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Sample records for fusion welding improvements

  1. Fusion welding process

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Jones, Eric D.; McBride, Marvin A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  2. Physics of Fusion Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Applicabilities and limitations of three techniques analyzed. NASA technical memorandum discusses physics of electron-beam, gas/ tungsten-arc, and laser-beam welding. From comparison of capabilities and limitations of each technique with regard to various welding conditions and materials, possible to develop criteria for selecting best welding technique in specific application. All three techniques classified as fusion welding; small volume of workpiece melted by intense heat source. Heat source moved along seam, leaving in wake solid metal that joins seam edges together.

  3. Physics of Fusion Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Applicabilities and limitations of three techniques analyzed. NASA technical memorandum discusses physics of electron-beam, gas/ tungsten-arc, and laser-beam welding. From comparison of capabilities and limitations of each technique with regard to various welding conditions and materials, possible to develop criteria for selecting best welding technique in specific application. All three techniques classified as fusion welding; small volume of workpiece melted by intense heat source. Heat source moved along seam, leaving in wake solid metal that joins seam edges together.

  4. Workmanship standards for fusion welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, M. D.

    1967-01-01

    Workmanship standards manual defines practices, that adhere to rigid codes and specifications, for fusion welding of component piping, assemblies, and systems. With written and pictorial presentations, it is part of the operating procedure for fusion welding.

  5. Aluminum Lithium Alloy 2195 Fusion Welding Improvements with New Filler Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Carolyn; Bjorkman, Gerry; McCool, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation outlines NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems, and McCook Metals' development an aluminum-copper weld filler wire for fusion welding 2195 aluminum lithium. The aluminum-copper based weld filler wire has been identified as B218, which is the result of six years of weld filler wire development funded by NASA, Lockheed Martin, and McCook Metals. The Super Lightweight External Tank for the NASA Space Shuttle Program consists of 2195 welded with 4043 aluminum-silicon weld filler wire. The B218 filler wire chemistry was developed to produce enhanced 2195 weld and repair weld mechanical properties. An initial characterization of the B218 weld filler wire was performed consisting of initial weld and repair weld evaluation comparing B218 and 4043. The testing involved room temperature and cryogenic tensile testing along with fracture toughness testing. B218 weld filler wire proved to produce enhanced initial and repair weld tensile and fracture properties over 4043. B218 weld filler wire has proved to be a superior weld filler wire for welding 2195 and other aluminum lithium alloys over 4043.

  6. Aluminum Lithium Alloy 2195 Fusion Welding Improvements with New Filler Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this research was to assess the B218 weld filler wire for Super Lightweight External Tank production, which could improve current production welding and repair productivity. We took the following approaches: (1) Perform a repair weld quick look evaluation between 4043/B218 and B218/B218 weld filler wire combinations and evaluation tensile properties for planished and unplanished conditions; and (2) Perform repair weld evaluation on structural simulation panel using 4043-B218 and B218/B218 weld filler wire combinations and evaluation tensile and simulated service fracture properties for planished and unplanished conditions.

  7. Fusion Welding Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    alloy for a variety of Navy systems. The fracture toughness of thick plate submerged arc welds is of particular interesc. This project is an...research S on welding processes. Studies include metal vapors in the arc , development of a high speed infrared temperature monitor, digital signal...analysis as a weld process monitor, convection in arc weld pools, droplet transfer and contact tip wear in gas metal arc welding of titanium, and fractd’re

  8. Fusion Welding Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    34Metullurgical Factors Influencing Charpy Energy of Submerged Arc Welded HY-80 Steel, by A. 0. Oladipupo (Abstract). "Influence of Surface Depression and...of submerged arc welded HY-80 steel. The abstract for a thesis discussing this work is included in Appendix E. Further work is being carried out to...Professor of Materials Engineering fi&foteft^^^^ vV L%1 <° .’•- $ APPENDIX E CHARPY ENERGY OF SUBMERGED ARC WELDED BT-80 STEEL by •£> Adebisi 0

  9. Fusion Welding Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-30

    of deep surface depresion due to vortex formation is being studied through a mathematical model. I Welding direction (a)e S (b) Figure 27: Schematic...each weldment. Specimens were cleaned in acetone and alcohol to remove grease and * dirt. They were finally cleaned ultrasonically in a detergent

  10. FUSION WELDING METHOD AND APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, W.L.; Steinkamp, W.I.

    1961-01-17

    An apparatus for the fusion welding of metal pieces at a joint is described. The apparatus comprises a highvacuum chamber enclosing the metal pieces and a thermionic filament emitter. Sufficient power is applied to the emitter so that when the electron emission therefrom is focused on the joint it has sufficient energy to melt the metal pieces, ionize the metallic vapor abcve the molten metal, and establish an arc discharge between the joint and the emitter.

  11. Hybrid manufacturing processes for fusion welding and friction stir welding of aerospace grade aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gegesky, Megan Alexandra

    Friction stir welding and processing can provide for joints in aerospace grade aluminum alloys that have preferable material properties as compared to fusion welding techniques. Aerospace grade aluminum alloys such as AA2024-T3 and AA7075-T6 are considered non-weldable by traditional fusion welding techniques. Improved mechanical properties over previously used techniques are usually preferable for aerospace applications. Therefore, by combining traditional fusion welding and friction stir processing techniques, it could be plausible to create more difficult geometries in manufactured parts instead of using traditional techniques. While this combination of fusion welding and friction stir processing is not a new technology, its introduction to aerospace grade aluminum alloys as well as non-weldable alloys, is new. This is brought about by a lowered required clamping force required by adding a fusion weld before a friction stir processing technique. The changes in properties associated with joining techniques include: microstructural changes, changes in hardness, tensile strength, and corrosion resistance. This thesis illustrates these changes for the non-weldable AA2024-T351 and AA7075-T651 as well as the weldable alloy AA5052-H32. The microhardness, tensile strength and corrosion resistance of the four processing states: base material, fusion welded material, friction stir welded material, and friction stir processed fusion welded material is studied. The plausibility of this hybrid process for the three different materials is characterized, as well as plausible applications for this joining technique.

  12. U-Groove aluminum weld strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Vaughan, R.

    1996-01-01

    Though butt-welds are among the most preferred joining methods in aerostructures, their strength dependence on inelastic mechanics is generally the least understood. This study investigated experimental strain distributions across a thick aluminum U-grooved weld and identified two weld process considerations for improving the multipass weld strength. The extreme thermal expansion and contraction gradient of the fusion heat input across the groove tab thickness produces severe peaking, which induces bending under uniaxial loading. The filler strain-hardening decreased with increasing filler pass sequence, producing the weakest welds on the last pass side. Current welding schedules unknowingly compound these effects which reduce the weld strength. A depeaking index model was developed to select filler pass thicknesses, pass numbers, and sequences to improve depeaking in the welding process. The intent is to combine the strongest weld pass side with the peaking induced bending tension to provide a more uniform stress and stronger weld under axial tensile loading.

  13. U-groove aluminum weld strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Vaughan, R.

    1995-01-01

    Though butt-welds are among the most preferred joining methods in aerostructures, their strength dependence on inelastic mechanics is generally the least understood. This study investigated experimental strain distributions across a thick aluminum U-grooved weld and identified two weld process considerations for improving the multipass weld strength. The extreme thermal expansion and contraction gradient of the fusion heat input across the groove tab thickness produces severe peaking which induces bending under uniaxial loading. The filler strain-hardening deceased with increasing filler pass sequence, producing the weakest welds on the last pass side. Current welding schedules unknowingly compound these effects which reduce the weld strength. A de-peaking index model was developed to select filler pass thicknesses, pass numbers, and sequences to improve de-peaking in the welding process. Intent is to combine the strongest weld pass side with the peaking induced bending tension to provide a more uniform stress and stronger weld under axial tensile loading.

  14. U-Groove Aluminum Weld Strength Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Vaughan, R.

    1997-01-01

    Though butt-welds are among the most preferred joining methods in aerostructures, their strength dependence on inelastic mechanics is generally the least understood. This study investigated experimental strain distributions across a thick aluminum U-grooved weld and identified two weld process considerations for improving the multipass weld strength. One is the source of peaking in which the extreme thermal expansion and contraction gradient of the fusion heat input across the groove tab thickness produces severe angular distortion that induces bending under uniaxial loading. The other is the filler strain hardening decreasing with increasing filler pass sequences, producing the weakest welds on the last weld pass side. Both phenomena are governed by weld pass sequences. Many industrial welding schedules unknowingly compound these effects, which reduce the weld strength. A depeaking index model was developed to select filler pass thickness, pass numbers, and sequences to improve depeaking in the welding process. The result was to select the number and sequence of weld passes to reverse the peaking angle such as to combine the strongest weld pass side with the peaking induced bending tension component side to provide a more uniform stress and stronger weld under axial tensile loading.

  15. Improving the Mechanical Properties of the Fusion Zone in Electron-Beam Welded Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, Christopher J.; Sabol, Joseph C.; Pasang, Timotius; Watanabe, Masashi; Misiolek, Wojciech Z.

    2017-01-01

    It is well-known that ω-phase precipitates embrittle Ti-5553 alloys and that ω-phase embrittlement can be overcome with appropriate heat treatments. However, the microstructural evolution of electron-beam welded Ti-5553 is not as understood as compared to the cast or wrought material. This study compared the microstructures of as-welded and post-weld heat-treated specimens by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and similarly compared the localized mechanical behavior of the fusion zones with microhardness testing and digital image correlation coupled tensile testing. The primary observations were that the embrittling ω-phase precipitates formed upon cooling, and could not be fully solutionized in a single-step treatment of 1077 K (804 °C) for 1 hour. It was also discovered that nanoscale α-phase precipitates nucleated after the single-step treatment, although they were small in number and sparsely distributed. However, a two-step heat treatment of 1077 K (804 °C) for 1 hour and 873 K (600 °C) for 4 hours completely solutionized the ω-phase and produced a dense network of 2-μm-wide α-phase plates, which significantly improved the mechanical properties. Overall, this study has shown that post-weld heat treatments improve the strength and ductility of electron-beam welded Ti-5553 alloys by controlling ω- and α-phase evolution.

  16. Improving the Mechanical Properties of the Fusion Zone in Electron-Beam Welded Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, Christopher J.; Sabol, Joseph C.; Pasang, Timotius; Watanabe, Masashi; Misiolek, Wojciech Z.

    2017-04-01

    It is well-known that ω-phase precipitates embrittle Ti-5553 alloys and that ω-phase embrittlement can be overcome with appropriate heat treatments. However, the microstructural evolution of electron-beam welded Ti-5553 is not as understood as compared to the cast or wrought material. This study compared the microstructures of as-welded and post-weld heat-treated specimens by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and similarly compared the localized mechanical behavior of the fusion zones with microhardness testing and digital image correlation coupled tensile testing. The primary observations were that the embrittling ω-phase precipitates formed upon cooling, and could not be fully solutionized in a single-step treatment of 1077 K (804 °C) for 1 hour. It was also discovered that nanoscale α-phase precipitates nucleated after the single-step treatment, although they were small in number and sparsely distributed. However, a two-step heat treatment of 1077 K (804 °C) for 1 hour and 873 K (600 °C) for 4 hours completely solutionized the ω-phase and produced a dense network of 2- μm-wide α-phase plates, which significantly improved the mechanical properties. Overall, this study has shown that post-weld heat treatments improve the strength and ductility of electron-beam welded Ti-5553 alloys by controlling ω- and α-phase evolution.

  17. Effects of Fusion Tack Welds on Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Pendleton, M. L.; Brooke, S. A.; Russell, C. K.

    2012-01-01

    In order to know whether fusion tack welds would affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir seam welds in 2195-T87 aluminum alloy, the fracture stresses of 144 tensile test coupons cut from 24 welded panels containing segments of friction stir welds were measured. Each of the panels was welded under unique processing conditions. A measure of the effect of the tack welds for each panel was devised. An analysis of the measures of the tack weld effect supported the hypothesis that fusion tack welds do not affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir welds to a 5% level of confidence.

  18. Melting efficiency in fusion welding

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerschbach, P.W.

    1991-01-01

    Basic to our knowledge of the science of welding is an understanding of the melting efficiency, which indicates how much of the heat deposited by the welding process is used to produce melting. Recent calorimetric studies of GTAW, PAW, and LBW processes have measured the net heat input to the part thereby quantifying the energy transfer efficiency and in turn permitting an accurate determination of the melting efficiency. It is indicated that the weld process variables can dramatically affect the melting efficiency. This limiting value is shown to depend on the weld heat flow geometry as predicted by analytical solutions to the heat flow equation and as demonstrated by the recent empirical data. A new dimensionless parameter is used to predict the melting efficiency and is shown to correlate extremely well with recent empirical data. This simple prediction methodology is notable because it requires only a knowledge of the weld schedule and the material properties in order to estimate melting efficiency. 22 refs., 16 figs.

  19. Advanced fusion welding processes, solid state joining and a successful marriage. [production of aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, F. R.

    1972-01-01

    Joining processes for aerospace systems combine fusion welding and solid state joining during production of metal structures. Detailed characteristics of electron beam welding, plasma arc welding, diffusion welding, inertia welding and weldbond processes are discussed.

  20. An Improved Method of Capturing the Surface Boundary of a Ti-6Al-4V Fusion Weld Bead for Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, R. P.; Villa, M.; Sovani, Y.; Panwisawas, C.; Perumal, B.; Ward, R. M.; Brooks, J. W.; Basoalto, H. C.

    2016-02-01

    Weld simulation methods have often employed mathematical functions to describe the size and shape of the molten pool of material transiently present in a weld. However, while these functions can sometimes accurately capture the fusion boundary for certain welding parameters in certain materials, they do not necessarily offer a robust methodology for the more intricate weld pool shapes that can be produced in materials with a very low thermal conductivity, such as the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. Cross-sections of steady-state welds can be observed which contain a dramatic narrowing of the pool width at roughly half way in to the depth of the plate of material, and a significant widening again at the base. These effects on the weld pool are likely to do with beam focusing height. However, the resultant intricacy of the pool means that standard formulaic methods to capture the shape may prove relatively unsuccessful. Given how critical the accuracy of pool shape is in determining the mechanical response to the heating, an alternative method is presented. By entering weld pool width measurements for a series of depths in a Cartesian co-ordinate system using FE weld simulation software Sysweld, a more representative weld pool size and shape can be predicted, compared to the standard double ellipsoid method. Results have demonstrated that significant variations in the mid-depth thermal profile are observed between the two, even though the same values for top and bottom pool-widths are entered. Finally, once the benefits of the Cartesian co-ordinate method are demonstrated, the robustness of this approach to predict a variety of weld pool shapes has been demonstrated upon a series of nine weld simulations, where the two key process parameters (welding laser power and travel speed) are explored over a design space ranging from 1.5 to 3 kW and 50 to 200 mm/s. Results suggest that for the faster travel speeds, the more detailed Cartesian co-ordinate method is better, whereas

  1. Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In fusion welding, parts are joined together by melting and subsequent solidification. Although this principle is simple, complex transport phenomena take place during fusion welding, and they determine the final weld quality and performance. The heat and mass transfer in the weld pool directly affect the size and shape of the pool, the solidification microstructure, the formation of weld defects such as porosity and humping, and the temperature distribution in the fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ). Furthermore, the temperature evolution affects the kinetics and extent of various solid-state phase transformations, which in turn determine the final weld microstructure and mechanical properties. The formation of residual stresses and distortion originates from the thermal expansion and contraction during welding heating and cooling, respectively.

  2. Low Gravity Improves Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.; Plaster, Teresa C.

    1993-01-01

    Hardnesses and tensile strengths greater. Welds made under right conditions in low gravity appear superior to those made under high gravity. Conclusion drawn from results of welding experiments conducted during low- and high-gravity-simulating maneuvers of KC-135 airplane. Results have implications not only for welding in outer space but also for repeated rapid welding on Earth or in airplanes under simulated low gravity to obtain unusually strong joints.

  3. Low Gravity Improves Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.; Plaster, Teresa C.

    1993-01-01

    Hardnesses and tensile strengths greater. Welds made under right conditions in low gravity appear superior to those made under high gravity. Conclusion drawn from results of welding experiments conducted during low- and high-gravity-simulating maneuvers of KC-135 airplane. Results have implications not only for welding in outer space but also for repeated rapid welding on Earth or in airplanes under simulated low gravity to obtain unusually strong joints.

  4. Fusion welding of a modern borated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Robino, C.V.; Cieslak, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments designed to assess the fabrication and service weldability of 304B4A borated stainless steel were conducted. Welding procedures and parameters for manual gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, autogenous electron beam (EB) welding and filler-added EB welding were developed and found to be similar to those for austenitic stainless steels. Following the procedure development, four test welds were produced and evaluated by microstructural analysis and Charpy impact testing. Further samples were used for determination of the postweld heat treatment (PWHT) response of the welds. The fusion zone structure of welds in this alloy consists of primary austenite dendrites with an interdendritic eutectic-like austenite/boride constituent. Welds also show an appreciable partially molten zone that consists of the austenite/boride eutectic surrounding unmelted austenite islands. The microstructure of the EB welds was substantially finer than that of the GTA welds, and boride coarsening was not observed in the solid state heat-affected zone (HAZ) of either weld type. The impact toughness of as-welded samples was found to be relatively poor, averaging less than 10 J for both GTA and EB welds. For fusion zone notched GTA and EB samples and centerline notched EB samples, fracture generally occurred along the boundary between the partially molten and solid-state regions of the HAZ. The results of the PWHT study were very encouraging, with typical values of the impact energy for HAZ notched samples approaching 40 J, or twice the minimum code-acceptable value.

  5. Fracture evaluation of fusion line cracks in bimetallic welds

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, P.M.; Rudland, D.L.; Francini, R.B.; Marschall, C.; Wilkoswski, G.M.

    1996-12-01

    There are many locations in nuclear power plants piping systems where carbon steel pipe or components are jointed to stainless steel pipe or components with a bimetallic weld. The objective of the research described in this paper was to assess the accuracy of current fracture analyses for the case of a crack along a carbon steel to austenitic weld fusion line. To achieve th is objective, material property data and data from a large-diameter (i.e., 36-inch) pipe fracture experiment were developed to assess current analytical methods. The bimetallic welds evaluated in this program were bimetallic welds obtained from a canceled Combustion Engineering plant. The welds joined sections of the carbon steel cold-leg piping system to stainless steel safe ends that were to be welded to stainless steel pump housings. The weld procedure involved buttering the carbon steel pipe with Inconel 182 weld metal and then completing the bulk of the weld using a shielded-metal-arc weld (SMAW) process using Inconel 182 weld rod. The major conclusion drawn as a result of these efforts was that the fracture behavior of the bimetallic weld evaluated in this program could be evaluated with reasonable accuracy using the strength and toughness properties of the carbon steel pipe base metal in conjunction with conventional J-estimation schemes. As will be discussed in this paper, this conclusion is only valid for the case where the weld is made using an Inconel weld procedure. If the weld is made using a stainless steel weld procedure, then decarburization at the fusion line may affect the fusion line toughness.

  6. Microstructure Improvement in Weld Metal under the Ultrasonic Application

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Yan; Xu, Cailu; Han, Qingyou

    2007-01-01

    When considering the operational performance of weldments in the engineering projects, the most important issues to be considered are weld metal mechanical properties, integrity of the welded joint, and weldability 1 . These issues are closely related to the microstructure of the weld metal. A significant amount of research has been carried out to alter the process variables and to use external devices to obtain microstructure control of the weldments. It has been reported that grain refined microstructure not only reduces cracking behavior of alloys including solidification cracking, cold cracking and reheat cracking, 2 - 5 but also improves the mechanical properties of the weld metal, such as toughness, ductility, strength, and fatigue life. 6, 7 Weld pool stirring, 8 arc oscillation, 9, 10 arc pulsation, 11 , and magnetic arc oscillator 12, 13 have been applied to fusion welding to refine the microstructures. This article describes initial experimental results on the use of power ultrasonic vibration to refine the microstructure of weld metals.

  7. Sensor fusion using neural network in the robotic welding

    SciTech Connect

    Ohshima, Kenji; Yabe, Masaaki; Akita, Kazuya; Kugai, Katsuya; Yamane, Satoshi; Kubota, Takefumi

    1995-12-31

    It is important to realize intelligent welding robots to obtain a good quality of the welding results. For this purpose, it is required to detect the torch height, the torch attitude, the deviation from the center of the gap. In order to simultaneously detect those, the authors propose the sensor fusion by using the neural network, i.e., the information concerning the welding torch is detected by using both the welding current and the welding voltage. First, the authors deal with the welding phenomena as the melting phenomena in the electrode wire of the MIG welding and the CO{sub 2} short circuiting welding. Next, the training data of the neutral networks are made from the numerical simulations. The neuro arc sensor is trained so as to get the desired performance of the sensor. By using it, the seam tracking is carried out in the T-joint.

  8. Submodeling Simulations in Fusion Welds: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifaz, E. A.

    2013-11-01

    In part I, three-dimensional transient non-linear sub modeling heat transfer simulations were performed to study the thermal histories and thermal cycles that occur during the welding process at the macro, meso and micro scales. In the present work, the corresponding non-uniform temperature changes were imposed as load conditions on structural calculations to study the evolution of localized plastic strains and residual stresses at these sub-level scales. To reach the goal, a three-dimensional finite element elastic-plastic model (ABAQUS code) was developed. The sub-modeling technique proposed to be used in coupling phase-field (and/or digital microstructures) codes with finite element codes, was used to mesh a local part of the model with a refined mesh based on interpolation of the solution from an initial, relatively coarse, macro global model. The meso-sub-model is the global model for the subsequent micro sub-model. The strategy used to calculate temperatures, strains and residual stresses at the macro, meso and micro scale level, is very flexible to be used to any number of levels. The objective of this research was to initiate the development of microstructural models to identify fusion welding process parameters for preserving the single crystal nature of gas turbine blades during repair procedures. The multi-scale submodeling approach can be used to capture weld pool features at the macro-meso scale level, and micro residual stress and secondary dendrite arm spacing features at the micro scale level.

  9. Classification of weld defect based on information fusion technology for radiographic testing system

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hongquan; Liang, Zeming Gao, Jianmin; Dang, Changying

    2016-03-15

    Improving the efficiency and accuracy of weld defect classification is an important technical problem in developing the radiographic testing system. This paper proposes a novel weld defect classification method based on information fusion technology, Dempster–Shafer evidence theory. First, to characterize weld defects and improve the accuracy of their classification, 11 weld defect features were defined based on the sub-pixel level edges of radiographic images, four of which are presented for the first time in this paper. Second, we applied information fusion technology to combine different features for weld defect classification, including a mass function defined based on the weld defect feature information and the quartile-method-based calculation of standard weld defect class which is to solve a sample problem involving a limited number of training samples. A steam turbine weld defect classification case study is also presented herein to illustrate our technique. The results show that the proposed method can increase the correct classification rate with limited training samples and address the uncertainties associated with weld defect classification.

  10. Classification of weld defect based on information fusion technology for radiographic testing system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongquan; Liang, Zeming; Gao, Jianmin; Dang, Changying

    2016-03-01

    Improving the efficiency and accuracy of weld defect classification is an important technical problem in developing the radiographic testing system. This paper proposes a novel weld defect classification method based on information fusion technology, Dempster-Shafer evidence theory. First, to characterize weld defects and improve the accuracy of their classification, 11 weld defect features were defined based on the sub-pixel level edges of radiographic images, four of which are presented for the first time in this paper. Second, we applied information fusion technology to combine different features for weld defect classification, including a mass function defined based on the weld defect feature information and the quartile-method-based calculation of standard weld defect class which is to solve a sample problem involving a limited number of training samples. A steam turbine weld defect classification case study is also presented herein to illustrate our technique. The results show that the proposed method can increase the correct classification rate with limited training samples and address the uncertainties associated with weld defect classification.

  11. Classification of weld defect based on information fusion technology for radiographic testing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hongquan; Liang, Zeming; Gao, Jianmin; Dang, Changying

    2016-03-01

    Improving the efficiency and accuracy of weld defect classification is an important technical problem in developing the radiographic testing system. This paper proposes a novel weld defect classification method based on information fusion technology, Dempster-Shafer evidence theory. First, to characterize weld defects and improve the accuracy of their classification, 11 weld defect features were defined based on the sub-pixel level edges of radiographic images, four of which are presented for the first time in this paper. Second, we applied information fusion technology to combine different features for weld defect classification, including a mass function defined based on the weld defect feature information and the quartile-method-based calculation of standard weld defect class which is to solve a sample problem involving a limited number of training samples. A steam turbine weld defect classification case study is also presented herein to illustrate our technique. The results show that the proposed method can increase the correct classification rate with limited training samples and address the uncertainties associated with weld defect classification.

  12. Ultrasonic detection of flaws in fusion butt welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, B. T.; Hanna, K. J.; Tooley, W. M.

    1970-01-01

    Reliable and accurate Delta technique, a nondestructive ultrasonics method, uses redirection of energy to detect randomly oriented imperfections in fusion butt welds. Data on flaws can be read from either an oscilloscope or a printout.

  13. Repair welding of fusion reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, B.A.

    1993-05-15

    Experiments have shown that irradiated Type 316 stainless steel is susceptible to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) cracking upon cooling when welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process under lateral constraint. The cracking has been hypothesized to be caused by stress-assisted helium bubble growth and rupture at grain boundaries. This study utilized an experimental welding setup which enabled different compressive stresses to be applied to the plates during welding. Autogenous GTA welds were produced in Type 316 stainless steel doped with 256 appm helium. The application of a compressive stress, 55 MPa, during welding suppressed the previously observed catastrophic cracking. Detailed examinations conducted after welding showed a dramatic change in helium bubble morphology. Grain boundary bubble growth along directions parallel to the weld was suppressed. Results suggest that stress-modified welding techniques may be used to suppress or eliminate helium-induced cracking during joining of irradiated materials.

  14. Chamber free fusion welding root side purging method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparati are presented for non-chamber root side purging in fusion welding of oxygen reactive metals which require that the molten weld zone and local solid areas of the weld seam remaining at high temperatures be shielded from normal atmosphere to prevent degradation of the welded area. The apparati provide an inert atmosphere to the root side of a weld joint through a porous medium whereby the jet-like thrust of the plasma arc actually draws the continuously supplied inert atmosphere into the path of the molten or high temperature solid weld zone. The porous medium is configured so it can be placed at the borders of the weld seam and substantially parallel to the seam without restricting the view of the root side of the seam. The inert gas is dispersed evenly through the porous media and across the weld seam, at the point of arc penetration and in front of and behind the arc. The apparati can be constructed so as to limit the amount of inert gas flow and can be mobile and travel synchronously with the welding arc.

  15. Chamber free fusion welding root side purging method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dailey, J. R. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparati are presented for non-chamber root side purging in fusion welding of oxygen reactive metals which require that the molten weld zone and local solid areas of the weld seam remaining at high temperatures be shielded from normal atmosphere to prevent degradation of the welded area. The apparati provide an inert atmosphere to the root side of a weld joint through a porous medium whereby the jet-like thrust of the plasma arc actually draws the continuously supplied inert atmosphere into the path of the molten or high temperature solid weld zone. The porous medium is configured so it can be placed at the borders of the weld seam and substantially parallel to the seam without restricting the view of the root side of the seam. The inert gas is dispersed evenly through the porous media and across the weld seam, at the point of arc penetration and in front of and behind the arc. The apparati can be constructed so as to limit the amount of inert gas flow and can be mobile and travel synchronously with the welding arc.

  16. Weld joints inspection using multisource data and image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chady, T.; Sikora, R.; Szwagiel, M.; Szydłowski, M.; Waszczuk, P.; Grochowalska, B.; Grzywacz, B.; Misztal, L.

    2017-02-01

    The novel concept of comprehensive weld inspection with use of three sources of data (radiogram image, image composed of laser profilometer 3D data, CCD camera image) and weld images fusion is presented in the paper. The algorithms of data processing aimed at detection and visualization of weld flaws are roughly described. The special attention was paid at presentation and explanation of algorithm for aligning and spatial correction of images composed of data delivered by three independent sources. The results yielded by proposed algorithms for preprocessing of weld images, weld detection, feature extraction, shape extraction, shape matching, filtering, distortion correction, etc. are illustrated with several figures included in the paper. The concise description of designed and implemented laboratory stands is included in the paper too.

  17. Final Report: A Transport Phenomena Based Approach to Probe Evolution of Weld Macro and Microstructures and A Smart Bi-directional Model of Fusion Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Tarasankar DebRoy

    2009-12-11

    In recent years, applications of numerical heat transfer and fluid flow models of fusion welding have resulted in improved understanding of both the welding processes and welded materials. They have been used to accurately calculate thermal cycles and fusion zone geometry in many cases. Here we report the following three major advancements from this project. First, we show how microstructures, grain size distribution and topology of welds of several important engineering alloys can be computed starting from better understanding of the fusion welding process through numerical heat transfer and fluid flow calculations. Second, we provide a conclusive proof that the reliability of numerical heat transfer and fluid flow calculations can be significantly improved by optimizing several uncertain model parameters. Third, we demonstrate how the numerical heat transfer and fluid flow models can be combined with a suitable global optimization program such as a genetic algorithm for the tailoring of weld attributes such as attaining a specified weld geometry or a weld thermal cycle. The results of the project have been published in many papers and a listing of these are included together with a list of the graduate thesis that resulted from this project. The work supported by the DOE award has resulted in several important national and international awards. A listing of these awards and the status of the graduate students are also presented in this report.

  18. Fusion Welding of AerMet 100 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    ENGLEHART, DAVID A.; MICHAEL, JOSEPH R.; NOVOTNY, PAUL M.; ROBINO, CHARLES V.

    1999-08-01

    A database of mechanical properties for weldment fusion and heat-affected zones was established for AerMet{reg_sign}100 alloy, and a study of the welding metallurgy of the alloy was conducted. The properties database was developed for a matrix of weld processes (electron beam and gas-tungsten arc) welding parameters (heat inputs) and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions. In order to insure commercial utility and acceptance, the matrix was commensurate with commercial welding technology and practice. Second, the mechanical properties were correlated with fundamental understanding of microstructure and microstructural evolution in this alloy. Finally, assessments of optimal weld process/PWHT combinations for cotildent application of the alloy in probable service conditions were made. The database of weldment mechanical properties demonstrated that a wide range of properties can be obtained in welds in this alloy. In addition, it was demonstrated that acceptable welds, some with near base metal properties, could be produced from several different initial heat treatments. This capability provides a means for defining process parameters and PWHT's to achieve appropriate properties for different applications, and provides useful flexibility in design and manufacturing. The database also indicated that an important region in welds is the softened region which develops in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and analysis within the welding metallurgy studies indicated that the development of this region is governed by a complex interaction of precipitate overaging and austenite formation. Models and experimental data were therefore developed to describe overaging and austenite formation during thermal cycling. These models and experimental data can be applied to essentially any thermal cycle, and provide a basis for predicting the evolution of microstructure and properties during thermal processing.

  19. Repair welding of fusion reactor components. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, B.A.; Wang, C.A.

    1997-09-30

    The exposure of metallic materials, such as structural components of the first wall and blanket of a fusion reactor, to neutron irradiation will induce changes in both the material composition and microstructure. Along with these changes can come a corresponding deterioration in mechanical properties resulting in premature failure. It is, therefore, essential to expect that the repair and replacement of the degraded components will be necessary. Such repairs may require the joining of irradiated materials through the use of fusion welding processes. The present ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) conceptual design is anticipated to have about 5 km of longitudinal welds and ten thousand pipe butt welds in the blanket structure. A recent study by Buende et al. predict that a failure is most likely to occur in a weld. The study is based on data from other large structures, particularly nuclear reactors. The data used also appear to be consistent with the operating experience of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This reactor has a fuel pin area comparable with the area of the ITER first wall and has experienced one unanticipated fuel pin failure after two years of operation. The repair of irradiated structures using fusion welding will be difficult due to the entrapped helium. Due to its extremely low solubility in metals, helium will diffuse and agglomerate to form helium bubbles after being trapped at point defects, dislocations, and grain boundaries. Welding of neutron-irradiated type 304 stainless steels has been reported with varying degree of heat-affected zone cracking (HAZ). The objectives of this study were to determine the threshold helium concentrations required to cause HAZ cracking and to investigate techniques that might be used to eliminate the HAZ cracking in welding of helium-containing materials.

  20. Effect of pulsed current GTA welding parameters on the fusion zone microstructure of AA 6061 aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, T. Senthil; Balasubramanian, V.; Babu, S.; Sanavullah, M. Y.

    2007-08-01

    AA6061 aluminium alloy (Al-Mg-Si alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of food processing equipment, chemical containers, passenger cars, road tankers, and railway transport systems. The preferred process for welding these aluminium alloys is frequently Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welding due to its comparatively easy applicability and lower cost. In the case of single pass GTA welding of thinner sections of this alloy, the pulsed current has been found beneficial due to its advantages over the conventional continuous current processes. The use of pulsed current parameters has been found to improve the mechanical properties of the welds compared to those of continuous current welds of this alloy due to grain refinement occurring in the fusion zone. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to develop a mathematical model to predict the fusion zone grain diameter incorporating pulsed current welding parameters. Statistical tools such as design of experiments, analysis of variance, and regression analysis are used to develop the mathematical model. The developed model can be effectively used to predict the fusion grain diameter at a 95% confidence level for the given pulsed current parameters. The effect of pulsed current GTA welding parameters on the fusion zone grain diameter of AA 6061 aluminium alloy welds is reported in this paper.

  1. Simulating weld-fusion boundary microstructures in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrivas, Anastasios D.; Lippold, John C.

    2004-02-01

    A fundamental study of weld-fusion boundary microstructure evolution in aluminum alloys was conducted in an effort to understand equiaxed grain zone formation and fusion boundary nucleation and growth phenomena. In addition to commercial aluminum alloys, experimental Mg-bearing alloys with Zr and Sc additions were studied along with the widely used Cu- and Licontaining alloy 2195-T8. This article describes work conducted to clarify the interrelation among composition, base metal substrate, and temperature as they relate to nucleation and growth phenomena at the fusion boundary.

  2. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  3. Stainless steel submerged arc weld fusion line toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfield, A.R.; Held, P.R.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1995-04-01

    This effort evaluated the fracture toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines. The incentive was to explain why cracks grow into the fusion line in many pipe tests conducted with cracks initially centered in SAWS. The concern was that the fusion line may have a lower toughness than the SAW. It was found that the fusion line, Ji. was greater than the SAW toughness but much less than the base metal. Of greater importance may be that the crack growth resistance (JD-R) of the fusion line appeared to reach a steady-state value, while the SAW had a continually increasing JD-R curve. This explains why the cracks eventually turn to the fusion line in the pipe experiments. A method of incorporating these results would be to use the weld metal J-R curve up to the fusion-line steady-state J value. These results may be more important to LBB analyses than the ASME flaw evaluation procedures, since there is more crack growth with through-wall cracks in LBB analyses than for surface cracks in pipe flaw evaluations.

  4. Optimization of Fiber Laser Welding of DP980 Steels Using RSM to Improve Weld Properties for Formability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Panda, S. K.; Saha, P.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of laser parameters on weld quality is a critical laboratory study before implementation of newly developed high-strength dual-phase steels in fabrication of auto-bodies. In present work, dual-phase steels having tensile strength of 980 MPa (DP980) were welded using different welding speeds by Yb-fiber laser source to fabricate similar material combinations laser-welded blanks (LWBs). The weld zone microhardness, microstructure, and formability of DP980 LWBs were compared with those of the DP600 and micro-alloyed interstitial free high-strength steel (IFHS) LWBs. It was found that the formation of soft zone at the outer side of the HAZ was responsible for significant reduction in formability of DP980 LWBs due to strain localization and premature failure. Hence, response surface methodology based on Box-Behnken design was implemented to establish a mathematical model which could correlate the influence of laser process parameters such as power, welding speed, and focal position on weld quality in terms of aspect ratio of fusion zone, width of the soft zone, and surface roughness of weld to improve formability. The model was successfully implemented to optimize the laser parameters, and approximately 13.58% improvement in Erichsen cup height was achieved due to complete weld penetration with simultaneous 67% reduction in soft zone width and 55% reduction in softening. However, the failure was still observed to occur in the soft zone propagating parallel to weld in radial direction.

  5. DETECTION OF LACK OF FUSION WELD DEFECTS BY RADIOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, M. P.; Almeida, R. M.; Rebello, J. M. A.

    2009-03-03

    In this work, radiography was employed as the NDT technique for detection of flaws in circumferential girth welds of steel pipelines used in offshore installations in the petroleum industry. The kind of defect specifically focused was lack of fusion. It is currently accepted in the literature that radiography is not as sensitive as ultrasonics to detect lack of fusion defects. Unfortunately, the radiographic inspection can barely detect lack of fusion and only when it is associated to inclusions and voids of considerable size. However, in a previous article ('Reliability of radiographic inspection of steel pipeline girth welds', QNDE Conference, 2007), the authors showed that it is possible to detect lack of fusion defects if, in the radiographic tests, the angle of incidence is the same angle that the weld bevel makes with the test piece surface, which means lowering the angle of disorientation between the flaw and the radiographic beam. However, no concerns were made to sizing the defects. Computational simulation was used with XRSIM software to establish the optimal radiographic parameters to reach the lower limit for detection for this kind of defect.

  6. Heat Source - Materials Interactions during Fusion Welding.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-30

    under these p conditions would be linear regardless of the natures of these compounds. In this respect, the oxygen pressure plots advocated herein...Dependence of the Equilibrium Oxygen Pressure in Metal Oxide Systems A. Block-Bolten and D. R. Sadoway 100 ___Accescion Fr N~TI GRA&I DTIC TAB...report describes work performed in the MIT Welding Laboratory under Office of Naval Research sponsorship. The work ii generally fundamental in nature

  7. Improving fatigue performance of rail thermite welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezzini-Aouad, M.; Flahaut, P.; Hariri, S.; Winiar, L.

    2010-06-01

    Rail transport development offers economic and ecological interests. Nevertheless, it requires heavy investments in rolling material and infrastructure. To be competitive, this transportation means must rely on safe and reliable infrastructure, which requires optimization of all implemented techniques and structure. Rail thermite (or aluminothermic) welding is widely used within the railway industry for in-track welding during re-rail and defect replacement. The process provides numerous advantages against other welding technology commonly used. Obviously, future demands on train traffic are heavier axle loads, higher train speeds and increased traffic density. Thus, a new enhanced weld should be developed to prevent accidents due to fracture of welds and to lower maintenance costs. In order to improve such assembly process, a detailed metallurgical study coupled to a thermomechanical modelling of the phenomena involved in the thermite welding process is carried out. Obtained data enables us to develop a new improved thermite weld (type A). This joint is made by modifying the routinely specified procedure (type B) used in a railway rail by a standard gap alumino-thermic weld. Joints of type A and B are tested and compared. Based on experimental temperature measurements, a finite element analysis is used to calculate the thermal residual stresses induced. In the vicinity of the weld, the residual stress patterns depend on the thermal conditions during welding as it also shown by litterature [1, 2]. In parallel, X-Ray diffraction has been used to map the residual stress field that is generated in welded rail of types A and B. Their effect on fatigue crack growth in rail welds is studied. An experimental study based on fatigue tests of rails welded by conventional and improved processes adjudicates on the new advances and results will be shown.

  8. Improved welding of Rene-41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunez, S.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-tungsten arc welding with a filler of Rene-41 produces strong welded joints. When Rene-41 is used, resistance to strain-age cracking is greatly increased by post-weld solution annealing in an inert atmosphere. Mechanical properties of Rene-41 and Hastelloy-W are compared.

  9. Fusion-bonded epoxy coating defects on weld center line of submerged-arc welded pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Sokol, D.R.; Herndon, C.M. )

    1990-08-01

    The problem of weld center line coating defects in fusion-bonded epoxy coatings has occurred on pipe produced in Europe, North America, and Asia. At various times, the defects have been attributed to coating application practices, powder manufacturing, pipe manufacturing, welding methods, and overly critical inspectors. This article details plant experience and experimental trails that led to the identification of the cause and proof of the solution. The ultimate effect of initial coating defects on cathodic protection requirements is a matter of concern also.

  10. Improving Fatigue Performance of AHSS Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhili; Yu, Xinghua; Erdman, III, Donald L.; Wang, Yanli; Kelly, Steve; Hou, Wenkao; Yan, Benda; Wang, Zhifeng; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Reported herein is technical progress on a U.S. Department of Energy CRADA project with industry cost-share aimed at developing the technical basis and demonstrate the viability of innovative in-situ weld residual stresses mitigation technology that can substantially improve the weld fatigue performance and durability of auto-body structures. The developed technology would be costeffective and practical in high-volume vehicle production environment. Enhancing weld fatigue performance would address a critical technology gap that impedes the widespread use of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) and other lightweight materials for auto body structure light-weighting. This means that the automotive industry can take full advantage of the AHSS in strength, durability and crashworthiness without the concern of the relatively weak weld fatigue performance. The project comprises both technological innovations in weld residual stress mitigation and due-diligence residual stress measurement and fatigue performance evaluation. Two approaches were investigated. The first one was the use of low temperature phase transformation (LTPT) weld filler wire, and the second focused on novel thermo-mechanical stress management technique. Both technical approaches have resulted in considerable improvement in fatigue lives of welded joints made of high-strength steels. Synchrotron diffraction measurement confirmed the reduction of high tensile weld residual stresses by the two weld residual stress mitigation techniques.

  11. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF HELIUM BEARING FUSION WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tosten, M; Michael Morgan, M

    2008-12-12

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was conducted to characterize the helium bubble distributions in tritium-charged-and-aged 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel fusion welds containing approximately 150 appm helium-3. TEM foils were prepared from C-shaped fracture toughness test specimens containing {delta} ferrite levels ranging from 4 to 33 volume percent. The weld microstructures in the low ferrite welds consisted mostly of austenite and discontinuous, skeletal {delta} ferrite. In welds with higher levels of {delta} ferrite, the ferrite was more continuous and, in some areas of the 33 volume percent sample, was the matrix/majority phase. The helium bubble microstructures observed were similar in all samples. Bubbles were found in the austenite but not in the {delta} ferrite. In the austenite, bubbles had nucleated homogeneously in the grain interiors and heterogeneously on dislocations. Bubbles were not found on any austenite/austenite grain boundaries or at the austenite/{delta} ferrite interphase interfaces. Bubbles were not observed in the {delta} ferrite because of the combined effects of the low solubility and rapid diffusion of tritium through the {delta} ferrite which limited the amount of helium present to form visible bubbles.

  12. Fusion and friction stir welding of aluminum-metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storjohann, D.; Barabash, O. M.; David, S. A.; Sklad, P. S.; Bloom, E. E.; Babu, S. S.

    2005-11-01

    Microstructure evolutions and degradations of aluminum-metal-matrix composites during fusion welding were studied and compared with thermodynamic calculations. In fusion welds of Al2O3-reinforced composites, the decomposition of Al2O3 was observed. In fusion welds of SiC whisker-reinforced composites, the decomposition of SiC to Al4C3+Si by reaction with molten aluminum occurred. These phenomena led to unacceptable fusion welds in aluminum metal-matrix composites. Successful welds were produced in the same composites by friction stir welding (FSW). Significant reorientation of SiC whiskers close to the boundary of the dynamically recrystallized and thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ) was observed. The small hardening in the dynamically recrystallized region was attributed to the presence of dislocation tangles in between SiC whiskers.

  13. Rotor welding to improve SCC resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Segletes, D.S.; Moreci, J.A.; Cramer, E.P.

    1999-11-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of low pressure steam turbine rotor blade attachments and disc bores is an industry issue on many older fossil and nuclear units. This paper discusses repair options available to the plant operator ranging from component restoration to enhancements dramatically increasing SCC resistance. The techniques described are uniformly applicable regardless of OEM and include geometric improvements to reduce peak surface stresses and material improvements through replacement or weld repair of components. Highlighted is the application of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) of steam turbine rotors including the use of 12% Cr weld metal to minimize susceptibility to SCC.

  14. Improved diffusion welding and roll welding of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holko, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Auto-vacuum cleaning technique was applied to titanium parts prior to welding. This provides oxide-free welding surfaces. Diffusion welding can be accomplished in as little as five minutes of hot pressing. Roll welding can be accomplished with only ten percent deformation.

  15. Microstructure and Plastic Deformation of the As-Welded Invar Fusion Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, D. J.; Zhou, D. R.; Xu, P. Q.; Lu, F. G.

    2017-02-01

    The as-welded Invar fusion zones were fabricated between cemented carbides and carbon steel using a Fe-Ni Invar interlayer and laser welding method. Three regions in the as-welded Invar fusion zones were defined to compare microstructures, and these were characterized and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. The structure and plastic deformation mechanism for initial Invar Fe-Ni alloys and the as-welded Invar fusion zones are discussed. (1) After undergoing high-temperature thermal cycles, the microstructure of the as-welded Invar fusion zones contains γ-(Fe, Ni) solid solution (nickel dissolving in γ-Fe) with a face-centered cubic (fcc) crystal structure and mixed carbides (eutectic colonies, mixed carbides between two adjacent grains). The mixed carbides exhibited larger, coarser eutectic microstructures with a decrease in welding speed and an increase in heat input. (2) The structure of the initial Invar and the as-welded Invar is face-centered cubic γ-(Fe, Ni). (3) The as-welded Invar has a larger plastic deformation than initial Invar with an increase in local strain field and dislocation density. Slip deformation is propagated along the (111) plane. This finding helps us to understand microstructure and the formation of dislocation and plastic deformation when the Invar Fe-Ni alloy undergoes a high-temperature process.

  16. Microstructure and Plastic Deformation of the As-Welded Invar Fusion Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, D. J.; Zhou, D. R.; Xu, P. Q.; Lu, F. G.

    2017-05-01

    The as-welded Invar fusion zones were fabricated between cemented carbides and carbon steel using a Fe-Ni Invar interlayer and laser welding method. Three regions in the as-welded Invar fusion zones were defined to compare microstructures, and these were characterized and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. The structure and plastic deformation mechanism for initial Invar Fe-Ni alloys and the as-welded Invar fusion zones are discussed. (1) After undergoing high-temperature thermal cycles, the microstructure of the as-welded Invar fusion zones contains γ-(Fe, Ni) solid solution (nickel dissolving in γ-Fe) with a face-centered cubic (fcc) crystal structure and mixed carbides (eutectic colonies, mixed carbides between two adjacent grains). The mixed carbides exhibited larger, coarser eutectic microstructures with a decrease in welding speed and an increase in heat input. (2) The structure of the initial Invar and the as-welded Invar is face-centered cubic γ-(Fe, Ni). (3) The as-welded Invar has a larger plastic deformation than initial Invar with an increase in local strain field and dislocation density. Slip deformation is propagated along the (111) plane. This finding helps us to understand microstructure and the formation of dislocation and plastic deformation when the Invar Fe-Ni alloy undergoes a high-temperature process.

  17. Performance Improvement of Friction Stir Welds by Better Surface Finish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Sam; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    The as-welded friction stir weld has a cross section that may act as a stress concentrator. The geometry associated with the stress concentration may reduce the weld strength and it makes the weld challenging to inspect with ultrasound. In some cases, the geometry leads to false positive nondestructive evaluation (NDE) indications and, in many cases, it requires manual blending to facilitate the inspection. This study will measure the stress concentration effect and develop an improved phased array ultrasound testing (PAUT) technique for friction stir welding. Post-welding, the friction stir weld (FSW) tool would be fitted with an end mill that would machine the weld smooth, trimmed shaved. This would eliminate the need for manual weld preparation for ultrasonic inspections. Manual surface preparation is a hand operation that varies widely depending on the person preparing the welds. Shaving is a process that can be automated and tightly controlled.

  18. METHOD OF OBTAINING AN IMPROVED WELD IN INERT ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1962-12-11

    A method is reported for inert arc welding. An a-c welding current is applied to the workpiece and welding electrode such that the positive portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode positive, has only sufficient energy to clean the surface of the workpiece and the negative portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode negative, contains the energy required to weld. (AEC)

  19. Pre-weld heat treatment improves welds in Rene 41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prager, M.

    1968-01-01

    Cooling of Rene 41 prior to welding reduces the incidence of cracking during post-weld heat treatment. The microstructure formed during the slow cooling rate favors elevated temperature ductility. Some vestiges of this microstructure are apparently retained during welding and thus enhance strain-age crack resistance in air.

  20. Microstructures and microhardness at fusion boundary of 316 stainless steel/Inconel 182 dissimilar welding

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Lu, Yonghao; Ding, Xianfei; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2015-09-15

    Microstructures and microhardness at fusion boundary of a weld joint were investigated in a 316 stainless steel/Inconel 182 dissimilar weldment. The results showed that there were two alternately distributed typical fusion boundaries, a narrow random boundary (possessed 15% in length) with a clear sharp interface and an epitaxial fusion one with (100){sub BM}//(100){sub WM} at the joint interface. The composition transition, microstructure and hardness across the fusion boundary strongly depended on the type of the fusion boundary. For the random boundary, there was a clear sharp interface and the composition transition with a width of 100 μm took place symmetrically across the grain boundary. For the epitaxial fusion one, however, there were Type-I and Type-II grain boundaries perpendicular and parallel to the epitaxial fusion boundary, respectively. The composition transition took place in the Inconel 182 weld side. Σ3 boundaries in the HAZ of 316SS side and Σ5 grain boundaries in weld metal were usually observed, despite the type of fusion boundary, however the former was much more in epitaxial fusion boundary. Microhardness was continuously decreased across the random fusion boundary from the side of Inconel 182 to 316SS, but a hardening phenomenon appeared in the epitaxial fusion boundary zone because of its fine cellular microstructure. - Highlights: • Two typical fusion boundaries alternately distributed in the fusion interface • The microstructure, composition and hardness across fusion boundary depended on its type. • Different regions in welded joint have different special CSL value boundaries. • Hardening phenomenon only appeared in the epitaxial fusion boundary.

  1. Filler wire for aluminum alloys and method of welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Jr., Gerald W. O. (Inventor); Cho, Alex (Inventor); Russell, Carolyn K. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A weld filler wire chemistry has been developed for fusion welding 2195 aluminum-lithium. The weld filler wire chemistry is an aluminum-copper based alloy containing high additions of titanium and zirconium. The additions of titanium and zirconium reduce the crack susceptibility of aluminum alloy welds while producing good weld mechanical properties. The addition of silver further improves the weld properties of the weld filler wire. The reduced weld crack susceptibility enhances the repair weldability, including when planishing is required.

  2. Fusion welding studies using laser on Ti-SS dissimilar combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugarajan, B.; Padmanabham, G.

    2012-11-01

    Laser welding investigations were carried out on dissimilar Ti-SS combination. The study is aimed to improve the weld strength and ductility by minimizing harmful intermetallics and taking advantage of high cooling rates in laser welding. Results of continuous wave 3.5 kW CO2 laser welding of totally dissimilar combination of Titanium and stainless steel (304) have been discussed. Bead on plate welding experiments were conducted to identify the laser welding parameters using depth of penetration as criteria. The welding of dissimilar combination has been attempted both autogenously and with interlayers such as Vanadium (V) and Tantalum (Ta) in the form of laser cladding as well as strip. Autogenous welds were carried out by varying the laser power, welding speed and position of the laser beam with respect to the joint centre. The resultant welds are characterized by macrostructure analysis, SEM/EDAX and XRD and as welded tensile test in UTM. The autogenous welds have exhibited extensive cracking even when welded at high speeds or by manipulating the beam position with respect to the joint. Similarly Vandaium as interlayer could not achieve crack free joint. A joint with 40 MPa strength could be made with Ta as interlayer. Results and analysis of these variants of laser welded joints are reported and discussed.

  3. Repair welding of fusion reactor components. Second year technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, B.A.

    1993-05-15

    Experiments have shown that irradiated Type 316 stainless steel is susceptible to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) cracking upon cooling when welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process under lateral constraint. The cracking has been hypothesized to be caused by stress-assisted helium bubble growth and rupture at grain boundaries. This study utilized an experimental welding setup which enabled different compressive stresses to be applied to the plates during welding. Autogenous GTA welds were produced in Type 316 stainless steel doped with 256 appm helium. The application of a compressive stress, 55 MPa, during welding suppressed the previously observed catastrophic cracking. Detailed examinations conducted after welding showed a dramatic change in helium bubble morphology. Grain boundary bubble growth along directions parallel to the weld was suppressed. Results suggest that stress-modified welding techniques may be used to suppress or eliminate helium-induced cracking during joining of irradiated materials.

  4. The effects of welded joint characteristics on its properties in HDPE thermal fusion welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hongbin; Peng, Jun

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, PE100 pipes with the diameter of 200 mm and the thickness of 11.9 mm were used as material. The welded joints were obtained in different welding pressures with the optimal welding temperature of 220∘C. Reheating process on the welded joints with the temperature of 130∘C was carried out. The joints exhibited X-type, and the cause of X-type joints was discussed. The temperature field in the forming process of welded joints was measured, and tensile and bending tests on welded joints were carried out. The fracture surface of welded joints was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and crystallinity calculation was taken by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mechanism of X-type weld profile effects on welded joints properties was analyzed. It was concluded that the mechanical properties of welded joints decrease with the reduced X distance between lines.

