IFE, with larger compression targets, and with much less ambitious compression ratios. A less expensive, repetitive pulsed power driver, if feasible, would require engineering development for transient, rapidly replaceable transmission lines such as envisioned by Sandia National Laboratories. Supported by DOE-OFES.

  20. A Review of Nonlinear Low Frequency (LF) Wave Observations in Space Plasmas: On the Development of Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1995-01-01

    As the lead-off presentation for the topic of nonlinear waves and their evolution, we will illustrate some prominent examples of waves in space plasmas. We will describe recent observations detected within planetary foreshocks, near comets and in interplanetary space. It is believed that the nonlinear LF plasma wave features discussed here are part of and may be basic to the development of plasma turbulence. In this sense, this is one area of space plasma physics that is fundamental, with applications to fusion physics and astrophysics as well. It is hoped that the reader(s) will be stimulated to study nonlinear wave development themselves, if he/she is not already involved.

  1. Turbulent boundary-layer control with plasma spanwise travelling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, Richard D.; Choi, Kwing-So

    2014-08-01

    Arrays of dielectric-barrier-discharge plasma actuators have been designed to generate spanwise travelling waves in the turbulent boundary layer for possible skin-friction drag reductions. Particle image velocimetry was used to elucidate the modifications to turbulence structures created by the plasma spanwise travelling waves. It has been observed that the plasma spanwise travelling waves amalgamated streamwise vortices, lifting low-speed fluid from the near-wall region up and around the peripheries of their cores to form wide ribbons of low-speed streamwise velocity within the viscous sublayer.

  2. Status and Verification of Edge Plasma Turbulence Code BOUT

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V; Xu, X Q; Dudson, B; LoDestro, L L; Myra, J R

    2009-01-08

    The BOUT code is a detailed numerical model of tokamak edge turbulence based on collisional plasma uid equations. BOUT solves for time evolution of plasma uid variables: plasma density N{sub i}, parallel ion velocity V{sub {parallel}i}, electron temperature T{sub e}, ion temperature T{sub i}, electric potential {phi}, parallel current j{sub {parallel}}, and parallel vector potential A{sub {parallel}}, in realistic 3D divertor tokamak geometry. The current status of the code, physics model, algorithms, and implementation is described. Results of verification testing are presented along with illustrative applications to tokamak edge turbulence.

  3. Gyrokinetic turbulence simulations at high plasma beta

    SciTech Connect

    Pueschel, M. J.; Kammerer, M.; Jenko, F.

    2008-10-15

    Electromagnetic gyrokinetic turbulence simulations employing Cyclone Base Case parameters are presented for {beta} values up to and beyond the kinetic ballooning threshold. The {beta} scaling of the turbulent transport is found to be linked to a complex interplay of linear and nonlinear effects. Linear investigation of the kinetic ballooning mode is performed in detail, while nonlinearly, it is found to dominate the turbulence only in a fairly narrow range of {beta} values just below the respective ideal limit. The magnetic transport scales like {beta}{sup 2} and is well described by a Rechester-Rosenbluth-type ansatz.

  4. Self-consistent dynamics of impurities in magnetically confined plasmas: turbulence intermittency and non-diffusive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Futatani, S.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Garbet, X; Benkadda, S.; Dubuit, N.

    2012-01-01

    Self-consistent turbulent transport of high concentration impurities in magnetically confined fusion plasmas is studied using a three-dimensional nonlinear fluid global turbulence model which includes ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped electron mode (TEM) instabilities. It is shown that the impurity concentration can have a dramatic feedback in the turbulence and, as a result, it can significantly change the transport properties of the plasma. High concentration impurities can trigger strong intermittency, that manifests in non-Gaussian heavy tails of the pdfs of E B and the ion-temperature flux fluctuations. At the heart of this self-consistent coupling is the existence of inward propagating ion temperature fronts with a sharp gradient at the leading edge that give rise to instabilities and avalanche-like bursty transport. Numerical evidence of time non-locality in the turbulent transport of high concentration impurities is also presented.

  5. Vortex stabilized electron beam compressed fusion grade plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2014-03-19

    Most inertial confinement fusion schemes are comprised of highly compressed dense plasmas. Those schemes involve short, extremely high power, short pulses of beams (lasers, particles) applied to lower density plasmas or solid pellets. An alternative approach could be to shoot an intense electron beam through very dense, atmospheric pressure, vortex stabilized plasma.

  6. Coherent structures, dissipation and intermittency in plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, M.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Parashar, T.; Shay, M. A.; Karimabadi, H.; Wu, P.

    2015-12-01

    The nature of collisionless dissipation in turbulent plasmas such as the solar wind and the solar corona has been hotly debated recently. Here we report results from high resolution, fully kinetic simulations of plasmas turbulence in both two and three dimensions. The simulations show development of turbulent coherent structures, characterized by sheet-like current density structures spanning a range of scales. Results from particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are also compared with MHD simulations in terms of coherent structures, dissipation and intermittency. An important conclusion, for all simulations examined, is that the dissipation is concentrated in very small volumes, reminiscent of the scenario that motivates the Kolmogorov refined similarity hypothesis in hydrodynamic turbulence. Extrapolated to large heliospheric system sizes, this leads to the expectation of significant departures from heating processes that operate uniformly in space. Results from latest 3D driven PIC simulations, as well as the connection to solar wind observations, will also be discussed.

  7. Turbulent transport of alpha particles in reactor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Mila, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2006-11-15

    A systematic study of the behavior of energetic ions in reactor plasmas is presented. Using self-consistent gyrokinetic simulations, in concert with an analytic asymptotic theory, it is found that alpha particles can interact significantly with core ion-temperature-gradient turbulence. Specifically, the per-particle flux of energetic alphas is comparable to the per-particle flux of thermal species (deuterium or helium ash). This finding opposes the conventional wisdom that energetic ions, because of their large gyroradii, do not interact with the turbulence. For the parameters studied, a turbulent modification of the alpha-particle density profile appears to be stronger than turbulent modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile. Crude estimates indicate that the alpha density modification, which is directly proportional to the core turbulence intensity, could be in the range of 15% at midradius in a reactor. The corresponding modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile is predicted to be smaller (in the 1% range)

  8. Turbulence and Transport in Multi-Ion Species Plasmas in the Large Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Jeffrey

    2016-10-01

    Understanding of turbulence and transport in multi-ion-species plasmas is important for establishing predictive capability for burning tokamak plasmas with comparable densities of D and T. Fundamental modifications to drift-wave instabilities and resulting turbulence are expected from theoretical studies, including new instabilities driven by dissimilar ion density gradients. Even in pure ion species plasmas, transport mysteries remain regarding dependence on ion mass such as the isotope scaling of turbulent transport. Recently, experiments have been performed on the Large Plasma Device at UCLA in which mixed Hydrogen-Helium plasmas were created and the relative concentration was varied systematically. The properties of edge turbulence and transport rates were documented and initial results will be presented. Experimental results are will also be compared to linear drift-wave instability theory in plasmas with multiple ion species.

  9. BOOK REVIEW: Plasma and Fluid Turbulence: Theory and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, A.; Itoh, S. I.; Itoh, K.

    2003-03-01

    The area of turbulence has been covered by many books over the years. This has, of course, mainly been fluid turbulence, while the area of plasma turbulence has been treated much less. This book by Yoshizawa et al covers both plasma and fluid turbulence, in a way that does justice to both areas at the same time as cross-disciplinary aspects are illuminated. The book should be useful to physicists working in both areas partly because it examines fundamental aspects in a pedagogical way, partly because it is up to date and partly because of the cross-disciplinary aspects which enrich both areas. It is written as an advanced textbook. The reader should have previous knowledge of at least one of the areas and also some background in statistical physics. The book starts with the very important and highly up to date area of structure formation which is relevant both to fluids and plasmas. Here, pipe flow of fluids is treated as an introduction to the area, then follows discussion of the generation of magnetic fields by turbulent motion in stellar objects and stucture formation in plasmas confined by a magnetic field. Also the concept of bifurcation is introduced. This part builds up knowledge from the simple fluid case to the problems of magnetic confinement of plasmas in a very pedagogical way. It continues by introducing the fundamentals of fluid turbulence. This is done very systematically and concepts useful for industrial applications like the K-e method and several ways of heuristic modelling are introduced. Also the two dimensional vortex equation, which is also relevant to magnetized plasmas is introduced. In chapter 5 the statistical theory of turbulence is treated. It starts with a very nice and easy to understand example of renormalization of a simple nonlinear equation where the exact solution is known. It introduces the method of partial renormalization, Greens functions and the direct interaction approximation (DIA). The book then continues with an

  10. How turbulence fronts induce plasma spin-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosuga, Y.; Itoh, S.-I.; Diamond, P. H.; Itoh, K.

    2017-03-01

    A calculation which describes the spin-up of toroidal plasmas by the radial propagation of turbulence fronts with broken parallel symmetry is presented. The associated flux of parallel momentum is calculated by using a two-scale direct-interaction approximation in the weak turbulence limit. We show that fluctuation momentum spreads faster than mean flow momentum. Specifically, the turbulent flux of wave momentum is stronger than the momentum pinch. The scattering of fluctuation momentum can induce edge-core coupling of toroidal flows, as observed in experiments.

  11. Progress In Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Francis Y. C.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Lee, Michael; Smith, James; Martin, Adam; Wu, S. T.; Schmidt, George; hide

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) attempts to combine the favorable attributes of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) for energy confinement with the attributes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for efficient compression heating and wall-free containment of the fusing plasma. It uses a material liner to compress and contain a magnetized plasma. For practical applications, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC).

  12. High-Gain High-Field Fusion Plasma.

    PubMed

    Li, Ge

    2015-10-28

    A Faraday wheel (FW)-an electric generator of constant electrical polarity that produces huge currents-could be implemented in an existing tokamak to study high-gain high-field (HGHF) fusion plasma, such as the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). HGHF plasma can be realized in EAST by updating its pulsed-power system to compress plasma in two steps by induction fields; high gains of the Lawson trinity parameter and fusion power are both predicted by formulating the HGHF plasma. Both gain rates are faster than the decrease rate of the plasma volume. The formulation is checked by earlier ATC tests. Good agreement between theory and tests indicates that scaling to over 10 T at EAST may be possible by two-step compressions with a compression ratio of the minor radius of up to 3. These results point to a quick new path of fusion plasma study, i.e., simulating the Sun by EAST.

  13. Predictive simulations of tokamak plasmas with a model for ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Redd, A.J.; Kritz, A.H.; Bateman, G.; Horton, W.

    1998-05-01

    A drift wave transport model, recently developed by Ottaviani, Horton and Erba (OHE) [Ottaviani {ital et al.}, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion {bold 39}, 1461 (1997)], has been implemented and tested in a time-dependent predictive transport code. This OHE model assumes that anomalous transport is due to turbulence driven by ion temperature gradients and that the fully developed turbulence will extend into linearly stable regions, as described in the reference cited above. A multiplicative elongation factor is introduced in the OHE model and simulations are carried out for 12 discharges from major tokamak experiments, including both L- and H-modes (low- and high-confinement modes) and both circular and elongated discharges. Good agreement is found between the OHE model predictions and experiment. This OHE model is also used to describe the performance of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [Putvinski {ital et al.}, in {ital Proceedings of the 16th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference}, Montr{acute e}al, Canada, 1996 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1997), Vol. 2, p. 737.] A second version of the OHE model, in which the turbulent transport is not allowed to penetrate into linearly stable regions, has also been implemented and tested. In simulations utilizing this version of the model, the linear stability of the plasma core eliminates the anomalous thermal transport near the magnetic axis, resulting in an increase in the core temperatures to well above the experimental values. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Multi-Field/-Scale Interaction of Neoclassical Tearing Modes with Turbulence and Impact on Plasma Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardoczi, Laszlo

    Neoclassical Tearing Modes (NTMs) are a major impediment in the development of operational scenarios of present toroidal fusion devices. The multi-scale and non-linear interaction of NTMs with turbulence has been an active field of theoretical plasma research in the past decade for its role in plasma confinement. However, little to no experimental effort has been devoted to explore this interaction. As part of this thesis, dedicated experiments were conducted utilizing the full complement of the DIII-D turbulence diagnostics to study the effect of NTM on turbulence as well as the effect of turbulence on NTM growth. The first localized measurements of long and intermediate wavelength turbulent density fluctuations and long wavelength turbulent electron temperature fluctuations modified by magnetic islands are presented. These long and intermediate wavelengths correspond to the expected Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG) and Trapped Electron Mode (TEM) scales, respectively. Two regimes were observed when tracking density fluctuations during NTM evolution: (1) small islands are characterized by steep electron temperature radial profile and turbulence levels comparable to that of the background; (2) large islands have a flat electron temperature profile and reduced turbulence level at the O-point. Radially outside of the large island, the electron temperature profile is steeper and the turbulence level increased compared to the no or small island case. It was also found that turbulence is reduced in the O-point region compared to the X-point region. This helical structure of turbulence modification leads to a 15% modulation of the density fluctuation power as the island rotates in the lab frame and this modulation is nearly in phase with the electron temperature modulation. These measurements were also used to determine the turbulence penetration length scale at the island separatrix and was found that the turbulence penetration length scale is on the order of the

  15. Kinetic signatures and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind plasma.

    PubMed

    Osman, K T; Matthaeus, W H; Hnat, B; Chapman, S C

    2012-06-29

    A connection between kinetic processes and intermittent turbulence is observed in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 A.U. In particular, kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating are concentrated near coherent structures, such as current sheets, which are nonuniformly distributed in space. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. The inhomogeneous heating in these regions, which is present in both the magnetic field parallel and perpendicular temperature components, results in protons at least 3-4 times hotter than under typical stable plasma conditions. These results offer a new understanding of kinetic processes in a turbulent regime, where linear Vlasov theory is not sufficient to explain the inhomogeneous plasma dynamics operating near non-Gaussian structures.

  16. Analysis of turbulence diffusion and H-mode transition in conjunction with gyrocentre shift at the boundary of fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. C.

    2009-06-01

    A new concept of turbulence transport and diffusion coefficient are derived from the microscopic \\tilde {E}\\times B ( \\tilde {E} is the localized electric field and B is the magnetic field) drifts at the boundary of fusion devices by characterization of the gyrocentre shift induced by the collisions among electrons, ions and neutrals. It is found that when the viscosity force of the ion-neutral collision is counted, Reynolds numbers of the poloidal ion flow in the vicinity of the tokamak separatrix vary over the critical value between turbulent and laminar flows depending on the plasma parameters such as temperature, neutral density and density fluctuation level, which explains the mechanism of the fast transition from the low confinement mode to the high confinement mode (L/H transition) for the examplar cases.

  17. Target Plasma Formation for Magnetic Compression/Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemuth, I. R.; Reinovsky, R. E.; Chrien, R. E.; Christian, J. M.; Ekdahl, C. A.; Goforth, J. H.; Haight, R. C.; Idzorek, G.; King, N. S.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Larson, R. E.; Morgan, G. L.; Olinger, B. W.; Oona, H.; Sheehey, P. T.; Shlachter, J. S.; Smith, R. C.; Veeser, L. R.; Warthen, B. J.; Younger, S. M.; Chernyshev, V. K.; Mokhov, V. N.; Demin, A. N.; Dolin, Y. N.; Garanin, S. F.; Ivanov, V. A.; Korchagin, V. P.; Mikhailov, O. D.; Morozov, I. V.; Pak, S. V.; Pavlovskii, E. S.; Seleznev, N. Y.; Skobelev, A. N.; Volkov, G. I.; Yakubov, V. A.

    1995-09-01

    Experimental observations of plasma behavior in a novel plasma formation chamber are reported. Experimental results are in reasonable agreement with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computations suggesting that the plasma could subsequently be adiabatically compressed by a magnetically driven pusher to yield 1 GJ of fusion energy. An explosively driven helical flux compression generator mated with a unique closing switch/opening switch combination delivered a 2.7 MA, 347 μs magnetization current and an additional 5 MA, 2.5 μs electrical pulse to the chamber. A hot plasma was produced and 1013 D-T fusion reactions were observed.

  18. CONFERENCE DESCRIPTION Theory of Fusion Plasmas: Varenna-Lausanne International Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbet, X.; Sauter, O.

    2010-12-01

    The Joint Varenna-Lausanne international workshop on Theory of Fusion Plasmas takes place every other year in a place particularly favourable for informal and in-depth discussions. Invited and contributed papers present state-of-the-art research in theoretical plasma physics, covering all domains relevant to fusion plasmas. This workshop always welcomes a fruitful mix of experienced researchers and students, to allow a better understanding of the key theoretical physics models and applications. Theoretical issues related to burning plasmas Anomalous Transport (Turbulence, Coherent Structures, Microinstabilities) RF Heating and Current Drive Macroinstabilities Plasma-Edge Physics and Divertors Fast particles instabilities Further details: http://Varenna-Lausanne.epfl.ch The conference is organized by: Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Association EURATOM - Confédération Suisse 'Piero Caldirola' International Centre for the Promotion of Science and International School of Plasma Physics Istituto di Fisica del Plasma del CNR, Milano Editors: X Garbet (CEA, Cadarache, France) and O Sauter (CRPP-EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland)

  19. Plasma Heating During Magnetic Reconnection: Implications for Turbulent Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, M. A.; Parashar, T.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Haggerty, C. C.

    2015-12-01

    Current sheets and associated intermittency are known to be prevalent in many turbulent plasmas and have been shown to be correlated with heating in observations of solar wind turbulence [1] and dissipation in kinetic particle-in-cell simulations [5]. Most intriguing, recent PIC simulations have found that the relative ion to electron heating ratio is strongly dependent on the turbulence amplitude [3]. An important question is whether magnetic reconnection is an important mechanism responsible for this heating. Studies focused on laminar reconnection have made significant progress recently on the magnitude and physics responsible for heating during magnetic reconnection [2,4]. The ambient Alfven speed of plasma flowing into the reconnection region plays a critical role, with heating initially taking the form of counterstreaming beams generated by non-local acceleration mechanism. However, there are significant uncertainties with how to link this basic reconnection heating with generic heating in a turbulent plasma. In this presentation, our current understanding of heating due to reconnection will be reviewed, and the factors determining the applicability of this heating to turbulent dissipation and heating will be discussed. These ideas will be explored through the comparison of kinetic PIC simulations of turbulence with reconnection heating models. Key aspects that will be examined are the effect of differing turbulent conditions on the magnitude and anisotropy of the heating, as well as the ion to electron heating ratio. [1] Osman et al., ApJ Letters, 727, L11, 2011. [2] Phan, et al., GRL, 40, 50917, 2013. [3] Wu et al., ApJ Letters, 763, L30, 2013. [4] Shay et al., Phys. Plasmas, 21, 122902, 2014. [5] Wan et al., PRL, 114, 175002, 2015.

  20. Plasma turbulence in the downstream ionosheath of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Scarf, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Observations made by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter plasma analyzer and the plasma wave instrument in the Venus ionosheath are compared. Large increases in plasma wave turbulence levels appear to be connected with changing plasma distributions and interpenetrating plasma beams. Some of these plasma waves are identified as Doppler - shifted ion acoustic waves due to beam/beam interactions, but it is noted that different forms of instabilities are probably also operative. The changes in the temperature, intensity and energy of the peak in the PVO plasma distributions are similar to those observed by Venera 10 closer to the planet and appear to be evidence for rarefaction and compression in the downstream ionosheath. Some of the changes in the PVO plasma distributions may be related to the presence of a second ion population or the acceleration of protons.

  1. 3D plasma turbulence and neutral simulations using the Hermes model in BOUT + + : a study of linear devices and the tokamak edge and divertor region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leddy, Jarrod; Dudson, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the transport processes in the low temperature plasma at the boundary region of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) devices is crucial to the design and operation of future fusion reactor devices. It influences the divertor heat load, and probably the core confinement as well. The dominant source of this transport is turbulence, which serves to mix the high and low temperature regions of the plasma. The nature of this plasma turbulence is affected by not only the plasma parameters, but also the neutral species that also exist in these low temperature regions. The interaction of neutrals with the plasma turbulence is studied in linear device geometry (for its simplicity, yet similarity in plasma parameters), and the result is a strong interaction that impacts the local plasma and neutral densities, momenta and energies. The neutral gas is found to affect plasma edge turbulence primarily through momentum exchange, reducing the radial electric field and enhancing cross-field transport, with consequent implications for the SOL width and divertor heat loads. Therefore, turbulent plasma and fluid simulations have been performed in multiple tokamak geometries to more closely examine the effects of this interaction. These cases were chosen for the variety in configuration with ISTOK having a toroidal limiter (ie. no divertor), DIII-D having a standard divertor configuration, and MAST-U having a super-X divertor with extended outer divertor legs. Progress towards the characterization of neutral impact on detachment and edge behavior will be presented.

  2. Direct observation of turbulent magnetic fields in hot, dense laser produced plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Sudipta; Narayanan, V.; Ding, Wen Jun; Lad, Amit D.; Hao, Biao; Ahmad, Saima; Wang, Wei Min; Sheng, Zheng Ming; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman; Das, Amita; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence in fluids is a ubiquitous, fascinating, and complex natural phenomenon that is not yet fully understood. Unraveling turbulence in high density, high temperature plasmas is an even bigger challenge because of the importance of electromagnetic forces and the typically violent environments. Fascinating and novel behavior of hot dense matter has so far been only indirectly inferred because of the enormous difficulties of making observations on such matter. Here, we present direct evidence of turbulence in giant magnetic fields created in an overdense, hot plasma by relativistic intensity (1018W/cm2) femtosecond laser pulses. We have obtained magneto-optic polarigrams at femtosecond time intervals, simultaneously with micrometer spatial resolution. The spatial profiles of the magnetic field show randomness and their k spectra exhibit a power law along with certain well defined peaks at scales shorter than skin depth. Detailed two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations delineate the underlying interaction between forward currents of relativistic energy “hot” electrons created by the laser pulse and “cold” return currents of thermal electrons induced in the target. Our results are not only fundamentally interesting but should also arouse interest on the role of magnetic turbulence induced resistivity in the context of fast ignition of laser fusion, and the possibility of experimentally simulating such structures with respect to the sun and other stellar environments. PMID:22566660

  3. Turbulence and Plasma Physics in Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schekochihin, Alexander

    2005-10-01

    The intracluster medium appears to be in a turbulent state. It is also threaded by randomly tangled magnetic fields. In the past few years there has been a dramatic increase in the quantity and quality of observational data on cluster turbulence and magnetic fields. The observed magnetic fields are strong enough to be dynamically important. The turbulence and magnetic field regulate the viscous heating and heat transport that determine the thermal structure of clusters. A coherent theory of magnetized cluster turbulence is necessary for understanding cluster behaviour on both large and small scales. The strength and certainly the structure of the cluster fields are determined by their interaction with the turbulence. This talk will first describe the fundamental properties of the turbulent generation of magnetic fields: (1) what type of field structure can be produced and maintained; (2) how a dynamical saturated state is achieved; (3) what are the observable signatures of the field structure in clusters. The field structure in no small measure depends on the nature of the viscous and magnetic cutoffs. These are determined by the plasma physics of the intracluster medium, which has very low collisionality. It will be shown that, under very general conditions, cluster plasmas threaded by weak magnetic fields are subject to firehose and mirror instabilities. These are driven by the anisotropies of the plasma pressure (viscous stress) that naturally arise in any weakly magnetized plasma that has low collisionality and is subject to stirring. The effect is captured by the extended MHD model with Braginskii viscosity, but, as the instability growth rates are proportional to the wavenumber down to the ion gyroscale, MHD equations with Braginskii viscosity are not well posed and a fully kinetic description is necessary. The instabilities may lead to the amplification of magnetic fields in clusters to the observed strength of ˜10μG on cosmologically trivial time scales

  4. Turbulent and directed plasma motions in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fludra, A.; Bentley, R. D.; Lemen, J. R.; Jakimiec, J.; Sylwester, J.

    1989-01-01

    An improved method for fitting asymmetric soft X-ray line profiles from solar flares is presented. A two-component model is used where one component represents the total emission from directed upflow plasma and the other the emission from the plasma at rest. Unlike previous methods, the width of the moving component is independent from that of the stationary component. Time variations of flare plasma characteristics (i.e., temperature, emission measure of moving and stationary plasma, upflow and turbulent velocities) are derived from the Ca XIX and Fe XXV spectra recorded by the Bent Crystal Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission. The fitting technique provides a statistical estimation for the uncertainties in the fitting parameters. The relationship between the directed and turbulent motions has been studied, and a correlation of the random and directed motions has been found in some flares with intensive plasma upflows. Mean temperatures of the upflowing and stationary plasmas are compared for the first time from ratios of calcium to iron X-ray line intensities. Finally, evidence for turbulent motions and the possibility of plasma upflow late into the decay phase is presented and discussed.

  5. Edge ambipolar potential in toroidal fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Spizzo, G. Vianello, N.; Agostini, M.; Puiatti, M. E.; Scarin, P.; Spolaore, M.; Terranova, D.; White, R. B.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Schmitz, O.; Cavazzana, R.; Ciaccio, G.

    2014-05-15

    A series of issues with toroidally confined fusion plasmas are related to the generation of 3D flow patterns by means of edge magnetic islands, embedded in a chaotic field and interacting with the wall. These issues include the Greenwald limit in Tokamaks and reversed-field pinches, the collisionality window for ELM mitigation with the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in Tokamaks, and edge islands interacting with the bootstrap current in stellarators. Measurements of the 2D map of the edge electric field E{sup r}(r=a,θ,ϕ) in the RFX reversed-field pinch show that E{sup r} has the same helicity of the magnetic islands generated by a m/n perturbation: in fact, defining the helical angle u=mθ−nϕ+ωt, maps show a sinusoidal dependence as a function of u, E{sup r}=E{sup ~r}sin u. The associated E × B flow displays a huge convective cell with v(a)≠0 which, in RFX and near the Greenwald limit, determines a stagnation point for density and a reversal of the sign of E{sup r}. From a theoretical point of view, the question is how a perturbed toroidal flux of symmetry m/n gives rise to an ambipolar potential Φ=Φ{sup ~}sin u. On the basis of a model developed with the guiding center code ORBIT and applied to RFX and the TEXTOR tokamak, we will show that the presence of an m/n perturbation in any kind of device breaks the toroidal symmetry with a drift proportional to the gyroradius ρ, thus larger for ions (ρ{sub i} ≫ ρ{sub e}). Immediately, an ambipolar potential arises to balance the drifts, with the same symmetry as the original perturbation.

  6. Gyrokinetic Simulation of TAE in Fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhixuan

    Linear gyrokinetic simulation of fusion plasmas finds a radial localization of the toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) due to the non-perturbative energetic particles (EP) contribution. The EP-driven TAE has a radial mode width much smaller than that predicted by the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The TAE radial position stays around the strongest EP pressure gradients when the EP profile evolves. The non-perturbative EP contribution is also the main cause for the breaking of the radial symmetry of the ballooning mode structure and for the dependence of the TAE frequency on the toroidal mode number. These phenomena are beyond the picture of the conventional MHD theory. Linear gyrokinetic simulation of the electron cyclotron heating (ECH) experiments on DIII-D successfully recover the TAE and RSAE. The EP profile, rather than the electron temperature, is found to be the key factor determining whether TAE or RSAE is the dominant mode in the system in our simulation. Investigation on the nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation model reveals a missing nonlinear term which has important contributions to the zonal magnetic fields. A new fluid-electron hybrid model is proposed to keep this nonlinear term in the lowest order fluid part. Nonlinear simulation of TAE using DIII-D parameters confirms the importance of this new term for the zonal magnetic fields. It is also found that zonal structures dominated by zonal electric fields are forced driven at about twice the linear growth rate of TAE in the linear phase. The zonal flows then limit the nonlinear saturation level by tearing the eigenmode structures apart. In the nonlinear phase of the simulation, the major frequency in the system chirps down by about 30% and stays there.

  7. Suppression of phase mixing in drift-kinetic plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J. T.; Highcock, E. G.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Dellar, P. J.

    2016-07-15

    Transfer of free energy from large to small velocity-space scales by phase mixing leads to Landau damping in a linear plasma. In a turbulent drift-kinetic plasma, this transfer is statistically nearly canceled by an inverse transfer from small to large velocity-space scales due to “anti-phase-mixing” modes excited by a stochastic form of plasma echo. Fluid moments (density, velocity, and temperature) are thus approximately energetically isolated from the higher moments of the distribution function, so phase mixing is ineffective as a dissipation mechanism when the plasma collisionality is small.

  8. Magnetized Target Fusion Propulsion: Plasma Injectors for MTF Guns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2003-01-01

    To achieve increased payload size and decreased trip time for interplanetary travel, a low mass, high specific impulse, high thrust propulsion system is required. This suggests the need for research into fusion as a source of power and high temperature plasma. The plasma would be deflected by magnetic fields to provide thrust. Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) research consists of several related investigations into these topics. These include the orientation and timing of the plasma guns and the convergence and interface development of the "pusher" plasma. Computer simulations of the gun as it relates to plasma initiation and repeatability are under investigation. One of the items under development is the plasma injector. This is a surface breakdown driven plasma generator designed to function at very low pressures. The performance, operating conditions and limitations of these injectors need to be determined.

  9. RF wave propagation and scattering in turbulent tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W. Michoski, C.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2015-12-10

    Drift wave turbulence driven by the steep electron and ion temperature gradients in H-mode divertor tokamaks produce scattering of the RF waves used for heating and current drive. The X-ray emission spectra produced by the fast electrons require the turbulence broaden RF wave spectrum. Both the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid waves and the 170 GHz electron cyclotron [EC] RF waves experience scattering and diffraction by the electron density fluctuations. With strong LHCD there are bifurcations in the coupled turbulent transport dynamics giving improved steady-state confinement states. The stochastic scattering of the RF rays makes the prediction of the distribution of the rays and the associated particle heating a statistical problem. Thus, we introduce a Fokker-Planck equation for the probably density of the RF rays. The general frame work of the coupled system of coupled high frequency current driving rays with the low-frequency turbulent transport determines the profiles of the plasma density and temperatures.

  10. Investigation of an Oscillating Surface Plasma for Turbulent Drag Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    An oscillating, weakly ionized surface plasma has been investigated for use in turbulent boundary layer viscous drag reduction. The study was based on reports showing that mechanical spanwise oscillations of a wall can reduce viscous drag due to a turbulent boundary layer by up to 40%. It was hypothesized that the plasma induced body force in high electric field gradients of a surface plasma along strip electrodes could also be configured to oscillate the flow. Thin dielectric panels with millimeter-scale, flush- mounted, triad electrode arrays with one and two-phase high voltage excitation were tested. Results showed that while a small oscillation could be obtained, the effect was lost at a low frequency (less than 100Hz). Furthermore, a mean flow was generated during the oscillation that complicates the effect. Hot-wire and pitot probe diagnostics are presented along with phase-averaged images revealing plasma structure.

  11. Simultaneous Multi-angle Measurements of Plasma Turbulence at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Naomi; Golkowski, Mark; Sheerin, James; University of Colorado Denver Team

    2013-10-01

    We report the results from a recent series of experiments employing the HAARP HF transmitter to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. Diagnostics included the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) located at HAARP, the Super DARN-Kodiak HF radar, and HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE). Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments demonstrate control and suppression of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI). This allows the isolation of ponderomotive plasma turbulence effects. For the first time, plasma line spectra measured simultaneously in different spots of the interaction region displayed marked but contemporaneous differences dependent on the aspect angle of the HF pump beam and the pointing angle of the MUIR diagnostic radar. Outshifted Plasma Line (OPL) spectra, rarely observed in past experiments, occurred with sufficient regularity for experimentation. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  12. Simultaneous Multi-angle Measurements of Plasma Turbulence at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Naomi

    We report the results from a recent series of experiments employing the HAARP HF transmitter to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. Diagnostics included the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the Super DARN-Kodiak HF radar, and HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE). Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments demonstrate control and suppression of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI). This allows the isolation of ponderomotive plasma turbulence effects. For the first time, plasma line spectra measured simultaneously in different spots of the interaction region displayed marked but contemporaneous differences dependent on the aspect angle of the HF pump beam and the pointing angle of the MUIR diagnostic radar. Outshifted Plasma Line spectra, rarely observed in past experiments, occurred with sufficient regularity for experimentation. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  13. Spontaneous emission of electromagnetic radiation in turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Simões, F. J. R.; Pavan, J.; Gaelzer, R.

    2014-01-15

    Known radiation emission mechanisms in plasmas include bremmstrahlung (or free-free emission), gyro- and synchrotron radiation, cyclotron maser, and plasma emission. For unmagnetized plasmas, only bremmstrahlung and plasma emissions are viable. Of these, bremmstrahlung becomes inoperative in the absence of collisions, and the plasma emission requires the presence of electron beam, followed by various scattering and conversion processes. The present Letter proposes a new type of radiation emission process for plasmas in a state of thermodynamic quasi-equilibrium between particles and enhanced Langmuir turbulence. The radiation emission mechanism proposed in the present Letter is not predicted by the linear theory of thermal plasmas, but it relies on nonlinear wave-particle resonance processes. The electromagnetic particle-in-cell numerical simulation supports the new mechanism.

  14. Magnetised plasma turbulence in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schekochihin, A.; Cowley, S.; Kulsrud, R.; Hammett, G.; Sharma, P.

    2005-06-01

    Cluster plasmas are magnetised already at very low magnetic field strength. Low collisionality implies that conservation of the first adiabatic invariant results in an anisotropic viscous stress (Braginskii viscosity) or, equivalently, anisotropic plasma pressure. This triggers firehose and mirror instabilities, which have growth rates proportional to the wavenumber down to scales of the order of ion Larmor radius. This means that MHD equations with Braginskii viscosity are not well posed and fully kinetic description is necessary. In this paper, we review the basic picture of small-scale dynamo in the cluster plasma and attempt to reconcile it with the existence of plasma instabilities at collisionless scales.

  15. ECRH microwave beam broadening in the edge turbulent plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sysoeva, E. V.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Popov, A. Yu.; Silva, F. da; Heuraux, S.

    2014-02-12

    The influence of turbulent plasma density fluctuations on angular and spatial beam width is treated analytically in the framework of WKB based eikonal method. Reasonable agreement of analytical and numerical treatment results is demonstrated within the domain of quasi-optical approximation validity. Significant broadening of microwave beams is predicted for future ECRH experiments at ITER.

  16. Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in spherical tokamak regime

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.; Ren, Y.; ...

    2015-10-15

    Highly distinct features of spherical tokamaks (ST), such as National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) and NSTX-U, result in a different fusion plasma regime with unique physics properties compared to conventional tokamaks. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations critical for addressing turbulence and transport physics in the ST regime have led to new insights. The drift wave Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability characterized by intrinsic mode asymmetry is identified in strongly rotating NSTX L-mode plasmas. While the strong E x B shear associated with the rotation leads to a reduction in KH/ion temperature gradient turbulence, the remaining fluctuations can produce a significant ion thermal transportmore » that is comparable to the experimental level in the outer core region (with no "transport shortfall"). The other new, important turbulence source identified in NSTX is the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM), which is believed to play little role in conventional tokamak regime. Due to the high fraction of trapped electrons, long wavelength DTEMs peaking around kθρs ~ 0.1 are destabilized in NSTX collisionality regime by electron density and temperature gradients achieved there. Surprisingly, the E x B shear stabilization effect on DTEM is remarkably weak, which makes it a major turbulence source in the ST regime dominant over collisionless TEM (CTEM). The latter, on the other hand, is subject to strong collisional and E x B shear suppression in NSTX. DTEM is shown to produce significant particle, energy and toroidal momentum transport, in agreement with experimental levels in NSTX H-modes. Furthermore, DTEM-driven transport in NSTX parametric regime is found to increase with electron collision frequency, providing one possible source for the scaling of confinement time observed in NSTX H-modes. Most interestingly, the existence of a turbulence-free regime in the collision-induced CTEM to DTEM transition, corresponding to a minimum plasma transport in

  17. Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in spherical tokamak regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.; Ren, Y.; Kaye, S.; Chen, J.; Startsev, E.; Lu, Z.; Li, Z. Q.

    2015-10-01

    Highly distinct features of spherical tokamaks (ST), such as National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) and NSTX-U, result in a different fusion plasma regime with unique physics properties compared to conventional tokamaks. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations critical for addressing turbulence and transport physics in the ST regime have led to new insights. The drift wave Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability characterized by intrinsic mode asymmetry is identified in strongly rotating NSTX L-mode plasmas. While the strong E ×B shear associated with the rotation leads to a reduction in KH/ion temperature gradient turbulence, the remaining fluctuations can produce a significant ion thermal transport that is comparable to the experimental level in the outer core region (with no "transport shortfall"). The other new, important turbulence source identified in NSTX is the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM), which is believed to play little role in conventional tokamak regime. Due to the high fraction of trapped electrons, long wavelength DTEMs peaking around kθρs˜0.1 are destabilized in NSTX collisionality regime by electron density and temperature gradients achieved there. Surprisingly, the E ×B shear stabilization effect on DTEM is remarkably weak, which makes it a major turbulence source in the ST regime dominant over collisionless TEM (CTEM). The latter, on the other hand, is subject to strong collisional and E ×B shear suppression in NSTX. DTEM is shown to produce significant particle, energy and toroidal momentum transport, in agreement with experimental levels in NSTX H-modes. Moreover, DTEM-driven transport in NSTX parametric regime is found to increase with electron collision frequency, providing one possible source for the scaling of confinement time observed in NSTX H-modes. Most interestingly, the existence of a turbulence-free regime in the collision-induced CTEM to DTEM transition, corresponding to a minimum plasma transport in advanced ST

  18. Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in spherical tokamak regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.; Ren, Y.; Kaye, S.; Chen, J.; Startsev, E.; Lu, Z.; Li, Z. Q.

    2015-10-15

    Highly distinct features of spherical tokamaks (ST), such as National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) and NSTX-U, result in a different fusion plasma regime with unique physics properties compared to conventional tokamaks. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations critical for addressing turbulence and transport physics in the ST regime have led to new insights. The drift wave Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability characterized by intrinsic mode asymmetry is identified in strongly rotating NSTX L-mode plasmas. While the strong E x B shear associated with the rotation leads to a reduction in KH/ion temperature gradient turbulence, the remaining fluctuations can produce a significant ion thermal transport that is comparable to the experimental level in the outer core region (with no "transport shortfall"). The other new, important turbulence source identified in NSTX is the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM), which is believed to play little role in conventional tokamak regime. Due to the high fraction of trapped electrons, long wavelength DTEMs peaking around kθρs ~ 0.1 are destabilized in NSTX collisionality regime by electron density and temperature gradients achieved there. Surprisingly, the E x B shear stabilization effect on DTEM is remarkably weak, which makes it a major turbulence source in the ST regime dominant over collisionless TEM (CTEM). The latter, on the other hand, is subject to strong collisional and E x B shear suppression in NSTX. DTEM is shown to produce significant particle, energy and toroidal momentum transport, in agreement with experimental levels in NSTX H-modes. Furthermore, DTEM-driven transport in NSTX parametric regime is found to increase with electron collision frequency, providing one possible source for the scaling of confinement time observed in NSTX H-modes. Most interestingly, the existence of a turbulence-free regime in the collision-induced CTEM to DTEM transition, corresponding to a minimum plasma

  19. Fission and activation of uranium by fusion-plasma neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.; Mcfarland, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Fusion-fission hybrid reactors are discussed in terms of two main purposes: to breed fissile materials (Pu 233 and Th 233 from U 238 or Th 232) for use in low-reactivity breeders, and to produce tritium from lithium to refuel fusion plasma cores. Neutron flux generation is critical for both processes. Various methods for generating the flux are described, with attention to new geometries for multiple plasma focus arrays, e.g., hypocycloidal pinch and staged plasma focus devices. These methods are evaluated with reference to their applicability to D-D fusion reactors, which will ensure a virtually unlimited energy supply. Accurate observations of the neutron flux from such schemes are obtained by using different target materials in the plasma focus.

