Science.gov

Sample records for future high-energy accelerators

  1. Future Accelerator Challenges in Support of High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.; Zisman, M.S.

    2008-05-03

    Historically, progress in high-energy physics has largely been determined by development of more capable particle accelerators. This trend continues today with the imminent commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and the worldwide development effort toward the International Linear Collider. Looking ahead, there are two scientific areas ripe for further exploration--the energy frontier and the precision frontier. To explore the energy frontier, two approaches toward multi-TeV beams are being studied, an electron-positron linear collider based on a novel two-beam powering system (CLIC), and a Muon Collider. Work on the precision frontier involves accelerators with very high intensity, including a Super-BFactory and a muon-based Neutrino Factory. Without question, one of the most promising approaches is the development of muon-beam accelerators. Such machines have very high scientific potential, and would substantially advance the state-of-the-art in accelerator design. The challenges of the new generation of accelerators, and how these can be accommodated in the accelerator design, are described. To reap their scientific benefits, all of these frontier accelerators will require sophisticated instrumentation to characterize the beam and control it with unprecedented precision.

  2. Experimental, Theoretical and Computational Studies of Plasma-Based Concepts for Future High Energy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Chan; Mori, W.

    2013-10-21

    This is the final report on the DOE grant number DE-FG02-92ER40727 titled, “Experimental, Theoretical and Computational Studies of Plasma-Based Concepts for Future High Energy Accelerators.” During this grant period the UCLA program on Advanced Plasma Based Accelerators, headed by Professor C. Joshi has made many key scientific advances and trained a generation of students, many of whom have stayed in this research field and even started research programs of their own. In this final report however, we will focus on the last three years of the grant and report on the scientific progress made in each of the four tasks listed under this grant. Four tasks are focused on: Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Research at FACET, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, In House Research at UCLA’s Neptune and 20 TW Laser Laboratories, Laser-Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) in Self Guided Regime: Experiments at the Callisto Laser at LLNL, and Theory and Simulations. Major scientific results have been obtained in each of the four tasks described in this report. These have led to publications in the prestigious scientific journals, graduation and continued training of high quality Ph.D. level students and have kept the U.S. at the forefront of plasma-based accelerators research field.

  3. Production and supply of radioisotopes with high-energy particle accelerators current status and future directions

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mausner, L.F.

    1994-03-01

    Although the production of radioisotopes in reactors or in low to medium energy cyclotrons appears to be relatively well established, especially for those isotopes that are routinely used and have a commercial market, certain isotopes can either be made only in high-energy particle accelerators or their production is more cost effective when made this way. These facilities are extremely expensive to build and operate, and isotope production is, in general, either not cost-effective or is in conflict with their primary mandate or missions which involve physics research. Isotope production using high-energy accelerators in the US, therefore, has been only an intermittent and parasitic activity. However, since a number of isotopes produced at higher energies are emerging as being potentially useful for medical and other applications, there is a renewed concern about their availability in a continuous and reliable fashion. In the US, in particular, the various aspects of the prediction and availability of radioisotopes from high-energy accelerators are presently undergoing a detailed scrutiny and review by various scientific and professional organizations as well as the Government. A number of new factors has complicated the supply/demand equation. These include considerations of cost versus needs, reliability factors, mission orientation, research and educational components, and commercial viability. This paper will focus on the present status and projected needs of radioisotope production with high-energy accelerators in the US, and will compare and examine the existing infrastructure in other countries for this purpose.

  4. HIGH ENERGY PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Courant, E.D.; Livingston, M.S.; Snyder, H.S.

    1959-04-14

    An improved apparatus is presented for focusing charged particles in an accelerator. In essence, the invention includes means for establishing a magnetic field in discrete sectors along the path of moving charged particles, the magnetic field varying in each sector in accordance with the relation. B = B/ sub 0/ STAln (r-r/sub 0/)/r/sub 0/!, where B/sub 0/ is the value of the magnetic field at the equilibrium orbit of radius r/sub 0/ of the path of the particles, B equals the magnetic field at the radius r of the chamber and n equals the magnetic field gradient index, the polarity of n being abruptly reversed a plurality of times as the particles travel along their arcuate path. With this arrangement, the particles are alternately converged towards the axis of their equillbrium orbit and diverged therefrom in successive sectors with a resultant focusing effect.

  5. Future of high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, W.K.H.

    1984-06-01

    A rough overview is given of the expectations for the extension of high energy colliders and accelerators into the xtremely high energy range. It appears likely that the SSC or something like it will be the last gasp of the conventional method of producing high energy proton-proton collisions using synchrotron rings with superconducting magnets. It is likely that LEP will be the highest energy e+e/sup -/ colliding beam storage ring built. The future beyond that depends on the successful demonstrations of new technologies. The linear collider offers hope in this respect for some extension in energy for electrons, and maybe even for protons, but is too early to judge whether, by how much, or when such an extension will indeed take place.

  6. Multi-processor developments in the United States for future high energy physics experiments and accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, I.

    1988-03-01

    The use of multi-processors for analysis and high-level triggering in High Energy Physics experiments, pioneered by the early emulator systems, has reached maturity, in particular with the multiple microprocessor systems in use at Fermilab. It is widely acknowledged that such systems will fulfill the major portion of the computing needs of future large experiments. Recent developments at Fermilab's Advanced Computer Program will make such systems even more powerful, cost-effective, and easier to use than they are at present. The next generation of microprocessors, already available, will provide CPU power of about one VAX 780 equivalent/$300, while supporting most VMS FORTRAN extensions and large (>8MB) amounts of memory. Low cost high density mass storage devices (based on video tape cartridge technology) will allow parallel I/O to remove potential I/O bottlenecks in systems of over 1000 VAX equipment processors. New interconnection schemes and system software will allow more flexible topologies and extremely high data bandwidth, especially for on-line systems. This talk will summarize the work at the Advanced Computer Program and the rest of the US in this field. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  7. QUASI-OPTICAL 3-dB HYBRID FOR FUTURE HIGH-ENERGY ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-15

    Phase-controlled wave combiners-commutators and isolators for protecting rf sources against reflection from the accelerating structure can be built using a 3-dB hybrid built around a metallic grating used in a ''magic-Y'' configuration. Models of the magic-Y were designed and tested, both at 34.272 GHz using the Omega-P Ka-band magnicon, and at 11.424 GHz using the Omega-P/NRL X-band magnicon. All elements of the magic-Y were optimized analytically and numerically. A non-vacuum 34 GHz model of the magic Y was built and tested experimentally at a low power. An engineering design for the high power (vacuum) compressor was configured. Similar steps were taken for the 11-GHz version.

  8. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.