  5. Microstructure characterization of laser welded Ti-6Al-4V fusion zones

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Pei-quan; Li, Leijun Zhang, Chunbo

    2014-01-15

    The as-welded microstructure of laser-welded Ti-6Al-4V is characterized as a function of CO2 key-hole mode laser welding speed. Martensitic α′ is the predominant phase, with some α and retained β. Phase transformation is affected by the cooling rate through laser welding speed. A higher welding speed of 1.6 to 2.0 m/min produced more martensite α′ and less retained β in the welds. 1.4 m/min welding speed produced small amounts of α, besides the martensite α′. A trace of δ titanium hydride phase seems to have formed in the weld fusion zone. Moiré fringes are a common feature in the TEM microstructure, due to abundance of multi-phase interfaces. Tensile twins and clusters of dislocations indicate that plastic deformation has happened in the as-welded microstructure, indicating the local stress levels to be approaching the yield stress on-cooling during laser welding.

  6. Hydrogen-induced cracking along the fusion boundary of dissimilar metal welds

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, M.D.; Nelson, T.W.; Lippold, J.C.

    1999-02-01

    Presented here are the results from a series of experiments in which dissimilar metals welds were made using the gas tungsten arc welding process with pure argon or argon-6% hydrogen shielding gas. The objective was to determine if cracking near the fusion boundary of dissimilar metal welds could be caused by hydrogen absorbed during welding and to characterize the microstructures in which cracking occurred. Welds consisted of ER308 and ER309LSi austenitic stainless steel and ERNiCr-3-nickel-based filler metals deposited on A36 steel base metal. Cracking was observed in welds made with all three filler metals. A ferrofluid color metallography technique revealed that cracking was confined to regions in the weld metal containing martensite. Microhardness indentations indicated that martensitic regions in which cracking occurred had hardness values from 400 to 550 HV. Cracks did not extend into bulk weld metal with hardness less than 350 HV. Martensite formed near the fusion boundary in all three filler metals due to regions of locally increased base metal dilution.

  7. Verifying root fusion in electron-beam welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, F. L.; Doctor, S.; Kleint, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Ultrasonic equipment and x-y recorder indicate where back side of joint is properly welded. Wire waveguide placed in groove at root of joint to be welded is fused when joint is adequately penetrated. Ultransonic signal moving down waveguide is reflected where guide is melted. Change in reflected-signal arrival time with change in weld-head position is nearly constant unless joint is incompletely penetrated. Method permits determination of penetration depth in preweld samples without opening vacuum chamber and sectioning weld. Technique is particularly valuable when back side of joint is inaccessible.

  8. Verifying root fusion in electron-beam welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, F. L.; Doctor, S.; Kleint, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Ultrasonic equipment and x-y recorder indicate where back side of joint is properly welded. Wire waveguide placed in groove at root of joint to be welded is fused when joint is adequately penetrated. Ultransonic signal moving down waveguide is reflected where guide is melted. Change in reflected-signal arrival time with change in weld-head position is nearly constant unless joint is incompletely penetrated. Method permits determination of penetration depth in preweld samples without opening vacuum chamber and sectioning weld. Technique is particularly valuable when back side of joint is inaccessible.

  9. Effect of minor chemistry elements on GTA weld fusion zone characteristics of a commercial grade titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Marya, S.K.

    1996-06-01

    Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) is the most common technique employed in the fabrication of rolled thin tubes. One of the major manufacturing problems concerns the stability of weld fusion zone on materials from different casts, notwithstanding stringent monitoring of the process parameters -- current, voltage and travel speed. These parameters determine the theoretical weld heat and are expected to control the instantaneous mass of melt. According to the data compiled by Sahoo et al., oxygen is known to reduce the surface tension of most of the metals. However, investigations on the role of minor changes in concentrations of elements like sulphur, oxygen, selenium, bismuth, aluminium, and titanium in steels have very often attributed the cast to cast variations to different temperature gradients of surface tension over the weldpool. To the author`s knowledge, no reported work so far has revealed changing weld profiles in autogeneous mechanized GTA welds on titanium due to minor composition changes.

  10. Thick SS316 materials TIG welding development activities towards advanced fusion reactor vacuum vessel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B. Ramesh; Gangradey, R.

    2012-11-01

    Advanced fusion reactors like ITER and up coming Indian DEMO devices are having challenges in terms of their materials design and fabrication procedures. The operation of these devices is having various loads like structural, thermo-mechanical and neutron irradiation effects on major systems like vacuum vessel, divertor, magnets and blanket modules. The concept of double wall vacuum vessel (VV) is proposed in view of protecting of major reactor subsystems like super conducting magnets, diagnostic systems and other critical components from high energy 14 MeV neutrons generated from fusion plasma produced by D-T reactions. The double walled vacuum vessel is used in combination with pressurized water circulation and some special grade borated steel blocks to shield these high energy neutrons effectively. The fabrication of sub components in VV are mainly used with high thickness SS materials in range of 20 mm- 60 mm of various grades based on the required protocols. The structural components of double wall vacuum vessel uses various parts like shields, ribs, shells and diagnostic vacuum ports. These components are to be developed with various welding techniques like TIG welding, Narrow gap TIG welding, Laser welding, Hybrid TIG laser welding, Electron beam welding based on requirement. In the present paper the samples of 20 mm and 40 mm thick SS 316 materials are developed with TIG welding process and their mechanical properties characterization with Tensile, Bend tests and Impact tests are carried out. In addition Vickers hardness tests and microstructural properties of Base metal, Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and Weld Zone are done. TIG welding application with high thick SS materials in connection with vacuum vessel requirements and involved criticalities towards welding process are highlighted.

  11. Fracture evaluations of fusion line cracks in nuclear pipe bimetallic welds

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, P.; Francini, R.; Rahman, S.; Rosenfield, A.; Wilkowski, G.

    1995-04-01

    In both BWRs and PWRs there are many locations where carbon steel pipe or components are joined to stainless steel pipe or components with a bimetallic weld. The objective of the research described in this report was to assess the accuracy of current fracture analyses for the case of a crack along a carbon steel to austenitic weld fusion line. To achieve the program objective, material property data and data from a large-diameter pipe fracture experiment were developed to assess current analytical methods. The bimetallic welds evaluated in this program were bimetallic welds obtained from a cancelled Combustion Engineering plant. The welds joined sections of the carbon steel cold-leg piping system to stainless steel safe ends that were to be welded to stainless steel pump housings. The major conclusion drawn as a result of these efforts was that the fracture behavior of the bimetallic weld evaluated in this program could be evaluated with reasonable accuracy using the strength and toughness properties of the carbon steel pipe material in conjunction with conventional elastic-plastic fracture mechanics or limit-load analyses. This may not be generally true for all bimetallic welds, as discussed in this report.

  12. Numerical analysis of the heat transfer and fluid flow in the butt-fusion welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jae Hyun; Choi, Sunwoong; Nam, Jaewook; Ahn, Kyung Hyun; Oh, Ju Seok

    2017-02-01

    Butt-fusion welding is an effective process for welding polymeric pipes. The process can be simplified into two stages. In heat soak stage, the pipe is heated using a hot plate contacted with one end of the pipe. In jointing stage, a pair of heated pipes is compressed against one another so that the melt regions become welded. In previous works, the jointing stage that is highly related to the welding quality was neglected. However, in this study, a finite element simulation is conducted including the jointing stage. The heat and momentum transfer are considered altogether. A new numerical scheme to describe the melt flow and pipe deformation for the butt-fusion welding process is introduced. High density polyethylene (HDPE) is used for the material. Flow via thermal expansion of the heat soak stage, and squeezing and fountain flow of the jointing stage are well reproduced. It is also observed that curling beads are formed and encounter the pipe body. The unique contribution of this study is its capability of directly observing the flow behaviors that occur during the jointing stage and relating them to welding quality.

  13. Tests show that aluminum welds are improved by bead removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, D. W.

    1967-01-01

    Tests with 2218-T87 aluminum alloy plate indicate improvements in strength, ductility, fatigue properties, and burst pressure result when one or both of the top and bottom weld beads are removed. There is, however, a drop in yield strength. The consistency of test data is considerably improved by weld bead removal.

  14. Solid-state and fusion resistance spot welding of TD-NiCr sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    By using specially processed TD-NiCr sheet in both 0.4-mm (0.015-in.) and 1.6-mm (0.062-in.) thicknesses and carefully selected welding procedures, solid state resistance spot welds were produced which, after postheating at 1200 C, were indistinguishable from the parent material. Stress-rupture shear tests of single-spot lap joints in 0.4-mm (0.015-in.) thick sheet showed that these welds were as strong as the parent material. Similar results were obtained in tensile-shear tests at room temperature and 1100 C and in fatigue tests. Conventional fusion spot welds in commercial sheet were unsatisfactory because of poor stress-rupture shear properties resulting from metallurgical damage to the parent material.

  15. [Element distribution analysis of welded fusion zone by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Zhang, Yong; Jia, Yun-Hai; Wang, Hai-Zhou

    2014-04-01

    Over the past decade there has been intense activity in the study and development of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). As a new tool for surface microanalysis, it caused widespread in materials science because of the advantage of rapid and high sensitivity. In the present paper, the distribution of Ni, Mn, C and Si near weld fusion line was analyzed on two kinds of weld sample. Line scanning mode analysis was carried out by three different kinds of methods, namely laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM/EDS) and electron probe X-ray microanalyser (EPMA). The concentration variation trend of Ni and Mn acquired by LIBS is coincident with SEM/EDS and EPMA. The result shows that the content of Ni and Mn was significantly different between weld seam and base metal on both the samples. The content of Ni and Mn was much higher in weld seam than in base metal, and a sharp concentration gradient was analyzed in the fusion zone. According to the distribution of Ni and Mn, all the three methods got a similar value of welded fusion zone width. The concentration variation trend of C and Si acquired by LIBS is not coincident with SEM/EDS and EPMA. The concentration difference between weld seam and base metal was analyzed by LIBS, but had not by SEM/EDS and EPMA, because of the low concentration and slight difference. The concentration gradient of C and Si in fusion zone was shows clearly by LIBS. For higher sensitivity performance, LIBS is much more adapted to analyze low content element than SEM/EDS and EPMA.

  16. Reduced heat input keyhole welding through improved joint design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, John M. (Inventor); Harwig, Dennis D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An improved high energy density welding method for reducing input keyhole welding prepares the weld joint (8) between two edges (10, 14) of at least one member by separating the edges (10, 14) of the member (12, 16) with a controllable gap (22) by a projecting portion (24) selectively positioned on one edge (10, 14) of the member (12, 16). The projecting portion (24) closely abuts the other edge of the member for maintaining the controlled distance (d) of the controllable gap (22) to enhance the welding method.

  17. Precipitation behavior of σ phase in fusion zone of dissimilar stainless steel welds during multi-pass GTAW process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chih-Chun; Chang, Tao-Chih; Lin, Dong-Yih; Chen, Ming-Che; Wu, Weite

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the precipitation characteristics of σ phase in the fusion zone of stainless steel welds at various welding passes during a tungsten are welding (GTAW) process. The morphology, quantity, and chemical composition of the δ-ferrite and σ phase were analyzed using optical microscopy (OM), a ferritscope (FS), a X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), an electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA), and a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS), respectively. Massive δ-ferrite was observed in the fusion zone of the first pass welds during welding of dissimilar stainless steels. The σ phase precipitated at the inner δ-ferrite particles and decreased δ-ferrite content during the third pass welding. The σ and δ phases can be stabilized by Si element, which promoted the phase transformation of σ→ϱ+λ2 in the fusion zone of the third pass welds. It was found that the σ phase was a Fe-Cr-Si intermetallic compound found in the fusion zone of the third pass welds during multi-pass welding.

  18. Microstructural evolution of fusion zone in laser beam welds of pure titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.; Nakata, K.; Zhang, J.X.; Yamamoto, N.; Liao, J.

    2012-03-15

    Microstructural evolution of fusion zone in laser beam welds of pure titanium was studied by means of electron backscattering diffraction. The microstructural evolution is strongly affected by the {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation mechanism dependent on the cooling rate during phase transformation. The long-range diffusional transformation mainly occurs in the fusion zone at the low cooling rate, and the massive transformation dominantly takes place at the high cooling rate. For this reason, the grain morphologies probably change from the granular-like to columnar-like grains with the cooling rate increasing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructures of fusion zone in laser beam welds of pure titanium are studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing cooling rate changes grain morphology from granular to columnar one. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Final microstructures depend on the {beta}{yields}{alpha} transformation mechanisms.

  19. Defect Detectability Improvement for Conventional Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate the effects of defect detectability via phased array ultrasound technology in conventional friction stir welds by comparing conventionally prepped post weld surfaces to a machined surface finish. A machined surface is hypothesized to improve defect detectability and increase material strength.

  20. Microstructural analysis of laser weld fusion zone in Haynes 282 superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Osoba, L.O.; Ding, R.G.; Ojo, O.A.

    2012-03-15

    Analytical electron microscopy and spectroscopy analyses of the fusion zone (FZ) microstructure in autogenous laser beam welded Haynes 282 (HY 282) superalloy were performed. The micro-segregation patterns observed in the FZ indicate that Co, Cr and Al exhibited a nearly uniform distribution between the dendrite core and interdendritic regions while Ti and Mo were rejected into the interdendritic liquid during the weld solidification. Transmission electron diffraction analysis and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis revealed the second phase particles formed along the FZ interdendritic region to be Ti-Mo rich MC-type carbide particles. Weld FZ solidification cracking, which is sometimes associated with the formation of {gamma}-{gamma}' eutectic in {gamma}' precipitation strengthened nickel-base superalloys, was not observed in the HY 282 superalloy. Modified primary solidification path due to carbon addition in the newly developed superalloy is used to explain preclusion of weld FZ solidification cracking in the material. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A newly developed superalloy was welded by CO{sub 2} laser beam joining technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron microscopy characterization of the weld microstructure was performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identified interdendritic microconstituents consist of MC-type carbides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modification of primary solidification path is used to explain cracking resistance.

  1. Fusion welding of advanced borated stainless steels. Final report: CRADA No. CR1042

    SciTech Connect

    Robino, C.V.; Cieslak, M.J.

    1994-02-01

    This work addressed two major areas concerning joining of advanced borated stainless steels. These areas included the development of a understanding of the physical metallurgy of borated stainless steels and the development of welding processes and post-weld heat treatments for these alloys. Differential thermal analysis experiments were conducted on ten heats of borated stainless steel to determine the transformation temperatures and melting behavior of the alloys. On-heating solidus temperatures were measured for all of the alloys and were used to define the temperatures associated with the fusion line during welding. Isothermal heat treatments designed to evaluate the effects of elevated temperature exposures on the toughness of the borated grades were conducted. These tests were used to determine if significant changes in the microstructure or mechanical properties of weld heat-affected zones (HAZ) occur. Specifically, the tests addressed the solid-state region of the HAZ. The test matrix included a variety of alloy compositions and thermal exposures at temperatures near the on-heating solidus (as determined by the DTA experiments). Welding experiments designed to assess the mechanical properties and microstructure of gas-tungsten arc and electron beam welds were conducted.

  2. Improvement of reliability of welding by in-process sensing and control (development of smart welding machines for girth welding of pipes). Third progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Converti, J.; Dror, Y.; Hardt, D.; Liang, S.; Masubuchi, K.; Moore, J.; Paynter, H.; Unkel, W.; Zacksenhouse, M.

    1981-06-01

    This two part progress report covers work from March 16, 1980 to March 15, 1981. The overall objective of this program is to improve the reliability of welding by developing smart welding machines. In addition to exercising strict control of the welding machinery, the smart welding machine exercises real-time, closed-loop control of the weld itself. The weld quality, for the work to date, has been defined in terms of acceptable (full) penetration and weld bead width. Metallurgical defects, gas inclusions and oxidation/wetting problems have not been considered explicitly. Although the concepts and techniques developed have general application to the welding field, the program is focused specifically toward the welding of pipes. Further, the present work condentrates on the root pass(es) using GTAW rather than on the filling process using GMAW.

  3. Effects of Friction Stir Processing on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Fusion Welded 304L Stainless Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Effects of Friction Stir Processing on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Fusion Welded 304L Stainless Steel C.J. Sterling1, T.W...Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Fusion Welded 304L Stainless Steel 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Nelson1, C.D. Sorensen1 and M. Posada2 1Department of Mechanical Engineering Brigham Young University 435 CTB Provo, UT, 84602, USA 2Naval Surface

  4. Microstructural Study Of Fusion Welds in 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn Stainless Steels (U)

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL, TOSTEN

    2005-03-01

    Light-optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been employed to characterize the microstructures of a series of fusion welds made on 304L and 21-6-9 stainless steels. The materials investigated in this study included high-energy-rate-forged 304L, conventionally forged 21-6-9, and 304L weld critical plate (higher ferrite potential). The weld critical plate contained an electron beam weld (no filler wire) while other specimens were welded with various combinations of 308L, 309L modified (MOD) and 312 MOD stainless steel filler wires to produce samples with a range of delta ferrite contents (4 to 33 percent) in the resulting welds. TEM specimens were prepared from broken arc-shaped, mechanical property test specimens that had been used to measure fracture toughness of the fusion welds. Specimens were prepared from regions of the weld heat-affected zones as well as from areas within the weld metal, including areas close to the fracture surface (plastically deformed regions). The observed microstructures varied according to the amount of ferrite in each weld. At the lowest ferrite levels the microstructure consisted of austenite and skeletal ferrite with austenite being the majority (matrix) phase. At intermediate levels of ferrite, lathy austenite/ferrite was observed and the ferrite became continuous throughout the specimens examined. In the weld with the most ferrite, many austenite morphologies were observed and ferrite was the matrix phase. Closest to the fracture surface an increase in dislocation density in both the ferrite and austenite were observed in all welds. Deformation twinning was also observed in the austenite. Many of the welds contained a large number of non-metallic inclusions (oxide particles) which most likely originated from impurities in the weld wires.

  5. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  6. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  7. FCAW orbital pipe welding technology improves fab shop productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Emmerson, J.G.

    1999-11-01

    Fabricators, like all companies facing increasing competition, are reevaluating and redesigning work flow and plant layout, and implementing new techniques to improve productivity and reduce work-in-process times. Submerged arc welding (SAW) has been widely used for years to produce high-quality mechanized butt joint welds in pipe, but requires workpieces to be rotated under a fixed torch. Submerged arc welding can provide high deposition rates, but requires considerable capital expenditures for turning rolls and positioners, especially if the pipe work consists of larger-diameter pipe, long lengths and heavy assemblies. Spool pieces with complex or asymmetrical configurations (elbows, for example) often cannot be conveniently rotated without special and time-consuming fixturing. Many assemblies may consist of pipe connections that must be made in position. Traditionally, these welds have been made using manual techniques: shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or a combination of processes by skilled welders. With the growing shortage of skilled welders worldwide, fabricators are increasingly evaluating different processes and techniques to compensate for less-skilled welders or to improve the productivity of their skilled work force. One technique increasingly being used in mechanized orbital flux cored arc welding (FCAW). FCAW might be thought of as the submerged arc process turned inside out. With SAW, a solid wire electrode is simultaneously fed into the weld pool along with powdered flux. Instead of solid wire, FCAW substitutes a metal tube or sheath, wrapped around a core of flux. The orbital systems on the market today use additional gas shielding of the weld pool. All-position FCAW wires are formulated with fluxing agents that promote rapid pool solidification, which allow welds to be made in all positions.

  8. Customized orbital welding meets the challenge of titanium welding

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Titanium has emerged as the material of choice for tubing used in surface condensers around the world in both new and retrofit configurations. A major worldwide supplier of steam surface condensers to the electric utility industry, Senior Engineering is finding an increased use of titanium tubes and tube sheets in condenser specifications. When compared to other alloys, titanium`s light weight is efficient in design, handling, transportation and installation activities. Additionally, it maintains a stable price structure. Senior Engineering implements an orbital welding process using fusion gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) for its titanium tube-to-tube sheet welding. Orbital welding involves the use of a welding apparatus placed inside a tube or pipe to automatically and precisely weld a 360-deg joint. When welding manually, a welder stops several times during the weld due to the large amount of time and fatigue involved in achieving 360-deg welds, which results in lack of fusion. An automated orbital welding system, however, can accomplish the task as one continuous weld. This reduces process time and decreases lack of fusion. The orbital welding systems, featuring a microprocessor-based controller, an inverter-based power supply, an expandable mandrel and a customized torch shroud, reduced welding labor by 35%. The improved labor efficiency justified the addition of two more of the systems in January 1996.

  9. Microstructural Evolution of INCONEL® Alloy 740H® Fusion Welds During Creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechetti, Daniel H.; DuPont, John N.; de Barbadillo, John J.; Baker, Brian A.; Watanabe, Masashi

    2015-02-01

    Electron microscopy techniques have been used to investigate the cause of premature creep failure in the fusion zone of INCONEL® Alloy 740H® (INCONEL and 740H are registered trademarks of Special Metals Corporation) welds. The reduced creep rupture lives of all-weld-metal and cross-weld creep specimens (relative to base metal specimens) have been attributed to the presence of large grain boundary regions that were denuded in fine γ' but contained coarse, elongated particles. Investigation of creep rupture specimens has revealed four factors that influence the formation of these coarsened zones, and the large particles found within them have been identified as γ'. Comparisons of the microstructural characteristics of these zones to the characteristics that are typical of denuded zones formed by a variety of mechanisms identified in the literature have been made. It is concluded that the mechanism of γ'-denuded zone formation in alloy 740H is discontinuous coarsening of the γ' phase. The discontinuous reaction is catalyzed by the grain boundary migration and sliding which occur during creep and likely promoted by the inhomogeneous weld metal microstructure that results from solute segregation during solidification. The increased susceptibility to the formation of the observed γ'-denuded zones in the weld metal as compared to the base metal is discussed in the context of differences in the contributions to the driving force for the discontinuous coarsening reaction.

  10. Effects of Fusion Zone Size on Failure Modes and Performance of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2006-04-28

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using the limit load based analytical model and the micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that the conventional weld size of 4 t can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials. The results also suggest that performance based spot weld acceptance criteria should be developed for different AHSS spot welds.

  11. Material property evaluations of bimetallic welds, stainless steel saw fusion lines, and materials affected by dynamic strain aging

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.; Scott, P.; Marschall, C.; Wilkowski, G.

    1997-04-01

    Pipe fracture analyses can often reasonably predict the behavior of flawed piping. However, there are material applications with uncertainties in fracture behavior. This paper summarizes work on three such cases. First, the fracture behavior of bimetallic welds are discussed. The purpose of the study was to determine if current fracture analyses can predict the response of pipe with flaws in bimetallic welds. The weld joined sections of A516 Grade 70 carbon steel to F316 stainless steel. The crack was along the carbon steel base metal to Inconel 182 weld metal fusion line. Material properties from tensile and C(T) specimens were used to predict large pipe response. The major conclusion from the work is that fracture behavior of the weld could be evaluated with reasonable accuracy using properties of the carbon steel pipe and conventional J-estimation analyses. However, results may not be generally true for all bimetallic welds. Second, the toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines is discussed. During large-scale pipe tests with flaws in the center of the SAW, the crack tended to grow into the fusion line. The fracture toughness of the base metal, the SAW, and the fusion line were determined and compared. The major conclusion reached is that although the fusion line had a higher initiation toughness than the weld metal, the fusion-line J-R curve reached a steady-state value while the SAW J-R curve increased. Last, carbon steel fracture experiments containing circumferential flaws with periods of unstable crack jumps during steady ductile tearing are discussed. These instabilities are believed to be due to dynamic strain aging (DSA). The paper discusses DSA, a screening criteria developed to predict DSA, and the ability of the current J-based methodologies to assess the effect of these crack instabilities. The effect of loading rate on the strength and toughness of several different carbon steel pipes at LWR temperatures is also discussed.

  12. Improved Assembly for Gas Shielding During Welding or Brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul; Baker, Kevin; Weeks, Jack

    2009-01-01

    An improved assembly for inert-gas shielding of a metallic joint is designed to be useable during any of a variety of both laser-based and traditional welding and brazing processes. The basic purpose of this assembly or of a typical prior related assembly is to channel the flow of a chemically inert gas to a joint to prevent environmental contamination of the joint during the welding or brazing process and, if required, to accelerate cooling upon completion of the process.

  13. Microstructural Evolution and Creep Rupture Behavior of INCONEL RTM Alloy 740H Fusion Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechetti, Daniel H., Jr.

    Electron microscopy techniques were used to investigate the causes of reduced creep-rupture life in INCONEL® alloy 740H ® fusion welds with a specific focus on understanding the formation and evolution of γ'-free zones along grain boundaries. Investigation of creep-rupture specimens revealed four operational factors that influence the formation of these precipitate-free zones, and the identity of large second phase particles typically found within them has been determined. A stress-free aging has demonstrated the influence of stress on the formation of the precipitate-free regions and has illustrated what appear to be the initial stages of their development. It is concluded that the mechanism of precipitate-free zone formation in alloy 740H is moderate discontinuous precipitation accompanied by significant discontinuous growth of the γ' phase. These discontinuous reactions are likely exacerbated by microsegregation within the welded microstructure and by the mechanical deformation associated with grain boundary sliding during creep. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling were used to determine appropriate heat treatment schedules for homogenization and second phase dissolution of welds in alloy 740H. Following these simulations, a two-step heat treatment process was applied to specimens from a single pass gas tungsten arc weld (GTAW). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been used to assess the changes in the distribution of alloying elements as well as changes in the fraction of second phase particles within the fusion zone. Experimental results demonstrate that homogenization of alloy 740H weld metal can be achieved by an 1100°C/4hr treatment. Complete dissolution of second phase particles could not be completely achieved, even at exposure to temperatures near the alloy's solidus temperature. These results are in good agreement with thermodynamic and kinetic predictions.

  14. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  15. Sensoring Fusion Data from the Optic and Acoustic Emissions of Electric Arcs in the GMAW-S Process for Welding Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro, Sadek Crisóstomo Absi; Cayo, Eber Huanca

    2012-01-01

    The present study shows the relationship between welding quality and optical-acoustic emissions from electric arcs, during welding runs, in the GMAW-S process. Bead on plate welding tests was carried out with pre-set parameters chosen from manufacturing standards. During the welding runs interferences were induced on the welding path using paint, grease or gas faults. In each welding run arc voltage, welding current, infrared and acoustic emission values were acquired and parameters such as arc power, acoustic peaks rate and infrared radiation rate computed. Data fusion algorithms were developed by assessing known welding quality parameters from arc emissions. These algorithms have showed better responses when they are based on more than just one sensor. Finally, it was concluded that there is a close relation between arc emissions and quality in welding and it can be measured from arc emissions sensing and data fusion algorithms. PMID:22969330

  16. Sensoring fusion data from the optic and acoustic emissions of electric arcs in the GMAW-S process for welding quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Sadek Crisóstomo Absi; Cayo, Eber Huanca

    2012-01-01

    The present study shows the relationship between welding quality and optical-acoustic emissions from electric arcs, during welding runs, in the GMAW-S process. Bead on plate welding tests was carried out with pre-set parameters chosen from manufacturing standards. During the welding runs interferences were induced on the welding path using paint, grease or gas faults. In each welding run arc voltage, welding current, infrared and acoustic emission values were acquired and parameters such as arc power, acoustic peaks rate and infrared radiation rate computed. Data fusion algorithms were developed by assessing known welding quality parameters from arc emissions. These algorithms have showed better responses when they are based on more than just one sensor. Finally, it was concluded that there is a close relation between arc emissions and quality in welding and it can be measured from arc emissions sensing and data fusion algorithms.

  17. Fusion boundary precipitation in thermally aged dissimilar metal welds studied by atom probe tomography and nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Taeho; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Seunghyun; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-04-01

    In this study, microstructural and mechanical characterizations were performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the fusion boundary region between low-alloy steel and Nickel-based weld metal in dissimilar metal welds used in operating power plant systems. The effects of thermal aging treatment on the low-alloy steel side near the fusion boundary were an increase in the ratio of Cr constituents and Cr-rich precipitates and the formation and growth of Cr23C6. Cr concentrations were calculated using atom probe tomography. The accuracy of simulations of thermal aging effects of heat treatment was verified, and the activation energy for Cr diffusion in the fusion boundary region was calculated. The mechanical properties of fusion boundary region changed based on the distribution of Cr-rich precipitates, where the material initially hardened with the formation of Cr-rich precipitates and then softened because of the reduction of residual strain or coarsening of Cr-rich precipitates.

  18. Effect of electromagnetic interaction during fusion welding of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel on the corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Rentería, M. A.; López-Morelos, V. H.; González-Sánchez, J.; García-Hernández, R.; Dzib-Pérez, L.; Curiel-López, F. F.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of electromagnetic interaction of low intensity (EMILI) applied during fusion welding of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel on the resistance to localised corrosion in natural seawater was investigated. The heat affected zone (HAZ) of samples welded under EMILI showed a higher temperature for pitting initiation and lower dissolution under anodic polarisation in chloride containing solutions than samples welded without EMILI. The EMILI assisted welding process developed in the present work enhanced the resistance to localised corrosion due to a modification on the microstructural evolution in the HAZ and the fusion zone during the thermal cycle involved in fusion welding. The application of EMILI reduced the size of the HAZ, limited coarsening of the ferrite grains and promoted regeneration of austenite in this zone, inducing a homogeneous passive condition of the surface. EMILI can be applied during fusion welding of structural or functional components of diverse size manufactured with duplex stainless steel designed to withstand aggressive environments such as natural seawater or marine atmospheres.

  19. Welding Using Chilled-Inert-Gas Purging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes study of fusion welding using chilled inert gas. Marked improvement shown in welding of aluminum using chilled helium gas. Chilling inert gas produces two additional benefits: 1) creation of ultradense inert atmosphere around welds; 2) chilled gas cools metal more quickly down to temperature at which metals not reactive.

  20. Welding Using Chilled-Inert-Gas Purging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes study of fusion welding using chilled inert gas. Marked improvement shown in welding of aluminum using chilled helium gas. Chilling inert gas produces two additional benefits: 1) creation of ultradense inert atmosphere around welds; 2) chilled gas cools metal more quickly down to temperature at which metals not reactive.

  1. A method for studying weld fusion boundary microstructure evolution in aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kostrivas, A.; Lippold, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Aluminum alloys may exhibit a variety of microstructures within the fusion zone adjacent to the fusion boundary. Under conventional weld solidification conditions, epitaxial nucleation occurs off grains in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and solidification proceeds along preferred growth directions. In some aluminum alloys, such as those containing Li and Zr, a nondendritic equiaxed grain zone (EQZ) has been observed along the fusion boundary that does not nucleate epitaxially from the HAZ substrate. The EQZ has been the subject of considerable study because of its susceptibility to cracking during initial fabrication and repair. The motivation of this investigation was to develop a technique that would allow the nature and evolution of the fusion boundary to be studied under controlled thermal conditions. A melting technique was developed to simulate the fusion boundary of aluminum alloys using the Gleeble{reg{underscore}sign} thermal simulator. Using a steel sleeve to contain the aluminum, samples wee heated to incremental temperatures above the solidus temperature of a number of alloys. In Alloy 2195, a 4Cu-1Li alloy, an EQZ could be formed by heating in the temperature range approximately from 630--640 C. At temperatures above 640 C, solidification occurred by the normal epitaxial nucleation and growth mechanism. Fusion boundary behavior was also studied in Alloys 5454-H34, 6061-T6 and 2219-T8. Nucleation in these alloys was observed to be epitaxial. Details of the technique and its effectiveness for performing controlled melting experiments at incremental temperatures above the solidus are described.

  2. Nature and evolution of the fusion boundary in ferritic-austenitic dissimilar weld metals. Part 1 -- Nucleation and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, T.W.; Lippold, J.C.; Mills, M.J.

    1999-10-01

    A fundamental investigation of fusion boundary microstructure evolution in dissimilar-metal welds (DMWs) between ferritic base metals and a face-centered-cubic (FCC) filler metal was conducted. The objective of the work presented here was to characterize the nature and character of the elevated-temperature fusion boundary to determine the nucleation and growth characteristics of DMWs. Type 409 ferritic stainless steel and 1080 pearlitic steel were utilized as base metal substrates, and Monel (70Ni-30Cu) was used as the filler metal. The Type 409 base metal provided a fully ferritic or body-centered-cubic (BCC) substrate at elevated temperatures and exhibited no on-cooling phase transformations to mask or disguise the original character of the fusion boundary. The 1080 pearlitic steel was selected because it is austenitic at the solidus temperature, providing an austenite substrate at the fusion boundary. The weld microstructure generated with each of the base metals in combination with Monel was fully austenitic. In the Type 409/Monel system, there was no evidence of epitaxial nucleation and growth as normally observed in homogeneous weld metal combinations. The fusion boundary in this system exhibited random grain boundary misorientations between the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal grains. In the 1080/Monel system, evidence of normal epitaxial growth was observed at the fusion boundary, where solidification and HAZ grain boundaries converged. The fusion boundary morphologies are a result of the crystal structure present along the fusion boundary during the initial stages of solidification. Based on the results of this investigation, a model for heterogeneous nucleation along the fusion boundary is proposed when the base and weld metals exhibit ferritic (BCC) and FCC crystal structures, respectively.

  3. Microstructural Evolution and Creep-Rupture Behavior of A-USC Alloy Fusion Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechetti, Daniel H.; DuPont, John N.; Siefert, John A.; Shingledecker, John P.

    2016-09-01

    Characterization of the microstructural evolution of fusion welds in alloys slated for use in advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) boilers during creep has been performed. Creep-rupture specimens involving INCONEL® 740, NIMONIC® 263 (INCONEL and NIMONIC are registered trademarks of Special Metals Corporation), and Haynes® 282® (Haynes and 282 are registered trademarks of Haynes International) have been analyzed via light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermodynamic and kinetic modeling. Focus has been given to the microstructures that develop along the grain boundaries in these alloys during creep at temperatures relevant to the A-USC process cycle, and particular attention has been paid to any evidence of the formation of local γ'-denuded or γ'-free zones. This work has been performed in an effort to understand the microstructural changes that lead to a weld strength reduction factor (WSRF) in these alloys as compared to solution annealed and aged alloy 740 base metal. γ' precipitate-free zones have been identified in alloy 740 base metal, solution annealed alloy 740 weld metal, and alloy 263 weld metal after creep. Their development during long-term thermal exposure is correlated with the stabilization of phases that are rich in γ'-forming elements ( e.g., η and G) and is suppressed by precipitation of phases that do not contain the γ' formers ( e.g., M23C6 and μ). The location of failure and creep performance in terms of rupture life and WSRF for each welded joint is presented and discussed.

  4. Microstructural Evolution and Creep-Rupture Behavior of Fusion Welds Involving Alloys for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechetti, Daniel H., Jr.

    determine the correlation of discontinuous coarsening of the gamma' phase with time at temperature, creep strain, plastic prestrain, post-weld heat treatment, and compositional modification. The discontinuous coarsening reaction was shown to depend most strongly on the total strain experienced during creep. Post-weld homogenization and compositional modification had mixed effects on fusion weld rupture life and the rate of discontinuous coarsening. The differences in rupture life and discontinuous coarsening across a large matrix of creep specimens were related to the differences in strain at rupture and the relative ease of grain boundary motion in the samples. Finally, in-depth characterization of the discontinuous coarsening reaction products in alloy 740H creep specimens was performed. The effects of solute partitioning during non-equilibrium solidification on the variation in the volume fraction of strengthening precipitates along the length of the grain boundaries has been linked to the propensity for discontinuous coarsening. Evidence for the preferential development of discontinuous coarsening along grain boundary segments with sharp variations in gamma' content was presented. In addition, evidence for the preferred growth of colonies of discontinuous coarsening into regions of lower gamma' content was documented. Scanning transmission electron microscopy determined the compositions of the matrix and precipitate phases within the colonies and quantified the segregation of alloying elements to the reaction front. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling using commercially available software packages were leaned on extensively throughout this research, both as a way to provide theoretical bases for experimental observations and as a way to design and guide experimentation. Overall, the results presented in this work offer detailed observations on the evolution of deleterious grain boundary features in A-USC alloy fusion welds and provide insight for changes that may improve

  5. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 12-unit secondary course in welding. Purpose stated for the flexible entry and exit course is to help students master manipulative skills to develop successful welding techniques and to gain an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in the welding field. Units cover oxyacetylene…

  6. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 12-unit secondary course in welding. Purpose stated for the flexible entry and exit course is to help students master manipulative skills to develop successful welding techniques and to gain an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in the welding field. Units cover oxyacetylene…

  7. Welding and cutting characteristics of blanket/first wall module to back plate for fusion experimental reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroda, T.; Furuya, K.; Sato, S.

    1995-12-31

    A modular blanket/first wall has been proposed for a fusion experimental reactor, e.g., International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), with support ribs connecting to a strong back plate. For the connection method, a welding approach has been investigated. Welding and cutting tests of the support ribs have been performed with three types of test specimens; flat plate (200 mm x 400 mm), partial model (700 mm x 200 mm), and full-box model (600 mm x 1000 mm x 430 mm). The support ribs were made of type 316L austenitic stainless steel with the thickness of 50 mm in all these tests. The welding method applied to these tests was narrow gap TIG, and water jet for cutting. Through these tests, engineering data including optimum welding conditions, welding distortion, and welding/cutting speeds have been obtained. Transverse shrinkage was about 10 mm for the welding of 50 mm thick rib. However, the difference in distortion at the first wall surface was within 1--2 mm. Therefore, the blanket/first wall module can be installed with quite a high accuracy by taking into account the module moving to the back plate during the welding.

  8. Impact of improved confinement on fusion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Fukuyama, A.

    1990-12-01

    The effect of the improvement of the plasma confinement on fusion research is investigated for the ITER grade plasma. The impact of the confinement improvement is quantitatively evaluated from the viewpoints of necessity and cost, the engineering research and development, the economic potential, and reduction of the ambiguity in the design of future devices. It is shown that confinement improvement has a strong and favorable influence on these aspects.

  9. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using limit load based analytical model and micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials examined. The critical fusion zone size for nugget pullout shall be derived for individual materials based on different base metal properties as well as different heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld properties resulted from different welding parameters.

  10. New backup-bar groove configuration improves heliarc welding of 2014-T6 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. J.

    1966-01-01

    Backup chill bar with new grooved dimensions improve welding of 2014-T6 aluminum. This groove geometry affords optimum chilling characteristics, reduces shrinkage and the weld bead is narrower and consistently free from impurities or voids.

  11. Preventive strength training improves working ergonomics during welding.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Karsten; Petermann, Carmen; Pilat, Christian; Schubert, Emil; Pons-Kühnemann, Jörn; Mooren, Frank C

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of a preventive strength training program on cardiovascular, metabolic and muscular strains during welding. Welders are one of the occupation groups which typically have to work in extended forced postures which are known to be an important reason for musculoskeletal disorders. Subjects (exercise group) accomplished a 12-week strength training program, while another group served as controls (control group). Pre and post training examinations included the measurements of the one repetition maximum and an experimental welding test. Local muscle activities were analysed by surface electromyography. Furthermore, heart rate, blood pressure, lactate and rating of perceived exertion were examined. In the exercise group, strength training lead to a significant increase of one repetition maximum in all examined muscles (p<.05). During the experimental welding test muscle activities of trunk and shoulder muscles and arm muscles were significantly reduced in the exercise group after intervention (p<.05). While no changes of neither cardiovascular nor metabolic parameters were found, subjects of the exercise group rated a significantly decreased rate of perceived exertion welding (p<.05). Effects of strength training can be translated in an improved working ergonomics and tolerance against the exposure to high physical demands at work.

  12. Microstructure evolution in the fusion welding of heat-treatable Al-Cu-Li alloys. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, K.

    1994-01-01

    Aluminum alloys 2090 and 2195 and Al-2.5Cu were welded autogenously using the gas tungsten-arc (GTA) and CO2 laser beam (LB) welding processes. Relationships between microstructure and mechanical properties in the fusion zone (FZ) and the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in both the as-welded and the postweld heat-treated conditions were studied. Solute segregation due to non-equilibrium solidification in the FZ and its effect on precipitation after postweld aging was quantitatively investigated. After aging treatment, precipitates were found surrounding eutectic regions where higher solute content was measured. Fast cooling LB weld exhibited narrower solute enriched regions and narrower precipitate segregation zones (PSZ`s) adjacent to the eutectic. A partial recovery of strength and hardness in the FZ`s was achieved by postweld aging at 160 C and 190 C for 16 hours. A higher Li/Cu ratio in 2090 promoted the formation of uniformly distributed delta(prime) precipitates in the as-welded HAZ. An evident reduction in the FZ ductility occurred in the 2195 LB welds due to the existence of porosity and shrinkage cavities, and the constraint effect from narrower FZ`s. GTA welds in both 2090 and 2195 alloys exhibited a hardness recovery in the near HAZ, which was not obvious in the LB welds. Postweld aging enhanced this hardness variation. Overaging, dissolution and reprecipitation of various strengthening precipitates occurred in the different regions of the HAZ, and consequently induced the hardness variation. Higher heat inputs increased the HAZ width and enhanced the hardness increase in the near HAZ. Aged HAZ microstructure was affected by the precipitation in the as-welded condition. The formation of Li-containing precipitates in the GTA HAZ, especially alpha(prime) in Li-lean 2195, consumed Li from the matrix. Consequently, the precipitation of T1 was affected.

  13. The defects and microstructure in the fusion zone of multipass laser welded joints with Inconel 52M filler wire for nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Lu, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Xiaolei; Huang, Jian; Liu, Luwei; Wu, Yixiong

    2017-09-01

    The defects and microstructure in the fusion zone of multipass laser welded joints with Inconel 52M filler wire are investigated for nuclear power plants. Experimental results indicate that the incomplete fusion forms as the deposited metals do not completely cover the groove during multipass laser welding. The dendritic morphologies are observed on the inner surface of the porosity in the fusion zone. Many small cellular are found in the zones near the fusion boundary. With solidification preceding, cellular gradually turn into columnar dendrites and symmetrical columnar dendrites are exhibited in the weld center of the fusion zone. The fine equiaxed grains form and columnar dendrites disappear in the remelted zone of two passes. The dendrite arm spacing in the fusion zone becomes widened with increasing welding heat input. Nb-rich carbides/carbonitrides are preferentially precipitated in the fusion zone of multipass laser welded joints. In respect to high cooling rate during multipass laser welding, element segregation could be insufficient to achieve the component of Laves phase.

  14. Welding for testability: An approach aimed at improving the ultrasonic testing of thick-walled austenitic and dissimilar metal welds

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Sabine; Dugan, Sandra; Barth, Martin; Schubert, Frank; Köhler, Bernd

    2014-02-18

    Austenitic and dissimilar welds in thick walled components show a coarse grained, dendritic microstructure. Therefore, ultrasonic testing has to deal with beam refraction, scattering and mode conversion effects. As a result, the testing techniques typically applied for isotropic materials yield dissatisfying results. Most approaches for improvement of ultrasonic testing have been based on modeling and improved knowledge of the complex wave propagation phenomena. In this paper, we discuss an alternative approach: is it possible to use a modified welding technology which eliminates the cause of the UT complications, i.e. the large-grained structure of the weld seams? Various modification parameters were tested, including: TIG current pulsing, additional DC and AC magnetic fields, and also additional external vibrations during welding. For all welds produced under different conditions, the grain structure of the weld seam was characterized by optical and GIUM microstructure visualizations on cross sections, wave field propagation measurements, and ultrasonic tests of correct detectability of flaws. The mechanical properties of the welds were also tested.

  15. Welding for testability: An approach aimed at improving the ultrasonic testing of thick-walled austenitic and dissimilar metal welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Sabine; Dugan, Sandra; Barth, Martin; Schubert, Frank; Köhler, Bernd

    2014-02-01

    Austenitic and dissimilar welds in thick walled components show a coarse grained, dendritic microstructure. Therefore, ultrasonic testing has to deal with beam refraction, scattering and mode conversion effects. As a result, the testing techniques typically applied for isotropic materials yield dissatisfying results. Most approaches for improvement of ultrasonic testing have been based on modeling and improved knowledge of the complex wave propagation phenomena. In this paper, we discuss an alternative approach: is it possible to use a modified welding technology which eliminates the cause of the UT complications, i.e. the large-grained structure of the weld seams? Various modification parameters were tested, including: TIG current pulsing, additional DC and AC magnetic fields, and also additional external vibrations during welding. For all welds produced under different conditions, the grain structure of the weld seam was characterized by optical and GIUM microstructure visualizations on cross sections, wave field propagation measurements, and ultrasonic tests of correct detectability of flaws. The mechanical properties of the welds were also tested.

  16. Combining Welding Expert Systems With Welding Databases to Improve Shipbuilding Production (The National Shipbuilding Research Program)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    boards ever developed. BACKGROUND The joining of metals into fabricated com- ponents and structures is a difficult task. The most common method of...joining metals is weld- ing, but the welding process is complex and requires several important steps to be performed in a carefully integrated manner...including filler metal and protective flux orinert gas, are chosen. Then the welding procedure is specified, including preheating schedules; welding

  17. Sensor fusion for improved indoor navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilsson, Erika; Rydell, Joakim

    2012-09-01

    A reliable indoor positioning system providing high accuracy has the potential to increase the safety of first responders and military personnel significantly. To enable navigation in a broad range of environments and obtain more accurate and robust positioning results, we propose a multi-sensor fusion approach. We describe and evaluate a positioning system, based on sensor fusion between a foot-mounted inertial measurement unit (IMU) and a camera-based system for simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). The complete system provides accurate navigation in many relevant environments without depending on preinstalled infrastructure. The camera-based system uses both inertial measurements and visual data, thereby enabling navigation also in environments and scenarios where one of the sensors provides unreliable data during a few seconds. When sufficient light is available, the camera-based system generally provides good performance. The foot-mounted system provides accurate positioning when distinct steps can be detected, e.g., during walking and running, even in dark or smoke-filled environments. By combining the two systems, the integrated positioning system can be expected to enable accurate navigation in almost all kinds of environments and scenarios. In this paper we present results from initial tests, which show that the proposed sensor fusion improves the navigation solution considerably in scenarios where either the foot-mounted or camera-based system is unable to navigate on its own.

  18. Microstructural characteristics and mechanism of toughness improvement of laser and electron-beam welds of V-4Cr-4Ti following postwelding heat-treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Park, J.H.; Gazda, J.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-10-01

    The authors are conducting a program to develop an optimal laser welding procedure for large-scale fusion-reactor structural components to be fabricated from vanadium-base alloys. Microstructural characteristics were investigated by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and chemical analysis to provide an understanding of the mechanism of the drastic improvement of impact toughness of laser and electron-beam (EB) welds of V-4Cr-4Ti following postwelding annealing at 1000{degrees}C. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that annealed weld zones were characterized by extensive networks of fine V(C,O,N) precipitates, which appear to clean away O, C, and N from grain matrices. This process is accompanied by simultaneous annealing-out of the dense dislocations present in the weld fusion zone. It seems possible to produce high-quality welds under practical conditions by controlling and adjusting the cooling rate of the weld zone by some innovative method to maximize the precipitation of V(C,O,N).

  19. Improving Processes of Mechanized Pulsed Arc Welding of Low-Frequency Range Variation of Mode Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraev, Yu N.; Solodskiy, S. A.; Ulyanova, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    A new technology of low-frequency modulation of the arc current in MAG and MIG welding is presented. The technology provides control of thermal and crystallization processes, stabilizes the time of formation and crystallization of the weld pool. Conducting theoretical studies allowed formulating the basic criteria for obtaining strong permanent joints for high-duty structures, providing conditions for more equilibrium structure of the deposited metal and the smaller width of the HAZ. The stabilization of time of the formation and crystallization of the weld pool improves the formation of the weld and increases productivity in welding thin sheet metal.

  20. Taguchi Optimization of Pulsed Current GTA Welding Parameters for Improved Corrosion Resistance of 5083 Aluminum Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastkerdar, E.; Shamanian, M.; Saatchi, A.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the Taguchi method was used as a design of experiment (DOE) technique to optimize the pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) parameters for improved pitting corrosion resistance of AA5083-H18 aluminum alloy welds. A L9 (34) orthogonal array of the Taguchi design was used, which involves nine experiments for four parameters: peak current ( P), base current ( B), percent pulse-on time ( T), and pulse frequency ( F) with three levels was used. Pitting corrosion resistance in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution was evaluated by anodic polarization tests at room temperature and calculating the width of the passive region (∆ E pit). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on the measured data and S/ N (signal to noise) ratios. The "bigger is better" was selected as the quality characteristic (QC). The optimum conditions were found as 170 A, 85 A, 40%, and 6 Hz for P, B, T, and F factors, respectively. The study showed that the percent pulse-on time has the highest influence on the pitting corrosion resistance (50.48%) followed by pulse frequency (28.62%), peak current (11.05%) and base current (9.86%). The range of optimum ∆ E pit at optimum conditions with a confidence level of 90% was predicted to be between 174.81 and 177.74 mVSCE. Under optimum conditions, the confirmation test was carried out, and the experimental value of ∆ E pit of 176 mVSCE was in agreement with the predicted value from the Taguchi model. In this regard, the model can be effectively used to predict the ∆ E pit of pulsed current gas tungsten arc welded joints.

  1. Weld bead reinforcement removal: A method of improving the strength and ductility of peaked welds in 2219-T87 aluminum alloy plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovoy, C. V.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a study to determine the degree to which the ductility and tensile properties of peaked welds could be enhanced by removing the reinforcing bead and fairing the weld nugget into the adjacent parent metal are presented. The study employed 2219-T87 aluminum alloy plate, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, and 2319 filler wire. The study concluded that significant improvements in peak weld, ultimate strength, and ductility can be obtained through removal and fairing of the weld reinforcing bead. The specimens so treated and tested in this program exhibited ultimate strength improvements of 2 to 3 percent for peak angles of 5.8 to 10 degrees and 10 to 22 percent for welds with peak angles of 11.7 to 16.9 degrees. It was also determined that removal of the weld bead enhanced the ability of peaked welds to straighten when exposed to cyclic loading at stress levels above the yield strength.

  2. Feasibility study on welding and cutting methods for thick plate in fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Osaki, T.; Nakayama, Y.; Kobayashi, T.

    1995-12-31

    Application of tungsten-arc inert-gas (TIG) welding with narrow gap has been considered as a hopeful joint method to suppress post welding deformation for thick plates. The authors studied some parameters to predict the post-welding deformation for the narrow gap shape of TIG welding. As for cutting methods, the water jet method was applied for weld joints in this study. Reweld tests by using the TIG welding method were successfully performed under the condition of cutting surface as it was. Results of tensile tests for reweld joints showed no reduction in strength. This reveals a good prospect of providing reweld groove surface without any machining on site.

  3. Effects of Fusion Zone Size on Failure Modes and Performance of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds (2006-01-0531)

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-03-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using the limit load based analytical model and the micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that the conventional weld size of 4 t1/2 can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials. The results also suggest that performance based spot weld acceptance criteria should be developed for different AHSS spot welds.

  4. Welding Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Welding fabrication and welding processes were studied. The following research projects are reported: (1) welding fabrication; (2) residual stresses and distortion in structural weldments in high strength steels; (3) improvement of reliability of welding by in process sensing and control (development of smart welding machines for girth welding of pipes); (4) development of fully automated and integrated welding systems for marine applications; (5) advancement of welding technology; (6) research on metal working by high power laser (7) flux development; (8) heat and fluid flow; (9) mechanical properties developments.

  5. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  6. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Harold; Whitney, Gregory

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as welders and preparing them for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains an overview of new and emerging welding technologies, a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography.…

  7. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Harold; Whitney, Gregory

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as welders and preparing them for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains an overview of new and emerging welding technologies, a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography.…

  8. Development of an improved GTA (gas tungsten arc) weld temperature monitor fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Hollar, D.L.

    1990-05-01

    An initial design weld temperature control fixture was implemented into final closure of an electronic assembly in November 1986. Use of this fixture indicated several areas that could be improved. Review of these areas with the process engineer and the weld operator provided the ideas to be incorporated into the new design Phase 2 fixture. Some primary areas of change and improvement included fixture mobility to provide better accessibility to the weld joint area, automatic timed blow cooling of the weld joint, and a feature to assure proper thermocouple placement. The resulting Phase 2 fixture design provided all of the essential weld temperature monitoring features in addition to several significant improvements. Technology developed during this project will pave the way to similar process monitoring of other manual gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding applications. 9 figs.

  9. Characterization of Discontinuous Coarsening Reaction Products in INCONEL® Alloy 740H® Fusion Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechetti, Daniel H.; Dupont, John N.; Watanabe, Masashi; de Barbadillo, John J.

    2017-04-01

    Characterization of γ' coarsened zones (CZs) in alloy 740H fusion welds via a variety of electron microscopy techniques was conducted. The effects of solute partitioning during nonequilibrium solidification on the amount of strengthening precipitates along the grain boundaries were evaluated via electron-probe microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy. Electron backscatter diffraction was used to present evidence for the preferential growth of CZs toward regions of lower γ' content, even if growth in that direction increases grain boundary area. Scanning electron microscopy and image analysis were used to quantify the propensity for CZs to develop along certain segments of the grain boundaries, as governed by the local variations in γ' content. Scanning transmission electron microscopy with X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometry (XEDS) was used to assess the compositions of the matrix and precipitate phases within the CZs and to quantify the segregation of alloying components to the reaction front. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling were used to compare calculated and experimental compositions. The work presented here provides new insight into the progression of the discontinuous coarsening (DC) reaction in a complex engineering alloy.

  10. Characterization of Discontinuous Coarsening Reaction Products in INCONEL® Alloy 740H® Fusion Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechetti, Daniel H.; Dupont, John N.; Watanabe, Masashi; de Barbadillo, John J.