  20. Fission and activation of uranium by fusion-plasma neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.; Mcfarland, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Fusion-fission hybrid reactors are discussed in terms of two main purposes: to breed fissile materials (Pu 233 and Th 233 from U 238 or Th 232) for use in low-reactivity breeders, and to produce tritium from lithium to refuel fusion plasma cores. Neutron flux generation is critical for both processes. Various methods for generating the flux are described, with attention to new geometries for multiple plasma focus arrays, e.g., hypocycloidal pinch and staged plasma focus devices. These methods are evaluated with reference to their applicability to D-D fusion reactors, which will ensure a virtually unlimited energy supply. Accurate observations of the neutron flux from such schemes are obtained by using different target materials in the plasma focus.

  1. Sudden Viscous Dissipation of Compressing Turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-03-11

    Here we report compression of turbulent plasma can amplify the turbulent kinetic energy, if the compression is fast compared to the viscous dissipation time of the turbulent eddies. A sudden viscous dissipation mechanism is demonstrated, whereby this amplified turbulent kinetic energy is rapidly converted into thermal energy, suggesting a new paradigm for fast ignition inertial fusion.

  2. Sudden Viscous Dissipation of Compressing Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-03-11

    Here we report compression of turbulent plasma can amplify the turbulent kinetic energy, if the compression is fast compared to the viscous dissipation time of the turbulent eddies. A sudden viscous dissipation mechanism is demonstrated, whereby this amplified turbulent kinetic energy is rapidly converted into thermal energy, suggesting a new paradigm for fast ignition inertial fusion.

  3. PREFACE: Theory of Fusion Plasmas, 13th Joint Varenna-Lausanne International Workshop (2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbet, Xavier; Sauter, Olivier

    2012-12-01

    The 2012 joint Varenna-Lausanne international workshop on the theory of fusion plasmas has been very fruitful. A broad variety of topics were addressed, as usual covering turbulence, MHD, edge physic, RF wave heating and a taste of astrophysics. Moreover the scope of the meeting was extended this year to include the physics of materials and diagnostics for burning plasmas. This evolution reflects the complexity of problems at hand in fusion, in particular in the context of ITER construction. Long-standing problems without immediate consequences have sometimes become an urgent matter in that context. One may quote for instance the choice of plasma facing components or the design of control systems. Another characteristic of the meeting is the interplay between various domains of plasma physics. For instance MHD modes are now currently investigated with gyrokinetic codes, kinetic effects are more and more included in MHD stability analysis, and turbulence is now accounted for in wave propagation problems. This is the proof of cross-fertilization and it is certainly a healthy sign in our community. Finally introducing some novelty in the programme does not prevent us from respecting the traditions of the meeting. As usual a good deal of the presentations were dedicated to numerical simulations. Combining advanced numerical techniques with elaborated analytical theory is certainly a trademark of the Varenna-Lausanne conference, which was respected again this year. The quality and size of the scientific production is illustrated by the 26 papers which appear in the present volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series, all refereed. We would also like to mention another set of 20 papers to be published in Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. We hope the readers will enjoy this special issue of JPCS and the one to come in PPCF. Xavier Garbet and Olivier Sauter October 26, 2012

  4. Spherically symmetric simulation of plasma liner driven magnetoinertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Samulyak, Roman; Parks, Paul; Wu Lingling

    2010-09-15

    Spherically symmetric simulations of the implosion of plasma liners and compression of plasma targets in the concept of the plasma jet driven magnetoinertial fusion have been performed using the method of front tracking. The cases of single deuterium and xenon liners and double layer deuterium-xenon liners compressing various deuterium-tritium targets have been investigated, optimized for maximum fusion energy gains, and compared with theoretical predictions and scaling laws of [P. Parks, Phys. Plasmas 15, 062506 (2008)]. In agreement with the theory, the fusion gain was significantly below unity for deuterium-tritium targets compressed by Mach 60 deuterium liners. The most optimal setup for a given chamber size contained a target with the initial radius of 20 cm compressed by a 10 cm thick, Mach 60 xenon liner, achieving a fusion energy gain of 10 with 10 GJ fusion yield. Simulations also showed that composite deuterium-xenon liners reduce the energy gain due to lower target compression rates. The effect of heating of targets by alpha particles on the fusion energy gain has also been investigated.

  5. Magnetogenesis and magnetothermal equilibria in turbulent galaxy-cluster plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schekochihin, Alexander

    2011-04-01

    We do not know the exact mechanism of magnetic field generation in magnetised weakly collisional (or collisionless) turbulent plasma. We do know that large-scale MHD motions in such plasmas are subject to fast small-scale kinetic instabilities (mirror and firehose) triggered (at high beta) by pressure anisotropies and that these anisotropies will always arise in a turbulent plasma. Therefore, standard MHD equations cannot be used to describe the turbulent dynamo. I will argue that the likely scenario in such plasmas is explosively fast growth of magnetic fluctuations to dynamical levels. I will further argue that if an efficient turbulent dynamo is assumed, radiative cooling in such plasmas can be balanced in a thermally stable way by turbulent heating, whose rate is set by the condition that plasma locally remains in a marginal state with respect to the mirror and firehose instabilities. This thermal stability suggests that a cooling catastrophe is not inevitable, although whether this old problem is thus resolved depends on whether a number of assumptions about the nonlinear behaviour of the instabilities, strength of turbulence and efficiency of the dynamo are borne out by first- principles microphysical theory, simulations or plasma experiments.References:A. A. Schekochihin, M. Brueggen, L. Feretti, M. W. Kunz, and L. Rudnick, Space Sci. Rev., in preparation (2011)M. W. Kunz, A. A. Schekochihin, S. C. Cowley, J. J. Binney, and J. S. Sanders, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., in press (2011) [e-print arXiv:1003.2719]M. S. Rosin, A. A. Schekochihin, F. Rincon, and S. C. Cowley, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., in press (2011) [e-print arXiv:1002.4017]A. A. Schekochihin, S. C. Cowley, F. Rincon, and M. S. Rosin, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 405, 291 (2010) [e-print arXiv:0912.1359]A. A. Schekochihin, S. C. Cowley, R. M. Kulsrud, M. S. Rosin, and T. Heinemann, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 081301 (2008) [e-print arXiv:0709.3828]A. A. Schekochihin and S. C. Cowley, Phys. Plasmas 13, 056501

  6. Effects of turbulence on the Thomson scattering process in turbulent plasmas by the scattering of electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Young-Dae

    2013-05-01

    The effects of turbulence on the Thomson scattering process are investigated in turbulent plasmas. The Thomson scattering cross section in turbulent plasmas is obtained by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and plasma dielectric function as a function of the diffusion coefficient, wave number, and Debye length. It is demonstrated that the turbulence effect suppresses the Thomson scattering cross section. It is also shown that the turbulence effect on the Thomson scattering process decreases with increasing thermal energy. The dependence of the wave number on the total Thomson scattering cross section including the turbulent structure factor is also discussed. This paper is dedicated to the late Prof. P. K. Shukla in memory of exciting and stimulating collaborations on effective interaction potentials in various astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  7. Granular fluctuations in plasma turbulence and their role in transport

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.

    1993-04-01

    Three general types of granular or discrete fluctuations in plasma turbulence are reviewed, with emphasis placed on their unique role in fluctuation-induced transport. These fluctuations are clumps, holes, and vortices, and represent structures that are not part of the normal mode response, the basis of conventional descriptions of plasma turbulence and transport. These fluctuations interact with the normal mode response to produce profound modifications of transport. The self-consistent linking of fields and particle distributions through quasineutrality and Ampere's law is shown to be crucial in calculating these modifications. In particular, it is pointed out that collisionless electron motion along perturbed magnetic fields produces almost no transport of field aligned current across equilibrium surfaces. It is also shown that clumps are granular structures which are turbulently mixed, whereas holes and vortices avoid mixing and relaxation through strong self-binding effects. The distinction between structures that are mixed and those that are persistent is probed in an analysis of the interaction of an intense vortex and ambient turbulent fluctuations. It is shown that, above a critical amplitude, the shearing of eddies due to the differential rotation of the vortex suppresses the fluctuations that mix its vorticity, allowing it to achieve a lifetime greatly in excess of the turbulent interaction time scale.

  8. Granular fluctuations in plasma turbulence and their role in transport

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.

    1993-04-01

    Three general types of granular or discrete fluctuations in plasma turbulence are reviewed, with emphasis placed on their unique role in fluctuation-induced transport. These fluctuations are clumps, holes, and vortices, and represent structures that are not part of the normal mode response, the basis of conventional descriptions of plasma turbulence and transport. These fluctuations interact with the normal mode response to produce profound modifications of transport. The self-consistent linking of fields and particle distributions through quasineutrality and Ampere`s law is shown to be crucial in calculating these modifications. In particular, it is pointed out that collisionless electron motion along perturbed magnetic fields produces almost no transport of field aligned current across equilibrium surfaces. It is also shown that clumps are granular structures which are turbulently mixed, whereas holes and vortices avoid mixing and relaxation through strong self-binding effects. The distinction between structures that are mixed and those that are persistent is probed in an analysis of the interaction of an intense vortex and ambient turbulent fluctuations. It is shown that, above a critical amplitude, the shearing of eddies due to the differential rotation of the vortex suppresses the fluctuations that mix its vorticity, allowing it to achieve a lifetime greatly in excess of the turbulent interaction time scale.

  9. Turbulent contributions to Ohm's law in axisymmetric magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavdarovski, I.; Gatto, R.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of magnetic turbulence in shaping the current density in axisymmetric magnetized plasmas is analyzed using a turbulent extension of Ohm's law derived from the self-consistent action-angle transport theory. Besides the well-known hyper-resistive (helicity-conserving) contribution, the generalized Ohm's law contains an anomalous resistivity term and a turbulent bootstrap-like term proportional to the current density derivative. The numerical solution of the equation for equilibrium and turbulence profiles characteristic of conventional and advanced scenarios shows that, through the "turbulent bootstrap" effect and anomalous resistivity, power and parallel current can be generated which are a sizable portion (about 20%-25%) of the corresponding effects associated with the neoclassical bootstrap effect. The degree of alignment of the turbulence peak and the pressure gradient plays an important role in defining the steady-state regime. In a fully bootstrapped tokamak, the hyper-resistivity is essential in overcoming the intrinsic limitation of the hollow current profile.

  10. GYROKINETIC PARTICLE SIMULATION OF TURBULENT TRANSPORT IN BURNING PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Claude Wendell

    2014-06-10

    The SciDAC project at the IFS advanced the state of high performance computing for turbulent structures and turbulent transport. The team project with Prof Zhihong Lin [PI] at Univ California Irvine produced new understanding of the turbulent electron transport. The simulations were performed at the Texas Advanced Computer Center TACC and the NERSC facility by Wendell Horton, Lee Leonard and the IFS Graduate Students working in that group. The research included a Validation of the electron turbulent transport code using the data from a steady state university experiment at the University of Columbia in which detailed probe measurements of the turbulence in steady state were used for wide range of temperature gradients to compare with the simulation data. These results were published in a joint paper with Texas graduate student Dr. Xiangrong Fu using the work in his PhD dissertation. X.R. Fu, W. Horton, Y. Xiao, Z. Lin, A.K. Sen and V. Sokolov, “Validation of electron Temperature gradient turbulence in the Columbia Linear Machine, Phys. Plasmas 19, 032303 (2012).

  11. Three-dimensional turbulence structure in space and astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Yasuhito; Comisel, Horia; Motschmann, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Plasma turbulence appears in the solar wind and around the Earth bow shock, and serves as an ideal natural laboratory for studying turbulence structure, mechanisms of energy cascade and dissipation, and particle energization. Understanding dissipation mechanisms and particle energization is relevant to astrophysical applications such as accretion disks, interstellar medium, and supernova explosions. Our knowledge on turbulence structure and dissipation mechanisms has been advanced so much through the past decade thanks to multi-point measurements in space. Using the Cluster measurements in the solar wind, the three-dimensional filamentary structure of solar wind turbulence has experimentally been revealed from magnetohydrodynamic scales (at about 1,000 to 10,000 km) down to ion kinetic scales (at about 100 km). The filamentation process has also been confirmed by hybrid simulations of ion-kinetic turbulence. Based on a review of filamentation process, wave modes, spectral anisotropy models from the Cluster observations and the hybrid simulations, observational scenarios for understanding particle energization process for the THOR mission concept (Turbulence Heating Observer) are discussed.

  12. Strongly turbulent stabilization of electron beam-plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, H. P.; Haber, I.; Palmadesso, P.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1980-01-01

    The stabilization of electron beam interactions due to strongly turbulent nonlinearities is studied analytically and numerically for a wide range of plasma parameters. A fluid mode coupling code is described in which the effects of electron and ion Landau damping and linear growth due to the energetic electron beam are included in a phenomenological manner. Stabilization of the instability is found to occur when the amplitudes of the unstable modes exceed the threshold of the oscillating two-stream instability. The coordinate space structure of the turbulent spectrum which results clearly shows that soliton-like structures are formed by this process. Phenomenological models of both the initial stabilization and the asymptotic states are developed. Scaling laws between the beam-plasma growth rate and the fluctuations in the fields and plasma density are found in both cases, and shown to be in good agreement with the results of the simulation.

  13. Strongly turbulent stabilization of electron beam-plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, H. P.; Haber, I.; Palmadesso, P.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1980-01-01

    The stabilization of electron beam interactions due to strongly turbulent nonlinearities is studied analytically and numerically for a wide range of plasma parameters. A fluid mode coupling code is described in which the effects of electron and ion Landau damping and linear growth due to the energetic electron beam are included in a phenomenological manner. Stabilization of the instability is found to occur when the amplitudes of the unstable modes exceed the threshold of the oscillating two-stream instability. The coordinate space structure of the turbulent spectrum which results clearly shows that soliton-like structures are formed by this process. Phenomenological models of both the initial stabilization and the asymptotic states are developed. Scaling laws between the beam-plasma growth rate and the fluctuations in the fields and plasma density are found in both cases, and shown to be in good agreement with the results of the simulation.

  14. Plasma shaping effects on tokamak scrape-off layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Fabio; Lanti, Emmanuel; Jolliet, Sébastien; Ricci, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    The impact of plasma shaping on tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) turbulence is investigated. The drift-reduced Braginskii equations are written for arbitrary magnetic geometries, and an analytical equilibrium model is used to introduce the dependence of turbulence equations on tokamak inverse aspect ratio (ε ), Shafranov’s shift (Δ), elongation (κ), and triangularity (δ). A linear study of plasma shaping effects on the growth rate of resistive ballooning modes (RBMs) and resistive drift waves (RDWs) reveals that RBMs are strongly stabilized by elongation and negative triangularity, while RDWs are only slightly stabilized in non-circular magnetic geometries. Assuming that the linear instabilities saturate due to nonlinear local flattening of the plasma gradient, the equilibrium gradient pressure length {L}p=-{p}e/{{\

  15. Universal probability distribution function for bursty transport in plasma turbulence.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, I; Benkadda, S; Garbet, X; Ropokis, G; Hizanidis, K; del-Castillo-Negrete, D

    2009-10-16

    Bursty transport phenomena associated with convective motion present universal statistical characteristics among different physical systems. In this Letter, a stochastic univariate model and the associated probability distribution function for the description of bursty transport in plasma turbulence is presented. The proposed stochastic process recovers the universal distribution of density fluctuations observed in plasma edge of several magnetic confinement devices and the remarkable scaling between their skewness S and kurtosis K. Similar statistical characteristics of variabilities have been also observed in other physical systems that are characterized by convection such as the x-ray fluctuations emitted by the Cygnus X-1 accretion disc plasmas and the sea surface temperature fluctuations.

  16. COSMIC-RAY TRANSPORT THEORY IN PARTIALLY TURBULENT SPACE PLASMAS WITH COMPRESSIBLE MAGNETIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, S.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2012-02-01

    Recently, a new transport theory of cosmic rays in magnetized space plasmas extending the quasilinear approximation to the particle orbit has been developed for the case of an axisymmetric incompressible magnetic turbulence. Here, we generalize the approach to the important physical case of a compressible plasma. As previously obtained in the case of an incompressible plasma, we allow arbitrary gyrophase deviations from the unperturbed spiral orbits in the uniform magnetic field. For the case of quasi-stationary and spatially homogeneous magnetic turbulence we derive, in the small Larmor radius approximation, gyrophase-averaged cosmic-ray Fokker-Planck coefficients. Upper limits for the perpendicular and pitch-angle Fokker-Planck coefficients and for the perpendicular and parallel spatial diffusion coefficients are presented.

  17. Intermittency, coherent structures and dissipation in plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, M.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Parashar, T. N.; Wu, P.; Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.

    2016-04-15

    Collisionless dissipation in turbulent plasmas such as the solar wind and the solar corona has been an intensively studied subject recently, with new insights often emerging from numerical simulation. Here we report results from high resolution, fully kinetic simulations of plasma turbulence in both two (2D) and three (3D) dimensions, studying the relationship between intermittency and dissipation. The simulations show development of turbulent coherent structures, characterized by sheet-like current density structures spanning a range of scales. An approximate dissipation measure is employed, based on work done by the electromagnetic field in the local electron fluid frame. This surrogate dissipation measure is highly concentrated in small subvolumes in both 2D and 3D simulations. Fully kinetic simulations are also compared with magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations in terms of coherent structures and dissipation. The interesting result emerges that the conditional averages of dissipation measure scale very similarly with normalized current density J in 2D and 3D particle-in-cell and in MHD. To the extent that the surrogate dissipation measure is accurate, this result implies that on average dissipation scales as ∼J{sup 2} in turbulent kinetic plasma. Multifractal intermittency is seen in the inertial range in both 2D and 3D, but at scales ∼ion inertial length, the scaling is closer to monofractal.

  18. Turbulence in strongly coupled dusty plasmas using generalized hydrodynamic description

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Sanat Kumar; Dharodi, Vikram Singh; Das, Amita; Patel, Bhavesh G.; Kaw, Predhiman

    2015-02-15

    The properties of decaying turbulence have been studied with the help of a Generalized Hydrodynamic (GHD) fluid model in the context of strongly coupled dusty plasma medium in two dimensions. The GHD model treats the strongly coupled dusty plasma system as a visco-elastic medium. The incompressible limit of the GHD model is considered here. The studies carried out here are, however, applicable to a wider class of visco-elastic systems, and are not merely confined to the dusty plasma medium. Our simulations studies show that an initial spectrum that is confined in a limited domain of wave numbers becomes broad, even when the Reynold's number is much less than the critical value required for the onset of turbulence in Newtonian fluids. This is a signature of elastic turbulence, where Weissenberg's number also plays an important role on the onset of turbulence. This feature has been observed in several experiments. It is also shown that the existence of memory relaxation time parameter and the transverse shear wave inhibit the normal process (for 2-D systems) of inverse spectral cascade in this case. A detailed simulation study has been carried out for the understanding of this inhibition.

  19. Turbulent-driven intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Michael; Parra, Felix; Lee, Jungpyo; Belli, Emily; Nave, Filomena; White, Anne

    2013-10-01

    Tokamak plasmas are routinely observed to rotate even in the absence of an externally applied torque. This ``intrinsic'' rotation exhibits several robust features, including rotation reversals with varying plasma density and current and rotation peaking at the transition from low confinement to high confinement regimes. Conservation of toroidal angular momentum dictates that the intrinsic rotation is determined by momentum redistribution within the plasma, which is dominated by turbulent transport. The turbulent momentum transport, and thus the intrinsic rotation profile, is driven by formally small effects that are usually neglected. We present a gyrokinetic theory that makes use of the smallness of the poloidal to total magnetic field ratio to self-consistently include the dominant effects driving intrinsic turbulent momentum transport in tokamaks. These effects (including slow radial profile variation, slow poloidal turbulence variation, and diamagnetic corrections to the equilibrium Maxwellian) have now been implemented in the local, delta-f gyrokinetic code GS2. We describe important features of the numerical implementation and show numerical results on intrinsic momentum transport that are qualitatively consistent with experimental rotation reversals.

  20. Fractional Transport in Strongly Turbulent Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isliker, Heinz; Vlahos, Loukas; Constantinescu, Dana

    2017-07-01

    We analyze statistically the energization of particles in a large scale environment of strong turbulence that is fragmented into a large number of distributed current filaments. The turbulent environment is generated through strongly perturbed, 3D, resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations, and it emerges naturally from the nonlinear evolution, without a specific reconnection geometry being set up. Based on test-particle simulations, we estimate the transport coefficients in energy space for use in the classical Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, and we show that the latter fails to reproduce the simulation results. The reason is that transport in energy space is highly anomalous (strange), the particles perform Levy flights, and the energy distributions show extended power-law tails. Newly then, we motivate the use and derive the specific form of a fractional transport equation (FTE), we determine its parameters and the order of the fractional derivatives from the simulation data, and we show that the FTE is able to reproduce the high energy part of the simulation data very well. The procedure for determining the FTE parameters also makes clear that it is the analysis of the simulation data that allows us to make the decision whether a classical FP equation or a FTE is appropriate.

  1. First fusion proton measurements in TEXTOR plasmas using activation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Bonheure, G.; Wassenhove, G. Van; Mlynar, J.; Hult, M.; Gonzalez de Orduna, R.; Lutter, G.; Vermaercke, P.; Huber, A.; Schweer, B.; Esser, G.; Biel, W.

    2012-10-15

    MeV particle loss measurements from fusion plasmas, in particular alpha particles, remain difficult in large fusion devices and further R and D is needed for ITER. This paper describes the first attempt to measure 3 MeV escaping fusion protons emitted from TEXTOR tokamak plasmas using activation technique. This technique was successfully demonstrated, initially, in 2006 on the JET tokamak. An ion camera equipped with a collimator and several types of activation detectors was installed inside the TEXTOR vacuum vessel to perform these measurements. After irradiation, the detectors were analyzed using ultra low level gamma-ray spectrometry at the HADES underground laboratory. 3 MeV escaping fusion protons were detected in larger number -{approx}6 times more - compared to earlier measurements using this technique on JET. Another major progress was the reduction of the cooling time by a factor of 50, which made possible to detect radionuclides with half-life of less than 90 min.

  2. First fusion proton measurements in TEXTOR plasmas using activation technique.

    PubMed

    Bonheure, G; Mlynar, J; Van Wassenhove, G; Hult, M; González de Orduña, R; Lutter, G; Vermaercke, P; Huber, A; Schweer, B; Esser, G; Biel, W

    2012-10-01

    MeV particle loss measurements from fusion plasmas, in particular alpha particles, remain difficult in large fusion devices and further R&D is needed for ITER. This paper describes the first attempt to measure 3 MeV escaping fusion protons emitted from TEXTOR tokamak plasmas using activation technique. This technique was successfully demonstrated, initially, in 2006 on the JET tokamak. An ion camera equipped with a collimator and several types of activation detectors was installed inside the TEXTOR vacuum vessel to perform these measurements. After irradiation, the detectors were analyzed using ultra low level gamma-ray spectrometry at the HADES underground laboratory. 3 MeV escaping fusion protons were detected in larger number -~6 times more--compared to earlier measurements using this technique on JET. Another major progress was the reduction of the cooling time by a factor of 50, which made possible to detect radionuclides with half-life of less than 90 min.

  3. First fusion proton measurements in TEXTOR plasmas using activation techniquea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonheure, G.; Mlynar, J.; Wassenhove, G. Van; Hult, M.; González de Orduña, R.; Lutter, G.; Vermaercke, P.; Huber, A.; Schweer, B.; Esser, G.; Biel, W.

    2012-10-01

    MeV particle loss measurements from fusion plasmas, in particular alpha particles, remain difficult in large fusion devices and further R&D is needed for ITER. This paper describes the first attempt to measure 3 MeV escaping fusion protons emitted from TEXTOR tokamak plasmas using activation technique. This technique was successfully demonstrated, initially, in 2006 on the JET tokamak. An ion camera equipped with a collimator and several types of activation detectors was installed inside the TEXTOR vacuum vessel to perform these measurements. After irradiation, the detectors were analyzed using ultra low level gamma-ray spectrometry at the HADES underground laboratory. 3 MeV escaping fusion protons were detected in larger number -˜6 times more - compared to earlier measurements using this technique on JET. Another major progress was the reduction of the cooling time by a factor of 50, which made possible to detect radionuclides with half-life of less than 90 min.

  4. Ion temperature gradient turbulence in helical and axisymmetric RFP plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Predebon, I.; Xanthopoulos, P.

    2015-05-15

    Turbulence induced by the ion temperature gradient (ITG) is investigated in the helical and axisymmetric plasma states of a reversed field pinch device by means of gyrokinetic calculations. The two magnetic configurations are systematically compared, both linearly and nonlinearly, in order to evaluate the impact of the geometry on the instability and its ensuing transport, as well as on the production of zonal flows. Despite its enhanced confinement, the high-current helical state demonstrates a lower ITG stability threshold compared to the axisymmetric state, and ITG turbulence is expected to become an important contributor to the total heat transport.

  5. Plasma Physics, Fusion Science, and California High School Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correll, Donald

    2004-11-01

    In order to further engage California HIgh School science teachers in plasma physics and fusion science, a collaboration was formed between LLNL's Fusion Energy Program and the University of California's Edward Teller Education Center (etec.ucdavis.edu). California's Science Content Standards for high school physics (www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/scphysics.asp) were used to create a public lecture (education.llnl.gov/sos/) that covered "students are expected to achieve" physics topics relevant to astrophysical and fusion plasma research. In addition to the lecture, a two day workshop for the Edward Teller Education Symposium, September 24 - 25, 2004 (education.llnl.gov/symposium2004) was designed around plasma spectroscopy (education.llnl.gov/symposium2004/agenda_astro.html). Plasma spectroscopy was chosen as the "anchor" to the workshop given the breadth and depth of the field to both astrophysical and fusion plasma research. Workshop participation includes lectures, tours, spectroscopic measurements, and building a 'spectroscope' for use in the teachers' respective high school classrooms. Accomplishments will be reported and future plans will be presented that include development of a one to two week expanded workshop that includes plasma research methods and advanced science skills essential to guiding students to conduct research projects.

  6. Alpha heating and burning plasmas in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Spears, B. K.; Nora, R.; Bose, A.; Howard, J.; Woo, K. M.; Edwards, M. J.; Sanz, J.

    2015-06-01

    Estimating the level of alpha heating and determining the onset of the burning plasma regime is essential to finding the path towards thermonuclear ignition. In a burning plasma, the alpha heating exceeds the external input energy to the plasma. Using a simple model of the implosion, it is shown that a general relation can be derived, connecting the burning plasma regime to the yield enhancement due to alpha heating and to experimentally measurable parameters such as the Lawson ignition parameter. A general alpha-heating curve is found, independent of the target and suitable to assess the performance of all laser fusion experiments whether direct or indirect drive. The onset of the burning plasma regime inside the hot spot of current implosions on the National Ignition Facility requires a fusion yield of about 50 kJ.

  7. Heavy particle collisions in astrophysical, fusion, and other plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, David

    2013-09-01

    Contemporary computational methods to treat few-body, atomic-scale interactions have opened opportunities to study them at a new level of detail to both uncover unexpected phenomena and to create data of unprecedented accuracy and scope for applications. Such interactions within gaseous, plasma, and even material environments are fundamental to such diverse phenomena as low temperature plasma processing of semiconductors, collapsing giant molecular clouds forming stars, fluorescent lighting, radiation treatment of disease, and the chemistry of earth's atmosphere. I will illustrate progress using examples from recent work treating heavy particle collision systems, for which our knowledge has been both subtly refined and significantly changed. Examples will include elastic and transport-related processes in fusion and solar-system plasmas, charge transfer leading to diagnostic light emission in planetary atmospheres and fusion plasmas, and excitation and ionization processes needed for plasma modeling and diagnostics.

  8. Plasma source development for fusion-relevant material testing

    DOE PAGES

    Caughman, John B. O.; Goulding, Richard H.; Biewer, Theodore M.; ...

    2017-05-01

    Plasma facing materials in the divertor of a magnetic fusion reactor will have to tolerate steady-state plasma heat fluxes in the range of 10 MW/m2 for ~107 sec, in addition to fusion neutron fluences, which can damage the plasma facing materials to high displacements per atom (dpa) of ~50 dpa . Material solutions needed for the plasma facing components are yet to be developed and tested. The Materials Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) is a newly proposed steady state linear plasma device that is designed to deliver the necessary plasma heat flux to a target for this material testing, including themore » capability to expose a-priori neutron damaged material samples to those plasmas. The requirements of the plasma source needed to deliver this plasma heat flux are being developed on the Proto-MPEX device, which is a linear high-intensity radio frequency (RF) plasma source that combines a high-density helicon plasma generator with electron and ion heating sections. It is being used to study the physics of heating over-dense plasmas in a linear configuration. The helicon plasma is operated at 13.56 MHz with RF power levels up to 120 kW. Microwaves at 28 GHz (~30 kW) are coupled to the electrons in the over-dense helicon plasma via Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW), and ion cyclotron heating at 7-9 MHz (~30 kW) is via a magnetic beach approach. High plasma densities >6x1019/m3 have been produced in deuterium, with electron temperatures that can range from 2 to >10 eV. Operation with on-axis magnetic field strengths between 0.6 and 1.4 T is typical. The plasma heat flux delivered to a target can be > 10 MW/m2, depending on the operating conditions.« less

  9. Tritium Plasma Experiment Upgrade for Fusion Tritium and Nuclear Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Taylor, Chase N.; Kolasinski, Robert D.; Buchenauer, Dean A.

    2015-11-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) is a unique high-flux linear plasma device that can handle beryllium, tritium, and neutron-irradiated plasma facing materials, and is the only existing device dedicated to directly study tritium retention and permeation in neutron-irradiated materials [M. Shimada et.al., Rev. Sci. Instru. 82 (2011) 083503 and and M. Shimada, et.al., Nucl. Fusion 55 (2015) 013008]. Recently the TPE has undergone major upgrades in its electrical and control systems. New DC power supplies and a new control center enable remote plasma operations from outside of the contamination area for tritium, minimizing the possible exposure risk with tritium and beryllium. We discuss the electrical upgrade, enhanced operational safety, improved plasma performance, and development of tritium plasma-driven permeation and optical spectrometer system. This upgrade not only improves operational safety of the worker, but also enhances plasma performance to better simulate extreme plasma-material conditions expected in ITER, Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF), and Demonstration reactor (DEMO). This work was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under the DOE Idaho Field Office contract number DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  10. Anisotropy in solar wind plasma turbulence.

    PubMed

    Oughton, S; Matthaeus, W H; Wan, M; Osman, K T

    2015-05-13

    A review of spectral anisotropy and variance anisotropy for solar wind fluctuations is given, with the discussion covering inertial range and dissipation range scales. For the inertial range, theory, simulations and observations are more or less in accord, in that fluctuation energy is found to be primarily in modes with quasi-perpendicular wavevectors (relative to a suitably defined mean magnetic field), and also that most of the fluctuation energy is in the vector components transverse to the mean field. Energy transfer in the parallel direction and the energy levels in the parallel components are both relatively weak. In the dissipation range, observations indicate that variance anisotropy tends to decrease towards isotropic levels as the electron gyroradius is approached; spectral anisotropy results are mixed. Evidence for and against wave interpretations and turbulence interpretations of these features will be discussed. We also present new simulation results concerning evolution of variance anisotropy for different classes of initial conditions, each with typical background solar wind parameters.

  11. Studies of Aspect Angle Dependence of Plasma Turbulence at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adham, N.; Sheerin, J. P.; Wood, M. R.; Roe, R. G.; Gerres, J. M.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Selcher, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    We report the results from a recent series of campaigns employing the HAARP HF transmitter to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. Diagnostics included the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, and HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE). Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments demonstrate control and suppression of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI). This allows the isolation of ponderomotive plasma turbulence effects. Plasma line spectra exhibit a marked dependence on the aspect angle of the HF pump beam and the pointing of the MUIR diagnostic radar. Refraction is shown to play an important role in the observed plasma line spectral density as a function of zenith angle including the discovery of a second region of strong turbulence displaced southward from the primary HF interaction region along the geomagnetic field line. Background ionospheric conditions are also observed to have a significant effect. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  12. Fusion Science Outreach at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Censabella, V.; Rivenberg, P.; Granville, J.; Nachtrieb, R.; Gangadhara, S.

    1997-11-01

    Educational Outreach at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center is organized and energized by volunteers working together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion and plasma-related experiments. The PSFC holds a number of outreach activities throughout the year, such as Middle and High School Outreach Days. Included in these days is a demonstration of how magnets affect plasma using the ``Plasma Demo," an educational tool which will be on display for the first time outside the MIT area. Also featured is ``C-Mod Jr.," a video game which helps students discover how computers manipulate magnetic pulses to keep a plasma confined in the C-Mod tokamak for as long as possible. The PSFC maintains a Home Page on the World Wide Web, which can be reached at HTTP://PFC.MIT.EDU.

  13. Neoclassical diffusion in a turbulent plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yushmanov, P. . Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii Texas Univ., Austin, TX . Inst. for Fusion Studies)

    1991-11-01

    This work describes a new approach to plasma transport where the toroidal drift motion is considered as a perturbation to the fluctuating velocity. Percolation theory is used to determine the scaling of the diffusion coefficient. Several neoclassical phenomena should persist even when diffusion is enhanced from neoclassical predictions. Numerical simulation results support the theoretical scaling arguments.

  14. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjan, Ram Rout, R. K. Srivastava, R. Gupta, Satish C.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Patel, N. N.; Alex, P.

    2014-04-24

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  15. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, R.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Patel, N. N.; Alex, P.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2014-04-01

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  16. A fusion power plant without plasma-material interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.A.

    1997-04-01

    A steady-state fusion power plant is described which avoids the deleterious plasma-material interactions found in D-T fueled tokamaks. It is based on driven p-{sup 11}B fusion in a high-beta closed-field device, the field-reversed configuration (FRC), anchored in a gas-dynamic trap (GDT). The plasma outflow on the open magnetic-field lines is cooled by radiation in the GDT, then channeled through a magnetic nozzle, promoting 3-body recombination in the expansion region. The resulting supersonic neutral exhaust stream flows through a turbine, generating electricity.

  17. Study of intermittent small-scale turbulence in Wendelstein 7-AS plasmas during controlled confinement transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Basse, N.P.; Zoletnik, S.; Michelsen, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    Confinement transitions in the Wendelstein 7-AS stellarator [H. Renner et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 31, 1579 (1989)] can be induced by varying either the internal plasma current or the external magnetic field. In this paper we report on experiments where closely matched confinement states (good and bad) were constructed using the latter method. Analysis using the former scheme has been reported upon previously [S. Zoletnik et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 44, 1581 (2002)]. The electron temperature, along with the major spectral characteristics of magnetic and small-scale electron density fluctuations, changes dramatically at the transition from good to bad confinement. The fluctuation power is intermittent, and core bursts traveling in the electron diamagnetic drift (DD) direction are correlated between the bottom and top of the plasma, especially during degraded confinement. A corresponding top-bottom correlation for the edge ion DD direction turbulence feature was not found. Strong correlations are observed both between the two density fluctuation signals and between magnetic and density fluctuations in bad compared to good confinement. The correlation time of the bursts is of order 100 {mu}s, similar to the lifetime observed during edge localized modes.

  18. Study of intermittent small-scale turbulence in Wendelstein 7-AS plasmas during controlled confinement transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basse, N. P.; Zoletnik, S.; Michelsen, P. K.; W7-As Team

    2005-01-01

    Confinement transitions in the Wendelstein 7-AS stellarator [H. Renner et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 31, 1579 (1989)] can be induced by varying either the internal plasma current or the external magnetic field. In this paper we report on experiments where closely matched confinement states (good and bad) were constructed using the latter method. Analysis using the former scheme has been reported upon previously [S. Zoletnik et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 44, 1581 (2002)]. The electron temperature, along with the major spectral characteristics of magnetic and small-scale electron density fluctuations, changes dramatically at the transition from good to bad confinement. The fluctuation power is intermittent, and core bursts traveling in the electron diamagnetic drift (DD) direction are correlated between the bottom and top of the plasma, especially during degraded confinement. A corresponding top-bottom correlation for the edge ion DD direction turbulence feature was not found. Strong correlations are observed both between the two density fluctuation signals and between magnetic and density fluctuations in bad compared to good confinement. The correlation time of the bursts is of order 100μs, similar to the lifetime observed during edge localized modes.

  19. Magnetic Turbulence in Colliding Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collette, A.; Gekelman, W.; Vincena, S.

    2007-05-01

    The expansion and interaction of dense plasmas in the presence of a magnetized background plasma is important in many astrophysical processes, among them coronal mass ejections and the many examples of plasma jets from astrophotography. Turbulence is expected to be present in many such configurations. We describe a series of experiments which involve the collision of two dense (initially, n > 1015cm-3) laser-produced plasmas within an ambient, highly magnetized background plasma. The laser-produced plasmas form diamagnetic cavities in which a large percentage of the background magnetic field (600G) has been expelled. First-stage observations of these structures have been completed using a fast (3ns exposure) camera. The photographs indicate complicated structure at late times, in addition to coherent corrugated structures on the bubble surfaces. The data hint at the presence of turbulence in the interaction. The second stage of observation will consist of direct investigation of the magnetic field using probes. A novel diagnostic system composed of small (300-500 micron) 3-axis differential magnetic field probes in conjunction with a ceramic motor system capable of extremely fine (sub-micron) positioning accuracy is currently under development. An ensemble of magnetic field data from fixed and movable probes makes possible the calculation of the cross-spectral function. Initial data from photography and a prototype probe will be presented.

  20. First 3-D simulations of meteor plasma dynamics and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, Meers M.; Dimant, Yakov S.

    2015-02-01

    Millions of small but detectable meteors hit the Earth's atmosphere every second, creating trails of hot plasma that turbulently diffuse into the background atmosphere. For over 60 years, radars have detected meteor plasmas and used these signals to infer characteristics of the meteoroid population and upper atmosphere, but, despite the importance of meteor radar measurements, the complex processes by which these plasmas evolve have never been thoroughly explained or modeled. In this paper, we present the first fully 3-D simulations of meteor evolution, showing meteor plasmas developing instabilities, becoming turbulent, and inhomogeneously diffusing into the background ionosphere. These instabilities explain the characteristics and strength of many radar observations, in particular the high-resolution nonspecular echoes made by large radars. The simulations reveal how meteors create strong electric fields that dig out deep plasma channels along the Earth's magnetic fields. They also allow researchers to explore the impacts of the intense winds and wind shears, commonly found at these altitudes, on meteor plasma evolution. This study will allow the development of more sophisticated models of meteor radar signals, enabling the extraction of detailed information about the properties of meteoroid particles and the atmosphere.

  1. Task toward a Realization of Commercial Tokamak Fusion Plants in 2050 -The Role of ITER and the Succeeding Developments- 3.Fusion Plasma Research toward Fusion Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Yutaka; Shimada, Michiya; Miura, Yukitoshi; Ogawa, Yuichi

    This section discusses fusion plasma research that needs to be carried out to develop fusion power plants. Burning plasma, in which self-heating by energetic alph aparticles plays an essential role, should be recognized as autonomous system. This is quite different from present plasma experiments, suggesting a possibility to yield some qualitative changes in fusion plasma research. Research with ITER is strongly expected to contribute to this burning plasma physics. In addition, plasma performance in steady-state and at high beta is very important in fusion power plants from the engineering and economical viewpoints. Plasma parameters expected for fusion power plants are discussed, and present status of experimental research is reviewed. Research in devices other than ITER with unique features would be instrumental for exploring high performance plasmas. A necessity of research complementary to ITER plasma is discussed.