    1994-08-01

    Accelerators have been devised and built for two reasons: In the first place, by physicists who needed high energy particles in order to have a means to explore the interactions between particles that probe the fundamental elementary forces of nature. And conversely, sometimes accelerator builders produce new machines for higher energy than ever before just because it can be done, and then challenge potential users to make new discoveries with the new means at hand. These two approaches or motivations have gone hand in hand. This lecture traces how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to the gigantic projects of today. So far all the really high-energy machines built and planned in the world--except the SLC--have been ring accelerators and storage rings using the strong-focusing method. But this method has not removed the energy limit, it has only pushed it higher. It would seem unlikely that one can go beyond the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)--but in fact a workshop was held in Sicily in November 1991, concerned with the question of extrapolating to 100 TeV. Other acceleration and beam-forming methods are now being discussed--collective fields, laser acceleration, wake-field accelerators etc., all aimed primarily at making linear colliders possible and more attractive than with present radiofrequency methods. So far it is not entirely clear which of these schemes will dominate particle physics in the future--maybe something that has not been thought of as yet.

  9. Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z. |

    1996-12-31

    A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

  10. On the Future High Energy Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-09-28

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of the next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium and far-future of accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance potential and cost range.

  11. New accelerators in high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Blewett, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    First, I should like to mention a few new ideas that have appeared during the last few years in the accelerator field. A couple are of importance in the design of injectors, usually linear accelerators, for high-energy machines. Then I shall review some of the somewhat sensational accelerator projects, now in operation, under construction or just being proposed. Finally, I propose to mention a few applications of high-energy accelerators in fields other than high-energy physics. I realize that this is a digression from my title but I hope that you will find it interesting.

  12. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.

    1989-10-01

    In this lecture I would like to trace how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to gigantic projects being hotly debated in Congress as well as in the scientific community.

  13. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  14. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2006-10-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  15. Perspectives on future high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Samios, N.P.

    1996-12-31

    The author states two general ways in which one must proceed in an attempt to forecast the future of high energy physics. The first is to utilize the state of knowledge in the field and thereby provide theoretical and experimental guidance on future directions. The second approach is technical, namely, how well can one do in going to higher energies with present techniques or new accelerator principles. He concludes that the future strategy is straightforward. The present accelerator facilities must be upgraded and run to produce exciting and forefront research. At the same time, the theoretical tools should be sharpened both extrapolating from lower energies (100 GeV) to high (multi TeV) and vice versa. The US should be involved in the LHC, both in the accelerator and experimental areas. There should be an extensive R and D program on accelerators for a multi-TeV capability, emphasizing e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders. Finally, the international cooperative activities should be strengthened and maintained.

  16. Systematical study on superconducting radio frequency elliptic cavity shapes applicable to future high energy accelerators and energy recovery linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemelin, Valery; Zadeh, Shahnam Gorgi; Heller, Johann; van Rienen, Ursula

    2016-10-01

    Elliptic cavities at medium- and high-β range are receiving broader use in the particle accelerator applications. Optimizing the shape of these cavities is a complex and demanding process. In this paper we propose an optimization approach to minimize the ratio of peak magnetic field to the acceleration field Hpk/Eacc while keeping the ratio of peak surface electric field to the accelerating field Epk/Eacc, aperture radius and wall slope angle α at some permitted values. We show that it is possible to substantially vary the cavity geometry without violating the constraints or deteriorating the objective of the optimization. This gives us freedom in designing the geometry to overcome problems such as multipactor while maintaining the minimal Hpk/Eacc . The optimization is then performed to find a set of optimized geometries with minimum Hpk/Eacc for different β 's ranging from 0.4 to 1, different peak surface electric fields, wall slope angles and aperture radii. These data could be generally used as a suitable starting point in designing elliptic cavities.

  17. Power Supplies for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Pranab Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The on-going research and the development projects with Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland has generated enormous enthusiasm and interest amongst all to know about the ultimate findings on `God's Particle'. This paper has made an attempt to unfold the power supply requirements and the methodology adopted to provide the stringent demand of such high energy particle accelerators during the initial stages of the search for the ultimate particles. An attempt has also been made to highlight the present status on the requirement of power supplies in some high energy accelerators with a view that, precautionary measures can be drawn during design and development from earlier experience which will be of help for the proposed third generation synchrotron to be installed in India at a huge cost.

  18. A phenomenological cost model for high energy particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, V.

    2014-07-01

    Accelerator-based facilities have enabled forefront research in high-energy physics for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of colliders has progressed immensely, while beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. In this paper we derive a simple scaling model for the cost of large accelerators and colliding beam facilities based on costs of 17 big facilities which have been either built or carefully estimated. Although this approach cannot replace an actual cost estimate based on an engineering design, this parameterization is to indicate a somewhat realistic cost range for consideration of what future frontier accelerator facilities might be fiscally realizable.

  19. High Energy Ion Acceleration by Extreme Laser Radiation Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-14

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2017-0015 High energy ion acceleration by extreme laser radiation pressure Paul McKenna UNIVERSITY OF STRATHCLYDE VIZ ROYAL COLLEGE...MM-YYYY)   14-03-2017 2. REPORT TYPE  Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To)  01 May 2013 to 31 Dec 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High energy ion acceleration...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Page 1 of 1FORM SF 298 3/15/2017https://livelink.ebs.afrl.af.mil/livelink/llisapi.dll 1 HIGH ENERGY ION ACCELERATION BY

  20. Crystal Ball: On the Future High Energy Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-09-20

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium- and far-future of the accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance reach and cost range. We briefly review such post-LHC options as linear e+e- colliders in Japan (ILC) or at CERN (CLIC), muon collider, and circular lepton or hadron colliders in China (CepC/SppC) and Europe (FCC). We conclude with a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and some perspectives for the far future of accelerator-based particle physics.

  1. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Milchberg, Howard M

    2013-03-30

    The eventual success of laser-plasma based acceleration schemes for high-energy particle physics will require the focusing and stable guiding of short intense laser pulses in reproducible plasma channels. For this goal to be realized, many scientific issues need to be addressed. These issues include an understanding of the basic physics of, and an exploration of various schemes for, plasma channel formation. In addition, the coupling of intense laser pulses to these channels and the stable propagation of pulses in the channels require study. Finally, new theoretical and computational tools need to be developed to aid in the design and analysis of experiments and future accelerators. Here we propose a 3-year renewal of our combined theoretical and experimental program on the applications of plasma waveguides to high-energy accelerators. During the past grant period we have made a number of significant advances in the science of laser-plasma based acceleration. We pioneered the development of clustered gases as a new highly efficient medium for plasma channel formation. Our contributions here include theoretical and experimental studies of the physics of cluster ionization, heating, explosion, and channel formation. We have demonstrated for the first time the generation of and guiding in a corrugated plasma waveguide. The fine structure demonstrated in these guides is only possible with cluster jet heating by lasers. The corrugated guide is a slow wave structure operable at arbitrarily high laser intensities, allowing direct laser acceleration, a process we have explored in detail with simulations. The development of these guides opens the possibility of direct laser acceleration, a true miniature analogue of the SLAC RF-based accelerator. Our theoretical studies during this period have also contributed to the further development of the simulation codes, Wake and QuickPIC, which can be used for both laser driven and beam driven plasma based acceleration schemes. We

  2. High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Thomas; Colby, Eric

    2002-12-01

    We summarize the reported results and the principal technical discussions that occurred in our Working Group on High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Schemes at the 2002 workshop on Advanced Accelerator Concepts at the Mandalay Beach resort, June 22-28, 2002.