    2017-02-01

    Characterization of γ' coarsened zones (CZs) in alloy 740H fusion welds via a variety of electron microscopy techniques was conducted. The effects of solute partitioning during nonequilibrium solidification on the amount of strengthening precipitates along the grain boundaries were evaluated via electron-probe microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy. Electron backscatter diffraction was used to present evidence for the preferential growth of CZs toward regions of lower γ' content, even if growth in that direction increases grain boundary area. Scanning electron microscopy and image analysis were used to quantify the propensity for CZs to develop along certain segments of the grain boundaries, as governed by the local variations in γ' content. Scanning transmission electron microscopy with X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometry (XEDS) was used to assess the compositions of the matrix and precipitate phases within the CZs and to quantify the segregation of alloying components to the reaction front. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling were used to compare calculated and experimental compositions. The work presented here provides new insight into the progression of the discontinuous coarsening (DC) reaction in a complex engineering alloy.

  11. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... fusion welded. Head-to-shell joints must be forge welded on class DOT-106A tanks and fusion welded on... AAR Specifications for Tank Cars, appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). (b)...

  12. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... fusion welded. Head-to-shell joints must be forge welded on class DOT-106A tanks and fusion welded on... AAR Specifications for Tank Cars, appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). (b)...

  13. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... fusion welded. Head-to-shell joints must be forge welded on class DOT-106A tanks and fusion welded on... AAR Specifications for Tank Cars, appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). (b)...

  14. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... fusion welded. Head-to-shell joints must be forge welded on class DOT-106A tanks and fusion welded on... AAR Specifications for Tank Cars, appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). (b)...

  15. Narrow groove gas tungsten arc welding of ASTM A508 Class 4 steel for improved toughness properties

    SciTech Connect

    Penik, M.A. Jr.

    1997-04-01

    Welding of heavy section steel has traditionally used the automatic submerged arc welding (ASAW) process because of the high deposition rates achievable. However, the properties, particularly fracture toughness, of the weld are often inferior when compared to base material. This project evaluated the use of narrow groove gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) to improve weld material properties. The welding procedures were developed for ASTM A508 Class 4 base material using a 1% Ni filler material complying to AWS Specification A.23-90-EF3-F3-N. A narrow groove joint preparation was used in conjunction with the GTAW process so competitive fabrication rates could be achieved when compared to the ASAW process. Weld procedures were developed to refine weld substructure to achieve better mechanical properties. Two heaters of weld wire were used to examine the effects of minor filler metal chemistry differences on weld mechanical properties. Extensive metallographic evaluations showed excellent weld quality with a refined microstructure. Chemical analysis of the weld metal showed minimal weld dilution by the base metal. Mechanical testing included bend and tensile tests to ensure weld quality and strength. A Charpy impact energy curve versus temperature and fracture toughness curve versus temperature were developed for each weld wire heat. Results of fracture toughness and Charpy impact testing indicated an improved transition temperature closer to that of the base material properties.

  16. Improved Back-Side Purge-Gas Chambers For Plasma Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ezell, Kenneth G.; Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Improved chambers for inert-gas purging of back sides of workpieces during plasma arc welding in keyhole (full-penetration) mode based on concept of directing flows of inert gases toward, and concentrating them on, hot weld zones. Tapered chamber concentrates flow of inert gas on plasma arc plume and surrounding metal.

  17. Crystallographic texture and microstructural changes in fusion welds of recrystallized Zry-4 rolled plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya Riffo, A.; Vicente Alvarez, M. A.; Santisteban, J. R.; Vizcaino, P.; Limandri, S.; Daymond, M. R.; Kerr, D.; Okasinski, J.; Almer, J.; Vogel, S. C.

    2017-05-01

    This work presents a detailed characterization of the microstructural and crystallographic texture changes observed in the transition region in a weld between two Zircaloy-4 cold rolled and recrystallized plates. The microstructural study was performed by optical microscopy under polarized light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Texture changes were characterized at different lengthscales: in the micrometric size, orientation imaging maps (OIM) were constructed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), in the millimetre scale, high energy XRD experiments were done at the Advanced Photon Source (USA) and compared to neutron diffraction texture determinations performed in the HIPPO instrument at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In the heat affected zone (HAZ) we observed the development of Widmanstätten microstructures, typical of the α(hcp) to β(bcc) phase transformation. Associated with these changes a rotation of the c-poles is found in the HAZ and fusion zone. While the base material shows the typical texture of a cold rolled plate, with their c-poles pointing 35° apart from the normal direction of the plate in the normal-transversal line, in the HAZ, c-poles align along the transversal direction of the plate and then re-orient along different directions, all of these changes occurring within a lengthscale in the order of mm. The evolution of texture in this narrow region was captured by both OIM and XRD, and is consistent with previous measurements done by Neutron Diffraction in the HIPPO diffractometer at Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA. The microstructural and texture changes along the HAZ were interpreted as arising due to the effect of differences in the cooling rate and β grain size on the progress of the different α variants during transformation. Fast cooling rates and large β grains are associated to weak variant selection during the β->α transformation, while slow cooling rates and fine β grains result in strong variant selection.

  18. Resistance upset welding for vessel fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Solid-state resistance upset welding has been successfully applied to fabrication of small vessels. The process has advantages compared with the fusion welding processes currently used to join the two halves of such vessels. These advantages result from the improved metallurgical properties of the weld zone and the simplicity of the welding process. Spherical and cylindrical shapes have been fabricated using the upset welding process. Nondestructive and destructive tests have shown excellent weld strength. Storage tests have demonstrated long term compatibility of the welds for cylindrical parts made from 304L stainless steel that have been in storage for eight years. Spherical vessels and reinforced desip vessels made from forged 21-6-9 stainless steel have been prepared for storage.

  19. Microstructural Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Fusion Welds and Simulated Heat-Affected Zones in an Iron-Copper Based Multi-Component Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farren, Jeffrey David

    -affected zone (HAZ) as a result of either full or partial dissolution of the copper-rich precipitates responsible for strengthening. Re-precipitation of the copper-rich precipitates was observed during the cooling portion of the weld thermal cycle but the resultant precipitate phase fractions were too low to fully recover the lost strength. The coarse-grained HAZ and fusion zone exhibited an acicular type microstructure which led to improved tensile properties when compared to the other regions of the HAZ. MatCalc simulations displayed excellent agreement with the precipitate parameters measured experimentally using the LEAP. The R-B model was shown to provide reasonable agreement under select conditions, but in general was determined to be overly sensitive to small variations in precipitate parameters. As a result in should be considered a qualitative tool only for precipitate radii less than ˜2 nm. Finally, it was determined that the current generation of MatCalc software was unable to accurately capture the precipitate evolution of various binary iron-copper alloys when experimental data sets were not available for calibration of the model parameters.

  20. Wonder Weld

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    Engineers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are using the process shown here to create a super-strong weld for the upgrade of a key component of the Lab's experimental nuclear fusion reactor.

  1. Using Feedback Strategies to Improve Peer-Learning in Welding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Selena; Leijten, Flip

    2012-01-01

    Due to safety considerations, students' practice and learning of welding is conducted within individual welding booths. The booth setting presents some challenges to student learning as collaborative learning within a workshop learning environment is compromised. The project reported in this paper, established peer-learning (i.e., students…

  2. Electron beam welding produces improved duplex crack arrest specimens

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.F.; Hudson, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The crack arrest toughness, K/sub Ia/, is generally determined using a monolithic compact type specimen which contains a brittle weld bead to act as a crack initiation site. To test at higher temperatures and toughnesses, electron beam (EB) welded duplex specimens were fabricated. These specimens required the joining of hardened 4340 steel, which acts as the crack initiator, to A533 grade B class 1 steel base material and submerged arc welds in this base metal. The successful fabrication of these specimens required the development of an EB welding procedure with a very narrow heat-affected zone (HAZ). A technique was also developed to eliminate the porosity which was always present in the EB welds through the submerged arc weld deposit region of the joint. The technique involved remelting the joint surface of the A533 steel containing the submerged arc weld to a controlled depth using an oscillated electron beam. This remelt in vacuum reduced the gaseous constituents to low levels and prevented porosity from forming in the deep penetration EB welds between this surface and the 4340 steel.

  3. Using Feedback Strategies to Improve Peer-Learning in Welding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Selena; Leijten, Flip

    2012-01-01

    Due to safety considerations, students' practice and learning of welding is conducted within individual welding booths. The booth setting presents some challenges to student learning as collaborative learning within a workshop learning environment is compromised. The project reported in this paper, established peer-learning (i.e., students…

  4. Friction plug welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeshita, Riki (Inventor); Hibbard, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Friction plug welding (FPW) usage is advantageous for friction stir welding (FSW) hole close-outs and weld repairs in 2195 Al--Cu--Li fusion or friction stir welds. Current fusion welding methods of Al--Cu--Li have produced welds containing varied defects. These areas are found by non-destructive examination both after welding and after proof testing. Current techniques for repairing typically small (<0.25) defects weaken the weldment, rely heavily on welders' skill, and are costly. Friction plug welding repairs increase strength, ductility and resistance to cracking over initial weld quality, without requiring much time or operator skill. Friction plug welding while pulling the plug is advantageous because all hardware for performing the weld can be placed on one side of the workpiece.

  5. Improvement in fusion reactor performance due to ion channeling

    SciTech Connect

    Emmert, G.A.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Santarius, J.F.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Meade, D.M.

    1994-11-01

    Ion channeling is a recent idea for improving the performance of fusion reactors by increasing the fraction of the fusion power deposited in the ions. In this paper the authors assess the effect of ion channeling on D-T and D-{sup 3}He reactors. The figures of merit used are the fusion power density and the cost of electricity. It is seen that significant ion channeling can lead to about a 50-65% increase in the fusion power density. For the Apollo D-{sup 3}He reactor concept the reduction in the cost of electricity can be as large as 30%.

  6. An Improved Plasticity-Based Distortion Analysis Method for Large Welded Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Ping; Athreya, Badrinarayan P.

    2013-05-01

    The plasticity-based distortion prediction method was improved to address the computationally intensive nature of welding simulations. Plastic strains, which are typically first computed using either two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) thermo-elastic-plastic analysis (EPA) on finite element models of simple weld geometry, are mapped to the full structure finite element model to predict distortion by conducting a linear elastic analysis. To optimize welding sequence to control distortion, a new theory was developed to consider the effect of weld interactions on plastic strains. This improved method was validated with experimental work on a Tee joint and tested on two large-scale welded structures—a light fabrication and a heavy fabrication—by comparing against full-blown distortion predictions using thermo-EPA. 3D solid and shell models were used for the heavy and light fabrications, respectively, to compute plastic strains due to each weld. Quantitative comparisons between this method and thermo-EPA indicate that this method can predict distortions fairly accurately—even for different welding sequences—and is roughly 1-2 orders of magnitude faster. It was concluded from these findings that, with further technical development, this method can be an ideal solver for optimizing welding sequences.

  7. Element mixing distribution and structure feature of fusion zone in laser welding between different alloys and pure titanium.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haishu; Liu, Jihong; Liu, Xuecheng; Li, Changyi; Yu, Zhiwei

    2002-07-01

    To study micro morphology and element-mixing distribution of different alloys welded in laser and analyze the feasibility of laser welding different alloys. Alloys and titanium were matched into 4 groups: Au-Pt with Ni-Cr; Au-Pt with pure Ti; pure Ti with Ni-Cr; Ni-Cr with Co-Cr. They were welded in laser. Changes in metallography after hybridization of crystalline grain, ranges of heat-affected zone and pores were observed through SEM with ultra-thin windowed X-ray energy atlas. Meanwhile 10 testing points were chosen with area of 300 micro m x 900 micro m along the welding surface from the side A alloy to the side B alloy, than the element mixing distribution and tendency were analyzed with X-ray energy atlas. 1. Hybridization of different alloys: (l) in the group of Au-Pt with Ti, there was titanium element mixing into Au-Pt tissue gradually and evenly on the Au-Pt side of the interface without clear boundary and increasing in size of crystalline grain. However, there was titanium crystalline grain increasing in size, irregular morphology and small sacks on the titanium side with clear boundary. (2) in the group of Ni-Cr with Ti, there was mixing regularly, slow transition and interlocks between crystalline grains on the Ni-Cr side of the in terface. Poor transition, clear boundary and small cracks were observed on titanium side. (3) in the group of Co-Cr with Ni-Cr, there was good transition, obscure boundary on both sides resulting from network, cylinder and branch structure growing. 2. Element-mixing distribution of different alloys. In fusion zone, the metal elements in matched groups mixed well and hybridized into new alloys except titanium blocks. The location of wave peak depended on the composition of alloys. Most of elements were from the alloy far from the fusion zone. The hybridization between pure titanium and any other alloys is not good The effect of laser welding different alloys is ideal except with pure titanium.

  8. Use of nickel to improve the mechanical properties of high oxygen underwater wet welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, A.M.; Teixeira, J.C.G.; Santos, V.R. dos; Paes, M.T.P.; Liu, S.

    1995-12-31

    The use of oxidizing electrodes for wet welding of offshore structural steels, in spite of their low susceptibility to hydrogen HAZ cracking, is limited, in part by the poor mechanical properties of their weld deposits. Low levels of carbon, manganese and other deoxidizers, together with high oxygen contents seems to be one of the reasons for this low performance. This work investigated the influence of nickel additions on the tensile strength and impact resistance of wet welds deposited at 1.1 m of water depth. It was found that maximum values of toughness and tensile strength occur for nickel contents between 2 and 3 weight percent. Nickel additions also had a strong effect in reducing the grain size of equiaxed ferrite in the reheated region of underwater wet welds thereby improving their mechanical properties. The deterioration of mechanical properties for nickel contents higher than 3 weight percent was attributed to weld metal solidification cracking.

  9. Laser Assisted Plasma Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect

    FUERSCHBACH,PHILLIP W.

    1999-10-05

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effecter to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (< 1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  10. Linker engineering for fusion protein construction: Improvement and characterization of a GLP-1 fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yuelin; Tong, Yue; Gao, Mingming; Chen, Chen; Gao, Xiangdong; Yao, Wenbing

    2016-01-01

    Protein engineering has been successfully applied in protein drug discovery. Using this technology, we previously have constructed a fusion protein by linking the globular domain of adiponectin to the C-terminus of a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog. Herein, to further improve its bioactivity, we reconstructed this fusion protein by introducing linker peptides of different length and flexibility. The reconstructed fusion proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified using nickel affinity chromatography. Their agonist activity towards receptors of GLP-1 and adiponectin were assessed in vitro by using luciferase assay and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) immunoblotting, respectively. The effects of the selected fusion protein on glucose and lipid metabolism were evaluated in mice. The fusion protein reconstructed using a linker peptide of AMGPSSGAPGGGGS showed high potency in activating GLP-1 receptor and triggering AMPK phosphorylation via activating the adiponectin receptor. Remarkably, the optimized fusion protein was highly effective in lowering blood glucose and lipids in mice. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that the bioactivity of this GLP-1 fusion protein can be significantly promoted by linker engineering, and indicate that the optimized GLP-1 fusion protein is a promising lead structure for anti-diabetic drug discovery.

  11. Friction stir welding of F82H steel for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Ando, Masami; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Kimura, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, friction stir welding was employed to join F82H steels and develop a potential joining technique for a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. The microstructures and mechanical properties on the joint region were investigated to evaluate the applicability of friction stir welding. F82H steel sheets were successfully butt-joined with various welding parameters. In welding conditions, 100 rpm and 100 mm/min, the stirred zone represented a comparable hardness distribution with a base metal. Stirred zone induced by 100 rpm reserved uniformly distributed precipitates and very fine ferritic grains, whereas the base metal showed a typical tempered martensite with precipitates on the prior austenite grain boundary and lath boundary. Although the tensile strength was decreased at 550 °C, the stirred zone treated at 100 rpm showed comparable tensile behavior with base metal up to 500 °C. Therefore, friction stir welding is considered a potential welding method to preserve the precipitates of F82H steel.

  12. Welding of Materials for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DuPont, John N.; Babu, Suresh; Liu, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    Materials will play a critical role in power generation from both new and existing plants that rely on coal, nuclear, and oil/gas as energy supplies. High efficiency power plants are currently being designed that will require materials with improved mechanical properties and corrosion resistance under conditions of elevated temperature, stress, and aggressive gaseous environments. Most of these materials will require welding during initial fabrication and plant maintenance. The severe thermal and strain cycles associated with welding can produce large gradients in microstructure and composition within the heat-affected and fusion zones of the weld, and these gradients are commonly accompanied by deleterious changes to properties. Thus, successful use of materials in energy applications hinges on the ability to understand, predict, and control the processing-microstructure-property relations during welding. This article highlights some of the current challenges associated with fusion welding of materials for energy applications.

  13. Inverter-based GTA welding machines improve fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Sammons, M.

    2000-05-01

    While known as precision process, many fabricators using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process fight several common problems that hinder quality, slow production, frustrate the operator and otherwise prevent the process from achieving its full potential. These include a limited ability to tailor the weld bead profile, poor control of the arc direction and arc wandering, poor arc starting, unstable or inconsistent arcs in the AC mode, high-frequency interference with electronics and tungsten contamination. Fortunately, new GTA welding technology--made possible by advances with inverter-based power sources and micro-processor controls--can eliminate common productivity gremlins. Further, new AC/DC inverter-based GTA power sources provide advanced arc shaping capabilities. As a result, many fabricators adopting this new technology have experienced phenomenal production increases, taken on new types of projects and reduced costs. Most importantly, the operators enjoy welding more.

  14. Multimodal medical image fusion using improved multi-channel PCNN.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yaqian; Zhao, Qinping; Hao, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal medical image fusion is a method of integrating information from multiple image formats. Its aim is to provide useful and accurate information for doctors. Multi-channel pulse coupled neural network (m-PCNN) is a recently proposed fusion model. Compared with previous methods, this network can effectively manage various types of medical images. However, it has two drawbacks: lack of control to feed function and low-level automation. The improved multi-channel PCNN proposed in this paper can adjust the impact of feed function by linking strength and adaptively compute the weighting coefficients for each pixel. Experimental results demonstrated the effectiveness of the improved m-PCNN fusion model.

  15. Improvement of bonding properties of laser transmission welded, dissimilar thermoplastics by plasma surface treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hopmann, Ch.; Weber, M.; Schöngart, M.; Sooriyapiragasam, S.; Behm, H.; Dahlmann, R.

    2015-05-22

    Compared to different welding methods such as ultrasonic welding, laser transmission welding is a relatively new technology to join thermoplastic parts. The most significant advantages over other methods are the contactless energy input which can be controlled very precisely and the low mechanical loads on the welded parts. Therefore, laser transmission welding is used in various areas of application, for example in medical technology or for assembling headlights in the automotive sector. However, there are several challenges in welding dissimilar thermoplastics. This may be due to different melting points on the one hand and different polarities on the other hand. So far these problems are faced with the intermediate layer technique. In this process a layer bonding together the two components is placed between the components. This means that an additional step in the production is needed to apply the extra layer. To avoid this additional step, different ways of joining dissimilar thermoplastics are investigated. In this regard, the improvement in the weldability of the dissimilar thermoplastics polyamide 6 (PA 6) and polypropylene (PP) by means of plasma surface modification and contour welding is examined. To evaluate the influence of the plasma surface modification process on the subsequent welding process of the two dissimilar materials, the treatment time as well as the storage time between treatment and welding are varied. The treatment time in pulsed micro wave excited oxygen plasmas with an electron density of about 1x10{sup 17} m{sup −3} is varied from 0.5 s to 120 s and the time between treatment and welding is varied from a few minutes up to a week. As reference, parts being made of the same polymer (PP and PA 6) are welded and tested. For the evaluation of the results of the welding experiments, short-time tensile tests are used to determine the bond strength. Without plasma treatment the described combination of PA 6/PP cannot be welded with

  16. Improvement of bonding properties of laser transmission welded, dissimilar thermoplastics by plasma surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Weber, M.; Schöngart, M.; Sooriyapiragasam, S.; Behm, H.; Dahlmann, R.

    2015-05-01

    Compared to different welding methods such as ultrasonic welding, laser transmission welding is a relatively new technology to join thermoplastic parts. The most significant advantages over other methods are the contactless energy input which can be controlled very precisely and the low mechanical loads on the welded parts. Therefore, laser transmission welding is used in various areas of application, for example in medical technology or for assembling headlights in the automotive sector. However, there are several challenges in welding dissimilar thermoplastics. This may be due to different melting points on the one hand and different polarities on the other hand. So far these problems are faced with the intermediate layer technique. In this process a layer bonding together the two components is placed between the components. This means that an additional step in the production is needed to apply the extra layer. To avoid this additional step, different ways of joining dissimilar thermoplastics are investigated. In this regard, the improvement in the weldability of the dissimilar thermoplastics polyamide 6 (PA 6) and polypropylene (PP) by means of plasma surface modification and contour welding is examined. To evaluate the influence of the plasma surface modification process on the subsequent welding process of the two dissimilar materials, the treatment time as well as the storage time between treatment and welding are varied. The treatment time in pulsed micro wave excited oxygen plasmas with an electron density of about 1x1017 m-3 is varied from 0.5 s to 120 s and the time between treatment and welding is varied from a few minutes up to a week. As reference, parts being made of the same polymer (PP and PA 6) are welded and tested. For the evaluation of the results of the welding experiments, short-time tensile tests are used to determine the bond strength. Without plasma treatment the described combination of PA 6/PP cannot be welded with sufficient bond

  17. Design of Boiler Welding for Improvement of Lifetime and Cost Control

    PubMed Central

    Thong-On, Atcharawadi; Boonruang, Chatdanai

    2016-01-01

    Fe-2.25Cr-1Mo a widely used material for headers and steam tubes of boilers. Welding of steam tube to header is required for production of boiler. Heat affected zone of the weld can have poor mechanical properties and poor corrosion behavior leading to weld failure. The cost of material used for steam tube and header of boiler should be controlled. This study propose a new materials design for boiler welding to improve the lifetime and cost control, using tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of Fe-2.25Cr-1Mo tube to carbon steel pipe with chromium-containing filler. The cost of production could be reduced by the use of low cost material such as carbon steel pipe for boiler header. The effect of chromium content on corrosion behavior of the weld was greater than that of the microstructure. The lifetime of the welded boiler can be increased by improvement of mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of the heat affected zone. PMID:28774014

  18. Fatigue Life Improvement for Cruciform Welded Joint by Mechanical Surface Treatment using Hammer Peening and UNSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seung-Ho; Han, Jeong-Woo; Nam, Yong-Yun; Cho, In-Ho

    For the improvement of fatigue strength of welded structures, mechanical post treatments have been applied in various industrial fields and have in most cases been founded to give substantial increases in their fatigue lives. These methods, generally, consist of the modification of weld toe geometry and the introduction of compressive residual stresses. In mechanical surface treatments, e.g. PHP (pneumatic hammer peening) and UNSM (ultrasonic nano-crystal surface modification), the weld profile is modified due to remove or reduce minute crack-like flaws, and compressive residual stresses are also induced. In this study, a pneumatic hammer peening procedure and a UNSM device were introduced, and a quantitative measure of fatigue strength improvement was performed. The fatigue strength at 2 × 106 cycles of hammer-peened and UNSM treated on a non-load carrying cruciform welded joint shows 220 and 260MPa, respectively, which are more than two times higher than that of as-welded specimen. Especially, the surface layer in the vicinity weld toe treated by the UNSM provides nano-crystal structure created by an ultrasonic cold forging and introduces very high welding residual stress in compression.

  19. Design of Boiler Welding for Improvement of Lifetime and Cost Control.

    PubMed

    Thong-On, Atcharawadi; Boonruang, Chatdanai

    2016-11-03

    Fe-2.25Cr-1Mo a widely used material for headers and steam tubes of boilers. Welding of steam tube to header is required for production of boiler. Heat affected zone of the weld can have poor mechanical properties and poor corrosion behavior leading to weld failure. The cost of material used for steam tube and header of boiler should be controlled. This study propose a new materials design for boiler welding to improve the lifetime and cost control, using tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of Fe-2.25Cr-1Mo tube to carbon steel pipe with chromium-containing filler. The cost of production could be reduced by the use of low cost material such as carbon steel pipe for boiler header. The effect of chromium content on corrosion behavior of the weld was greater than that of the microstructure. The lifetime of the welded boiler can be increased by improvement of mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of the heat affected zone.

  20. Improving the particle distribution and mechanical properties of friction-stir-welded composites by using a smooth pin tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huijie; Hu, Yanying; Zhao, Yunqiang; Fujii, Hidetoshi

    2017-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a very promising technique for joining particle-reinforced aluminum-matrix composites (PRAMCs), but with increase in the volume fraction of reinforcing particles, their distribution in welds becomes inhomogeneous. This leads to an inconsistent deformation of welds and their destruction at low stresses. In order to improve the weld microstructure, a smooth pin tool was used for the friction stir welding of AC4A + 30 vol.% SiC particle-reinforced aluminum-matrix composites. The present work describes the effect of welding parameters on the characteristics of particle distribution and the mechanical properties of welds. The ultimate strength of weld reached, 309 MPa, was almost 190% of that of the basic material. The mechanism of SiC particle conglomeration is clearly illustrated by means of schematic illustrations.

  1. Improved Heat-of-Fusion Energy Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K. H.; Manvi, R.

    1982-01-01

    Alkali metal/alkali-halide mixtures proposed for preventing solid buildup during energy recovery. When mixture melts (by absorption of heat of fusion), it forms two immiscible liquids. Salt-rich phase is heavier and has higher melting/recrysallization temperature; so during energy recovery salt crystallizes in this phase first. Since heat exchanger for energy recovery is in lighter metal-rich phase, solids do not form and there is no reduction of heat-recovery efficiency.

  2. Spinal Fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... concept of fusion is similar to that of welding in industry. Spinal fusion surgery, however, does not ... bone taken from the patient has a long history of use and results in predictable healing. Autograft ...

  3. Spinal Fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... concept of fusion is similar to that of welding in industry. Spinal fusion surgery, however, does not ... bone taken from the patient has a long history of use and results in predictable healing. Autograft ...

  4. Improvement of charpy toughness of weld metal in circumferential SMAW of pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, T.; Hara, N.; Sugino, T.; Naruse, S.; Kasai, N.

    1994-12-31

    Charpy toughness of weld metal made by low hydrogen and high cellulose electrodes for circumferential welding of API 5LX-60-X-70 grade of pipe is investigated. Improvements of charpy toughness was achieved by obtaining a fine microstructure through the adjustment of the quantity of alloying elements such as Mn and Ni and/or by the addition of an optimum range of micro-alloying elements like Ti and B for low hydrogen electrodes. It is reported that for high cellulose electrodes reducing the oxygen content in weld metal is also effective.

  5. Advanced Welding Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  6. Hydrogen-Assisted Crack Propagation in Austenitic Stainless Steel Fusion Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerday, B. P.; Dadfarnia, M.; Balch, D. K.; Nibur, K. A.; Cadden, C. H.; Sofronis, P.

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize hydrogen-assisted crack propagation in gas-tungsten arc (GTA) welds of the nitrogen-strengthened, austenitic stainless steel 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn (21-6-9), using fracture mechanics methods. The fracture initiation toughness and crack growth resistance curves were measured using fracture mechanics specimens that were thermally precharged with 230 wppm (1.3 at. pct) hydrogen. The fracture initiation toughness and slope of the crack growth resistance curve for the hydrogen-precharged weld were reduced by as much as 60 and 90 pct, respectively, relative to the noncharged weld. A physical model for hydrogen-assisted crack propagation in the welds was formulated from microscopy evidence and finite-element modeling. Hydrogen-assisted crack propagation proceeded by a sequence of microcrack formation at the weld ferrite, intense shear deformation in the ligaments separating microcracks, and then fracture of the ligaments. One salient role of hydrogen in the crack propagation process was promoting microcrack formation at austenite/ferrite interfaces and within the ferrite. In addition, hydrogen may have facilitated intense shear deformation in the ligaments separating microcracks. The intense shear deformation could be related to the development of a nonuniform distribution of hydrogen trapped at dislocations between microcracks, which in turn created a gradient in the local flow stress.

  7. Tailored Welding Technique for High Strength Al-Cu Alloy for Higher Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biradar, N. S.; Raman, R.

    AA2014 aluminum alloy, with 4.5% Cu as major alloying element, offers highest strength and hardness values in T6 temper and finds extensive use in aircraft primary structures. However, this alloy is difficult to weld by fusion welding because the dendritic structure formed can affect weld properties seriously. Among the welding processes, AC-TIG technique is largely used for welding. As welded yield strength was in the range of 190-195 MPa, using conventional TIG technique. Welding metallurgy of AA2014 was critically reviewed and factors responsible for lower properties were identified. Square-wave AC TIG with Transverse mechanical arc oscillation (TMAO) was postulated to improve the weld strength. A systematic experimentation using 4 mm thick plates produced YS in the range of 230-240 MPa, has been achieved. Through characterization including optical and SEM/EDX was conducted to validate the metallurgical phenomena attributable to improvement in weld properties.

  8. Laser Peening Effects on Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatamleh, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a welding technique that uses frictional heating combined with forging pressure to produce high strength bonds. It is attractive for aerospace applications. Although residual stresses in FSW are generally lower when compared to conventional fusion welds, recent work has shown that significant tensile residual stresses can be present in the weld after fabrication. Therefore, laser shock peening was investigated as a means of moderating the tensile residual stresses produced during welding. This slide presentation reviews the effect of Laser Peening on the weld, in tensile strength, strain, surface roughness, microhardness, surface wear/friction, and fatigue crack growth rates. The study concluded that the laser peening process can result in considerable improvement to crack initiaion, propagation and mechanical properties in FSW.

  9. Role of δ-ferrite in stress corrosion cracking retardation near fusion boundary of 316NG welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2012-05-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) near the fusion boundary of a 316NG stainless steel (SS) welded joint in high-temperature water was investigated with emphasis on the relation to the microstructural characteristics. δ-Ferrite islands were distributed on the crack paths (grain boundary in the partially melted zone and cell boundary in the unmixed zone) near the fusion boundary of 316NG SS piping. SCC retardation near the fusion boundary was clearly observed in our experiments. The relative crack growth rate (CGR) at the δ-γ interface was estimated to be 0.043 times lower than that at the γ-γ interface. The cracks remained for a considerable period of time just after they reached the δ-ferrite islands. Even those cracks that passed through an initial set of δ-ferrite islands were retarded when they encountered a subsequent set of δ-ferrite islands. High corrosion resistance due to the presence of large amounts of Cr and the island-shaped morphology of δ-ferrite are dominant factors in SCC retardation.

  10. Ultrasonic Impact Treatment to Improve Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Gou, G.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Chen, H.; Yang, Y. P.

    2016-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the major issues for welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy in high-speed trains. High residual stress in the welded joints under corrosion results in stress corrosion cracking. Ultrasonic impact treatment was used to control the residual stress of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy. Experimental tests show that ultrasonic impact treatment can induce compressive longitudinal and transverse residual stress in the welded joint, harden the surface, and increase the tensile strength of welded joints. Salt-fog corrosion tests were conducted for both an as-welded sample and an ultrasonic impact-treated sample. The surface of the treated sample had far fewer corrosion pits than that of the untreated sample. The treated sample has higher strength and lower tensile residual stress than the untreated sample during corrosion. Therefore, ultrasonic impact treatment is an effective technique to improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy.

  11. Improving Cerebellar Segmentation with Statistical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Plassard, Andrew J; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L; Claassen, Daniel O; Landman, Bennett A

    2016-02-27

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multi-atlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non-Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution.

  12. Improving cerebellar segmentation with statistical fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multiatlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non- Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution.

  13. Improving Cerebellar Segmentation with Statistical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multi-atlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non-Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution. PMID:27127334

  14. Laser welding in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Workman, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Autogenous welds in 304 stainless steel were performed by Nd-YAG laser heating in a simulated space environment. Simulation consists of welding on the NASA KC-135 aircraft to produce the microgravity and by containing the specimen in a vacuum chamber. Experimental results show that the microgravity welds are stronger, harder in the fusion zone, have deeper penetration and have a rougher surface rippling of the weld pool than one-g welds. To perform laser welding in space, a solar-pumped laser concept that significantly increases the laser conversion efficiency and makes welding viable despite the limited power availability of spacecraft is proposed.

  15. METAL FUSION AND FABRICATION WELDING. AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY--SERVICE OCCUPATIONS, MODULE, NUMBER 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ONE IN A SERIES DESIGNED TO HELP TEACHERS PREPARE POSTSECONDARY STUDENTS FOR THE AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY SERVICE OCCUPATIONS AS PARTS MEN, MECHANICS, MECHANIC'S HELPERS, OR SERVICE SUPERVISORS, THIS GUIDE AIMS TO DEVELOP STUDENT UNDERSTANDING OF WELDING EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES, AND ABILITY TO PERFORM SKILLS REQUIRED OF AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS. IT WAS…

  16. Fundamental Studies on Phase Transformations and Mechanical Properties of Fusion Welds in Advanced Naval Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-07-31

    Professor, Materials Science & Engineering Department Associate Director, Energy Research Center Site Director, NSF’ Center on Integrated Materials...Materials Science & Engineering Department Associate Director, Energy Research Center Site Director, NSF Center on Integrated Materials Joining...high heating and cooling rates associated with welding thermal cycles was not available for these alloys. For NUCu-140, the potential use of

  17. Kinect Fusion improvement using depth camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliari, D.; Menna, F.; Roncella, R.; Remondino, F.; Pinto, L.

    2014-06-01

    Scene's 3D modelling, gesture recognition and motion tracking are fields in rapid and continuous development which have caused growing demand on interactivity in video-game and e-entertainment market. Starting from the idea of creating a sensor that allows users to play without having to hold any remote controller, the Microsoft Kinect device was created. The Kinect has always attract researchers in different fields, from robotics to Computer Vision (CV) and biomedical engineering as well as third-party communities that have released several Software Development Kit (SDK) versions for Kinect in order to use it not only as a game device but as measurement system. Microsoft Kinect Fusion control libraries (firstly released in March 2013) allow using the device as a 3D scanning and produce meshed polygonal of a static scene just moving the Kinect around. A drawback of this sensor is the geometric quality of the delivered data and the low repeatability. For this reason the authors carried out some investigation in order to evaluate the accuracy and repeatability of the depth measured delivered by the Kinect. The paper will present a throughout calibration analysis of the Kinect imaging sensor, with the aim of establishing the accuracy and precision of the delivered information: a straightforward calibration of the depth sensor in presented and then the 3D data are correct accordingly. Integrating the depth correction algorithm and correcting the IR camera interior and exterior orientation parameters, the Fusion Libraries are corrected and a new reconstruction software is created to produce more accurate models.

  18. Surface preparation effects on GTA weld shape in JBK-75 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.D.; Robertson, A.M. ); Heiple, C.R. ); Sturgill, P.L.; Jamsay, R.

    1993-02-01

    The results of a study are reported here on the effects of surface preparation on the shape of autogenous gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds in JBK-75, an austenitic precipitation hardenable stainless steel similar to A286. Minor changes in surface preparation produced substantial changes in the fusion zone shape and welding behavior of this alloy. Increased and more consistent depth of fusion (higher d/w ratios) along with improved arc stability and less arc wander resulted from wire brushing and other abrasive surface preparations, although chemical and machining methods did not produce any increase in depth of fusion. Abrasive treatments roughen the surface, increase the surface area, increase the surface oxide thickness, and entrap oxide. The increased weld d/w ratio is attributed to oxygen added to the weld pool from the surface oxide on the base metal. The added oxygen alters the surface-tension-driven fluid flow pattern in the weld pool. Increased depth of fusion in wire-fed U-groove weld joints also resulted when welding wire with a greater surface oxide thickness was used. Increasing the amount of wire brushing produced even deeper welds. However, a maximum in depth of fusion was observed with further wire brushing, beyond which weld fusion depth decreased.

  19. Polarization image fusion algorithm based on improved PCNN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Siyuan; Yuan, Yan; Su, Lijuan; Hu, Liang; Liu, Hui

    2013-12-01

    The polarization detection technique provides polarization information of objects which conventional detection techniques are unable to obtain. In order to fully utilize of obtained polarization information, various polarization imagery fusion algorithms have been developed. In this research, we proposed a polarization image fusion algorithm based on the improved pulse coupled neural network (PCNN). The improved PCNN algorithm uses polarization parameter images to generate the fused polarization image with object details for polarization information analysis and uses the matching degree M as the fusion rule. The improved PCNN fused image is compared with fused images based on Laplacian pyramid (LP) algorithm, Wavelet algorithm and PCNN algorithm. Several performance indicators are introduced to evaluate the fused images. The comparison showed the presented algorithm yields image with much higher quality and preserves more detail information of the objects.

  20. Innovative Tools Advance Revolutionary Weld Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    (no toxic smoke or shielding gas, liquid metal splatter, arcing, dangerous voltage, or radiation), and environmentally sound (no consumables, fumes, or noise) than fusion welding. Under computer control, an automated FSW machine can create welds with high reproducibility, improving efficiency and overall quality of manufactured materials. The process also allows for welding dissimilar metals as well as those metals considered to be "unweldable" such as the 7xxx series aluminum alloys. Its effectiveness and versatility makes FSW useful for aerospace, rail, automotive, marine, and military applications. A downside to FSW, however, is the keyhole opening left in the weld when the FSW pin tool exits the weld joint. This is a significant problem when using the FSW process to join circumferential structures such as pipes and storage containers. Furthermore, weld joints that taper in material thickness also present problems when using the conventional FSW pin tool, because the threaded pin rotating within the weld joint material is a fixed length. There must be capability for the rotating pin to both increase and decrease in length in real time while welding the tapered material. (Both circumferential and tapered thickness weldments are found in the space shuttle external tank.) Marshall engineers addressed both the keyhole and tapered material thickness problems by developing the auto-adjustable pin tool. This unique piece of equipment automatically withdraws the pin into the tool s shoulder for keyhole closeout. In addition, the auto-adjustable pin tool retracts, or shortens, the rotating pin while welding a weld joint that tapers from one thickness to a thinner thickness. This year, the impact of the Marshall innovation was recognized with an "Excellence in Technology Transfer Award" from the Federal Laboratory Consortium.

  1. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wei; Chen, Gaoqiang; Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Frederick, David Alan; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  2. Study of weld offset in longitudinally welded SSME HPFTP inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Spanyer, K. S.; Brunair, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Welded joints are an essential part of rocket engine structures such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps. Defects produced in the welding process can be detrimental to weld performance. Recently, review of the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) titanium inlet X-rays revealed several weld discrepancies such as penetrameter density issues, film processing discrepancies, weld width discrepancies, porosity, lack of fusion, and weld offsets. Currently, the sensitivity of welded structures to defects is of concern. From a fatigue standpoint, weld offset may have a serious effect since local yielding, in general, aggravates cyclic stress effects. Therefore, the weld offset issue is considered in this report. Using the FEM and beamlike plate approximations, parametric studies were conducted to determine the influence of weld offsets and a variation of weld widths in longitudinally welded cylindrical structures with equal wall thicknesses on both sides of the joint. Following the study, some conclusions are derived for the weld offsets.

  3. Nonintrusive estimation of anisotropic stiffness maps of heterogeneous steel welds for the improvement of ultrasonic array inspection.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zheng; Mark, Alison F; Lowe, Michael J S; Withers, Philip J

    2015-08-01

    It is challenging to inspect austenitic welds nondestructively using ultrasonic waves because the spatially varying elastic anisotropy of weld microstructures can lead to the deviation of ultrasound. Models have been developed to predict the propagation of ultrasound in such welds once the weld stiffness heterogeneity is known. Consequently, it is desirable to have a means of measuring the variation in elastic anisotropy experimentally so as to be able to correct for deviations in ultrasonic pathways for the improvement of weld inspection. This paper investigates the use of external nonintrusive ultrasonic array measurements to construct such weld stiffness maps, representing the orientation of the stiffness tensor according to location in the weld cross section. An inverse model based on a genetic algorithm has been developed to recover a small number of key parameters in an approximate model of the weld map, making use of ultrasonic array measurements. The approximate model of the weld map uses the Modeling of anIsotropy based on Notebook of Arcwelding (MINA) formulation, which is one of the representations that has been proposed by other researchers to provide a simple, yet physically based, description of the overall variations of orientations of the stiffness tensors over the weld cross section. The choice of sensitive ultrasonic modes as well as the best monitoring positions have been discussed to achieve a robust inversion. Experiments have been carried out on a 60-mm-thick multipass tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld to validate the findings of the modeling, showing very good agreement. This work shows that ultrasonic array measurements can be used on a single side of a butt-welded plate, such that there is no need to access the remote side, to construct an approximate but useful weld map of the spatial variations in anisotropic stiffness orientation that occur within the weld.

  4. Investigations for the improvement of space shuttle main engine electron beam welding equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smock, R. A.; Taylor, R. A.; Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Progress made in the testing, evaluation, and correction of MSFC's 7.5 kW electron beam welder in support of space shuttle main engine component welding is summarized. The objective of this project was to locate and correct the deficiencies in the welder. Some 17 areas were deficient in the 7.5 kW ERI welding system and the associated corrective action was taken to improve its operational performance. An overall improvement of 20 times the original reliability was obtained at full rated capacity after the modifications were made.

  5. An improved adaptive IHS method for image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ting

    2015-12-01

    An improved adaptive intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) method is proposed for image fusion in this paper based on the adaptive IHS (AIHS) method and its improved method(IAIHS). Through improved method, the weighting matrix, which decides how many spatial details in the panchromatic (Pan) image should be injected into the multispectral (MS) image, is defined on the basis of the linear relationship of the edges of Pan and MS image. At the same time, a modulation parameter t is used to balance the spatial resolution and spectral resolution of the fusion image. Experiments showed that the improved method can improve spectral quality and maintain spatial resolution compared with the AIHS and IAIHS methods.

  6. The role of titanium in the non-metallic inclusions which nucleate acicular ferrite in the submerged arc weld (SAW) fusion zones of Navy HY-100 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, A.G.; Brothers, D.G.

    1995-04-01

    The origin of acicular ferrite in the weld metal of submerged arc weldments on high strength steels is very complex and depends upon the chemical composition for the steel base plate and filler wire, the composition of the flux used during welding and the cooling rate of the weld metal during the transformation of the undercooled metastable austenite. The strength and toughness of weld metal improves as the amount of acicular ferrite increases due its fine basket weave microstructure and so it is important to understand the mechanism of its formation so that the volume fraction of acicular ferrite can be maximized in steel weld metal. The chemical composition of the filler wire mostly determines the final composition of the weld metal although the composition of the base plate is important because of dilution effects. In high strength steels the alloying elements such as carbon, nickel, chromium, copper nd niobium are present to achieve the required strength levels and a fortuitous outcome of this is a continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram with features that mean that bainite is the major transformation product during the arc welding of these steels provided a suitable weld power and preheat/interpass temperature is chosen during multi-run welding. Once a suitable weld-metal hardenability and cooling rate has been established the amount of acicular ferrite nucleated will depend on the size, number, distribution and chemical composition of the non-metallic inclusions. Suitable inclusions appear to be in the size range 0.2--2.0 micrometers with a mean size of 0.5 micrometers being about an optimum value. These inclusions usually contain manganese, silicon, aluminum and titanium as their major constituents and do not appear to be exactly spherical but have a faceted or slightly angular appearance.

  7. Ultrasonic Phased Array Inspection of Flaws on Weld Fusion Faces Using Full Matrix Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, R.; Russell, J.; Cawley, P.; Habgood, N.

    2009-03-01

    Work is being conducted to develop phased array inspection of stainless steel welded pipes. Ideally this uses waves reflected and mode converted at the inner surface of the pipe, but most commercial phased array controllers do not currently provide for this. Our solution was to use Full Matrix Capture (FMC) and process the data ourselves. This paper explains the FMC principle, describes the signal processing algorithms along with introducing the Almost Total Focusing Method (ATFM) and illustrates how the processed data was presented. The inspections were also modeled using the CEA CIVA software and compared to experimental results.

  8. Improvement of ultrasonic characteristics in butt-welded joint of austenitic stainless steel using magnetic stirring method

    SciTech Connect

    Tanosaki, M.; Yoshikawa, K.; Arakawa, T.

    1995-08-01

    Magnetic Stirring Method of Tungsten Inert Gas(TIG) Welding are applied to butt-welded joint of austenitic stainless steel. The purpose of this method is to refine the welded structure and to improve the ultrasonic characteristics. In the conventional method of ultrasonic test in austenitic stainless steel weldments, dendritic solidification structure of weldment prevents smooth ultrasonic beam transmission. The tests are performed in three welding conditions; One is conventional TIG welding (without magnetic stirring), the other two are TIG welding using magnetic stirring method. Each test piece is evaluated by observing macro structure of cross section and by several ultrasonic tests examining pulse amplitudes, beam path length and proceeding beam direction. The detectability of artificial notches in weldment is also investigated and compared.

  9. Laser assisted arc welding for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerschbach, P.W.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effector to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (<1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  10. Improved Accuracy of the Inherent Shrinkage Method for Fast and More Reliable Welding Distortion Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendizabal, A.; González-Díaz, J. B.; San Sebastián, M.; Echeverría, A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a simple strategy adopted for the inherent shrinkage method (ISM) to predict welding-induced distortion. This strategy not only makes it possible for the ISM to reach accuracy levels similar to the detailed transient analysis method (considered the most reliable technique for calculating welding distortion) but also significantly reduces the time required for these types of calculations. This strategy is based on the sequential activation of welding blocks to account for welding direction and transient movement of the heat source. As a result, a significant improvement in distortion prediction is achieved. This is demonstrated by experimentally measuring and numerically analyzing distortions in two case studies: a vane segment subassembly of an aero-engine, represented with 3D-solid elements, and a car body component, represented with 3D-shell elements. The proposed strategy proves to be a good alternative for quickly estimating the correct behaviors of large welded components and may have important practical applications in the manufacturing industry.

  11. Sensor and information fusion for improved hostile fire situational awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Michael V.; Ludwig, William D.

    2010-04-01

    A research-oriented Army Technology Objective (ATO) named Sensor and Information Fusion for Improved Hostile Fire Situational Awareness uniquely focuses on the underpinning technologies to detect and defeat any hostile threat; before, during, and after its occurrence. This is a joint effort led by the Army Research Laboratory, with the Armaments and the Communications and Electronics Research, Development, and Engineering Centers (CERDEC and ARDEC) partners. It addresses distributed sensor fusion and collaborative situational awareness enhancements, focusing on the underpinning technologies to detect/identify potential hostile shooters prior to firing a shot and to detect/classify/locate the firing point of hostile small arms, mortars, rockets, RPGs, and missiles after the first shot. A field experiment conducted addressed not only diverse modality sensor performance and sensor fusion benefits, but gathered useful data to develop and demonstrate the ad hoc networking and dissemination of relevant data and actionable intelligence. Represented at this field experiment were various sensor platforms such as UGS, soldier-worn, manned ground vehicles, UGVs, UAVs, and helicopters. This ATO continues to evaluate applicable technologies to include retro-reflection, UV, IR, visible, glint, LADAR, radar, acoustic, seismic, E-field, narrow-band emission and image processing techniques to detect the threats with very high confidence. Networked fusion of multi-modal data will reduce false alarms and improve actionable intelligence by distributing grid coordinates, detection report features, and imagery of threats.

  12. Web-enabled Landsat Data (WELD): Demonstration of MODIS-Landsat Data Fusion to Provide a Consistent, Long-term, Large-area Data Record for the Terrestrial User Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, D.; Ju, J.; Kommadreddy, I.

    2010-12-01

    Consistent long-term and large-area Landsat data records are needed to monitor land cover change and study Earth system functioning. The U.S. Department of Interior / U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been providing terrain-corrected Landsat ETM+ data at no cost since January 2008. Every Landsat ETM+ acquisition with cloud cover less than 80% is used to generate weekly, monthly, seasonal and annual composited mosaics of the conterminous USA (CONUS) and Alaska. The consistency and quality of the ETM+ data is improved through a fusion with standard MODIS land products, including the MODIS BRDF reflectance anisotropy product to radiometrically normalize and fill missing (cloudy and SLC-off) Landsat pixels, the MODIS atmospheric characterization data to systematically atmospherically correct the Landsat data. The WELD mosaics are defined at 30 m spatial resolution and include spectral reflectance, brightness temperature, normalized difference vegetation index, the date each composited pixel was acquired on, per-band radiometric saturation status, cloud mask values, and land cover characterization information. Results, algorithm insights, and information on how to access the WELD data products via a web-enabled what-you-see-is-what-you-get intuitive distribution system (http://weld.cr.usgs.gov) are presented.

  13. Effect of Heat Input on the Tensile Damage Evolution in Pulsed Laser Welded Ti6Al4V Titanium Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Gao, Xiaolong; Zhang, Jianxun

    2016-11-01

    The present paper is focused on studying the effect of heat input on the tensile damage evolution of pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of Ti6Al4V alloy under monotonic loading. To analyze the reasons that the tensile fracture site of the pulsed-laser-welded Ti6Al4V sheet joints changes with the heat input under monotonic loading, the microstructure of the sample with different nominal strain values was investigated by in situ observation. Experiment results show that the tensile ductility and fatigue life of welded joints with low heat input are higher than that of welded joints with high heat input. Under tensile loads, the critical engineering strain for crack initiation is much lower in the welded joint with high heat input than in the welded joints with low and medium heat input. And the microstructural damage accumulation is much faster in the fusion zone than in the base metal for the welded joints with high input, whereas the microstructural damage accumulation is much faster in the base metal than in the fusion zone for the welded joints with low input. Consequently, the welded joints fractured in the fusion zone for the welds with high heat input, whereas the welded joints ruptured in the base metal for the welds with low heat input. It is proved that the fine grain microstructure produced by low heat input can improve the critical nominal strain for crack initiation and the resistance ability of microstructural damage.

  14. Dynamics of near-alpha titanium welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuberger, Brett William

    Typically, when gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is employed to join near-alpha titanium alloys, the resulting weld fusion zone (FZ) is much harder than that of the base metal (BM), thereby leading to lost ductility. The aim of this investigation was to improve FZ ductility of Ti-5Al-1Sn-1V-1Zr-0.8Mo by modifying filler metal chemistry. In this regard, metallic yttrium was added to the filler metal and aluminum concentration reduced. It was believed that additions of yttrium would lead to formation of yttria in the weld melt, thereby promoting heterogeneous nucleation. Since oxygen and aluminum both act as alpha-stabilizers, expected pickup of oxygen during the welding process will be offset by the aluminum reduction. Tensile testing indicated that modified filler metal welds showed a dramatic increase in ductility of the FZ. Fracture toughness testing showed that while JIC values decreased in all welds, the tearing modulus, T, in modified filler metal welds was significantly higher than that of matching filler metal welds. Microhardness mapping of the weld zones illustrated that modified filler metal welds were significantly softer than matching filler metal welds. Microstructural examinations were completed through the use of optical, SEM and TEM studies, indicating that there was a presence of nano-particles in the weld FZ. XPS analysis identified these particles as yttrium oxysulfate. WDS analysis across the welds' heat affected zones demonstrated that there is an internal diffusion of oxygen from the BM into the FZ. Research results indicate yttrium oxysulfide particles form in the weld pool, act as a drag force on the solidification front and limit growth of prior-beta grain boundaries. The reduced prior-beta grain size and removal of interstitial oxygen from the matrix in modified filler metal welds, further enhanced by oxidation of yttrium oxysulfide to yttrium oxysulfate, leads to increased ductility in the weld's FZ. Addition of yttrium to the weld also

  15. Self-assessed performance improves statistical fusion of image labels

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Frederick W. Xu, Zhoubing; Asman, Andrew J.; Allen, Wade M.; Reich, Daniel S.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-03-15

    . Statistical fusion resulted in statistically indistinguishable performance from self-assessed weighted voting. The authors developed a new theoretical basis for using self-assessed performance in the framework of statistical fusion and demonstrated that the combined sources of information (both statistical assessment and self-assessment) yielded statistically significant improvement over the methods considered separately. Conclusions: The authors present the first systematic characterization of self-assessed performance in manual labeling. The authors demonstrate that self-assessment and statistical fusion yield similar, but complementary, benefits for label fusion. Finally, the authors present a new theoretical basis for combining self-assessments with statistical label fusion.

  16. Self-assessed performance improves statistical fusion of image labels

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Frederick W.; Xu, Zhoubing; Asman, Andrew J.; Allen, Wade M.; Reich, Daniel S.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-01-01

    . Statistical fusion resulted in statistically indistinguishable performance from self-assessed weighted voting. The authors developed a new theoretical basis for using self-assessed performance in the framework of statistical fusion and demonstrated that the combined sources of information (both statistical assessment and self-assessment) yielded statistically significant improvement over the methods considered separately. Conclusions: The authors present the first systematic characterization of self-assessed performance in manual labeling. The authors demonstrate that self-assessment and statistical fusion yield similar, but complementary, benefits for label fusion. Finally, the authors present a new theoretical basis for combining self-assessments with statistical label fusion. PMID:24593721

  17. Parameter Design in Fusion Welding of AA 6061 Aluminium Alloy using Desirability Grey Relational Analysis (DGRA) Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adalarasan, R.; Santhanakumar, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, yield strength, ultimate strength and micro-hardness of the lap joints formed with Al 6061 alloy sheets by using the processes of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding and Metal Inert Gas (MIG) welding were studied for various combinations of the welding parameters. The parameters taken for study include welding current, voltage, welding speed and inert gas flow rate. Taguchi's L9 orthogonal array was used to conduct the experiments and an integrated technique of desirability grey relational analysis was disclosed for optimizing the welding parameters. The ignored robustness in desirability approach is compensated by the grey relational approach to predict the optimal setting of input parameters for the TIG and MIG welding processes which were validated through the confirmation experiments.