  2. Free energy and entropy flows in magnetised plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schekochihin, A.; Cowley, S.; Dorland, W.; Howes, G. G.; Quataert, E.; Tatsuno, T.; Plunk, G.; TenBarge, J.; Mallet, A.; Kanekar, A.

    2011-12-01

    Just as fluid turbulence can be conceptualised as a cascade of kinetic energy from large to small scales, kinetic plasma turbulence is a cascade of free energy in the 6D phase space (position and velocity). I will discuss this as a general principle and then specialise to the case of magnetised plasma turbulence at kinetic (sub-ion-Larmor) scales. At these scales, the free energy flux arriving from the inertial range splits into two channels: the kinetic Alfven wave cascade destined to be dissipated into electron heat and the ion entropy cascade, resulting in ion heating. The phase-space nature of the cascade is particularly manifest in this case as the ion entropy cascade involves simultaneous generation of small spatial scales and small scales in velocity space, the latter via a nonlinear phase-mixing process due to ion gyromotion. I will also discuss how the electron Landau damping and the associated process of parallel phase mixing fit into this cascade picture and whether they represent an effective dissipation mechanism in a strongly turbulent nonlinear system.

  3. Altitude characteristics of plasma turbulence excited with the Tromso superheater

    SciTech Connect

    Djuth, F.T.; Elder, J.H. ); Stubbe, P.; Kohl, H. ); Sulzer, M.P. ); Rietveld, M.T. )

    1994-01-01

    Langmuir/ion turbulence excited with the upgraded high-power (1.2-GW effective radiated power) HF heating facility at Tromso, Norway, has been recently studied with the European Incoherent Scatter VHF and UHF incoherent scatter radars. In this report the authors focus on the altitudinal development of the turbulence observed at the highest HF power levels available. Quite remarkably, the observed plasma turbulence plunges downward in altitude over timescales of tens of seconds following HF beam turn-on; the bottom altitude is generally reached after [approximately]30 s. This phenomenon has a well-defined HF power threshold. It is most likely caused by changes in the electron density profile brought about by HF heating of the electron gas. If this is the case, then the heat source must be nonlinearly dependent on HF power. Overall, the characteristics of the Tromso turbulence are quite distinctive when compared to similar high-resolution measurements made at Arecibo Observatory, Puerto Rico. After HF transmissions have been made for tens of seconds at Tromso, billowing altitude structures are often seen, in sharp contrast to layers of turbulence observed at Arecibo. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Transition to subcritical turbulence in a tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk, F.; Highcock, E. G.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Roach, C. M.; Field, A. R.; Dorland, W.

    2016-12-01

    Tokamak turbulence, driven by the ion-temperature gradient and occurring in the presence of flow shear, is investigated by means of local, ion-scale, electrostatic gyrokinetic simulations (with both kinetic ions and electrons) of the conditions in the outer core of the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST). A parameter scan in the local values of the ion-temperature gradient and flow shear is performed. It is demonstrated that the experimentally observed state is near the stability threshold and that this stability threshold is nonlinear: sheared turbulence is subcritical, i.e. the system is formally stable to small perturbations, but, given a large enough initial perturbation, it transitions to a turbulent state. A scenario for such a transition is proposed and supported by numerical results: close to threshold, the nonlinear saturated state and the associated anomalous heat transport are dominated by long-lived coherent structures, which drift across the domain, have finite amplitudes, but are not volume filling; as the system is taken away from the threshold into the more unstable regime, the number of these structures increases until they overlap and a more conventional chaotic state emerges. Whereas this appears to represent a new scenario for transition to turbulence in tokamak plasmas, it is reminiscent of the behaviour of other subcritically turbulent systems, e.g. pipe flows and Keplerian magnetorotational accretion flows.

  5. Isotope effect on filament dynamics in fusion edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, O. H. H.; Kendl, A.

    2017-06-01

    The influence of the ion mass on filament propagation in the scrape-off layer of toroidal magnetised plasmas is analysed for various fusion relevant majority species, like hydrogen isotopes and helium, on the basis of a computational isothermal gyrofluid model for the plasma edge. Heavy hydrogen isotope plasmas show slower outward filament propagation and thus improved confinement properties compared to light isotope plasmas, regardless of collisionality regimes. Similarly, filaments in fully ionised helium move more slowly than in deuterium. Different mass effects on the filament inertia through polarisation, finite Larmor radius, and parallel dynamics are identified.

  6. Physics of laser fusion. Vol. I. Theory of the coronal plasma in laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.

    1981-12-01

    This monograph deals with the physics of the coronal region in laser fusion targets. The corona consists of hot plasma which has been evaporated from the initially solid target during laser heating. It is in the corona that the laser light is absorbed by the target, and the resulting thermal energy is conducted toward cold high-density regions, where ablation occurs. The topics to be discussed are theoretical mechanisms for laser light absorption and reflection, hot-electron production, and the physics of heat conduction in laser-produced plasmas. An accompanying monograph by H. Ahlstrom (Vol.II) reviews the facilities, diagnostics, and data from recent laser fusion experiments.

  7. Aspect ratio effects on limited scrape-off layer plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolliet, Sébastien; Halpern, Federico D.; Loizu, Joaquim; Mosetto, Annamaria; Ricci, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    The drift-reduced Braginskii model describing turbulence in the tokamak scrape-off layer is written for a general magnetic configuration with a limiter. The equilibrium is then specified for a circular concentric magnetic geometry retaining aspect ratio effects. Simulations are then carried out with the help of the global, flux-driven fluid three-dimensional code GBS [Ricci et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 124047 (2012)]. Linearly, both simulations and simplified analytical models reveal a stabilization of ballooning modes. Nonlinearly, flux-driven nonlinear simulations give a pressure characteristic length whose trends are correctly captured by the gradient removal theory [Ricci and Rogers, Phys. Plasmas 20, 010702 (2013)], that assumes the profile flattening from the linear modes as the saturation mechanism. More specifically, the linear stabilization of ballooning modes is reflected by a 15% increase in the steady-state pressure gradient obtained from GBS nonlinear simulations when going from an infinite to a realistic aspect ratio.

  8. Aspect ratio effects on limited scrape-off layer plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jolliet, Sébastien Halpern, Federico D.; Loizu, Joaquim; Mosetto, Annamaria; Ricci, Paolo

    2014-02-15

    The drift-reduced Braginskii model describing turbulence in the tokamak scrape-off layer is written for a general magnetic configuration with a limiter. The equilibrium is then specified for a circular concentric magnetic geometry retaining aspect ratio effects. Simulations are then carried out with the help of the global, flux-driven fluid three-dimensional code GBS [Ricci et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 124047 (2012)]. Linearly, both simulations and simplified analytical models reveal a stabilization of ballooning modes. Nonlinearly, flux-driven nonlinear simulations give a pressure characteristic length whose trends are correctly captured by the gradient removal theory [Ricci and Rogers, Phys. Plasmas 20, 010702 (2013)], that assumes the profile flattening from the linear modes as the saturation mechanism. More specifically, the linear stabilization of ballooning modes is reflected by a 15% increase in the steady-state pressure gradient obtained from GBS nonlinear simulations when going from an infinite to a realistic aspect ratio.

  9. Complexity Induced Anisotropic Bimodal Intermittent Turbulence in Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tom; Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Wu, Cheng-Chin

    2004-01-01

    The "physics of complexity" in space plasmas is the central theme of this exposition. It is demonstrated that the sporadic and localized interactions of magnetic coherent structures arising from the plasma resonances can be the source for the coexistence of nonpropagating spatiotemporal fluctuations and propagating modes. Non-Gaussian probability distribution functions of the intermittent fluctuations from direct numerical simulations are obtained and discussed. Power spectra and local intermittency measures using the wavelet analyses are presented to display the spottiness of the small-scale turbulent fluctuations and the non-uniformity of coarse-grained dissipation that can lead to magnetic topological reconfigurations. The technique of the dynamic renormalization group is applied to the study of the scaling properties of such type of multiscale fluctuations. Charged particle interactions with both the propagating and nonpropagating portions of the intermittent turbulence are also described.

  10. Intermittent dissipation and heating in 3D kinetic plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, M.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.; Parashar, T.; Wu, P.; Shay, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of collisionless dissipation has been hotlydebated in recent years, with alternative ideas posed interms of various wave modes, such as kinetic Alfven waves,whistlers, linear Vlasov instabilities, cyclotron resonance,and Landau damping. Here we use large scale, fully kinetic3D simulations of collisionless plasma turbulence which showthe development of turbulence characterized by sheet-likecurrent density structures spanning a range of scales.We present evidence that these structures are sites for heatingand dissipation, and that stronger current structures signifyhigher dissipation rates. The analyses focus on quantities such as J.E, electron and proton temperatures, and PVI of the magnetic field. Evidently, kinetic scale plasma,like magnetohydrodynamics, becomes intermittent due tocurrent sheet formation, leading to the expectationthat heating and dissipation in astrophysical and space plasmasmay be highly nonuniform. Comparison with previousresults from 2D kinetic simulations, as well as high frequencysolar wind observational data will also be discussed.

  11. Edge transport bifurcation in plasma resistive interchange turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Wang, X. Y.; Sun, C. K.; Meng, C.; Zhou, A.; Liu, D.

    2017-05-01

    Transport bifurcation and mean E × B shear flow generation in resistive interchange turbulence are explored with self-consistent fluid simulations in a flux-driven system with both closed and open field line regions. The nonlinear evolution of resistive interchange modes shows the presence of two confinement regimes characterized by low and high mean E × B shear flows. By increasing the heat flux above a threshold, large-amplitude fluctuations are induced in the plasma edge region and a transition to the state of reduced turbulent transport occurs as the Reynolds power exceeds the fluctuation energy input rate for a sufficient time period. The flux-gradient relationship shows a sharp bifurcation in the plasma edge transport.

  12. Anisotropy in solar wind plasma turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Oughton, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, M.; Osman, K. T.

    2015-01-01

    A review of spectral anisotropy and variance anisotropy for solar wind fluctuations is given, with the discussion covering inertial range and dissipation range scales. For the inertial range, theory, simulations and observations are more or less in accord, in that fluctuation energy is found to be primarily in modes with quasi-perpendicular wavevectors (relative to a suitably defined mean magnetic field), and also that most of the fluctuation energy is in the vector components transverse to the mean field. Energy transfer in the parallel direction and the energy levels in the parallel components are both relatively weak. In the dissipation range, observations indicate that variance anisotropy tends to decrease towards isotropic levels as the electron gyroradius is approached; spectral anisotropy results are mixed. Evidence for and against wave interpretations and turbulence interpretations of these features will be discussed. We also present new simulation results concerning evolution of variance anisotropy for different classes of initial conditions, each with typical background solar wind parameters. PMID:25848082

  13. Laser-plasma interactions relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, K. B.

    1998-11-01

    Research into laser-driven inertial confinement fusion is now entering a critical juncture with the construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Many of the remaining unanswered questions concerning NIF involve interactions between lasers and plasmas. With the eventual goal of fusion power in mind, laser-plasma interactions relevant to laser fusion schemes is an important topic in need of further research. This work experimentally addresses some potential shortcuts and pitfalls on the road to laser-driven fusion power. Current plans on NIF have 192 laser beams directed into a small cylindrical cavity which will contain the fusion fuel; to accomplish this the beams must cross in the entrance holes, and this intersection will be in the presence of outward-flowing plasma. To investigate the physics involved, interactions of crossing laser beams in flowing plasmas are investigated with experiments on the Nova laser facility at LLNL. It was found that in a flowing plasma, energy is transferred between two crossing laser beams, and this may have deleterious consequences for energy balance and ignition in NIF. Possible solutions to this problem are presented. A recently-proposed alternative to standard laser-driven fusion, the ''fast ignitor'' concept, is also experimentally addressed in this dissertation. Many of the laser-plasma interactions necessary for the success of the fast ignitor have not previously been explored at the relevant laser intensities. Specifically, the transfer of high-intensity laser energy to electrons at solid-target interfaces is addressed. 20-30% conversion efficiencies into forward-propagated electrons were measured, along with an average electron energy that varied with the type of target material. The directionality of the electrons was also measured, revealing an apparent beaming of the highest energy electrons. This work was extended to various intensities and pulse lengths and a

  14. Passive Spectroscopic Diagnostics for Magnetically-confined Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B. C.; Biter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hillis, D. L.; Hogan, J. T.

    2007-07-18

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities and hydrogen isotopes plays an important role in the study of magnetically-confined fusion plasmas, both in determining the effects of impurities on plasma behavior and in measurements of plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, particle transport, and particle influx rates. This paper reviews spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma radiation that are excited by collisional processes in the plasma, which are termed 'passive' spectroscopic diagnostics to distinguish them from 'active' spectroscopic diagnostics involving injected particle and laser beams. A brief overview of the ionization balance in hot plasmas and the relevant line and continuum radiation excitation mechanisms is given. Instrumentation in the soft X-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the spectrum is described and examples of measurements are given. Paths for further development of these measurements and issues for their implementation in a burning plasma environment are discussed.

  15. Lithium As Plasma Facing Component for Magnetic Fusion Research

    SciTech Connect

    Masayuki Ono

    2012-09-10

    The use of lithium in magnetic fusion confinement experiments started in the 1990's in order to improve tokamak plasma performance as a low-recycling plasma-facing component (PFC). Lithium is the lightest alkali metal and it is highly chemically reactive with relevant ion species in fusion plasmas including hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, carbon, and oxygen. Because of the reactive properties, lithium can provide strong pumping for those ions. It was indeed a spectacular success in TFTR where a very small amount (~ 0.02 gram) of lithium coating of the PFCs resulted in the fusion power output to improve by nearly a factor of two. The plasma confinement also improved by a factor of two. This success was attributed to the reduced recycling of cold gas surrounding the fusion plasma due to highly reactive lithium on the wall. The plasma confinement and performance improvements have since been confirmed in a large number of fusion devices with various magnetic configurations including CDX-U/LTX (US), CPD (Japan), HT-7 (China), EAST (China), FTU (Italy), NSTX (US), T-10, T-11M (Russia), TJ-II (Spain), and RFX (Italy). Additionally, lithium was shown to broaden the plasma pressure profile in NSTX, which is advantageous in achieving high performance H-mode operation for tokamak reactors. It is also noted that even with significant applications (up to 1,000 grams in NSTX) of lithium on PFCs, very little contamination (< 0.1%) of lithium fraction in main fusion plasma core was observed even during high confinement modes. The lithium therefore appears to be a highly desirable material to be used as a plasma PFC material from the magnetic fusion plasma performance and operational point of view. An exciting development in recent years is the growing realization of lithium as a potential solution to solve the exceptionally challenging need to handle the fusion reactor divertor heat flux, which could reach 60 MW/m2 . By placing the liquid lithium (LL) surface in the path of the main

  16. Trapped Electron Mode Turbulence Driven Intrinsic Rotation in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Hahm, T. S.; Ethier, S.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2011-02-07

    Recent progress from global gyrokinetic simulations in understanding the origin of intrinsic rotation in toroidal plasmas is reported with emphasis on electron thermal transport dominated regimes. The turbulence driven intrinsic torque associated with nonlinear residual stress generation by the fluctuation intensity and the intensity gradient in the presence of zonal flow shear induced asymmetry in the parallel wavenumber spectrum is shown to scale close to linearly with plasma gradients and the inverse of the plasma current. These results qualitatively reproduce empirical scalings of intrinsic rotation observed in various experiments. The origin of current scaling is found to be due to enhanced kll symmetry breaking induced by the increased radial variation of the safety factor as the current decreases. The physics origin for the linear dependence of intrinsic torque on pressure gradient is that both turbulence intensity and the zonal flow shear, which are two key ingredients for driving residual stress, increase with the strength of turbulence drive, which is R0/LTe and R0/Lne for the trapped electron mode. __________________________________________________

  17. Advanced Tokamak Plasmas in the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Kessel; D. Meade; D.W. Swain; P. Titus; M.A. Ulrickson

    2003-10-13

    The Advanced Tokamak (AT) capability of the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) burning plasma experiment is examined with 0-D systems analysis, equilibrium and ideal-MHD stability, radio-frequency current-drive analysis, and full discharge dynamic simulations. These analyses have identified the required parameters for attractive burning AT plasmas, and indicate that these are feasible within the engineering constraints of the device.

  18. High-Gain High-Field Fusion Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ge

    2015-01-01

    A Faraday wheel (FW)—an electric generator of constant electrical polarity that produces huge currents—could be implemented in an existing tokamak to study high-gain high-field (HGHF) fusion plasma, such as the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). HGHF plasma can be realized in EAST by updating its pulsed-power system to compress plasma in two steps by induction fields; high gains of the Lawson trinity parameter and fusion power are both predicted by formulating the HGHF plasma. Both gain rates are faster than the decrease rate of the plasma volume. The formulation is checked by earlier ATC tests. Good agreement between theory and tests indicates that scaling to over 10 T at EAST may be possible by two-step compressions with a compression ratio of the minor radius of up to 3. These results point to a quick new path of fusion plasma study, i.e., simulating the Sun by EAST. PMID:26507314

  19. On Kraichnan's 'direct interaction approximation' and Kolmogoroff's theory in two-dimensional plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.; Sudan, R.N.

    1981-04-01

    The nonlinear damping in a strongly turbulent convecting plasma computed by Kraichnan's modified direct inteaction approximation and the power spectrum are rederived in a physically transparent form using Kolmogoroff's theory of turbulence.

  20. Alpha Heating and Burning Plasmas in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.

    2016-05-01

    Assessing the degree to which fusion alpha particles contribute to the fusion yield is essential to understanding the onset of the thermal runaway process of thermonuclear ignition. It is shown that in inertial confinement fusion, the yield enhancement due to alpha particle heating (before ignition occurs) depends on the generalized Lawson parameter that can be inferred from experimental observables. A universal curve valid for arbitrary laser-fusion targets shows the yield amplification due to alpha heating for a given value of the Lawson parameter. The same theory is used to determine the onset of the burning plasma regime when the alpha heating exceeds the compression work. This result can be used to assess the performance of current ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility.

  1. TRPM7 facilitates cholinergic vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Brauchi, Sebastian; Krapivinsky, Grigory; Krapivinsky, Luba; Clapham, David E

    2008-06-17

    TRPM7, of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family, is both an ion channel and a kinase. Previously, we showed that TRPM7 is located in the membranes of acetylcholine (ACh)-secreting synaptic vesicles of sympathetic neurons, forms a molecular complex with proteins of the vesicular fusion machinery, and is critical for stimulated neurotransmitter release. Here, we targeted pHluorin to small synaptic-like vesicles (SSLV) in PC12 cells and demonstrate that it can serve as a single-vesicle plasma membrane fusion reporter. In PC12 cells, as in sympathetic neurons, TRPM7 is located in ACh-secreting SSLVs. TRPM7 knockdown by siRNA, or abolishing channel activity by expression of a dominant negative TRPM7 pore mutant, decreased the frequency of spontaneous and voltage-stimulated SSLV fusion events without affecting large dense core vesicle secretion. We conclude that the conductance of TRPM7 across the vesicle membrane is important in SSLV fusion.

  2. On the estimation by Kadomtsev of coefficients of turbulent transport in magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nedospasov, A. V.

    2009-06-15

    The behavior of plasma in magnetic field is, as a rule, defined by nonlinear interaction of numerous oscillations and exhibits a complex turbulent pattern. Such state of plasma cannot described by linear and quasilinear theories. This paper reflects on the history of studying turbulence in magnetized plasma. In 1964, Kadomtsev (1928-1998) suggested [B. B. Kadomtsev, Vopr. Teor. Plazmy 4, 188 (1964)] that for estimation of coefficients of turbulent transport of plasma across the magnetic field, only the results of linear approximation of plasma instabilities can be used. Examples of experimental validation of the suggested approach, in particular regarding properties of turbulent positive column of discharge in a strong magnetic field, of ionization turbulence of weakly ionized plasma in crossed E, H, fields, and of turbulence of wall plasma in tokamaks, are discussed.

  3. Plasma Physics Lab and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, 1989

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    From the Princeton University Archives: Promotional video about the Plasma Physics Lab and the new Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), with footage of the interior, machines, and scientists at work. This film is discussed in the audiovisual blog of the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, which holds the archives of Princeton University.

  4. Optimal control theory applied to fusion plasma thermal stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, G.; Miley, G.; Maya, I.

    1985-01-01

    Many authors have investigated stability characteristics and performance of various burn control schemes. The work presented here represents the first application of optimal control theory to the problem of fusion plasma thermal stabilization. The objectives of this initial investigation were to develop analysis methods, demonstrate tractability, and present some preliminary results of optimal control theory in burn control research.

  5. Self-consistent Simulations of Plasma-Neutral in a Partially Ionized Astrophysical Turbulent Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Zank, G. P.

    2010-03-01

    A local turbulence model is developed to study energy cascades in the heliosheath and outer heliosphere (OH) based on self-consistent two-dimensional fluid simulations. The model describes a partially ionized magnetofluid OH that couples a neutral hydrogen fluid with a plasma primarily through charge-exchange interactions. Charge-exchange interactions are ubiquitous in warm heliospheric plasma, and the strength of the interaction depends largely on the relative speed between the plasma and the neutral fluid. Unlike small-length scale linear collisional dissipation in a single fluid, charge-exchange processes introduce channels that can be effective on a variety of length scales that depend on the neutral and plasma densities, temperature, relative velocities, charge-exchange cross section, and the characteristic length scales. We find, from scaling arguments and nonlinear coupled fluid simulations, that charge-exchange interactions modify spectral transfer associated with large-scale energy-containing eddies. Consequently, the turbulent cascade rate prolongs spectral transfer among inertial range turbulent modes. Turbulent spectra associated with the neutral and plasma fluids are therefore steeper than those predicted by Kolmogorov's phenomenology. Our work is important in the context of the global heliospheric interaction, the energization and transport of cosmic rays, gamma-ray bursts, interstellar density spectra, etc. Furthermore, the plasma-neutral coupling is crucial in understanding the energy dissipation mechanism in molecular clouds and star formation processes.

  6. Fundamental statistical descriptions of plasma turbulence in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krommes, John A.

    2002-04-01

    A pedagogical review of the historical development and current status (as of early 2000) of systematic statistical theories of plasma turbulence is undertaken. Emphasis is on conceptual foundations and methodology, not practical applications. Particular attention is paid to equations and formalism appropriate to strongly magnetized, fully ionized plasmas. Extensive reference to the literature on neutral-fluid turbulence is made, but the unique properties and problems of plasmas are emphasized throughout. Discussions are given of quasilinear theory, weak-turbulence theory, resonance-broadening theory, and the clump algorithm. The direct-interaction approximation (DIA) is developed as a central focus of the article, and its relationship to the earlier plasma theories is explained. Various methods of renormalized perturbation theory are described, then unified with the aid of the generating-functional formalism of Martin, Siggia, and Rose. A general expression for the renormalized dielectric function is deduced and discussed in detail. Modern approaches such as decimation and PDF methods are described. Derivations of DIA-based Markovian closures are discussed. The eddy-damped quasinormal Markovian (EDQNM) closure is shown to be nonrealizable in the presence of waves, and a new realizable Markovian closure is presented. The test-field model and a realizable modification thereof are also summarized. Numerical solutions of various closures for some plasma-physics paradigms are reviewed. The variational approach to bounds on transport is developed. Miscellaneous topics include Onsager symmetries for turbulence, the interpretation of entropy balances for both kinetic and fluid descriptions, self-organized criticality, statistical interactions between disparate scales, and the roles of both mean and random shear. Appendices are provided on Fourier transform conventions, dimensional and scaling analysis, the derivations of nonlinear gyrokinetic and gyrofluid equations

  7. Lithium-based surfaces controlling fusion plasma behavior at the plasma-material interface

    SciTech Connect

    Allain, Jean Paul; Taylor, Chase N.

    2012-05-15

    The plasma-material interface and its impact on the performance of magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas are considered to be one of the key scientific gaps in the realization of nuclear fusion power. At this interface, high particle and heat flux from the fusion plasma can limit the material's lifetime and reliability and therefore hinder operation of the fusion device. Lithium-based surfaces are now being used in major magnetic confinement fusion devices and have observed profound effects on plasma performance including enhanced confinement, suppression and control of edge localized modes (ELM), lower hydrogen recycling and impurity suppression. The critical spatial scale length of deuterium and helium particle interactions in lithium ranges between 5-100 nm depending on the incident particle energies at the edge and magnetic configuration. Lithium-based surfaces also range from liquid state to solid lithium coatings on a variety of substrates (e.g., graphite, stainless steel, refractory metal W/Mo/etc., or porous metal structures). Temperature-dependent effects from lithium-based surfaces as plasma facing components (PFC) include magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability issues related to liquid lithium, surface impurity, and deuterium retention issues, and anomalous physical sputtering increase at temperatures above lithium's melting point. The paper discusses the viability of lithium-based surfaces in future burning-plasma environments such as those found in ITER and DEMO-like fusion reactor devices.

  8. Lithium-based surfaces controlling fusion plasma behavior at the plasma-material interfacea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, Jean Paul; Taylor, Chase N.

    2012-05-01

    The plasma-material interface and its impact on the performance of magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas are considered to be one of the key scientific gaps in the realization of nuclear fusion power. At this interface, high particle and heat flux from the fusion plasma can limit the material's lifetime and reliability and therefore hinder operation of the fusion device. Lithium-based surfaces are now being used in major magnetic confinement fusion devices and have observed profound effects on plasma performance including enhanced confinement, suppression and control of edge localized modes (ELM), lower hydrogen recycling and impurity suppression. The critical spatial scale length of deuterium and helium particle interactions in lithium ranges between 5-100 nm depending on the incident particle energies at the edge and magnetic configuration. Lithium-based surfaces also range from liquid state to solid lithium coatings on a variety of substrates (e.g., graphite, stainless steel, refractory metal W/Mo/etc., or porous metal structures). Temperature-dependent effects from lithium-based surfaces as plasma facing components (PFC) include magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability issues related to liquid lithium, surface impurity, and deuterium retention issues, and anomalous physical sputtering increase at temperatures above lithium's melting point. The paper discusses the viability of lithium-based surfaces in future burning-plasma environments such as those found in ITER and DEMO-like fusion reactor devices.

  9. Probing plasma turbulence by modulating the electron temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; Holland, C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Doyle, E. J.; Hillesheim, J.; Peebles, W. A.; Zeng, L.; White, A. E.; Austin, M. E.; Yan, Z.

    2010-05-15

    The local value of a/L{sub Te}, a turbulence drive term, was modulated with electron cyclotron heating in L-mode discharges on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] and the density and electron temperature fluctuations in low, intermediate, and high-k regimes were measured and compared with nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. The local drive term at rhoapprox0.6 was reduced by up to 50%, which produced comparable reductions in electron temperature fluctuations at low-k. At intermediate k, k{sub t}hetaapprox4 cm{sup -1} and k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}approx0.8, a very interesting and unexpected result was observed where density fluctuations increased by up to 10% when the local drive term was decreased by 50%. Initial comparisons of simulations from GYRO with the thermal diffusivity from power balance analysis and measured turbulence response are reported. Simulations for the case with the lowest drive term are challenging as they are near the marginal value of a/L{sub Te} for trapped electron mode activity.

  10. Electron density measurements in the ITER fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Christopher; Udintsev, Victor; Andrew, Philip; Vayakis, George; Van Zeeland, Michael; Brower, David; Feder, Russell; Mukhin, Eugene; Tolstyakov, Sergey

    2013-08-01

    The operation of ITER requires high-quality estimates of the plasma electron density over multiple regions in the plasma for plasma evaluation, plasma control and machine protection purposes. Although the density regimes of ITER are not very different from those of existing tokamaks (1018-1021 m-3), the severe conditions of the fusion plasma environment present particular challenges to implementing these density diagnostics. In this paper we present an overview of the array of ITER electron density diagnostics designed to measure over the entire ITER domain: plasma core, pedestal, edge, scrape-off layer and divertor. It will focus on the challenges faced in making these measurements, and the technical solutions of the current designs.

  11. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center 1992--1993 report to the President

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at MIT`s plasma fusion center. Some of the areas covered are: plasma diagnostics; rf plasma heating; gyrotron research; treatment of solid waste by arc plasma; divertor experiments; tokamak studies; and plasma and fusion theory.

  12. Low frequency turbulence in space plasmas with dust impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atamaniuk, Barbara; Volokitin, Alexander S.; Rothkaehl, Hanna

    2013-04-01

    In order to enhance our understanding of the rich plasma physical processes that drive the solar-terrestrial space environment and to create the adequate and rich services for Space Weather Program, we need to increase our ability to perform multi-point measurements by means of different sensors. Moon as the natural spacecraft can be a target for localisation the radio receiver dedicated to monitoring Earth's space environment and obtain a much more complete picture of electromagnetic plasma turbulence in different space regions than those available hitherto. Moreover this diagnostic can give the information about the localisation and property of the plasmopause, magnetosheet, magnetopause, bow shock, solar wind and radio burst and CME. It is well known that even systems with a finite number of interacting waves can be realized in the turbulent state of the active media. At the same time the essential role of dissipation of the waves suggests that, at low threshold of instability, a typical perturbed state of the plasma can be described as a finite set of interacting waves, some of which are unstable and others are strongly damped. In such cases, the number of waves remains finite, but because of competition between the instability and damping of the waves when they interact, the dynamics of the amplitudes of the waves becomes stochastic in nature and the so-called few-mode turbulence. In analyzing the conditions of the various modes of instability of nonlinear low-frequency waves and discussed the transition from quasi-periodic regime to a few-mode turbulence, and then to the fully developed turbulence, depending on the density and composition of the dust component of the plasma. An important topic for lunar missions is understanding how the charged dust behaves, roles of dust transport, levitated dust and electrodynamics around the lunar surface . It could be essential for ensuring the continued safe operation of equipment and long-term exploration. Lunar dust is

  13. Fusion for Space Propulsion and Plasma Liner Driven MTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y.C. Francis; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    in the light of significant development of the enabling pulsed power component technologies that have occurred in the last two decades because of defense and other energy requirements. The extreme states of matter required to produce fusion reactions may be more readily realizable in the pulsed states with less system mass than in steady states. Significant saving in system mass may result in pulsed fusion systems using plasmas in the appropriate density regimes. Magnetized target fusion, which attempts to combine the favorable attributes of magnetic confinement and inertial compression-containment into one single integrated fusion scheme, appears to have benefits that are worth exploring for propulsion application.

  14. Fusion for Space Propulsion and Plasma Liner Driven MTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y.C. Francis; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    in the light of significant development of the enabling pulsed power component technologies that have occurred in the last two decades because of defense and other energy requirements. The extreme states of matter required to produce fusion reactions may be more readily realizable in the pulsed states with less system mass than in steady states. Significant saving in system mass may result in pulsed fusion systems using plasmas in the appropriate density regimes. Magnetized target fusion, which attempts to combine the favorable attributes of magnetic confinement and inertial compression-containment into one single integrated fusion scheme, appears to have benefits that are worth exploring for propulsion application.

  15. Nonlinear effects associated with fast magnetosonic waves and turbulent magnetic amplification in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwary, PremPyari; Sharma, Swati; Sharma, Prachi; Singh, Ram Kishor; Uma, R.; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the spatio-temporal evolution of magnetic field due to the nonlinear coupling between fast magnetosonic wave (FMSW) and low frequency slow Alfvén wave (SAW). The dynamical equations of finite frequency FMSW and SAW in the presence of ponderomotive force of FMSW (pump wave) has been presented. Numerical simulation has been carried out for the nonlinear coupled equations of finite frequency FMSW and SAW. A systematic scan of the nonlinear behavior/evolution of the pump FMSW has been done for one of the set of parameters chosen in this paper, using the coupled dynamical equations. Filamentation of fast magnetosonic wave has been considered to be responsible for the magnetic turbulence during the laser plasma interaction. The results show that the formation and growth of localized structures depend on the background magnetic field but the order of amplification does not get affected by the magnitude of the background magnetic field. In this paper, we have shown the relevance of our model for two different parameters used in laboratory and astrophysical phenomenon. We have used one set of parameters pertaining to experimental observations in the study of fast ignition of laser fusion and hence studied the turbulent structures in stellar environment. The other set corresponds to the study of magnetic field amplification in the clumpy medium surrounding the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. The results indicate considerable randomness in the spatial structure of the magnetic field profile in both the cases and gives a sufficient indication of turbulence. The turbulent spectra have been studied and the break point has been found around k which is consistent with the observations in both the cases. The nonlinear wave-wave interaction presented in this paper may be important in understanding the turbulence in the laboratory as well as the astrophysical phenomenon.

  16. Low-frequency instabilities and plasma turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilic, D. B.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study is reported of steady-state and time-dependent characteristics of the positive column and the hollow cathode discharge (HCD). The steady state of a non-isothermal, cylindrical positive column in an axial magnetic field is described by three moment equations in the plasma approximation. Volume generation of electron-ion pairs by single-stage ionization, the presence of axial current, and collisions with neutrals are considered. The theory covers the range from the low pressure, collisionless regime to the intermediate pressure, collisional regime. It yields radial profiles of the charged particle velocities, density, potential, electron and ion temperatures, and demonstrates similarity laws for the positive column. The results are compared with two moment theories and with experimental data on He, Ar and Hg found in the literature for a wide range of pressures. A simple generalization of the isothermal theory for an infinitely long cylinder in an axial magnetic field to the case of a finite column with axial current flow is also demonstrated.

  17. Detonability of white dwarf plasma: turbulence models at low densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenn, D.; Plewa, T.

    2017-06-01

    We study the conditions required to produce self-sustained detonations in turbulent, carbon-oxygen degenerate plasma at low densities. We perform a series of three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of turbulence driven with various degrees of compressibility. The average conditions in the simulations are representative of models of merging binary white dwarfs. We find that material with very short ignition times is abundant in case turbulence is driven compressively. This material forms contiguous structures that persist over many ignition times, and that we identify as prospective detonation kernels. Detailed analysis of prospective kernels reveals that these objects are centrally condensed and their shape is characterized by low curvature, supportive of self-sustained detonations. The key characteristic of the newly proposed detonation mechanism is thus high degree of compressibility of turbulent drive. The simulated detonation kernels have sizes notably smaller than the spatial resolution of any white dwarf merger simulation performed to date. The resolution required to resolve kernels is 0.1 km. Our results indicate a high probability of detonations in such well-resolved simulations of carbon-oxygen white dwarf mergers. These simulations will likely produce detonations in systems of lower total mass, thus broadening the population of white dwarf binaries capable of producing Type Ia supernovae. Consequently, we expect a downward revision of the lower limit of the total merger mass that is capable of producing a prompt detonation. We review application of the new detonation mechanism to various explosion scenarios of single, Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs.

  18. Coherent structure and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondhiya, Deepak Kumar; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Kasde, Satish Kumar

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the coherent structures and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft. Previously established novel wavelet and higher order statistics are used in this work. We analyze the wavelet power spectrum of various solar wind plasma parameters. We construct a statistical significance level in the wavelet power spectrum to quantify the interference effects arising from filling missing data in the time series, allowing extraction of significant power from the measured data. We analyze each wavelet power spectra for transient coherency, and global periodicities resulting from the superposition of repeating coherent structures. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. These results offer a new understanding of various processes in a turbulent regime. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for current theories of solar wind generation and describe future work for determining the relationship between the coherent structures in our ionic composition data and the structure of the coronal magnetic field. Keywords: Wavelet Power Spectrum, Coherent structure and Solar wind plasma

  19. Nonlinear Laser-Plasma Interaction in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Geissel, Matthias; Awe, Thomas James; Bliss, David E.; ...

    2016-03-04

    Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing a variation of Magneto-Inertial Fusion called Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion, or MagLIF. The MagLIF approach requires magnetization of the deuterium fuel, which is accomplished by an initial external B-Field and laser-driven pre-heat. Although magnetization is crucial to the concept, it is challenging to couple sufficient energy to the fuel, since laser-plasma instabilities exist, and a compromise between laser spot size, laser entrance window thickness, and fuel density must be found. Ultimately, nonlinear processes in laser plasma interaction, or laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), complicate the deposition of laser energy by enhanced absorption, backscatter, filamentation and beam-spray. Wemore » determine and discuss key LPI processes and mitigation methods. Results with and without improvement measures are presented.« less

  20. Nonlinear Laser-Plasma Interaction in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Geissel, Matthias; Awe, Thomas James; Bliss, David E.; Campbell, Edward Michael; Gomez, Matthew R.; Harding, Eric; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Kimmel, Mark W.; Knapp, Patrick; Lewis, Sean M.; McBride, Ryan D.; Peterson, Kyle; Schollmeier, Marius; Scoglietti, Daniel; Sefkow, Adam B.; Shores, Jonathon; Sinars, Daniel; Slutz, Stephen A.; Smith, Ian C.; Speas, Christopher; Vesey, Roger A.; Porter, John L.

    2016-03-04

    Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing a variation of Magneto-Inertial Fusion called Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion, or MagLIF. The MagLIF approach requires magnetization of the deuterium fuel, which is accomplished by an initial external B-Field and laser-driven pre-heat. Although magnetization is crucial to the concept, it is challenging to couple sufficient energy to the fuel, since laser-plasma instabilities exist, and a compromise between laser spot size, laser entrance window thickness, and fuel density must be found. Ultimately, nonlinear processes in laser plasma interaction, or laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), complicate the deposition of laser energy by enhanced absorption, backscatter, filamentation and beam-spray. We determine and discuss key LPI processes and mitigation methods. Results with and without improvement measures are presented.

  1. Turbulent energy transfer in electromagnetic turbulence: hints from a Reversed Field Pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, N.; Bergsaker, H.

    2005-10-01

    The relationship between electromagnetic turbulence and sheared plasma flow in a Reversed Field Pinch is addressed. ExB sheared flows and turbulence at the edge tends to organize themeselves near marginal stability, suggesting an underlying energy exchange process between turbulence and mean flow. In MHD this process is well described through the quantity P which represents the energy transfer (per mass and time unit) from turbulence to mean fields. In the edge region of RFP configuration, where magnetic field is mainly poloidal and the mean ExB is consequently toroidal, the quantity P results: P =[ -ρμ0 + ]Vφr where Vφ is the mean ExB toroidal flow, ρ the mean mass density and b and v the fluctuations of velocity and magnetic field respectively. Both the radial profiles and the temporal evolution of P have been measured in the edge region of Extrap-T2R Reversed Field Pinch experiment. The results support the existence of oscillating energy exchange process between fluctuations and mean flow.

  2. Fundamental Statistical Descriptions of Plasma Turbulence in Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    John A. Krommes

    2001-02-16

    A pedagogical review of the historical development and current status (as of early 2000) of systematic statistical theories of plasma turbulence is undertaken. Emphasis is on conceptual foundations and methodology, not practical applications. Particular attention is paid to equations and formalism appropriate to strongly magnetized, fully ionized plasmas. Extensive reference to the literature on neutral-fluid turbulence is made, but the unique properties and problems of plasmas are emphasized throughout. Discussions are given of quasilinear theory, weak-turbulence theory, resonance-broadening theory, and the clump algorithm. Those are developed independently, then shown to be special cases of the direct-interaction approximation (DIA), which provides a central focus for the article. Various methods of renormalized perturbation theory are described, then unified with the aid of the generating-functional formalism of Martin, Siggia, and Rose. A general expression for the renormalized dielectric function is deduced and discussed in detail. Modern approaches such as decimation and PDF methods are described. Derivations of DIA-based Markovian closures are discussed. The eddy-damped quasinormal Markovian closure is shown to be nonrealizable in the presence of waves, and a new realizable Markovian closure is presented. The test-field model and a realizable modification thereof are also summarized. Numerical solutions of various closures for some plasma-physics paradigms are reviewed. The variational approach to bounds on transport is developed. Miscellaneous topics include Onsager symmetries for turbulence, the interpretation of entropy balances for both kinetic and fluid descriptions, self-organized criticality, statistical interactions between disparate scales, and the roles of both mean and random shear. Appendices are provided on Fourier transform conventions, dimensional and scaling analysis, the derivations of nonlinear gyrokinetic and gyrofluid equations

  3. Book review: Modern Plasma Physics, Vol. I: Physical Kinetics of Turbulent Plasmas, by Patrick H. Diamond, Sanae-I. Itoh and Kimitaka Itoh, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (UK), 2010, IX, 417 p., ISBN 978-0-521-86920-1 (Hardback)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somov, B. V.