  3. High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Katsouleas, T.

    2004-10-11

    The reported results and discussions in the Working Group on High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Concepts are summarized. The working group focused largely on laser-generated proton and ion beams from solid targets, but also considered laser vacuum acceleration results, active media accelerator proposals, ferroelectric-based accelerator technology advances and beam conditioning concepts for free electron lasers. The charge to the working group was to develop a laser-based proton injector exceeding current capabilities in at least one important parameter.

  4. High-energy accelerator for beams of heavy ions

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.; Arnold, Richard C.

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for accelerating heavy ions to high energies and directing the accelerated ions at a target comprises a source of singly ionized heavy ions of an element or compound of greater than 100 atomic mass units, means for accelerating the heavy ions, a storage ring for accumulating the accelerated heavy ions and switching means for switching the heavy ions from the storage ring to strike a target substantially simultaneously from a plurality of directions. In a particular embodiment the heavy ion that is accelerated is singly ionized hydrogen iodide. After acceleration, if the beam is of molecular ions, the ions are dissociated to leave an accelerated singly ionized atomic ion in a beam. Extraction of the beam may be accomplished by stripping all the electrons from the atomic ion to switch the beam from the storage ring by bending it in magnetic field of the storage ring.

  5. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future High Energy Proton Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourlay, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Interest in high field dipoles has been given a boost by new proposals to build a high-energy proton-proton collider to follow the LHC and programs around the world are taking on the task to answer the need. Studies aiming toward future high-energy proton-proton colliders at the 100 TeV scale are now being organized. The LHC and current cost models are based on technology close to four decades old and point to a broad optimum of operation using dipoles with fields between 5 and 12T when site constraints, either geographical or political, are not a factor. Site geography constraints that limit the ring circumference can drive the required dipole field up to 20T, which is more than a factor of two beyond state-of-the-art. After a brief review of current progress, the talk will describe the challenges facing future development and present a roadmap for moving high field accelerator magnet technology forward. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, High Energy Physics, US Department of Energy, under contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  6. Reinventing the Accelerator for the High Energy Frontier

    ScienceCinema

    Rosenzweig, James [UCLA, Los Angeles, California, United States

    2016-07-12

    The history of discovery in high-energy physics has been intimately connected with progress in methods of accelerating particles for the past 75 years. This remains true today, as the post-LHC era in particle physics will require significant innovation and investment in a superconducting linear collider. The choice of the linear collider as the next-generation discovery machine, and the selection of superconducting technology has rather suddenly thrown promising competing techniques -- such as very large hadron colliders, muon colliders, and high-field, high frequency linear colliders -- into the background. We discuss the state of such conventional options, and the likelihood of their eventual success. We then follow with a much longer view: a survey of a new, burgeoning frontier in high energy accelerators, where intense lasers, charged particle beams, and plasmas are all combined in a cross-disciplinary effort to reinvent the accelerator from its fundamental principles on up.

  7. Future scientific applications for high-energy lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.W.

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses future applications for high-energy lasers in the areas of astrophysics and space physics; hydrodynamics; material properties; plasma physics; radiation sources; and radiative properties.

  8. High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T.; Colby, E.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    The High Energy Density and Exotic Acceleration working group took as our goal to reach beyond the community of plasma accelerator research with its applications to high energy physics, to promote exchange with other disciplines which are challenged by related and demanding beam physics issues. The scope of the group was to cover particle acceleration and beam transport that, unlike other groups at AAC, are not mediated by plasmas or by electromagnetic structures. At this Workshop, we saw an impressive advancement from years past in the area of Vacuum Acceleration, for example with the LEAP experiment at Stanford. And we saw an influx of exciting new beam physics topics involving particle propagation inside of solid-density plasmas or at extremely high charge density, particularly in the areas of laser acceleration of ions, and extreme beams for fusion energy research, including Heavy-ion Inertial Fusion beam physics. One example of the importance and extreme nature of beam physics in HED research is the requirement in the Fast Ignitor scheme of inertial fusion to heat a compressed DT fusion pellet to keV temperatures by injection of laser-driven electron or ion beams of giga-Amp current. Even in modest experiments presently being performed on the laser-acceleration of ions from solids, mega-amp currents of MeV electrons must be transported through solid foils, requiring almost complete return current neutralization, and giving rise to a wide variety of beam-plasma instabilities. As keynote talks our group promoted Ion Acceleration (plenary talk by A. MacKinnon), which historically has grown out of inertial fusion research, and HIF Accelerator Research (invited talk by A. Friedman), which will require impressive advancements in space-charge-limited ion beam physics and in understanding the generation and transport of neutralized ion beams. A unifying aspect of High Energy Density applications was the physics of particle beams inside of solids, which is proving to

  9. High energy physics, past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Hirotaka

    2017-03-01

    At the beginning of last century we witnessed the emergence of new physics, quantum theory and gravitational theory, which gave us correct understanding of the world of atoms and deep insight into the structure of universe we live in. Towards the end of the century, string theory emerged as the most promising candidate to unify these two theories. In this talk, I would like to assert that the understanding of the origin of physical constants, ℏ (Planck constant) for quantum theory, and G (Newton’s gravitational constant) for gravitational theory within the framework of string theory is the key to understanding string theory. Then, I will shift to experimental high energy physics and discuss the necessity of world-wide collaboration in the area of superconducting technology which is essential in constructing the 100 TeV hadron collider.

  10. A future very-high-energy view of our Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Hinton, J. A.; Hermann, G.; Digel, S.

    2008-12-24

    The survey of the inner Galaxy with H.E.S.S. [1, 2] was remarkably successful in detecting a wide range of new very-high-energy gamma-ray sources. New TeV gamma-ray emitting source classes were established, although several of the sources remain unidentified, and progress has been made in understanding particle acceleration in astrophysical sources. In this work, we constructed a model of a population of such very-high-energy gamma-ray emitters and normalised the flux and size distribution of this population model to the H.E.S.S.-discovered sources. Extrapolating that population of objects to lower flux levels we investigate what a future array of imaging atmospheric telescopes (IACTs) such as AGIS or CTA might detect in a survey of the Inner Galaxy with an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity. The sheer number of sources detected together with the improved resolving power will likely result in a huge improvement in our understanding of the populations of galactic gamma-ray sources. A deep survey of the inner Milky Way would also support studies of the interstellar diffuse gamma-ray emission in regions of high cosmic-ray density. In the final section of this paper we investigate the science potential for the Galactic Centre region for studying energy-dependent diffusion with such a future array.

  11. Yang-Mills theories at high energy accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterman, George

    2016-03-01

    I will begin with a brief review of the triumph of Yang-Mills theory at particle accelerators, a development that began some years after their historic paper. This story reached a culmination, or at least local extremum, with the discovery at the Large Hadron Collider of a Higgs-like scalar boson in 2012. The talk then proceeds to a slightly more technical level, discussing how we derive predictions from the gauge field theories of the Standard Model and its extensions for use at high energy accelerators.