  18. A Power Factor Corrected SMPS with Improved Power Quality for Welding Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narula, Swati; Singh, Bhim; Bhuvaneswari, G.; Pandey, Rahul

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the analysis, design and implementation of a power factor corrected Arc Welding Power Supply (AWPS) with a boost converter at the front end and three full-bridge (FB) converters connected in parallel at the load end. The modular arrangement of the FB converters offers several meritorious features like usage of power devices with comparatively lower voltage and current ratings, ease of power expandability, easy maintenance, etc. The boost converter operates in continuous conduction mode minimizing the input current ripple and leading to the lowest RMS current thereby improving the input power quality. Individual control loops are designed for each power stage. A dual loop control scheme is employed to incorporate over-current limit on the proposed AWPS which ensures excellent weld bead quality. The proposed AWPS is implemented to validate its performance over a wide range of line/load variations. Test results confirm its fast parametrical response to load and source voltage variations and over-current protection leading to improved welding performance and weld bead quality. The system is found to perform extremely well with very low input current THD and unity power factor, adhering to international power quality norms.

  19. Web-enabled Landsat Data (WELD): Demonstration of MODIS-Landsat Data Fusion to Provide a Consistent, Long-term, Large-area Data Record for the Terrestrial User Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, D.; Ju, J.; Vermote, E. F.; Zhang, C.; Egorov, A.; Kovalskyy, V.; Loveland, T. R.; Hansen, M. C.; Scaramuzza, P. L.; Kline, K.; Yeom, J.; Kommadreddy, I.

    2009-12-01

    Consistent long-term and large-area Landsat data records are needed to monitor land cover change and study Earth system functioning. The objective of NASA’s Making Earth Science Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program is to provide Earth science data products and services driven by NASA’s Earth science goals and to advance NASA’s “missions to measurements” concept. This MEaSUREs WELD project contributes to the Land measurement theme by systematically generating radiometrically consistent Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) mosaics of the conterminous USA (CONUS) and Alaska. The U.S. Department of Interior / U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been providing terrain-corrected Landsat ETM+ data at no cost since January 2008. In the WELD project every USGS Landsat ETM+ acquisition with cloud cover less than 60% is used to generate monthly, seasonal and annual composited mosaics. The consistency and quality of the ETM+ data is improved through a fusion with standard MODIS land products, including the MODIS BRDF reflectance anisotropy product to radiometrically normalize and fill missing (cloudy and SLC-off) Landsat pixels, the MODIS atmospheric characterization data to systematically atmospherically correct the Landsat data, and the MODIS vegetation continuous field product to provide training for Landsat scale land cover characterization. The WELD mosaics are defined at 30 m and include spectral reflectance, brightness temperature, normalized difference vegetation index, the date each composited pixel was acquired on, per-band radiometric saturation status, cloud mask values, and land cover characterization information. Results for the CONUS, algorithm insights, and information on how to access the WELD data products via the internet from the USGS Landsat project are presented.

  20. [An improved low spectral distortion PCA fusion method].

    PubMed

    Peng, Shi; Zhang, Ai-Wu; Li, Han-Lun; Hu, Shao-Xing; Meng, Xian-Gang; Sun, Wei-Dong

    2013-10-01

    Aiming at the spectral distortion produced in PCA fusion process, the present paper proposes an improved low spectral distortion PCA fusion method. This method uses NCUT (normalized cut) image segmentation algorithm to make a complex hyperspectral remote sensing image into multiple sub-images for increasing the separability of samples, which can weaken the spectral distortions of traditional PCA fusion; Pixels similarity weighting matrix and masks were produced by using graph theory and clustering theory. These masks are used to cut the hyperspectral image and high-resolution image into some sub-region objects. All corresponding sub-region objects between the hyperspectral image and high-resolution image are fused by using PCA method, and all sub-regional integration results are spliced together to produce a new image. In the experiment, Hyperion hyperspectral data and Rapid Eye data were used. And the experiment result shows that the proposed method has the same ability to enhance spatial resolution and greater ability to improve spectral fidelity performance.

  1. Improved Controls for Fusion RF Systems. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Jeffrey A.

    2011-11-08

    We have addressed the specific requirements for the integrated systems controlling an array of klystrons used for Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). The immediate goal for our design was to modernize the transmitter protection system (TPS) for LHCD on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (MIT-PSFC). Working with the Alcator C-Mod team, we have upgraded the design of these controls to retrofit for improvements in performance and safety, as well as to facilitate the upcoming expansion from 12 to 16 klystrons. The longer range goals to generalize the designs in such a way that they will be of benefit to other programs within the international fusion effort was met by designing a system which was flexible enough to address all the MIT system requirements, and modular enough to adapt to a large variety of other requirements with minimal reconfiguration.

  2. Galvanic Corrosion Behavior of Microwave Welded and Post-weld Heat-Treated Inconel-718 Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Amit; Sharma, Apurbba Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, corrosion behavior of microwave welded Inconel-718 at various conditions was investigated. Welding of Inconel-718 in 980 °C solution-treated condition was performed using microwave hybrid heating technique. The microwave welds were subjected to post-heat treatment for improving its microstructure and mechanical properties by solubilizing the Nb-enriched Laves phase. The microstructural features of the fabricated welds at various conditions were investigated through scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical testing results revealed that Inconel-718 welds were galvanic corroded when they were anodically polarized in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution at 28 °C. The difference in the corrosion potentials between the base metal (BM) and fusion zone (FZ) in an Inconel-718 weld was the main factor for galvanic corrosion. The highest corrosion was occurred in the as-welded/aged weldments, followed by 980 °C solution-treated and aged weldments, as-welded specimen, and 1080 °C solution-treated and aged (1080STA) weldments. The least galvanic corrosion was occurred in the 1080STA specimens due to almost uniform microstructure developed in the weldment after the treatment. Thus, it was possible to minimize the galvanic corrosion in the microwave welded Inconel-718 by 1080STA treatment which resulted in reducing the difference in corrosion potentials between the BM and the FZ.

  3. Aluminum U-groove weld enhancement based on experimental stress analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Vaughan, R.

    1995-01-01

    Though butt-welds are among the most preferred joining methods in aerostructures because of their sealing and assembly integrity and general elastic performance; their inelastic mechanics are generally the least understood. This study investigated experimental strain distributions across a thick aluminum U-grooved weld and identified two weld process considerations for improving the multipass weld strength. The extreme thermal expansion and contraction gradient of the fusion heat input across the tab thickness between the grooves produce severe peaking, which induces bending moment under uniaxial loading. The filler strain hardening decreased with increasing filler pass sequence. These combined effects reduce the weld strength, and a depeaking index model was developed to select filler pass thicknesses, pass numbers, and sequences to improve the welding process results over the current normal weld schedule.

  4. The development of an improved streak tube for fusion diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howorth, J. R.; Milnes, J. S.; Fisher, Y.; Jadwin, A.; Boni, R.; Jaanimagi, P. A.

    2016-11-01

    The fusion diagnostic community, including the National Ignition Facility, the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Megajoule in France, and others require optical recording instruments with precise time resolution covering a dynamic range of many orders of magnitude. In 2012, LLE, Photek, and Sydor Instruments embarked on the re-design of an improved streak tube for fusion diagnostics. As a baseline we started with the Photek ST-Y streak tube which is a member of the RCA design dating back to 1957, because the tube body can accommodate a 35 mm long photocathode, and consequently more fibre coupled diagnostic channels than smaller designs. Electron optical modelling was carried out by both Paul Jaanimagi in the US and by Photek with different software packages in a parallel exercise. Our goal was to address some of the short-comings of this tube, the initial approach being to increase the field between the photocathode and extractor electrode from 700 to 1300 V/mm to reduce space charge effects and to improve time resolution. Many changes and modifications were made: the time resolution was improved to 5 ps, the usable cathode length was increased from 20 mm to 32 mm under high extraction field operation, and the off-axis spatial resolution was substantially improved compared to other tubes of this format. Several tubes have been built and tested in Sydor ROSS-5800 streak cameras.

  5. Metallurgical and mechanical properties of laser welded high strength low alloy steel

    PubMed Central

    Oyyaravelu, Ramachandran; Kuppan, Palaniyandi; Arivazhagan, Natarajan

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating the microstructure and mechanical properties of Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser welded high strength low alloy (HSLA) SA516 grade 70 boiler steel. The weld joint for a 4 mm thick plate was successfully produced using minimum laser power of 2 kW by employing a single pass without any weld preheat treatment. The micrographs revealed the presence of martensite phase in the weld fusion zone which could be due to faster cooling rate of the laser weldment. A good correlation was found between the microstructural features of the weld joints and their mechanical properties. The highest hardness was found to be in the fusion zone of cap region due to formation of martensite and also enrichment of carbon. The hardness results also showed a narrow soft zone at the heat affected zone (HAZ) adjacent to the weld interface, which has no effect on the weld tensile strength. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints were 338 MPa and 549 MPa, respectively, which were higher than the candidate metal. These tensile results suggested that the laser welding process had improved the weld strength even without any weld preheat treatment and also the fractography of the tensile fractured samples showed the ductile mode of failure. PMID:27222751

  6. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  7. Welding development for V-Cr-Ti alloys

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.F.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    A vanadium structure, cooled with helium, is a favored concept for an advanced breeding blanket for fusion systems. The objective of this task is to develop the metallurgical and technological base for the welding of thick sections of V-Cr-Ti. The subsize Charpy test results for electron beam weld metal from the V-5Cr-5Ti alloy has shown significant improvement in Charpy fracture energy compared to both gas tungsten arc weld metal and the base metal itself. These results are preliminary, however, and additional confirmation testing and analysis will be required to explain this improvement in properties.

  8. Influence of Yb:YAG Laser Beam Parameters on Haynes 188 Weld Fusion Zone Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graneix, Jérémie; Beguin, Jean-Denis; Alexis, Joël; Masri, Talal

    2017-08-01

    The weldability of 1.2 mm thick Haynes 188 alloy sheets by a disk Yb:YAG laser welding was examined. Butt joints were made, and the influence of parameters such as power, size, and shape of the spot, welding speed, and gas flow has been investigated. Based on an iconographic correlation approach, optimum process parameters were determined. Depending on the distribution of the power density (circular or annular), acceptable welds were obtained. Powers greater than 1700 W, welding speeds higher than 3.8 m mm-1, and spot sizes between 160 and 320 μm were needed in the circular (small fiber) configuration. By comparison, the annular (large fiber) configuration required a power as high as 2500 W, and a welding speed less than 3.8 m min-1. The mechanical properties of the welds depended on their shape and microstructure, which in turn depended on the welding conditions. The content of carbides, the proportion of areas consisting of cellular and dendritic substructures, and the size of these substructures were used to explain the welded joint mechanical properties.

  9. Resistance Spot Welding of Aluminum Alloy to Steel with Transition Material - Part II: Finite Element Analyses of Nugget Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2004-07-01

    This paper summarizes work on finite element modeling of nugget growth for resistance spot welding of aluminum alloy to steel. It is a sequel to a previous paper on experimental studies of resistance spot welding of aluminum to steel using a transition material. Since aluminum alloys and steel cannot be readily fusion welded together due to their drastically different thermal physical properties, a cold-rolled clad material was introduced as a transition to aid the resistance welding process. Coupled electrical-thermal-mechanical finite element analyses were performed to simulate the nugget growth and heat generation patterns during the welding process. The predicted nugget growth results were compared to the experimental weld cross sections. Reasonable comparisons of nugget size were achieved. The finite element simulation procedures were also used in the electrode selection state to help reduce weld expulsion and improve weld quality.

  10. Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-10-01

    Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material affected by the weld. Bead-on-plate and butt welds were previously performed to depths of about 4 mm with a 6-kW CO{sub 2} laser on V-4%Cr-4%Ti and V-5%Cr-5%Ti alloys. These welds were made at a speed of 0.042 m/s using argon purging at a flow rate of 2.8 m{sup 3}/s. The purge was distributed with a diffuser nozzle aimed just behind the laser beam during the welding operation. The fusion zones of welds made under these conditions consisted of very fine, needle-shaped grains and were also harder than the bulk metal (230-270 dph, compared to {approx}180 dph for the bulk metal). A limited number of impact tests showed that the as-welded ductile-brittle transition temperatures (DBTT) was above room temperature, but heat treatment at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h in vacuum reduced the DBTT to <{minus}25{degrees}C. Activities during this reporting period focused on improvements in the purging system and determination of the effect of welding speed on welds. A 2-kW continuous YAG laser at Lumonics Corp. in Livonia, MI, was used to make 34 test welds for this study.

  11. Study on Welding Mechanism Based on Modification of Polypropylene for Improving the Laser Transmission Weldability to PA66.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huixia; Jiang, Hairong; Guo, Dehui; Chen, Guochun; Yan, Zhang; Li, Pin; Zhu, Hejun; Chen, Jun; Wang, Xiao

    2015-08-04

    Polypropylene and PA66 are widely used in our daily life, but they cannot be welded by laser transmission welding (LTW) because of polar differences and poor compatibility. In this paper, grafting modification technology is used to improve the welding performance between polypropylene and PA66. Firstly, the strong reactive and polar maleic-anhydride (MAH) is grafted to polypropylene and infrared spectrometer is used to prove that MAH has been grafted to polypropylene. At the same time, the mechanical and thermal properties of the graft modified polypropylene (TGMPP) are tested. The results prove that the grafting modification has little influence on them. Also, the optical properties of TGMPP are measured. Then, the high welding strength between TGMPP and PA66 is found and the mechanism of the weldability is researched, which shows that there are two reasons for the high welding strength. By observing the micro morphology of the welding zone, one reason found is that the modification of polypropylene can improve the compatibility between polypropylene and PA66 and make them easy to diffuse mutually, which causes many locking structures formed in the welding region. The other reason is that there are chemical reactions between TGMPP and PA66 proved by the X-ray photoelectron spectrometer.

  12. Study on Welding Mechanism Based on Modification of Polypropylene for Improving the Laser Transmission Weldability to PA66

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huixia; Jiang, Hairong; Guo, Dehui; Chen, Guochun; Yan, Zhang; Li, Pin; Zhu, Hejun; Chen, Jun; Wang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Polypropylene and PA66 are widely used in our daily life, but they cannot be welded by laser transmission welding (LTW) because of polar differences and poor compatibility. In this paper, grafting modification technology is used to improve the welding performance between polypropylene and PA66. Firstly, the strong reactive and polar maleic-anhydride (MAH) is grafted to polypropylene and infrared spectrometer is used to prove that MAH has been grafted to polypropylene. At the same time, the mechanical and thermal properties of the graft modified polypropylene (TGMPP) are tested. The results prove that the grafting modification has little influence on them. Also, the optical properties of TGMPP are measured. Then, the high welding strength between TGMPP and PA66 is found and the mechanism of the weldability is researched, which shows that there are two reasons for the high welding strength. By observing the micro morphology of the welding zone, one reason found is that the modification of polypropylene can improve the compatibility between polypropylene and PA66 and make them easy to diffuse mutually, which causes many locking structures formed in the welding region. The other reason is that there are chemical reactions between TGMPP and PA66 proved by the X-ray photoelectron spectrometer. PMID:28793484

  13. Improving Higgs coupling measurements through ZZ Fusion at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Tao; Liu, Zhen; Qian, Zhuoni; Sayre, Joshua

    2015-06-17

    In this study, we evaluate the e-e+ → e-e+ + h process through the ZZ fusion channel at the International Linear Collider operating at 500 GeV and 1 TeV center-of-mass energies. We perform realistic simulations on the signal process and background processes. With judicious kinematic cuts, we find that the inclusive cross section can be measured to 2.9% after combining the 500 GeV at 500 fb-1 and 1 TeV at 1 ab-1 runs. A multivariate log-likelihood analysis further improves the precision of the cross section measurement to 2.3%. We discuss the overall improvement to model-independent Higgs width and coupling determinations and demonstrate the use of different channels in distinguishing new physics effects in Higgs physics. Our study demonstrates the importance of the ZZ fusion channel to Higgs precision physics, which has often been neglected in the literature.

  14. Improving Higgs coupling measurements through ZZ Fusion at the ILC

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Tao; Liu, Zhen; Qian, Zhuoni; ...

    2015-06-17

    In this study, we evaluate the e-e+ → e-e+ + h process through the ZZ fusion channel at the International Linear Collider operating at 500 GeV and 1 TeV center-of-mass energies. We perform realistic simulations on the signal process and background processes. With judicious kinematic cuts, we find that the inclusive cross section can be measured to 2.9% after combining the 500 GeV at 500 fb-1 and 1 TeV at 1 ab-1 runs. A multivariate log-likelihood analysis further improves the precision of the cross section measurement to 2.3%. We discuss the overall improvement to model-independent Higgs width and coupling determinations and demonstrate the usemore » of different channels in distinguishing new physics effects in Higgs physics. Our study demonstrates the importance of the ZZ fusion channel to Higgs precision physics, which has often been neglected in the literature.« less

  15. Improving the corrosion properties of magnesium AZ31 alloy GTA weld metal using microarc oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siva Prasad, M.; Ashfaq, M.; Kishore Babu, N.; Sreekanth, A.; Sivaprasad, K.; Muthupandi, V.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, the morphology, phase composition, and corrosion properties of microarc oxidized (MAO) gas tungsten arc (GTA) weldments of AZ31 alloy were investigated. Autogenous gas tungsten arc welds were made as full penetration bead-on-plate welding under the alternating-current mode. A uniform oxide layer was developed on the surface of the specimens with MAO treatment in silicate-based alkaline electrolytes for different oxidation times. The corrosion behavior of the samples was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The oxide film improved the corrosion resistance substantially compared to the uncoated specimens. The sample coated for 10 min exhibited better corrosion properties. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was concluded to strongly depend on the morphology, whereas the phase composition and thickness were concluded to only slightly affect the corrosion resistance.

  16. Improving Orbit Determination for Geostationary Satellites via Data Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Joseph; Chazono, Hideshi; Izumiyama, Taku

    2013-08-01

    Intelsat Ltd. (IS), SKY Perfect JSAT Corporation (SJC) and IHI Corporation (IHI) conducted a joint study to evaluate accuracies and error covariance of determined orbits for IS and SJC satellites by using solo optical observed data from IHI optical observation demonstrator, and combined data from tradition ranging data. Optical data has proven to be very useful for space surveillance and close approach monitoring providing improved orbital knowledge of both active and non-active space objects. As satellite operators we are also interested in using optical data to complement our standard ranging measurements to improve our orbit uncertainties and help to resolve and calibrate sensor biases. In the first phase of our join study IHI provided optical observations for both IS and SJC satellites and we will present the multi-objectives of our join study and preliminary results in the orbit comparisons and error estimations from different fusion techniques.

  17. On Improving the Quality of Gas Tungsten Arc Welded 18Ni 250 Maraging Steel Rocket Motor Casings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Renu N.; Raja, V. S.; Mukherjee, M. K.; Narayana Murty, S. V. S.

    2017-10-01

    In view of their excellent combination of strength and toughness, maraging steels (18Ni 250 grade) are widely used for the fabrication of large sized solid rocket motor casings. Gas tungsten arc welding is commonly employed to fabricate these thin walled metallic casings, as the technique is not only simple but also provides the desired mechanical properties. However, sometimes, radiographic examination of welds reveals typical unacceptable indications requiring weld repair. As a consequence, there is a significant drop in weld efficiency and productivity. In this work, the nature and the cause of the occurrence of these defects have been investigated and an attempt is made to overcome the problem. It has been found that weld has a tendency to form typical Ca and Al oxide inclusions leading to the observed defects. The use of calcium fluoride flux has been found to produce a defect free weld with visible effect on weld bead finish. The flux promotes the separation of inclusions, refines the grain size and leads to significant improvement in mechanical properties of the weldment.

  18. Application of Pre-heating to Improve the Consistency and Quality in AA5052 Resistance Spot Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhen; Ao, Sansan; Chao, Yuh Jin; Cui, Xuetuan; Li, Yang; Lin, Ye

    2015-10-01

    Making consistent resistance spot welds of aluminum alloy with good quality and at high volume has several obstacles in automotive industry. One of the difficult issues arises from the presence of a tough non-conducting oxide film on the aluminum sheet surface. The oxide film develops over time and often is non-uniform across the surface of the aluminum alloy sheet, which makes the contact resistance characteristics irregular at the faying interface during welding. The consistency in quality of the final spot welds is therefore problematic to control. To suppress the effect of the irregular oxide film on the spot weld quality, application of a pre-heating treatment in the welding schedule for aluminum alloy 5052 is investigated in this present work. The current level of the pre-heating required to reduce the scatter of the contact resistance at the W/W (workpiece-to-workpiece) faying interface is quantified experimentally. The results indicate that the contact resistance at the W/W faying interface with a pre-heating treatment becomes much consistent and can be reduced by two orders of magnitude. Having the uncertain variation of the contact resistance at the W/W faying surface virtually reduced or removed, the quality of the spot welds in terms of the peak load and nugget diameter is examined and shows a great improvement. The proposed method may provide a robust method for high-volume spot welding of aluminum alloy sheets in auto industry.

  19. Concurrent laser welding and annealing exploiting robotically manipulated optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Hussein A.; Siddiqui, Rafiq A.

    2002-12-01

    Present investigation reports on the effects of incorporating pre- and post-heating on the mechanical properties of laser-welded joints, in normal air condition. Two common types of steels, i.e. mild steel, and stainless steel were welded with Lumonic's MS 830 Nd 3+:YAG laser machine, with an output capacity of 400 W. Due to the low integrated energy input required for laser welded joints, the welded region are often cooled too rapidly via conduction to the surrounding material and atmosphere, which leads to hardness discontinuities in the fusion and heat affected zone. The effects of in-process laser annealing on the mechanical properties and microstructure of laser-welded joints are important in any manufacturing operation. To improve the poor weld characteristics, this work investigates the use of automated dual-beam delivery system to implement a pre- or post-heating technique, simultaneously with the welding process. The results show that proper selection of the control parameters for the pre- or post-heating can reduce the hardness of the weld significantly and improve the welded joints mechanical properties, such as higher tensile strength and better durability.

  20. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.300-9 Section 179.300-9... Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-9 Welding. (a) Longitudinal... fusion welded on class DOT-110A tanks. Welding procedures, welders and fabricators must be approved...

  1. Improved target detection by IR dual-band image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adomeit, U.; Ebert, R.

    2009-09-01

    Dual-band thermal imagers acquire information simultaneously in both the 8-12 μm (long-wave infrared, LWIR) and the 3-5 μm (mid-wave infrared, MWIR) spectral range. Compared to single-band thermal imagers they are expected to have several advantages in military applications. These advantages include the opportunity to use the best band for given atmospheric conditions (e. g. cold climate: LWIR, hot and humid climate: MWIR), the potential to better detect camouflaged targets and an improved discrimination between targets and decoys. Most of these advantages have not yet been verified and/or quantified. It is expected that image fusion allows better exploitation of the information content available with dual-band imagers especially with respect to detection of targets. We have developed a method for dual-band image fusion based on the apparent temperature differences in the two bands. This method showed promising results in laboratory tests. In order to evaluate its performance under operational conditions we conducted a field trial in an area with high thermal clutter. In such areas, targets are hardly to detect in single-band images because they vanish in the clutter structure. The image data collected in this field trial was used for a perception experiment. This perception experiment showed an enhanced target detection range and reduced false alarm rate for the fused images compared to the single-band images.

  2. Improved microstructure and mechanical properties in gas tungsten arc welded aluminum joints by using graphene nanosheets/aluminum composite filler wires.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, M; Gholami, A R; Eynalvandpour, A; Ahmadi, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, different amounts of graphene nanosheets (GNSs) were added to the 4043 aluminum alloy powders by using the mechanical alloying method to produce the composite filler wires. With each of the produced composite filler wires, one all-weld metal coupon was welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process. The microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture surface morphology of the weld metals have been evaluated and the results are compared. As the amount of GNSs in the composition of filler wire is increased, the microstructure of weld metal was changed from the dendritic structure to fine equiaxed grains. Furthermore, the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was improved, and is attributed to the augmented nucleation and retarded growth. From the results, it was seen that the GNSs/Al composite filler wire can be used to improve the microstructure and mechanical properties of GTA weld metals of aluminum and its alloys.

  3. Penetration in GTA welding

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1990-01-01

    The size and shape of the weld bead produced in GTA welding depends on the magnitude and distribution of the energy incident on the workpiece surfaces as well as the dissipation of that energy in the workpiece. The input energy is largely controllable through the welding parameters selected, however the dissipation of that energy in the workpiece is less subject to control. Changes in energy dissipation can produce large changes in weld shape or penetration. Heat transport away from the weld pool is almost entirely by conduction, but heat transport in the weld pool is more complicated. Heat conduction through the liquid is an important component, but heat transport by convection (mass transport) is often the dominant mechanism. Convective heat transport is directional and changes the weld pool shape from that produced by conduction alone. Surface tension gradients are often the dominant forces driving fluid flow in GTA weld pools. These gradients are sensitive functions of weld pool chemistry and the energy input distribution to the weld. Experimental and theoretical work conducted primarily in the past decade has greatly enhanced our understanding of weld pool fluid flow, the forces which drive it, and its effects on weld pool shape. This work is reviewed here. While less common, changes in energy dissipation through the unmelted portion of the workpiece can also affect fusion zone shape or penetration. These effects are also described. 41 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Probing Reliability of Transport Phenomena Based Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow Analysis in Autogeneous Fusion Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, S.; de, A.

    2010-09-01

    The transport phenomena based heat transfer and fluid flow calculations in weld pool require a number of input parameters. Arc efficiency, effective thermal conductivity, and viscosity in weld pool are some of these parameters, values of which are rarely known and difficult to assign a priori based on the scientific principles alone. The present work reports a bi-directional three-dimensional (3-D) heat transfer and fluid flow model, which is integrated with a real number based genetic algorithm. The bi-directional feature of the integrated model allows the identification of the values of a required set of uncertain model input parameters and, next, the design of process parameters to achieve a target weld pool dimension. The computed values are validated with measured results in linear gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) weld samples. Furthermore, a novel methodology to estimate the overall reliability of the computed solutions is also presented.

  5. EVALUATION OF CONSTANT CURRENT WELD CONTROL FOR PINCH WELDING

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P; STANLEY, S; HOWARD, H

    2005-10-11

    Modern weld controllers typically use current to control the weld process. SRS uses a legacy voltage control method. This task was undertaken to determine if the improvements in the weld control equipment could be implemented to provide improvements to the process control. The constant current mode of operation will reduce weld variability by about a factor of 4. The constant voltage welds were slightly hotter than the constant current welds of the same nominal current. The control mode did not appear to adversely affect the weld quality, but appropriate current ranges need to be established and a qualification methodology for both welding and shunt calibrations needs to be developed and documented.

  6. Improved Magnetic Fusion Energy Economics via Massive Resistive Electromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, R.D.

    1998-08-19

    Abandoning superconductors for magnetic fusion reactors and instead using resistive magnet designs based on cheap copper or aluminum conductor material operating at "room temperature" (300 K) can reduce the capital cost per unit fusion power and simplify plant operations. By increasing unit size well beyond that of present magnetic fusion energy conceptual designs using superconducting electromagnets, the recirculating power fraction needed to operate resistive electromagnets can be made as close to zero as needed for economy without requiring superconductors. Other advantages of larger fusion plant size, such as very long inductively driven pulses, may also help reduce the cost per unit fusion power.

  7. Effects of Yttrium Microalloying on the Epitaxial Grain Growth in Ti-6Al-4V Weld Fusion Zones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    microalloy additions. 2 I ,m III II I I__ 3 EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE Weld Preparation - All the welds were prepared by the Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) process...1425*F for 2 h; 6) Hot swaged (0.650 in. dia); 7) Anneal at 1425*F for 2 h; 8) Warm swaged (0.300 in. dia); 9) Anneal at 1350*F for 3 h; 10) Cold drawn

  8. Toward Improving the Type IV Cracking Resistance in Cr-Mo Steel Weld Through Thermo-Mechanical Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shassere, Benjamin A.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Detailed microstructure characterization of Grade 91 (Modified 9Cr-1Mo, ASTM A387) steel subjected to a thermo-mechanical treatment process was performed to rationalize the cross-weld creep properties. A series of thermo-mechanical processing in the austenite phase region, followed by isothermal aging at temperatures at 973 K to 1173 K (700 °C to 900 °C), was applied to the Grade 91 steel to promote precipitation kinetics of MX (M: Nb and V, X: C and N) in the austenite matrix. Detailed characterization of the base metals after standard tempering confirmed the presence of fine MX dispersion within the tempered martensitic microstructure in steels processed at/and above 1073 K (800 °C). Relatively low volume fraction of M23C6 precipitates was observed after processing at 1073 K (800 °C). The cross-weld creep strength after processing was increased with respect to the increase of MX dispersion, indicating that these MX precipitates maintained during weld thermal cycles in the fine-grained heat-affected zone region and thereby contribute to improved creep resistant of welds in comparison to the welds made with the standard "normalization and tempering" processes. The steels processed in this specific processing condition showed improved cross-weld creep resistance and sufficient room temperature toughness. The above data are also analyzed based on existing theories of creep deformation based on dislocation climb mechanism.

  9. Toward Improving the Type IV Cracking Resistance in Cr-Mo Steel Weld Through Thermo-Mechanical Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Shassere, Benjamin A.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-02-23

    Detailed microstructure characterization of Grade 91 (Modified 9Cr-1Mo, ASTM A387) steel subjected to a thermo-mechanical treatment (TMT) process was performed to rationalize the cross-weld creep properties. A series of thermo-mechanical processing in the austenite phase region, followed by isothermal aging at temperatures at 973 to 1173 K (700 to 900ºC) was applied to the Grade 91 steel to promote precipitation kinetics of MX (M: Nb and V, X: C and N) in the austenite matrix. Detailed characterization of the base metals after standard tempering confirmed the presence of fine MX dispersion within the tempered martensitic microstructure in steels processed at/and above 1073 K (800 ºC). Relatively low volume fraction of M23C6 precipitates was observed after processing at 1073 K (800 ºC). The cross-weld creep strength after processing was increased with respect to the increase of MX dispersion, indicating that these MX precipitates maintained during weld thermal cycles in the fine grained heat affected zone (FGHAZ) region and thereby contribute to improved creep resistant of welds in comparison to the welds made with the standard “normalization and tempering” processes. Lastly, the steels processed in this specific processing condition showed improved cross-weld creep resistance and sufficient room-temperature toughness. The above data is also analysed based on existing theories of creep deformation based on dislocation climb mechanism.

  10. Toward Improving the Type IV Cracking Resistance in Cr-Mo Steel Weld Through Thermo-Mechanical Processing

    DOE PAGES

    Shassere, Benjamin A.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-02-23

    Detailed microstructure characterization of Grade 91 (Modified 9Cr-1Mo, ASTM A387) steel subjected to a thermo-mechanical treatment (TMT) process was performed to rationalize the cross-weld creep properties. A series of thermo-mechanical processing in the austenite phase region, followed by isothermal aging at temperatures at 973 to 1173 K (700 to 900ºC) was applied to the Grade 91 steel to promote precipitation kinetics of MX (M: Nb and V, X: C and N) in the austenite matrix. Detailed characterization of the base metals after standard tempering confirmed the presence of fine MX dispersion within the tempered martensitic microstructure in steels processed at/andmore » above 1073 K (800 ºC). Relatively low volume fraction of M23C6 precipitates was observed after processing at 1073 K (800 ºC). The cross-weld creep strength after processing was increased with respect to the increase of MX dispersion, indicating that these MX precipitates maintained during weld thermal cycles in the fine grained heat affected zone (FGHAZ) region and thereby contribute to improved creep resistant of welds in comparison to the welds made with the standard “normalization and tempering” processes. Lastly, the steels processed in this specific processing condition showed improved cross-weld creep resistance and sufficient room-temperature toughness. The above data is also analysed based on existing theories of creep deformation based on dislocation climb mechanism.« less

  11. Model of Layered Weld Formation Under Narrow Gap Pulse Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The model parameters of narrow gap pulse welding can be divided into input, internal and output ones. The breadth of gap, that is, clearance breadth between upright edges is one of key parameters securing high quality of a weld joint. The paper presents theoretical outcomes for the model of layered weld formation under narrow gap pulse welding. Based on these studies is developed model of processes, which occur in the weld pool under pulse grove welding. It comprises the scheme of liquid metal motion in the weld pool, scheme of fusion with the side edge and in the bottom part, and the scheme of welding current impulse effect on the structure of a weld joint.

  12. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  13. Development of a Comprehensive Weld Process Model

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, B.; Zacharia, T.

    1997-05-01

    . The timing results illustrate the potential of the modified computer model for the analysis of large-scale welding simulations. 2. The kinetics of grain structure evolution in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ) has been simulated with reasonable accuracy by coupling an improved MC grain growth algorithm with a methodology for converting the MC parameters of grain size and time to real parameters. The simulations effectively captured the thermal pinning phenomenon that has been reported in the weld HAZ. 3. A cellular automaton (CA) code has been developed to simulate the solidification microstructure in the weld fusion zone. The simulations effectively captured the epitaxial growth of the HAZ grains, the grain selection mechanism, and the formation of typical grain structures observed in the weld t%sion zone. 4. The point heat source used in the LMES welding code has ben replaced with a distributed heat source to better capture the thermal characteristics and energy distributions in a commercial welding heat source. 5. Coupled thermal-mechanical and metallurgical models have been developed to accurately predict the weld residual stresses, and 6. Attempts have been made to integrate the newly developed computational capabilities into a comprehensive weld design tool.

  14. An Evaluation of Signal Processing Tools for Improving Phased Array Ultrasonic Weld Inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Harris, Robert V.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2011-03-24

    Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) commonly used in U.S. nuclear power plants is a coarse-grained, elastically anisotropic material. The coarse-grained nature of CASS makes ultrasonic inspection of in-service components difficult. Recently, low-frequency phased array ultrasound has emerged as a candidate for the CASS piping weld inspection. However, issues such as low signal-to-noise ratio and difficulty in discriminating between flaw and non-flaw signals remain. This paper discusses the evaluation of a number of signal processing algorithms for improving flaw detection in CASS materials. The full paper provides details of the algorithms being evaluated, along with preliminary results.

  15. Improvement in Fatigue Performance of Aluminium Alloy Welded Joints by Laser Shock Peening in a Dynamic Strain Aging Temperature Regime

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chun; Zhou, Jianzhong; Meng, Xiankai; Huang, Shu

    2016-01-01

    As a new treatment process after welding, the process parameters of laser shock peening (LSP) in dynamic strain aging (DSA) temperature regimes can be precisely controlled, and the process is a non-contact one. The effects of LSP at elevated temperatures on the distribution of the surface residual stress of AA6061-T6 welded joints were investigated by using X-ray diffraction technology with the sin2ϕ method and Abaqus software. The fatigue life of the welded joints was estimated by performing tensile fatigue tests. The microstructural evolution in surface and fatigue fractures of the welded joints was presented by means of surface integrity and fracture surface testing. In the DSA temperature regime of AA6061-T6 welded joints, the residual compressive stress was distributed more stably than that of LSP at room temperature. The thermal corrosion resistance and fatigue properties of the welded joints were also improved. The experimental results and numerical analysis were in mutual agreement. PMID:28773920

  16. Improvement in Fatigue Performance of Aluminium Alloy Welded Joints by Laser Shock Peening in a Dynamic Strain Aging Temperature Regime.

    PubMed

    Su, Chun; Zhou, Jianzhong; Meng, Xiankai; Huang, Shu

    2016-09-26

    As a new treatment process after welding, the process parameters of laser shock peening (LSP) in dynamic strain aging (DSA) temperature regimes can be precisely controlled, and the process is a non-contact one. The effects of LSP at elevated temperatures on the distribution of the surface residual stress of AA6061-T6 welded joints were investigated by using X-ray diffraction technology with the sin²ϕ method and Abaqus software. The fatigue life of the welded joints was estimated by performing tensile fatigue tests. The microstructural evolution in surface and fatigue fractures of the welded joints was presented by means of surface integrity and fracture surface testing. In the DSA temperature regime of AA6061-T6 welded joints, the residual compressive stress was distributed more stably than that of LSP at room temperature. The thermal corrosion resistance and fatigue properties of the welded joints were also improved. The experimental results and numerical analysis were in mutual agreement.

  17. Influence of M-TIG and A-TIG Welding Process on Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyarthy, R. S.; Dwivedi, D. K.; Vasudevan, M.

    2017-03-01

    The current study investigates the effects of activating flux tungsten inert gas welding (A-TIG) and multipass tungsten inert gas welding (M-TIG) on the weld morphology, angular distortion, microstructures and mechanical properties when welding 8-mm-thick 409 ferritic stainless steel (FSS). SiO2 was used as activating flux for A-TIG welding, while SUPERTIG ER309L was used as filler for M-TIG welding. Bead-on-plate weld trials were carried out to obtain the full penetration by using different combinations of flux coating density, welding speed and welding current. An optical microscope, field emission scanning microscope (FESEM), and x-ray diffractometer were used for the metallurgical characterizations. Vickers hardness, tensile test, Charpy toughness test, and creep behavior test were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties of the base and weld metals. Experimental results indicate that the A-TIG process can increase the joint penetration and tends to reduce the angular distortion of the 409 FSS weldment. The A-TIG welded joint also exhibited greater mechanical strength. However, a critically low Charpy toughness was measured for the A-TIG weld fusion zone, which was later sufficiently improved after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). It was concluded that PWHT is mandatory for A-TIG welded 409 FSS.

  18. Influence of M-TIG and A-TIG Welding Process on Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyarthy, R. S.; Dwivedi, D. K.; Vasudevan, M.

    2017-02-01

    The current study investigates the effects of activating flux tungsten inert gas welding (A-TIG) and multipass tungsten inert gas welding (M-TIG) on the weld morphology, angular distortion, microstructures and mechanical properties when welding 8-mm-thick 409 ferritic stainless steel (FSS). SiO2 was used as activating flux for A-TIG welding, while SUPERTIG ER309L was used as filler for M-TIG welding. Bead-on-plate weld trials were carried out to obtain the full penetration by using different combinations of flux coating density, welding speed and welding current. An optical microscope, field emission scanning microscope (FESEM), and x-ray diffractometer were used for the metallurgical characterizations. Vickers hardness, tensile test, Charpy toughness test, and creep behavior test were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties of the base and weld metals. Experimental results indicate that the A-TIG process can increase the joint penetration and tends to reduce the angular distortion of the 409 FSS weldment. The A-TIG welded joint also exhibited greater mechanical strength. However, a critically low Charpy toughness was measured for the A-TIG weld fusion zone, which was later sufficiently improved after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). It was concluded that PWHT is mandatory for A-TIG welded 409 FSS.

  19. Method of welding joint in closed vessel improves quality of seam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, R.; Levoe, C.

    1964-01-01

    To facilitate welding of closed vessels, a metal backup strip is used at the junction inside the vessel. After welding from the outside, this strip is dissolved by a chemically reactive solvent poured through a filler hole into the vessel.

  20. Multisensor multiresolution data fusion for improvement in classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubeena, V.; Tiwari, K. C.

    2016-04-01

    The rapid advancements in technology have facilitated easy availability of multisensor and multiresolution remote sensing data. Multisensor, multiresolution data contain complementary information and fusion of such data may result in application dependent significant information which may otherwise remain trapped within. The present work aims at improving classification by fusing features of coarse resolution hyperspectral (1 m) LWIR and fine resolution (20 cm) RGB data. The classification map comprises of eight classes. The class names are Road, Trees, Red Roof, Grey Roof, Concrete Roof, Vegetation, bare Soil and Unclassified. The processing methodology for hyperspectral LWIR data comprises of dimensionality reduction, resampling of data by interpolation technique for registering the two images at same spatial resolution, extraction of the spatial features to improve classification accuracy. In the case of fine resolution RGB data, the vegetation index is computed for classifying the vegetation class and the morphological building index is calculated for buildings. In order to extract the textural features, occurrence and co-occurence statistics is considered and the features will be extracted from all the three bands of RGB data. After extracting the features, Support Vector Machine (SVMs) has been used for training and classification. To increase the classification accuracy, post processing steps like removal of any spurious noise such as salt and pepper noise is done which is followed by filtering process by majority voting within the objects for better object classification.

  1. Use of Simulation to Improve the Effectiveness of Army Welding Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    support weight or carry a load. In contrast, specialist welding skills are required for more complex welds, such as repairing vehicle armour . These...welds are more difficult due to the type of metal used, the requirement for a higher standard of weld to ensure the armour protects the crew, and the...Put on required safety equipment ( glasses , mask, gloves) Low Low 3.2. Hold gun in correct position High Medium 3.2.1. At required angle

  2. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming

    2012-07-15

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80-100 {mu}m between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn{sub 2}, Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg-Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

  3. Score Fusion and Decision Fusion for the Performance Improvement of Face Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    while the thermal dataset is denoted as ASUIR. Combining with left ( L ) and right (R) side, the notations of all datasets are ASUDCL, ASUDCR, ASUIRL...DC, IR), stereo side ( L , R), and decision rule (AND, OR) are exhibited in Table 2. B. Performance of single face recognition algorithm The three...KNN, BLR and HMM), there are four different combinations, L (score fusion from left images), R (score fusion from right images), L &R (decision

  4. Technology of welding aluminum alloys-IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginez, R.; Lewis, J. R.; Millett, A. U.; Saenger, K. A.; Skelly, J. K.; Standiford, V. E.; Whiteman, J. O.

    1978-01-01

    Skate-weld carriage and track assembly were developed for controlled fusion welding on compound-curvature surfaces. Unlike fixed-position carriage used for vertical, horizontal, and circumferential welding, carriage has suspension system that permits angular positioning of weld head on carriage. It also has carriage-and-drive track mechanism capable of traveling over compound curvatures. Carriage is designed with universal mounting platform so that slim tools, weld heads, or X-ray units can be interchanged without need for realinement.

  5. Improving Hygienic Characteristics of Coated Electrodes for Welding High-Alloy Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'yaschenko, D. P.; Chinakhov, D. A.; Ivanov, K. V.; Sadikov, I. D.

    2017-01-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies showing that the use of an inverter power supply instead of a diode rectifier provides:: fine-droplet electrode metal transfer which reduces generation time by 46% and transfer time by 28%; transfer of alloying elements from welding materials into the weld metal which reduces its loss from the welding line by 6% and the heat affected area by 3%; reducing the emission rate of welding fumes and their components by 23%; reducing specific emission of welding fumes and their components by 23%.

  6. Hybrid/Tandem Laser-Arc Welding of Thick Low Carbon Martensitic Stainless Steel Plates =

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh

    High efficiency and long-term life of hydraulic turbines and their assemblies are of utmost importance for the hydropower industry. Usually, hydroelectric turbine components are made of thick-walled low carbon martensitic stainless steels. The assembly of large hydroelectric turbine components has been a great challenge. The use of conventional welding processes involves typical large groove design and multi-pass welding to fill the groove which exposes the weld to a high heat input creating relatively large fusion zone and heat affected zone. The newly-developed hybrid/tandem laser-arc welding technique is believed to offer a highly competitive solution to improve the overall hydro-turbine performance by combining the high energy density and fast welding speed of the laser welding technology with the good gap bridging and feeding ability of the gas metal arc welding process to increase the productivity and reduce the consumable material. The main objective of this research work is to understand different challenges appearing during hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) of thick gauge assemblies of low carbon 13%Cr- 4%Ni martensitic stainless steel and find a practical solution by adapting and optimizing this relatively new welding process in order to reduce the number of welding passes necessary to fill the groove gap. The joint integrity was evaluated in terms of microstructure, defects and mechanical properties in both as-welded and post-welded conditions. A special focus was given to the hybrid and tandem laser-arc welding technique for the root pass. Based on the thickness of the low carbon martensitic stainless steel plates, this work is mainly focused on the following two tasks: • Single pass hybrid laser-arc welding of 10-mm thick low carbon martensitic stainless steel. • Multi-pass hybrid/tandem laser-arc welding of 25-mm thick martensitic stainless steel.

  7. Improving Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Image Quality with Image Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Tarolli, Jay G.; Jackson, Lauren M.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The spatial resolution of chemical images acquired with cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is limited not only by the size of the probe utilized to create the images, but also by detection sensitivity. As the probe size is reduced to below 1 µm, for example, a low signal in each pixel limits lateral resolution due to counting statistics considerations. Although it can be useful to implement numerical methods to mitigate this problem, here we investigate the use of image fusion to combine information from scanning electron microscope (SEM) data with chemically resolved SIMS images. The advantage of this approach is that the higher intensity and, hence, spatial resolution of the electron images can help to improve the quality of the SIMS images without sacrificing chemical specificity. Using a pan-sharpening algorithm, the method is illustrated using synthetic data, experimental data acquired from a metallic grid sample, and experimental data acquired from a lawn of algae cells. The results show that up to an order of magnitude increase in spatial resolution is possible to achieve. A cross-correlation metric is utilized for evaluating the reliability of the procedure. PMID:24912432

  8. Improved Image Fusion Method Based on NSCT and Accelerated NMF

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Lai, Siyu; Li, Mingdong

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve algorithm efficiency and performance, a technique for image fusion based on the Non-subsampled Contourlet Transform (NSCT) domain and an Accelerated Non-negative Matrix Factorization (ANMF)-based algorithm is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the registered source images are decomposed in multi-scale and multi-direction using the NSCT method. Then, the ANMF algorithm is executed on low-frequency sub-images to get the low-pass coefficients. The low frequency fused image can be generated faster in that the update rules for W and H are optimized and less iterations are needed. In addition, the Neighborhood Homogeneous Measurement (NHM) rule is performed on the high-frequency part to achieve the band-pass coefficients. Finally, the ultimate fused image is obtained by integrating all sub-images with the inverse NSCT. The simulated experiments prove that our method indeed promotes performance when compared to PCA, NSCT-based, NMF-based and weighted NMF-based algorithms. PMID:22778618

  9. Improved image fusion method based on NSCT and accelerated NMF.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Lai, Siyu; Li, Mingdong

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve algorithm efficiency and performance, a technique for image fusion based on the Non-subsampled Contourlet Transform (NSCT) domain and an Accelerated Non-negative Matrix Factorization (ANMF)-based algorithm is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the registered source images are decomposed in multi-scale and multi-direction using the NSCT method. Then, the ANMF algorithm is executed on low-frequency sub-images to get the low-pass coefficients. The low frequency fused image can be generated faster in that the update rules for W and H are optimized and less iterations are needed. In addition, the Neighborhood Homogeneous Measurement (NHM) rule is performed on the high-frequency part to achieve the band-pass coefficients. Finally, the ultimate fused image is obtained by integrating all sub-images with the inverse NSCT. The simulated experiments prove that our method indeed promotes performance when compared to PCA, NSCT-based, NMF-based and weighted NMF-based algorithms.

  10. Improving Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Image Quality with Image Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarolli, Jay G.; Jackson, Lauren M.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2014-12-01

    The spatial resolution of chemical images acquired with cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is limited not only by the size of the probe utilized to create the images but also by detection sensitivity. As the probe size is reduced to below 1 μm, for example, a low signal in each pixel limits lateral resolution because of counting statistics considerations. Although it can be useful to implement numerical methods to mitigate this problem, here we investigate the use of image fusion to combine information from scanning electron microscope (SEM) data with chemically resolved SIMS images. The advantage of this approach is that the higher intensity and, hence, spatial resolution of the electron images can help to improve the quality of the SIMS images without sacrificing chemical specificity. Using a pan-sharpening algorithm, the method is illustrated using synthetic data, experimental data acquired from a metallic grid sample, and experimental data acquired from a lawn of algae cells. The results show that up to an order of magnitude increase in spatial resolution is possible to achieve. A cross-correlation metric is utilized for evaluating the reliability of the procedure.

  11. Insights Gained from Ultrasonic Testing of Piping Welds Subjected to the Mechanical Stress Improvement Process

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Moran, Traci L.

    2010-12-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assisting the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in developing a position on the management of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in leak-before-break piping systems. Part of this involves determining whether inspections alone, or inspections plus mitigation, are needed. This work addresses the reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) of cracks that have been mitigated by the mechanical stress improvement process (MSIP). The MSIP has been approved by the NRC (NUREG-0313) since 1986 and modifies residual stresses remaining after welding with compressive, or neutral, stresses near the inner diameter surface of the pipe. This compressive stress is thought to arrest existing cracks and inhibit new crack formation. To evaluate the effectiveness of the MSIP and the reliability of ultrasonic inspections, flaws were evaluated both before and after MSIP application. An initial investigation was based on data acquired from cracked areas in 325-mm-diameter piping at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) in Lithuania. In a follow-on exercise, PNNL acquired and evaluated similar UT data from a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) specimen containing implanted thermal fatigue cracks. The DMW specimen is a carbon steel nozzle-to-safe end-to-stainless steel pipe section that simulates a pressurizer surge nozzle. The flaws were implanted in the nozzle-to-safe end Alloy 82/182 butter region. Results are presented on the effects of MSIP on specimen surfaces, and on UT flaw responses.

  12. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  13. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  14. Parametric study in weld mismatch of longitudinally welded SSME HPFTP inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Spanyer, K. L.; Brunair, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    Welded joints are an essential part of pressure vessels such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Turbopumps. Defects produced in the welding process can be detrimental to weld performance. Recently, review of the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) titanium inlet x rays revealed several weld discrepancies such as penetrameter density issues, film processing discrepancies, weld width discrepancies, porosity, lack of fusion, and weld offsets. Currently, the sensitivity of welded structures to defects is of concern. From a fatigue standpoint, weld offset may have a serious effect since local yielding, in general, aggravates cyclic stress effects. Therefore, the weld offset issue is considered. Using the finite element method and mathematical formulations, parametric studies were conducted to determine the influence of weld offsets and a variation of weld widths in longitudinally welded cylindrical structures with equal wall thickness on both sides of the joint. From the study, the finite element results and theoretical solutions are presented.

  15. Friction Buttering: A New Technique for Dissimilar Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, G. M.; Mastanaiah, P.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Kottada, Ravi Sankar

    2017-06-01

    This work offers a fresh perspective on buttering, a technique often considered for fusion welding of dissimilar metals. For the first time, buttering was attempted in solid state using friction deposition. Using this new "friction buttering" technique, fusion welding of two different dissimilar metal pairs (austenitic stainless steel/borated stainless steel and Al-Cu-Mg/Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) was successfully demonstrated. The results show that friction buttering can simplify a tough dissimilar welding problem into a routine fusion welding task.

  16. Friction Buttering: A New Technique for Dissimilar Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, G. M.; Mastanaiah, P.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Kottada, Ravi Sankar

    2017-02-01

    This work offers a fresh perspective on buttering, a technique often considered for fusion welding of dissimilar metals. For the first time, buttering was attempted in solid state using friction deposition. Using this new "friction buttering" technique, fusion welding of two different dissimilar metal pairs (austenitic stainless steel/borated stainless steel and Al-Cu-Mg/Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) was successfully demonstrated. The results show that friction buttering can simplify a tough dissimilar welding problem into a routine fusion welding task.

  17. A study of the solid-liquid interface in cobalt base alloy (Stellite) coatings deposited by fusion welding (TIG)

    SciTech Connect

    Molleda, F. . E-mail: fmolleda@etsin.upm.es; Mora, J.; Molleda, F.J.; Mora, E.; Carrillo, E.; Mellor, B.G.

    2006-12-15

    Microstructural features present at the interface between a weld deposited Stellite 6 hard facing and an austenitic stainless steel substrate are described. Elemental X-ray maps indicate that diffusion of carbon from the liquid Stellite to the austenitic stainless steel takes place along grain boundaries resulting in the formation of chromium carbide 'arms' that penetrate along the austenite grain boundaries in the interfacial region.

  18. Fusion of infrared-visible images using improved multi-scale top-hat transform and suitable fusion rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Pan; Ma, Xiaoqing; Huang, Zhanhua

    2017-03-01

    Integration of infrared and visible images is an active and important topic in image understanding and interpretation. In this paper, a new fusion method is proposed based on the improved multi-scale center-surround top-hat transform, which can effectively extract the feature information and detail information of source images. Firstly, the multi-scale bright (dark) feature regions of infrared and visible images are respectively extracted at different scale levels by the improved multi-scale center-surround top-hat transform. Secondly, the feature regions at the same scale in both images are combined by multi-judgment contrast fusion rule, and the final feature images are obtained by simply adding all scales of feature images together. Then, a base image is calculated by performing Gaussian fuzzy logic combination rule on two smoothed source images. Finally, the fusion image is obtained by importing the extracted bright and dark feature images into the base image with a suitable strategy. Both objective assessment and subjective vision of the experimental results indicate that the proposed method is superior to current popular MST-based methods and morphology-based methods in the field of infrared-visible images fusion.

  19. Heat Treatment of Friction-Stir-Welded 7050 Aluminum Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petter, George E.; Figert, John D.; Rybicki, Daniel J.; Burns, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    A method of heat treatment has been developed to reverse some of the deleterious effects of friction stir welding of plates of aluminum alloy 7050. This alloy is considered unweldable by arc and high-energy-density beam fusion welding processes. The alloy can be friction stir welded, but as-welded workpieces exhibit low ductility, low tensile and yield strengths, and low resistance to stress corrosion cracking. Heat treatment according to the present method increases tensile and yield strengths, and minimizes or eliminates stress corrosion cracking. It also increases ductility. This method of heat treatment is a superior alternative to a specification-required heat treatment that caused the formation of large columnar grains, which are undesired. Workpieces subjected to the prior heat treatment exhibited elongations <2 percent, and standard three-point bend specimens shattered. The development of the present heat treatment method was guided partly by the principles that (1) by minimizing grain sizes and relieving deformation stresses, one can minimize or eliminate stress corrosion cracking and (2) the key to maximizing strength and eliminating residual stresses is to perform post-weld solution heating for as long a time as possible while incurring little or no development of large columnar grains in friction stir weld nuggets. It is necessary to perform some of the solution heat treatment (to soften the alloy and improve machine welding parameters) before welding. The following is an example of thickness- dependent pre- and post-weld heat treatments according to the present method: For plates 0.270 in. (approx.6.86 mm) thick milled from plates 4.5 in. (114.3 mm) thick, perform pre-weld solution heating at 890 F (477 C) for 1 hour, then cool in air. After friction stir welding, perform solution heating for 10 minutes, quench, hold at room temperature for 96 hours, then age at 250 F (121 C) for 5 hours followed by 325 F (163 C) for 27 hours.