    If you want to learn not only the most fundamental things about the physics of turbulent plasmas but also the current state of the problem including the most recent results in theoretical and experimental investigations - and certainly many physicists and astrophysicists do - this series of three excellent monographs is just for you. The first volume "Physical Kinetics of Turbulent Plasmas" develops the kinetic theory of turbulence through a focus on quasi-particle models and dynamics. It discusses the concepts and theoretical methods for describing weak and strong fluid and phase space turbulence in plasma systems far from equilibrium. The core material includes fluctuation theory, self-similar cascades and transport, mean field theory, resonance broadening and nonlinear wave-particle interaction, wave-wave interaction and wave turbulence, strong turbulence theory and renormalization. The book gives readers a deep understanding of the fields under consideration and builds a foundation for future applications to multi-scale processes of self-organization in tokamaks and other confined plasmas. In spite of a short pedagogical introduction, the book is addressed mainly to well prepared readers with a serious background in plasma physics, to researchers and advanced graduate students in nonlinear plasma physics, controlled fusions and related fields such as cosmic plasma physics

  4. Muon catalyzed fusion in plasma state and high intensity DT fusion neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    dt/mu/ molecular formation rates in a plasma state of DT mixture by d and t ions are, respectively, 63 and 77 times higher than the ones by electrons. High plasma oscillation frequency in a high electron density plasma enhances the formation rate in the high temperature dt mixture. The DT muon catalyzed fusion has the ability to produce much higher intensity 14 MeV neutron source (in order of 5 /times/ 10/sup 16/n/cm/sup 2//sec) than other means of stripping and spallation approaches. Such neutrons can be used for testing of first wall material candidates for magnetic fusion reactors, for incinerating fission products (e.g., Cs/sup 137/) and for creating high thermal flux neutron sources, on the order of 10/sup 17/n/cm/sup 2//sec. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Co-current toroidal rotation-driven and turbulent stresses with resonant magnetic perturbations in the edge plasmas of the J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, K. J.; Shi, Yuejiang; Liu, H.; Diamond, P. H.; Li, F. M.; Cheng, J.; Chen, Z. P.; Nie, L.; Ding, Y. H.; Wu, Y. F.; Chen, Z. Y.; Rao, B.; Cheng, Z. F.; Gao, L.; Zhang, X. Q.; Yang, Z. J.; Wang, N. C.; Wang, L.; Jin, W.; Xu, J. Q.; Yan, L. W.; Dong, J. Q.; Zhuang, G.; J-TEXT Team

    2016-07-01

    The acceleration of the co-current toroidal rotations around resonant surfaces by resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) through turbulence is presented. These experiments were performed using a Langmuir probe array in the edge plasmas of the J-TEXT tokamak. This study aims at understanding the RMP effects on edge toroidal rotations and exploring its control method. With RMPs, the flat electron temperature T e profile, due to magnetic islands, appears around resonant surfaces (Zhao et al 2015 Nucl. Fusion 55 073022). When the resonant surface is closer to the last closed flux surface, the flat T e profile vanishes with RMPs. In both cases, the toroidal rotations significantly increase in the direction of the plasma current around the resonant surfaces with RMPs. The characteristics of turbulence are significantly affected by RMPs around the resonant surfaces. The turbulence intensity profile changes and the poloidal wave vector k θ increases with RMPs. The power fraction of the turbulence components in the ion diamagnetic drift direction increases with RMPs. The measurements of turbulent Reynolds stresses are consistent with the toroidal flows that can be driven by turbulence. The estimations of the energy transfer between the turbulence and toroidal flows suggest that turbulence energy transfers into toroidal flows. The result has the implication of the intrinsic rotation being driven by RMPs via turbulence.

  6. Plasma turbulence and impulsive UV line emission in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.

    1986-01-01

    Observations show that hard X-ray burst and UV lines rise and fall simultaneously on time scales of seconds. Hydrodynamic simulations of beam-heated atmospheres, based on collisional transport, however, produce only a gradual fall in UV emission, when the beam flux falls, due to the long time scale of conductive relaxation. It is suggested that this discrepancy might be explained by onset of plasma turbulence driven by the strong heat flux or by the beam return current going unstable. Such turbulence greatly reduces electrical and thermal conductivities. Fall in electrical conductivity reduces the hard X-ray flux by enhanced ohmic dissipation of the return current, while fall in thermal conductivity may cause the UV line to fall by reducing the transition region thickness.

  7. LiWall Fusion - The New Concept of Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Zakharov

    2011-01-12

    Utilization of the outstanding abilities of a liquid lithium layer in pumping hydrogen isotopes leads to a new approach to magnetic fusion, called the LiWall Fusion. It relies on innovative plasma regimes with low edge density and high temperature. The approach combines fueling the plasma by neutral injection beams with the best possible elimination of outside neutral gas sources, which cools down the plasma edge. Prevention of cooling the plasma edge suppresses the dominant, temperature gradient related turbulence in the core. Such an approach is much more suitable for controlled fusion than the present practice, relying on high heating power for compensating essentially unlimited turbulent energy losses.

  8. Long-range spatial correlations in the turbulent edge plasma of the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil’kov, D. G. Kholnov, Yu. V.; Shchepetov, S. V.

    2013-08-15

    Long-range spatial correlations in the turbulent plasma of the L-2M stellarator were revealed experimentally, and their relation to the geometry of magnetic surfaces was analyzed (Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50, 045001 (2008)). The operation modes of the facility in which fast transport transitions in plasma are possible were studied. Upon these transitions, the turbulence level is found to decrease substantially. It is shown that long-range spatial correlations are typical of relatively narrow frequency ranges. In particular, before a transport transition, such frequency ranges are f ∼ 30–40 kHz and f ∼ 1–3 kHz. After the transition, long-range spatial correlations in the frequency range of f ∼ 30–40 kHz disappear due to a significant decrease in the turbulence level in this frequency range. At the same time, correlations in the low frequency range are retained and new correlations at frequencies of f ∼ 6-12 kHz occur. It is found that global electromagnetic oscillations in the frequency range of f ∼ 1–3 kHz are related to the m/n = 0/0 perturbation and its toroidal satellites (here, m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, respectively). It is also shown that, after the transport transition, a three-dimensional localized electromagnetic mode at the frequency of the geodesic acoustic mode governed by the average magnetic field curvature is excited. At higher frequencies typical of a geodesic acoustic mode related to the three-dimensional curvature of the magnetic field, no long-range spatial correlations were observed both before and after the transport transition.

  9. Fusion Plasma Theory: Task 1, Magnetic confinement Fusion Plasma Theory. Annual progress report, November 16, 1992--November 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    The research performed under this grant during the current year has concentrated on few tokamak plasma confinement issues: applications of our new Chapman-Enskog-like approach for developing hybrid fluid/kinetic descriptions of tokamak plasmas; multi-faceted studies as part of our development of a new interacting island paradigm for the tokamak equilibrium`` and transport; investigations of the resolution power of BES and ECE diagnostics for measuring core plasma fluctuations; and studies of net transport in the presence of fluctuating surfaces. Recent progress and publications in these areas, and in the management of the NERSC node and the fusion theory workstations are summarized briefly in this report.

  10. Solar system plasma Turbulence: Observations, inteRmittency and Multifractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echim, Marius M.

    2016-04-01

    The FP7 project STORM is funded by the European Commission to "add value to existing data bases through a more comprehensive interpretation". STORM targets plasma and magnetic field databases collected in the solar wind (Ulysses and also some planetary missions), planetary magnetospheres (Venus Express, Cluster, a few orbits from Cassini), cometary magnetosheaths (e.g. Haley from Giotto observations). The project applies the same package of analysis methods on geomagnetic field observations from ground and on derived indices (e.g. AE, AL, AU, SYM-H). The analysis strategy adopted in STORM is built on the principle of increasing complexity, from lower (like, e.g., the Power Spectral Density - PSD) to higher order analyses (the Probability Distribution Functions - PDFs, Structure Functions - SFs, Fractals and Multifractals - MFs). Therefore STORM targets not only the spectral behavior of turbulent fluctuations but also their topology and scale behavior inferred from advanced mathematical algorithms and geometrical-like analogs. STORM started in January 2013 and ended in December 2015. We will report on a selection of scientific and technical achievements and will highlight: (1) the radial evolution of solar wind turbulence and intermittency based on Ulysses data with some contributions from Venus Express and Cluster; (2) comparative study of fast and slow wind turbulence and intermittency at solar minimum; (3) comparative study of the planetary response (Venus and Earth magnetosheaths) to turbulent solar wind; (4) the critical behavior of geomagnetic fluctuations and indices; (5) an integrated library for non-linear analysis of time series that includes all the approaches adopted in STORM to investigate solar system plasma turbulence. STORM delivers an unprecedented volume of analysed data for turbulence. The project made indeed a systematic survey, orbit by orbit, of data available from ESA repositories and Principal Investigators and provides results ordered as a

  11. Control of Internal Transport Barriers in Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panta, Soma; Newman, David; Sanchez, Raul; Terry, Paul

    2016-10-01

    In magnetic confinement fusion devices the best performance often involves some sort of transport barriers to reduce the energy and particle flow from core to edge. Those barriers create gradients in the temperature and density profiles. If gradients in the profiles are too steep that can lead to instabilities and the system collapses. Control of these barriers is therefore an important challenge for fusion devices (burning plasmas). In this work we focus on the dynamics of internal transport barriers. Using a simple 7 field transport model, extensively used for barrier dynamics and control studies, we explore the use of RF heating to control the local gradients and therefore the growth rates and shearing rates for barrier initiation and control in self-heated fusion plasmas. Ion channel barriers can be formed in self-heated plasmas with some NBI heating but electron channel barriers are very sensitive. They can be formed in self-heated plasmas with additional auxiliary heating i.e. NBI and radio-frequency(RF). Using RF heating on both electrons and ions at proper locations, electron channel barriers along with ion channel barriers can be formed and removed demonstrating a control technique. Investigating the role of pellet injection in controlling the barriers is our next goal. Work supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER54741.

  12. Studies of numerical algorithms for gyrokinetics and the effects of shaping on plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, Emily Ann

    Advanced numerical algorithms for gyrokinetic simulations are explored for more effective studies of plasma turbulent transport. The gyrokinetic equations describe the dynamics of particles in 5-dimensional phase space, averaging over the fast gyromotion, and provide a foundation for studying plasma microturbulence in fusion devices and in astrophysical plasmas. Several algorithms for Eulerian/continuum gyrokinetic solvers are compared. An iterative implicit scheme based on numerical approximations of the plasma response is developed. This method reduces the long time needed to set-up implicit arrays, yet still has larger time step advantages similar to a fully implicit method. Various model preconditioners and iteration schemes, including Krylov-based solvers, are explored. An Alternating Direction Implicit algorithm is also studied and is surprisingly found to yield a severe stability restriction on the time step. Overall, an iterative Krylov algorithm might be the best approach for extensions of core tokamak gyrokinetic simulations to edge kinetic formulations and may be particularly useful for studies of large-scale ExB shear effects. The effects of flux surface shape on the gyrokinetic stability and transport of tokamak plasmas are studied using the nonlinear GS2 gyrokinetic code with analytic equilibria based on interpolations of representative JET-like shapes. High shaping is found to be a stabilizing influence on both the linear ITG instability and nonlinear ITG turbulence. A scaling of the heat flux with elongation of chi ˜ kappa-1.5 or kappa-2 (depending on the triangularity) is observed, which is consistent with previous gyrofluid simulations. Thus, the GS2 turbulence simulations are explaining a significant fraction, but not all, of the empirical elongation scaling. The remainder of the scaling may come from (1) the edge boundary conditions for core turbulence, and (2) the larger Dimits nonlinear critical temperature gradient shift due to the

  13. Electrostatic turbulence in the low-density plasma column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Daria; Granucci, Gustavo; Garavaglia, Saul; Cremona, Anna; Minelli, Daniele; Mellera, Vittoria

    2010-11-01

    Electron plasma density fluctuations are observed in plasma when a radial pressure gradient excites drift waves. The linear machine GyM (R=0.125 m, L= 2.11 m, B<0.1T), operating at IFP-CNR since 2008, has started experiments aimed at characterizing drift waves excited in its non-uniform magnetized plasma. Two different plasma sources (magnetron 2.45 GHz or hot filament) have been used to sustain plasma with adjustable sections (1.5 cmplasma density have been observed and characterized as a function of the injected RF power. The dynamic (frequency and amplitude) of such fluctuations has been related to the spontaneous radial electric field consequence of different electron density profiles. The results from the new probe array, recently implemented in GyM to provide a deeper study of the spatial distribution of turbulence, are shown.

  14. Observation of Pedestal Plasma Turbulence on EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Tao; Han, Xiang; Zhang, Shoubiao; Wang, Yumin; Liu, Zixi; Yang, Yao; Liu, Shaocheng; Shi, Nan; Ling, Bili; Li, Jiangang; The EAST Team

    2013-08-01

    Pedestal plasma turbulence was experimentally studied by microwave reflectometry on EAST tokamak. The characteristics of edge pedestal turbulence during dithering L-H transition, ELM-free H-mode phase and inter-ELM phase have recently been studied on EAST. An edge spatial structure of density fluctuation and its dithering temporal evolution is observed for the first time on the EAST tokamak during the L-H transition phase. A coherent mode usually appears during the ELM-free phase prior to the first ELM on EAST tokamak. The mode frequency gradually decreases as the pedestal evolves. Analysis shows that the coherent mode is in the pedestal region inside the separatrix. In plasma with type-III ELMs, a precursor mode before ELM is usually observed. The frequency of the precursor was initially about 150 kHz and gradually decreased till the next ELM. The mode amplitude increases or shows saturation before ELM. In the plasma with compound ELMs composed of high and low frequency ELMs, the precursor was also observed before the high frequency ELM while the harmonic oscillations with frequencies of 20 kHz, 40 kHz and 60 kHz appear before the low frequency ELM.

  15. Dynamics of Turbulence Suppression in a Helicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Tiffany; Gilmore, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Experiments are currently being conducted in the the Helicon-Cathode Device (HelCat) at the University of New Mexico. The goal is to the study in detail the transition from a turbulent to a non-turbulent state in the presence of flow shear. HelCat has intrinsic fluctuations that have been identified as drift-waves. Using simple electrode biasing, it has been found that these fluctuations can be completely suppressed. In some extreme cases, a different instability, possibly the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, can be excited. Detailed studies are underway in order to understand the characteristics of each mode, and to elucidate the underlying physics that cause the change between an unstable plasma, and an instability-free plasma. Dynamics being observed include changes in flow profiles, both azimuthal and parallel, as well as changes in potential and temperature gradients. Further understanding is being sought using several computer codes developed at EPFL: a linear stability solver (LSS,footnotetextP. Ricci and B.N. Rogers (2009). Phys Plasmas 16, 062303. a one-dimensional PIC code/sheath solver, ODISEE,footnotetextJ. Loizu, P. Ricci, and C. Theiler (2011). Phys Rev E 83, 016406 and a global, 3D Braginski code, GBS.footnotetextRicci, Rogers (2009) A basic overview of results will be presented.

  16. Plasma-sprayed materials for magnetic fusion energy devices

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.F.; Croessmann, C.D.; Hosking, F.M.; Watson, R.D.; Koski, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma spray technology is being evaluated as a means to address important fabrication and maintenance problems associated with plasma-interactive components in magnetic fusion devices (e.g., limiters, divertors, and some first wall surfaces). Low-oxygen vacuum plasma sprayed copper has been tested as a ductile, high thermal conductivity interlayer to limit thermal stress and prevent cracking when brazing pyrolytic graphite (PG) tiles to high-strength metal cooling tubes. A brazed tile/tube assembly with this sprayed interlayer has survived thermal testing up to a surface heat flux of 2.0 kW cm{sup {minus}2} as computed on the basis of the power removed in the sample cooling water. A vacuum-sprayed, tungsten-wire-reinforced, copper composite has also been studied as a means to produce an interlayer with highly anisotropic thermal expansion similar to that of PG. Beryllium and tungsten are the present alternatives to graphite for plasma-facing surfaces. High heat flux testing of plasma-sprayed beryllium samples indicates that adhesion and thermal conductivity must be improved. Plasma-sprayed tungsten has performed well in thermal tests, but other factors may rule out the use of tungsten in near term fusion devices. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Understanding plasma facing surfaces in magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Koel, B. E.; Roszell, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    The plasma-material interface is recognized to be the most critical challenge in the realization of fusion energy. Liquid metals offer a self-healing, renewable interface that bypasses present issues with solid, neutron-damaged materials such as tungsten. Lithium in particular has dramatically improved plasma performance in many tokamaks through a reduction of hydrogen recycling. However the detailed chemical composition and properties of the top few nm that interact with the plasma are often obscure. Surface analysis has proven to be a key tool in semiconductor processing and a new laboratory has been established at PPPL to apply surface science techniques to plasma facing materials. We have shown that lithiated PFC surfaces in tokamaks will likely be oxidized during the intershot interval. Present work is focused on deuterium uptake of solid and liquid metals for plasma density control and sub-micron scale wetting of liquid metals on their substrates. The long-term goal is to provide a material database for designing liquid metal plasma facing components for tokamaks such as National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U) and Fusion Nuclear Science Facility-ST (FNSF-ST). Support was provided through DOE-PPPL Contract Number is DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  18. Plasma processing techniques for tritium inventory control in fusion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabarés, F. L.; Rohde, V.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2004-12-01

    Some techniques with a long tradition in the plasma technology field have already been successfully applied to research in plasma wall interactions of fusion devices. They have produced important advances in the control of particle and energy exhaust. In this paper, the possible application of these techniques to the problem of tritium inventory control in fusion reactors with carbon-based plasma facing materials, as in ITER, is proposed. It is based on a critical analysis of relevant information obtained in the field of hard CN film deposition and consists of the use of chemical scavengers for the inhibition of tritium-rich carbon-film formation in hidden areas of the divertor. The practical implementation of the technique, however, requires a detailed knowledge of the physio-chemical processes involved, and, to date, experiments in cold and divertor plasmas have been performed. Very recent experiments in the ASDEX Upgrade device have shown that the injection of nitrogen in the sub-divertor region can lead to a drastic decrease in the level of deposited material with no significant effects in the performance of the main plasma. This and other findings are interpreted in the light of recent results from laboratory and divertor plasma experiments and the extrapolation to new divertor scenarios is discussed.

  19. Core turbulent transport in tokamak plasmas: bridging theory and experiment with QuaLiKiz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdelle, C.; Citrin, J.; Baiocchi, B.; Casati, A.; Cottier, P.; Garbet, X.; Imbeaux, F.; Contributors, JET

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear gyrokinetic codes allow for detailed understanding of tokamak core turbulent transport. However, their computational demand precludes their use for predictive profile modeling. An alternative approach is required to bridge the gap between theoretical understanding and prediction of experiments. A quasilinear gyrokinetic model, QuaLiKiz (Bourdelle et al 2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 112501), is demonstrated to be rapid enough to ease systematic interface with experiments. The derivation and approximation of this approach are reviewed. The quasilinear approximation is proven valid over a wide range of core plasma parameters. Examples of profile prediction using QuaLiKiz coupled to the CRONOS integrated modeling code (Artaud et al 2010 Nucl. Fusion 50 043001) are presented. QuaLiKiz is being coupled to other integrated modeling platforms such as ETS and JETTO. QuaLiKiz quasilinear gyrokinetic turbulent heat, particle and angular momentum fluxes are available to all users. It allows for extensive stand-alone interpretative analysis and for first principle based integrated predictive modeling.

  20. The plasma-wall interaction region: a key low temperature plasma for controlled fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Counsell, G. F.

    2002-08-01

    The plasma-wall interaction region of a fusion device provides the interface between the hot core plasma and the material surfaces. To obtain acceptably low levels of erosion from these surfaces requires most of the power leaving the core to be radiated. This is accomplished in existing devices by encouraging plasma detachment, in which the hot plasma arriving in the region is cooled by volume recombination and ion-neutral momentum transfer with a dense population of neutrals recycled from the surface. The result is a low temperature (1 eV1019 m-3) but weakly ionized (n0>1020 m-3, ne/n0<0.1) plasma found nowhere else in the fusion environment. This plasma provides many of the conditions found in industrial plasmas exploiting plasma chemistry and the presence of carbon in the region (in the form of carbon-fibre composite used in the plasma facing materials) can result in the formation of deposited hydrocarbon films. The plasma-wall interaction region is therefore among the most difficult in fusion to model, requiring an understanding of atomic, molecular and surface physics issues.

  1. Transport studies in fusion plasmas: Perturbative experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cardozo, N.J.L.

    1996-03-01

    By subjecting a plasma in steady state to small perturbations and measuring the response, it is possible to determine elements of the matrix of transport coefficients. Experimentally this is difficult, and results are mainly limited to transport driven by the pressure and temperature gradients. Importantly, off-diagonal elements in the transport matrix appear to be important. This has also implications for the interpretation of the so-called `power balance` diffusivity, determined from the steady state fluxes and gradients. Experimental techniques, analysis techniques, basic formulas, etc., are briefly reviewed. Experimental results are summarized. The fundamental question whether the fluxes are linear functions of the gradients or not is discussed. 31 refs.

  2. Transport equation for plasmas in a stationary-homogeneous turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaojie

    2016-02-15

    For a plasma in a stationary homogeneous turbulence, the Fokker-Planck equation is derived from the nonlinear Vlasov equation by introducing the entropy principle. The ensemble average in evaluating the kinetic diffusion tensor, whose symmetry has been proved, can be computed in a straightforward way when the fluctuating particle trajectories are provided. As an application, it has been shown that a mean parallel electric filed can drive a particle flux through the Stokes-Einstein relation, independent of the details of the fluctuations.

  3. Length of magnetic field lines in turbulent plasmas.

    PubMed

    Nunez, Manuel

    2002-06-01

    An estimation of the length of any magnetic field line in a two-dimensional periodic magnetohydrodynamic problem is provided. This is done by using some classical function theory results on the analytic extension of the vector potential. The essential parameter, the maximum of this extension, may be analyzed in the case of turbulent plasmas by admitting the Iroshnikov-Kraichnan statistics, establishing in this way a relation between the length of any magnetic field line and the energy dissipation scale. (c) 2002 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Turbulent boundary-layer control with plasma actuators.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwing-So; Jukes, Timothy; Whalley, Richard

    2011-04-13

    This paper reviews turbulent boundary-layer control strategies for skin-friction reduction of aerodynamic bodies. The focus is placed on the drag-reduction mechanisms by two flow control techniques-spanwise oscillation and spanwise travelling wave, which were demonstrated to give up to 45 per cent skin-friction reductions. We show that these techniques can be implemented by dielectric-barrier discharge plasma actuators, which are electric devices that do not require any moving parts or complicated ducting. The experimental results show different modifications to the near-wall structures depending on the control technique.

  5. Plasma Heating and Current Drive for Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtkamp, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    ITER (in Latin ``the way'') is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen - deuterium and tritium - fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q >= 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). In a Tokamak the definition of the functionalities and requirements for the Plasma Heating and Current Drive are relevant in the determination of the overall plant efficiency, the operation cost of the plant and the plant availability. This paper summarise these functionalities and requirements in perspective of the systems under construction in ITER. It discusses the further steps necessary to meet those requirements. Approximately one half of the total heating will be provided by two Neutral Beam injection systems at with energy of 1 MeV and a beam power of 16 MW into the plasma. For ITER specific test facility is being build in order to develop and test the Neutral Beam injectors. Remote handling maintenance scheme for the NB systems, critical during the nuclear phase of the project, will be developed. In addition the paper will give an overview over the general status of ITER. )

  6. Exploring turbulent energy dissipation and particle energization in space plasmas: the science of THOR mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retinò, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The Universe is permeated by hot, turbulent magnetized plasmas. They are found in active galactic nuclei, supernova remnants, the intergalactic and interstellar medium, as well as in the solar corona, the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere. Turbulent plasmas are also found in laboratory devices such as e.g. tokamaks. Our comprehension of the plasma Universe is largely based on measurements of electromagnetic radiation such as light or X-rays which originate from particles that are heated and accelerated as a result of energy dissipation in turbulent environments. Therefore it is of key importance to study and understand how plasma is energized by turbulence. Most of the energy dissipation occurs at kinetic scales, where plasma no longer behaves as a fluid and the properties of individual plasma species (electrons, protons and other ions) become important. THOR (Turbulent Heating ObserveR - http://thor.irfu.se/) is a space mission currently in Study Phase as candidate for M-class mission within the Cosmic Vision program of the European Space Agency. The scientific theme of the THOR mission is turbulent energy dissipation and particle energization in space plasmas, which ties in with ESA's Cosmic Vision science. The main focus is on turbulence and shock processes, however areas where the different fundamental processes interact, such as reconnection in turbulence or shock generated turbulence, are also of high importance. The THOR mission aims to address fundamental questions such as how plasma is heated and particles are accelerated by turbulent fluctuations at kinetic scales, how energy is partitioned among different plasma components and how dissipation operates in different regimes of turbulence. To reach the goal, a careful design of the THOR spacecraft and its payload is ongoing, together with a strong interaction with numerical simulations. Here we present the science of THOR mission and we discuss implications of THOR observations for space

  7. Component Framework for Coupled Integrated Fusion Plasma Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Elwasif, Wael R; Bernholdt, David E; Berry, Lee A; Batchelor, Donald B

    2007-01-01

    Fusion Successful simulation of the complex physics that affect magnetically confined fusion plasma remains an important target milestone towards the development of viable fusion energy. Major advances in the underlying physics formulations, mathematical modeling, and computational tools and techniques are needed to enable a complete fusion simulation on the emerging class of large scale capability parallel computers that are coming on-line in the next few years. Several pilot projects are currently being undertaken to explore different (partial) code integration and coupling problems, and possible solutions that may guide the larger integration endeavor. In this paper, we present the design and implementation details of one such project, a component based approach to couple existing codes to model the interaction between high power radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic waves, and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) aspects of the burning plasma. The framework and component design utilize a light coupling approach based on high level view of constituent codes that facilitates rapid incorporation of new components into the integrated simulation framework. The work illustrates the viability of the light coupling approach to better understand physics and stand-alone computer code dependencies and interactions, as a precursor to a more tightly coupled integrated simulation environment.

  8. Baseline high heat flux and plasma facing materials for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Y.; Schmid, K.; Balden, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Loewenhoff, Th.; Ito, A.; Hasegawa, A.; Hardie, C.; Porton, M.; Gilbert, M.

    2017-09-01

    In fusion reactors, surfaces of plasma facing components (PFCs) are exposed to high heat and particle flux. Tungsten and Copper alloys are primary candidates for plasma facing materials (PFMs) and coolant tube materials, respectively, mainly due to high thermal conductivity and, in the case of tungsten, its high melting point. In this paper, recent understandings and future issues on responses of tungsten and Cu alloys to fusion environments (high particle flux (including T and He), high heat flux, and high neutron doses) are reviewed. This review paper includes; Tritium retention in tungsten (K. Schmid and M. Balden), Impact of stationary and transient heat loads on tungsten (J.W. Coenen and Th. Loewenhoff), Helium effects on surface morphology of tungsten (Y. Ueda and A. Ito), Neutron radiation effects in tungsten (A. Hasegawa), and Copper and copper alloys development for high heat flux components (C. Hardie, M. Porton, and M. Gilbert).

  9. Impact of E × B flow shear on turbulence and resulting power fall-off width in H-mode plasmas in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Q. Q. Zhong, F. C. E-mail: fczhong@dhu.edu.cn; Jia, M. N.; Xu, G. S. E-mail: fczhong@dhu.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Wang, H. Q.; Chen, R.; Yan, N.; Liu, S. C.; Chen, L.; Li, Y. L.; Liu, J. B.

    2015-06-15

    The power fall-off width in the H-mode scrape-off layer (SOL) in tokamaks shows a strong inverse dependence on the plasma current, which was noticed by both previous multi-machine scaling work [T. Eich et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 093031 (2013)] and more recent work [L. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 114002 (2014)] on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. To understand the underlying physics, probe measurements of three H-mode discharges with different plasma currents have been studied in this work. The results suggest that a higher plasma current is accompanied by a stronger E×B shear and a shorter radial correlation length of turbulence in the SOL, thus resulting in a narrower power fall-off width. A simple model has also been applied to demonstrate the suppression effect of E×B shear on turbulence in the SOL and shows relatively good agreement with the experimental observations.

  10. Synthetic aperture microwave imaging with active probing for fusion plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, Vladimir F.; Freethy, Simon J.; Huang, Billy K.

    2014-08-21

    A Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) system has been designed and built to obtain 2-D images at several frequencies from fusion plasmas. SAMI uses a phased array of linearly polarised antennas. The array configuration has been optimised to achieve maximum synthetic aperture beam efficiency. The signals received by antennas are down-converted to the intermediate frequency range and then recorded in a full vector form. Full vector signals allow beam focusing and image reconstruction in both real time and a post-processing mode. SAMI can scan over 16 pre-programmed frequencies in the range of 10-35GHz with a switching time of 300ns. The system operates in 2 different modes simultaneously: both a 'passive' imaging of plasma emission and also an 'active' imaging of the back-scattered signal of the radiation launched by one of the antennas from the same array. This second mode is similar to so-called Doppler backscattering (DBS) reflectometry with 2-D resolution of the propagation velocity of turbulent structures. Both modes of operation show good performance in fusion plasma experiments on Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). We have obtained the first ever 2-D images of BXO mode conversion windows. With active probing, first ever turbulence velocity maps have been obtained. We present an overview of the diagnostic and discuss recent results. In contrast to quasi-optical microwave imaging systems SAMI requires neither big aperture viewing ports nor large 2-D detector arrays to achieve the desired imaging resolution. The number of effective 'pixels' of the synthesized image is proportional to the number of receiving antennas squared. Thus only a small number of optimised antennas is sufficient for the majority of applications. Possible implementation of SAMI on ITERand DEMO is discussed.

  11. Synthetic aperture microwave imaging with active probing for fusion plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Vladimir F.; Freethy, Simon J.; Huang, Billy K.; Vann, Roddy G. L.

    2014-08-01

    A Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) system has been designed and built to obtain 2-D images at several frequencies from fusion plasmas. SAMI uses a phased array of linearly polarised antennas. The array configuration has been optimised to achieve maximum synthetic aperture beam efficiency. The signals received by antennas are down-converted to the intermediate frequency range and then recorded in a full vector form. Full vector signals allow beam focusing and image reconstruction in both real time and a post-processing mode. SAMI can scan over 16 pre-programmed frequencies in the range of 10-35GHz with a switching time of 300ns. The system operates in 2 different modes simultaneously: both a 'passive' imaging of plasma emission and also an 'active' imaging of the back-scattered signal of the radiation launched by one of the antennas from the same array. This second mode is similar to so-called Doppler backscattering (DBS) reflectometry with 2-D resolution of the propagation velocity of turbulent structures. Both modes of operation show good performance in fusion plasma experiments on Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). We have obtained the first ever 2-D images of BXO mode conversion windows. With active probing, first ever turbulence velocity maps have been obtained. We present an overview of the diagnostic and discuss recent results. In contrast to quasi-optical microwave imaging systems SAMI requires neither big aperture viewing ports nor large 2-D detector arrays to achieve the desired imaging resolution. The number of effective 'pixels' of the synthesized image is proportional to the number of receiving antennas squared. Thus only a small number of optimised antennas is sufficient for the majority of applications. Possible implementation of SAMI on ITERand DEMO is discussed.

  12. Nonlocal wave turbulence in non-Abelian plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehtar-Tani, Yacine

    2017-10-01

    We investigate driven wave turbulence in non-Abelian plasmas, in the framework of kinetic theory where both elastic and inelastic processes are considered in the small angle approximation. The gluon spectrum, that forms in the presence of a steady source, is shown to be controlled by nonlocal interactions in momentum space, in contrast to the universal Kolmogorov-Zakharov spectra. Assuming strongly nonlocal interactions, we show that inelastic processes are dominant in the IR and cause a thermal bath to form below the forcing scale, as a result of a detailed balance between radiation and absorption of soft gluons by the hard ones. Above the forcing scale, the inelastic collision term reduces to an inhomogeneous diffusion-like equation yielding a spectrum that spreads to the UV as t 1 / 2, similarly to elastic processes. Due to nonlocal interactions the non-universal turbulent spectrum is not steady and flattens when time goes on toward the thermal distribution. This analysis is complemented by numerical simulations, where we observe that in the explored time interval the spectral exponent of the nonlocal turbulent cascade is close to -2 in agreement with simulations of classical Yang-Mills equations.

  13. Ignition Regime for Fusion in a Degenerate Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Son, S.; Fisch, N.J.

    2005-12-01

    We identify relevant parameter regimes in which aneutronic fuels can undergo fusion ignition in hot-ion degenerate plasma. Because of relativistic effects and partial degeneracy, the self-sustained burning regime is considerably larger than previously calculated. Inverse bremsstrahlung plays a major role in containing the reactor energy. We solve the radiation transfer equation and obtain the contribution to the heat conductivity from inverse bremsstrahlung.

  14. Microwave imaging of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabot, Roland; Elbèze, Didier; Lee, Woochang; Nam, Yoonbum; Park, Hyeon; Shen, Junsong; Yun, Gunsu; Choi, Minjun; Giacalone, Jean-Claude; Nicolas, Timothée; Bottereau, Christine; Clairet, Frédéric; Lotte, Philippe; Molina, Diego

    2016-11-01

    Microwave imaging diagnostics are extremely useful for observing magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in magnetic fusion plasmas. Two imaging diagnostics will be available on the WEST tokamak. A method was developed to reconstruct electron density maps from electron density profiles measured by ultrafast reflectometry, a technique based on FM-CW radar principle. It relies on plasma rotation to perform 2D reconstruction. An Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic will image directly the temperature fluctuations. It will be equivalent to 24 stacked vertically radiometers, each probing a spot of few centimetres. These two complementary techniques will contribute to the validation of MHD models.

  15. Optimal control theory applied to fusion plasma thermal stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, G.; Maya, I.; Miley, G.H.

    1985-07-01

    Optimal control theory is applied to determine feedback control for thermal stability of a driven, subingnition tokamak controlled by fuel injection and additional heating. It was found that the simplifications of the plasma burn dynamics and the control figure of merit required for the synthesis of optimal feedback laws were valid. Control laws were determined which allowed thermal stability in plasmas subject to 10% offset in temperature. The minimum ignition margin (defined as the difference between ignition temperature and the subignition operating point) was found to be 0.95 keV, corresponding to steady state heating requirements of less than 2% of fusion power.

  16. On the phase shift between electric potential and plasma density fluctuations in the edge turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Shchepetov, S. V. Kholnov, Yu. V.; Vasil'kov, D. G.

    2013-02-15

    In some cases, the phase shift between fluctuations of the electric potential and plasma density helps to identify the instability that governs the turbulent state. In this paper, the basic experimental and theoretical results that denote the possibility (or impossibility) of such identification are briefly discussed. The experimental data based on measurements of the phase shift between the floating potential and ion saturation current fluctuations in the L-2M stellarator-a system with externally imposed magnetic surfaces-are presented (Shchepetov, Kholnov, Fedyanin, et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 045001 (2008)). It is shown that the observed phase shift {Omega} varies in a wide range from {pi} to 0, gradually decreasing with deepening inside the plasma. A number of arguments are presented suggesting that {Omega} Almost-Equal-To {pi} can indicate that the process is nonlocal, i.e., oscillations at a given spatial point are driven and mainly determined by the processes localized outside of the observation point. We note that, within the framework of the magnetohydrodynamic theory, plasma was definitely unstable with respect to resistive interchange modes in all cases under study. It is demonstrated experimentally that the widespread notion that the phase shift {Omega} Almost-Equal-To {pi}/2 is characteristic of only resistive interchange modes is hardly universal. The experimental results are analyzed on the basis of analytical estimates.

  17. Interactive Plasma Physics Education Using Data from Fusion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, Brisa; Davis, Bill; Zwicker, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    The Internet Plasma Physics Education Experience (IPPEX) website was created in 1996 to give users access to data from plasma and fusion experiments. Interactive material on electricity, magnetism, matter, and energy was presented to generate interest and prepare users to understand data from a fusion experiment. Initially, users were allowed to analyze real-time and archival data from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) experiment. IPPEX won numerous awards for its novel approach of allowing users to participate in ongoing research. However, the latest revisions of IPPEX were in 2001 and the interactive material is no longer functional on modern browsers. Also, access to real-time data was lost when TFTR was shut down. The interactive material on IPPEX is being rewritten in ActionScript3.0, and real-time and archival data from the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) will be made available to users. New tools like EFIT animations, fast cameras, and plots of important plasma parameters will be included along with an existing Java-based ``virtual tokamak.'' Screenshots from the upgraded website and future directions will be presented.

  18. Shear Alfvén waves in turbulent plasmas.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Manuel

    2002-03-01

    The rate of decay of shear Alfvén waves along a magnetic field line of a diffusive plasma grows with the number of nodes of the initial perturbation. It is reasonable to think that the energy dissipation produced by this decay will be small if the perturbation was localized in a small set. This does not happen in turbulent plasmas: transport of the oscillation by the flow involves the whole domain. A general relation is obtained proving that the global energy dissipation is bounded below by an exponential of the number of nodes of any shear Alfvén wave along a segment of any field line of the average magnetic field.

  19. Dependence of Turbulence Spatial Correlation Lengths on Plasma Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, Jason; Barnes, Michael; Parra, Felix I.; Roach, Colin M.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations in GS2 to investigate the parallel and perpendicular correlation lengths of electrostatic turbulence in tokamak plasmas with rotation. These correlation lengths are characterised for a range of parameters, including the E × B shear, γE. We observe that the correlation lengths decrease as γE increases. Simulation results are compared against scaling laws deduced from the critical balance conjecture, which states that nonlinear perpendicular decorrelation times and parallel streaming times are comparable at all spatial scales. This work received funding from Euratom grant agreement No 633053 and from the RCUK Energy Programme [grant number EP/I501045], and gyrokinetic calculations were performed on ARCHER via the Plasma HEC Consortium [EPSRC Grant No.EP/L000237/1].

  20. Structures and turbulent relaxation in non-neutral plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romé, M.; Chen, S.; Maero, G.

    2017-01-01

    The transverse dynamics of a magnetized pure electron plasma confined in a Penning-Malmberg trap is analogous to that of a two-dimensional (2D) ideal fluid. The dynamics of a system in a regime of external forcing due to the application of time-dependent potentials on different azimuthal sectors of the confining circular wall is studied numerically by means of 2D particle-in-cell simulations. The evolution of turbulence starting from an annular initial density distribution is investigated for different kinds and parameters of forcing by means of wavelet-based multiresolution analysis. From an experimental point of view, the analyzed forcing technique is useful to excite or damp different diocotron perturbations and therefore for the control and manipulation of plasma evolution. Nonetheless, the numerical results indicate that even in a weak forcing regime the system evolution is sensitive to small initial density fluctuations.

  1. Magneto-inertial Fusion: An Emerging Concept for Inertial Fusion and Dense Plasmas in Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Thio, Francis Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    An overview of the U.S. program in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is given in terms of its technical rationale, scientific goals, vision, research plans, needs, and the research facilities currently available in support of the program. Magneto-inertial fusion is an emerging concept for inertial fusion and a pathway to the study of dense plasmas in ultrahigh magnetic fields (magnetic fields in excess of 500 T). The presence of magnetic field in an inertial fusion target suppresses cross-field thermal transport and potentially could enable more attractive inertial fusion energy systems. A vigorous program in magnetized high energy density laboratory plasmas (HED-LP) addressing the scientific basis of magneto-inertial fusion has been initiated by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy involving a number of universities, government laboratories and private institutions.