  12. Neutron dosimetry with TL albedo dosemeters at high energy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Haninger, T; Fehrenbacher, G

    2007-01-01

    The GSF-Personal Monitoring Service uses the TLD albedo dosemeter as standard neutron personal dosemeter. Due to its low sensitivity for fast neutrons however, it is generally not recommended for workplaces at high-energy accelerators. Test measurements with the albedo dosemeter were performed at the accelerator laboratories of GSI in Darmstadt and DESY in Hamburg to reconsider this hypothesis. It revealed that the albedo dosemeter can also be used as personal dosemeter at these workplaces, because at all measurement locations a significant part of neutrons with lower energies could be found, which were produced by scattering at walls or the ground.

  13. Photonic Band Gap resonators for high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, S.; Smith, D.R.; Kroll, N. |

    1993-12-31

    We have proposed that a new type of microwave resonator, based on Photonic Band Gap (PBG) structures, may be particularly useful for high energy accelerators. We provide an explanation of the PBG concept and present data which illustrate some of the special properties associated with such structures. Further evaluation of the utility of PBG resonators requires laboratory testing of model structures at cryogenic temperatures, and at high fields. We provide a brief discussion of our test program, which is currently in progress.

  14. Laser acceleration and its future

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2010-01-01

    Laser acceleration is based on the concept to marshal collective fields that may be induced by laser. In order to exceed the material breakdown field by a large factor, we employ the broken-down matter of plasma. While the generated wakefields resemble with the fields in conventional accelerators in their structure (at least qualitatively), it is their extreme accelerating fields that distinguish the laser wakefield from others, amounting to tiny emittance and compact accelerator. The current research largely falls on how to master the control of acceleration process in spatial and temporal scales several orders of magnitude smaller than the conventional method. The efforts over the last several years have come to a fruition of generating good beam properties with GeV energies on a table top, leading to many applications, such as ultrafast radiolysis, intraoperative radiation therapy, injection to X-ray free electron laser, and a candidate for future high energy accelerators. PMID:20228616

  15. Practical aspects of shielding high-energy particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.H. |

    1993-09-01

    The experimental basis of shielding design for high-energy accelerators that has been established over the past thirty years is described. Particular emphasis is given to the design of large accelerators constructed underground. The first data obtained from cosmic-ray physics were supplemented by basic nuclear physics. When these data proved insufficient, experiments were carried out and interpreted by several empirical formulae -- the most successful of which has been the Moyer Model. This empirical model has been used successfully to design the shields of most synchrotrons currently in operation, and is still being used in preliminary design and to check the results of neutron transport calculations. Accurate shield designs are needed to reduce external radiation levels during accelerator operations and to minimize environmental impacts such as {open_quotes}skyshine{close_quotes} and the production of radioactivity in groundwater. Examples of the cost of minimizing such environmental impacts are given.

  16. An introduction to the physics of high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.A.; Syphers, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    This book is an outgrowth of a course given by the authors at various universities and particle accelerator schools. It starts from the basic physics principles governing particle motion inside an accelerator, and leads to a full description of the complicated phenomena and analytical tools encountered in the design and operation of a working accelerator. The book covers acceleration and longitudinal beam dynamics, transverse motion and nonlinear perturbations, intensity dependent effects, emittance preservation methods and synchrotron radiation. These subjects encompass the core concerns of a high energy synchrotron. The authors apparently do not assume the reader has much previous knowledge about accelerator physics. Hence, they take great care to introduce the physical phenomena encountered and the concepts used to describe them. The mathematical formulae and derivations are deliberately kept at a level suitable for beginners. After mastering this course, any interested reader will not find it difficult to follow subjects of more current interests. Useful homework problems are provided at the end of each chapter. Many of the problems are based on actual activities associated with the design and operation of existing accelerators.

  17. On the acceleration of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Fraschetti, Federico

    2008-12-13

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) hit the Earth's atmosphere with energies exceeding 10(18)eV. This is the same energy as carried by a tennis ball moving at 100 km h-1, but concentrated on a subatomic particle. UHECRs are so rare (the flux of particles with E>10(20)eV is 0.5 km -2 per century) that only a few such particles have been detected over the past 50 years. Recently, the HiRes and Auger experiments have reported the discovery of a high-energy cut-off in the UHECR spectrum, and Auger has found an apparent clustering of the highest energy events towards nearby active galactic nuclei. Consensus is building that the highest energy particles are accelerated within the radio-bright lobes of these objects, but it remains unclear how this actually happens, and whether the cut-off is due to propagation effects or reflects an intrinsically physical limitation of the acceleration process. The low event statistics presently allows for many different plausible models; nevertheless observations are beginning to impose strong constraints on them. These observations have also motivated suggestions that new physics may be implicated. We present a review of the key theoretical and observational issues related to the processes of propagation and acceleration of UHECRs and proposed solutions.

  18. Report of the Subpanel on Accelerator Research and Development of the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Accelerator R and D in the US High Energy Physics (HEP) program is reviewed. As a result of this study, some shift in priority, particularly as regards long-range accelerator R and D, is suggested to best serve the future needs of the US HEP program. Some specific new directions for the US R and D effort are set forth. 18 figures, 5 tables. (RWR)

  19. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; /SLAC

    2012-04-03

    An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

  20. Induced radioactivity in and around high-energy particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Vincke, Helmut; Theis, Chris; Roesler, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    Particle accelerators and their surroundings are locations of residual radioactivity production that is induced by the interaction of high-energy particles with matter. This paper gives an overview of the principles of activation caused at proton accelerators, which are the main machines operated at Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire. It describes the parameters defining radio-nuclide production caused by beam losses. The second part of the paper concentrates on the analytic calculation of activation and the Monte Carlo approach as it is implemented in the FLUKA code. Techniques used to obtain, on the one hand, estimates of radioactivity in Becquerel and, on the other hand, residual dose rates caused by the activated material are discussed. The last part of the paper focuses on experiments that allow for benchmarking FLUKA activation calculations and on simulations used to predict activation in and around high-energy proton machines. In that respect, the paper addresses the residual dose rate that will be induced by proton-proton collisions at an energy of two times 7 TeV in and around the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector. Besides activation of solid materials, the air activation expected in the CMS cavern caused by this beam operation is also discussed.

  1. Shielding analyses for repetitive high energy pulsed power accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jow, H. N.; Rao, D. V.

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs, tests and operates a variety of accelerators that generate large amounts of high energy Bremsstrahlung radiation over an extended time. Typically, groups of similar accelerators are housed in a large building that is inaccessible to the general public. To facilitate independent operation of each accelerator, test cells are constructed around each accelerator to shield it from the radiation workers occupying surrounding test cells and work-areas. These test cells, about 9 ft. high, are constructed of high density concrete block walls that provide direct radiation shielding. Above the target areas (radiation sources), lead or steel plates are used to minimize skyshine radiation. Space, accessibility and cost considerations impose certain restrictions on the design of these test cells. SNL Health Physics division is tasked to evaluate the adequacy of each test cell design and compare resultant dose rates with the design criteria stated in DOE Order 5480.11. In response, SNL Health Physics has undertaken an intensive effort to assess existing radiation shielding codes and compare their predictions against measured dose rates. This paper provides a summary of the effort and its results.