  20. Affordable non-traditional source data mining for context assessment to improve distributed fusion system robustness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Christopher; Haith, Gary; Steinberg, Alan; Morefield, Charles; Morefield, Michael

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes methods to affordably improve the robustness of distributed fusion systems by opportunistically leveraging non-traditional data sources. Adaptive methods help find relevant data, create models, and characterize the model quality. These methods also can measure the conformity of this non-traditional data with fusion system products including situation modeling and mission impact prediction. Non-traditional data can improve the quantity, quality, availability, timeliness, and diversity of the baseline fusion system sources and therefore can improve prediction and estimation accuracy and robustness at all levels of fusion. Techniques are described that automatically learn to characterize and search non-traditional contextual data to enable operators integrate the data with the high-level fusion systems and ontologies. These techniques apply the extension of the Data Fusion & Resource Management Dual Node Network (DNN) technical architecture at Level 4. The DNN architecture supports effectively assessment and management of the expanded portfolio of data sources, entities of interest, models, and algorithms including data pattern discovery and context conformity. Affordable model-driven and data-driven data mining methods to discover unknown models from non-traditional and `big data' sources are used to automatically learn entity behaviors and correlations with fusion products, [14 and 15]. This paper describes our context assessment software development, and the demonstration of context assessment of non-traditional data to compare to an intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance fusion product based upon an IED POIs workflow.

  1. Improvement of resistance to hydrogen induced cracking in electric resistance welded pipes fabricated with slit coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hyun Uk; Lee, Jong Bong; Choi, Ho Jin

    2009-02-01

    The optimization of electric resistance welding (ERW) conditions was studied to improve the resistance to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) at the bondline in small diameter API X60 ERW pipes fabricated with slit coils. The results show that HIC is initiated preferentially at the elongated Si, Mn and Al-rich oxide inclusions, normally known as a penetrator on the bondline. However, no evidence was found of any centerline segregation effect. The HIC ratio increases with the fraction of penetrators at the bondline, regardless of the degrees of center segregation. Furthermore, for a satisfactory level of HIC resistance, the fraction of penetrators must be less than 0.03 % and most of the penetrators should be circular-shaped. The design of experimental (DOE) method was used to determine the optimum ERW condition for minimization of the penetrator ratio. Finally, guideline is suggested for the optimum ERW condition for achieving excellent HIC resistance.

  2. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1986-01-01

    Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

  3. Improvement of information fusion-based audio steganalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraetzer, Christian; Dittmann, Jana

    2010-01-01

    In the paper we extend an existing information fusion based audio steganalysis approach by three different kinds of evaluations: The first evaluation addresses the so far neglected evaluations on sensor level fusion. Our results show that this fusion removes content dependability while being capable of achieving similar classification rates (especially for the considered global features) if compared to single classifiers on the three exemplarily tested audio data hiding algorithms. The second evaluation enhances the observations on fusion from considering only segmental features to combinations of segmental and global features, with the result of a reduction of the required computational complexity for testing by about two magnitudes while maintaining the same degree of accuracy. The third evaluation tries to build a basis for estimating the plausibility of the introduced steganalysis approach by measuring the sensibility of the models used in supervised classification of steganographic material against typical signal modification operations like de-noising or 128kBit/s MP3 encoding. Our results show that for some of the tested classifiers the probability of false alarms rises dramatically after such modifications.

  4. Grain Refinement in Al-Mg-Si Alloy TIG Welds Using Transverse Mechanical Arc Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biradar, N. S.; Raman, R.

    2012-11-01

    Reduction in grain size in weld fusion zones (FZs) presents the advantages of increased resistance to solidification cracking and improvement in mechanical properties. Transverse mechanical arc oscillation was employed to obtain grain refinement in the weldment during tungsten inert gas welding of Al-Mg-Si alloy. Electron backscattered diffraction analysis was carried out on AA6061-AA4043 filler metal tungsten inert gas welds. Grain size, texture evolution, misorientation distribution, and aspect ratio of weld metal, PMZ, and BM have been observed at fixed arc oscillation amplitude and at three different frequencies levels. Arc oscillation showed grain size reduction and texture formation. Fine-grained arc oscillated welds exhibited better yield and ultimate tensile strengths and significant improvement in percent elongation. The obtained results were attributed to reduction in equivalent circular diameter of grains and increase in number of subgrain network structure of low angle grain boundaries.

  5. 49 CFR 179.220-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding. 179.220-10 Section 179.220-10...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-10 Welding. (a) All joints must be fusion... subchapter). Welding procedures, welders, and fabricators shall be approved. (b) Radioscopy of the...

  6. 49 CFR 179.200-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding. 179.200-10 Section 179.200-10...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-10 Welding. (a) All joints shall be fusion... § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be approved. (b)...

  7. 49 CFR 179.220-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding. 179.220-10 Section 179.220-10...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-10 Welding. (a) All joints must be fusion... subchapter). Welding procedures, welders, and fabricators shall be approved. (b) Radioscopy of the...

  8. 49 CFR 179.220-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding. 179.220-10 Section 179.220-10...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-10 Welding. (a) All joints must be fusion... subchapter). Welding procedures, welders, and fabricators shall be approved. (b) Radioscopy of the...

  9. The basics of semiautomatic welding

    SciTech Connect

    Uttrachi, G.D. ); Meyer, D.W. )

    1993-08-01

    By definition, gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and flux cored arc welding (FCAW) are semiautomatic processes in which a consumable electrode is fed into a weld at a controlled rate, while in most cases a continuous blanket of gas shields the weld zone from contamination by the atmosphere. Semiautomatic welding includes five distinctive techniques or process variations, known as short circuiting, spray transfer, pulsed spray, gas shielded flux cored, and self-shielded flux cored welding. Short circuiting welding operates on generally lower arc voltages and amperages than spray transfer. This process pinpoints the arc heat and produces a small fast-freezing weld pool. The spray transfer process provides an intensely hot, higher voltage arc and high deposition rates. The pulsed spray mode of metal transfer uses two weld current levels: low background and pulse peak. Droplet transfer usually occurs during the pulse peak portion of the cycle. The low current background allows reduced heat input and improved weld pool control. Flux cored welding transfers metal in a manner similar to spray transfer, but with larger droplets. The higher weld currents usable with flux cored welding result in higher deposition rates and deeper penetration. Self-shielded flux cored welding is similar to gas-shielded flux cored welding except that its weld shielding mechanism is self-contained in the wire. As a result, it can be used outdoors with less need for wind breaks.

  10. Weld Wire Investigation Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M.A.

    1999-03-22

    After GTA welding reservoir A production/process prove-in assemblies, X-ray examination detected a lack of sidewall fusion. After examining several possible causes, it was determined that the weld wire filler metal was responsible, particularly the wire cleaning process. The final conclusion was that the filler wire must be abrasively cleaned in a particular manner to perform as required. The abrasive process was incorporated into the wire material specification, ensuring consistency for all reservoir GTA welding at AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T).

  11. Welding Curtains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-01-01

    Concept of transparent welding curtains made of heavy duty vinyl originated with David F. Wilson, President of Wilson Sales Company. In 1968, Wilson's curtains reduced glare of welding arc and blocked ultraviolet radiation. When later research uncovered blue light hazards, Wilson sought improvement of his products. He contracted Dr. Charles G. Miller and James B. Stephens, both of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and they agreed to undertake development of a curtain capable of filtering out harmful irradiance, including ultraviolet and blue light and provide protection over a broad range of welding operation. Working on their own time, the JPL pair spent 3 years developing a patented formula that includes light filtering dyes and small particles of zinc oxide. The result was the Wilson Spectra Curtain.

  12. Thermal Stir Welding: A New Solid State Welding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stir welding is a new welding process developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Thermal stir welding is similar to friction stir welding in that it joins similar or dissimilar materials without melting the parent material. However, unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the process are all independent of each other and are separately controlled. Furthermore, the heating element of the process can be either a solid-state process (such as a thermal blanket, induction type process, etc), or, a fusion process (YG laser, plasma torch, etc.) The separation of the heating, stirring, forging elements of the process allows more degrees of freedom for greater process control. This paper introduces the mechanics of the thermal stir welding process. In addition, weld mechanical property data is presented for selected alloys as well as metallurgical analysis.

  13. Thermal Stir Welding: A New Solid State Welding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thermal stir welding is a new welding process developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Thermal stir welding is similar to friction stir welding in that it joins similar or dissimilar materials without melting the parent material. However, unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the process are all independent of each other and are separately controlled. Furthermore, the heating element of the process can be either a solid-state process (such as a thermal blanket, induction type process, etc), or, a fusion process (YG laser, plasma torch, etc.) The separation of the heating, stirring, forging elements of the process allows more degrees of freedom for greater process control. This paper introduces the mechanics of the thermal stir welding process. In addition, weld mechanical property data is presented for selected alloys as well as metallurgical analysis.

  14. Thermal Stir Welding: A New Solid State Welding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stir welding is a new welding process developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Thermal stir welding is similar to friction stir welding in that it joins similar or dissimilar materials without melting the parent material. However, unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the process are all independent of each other and are separately controlled. Furthermore, the heating element of the process can be either a solid-state process (such as a thermal blanket, induction type process, etc), or, a fusion process (YG laser, plasma torch, etc.) The separation of the heating, stirring, forging elements of the process allows more degrees of freedom for greater process control. This paper introduces the mechanics of the thermal stir welding process. In addition, weld mechanical property data is presented for selected alloys as well as metallurgical analysis.

  15. Thermal Stir Welding: A New Solid State Welding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thermal stir welding is a new welding process developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Thermal stir welding is similar to friction stir welding in that it joins similar or dissimilar materials without melting the parent material. However, unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the process are all independent of each other and are separately controlled. Furthermore, the heating element of the process can be either a solid-state process (such as a thermal blanket, induction type process, etc), or, a fusion process (YG laser, plasma torch, etc.) The separation of the heating, stirring, forging elements of the process allows more degrees of freedom for greater process control. This paper introduces the mechanics of the thermal stir welding process. In addition, weld mechanical property data is presented for selected alloys as well as metallurgical analysis.

  16. A study of weld quality in ultrasonic spot welding of similar and dissimilar metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sarraf, Z.; Lucas, M.

    2012-08-01

    Several difficulties are faced in joining thinner sheets of similar and dissimilar materials from fusion welding processes such as resistance welding and laser welding. Ultrasonic metal welding overcomes many of these difficulties by using high frequency vibration and applied pressure to create a solid-state weld. Ultrasonic metal welding is an effective technique in joining small components, such as in wire bonding, but is also capable of joining thicker sheet, depending on the control of welding conditions. This study presents the design, characterisation and test of a lateral-drive ultrasonic metal welding device. The ultrasonic welding horn is modelled using finite element analysis and its vibration behaviour is characterised experimentally to ensure ultrasonic energy is delivered to the weld coupon. The welding stack and fixtures are then designed and mounted on a test machine to allow a series of experiments to be conducted for various welding and ultrasonic parameters. Weld strength is subsequently analysed using tensile-shear tests. Control of the vibration amplitude profile through the weld cycle is used to enhance weld strength and quality, providing an opportunity to reduce part marking. Optical microscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the weld quality. The results show how the weld quality is particularly sensitive to the combination of clamping force and vibration amplitude of the welding tip.

  17. Improving Between-Shot Fusion Data Analysis with Parallel Structures

    SciTech Connect

    CHET NIETER

    2005-07-27

    In the Phase I project we concentrated on three technical objectives to demonstrate the feasibility of the Phase II project: (1) the development of a parallel MDSplus data handler, (2) the parallelization of existing fusion data analysis packages, and (3) the development of techniques to automatically generate parallelized code using pre-compiler directives. We summarize the results of the Phase I research for each of these objectives below. We also describe below additional accomplishments related to the development of the TaskDL and mpiDL parallelization packages.

  18. High cycle fatigue of weld repaired cast Ti-6AI-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, G. B.; Hodi, F. S.; Eagar, T. W.

    1982-09-01

    In order to determine the effects of weld repair on fatigue life of titanium-6Al-4V castings, a series of specimens was exposed to variations in heat treatment, weld procedure, HIP cycle, cooling rate, and surface finish. The results indicate that weld repair is not detrimental to HCF properties as fatigue cracks were located primarily in the base metal. Fine surface finish and large colony size are the primary variables improving the fatigue life. The fusion zone resisted fatigue crack initiation due to a basketweave morphology and thin grain boundary alpha. Multipass welds were shown not to affect fatigue life when compared with single pass welds. A secondary HIP treatment was not detrimental to fatigue properties, but was found to be unnecessary.

  19. Improved Hidden Clique Detection by Optimal Linear Fusion of Multiple Adjacency Matrices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-30

    Improved Hidden Clique Detection by Optimal Linear Fusion of Multiple Adjacency Matrices (Invited Paper) Himanshu Nayar∗, Rajmonda S. Caceres†, Kelly...where we are a given multiple Erdős- Renyi modeled adjacency matrices containing a common hidden or planted clique. The objective is to combine them...probability—we adopt a linear fusion model in which we analyze a convex combination of the adjacency matrices of the graphs. Within this context, we

  20. An improved radiochemical separation of uranium and thorium in environmental samples involving peroxide fusion.

    PubMed

    Galindo, C; Mougin, L; Nourreddine, A

    2007-01-01

    A radiochemical procedure for the accurate determination of uranium and thorium using peroxide fusion followed by ion exchange and extraction chromatography is described. The method of extraction of the element from solid samples is the most important factor in the investigation. It is demonstrated, by measuring a number of reference materials, that fusion with Na(2)O(2) ensures a complete destruction of the mineral lattice and greatly improves the determination of the true activity of actinides.

  1. Percutaneous Thermal Ablation with Ultrasound Guidance. Fusion Imaging Guidance to Improve Conspicuity of Liver Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hakime, Antoine; Yevich, Steven; Tselikas, Lambros; Deschamps, Frederic; Petrover, David; De Baere, Thierry

    2017-05-01

    To assess whether fusion imaging-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) can improve visibility and targeting of liver metastasis that were deemed inconspicuous on ultrasound (US). MWA of liver metastasis not judged conspicuous enough on US was performed under CT/US fusion imaging guidance. The conspicuity before and after the fusion imaging was graded on a five-point scale, and significance was assessed by Wilcoxon test. Technical success, procedure time, and procedure-related complications were evaluated. A total of 35 patients with 40 liver metastases (mean size 1.3 ± 0.4 cm) were enrolled. Image fusion improved conspicuity sufficiently to allow fusion-targeted MWA in 33 patients. The time required for image fusion processing and tumors' identification averaged 10 ± 2.1 min (range 5-14). Initial conspicuity on US by inclusion criteria was 1.2 ± 0.4 (range 0-2), while conspicuity after localization on fusion imaging was 3.5 ± 1 (range 1-5, p < 0.001). Technical success rate was 83% (33/40) in intention-to-treat analysis and 100% in analysis of treated tumors. There were no major procedure-related complications. Fusion imaging broadens the scope of US-guided MWA to metastasis lacking adequate conspicuity on conventional US. Fusion imaging is an effective tool to increase the conspicuity of liver metastases that were initially deemed non visualizable on conventional US imaging.

  2. Bayesian fusion algorithm for improved oscillometric blood pressure estimation.

    PubMed

    Forouzanfar, Mohamad; Dajani, Hilmi R; Groza, Voicu Z; Bolic, Miodrag; Rajan, Sreeraman; Batkin, Izmail

    2016-11-01

    A variety of oscillometric algorithms have been recently proposed in the literature for estimation of blood pressure (BP). However, these algorithms possess specific strengths and weaknesses that should be taken into account before selecting the most appropriate one. In this paper, we propose a fusion method to exploit the advantages of the oscillometric algorithms and circumvent their limitations. The proposed fusion method is based on the computation of the weighted arithmetic mean of the oscillometric algorithms estimates, and the weights are obtained using a Bayesian approach by minimizing the mean square error. The proposed approach is used to fuse four different oscillometric blood pressure estimation algorithms. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated on a pilot dataset of 150 oscillometric recordings from 10 subjects. It is found that the mean error and standard deviation of error are reduced relative to the individual estimation algorithms by up to 7 mmHg and 3 mmHg in estimation of systolic pressure, respectively, and by up to 2 mmHg and 3 mmHg in estimation of diastolic pressure, respectively.

  3. Recovery of Mechanical Properties of a 6061-T6 Aluminum Weld by Heat Treatment After Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Javier Serrano; Ambriz, Ricardo Rafael; López, Francisco Fernando Curiel; Vigueras, David Jaramillo

    2016-07-01

    The dilution effects in welds of a 6061-T6 (Al-Si-Mg) alloy obtained by the modified indirect electric arc (MIEA), using an ER4043 filler metal (Al-Si), and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) were analyzed. The soft zone (55 to 70 HV0.1) formed by the microstructural transformation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) was eliminated. The hardness measurements were presented on a traditional microhardness profile and mapping representation. A hardening effect of the fusion zone was observed; the hardness values were above 120 HV0.1 and tended to be uniform. This behavior could be attributed to the chemical composition of the filler metal, the Mg migration from the base to the weld metal, and the reversible process of the PWHT, which promotes precipitation hardening. Improvement for yield (260 MPa) and tensile strength (310 MPa) of the MIEA joints was observed; these values were similar to those obtained for the base metal. However, the presence of porosity in the fusion zone limits the ductility of the joints (4.3 pct). Even though the yield and tensile strengths of the base metal and welded joints were similar, the stress concentration due to porosity in the weld metal generated data dispersion in fatigue life. As a consequence, the high-cycle fatigue life decreases with respect to the base metal. In contrast, when the crack propagates under elastic conditions, the crack-tip singularity is affected by the porosity in the weld metal (stress liberator). This aspect, in conjunction with the hardening effect in joints subjected to PWHT, improves the fatigue crack growth rate when compared to the as-welded condition.

  4. Improved TIG weld joint strength in aluminum alloy 2219-T87 by filler metal substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, R. M.; Lovoy, C. V.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an investigation on weld joint characteristics of aluminum alloy 2219-T87 are given. Five different alloys were utilized as filler material. The mechanical properties of the joints were determined at ambient and cryogenic temperatures for weldments in the as-welded condition and also, for weldments after elevated temperature exposures. Other evaluations included hardness surveys, stress corrosion susceptibility, and to a limited extent, the internal metallurgical weld structures. The overall results indicate that M-943 filler weldments are superior in strength to weldments containing either the standard 2319 filler or fillers 2014, 2020, and a dual wire feed consisting of three parts 2319 and one part 5652. In addition, no deficiencies were evident in M-934 filler weldments with regard to ductility, joint strength after elevated temperature exposure, weld hardness, metallographic structures, or stress corrosion susceptibility.

  5. Weld Defect Tolerance Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    load bearing cross-sectional area. 3. into Lack of Fusion and Lack of Penetration Lack of fusion is when the weld metal has not fused (melted) the...probability of survival (12). Each band corresponds to a specific fatigue strength required in a given structure in conformance with design criteria...treatment dates back to Palmgren in 1924. Since then, so many hypotheses for fatigue failure modes have surfaced in the world literature that it is rather

  6. [Posterior interbody fusion versus improved transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in segmental spinal fixation for aged spondylolisthesis with lumbar spinal canal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Wu, Ji-bin; Zhao, Meng; Dai, Wei-xiang; Wu, De-hui; Wang, Zhao-hong; Feng, Jie; Liu, Chao; Zhao, Qing-hua; Tian, Ji-wei

    2012-03-06

    To assess the clinical and radiographic outcomes of posterior lumbar fixation and posterior interbody fusion or improved transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for Meyerding grade II/III spondylolisthesis so as to address the suitability of a dynamic stabilization. A total of 28 consecutive patients underwent posterior lumbar fixation and posterior interbody fusion or improved transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for Meyerding grade II/III spondylolisthesis. Among them, 13 patients underwent posterior interface fusion (PLIF) and pedicle screw fixation. And improved transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (ITLIF) and placement of the same system were performed in 15 patients. Their clinical, economic, functional, and radiographic data were recorded both pre- and postoperatively. The average changes of economic and functional scores on the Prolo scale were 1.36 and 1.48 respectively. In patients with posterior interbody fusion; the average preoperative vertebral slippage was 46.9% (range: 25 - 75%) versus 14.6% (range: 15 - 25%) postoperatively. In patients with ITLIF, the average changes in economic and functional scores were 1.75 and 1.63 respectively. And the average preoperative vertebral slippage was 45.2% (range: 28 - 78%) compared with 26.3% (range: 14 - 28%) postoperatively. When two fusion techniques were compared, an overall superior reliability and resistance of systems was associated with the ITLIF procedure. But their clinical outcomes did not differ greatly (P > 0.05). The application of a segmental pedicle screw fixation is both feasible and efficacious.

  7. A study of processes for welding pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, J.

    1991-07-01

    A review was made of exisiting and potential processes for welding pipelines: fusion welding (arc, electron beam, laser, thermit) and forge welding (friction, flash, magnetically impelled arc butt, upset butt, explosive, shielded active gas, gas pressure). Consideration of J-lay operations gave indications that were reflections of the status of the processes in terms of normal land and offshore S-lay operation: forge welding processes, although having promise require considerable development; fusion welding processes offer several possibilities (mechanized GMA welding likely to be used in 1991-2); laser welding requires development in all pipeline areas: a production machine for electron beam welding will involve high costs. Nondestructive testing techniques are also reviewed. Demand for faster quality assessment is being addressed by speeding radiographic film processing and through the development of real time radiography and automatic ultrasonic testing. Conclusions on most likely future process developments are: SMAW with cellulosic electrodes is best for tie-ins, short pip runs; SMAW continues to be important for small-diameter lines, although mechanized GMA could be used, along with mechanical joining, MIAB, radial fraction, and flash butt; mechanized GMA welding is likely to predominate for large diameter lines and probably will be used for the first J-lay line (other techniques could be used too); and welding of piping for station facilities involves both shop welding of sub-assemblies and on-site welding of pipe and sub-assemblies to each other (site welding uses both SMAW and GMAW). Figs, tabs.

  8. VPPA weld model evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  9. Welding for life

    SciTech Connect

    Stiebler, T.J.; Nugent, R.M.; Wilson, R.P.

    1994-12-31

    State of the Art Welding Techniques are being utilized to extend the life of major steam turbine components, as well as other traditional types of repairs. The development of a temper bead welding technique has allowed Houston Lighting and Power (HL and P) to perform innovative weld repairs. Nozzle vanes are weld repaired without removing the nozzle blocks from the case; repair life has also been doubled. A new two wire Gas Tungsten ARC Welding (GTAW) machine has produced high deposition rates while maintaining excellent mechanical properties. This results in faster turn-around time and with an improved weld repair. Development of a weld wire specification has also been instrumental in achieving additional component life by increasing the resistance to fatigue, especially in the heat affected zone. All these factors work together to enhance the weld repairs. Tensile strengths of 140,000 PSI with good ductility have been achieved. This paper will discuss their experiences with several repairs and recap the results of some studies and tests performed during the technique development stages. Major repairs include; weld repair of cases, nozzle blocks, nozzle boxes, stationary blade repair, forced draft fan shaft buildup, weld repair of turbine shrouds, blades, tennons and journals.

  10. Weld electrode cooling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Robert C.; Simon, Daniel L.

    1999-03-01

    The U.S. auto/truck industry has been mandated by the Federal government to continuously improve their fleet average gas mileage, measured in miles per gallon. Several techniques are typically used to meet these mandates, one of which is to reduce the overall mass of cars and trucks. To help accomplish this goal, lighter weight sheet metal parts, with smaller weld flanges, have been designed and fabricated. This paper will examine the cooling characteristics of various water cooled weld electrodes and shanks used in resistance spot welding applications. The smaller weld flanges utilized in modern vehicle sheet metal fabrications have increased industry's interest in using one size of weld electrode (1/2 inch diameter) for certain spot welding operations. The welding community wants more data about the cooling characteristics of these 1/2 inch weld electrodes. To hep define the cooling characteristics, an infrared radiometer thermal vision system (TVS) was used to capture images (thermograms) of the heating and cooling cycles of several size combinations of weld electrodes under typical production conditions. Tests results will show why the open ended shanks are more suitable for cooling the weld electrode assembly then closed ended shanks.

  11. Welding arc plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  12. Weld seam tracking and lap weld penetration monitoring using the optical spectrum of the weld plume

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, R.E.; Hopkins, J.A.; Semak, V.V.; McCay, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Joining of dissimilar materials is a long standing problem in manufacturing, with many tricks and special techniques developed to successfully join specific pairs of materials. Often, these special techniques impose stringent requirements on the process such as precise control of process parameters to achieve the desired joint characteristics. Laser welding is one of the techniques which has had some success in welding dissimilar metal alloys, and appears to be a viable process for these materials. Minimal heat input limits differential thermal expansion, and the small weld pool allows precise control of alloy mixing in the fusion zone. Obtaining optimal weld performance requires accurate monitoring and control of absorbed laser power and weld focus position. In order to monitor the laser welding process, the authors have used a small computer controlled optical spectrometer to observe the emission from the weld plume. Absorbed laser power can be related to the temperature of the weld pool surface and the plume above the weld. Focus position relative to the joint can easily be seen by the proportion of elements from each material existing in the plume. This monitor has been used to observe and optimize the performance of butt and lap welds between dissimilar alloys, where each alloy contains at least one element not found in the other alloy. Results will be presented for a copper-steel butt joint and a lap weld between stainless and low alloy steels.

  13. Study of Mechanical Properties and Characterization of Pipe Steel welded by Hybrid (Friction Stir Weld + Root Arc Weld) Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Wasson, Andrew J; Fairchild, Doug P; Wang, Yanli; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has recently attracted attention as an alternative construction process for gas/oil transportation applications due to advantages compared to fusion welding techniques. A significant advantage is the ability of FSW to weld the entire or nearly the entire wall thickness in a single pass, while fusion welding requires multiple passes. However, when FSW is applied to a pipe or tube geometry, an internal back support anvil is required to resist the plunging forces exerted during FSW. Unfortunately, it may not be convenient or economical to use internal backing support due to limited access for some applications. To overcome this issue, ExxonMobil recently developed a new concept, combining root arc welding and FSW. That is, a root arc weld is made prior to FSW that supports the normal loads associated with FSW. In the present work, mechanical properties of a FSW + root arc welded pipe steel are reported including microstructure and microhardness.

  14. Improving the recognition of fingerprint biometric system using enhanced image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsharif, Salim; El-Saba, Aed; Stripathi, Reshma

    2010-04-01

    Fingerprints recognition systems have been widely used by financial institutions, law enforcement, border control, visa issuing, just to mention few. Biometric identifiers can be counterfeited, but considered more reliable and secure compared to traditional ID cards or personal passwords methods. Fingerprint pattern fusion improves the performance of a fingerprint recognition system in terms of accuracy and security. This paper presents digital enhancement and fusion approaches that improve the biometric of the fingerprint recognition system. It is a two-step approach. In the first step raw fingerprint images are enhanced using high-frequency-emphasis filtering (HFEF). The second step is a simple linear fusion process between the raw images and the HFEF ones. It is shown that the proposed approach increases the verification and identification of the fingerprint biometric recognition system, where any improvement is justified using the correlation performance metrics of the matching algorithm.

  15. Improving Agent Based Models and Validation through Data Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, Marek; Demianyk, Bryan C.P.; Friesen, Marcia R.; McLeod, Robert D.; Mukhi, Shamir N.

    2011-01-01

    This work is contextualized in research in modeling and simulation of infection spread within a community or population, with the objective to provide a public health and policy tool in assessing the dynamics of infection spread and the qualitative impacts of public health interventions. This work uses the integration of real data sources into an Agent Based Model (ABM) to simulate respiratory infection spread within a small municipality. Novelty is derived in that the data sources are not necessarily obvious within ABM infection spread models. The ABM is a spatial-temporal model inclusive of behavioral and interaction patterns between individual agents on a real topography. The agent behaviours (movements and interactions) are fed by census / demographic data, integrated with real data from a telecommunication service provider (cellular records) and person-person contact data obtained via a custom 3G Smartphone application that logs Bluetooth connectivity between devices. Each source provides data of varying type and granularity, thereby enhancing the robustness of the model. The work demonstrates opportunities in data mining and fusion that can be used by policy and decision makers. The data become real-world inputs into individual SIR disease spread models and variants, thereby building credible and non-intrusive models to qualitatively simulate and assess public health interventions at the population level. PMID:23569606

  16. Submerged Friction-Stir Welding (SFSW) Underwater and Under Liquid Nitrogen: An Improved Method to Join Al Alloys to Mg Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mofid, Mohammad Ammar; Abdollah-Zadeh, Amir; Ghaini, Farshid Malek; Gür, Cemil Hakan

    2012-12-01

    Submerged friction-stir welding (SFSW) underwater and under liquid nitrogen is demonstrated as an alternative and improved method for creating fine-grained welds in dissimilar metals. Plates of AZ31 (Mg alloy) and AA5083 H34 were joined by friction-stir welding in three different environments, i.e., in air, water, and liquid nitrogen at 400 rpm and 50 mm/min. The temperature profile, microstructure, scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), hardness, and tensile testing results were evaluated. In the stir zone of an air-welded specimen, formation of brittle intermetallic compounds of Al3Mg2, Al12Mg17, and Al2Mg3 contributed to cracking in the weld nugget. These phases were formed because of constitutional liquation. Friction-stir welding underwater and under liquid nitrogen significantly suppresses the formation of intermetallic compounds because of the lower peak temperature. Furthermore, the temperature profiles plotted during this investigation indicate that the largest amount of ∆ T is generated by the weld under liquid nitrogen, which is performed at the lowest temperature. It is shown that in low-temperature FSW, the flow stress is higher, plastic contribution increases, and so adiabatic heating, a result of high strain and high strain-rate deformation, drives the recrystallization process beside frictional heat.

  17. Friction Stir Welding of the Space Shuttle External Tank Longitudinal Barrel Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Glynn; Pareti, Paul; Thompson, Jack; Lawless, Kirby; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Through the implementation of friction stir welding, the safety, reliability, and producibility of the external tank is enhanced. Such fusion procedures are accomplished with the use of a short barrel weld tool or a long barrel weld tool. Forecasted developments in the fusion tooling field include the advent of a universal tool which is capable to fusing all barrel configurations. A wide array of mechanical and electrical controls are described for such a device.

  18. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  19. Improving aquaporin Z expression in Escherichia coli by fusion partners and subsequent condition optimization.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jiazhang; Ding, Shinghua; Cai, Jin; Zhang, Danping; Xu, Zhinan; Wang, Xiaoning

    2009-03-01

    Aquaporin Z (AqpZ), a typical orthodox aquaporin with six transmembrane domains, was expressed as a fusion protein with TrxA in E. coli in our previous work. In the present study, three fusion partners (DsbA, GST and MBP) were employed to improve the expression level of this channel protein in E. coli. The result showed that, compared with the expression level of TrxA-AqpZ, five- to 40-fold increase in the productivity of AqpZ with fusion proteins was achieved by employing these different fusion partners, and MBP was the most efficient fusion partner to increase the expression level. By using E. coli C43 (DE3)/pMAL-AqpZ, the effects of different expression conditions were investigated systematically to improve the expression level of MBP-AqpZ in E. coli. The high productivity of MBP-AqpZ (200 mg/l) was achieved under optimized conditions. The present work provides a novel approach to improve the expression level of membrane proteins in E. coli.

  20. High-power laser welding application of thin sheets and assessment of weld bead properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koruk, Ali I.; Hrivnak, Ivan

    2000-02-01

    Research work was aimed at the welding of thin sheets using high power CO2 laser. Process parameters, evaluation of the weld by micro, macro and mechanical are briefly given. Characteristics of the laser welding are described. Optimal proces parameters which are power, weld speed, gas flow, focal point, gap distance, were used. Microstructural evaluation by light microscope and transmission electron (TEM) microscope for substructural analysis was employed. Therefore general weld imperfections were observed and laser weld evaluation was made with EN ISO 13919-1. Mechanical performance of welded sheets was done by uniaxial tensile test, Erichsen test, and microhardness test. Uniaxial tensile test was employed transverse-weld oriented to the tensile direction and longitudinal-weld oriented to the tensile direction. Results were compared with base metal properties. Maximum tensile strength was obtained from the longitudinal-weld with reduced ductility. In transverse-weld direction fracture was far from the weld. Microhardness test was applied to the cross section of the welded sheets. Maximum hardness was obtained from the weld fusion zone (FZ) where hardness was increasing from HAZ to weld FZ center. Therefore hardness results were verified by empirical equations, which are proposed by various authors. Erichsen test was employed for the ductility evaluations of the welded sheets whereby two types of defect were observed from the Erichsen test. The First one was observed in the weakest sheet (lowest gauge or lowest strength). It occurs when the major strain direction is perpendicular to the weld seam. The second one occurred across the weld by the higher strength and lower elongation of the weld while major strain direction was parallel to the weld seam. Process parameters, microstructural and substructural analyses were compared with mechanical performance of the welded sheets. As a result the laser welded thin sheets were evaluated in many aspects.

  1. Electric arc welding gun

    DOEpatents

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  2. Addition of cerium and yttrium to ferritic steel weld metal to improve hydrogen trapping efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Jin; Ryu, Kang Mook; Oh, Min-suk

    2017-04-01

    The applicability of Ce and Y as promising candidate elements to form irreversible traps in weld metal was investigated by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) with gas chromatography (GC). The precise nature of the precipitate particles newly formed in the weld metal by the addition of Ce and Y to a certain alloy system was characterized. Moreover, the hydrogen trapping efficiency expressed as the reduction of the diffusible hydrogen in the weld metal was analyzed. The results showed that the addition of Ce and/or Y to this alloy system led to the formation of a mixed type of (Ce,Ti)-based oxide, (Y,Ni)-based carbide, or (Ce,Y,Ti)-based oxide particles. Because of the high activation energy of the mixed type of particles (≥ 150 kJ/mol), the trapping efficiency for hydrogen was considered to be sufficiently high to effectively reduce the diffusible hydrogen content.

  3. Welding and Brazing Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    Hot isostatic pressing and conventional furnace brazing effective under right conditions. Study performed showed feasibility of welding SiC using several welding and brazing techniques. Use of SiC improves engine efficiency by allowing increase in operating temperature. SiC successfully hot-pressure-welded at 3,550 degrees F (1,950 degrees C) in argon. Refinements of solid-state welding and brazing procedures used sufficient for some specific industrial applications.

  4. Development Program for Improving Foundry and Repair Welding Techniques for ZE41-type Magnesium Alloy Castings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-01

    48,49,50 XI Tensile properties of test bars machined from areas of test plate containing flow-line tjrpe of segregation 51 XII Summary...TEST PLATES Melting and Pouring; The metal was prepared from alloyed EZ33 or ZE41 ingots , foundry returns (gates, risers and scrap castings) and...No back-up material, mild-steel back-up and carbon back-up. Carbon back-up gave best results. Sequence of welding: The sequence of welding eight

  5. Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool

    DOEpatents

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1984-03-13

    An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

  6. Fast, automatically darkening welding filter offering an improved level of safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Stephen

    1996-03-01

    A mode of operation is introduced for the standard 90 degrees twisted nematic (TN) liquid-crystal cell when placed together with an interference filter and positioned between crossed polarizers such that a small stimulating voltage of between 2.0 and 3.0 V is required in order to attain the light state. Further incrementation of the driving electronics reverts the system back to a darker phase. Such cells offer advantages over those of the standard 90 degrees TN device operating in the normally white mode, in that the unit maintains the fast response time from the light to the dark state associated with the employment of TN cells placed between crossed polarizers. In addition, a low transmittance state is achieved when the unit is in the inactivated phase; this is an effect usually correlated with the normally black mode of operation. These cells are therefore ideal candidates for incorporation into fast, automatically darkening, welding filters that are designed to change rapidly from the light to the dark protective state, while offering an improved level of safety by not holding in a potentially hazardous light state should the controlling electronics malfunction. The requirement for this phenomenon to be observed is that the cell displays a low optical transmittance over the green wavelengths of the visible spectrum when in the inactivated phase and placed between crossed polarizers. The presence of an interference filter that possesses a peak transmittance over the central part of the visible spectrum is also necessary. It is shown that there are only two possible cell types that satisfy this criteria, and the optical properties of such cells are analyzed in some detail.

  7. Galvanic corrosion of beryllium welds

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.A.; Butt, D.P.; Lillard, R.S.

    1997-12-01

    Beryllium is difficult to weld because it is highly susceptible to cracking. The most commonly used filler metal in beryllium welds is Al-12 wt.% Si. Beryllium has been successfully welded using Al-Si filler metal with more than 30 wt.% Al. This filler creates an aluminum-rich fusion zone with a low melting point that tends to backfill cracks. Drawbacks to adding a filler metal include a reduction in service temperature, a lowering of the tensile strength of the weld, and the possibility for galvanic corrosion to occur at the weld. To evaluate the degree of interaction between Be and Al-Si in an actual weld, sections from a mock beryllium weldment were exposed to 0.1 M Cl{sup {minus}} solution. Results indicate that the galvanic couple between Be and the Al-Si weld material results in the cathodic protection of the weld and of the anodic dissolution of the bulk Be material. While the cathodic protection of Al is generally inefficient, the high anodic dissolution rate of the bulk Be during pitting corrosion combined with the insulating properties of the Be oxide afford some protection of the Al-Si weld material. Although dissolution of the Be precipitate in the weld material does occur, no corrosion of the Al-Si matrix was observed.

  8. Development and testing of the improved focusing quadrupole for heavy ion fusion accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Manahan, R R; Martovetsky, N N; Meinke, R B; Chiesa, L; Lietzke, A F; Sabbi, G L; Seidl, P A

    2003-10-23

    An improved version of the focusing magnet for a Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) accelerator was designed, built and tested in 2002-2003. This quadrupole has higher focusing power and lower error field than the previous version of the focusing quadrupoles successfully built and tested in 2001. We discuss the features of the new design, selected fabrication issues and test results.

  9. The Measurement of the Specific Latent Heat of Fusion of Ice: Two Improved Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, S. Y.; Chun, C. K. W.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests two methods for measuring the specific latent heat of ice fusion for high school physics laboratories. The first method is an ice calorimeter which is made from simple materials. The second method improves the thermal contact and allows for a more accurate measurement. Lists instructions for both methods. (Author/YDS)

  10. The Measurement of the Specific Latent Heat of Fusion of Ice: Two Improved Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, S. Y.; Chun, C. K. W.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests two methods for measuring the specific latent heat of ice fusion for high school physics laboratories. The first method is an ice calorimeter which is made from simple materials. The second method improves the thermal contact and allows for a more accurate measurement. Lists instructions for both methods. (Author/YDS)

  11. Hydrogen Assisted Crack in Dissimilar Metal Welds for Subsea Service under Cathodic Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, Desmond

    Dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) are routinely used in the oil and gas industries for structural joining of high strength steels in order to eliminate the need for post weld heat treatment (PWHT) after field welding. There have been reported catastrophic failures in these DMWs, particularly the AISI 8630 steel - Alloy 625 DMW combination, during subsea service while under cathodic protection (CP). This is due to local embrittlement that occurs in susceptible microstructures that are present at the weld fusion boundary region. This type of cracking is known as hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) and it is influenced by base/filler metal combination, and welding and PWHT procedures. DMWs of two material combinations (8630 steel -- Alloy 625 and F22 steel -- Alloy 625), produced with two welding procedures (BS1 and BS3) in as welded and PWHT conditions were investigated in this study. The main objectives included: 1) evaluation of the effect of materials composition, welding and PWHT procedures on the gradients of composition, microstructure, and properties in the dissimilar transition region and on the susceptibility to HAC; 2) investigation of the influence of microstructure on the HAC failure mechanism and identification of microstructural constituents acting as crack nucleation and propagation sites; 3) assessment of the applicability of two-step PWHT to improve the resistance to HAC in DMWs; 4) establishment of non-failure criterion for the delayed hydrogen cracking test (DHCT) that is applicable for qualification of DMWs for subsea service under cathodic protection (CP).

  12. Welding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  13. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  14. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  15. Automatic orbital GTAW welding: Highest quality welds for tomorrow's high-performance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henon, B. K.

    1985-01-01

    Automatic orbital gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIG welding is certain to play an increasingly prominent role in tomorrow's technology. The welds are of the highest quality and the repeatability of automatic weldings is vastly superior to that of manual welding. Since less heat is applied to the weld during automatic welding than manual welding, there is less change in the metallurgical properties of the parent material. The possibility of accurate control and the cleanliness of the automatic GTAW welding process make it highly suitable to the welding of the more exotic and expensive materials which are now widely used in the aerospace and hydrospace industries. Titanium, stainless steel, Inconel, and Incoloy, as well as, aluminum can all be welded to the highest quality specifications automatically. Automatic orbital GTAW equipment is available for the fusion butt welding of tube-to-tube, as well as, tube to autobuttweld fittings. The same equipment can also be used for the fusion butt welding of up to 6 inch pipe with a wall thickness of up to 0.154 inches.

  16. Investigation of factors controlling GTA weld bead geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smartt, H.B.; Key, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    In welding processes employing a consumable electrode, the input of heat and mass to the fusion zone is coupled. In contrast, in the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process, which uses a nonconsumable tungsten electrode, the input of heat and mass to the fusion zone are not coupled. As a result, the relationships between process parameters (current, arc voltage, welding speed, and filler wire speed) and weld bead geometry (bead width, penetration, and reinforcement) for GTA welding are complex. This work presents an experimental study of the process-parameter/weld-bead-geometry relationships for constant parameter GTAW of Type 304 stainless steel. Bead-on-plate results for partial-penetration welds in 12.5-mm thick plate, using an automatic GTAW machine, are presented. Measurements of bead width, penetration, and bead transverse cross-sectional area are given for autogenous welding; measurements of bead width, penetration, reinforcement, cross-sectional area, and dilution are given for nonautogenous welding.

  17. Empty polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages in anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF) show slow radiographic fusion that reduces clinical improvement: results from the prospective multicenter "PIERCE-PEEK" study.

    PubMed

    Suess, Olaf; Schomaker, Martin; Cabraja, Mario; Danne, Marco; Kombos, Theodoros; Hanna, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a well-established surgical treatment for radiculopathy and myelopathy. Previous studies showed that empty PEEK cages have lower radiographic fusion rates, but the clinical relevance remains unclear. This paper's aim is to provide high-quality evidence on the outcomes of ACDF with empty PEEK cages and on the relevance of radiographic fusion for clinical outcomes. This large prospective multicenter clinical trial performed single-level ACDF with empty PEEK cages on patients with cervical radiculopathy or myelopathy. The main clinical outcomes were VAS (0-10) for pain and NDI (0-100) for functioning. Radiographic fusion was evaluated by two investigators for three different aspects. The median (range) improvement of the VAS pain score was: 3 (1-6) at 6 months, 3 (2-8) at 12 months, and 4 (2-8) at 18 months. The median (range) improvement of the NDI score was: 12 (2-34) at 6 months, 18 (4-46) at 12 months, and 22 (2-44) at 18 months. Complete radiographic fusion was reached by 126 patients (43%) at 6 months, 214 patients (73%) at 12 months, and 241 patients (83%) at 18 months. Radiographic fusion was a highly significant (p < 0.001) predictor of the improvement of VAS and NDI scores. This study provides strong evidence that ACDF is effective treatment, but the overall rate of radiographic fusion with empty PEEK cages is slow and insufficient. Lack of complete radiographic fusion leads to less improvement of pain and disability. We recommend against using empty uncoated pure PEEK cages in ACDF. ISRCTN42774128. Retrospectively registered 14 April 2009.

  18. Resummation improved rapidity spectrum for gluon fusion Higgs production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Markus A.; Michel, Johannes K. L.; Tackmann, Frank J.

    2017-05-01

    Gluon-induced processes such as Higgs production typically exhibit large perturbative corrections. These partially arise from large virtual corrections to the gluon form factor, which at timelike momentum transfer contains Sudakov logarithms evaluated at negative arguments ln2(-1) = - π 2. It has been observed that resumming these terms in the timelike form factor leads to a much improved perturbative convergence for the total cross section. We discuss how to consistently incorporate the resummed form factor into the perturbative predictions for generic cross sections differential in the Born kinematics, including in particular the Higgs rapidity spectrum. We verify that this indeed improves the perturbative convergence, leading to smaller and more reliable perturbative uncertainties, and that this is not affected by cancellations between resummed and unresummed contributions. Combining both fixed-order and resummation uncertainties, the perturbative uncertainty for the total cross section at N3LO + N3LL φ ' is about a factor of two smaller than at N3LO. The perturbative uncertainty of the rapidity spectrum at NNLO + NNLL φ ' is similarly reduced compared to NNLO. We also study the analogous resummation for quark-induced processes, namely Higgs production through bottom quark annihilation and the Drell-Yan rapidity spectrum. For the former the resummation leads to a small improvement, while for the latter it confirms the already small uncertainties of the fixed-order predictions.

  19. Improving image classification in a complex wetland ecosystem through image fusion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Lalit; Sinha, Priyakant; Taylor, Subhashni

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of image fusion techniques on vegetation classification accuracies in a complex wetland system. Fusion of panchromatic (PAN) and multispectral (MS) Quickbird satellite imagery was undertaken using four image fusion techniques: Brovey, hue-saturation-value (HSV), principal components (PC), and Gram-Schmidt (GS) spectral sharpening. These four fusion techniques were compared in terms of their mapping accuracy to a normal MS image using maximum-likelihood classification (MLC) and support vector machine (SVM) methods. Gram-Schmidt fusion technique yielded the highest overall accuracy and kappa value with both MLC (67.5% and 0.63, respectively) and SVM methods (73.3% and 0.68, respectively). This compared favorably with the accuracies achieved using the MS image. Overall, improvements of 4.1%, 3.6%, 5.8%, 5.4%, and 7.2% in overall accuracies were obtained in case of SVM over MLC for Brovey, HSV, GS, PC, and MS images, respectively. Visual and statistical analyses of the fused images showed that the Gram-Schmidt spectral sharpening technique preserved spectral quality much better than the principal component, Brovey, and HSV fused images. Other factors, such as the growth stage of species and the presence of extensive background water in many parts of the study area, had an impact on classification accuracies.

  20. Technique for image fusion based on nonsubsampled shearlet transform and improved pulse-coupled neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Weiwei; Liu, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    A new technique for image fusion based on nonsubsampled shearlet transform (NSST) and improved pulse-coupled neural network (PCNN) is proposed. NSST, as a novel multiscale geometric analysis tool, can be optimally efficient in representing images and capturing the geometric features of multidimensional data. As a result, NSST is introduced into the area of image fusion to complete the decompositions of source images in any scale and any direction. Then the basic PCNN model is improved to be improved PCNN (IPCNN), which is more concise and more effective. IPCNN adopts the contrast of each pixel in images as the linking strength β, and the time matrix T of subimages can be obtained via the synchronous pulse-burst property. By using IPCNN, the fused subimages can be achieved. Finally, the final fused image can be obtained by using inverse NSST. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the new technique presented in this paper is competitive in the field of image fusion in terms of both fusion performance and computational efficiency.

  1. Mechanics and mechanisms of ultrasonic metal welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Edgar

    During ultrasonic welding of sheet metal, normal and shear forces act on the parts to be welded and the weld interface. These forces are a result of the ultrasonic vibrations of the tool, pressed onto the parts to be welded. Furthermore they determine the weld quality and the power that is needed to produce the weld. The main goal in this study is to measure and calculate the tangential forces during ultrasonic metal welding that act on the parts and the weld interface and correlate them to weld quality. In this study a mechanics based model was developed which included a model for the temperature generation during welding and its effect on the mechanical material properties. This model was then used to calculate the interface forces during welding. The model results were in good agreement with the experimental results, which included the measured shear force during welding. With the knowledge of the forces that act at the interface it might be possible to control weld quality (strength) and avoid sonotrode welding (sticking of the sonotrode to the parts). Without a solution to these two problems USMW will never be applicable to large scale automated production use, despite its advantages. In the experiments the influence of part dimensions, friction coefficient, normal force and vibration amplitude on weld quality and sonotrode adhesion were examined. The presented model is capable of predicting and explaining unfavorable welding conditions, therefore making it possible to predetermine weld locations on larger parts or what surface preparation of the parts to be welded would lead to an improved welding result. Furthermore shear force at the anvil measured during welding could be correlated to changing welding conditions. This is a new approach of explaining the process of USMW, because it is based on mechanical considerations. The use of a shear force measuring anvil has the potential to be implemented into welding systems and the shear force would provide an

  2. Improving video foreground segmentation and propagation through multifeature fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaoliu; Wang, Yan; Yuan, Xiaobing; Li, Baoqing; Ding, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Zebin

    2015-11-01

    Video foreground segmentation lays the foundation for many high-level visual applications. However, how to dig up the effective features for foreground propagation and how to intelligently fuse the different information are still challenging problems. We aim to deal with the above-mentioned problems, and the goal is to accurately propagate the object across the rest of the frames given an initially labeled frame. Our contributions are summarized as follows: (1) we describe the object features with superpixel-based appearance and motion clues from both global and local viewpoints. Furthermore, the objective confidences for both the appearance and motion features are also introduced to balance the different clues. (2) All the features and their confidences are intelligently fused by the improved Dempster-Shafer evidence theory instead of the empirical parameters tuning used in many algorithms. Experimental results on the two well-known SegTrack and SegTrack v2 datasets demonstrate that our algorithm can yield high-quality segmentations.

  3. An Improved BLE Indoor Localization with Kalman-Based Fusion: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Röbesaat, Jenny; Zhang, Peilin; Abdelaal, Mohamed; Theel, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Indoor positioning has grasped great attention in recent years. A number of efforts have been exerted to achieve high positioning accuracy. However, there exists no technology that proves its efficacy in various situations. In this paper, we propose a novel positioning method based on fusing trilateration and dead reckoning. We employ Kalman filtering as a position fusion algorithm. Moreover, we adopt an Android device with Bluetooth Low Energy modules as the communication platform to avoid excessive energy consumption and to improve the stability of the received signal strength. To further improve the positioning accuracy, we take the environmental context information into account while generating the position fixes. Extensive experiments in a testbed are conducted to examine the performance of three approaches: trilateration, dead reckoning and the fusion method. Additionally, the influence of the knowledge of the environmental context is also examined. Finally, our proposed fusion method outperforms both trilateration and dead reckoning in terms of accuracy: experimental results show that the Kalman-based fusion, for our settings, achieves a positioning accuracy of less than one meter. PMID:28445421

  4. An Improved BLE Indoor Localization with Kalman-Based Fusion: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Röbesaat, Jenny; Zhang, Peilin; Abdelaal, Mohamed; Theel, Oliver

    2017-04-26

    Indoor positioning has grasped great attention in recent years. A number of efforts have been exerted to achieve high positioning accuracy. However, there exists no technology that proves its efficacy in various situations. In this paper, we propose a novel positioning method based on fusing trilateration and dead reckoning. We employ Kalman filtering as a position fusion algorithm. Moreover, we adopt an Android device with Bluetooth Low Energy modules as the communication platform to avoid excessive energy consumption and to improve the stability of the received signal strength. To further improve the positioning accuracy, we take the environmental context information into account while generating the position fixes. Extensive experiments in a testbed are conducted to examine the performance of three approaches: trilateration, dead reckoning and the fusion method. Additionally, the influence of the knowledge of the environmental context is also examined. Finally, our proposed fusion method outperforms both trilateration and dead reckoning in terms of accuracy: experimental results show that the Kalman-based fusion, for our settings, achieves a positioning accuracy of less than one meter.

  5. Research on High-Strength Steels with an Improved Resistance against Weld Cracking.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    sticks are crayons which melt at a predetermined temperature, and can be applied to a piece of steel in order to monitor its temperature as it is...them from getting too close to those areas which might be melted by the actual welding process. As described previously temperature indicating crayons ...pure sample of metal will melt and solidify at a single temperature for any uniform set of testing conditions. When alloying elements are added to the

  6. Advanced Welding Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  7. PLASMA ARC WELDING OF THIN MATERIALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    AMS-4901, and AMS-4911 resulted in quality and mechanical properties equivalent to welds made by the gas tungsten arc welding ( GTAW ) process. The...lengths of 0.125 to 0.375 in. Particularly smooth and consistent edge welds are obtained to a degree not normally reached with the GTAW process. Fusion...the GTAW process with the advantages of simplified arc prepositioning and, starting with the pilot arc transfer system, insensitivity to arc length

  8. Improving CAD performance by fusion of the bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Li, Lihua; Liu, Wei; Xu, Weidong; Lederman, Dror; Zheng, Bin

    2012-03-01

    Bilateral mammographic tissue density asymmetry could be an important factor in assessing risk of developing breast cancer and improving the detection of the suspicious lesions. This study aims to assess whether fusion of the bilateral mammographic density asymmetrical information into a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme could improve CAD performance in detecting mass-like breast cancers. A testing dataset involving 1352 full-field digital mammograms (FFDM) acquired from 338 cases was used. In this dataset, half (169) cases are positive containing malignant masses and half are negative. Two computerized schemes were first independently applied to process FFDM images of each case. The first single-image based CAD scheme detected suspicious mass regions on each image. The second scheme detected and computed the bilateral mammographic tissue density asymmetry for each case. A fusion method was then applied to combine the output scores of the two schemes. The CAD performance levels using the original CAD-generated detection scores and the new fusion scores were evaluated and compared using a free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) type data analysis method. By fusion with the bilateral mammographic density asymmetrical scores, the case-based CAD sensitivity was increased from 79.2% to 84.6% at a false-positive rate of 0.3 per image. CAD also cued more "difficult" masses with lower CAD-generated detection scores while discarded some "easy" cases. The study indicated that fusion between the scores generated by a single-image based CAD scheme and the computed bilateral mammographic density asymmetry scores enabled to increase mass detection sensitivity in particular to detect more subtle masses.