  2. Impact of plasma parameter on self-organization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, C.; Idomura, Y.; Maeyama, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2017-04-01

    Self-organization in the slab electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) turbulence is investigated based on gyrokinetic simulations and the Hasegawa-Mima (HM) equation. The scale and the anisotropy of self-organized turbulent structures vary depending on the Rhines scale and the characteristic scale given by the adiabatic response term in the HM equation. The former is determined by competition between the linear wave dispersion and the nonlinear turbulent cascade, while the latter is given as the scale, at which the turbulent cascade is impeded. These scales are controlled by plasma parameters such as the density and temperature gradient, and the temperature ratio of ion to electron. It is found that depending on the plasma parameters, the ETG turbulence shows either isotropic turbulence or zonal flows, which give significantly different transport levels. Although the modulational instability excites zonal modes regardless of the plasma parameters, the final turbulent structure is determined by the self-organization process.

  3. Magnetic turbulence in a table-top laser-plasma relevant to astrophysical scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Gourab; Schoeffler, Kevin M.; Kumar Singh, Prashant; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D.; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman; Silva, Luis O.; Das, Amita; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2017-06-01

    Turbulent magnetic fields abound in nature, pervading astrophysical, solar, terrestrial and laboratory plasmas. Understanding the ubiquity of magnetic turbulence and its role in the universe is an outstanding scientific challenge. Here, we report on the transition of magnetic turbulence from an initially electron-driven regime to one dominated by ion-magnetization in a laboratory plasma produced by an intense, table-top laser. Our observations at the magnetized ion scale of the saturated turbulent spectrum bear a striking resemblance with spacecraft measurements of the solar wind magnetic-field spectrum, including the emergence of a spectral kink. Despite originating from diverse energy injection sources (namely, electrons in the laboratory experiment and ion free-energy sources in the solar wind), the turbulent spectra exhibit remarkable parallels. This demonstrates the independence of turbulent spectral properties from the driving source of the turbulence and highlights the potential of small-scale, table-top laboratory experiments for investigating turbulence in astrophysical environments.

  4. Turbulent convective flows in the solar photospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroli, A.; Giannattasio, F.; Fanfoni, M.; Del Moro, D.; Consolini, G.; Berrilli, F.

    2015-10-01

    > The origin of the 22-year solar magnetic cycle lies below the photosphere where multiscale plasma motions, due to turbulent convection, produce magnetic fields. The most powerful intensity and velocity signals are associated with convection cells, called granules, with a scale of typically 1 Mm and a lifetime of a few minutes. Small-scale magnetic elements (SMEs), ubiquitous on the solar photosphere, are passively transported by associated plasma flows. This advection makes their traces very suitable for defining the convective regime of the photosphere. Therefore the solar photosphere offers an exceptional opportunity to investigate convective motions, associated with compressible, stratified, magnetic, rotating and large Rayleigh number stellar plasmas. The magnetograms used here come from a Hinode/SOT uninterrupted 25-hour sequence of spectropolarimetric images. The mean-square displacement of SMEs has been modelled with a power law with spectral index . We found for times up to and for times up to . An alternative way to investigate the advective-diffusive motion of SMEs is to look at the evolution of the two-dimensional probability distribution function (PDF) for the displacements. Although at very short time scales the PDFs are affected by pixel resolution, for times shorter than the PDFs seem to broaden symmetrically with time. In contrast, at longer times a multi-peaked feature of the PDFs emerges, which suggests the non-trivial nature of the diffusion-advection process of magnetic elements. A Voronoi distribution analysis shows that the observed small-scale distribution of SMEs involves the complex details of highly nonlinear small-scale interactions of turbulent convective flows detected in solar photospheric plasma.

  5. Three-dimensional plasma actuation for faster transition to turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Gupta, Arnob; Roy, Subrata

    2017-10-01

    We demonstrate that a 3D non-linear plasma actuation method creates secondary instabilities by forming lambda vortices for a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer flow over a flat plate. Both bypass transition and controlled transition processes are numerically investigated using wall resolved modal discontinuous Galerkin based implicit large eddy simulation. The largest momentum thickness based Reynolds numbers ≤ft( R{{e}θ } \\right) tested are 1250 and 1100 for the bypass transition and the controlled transition, respectively. The 3D actuation method is based on a square serpentine plasma actuator (Durscher and Roy 2012 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45 035202). The transition is achieved via oblique wave transition by perturbing the flow at a frequency of 1 kHz with amplitude of 10% of the freestream velocity. Although the flow is perturbed at a single frequency, the instabilities arising due to the nonlinear interaction between the consecutive lambda vortices, creates subharmonic lambda vortices (half of the fundamental frequency), which finally break down into fully turbulent flow. These interactions have been thoroughly studied and discussed. Since the actuation creates oblique wave transition it will allow faster transition compared to the standard secondary instability mechanism with similar disturbance amplitude reducing the amount of energy input required for flow control.

  6. Transition of energy transfer from MHD turbulence to kinetic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan; Matthaeus, William; Parashar, Tulasi; Shi, Yipeng; Wan, Minping; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-11-01

    The classical energy cascade scenario is of great importance in explaining the heating of corona and solar wind. One can envision that energy residing in large-scale fluctuations is transported to smaller scales where dissipation occurs and finally drives kinetic processes that absorb the energy flux and energize charged particles. Here we inquire how the cascade operates in a compressible plasma, and how the characteristics of energy transfer vary going from MHD to kinetic scales. When filtering MHD equations, we can get an apparent inertial range over which the conservative energy cascade occurs and the scale locality of energy transfer is similar to the cases of incompressible MHD turbulence. Pervasive shocks not only make a significant difference on energy cascade and magnetic amplification, but can also introduce considerable pressure dilation, a complement of viscous and ohmic dissipation that can trigger an alternative channel of the conversion between kinetic and internal energy. The procedure can also be applied to the Vlasov equation and kinetic simulation, in comparison with MHD turbulence, and is a good candidate to investigate the energy cascade process and the analogous role of the (tensor) pressure dilation in collisionless plasma.

  7. Internet and web projects for fusion plasma science and education. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, Timothy E.

    1999-08-30

    The plasma web site at http://www.plasmas.org provides comprehensive coverage of all plasma science and technology with site links worldwide. Prepared to serve the general public, students, educators, researchers, and decision-makers, the site covers basic plasma physics, fusion energy, magnetic confinement fusion, high energy density physics include ICF, space physics and astrophysics, pulsed-power, lighting, waste treatment, plasma technology, plasma theory, simulations and modeling.

  8. Ion-cyclotron turbulence and diagonal double layers in a magnetospheric plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liperovskiy, V. A.; Pudovkin, M. I.; Skuridin, G. A.; Shalimov, S. L.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of current concepts regarding electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence (theory and experiment), and regarding inclined double potential layers in the magnetospheric plasma is presented. Anomalous resistance governed by electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence, and one-dimensional and two-dimensional models of double electrostatic layers in the magnetospheric plasma are examined.

  9. A region of intense plasma wave turbulence on auroral field lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Frank, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report presents a detailed study of the plasma wave turbulence observed by HAWKEYE-1 and IMP-6 on high latitude auroral field lines and investigates the relationship of this turbulence to magnetic field and plasma measurements obtained in the same region.

  10. Super-diffusion scalings - space versus fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Sergey; Budaev, Vyacheslav; Silin, Victor

    2016-07-01

    In the plasma kinetics, looking at the plasma waves interactions with the particles, most people use the Boltzman nonlinear approach for a variate of the waves, which could be interpreted as a "turbulence". We have now a theory for ion-sound turbulence [Silin e. a., 2011] that predicts fast heating of the ions: it can be either in fusion devices , magnetosphere or solar plasma. The ion heating could result into the power lowers for the turbulent spectra. We compare the theory predictions with the experimental data both from the fusion laboratory devices and from space plasma data, discussing their applicability to the solar plasma.

  11. Effects of the location of a biased limiter on turbulent transport in the IR-T1 tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Ramin; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Elahi, Ahmad Salar; Meshkani, Sakineh

    2017-09-01

    Plasma confinement plays an important role in fusion study. Applying an external voltage using limiter biasing system is proved to be an efficient approach for plasma confinement. In this study, the position of the limiter biasing system was changed to investigate the effect of applying external voltages at different places to the plasma. The external voltages of ±200 V were applied at the different positions of edge, 5 mm and 10 mm inside the plasma. Then, the main plasma parameters were measured. The results show that the poloidal turbulent transport and radial electric field increased about 25-35% and 35-45%, respectively (specially when the limiter biasing system was placed 5 mm inside the plasma). Also, the Reynolds stress is experienced its maximum reduction about 5-10% when the limiter biasing system was at 5 mm inside the plasma and the voltage of +200 V was applied to the plasma. When the limiter biasing system move 10 mm inside the plasma, the main plasma parameters experienced more instabilities and fluctuations than other positions.

  12. Electromagnetic turbulence and transport in increased β LAPD Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Giovanni; Carter, Troy; Pueschel, Mj; Jenko, Frank; Terry, Paul; Told, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    The new LaB6 plasma source in LAPD has enabled the production of magnetized, increased β plasmas (up to 15%). We report on the modifications of pressure-gradient-driven turbulence and transport with increased plasma β. Density fluctuations decrease with increasing β while magnetic fluctuations increase. B ⊥ fluctuations saturate while parallel (compressional) magnetic fluctuations increase continuously with β. At the highest β values Î δ ||/ δ B ⊥ 2 and δ B/B 1%. The measurements are consistent with the excitation of the Gradient-driven Drift Coupling (GDC). This instability prefers k|| = 0 and grows in finite β plasmas due to density and temperature gradients through the production of parallel magnetic field fluctuations and resulting ⊥ B|| drifts. Comparisons between experimental measurements and theoretical predictions for the GDC will be shown. Direct measurements of electrostatic particle flux have been performed and show a strong reduction with increasing β. No evidence is found (e.g. density profile shape) of enhanced confinement, suggesting that other transport mechanisms are active. Preliminary measurements indicate that electromagnetic transport due to parallel magnetic field fluctuations at first increases with β but is subsequently suppressed at higher β values.

  13. Three-dimensional modeling of beam emission spectroscopy measurements in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guszejnov, D.; Pokol, G. I.; Pusztai, I.; Refy, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Nam, Y. U.

    2012-11-15

    One of the main diagnostic tools for measuring electron density profiles and the characteristics of long wavelength turbulent wave structures in fusion plasmas is beam emission spectroscopy (BES). The increasing number of BES systems necessitated an accurate and comprehensive simulation of BES diagnostics, which in turn motivated the development of the Rate Equations for Neutral Alkali-beam TEchnique (RENATE) simulation code that is the topic of this paper. RENATE is a modular, fully three-dimensional code incorporating all key features of BES systems from the atomic physics to the observation, including an advanced modeling of the optics. Thus RENATE can be used both in the interpretation of measured signals and the development of new BES systems. The most important components of the code have been successfully benchmarked against other simulation codes. The primary results have been validated against experimental data from the KSTAR tokamak.

  14. High fusion performance from deuterium-tritium plasmas in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keilhacker, M.; Gibson, A.; Gormezano, C.; Lomas, P. J.; Thomas, P. R.; Watkins, M. L.; Andrew, P.; Balet, B.; Borba, D.; Challis, C. D.; Coffey, I.; Cottrell, G. A.; DeEsch, H. P. L.; Deliyanakis, N.; Fasoli, A.; Gowers, C. W.; Guo, H. Y.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Jones, T. T. C.; Kerner, W.; König, R. W. T.; Loughlin, M. J.; Maas, A.; Marcus, F. B.; Nave, M. F. F.; Rimini, F. G.; Sadler, G. J.; Sharapov, S. E.; Sips, G.; Smeulders, P.; Söldner, F. X.; Taroni, A.; Tubbing, B. J. D.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Ward, D. J.; JET Team

    1999-02-01

    High fusion power experiments using DT mixtures in ELM-free H mode and optimized shear regimes in JET are reported. A fusion power of 16.1 MW has been produced in an ELM-free H mode at 4.2 MA/3.6 T. The transient value of the fusion amplification factor was 0.95+/-0.17, consistent with the high value of nDT(0)τEdiaTi(0) = 8.7 × 1020+/-20% m-3 s keV, and was maintained for about half an energy confinement time until excessive edge pressure gradients resulted in discharge termination by MHD instabilities. The ratio of DD to DT fusion powers (from separate but otherwise similar discharges) showed the expected factor of 210, validating DD projections of DT performance for similar pressure profiles and good plasma mixture control, which was achieved by loading the vessel walls with the appropriate DT mix. Magnetic fluctuation spectra showed no evidence of Alfvénic instabilities driven by alpha particles, in agreement with theoretical model calculations. Alpha particle heating has been unambiguously observed, its effect being separated successfully from possible isotope effects on energy confinement by varying the tritium concentration in otherwise similar discharges. The scan showed that there was no, or at most a very weak, isotope effect on the energy confinement time. The highest electron temperature was clearly correlated with the maximum alpha particle heating power and the optimum DT mixture; the maximum increase was 1.3+/-0.23 keV with 1.3 MW of alpha particle heating power, consistent with classical expectations for alpha particle confinement and heating. In the optimized shear regime, clear internal transport barriers were established for the first time in DT, with a power similar to that required in DD. The ion thermal conductivity in the plasma core approached neoclassical levels. Real time power control maintained the plasma core close to limits set by pressure gradient driven MHD instabilities, allowing 8.2 MW of DT fusion power with nDT(0)τEdiaTi(0

  15. Shukla-Spatschek diffusion effects on surface plasma waves in astrophysical turbulent plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-02-01

    The effects of Shukla-Spatschek turbulent diffusion on a temporal mode of surface waves propagating at the interface of an astrophysical turbulent plasma are investigated. The damping rates for high and low modes of surface wave are kinetically derived by employing the Vlasov-Poisson equation and the specular reflection boundary condition. We found that the diffusion caused by the fluctuating electric fields leads to damping for both high and low modes of surface waves. The high-mode damping is enhanced with an increase of the wavenumber and the diffusion coefficient, but suppressed by an increase of electron thermal energy. By contrast, the low-mode damping is suppressed as the wavenumber and the thermal energy increase although it is enhanced as the diffusion increases. The variation of the damping rate due to the Shukla-Spatschek turbulent diffusion is also discussed.

  16. Local transport barrier formation and relaxation in reverse-shear plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synakowski, E. J.; Batha, S. H.; Beer, M. A.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Budny, R. V.; Bush, C. E.; Efthimion, P. C.; Hahm, T. S.; Hammett, G. W.; LeBlanc, B.; Levinton, F.; Mazzucato, E.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A. T.; Schmidt, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Scott, S. D.; Taylor, G.; Zarnstorff, M. C.

    1997-05-01

    The roles of turbulence stabilization by sheared E×B flow and Shafranov shift gradients are examined for Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [D. J. Grove and D. M. Meade, Nucl. Fusion 25, 1167 (1985)] enhanced reverse-shear (ERS) plasmas. Both effects in combination provide the basis of a positive-feedback model that predicts reinforced turbulence suppression with increasing pressure gradient. Local fluctuation behavior at the onset of ERS confinement is consistent with this framework. The power required for transitions into the ERS regime are lower when high power neutral beams are applied earlier in the current profile evolution, consistent with the suggestion that both effects play a role. Separation of the roles of E×B and Shafranov shift effects was performed by varying the E×B shear through changes in the toroidal velocity with nearly steady-state pressure profiles. Transport and fluctuation levels increase only when E×B shearing rates are driven below a critical value that is comparable to the fastest linear growth rates of the dominant instabilities. While a turbulence suppression criterion that involves the ratio of shearing to linear growth rates is in accord with many of these results, the existence of hidden dependencies of the criterion is suggested in experiments where the toroidal field was varied. The forward transition into the ERS regime has also been examined in strongly rotating plasmas. The power threshold is higher with unidirectional injection than with balance injection.

  17. Dust remobilization in fusion plasmas under steady state conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolias, P.; Ratynskaia, S.; De Angeli, M.; De Temmerman, G.; Ripamonti, D.; Riva, G.; Bykov, I.; Shalpegin, A.; Vignitchouk, L.; Brochard, F.; Bystrov, K.; Bardin, S.; Litnovsky, A.

    2016-02-01

    The first combined experimental and theoretical studies of dust remobilization by plasma forces are reported. The main theoretical aspects of remobilization in fusion devices under steady state conditions are analyzed. In particular, the dominant role of adhesive forces is highlighted and generic remobilization conditions—direct lift-up, sliding, rolling—are formulated. A novel experimental technique is proposed, based on controlled adhesion of dust grains on tungsten samples combined with detailed mapping of the dust deposition profile prior and post plasma exposure. Proof-of-principle experiments in the TEXTOR tokamak and the EXTRAP-T2R reversed-field pinch are presented. The versatile environment of the linear device Pilot-PSI allowed for experiments with different magnetic field topologies and varying plasma conditions that were complemented with camera observations.

  18. Trends in laser-plasma-instability experiments for laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.P. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1991-06-06

    Laser-plasma instability experiments for laser fusion have followed three developments. These are advances in the technology and design of experiments, advances in diagnostics, and evolution of the design of high-gain targets. This paper traces the history of these three topics and discusses their present state. Today one is substantially able to produce controlled plasma conditions and to diagnose specific instabilities within such plasmas. Experiments today address issues that will matter for future laser facilities. Such facilities will irradiate targets with {approx}1 MJ of visible or UV light pulses that are tens of nanoseconds in duration, very likely with a high degree of spatial and temporal incoherence. 58 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Plasma-wall interactions and plasma behaviour in fusion devices with liquid lithium plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirnov, S.

    2009-06-01

    The application of lithium as a self-recovery and renewable material of plasma facing components (PFC) can be used to solve steady state fusion reactor PFC problems. This paper is a survey of liquid Li use in current tokamaks. Liquid Li as tokamak limiter material has been tested in T-11 M tokamak (TRINITI, RF), in FTU (Italy) and in CDX-U (USA). The idea of T-11 M and FTU liquid Li limiters is based on the Capillary-Pore System (CPS) concept. The main feature of CDX-U toroidal limiter was free liquid Li surface. The crucial issue of tokamak is impurity contamination. Lithium experiments in tokamaks discovered that poor lithium penetration into hot plasma core from its periphery (lithium screening) and the development close to plasma boundary lithium non-coronal irradiative blanket. Lithium screening can be physical ground of lithium 'emitter-collector' limiter concept with irradiated blanket and PFC prevention from a high local power load up to level of ITER parameters.

  20. Multispecies density peaking in gyrokinetic turbulence simulations of low collisionality Alcator C-Mod plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelsen, D. R. Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Greenwald, M.; Howard, N. T.; Hughes, J. W.; Rice, J. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Podpaly, Y.; Ma, Y.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2015-06-15

    Peaked density profiles in low-collisionality AUG and JET H-mode plasmas are probably caused by a turbulently driven particle pinch, and Alcator C-Mod experiments confirmed that collisionality is a critical parameter. Density peaking in reactors could produce a number of important effects, some beneficial, such as enhanced fusion power and transport of fuel ions from the edge to the core, while others are undesirable, such as lower beta limits, reduced radiation from the plasma edge, and consequently higher divertor heat loads. Fundamental understanding of the pinch will enable planning to optimize these impacts. We show that density peaking is predicted by nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations based on measured profile data from low collisionality H-mode plasma in Alcator C-Mod. Multiple ion species are included to determine whether hydrogenic density peaking has an isotope dependence or is influenced by typical levels of low-Z impurities, and whether impurity density peaking depends on the species. We find that the deuterium density profile is slightly more peaked than that of hydrogen, and that experimentally relevant levels of boron have no appreciable effect on hydrogenic density peaking. The ratio of density at r/a = 0.44 to that at r/a = 0.74 is 1.2 for the majority D and minority H ions (and for electrons), and increases with impurity Z: 1.1 for helium, 1.15 for boron, 1.3 for neon, 1.4 for argon, and 1.5 for molybdenum. The ion temperature profile is varied to match better the predicted heat flux with the experimental transport analysis, but the resulting factor of two change in heat transport has only a weak effect on the predicted density peaking.

  1. Mixing and turbulent mixing in fluids, plasma and materials: summary of works presented at the 3rd International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Serge; Keane, Christopher J.; Niemela, Joseph J.; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.

    2013-07-01

    Mixing and turbulent mixing are non-equilibrium processes that occur in a broad variety of processes in fluids, plasmas and materials. The processes can be natural or artificial, their characteristic scales can be astrophysical or atomistic, and energy densities can be low or high. Understanding the fundamental aspects of turbulent mixing is necessary to comprehend the dynamics of supernovae and accretion discs, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, mantle-lithosphere tectonics and volcanic eruptions, atmospheric and oceanographic flows in geophysics, and premixed and non-premixed combustion. It is crucial for the development of the methods of control in technological applications, including mixing mitigation in inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, and mixing enhancement in reactive flows, as well as material transformation under the action of high strain rates. It can improve our knowledge of realistic turbulent processes at low energy density involving walls, unsteady transport, interfaces and vortices, as well as high energy density hydrodynamics including strong shocks, explosions, blast waves and supersonic flows. A deep understanding of mixing and turbulent mixing requires one to go above and beyond canonical approaches and demands further enhancements in the quality and information capacity of experimental and numerical data sets, and in the methods of theoretical analysis of continuous dynamics and kinetics. This has the added potential then of bringing the experiment, numerical modelling, theoretical analysis and data processing to a new level of standards. At the same time, mixing and turbulent mixing being one of the most formidable and multi-faceted problems of modern physics and mathematics, is well open for a curious mind. In this article we briefly review various aspects of turbulent mixing, and present a summary of over 70 papers that were discussed at the third International Conference on 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2011, that

  2. Turbulence and bias-induced flows in simple magnetized toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Rogers, B. N.; Ricci, P.; Gentle, K. W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2011-05-15

    Turbulence and bias-induced flows in simple magnetized toroidal plasmas are explored with global three-dimensional fluid simulations, focusing on the parameters of the Helimak experiment. The simulations show that plasma turbulence and transport in the regime of interest are dominated by the ideal interchange instability. The application of a bias voltage alters the structure of the plasma potential, resulting in the equilibrium sheared flows.These bias-induced vertical flows located in the gradient region appear to reduce the radial extent of turbulent structures,and thereby lower the radial plasma transport on the low field side.

  3. Ultrasmooth plasma polymerized coatings for laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Letts, S.A.; Myers, D.W.; Witt, L.A.

    1980-08-26

    Coatings for laser fusion targets were deposited up to 135 ..mu..m thick by plasma polymerization onto 140 ..mu..m diameter DT filled glass microspheres. Ultrasmooth surfaces (no defect higher than 0.1 ..mu..m) were achieved by eliminating particulate contamination. Process generated particles were eliminated by determining the optimum operating conditions of power, gas flow, and pressure, and maintaining these conditions through feedback control. From a study of coating defects grown over known surface irregularities, a quantitative relationship between irregularity size, film thickness, and defect size was determined. This relationship was used to set standards for the maximum microshell surface irregularity tolerable in the production of hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon coated laser fusion targets.

  4. High temperature superconductors for fusion at the Swiss Plasma Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzone, P.; Wesche, R.; Uglietti, D.; Bykovsky, N.

    2017-08-01

    High temperature superconductors (HTS) may become in future an option for the superconducting magnets of commercial fusion plants. At the Swiss Plasma Center (SPC) the R&D activity toward HTS high current, high field cables suitable for fusion magnets started in 2012 and led in 2015 to the assembly of the first 60 kA, 12 T prototype conductor. The cable concept developed at the SPC is based on the principle of ‘soldered, twisted stacks’ of REBCO tapes. The required number of stacks is assembled in a cored flat cable, cooled by forced flow of supercritical helium. The sample environment of the test facility at SPC has been upgraded with a HTS adapter and a counter-flow heat exchanger to allow testing the HTS sample in a broader range of temperature (4.5 K-50 K) using the existing, NbTi based superconducting transformer and the closed loop refrigerator.

  5. Measurements of fusion reactions from a Tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrien, R. E.

    1981-11-01

    Tokamak fusion reaction diagnostics were extended to include measurements of d-t, dp-3He, and d-d (proton branch) reactions. The confinement and slowing down of 1 MeV d-d tritons were studied y measuring d-t meutrons. The first charged fusion products to be detected in a Tokamak were the 3 MeV d-d and 14.7 MeV d- 3He protons. Beam-target d-3He reactions were measured during deuterium beam injection to study the transport and vessel retention of helium. Large d-3He reaction rates were produced by ion cyclotron heating of a 3He minority in a deuterium plasma. Measurements of the reaction rate, energy spectrum, and decay time indicate that the reactions are produced by 200 - 400 keV3He ions. Sawtooth and m = 2 oscillations in the proton emission were observed.

  6. Subgrid-scale modeling for the study of compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshov, A. A.; Karelsky, K. V.; Petrosyan, A. S.

    2014-05-01

    A state-of-the-art review is given of research by computing physics methods on compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in space plasmas. The presence of magnetic fields and compressibility in this case makes space plasma turbulence much less amenable to direct numerical simulations than a neutral incompressible fluid. The large eddy simulation method is discussed, which was developed as an alternative to direct modeling and which filters the initial magnetohydrodynamic equations and uses the subgrid-scale modeling of universal small-scale turbulence. A detailed analysis is made of both the method itself and different subgrid-scale parametrizations for compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulent flows in polytropic and heat-conducting plasmas. The application of subgrid-scale modeling to study turbulence in the local interstellar medium and the scale-invariant spectra of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are discussed.

  7. Turbulent hydrodynamics experiments using a new plasma piston

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.; Glendinning, S. G.; Suter, L. J.; Remington, B. A.; Landen, O.; Turner, R. E.; Shepard, T. J.; Lasinski, B.; Budil, K.; Robey, H.

    2000-05-01

    A new method for performing compressible hydrodynamic instability experiments using high-power lasers is presented. A plasma piston is created by supersonically heating a low-density carbon based foam with x-rays from a gold hohlraum heated to {approx}200 eV by a {approx}1 ns Nova laser pulse [E. M. Campbell et al., Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)]. The piston causes an almost shockless acceleration of a thin, higher-density payload consisting of a layer of gold, initially 1/2 {mu}m thick, supported on 10 {mu}m of solid plastic, at {approx}45 {mu}m/ns{sup 2}. The payload is also heated by hohlraum x-rays to in excess of 150 eV so that the Au layer expands to {approx}20 {mu}m prior to the onset of instability growth. The Atwood number between foam and Au is {approx}0.7. Rayleigh-Taylor instability, seeded by the random fibrous structure of the foam, causes a turbulent mixing region with a Reynolds number >10{sup 5} to develop between piston and Au. The macroscopic width of the mixing region was inferred from the change in Au layer width, which was recorded via time resolved x-radiography. The mix width thus inferred is demonstrated to depend on the magnitude of the initial foam seed. For a small initial seed, the bubble front in the turbulent mixing region is estimated indirectly to grow as {approx}0.036{+-}0.19 [{integral}{radical}(Ag)dt]{sup 2} which would imply for a constant acceleration 0.036{+-}0.019 Agt{sup 2}. More direct measurement techniques must be developed in larger scale experiments to remove potential complicating factors and reduce the error bar to a level that would permit the measurements to discriminate between various theories and models of turbulent mixing. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Magnetorotational Turbulence and Dynamo in a Collisionless Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Matthew W.; Stone, James M.; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-12-01

    We present results from the first 3D kinetic numerical simulation of magnetorotational turbulence and dynamo, using the local shearing-box model of a collisionless accretion disk. The kinetic magnetorotational instability grows from a subthermal magnetic field having zero net flux over the computational domain to generate self-sustained turbulence and outward angular-momentum transport. Significant Maxwell and Reynolds stresses are accompanied by comparable viscous stresses produced by field-aligned ion pressure anisotropy, which is regulated primarily by the mirror and ion-cyclotron instabilities through particle trapping and pitch-angle scattering. The latter endow the plasma with an effective viscosity that is biased with respect to the magnetic-field direction and spatiotemporally variable. Energy spectra suggest an Alfvén-wave cascade at large scales and a kinetic-Alfvén-wave cascade at small scales, with strong small-scale density fluctuations and weak nonaxisymmetric density waves. Ions undergo nonthermal particle acceleration, their distribution accurately described by a κ distribution. These results have implications for the properties of low-collisionality accretion flows, such as that near the black hole at the Galactic center.

  9. Magnetorotational Turbulence and Dynamo in a Collisionless Plasma.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Matthew W; Stone, James M; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-12-02

    We present results from the first 3D kinetic numerical simulation of magnetorotational turbulence and dynamo, using the local shearing-box model of a collisionless accretion disk. The kinetic magnetorotational instability grows from a subthermal magnetic field having zero net flux over the computational domain to generate self-sustained turbulence and outward angular-momentum transport. Significant Maxwell and Reynolds stresses are accompanied by comparable viscous stresses produced by field-aligned ion pressure anisotropy, which is regulated primarily by the mirror and ion-cyclotron instabilities through particle trapping and pitch-angle scattering. The latter endow the plasma with an effective viscosity that is biased with respect to the magnetic-field direction and spatiotemporally variable. Energy spectra suggest an Alfvén-wave cascade at large scales and a kinetic-Alfvén-wave cascade at small scales, with strong small-scale density fluctuations and weak nonaxisymmetric density waves. Ions undergo nonthermal particle acceleration, their distribution accurately described by a κ distribution. These results have implications for the properties of low-collisionality accretion flows, such as that near the black hole at the Galactic center.

  10. On the effect of intermittency of turbulence on the parabolic relation between skewness and kurtosis in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guszejnov, Dávid; Lazányi, Nóra; Bencze, Attila; Zoletnik, Sándor

    2013-11-01

    This paper is aimed to contribute to the scientific discussions that have been triggered by the experimental observation of a quadratic relation between the kurtosis and skewness of turbulent fluctuations present in fusion plasmas and other nonlinear physical systems. In this paper, we offer a general statistical model which attributes the observed K =aS2+b relation to the varying intermittency of the experimental signals. The model is a two random variable model constructed to catch the essential intermittent feature of the real signal. One of the variables is the amplitude of the underlying intermittent event (e.g., turbulent structure) while the other is connected to the intermittency level of the system. This simple model can attribute physical meaning to the a and b coefficients, as they characterize the spatio-temporal statistics of intermittent events. By constructing a particle-conserving Gaussian model for the underlying coherent structures, the experimentally measured a and b coefficients could be adequately reproduced.

  11. Kinetic theory of weak turbulence in magnetized plasmas: Perpendicular propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2015-08-15

    The present paper formulates a weak turbulence theory in which electromagnetic perturbations are assumed to propagate in directions perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. By assuming that all wave vectors lie in one direction transverse to the ambient magnetic field, the linear solution and second-order nonlinear solutions to the equation for the perturbed distribution function are obtained. Nonlinear perturbed current from the second-order nonlinearity is derived in general form, but the limiting situation of cold plasma temperature is taken in order to derive an explicit nonlinear wave kinetic equation that describes three-wave decay/coalescence interactions among X and Z modes. A potential application of the present formalism is also discussed.

  12. Two dimensional turbulence in inviscid fluids or guiding center plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seyler, C. E., Jr.; Salu, Y.; Montgomery, D.; Knorr, G.

    1975-01-01

    Analytic theory for two-dimensional turbulent equilibria for the inviscid Navier-Stokes equations is examined mathematically. Application of the technique to electrostatic guiding center plasma is discussed. A good fit is demonstrated for the approach to a predicted energy per Fourier mode obtained from a two-temperature canonical ensemble. Negative as well as positive temperature regimes are explored. Fluctuations about the mean energy per mode also compare well with theory. In the regime of alpha less than zero, beta greater than zero, with the minimum value of alpha plus beta times k squared near zero, contour plots of the stream function reveal macroscopic vortex structures similar to those seen previously in discrete vortex simulations. Eulerian direct interaction equations, which can be used to follow the approach to inviscid equilibrium, are derived.

  13. 2012 Joint Varenna-Lausanne International Workshop on the theory of fusion plasmas (Varenna, Italy, 27-31 August 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabet, Xavier; Sauter, Olivier

    2013-07-01

    The 2012 Joint Varenna-Lausanne International Workshop on the theory of fusion plasmas was very fruitful. A broad variety of topics was addressed, covering turbulence, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), edge physics, and radio frequency (RF) wave heating. Moreover, the scope of the meeting was extended this year to include the physics of materials and diagnostics for burning plasmas. This evolution reflects the complexity of problems at hand in fusion, some of them triggered by the construction of ITER and JT-60SA. Long-standing problems without immediate consequences have sometimes become an urgent matter in that context. One may refer to, for instance, the choice of plasma facing components or the design of control systems. Another characteristic of these workshops is the interplay between various domains of plasma physics. For instance, MHD modes are currently investigated with gyrokinetic codes, kinetic effects are included in MHD stability analysis more and more, and turbulence is now accounted for in wave propagation problems. This is proof of cross-fertilization and is certainly a healthy sign for our community. Finally, introducing some novelty in the programme does not prevent from us respecting old traditions. As usual, many presentations were dedicated to numerical simulations. Combining advanced numerical techniques with elaborated analytical theory is certainly a trademark of the Varenna-Lausanne Workshop, which was respected again this year. The quality and size of the scientific output from this workshop is shown in this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion; a further 26 papers have already appeared in Journal of Physics: Conference Series in December 2012. We hope the readers will enjoy this special issue, and find therein knowledge and inspiration.

  14. Developed turbulence and nonlinear amplification of magnetic fields in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

    PubMed

    Meinecke, Jena; Tzeferacos, Petros; Bell, Anthony; Bingham, Robert; Clarke, Robert; Churazov, Eugene; Crowston, Robert; Doyle, Hugo; Drake, R Paul; Heathcote, Robert; Koenig, Michel; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Kuranz, Carolyn; Lee, Dongwook; MacDonald, Michael; Murphy, Christopher; Notley, Margaret; Park, Hye-Sook; Pelka, Alexander; Ravasio, Alessandra; Reville, Brian; Sakawa, Youichi; Wan, Willow; Woolsey, Nigel; Yurchak, Roman; Miniati, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander; Lamb, Don; Gregori, Gianluca

    2015-07-07

    The visible matter in the universe is turbulent and magnetized. Turbulence in galaxy clusters is produced by mergers and by jets of the central galaxies and believed responsible for the amplification of magnetic fields. We report on experiments looking at the collision of two laser-produced plasma clouds, mimicking, in the laboratory, a cluster merger event. By measuring the spectrum of the density fluctuations, we infer developed, Kolmogorov-like turbulence. From spectral line broadening, we estimate a level of turbulence consistent with turbulent heating balancing radiative cooling, as it likely does in galaxy clusters. We show that the magnetic field is amplified by turbulent motions, reaching a nonlinear regime that is a precursor to turbulent dynamo. Thus, our experiment provides a promising platform for understanding the structure of turbulence and the amplification of magnetic fields in the universe.

  15. Developed turbulence and nonlinear amplification of magnetic fields in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Meinecke, Jena; Tzeferacos, Petros; Bell, Anthony; Bingham, Robert; Clarke, Robert; Churazov, Eugene; Crowston, Robert; Doyle, Hugo; Drake, R. Paul; Heathcote, Robert; Koenig, Michel; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Kuranz, Carolyn; Lee, Dongwook; MacDonald, Michael; Murphy, Christopher; Notley, Margaret; Park, Hye-Sook; Pelka, Alexander; Ravasio, Alessandra; Reville, Brian; Sakawa, Youichi; Wan, Willow; Woolsey, Nigel; Yurchak, Roman; Miniati, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander; Lamb, Don; Gregori, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The visible matter in the universe is turbulent and magnetized. Turbulence in galaxy clusters is produced by mergers and by jets of the central galaxies and believed responsible for the amplification of magnetic fields. We report on experiments looking at the collision of two laser-produced plasma clouds, mimicking, in the laboratory, a cluster merger event. By measuring the spectrum of the density fluctuations, we infer developed, Kolmogorov-like turbulence. From spectral line broadening, we estimate a level of turbulence consistent with turbulent heating balancing radiative cooling, as it likely does in galaxy clusters. We show that the magnetic field is amplified by turbulent motions, reaching a nonlinear regime that is a precursor to turbulent dynamo. Thus, our experiment provides a promising platform for understanding the structure of turbulence and the amplification of magnetic fields in the universe. PMID:26100873

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, Marco

    1998-04-01

    Professor Kenro Miyamoto, already well known for his textbook Plasma Physics for Nuclear Fusion (MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1976; revised edition 1989), has now published a new book entitled Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (Iwanami Book Service Center, Tokyo, 1997). To a large extent, the new book is a somewhat shortened and well reorganized version of its predecessor. The style, concise and matter of fact, clearly shows the origin of the text in lectures given by the author to graduate students. As announced by the title, the book is divided into two parts: the first part (about 250 pages) is a general introduction to the physics of plasmas, while the second, somewhat shorter, part (about 150 pages), is devoted to a description of the most important experimental approaches to achieving controlled thermonuclear fusion. Even in the first part, moreover, the choice of subjects is consistently oriented towards the needs of fusion research. Thus, the introduction to the behaviour of charged particles (particle motion, collisions, etc.) and to the collective description of plasmas is quite short, although the reader will get a flavour of all the most important topics and will find a number of examples chosen for their relevance to fusion applications (only the presentation of the Vlasov equation, in the second section of Chapter 4, might be criticized as so concise as to be almost misleading, since the difference between microscopic and macroscopic fields is not even mentioned). Considerably more space is devoted to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description of equilibrium and stability. This part includes the solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation for circular tokamaks, a brief discussion of Pfirsch-Schlüter, neoclassical and anomalous diffusion, and two relatively long chapters on the most important ideal and resistive MHD instabilities of toroidal plasmas; drift and ion temperature gradient driven instabilities are also briefly presented. The

  17. A Vlasov equation with Dirac potential used in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bardos, Claude; Nouri, Anne

    2012-11-15

    Well-posedness of the Cauchy problem is analyzed for a singular Vlasov equation governing the evolution of the ionic distribution function of a quasineutral fusion plasma. The Penrose criterium is adapted to the linearized problem around a time and space homogeneous distribution function showing (due to the singularity) more drastic differences between stable and unstable situations. This pathology appears on the full nonlinear problem, well-posed locally in time with analytic initial data, but generally ill-posed in the Hadamard sense. Eventually with a very different class of solutions, mono-kinetic, which constrains the structure of the density distribution, the problem becomes locally in time well-posed.

  18. Recombination of H atoms on the dust in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtiyari-Ramezani, M. Alinejad, N.; Mahmoodi, J.

    2015-07-15

    We survey a model for theoretical study of the interaction of hydrogen and dust surface and apply our results for dusty plasmas to fusion devices. In this model, considering the mobility of ad-atoms from one physisorbed, or chemisorbed site, to other one by thermal diffusion, we describe the formation of H{sub 2} on grain surfaces. Finally, we calculate the formation rate on the high temperature dust surfaces for a range of temperature and density in typical conditions of divertor of tokamak.

  19. Azimuthal inhomogeneity of turbulence structure and its impact on intermittent particle transport in linear magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T.; Inagaki, S.; Sasaki, M.; Nagashima, Y.; Kasuya, N.; Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, S.-I.; Kosuga, Y.; Arakawa, H.; Yamada, T.; Miwa, Y.; Itoh, K.