  2. High energy density physics issues related to Future Circular Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Wollmann, D.; Piriz, A. R.

    2017-07-01

    A design study for a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator named, Future Circular Collider (FCC), is being carried out by the International Scientific Community. A complete design report is expected to be ready by spring 2018. The FCC will accelerate two counter rotating beams of 50 TeV protons in a tunnel having a length (circumference) of 100 km. Each beam will be comprised of 10 600 proton bunches, with each bunch having an intensity of 1011 protons. The bunch length is of 0.5 ns, and two neighboring bunches are separated by 25 ns. Although there is an option for 5 ns bunch separation as well, in the present studies, we consider the former case only. The total energy stored in each FCC beam is about 8.5 GJ, which is equivalent to the kinetic energy of Airbus 380 (560 t) flying at a speed of 850 km/h. Machine protection is a very important issue while operating with such powerful beams. It is important to have an estimate of the damage caused to the equipment and accelerator components due to the accidental release of a partial or total beam at a given point. For this purpose, we carried out numerical simulations of full impact of one FCC beam on an extended solid copper target. These simulations have been done employing an energy deposition code, FLUKA, and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code, BIG2, iteratively. This study shows that although the static range of a single FCC proton and its shower is about 1.5 m in solid copper, the entire beam will penetrate around 350 m into the target. This substantial increase in the range is due to the hydrodynamic tunneling of the beam. Our calculations also show that a large part of the target will be converted into high energy density matter including warm dense matter and strongly coupled plasmas.

  3. Cryogenics for high-energy particle accelerators: highlights from the first fifty years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrun, Ph

    2017-02-01

    Applied superconductivity has become a key technology for high-energy particle accelerators, allowing to reach higher beam energy while containing size, capital expenditure and operating costs. Large and powerful cryogenic systems are therefore ancillary to low-temperature superconducting accelerator devices – magnets and high-frequency cavities – distributed over multi-kilometre distances and operating generally close to the normal boiling point of helium, but also above 4.2 K in supercritical and down to below 2 K in superfluid. Additionally, low-temperature operation in accelerators may also be required by considerations of ultra-high vacuum, limited stored energy and beam stability. We discuss the rationale for cryogenics in high-energy particle accelerators, review its development over the past half-century and present its outlook in future large projects, with reference to the main engineering domains of cryostat design and heat loads, cooling schemes, efficient power refrigeration and cryogenic fluid management.

  4. Single event effects in high-energy accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Alía, Rubén; Brugger, Markus; Danzeca, Salvatore; Cerutti, Francesco; de Carvalho Saraiva, Joao Pedro; Denz, Reiner; Ferrari, Alfredo; Foro, Lionel L.; Peronnard, Paul; Røed, Ketil; Secondo, Raffaello; Steckert, Jens; Thurel, Yves; Toccafondo, Iacocpo; Uznanski, Slawosz

    2017-03-01

    The radiation environment encountered at high-energy hadron accelerators strongly differs from the environment relevant for space applications. The mixed-field expected at modern accelerators is composed of charged and neutral hadrons (protons, pions, kaons and neutrons), photons, electrons, positrons and muons, ranging from very low (thermal) energies up to the TeV range. This complex field, which is extensively simulated by Monte Carlo codes (e.g. FLUKA) is due to beam losses in the experimental areas, distributed along the machine (e.g. collimation points) and deriving from the interaction with the residual gas inside the beam pipe. The resulting intensity, energy distribution and proportion of the different particles largely depends on the distance and angle with respect to the interaction point as well as the amount of installed shielding material. Electronics operating in the vicinity of the accelerator will therefore be subject to both cumulative damage from radiation (total ionizing dose, displacement damage) as well as single event effects which can seriously compromise the operation of the machine. This, combined with the extensive use of commercial-off-the-shelf components due to budget, performance and availability reasons, results in the need to carefully characterize the response of the devices and systems to representative radiation conditions.

  5. High energy electron beam processing experiments with induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, D. L.; Birx, D. L.; Dave, V. R.

    1995-05-01

    Induction accelerators are capable of producing very high electron beam power for processing at energies of 1-10 MeV. A high energy electron beam (HEEB) material processing system based on all-solid-state induction accelerator technology is in operation at Science Research Laboratory. The system delivers 50 ns 500 A current pulses at 1.5 MeV and is capable of operating at high power (500 kW) and high (˜ 5 kHz) repetition rate. HEEB processing with induction accelerators is useful for a wide variety of applications including the joining of high temperature materials, powder metallurgical fabrication, treatment of organic-contaminated wastewater and the curing of polymer matrix composites. High temperature HEEB experiments at SRL have demonstrated the brazing of carbon-carbon composites to metallic substrates and the melting and sintering of powders for graded-alloy fabrication. Other experiments have demonstrated efficient destruction of low-concentration organic contaminants in water and low temperature free-radical cross-linking of fiber-reinforced composites with acrylated resin matrices.

  6. String black holes as particle accelerators to arbitrarily high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2014-07-01

    We show that an extremal Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black hole may act as a particle accelerator with arbitrarily high energy when two uncharged particles falling freely from rest to infinity on the near horizon. We show that the center of mass energy of collision is independent of the extreme fine tuning of the angular momentum of the colliding particles. We further show that the center of mass energy of collisions of particles at the ISCO ( r ISCO ) or at the photon orbit ( r ph ) or at the marginally bound circular orbit ( r mb ) i.e. at r≡ r ISCO = r ph = r mb =2 M could be arbitrarily large for the aforementioned space-time, which is quite different from the Schwarzschild and the Reissner-Nordstrøm space-time. For non-extremal GMGHS space-time the CM energy is finite and depends upon the asymptotic value of the dilation field ( ϕ 0).

  7. Accelerator physics and technology challenges of very high energy hadron colliders

    DOE PAGES

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D.

    2015-08-20

    High energy hadron colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present, international particle physics community considers several options for a 100 TeV proton–proton collider as a possible post-LHC energy frontier facility. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This article briefly reviews the accelerator physics and technology challenges of the future very high energy colliders and outlines the areas of required research and development towards their technical and financial feasibility.

  8. Accelerator physics and technology challenges of very high energy hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D.

    2015-08-01

    High energy hadron colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present, international particle physics community considers several options for a 100 TeV proton-proton collider as a possible post-LHC energy frontier facility. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This paper briefly reviews the accelerator physics and technology challenges of the future very high energy colliders and outlines the areas of required research and development towards their technical and financial feasibility.