  9. Noise temperature improvement for magnetic fusion plasma millimeter wave imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, J.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-03-01

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas [B. Tobias et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 6, 2106042 (2011)]. Of particular importance have been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry systems for imaging Te and ne fluctuations. These instruments have employed heterodyne receiver arrays with Schottky diode mixer elements directly connected to individual antennas. Consequently, the noise temperature has been strongly determined by the conversion loss with typical noise temperatures of ˜60 000 K. However, this can be significantly improved by making use of recent advances in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit chip low noise amplifiers to insert a pre-amplifier in front of the Schottky diode mixer element. In a proof-of-principle design at V-Band (50-75 GHz), significant improvement of noise temperature from the current 60 000 K to measured 4000 K has been obtained.

  10. Multi-sensor fusion with interacting multiple model filter for improved aircraft position accuracy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Taehwan; Lee, Changho; Choi, Sangbang

    2013-03-27

    The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has decided to adopt Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) as the 21st century standard for navigation. Accordingly, ICAO members have provided an impetus to develop related technology and build sufficient infrastructure. For aviation surveillance with CNS/ATM, Ground-Based Augmentation System (GBAS), Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B), multilateration (MLAT) and wide-area multilateration (WAM) systems are being established. These sensors can track aircraft positions more accurately than existing radar and can compensate for the blind spots in aircraft surveillance. In this paper, we applied a novel sensor fusion method with Interacting Multiple Model (IMM) filter to GBAS, ADS-B, MLAT, and WAM data in order to improve the reliability of the aircraft position. Results of performance analysis show that the position accuracy is improved by the proposed sensor fusion method with the IMM filter.

  11. Improved Classification of Orthosiphon stamineus by Data Fusion of Electronic Nose and Tongue Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Ammar; Shakaff, Ali Yeon Md.; Adom, Abdul Hamid; Ahmad, Mohd Noor; Masnan, Maz Jamilah; Aziz, Abdul Hallis Abdul; Fikri, Nazifah Ahmad; Abdullah, Abu Hassan; Kamarudin, Latifah Munirah

    2010-01-01

    An improved classification of Orthosiphon stamineus using a data fusion technique is presented. Five different commercial sources along with freshly prepared samples were discriminated using an electronic nose (e-nose) and an electronic tongue (e-tongue). Samples from the different commercial brands were evaluated by the e-tongue and then followed by the e-nose. Applying Principal Component Analysis (PCA) separately on the respective e-tongue and e-nose data, only five distinct groups were projected. However, by employing a low level data fusion technique, six distinct groupings were achieved. Hence, this technique can enhance the ability of PCA to analyze the complex samples of Orthosiphon stamineus. Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) was then used to further validate and classify the samples. It was found that the LDA performance was also improved when the responses from the e-nose and e-tongue were fused together. PMID:22163381

  12. Noise temperature improvement for magnetic fusion plasma millimeter wave imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Lai, J; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C

    2014-03-01

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas [B. Tobias et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 6, 2106042 (2011)]. Of particular importance have been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry systems for imaging T(e) and n(e) fluctuations. These instruments have employed heterodyne receiver arrays with Schottky diode mixer elements directly connected to individual antennas. Consequently, the noise temperature has been strongly determined by the conversion loss with typical noise temperatures of ~60,000 K. However, this can be significantly improved by making use of recent advances in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit chip low noise amplifiers to insert a pre-amplifier in front of the Schottky diode mixer element. In a proof-of-principle design at V-Band (50-75 GHz), significant improvement of noise temperature from the current 60,000 K to measured 4000 K has been obtained.

  13. Multi-Sensor Fusion with Interacting Multiple Model Filter for Improved Aircraft Position Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Taehwan; Lee, Changho; Choi, Sangbang

    2013-01-01

    The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has decided to adopt Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) as the 21st century standard for navigation. Accordingly, ICAO members have provided an impetus to develop related technology and build sufficient infrastructure. For aviation surveillance with CNS/ATM, Ground-Based Augmentation System (GBAS), Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B), multilateration (MLAT) and wide-area multilateration (WAM) systems are being established. These sensors can track aircraft positions more accurately than existing radar and can compensate for the blind spots in aircraft surveillance. In this paper, we applied a novel sensor fusion method with Interacting Multiple Model (IMM) filter to GBAS, ADS-B, MLAT, and WAM data in order to improve the reliability of the aircraft position. Results of performance analysis show that the position accuracy is improved by the proposed sensor fusion method with the IMM filter. PMID:23535715

  14. Performance improvement of classifier fusion for batch samples based on upper integral.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hui-Min; Wang, Xi-Zhao

    2015-03-01

    The generalization ability of ELM can be improved by fusing a number of individual ELMs. This paper proposes a new scheme of fusing ELMs based on upper integrals, which differs from all the existing fuzzy integral models of classifier fusion. The new scheme uses the upper integral to reasonably assign tested samples to different ELMs for maximizing the classification efficiency. By solving an optimization problem of upper integrals, we obtain the proportions of assigning samples to different ELMs and their combinations. The definition of upper integral guarantees such a conclusion that the classification accuracy of the fused ELM is not less than that of any individual ELM theoretically. Numerical simulations demonstrate that most existing fusion methodologies such as Bagging and Boosting can be improved by our upper integral model.

  15. Tandem SUMO fusion vectors for improving soluble protein expression and purification.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Fernando; Ciragan, Annika; Iwaï, Hideo

    2015-12-01

    Availability of highly purified proteins in quantity is crucial for detailed biochemical and structural investigations. Fusion tags are versatile tools to facilitate efficient protein purification and to improve soluble overexpression of proteins. Various purification and fusion tags have been widely used for overexpression in Escherichia coli. However, these tags might interfere with biological functions and/or structural investigations of the protein of interest. Therefore, an additional purification step to remove fusion tags by proteolytic digestion might be required. Here, we describe a set of new vectors in which yeast SUMO (SMT3) was used as the highly specific recognition sequence of ubiquitin-like protease 1, together with other commonly used solubility enhancing proteins, such as glutathione S-transferase, maltose binding protein, thioredoxin and trigger factor for optimizing soluble expression of protein of interest. This tandem SUMO (T-SUMO) fusion system was tested for soluble expression of the C-terminal domain of TonB from different organisms and for the antiviral protein scytovirin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A novel super-resolution image fusion algorithm based on improved PCNN and wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Na; Gao, Kun; Song, Yajun; Ni, Guoqiang

    2009-10-01

    Super-resolution reconstruction technology is to explore new information between the under-sampling image series obtained from the same scene and to achieve the high-resolution picture through image fusion in sub-pixel level. The traditional super-resolution fusion methods for sub-sampling images need motion estimation and motion interpolation and construct multi-resolution pyramid to obtain high-resolution, yet the function of the human beings' visual features are ignored. In this paper, a novel resolution reconstruction for under-sampling images of static scene based on the human vision model is considered by introducing PCNN (Pulse Coupled Neural Network) model, which simplifies and improves the input model, internal behavior and control parameters selection. The proposed super-resolution image fusion algorithm based on PCNN-wavelet is aimed at the down-sampling image series in a static scene. And on the basis of keeping the original features, we introduce Relief Filter(RF) to the control and judge segment to overcome the effect of random factors(such as noise, etc) effectively to achieve the aim that highlighting interested object though the fusion. Numerical simulations show that the new algorithm has the better performance in retaining more details and keeping high resolution.

  17. Experimental investigation and metallographic characterization of fiber laser beam welding of Ti-6Al-4V alloy using response surface method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Chandan; Das, Manas; Paul, C. P.; Singh, B.

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, experimental investigations of fiber-laser-beam-welding of 5 mm thick Ti-6Al-4V alloy are carried out based on statistical design of experiments. The relationship between the process parameters such as welding power, welding speed, and defocused position of the laser beam with the output responses such as width of the fusion zone, size of the heat affected zone, and fusion zone area are established in terms of regression models. Also, the most significant process parameters and their optimum ranges are identified and their percentage contributions on output responses are calculated. It is observed that welding power and speed plays the major role for full penetration welding. Also, welding power shows direct effect whereas welding speed shows the inverse effect on the output responses. The bead geometry is influenced by the defocused position of the laser beam due to the change in power density on the workpiece surface. However, overall fusion zone area is unaffected. Mechanical characterization of the welded samples such as microstructural analysis, hardness, and tensile tests are conducted. It is noticed that the hardness value of the FZ is higher than the HAZ and BM zone due to the difference in cooling rate during welding which promotes the formation of α‧ martensitic phase in the FZ. Also, an average hardness value in the FZ is compared for two different defocusing positions (i.e. 1 and 2 mm). It is found that hardness value is higher for 1 mm defocused position than 2 mm due the decrement in grain size below a critical range at 2 mm defocused position. The ultimate tensile strength and % elongation of the welded samples are degraded as compared to BM which can be further improved by post heat treatment.

  18. Improvement in Joint Strength of Spray-Deposited Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloy in Underwater Friction Stir Welding by Altered Temperature of Cooling Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Haimei; Yan, Keng; Wang, Qingzhao; Zhao, Yong; Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Hao

    2016-12-01

    We improved the joint properties of spray-deposited Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy during underwater friction stir welding at cooling media temperatures of 8.6, 24.8 and 58.6 °C, respectively. The joint welded at high temperature (58.6 °C) showed a high tensile strength (467.18 MPa) and improved elongation. Its thermal cycle indicates preheating and slow cooling, which created a mild and uniform temperature gradient on both sides of the joint. DSC, SEM and EDS, and XRD analyses indicate that high-temperature cooling medium facilitated re-dissolution of the strengthening phases in the matrix, to strengthen the joint. Al32(Mg,Zn)49 exhibited a semi-coherent structure with matrix detected in the joint welded in a high-temperature medium. The high-temperature cooling medium is most efficient for joint optimization.

  19. Welding and Weldability of Thorium-Doped Iridium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Ohriner, E.K.; King, J.F.

    2000-03-12

    Ir-0.3%W alloys doped with thorium are currently used as post-impact containment material for radioactive fuel in thermoelectric generators that provide stable electrical power for a variety of outer planetary space exploration missions. Welding and weldability of a series of alloys was investigated using arc and laser welding processes. Some of these alloys are prone to severe hot-cracking during welding. Weldability of these alloys was characterized using Sigmajig weldability test. Hot-cracking is influenced to a great extent by the fusion zone microstructure and composition. Thorium content and welding atmosphere were found to be very critical. The weld cracking behavior in these alloys can be controlled by modifying the fusion zone microstructure. Fusion zone microstructure was found to be controlled by welding process, process parameters, and the weld pool shape.

  20. Effect of Pulse Parameters on Weld Quality in Pulsed Gas Metal Arc Welding: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Kamal; Pal, Surjya K.

    2011-08-01

    The weld quality comprises bead geometry and its microstructure, which influence the mechanical properties of the weld. The coarse-grained weld microstructure, higher heat-affected zone, and lower penetration together with higher reinforcement reduce the weld service life in continuous mode gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Pulsed GMAW (P-GMAW) is an alternative method providing a better way for overcoming these afore mentioned problems. It uses a higher peak current to allow one molten droplet per pulse, and a lower background current to maintain the arc stability. Current pulsing refines the grains in weld fusion zone with increasing depth of penetration due to arc oscillations. Optimum weld joint characteristics can be achieved by controlling the pulse parameters. The process is versatile and easily automated. This brief review illustrates the effect of pulse parameters on weld quality.

  1. Improved Guided Image Fusion for Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jameel, Amina

    2014-01-01

    Improved guided image fusion for magnetic resonance and computed tomography imaging is proposed. Existing guided filtering scheme uses Gaussian filter and two-level weight maps due to which the scheme has limited performance for images having noise. Different modifications in filter (based on linear minimum mean square error estimator) and weight maps (with different levels) are proposed to overcome these limitations. Simulation results based on visual and quantitative analysis show the significance of proposed scheme. PMID:24695586

  2. The addition of a sagittal image fusion improves the prostate cancer detection in a sensor-based MRI /ultrasound fusion guided targeted biopsy.

    PubMed

    Günzel, Karsten; Cash, Hannes; Buckendahl, John; Königbauer, Maximilian; Asbach, Patrick; Haas, Matthias; Neymeyer, Jörg; Hinz, Stefan; Miller, Kurt; Kempkensteffen, Carsten

    2017-01-13

    To explore the diagnostic benefit of an additional image fusion of the sagittal plane in addition to the standard axial image fusion, using a sensor-based MRI/US fusion platform. During July 2013 and September 2015, 251 patients with at least one suspicious lesion on mpMRI (rated by PI-RADS) were included into the analysis. All patients underwent MRI/US targeted biopsy (TB) in combination with a 10 core systematic prostate biopsy (SB). All biopsies were performed on a sensor-based fusion system. Group A included 162 men who received TB by an axial MRI/US image fusion. Group B comprised 89 men in whom the TB was performed with an additional sagittal image fusion. The median age in group A was 67 years (IQR 61-72) and in group B 68 years (IQR 60-71). The median PSA level in group A was 8.10 ng/ml (IQR 6.05-14) and in group B 8.59 ng/ml (IQR 5.65-12.32). In group A the proportion of patients with a suspicious digital rectal examination (DRE) (14 vs. 29%, p = 0.007) and the proportion of primary biopsies (33 vs 46%, p = 0.046) were significantly lower. The rate of PI-RADS 3 lesions were overrepresented in group A compared to group B (19 vs. 9%; p = 0.044). Classified according to PI-RADS 3, 4 and 5, the detection rates of TB were 42, 48, 75% in group A and 25, 74, 90% in group B. The rate of PCa with a Gleason score ≥7 missed by TB was 33% (18 cases) in group A and 9% (5 cases) in group B; p-value 0.072. An explorative multivariate binary logistic regression analysis revealed that PI-RADS, a suspicious DRE and performing an additional sagittal image fusion were significant predictors for PCa detection in TB. 9 PCa were only detected by TB with sagittal fusion (sTB) and sTB identified 10 additional clinically significant PCa (Gleason ≥7). Performing an additional sagittal image fusion besides the standard axial fusion appears to improve the accuracy of the sensor-based MRI/US fusion platform.

  3. Application of Large Aperture Emats to Weld Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclauchlan, D. T.; Clark, S. P.; Hancock, J. W.

    2008-02-01

    One of the most significant developments in EMAT operation is the incorporation of phased array techniques. Phased array EMATs enable electronic beam steering and focusing while operating with temporally short pulses for good range resolution. Using phased array EMAT operation, multiple high powered pulsers are combined in the generation of the ultrasonic wave and multiple elements are combined in the reception of the ultrasonic wave, for improved sensitivity. EMATs make it practical to operate with shear horizontal (SH) waves and scan over a metal part's surface. An EMAT generated line force at the surface launches shear horizontal waves with uniform amplitude for beam angles from -90° to 90°. Shear horizontal waves also reflect without mode conversion from surfaces that are parallel to the polarization of the shear wave displacements. The combination of these advantages makes phased array EMATs well suited for weld inspection. Recently, BWXT Services has developed a 32 active channel EMAT phased array system for operation up to 5 MHz. In addition, each element can be constructed with several sub-elements, alternating in polarity, to effectively multiply the number of active elements for a restricted range of beam angles. For example by using elements comprised of 4 sub elements, a 128 active element aperture designed for operation with a nominal 60° beam angle provides good beam steering and focusing performance for 45° to 70° beam angles. The large active apertures allow the use of highly focused beams for good defect detection and high resolution imaging of weld defects. Application of this system to weld inspections has verified that good defect detection and imaging is possible. In addition, operation with SH waves has proven to provide improved detection of lack of fusion at the cap and root of the weld for certain weld geometries. The system has also been used to demonstrate the inspection of submerged metal arc welds while welding.

  4. APPLICATION OF LARGE APERTURE EMATS TO WELD INSPECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maclauchlan, D. T.; Clark, S. P.; Hancock, J. W.

    2008-02-28

    One of the most significant developments in EMAT operation is the incorporation of phased array techniques. Phased array EMATs enable electronic beam steering and focusing while operating with temporally short pulses for good range resolution. Using phased array EMAT operation, multiple high powered pulsers are combined in the generation of the ultrasonic wave and multiple elements are combined in the reception of the ultrasonic wave, for improved sensitivity. EMATs make it practical to operate with shear horizontal (SH) waves and scan over a metal part's surface. An EMAT generated line force at the surface launches shear horizontal waves with uniform amplitude for beam angles from -90 deg. to 90 deg. Shear horizontal waves also reflect without mode conversion from surfaces that are parallel to the polarization of the shear wave displacements. The combination of these advantages makes phased array EMATs well suited for weld inspection. Recently, BWXT Services has developed a 32 active channel EMAT phased array system for operation up to 5 MHz. In addition, each element can be constructed with several sub-elements, alternating in polarity, to effectively multiply the number of active elements for a restricted range of beam angles. For example by using elements comprised of 4 sub elements, a 128 active element aperture designed for operation with a nominal 60 deg. beam angle provides good beam steering and focusing performance for 45 deg. to 70 deg. beam angles. The large active apertures allow the use of highly focused beams for good defect detection and high resolution imaging of weld defects. Application of this system to weld inspections has verified that good defect detection and imaging is possible. In addition, operation with SH waves has proven to provide improved detection of lack of fusion at the cap and root of the weld for certain weld geometries. The system has also been used to demonstrate the inspection of submerged metal arc welds while welding.

  5. Some recent studies on laser cladding and dissimilar welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaul, Rakesh; Ganesh, P.; Paul, C. P.; Albert, S. K.; Mudali, U. Kamachi; Nath, A. K.

    2006-01-01

    Indigenous development of high power CO II laser technology and industrial application of lasers represent two important mandates of the laser program, being pursued at Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT), India. The present paper describes some of the important laser material processing studies, involving cladding and dissimilar welding, performed in authors' laboratory. The first case study describes how low heat input characteristics of laser cladding process has been successfully exploited for suppressing dilution in "Colmonoy6" (a nickel-base hardfacing alloy) deposits on austenitic stainless steel components. Crack free hardfaced deposits were obtained by controlling heating and cooling rates associated with laser treatment. The results show significant advantage over Colmonoy 6 deposits made by GTAW, where a 2.5 mm thick region of dilution (with reduced hardness) develops next to substrateiclad interface. The next work involves laser-assisted deposition of graded "Stellite6" (a Co-base hardfacing alloy) with smooth transition in chemical composition and hardness for enhanced resistance against cracking, esp. under thermal cycling conditions. The following two case studies demonstrate significant improvement in corrosion properties of type 304L stainless steel by laser surface alloying, achieved through cladding route. The following case study demonstrates engineering of fusion zone microstructure of end plug dissimilar weld (between alloy D9 and type 3 16M stainless steel) by controlled preferential displacement of focused laser beam, which, in-turn, enhanced its resistance against solidification cracking. Crater appearing at the termination point of laser weld is also eliminated by ramping of laser power towards the end of laser welding. The last case study involves engineering of fusion zone microstructure of dissimilar laser weld between type 304 austenitic stainless steel and stabilized 17%Cr ferritic stainless steel by controlling welding parameters.

  6. Comparison Between Keyhole Weld Model and Laser Welding Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B C; Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W

    2002-09-23

    A series of laser welds were performed using a high-power diode-pumped continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser welder. In a previous study, the experimental results of those welds were examined, and the effects that changes in incident power and various welding parameters had on weld geometry were investigated. In this report, the fusion zones of the laser welds are compared with those predicted from a laser keyhole weld simulation model for stainless steels (304L and 21-6-9), vanadium, and tantalum. The calculated keyhole depths for the vanadium and 304L stainless steel samples fit the experimental data to within acceptable error, demonstrating the predictive power of numerical simulation for welds in these two materials. Calculations for the tantalum and 21-6-9 stainless steel were a poorer match to the experimental values. Accuracy in materials properties proved extremely important in predicting weld behavior, as minor changes in certain properties had a significant effect on calculated keyhole depth. For each of the materials tested, the correlation between simulated and experimental keyhole depths deviated as the laser power was increased. Using the model as a simulation tool, we conclude that the optical absorptivity of the material is the most influential factor in determining the keyhole depth. Future work will be performed to further investigate these effects and to develop a better match between the model and the experimental results for 21-6-9 stainless steel and tantalum.

  7. Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welds in A12195-T8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinchen, David G.; Li, Zhixian; Adams, Glynn P.

    1999-01-01

    An extensive study of the mechanical properties of friction stir welded Al-Li 2195 has been conducted by Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems under contract to NASA. The study was part of a development program in which weld parameters were defined for using FSW to assemble large-scale aluminum cryogenic tanks. In excess of 300 feet of 0.320 in. gage plate material was welded and tested. The tests include room temperature and cryogenic temperature tensile tests and surface crack tension (SCT) tests, nondestructive evaluation, metallurgical studies, and photostress analysis. The results of the testing demonstrated improved mechanical properties with FSW as compared to typical fusion welding processes. Increases in ultimate tensile strength, cryogenic enhancement and elongation were observed with the tensile test results. Increased fracture toughness was observed with the SCT results. Nondestructive evaluations were conducted on all welded Joints. No volumetric defects were indicated. Surface indications on the root side of the welds did not significantly affect weld strength. The results of the nondestructive evaluations were confirmed via metallurgical studies. Photostress analysis revealed strain concentrations in multi-pass and heat-repaired FSW's. Details of the tests and results are presented.

  8. Microstructure/property relationships in dissimilar welds between duplex stainless steels and carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhouse, E.J.; Lippold, J.C.

    1998-12-01

    The metallurgical characteristics, toughness and corrosion resistance of dissimilar welds between duplex stainless steel Alloy 2205 and carbon steel A36 have been evaluated. Both duplex stainless steel ER2209 and Ni-based Alloy 625 filler metals were used to join this combination using a multipass, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. Defect-free welds were made with each filler metal. The toughness of both the 625 and 2209 deposits were acceptable, regardless of heat input. A narrow martensitic region with high hardness was observed along the A36/2209 fusion boundary. A similar region was not observed in welds made with the 625 filler metal. The corrosion resistance of the welds made with 2209 filler metal improved with increasing heat input, probably due to higher levels of austenite and reduced chromium nitride precipitation. Welds made with 625 exhibited severe attack in the root pass, while the bulk of the weld was resistant. This investigation has shown that both filler metals can be used to joint carbon steel to duplex stainless steels, but that special precautions may be necessary in corrosive environments.

  9. Characterization of simulated production welds in alloy 908

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, C.H.; Grundy, D.C.; Steeves, M.M.

    1997-06-01

    This study characterized room temperature mechanical properties of Incoloy{reg_sign} alloy 908* welds made from two base metal conditions: mill-annealed or homogenized (1050{degrees}C/1hr). An automatic pulsed-gas tungsten arc welder simulated actual conduit welding conditions. The weld fusion zone showed a typical cellular-dendritic microstructure with the precipitation of secondary phases within the interdendritic zone. Grain boundary liquation phenomenon was observed near the fusion boundaries in the heat affected zone. Complete resolidification of liquated grain boundaries prevented crack formation during welding. The tensile properties of the welds showed a strong dependence on the selection of the base metal used for welding. When the base metal was homogenized, the welds showed about the same amount of ductility as the homogenized base metal in the as-welded condition. Its strength was also higher than that of the surrounding homogenized base metal. The fracture toughness of welds was measured by the J-integral test technique. Unlike the tensile properties, the fracture toughness of the welds showed no dependence on the condition of the base metal. The fracture toughness of the welds was about 140 MPa{radical}m in the aged condition. The fatigue crack growth rates of aged production welds were comparable to those of the base metal. The fatigue crack growth threshold was measured to be about 3.7 MPa{radical}m for the as-welded production welds with homogenized base metal.

  10. FRICTION-STIR-LAP-WELDS OF AA6111 ALUMINUM ALLOY

    SciTech Connect

    Yadava, Manasij; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Chen, Y. L.; Gayden, X.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2007-01-09

    Lap joints of 1 mm thick AA6111 aluminum sheets were made by friction stir welding, using robotic and conventional machines. Welds were made for advancing as well as retreating side loading. Thinning in welds was quantified. Lap shear test of welds was conducted in as-welded and paint-baked conditions. Conventional machine welds showed less thinning and better strength than robotic machine welds. Process forces in conventional machine welding were higher. Paint bake treatment improved the weld strength; but the improvement varied with process parameters. Advancing side loaded welds achieved higher strength than the retreating side loaded welds. Fracture location was found to occur on the loaded side of the weld and along the thinning defect.

  11. Radioscapholunate Fusions

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Duncan Thomas; Bain, Gregory Ian

    2012-01-01

    Radiocarpal fusions are performed for a variety of indications, most commonly for debilitating painful arthritis. The goal of a wrist fusion is to fuse the painful, diseased joints and to preserve motion through the healthy joints. Depending on the extent of the disease process, radiocarpal fusions may take the form of radiolunate, radioscapholunate, or total wrist fusions. Surgical techniques and instrumentation have advanced over the last few decades, and consequently the functional outcomes have improved and complications decreased. Techniques for partial carpal fusions have improved and now include distal scaphoid and triquetrum excision, which improves range of motion and fusion rates. In this article we discuss the various surgical techniques and fixation methods available and review the corresponding evidence in the literature. The authors' preferred surgical technique of radioscapholunate fusion with distal scaphoid and triquetrum excision is outlined. New implants and new concepts are also discussed. PMID:24179717

  12. Computerized radiographic sensing and control of an arc welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Rokhlin, S.I.; Guu, A.C. . Dept. of Welding Engineering)

    1990-03-01

    This paper summarizes an effort in which real-time radiography was implemented for on-line arc welding process study and control. X-ray penetrating radiation was used for volume observation in the welding pool and the heat-affected zone during the weld process. The advantages of such a technique are online detection and monitoring of defect formation in the weld and capability to study metal fusion and filler metal/base metal interaction and metal transfer in the welding pool. This technique may also be used for postservice, real-time remote testing of weld quality.

  13. Welding Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  14. Welding Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  15. Iterative structure-based improvement of a respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Li; Chen, Man; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Kong, Wing-Pui; Lai, Yen-Ting; Rundlet, Emily J.; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Yang, Yongping; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Guttman, Miklos; Lees, Christopher R.; Pancera, Marie; Sastry, Mallika; Soto, Cinque; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B.E.; Thomas, Paul V.; Van Galen, Joseph G.; Baxa, Ulrich; Lee, Kelly K.; Mascola, John R.; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Structure-based design of vaccines has been a long-sought goal, especially the iterative optimization used so successfully with structure-based design of drugs. We previously developed a 1st-generation vaccine antigen called DS-Cav1, comprising a pre-fusion-stabilized form of the fusion (F) glycoprotein, which elicited high titers of protective responses against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in mice and macaques. Here we report the improvement of DS-Cav1 through iterative cycles of structure-based design that significantly increased the titer of RSV-protective responses. The resultant 2nd-generation “DS2”-stabilized immunogens have F subunits genetically linked, fusion peptide deleted, and interprotomer movements stabilized by an additional disulfide bond. These DS2-immunogens are promising vaccine candidates with superior attributes, such as the absence of a requirement for furin cleavage and increased antigenic stability to heat inactivation. The iterative structure-based improvement described here may have utility in the optimization of other vaccine antigens. PMID:27478931

  16. An Improved WiFi Indoor Positioning Algorithm by Weighted Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Rui; Guo, Qiang; Hu, Changzhen; Xue, Jingfeng

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of mobile Internet has offered the opportunity for WiFi indoor positioning to come under the spotlight due to its low cost. However, nowadays the accuracy of WiFi indoor positioning cannot meet the demands of practical applications. To solve this problem, this paper proposes an improved WiFi indoor positioning algorithm by weighted fusion. The proposed algorithm is based on traditional location fingerprinting algorithms and consists of two stages: the offline acquisition and the online positioning. The offline acquisition process selects optimal parameters to complete the signal acquisition, and it forms a database of fingerprints by error classification and handling. To further improve the accuracy of positioning, the online positioning process first uses a pre-match method to select the candidate fingerprints to shorten the positioning time. After that, it uses the improved Euclidean distance and the improved joint probability to calculate two intermediate results, and further calculates the final result from these two intermediate results by weighted fusion. The improved Euclidean distance introduces the standard deviation of WiFi signal strength to smooth the WiFi signal fluctuation and the improved joint probability introduces the logarithmic calculation to reduce the difference between probability values. Comparing the proposed algorithm, the Euclidean distance based WKNN algorithm and the joint probability algorithm, the experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm has higher positioning accuracy. PMID:26334278

  17. An Improved WiFi Indoor Positioning Algorithm by Weighted Fusion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Guo, Qiang; Hu, Changzhen; Xue, Jingfeng

    2015-08-31

    The rapid development of mobile Internet has offered the opportunity for WiFi indoor positioning to come under the spotlight due to its low cost. However, nowadays the accuracy of WiFi indoor positioning cannot meet the demands of practical applications. To solve this problem, this paper proposes an improved WiFi indoor positioning algorithm by weighted fusion. The proposed algorithm is based on traditional location fingerprinting algorithms and consists of two stages: the offline acquisition and the online positioning. The offline acquisition process selects optimal parameters to complete the signal acquisition, and it forms a database of fingerprints by error classification and handling. To further improve the accuracy of positioning, the online positioning process first uses a pre-match method to select the candidate fingerprints to shorten the positioning time. After that, it uses the improved Euclidean distance and the improved joint probability to calculate two intermediate results, and further calculates the final result from these two intermediate results by weighted fusion. The improved Euclidean distance introduces the standard deviation of WiFi signal strength to smooth the WiFi signal fluctuation and the improved joint probability introduces the logarithmic calculation to reduce the difference between probability values. Comparing the proposed algorithm, the Euclidean distance based WKNN algorithm and the joint probability algorithm, the experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm has higher positioning accuracy.

  18. Intraspecific protoplast fusion of Brettanomyces anomalus for improved production of an extracellular β-glucosidase

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Zhao, Xihong; Pan, Siyi

    2014-01-01

    Improvement of production of an extracellular β-glucosidase with high activity by Brettanomyces anomalus PSY-001 was performed by using recursive protoplast fusion in a genome-shuffling format. The initial population was generated by ultraviolet irradiation, ultrasonic mutagenesis and, then, subjected to recursive protoplast fusion. Mutant strains exhibiting significantly higher β-glucosidase activities in liquid media were isolated. The best mutant strain showed increased cell growth in a flask culture, as well as increased β-glucosidase production. A recombinant strain, F3-25, was obtained after three rounds of genome shuffling and its production of β-glucosidase activity reached 4790 U L−1, which was a nearly eightfold increase compared to the original strain B. anomalus PSY-001. The subculture experiments indicated that F3-25 was genetically stable. PMID:26019572

  19. Evaluation of weld metal 82 and weld metal 152 stress corrosion cracking susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Psaila-Dombrowski, M.J.; Sarver, J.M.; Doherty, P.E.; Schneider, W.G.

    1995-12-31

    Welds are often an area of concern in steam generators (SG) because of the different materials in the welds, the residual stresses which result from the welding process and subsequent operational stresses. In general a weld is composed of a base metal, weld metal and the heat affected zone (HAZ). This study investigated the corrosion performance of welds connecting the divider plate to the weld buildup in a welded-in divider plate (WIDP) design. The materials of interest were Alloy 690 plate, Weld Metals (WM) 82 and WM 152. Weld test samples were fabricated in a manner that is consistent with SG fabrication practices in which WM 152 is used to attach the Alloy 690 plate to the WM 82 weld buildup. Round tensile specimens were used to evaluate WIDP welds. Specimens were manufactured parallel to the weld fusion lines, hence, the gauge length of each specimen contained either the base metal or a metal and a HAZ. Use of specimens of this orientation permitted evaluation of all the materials contained in the specimen for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility, not just the weakest materials. Constant extension rate tests were performed in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary water chemistry and faulted primary water chemistry at 343 C and a strain rate of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} sec{sup {minus}1}. No SCC was found in any specimen in either environment.

  20. Effects of heat input on the pitting resistance of Inconel 625 welds by overlay welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun Seok; Park, Young IL; Lee, Hae Woo

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the relationship between the dilution ratio of the weld zone and pitting resistance depending on the heat input to welding of the Inconel alloy. Each specimen was produced by electroslag welding using Inconel 625 as the filler metal. In the weld zone of each specimen, dendrite grains were observed near the fusion line and equiaxed grains were observed on the surface. It was also observed that a melted zone with a high Fe content was formed around the fusion line, which became wider as the welding heat input increased. In order to evaluate the pitting resistance, potentiodynamic polarization tests and CPT tests were conducted. The results of these tests confirmed that there is no difference between the pitting resistances of each specimen, as the structures of the surfaces were identical despite the effect of the differences in the welding heat input for each specimen and the minor dilution effect on the surface.

  1. Fusion Peptide Improves Stability and Bioactivity of Single Chain Antibody against Rabies Virus.

    PubMed

    Xi, Hualong; Zhang, Kaixin; Yin, Yanchun; Gu, Tiejun; Sun, Qing; Shi, Linqing; Zhang, Renxia; Jiang, Chunlai; Kong, Wei; Wu, Yongge

    2017-04-28

    The combination of rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) with a vaccine is currently effective against rabies infections, but improvements are needed. Genetic engineering antibody technology is an attractive approach for developing novel antibodies to replace RIG. In our previous study, a single-chain variable fragment, scFv57R, against rabies virus glycoprotein was constructed. However, its inherent weak stability and short half-life compared with the parent RIG may limit its diagnostic and therapeutic application. Therefore, an acidic tail of synuclein (ATS) derived from the C-terminal acidic tail of human alpha-synuclein protein was fused to the C-terminus of scFv57R in order to help it resist adverse stress and improve the stability and halflife. The tail showed no apparent effect on the preparation procedure and affinity of the protein, nor did it change the neutralizing potency in vitro. In the ELISA test of molecular stability, the ATS fusion form of the protein, scFv57R-ATS, showed an increase in thermal stability and longer half-life in serum than scFv57R. The protection against fatal rabies virus challenge improved after fusing the tail to the scFv, which may be attributed to the improved stability. Thus, the ATS fusion approach presented here is easily implemented and can be used as a new strategy to improve the stability and half-life of engineered antibody proteins for practical applications.

  2. Elements of arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This paper looks at the following arc welding techniques: (1) shielded metal-arc welding; (2) submerged-arc welding; (3) gas metal-arc welding; (4) flux-cored arc welding; (5) electrogas welding; (6) gas tungsten-arc welding; and (7) plasma-arc welding.

  3. An Improved Multi-Sensor Fusion Navigation Algorithm Based on the Factor Graph.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qinghua; Chen, Weina; Liu, Jianye; Wang, Huizhe

    2017-03-21

    An integrated navigation system coupled with additional sensors can be used in the Micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (MUAV) applications because the multi-sensor information is redundant and complementary, which can markedly improve the system accuracy. How to deal with the information gathered from different sensors efficiently is an important problem. The fact that different sensors provide measurements asynchronously may complicate the processing of these measurements. In addition, the output signals of some sensors appear to have a non-linear character. In order to incorporate these measurements and calculate a navigation solution in real time, the multi-sensor fusion algorithm based on factor graph is proposed. The global optimum solution is factorized according to the chain structure of the factor graph, which allows for a more general form of the conditional probability density. It can convert the fusion matter into connecting factors defined by these measurements to the graph without considering the relationship between the sensor update frequency and the fusion period. An experimental MUAV system has been built and some experiments have been performed to prove the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. An Improved Multi-Sensor Fusion Navigation Algorithm Based on the Factor Graph

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qinghua; Chen, Weina; Liu, Jianye; Wang, Huizhe

    2017-01-01

    An integrated navigation system coupled with additional sensors can be used in the Micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (MUAV) applications because the multi-sensor information is redundant and complementary, which can markedly improve the system accuracy. How to deal with the information gathered from different sensors efficiently is an important problem. The fact that different sensors provide measurements asynchronously may complicate the processing of these measurements. In addition, the output signals of some sensors appear to have a non-linear character. In order to incorporate these measurements and calculate a navigation solution in real time, the multi-sensor fusion algorithm based on factor graph is proposed. The global optimum solution is factorized according to the chain structure of the factor graph, which allows for a more general form of the conditional probability density. It can convert the fusion matter into connecting factors defined by these measurements to the graph without considering the relationship between the sensor update frequency and the fusion period. An experimental MUAV system has been built and some experiments have been performed to prove the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:28335570

  5. Forming of aluminium alloy friction stir welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruni, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    The present paper aims at investigating, through analytical models, numerical models and experiments, the effect of the warm deformation phase, realised with an in temperature upsetting, on the weld previously performed by friction stir lap welding on aluminium alloy blanks. The investigation allows to show the deformation zones after upsetting that determine the homogenisation of the weld section. The analytical model allows to relate the friction factor with the upsetting load. The presence on the weld of not elevated friction factor values determines the deformation and localisation levels very useful for the weld. Such methodology allows to improve the weld itself with the forming phase.

  6. Welding in space and the construction of space vehicles by welding; Proceedings of the Conference, New Carrollton, MD, Sept. 24-26, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The present conference discusses such topics in spacecraft welding as the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility's evidence on material properties degradation, EVA/telerobotic construction techniques, welding of the superfluid helium on-orbit transfer flight demonstration tanks and hardware, electron-beam welding of aerospace vehicles, variable-polarity plasma arc keyhole welding of Al, aircraft experiments of low-gravity fusion welding, flash-butt welding of Al alloys, and a computer-aided handbook for space welding fabrication. Also discussed are the welded nozzle extension for Ariane launch vehicles, the existence of on-orbit cold-welding, structural materials performance in long-term space service, high-strength lightweight alloys, steels, and heat-resistant alloys for aerospace welded structures, the NASA-Goddard satellite repair program, and the uses of explosion welding and cutting in aerospace engineering.

  7. Welding in space and the construction of space vehicles by welding; Proceedings of the Conference, New Carrollton, MD, Sept. 24-26, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The present conference discusses such topics in spacecraft welding as the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility's evidence on material properties degradation, EVA/telerobotic construction techniques, welding of the superfluid helium on-orbit transfer flight demonstration tanks and hardware, electron-beam welding of aerospace vehicles, variable-polarity plasma arc keyhole welding of Al, aircraft experiments of low-gravity fusion welding, flash-butt welding of Al alloys, and a computer-aided handbook for space welding fabrication. Also discussed are the welded nozzle extension for Ariane launch vehicles, the existence of on-orbit cold-welding, structural materials performance in long-term space service, high-strength lightweight alloys, steels, and heat-resistant alloys for aerospace welded structures, the NASA-Goddard satellite repair program, and the uses of explosion welding and cutting in aerospace engineering.

  8. Welding in space and the construction of space vehicles by welding; Proceedings of the Conference, New Carrollton, MD, Sept. 24-26, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The present conference discusses such topics in spacecraft welding as the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility's evidence on material properties degradation, EVA/telerobotic construction techniques, welding of the superfluid helium on-orbit transfer flight demonstration tanks and hardware, electron-beam welding of aerospace vehicles, variable-polarity plasma arc keyhole welding of Al, aircraft experiments of low-gravity fusion welding, flash-butt welding of Al alloys, and a computer-aided handbook for space welding fabrication. Also discussed are the welded nozzle extension for Ariane launch vehicles, the existence of on-orbit cold-welding, structural materials performance in long-term space service, high-strength lightweight alloys, steels, and heat-resistant alloys for aerospace welded structures, the NASA-Goddard satellite repair program, and the uses of explosion welding and cutting in aerospace engineering.

  9. Effect of Welding Current on the Structure and Properties of Resistance Spot Welded Dissimilar (Austenitic Stainless Steel and Low Carbon Steel) Metal Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawon, M. R. A.; Gulshan, F.; Kurny, A. S. W.

    2015-04-01

    1.5 mm thick sheet metal coupons of austenitic stainless steel and plain low carbon steel were welded by resistance spot welding technique. The effects of welding current in the range 3-9 kA on the structure and mechanical properties of welded joint were investigated. The structure was studied by macroscopic, microscopic and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Mechanical properties were determined by tensile testing and microhardness measurements. Asymmetrical shape weld nugget was found to have formed in the welded joint which increased in size with an increase in welding current. The fusion zone showed cast structure with coarse columnar grain and dendritic with excess delta ferrite in austenitic matrix. Microhardness of the weld nugget was maximum because of martensite formation. An increase in welding current also increased tensile strength of the weld coupon. An attempt has also been made to relate the mode of fracture with the welding current.

  10. Research on the activating flux gas tungsten arc welding and plasma arc welding for stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Her-Yueh

    2010-10-01

    A systematic study of the effects of activating flux in the weld morphology, arc profile, and angular distortion and microstructure of two different arc welding processes, namely, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and Plasma Arc Welding (PAW), was carried out. The results showed that the activating fluxes affected the penetration capability of arc welding on stainless steel. An increase in energy density resulting from the arc constriction and anode spot reduction enhanced the penetration capability. The Depth/Width (D/W) ratio of the weld played a major role in causing angular distortion of the weldment. Also, changes in the cooling rate, due to different heat source characteristics, influenced the microstructure from the fusion line to the centre of the weld.

  11. Improved inhibitor tolerance in xylose-fermenting yeast Spathaspora passalidarum by mutagenesis and protoplast fusion.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaoru; Yao, Shuo

    2012-03-01

    The xylose-fermenting yeast Spathaspora passalidarum showed excellent fermentation performance utilizing glucose and xylose under anaerobic conditions. But this yeast is highly sensitive to the inhibitors such as furfural present in the pretreated lignocellulosic biomass. In order to improve the inhibitor tolerance of this yeast, a combination of UV mutagenesis and protoplast fusion was used to construct strains with improved performance. Firstly, UV-induced mutants were screened and selected for improved tolerance towards furfural. The most promised mutant, S. passalidarum M7, produced 50% more final ethanol than the wild-type strain in a synthetic xylose medium containing 2 g/l furfural. However, this mutant was unable to grow in a medium containing 75% liquid fraction of pretreated wheat straw (WSLQ), in which furfural and many other inhibitors were present. Hybrid yeast strains, obtained from fusion of the protoplasts of S. passalidarum M7 and a robust yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 96581, were able to grow in 75% WSLQ and produce around 0.4 g ethanol/g consumed xylose. Among the selected hybrid strains, the hybrid FS22 showed the best fermentation capacity in 75% WSLQ. Phenotypic and partial molecular analysis indicated that S. passalidarum M7 was the dominant parental contributor to the hybrid. In summary, the hybrids are characterized by desired phenotypes derived from both parents, namely the ability to ferment xylose from S. passalidarum and an increased tolerance to inhibitors from S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581.

  12. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  13. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  14. Experimental and simulation study on the microstructure of TA15 titanium alloy laser beam welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Xiaohong; Peng, Qingyu; Wei, Yanhong; Ou, Wenmin

    2017-09-01

    Laser beam welding technique offers obvious advantages over other fusion welding processes in terms of joining titanium alloy. The microstructure of welded seam and heat affected zone resulted from diverse welding speeds and laser powers were investigated after simulating welding heat treatment. The analysis of the thermal transport properties successfully explained the morphology. Optimal process parameters were obtained. The simulation results were consistent with the corresponding experimental observations.

  15. Microstructural characterization in dissimilar friction stir welding between 304 stainless steel and st37 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jafarzadegan, M.; Feng, A.H.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Saeid, T.; Shen, J.; Assadi, H.

    2012-12-15

    In the present study, 3 mm-thick plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by friction stir welding at a welding speed of 50 mm/min and tool rotational speed of 400 and 800 rpm. X-ray diffraction test was carried out to study the phases which might be formed in the welds. Metallographic examinations, and tensile and microhardness tests were used to analyze the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Four different zones were found in the weld area except the base metals. In the stir zone of the 304 stainless steel, a refined grain structure with some features of dynamic recrystallization was evidenced. A thermomechanically-affected zone was characterized on the 304 steel side with features of dynamic recovery. In the other side of the stir zone, the hot deformation of the st37 steel in the austenite region produced small austenite grains and these grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite and some products of displacive transformations such as Widmanstatten ferrite and martensite by cooling the material after friction stir welding. The heat-affected zone in the st37 steel side showed partially and fully refined microstructures like fusion welding processes. The recrystallization in the 304 steel and the transformations in the st37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld area and therefore, improved the tensile properties of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW produced sound welds between st37 low carbon steel and 304 stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SZ of the st37 steel contained some products of allotropic transformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The material in the SZ of the 304 steel showed features of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The finer microstructure in the SZ increased the hardness and tensile strength.

  16. Multi-sensor multi-resolution image fusion for improved vegetation and urban area classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, U.; Milesi, C.; Nemani, R. R.; Basu, S.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we perform multi-sensor multi-resolution data fusion of Landsat-5 TM bands (at 30 m spatial resolution) and multispectral bands of World View-2 (WV-2 at 2 m spatial resolution) through linear spectral unmixing model. The advantages of fusing Landsat and WV-2 data are two fold: first, spatial resolution of the Landsat bands increases to WV-2 resolution. Second, integration of data from two sensors allows two additional SWIR bands from Landsat data to the fused product which have advantages such as improved atmospheric transparency and material identification, for example, urban features, construction materials, moisture contents of soil and vegetation, etc. In 150 separate experiments, WV-2 data were clustered in to 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 spectral classes and data fusion were performed with 3x3, 5x5, 7x7, 9x9 and 11x11 kernel sizes for each Landsat band. The optimal fused bands were selected based on Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient, RMSE (root mean square error) and ERGAS index and were subsequently used for vegetation, urban area and dark objects (deep water, shadows) classification using Random Forest classifier for a test site near Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco, California, USA. Accuracy assessment of the classified images through error matrix before and after fusion showed that the overall accuracy and Kappa for fused data classification (93.74%, 0.91) was much higher than Landsat data classification (72.71%, 0.70) and WV-2 data classification (74.99%, 0.71). This approach increased the spatial resolution of Landsat data to WV-2 spatial resolution while retaining the original Landsat spectral bands with significant improvement in classification.

  17. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jian; Qi, Junlei; Song, Xiaoguo; Feng, Jicai

    2014-01-01

    Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials. PMID:28788113

  18. Pearson's Functions to Describe FSW Weld Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lacombe, D.; Coupard, D.; Tcherniaeff, S.; Girot, F.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.

    2011-01-17

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new joining technique particularly for aluminium alloys that are difficult to fusion weld. In this study, the geometry of the weld has been investigated and modelled using Pearson's functions. It has been demonstrated that the Pearson's parameters (mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis and geometric constant) can be used to characterize the weld geometry and the tensile strength of the weld assembly. Pearson's parameters and process parameters are strongly correlated allowing to define a control process procedure for FSW assemblies which make radiographic or ultrasonic controls unnecessary. Finally, an optimisation using a Generalized Gradient Method allows to determine the geometry of the weld which maximises the assembly tensile strength.

  19. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jian; Qi, Junlei; Song, Xiaoguo; Feng, Jicai

    2014-06-25

    Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing-microstructure-property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials.

  20. Is the use of minimally invasive fusion technologies associated with improved outcomes after elective interbody lumbar fusion? Analysis of a nationwide prospective patient-reported outcomes registry.

    PubMed

    McGirt, Matthew J; Parker, Scott L; Mummaneni, Praveen; Knightly, John; Pfortmiller, Deborah; Foley, Kevin; Asher, Anthony L

    2017-07-01

    elective interbody lumbar fusion using MIS enabling technologies whereas 1,480 (76%) underwent the procedure using traditional open technologies. The MIS patients were slightly healthier (American Society of Anesthesiologists grade), had private insurance more frequently, and underwent two-level fusion less frequently. Unmatched, the MIS cohort was associated with reduced blood loss, a 0.7-day reduction in mean length of hospital stay, and 5% reduced need for post-discharge inpatient rehabilitation, but equivalent 90-day safety measures. After propensity matching, the MIS cohort remained associated with reduced blood loss and a shorter length of stay for one-level fusion (p<.05) but had equivalent length of stay for two-level fusion. Outcomes in all other 90-day safety measures were similar. In both unadjusted and propensity-matched comparison, MIS versus open technologies were associated with equivalent return to work, patient-reported pain, physical disability, and quality of life at 3 and 12 months' follow-up. In a representative sampling registry of elective interbody lumbar spine fusion procedures spanning 27 US states, nearly a quarter of procedures performed from 2010 to 2014 used minimally invasive enabling technologies. Regardless of approach, interbody lumbar fusion was associated with significant and sustained improvements in all measured health domains. When used in everyday care by a wide spectrum of spine surgeons in non-research settings, the use of MIS technologies was associated with reduced intraoperative blood loss but only a half-day reduction in mean length of hospital stay for one-level fusions. Minimally invasive surgery was not associated with any improved perioperative safety measures or 12-month outcomes. Although MIS enabling technologies may increase some in-hospital care efficiencies, MIS clinical outcomes are similar to open surgery for patients undergoing one- and two-level interbody lumbar fusions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. WELDING TORCH

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  2. Multi-Scale Fusion for Improved Localization of Malicious Tampering in Digital Images.

    PubMed

    Korus, Paweł; Huang, Jiwu

    2016-03-01

    A sliding window-based analysis is a prevailing mechanism for tampering localization in passive image authentication. It uses existing forensic detectors, originally designed for a full-frame analysis, to obtain the detection scores for individual image regions. One of the main problems with a window-based analysis is its impractically low localization resolution stemming from the need to use relatively large analysis windows. While decreasing the window size can improve the localization resolution, the classification results tend to become unreliable due to insufficient statistics about the relevant forensic features. In this paper, we investigate a multi-scale analysis approach that fuses multiple candidate tampering maps, resulting from the analysis with different windows, to obtain a single, more reliable tampering map with better localization resolution. We propose three different techniques for multi-scale fusion, and verify their feasibility against various reference strategies. We consider a popular tampering scenario with mode-based first digit features to distinguish between singly and doubly compressed regions. Our results clearly indicate that the proposed fusion strategies can successfully combine the benefits of small-scale and large-scale analyses and improve the tampering localization performance.

  3. Iterative structure-based improvement of a fusion-glycoprotein vaccine against RSV.

    PubMed

    Joyce, M Gordon; Zhang, Baoshan; Ou, Li; Chen, Man; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Kong, Wing-Pui; Lai, Yen-Ting; Rundlet, Emily J; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Yang, Yongping; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Guttman, Miklos; Lees, Christopher R; Pancera, Marie; Sastry, Mallika; Soto, Cinque; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B E; Thomas, Paul V; Van Galen, Joseph G; Baxa, Ulrich; Lee, Kelly K; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Kwong, Peter D

    2016-09-01

    Structure-based design of vaccines, particularly the iterative optimization used so successfully in the structure-based design of drugs, has been a long-sought goal. We previously developed a first-generation vaccine antigen called DS-Cav1, comprising a prefusion-stabilized form of the fusion (F) glycoprotein, which elicits high-titer protective responses against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in mice and macaques. Here we report the improvement of DS-Cav1 through iterative cycles of structure-based design that significantly increased the titer of RSV-protective responses. The resultant second-generation 'DS2'-stabilized immunogens have their F subunits genetically linked, their fusion peptides deleted and their interprotomer movements stabilized by an additional disulfide bond. These DS2 immunogens are promising vaccine candidates with superior attributes, such as their lack of a requirement for furin cleavage and their increased antigenic stability against heat inactivation. The iterative structure-based improvement described here may have utility in the optimization of other vaccine antigens.

  4. Noise temperature improvement for magnetic fusion plasma millimeter wave imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, J.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-03-15

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas [B. Tobias et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 6, 2106042 (2011)]. Of particular importance have been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry systems for imaging T{sub e} and n{sub e} fluctuations. These instruments have employed heterodyne receiver arrays with Schottky diode mixer elements directly connected to individual antennas. Consequently, the noise temperature has been strongly determined by the conversion loss with typical noise temperatures of ∼60 000 K. However, this can be significantly improved by making use of recent advances in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit chip low noise amplifiers to insert a pre-amplifier in front of the Schottky diode mixer element. In a proof-of-principle design at V-Band (50–75 GHz), significant improvement of noise temperature from the current 60 000 K to measured 4000 K has been obtained.

  5. Improving iris recognition performance using segmentation, quality enhancement, match score fusion, and indexing.

    PubMed

    Vatsa, Mayank; Singh, Richa; Noore, Afzel

    2008-08-01

    This paper proposes algorithms for iris segmentation, quality enhancement, match score fusion, and indexing to improve both the accuracy and the speed of iris recognition. A curve evolution approach is proposed to effectively segment a nonideal iris image using the modified Mumford-Shah functional. Different enhancement algorithms are concurrently applied on the segmented iris image to produce multiple enhanced versions of the iris image. A support-vector-machine-based learning algorithm selects locally enhanced regions from each globally enhanced image and combines these good-quality regions to create a single high-quality iris image. Two distinct features are extracted from the high-quality iris image. The global textural feature is extracted using the 1-D log polar Gabor transform, and the local topological feature is extracted using Euler numbers. An intelligent fusion algorithm combines the textural and topological matching scores to further improve the iris recognition performance and reduce the false rejection rate, whereas an indexing algorithm enables fast and accurate iris identification. The verification and identification performance of the proposed algorithms is validated and compared with other algorithms using the CASIA Version 3, ICE 2005, and UBIRIS iris databases.