    2015-11-15

    Fluctuation component in the turbulence regime is found to be azimuthally localized at a phase of the global coherent modes in a linear magnetized plasma PANTA. Spatial distribution of squared bicoherence is given in the azimuthal cross section as an indicator of nonlinear energy transfer function from the global coherent mode to the turbulence. Squared bicoherence is strong at a phase where the turbulence amplitude is large. As a result of the turbulence localization, time evolution of radial particle flux becomes bursty. Statistical features such as skewness and kurtosis are strongly modified by the localized turbulence component, although contribution to mean particle flux profile is small.

  20. Plasma assessments for the fusion engineering device (FED)

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Rutherford, P.H.; Lyon, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    An initial range of plasma assumptions and scenarios has been examined for the US tokamak FED concept. The results suggest that the current FED baseline parameters of R = 4.8 m, B/sub t/ = 3.6 T, a = 1.3 m, b = 2.1 m (D-shape), and I/sub p/ = 4.8 to 5.4 MA are appropriate for achieving its nominal goals of P(fusion) approx. = 180 MW and a plasma Q greater than or equal to to 5 for a pulse length greater than 100 s. However, large uncertainty still exists in the areas of current startup, ion-cyclotron wave launching, influence of plasma shape on achievable beta, impurity control, plasma edge transport, and plasma disruption. Various options and remedies have been suggested to alleviate the impact of the uncertainty on the FED design concept. They appear promising because they can be studied experimentally and are not expected to lead to fundamental design modifications of FED.

  1. Educational Outreach at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivenberg, Paul; Thomas, Paul

    2006-10-01

    At the MIT PSFC, student and staff volunteers work together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion science and plasma technology. Seeking to generate excitement in young people about science and engineering, the PSFC hosts a number of educational outreach activities throughout the year, including Middle and High School Outreach Days. The PSFC also has an in-school science demonstration program on the theme of magnetism. The Mr. Magnet Program, headed by Mr. Paul Thomas, has been bringing lively demonstrations on magnetism into local elementary and middle schools for 15 years. This year Mr. Magnet presented the program to nearly 30,000 students at over 67 schools and other events, reaching kindergartners through college freshmen. In addition to his program on magnetism, he is offering an interactive lecture about plasma to high schools. The "Traveling Plasma Lab" encourages students to learn more about plasma science while having fun investigating plasma properties using actual laboratory techniques and equipment. Beyond the classroom, Paul Thomas has provided technical training for Boston Museum of Science staff in preparation for the opening of a Star Wars exhibit. His hands-on demos have also been filmed by the History Channel for a one-hour program about Magnetism, which aired in June 2006.

  2. Interaction between plasma synthetic jet and subsonic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Haohua; Kotsonis, Marios

    2017-04-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the interaction between a plasma synthetic jet (PSJ) and a subsonic turbulent boundary layer (TBL) using a hotwire anemometer and phase-locked particle imaging velocimetry. The PSJ is interacting with a fully developed turbulent boundary layer developing on the flat wall of a square wind tunnel section of 1.7 m length. The Reynolds number based on the freestream velocity (U∞ = 20 m/s) and the boundary layer thickness (δ99 = 34.5 mm) at the location of interaction is 44 400. A large-volume (1696 mm3) three-electrode plasma synthetic jet actuator (PSJA) with a round exit orifice (D = 2 mm) is adopted to produce high-speed (92 m/s) and short-duration (Tjet = 1 ms) pulsed jets. The exit velocity variation of the adopted PSJA in a crossflow is shown to remain almost identical to that in quiescent conditions. However, the flow structures emanating from the interaction between the PSJ and the TBL are significantly different from what were observed in quiescent conditions. In the midspan xy plane (z = 0 mm), the erupted jet body initially follows a wall-normal trajectory accompanied by the formation of a distinctive front vortex ring. After three convective time scales the jet bends to the crossflow, thus limiting the peak penetration depth to approximately 0.58δ99. Comparison of the normalized jet trajectories indicates that the penetration ability of the PSJ is less than steady jets with the same momentum flow velocity. Prior to the jet diminishing, a recirculation region is observed in the leeward side of the jet body, experiencing first an expansion and then a contraction in the area. In the cross-stream yz plane, the signature structure of jets in a crossflow, the counter-rotating vortex pair (CVP), transports high-momentum flow from the outer layer to the near-wall region, leading to a fuller velocity profile and a drop in the boundary layer shape factor (1.3 to 1.2). In contrast to steady jets, the CVP produced by the PSJ

  3. Permutation entropy and statistical complexity analysis of turbulence in laboratory plasmas and the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Weck, P J; Schaffner, D A; Brown, M R; Wicks, R T

    2015-02-01

    The Bandt-Pompe permutation entropy and the Jensen-Shannon statistical complexity are used to analyze fluctuating time series of three different turbulent plasmas: the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the plasma wind tunnel of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX), drift-wave turbulence of ion saturation current fluctuations in the edge of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD), and fully developed turbulent magnetic fluctuations of the solar wind taken from the Wind spacecraft. The entropy and complexity values are presented as coordinates on the CH plane for comparison among the different plasma environments and other fluctuation models. The solar wind is found to have the highest permutation entropy and lowest statistical complexity of the three data sets analyzed. Both laboratory data sets have larger values of statistical complexity, suggesting that these systems have fewer degrees of freedom in their fluctuations, with SSX magnetic fluctuations having slightly less complexity than the LAPD edge I(sat). The CH plane coordinates are compared to the shape and distribution of a spectral decomposition of the wave forms. These results suggest that fully developed turbulence (solar wind) occupies the lower-right region of the CH plane, and that other plasma systems considered to be turbulent have less permutation entropy and more statistical complexity. This paper presents use of this statistical analysis tool on solar wind plasma, as well as on an MHD turbulent experimental plasma.

  4. Interplay of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Inertial Fusion Hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Strozzi, D. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Michel, P.; ...

    2017-01-12

    The effects of laser-plasma interactions (LPI) on the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion hohlraums are investigated in this work via a new approach that self-consistently couples reduced LPI models into radiation-hydrodynamics numerical codes. The interplay between hydrodynamics and LPI—specifically stimulated Raman scatter and crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET)—mostly occurs via momentum and energy deposition into Langmuir and ion acoustic waves. This spatially redistributes energy coupling to the target, which affects the background plasma conditions and thus, modifies laser propagation. In conclusion, this model shows reduced CBET and significant laser energy depletion by Langmuir waves, which reduce the discrepancy between modeling andmore » data from hohlraum experiments on wall x-ray emission and capsule implosion shape.« less

  5. Particle model for nonlocal heat transport in fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Bufferand, H; Ciraolo, G; Ghendrih, Ph; Lepri, S; Livi, R

    2013-02-01

    We present a simple stochastic, one-dimensional model for heat transfer in weakly collisional media as fusion plasmas. Energies of plasma particles are treated as lattice random variables interacting with a rate inversely proportional to their energy schematizing a screened Coulomb interaction. We consider both the equilibrium (microcanonical) and nonequilibrium case in which the system is in contact with heat baths at different temperatures. The model exhibits a characteristic length of thermalization that can be associated with an interaction mean free path and one observes a transition from ballistic to diffusive regime depending on the average energy of the system. A mean-field expression for heat flux is deduced from system heat transport properties. Finally, it is shown that the nonequilibrium steady state is characterized by long-range correlations.

  6. Interplay of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Inertial Fusion Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, D. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Michel, P.; Divol, L.; Sepke, S. M.; Kerbel, G. D.; Thomas, C. A.; Ralph, J. E.; Moody, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of laser-plasma interactions (LPI) on the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion hohlraums are investigated via a new approach that self-consistently couples reduced LPI models into radiation-hydrodynamics numerical codes. The interplay between hydrodynamics and LPI—specifically stimulated Raman scatter and crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET)—mostly occurs via momentum and energy deposition into Langmuir and ion acoustic waves. This spatially redistributes energy coupling to the target, which affects the background plasma conditions and thus, modifies laser propagation. This model shows reduced CBET and significant laser energy depletion by Langmuir waves, which reduce the discrepancy between modeling and data from hohlraum experiments on wall x-ray emission and capsule implosion shape.

  7. Investigation of edge turbulence by means of optical and electrical diagnostics in RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarin, Paolo; Cavazzana, Roberto; Serianni, Gianluigi; Yagi, Yasuyuki; Sakakita, Hajime

    2003-10-01

    Electrostatic turbulence in the edge region of RFP is commonly observed with sets of Langmuir probes during low current operation and associated with electrostatic structures. A new diagnostic system is being developed for the investigation of electrostatic turbulence in the edge region of fusion plasmas, at high plasma currents and thermal loads and will be used in the TPE-RX and RFX devices. The system is composed of gas puff nozzle, a double radial array of Langmuir probes and a set of 32 optical chords measuring the HÑ fluctuations. The nozzle will allow the puffing of gas to increase the local optical emissivity; the optical sensors will permit to investigate the optical emissivity turbulent pattern and to perform a two-dimensional analysis of turbulent structures. The Langmuir probes will be used to visualise the floating potential turbulent pattern and to measure the electron density. After assessing the correspondence between the results of the two systems and characterising the properties of the local plasma, the Langmuir probes will be remotely removed and only the optical analysis will be continued at high plasma currents. The gas flow will be characterised so as not to perturb the investigated region, while at the same time increasing the local emissivity. The area of optical view is 60 mm wide (toroidal direction) and 4 mm high (poloidal direction). The fields of view of adjacent chords in the object plane are 5 mm toroidally apart from each other and their diameter is 4 mm. The focus along the line of sight is about 50 mm deep. Each chord views a cone centred on focal point in the outer edge and extending through the plasma. The contributions due to small-scale structures away from the focus will be spatially averaged and so should contribute mainly a constant level to the chord signal. The puffed cloud emission will be collected from 3 optical heads and transferred through 35 m long optical fibres to the detection system, for which standard

  8. Laser beam propagation through inertial confinement fusion hohlraum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D. H.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N. B.; Dixit, S.; Neumayer, P.; Moody, J. D.; Pollock, B. B.; Ross, J. S.; Suter, L.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2007-05-15

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes have been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. The plasma emulator is produced in a gas-filled hohlraum; a blue 351-nm laser beam propagates along the axis of the hohlraum interacting with a high-temperature (T{sub e}=3.5 keV), dense (n{sub e}=5x10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}), long-scale length (L{approx}2 mm) plasma. Experiments at these conditions have demonstrated that the interaction beam produces less than 1% total backscatter resulting in transmission greater than 90% for laser intensities less than I<2x10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}. The bulk plasma conditions have been independently characterized using Thomson scattering where the peak electron temperatures are shown to scale with the hohlraum heater beam energy in the range from 2 keV to 3.5 keV. This feature has allowed us to determine the thresholds for both backscattering and filamentation instabilities; the former measured with absolutely calibrated full aperture backscatter and near backscatter diagnostics and the latter with a transmitted beam diagnostics. Comparing the experimental results with detailed gain calculations for the onset of significant laser scattering processes shows a stimulated Brillouin scattering threshold (R=10%) for a linear gain of 15; these high temperature, low density experiments produce plasma conditions comparable to those along the outer beams in ignition hohlraum designs. By increasing the gas fill density (n{sub e}=10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}) in these targets, the inner beam ignition hohlraum conditions are accessed. In this case, stimulated Raman scattering dominates the backscattering processes and we show that scattering is small for gains less than 20 which can be achieved through proper choice of the laser beam intensity.

  9. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, Richard D.; Walsh, James L.

    2016-08-01

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence.

  10. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device.

    PubMed

    Whalley, Richard D; Walsh, James L

    2016-08-26

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence.

  11. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device

    PubMed Central

    Whalley, Richard D.; Walsh, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence. PMID:27561246

  12. Turbulent Mixing Layer Control using Ns-DBD Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashish; Little, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    A low speed turbulent mixing layer (Reθo =1282, U1 /U2 = 0 . 28 and U2 = 11 . 8 m / s) is subject to nanosecond pulse driven dielectric barrier discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuation. The forcing frequency corresponds to a Strouhal number (St) of 0.032 which is the most amplified frequency based on stability theory. Flow response is studied as a function of the pulse energy, the energy input time scale (carrier frequency) and the duration of actuation (duty cycle). It is found that successful actuation requires a combination of forcing parameters. An evaluation of the forcing efficacy is achieved by examining different flow quantities such as momentum thickness, vorticity and velocity fluctuations. In accordance with past work, a dependence is found between the initial shear layer thickness and the energy coupled to the flow. More complex relationships are also revealed such as a limitation on the maximum pulse energy which yields control. Also, the pulse energy and the carrier frequency (inverse of period between successive pulses) are interdependent whereby an optimum exists between them and extreme values of either parameter is inconsonant with the control desired. These observations establish a rich and complex process behind ns-DBD plasma actuation. Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-12-1-0044).

  13. Neutron Generation by Laser-Driven Spherically Convergent Plasma Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, G.; Yan, J.; Liu, J.; Lan, K.; Chen, Y. H.; Huo, W. Y.; Fan, Z.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, J.; Chen, Z.; Jiang, W.; Chen, L.; Tang, Q.; Yuan, Z.; Wang, F.; Jiang, S.; Ding, Y.; Zhang, W.; He, X. T.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate a new laser-driven spherically convergent plasma fusion scheme (SCPF) that can produce thermonuclear neutrons stably and efficiently. In the SCPF scheme, laser beams of nanosecond pulse duration and 1 014- 1 015 W /cm2 intensity uniformly irradiate the fuel layer lined inside a spherical hohlraum. The fuel layer is ablated and heated to expand inwards. Eventually, the hot fuel plasmas converge, collide, merge, and stagnate at the central region, converting most of their kinetic energy to internal energy, forming a thermonuclear fusion fireball. With the assumptions of steady ablation and adiabatic expansion, we theoretically predict the neutron yield Yn to be related to the laser energy EL, the hohlraum radius Rh, and the pulse duration τ through a scaling law of Yn∝(EL/Rh1.2τ0.2 )2.5. We have done experiments at the ShengGuangIII-prototype facility to demonstrate the principle of the SCPF scheme. Some important implications are discussed.

  14. Investigation of turbulence in reversed field pinch plasma by using microwave imaging reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Z. B.; Nagayama, Y.; Hamada, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Michael, C. A.; Yambe, K.

    2011-10-15

    Turbulence in the reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma has been investigated by using the microwave imaging reflectometry in the toroidal pinch experiment RX (TPE-RX). In conventional RFP plasma, the fluctuations are dominated by the intermittent blob-like structures. These structures are accompanied with the generation of magnetic field, the strong turbulence, and high nonlinear coupling among the high and low k modes. The pulsed poloidal current drive operation, which improves the plasma confinement significantly, suppresses the dynamo, the turbulence, and the blob-like structures.

  15. Acceleration of compact toroid plasma rings for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, C.W.; Barr, W.L.; Eddleman, J.L.; Gee, M.; Hammer, J.H.; Ho, S.K.; Logan, B.G.; Meeker, D.J.; Mirin, A.A.; Nevins, W.M.

    1988-08-26

    We describe experimental results for a new type of collective accelerator based on magnetically confined compact torus (CT) plasma rings and discuss applications to both inertial and magnetic fusion. We have demonstrated the principle of CT acceleration in the RACE device with acceleration of 0.5 mg ring masses to 400 km/s and 0.02 mg ring masses to 1400 km/s at greater than or equal to30% efficiency. Scaling the CT accelerator to the multi-megajoule level could provide an efficient, economical driver for inertial fusion (ICF) or magnetically insulated inertial fusion. Efficient conversion to x-rays for driving hohlraum-type ICF targets has been modeled using a radiation-hydrodynamics code. At less demanding conditions than required for ICF, a CT accelerator can be applied to fueling and current drive in tokamaks. Fueling is accomplished by injecting CTs at the required rate to sustain the particle inventory and at a velocity sufficient to penetrate to the magnetic axis before CT dissolution. Current drive is a consequence of the magnetic helicity content of the CT, which is approximately conserved during reconnection of the CT fields with the tokamak. Major areas of uncertainty in CT fueling and current drive concern the mechanism by which CTs will stop in a tokamak plasma and the effects of the CT on energy confinement and magnetic stability. Bounds on the required CT injection velocity are obtained by considering drag due to emission of an Alfven-wave wake and rapid reconnection and tilting on the internal Alfven time scale of the CT. Preliminary results employing a 3-D, resistive MHD code show rapid tilting with the CT aligning its magnetic moment with the tokamak field. Requirements for an experimental test of CT injection and scenarios for fueling a reactor will also be discussed. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Turbulent relaxation and meta-stable equilibrium states of an electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Douglas J.

    A Malmberg-Penning electron trap allows for the experimental study of nearly ideal, two-dimensional (2D) inviscid (Euler) hydrodynamics. This is perhaps the simplest case of self organizing nonlinear turbulence, and is therefore a paradigm for dynamo theory, Taylor relaxation, selective decay and other nonlinear fluid processes. The dynamical relaxation of a pure electron plasma in the guiding-center-drift approximation is studied, comparing experiments, numerical simulations and statistical theories of weakly-dissipative 2D turbulence. The nonuniform metastable equilibrium states resulting from turbulent evolution are examined, and are well-described by a maximum entropy principle for constrained circulation, energy, and angular momentum. The turbulent decay of the system is also examined, and a similarity decay law is proposed which incorporates the substantial enstrophy trapped in the metastable equilibrium. This law approaches Batchelor's t-2 self-similar decay in the limit of strong turbulence, and is verified in turbulent evolution in the electron plasma experiment.

  17. Simulation of turbulence in the divertor region of tokamak edge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umansky, M. V.; Rognlien, T. D.; Xu, X. Q.

    2005-03-01

    Results are presented for turbulence simulations with the fluid edge turbulence code BOUT [X.Q. Xu, R.H. Cohen, Contr. Plas. Phys. 36 (1998) 158]. The present study is focussed on turbulence in the divertor leg region and on the role of the X-point in the structure of turbulence. Results of the present calculations indicate that the ballooning effects are important for the divertor fluctuations. The X-point shear leads to weak correlation of turbulence across the X-point regions, in particular for large toroidal wavenumber. For the saturated amplitudes of the divertor region turbulence it is found that amplitudes of density fluctuations are roughly proportional to the local density of the background plasma. The amplitudes of electron temperature and electric potential fluctuations are roughly proportional to the local electron temperature of the background plasma.

  18. Robustness of predator-prey models for confinement regime transitions in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2013-04-15

    Energy transport and confinement in tokamak fusion plasmas is usually determined by the coupled nonlinear interactions of small-scale drift turbulence and larger scale coherent nonlinear structures, such as zonal flows, together with free energy sources such as temperature gradients. Zero-dimensional models, designed to embody plausible physical narratives for these interactions, can help to identify the origin of enhanced energy confinement and of transitions between confinement regimes. A prime zero-dimensional paradigm is predator-prey or Lotka-Volterra. Here, we extend a successful three-variable (temperature gradient; microturbulence level; one class of coherent structure) model in this genre [M. A. Malkov and P. H. Diamond, Phys. Plasmas 16, 012504 (2009)], by adding a fourth variable representing a second class of coherent structure. This requires a fourth coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equation. We investigate the degree of invariance of the phenomenology generated by the model of Malkov and Diamond, given this additional physics. We study and compare the long-time behaviour of the three-equation and four-equation systems, their evolution towards the final state, and their attractive fixed points and limit cycles. We explore the sensitivity of paths to attractors. It is found that, for example, an attractive fixed point of the three-equation system can become a limit cycle of the four-equation system. Addressing these questions which we together refer to as 'robustness' for convenience is particularly important for models which, as here, generate sharp transitions in the values of system variables which may replicate some key features of confinement transitions. Our results help to establish the robustness of the zero-dimensional model approach to capturing observed confinement phenomenology in tokamak fusion plasmas.

  19. Robustness of predator-prey models for confinement regime transitions in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2013-04-01

    Energy transport and confinement in tokamak fusion plasmas is usually determined by the coupled nonlinear interactions of small-scale drift turbulence and larger scale coherent nonlinear structures, such as zonal flows, together with free energy sources such as temperature gradients. Zero-dimensional models, designed to embody plausible physical narratives for these interactions, can help to identify the origin of enhanced energy confinement and of transitions between confinement regimes. A prime zero-dimensional paradigm is predator-prey or Lotka-Volterra. Here, we extend a successful three-variable (temperature gradient; microturbulence level; one class of coherent structure) model in this genre [M. A. Malkov and P. H. Diamond, Phys. Plasmas 16, 012504 (2009)], by adding a fourth variable representing a second class of coherent structure. This requires a fourth coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equation. We investigate the degree of invariance of the phenomenology generated by the model of Malkov and Diamond, given this additional physics. We study and compare the long-time behaviour of the three-equation and four-equation systems, their evolution towards the final state, and their attractive fixed points and limit cycles. We explore the sensitivity of paths to attractors. It is found that, for example, an attractive fixed point of the three-equation system can become a limit cycle of the four-equation system. Addressing these questions which we together refer to as "robustness" for convenience is particularly important for models which, as here, generate sharp transitions in the values of system variables which may replicate some key features of confinement transitions. Our results help to establish the robustness of the zero-dimensional model approach to capturing observed confinement phenomenology in tokamak fusion plasmas.

  20. Simulations of drift resistive ballooning L-mode turbulence in the edge plasma of the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B. I.; Umansky, M. V.; Nevins, W. M.; Makowski, M. A.; Boedo, J. A.; Rudakov, D. L.; McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; Groebner, R. J.

    2013-05-15

    Results from simulations of electromagnetic drift-resistive ballooning turbulence for tokamak edge turbulence in realistic single-null geometry are reported. The calculations are undertaken with the BOUT three-dimensional fluid code that solves Braginskii-based fluid equations [X. Q. Xu and R. H. Cohen, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 36, 158 (1998)]. The simulation setup models L-mode edge plasma parameters in the actual magnetic geometry of the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 807 (2002)]. The computations track the development of drift-resistive ballooning turbulence in the edge region to saturation. Fluctuation amplitudes, fluctuation spectra, and particle and thermal fluxes are compared to experimental data near the outer midplane from Langmuir probe and beam-emission-spectroscopy for a few well-characterized L-mode discharges in DIII-D. The simulations are comprised of a suite of runs in which the physics model is varied to include more fluid fields and physics terms. The simulations yield results for fluctuation amplitudes, correlation lengths, particle and energy fluxes, and diffusivities that agree with measurements within an order of magnitude and within factors of 2 or better for some of the data. The agreement of the simulations with the experimental measurements varies with respect to including more physics in the model equations within the suite of models investigated. The simulations show stabilizing effects of sheared E × B poloidal rotation (imposed zonal flow) and of lower edge electron temperature and density.

  1. A burning plasma program strategy to advance fusion energy. Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, Burning Plasma Strategy Panel

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2002-09-01

    Fusion energy shows great promise to contribute to securing the energy future of humanity. The risk of conflicts arising from energy shortages and supply cutoffs, as well as the risk of severe environmental impacts from existing methods of energy production, are strong reasons to pursue fusion energy now. The world effort to develop fusion energy is at the threshold of a new stage in its research: the investigation of burning plasmas. This investigation, at the frontier of the physics of complex systems, would be a huge step in establishing the potential of magnetic fusion energy to contribute to the world’s energy security. The defining feature of a burning plasma is that it is self-heated: the 100 million degree temperature of the plasma is maintained mainly by the heat generated by the fusion reactions themselves, as occurs in burning stars. The fusion-generated alpha particles produce new physical phenomena that are strongly coupled together as a nonlinear complex system. Understanding all elements of this system poses a major challenge to fundamental plasma physics. The technology needed to produce and control a burning plasma presents challenges in engineering science similarly essential to the development of fusion energy.

  2. Surface modifications of fusion reactor relevant materials on exposure to fusion grade plasma in plasma focus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, R.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Mishra, P.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2015-11-01

    An 11.5 kJ plasma focus (PF) device was used here to irradiate materials with fusion grade plasma. The surface modifications of different materials (W, Ni, stainless steel, Mo and Cu) were investigated using various available techniques. The prominent features observed through the scanning electron microscope on the sample surfaces were erosions, cracks, blisters and craters after irradiations. The surface roughness of the samples increased multifold after exposure as measured by the surface profilometer. The X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the changes in the microstructures and the structural phase transformation in surface layers of the samples. We observed change in volumes of austenite and ferrite phases in the stainless steel sample. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis suggested alloying of the surface layer of the samples with elements of the PF anode. We report here the comparative analysis of the surface damages of materials with different physical, thermal and mechanical properties. The investigations will be useful to understand the behavior of the perspective materials for future fusion reactors (either in pure form or in alloy) over the long operations.

  3. Differential turbulent heating of different ions in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Elizarov, L.I.; Ivanov, A.A.; Serebrennikov, K.S.; Vostrikova, E.A.

    2006-03-15

    The article considers the collisionless ion sound turbulent heating of different ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The ion sound arises due to parametric instability of pumping wave propagating along the magnetic field with the frequency close to that of electron cyclotron. Within the framework of turbulent heating model the different ions temperatures are calculated in gas-mixing ECRIS plasma.

  4. Ionization effects and modeling considerations for sudden viscous dissipation in compressing plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nat

    2016-10-01

    Turbulent plasma flow, amplified by rapid 3D compression, can be suddenly dissipated under continuing compression. This sudden dissipation comes about because the plasma viscosity is very sensitive to temperature, μ T 5 / 2 . We discuss approaches to constructing simple models to capture the turbulence energy growth and dissipation during rapid plasma compressions. Additionally, we explore the effects on compressing turbulence of plasma ionization during compression, to which the viscosity is also very sensitive. We show plasma ionization during compression enables larger turbulence growth, compared to when there is no plasma ionization. Further, ionization during compression can prevent the sudden dissipation effect, and can also make the difference between increasing and decreasing turbulence energy under compression. The influence exerted by ionization opens up the prospect for control of turbulence growth and sudden dissipation timing through choice of the plasma ion species. This work was supported by DOE through Contracts No. DE-AC02-09CH1-1466 and NNSA 67350-9960 (Prime # DOE DE-NA0001836), by DTRA HDTRA1-11-1-0037, and by NSF Contract No. PHY-1506122.

  5. Dense Plasma Focus - From Alternative Fusion Source to Versatile High Energy Density Plasma Source for Plasma Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF), a coaxial plasma gun, utilizes pulsed high current electrical discharge to heat and compress the plasma to very high density and temperature with energy densities in the range of 1-10 × 1010 J/m3. The DPF device has always been in the company of several alternative magnetic fusion devices as it produces intense fusion neutrons. Several experiments conducted on many different DPF devices ranging over several order of storage energy have demonstrated that at higher storage energy the neutron production does not follow I4 scaling laws and deteriorate significantly raising concern about the device's capability and relevance for fusion energy. On the other hand, the high energy density pinch plasma in DPF device makes it a multiple radiation source of ions, electron, soft and hard x-rays, and neutrons, making it useful for several applications in many different fields such as lithography, radiography, imaging, activation analysis, radioisotopes production etc. Being a source of hot dense plasma, strong shockwave, intense energetic beams and radiation, etc, the DPF device, additionally, shows tremendous potential for applications in plasma nanoscience and plasma nanotechnology. In the present paper, the key features of plasma focus device are critically discussed to understand the novelties and opportunities that this device offers in processing and synthesis of nanophase materials using, both, the top-down and bottom-up approach. The results of recent key experimental investigations performed on (i) the processing and modification of bulk target substrates for phase change, surface reconstruction and nanostructurization, (ii) the nanostructurization of PLD grown magnetic thin films, and (iii) direct synthesis of nanostructured (nanowire, nanosheets and nanoflowers) materials using anode target material ablation, ablated plasma and background reactive gas based synthesis and purely gas phase synthesis of various different types of

  6. Experimental and theoretical research in applied plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Porkolab, M.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: fusion theory and computations; theory of thermonuclear plasmas; user service center; high poloidal beta studies on PBX-M; fast ECE fluctuation diagnostic for balloning mode studies; x-ray imaging diagnostic; millimeter/submillimeter-wave fusion ion diagnostics; small scale turbulence and nonlinear dynamics in plasmas; plasma turbulence and transport; phase contrast interferometer diagnostic for long wavelength fluctuations in DIII-D; and charged and neutral fusion production for fusio plasmas.

  7. SPECTRAL BREAKS OF ALFVÉNIC TURBULENCE IN A COLLISIONLESS PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Boldyrev, Stanislav; Xia, Qian; Zhdankin, Vladimir; Chen, Christopher H. K.

    2015-06-20

    Recent observations reveal that magnetic turbulence in the nearly colisionless solar wind plasma extends to scales smaller than the plasma microscales, such as ion gyroradius and ion inertial length. Measured breaks in the spectra of magnetic and density fluctuations at high frequencies are thought to be related to the transition from large-scale hydromagnetic to small-scale kinetic turbulence. The scales of such transitions and the responsible physical mechanisms are not well understood however. In the present work we emphasize the crucial role of the plasma parameters in the transition to kinetic turbulence, such as the ion and electron plasma beta, the electron to ion temperature ratio, the degree of obliquity of turbulent fluctuations. We then propose an explanation for the spectral breaks reported in recent observations.

  8. Turbulent acceleration and heating in toroidal magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbet, X.; Esteve, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Abiteboul, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Smolyakov, A.

    2013-07-01

    It is shown that turbulence is responsible for a source of momentum, which cannot be recast as a divergence of a momentum flux. This process is similar to turbulent heating, with similar properties. The sum over all species vanishes up to polarization contributions. Hence, toroidal momentum is transferred from species to species, mediated by turbulence. As for momentum flux, symmetry breaking is needed. Flow shear is investigated as a source of symmetry breaking, leading to a source of momentum proportional to the shear rate. Turbulent acceleration is significant for ion species. It is found that it is proportional to the charge number Z, while turbulent heating scales as Z2/A, where A is the mass number. It is maximum in the edge, where the E × B flow shear rate and turbulence intensity are maximum. When both are large enough, the turbulent torque may overcome the collisional friction between impurities and main ions, thus leading to different toroidal velocities.

  9. The role of the plasma current in turbulence decrease during lower hybrid current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antar, G.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Asghar, A.; Žàček, F.

    2017-03-01

    The interaction of radio frequency (RF) waves with edge turbulence has resurfaced after the results obtained on many tokamaks showing that edge turbulence decreases when the ion cyclotron frequency heating (ICRH) is switched on. Using the lower hybrid (LH) waves to drive current into tokamak plasmas, this issue presented contradicting results with some tokamaks (FTU & HT-7) showing a net decrease, similar to the ICRH results, and others (Tore Supra) did not. In this article, these apparent discrepancies among tokamaks and RF wave frequencies are removed. It is found that turbulence large-scale structures in the scrape-off layer decrease at high enough plasma currents (Ip) on the Tore Supra tokamak. We distinguish three regimes: At low Ip's, no modification is detected with statistical properties of turbulence similar to ohmic plasmas even with PLH reaching 4.8 MW. At moderate plasma currents, turbulence properties are modified only at a high LH power. At high plasma currents, turbulent large scales are reduced to values smaller than 1 cm, and this is accompanied by a net decrease in the level of turbulence of about 30% even with a moderate LH power.

  10. Laser Beam Propagation through Inertial Confinement Fusion Hohlraum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Meezan, N B; DIxit, S; Neumayer, P; Moody, J D; Pollock, B B; Ross, J S; Glenzer, S H

    2006-10-26

    A study of the relevant laser-plasma interaction processes has been performed in long-scale length plasmas that emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Experiments in this high-temperature (T{sub e} = 3.5 keV), dense (n{sub e} = 0.5 - 1 x 10{sup -3}) hohlraum plasma have demonstrated that blue 351-nm laser beams produce less than 1% total backscatter resulting in transmission greater than 90% for ignition relevant laser intensities (I < 2 x 10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}). The bulk plasma conditions have been independently characterized using Thomson scattering where the peak electron temperatures are shown to scale with the hohlraum heater beam energy in the range from 2 keV to 3.5 keV. This feature has allowed us to determine the thresholds for both backscattering and filamentation instabilities; the former measured with absolutely calibrated full aperture backscatter and near backscatter diagnostics and the latter with a transmitted beam diagnostics. Comparing the experimental results with detailed gain calculations for the onset of significant laser scattering processes shows that these results are relevant for the outer beams in ignition hohlraum experiments corresponding to a gain threshold for stimulated Brillouin scattering of 15. By increasing the gas fill density in these experiments further accesses inner beam ignition hohlraum conditions. In this case, stimulated Raman scattering dominates the backscattering processes. They show that scattering is small for gains smaller than 20, which can be achieved through proper choice of the laser beam intensity.

  11. Educational Outreach at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivenberg, Paul; Thomas, Paul

    2004-11-01

    At the MIT PSFC student and staff volunteers work together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion science and plasma technology. Seeking to generate excitement in young people about science and engineering, the PSFC hosts a number of educational outreach activities and tours throughout the year, including Middle and High School Outreach Days. The PSFC also has an in-school science demonstration program on the theme of magnetism. As ''Mr. Magnet'' Technical Supervisor Paul Thomas brings a truck-load of hands-on demonstrations to K-12 schools, challenging students to help him with experiments. While teaching fundamentals of magnetism and electricity he shows that science is fun for all, and that any student can have a career in science. This year he taught at 75 schools and other events, reaching 30,000 teachers and students. He has expanded his teaching to include an interactive demonstration of plasma, encouraging participants to investigate plasma properties with audiovisual, electromagnetic, and spectroscopic techniques. The PSFC's continuing involvement with the MIT Museum and the Boston Museum of Science also helps familiarize the public with the fourth state of matter.

  12. Educational Outreach at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P.; Rivenberg, P.; Censabella, V.

    2002-11-01

    At the MIT PSFC, student and staff volunteers work together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion science and plasma technology. Seeking to generate excitement in young people about science and engineering, the PSFC hosts a number of educational outreach activities throughout the year, including Middle and High School Outreach Days. The PSFC also has an in-school science-demonstration program on the theme of magnetism. As ``Mr. Magnet," Technical Supervisor Paul Thomas brings a truck-load of hands-on demonstrations to K-12 schools, challenging students to help him with experiments. While teaching fundamentals of magnetism and electricity he shows that science is fun for all, and that any student can have a career in science. This year he reached 82 schools -- 30,000 teachers and students. He has recently expanded his teaching to include an interactive demonstration of plasma, encouraging participants to investigate plasma properties with audiovisual, electromagnetic, and spectroscopic techniques. He has also developed a workshop for middle school on how to build an electromagnet.

  13. 1991 US-Japan workshop on Nuclear Fusion in Dense Plasmas. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimaru, S.; Tajima, T.

    1991-10-01

    The scientific areas covered at the Workshop may be classified into the following subfields: (1) basic theory of dense plasma physics and its interface with atomic physics and nuclear physics; (2) physics of dense z-pinches, ICF plasmas etc; (3) stellar interior plasmas; (4) cold fusion; and (5) other dense plasmas.

  14. 1991 US-Japan workshop on Nuclear Fusion in Dense Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimaru, S. . Dept. of Physics); Tajima, T. . Inst. for Fusion Studies)

    1991-10-01

    The scientific areas covered at the Workshop may be classified into the following subfields: (1) basic theory of dense plasma physics and its interface with atomic physics and nuclear physics; (2) physics of dense z-pinches, ICF plasmas etc; (3) stellar interior plasmas; (4) cold fusion; and (5) other dense plasmas.

  15. Insulin Stimulates Membrane Fusion and GLUT4 Accumulation in Clathrin Coats on Adipocyte Plasma Membranes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shaohui; Lifshitz, Larry M.; Jones, Christine; Bellve, Karl D.; Standley, Clive; Fonseca, Sonya; Corvera, Silvia; Fogarty, Kevin E.; Czech, Michael P.

    2007-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy reveals highly mobile structures containing enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) within a zone about 100 nm beneath the plasma membrane of 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We developed a computer program (Fusion Assistant) that enables direct analysis of the docking/fusion kinetics of hundreds of exocytic fusion events. Insulin stimulation increases the fusion frequency of exocytic GLUT4 vesicles by ∼4-fold, increasing GLUT4 content in the plasma membrane. Remarkably, insulin signaling modulates the kinetics of the fusion process, decreasing the vesicle tethering/docking duration prior to membrane fusion. In contrast, the kinetics of GLUT4 molecules spreading out in the plasma membrane from exocytic fusion sites is unchanged by insulin. As GLUT4 accumulates in the plasma membrane, it is also immobilized in punctate structures on the cell surface. A previous report suggested these structures are exocytic fusion sites (Lizunov et al., J. Cell Biol. 169:481-489, 2005). However, two-color TIRF microscopy using fluorescent proteins fused to clathrin light chain or GLUT4 reveals these structures are clathrin-coated patches. Taken together, these data show that insulin signaling accelerates the transition from docking of GLUT4-containing vesicles to their fusion with the plasma membrane and promotes GLUT4 accumulation in clathrin-based endocytic structures on the plasma membrane. PMID:17339344

  16. In vitro fusion of lung lamellar bodies and plasma membrane is augmented by lung synexin.

    PubMed

    Chander, A; Wu, R D

    1991-11-05

    Lamellar bodies of lung epithelial type II cells undergo fusion with plasma membrane prior to exocytosis of surfactant into the alveolar lumen. Since synexin from adrenal glands promotes aggregation and fusion of chromaffin granules, we purified synexin-like proteins from bovine lung cytosolic fraction, and evaluated their effect on the fusion of isolated lamellar bodies and plasma membrane fractions. Synexin activity, which co-purified with an approx. 47 kDa protein (pI 6.8), was assessed by following calcium-dependent aggregation of liposomes prepared from a mixture of phosphatidylcholine:phosphatidylserine (PC:PS, 3:1, mol/mol). Lung synexin caused aggregation of liposomes approximating lung surfactant lipid-like composition, isolated lamellar bodies, or isolated plasma membrane fraction. Lung synexin promoted fusion only in the presence of calcium. It augmented fusion between lamellar bodies and plasma membranes, lamellar bodies and liposomes, or between two populations of liposomes. However, selectivity with regard to synexin-mediated fusion was observed as synexin did not promote fusion between plasma membrane and liposomes, or between liposomes of surfactant lipid-like composition and other liposomes. These observations support a role for lung synexin in membrane fusion between the plasma membrane and lamellar bodies during exocytosis of lung surfactant, and suggest that such fusion is dependent on composition of interacting membranes.

  17. Secondary Nuclear Reactions in Magneto-Inertial Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    The goal of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) is to relax the extreme pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion by magnetizing the fuel. Understanding the level of magnetization at stagnation is critical for charting the performance of any MIF concept. We show here that the secondary nuclear reactions in magnetized deuterium plasma can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product (BR), the critical confinement parameter for MIF. The secondary neutron yields and spectra are examined and shown to be extremely sensitive to BR. In particular, embedded magnetic fields are shown to affect profoundly the isotropy of the secondary neutron spectra. Detailed modeling of these spectra along with the ratio of overall secondary to primary neutron yields is used to form the basis of a diagnostic technique used to infer BR at stagnation. Effects of gradients in density, temperature and magnetic field strength are examined, as well as other possible non-uniform fuel configurations. Computational results employing a fully kinetic treatment of charged reaction product transport and Monte Carlo treatment of secondary reactions are compared to results from recent experiments at Sandia National Laboratories' Z machine testing the MAGnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept. The technique reveals that the charged reaction products were highly magnetized in these experiments. Implications for eventual ignition-relevant experiments with deuterium-tritium fuel are discussed. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Anomalous transport in turbulent plasmas and continuous time random walks

    SciTech Connect

    Balescu, R.

    1995-05-01

    The possibility of a model of anomalous transport problems in a turbulent plasma by a purely stochastic process is investigated. The theory of continuous time random walks (CTRW`s) is briefly reviewed. It is shown that a particular class, called the standard long tail CTRW`s is of special interest for the description of subdiffusive transport. Its evolution is described by a non-Markovian diffusion equation that is constructed in such a way as to yield exact values for all the moments of the density profile. The concept of a CTRW model is compared to an exact solution of a simple test problem: transport of charged particles in a fluctuating magnetic field in the limit of infinite perpendicular correlation length. Although the well-known behavior of the mean square displacement proportional to {ital t}{sup 1/2} is easily recovered, the exact density profile cannot be modeled by a CTRW. However, the quasilinear approximation of the kinetic equation has the form of a non-Markovian diffusion equation and can thus be generated by a CTRW.