  9. Accelerators for America's Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mei

    2016-03-01

    Particle accelerator, a powerful tool to energize beams of charged particles to a desired speed and energy, has been the working horse for investigating the fundamental structure of matter and fundermental laws of nature. Most known examples are the 2-mile long Stanford Linear Accelerator at SLAC, the high energy proton and anti-proton collider Tevatron at FermiLab, and Large Hadron Collider that is currently under operation at CERN. During the less than a century development of accelerator science and technology that led to a dazzling list of discoveries, particle accelerators have also found various applications beyond particle and nuclear physics research, and become an indispensible part of the economy. Today, one can find a particle accelerator at almost every corner of our lives, ranging from the x-ray machine at the airport security to radiation diagnostic and therapy in hospitals. This presentation will give a brief introduction of the applications of this powerful tool in fundermental research as well as in industry. Challenges in accelerator science and technology will also be briefly presented

  10. Accelerated hematopoietic toxicity by high energy (56)Fe radiation.

    PubMed

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Trani, Daniela; Doiron, Kathryn; Rotolo, Jimmy A; Kallakury, Bhaskar V S; Kolesnick, Richard; Cole, Michael F; Fornace, Albert J

    2012-03-01

    There is little information on the relative toxicity of highly charged (Z) high-energy (HZE) radiation in animal models compared to γ or X-rays, and the general assumption based on in vitro studies has been that acute toxicity is substantially greater. C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with (56)Fe ions (1 GeV/nucleon), and acute (within 30 d) toxicity compared to that of γ rays or protons (1 GeV). To assess relative hematopoietic and gastrointestinal toxicity, the effects of (56)Fe ions were compared to γ rays using complete blood count (CBC), bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage colony forming unit (GM-CFU), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay for apoptosis in bone marrow, and intestinal crypt survival. Although onset was more rapid, (56)Fe ions were only slightly more toxic than γ rays or protons with lethal dose (LD)(50/30) (a radiation dose at which 50% lethality occurs at 30-day) values of 5.8, 7.25, and 6.8 Gy, respectively, with relative biologic effectiveness for (56)Fe ions of 1.25 and 1.06 for protons. (56)Fe radiation caused accelerated and more severe hematopoietic toxicity. Early mortality correlated with more profound leukopenia and subsequent sepsis. Results indicate that there is selective enhanced toxicity to bone marrow progenitor cells, which are typically resistant to γ rays, and bone marrow stem cells, because intestinal crypt cells did not show increased HZE toxicity.

  11. Rare isotope accelerator project in Korea and its application to high energy density sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, M.; Chung, Y. S.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, B. J.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    2014-01-01

    As a national science project, the Korean government has recently established the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) with the goal of conducting world-class research in basic sciences. One of the core facilities for the IBS will be the rare isotope accelerator which can produce high-intensity rare isotope beams to investigate the fundamental properties of nature, and also to support a broad research program in material sciences, medical and biosciences, and future nuclear energy technologies. The construction of the accelerator is scheduled to be completed by approximately 2017. The design of the accelerator complex is optimized to deliver high average beam current on targets, and to maximize the production of rare isotope beams through the simultaneous use of Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) and In-Flight Fragmentation (IFF) methods. The proposed accelerator is, however, not optimal for high energy density science, which usually requires very high peak currents on the target. In this study, we present possible beam-plasma experiments that can be done within the scope of the current accelerator design, and we also investigate possible future extension paths that may enable high energy density science with intense pulsed heavy ion beams.

  12. High energy physics advisory panel`s subpanel on vision for the future of high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This report was requested by the Secretary of Energy to (1) define a long-term program for pursuing the most important high-energy physics goals since the termination of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project, (2) assess the current US high-energy physics program, and (3) make recommendations regarding the future of the field. Subjects on which recommendations were sought and which the report addresses were: high-energy physics funding priorities; facilitating international collaboration for future construction of large high-energy physics facilities; optimizing uses of the investment made in the SSC; how to encourage displaced scientists and engineers to remain in high-energy physics and to attract young scientists to enter the field in the future. The report includes a description of the state of high-energy physics research in the context of history, a summary of the SSC project, and documentation of the report`s own origins and development.

  13. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Milchberg, Howard

    2016-07-01

    This grant supported basic experimental, theoretical and computer simulation research into developing a compact, high pulse repetition rate laser accelerator using the direct laser acceleration mechanism in plasma-based slow wave structures.

  14. A practical guide to modern high energy particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, S.D.

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to convey an understanding of how particle accelerators work and why they look the way they do. The approach taken is physically intuitive rather than mathematically rigorous. The emphasis is on the description of proton circular accelerators and colliders. Linear accelerators are mentioned only in passing as sources of protons for higher energy rings. Electron accelerators/storage rings and antiproton sources are discussed only by way of brief descriptions of the features which distinguish them from proton accelerators. The basics of how generic accelerators work are discussed, focusing on descriptions of what sets the overall scale, single particle dynamics and stability, and descriptions of the phase space of the particle beam, the information thus presented is then used to go through the exercise of designing a Superconducting Super Collider. (LEW)

  15. Radiation Shielding at High-Energy Electron and Proton Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, Sayed H.; Cossairt, J.Donald; Liu, James C.; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The goal of accelerator shielding design is to protect the workers, general public, and the environment against unnecessary prompt radiation from accelerator operations. Additionally, shielding at accelerators may also be used to reduce the unwanted background in experimental detectors, to protect equipment against radiation damage, and to protect workers from potential exposure to the induced radioactivity in the machine components. The shielding design for prompt radiation hazards is the main subject of this chapter.

  16. High energy neutrinos from astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Hooper, Dan; Sarkar, Subir; Taylor, Andrew M.

    2008-02-01

    Ongoing experimental efforts to detect cosmic sources of high energy neutrinos are guided by the expectation that astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray protons would also generate neutrinos through interactions with ambient matter and/or photons. However, there will be a reduction in the predicted neutrino flux if cosmic ray sources accelerate not only protons but also significant numbers of heavier nuclei, as is indicated by recent air shower data. We consider plausible extragalactic sources such as active galactic nuclei, gamma ray bursts and starburst galaxies and demand consistency with the observed cosmic ray composition and energy spectrum at Earth after allowing for propagation through intergalactic radiation fields. This allows us to calculate the expected neutrino fluxes from the sources, normalized to the observed cosmic ray spectrum. We find that the likely signals are still within reach of next generation neutrino telescopes such as IceCube.PACS95.85.Ry98.70.Rz98.54.Cm98.54.EpReferencesFor a review, see:F.HalzenD.HooperRep. Prog. Phys.6520021025A.AchterbergIceCube CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.972006221101A.AchterbergIceCube CollaborationAstropart. Phys.262006282arXiv:astro-ph/0611063arXiv:astro-ph/0702265V.NiessANTARES CollaborationAIP Conf. Proc.8672006217I.KravchenkoPhys. Rev. D732006082002S.W.BarwickANITA CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.962006171101V.Van ElewyckPierre Auger CollaborationAIP Conf. Proc.8092006187For a survey of possible sources and event rates in km3 detectors see e.g.,W.BednarekG.F.BurgioT.MontaruliNew Astron. Rev.4920051M.D.KistlerJ.F.BeacomPhys. Rev. D742006063007A. Kappes, J. Hinton, C. Stegmann, F.A. Aharonian, arXiv:astro-ph/0607286.A.LevinsonE.WaxmanPhys. Rev. Lett.872001171101C.DistefanoD.GuettaE.WaxmanA.LevinsonAstrophys. J.5752002378F.A.AharonianL.A.AnchordoquiD.KhangulyanT.MontaruliJ. Phys. Conf. Ser.392006408J.Alvarez-MunizF.HalzenAstrophys. J.5762002L33F.VissaniAstropart. Phys.262006310F.W

  17. High energy particle acceleration in solar flares Observational evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1983-07-01

    The recent gamma ray and neutron observations made by the SMM Gamma Ray Spectrometer are reviewed. The implication these observations hold for understanding particle acceleration in solar flares are discussed. The data require that both electrons and ions must be accelerated together to relativistic energies and interact with matter in a time scale of seconds.