  6. Rapid Repairs: Surface Preparation of Ti-3 Al-2.5V Alloy Tubes by Fiber Laser and Welding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    process, namely Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Process ( GTAW ) is undertaken to join theses components. Different sized tubes are required to be welded with...components is indispensable for installing hydraulic systems. Normally fusion welding process, namely Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Process ( GTAW ) is undertaken

  7. Characterization of a Cellulomonas fimi exoglucanase/xylanase-endoglucanase gene fusion which improves microbial degradation of cellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Duedu, Kwabena O; French, Christopher E

    2016-11-01

    Effective degradation of cellulose requires multiple classes of enzyme working together. However, naturally occurring cellulases with multiple catalytic domains seem to be rather rare in known cellulose-degrading organisms. A fusion protein made from Cellulomonas fimi exo- and endo- glucanases, Cex and CenA which improves breakdown of cellulose is described. A homologous carbohydrate binding module (CBM-2) present in both glucanases was fused to give a fusion protein CxnA. CxnA or unfused constructs (Cex+CenA, Cex, or CenA) were expressed in Escherichia coli and Citrobacter freundii. The latter recombinant strains were cultured at the expense of cellulose filter paper. The expressed CxnA had both exo- and endo- glucanase activities. It was also exported to the supernatant as were the non-fused proteins. In addition, the hybrid CBM from the fusion could bind to microcrystalline cellulose. Growth of C. freundii expressing CxnA was superior to that of cells expressing the unfused proteins. Physical degradation of filter paper was also faster with the cells expressing fusion protein than the other constructs. Our results show that fusion proteins with multiple catalytic domains can improve the efficiency of cellulose degradation. Such fusion proteins could potentially substitute cloning of multiple enzymes as well as improving product yields.

  8. The use of barbed sutures during scoliosis fusion wound closure: a quality improvement analysis.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Alfred; Ballard, Ryan; Garg, Sumeet; Baulesh, David; Erickson, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Growing evidence in the orthopaedic arthroplasty literature supports the use of running bidirectional barbed suture (barbed suture) for closure of knee arthrotomies. More rapid wound closure and suture line integrity are described as its major advantages. No studies of barbed suture for the closure of posterior spinal wounds exist. The purpose of this project is to compare wound closure times and hospital charges using traditional closure versus barbed suture closure of posterior spine wounds created during scoliosis surgery. A quality improvement project was initiated at a single tertiary-referral children's hospital spine program evaluating traditional layered interrupted suture closure (group 1) and running bidirectional barbed suture closure (Quill SRS) (group 2). Data regarding wound closure time, length of incision, fusion levels, suture cost, and hospital charges were prospectively collected over a 1-month period. Ten incisions comprised group 1 and 15 comprised group 2. The average wound closure times were 29.5 and 17 minutes, respectively, P=0.006. The wound lengths between the groups were statistically comparable (P=0.15). Taking into account the wound length, the average closure time in group 1 was 1.29 cm/min compared with 1.97 cm/min in group 2 (P<0.01). When accounting for the extra cost associated with the use of barbed sutures ($62.54; P<0.0001), the impact of a more rapid closure resulted in a difference in hospital charges of $884.60 per case (P=0.0013). Barbed suture closure of spinal fusion incisions results in a 40% reduction in closure time, resulting in an $884.60 decrease in hospital charges related to operating room time. This may represent significant yearly cost savings in a high-volume spine fusion center and warrants further investigation comparing patient-related outcomes. This quality improvement analysis provides preliminary economic justification for using barbed suture for scoliosis fusion wound closure resulting in decreased

  9. Web-enabled Landsat Data (WELD): a Consistent Seamless Near Real Time MODIS-Landsat Data Fusion for the Terrestrial User Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, D.; Ju, J.; Vermote, E.; Kline, K.; Loveland, T.; Hansen, M.

    2008-12-01

    The overall objective of NASA's Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) solicitations is to select projects providing Earth science data products and services driven by NASA's Earth science goals and contributing to advancing NASA's "missions to measurements" concept. This project contributes to the Land measurement theme; working at high spatial resolution and using state of the art and validated MODIS land products to systematically generate "seamless" radiometrically consistent mosaiced Landsat ETM+ data sets with per-pixel quality assessment information and derived land cover characterization at monthly, seasonal and annual time periods. The project will improve the consistency and quality of ETM+ SLC-off data through a fusion with MODIS land products, including the MODIS BRDF anisotropy product to radiometrically normalize and fill missing (cloudy and SLC-off) Landsat pixels, the MODIS atmospheric characterization data and procedure to systematically atmospherically correct the Landsat data, and the MODIS vegetation continuous field product to provide training for Landsat scale land cover characterization. The resulting high spatial resolution Landsat mosaic products will be generated for the conterminous USA (CONUS) and Alaska for a 7 year period, and made freely available to the user community via the Internet. Early CONUS results, algorithm insights, and information on how to access sample data products, and steps for community outreach and participation are presented.

  10. Automatic Welding System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Robotic welding has been of interest to industrial firms because it offers higher productivity at lower cost than manual welding. There are some systems with automated arc guidance available, but they have disadvantages, such as limitations on types of materials or types of seams that can be welded; susceptibility to stray electrical signals; restricted field of view; or tendency to contaminate the weld seam. Wanting to overcome these disadvantages, Marshall Space Flight Center, aided by Hayes International Corporation, developed system that uses closed-circuit TV signals for automatic guidance of the welding torch. NASA granted license to Combined Technologies, Inc. for commercial application of the technology. They developed a refined and improved arc guidance system. CTI in turn, licensed the Merrick Corporation, also of Nashville, for marketing and manufacturing of the new system, called the CT2 Optical Trucker. CT2 is a non-contracting system that offers adaptability to broader range of welding jobs and provides greater reliability in high speed operation. It is extremely accurate and can travel at high speed of up to 150 inches per minute.

  11. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  12. Improvement of mammographic lesion detection by fusion of information from different views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquerault, Sophie; Petrick, Nicholas; Chan, Heang-Ping; Sahiner, Berkman

    2001-07-01

    In screening mammography, two standard views, craniocaudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO), are commonly taken, and radiologists use information from the two views for lesion detection and diagnosis. Current computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems are designed to detect lesions on each view separately. We are developing a CAD method that utilizes information from the two views to reduce false-positives (FPs). Our two-view detection scheme consists of two main stages, a one-view pre-screening stage and a two-view correspondence stage. The one-view and two-view scores are then fused to estimate the likelihood that an object is a true mass. In this study, we analyzed the effectiveness of the proposed fusion scheme for FP reduction and its dependence on the number of objects per image in the pre-screening stage. The preliminary results demonstrate that the fusion of information from the CC and MLO views significantly reduced the FP rate in comparison to the one-view scheme. When the pre-screening stage produced 10 objects per image, the two-view fusion technique reduced the FP rate from an average of 2.1 FPs/image in our current one-view CAD scheme to 1.2 FPs/image at a sensitivity of 80%. The results also indicate that the improvement in the detection accuracy was essentially independent of the number of initial objects per image obtained at the pre-screening stage for this data set.

  13. Metal Working and Welding Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by metal workers and welders. Addressed in the six individual units of the course are the following topics: weldable metals and their alloys, arc welding, gas welding,…

  14. Improving Stiffness-to-weight Ratio of Spot-welded Structures based upon Nonlinear Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengyong

    2017-07-01

    Spot welding has been widely used for vehicle body construction due to its advantages of high speed and adaptability for automation. An effort to increase the stiffness-to-weight ratio of spot-welded structures is investigated based upon nonlinear finite element analysis. Topology optimization is conducted for reducing weight in the overlapping regions by choosing an appropriate topology. Three spot-welded models (lap, doubt-hat and T-shape) that approximate “typical” vehicle body components are studied for validating and illustrating the proposed method. It is concluded that removing underutilized material from overlapping regions can result in a significant increase in structural stiffness-to-weight ratio.

  15. Arc spot welding technique for underwater use

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, H.; Ide, Y.; Ogawa, Y.

    1995-12-31

    An arc spot welding equipment with special local cavity shroud was developed for underwater salvaging activity. Arc spot welding for lapped plates is an effective method to recover defects. This method in surface is so simple to use widely in the field of railways and chemical plants manufacturing. But there is some problems on the reliability of joint strength and bead shapes. A special arc spot nozzle to improve welding quality was developed. A small outlet of air jet at the bottom of the nozzle was created to maintain the swirl flow of shielding gas and certain rejection of excessive molten metal. This nozzle covers the welding part completely, then it also works as a local cavity shroud under water. This paper describes the design and function of the nozzle for CO{sub 2} arc spot welding system. A programmable controller manages the welding sequence of shielding gas flow, air jet flow, and arcing time. This welding gun is operated manually, but the operation is only to press the gun on the weld point. After that welding will proceed automatically, and arcing time is about three seconds. Whole time for welding which includes pre and post gas flow time is less than ten seconds for surface use, it is required some more additional pre drying process of welding point for underwater use to guarantee the high quality welding results. Fundamental analysis of welding conditions and the effects of air jet were considered.

  16. Robotic Vision for Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Vision system for robotic welder looks at weld along axis of welding electrode. Gives robot view of most of weld area, including yet-unwelded joint, weld pool, and completed weld bead. Protected within welding-torch body, lens and fiber bundle give robot closeup view of weld in progress. Relayed to video camera on robot manipulator frame, weld image provides data for automatic control of robot motion and welding parameters.

  17. Welding of Mo-Based Alloy Using Electron Beam and Laser-GTAW Hybrid Welding Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Anjan; Kumar, Santosh; Tewari, Raghvendra; Dey, Gautam Kumar

    2016-03-01

    In the current study, welding of TZM (molybdenum-based alloy) plates in square-butt configuration was carried out using electron beam and laser-GTAW hybrid power sources. Microstructures of weld joint containing three zones—parent metal, heat-affected zone, and fusion zone—were clearly identified when examined through optical and scanning electron microscopy. The weld joints were found to be sound with very wide fusion and heat-affected zones. The microstructure of the fusion zone was coarse-grained. as-solidified microstructure, while the microstructure of heat-affected zone was the recrystallized microstructure with reduction in grain size as distance from the fusion line increased. Microhardness profile using Vickers hardness tester was obtained across the weld region, and the tensile properties of the weld joints were evaluated by performing room temperature tensile test and fracture was examined using scanning electron microscope. Joint coefficient of the weld joints were ~40 to 45 pct of that of the parent metals with nonmeasurable tensile ductility with predominantly transgranular mode of fracture indicating weakness along the grain boundary. Detailed orientation imaging and transmission electron microscopy were carried out to understand the most dominating factor in introducing weld joint brittleness.

  18. Polyimide weld bonding for titanium alloy joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Kurland, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two weld bonding processes were developed for joining titanium alloy; one process utilizes a weld-through technique and the other a capillary-flow technique. The adhesive used for the weld-through process is similar to the P4/A5F system. A new polyimide laminating resin, BFBI/BMPM, was used in the capillary-flow process. Static property information was generated for weld-bonded joints over the temperature range of 219 K (-65 F) to 561 K (+550 F) and fatigue strength information was generated at room temperature. Significant improvement in fatigue strength was demonstrated for weld-bonded joints over spot-welded joints. A demonstration was made of the applicability of the weld-through weld-bonding process for fabricating stringer stiffened skin panels.

  19. Fusion of digital breast tomosynthesis images via wavelet synthesis for improved lesion conspicuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharan, Harishwaran; Pomponiu, Victor; Zheng, Bin; Whiting, Bruce; Gur, David

    2014-03-01

    Full-field digital mammography (FFDM) is the most common screening procedure for detecting early breast cancer. However, due to complications such as overlapping breast tissue in projection images, the efficacy of FFDM reading is reduced. Recent studies have shown that digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), in combination with FFDM, increases detection sensitivity considerably while decreasing false-positive, recall rates. There is a huge interest in creating diagnostically accurate 2-D interpretations from the DBT slices. Most of the 2-D syntheses rely on visualizing the maximum intensities (brightness) from each slice through different methods. We propose a wavelet based fusion method, where we focus on preserving holistic information from larger structures such as masses while adding high frequency information that is relevant and helpful for diagnosis. This method enables the spatial generation of a 2D image from a series of DBT images, each of which contains both smooth and coarse structures distributed in the wavelet domain. We believe that the wavelet-synthesized images, generated from their DBT image datasets, provide radiologists with improved lesion and micro-calcification conspicuity as compared with FFDM images. The potential impact of this fusion method is (1) Conception of a device-independent, data-driven modality that increases the conspicuity of lesions, thereby facilitating early detection and potentially reducing recall rates; (2) Reduction of the accompanying radiation dose to the patient.

  20. Multi-source remotely sensed data fusion for improving land cover classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Huang, Bo; Xu, Bing

    2017-02-01

    Although many advances have been made in past decades, land cover classification of fine-resolution remotely sensed (RS) data integrating multiple temporal, angular, and spectral features remains limited, and the contribution of different RS features to land cover classification accuracy remains uncertain. We proposed to improve land cover classification accuracy by integrating multi-source RS features through data fusion. We further investigated the effect of different RS features on classification performance. The results of fusing Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) data with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), China Environment 1A series (HJ-1A), and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection (ASTER) digital elevation model (DEM) data, showed that the fused data integrating temporal, spectral, angular, and topographic features achieved better land cover classification accuracy than the original RS data. Compared with the topographic feature, the temporal and angular features extracted from the fused data played more important roles in classification performance, especially those temporal features containing abundant vegetation growth information, which markedly increased the overall classification accuracy. In addition, the multispectral and hyperspectral fusion successfully discriminated detailed forest types. Our study provides a straightforward strategy for hierarchical land cover classification by making full use of available RS data. All of these methods and findings could be useful for land cover classification at both regional and global scales.

  1. Improved fusion performance in low-q, low triangularity plasmas with negative central magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E.J.; Casper, T.N.; Chu, M.S.

    1996-07-01

    Fusion performance in DIII-D low-q single-null divertor discharges has doubled as a result of improved confinement and stability, achieved through modification of pressure and current density profiles. These discharges extend the regime of neoclassical core confinement associated with negative or weak central magnetic shear to plasmas with the low safety factor (q{sub 95}{approximately}3) and triangularity ({delta}{approximately}0.3) anticipated in future tokamaks such as ITER. Energy confinement times exceed the ITER-89P L- mode scaling law by up to a factor of 4, and are almost twice as large as in previous single-null cases with 3{le}q{sub 95}{le}4. The normalized beta [{beta}(aB/I)] reaches values as high as 4, comparable to the best previous single-null discharges. Although high triangularity allows a larger plasma current, the fusion gain in these low triangularity plasmas is similar to that of high triangularity double-null plasmas at the same plasma current. These results are encouraging for advanced performance operation in ITER and for D-T experiments in JET.

  2. Effect of thermal exposure, forming, and welding on high-temperature, dispersion-strengthened aluminum alloy: Al-8Fe-1V-2Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. R.; Gilman, P. S.; Zedalis, M. S.; Skinner, D. J.; Peltier, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of applying conventional hot forming and welding methods to high temperature aluminum alloy, Al-8Fe-1V-2Si (FVS812), for structural applications and the effect of thermal exposure on mechanical properties were determined. FVS812 (AA8009) sheet exhibited good hot forming and resistance welding characteristics. It was brake formed to 90 deg bends (0.5T bend radius) at temperatures greater than or equal to 390 C (730 F), indicating the feasibility of fabricating basic shapes, such as angles and zees. Hot forming of simple contoured-flanged parts was demonstrated. Resistance spot welds with good static and fatigue strength at room and elevated temperatures were readily produced. Extended vacuum degassing during billet fabrication reduced porosity in fusion and resistance welds. However, electron beam welding was not possible because of extreme degassing during welding, and gas-tungsten-arc welds were not acceptable because of severely degraded mechanical properties. The FVS812 alloy exhibited excellent high temperature strength stability after thermal exposures up to 315 C (600 F) for 1000 h. Extended billet degassing appeared to generally improve tensile ductility, fatigue strength, and notch toughness. But the effects of billet degassing and thermal exposure on properties need to be further clarified. The manufacture of zee-stiffened, riveted, and resistance-spot-welded compression panels was demonstrated.

  3. Welding high-strength aluminum alloys at the Paton Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchuk, Yatsenko, S.I.; Cherednichok, V.T.; Semenov, L.A. )

    1993-07-01

    The choice of the flash method for welding aluminum-alloy sections was governed first of all by the possibility of producing homogeneous-structure joints with the minimum amount of possible discontinuities and an insignificant metal strength loss in the welding zone. The aluminum alloy welding technology under consideration relies on the method of flash welding without using any protective atmospheres. The reason is first of all that a complex cross-sectional shape of workpieces being joined, their configuration and considerable overall dimensions make it difficult to use chambers of any type. Besides, conducted studies ascertained that in flash welding, in contrast to various fusion welding processes, the use of protective atmospheres or a vacuum is of little benefit. Here are the results of studying the specifics of thermal and electric processes in flashing, the physical features of weld joint formation, the basics of the welding technology, and the characteristics of the equipment.

  4. Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System

    SciTech Connect

    Sease, John D

    2010-02-01

    The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. In recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.

  5. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  6. Welding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    The purpose of this welding program is to provide students with skills and techniques to become employed as advanced apprentice welders. The welding program manual includes the following sections: (1) course description; (2) general objectives; (3) competencies; (4) curriculum outline for 13 areas; (5) 13 references; and (6) student progress…

  7. Welding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    The purpose of this welding program is to provide students with skills and techniques to become employed as advanced apprentice welders. The welding program manual includes the following sections: (1) course description; (2) general objectives; (3) competencies; (4) curriculum outline for 13 areas; (5) 13 references; and (6) student progress…

  8. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  9. Double-Sided Single-Pass Submerged Arc Welding for 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jian; Yuan, Yi; Wang, Xiaoming; Yao, Zongxiang

    2013-09-01

    The duplex stainless steel (DSS), which combines the characteristics of ferritic steel and austenitic steel, is used widely. The submerged arc welding (SAW) method is usually applied to join thick plates of DSS. However, an effective welding procedure is needed in order to obtain ideal DSS welds with an appropriate proportion of ferrite (δ) and austenite (γ) in the weld zone, particularly in the melted zone and heat-affected zone. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a high efficiency double-sided single-pass (DSSP) SAW joining method for thick DSS plates. The effectiveness of the converse welding procedure, characterizations of weld zone, and mechanical properties of welded joint are analyzed. The results show an increasing appearance and continuous distribution feature of the σ phase in the fusion zone of the leading welded seam. The converse welding procedure promotes the σ phase to precipitate in the fusion zone of leading welded side. The microhardness appears to significantly increase in the center of leading welded side. Ductile fracture mode is observed in the weld zone. A mixture fracture feature appears with a shear lip and tears in the fusion zone near the fusion line. The ductility, plasticity, and microhardness of the joints have a significant relationship with σ phase and heat treatment effect influenced by the converse welding step. An available heat input controlling technology of the DSSP formation method is discussed for SAW of thick DSS plates.

  10. Improvement of the developmental competence of porcine oocytes collected from early antral follicles by cytoplast fusion

    PubMed Central

    DANG-NGUYEN, Thanh Quang; APPELTANT, Ruth; SOMFAI, Tamas; ISHIHARA, Shinya; MEN, Nguyen Thi; SANTOS, Elisa Caroline da Silva; NOGUCHI, Junko; KANEKO, Hiroyuki; KIKUCHI, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we propose an alternative technique called cytoplast fusion to improve the maturation rate and developmental competence of growing oocytes collected from early antral follicles in pigs. We examined whether the fusion of a growing oocyte with the cytoplast from a fully-grown oocyte (CFR group) could better promote maturation and developmental competence of the growing oocyte compared to germinal vesicle (GV) transfer (GVTR group). After 44 h of in vitro maturation (IVM), most growing oocytes (GR group) were still arrested at the GV stage (64.0 ± 5.1%); this number was significantly higher (P < 0.01) than that of the other groups. No matured oocyte was observed in the GR group. The maturation rate of GVTR oocytes was significantly improved (18.8 ± 3.5%) compared with that of growing oocytes. The proportion of oocytes that reached the metaphase-II (M-II) stage in the CFR group (37.8 ± 2.0%) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that in the GVTR group, although still lower than that in the control group (75.2 ± 4.4%). No blastocyst was derived from growing oocytes. Among in vitro fertilized GVTR oocytes, 3.0 ± 1.9% developed into blastocysts; however, this percentage showed an insignificant increase compared with the GR group. On the other hand, the percentage of CFR embryos that developed into blastocysts (12.0 ± 4.3%) was significantly higher than that of GR embryos (0.0%), although still lower than that of control embryos (27.0 ± 5.5%). Total cell number in blastocysts in the GVTR group (23.3 ± 6.9) was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than that in the control group (50.4 ± 5.0). Meanwhile, the total cell number in blastocysts derived from CFR oocytes (36.3 ± 4.8) was comparable to that of the control group. In summary, cytoplast fusion significantly improves maturation rate and developmental competence of growing oocytes compared with GV transfer. PMID:27795465

  11. Microstructural Characteristics of a Stainless Steel/Copper Dissimilar Joint Made by Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuhai; Huang, Jihua; Xia, Jun; Zhang, Hua; Zhao, Xingke

    2013-08-01

    The microstructures and its formation mechanism of a stainless steel/copper dissimilar joint by laser welding were investigated. It was found that the two modes of joining, i.e., welding-brazing and fusion welding, depend on different processing parameters. In the welding-brazing mode, the interface between copper and the fusion zone has scraggy morphology because the molten pool is frozen by solid copper with high thermal conductivity. The interdiffusion of elements occurs in the neighborhood of the interface, which leads to the metallurgy bond of the mode. In the fusion welding mode, the liquid phase in the fusion zone undergoes not only primary but also secondary liquid separation due to the high cooling rate and high supercooling level of laser welding. Some microcracks generated in the fusion zone by thermal stress mismatch are healed by liquid copper filling.

  12. Experimental Characterization of Electron Beam Welded SAE 5137H Thick Steel Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattire, Prakash; Bhawar, Valmik; Thakare, Sandeep; Patil, Sachin; Mane, Santosh; Singh, Rajkumar, Dr.

    2017-09-01

    Electron beam welding is known for its narrow weld zone with high depth to width ratio, less heat affected zone, less distortion and contamination. Electron beam welding is fusion welding process, where high velocity electrons impinge on material joint to be welded and kinetic energy of this electron is transformed into heat upon impact to fuse the material. In the present work electron beam welding of 60 mm thick SAE 5137H steel is studied. Mechanical and metallurgical properties of electron beam welded joint of SAE 5137H were evaluated. Mechanical properties are analysed by tensile, impact and hardness test. Metallurgical properties are investigated through optical and scanning electron microscope. The hardness traverse across weld zone shows HV 370-380, about 18% increase in the tensile strength and very low toughness of weld joint compared to parent metal. Microstructural observation shows equiaxed dendrite in the fusion zone and partial grain refinement was found in the HAZ.

  13. WELDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  14. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Muth, Thomas R; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Frederick, David Alan; Contescu, Cristian I; Chen, Wei; Lim, Yong Chae; Peter, William H; Feng, Zhili

    2013-01-01

    ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  15. Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Creep Rupture Properties of Grade 91 Steel Heavy Section Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Leijun

    2012-11-02

    This project will conduct a systematic metallurgical study on the effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the creep rupture properties of P91 heavy section welds. The objective is to develop a technical guide for selecting PWHT parameters, and to predict expected creep-rupture life based on the selection of heat treatment parameters. The project consists of four interdependent tasks: Experimentally and numerically characterize the temperature fields of typical post-weld heat treatment procedures for various weld and joint configurations to be used in Gen IV systems. Characterize the microstructure of various regions, including the weld fusion zone, coarse-grain heat-affected zone, and fine-grain heat affected zone, in the welds that underwent the various welding and PWHT thermal histories. Conduct creep and creep-rupture testing of coupons extracted from actual and physically simulated welds. Establish the relationship among PWHT parameters, thermal histories, microstructure, creep, and creep-rupture properties.

  16. High Temperature Analysis of Aluminum-Lithium 2195 Alloy to Aid in the Design of Improved Welding Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talia, George E.; Widener, Christian

    1996-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys have extraordinary properties. The addition of lithium to an aluminum alloy decreases its density, while making large increases in its strength and hardness. The down side is that they are unstable at higher temperatures, and are subsequently difficult to weld or even manufacture. Martin Marietta, though, developed an aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 that was reported to have exceptional properties and good weldability. Thus, it was chosen as the alloy for the space shuttles super light external tank. Unfortunately, welding 2195 has turned out to be much more of a challenge than anticipated. Thus, research has been undergone in order to understand the mechanisms that are causing the welding problems. Gas reactions have been observed to be detrimental to weld strength. Water vapor has often been identified as having a significant role in these reactions. Nitrogen, however, has also been shown to have a direct correlation to porosity. These reactions were suspected as being complex and responsible for the two main problems of welding 2195. One, the initial welds of 2195 are much weaker than the parent metal. Second, each subsequent welding pass increases the size and number of cracks and porosity, yielding significant reductions in strength. Consequently, the objective of this research was to characterize the high-temperature reactions of 2195 in order to understand the mechanisms for crack growth and the formation of porosity in welds. In order to accomplish that goal, an optical hot-stage microscope, HSM, was used to observe those reactions as they occurred. Surface reactions of 2195 were observed in a variety of environments, such as air, vacuum, nitrogen and helium. For comparison, some samples of Al-2219 were also observed. Some of the reacted surfaces were then analyzed on a scanning electron microscope, SEM. Additionally, a gas chromatograph was used to analyze the gaseous products of the high temperature reactions.

  17. Origins of Line Defects in Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds and Their Impact on Weld Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSWing) is a solid state joining technique which reduces the occurrence of typical defects formed in fusion welds, especially of highly alloyed metals. Although the process is robust for aluminum alloys, occasional reductions in the strength of FSWs have been observed. Shortly after the NASA-MSFC implemented a variation of FSW called self-reacting (SR), low strength properties were observed. At that time, this reduction in strength was attributed to a line defect. At that time, the limited data suggested that the line defect was related to the accumulation of native oxides that form on the weld lands and faying surfaces. Through a series of improved cleaning methods, tool redesign, and process parameter modifications, the reduction in the strength of the SR-FSWs was eliminated. As more data has been collected, the occasional reduction in the strength of SR-FSW still occurs. These occasional reductions indicate a need to reexamine the underlying causes. This study builds off a series of self reacting (SR)-FSWs that were made in 3 different thickness panels of AA2219 (0.95, 1.27 and 1.56 cm) at 2 different weld pitches. A bead on plate SR-FSW was also made in the 1.56 cm thick panel to understand the contribution of the former faying surfaces. Copper tracer studies were used to understand the flow lines associated with the weld tool used. The quality of the SR-FSWs was evaluated from tensile testing at room temperature. Reductions in the tensile strength were observed in some weldments, primarily at higher weld pitch or tool rotations. This study explores possible correlations between line defects and the reduction of strength in SR-FSWs. Results from this study will assist in a better understand of the mechanisms responsible for reduced tensile strength and provide methodology for minimizing their occurrence.

  18. Image fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavel, M.

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: a system overview of the basic components of a system designed to improve the ability of a pilot to fly through low-visibility conditions such as fog; the role of visual sciences; fusion issues; sensor characterization; sources of information; image processing; and image fusion.

  19. Hardness, Microstructure, and Residual Stresses in Low Carbon Steel Welding with Post-weld Heat Treatment and Temper Bead Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloraier, Abdulkareem S.; Joshi, Suraj; Price, John W. H.; Alawadhi, Khaled

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates the effects of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) and temper bead welding (TBW) on hardness, microstructure and residual stresses in multi-layer welding on low carbon steel specimens made with two different weld geometries, viz. (1) smooth-contoured and (2) U-shaped. It was found that the PWHT technique gave overall lower hardness than the TBW technique, but the hardness values in both techniques were acceptable. Microscopy analysis showed that the TBW technique was more effective in tempering the heat affected zone as the grain size decreased slightly at the fusion line in spite of the higher temperature at the fusion line. Residual stresses measured using the hole-drilling method showed that the residual stress is not reduced below yield stress near the last bead solidified in TBW. Only PWHT gives low residual stress results in this area. High tensile residual stresses may result in sensitivity to fatigue loading.

  20. Optimization of FS Welding Parameters for Improving Mechanical Behavior of AA2024-T351 Joints Based on Taguchi Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, C.; Infante, V.

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, the design of an experiment technique, the Taguchi method, has been used to optimize the friction stir welding (FSW) parameters for improving mechanical behavior of AA2024-T351 joints. The parameters considered were vertical downward forging force, tool travel speed, and probe length. An orthogonal array of L9 (34) was used; ANOVA analyses were carried out to identify the significant factors affecting tensile strength (Global Efficiency to Tensile Strength—GETS), bending strength (Global Efficiency to Bending—GEB), and hardness field. The percentage contribution of each parameter was also determined. As a result of the Taguchi analysis in this study, the probe length is the most significant parameter on GETS, and the tool travel speed is the most important parameter affecting both the GEB and the hardness field. An algebraic model for predicting the best mechanical performance, namely fatigue resistance, was developed and the optimal FSW combination was determined using this model. The results obtained were validated by conducting confirmation tests, the results of which verify the adequacy and effectiveness of this approach.

  1. An improved poly(A) motifs recognition method based on decision level fusion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanxin; Han, Jiuqiang; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Jiguang; Liu, Ruiling

    2015-02-01

    Polyadenylation is the process of addition of poly(A) tail to mRNA 3' ends. Identification of motifs controlling polyadenylation plays an essential role in improving genome annotation accuracy and better understanding of the mechanisms governing gene regulation. The bioinformatics methods used for poly(A) motifs recognition have demonstrated that information extracted from sequences surrounding the candidate motifs can differentiate true motifs from the false ones greatly. However, these methods depend on either domain features or string kernels. To date, methods combining information from different sources have not been found yet. Here, we proposed an improved poly(A) motifs recognition method by combing different sources based on decision level fusion. First of all, two novel prediction methods was proposed based on support vector machine (SVM): one method is achieved by using the domain-specific features and principle component analysis (PCA) method to eliminate the redundancy (PCA-SVM); the other method is based on Oligo string kernel (Oligo-SVM). Then we proposed a novel machine-learning method for poly(A) motif prediction by marrying four poly(A) motifs recognition methods, including two state-of-the-art methods (Random Forest (RF) and HMM-SVM), and two novel proposed methods (PCA-SVM and Oligo-SVM). A decision level information fusion method was employed to combine the decision values of different classifiers by applying the DS evidence theory. We evaluated our method on a comprehensive poly(A) dataset that consists of 14,740 samples on 12 variants of poly(A) motifs and 2750 samples containing none of these motifs. Our method has achieved accuracy up to 86.13%. Compared with the four classifiers, our evidence theory based method reduces the average error rate by about 30%, 27%, 26% and 16%, respectively. The experimental results suggest that the proposed method is more effective for poly(A) motif recognition.

  2. Chemical conjugate TMV-peptide bivalent fusion vaccines improve cellular immunity and tumor protection.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Alison A; Corbo, Tina A; Wykoff-Clary, Sherri; Palmer, Kenneth E; Pogue, Gregory P

    2006-01-01

    Chemical conjugation of CTL peptides to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) has shown promise as a molecular adjuvant scaffold for augmentation of cellular immune responses to peptide vaccines. This study demonstrates the ease of generating complex multipeptide vaccine formulations using chemical conjugation to TMV for improved vaccine efficacy. We have tested a model foreign antigen target-the chicken ovalbumin-derived CTL peptide (Ova peptide), as well as mouse melanoma-associated CTL epitopes p15e and tyrosinase-related protein 2 (Trp2) peptides that are self-antigen targets. Ova peptide fusions to TMV, as bivalent formulations with peptides encoding additional T-help or cellular uptake via the integrin-receptor binding RGD peptide, showed improved vaccine potency evidenced by significantly enhanced numbers of antigen-reactive T cells measured by in vitro IFNgamma cellular analysis. We measured the biologically relevant outcome of vaccination in protection of mice from EG.7-Ova tumor challenge, which was achieved with only two doses of vaccine ( approximately 600 ng peptide) given without adjuvant. The p15e peptide alone or Trp2 peptide alone, or as a bivalent formulation with T-help or RGD uptake epitopes, was unable to stimulate effective tumor protection. However, a vaccine with both CTL peptides fused together onto TMV generated significantly improved survival. Interestingly, different bivalent vaccine formulations were required to improve vaccine efficacy for Ova or melanoma tumor model systems.

  3. Elucidation of phenomena in high-power fiber laser welding and development of prevention procedures of welding defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Seiji; Kawahito, Yousuke

    2009-02-01

    Fiber lasers have been receiving considerable attention because of their advantages of high power, high beam quality and high efficiency, and are expected as one of the desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. In our researches, therefore, the effects of laser powers and their densities on the weld penetration and the formation of sound welds were investigated in welding of Type 304 austenitic stainless steel, A5052 aluminum alloy or high strength steel plates with four laser beams of about 0.12 to 1 mm in focused spot diameter, and their welding phenomena were observed with high-speed video cameras and X-ray transmission real-time imaging system. It was found that the laser power density exerted a remarkable effect on the increase in weld penetration at higher welding speeds, but on the other hand at low welding speeds deeper-penetration welds could be produced at higher power. Laser-induced plume behavior and its effect on weld penetration, and the mechanisms of spattering, underfilling, porosity and humping were elucidated, sound welds without welding defects could be produced under the improved welding conditions. In addition, importance of the development of focusing optics and the removal of a plume during remote welding will be emphasized in terms of the stable production of constant deep-penetration welds and the reduction in welding defects in high power laser welding.

  4. Carbide-Free Bainitic Weld Metal: A New Concept in Welding of Armor Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Murthy, N.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Murty, B. S.; Reddy, G. M.; Rao, T. J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Carbide-free bainite, a fine mixture of bainitic ferrite and austenite, is a relatively recent development in steel microstructures. Apart from being very strong and tough, the microstructure is hydrogen-tolerant. These characteristics make it well-suited for weld metals. In the current work, an armor-grade quenched and tempered steel was welded such that the fusion zone developed a carbide-free bainitic microstructure. These welds showed very high joint efficiency and ballistic performance compared to those produced, as per the current industrial practice, using austenitic stainless steel fillers. Importantly, these welds showed no vulnerability to cold cracking, as verified using oblique Y-groove tests. The concept of carbide-free bainitic weld metal thus promises many useful new developments in welding of high-strength steels.

  5. Toughness of 12%Cr ferritic/martensitic steel welds produced by non-arc welding processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, B.J.; Gooch, T.G.

    1998-08-01

    Low carbon 12%Cr steels can offer reduced life cycle costs in many applications. The present work examined the behavior of commercial steels of varying composition when subject to low heat input welding by the electron beam (EB) process and to a forge cycle by linear friction welding (LFW). Charpy impact testing was carried out on the high temperature heat-affected zone (HAZ)/fusion boundary or weld interface, with metallographic examination. With EB welding, the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was below 0 C (32 F) only for steel of low ferrite factor giving a fully martensitic weld area. Higher ferrite factor alloys showed predominantly ferritic transformed microstructures and a transition well above room temperature. Grain coarsening was found even with low EB process power, the peak grain size increasing with both heat input and steel ferrite factor. Use of LFW gave a fine weld area structure and DBTTs around 0 C even in high ferrite factor (FF) material.

  6. The reliability of untempered end plug welds on HT9-clad IFR fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D C; Porter, D L

    1987-02-01

    Welding generally leaves residual stresses in transformed weld zones, which can initiate cracks from flaws already present in the weld zones. When HT9 cools from welding temperatures, a martensite phase forms in the weld fusion zone and heat-affected zone. Because this martensite phase is hard and brittle, it is particularly susceptible to cracking aggravated by residual stresses. This causes concern over the use of untempered welds on HT9-clad fuel elements. To determine if residual stresses present in end-plug weld zones would affect fuel pin performance, HT9 capsules with prototypic TIG- and CD-welded end plugs (in the tempered and as-welded conditions) were pressurized to failure at room temperature, 550{sup 0}C, and 600{sup 0}C. None of the capsules failed in a weld zone. To determine the effects of reactor operating temperatures on untempered welds, prototypic TIG welds were tempered at reactor bulk sodium temperature and an expected sodium outlet temperature for various lengths of time. Subsequent tensile and burst tests of these specimens proved that any embrittling effects that may have been induced in these welds were of no consequence. Hardness tests on longitudinal sections of welds indicated the amount of tempering a weld will receive inreactor after relatively short lengths of time. The pressure burst tests proved that untemperted welds on HT9-clad fuel elements are as reliable as tempered welds; any residual stresses in untempered weld zones were of no consequence. The tempering test showed that welds used in the as-welded condition will sufficiently temper in 7 days at 550{sup 0}C, but will not, sufficiently temper in 7 days at bulk sodium temperature. A comparison of the structure of laser welds to those of CD and TIG welds indicated that untempered laser welds will perform and temper in a manner similar to the TIG welds tested in this effort.

  7. Welded joints integrity analysis and optimization for fiber laser welding of dissimilar materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Yuewei; Shao, Xinyu; Jiang, Ping; Li, Peigen; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Dissimilar materials welded joints provide many advantages in power, automotive, chemical, and spacecraft industries. The weld bead integrity which is determined by process parameters plays a significant role in the welding quality during the fiber laser welding (FLW) of dissimilar materials. In this paper, an optimization method by taking the integrity of the weld bead and weld area into consideration is proposed for FLW of dissimilar materials, the low carbon steel and stainless steel. The relationships between the weld bead integrity and process parameters are developed by the genetic algorithm optimized back propagation neural network (GA-BPNN). The particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is taken for optimizing the predicted outputs from GA-BPNN for the objective. Through the optimization process, the desired weld bead with good integrity and minimum weld area are obtained and the corresponding microstructure and microhardness are excellent. The mechanical properties of the optimized joints are greatly improved compared with that of the un-optimized welded joints. Moreover, the effects of significant factors are analyzed based on the statistical approach and the laser power (LP) is identified as the most significant factor on the weld bead integrity and weld area. The results indicate that the proposed method is effective for improving the reliability and stability of welded joints in the practical production.

  8. Weighted fusion of depth and inertial data to improve view invariance for real-time human action recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Hao, Huiyan; Jafari, Roozbeh; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents an extension to our previously developed fusion framework [10] involving a depth camera and an inertial sensor in order to improve its view invariance aspect for real-time human action recognition applications. A computationally efficient view estimation based on skeleton joints is considered in order to select the most relevant depth training data when recognizing test samples. Two collaborative representation classifiers, one for depth features and one for inertial features, are appropriately weighted to generate a decision making probability. The experimental results applied to a multi-view human action dataset show that this weighted extension improves the recognition performance by about 5% over equally weighted fusion deployed in our previous fusion framework.

  9. Fiber Laser Welded AZ31 Magnesium Alloy: The Effect of Welding Speed on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, S. H.; Chen, D. L.; Bhole, S. D.; Powidajko, E.; Weckman, D. C.; Zhou, Y.

    2012-06-01

    This study was aimed at characterizing microstructural change and evaluating tensile and fatigue properties of fiber laser welded AZ31B-H24 Mg alloy with special attention to the effect of welding speed. Laser welding led to the formation of equiaxed dendrites in the fusion zone and columnar dendrites near the fusion zone boundary along with divorced eutectic Mg17Al12 particles and recrystallized grains in the heat-affected zone. The lowest hardness across the weld appeared in the fusion zone. Although the yield strength, ductility, and fatigue life decreased, the hardening capacity increased after laser welding, with a joint efficiency reaching about 90 pct. A higher welding speed resulted in a narrower fusion zone, smaller grain size, higher yield strength, and longer fatigue life, as well as a slightly lower strain-hardening capacity mainly because of the smaller grain sizes. Tensile fracture occurred in the fusion zone, whereas fatigue failure appeared essentially in between the heat-affected zone and the fusion zone. Fatigue cracks initiated from the near-surface welding defects and propagated by the formation of fatigue striations together with secondary cracks.

  10. High Strength Steel Weldment Reliability: Weld Metal Hydrogen Trapping.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    additions to welding consumables to control weld metal hydrogen and thus reduce susceptibility to cold cracking in high strength steel weldments. 14...applying weld metal hydrogen trapping to improve the resistance to hydrogen cracking in welding of high strength steels . Hydrogen cracking in high...requirements which are necessary to prevent hydrogen cracking in high strength steel welding. Common practices to prevent hydrogen cracking in steel

  11. Halide Welding for Silver Nanowire Network Electrode.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyungseok; Kim, Yeontae; Cheon, Siuk; Yi, Gi-Ra; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2017-09-13

    We developed a method of chemically welding silver nanowires (AgNWs) using an aqueous solution containing sodium halide salts (NaF, NaCl, NaBr, or NaI). The halide welding was performed simply by immersing the as-coated AgNW film into the sodium halide solution, and the resulting material was compared with those obtained using two typical thermal and plasmonic welding techniques. The halide welding dramatically reduced the sheet resistance of the AgNW electrode because of the strong fusion among nanowires at each junction while preserving the optical transmittance. The dramatic decrease in the sheet resistance was attributed to the autocatalytic addition of dissolved silver ions to the nanowire junction. Unlike thermal and plasmonic welding methods, the halide welding could be applied to AgNW films with a variety of deposition densities because the halide ions uniformly contacted the surface or junction regions. The optimized AgNW electrodes exhibited a sheet resistance of 9.3 Ω/sq at an optical transmittance of 92%. The halide welding significantly enhanced the mechanical flexibility of the electrode compared with the as-coated AgNWs. The halide-welded AgNWs were successfully used as source-drain electrodes in a transparent and flexible organic field-effect transistor (OFET). This simple, low-cost, and low-power consumption halide welding technique provides an innovative approach to preparing transparent electrodes for use in next-generation flexible optoelectronic devices.

  12. Laser Beam Submerged Arc Hybrid Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisgen, Uwe; Olschok, Simon; Mavany, Michael; Jakobs, Stefan

    The laser beam submerged arc hybrid welding method originates from the knowledge that, with increasing penetration depth, the laser beam process has a tendency to pore formation in the lower weld regions. The combination with the energy efficient submerged arc process improves the degassing and reduces the tendency to pore formation. The high deposition rate of the SA process in combination with the laser beam process offers, providing the appropriate choice of weld preparation, the possibility of welding plates with a thickness larger than 20 mm in a single pass, and also of welding thicker plates with the double sided single pass technique.

  13. Laser Beam Submerged Arc Hybrid Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisgen, Uwe; Olschok, Simon; Jakobs, Stefan; Schleser, Markus; Mokrov, Oleg; Rossiter, Eduardo

    The laser beam-submerged arc hybrid welding method originates from the knowledge that, with increasing penetration depth, the laser beam process has a tendency to pore formation in the lower weld regions. The coupling with the energy-efficient submerged-arc process improves degassing and reduces the tendency to pore formation. The high deposition rate of the SA process in combination with the laser beam process offers, providing the appropriate choice of weld preparation, the possibility of welding plates with a thickness larger than 20° mm in a single pass, and also of welding thicker plates with the double-sided single pass technique.

  14. Advances in welding science - a perspective

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Babu, S.S.; DebRoy, T.

    1995-02-01

    The ultimate goal of welding technology is to improve the joint integrity and increase productivity. Over the years, welding has been more of an art than a science, but in the last few decades major advances have taken place in welding science and technology. With the development of new methodologies at the crossroads of basic and applied sciences, enormous opportunities and potential exist to develop a science-based tailoring of composition, structure, and properties of welds with intelligent control and automation of the welding processes.

  15. Gravitational effects on the GTA weld pool size of a pure metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domey, Jeffrey John

    Understanding the physical phenomena involved in the welding process is of substantial value to improving the weldability of materials. The nature of arc welding restricts direct observation during the welding process to surface phenomena, and physical observation of the weld is limited to solidified welds. Thus, accurate computational simulations are needed to provide a better understanding of the transient phenomena that are present during the welding process. One of the major factors affecting the motion within the molten weld pool is the gravity-driven buoyancy force. This force opposes the electromagnetic force induced flow for the straight polarity (direct-current electrode negative) GTA weld. The buoyancy force can also act to oppose or enhance the Marangoni convective flow within the weld pool depending on the sign of the surface tension temperature coefficient. An extensive study involving both numerical as well as physical experiments of the GTA welding process covering a variety of gravitational fields has been performed. Numerical experiments, utilizing the WELDER code, were conducted for stationary GTA welds onto an aluminum alloy. It was found that at a g-level of 0.1g, the convective flow was dominated by the electromagnetic force, while at higher g-levels, 1.0g and 2.0g, the convective flow was dominated by the buoyancy force. It was also found that the depth-to-width (d/w) ratio decreased as the g-level increased for 0.1g to 2.0g. Numerical experiments were also performed in the 1.0g to 10.0g range for stationary GTA welds onto commercially pure nickel. It was found that the electro-magnetic force dominated all of the simulations, although as the g-level increased, the buoyancy force increased causing a decrease in the depth of the fusion zone. This decrease in depth caused a decrease in the d/w ratio of the fusion zone as the g-level increased. Physical experiments for GTA welding of commercially pure nickel in the high-g range (up to 10.0g) were

  16. Laser welding of automotive aluminum alloys to achieve defect-free, structurally sound and reliable welds

    SciTech Connect

    DebRoy, T.

    2000-11-17

    The objective of this program was to seek improved process control and weldment reliability during laser welding of automotive aluminum alloys while retaining the high speed and accuracy of the laser beam welding process. The effects of various welding variables on the loss of alloying elements and the formation of porosity and other geometric weld defects such as underfill and overfill were studied both experimentally and theoretically.

  17. Effect of Water Cooling on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 6N01 Aluminum Alloy P-MIG-Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Li, Haiyang; Liang, Zhimin; Wang, Dianlong

    2017-06-01

    In-process water cooling was applied to 8-mm-thick 6N01 aluminum alloy joined using the pulsed metal-inert gas (P-MIG) multi-pass welding method. The influence of the cooling conditions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joints were mainly discussed. Compared with natural cooling, under water cooling, the peak temperature decreased and the cooling rate increased substantially, leading to a decrease in the partially melted zone of the welded joint. The columnar grain sizes adjacent to the fusion boundary were much more elongated under water cooling than under natural cooling. In addition, when water cooling was performed, the width of the softened zone was approximately 6 mm smaller than that with natural cooling, and the overall microhardness of the welded joint was improved. The tensile and nominal yield strengths of the welded joint were approximately 11 and 7 MPa higher under water cooling than under natural cooling, respectively. The fracture surface morphology of the welded joints exhibited typical ductile fracture. Thus, water cooling can optimize the microstructure and improve the mechanical properties of the 6N01 alloy P-MIG-welded joint.

  18. Effect of Water Cooling on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 6N01 Aluminum Alloy P-MIG-Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Li, Haiyang; Liang, Zhimin; Wang, Dianlong

    2017-08-01

    In-process water cooling was applied to 8-mm-thick 6N01 aluminum alloy joined using the pulsed metal-inert gas (P-MIG) multi-pass welding method. The influence of the cooling conditions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joints were mainly discussed. Compared with natural cooling, under water cooling, the peak temperature decreased and the cooling rate increased substantially, leading to a decrease in the partially melted zone of the welded joint. The columnar grain sizes adjacent to the fusion boundary were much more elongated under water cooling than under natural cooling. In addition, when water cooling was performed, the width of the softened zone was approximately 6 mm smaller than that with natural cooling, and the overall microhardness of the welded joint was improved. The tensile and nominal yield strengths of the welded joint were approximately 11 and 7 MPa higher under water cooling than under natural cooling, respectively. The fracture surface morphology of the welded joints exhibited typical ductile fracture. Thus, water cooling can optimize the microstructure and improve the mechanical properties of the 6N01 alloy P-MIG-welded joint.

  19. TEM Observation of Martensite Layer at the Weld Interface of an A508III to Inconel 82 Dissimilar Metal Weld Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. R.; Lu, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    A lenticular martensite layer at the weld interface in an A508III/Inconel 82 dissimilar metal weld (DMW) joint was studied by TEM. The martensite/weld metal boundary was observed as the fusion boundary. There was a K-S orientation relationship between martensite and weld metal. The formation of the martensite was mainly determined by the distribution of alloy elements. The martensite was responsible for the hardness peak in the DMW.

  20. ELECTRIC WELDING EQUIPMENT AND AUTOMATION OF WELDING IN CONSTRUCTION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    WELDING , *ARC WELDING , AUTOMATION, CONSTRUCTION, INDUSTRIES, POWER EQUIPMENT, GENERATORS, POWER TRANSFORMERS, RESISTANCE WELDING , SPOT WELDING , MACHINES, AUTOMATIC, STRUCTURES, WIRING DIAGRAMS, USSR.

  1. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  2. Virtual Welded - Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhishang; Ludewig, Howard W.; Babu, S. Suresh

    2005-06-30

    Virtual Welede-Joint Design, a systematic modeling approach, has been developed in this project to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, properties, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatique strength. This systematic modeling approach was applied in the welding of high strength steel. A special welding wire was developed in this project to introduce compressive residual stress at weld toe. The results from both modeling and experiments demonstrated that more than 10x fatique life improvement can be acheived in high strength steel welds by the combination of compressive residual stress from the special welding wire and the desired weld bead shape from a unique welding process. The results indicate a technology breakthrough in the design of lightweight and high fatique performance welded structures using high strength steels.

  3. Improvement of Productivity in TIG Welding Plant by Equipment Design in Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanavel, C.; Saravanan, R.; Chandrasekaran, M.; Jayakanth, J. J.

    2017-03-01

    Measurements and improvements are very indispensable task at all levels of management. Here some samples are, at operator level: Measuring operating parameters to ensure OEE (Overall Equipment Effectiveness) and measuring Q components performance to ensure quality, at supervisory level: measuring operator’s performance to ensure labour utility at managerial level: production and productivity measurements and at top level capital and capacity utilization. An often accepted statement is “Improvement is impossible without measurement”. Measurements often referred as observation. The case study was conducted at Government Boiler factory in India. The scientific approach followed for indentifying non value added activities. Personalised new equipment designed and installed to achieve productivity improvement of 85% for a day. The new equipment can serve 360o around its axis hence it simplified loading and unloading procedures as well as reduce their times and ensured effective space and time.

  4. Recent progress on gas tungsten arc welding of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; King, J.F.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    Emphasis has been placed on welding 6.4 mm plate, primarily by gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding. The weld properties were tested using blunt notch Charpy testing to determine the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Erratic results were attributed to hydrogen and oxygen contamination of the welds. An improved gas clean-up system was installed on the welding glove box and the resulting high purity welds had Charpy impact properties similar to those of electron beam welds with similar grain size. A post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) of 950{degrees}C for two hours did not improve the properties of the weld in cases where low concentrations of impurities were attained. Further improvements in the gas clean-up system are needed to control hydrogen contamination.

  5. Improvement of spectral calibration for food analysis through multi-model fusion.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chao; Chen, Hui; Xu, Zehong; Wu, Tong; Wang, Li; Zhu, Wanping

    2012-10-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy will present a more promising tool for quantitative analysis if the predictive ability of the calibration model is further improved. To achieve this goal, a new ensemble calibration method based on uninformative variable elimination (UVE)-partial least square (PLS) is proposed, which is named as ensemble PLS (EPLS), meaning a fusion of multiple PLS models. In this method, different calibration sets are first generated by bootstrap and different PLS models are obtained. Then, the UVE is used to shrink the original variable space into a specific subspace. By repeating this process, a fixed number of candidates PLS member models are obtained. Finally, a smaller part of candidate models are integrated to produce an ensemble model. In order to verify the performance of EPLS, three NIR spectral datasets from food industry were used for illustration. Both full-spectrum PLS and UVEPLS of single models were used as reference. It was found that the proposed method could lead to lower RMSEP (root mean square error of prediction) value than PLS and UVEPLS and such an improvement is statistically significant according to a paired t-test. The results showed that the method is of value to enhance the predictive ability of PLS-based calibration involving complex NIR matrices in food analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Improvement of spectral calibration for food analysis through multi-model fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chao; Chen, Hui; Xu, Zehong; Wu, Tong; Wang, Li; Zhu, Wanping

    2012-10-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy will present a more promising tool for quantitative analysis if the predictive ability of the calibration model is further improved. To achieve this goal, a new ensemble calibration method based on uninformative variable elimination (UVE)-partial least square (PLS) is proposed, which is named as ensemble PLS (EPLS), meaning a fusion of multiple PLS models. In this method, different calibration sets are first generated by bootstrap and different PLS models are obtained. Then, the UVE is used to shrink the original variable space into a specific subspace. By repeating this process, a fixed number of candidates PLS member models are obtained. Finally, a smaller part of candidate models are integrated to produce an ensemble model. In order to verify the performance of EPLS, three NIR spectral datasets from food industry were used for illustration. Both full-spectrum PLS and UVEPLS of single models were used as reference. It was found that the proposed method could lead to lower RMSEP (root mean square error of prediction) value than PLS and UVEPLS and such an improvement is statistically significant according to a paired t-test. The results showed that the method is of value to enhance the predictive ability of PLS-based calibration involving complex NIR matrices in food analysis.

  7. Improved disparity map analysis through the fusion of monocular image segmentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlant, Frederic P.; Mckeown, David M.