  19. Electromagnetic gyrokinetic turbulence in finite-beta helical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.; Nakajima, N.; Maeyama, S.

    2014-05-15

    A saturation mechanism for microturbulence in a regime of weak zonal flow generation is investigated by means of electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations. The study identifies a new saturation process of the kinetic ballooning mode (KBM) turbulence originating from the spatial structure of the KBM instabilities in a finite-beta Large Helical Device (LHD) plasma. Specifically, the most unstable KBM in LHD has an inclined mode structure with respect to the mid-plane of a torus, i.e., it has a finite radial wave-number in flux tube coordinates, in contrast to KBMs in tokamaks as well as ion-temperature gradient modes in tokamaks and helical systems. The simulations reveal that the growth of KBMs in LHD is saturated by nonlinear interactions of oppositely inclined convection cells through mutual shearing as well as by the zonal flow. The saturation mechanism is quantitatively investigated by analysis of the nonlinear entropy transfer that shows not only the mutual shearing but also a self-interaction with an elongated mode structure along the magnetic field line.

  20. Influence of Dupree diffusivity on the occurrence scattering time advance in turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-12-15

    The influence of Dupree diffusivity on the occurrence scattering time advance for the electron-ion collision is investigated in turbulent plasmas. The second-order eikonal method and the effective Dupree potential term associated with the plasma turbulence are employed to obtain the occurrence scattering time as a function of the diffusion coefficient, impact parameter, collision energy, thermal energy, and Debye length. The result shows that the occurrence scattering time advance decreases with an increase of the Dupree diffusivity. Hence, we have found that the influence of plasma turbulence diminishes the occurrence time advance in forward electron-ion collisions in thermal turbulent plasmas. The occurrence time advance shows that the propensity of the occurrence time advance increases with increasing scattering angle. It is also found that the effect of turbulence due to the Dupree diffusivity on the occurrence scattering time advance decreases with an increase of the thermal energy. In addition, the variation of the plasma turbulence on the occurrence scattering time advance due to the plasma parameters is also discussed.

  1. Bit error rate performance of free-space optical link under effect of plasma sheath turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangting; Yang, Shaofei; Guo, Lixin; Cheng, Mingjian; Gong, Teng

    2017-08-01

    Based on the power spectrum of the refractive-index fluctuation in the plasma sheath turbulence, the expressions for wave structure functions and scintillation index of optical wave propagating in a turbulent plasma sheath are derived. The effect of the turbulence microstructure on the propagation characteristics of optical waves are simulated and analyzed. Finally, the bit error performance of a free-space optical (FSO) link is investigated under the effect of plasma sheath turbulence. The results indicate that the spherical waves have a better communication performance in the FSO link. In addition, a greater variance of the refractive index fluctuation causes a more severe fluctuation in electron density, temperature, and collision frequency inside the plasma sheath. However, when the outer scale is close to the thickness of the plasma sheath, the turbulence eddies have almost no influence on the wave propagation. Therefore, the bit error rate (BER) obviously increases with the increase in variance of the refractive index fluctuation and the decrease in the outer scale. These results are fundamental for evaluating the performance of the FSO link under the effect of plasma sheath turbulence.

  2. Stabilization effect of Weibel modes in relativistic laser fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belghit, Slimen; Sid, Abdelaziz

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the Weibel instability (WI) due to inverse bremsstrahlung (IB) absorption in a laser fusion plasma has been investigated. The stabilization effect due to the coupling of the self-generated magnetic field by WI with the laser wave field is explicitly shown. In this study, the relativistic effects are taken into account. Here, the basic equation is the relativistic Fokker-Planck (F-P) equation. The main obtained result is that the coupling of self-generated magnetic field with the laser wave causes a stabilizing effect of excited Weibel modes. We found a decrease in the spectral range of Weibel unstable modes. This decreasing is accompanied by a reduction of two orders in the growth rate of instable Weibel modes or even stabilization of these modes. It has been shown that the previous analysis of the Weibel instability due to IB has overestimated the values of the generated magnetic fields. Therefore, the generation of magnetic fields by the WI due to IB should not affect the experiences of an inertial confinement fusion.

  3. Stabilization effect of Weibel modes in relativistic laser fusion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Belghit, Slimen Sid, Abdelaziz

    2016-06-15

    In this work, the Weibel instability (WI) due to inverse bremsstrahlung (IB) absorption in a laser fusion plasma has been investigated. The stabilization effect due to the coupling of the self-generated magnetic field by WI with the laser wave field is explicitly shown. In this study, the relativistic effects are taken into account. Here, the basic equation is the relativistic Fokker-Planck (F-P) equation. The main obtained result is that the coupling of self-generated magnetic field with the laser wave causes a stabilizing effect of excited Weibel modes. We found a decrease in the spectral range of Weibel unstable modes. This decreasing is accompanied by a reduction of two orders in the growth rate of instable Weibel modes or even stabilization of these modes. It has been shown that the previous analysis of the Weibel instability due to IB has overestimated the values of the generated magnetic fields. Therefore, the generation of magnetic fields by the WI due to IB should not affect the experiences of an inertial confinement fusion.

  4. High quality actively cooled plasma facing components for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper interweaves some suggestions for developing actively-cooled PFCs (plasma facing components) for future fusion devices with supporting examples taken from the design, fabrication and operation of Tore Supra`s Phase III Outboard Pump Limiter (OPL). This actively-cooled midplane limiter, designed for heat and particle removal during long pulse operation, has been operated in essentially thermally steady state conditions. From experience with testing to identify braze flaws in the OPL, recommendations are made to analyze the impact of joining flaws on thermal-hydraulic performance of PFCs and to validate a method of inspection for such flaws early in the design development. Capability for extensive in-service monitoring of future PFCs is also recommended and the extensive calorimetry and IR thermography used to confirm and update safe operating limits for power handling of the OPL are reviewed.

  5. Fusion Plasma Theory: Task 3, Auxiliary radiofrequency heating of tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Scharer, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The research performed under this grant during the past year has been concentrated on the following several key tokamak ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) coupling, heating and current drive issues: Efficient coupling during the L- to H- mode transition by analysis and computer simulation of ICRF antennas; analysis of ICRF cavity-backed coil antenna coupling to plasma edge profiles including fast and ion Bernstein wave coupling for heating and current drive; benchmarking the codes to compare with current JET, D-IIID and ASDEX experimental results and predictions for advanced tokamaks such as BPX and SSAT (Steady-State Advanced Tokamak); ICRF full-wave field solutions, power conservation, heating analyses and minority ion current drive; and the effects of fusion alpha particle or ion tail populations on the ICRF absorption. Research progress, publications, and conference and workshop presentations are summarized in this report.

  6. Turbulent amplification of magnetic field in laser plasma interaction and astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwary, Prem Pyari; Sharma, Swati; Singh, Ram Kishor; Kumari, Anju; Satsangi, V. R.; Sharma, R. P.

    2017-06-01

    The investigation of the nonlinear evolution of magnetosonic wave (MSW) in the presence of density fluctuations at the background has been presented in this paper. The propagation of a single beam or counter propagation of beams is assumed to change the background density accordingly. The model equation for MSW has been obtained by considering the effect of modified plasma density in the background, along with the nonlinear ponderomotive force. The equation so found has been numerically solved to study its effect on the localization of MSW. From the results, the localized and filamentary structures of the MSW can be observed. The effect of variation of the amplitude of density perturbation has been studied on the amplification of magnetic field. To get better insight of these structures, a semi-analytical model with paraxial approximation has been studied. The effect of background density fluctuations on the resulting turbulent spectrum has been evaluated. The results show that the turbulent spectrum gets flattened towards smaller scales as the counter propagation of beams takes place as compared to the single beam propagation. The nonlinear interaction presented here may be important in interpreting the phenomenon of turbulence and magnetic field amplification due to mergers and jets in central galaxy.

  7. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition of two-dimensional turbulence in a pure electron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lepreti, F.; Vecchio, A.; Carbone, V.

    2010-06-16

    The free-decaying two-dimensional (2D) turbulence in a pure electron plasma confined in the Malmberg-Penning trap ELTRAP is investigated experimentally and analyzed through the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). POD is used to extract coherent structures of the flow from a sequence of plasma density measurements, which represent the vorticity of the 2D fluid. The coherent structures that are energetically dominant are identified and their spatio-temporal dynamics is studied over the time evolution of turbulence. The results suggests the the dominant POD modes can be identified with diocotron modes which appear to be active during both the onset and relaxation phases of turbulence.

  8. Turbulent fluctuations in the main core of TFTR plasmas with negative magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.; Beer, M.; Bell, M.G.

    1997-04-01

    Turbulent fluctuations in plasmas with reversed magnetic shear have been investigated in TFTR. Under intense auxiliary heating, these plasmas are observed to bifurcate into two states with different transport properties. In the state with better confinement, it has been found that the level of fluctuations is very small throughout most of the region with negative shear. By contrast, the state with lower confinement is characterized by large bursts of fluctuations which suggest a competition between the driving and the suppression of turbulence. These results are consistent with the suppression of turbulence by the ExB velocity shear.

  9. Feedback control of plasma instabilities with charged particle beams and study of plasma turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tham, Philip Kin-Wah

    1994-01-01

    . A plasma instability is usually observed in its saturated state and appears as a single feature in the frequency spectrum with a single azimuthal and parallel wavenumbers. The physics of the non-zero spectral width was investigated in detail because the finite spectral width can cause "turbulent" transport. One aspect of the "turbulence" was investigated by obtaining the scaling of the linear growth rate of the instabilities with the fluctuation levels. The linear growth rates were measured with the established gated feedback technique. The research showed that the ExB instability evolves into a quasi-coherent state when the fluctuation level is high. The coherent aspects were studied with a bispectral analysis. Moreover, the single spectral feature was discovered to be actually composed of a few radial harmonics. The radial harmonics play a role in the nonlinear saturation of the instability via three-wave coupling.

  10. Disassembly time of deuterium-cluster-fusion plasma irradiated by an intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.

    2015-07-02

    Energetic deuterium ions from large deuterium clusters (>10 nm diameter) irradiated by an intense laser pulse (>10¹⁶ W/cm²) produce DD fusion neutrons for a time interval determined by the geometry of the resulting fusion plasma. We show an analytical solution of this time interval, the plasma disassembly time, for deuterium plasmas that are cylindrical in shape. Assuming a symmetrically expanding deuterium plasma, we calculate the expected fusion neutron yield and compare with an independent calculation of the yield using the concept of a finite confinement time at a fixed plasma density. The calculated neutron yields agree quantitatively with the available experimental data. Our one-dimensional simulations indicate that one could expect a tenfold increase in total neutron yield by magnetically confining a 10 - keV deuterium fusion plasma for 10 ns.

  11. Disassembly time of deuterium-cluster-fusion plasma irradiated by an intense laser pulse

    DOE PAGES

    Bang, W.

    2015-07-02

    Energetic deuterium ions from large deuterium clusters (>10 nm diameter) irradiated by an intense laser pulse (>10¹⁶ W/cm²) produce DD fusion neutrons for a time interval determined by the geometry of the resulting fusion plasma. We show an analytical solution of this time interval, the plasma disassembly time, for deuterium plasmas that are cylindrical in shape. Assuming a symmetrically expanding deuterium plasma, we calculate the expected fusion neutron yield and compare with an independent calculation of the yield using the concept of a finite confinement time at a fixed plasma density. The calculated neutron yields agree quantitatively with the availablemore » experimental data. Our one-dimensional simulations indicate that one could expect a tenfold increase in total neutron yield by magnetically confining a 10 - keV deuterium fusion plasma for 10 ns.« less

  12. Plasma turbulence in the equatorial ionospheric F region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaniel, Rickey Dale

    Equatorial spread F is a spectacular phenomenon in which the equatorial region ionosphere is reshaped after sunset. The plasma instabilities responsible for equatorial spread F are fascinating since they occur on time scales ranging from seconds to hours and length scales from centimeters to tens of kilometers. The plasma irregularities that occur in the F region also influence the performance and reliability of space borne and ground based electronic systems and may cause the disruption of satellite operations, communications, navigation, and electrical power distribution grids, leading to potentially broad economic losses. The ionospheric model equations that describe these plasma instabilities display different dynamical behavior based on the value of the ion-neutral collision frequency. The transition occurs at the so-called inertial regime of the ionosphere, where the model equations are similar to the Navier Stokes equations except applied to inhomogeneous fluids. A general analytic solution does not exist for these nonlinear equations; however, a numerical model is developed by maintaining charge neutrality in the vicinity of a circular bubble rising from the collisional to the inertial regime. Using this model, we are able to determine the location of the inertial regime as a function of local time, longitude, season, and solar cycle. The model results determine that the regime occurs generally from about 2000 and 2100 local time and 500-900 km apex height. Also, the model predicts that solar minimum periods are generally more conducive for inertial effects than solar maximum periods. Time series analysis performed on Dynamics Explorer II ion density data show that a turbulent cascade form in the inertial regime predicted by the model. Intermediate scale density power spectra all obey k-5/3 spectra scaling when measured in altitude and local time windows predicted by our model as failing within the inertial regime. Meanwhile, density power spectra for data

  13. Intermittency, avalanche statistics, and long-term correlations in a turbulent plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Omar; López, Juan M.; Sentíes, José M.; Anabitarte, Ernesto

    2013-04-01

    We study the turbulent dynamics of a helium plasma in a non-confining cylindrical configuration. Our experimental setup allows us to analyze particle transport in different plasma regions. We find that, whereas the transport is diffusive in the innermost regions of the plasma, distinctive non-diffusive features appear in regions away from the center. Indeed, at the plasma edge we find that particle flux exhibits a power-law distribution of avalanche durations, intermittency, and long-term correlations.

  14. Plasma facing materials and components for future fusion devices—development, characterization and performance under fusion specific loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linke, J.

    2006-04-01

    The plasma exposed components in existing and future fusion devices are strongly affected by the plasma material interaction processes. These mechanisms have a strong influence on the plasma performance; in addition they have major impact on the lifetime of the plasma facing armour and the joining interface between the plasma facing material (PFM) and the heat sink. Besides physical and chemical sputtering processes, high heat quasi-stationary fluxes during normal and intense thermal transients are of serious concern for the engineers who develop reliable wall components. In addition, the material and component degradation due to intense fluxes of energetic neutrons is another critical issue in D-T-burning fusion devices which requires extensive R&D. This paper presents an overview on the materials development and joining, the testing of PFMs and components, and the analysis of the neutron irradiation induced degradation.

  15. Atomic, Molecular and Plasma-Surface Interaction Data for Fusion Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. E. H.; Humbert, D.

    2009-05-02

    Research on fusion energy requires a large amount of data in order to predict the behaviour of complex plasma devices. As plasma systems are updated and new machines are designed, data are required for a variety of different materials over a wide range of plasma conditions. The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency works to coordinate multinational efforts to establish databases for this fusion research effort.

  16. Gyrokinetic simulation of turbulence driven geodesic acoustic modes in edge plasmas of HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Feng; Zhao, K. J.; Lin, Z.; Dong, J. Q.

    2010-11-15

    Strong correlation between high frequency microturbulence and low frequency geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) has been observed in the edge plasmas of the HL-2A tokamak, suggesting possible GAM generation via three wave coupling with turbulence, which is in turn modulated by the GAM. In this work, we use the gyrokinetic toroidal code to study the linear and nonlinear development of the drift instabilities, as well as the generation of the GAM (and low frequency zonal flows) and its interaction with the turbulence for realistic parameters in the edge plasmas of the HL-2A tokamak for the first time. The simulation results indicate that the unstable drift wave drives strong turbulence in the edge plasma of HL-2A. In addition, the generation of the GAM and its interaction with the turbulence are all observed in the nonlinear simulation. The simulation results are in reasonable agreement with the experimental observations.

  17. Low Frequency Turbulence as the Source of High Frequency Waves in Multi-Component Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Krivorutsky, Emmanuel N.; Uritsky, Vadim M.

    2011-01-01

    Space plasmas support a wide variety of waves, and wave-particle interactions as well as wavewave interactions are of crucial importance to magnetospheric and ionospheric plasma behavior. High frequency wave turbulence generation by the low frequency (LF) turbulence is restricted by two interconnected requirements: the turbulence should be strong enough and/or the coherent wave trains should have the appropriate length. These requirements are strongly relaxed in the multi-component plasmas, due to the heavy ions large drift velocity in the field of LF wave. The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs), in particular, is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. It is demonstrated that large-amplitude Alfven waves, in particular those associated with LF turbulence, may generate LHW s in the auroral zone and ring current region and in some cases (particularly in the inner magnetosphere) this serves as the Alfven wave saturation mechanism. We also argue that the described scenario can playa vital role in various parts of the outer magnetosphere featuring strong LF turbulence accompanied by LHW activity. Using the data from THEMIS spacecraft, we validate the conditions for such cross-scale coupling in the near-Earth "flow-braking" magnetotail region during the passage of sharp injection/dipolarization fronts, as well as in the turbulent outflow region of the midtail reconnection site.

  18. Transmission Grating Imaging Spectrometer for Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagojevic, B.; Stutman, D.; Vero, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H. W.

    2001-10-01

    The Johns Hopkins Plasma Spectroscopy Group is developing a transmission grating (TG) based imaging spectrometer for the soft and ultrasoft X-ray (USXR) ranges. The spectrometer will be integrated into a multi-purpose impurity diagnostic package for Magnetically Confined Fusion experiments, which will provide time and space resolved information about radiation losses, Zeff profiles and particle transport. The package will also include 2-D filtered USXR diode arrays and atomic physics and impurity transport computational capability. The spectrometer has a very simple layout, consisting of two collimating and space resolving slits, a TG and a 2-D imaging detector. As detector we are developing phosphor (P45) coated fiber optic plates with CCD and intensified CCD image readout. The performance of a test 5000 l/mm, 2:1 bar to open area ratio TG has been evaluated in the laboratory using a K-alpha Manson source and the emission from a Penning Discharge. The incident and diffracted photon flux was recorded in the 10-300 Å range with a gas flow proportional counter. The measurements show that spectral resolution and efficiency agree well with the predicted values. A device optimized for spectral resolution and higher order suppression will be tested on the CDX-U and NSTX tokamak at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Work supported by DoE grant No. DE-FG02-86ER52314ATDoE

  19. RF PLASMA SOURCE FOR A HEAVY ION FUSION INJECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G A; Grote, D P; Halaxi, E; Kwan, J W; Waldron, W L

    2004-06-25

    We are developing high-current ion sources for Heavy Ion Fusion applications. Our proposed RF plasma source starts with an array of high current density mini-beamlets (of a few mA each at {approx}100 mA/cm{sup 2}) that are kept separated from each other within a set of acceleration grids. After they have gained sufficient kinetic energy (>1.2 MeV), the mini-beamlets are allowed to merge together to form a high current beam (about 0.5 A) with low emittance. Simulations have been done to maximize the beam brightness within the physical constraints of the source. We have performed a series of experiments on an RF plasma source. A 80-kV 20-{micro}s source has produced up to 5 mA of Ar{sup +} in a single beamlet and we measured the emittance of a beamlet, its energy spread, and the fraction of ions in higher charge states. We have also tested a 50-kV 61-hole multi-beamlet array. Two upcoming experiments are being prepared: the first experiment will test full-gradient extraction and transport of 61 beamlets though the first four electrodes, and the second experiment will converge 119 beamlets into an ESQ channel at one-quarter scaled voltage of a 1.6 MV HIF injector.

  20. High density turbulent plasma processes from a shock tube. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.A. III

    1997-01-01

    A broad-based set of measurements has begun on high density turbulent plasma processes. This includes determinations of new plasma physics and the initiation of work on new diagnostics for collisional plasmas as follows: (1) A transient increase is observed in both the spectral energy decay rate and the degree of chaotic complexity at the interface of a shock wave and a turbulent ionized gas. Even though the gas is apparently brought to rest by the shock wave, no evidence is found either of prompt relaminarization or of any systematic influence of end-wall material thermal conductivities on the turbulence parameters. (2) Point fluorescence emissions and averaged spectral line evolutions in turbulent plasmas produced in both the primary and the reflected shock wave flows exhibit ergodicity in the standard turbulence parameters. The data show first evidence of a reverse energy cascade in the collisional turbulent plasma. This suggests that the fully turbulent environment can be described using a stationary state formulation. In these same data, the author finds compelling evidence for a turbulent Stark effect on neutral emission lines in these data which is associated with evidence of large coherent structures and dominant modes in the Fourier analyses of the fluctuations in the optical spectra. (3) A neutral beam generator has been assembled by coupling a Colutron Ion Gun to a charge exchange chamber. Beam-target collisions where the target species is neutral and the beam is either singly charged or neutral have been performed using argon as the working gas. Spectral analysis of the emission shows specific radiative transitions characteristic of both Ar I and Ar II, indicating that some ionization of the target gas results. Gas and plasma parameters such as density, pressure, temperature and flow velocity and their fluctuations can now be followed in real time by spectroscopic analysis of carefully chosen radiative emissions.

  1. Upper-hybrid wave-driven Alfvenic turbulence in magnetized dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, A. P.; Banerjee, S.

    2011-03-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of coupled electrostatic upper-hybrid (UH) and Alfven waves (AWs) is revisited in a magnetized electron-ion plasma with charged dust impurities. A pair of nonlinear equations that describe the interaction of UH wave envelopes (including the relativistic electron mass increase) and the density as well as the compressional magnetic field perturbations associated with the AWs are solved numerically to show that many coherent solitary patterns can be excited and saturated due to modulational instability of unstable UH waves. The evolution of these solitary patterns is also shown to appear in the states of spatiotemporal coherence, temporal as well as spatiotemporal chaos, due to collision and fusion among the patterns in stochastic motion. Furthermore, these spatiotemporal features are demonstrated by the analysis of wavelet power spectra. It is found that a redistribution of wave energy takes place to higher harmonic modes with small wavelengths, which, in turn, results in the onset of Alfvenic turbulence in dusty magnetoplasmas. Such a scenario can occur in the vicinity of Saturn's magnetosphere as many electrostatic solitary structures have been observed there by the Cassini spacecraft.

  2. A self-organized criticality model for ion temperature gradient mode driven turbulence in confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Isliker, H.; Pisokas, Th.; Vlahos, L.; Strintzi, D.

    2010-08-15

    A new self-organized criticality (SOC) model is introduced in the form of a cellular automaton (CA) for ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode driven turbulence in fusion plasmas. Main characteristics of the model are that it is constructed in terms of the actual physical variable, the ion temperature, and that the temporal evolution of the CA, which necessarily is in the form of rules, mimics actual physical processes as they are considered to be active in the system, i.e., a heating process and a local diffusive process that sets on if a threshold in the normalized ITG R/L{sub T} is exceeded. The model reaches the SOC state and yields ion temperature profiles of exponential shape, which exhibit very high stiffness, in that they basically are independent of the loading pattern applied. This implies that there is anomalous heat transport present in the system, despite the fact that diffusion at the local level is imposed to be of a normal kind. The distributions of the heat fluxes in the system and of the heat out-fluxes are of power-law shape. The basic properties of the model are in good qualitative agreement with experimental results.

  3. Upper-hybrid wave-driven Alfvénic turbulence in magnetized dusty plasmas.

    PubMed

    Misra, A P; Banerjee, S

    2011-03-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of coupled electrostatic upper-hybrid (UH) and Alfvén waves (AWs) is revisited in a magnetized electron-ion plasma with charged dust impurities. A pair of nonlinear equations that describe the interaction of UH wave envelopes (including the relativistic electron mass increase) and the density as well as the compressional magnetic field perturbations associated with the AWs are solved numerically to show that many coherent solitary patterns can be excited and saturated due to modulational instability of unstable UH waves. The evolution of these solitary patterns is also shown to appear in the states of spatiotemporal coherence, temporal as well as spatiotemporal chaos, due to collision and fusion among the patterns in stochastic motion. Furthermore, these spatiotemporal features are demonstrated by the analysis of wavelet power spectra. It is found that a redistribution of wave energy takes place to higher harmonic modes with small wavelengths, which, in turn, results in the onset of Alfvénic turbulence in dusty magnetoplasmas. Such a scenario can occur in the vicinity of Saturn's magnetosphere as many electrostatic solitary structures have been observed there by the Cassini spacecraft.

  4. Fusion gamma diagnostics for D-T and D-/sup 3/He plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; Hendel, H.

    1982-11-01

    Nuclear reactions of interest in controlled thermonuclear fusion research often possess a branch yielding prompt emission of gamma radiation. In principle, the gamma emission can be exploited to provide a new fusion diagnostic offering measurements comparable to those obtained by the well established neutron diagnostics methods. The conceptual aspects for a fusion gamma diagnostic are discussed in this paper and the feasibility for application to the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor during deuterium neutral beam heating of a D-T plasma and minority ion cyclotron resonance heating of a D-/sup 3/He plasma is examined.

  5. Plasma wave signatures of collisionless shocks and the role of plasma wave turbulence in shock formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellott, M. M.

    1986-01-01

    Observations of the plasma waves associated with collisionless shocks are reviewed, and the understanding of their generation mechanisms and their importance to shock physics are summarized. The emphasis is on waves generated directly at the shock, especially ion acoustic and lower-hybrid-like modes. The observations are discussed in the context of shock structure, with attention given to the distinctions between waves generated in the shock foot and ramp. The behavior of resistive, dispersive, and supercritical quasi-perpendicular shocks is contrasted. Evidence for the operation of various generation mechanisms, including interactions with cross-field currents, gyrating reflected ions, and field-aligned electron beams, are summarized. The various forms of plasma heating which are actually observed are outlined, and the role of the various wave modes in this heating is discussed. Conclusion, it is argued that, while plasma wave turbulence may play a vital role in plasma heating for some special shocks, it is of second-order importance in most cases.

  6. Diagnosis of Magnetic Structures and Intermittency in Space Plasma Turbulence using the Method of Surrogate Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahraoui, Fouad; Goldstein, Melvyn

    2008-01-01

    Several observations in space plasmas have reported the presence of coherent structures at different plasma scales. Structure formation is believed to be a direct consequence of nonlinear interactions between the plasma modes, which depend strongly on phase synchronization of those modes. Despite this important role of the phases in turbulence, very limited work has been however devoted to study the phases as a potential tracers of nonlinearities in comparison with the wealth of literature on power spectra of turbulence where phases are totally missed. We present a method based on surrogate data to systematically detect coherent structures in turbulent signals. The new method has been applied successfully to magnetosheath turbulence (Sahraoui, Phys. Rev. E, 2008, in press), where the relationship between the identified phase coherence and intermittency (classically identified as non Gaussian tails of the PDFs) as well as the energy cascade has been studied. Here we review the main results obtained in that study and show further applications to small scale solar wind turbulence. Implications of the results on theoretical modelling of space turbulence (applicability of weak/wave turbulence, its validity limits and its connection to intermittency) will be discussed.

  7. Diagnosis of Magnetic Structures and Intermittency in Space Plasma Turbulence using the Method of Surrogate Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahraoui, Fouad; Goldstein, Melvyn

    2008-01-01

    Several observations in space plasmas have reported the presence of coherent structures at different plasma scales. Structure formation is believed to be a direct consequence of nonlinear interactions between the plasma modes, which depend strongly on phase synchronization of those modes. Despite this important role of the phases in turbulence, very limited work has been however devoted to study the phases as a potential tracers of nonlinearities in comparison with the wealth of literature on power spectra of turbulence where phases are totally missed. We present a method based on surrogate data to systematically detect coherent structures in turbulent signals. The new method has been applied successfully to magnetosheath turbulence (Sahraoui, Phys. Rev. E, 2008, in press), where the relationship between the identified phase coherence and intermittency (classically identified as non Gaussian tails of the PDFs) as well as the energy cascade has been studied. Here we review the main results obtained in that study and show further applications to small scale solar wind turbulence. Implications of the results on theoretical modelling of space turbulence (applicability of weak/wave turbulence, its validity limits and its connection to intermittency) will be discussed.

  8. Magnetic turbulence in a table-top laser-plasma relevant to astrophysical scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Gourab; Schoeffler, Kevin M.; Kumar Singh, Prashant; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D.; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman; Silva, Luis O.; Das, Amita; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2017-01-01

    Turbulent magnetic fields abound in nature, pervading astrophysical, solar, terrestrial and laboratory plasmas. Understanding the ubiquity of magnetic turbulence and its role in the universe is an outstanding scientific challenge. Here, we report on the transition of magnetic turbulence from an initially electron-driven regime to one dominated by ion-magnetization in a laboratory plasma produced by an intense, table-top laser. Our observations at the magnetized ion scale of the saturated turbulent spectrum bear a striking resemblance with spacecraft measurements of the solar wind magnetic-field spectrum, including the emergence of a spectral kink. Despite originating from diverse energy injection sources (namely, electrons in the laboratory experiment and ion free-energy sources in the solar wind), the turbulent spectra exhibit remarkable parallels. This demonstrates the independence of turbulent spectral properties from the driving source of the turbulence and highlights the potential of small-scale, table-top laboratory experiments for investigating turbulence in astrophysical environments. PMID:28665398

  9. Probabilistic analysis of turbulent structures from two-dimensional plasma imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, S. H.; Diallo, A.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Labit, B.; Plyushchev, G.; Podesta, M.; Poli, F. M.

    2006-10-15

    A method is presented to construct object-related structure observables, such as size, mass, shape, and trajectories from two-dimensional plasma imaging data. The probability distributions of these observables, deduced from measurements of many realizations, provide a robust framework in which the fluctuations, the turbulence, and the related transport are characterized. The results for imaging data recorded in the presence of drift-interchange instabilities and turbulence on the TORPEX toroidal plasma experiment [A. Fasoli et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 055902 (2006)] are discussed.

  10. Modeling of transient dust events in fusion edge plasmas with DUSTT-UEDGE code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that dust can be produced in fusion devices due to various processes involving structural damage of plasma exposed materials. Recent computational and experimental studies have demonstrated that dust production and associated with it plasma contamination can present serious challenges in achieving sustained fusion reaction in future fusion devices, such as ITER. To analyze the impact, which dust can have on performance of fusion plasmas, modeling of coupled dust and plasma transport with DUSTT-UEDGE code is used by the authors. In past, only steady-state computational studies, presuming continuous source of dust influx, were performed due to iterative nature of DUSTT-UEDGE code coupling. However, experimental observations demonstrate that intermittent injection of large quantities of dust, often associated with transient plasma events, may severely impact fusion plasma conditions and even lead to discharge termination. In this work we report on progress in coupling of DUSTT-UEDGE codes in time-dependent regime, which allows modeling of transient dust-plasma transport processes. The methodology and details of the time-dependent code coupling, as well as examples of simulations of transient dust-plasma transport phenomena will be presented. These include time-dependent modeling of impact of short out-bursts of different quantities of tungsten dust in ITER divertor on the edge plasma parameters. The plasma response to the out-bursts with various duration, location, and ejected dust sizes will be analyzed.

  11. Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) - parameters and potentials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Masashi Shimada; Robert D. Kolasinski; J. Phillip Sharpe; Rion A. Causey

    2011-08-01

    The Tritium plasma experiment (TPE) is a unique facility devoted to experiments on the behavior of deuterium/tritium in toxic (e.g. beryllium) and radioactive materials for fusion plasma-wall interaction (PWI) studies. A Langmuir probe was added to the system to characterize the plasma conditions in TPE. With this new diagnostic, we found the achievable electron temperature ranged from 5.0 to 10.0 eV, the electron density varied from 5.0 x 10{sup 16} to 2.5 x 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}, and the ion flux density varied between 5.0 x 10{sup 20} to 2.5 x 10{sup 22} m{sup -2}s{sup -1} along the centerline of the plasma. A comparison of these plasma parameters with the conditions expected for the plasma facing components (PFCs) in ITER shows that TPE is capable of achieving most (approximately 800 m{sup 2} of 850 m{sup 2} total PFCs area) of the expected ion flux density and electron density conditions.

  12. Tritium plasma experiment: Parameters and potentials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Masashi; Sharpe, J. Phillip; Kolasinski, Robert D.; Causey, Rion A.

    2011-08-15

    The tritium plasma experiment (TPE) is a unique facility devoted to experiments on the behavior of deuterium/tritium in toxic (e.g., beryllium) and radioactive materials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies. A Langmuir probe was added to the system to characterize the plasma conditions in TPE. With this new diagnostic, we found the achievable electron temperature ranged from 5.0 to 10.0 eV, the electron density varied from 5.0 x 10{sup 16} to 2.5 x 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}, and the ion flux density varied between 5.0 x 10{sup 20} to 2.5 x 10{sup 22} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} along the centerline of the plasma. A comparison of these plasma parameters with the conditions expected for the plasma facing components (PFCs) in ITER shows that TPE is capable of achieving most ({approx}800 m{sup 2} of 850 m{sup 2} total PFCs area) of the expected ion flux density and electron density conditions.

  13. Whole-volume integrated gyrokinetic simulation of plasma turbulence in realistic diverted-tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C S; Ku, Seung-Hoe; Diamond, P. H.; Adams, Mark; Tchoua, Roselyne B; Chen, Yang; Cummings, J.; D'Azevedo, Ed F; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Ethier, Stephane; Greengard, Leslie; Hahm, Taik Soo; Hinton, Fred; Keyes, David E; Klasky, Scott A; Lin, Z.; Lofstead, J.; Park, G.; Podhorszki, Norbert; Schwan, Karsten; Shoshani, A.; Silver, D.; Wolf, M.; Worley, Patrick H; Zorin, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Performance prediction for ITER is based upon the ubiquitous experimental observation that the plasma energy confinement in the device core is strongly coupled to the edge confinement for an unknown reason. The coupling time-scale is much shorter than the plasma transport time-scale. In order to understand this critical observation, a multi-scale turbulence-neoclassical simulation of integrated edge-core plasma in a realistic diverted geometry is a necessity, but has been a formidable task. Thanks to the recent development in high performance computing, we have succeeded in the integrated multiscale gyrokinetic simulation of the ion-temperature-gradient driven turbulence in realistic diverted tokamak geometry for the first time. It is found that modification of the self-organized criticality in the core plasma by nonlocal core-edge coupling of ITG turbulence can be responsible for the core-edge confinement coupling.

  14. Whole-volume integrated gyrokinetc simulation of plasma turbulence in realistic diverted-tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C S; Ku, Seung-Hoe; Diamond, Patrick; Adams, Mark; Tchoua, Roselyne B; Chen, Yang; Cummings, Julian; D'Azevedo, Eduardo; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Ethier, Stephane; Greengard, Leslie; Hahm, Taik Soo; Hinton, Fred; Keyes, David E; Klasky, Scott A; Lin, Zhihong; Lofstead, J.; Park, G.; Parker, Scott; Podhorszki, Norbert; Schwan, Karsten; Shoshani, A.; Silver, D.; Weitzner, Harold; Wolf, M.; Worley, Patrick H; Yoon, E.; Zorin, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Performance prediction for ITER is based upon the ubiquitous experimental observation that the plasma energy confinement in the device core is strongly coupled to the edge confinement for an unknown reason. The coupling time-scale is much shorter than the plasma transport time-scale. In order to understand this critical observation, a multi-scale turbulence-neoclassical simulation of integrated edge-core plasma in a realistic diverted geometry is a necessity, but has been a formidable task. Thanks to the recent development in high performance computing, we have succeeded in the integrated multiscale gyrokinetic simulation of the ion-temperature-gradient driven turbulence in realistic diverted tokamak geometry for the first time. It is found that modification of the self-organized criticality in the core plasma by nonlocal core-edge coupling of ITG turbulence can be responsible for the core-edge confinement coupling.

  15. Whole-volume integrated gyrokinetic simulation of plasma turbulence in realistic diverted-tokamak geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. S.; Ku, S.; Diamond, P.; Adams, M.; Barreto, R.; Chen, Y.; Cummings, J.; D'Azevedo, E.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ethier, S.; Greengard, L.; Hahm, T. S.; Hinton, F.; Keyes, D.; Klasky, S.; Lin, Z.; Lofstead, J.; Park, G.; Parker, S.; Podhorszki, N.; Schwan, K.; Shoshani, A.; Silver, D.; Wolf, M.; Worley, P.; Weitzner, H.; Yoon, E.; Zorin, D.

    2009-07-01

    Performance prediction for ITER is based upon the ubiquitous experimental observation that the plasma energy confinement in the device core is strongly coupled to the edge confinement for an unknown reason. The coupling time-scale is much shorter than the plasma transport time-scale. In order to understand this critical observation, a multi-scale turbulence-neoclassical simulation of integrated edge-core plasma in a realistic diverted geometry is a necessity, but has been a formidable task. Thanks to the recent development in high performance computing, we have succeeded in the integrated multiscale gyrokinetic simulation of the ion-temperature-gradient driven turbulence in realistic diverted tokamak geometry for the first time. It is found that modification of the self-organized criticality in the core plasma by nonlocal core-edge coupling of ITG turbulence can be responsible for the core-edge confinement coupling.

  16. Two Photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence for Fusion Class Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Drew B.

    Neutral hydrogen particles play an important role in many fusion systems. The edge region of fusion plasmas is strongly influenced by these neutral particles and is of growing importance because of the challenges of plasma material interaction. A two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence diagnostic at West Virginia University has been constructed to measure the local density and velocity distribution of these neutral particles. The diagnostic measures the ground state of hydrogen isotopes by way of two photon absorption from the 1s to 3d state and subsequent single photon emission to the 2 p state. These measurements are absolutely calibrated by comparing the integrated emission spectra to that of a measurement performed on a known density of calibration gas and knowing the relative absorption cross sections for the two species. Measurements were performed on deuterium atoms in the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Induction 3 and calibrated using the standard krypton calibration scheme. Measured neutral densities were well below predicted values and the measurement process identified a flaw in the krypton calibration scheme. A new calibration scheme using xenon gas was developed to eliminate any possibility of chromatic aberration through refractive optics. This new xenon calibration scheme required measurement of the relative absorption cross section between the 5p6 to 4p 57f to 5p55 d Xe scheme and the 4p6 to 4 p55p to 4p 55s Kr scheme, then comparison of the Xe to Kr relative cross section to the Kr to H relative cross section to determine the overall Xe to H relative absorption cross section. Doppler free two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurements were also performed on the compact helicon for waves and instabilities experiment (CHEWIE), for hydrogen, deuterium, and krypton neutrals. The Doppler free technique increased signal intensity and narrowed the measured spectral width of the absorption line. The Doppler free technique

  17. Turbulent fluctuations during pellet injection into a dipole confined plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, D. T.; Mauel, M. E.; Roberts, T. M.; Kesner, J.; Woskov, P. P.