  18. Visions for the future of particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    The ambitions of accelerator based science, technology and applications far exceed the present accelerator possibilities. Accelerator science and technology is one of a key enablers of the developments in the particle physic, photon physics and also applications in medicine and industry. The paper presents a digest of the research results and visions for the future in the domain of accelerator science and technology in Europe, shown during the final fourth annual meeting of the EuCARD - European Coordination of Accelerator Research and Development. The conference concerns building of the research infrastructure, including advanced photonic and electronic systems for servicing large high energy physics experiments. There are debated a few basic groups of such systems like: measurement - control networks of large geometrical extent, multichannel systems for large amounts of metrological data acquisition, precision photonic networks of reference time, frequency and phase distribution. The main subject is however the vision for the future of particle accelerators and next generation light sources.

  19. APPARATUS FOR CONTROL OF HIGH-ENERGY ACCELERATORS

    DOEpatents

    Heard, H.G.

    1961-10-24

    A particle beam positioning control for a synchrotron or the like is described. The control includes means for selectively impressing a sinusoidal perturbation upon the rising voltage utilized to sweep the frequency of the f-m oscillator which is conventionally coupled to the accelerating electrode of a synchrotron. The perturbation produces a variation in the normal rate of change of frequency of the accelerating voltage applied to the accelerating electrode, resulting in an expansion or contraction of the particle beam orbit diameter during the perturbation. The beam may thus be controlled such that a portion strikes a target positioned close to the expanded or contracted orbit diameter and returns to the original orbit for further acceleration to the final energy. (AEC)

  20. Kerr black holes as particle accelerators to arbitrarily high energy.

    PubMed

    Bañados, Máximo; Silk, Joseph; West, Stephen M

    2009-09-11

    We show that intermediate mass black holes conjectured to be the early precursors of supermassive black holes and surrounded by relic cold dark matter density spikes can act as particle accelerators with collisions, in principle, at arbitrarily high center-of-mass energies in the case of Kerr black holes. While the ejecta from such interactions will be highly redshifted, we may anticipate the possibility of a unique probe of Planck-scale physics.

  1. Future accelerator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1986-05-01

    A general discussion is presented of the acceleration of particles. Upon this foundation is built a categorization scheme into which all accelerators can be placed. Special attention is devoted to accelerators which employ a wake-field mechanism and a restricting theorem is examined. It is shown how the theorem may be circumvented. Comments are made on various acceleration schemes.

  2. Medical Isotope Production with a High Energy Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.R.

    1999-05-10

    'Co-production of medical radioisotopes in an accelerator facility of the APT class would provide significant benefits to mankind through improved diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and also reduce the potential cost through sales of medical isotopes for radio pharmaceutical preparation. A business plan has been developed by the Economic Development Partnership to evaluate the viability of a joint business venture of this type with private industry. Results of the economic analysis indicate a positive cash flow after two years of operation and an internal rate of return in excess of 40 percent. Including provision for payment of a use fee to DOE, annual profits in excess of $150 million are projected.'

  3. Operational radiation protection in high-energy physics accelerators: implementation of ALARA in design and operation of accelerators.

    PubMed

    Fassò, A; Rokni, S

    2009-11-01

    This paper considers the historical evolution of the concept of optimisation of radiation exposures, as commonly expressed by the acronym ALARA, and discusses its application to various aspects of radiation protection at high-energy accelerators.

  4. Polarized ion sources for high-energy accelerators and colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenski, A. N.

    2001-06-01

    The recent progress in polarized ion source development is reviewed. In dc operation a 1.0 mA polarized H- ion current is now available from the Optically-Pumped Polarized Ion Source (OPPIS). In pulsed operation a 10 mA polarized H- ion current was demonstrated at the TRIUMF pulsed OPPIS test bench and a 2.5 mA peak current was obtained from an Atomic Beam Source (ABS) at the INR Moscow test bench. The possibilities for future improvements with both techniques are discussed. A new OPPIS for RHIC spin physics is described. The OPPIS reliably delivered polarized beam for the polarized run at RHIC. The results obtained with a new pulsed ABS injector for the IUCF Cooler Ring are also discussed. .

  5. POLARIZED ION SOURCES FOR HIGH ENERGY ACCELERATORS AND COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    ZELENSKI,A.N.

    2000-10-16

    The recent progress in polarized ion source development is reviewed. In dc operation a 1.0 mA polarized H{sup -} ion current is now available from the Optically-Pumped Polarized Ion Source (OPPIS) . In pulsed operation a 10 mA polarized H{sup -} ion current was demonstrated at the TRIUMF pulsed OPPIS test bench and a 3.5 mA peak current was obtained from an Atomic Beam Source (ABS) at the INR Moscow test bench. The possibilities for future improvements with both techniques are discussed. A new OPPIS for RHIC spin physics is described. The OPPIS reliably delivered polarized beam for the polarized run at RHIC. The results obtained with a new pulsed ABS injector for the IUCF Cooler Ring are also discussed.

  6. POLARIZED ION SOURCES FOR HIGH ENERGY ACCELERATORS AND COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    ZELENSKI,A.N.

    2000-10-16

    The recent progress in polarized ion source development is reviewed. In dc operation a 1.0 mA polarized H{sup -} ion current is now available from the Optically-Pumped Polarized Ion Source (OPPIS). In pulsed operation a 10 mA polarized H{sup -} ion current was demonstrated at the TRIUMF pulsed OPPIS test bench and a 3.5 mA peak current was obtained from an Atomic Beam Source (ABS) at the INR Moscow test bench. The possibilities for future improvements with both techniques are discussed. A new OPPIS for RHIC spin physics is described. The OPPIS reliably delivered polarized beam for the polarized run at RHIC. The results obtained with a new pulsed ABS injector for the IUCF Cooler Ring are also discussed.