    1991-01-01

    The focus is to examine how estimates of three dimensional scene structure, as encoded in a scene disparity map, can be improved by the analysis of the original monocular imagery. The utilization of surface illumination information is provided by the segmentation of the monocular image into fine surface patches of nearly homogeneous intensity to remove mismatches generated during stereo matching. These patches are used to guide a statistical analysis of the disparity map based on the assumption that such patches correspond closely with physical surfaces in the scene. Such a technique is quite independent of whether the initial disparity map was generated by automated area-based or feature-based stereo matching. Stereo analysis results are presented on a complex urban scene containing various man-made and natural features. This scene contains a variety of problems including low building height with respect to the stereo baseline, buildings and roads in complex terrain, and highly textured buildings and terrain. The improvements are demonstrated due to monocular fusion with a set of different region-based image segmentations. The generality of this approach to stereo analysis and its utility in the development of general three dimensional scene interpretation systems are also discussed.

  8. Improving 3D surface reconstruction from endoscopic video via fusion and refined reflectance modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Price, True; Zhao, Qingyu; Frahm, Jan-Michael; Rosenman, Julian; Pizer, Stephen

    2017-02-01

    Shape from shading (SFS) has been studied for decades; nevertheless, its overly simple assumptions and its ill-conditioning have resulted in infrequent use in real applications. Price et al. recently developed an iterative scheme named shape from motion and shading (SFMS) that models both shape and reflectance of an unknown surface simultaneously. SFMS produces a fairly accurate, dense 3D reconstruction from each frame of a pharyngeal endoscopic video, albeit with inconsistency between the 3D reconstructions of different frames. We present a comprehensive study of the SFMS scheme and several improvements to it: (1) We integrate a deformable registration method into the iterative scheme and use the fusion of multiple surfaces as a reference surface to guide the next iteration's reconstruction. This can be interpreted as incorporating regularity of a frame's reconstruction with that of temporally nearby frames. (2) We show that the reflectance model estimation is crucial and very sensitive to noise in the data. Moreover, even when the surface reflection is not assumed to be Lambertian, the reflectance model estimation function in SFMS is still overly simple for endoscopy of human tissue. By removing outlier pixels, by preventing unrealistic BRDF estimation, and by reducing the falloff speed of illumination in SFS to account for the effect of multiple bouncing of the light, we improve the reconstruction accuracy.

  9. Improved Iris Recognition through Fusion of Hamming Distance and Fragile Bit Distance.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Karen P; Bowyer, Kevin W; Flynn, Patrick J

    2011-12-01

    The most common iris biometric algorithm represents the texture of an iris using a binary iris code. Not all bits in an iris code are equally consistent. A bit is deemed fragile if its value changes across iris codes created from different images of the same iris. Previous research has shown that iris recognition performance can be improved by masking these fragile bits. Rather than ignoring fragile bits completely, we consider what beneficial information can be obtained from the fragile bits. We find that the locations of fragile bits tend to be consistent across different iris codes of the same eye. We present a metric, called the fragile bit distance, which quantitatively measures the coincidence of the fragile bit patterns in two iris codes. We find that score fusion of fragile bit distance and Hamming distance works better for recognition than Hamming distance alone. To our knowledge, this is the first and only work to use the coincidence of fragile bit locations to improve the accuracy of matches.

  10. Insect GDNF:TTC fusion protein improves delivery of GDNF to mouse CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianhong; Chian, Ru-Ju; Ay, Ilknur; Kashi, Brenda B.; Celia, Samuel A.; Tamrazian, Eric; Pepinsky, R. Blake; Fishman, Paul S.; Brown, Robert H.; Francis, Jonathan W.

    2009-12-18

    With a view toward improving delivery of exogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to CNS motor neurons in vivo, we evaluated the bioavailability and pharmacological activity of a recombinant GDNF:tetanus toxin C-fragment fusion protein in mouse CNS. Following intramuscular injection, GDNF:TTC but not recombinant GDNF (rGDNF) produced strong GDNF immunostaining within ventral horn cells of the spinal cord. Intrathecal infusion of GDNF:TTC resulted in tissue concentrations of GDNF in lumbar spinal cord that were at least 150-fold higher than those in mice treated with rGDNF. While levels of immunoreactive choline acetyltransferase and GFR{alpha}-1 in lumbar cord were not altered significantly by intrathecal infusion of rGNDF, GDNF:TTC, or TTC, only rGDNF and GDNF:TTC caused significant weight loss following intracerebroventricular infusion. These studies indicate that insect cell-derived GDNF:TTC retains its bi-functional activity in mammalian CNS in vivo and improves delivery of GDNF to spinal cord following intramuscular- or intrathecal administration.

  11. Revitalizing a Welding Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Dave

    1997-01-01

    The welding program at Mid-Del Lewis Eubanks Area Vo-Tech in Midwest City, Oklahoma, used a three-part approach to program improvement: ensuring student mastery of employability skills, developing professional relationships and providing students with industry role models, and exposing students to real work settings (JOW)

  12. Laser welding of selected aerospace alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebadan, Gracie E.

    The study was aimed at developing an understanding of the microstructural effects of the laser welding process on the alloys, and assessing the structural integrity of the resultant welds. The effect of laser processing parameters such as laser power, laser beam traverse speed, lens focal length, and the manipulation of these parameters on the welding efficiency and weld area integrity was also investigated. Other tasks within the project included a study on the possibility of using an anodic film to enhance the laser weld ability of Al 6061. Finally, attempts were made to identify phases observed in the weld area of the composite materials. Nimonics C263 and PE11 exhibited laser welds free of cracks and porosity. The difference in composition between the two alloys did not result in any significant dissimilarities in their response to the laser welding process. The welds in both alloys exhibited a fine columnar dendritic microstructure, and while carbides were observed in the interdendritic regions of the welds, electron optical analysis did not reveal any gamma' precipitates in this region. It was concluded that for the welding of thin gage materials above a threshold laser power the resultant welding efficiency shows a greater dependence on laser beam mode, and laser spot size, than on laser power, and beam traverse speed. Aluminum 6061 was not easily welded with a laser in its as received form, and the welds showed some degree of porosity. Anodizing was found to improve the welding efficiency in this material. While the presence of an anodic film on the metal surface increased the welding efficiency of the alloy, no relationship was found between the thickness of the anodic film and welding efficiency in the range of film thicknesses investigated. Weld regions were observed to be cellular dendritic in structure, with narrow heat affected zones. No precipitates or low melting point phases could be identified in the weld region. Melt zones were successfully

  13. Experimental verification of physical model of pulsed laser welding

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, J.L.; Keicher, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Whereas most experimental and theoretical studies of the role of convection in fusion welding have been concerned with continuous heat sources, a pulsed heat source is the focus of this study. This is primarily an experimental study of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of austenitic stainless steels. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  14. Thermal Stir Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Solid state welding processes have become the focus of welding process development at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike fusion weld processes such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA), electron beam (EB), etc., solid state welding processes do not melt the material during welding. The resultant microstructure can be characterized as a dynamically recrystallized morphology much different than the casted, dentritic structure typical of fusion weld processes. The primary benefits of solid state processes over fusion weld processes include superior mechanic properties and the elimination of thermal distortion and residual stresses. These solid state processes attributes have profoundly influenced the direction of advanced welding research and development within the NASA agency. Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) is a new solid state welding process being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the weld process can be decoupled for independent control. An induction coil induces energy into a workpiece to attain a desired plastic temperature. An independently controlled stir rod, captured within non-rotating containment plates, then stirs the plasticized material followed by forging plates/rollers that work the stirred weld joint. The independent control (decoupling) of heating, stirring and forging allows, theoretically, for the precision control of microstructure morphology. The TSW process is being used to evaluate the solid state joining of Haynes 230 for ARES J-2X applications. It is also being developed for 500-in (12.5 mm) thick commercially pure grade 2 titanium for navy applications. Other interests include Inconel 718 and stainless steel. This presentation will provide metallurgical and mechanical property data for these high melting temperature alloys.

  15. Thermal Stir Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Solid state welding processes have become the focus of welding process development at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike fusion weld processes such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA), electron beam (EB), etc., solid state welding processes do not melt the material during welding. The resultant microstructure can be characterized as a dynamically recrystallized morphology much different than the casted, dentritic structure typical of fusion weld processes. The primary benefits of solid state processes over fusion weld processes include superior mechanic properties and the elimination of thermal distortion and residual stresses. These solid state processes attributes have profoundly influenced the direction of advanced welding research and development within the NASA agency. Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) is a new solid state welding process being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the weld process can be decoupled for independent control. An induction coil induces energy into a workpiece to attain a desired plastic temperature. An independently controlled stir rod, captured within non-rotating containment plates, then stirs the plasticized material followed by forging plates/rollers that work the stirred weld joint. The independent control (decoupling) of heating, stirring and forging allows, theoretically, for the precision control of microstructure morphology. The TSW process is being used to evaluate the solid state joining of Haynes 230 for ARES J-2X applications. It is also being developed for 500-in (12.5 mm) thick commercially pure grade 2 titanium for navy applications. Other interests include Inconel 718 and stainless steel. This presentation will provide metallurgical and mechanical property data for these high melting temperature alloys.

  16. Improvement on the thermal stability and activity of plant cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase 1 by tailing hyper-acidic fusion partners.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengru; Gong, Ming; Yang, Yumei; Li, Xujuan; Wang, Haibo; Zou, Zhurong

    2015-04-01

    Cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase 1 (APX1) plays a crucial role in regulating the level of plant cellular reactive oxygen species and its thermolability is proposed to cause plant heat-susceptibility. Herein, several hyper-acidic fusion partners, such as the C-terminal peptide tails, were evaluated for their effects on the thermal stability and activity of APX1 from Jatropha curcas and Arabidopsis. The hyper-acidic fusion partners efficiently improved the thermostability and prevented thermal inactivation of APX1 in both plant species with an elevated heat tolerance of at least 2 °C. These hyper-acidified thermostable APX1 fusion variants are of considerable biotechnological potential and can provide a new route to enhance the heat tolerance of plant species especially of inherent thermo-sensitivity.

  17. Welding method combining laser welding and MIG welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hamasaki, M.

    1985-03-26

    Welding of deep penetration is obtained in a sustrate by a method which comprises first melting the joint portion of the substrates by MIG welding and then focusing a laser beam in the bottom surface of a crater formed in consequence of the MIG welding thereby effecting laser welding of the crater.

  18. Manual-Protocol Inspired Technique for Improving Automated MR Image Segmentation during Label Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Nikhil; Pipitone, Jon; Winterburn, Julie L.; Guo, Ting; Duerden, Emma G.; Voineskos, Aristotle N.; Lepage, Martin; Miller, Steven P.; Pruessner, Jens C.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in multi-atlas based algorithms address many of the previous limitations in model-based and probabilistic segmentation methods. However, at the label fusion stage, a majority of algorithms focus primarily on optimizing weight-maps associated with the atlas library based on a theoretical objective function that approximates the segmentation error. In contrast, we propose a novel method—Autocorrecting Walks over Localized Markov Random Fields (AWoL-MRF)—that aims at mimicking the sequential process of manual segmentation, which is the gold-standard for virtually all the segmentation methods. AWoL-MRF begins with a set of candidate labels generated by a multi-atlas segmentation pipeline as an initial label distribution and refines low confidence regions based on a localized Markov random field (L-MRF) model using a novel sequential inference process (walks). We show that AWoL-MRF produces state-of-the-art results with superior accuracy and robustness with a small atlas library compared to existing methods. We validate the proposed approach by performing hippocampal segmentations on three independent datasets: (1) Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Database (ADNI); (2) First Episode Psychosis patient cohort; and (3) A cohort of preterm neonates scanned early in life and at term-equivalent age. We assess the improvement in the performance qualitatively as well as quantitatively by comparing AWoL-MRF with majority vote, STAPLE, and Joint Label Fusion methods. AWoL-MRF reaches a maximum accuracy of 0.881 (dataset 1), 0.897 (dataset 2), and 0.807 (dataset 3) based on Dice similarity coefficient metric, offering significant performance improvements with a smaller atlas library (< 10) over compared methods. We also evaluate the diagnostic utility of AWoL-MRF by analyzing the volume differences per disease category in the ADNI1: Complete Screening dataset. We have made the source code for AWoL-MRF public at: https://github.com/CobraLab/AWoL-MRF. PMID

  19. "3D fusion" echocardiography improves 3D left ventricular assessment: comparison with 2D contrast echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Daniel; Yaqub, Mohammad; Szmigielski, Cezary; Lima, Eduardo; Petersen, Steffen E; Becher, Harald; Noble, J Alison; Leeson, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Three-dimensional fusion echocardiography (3DFE) is a novel postprocessing approach that utilizes imaging data acquired from multiple 3D acquisitions. We assessed image quality, endocardial border definition, and cardiac wall motion in patients using 3DFE compared to standard 3D images (3D) and results obtained with contrast echocardiography (2DC). Twenty-four patients (mean age 66.9 ± 13 years, 17 males, 7 females) undergoing 2DC had three, noncontrast, 3D apical volumes acquired at rest. Images were fused using an automated image fusion approach. Quality of the 3DFE was compared to both 3D and 2DC based on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and endocardial border definition. We then compared clinical wall-motion score index (WMSI) calculated from 3DFE and 3D to those obtained from 2DC images. Fused 3D volumes had significantly improved CNR (8.92 ± 1.35 vs. 6.59 ± 1.19, P < 0.0005) and segmental image quality (2.42 ± 0.99 vs. 1.93 ± 1.18, P < 0.005) compared to unfused 3D acquisitions. Levels achieved were closer to scores for 2D contrast images (CNR: 9.04 ± 2.21, P = 0.6; segmental image quality: 2.91 ± 0.37, P < 0.005). WMSI calculated from fused 3D volumes did not differ significantly from those obtained from 2D contrast echocardiography (1.06 ± 0.09 vs. 1.07 ± 0.15, P = 0.69), whereas unfused images produced significantly more variable results (1.19 ± 0.30). This was confirmed by a better intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC 0.72; 95% CI 0.32-0.88) relative to comparisons with unfused images (ICC 0.56; 95% CI 0.02-0.81). 3DFE significantly improves left ventricular image quality compared to unfused 3D in a patient population and allows noncontrast assessment of wall motion that approaches that achieved with 2D contrast echocardiography. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Polyimide adhesives for weld-bonding titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Sheppard, C. H.; Baucom, R.

    1976-01-01

    Two weld bonding processes were developed for joining titanium alloy; one process utilizes a weld-through technique and the other a capillary-flow technique. The adhesive used for the weld-through process is similar to the P4/A5F system and a new adhesive system, CP/CFA, was used in the capillary-flow process. Static property information was generated for weld-bonded joints over the temperature range of 219K (-65 F) to 561K (550 F) and fatigue strength information was generated at room temperature. Significant improvement in fatigue strength was demonstrated for weld-bonded joints over spot-welded joints. A demonstration was made of the applicability of weld-bonding for fabricating stringer stiffened skin panels.

  1. APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Stone, C.C.

    1960-05-10

    An apparatus and method are given for forming a welding arc which is rotated by a magnetic field very rapidly about an annular electrode so that a weld is produced simultaneously over all points of an annular or closed path. This invention inhibits outgassing from the jacket of a fuel slug which is being welded by adjusting the pressure throughout the welding cycle to establish a balance between the gas pressure within the jacket and that of the atmosphere surrounding the jacket. Furthermore, an improved control of the magnetic field producing rotation of the welding arc is disclosed whereby this rotation is prevented from splashing about the metal being welded as the welding arc makes it molten.

  2. Laser beam welding of 5182 aluminum alloys sheet.

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K. H.; Sabo, K. R.; Altshuller, B.; Wilkinson, T. L.; Albright, C. E.; Technology Development; Alcan International Limited; Reynolds Metals Co.; Ohio State Univ.

    1999-06-01

    Conditions were determined for consistent coupling of a CO{sub 2} laser beam to weld 5182 aluminum alloy sheet. Full penetration butt and bead-on-plate welds on 0.8 and 1.8 mm sheets were performed. Process conditions examined included beam mode, spot size and irradiance, shielding gas flow, and edge quality and fitup. The observed weld quality variations with the different process parameters were consistent with physical phenomena and a threshold irradiance model. Optimal conditions were determined for obtaining consistent welds on 5182 alloy sheets. Formability and tensile tests were performed on the welded samples. All test failures occurred in the fusion zone. Reduction in formability and tensile strength of the welded samples are discussed with respect to weld profiles and process parameters.

  3. Development of techniques for welding V Cr Ti alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossbeck, M. L.; King, J. F.; Alexander, D. J.; Rice, P. M.; Goodwin, G. M.

    1998-10-01

    Welding vanadium alloys is complicated by interstitial impurity introduction and redistribution at elevated temperatures. Gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, which will probably be required for the fabrication of large tokamak structures, must be done in a glove box environment. Welds were evaluated by Charpy testing. GTA welds could be made with a ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of 50°C with a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) or by using a heated Ti getter system on the glove box to reduce interstitial contamination. Titanium-O,N,C precipitates in the fusion zone were found to transform to a more oxygen-rich phase during a PWHT of 950°C/2 h. Hydrogen was found to promote cleavage cracking following welding in cases where the atmosphere was contaminated. Grain size and microstructure also affected weld embrittlement.

  4. Present Status of Vanadium Alloys for Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Muroga, Takeo; Chen, J. M.; Chernov, V. M.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Le Flem, M.

    2014-12-01

    Vanadium alloys are advanced options for low activation structural materials. After more than two decades of research, V-4Cr-4Ti has been emerged as the leading candidate, and technological progress has been made in reducing the number of critical issues for application of vanadium alloys to fusion reactors. Notable progress has been made in fabricating alloy products and weld joints without degradation of properties. Various efforts are also being made to improve high temperature strength and creep-rupture resistance, low temperature ductility after irradiation, and corrosion resistance in blanket conditions. Future research should focus on clarifying remaining uncertainty in the operating temperature window of V-4Cr-4Ti for application to near to middle term fusion blanket systems, and on further exploration of advanced materials for improved performance for longer-term fusion reactor systems.

  5. Practical method for diffusion welding of steel plate in air.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.; Holko, K. H.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a simple and easily applied method of diffusion welding steel plate in air which does not require a vacuum furnace or hot press. The novel feature of the proposed welding method is that diffusion welds are made in air with deadweight loading. In addition, the use of an autogenous (self-generated) surface-cleaning principle (termed 'auto-vac cleaning') to reduce the effects of surface oxides that normally hinder diffusion welding is examined. A series of nine butt joints were diffusion welded in thick sections of AISI 1020 steel plate. Diffusion welds were attempted at three welding temperatures (1200, 1090, and 980 C) using a deadweight pressure of 34,500 N/sq m (5 psi) and a two-hour hold time at temperature. Auto-vac cleaning operations prior to welding were also studied for the same three temperatures. Results indicate that sound welds were produced at the two higher temperatures when the joints were previously fusion seal welded completely around the periphery. Also, auto-vac cleaning at 1200 C for 2-1/2 hours prior to diffusion welding was highly beneficial, particularly when subsequent welding was accomplished at 1090 C.

  6. Laser-Assisted Stir Welding of 25-mm-Thick HSLA-65 Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Keith M.

    2002-12-01

    Laser-assisted stir welding is a hybrid process that combines energy from a laser with functional heating and mechanical energy to join materials in the solid state. The technology is an adaptation of friction stir welding which is particularly suited for joining thick plates. Aluminum plates up to 75 mm thick have been successfully joined using friction stir welding. Since joining occurs in the solid state, stir technology offers the capability for fabricating full penetration joints in thick plates with better mechanical properties and less weld distortion than is possible by fusion processes. Currently friction stir welding is being used in several industries to improve productivity, reduce weight, and increase the strength of welded structures. Examples include: (a) the aircraft/aerospace industry where stir technology is currently being used to fabricate the space shuttle's external tank as well as components of the Delta family of rockets; (b) the shipping industry where container manufacturers are using stir technology to produce lighter containers with more payload capacity; and (c) the oil industry where offshore platform manufactures are using automated stir welding plants to fabricate large panels and structures up to 16 meters long with widths as required. In all these cases, stir technology has been restricted to aluminum alloys; however, stainless and HSLA 65 steels have been recently stir welded with friction as the primary heat source. One of the difficulties in adapting stir welding to steel is tool wear aggravated by the high tool rubbing velocities needed to provide frictional heat input into the material. Early work showed that the tool shoulder reached temperatures above 1000 C and the weld seam behind the tool stayed within this temperature range for up to 25 mm behind the tool. Cross sections of stir welded samples showed that the heat-affected zone is relatively wide and follows the profile of the tool shoulder. Besides minimizing the tool

  7. Welded Kimberlite?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Straaten, B. I.; Kopylova, M. G.; Russell, J. K.; Scott Smith, B. H.

    2009-05-01

    Welding of pyroclastic deposits generally involves the sintering of hot glassy vesicular particles and requires the presence of a load and/or high temperatures. Welding can occur on various scales as observed in large welded pyroclastic flows, in small-volume agglutinated spatter rims, or as in coalesced clastogenic lava flows. In all these examples welding occurs mainly by reduction or elimination of porosity within the vesicular clasts and/or inter-clast pore space. The end result of welding in pyroclastic deposits is to produce dense, massive, coherent deposits. Here, we present a possible new end-member of the welding process: welding of non- vesicular pyroclasts in intra-crater kimberlite deposits. Kimberlite melt is a low-viscosity liquid carrying abundant crystals. Because of this, kimberlite eruptions generally produce non-vesicular pyroclasts. During welding, these pyroclast cannot deform by volume reduction to form typical fiamme. As a result, welding and compaction in kimberlites proceeds via the reduction of inter-clast pore space alone. The lack of porous pyroclasts limits the maximum amount of volumetric strain within pyroclastic kimberlite deposits to about 30%. This value is substantially lower than the limiting values for welding of more common felsic pyroclastic flows. The lower limit for volumetric strain in welded kimberlite deposits severely restricts the development of a fabric. In addition, pyroclastic kimberlite deposits commonly feature equant-shaped pyroclasts, and equant-shaped crystals. This, in turn, limits the visibility of the results of compaction and pore space reduction, as there are few deformable markers and elongate rigid markers that are able to record the strain during compaction. These features, together with the low viscosity of kimberlite magma and the stratigraphic position of these kimberlite deposits within the upper reaches of the volcanic conduit, call for careful interpretation of coherent-looking rocks in these

  8. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Multipass TIG-Welded AA2219 Aluminum Alloy in 3.5 wt pct NaCl Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, A.; Sreekumar, K.; Raja, V. S.

    2012-09-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of the AA2219 aluminum alloy in the single-pass (SP) and multipass (MP) welded conditions was examined and compared with that of the base metal (BM) in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution using a slow-strain-rate technique (SSRT). The reduction in ductility was used as a parameter to evaluate the SCC susceptibility of both the BM and welded joints. The results showed that the ductility ratio ( ɛ NaCl/( ɛ air) was 0.97 and 0.96, respectively, for the BM and MP welded joint, and the same was marginally reduced to 0.9 for the SP welded joint. The fractographic examination of the failed samples revealed a typical ductile cracking morphology for all the base and welded joints, indicating the good environmental cracking resistance of this alloy under all welded conditions. To understand the decrease in the ductility of the SP welded joint, preexposure SSRT followed by microstructural observations were made, which showed that the decrease in ductility ratio of the SP welded joint was caused by the electrochemical pitting that assisted the nucleation of cracks in the form of corrosion induced mechanical cracking rather than true SCC failure of the alloy. The microstructural examination and polarization tests demonstrated a clear grain boundary (GB) sensitization of the PMZ, resulting in severe galvanic corrosion of the SP weld joint, which initiated the necessary conditions for the localized corrosion and cracking along the PMZ. The absence of PMZ and a refined fusion zone (FZ) structure because of the lesser heat input and postweld heating effect improved the galvanic corrosion resistance of the MP welded joint greatly, and thus, failure occurred along the FZ.

  9. Shielding gas effect on weld characteristics in arc-augmented laser welding process of super austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiya, P.; Kumar Mishra, Mahendra; Soundararajan, R.; Shanmugarajan, B.

    2013-02-01

    A series of hybrid welding (gas metal arc welding-CO2 laser beam welding) experiments were conducted on AISI 904L super austenitic stainless steel sheet of 5 mm thickness. A detailed study of CO2 Laser-GMAW hybrid welding experiments with different shielding gas mixtures (100% He, 50% He+50% Ar, 50%He+45% Ar+5% O2, and 45% He+45% Ar+10% N2) were carried out and the results are presented. The resultant welds were subjected to detailed mechanical and microstructural characterization. Hardness testing revealed that the hardness values in the fusion zone were higher than the base material irrespective of the parameters. Transverse tensile testing showed that the joint efficiency is 100% with all the shielding gas experimented. Impact energy values of the welds were also found to be higher than the base material and the fractrograph taken in scanning electron microscope (SEM) has shown that the welds exhibited dimple fracture similar to the base material.

  10. An experimental method for investigating phase transformations in the heat affected zone of welds using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J.W.; Wong, J.; Froba, M.; Waide, P.A.; Larson, E.M.

    1995-05-26

    Although welding is an established technology used in many industrial settings, it is least understand terms of the phases that actually exist, the variation of their spatial disposition with time, and the rate of transformation from one phase to another at various thermal coordinates in the vicinity of the weld. With the availability of high flux and, more recently, high brightness synchrotron x-radiation sources, a number of diffraction and spectroscopic methods have been developed for structural characterization with improved spatial and temporal resolutions to enable in-situ measurements of phases under extreme temperature, pressure and other processing conditions not readily accessible with conventional sources. This paper describes the application of spatially resolved x-ray diffraction (SRXRD) for in-situ investigations of phase transformations in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of fusion welds. Results are presented for gas tungsten (GTA) welds in commercially pure titanium that show the existence of the high temperature bcc {beta}-phase in a 3.3 {plus_minus} 0.3 mm wide HA band adjacent to the liquid weld pool. Phase concentration profiles derived from the SRXRD data further show the co-existence of both the low temperature hcp ({alpha}-phase and the {beta}-phase in the partially, transformed region of the HA. These results represent the first direct observations of solid state phase transformations and mapping of phase boundaries in fusion welds. SRXRD experiments of this type are needed as experimental input for modeling of kinetics of phase transformations and microstructural evolution under the highly non-isothermal conditions produced during welding.

  11. Effects of CaF2 Coating on the Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Tungsten Inert Gas Welded AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jun; Wang, Linzhi; Peng, Dong; Wang, Dan

    2012-11-01

    The effects of CaF2 coating on the macromorphologies of the welded seams were studied by morphological analysis. Microstructures and mechanical properties of butt joints welded with different amounts of CaF2 coatings were investigated using optical microscopy and tensile tests. The welding defects formed in the welded seams and the fracture surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. An increase in the amount of CaF2 coating deteriorated the appearances of the welded seams but it improved the weld penetration depth and the depth/width ( D/ W) ratio of the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded joints. The α-Mg grains and Mg17(Al,Zn)12 intermetallic compound (IMC) were coarser in the case of a higher amount of CaF2 coating. The increase in the amount of CaF2 coating reduced the porosities and total length of solidification cracks in the fusion zone (FZ). The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) value and elongation increased at first and then decreased sharply.

  12. CO2 laser beam welding of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy thin plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Akio; Kobayashi, Kojiro F.; Todaka, Hirotaka

    1997-12-01

    Laser beam welding is an attractive welding process for age-hardened aluminum alloys, because its low heat input minimizes the width of weld fusion and heat-affected zones (HAZs). In the present work, 1-mm-thick age-hardened Al-Mg-Si alloy, 6061-T6, plates were welded with full penetration using a 2.5-kW CO2 laser. Fractions of porosity in the fusion zones were less than 0.05 pct in bead-on-plate welding and less than 0.2 pct in butt welding with polishing the groove surface before welding. The width of a softened region in the-laser beam welds was less than 1/4 times that of a tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld. The softened region is caused by reversion of strengthening β″ (Mg2Si) precipitates due to weld heat input. The hardness values of the softened region in the laser beam welds were almost fully recovered to that of the base metal after an artificial aging treatment at 448 K for 28.8 ks without solution annealing, whereas those in the TIG weld were not recovered in a partly reverted region. Both the bead-on-plate weld and the butt weld after the postweld artificial aging treatment had almost equivalent tensile strengths to that of the base plate.

  13. Alloying and coating strategies for improved Pb-Li compatibility in DEMO-type fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unocic, K. A.; Pint, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Two strategies were explored to improve the Pb-16Li compatibility of Fe-base alloys for a fusion energy blanket system. The use of thin (∼50 μm) Al-rich diffusion coatings on Grade 92 (9Cr-2W) substrates significantly reduced the mass loss in static Pb-Li capsule tests for up to 5000 h at 600 °C and 700 °C. However, significant Al loss was observed at 700 °C. Thicker coatings with Fe-Al intermetallic layers partially spalled after exposure at 700 °C, suggesting that coating strategies are limited to lower temperatures. To identify compositions for further alloy development, model FeCrAlY alloys with 10-20 wt.%Cr and 3-5%Al were exposed for 1000 h at 700 °C. There was little effect on mass change of varying the Cr content, however, alloys with <5% Al showed mass losses in these experiments. For both coatings and FeCrAl alloys, the surface reaction product was LiAlO2 after exposure and cleaning.

  14. Novel approaches to improve iris recognition system performance based on local quality evaluation and feature fusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Liu, Yuanning; Zhu, Xiaodong; Chen, Huiling; He, Fei; Pang, Yutong

    2014-01-01

    For building a new iris template, this paper proposes a strategy to fuse different portions of iris based on machine learning method to evaluate local quality of iris. There are three novelties compared to previous work. Firstly, the normalized segmented iris is divided into multitracks and then each track is estimated individually to analyze the recognition accuracy rate (RAR). Secondly, six local quality evaluation parameters are adopted to analyze texture information of each track. Besides, particle swarm optimization (PSO) is employed to get the weights of these evaluation parameters and corresponding weighted coefficients of different tracks. Finally, all tracks' information is fused according to the weights of different tracks. The experimental results based on subsets of three public and one private iris image databases demonstrate three contributions of this paper. (1) Our experimental results prove that partial iris image cannot completely replace the entire iris image for iris recognition system in several ways. (2) The proposed quality evaluation algorithm is a self-adaptive algorithm, and it can automatically optimize the parameters according to iris image samples' own characteristics. (3) Our feature information fusion strategy can effectively improve the performance of iris recognition system.

  15. Improved prediction of drug-target interactions using regularized least squares integrating with kernel fusion technique.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ming; Wang, Yanli; Bryant, Stephen H

    2016-02-25

    Identification of drug-target interactions (DTI) is a central task in drug discovery processes. In this work, a simple but effective regularized least squares integrating with nonlinear kernel fusion (RLS-KF) algorithm is proposed to perform DTI predictions. Using benchmark DTI datasets, our proposed algorithm achieves the state-of-the-art results with area under precision-recall curve (AUPR) of 0.915, 0.925, 0.853 and 0.909 for enzymes, ion channels (IC), G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and nuclear receptors (NR) based on 10 fold cross-validation. The performance can further be improved by using a recalculated kernel matrix, especially for the small set of nuclear receptors with AUPR of 0.945. Importantly, most of the top ranked interaction predictions can be validated by experimental data reported in the literature, bioassay results in the PubChem BioAssay database, as well as other previous studies. Our analysis suggests that the proposed RLS-KF is helpful for studying DTI, drug repositioning as well as polypharmacology, and may help to accelerate drug discovery by identifying novel drug targets.

  16. Effect of Heat Input on Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties in the Weld Heat-Affected Zone of 9Cr-2W-VTa Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel for Fusion Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Hyoung Chan

    2015-01-01

    The phase transformation and mechanical properties in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel were explored. The samples for HAZs were prepared using a Gleeble simulator at different heat inputs. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite and carbides through quenching and tempering treatment, whereas the HAZs consisted of martensite, δ-ferrite, and a small volume of autotempered martensite. The prior austenite grain size, lath width of martensite, and δ-ferrite fraction in the HAZs increased with increase in the heat input. The mechanical properties were evaluated using Vickers hardness and Charpy V-notch impact test. The Vickers hardness in the HAZs was higher than that in the base steel but did not change noticeably with increase in the heat input. The HAZs showed poor impact property due to the formation of martensite and δ-ferrite as compared to the base steel. In addition, the impact property of the HAZs deteriorated more with the increase in the heat input. Post weld heat treatment contributed to improve the impact property of the HAZs through the formation of tempered martensite, but the impact property of the HAZs remained lower than that of base steel.

  17. Mechanical properties of laser welded aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, D.M.; Mazumder, J.

    1996-12-31

    The demand for lighter weight vehicles has prompted accelerated development in processing aluminum alloys for automobile structural applications. One of the current research initiatives centers on laser beam welding of aluminum alloys. Autogenous butt welds have been performed on Al 3003, 5754, 6111, and 6061-T6 plates with a 6 kW CO2 laser. For 6061, tensile data indicate about 60% of the base metal strength was attained in the as-welded condition, with a brittle fracture occurring through the weld. A post-weld heat treatment to the T6 condition resulted in a recovery of original ultimate tensile strengths, although these also failed in the weld. Hardness measurements of the post-weld T6 reveal a uniform hardness across the HAZ and fusion zone that is comparable to the original hardness. All 3003 welds fractured in the parent material in a ductile fashion. A high quality bead was consistently achieved with the 3003 alloy, whereas the other alloys demonstrated bead irregularities. SEM photographs reveal large, spherical pores, suggesting that they were formed by gas entrapment rather than by shrinkage.

  18. An investigation into geometry and microstructural effects upon the ultimate tensile strengths of butt welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical theory was evaluated empirically. This theory predicts weld ultimate tensile strength based on material properties and fusion line angles, mismatch, peaking, and weld widths. Welds were made on 1/4 and 1/2 in. aluminum 2219-T87, their geometries were measured, they were tensile tested, and these results were compared to theoretical predictions. Statistical analysis of results was performed to evaluate correlation of theory to results for many different categories of weld geometries.

  19. A New Multi-Sensor Fusion Scheme to Improve the Accuracy of Knee Flexion Kinematics for Functional Rehabilitation Movements

    PubMed Central

    Tannous, Halim; Istrate, Dan; Benlarbi-Delai, Aziz; Sarrazin, Julien; Gamet, Didier; Ho Ba Tho, Marie Christine; Dao, Tien Tuan

    2016-01-01

    Exergames have been proposed as a potential tool to improve the current practice of musculoskeletal rehabilitation. Inertial or optical motion capture sensors are commonly used to track the subject’s movements. However, the use of these motion capture tools suffers from the lack of accuracy in estimating joint angles, which could lead to wrong data interpretation. In this study, we proposed a real time quaternion-based fusion scheme, based on the extended Kalman filter, between inertial and visual motion capture sensors, to improve the estimation accuracy of joint angles. The fusion outcome was compared to angles measured using a goniometer. The fusion output shows a better estimation, when compared to inertial measurement units and Kinect outputs. We noted a smaller error (3.96°) compared to the one obtained using inertial sensors (5.04°). The proposed multi-sensor fusion system is therefore accurate enough to be applied, in future works, to our serious game for musculoskeletal rehabilitation. PMID:27854288

  20. Weldability of A7075-T651 and AZ31B dissimilar alloys by MIG welding method based on welding appearances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak, M.; Islam, M. R.

    2014-04-01

    It is not recommended to weld aluminium and magnesium dissimilar alloys using fusion welding method because of the formation of AlmMgn type intermetallic brittle compounds like Mg2Al3, Mg17Al12 etc. in the welding joint. These brittle compounds deteriorate the mechanical properties of the joint. But so far, insufficient researches have been attempted to stop the formation of AlmMgn type intermetallic brittle compounds in fusion welding method. The aim of this research work was to investigate on the weldability between A7075-T651 and AZ31B dissimilar alloys based on welding appearances and study the formation of intermetallic brittle compounds at the joint. In this research, A7075-T651 and AZ31B alloys were welded using ER5356 filler wire in MIG welding method in butt configuration. 100% argon was used as shielding gas. The results showed that, most of the welding appearances were moderate. The macroscopic investigation at all welding cross section showed that a lot of AlmMgn intermetallic brittle compounds were formed at the interface between weld seam and AZ31B parent metal side which caused macro cracks. A good number of macro pores were also observed at AZ31B parent metal side. These cracks and pores could easily cause the failure of the joint at very low stress.

  1. Development of a Twin Crystal Membrane Coupled Conformable Phased Array for the Inspection of Austenitic Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, J.; Long, R.; Cawley, P.

    2011-06-01

    The inspection of welded austenitic stainless steel components can be challenging. Austenitic welds contain an anisotropic, inhomogeneous grain structure which causes attenuation, scattering and beam bending. The inspection of components where the weld cap has not been removed is even more difficult due to the irregularity of the surface geometry. A twin crystal membrane coupled device has now been produced containing two linear phased arrays positioned adjacent to one another within the same housing. The arrays are angled relative to one another so that the transducer provides a pseudo-focusing effect at a depth corresponding to the beam crossing point. This type of design is used to improve the signal to noise ratio of the defect response in comparison to simple linear phased array transducer designs and to remove an internal noise signal found in linear phased array devices. Experimental results obtained from the through weld inspection of an austenitic stainless steel component with an undressed weld cap using the twin crystal membrane device are presented. These results demonstrate that small lack of side wall fusion defects can be reliably detected in large complex structures.

  2. Study on Mg/Al Weld Seam Based on Zn–Mg–Al Ternary Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liming; Liu, Fei; Zhu, Meili

    2014-01-01

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seams, a series of Zn–xAl filler metals was calculated and designed for joining Mg/Al dissimilar metals by gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding. An infrared thermography system was used to measure the temperature of the welding pool during the welding process to investigate the solidification process. It was found that the mechanical properties of the welded joints were improved with the increasing of the Al content in the Zn–xAl filler metals, and when Zn–30Al was used as the filler metal, the ultimate tensile strength could reach a maximum of 120 MPa. The reason for the average tensile strength of the joint increasing was that the weak zone of the joint using Zn–30Al filler metal was generated primarily by α-Al instead of MgZn2. When Zn–40Al was used as the filler metal, a new transition zone, about 20 μm-wide, appeared in the edge of the fusion zone near the Mg base metal. Due to the transition zones consisting of MgZn2- and Al-based solid solution, the mechanical property of the joints was deteriorated. PMID:28788508

  3. Development of a twin crystal membrane coupled conformable phased array for the inspection of austenitic welds

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.; Long, R.; Cawley, P.

    2011-06-23

    The inspection of welded austenitic stainless steel components can be challenging. Austenitic welds contain an anisotropic, inhomogeneous grain structure which causes attenuation, scattering and beam bending. The inspection of components where the weld cap has not been removed is even more difficult due to the irregularity of the surface geometry. A twin crystal membrane coupled device has now been produced containing two linear phased arrays positioned adjacent to one another within the same housing. The arrays are angled relative to one another so that the transducer provides a pseudo-focusing effect at a depth corresponding to the beam crossing point. This type of design is used to improve the signal to noise ratio of the defect response in comparison to simple linear phased array transducer designs and to remove an internal noise signal found in linear phased array devices. Experimental results obtained from the through weld inspection of an austenitic stainless steel component with an undressed weld cap using the twin crystal membrane device are presented. These results demonstrate that small lack of side wall fusion defects can be reliably detected in large complex structures.

  4. Plasmonic welded single walled carbon nanotubes on monolayer graphene for sensing target protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jangheon; Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Gi Gyu; Jung, Wonsuk

    2016-05-16

    We developed plasmonic welded single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on monolayer graphene as a biosensor to detect target antigen molecules, fc fusion protein without any treatment to generate binder groups for linker and antibody. This plasmonic welding induces atomic networks between SWCNTs as junctions containing carboxylic groups and improves the electrical sensitivity of a SWCNTs and the graphene membrane to detect target protein. We investigated generation of the atomic networks between SWCNTs by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy after plasmonic welding process. We compared the intensity ratios of D to G peaks from the Raman spectra and electrical sheet resistance of welded SWCNTs with the results of normal SWCNTs, which decreased from 0.115 to 0.086 and from 10.5 to 4.12, respectively. Additionally, we measured the drain current via source/drain voltage after binding of the antigen to the antibody molecules. This electrical sensitivity of the welded SWCNTs was 1.55 times larger than normal SWCNTs.

  5. Study of Gravity Effects on Titanium Laser Welding in the Vertical Position.

    PubMed

    Chang, Baohua; Yuan, Zhang; Pu, Haitao; Li, Haigang; Cheng, Hao; Du, Dong; Shan, Jiguo

    2017-09-08

    To obtain satisfactory welds in positional laser beam welding, it is necessary to know how process parameters will influence the quality of welds in different welding positions. In this study, the titanium alloy Ti6Al4V sheets were laser welded in two vertical welding positions (vertical up and vertical down), and the appearance, porosity, strength, and ductility of the laser joints were evaluated. Results show that undercuts of the vertical up welds were greater than that of vertical down welds, while the porosity contents were much higher in vertical down welds than that in vertical up welds. When welding with a higher heat input, the vertical up welding position resulted in poor weld profiles (undercuts and burn-through holes), whereas the vertical down welding position led to excessive porosity contents in welds. Both severe undercut and excessive porosity were detrimental to the tensile properties of the welds. Weld appearance was improved and porosity contents were reduced by using a lower heat input, achieving better weld quality. Therefore, it is suggested that process parameter settings with relatively high laser powers and welding speeds, which can result in lower heat inputs, are used when laser welding the Ti6Al4V titanium alloys vertically.

  6. Study of Gravity Effects on Titanium Laser Welding in the Vertical Position

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhang; Pu, Haitao; Li, Haigang; Cheng, Hao; Du, Dong; Shan, Jiguo

    2017-01-01

    To obtain satisfactory welds in positional laser beam welding, it is necessary to know how process parameters will influence the quality of welds in different welding positions. In this study, the titanium alloy Ti6Al4V sheets were laser welded in two vertical welding positions (vertical up and vertical down), and the appearance, porosity, strength, and ductility of the laser joints were evaluated. Results show that undercuts of the vertical up welds were greater than that of vertical down welds, while the porosity contents were much higher in vertical down welds than that in vertical up welds. When welding with a higher heat input, the vertical up welding position resulted in poor weld profiles (undercuts and burn-through holes), whereas the vertical down welding position led to excessive porosity contents in welds. Both severe undercut and excessive porosity were detrimental to the tensile properties of the welds. Weld appearance was improved and porosity contents were reduced by using a lower heat input, achieving better weld quality. Therefore, it is suggested that process parameter settings with relatively high laser powers and welding speeds, which can result in lower heat inputs, are used when laser welding the Ti6Al4V titanium alloys vertically. PMID:28885573

  7. B218 Weld Filler Wire Characterization for Al-Li Alloy 2195

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Russell, Carolyn

    2000-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Lockheed Martin Space Systems- Michoud Operations, and McCook Metals have developed an aluminum-copper weld filler wire for fusion welding aluminum lithium alloy 2195. The aluminum-copper based weld filler wire has been identified as B218, a McCook Metals designation. B218 is the result of six years of weld filler wire development funded by NASA, Lockheed Martin, and McCook Metals. The filler wire chemistry was developed to produce enhanced 2195 weld and repair weld mechanical properties over the 4043 aluminum-silicon weld filler wire, which is currently used to weld 2195 on the Super Lightweight External Tank for the NASA Space Shuttle Program. An initial characterization was performed consisting of a repair weld evaluation using B218 and 4043 weld filler wires. The testing involved room temperature and cryogenic repair weld tensile testing along with fracture toughness testing. From the testing, B218 weld filler wire produce enhanced repair weld tensile strength, ductility, and fracture properties over 4043. B218 weld filler wire has proved to be a superior weld filler wire for welding aluminum lithium alloy 2195 over 4043.

  8. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding.

    PubMed

    Fethke, Nathan B; Peters, Thomas M; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A

    2016-04-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18 min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 65.7 mg m(-3) for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), zinc (0.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), and manganese (0.9 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 1.5 mg m(-3) for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17 nm) through deck conditions (34±34 nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure

  9. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding

    PubMed Central

    Fethke, Nathan B.; Peters, Thomas M.; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A.

    2016-01-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2mg m−3 for bare beam; 65.7mg m−3 for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8mg m−3 for bare beam; 15.8mg m−3 for through deck), zinc (0.2mg m−3 for bare beam; 15.8mg m−3 for through deck), and manganese (0.9mg m−3 for bare beam; 1.5mg m−3 for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17nm) through deck conditions (34±34nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure levels during

  10. Improving high-resolution quantitative precipitation estimation via fusion of multiple radar-based precipitation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafieeinasab, Arezoo; Norouzi, Amir; Seo, Dong-Jun; Nelson, Brian

    2015-12-01

    For monitoring and prediction of water-related hazards in urban areas such as flash flooding, high-resolution hydrologic and hydraulic modeling is necessary. Because of large sensitivity and scale dependence of rainfall-runoff models to errors in quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE), it is very important that the accuracy of QPE be improved in high-resolution hydrologic modeling to the greatest extent possible. With the availability of multiple radar-based precipitation products in many areas, one may now consider fusing them to produce more accurate high-resolution QPE for a wide spectrum of applications. In this work, we formulate and comparatively evaluate four relatively simple procedures for such fusion based on Fisher estimation and its conditional bias-penalized variant: Direct Estimation (DE), Bias Correction (BC), Reduced-Dimension Bias Correction (RBC) and Simple Estimation (SE). They are applied to fuse the Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) and radar-only Next Generation QPE (Q2) products at the 15-min 1-km resolution (Experiment 1), and the MPE and Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) QPE products at the 15-min 500-m resolution (Experiment 2). The resulting fused estimates are evaluated using the 15-min rain gauge observations from the City of Grand Prairie in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex (DFW) in north Texas. The main criterion used for evaluation is that the fused QPE improves over the ingredient QPEs at their native spatial resolutions, and that, at the higher resolution, the fused QPE improves not only over the ingredient higher-resolution QPE but also over the ingredient lower-resolution QPE trivially disaggregated using the ingredient high-resolution QPE. All four procedures assume that the ingredient QPEs are unbiased, which is not likely to hold true in reality even if real-time bias correction is in operation. To test robustness under more realistic conditions, the fusion procedures were evaluated with and

  11. First Annual Progress Report on Radiation Tolerance of Controlled Fusion Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant FeCrAl Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Hu, Xunxiang; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Howard, Richard H.

    2015-12-01

    The present report summarizes and discusses the first year efforts towards developing a modern, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloy designed to have enhanced radiation tolerance and weldability under the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program. Significant efforts have been made within the first year of this project including the fabrication of seven candidate FeCrAl alloys with well controlled chemistry and microstructure, the microstructural characterization of these alloys using standardized and advanced techniques, mechanical properties testing and evaluation of base alloys, the completion of welding trials and production of weldments for subsequent testing, the design of novel tensile specimen geometry to increase the number of samples that can be irradiated in a single capsule and also shorten the time of their assessment after irradiation, the development of testing procedures for controlled hydrogen ingress studies, and a detailed mechanical and microstructural assessment of weldments prior to irradiation or hydrogen charging. These efforts and research results have shown promise for the FeCrAl alloy class as a new nuclear grade alloy class.

  12. Improved sequence-based prediction of disordered regions with multilayer fusion of multiple information sources

    PubMed Central

    Mizianty, Marcin J.; Stach, Wojciech; Chen, Ke; Kedarisetti, Kanaka Durga; Disfani, Fatemeh Miri; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Intrinsically disordered proteins play a crucial role in numerous regulatory processes. Their abundance and ubiquity combined with a relatively low quantity of their annotations motivate research toward the development of computational models that predict disordered regions from protein sequences. Although the prediction quality of these methods continues to rise, novel and improved predictors are urgently needed. Results: We propose a novel method, named MFDp (Multilayered Fusion-based Disorder predictor), that aims to improve over the current disorder predictors. MFDp is as an ensemble of 3 Support Vector Machines specialized for the prediction of short, long and generic disordered regions. It combines three complementary disorder predictors, sequence, sequence profiles, predicted secondary structure, solvent accessibility, backbone dihedral torsion angles, residue flexibility and B-factors. Our method utilizes a custom-designed set of features that are based on raw predictions and aggregated raw values and recognizes various types of disorder. The MFDp is compared at the residue level on two datasets against eight recent disorder predictors and top-performing methods from the most recent CASP8 experiment. In spite of using training chains with ≤25% similarity to the test sequences, our method consistently and significantly outperforms the other methods based on the MCC index. The MFDp outperforms modern disorder predictors for the binary disorder assignment and provides competitive real-valued predictions. The MFDp's outputs are also shown to outperform the other methods in the identification of proteins with long disordered regions. Availability: http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/MFDp.html Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: lkurgan@ece.ualberta.ca PMID:20823312

  13. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, Sabina Luisa; Casalino, Giuseppe; Casavola, Caterina; Moramarco, Vincenzo

    2013-12-18

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e., no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the weld. In this work FSW and LAFSW tests were conducted on 6 mm thick 5754H111 aluminum alloy plates in butt joint configuration. LAFSW is studied firstly to demonstrate the weldability of aluminum alloy using that technique. Secondly, process parameters, such as laser power and temperature gradient are investigated in order to evaluate changes in microstructure, micro-hardness, residual stress, and tensile properties. Once the possibility to achieve sound weld using LAFSW is demonstrated, it will be possible to explore the benefits for tool wear, higher welding speeds, and lower clamping force.

  14. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Campanelli, Sabina Luisa; Casalino, Giuseppe; Casavola, Caterina; Moramarco, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e., no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the weld. In this work FSW and LAFSW tests were conducted on 6 mm thick 5754H111 aluminum alloy plates in butt joint configuration. LAFSW is studied firstly to demonstrate the weldability of aluminum alloy using that technique. Secondly, process parameters, such as laser power and temperature gradient are investigated in order to evaluate changes in microstructure, micro-hardness, residual stress, and tensile properties. Once the possibility to achieve sound weld using LAFSW is demonstrated, it will be possible to explore the benefits for tool wear, higher welding speeds, and lower clamping force. PMID:28788430

  15. An investigation into underwater wet welding using the flux cored arc welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Brydon, A.M.; Nixon, J.H.

    1995-12-31

    For the last two years, Cranfield has been carrying out a program of process investigations into wet underwater welding (Graham and Nixon 1993, Nixon and Webb 1994), and has demonstrated that it is possible to markedly improve the stability and consistency of the process by using control techniques developed for hyperbaric welding. In the project reported below, an initial evaluation of wet flux cored arc welding was undertaken. Although there continues to be considerable resistance to the use of wet welding on structures in the North Sea, continued pressure to reduce repair and maintenance costs is causing the industry to re-examine techniques previously discounted, such as wet welding (Anon 1993).

  16. Weld Metallurgy and Mechanical Properties of High Manganese Ultra-high Strength Steel Dissimilar Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Lindner, Stefan; Monfort, Damien; Petring, Dirk

    The increasing demand for ultra-high strength steels in vehicle manufacturing leads to the application of new alloys. This poses a challenge on joining especially by fusion welding. A stainless high manganese steel sheet with excellent strength and deformation properties stands in the centre of the development. Similar and dissimilar welds with a metastable austenitic steel and a hot formed martensitic stainless steel were performed. An investigation of the mixing effects on the local microstructure and the hardness delivers the metallurgical features of the welds. Despite of carbon contents above 0.4 wt.% none of the welds have shown cracks. Mechanical properties drawn from tensile tests deliver high breaking forces enabling a high stiffness of the joints. The results show the potential for the application of laser beam welding for joining in assembly of structural parts.

  17. Correlation-agnostic fusion for improved uncertainty estimation in multi-view geo-location from UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Clark N.; Sundlie, Paul O.

    2017-05-01

    When geo-locating ground objects from a UAV, multiple views of the same object can lead to improved geo- location accuracy. Of equal importance to the location estimate, however, is the uncertainty estimate associated with that location. Standard methods for estimating uncertainty from multiple views generally assume that each view represents an independent measurement of the geo-location. Unfortunately, this assumption is often violated due to correlation between the location estimates. This correlation may occur due to the measurements coming from the same platform, meaning that the error in attitude or location may be correlated across time; or it may be due to external sources (such as GPS) having the same error in multiple aircraft. In either case, the geo-location estimates are not truly independent, leading to optimistic estimates of the geo-location uncertainty. For distributed data fusion applications, correlation-agnostic fusion methods have been developed that can fuse data together regardless of how much correlation may be present between the two estimates. While the results are generally not as impressive as when correlation is perfectly known and taken into account, the fused uncertainty results are guaranteed to be conservative and an improvement on operating without fusion. In this paper, we apply a selection of these correlation-agnostic fusion techniques to the multi-view geo-location problem and analyze their effects on geo-location and predicted uncertainty accuracy. We find that significant benefits can be found from applying these correlation agnostic fusion effects, but that they vary greatly in how well they estimate their own uncertainty.

  18. Effect of Weld Characteristic on Mechanical Strength of Laser-Arc Hybrid-Welded Al-Mg-Si-Mn Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Gao, Ming; Jiang, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-11-01

    Laser-arc hybrid welding (LAHW) was employed to improve the tensile properties of the joints of 8-mm-thick Al-Mg-Si-Mn alloy (AA6082) using Al-5Mg filler wire. The weld microstructures were examined by scanning electron microscope, electron backscattered diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy in detail. The LAHW joints with pore-free and high-tensile performances were obtained. The strength enhancement of the fusion zone and heat-affected zone in the LAHW joint was mainly attributed to the grain refinement strengthening and the precipitation strengthening, respectively. The microstructure characteristics were related to the effects of laser-arc interaction on the energy transfer within the molten pool. The arc caused the majority of laser energy to dissipate out of the keyhole, and then it reduced the heat input. The lower heat input refined the grain size, weakened the overaging effect, and thus improved the tensile strength.

  19. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, John O.; Sklar, Edward

    1998-01-01

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  20. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.