    2017-01-01

    We report measurements of the turbulent evolution of the plasma density profile following the fast injection of lithium pellets into the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) [Boxer et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 207 (2010)]. As the pellet passes through the plasma, it provides a significant internal particle source and allows investigation of density profile evolution, turbulent relaxation, and turbulent fluctuations. The total electron number within the dipole plasma torus increases by more than a factor of three, and the central density increases by more than a factor of five. During these large changes in density, the shape of the density profile is nearly "stationary" such that the gradient of the particle number within tubes of equal magnetic flux vanishes. In comparison to the usual case, when the particle source is neutral gas at the plasma edge, the internal source from the pellet causes the toroidal phase velocity of the fluctuations to reverse and changes the average particle flux at the plasma edge. An edge particle source creates an inward turbulent pinch, but an internal particle source increases the outward turbulent particle flux. Statistical properties of the turbulence are measured by multiple microwave interferometers and by an array of probes at the edge. The spatial structures of the largest amplitude modes have long radial and toroidal wavelengths. Estimates of the local and toroidally averaged turbulent particle flux show intermittency and a non-Gaussian probability distribution function. The measured fluctuations, both before and during pellet injection, have frequency and wavenumber dispersion consistent with theoretical expectations for interchange and entropy modes excited within a dipole plasma torus having warm electrons and cool ions.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Active Feedback Control of Turbulent Transport in a Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Mark Allen

    2013-07-07

    A new and unique basic plasma science laboratory device - the HelCat device (HELicon-CAThode) - has been constructed and is operating at the University of New Mexico. HelCat is a 4 m long, 0.5 m diameter device, with magnetic field up to 2.2 kG, that has two independent plasmas sources - an RF helicon source, and a thermionic cathode. These two sources, which can operate independently or simultaneously, are capable of producing plasmas with a wide range of parameters and turbulence characteristics, well suited to a variety of basic plasma physics experiments. An extensive set of plasma diagnostics is also operating. Experiments investigating the active feedback control of turbulent transport of particles and heat via electrode biasing to affect plasma ExB flows are underway, and ongoing.

  19. Formation of self-consistent pressure profiles in simulation of turbulent convection in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pastukhov, V. P. Smirnov, D. V.

    2016-04-15

    The formation of pressure profiles in turbulent tokamak plasmas in ohmic heating regimes and transient regimes induced by turning-on of electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating is investigated. The study is based on self-consistent modeling of low-frequency turbulent plasma convection described by an adiabatically reduced set of hydrodynamic-type equations. The simulations show that, in the ohmic heating stage, turbulence forms and maintains profiles of the total plasma pressure corresponding to turbulent relaxed states. These profiles are close to self-consistent profiles of the total plasma pressure experimentally observed on the T-10 tokamak in ohmic regimes with different values of the safety factor q{sub L} at the limiter. Simulations of nonstationary regimes induced by turning-on of on- and off-axis ECR heating show that the total plasma pressure profiles in the transient regimes remain close to those in the turbulent-relaxed state, as well as to the profiles experimentally observed on T-10.

  20. Turbulent transport across shear layers in magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nold, B.; Ramisch, M.; Manz, P.; Birkenmeier, G.; Ribeiro, T. T.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D.; Fuchert, G.; Stroth, U.

    2014-10-15

    Shear layers modify the turbulence in diverse ways and do not only suppress it. A spatial-temporal investigation of gyrofluid simulations in comparison with experiments allows to identify further details of the transport process across shear layers. Blobs in and outside a shear layer merge, thereby exchange particles and heat and subsequently break up. Via this mechanism particles and heat are transported radially across shear layers. Turbulence spreading is the immanent mechanism behind this process.

  1. Symmetry breaking in MAST plasma turbulence due to toroidal flow shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, M. F. J.; van Wyk, F.; Field, A. R.; Ghim, Y.-c.; Parra, F. I.; Schekochihin, A. A.; the MAST Team

    2017-03-01

    The flow shear associated with the differential toroidal rotation of tokamak plasmas breaks an underlying symmetry of the turbulent fluctuations imposed by the up–down symmetry of the magnetic equilibrium. Using experimental beam-emission-spectroscopy measurements and gyrokinetic simulations, this symmetry breaking in ion-scale turbulence in MAST is shown to manifest itself as a tilt of the spatial correlation function and a finite skew in the distribution of the fluctuating density field. The tilt is a statistical expression of the ‘shearing’ of the turbulent structures by the mean flow. The skewness of the distribution is related to the emergence of long-lived density structures in sheared, near-marginal plasma turbulence. The extent to which these effects are pronounced is argued (with the aid of the simulations) to depend on the distance from the nonlinear stability threshold. Away from the threshold, the symmetry is effectively restored.

  2. Dynamic properties of ionospheric plasma turbulence driven by high-power high-frequency radiowaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grach, S. M.; Sergeev, E. N.; Mishin, E. V.; Shindin, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    A review is given of the current state-of-the-art of experimental studies and the theoretical understanding of nonlinear phenomena that occur in the ionospheric F-layer irradiated by high-power high-frequency ground-based transmitters. The main focus is on the dynamic features of high-frequency turbulence (plasma waves) and low-frequency turbulence (density irregularities of various scales) that have been studied in experiments at the Sura and HAARP heating facilities operated in temporal and frequency regimes specially designed with consideration of the characteristic properties of nonlinear processes in the perturbed ionosphere using modern radio receivers and optical instruments. Experimental results are compared with theoretical turbulence models for a magnetized collisional plasma in a high-frequency electromagnetic field, allowing the identification of the processes responsible for the observed features of artificial ionospheric turbulence.

  3. Dynamic properties of ionospheric plasma turbulence driven by high-power high-frequency radiowaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grach, S. M.; Sergeev, E. N.; Mishin, E. V.; Shindin, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    A review is given of the current state-of-the-art of experimental studies and the theoretical understanding of nonlinear phenomena that occur in the ionospheric F-layer irradiated by high-power high-frequency ground-based transmitters. The main focus is on the dynamic features of high-frequency turbulence (plasma waves) and low-frequency turbulence (density irregularities of various scales) that have been studied in experiments at the Sura and HAARP heating facilities operated in temporal and frequency regimes specially designed with consideration of the characteristic properties of nonlinear processes in the perturbed ionosphere using modern radio receivers and optical instruments. Experimental results are compared with theoretical turbulence models for a magnetized collisional plasma in a high-frequency electromagnetic field, allowing the identification of the processes responsible for the observed features of artificial ionospheric turbulence.

  4. Regulating drift-wave plasma turbulence into spatiotemporal patterns by pinning coupling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Panpan; Yang, Lei; Deng, Zhigang; Wang, Xingang

    2011-07-01

    Using the technique of pinning coupling in chaos control, we investigate how the two-dimensional drift-wave plasma turbulence described by the Hasegawa-Mima equation can be regulated into different spatiotemporal patterns. It is shown both analytically and numerically that, depending on the pattern structure of the target, the pinning strength necessary for regulating the turbulence could have a large variation. More specifically, with the increase of the wave number of the target, the critical pinning strength is found to be increased by a power-law scaling. Moreover, in both the transition and transient process of the pinning regulation, the modes of the turbulence are found to be suppressed in a hierarchical fashion, that is, by the sequence of mode wave number. The findings give insight into the dynamics of drift-wave turbulence, as well as indicative to the design of new control techniques for real-world turbulence.

  5. Computational modeling of magentically driven liner-on-plasma fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehey, P.T.; Faehl, R.J.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.

    1996-12-31

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is an approach to controlled fusion which potentially avoids the difficulties of the traditional magnetic and inertial confinement approaches. It appears possible to investigate the critical issues for MTF at low cost, relative to traditional fusion programs, utilizing pulsed power drivers much less expensive than ICF drivers, and plasma configurations much less expensive than those needed for full magnetic confinement. Computational and experimental research into MTF is proceeding at Los Alamos, VNIIEF, and other laboratories.

  6. Influence of collective nonideal shielding on fusion reaction in partially ionized classical nonideal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-04-01

    The collective nonideal effects on the nuclear fusion reaction process are investigated in partially ionized classical nonideal hydrogen plasmas. The effective pseudopotential model taking into account the collective and plasma shielding effects is applied to describe the interaction potential in nonideal plasmas. The analytic expressions of the Sommerfeld parameter, the fusion penetration factor, and the cross section for the nuclear fusion reaction in nonideal plasmas are obtained as functions of the nonideality parameter, Debye length, and relative kinetic energy. It is found that the Sommerfeld parameter is suppressed due to the influence of collective nonideal shielding. However, the collective nonideal shielding is found to enhance the fusion penetration factor in partially ionized classical nonideal plasmas. It is also found that the fusion penetration factors in nonideal plasmas represented by the pseudopotential model are always greater than those in ideal plasmas represented by the Debye-Hückel model. In addition, it is shown that the collective nonideal shielding effect on the fusion penetration factor decreases with an increase of the kinetic energy.

  7. Influence of collective nonideal shielding on fusion reaction in partially ionized classical nonideal plasmas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-04-01

    The collective nonideal effects on the nuclear fusion reaction process are investigated in partially ionized classical nonideal hydrogen plasmas. The effective pseudopotential model taking into account the collective and plasma shielding effects is applied to describe the interaction potential in nonideal plasmas. The analytic expressions of the Sommerfeld parameter, the fusion penetration factor, and the cross section for the nuclear fusion reaction in nonideal plasmas are obtained as functions of the nonideality parameter, Debye length, and relative kinetic energy. It is found that the Sommerfeld parameter is suppressed due to the influence of collective nonideal shielding. However, the collective nonideal shielding is found to enhance the fusion penetration factor in partially ionized classical nonideal plasmas. It is also found that the fusion penetration factors in nonideal plasmas represented by the pseudopotential model are always greater than those in ideal plasmas represented by the Debye-Hückel model. In addition, it is shown that the collective nonideal shielding effect on the fusion penetration factor decreases with an increase of the kinetic energy.

  8. Interaction of plasmas with lithium and tungsten fusion plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiflis, Peter Robert

    One of the largest outstanding issues in magnetic confinement fusion is the interaction of the fusion plasma with the first wall of the device; an interaction which is strongest in the divertor region. Erosion, melting, sputtering, and deformation are all concerns which inform choices of divertor material. Of the many materials proposed for use in the divertor, only a few remain as promising choices. Tungsten has been chosen as the material for the ITER divertor, and liquid lithium stands poised as its replacement in higher heat flux devices. As a refractory metal, tungsten's large melting point and thermal conductivity as well as its low sputtering yield have led to its selection as the material of choice of the ITER divertor. Experiments have reinforced this choice demonstrating tungsten's ability to withstand large heat fluxes when adequately cooled. However, tungsten has shown a propensity to nanostructure under exposure within a certain temperature range to large fluxes of helium ions. These nanostructures if disrupted into the plasma as dust by an off-normal event would cause quenching of the plasma from the generated dust. Liquid lithium, meanwhile, has gathered growing interest within the fusion community in recent years as a divertor, limiter, and alternative first wall material. Liquid lithium is attractive as a low-Z material replacement for refractory metals due to its ability to getter impurities, while also being self-healing in nature. However, concerns exist about the stability of a liquid metal surface at the edge of a fusion device. Liquid metal pools, such as the Li-DiMes probe, have shown evidence of macroscopic lithium displacement as well as droplet formation and ejection into the plasma. These issues must be mitigated in future implementations of liquid lithium divertor concepts. Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT) and Kelvin-Helmholtz-like (KH) instabilities have been claimed as the initiators of droplet ejection, yet not enough data exists to

  9. FOREWORD: Carbon and Oxygen Collision Data for Fusion Plasma Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janev, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    On May 12-13, 1988, a Specialists' Meeting on "Carbon and Oxygen Collision Data for Fusion Plasma Research" was held in Vienna, Austria, organized by the Atomic and Molecular Data Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The objectives of the meeting were to review the data status of carbon and oxygen atoms and ions colliding with the most abundant constituents of a reactor-grade fusion plasma (electrons, protons, neutral hydrogen and helium), to identify the gaps in the data base, and through specific original contributions to contribute to the enlargement of this data base. About twenty specialists from the most active atomic collision research laboratories participated in the meeting. Comprehensive reviews and quality analysis of the collisional data base for carbon and oxygen ions were presented at the meeting by R A Phaneuf (electron-impact excitation and ionization), H Tawara and T Kato (electron-impact excitation of He-like ions), D C Griffin and Y Hahn (radiative and dielectronic recombination), H B Gilbody (total electron capture and ionization in Cq+, Oq+ - H, H2, He collisions), A Salin (state-selective electron capture) and T Watanabe (theoretical methods for charge exchange). New results for electron-ion collision processes were presented by P Defrance, Y Hahn, L J Roszman and for the heavy-particle collision processes by H Tawara, R E Hoekstra, A Bárány, R D Rivarola and Dz S Belkic. Y Nakai presented a semi-empirical formula for the total charge transfer cross sections, F Aumayr discussed the problem of electron capture measurements in presence of metastable fractions in the ion beam, and W L Wiese presented briefly the spectroscopic data base for carbon and oxygen ions. Two Working Groups were organized to summarize the discussions on the collisional data base of carbon and oxygen ions of interest to controlled fusion research. The present topical issue of Physica Scripta contains the Reports of the Working Groups and the contributions

  10. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics. Final report, fiscal years 1989--1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The objectives of the theoretical science program are: To support the interpretation of present experiments and predict the outcome of future planned experiments; to improve on existing models and codes and validate against experimental results; and to conduct theoretical physics development of advanced concepts with applications for DIII-D and future devices. Major accomplishments in FY91 include the corroboration between theory and experiment on MHD behavior in the second stable regime of operation on DIII-D, and the frequency and mode structure of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes in high beta, shaped plasmas. We have made significant advances in the development of the gyro-Landau fluid approach to turbulence simulation which more accurately models kinetic drive and damping mechanisms. Several theoretical models to explain the bifurcation phenomenon in L- to H-mode transition were proposed providing the theoretical basis for future experimental verification. The capabilities of new rf codes have been upgraded in response to the expanding needs of the rf experiments. Codes are being employed to plan for a fully non-inductive current drive experiment in a high beta, enhanced confinement regime. GA`s experimental effort in Applied Physics encompasses two advanced diagnostics essential for the operation of future fusion experiments: Alpha particle diagnostic, and current and density profile diagnostics. This paper discusses research in all these topics.

  11. Calculation of atomic structures and radiative properties of fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrah, Walid; Pain, Jean-Christophe; Benredjem, Djamel

    2017-03-01

    The opacity is an important issue in the knowledge of the radiative properties of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and astrophysical plasmas. In this work we present the opacity of the mixture C+Si, composing the ablator of some ICF capsules. We have used Cowan's code to calculate the atomic structure of carbon and silicon. We also have developed a collisional-radiative model in order to obtain the opacity of the mixture. Line broadening, line shift and ionization potential depression are taken into account in the opacity profile. Comparisons to other calculations are carried out. NLTE and LTE opacity calculations show discrepancies mainly in the range 1900-2000 eV for the bound-bound contribution to the total opacity and in the range 50-350 eV for the bound-free contribution. We have also accounted for photoexcitation and photoionization processes. The corresponding rates are obtained by modeling the Hohlraum radiation by a Planckian distribution at a radiative temperature of 300 eV.

  12. Closure of a kinetic model of plasma in strong turbulence by relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1978-01-01

    A Fokker-Planck kinetic equation for a turbulent plasma is derived by a repeated cascade decomposition. Calculation of the propagator and the kinetic equation determine the transport coefficients (diffusivity and turbulent viscosity) by means of a closure based on a relaxation procedure governing the approach to equilibrium. The k to the minus third power spectral law is obtained, which governs the coupling between the velocity and the electrostatic field fluctuations.

  13. Route to Drift Wave Chaos and Turbulence in a Bounded Low-{beta} Plasma Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, T.; Latten, A.; Piel, A.; Bonhomme, G.; Pierre, T.; Dudok de Wit, T.

    1997-11-01

    The transition scenario from stability to drift wave turbulence is experimentally investigated in a magnetized low-{beta} plasma with cylindrical geometry. It is demonstrated that the temporal dynamics is determined by the interaction and destabilization of spatiotemporal patterns, in particular, traveling waves. The analysis of the temporal and the spatiotemporal data shows that the bifurcations sequence towards weakly developed turbulence follows the Ruelle-Takens scenario. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Feasibility study of fusion plasma heating by relativistic high-current electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimenko, V.

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this research will be to study the feasibility of fusion plasma heating using ultra-short high intensity electron beam by dissipating the energy of excited wakes either in linear or nonlinear regimes.

  15. Quantifying Fusion Born Ion Populations in Magnetically Confined Plasmas using Ion Cyclotron Emission

    DOE PAGES

    Carbajal, L.; Warwick Univ., Coventry; Dendy, R. O.; ...

    2017-03-07

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) offers unique promise as a diagnostic of the fusion born alpha-particle population in magnetically confined plasmas. Pioneering observations from JET and TFTR found that ICE intensity P ICE scales approximately linearly with the measured neutron flux from fusion reactions, and with the inferred concentration, n /n i , of fusion-born alpha-particles confined within the plasma. We present fully nonlinear self-consistent kinetic simulations that reproduce this scaling for the first time. This resolves a longstanding question in the physics of fusion alpha particle confinement and stability in MCF plasmas. It confirms the MCI as the likely emissionmore » mechanism and greatly strengthens the basis for diagnostic exploitation of ICE in future burning plasmas.« less

  16. Compressible sub-Alfvénic MHD turbulence in low-beta plasmas.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jungyeon; Lazarian, A

    2002-06-17

    We present a model for compressible sub-Alfvénic isothermal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in low- beta plasmas and numerically test it. We separate MHD fluctuations into three distinct families: Alfvén, slow, and fast modes. We find that production of slow and fast modes by Alfvénic turbulence is suppressed. As a result, Alfvén modes in compressible regime exhibit scalings and anisotropy similar to those in incompressible regime. Slow modes passively mimic Alfvén modes. However, fast modes show isotropy and a scaling similar to acoustic turbulence.

  17. Magnetosheath Plasma Turbulence and Its Spatiotemporal Evolution as Observed by the Cluster Spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Yordanova, E.; Vaivads, A.; Andre, M.; Buchert, S. C.; Voeroes, Z.

    2008-05-23

    We study the plasma turbulence, at scales larger than the ion inertial length scale, downstream of a quasiparallel bow shock using Cluster multispacecraft measurements. We show that turbulence is intermittent and well described by the extended structure function model, which takes into account the spatial inhomogeneity of the cascade rate. For the first time we use multispacecraft observations to characterize the evolution of magnetosheath turbulence, particularly its intermittency, as a function of the distance from the bow shock. The intermittency significantly changes over the distance of the order of 100 ion inertial lengths, being increasingly stronger and anisotropic away from the bow shock.

  18. Dynamics of turbulent front at the correlation between atmospheric pressure plasma jet & gas flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Maede; Xu, Haitao; Pei, Xuekai; Lu, Xinpei

    2016-09-01

    Among variety of plasma applications, there is significant interest recently in the use of plasma as an actuator in flow control for aerodynamic applications in which the correlation between atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) and gas flow field is a crucial role. In this contribution, dynamic characterizations of the turbulent flow field in APPj are investigated by focusing on the effect of different parameters of APPJ, such as applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, gas flow rate, and time duration of the pulse We utilized Schlieren photography and photomultiplier tubes (PMT) as a signal triggering of an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) and also a high speed camera to examine the formation of the turbulent front and its dynamics. The results reveal that the turbulent front will appear earlier and closer to the tube nozzle by increasing the gas flow rate and applied voltage amplitude. It is found that the pulse time duration and repetition frequency cannot change the dynamics and formation of the turbulent front. Further investigation demonstrated that every pulse can excite one turbulent front which is created in a specific position in a laminar region and propagates downstream and the effect of increasing frequency results in the increasing of the number of turbulent front and expansion of their region of formation.

  19. The Numerical Tokamak Project (NTP) simulation of turbulent transport in the core plasma: A grand challenge in plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The long-range goal of the Numerical Tokamak Project (NTP) is the reliable prediction of tokamak performance using physics-based numerical tools describing tokamak physics. The NTP is accomplishing the development of the most advanced particle and extended fluid model`s on massively parallel processing (MPP) environments as part of a multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary numerical study of tokamak core fluctuations. The NTP is a continuing focus of the Office of Fusion Energy`s theory and computation program. Near-term HPCC work concentrates on developing a predictive numerical description of the core plasma transport in tokamaks driven by low-frequency collective fluctuations. This work addresses one of the greatest intellectual challenges to our understanding of the physics of tokamak performance and needs the most advanced computational resources to progress. We are conducting detailed comparisons of kinetic and fluid numerical models of tokamak turbulence. These comparisons are stimulating the improvement of each and the development of hybrid models which embody aspects of both. The combination of emerging massively parallel processing hardware and algorithmic improvements will result in an estimated 10**2--10**6 performance increase. Development of information processing and visualization tools is accelerating our comparison of computational models to one another, to experimental data, and to analytical theory, providing a bootstrap effect in our understanding of the target physics. The measure of success is the degree to which the experimentally observed scaling of fluctuation-driven transport may be predicted numerically. The NTP is advancing the HPCC Initiative through its state-of-the-art computational work. We are pushing the capability of high performance computing through our efforts which are strongly leveraged by OFE support.

  20. Controlled Fusion with Hot-ion Mode in a Degenerate Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    S. Son and N.J. Fisch

    2005-12-01

    n a Fermi-degenerate plasma, the rate of electron physical processes is much reduced from the classical prediction, possibly enabling new regimes for controlled nuclear fusion, including the hot-ion mode, a regime in which the ion temperature exceeds the electron temperature. Previous calculations of these processes in dense plasmas are now corrected for partial degeneracy and relativistic effects, leading to an expanded regime of self-sustained fusion.

  1. Observed Multi-Decade DD and DT Z-Pinch Fusion Rate Scaling in 5 Dense Plasma Focus Fusion Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, E. C.; Lowe, D. R.; O'Brien, R.; Meehan, B. T.

    2013-06-18

    Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) machines are in use worldwide or a wide variety of applications; one of these is to produce intense, short bursts of fusion via r-Z pinch heating and compression of a working gas. We have designed and constructed a series of these, ranging from portable to a maximum energy storage capacity of 2 MJ. Fusion rates from 5 DPF pulsed fusion generators have been measured in a single laboratory using calibrated activation detectors. Measured rates range from ~ 1015 to more than 1019 fusions per second have been measured. Fusion rates from the intense short (20 – 50 ns) periods of production were inferred from measurement of neutron production using both calibrated activation detectors and scintillator-PMT neutron time of flight (NTOF) detectors. The NTOF detectors are arranged to measure neutrons versus time over flight paths of 30 Meters. Fusion rate scaling versus energy and current will be discussed. Data showing observed fusion cutoff at D-D fusion yield levels of approximately 1*1012, and corresponding tube currents of ~ 3 MA will be shown. Energy asymmetry of product neutrons will also be discussed. Data from the NTOF lines of sight have been used to measure energy asymmetries of the fusion neutrons. From this, center of mass energies for the D(d,n)3He reaction are inferred. A novel re-entrant chamber that allows extremely high single pulse neutron doses (> 109 neutrons/cm2 in 50 ns) to be supplied to samples will be described. Machine characteristics and detector types will be discussed.

  2. Sheared E×B flow and plasma turbulence viscosity in a Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Regnoli, G.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2004-11-01

    The relationship between electromagnetic turbulence and sheared plasma flow in Reversed Field Pinch configuration is addressed. The momentum balance equation for a compressible plasma is considered and the terms involved are measured in the outer region of Extrap-T2R RFP device. It results that electrostatic fluctuations determine the plasma flow through the electrostatic component of Reynolds Stress tensor. This term involves spatial and temporal scales comparable to those of MHD activity. The derived experimental perpendicular viscosity is consistent with anomalous diffusion, the latter being discussed in terms of electrostatic turbulence background and coherent structures emerging from fluctuations. The results indicate a dynamical interplay between turbulence, anomalous transport and mean E×B profiles. The momentum balance has been studied also in non-stationary condition during the application of Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive, which is known to reduce the amplitude of MHD modes.

  3. Using Field-Particle Correlations to Diagnose the Collisionless Damping of Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howes, Gregory; Klein, Kristropher

    2016-10-01

    Plasma turbulence occurs ubiquitously throughout the heliosphere, yet our understanding of how turbulence governs energy transport and plasma heating remains incomplete, constituting a grand challenge problem in heliophysics. In weakly collisional heliospheric plasmas, such as the solar corona and solar wind, damping of the turbulent fluctuations occurs due to collisionless interactions between the electromagnetic fields and the individual plasma particles. A particular challenge in diagnosing this energy transfer is that spacecraft measurements are typically limited to a single point in space. Here we present an innovative field-particle correlation technique that can be used with single-point measurements to estimate the energization of the plasma particles due to the damping of the electromagnetic fields, providing vital new information about this how energy transfer is distributed as a function of particle velocity. This technique has the promise to transform our ability to diagnose the kinetic plasma physical mechanisms responsible for not only the damping of turbulence, but also the energy conversion in both collisionless magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration. The work has been supported by NSF CAREER Award AGS-1054061, NSF AGS-1331355, and DOE DE-SC0014599.

  4. Effect of turbulence on the dissipation of the space-charge wave in a bounded turbulent plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-07-15

    The dispersion relation and the dissipation process of the space-charge wave propagating in a bounded plasma such as a cylindrical waveguide are investigated by employing the longitudinal dielectric permittivity that contains the diffusivity based on the Dupree theory of turbulent plasma. We derived the dispersion relation for space-charge wave in terms of the radius of cylindrical waveguide and the roots of the Bessel function of the first kind which appears as the boundary condition. We find that the wave frequency for a lower-order root of the Bessel function is higher than that of a higher-order root. We also find that the dissipation is greatest for the lowest-order root, but it is suppressed significantly as the order of the root increases. The wave frequency and the dissipation process are enhanced as the radius of cylindrical waveguide increases. However, they are always smaller than the case of bulk plasma. We find that the diffusivity of turbulent plasma would enhance the damping of space-charge waves, especially, in the range of small wave number. For a large wave number, the diffusivity has little effect on the damping.

  5. Dust dynamics and diagnostic applications in quasi-neutral plasmas and magnetic fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhehui; Ticos, Catalin M.; Si, Jiahe; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Lapenta, Gianni; Wurden, Glen

    2007-11-01

    Little is known about dust dynamics in highly ionized quasi-neutral plasmas with ca. 1.0 e+20 per cubic meter density and ion temperature at a few eV and above, including in magnetic fusion. For example, dust motion in fusion, better known as UFO's, has been observed since 1980's but not explained. Solid understanding of dust dynamics is also important to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) because of concerns about safety and dust contamination of fusion core. Compared with well studied strongly-coupled dusty plasma regime, new physics may arise in the higher density quasi-neutral plasma regime because of at least four orders of magnitude higher density and two orders of magnitude hotter ion temperature. Our recent laboratory experiments showed that plasma-flow drag force dominates over other forces in a quasi-neutral flowing plasma. In contrast, delicate balance among different forces in dusty plasma has led to many unique phenomena, in particular, the formation of dust crystal. Based on our experiments, we argue that 1) dust crystal will not form in the highly ionized plasmas with flows; 2) the UFO's are moving dust dragged by plasma flows; 3) dust can be used to measure plasma flow. Two diagnostic applications using dust for laboratory quasi-neutral plasmas and magnetic fusion will also be presented.

  6. Turbulence, flows and edge localized mode (ELM) dynamics in limiter H-mode plasmas in TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, S.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Kantor, M.; Unterberg, B.; Sun, Y.; Van Oost, G.; Reiter, D.; TEXTOR Team

    2010-08-01

    The turbulence, plasma flow and edge localized mode (ELM) dynamics in the limiter H-mode TEXTOR plasmas are investigated. Properties of both ambient turbulence within 0 < k⊥ < 4.2 cm-1 and coherent modes are studied on the ELM time scale in detail. The turbulence level near the pedestal is shown to evolve several times with the period of ELMs. Within the inter-ELM period the 'silent stage' is found which is characterized by an extremely low (below that for Ohmic plasmas) turbulence level and a phase growth in the reflectometry signal. The silent stage is associated with the quasi-steady state when the pedestal is formed and confinement is improved between two successive ELMs. Quasi-coherent density oscillations near the pedestal region with m ≈ 3, 5, 16 and 38 are measured with correlation reflectometry. Low-m modes are found to reveal the signatures of precursor mode. At first, the radial structure of the rotation shear and radial electric field Er in limiter H-mode in TEXTOR is presented. The characteristic negative electric field well with the sharp gradient ∇Er ≈ 250 V cm-2 at ≈2 cm inside separatrix is resolved. The Er × B rotation profile defines both the resulting plasma rotation in the electron diamagnetic drift direction and a significant rotation shear near the separatrix which exceeds the decorrelation rate of ambient turbulence by several times.

  7. Characteristics of Turbulence-driven Plasma Flow and Origin of Experimental Empirical Scalings of Intrinsic Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Hahm, T. S.; Ethier, S.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W. M.; Lee, W. W.; Diamond, P. H.

    2011-03-20

    Toroidal plasma flow driven by turbulent torque associated with nonlinear residual stress generation is shown to recover the observed key features of intrinsic rotation in experiments. Specifically, the turbulence-driven intrinsic rotation scales close to linearly with plasma gradients and the inverse of the plasma current, qualitatively reproducing empirical scalings obtained from a large experimental data base. The effect of magnetic shear on the symmetry breaking in the parallel wavenumber spectrum is identified. The origin of the current scaling is found to be the enhanced kll symmetry breaking induced by increased radial variation of the safety factor as the current decreases. The physics origin for the linear dependence of intrinsic rotation on the pressure gradient comes from the fact that both turbulence intensity and the zonal flow shear, which are two key ingredients for driving the residual stress, are increased with the strength of the turbulence drives, which are R/LTe and R/Lne for the collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM). Highlighted results also include robust radial pinches in toroidal flow, heat and particle transport driven by CTEM turbulence, which emerge "in phase", and are shown to play important roles in determining plasma profiles. Also discussed are experimental tests proposed to validate findings from these gyrokinetic simulations.

  8. Sputtering, Plasma Chemistry, and RF Sheath Effects in Low-Temperature and Fusion Plasma Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.; McGugan, James M.; Pankin, Alexei Y.; Roark, Christine M.; Smithe, David N.; Stoltz, Peter H.

    2016-09-01

    A new sheath boundary condition has been implemented in VSim, a plasma modeling code which makes use of both PIC/MCC and fluid FDTD representations. It enables physics effects associated with DC and RF sheath formation - local sheath potential evolution, heat/particle fluxes, and sputtering effects on complex plasma-facing components - to be included in macroscopic-scale plasma simulations that need not resolve sheath scale lengths. We model these effects in typical ICRF antenna operation scenarios on the Alcator C-Mod fusion device, and present comparisons of our simulation results with experimental data together with detailed 3D animations of antenna operation. Complex low-temperature plasma chemistry modeling in VSim is facilitated by MUNCHKIN, a standalone python/C++/SQL code that identifies possible reaction paths for a given set of input species, solves 1D rate equations for the ensuing system's chemical evolution, and generates VSim input blocks with appropriate cross-sections/reaction rates. These features, as well as principal path analysis (to reduce the number of simulated chemical reactions while retaining accuracy) and reaction rate calculations from user-specified distribution functions, will also be demonstrated. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's SBIR program, Award DE-SC0009501.

  9. Effects of turbulent plasma scattering on the X-ray spectra of celestial bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.-Q.; Zhang, Z.-D.

    1981-12-01

    The paper investigates the effect of scattering by plasma turbulence on the Compton process, which converts Langmuir turbulent plasmas into high-frequency electromagnetic waves. The analysis demonstrates that the scattering greatly alters the spectral characteristics of the high-frequency radiation. A structural model for the active region producing the radiation is developed, and the temperature distribution in the X-radiation region of a large flare is calculated, showing the same general trend as the empirical distribution Machado et. al (1975) for low-temperature flares.

  10. Reconnection AND Bursty Bulk Flow Associated Turbulence IN THE Earth'S Plasma Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voros, Z.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Runov, A.; Volwerk, M.; Jankovicova, D.; Balogh, A.; Klecker, B.

    2006-12-01

    Reconnection related fast flows in the Earth's plasma sheet can be associated with several accompanying phenomena, such as magnetic field dipolarization, current sheet thinning and turbulence. Statistical analysis of multi-scale properties of turbulence facilitates to understand the interaction of the plasma flow with the dipolar magnetic field and to recognize the remote or nearby temporal and spatial characteristics of reconnection. The main emphasis of this presentation is on differentiating between the specific statistical features of flow associated fluctuations at different distances from the reconnection site.

  11. Ion acoustic turbulence and transport in a plasma in a strong electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychenkov, V. Iu.; Gradov, O. M.; Silin, V. P.

    1984-01-01

    A theory is derived for the nonlinear state which is established in a plasma when the ion acoustic instability is suppressed by nonlinear induced wave scattering by ions, and there is a quasi-linear relaxation of electrons among turbulent fluctuations. The behavior of the ion acoustic noise spectrum and of transport processes in strong fields, where the anomalous plasma resistance is a square-root function of the field intensity, is found. In this region of electric fields there is a universal distribution of the ion acoustic fluctuations in the magnitude of the wave vector and in angle for the turbulence spectrum.

  12. Fundamental emission via wave advection from a collapsing wave packet in electromagnetic strong plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jenet, F. A.; Melatos, A.; Robinson, P. A.

    2007-10-15

    Zakharov simulations of nonlinear wave collapse in continuously driven two-dimensional, electromagnetic strong plasma turbulence with electron thermal speeds v{>=}0.01c show that for v < or approx. 0.1c, dipole radiation occurs near the plasma frequency, mainly near arrest, but for v > or approx. 0.1c, a new mechanism applies in which energy oscillates between trapped Langmuir and transverse modes until collapse is arrested, after which trapped transverse waves are advected into incoherent interpacket turbulence by an expanding annular density well, where they detrap. The multipole structure, Poynting flux, source current, and radiation angular momentum are computed.

  13. Statistical description of turbulent transport for flux driven toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J.; Imadera, K.; Kishimoto, Y.; Li, J. Q.; Nordman, H.

    2017-06-01

    A novel methodology to analyze non-Gaussian probability distribution functions (PDFs) of intermittent turbulent transport in global full-f gyrokinetic simulations is presented. In this work, the auto-regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model is applied to time series data of intermittent turbulent heat transport to separate noise and oscillatory trends, allowing for the extraction of non-Gaussian features of the PDFs. It was shown that non-Gaussian tails of the PDFs from first principles based gyrokinetic simulations agree with an analytical estimation based on a two fluid model.

  14. Fusion of Multi-Pinched Plasma Beams Converging with Spatial Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Feng; Zheng, Xianjun; Deng, Baiquan

    2015-07-01

    Fusion reactions can be achieved by using deuterium from sea water as the fuel. The amount of deuterium in one gallon of sea water contains energy equivalent to three hundred gallons of gasoline. Satisfactory conditions of plasma temperature and density necessary to initiate fusion have been achieved in various research facilities. However, the confinement time is not sufficient for ignition due to plasma instabilities. Here we show that fatal plasma instabilities could be suppressed by the ingenious arrangement of multi-pinched plasma beams converging symmetrically in space based on the minimization principle of plasma potential energy. Confirmation tests are proposed using tiny wires containing deuterium. If successful, the results could lead to a feasible approach to obtaining commercial fusion power from sea water, hence without the need to use expensive and radioactive tritium as the fuel. supported by the Fund for the Construction of Graduate Degree, China (No. 2014XWD-S0805)

  15. Effect of different tritium fractions on some plasma parameters in deuterium-tritium magnetic confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, S. M.; Mohsenpour, T.; Dashtban, N.

    2016-09-01

    Nearly all reactor projects have considered deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion. The cross section of D-T reaction is larger than those of other fusion reactions, thus it is considered to be a more favorable reaction. The mix of fuel can vary. In this work, a comparison between the effects of different mixture of D-T fuel on the plasma parameters is made. A time dependence calculation of the fusion process is performed using the zero-dimensional model based on a coupled set of particle and energy balance equations in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). The time evolution of plasma parameters is also analyzed numerically.

  16. Ion distribution in the hot spot of an inertial confinement fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xianzhu; Guo, Zehua; Berk, Herb

    2012-10-01

    Maximizing the fusion gain of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for inertial fusion energy (IFE) applications leads to the standard scenario of central hot spot ignition followed by propagating burn wave through the cold/dense assembled fuel. The fact that the hot spot is surrounded by cold but dense fuel layer introduces subtle plasma physics which requires a kinetic description. Here we perform Fokker-Planck calculations and kinetic PIC simulations for an ICF plasma initially in pressure balance but having large temperature gradient over a narrow transition layer. The loss of the fast ion tail from the hot spot, which is important for fusion reactivity, is quantified by Fokker-Planck models. The role of electron energy transport and the ambipolar electric field is investigated via kinetic simulations and the fluid moment models. The net effect on both hot spot ion temperature and the ion tail distribution, and hence the fusion reactivity, is elucidated.

  17. Vortices, Reconnection and Turbulence in High Electron-Beta Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.

    2004-08-31

    Plasmas in which the kinetic energy exceeds the magnetic energy by a significant factor are common in space and in the laboratory. Such plasmas can convect magnetic fields and create null points in whose vicinity first the ions become unmagnetized, then the electrons. This project focuses on the detailed study of the transition regime of these plasmas.

  18. Frequency-resolved nonlinear turbulent energy transfer into zonal flows in strongly heated L-mode plasmas in the HL-2A tokamak.

    PubMed

    Xu, M; Tynan, G R; Diamond, P H; Manz, P; Holland, C; Fedorczak, N; Thakur, S Chakraborty; Yu, J H; Zhao, K J; Dong, J Q; Cheng, J; Hong, W Y; Yan, L W; Yang, Q W; Song, X M; Huang, Y; Cai, L Z; Zhong, W L; Shi, Z B; Ding, X T; Duan, X R; Liu, Y

    2012-06-15

    The absolute rate of nonlinear energy transfer among broadband turbulence, low-frequency zonal flows (ZFs) and geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) was measured for the first time in fusion-grade plasmas using two independent methods across a range of heating powers. The results show that turbulent kinetic energy from intermediate frequencies (20-80 kHz) was transferred into ZFs and GAMs, as well as into fluctuations at higher frequencies (>80  kHz). As the heating power was increased, the energy transfer from turbulence into GAMs and the GAM amplitudes increased, peaked and then decreased, while the energy transfer into the ZFs and the ZFs themselves increased monotonically with heating power. Thus there exists a competition between ZFs and GAMs for the transfer of turbulent energy, and the transfer into ZFs becomes dominant as the heating power is increased. The poloidal-radial Reynolds stress and the mean radial electric field profiles were also measured at different heating powers and found to be consistent with the energy transfer measurement. The results suggest that ZFs play an important role in the low-to-high (L-H) plasma confinement transition.

  19. Experimental and theoretical research in applied plasma physics. Technical progress report, October 15, 1990--October 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Porkolab, M.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: fusion theory and computations; theory of thermonuclear plasmas; user service center; high poloidal beta studies on PBX-M; fast ECE fluctuation diagnostic for balloning mode studies; x-ray imaging diagnostic; millimeter/submillimeter-wave fusion ion diagnostics; small scale turbulence and nonlinear dynamics in plasmas; plasma turbulence and transport; phase contrast interferometer diagnostic for long wavelength fluctuations in DIII-D; and charged and neutral fusion production for fusio plasmas.

  20. Plasma Turbulence and Kinetic Instabilities at Ion Scales in the Expanding Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, Petr; Matteini, Lorenzo; Landi, Simone; Verdini, Andrea; Franci, Luca; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between a decaying strong turbulence and kinetic instabilities in a slowly expanding plasma is investigated using two-dimensional (2D) hybrid expanding box simulations. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field perpendicular to the simulation box, and we start with a spectrum of large-scale, linearly polarized, random-phase Alfvénic fluctuations that have energy equipartition between kinetic and magnetic fluctuations and vanishing correlation between the two fields. A turbulent cascade rapidly develops; magnetic field fluctuations exhibit a power-law spectrum at large scales and a steeper spectrum at ion scales. The turbulent cascade leads to an overall anisotropic proton heating, protons are heated in the perpendicular direction, and, initially, also in the parallel direction. The imposed expansion leads to generation of a large parallel proton temperature anisotropy which is at later stages partly reduced by turbulence. The turbulent heating is not sufficient to overcome the expansion-driven perpendicular cooling and the system eventually drives the oblique firehose instability in a form of localized nonlinear wave packets which efficiently reduce the parallel temperature anisotropy. This work demonstrates that kinetic instabilities may coexist with strong plasma turbulence even in a constrained 2D regime.