  7. Future HEP Accelerators: The US Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Pushpalatha; Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-11-02

    Accelerator technology has advanced tremendously since the introduction of accelerators in the 1930s, and particle accelerators have become indispensable instruments in high energy physics (HEP) research to probe Nature at smaller and smaller distances. At present, accelerator facilities can be classified into Energy Frontier colliders that enable direct discoveries and studies of high mass scale particles and Intensity Frontier accelerators for exploration of extremely rare processes, usually at relatively low energies. The near term strategies of the global energy frontier particle physics community are centered on fully exploiting the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC), while the intensity frontier HEP research is focused on studies of neutrinos at the MW-scale beam power accelerator facilities, such as Fermilab Main Injector with the planned PIP-II SRF linac project. A number of next generation accelerator facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium- and long-term future programs of accelerator-based HEP research. In this paper, we briefly review the post-LHC energy frontier options, both for lepton and hadron colliders in various regions of the world, as well as possible future intensity frontier accelerator facilities.

  8. Superconductivity and future accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1983-08-01

    With the absence, thus far, of charged particle beam accelerators, particle accelerators employing accelerating cavities and deflecting magnets applying superconductivity are still being developed. This paper discusses hadron colliders which involve 20 TeV rings with 40 TeV CM energy with an emphasis to obtain maximum GeV/$, which may be crucial for serious consideration of funding. The accelerator design and operating features are discussed with an emphasis placed on the superconducting magnets. Material and labor costs are discussed. A diagram is given which illustrates magnet superconductor requirements, comparing Fe dominated 2.5T with air core cos theta magnets.

  9. Developing high energy, stable laser wakefield accelerators: particle simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, Cameron

    2006-10-01

    Laser driven wakefield accelerators produce accelerating fields thousands of times those achievable in conventional radiofrequency accelerators, and recent experiments have produced high energy electron bunches with low emittance and energy spread. Challenges now include control and reproducibility of the electron beam, further improvements in energy spread, and scaling to higher energies. We present large-scale particle in cell simulations together with recent experiments towards these goals. In LBNL experiments the relativistically intense drive pulse was guided over more than 10 diffraction ranges by plasma channels. Guiding beyond the diffraction range improved efficiency by allowing use of a smaller laser spot size (and hence higher intensities) over long propagation distances. At a drive pulse power of 9 TW, electrons were trapped from the plasma and beams of percent energy spread containing > 200pC charge above 80 MeV with normalized emittance estimated at < 2 π-mm-mrad were produced. Energies have now been scaled to 1 GeV using 40 TW of laser power. Particle simulations and data showed that the high quality bunch in recent experiments was formed when beam loading turned off injection after initial self trapping, creating a bunch of electrons isolated in phase space. A narrow energy spread beam was then obtained by extracting the bunch as it outran the accelerating phase of the wake. Large scale simulations coupled with experiments are now under way to better understand the optimization of such accelerators including production of reproducible electron beams and scaling to energies beyond a GeV. Numerical resolution and two and three dimensional effects are discussed as well as diagnostics for application of the simulations to experiments. Effects including injection and beam dynamics as well as pump laser depletion and reshaping will be described, with application to design of future experiments. Supported by DOE grant DE-AC02-05CH11231 and by an INCITE

  10. REPORT OF RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND FUTURE GOALS HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Mark B.; Kapustin, Anton N.; Schwarz, John Henry; Carroll, Sean; Ooguri, Hirosi; Gukov, Sergei; Preskill, John; Hitlin, David G.; Porter, Frank C.; Patterson, Ryan B.; Newman, Harvey B.; Spiropulu, Maria; Golwala, Sunil; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2014-08-26

    Caltech High Energy Physics (HEP) has a broad program in both experimental and theoretical physics. We are known for our creativity and leadership. The future is uncertain and we strive to be involved in all the major areas of experimental and theoretical HEP physics so no matter where the important discoveries occur we are well positioned to play an important role. An outstanding group of postdoctoral scholars, graduate students, staff scientists, and technical and administrative personnel support our efforts in experimental and theoretical physics. The PI’s on this grant are involved in the following program of experimental and theoretical activities: I) EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS Our CMS group, led by Harvey Newman and Maria Spiropulu, has played a key role in the discovery and interpretation of the Higgs boson and in searches for new physics. They have important hardware responsibilities in both ECAL and HCAL and are also involved in the upgrades needed for the High Luminosity LHC. Newman's group also develops and operates Grid-based computing, networking, and collaborative systems for CMS and the US HEP community. The charged lepton (Mu2e) and quark BaBar flavor physics group is led by David Hitlin and Frank Porter. On Mu2e they have been instrumental in the design of the calorimeter. Construction responsibilities include one third of the crystals and associated readout as well as the calibration system. They also will have responsibility for a major part of the online system software. Although data taking ceased in 2008 the Caltech BaBar group is active on several new forefront analyses. The neutrino group is led by Ryan Patterson. They are central to NOvA's core oscillation physics program, to calibration, and to detector readiness being responsible for the production and installation of 12,000 APD arrays. They have key roles in neutrino appearance and disappearance analysis in MINOS and MINOS+. Sunil Golwala leads the dark matter direct detection effort. Areas

  11. State of particle accelerators and high energy physics (Fermilab Summer School, 1981). Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.; Huson, F.R.; Month, M.

    1982-01-01

    The material gathered in this volume covers the seminars given at the Summer School on High Energy Particle Accelerators, sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Science Foundation, held at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois, July 13 to 24, 1981. The school was organized as a response to a recent appeal by a subpanel of the DOE High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) for more scientists and more students to work in the field of high energy particle accelerators. The committee set a number of objectives for the school: (1) to present in a thorough and up-to-date manner the entire spectrum of knowledge relating to accelerators; (2) to disseminate that knowledge to audiences that can best make use of it; (3) to encourage, by providing text materials and training to potential instructors, the development of accelerator physics education as part of university programs in high-energy physics; and (4) to foster a more extensive dialogue between particle and accelerator physicists. Separate entries were prepared for the data base for the papers included. (WHK)

  12. Shielding for High-Energy Electron Accelerator Installations. National Bureau of Standards Handbook 97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    Recommendations for radiation shielding, protection, and measurement are presented. This handbook is an extension of previous recommendations for protection against radiation from--(1) high energy and power electron accelerators, (2) food processing equipment, and (3) general sterilization equipment. The new recommendations are concerned with…

  13. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group: Progress report, March 1, 1988--February 28, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This report discusses work carried out by the High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group at the University of Maryland. Particular topics discussed are: OPAL experiment at LEP; deep inelastic muon interactions; B physics with the CLEO detector at CESR; further results from JADE; and search for ''small'' violation of the Pauli principle. (LSP)

  14. Shielding for High-Energy Electron Accelerator Installations. National Bureau of Standards Handbook 97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    Recommendations for radiation shielding, protection, and measurement are presented. This handbook is an extension of previous recommendations for protection against radiation from--(1) high energy and power electron accelerators, (2) food processing equipment, and (3) general sterilization equipment. The new recommendations are concerned with…

  15. Propulsion Estimates for High Energy Lunar Missions Using Future Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.; Bennett, Gary L.

    2016-01-01

    High energy propellants for human lunar missions are analyzed, focusing on very advanced ozone and atomic hydrogen. One of the most advanced launch vehicle propulsion systems, such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), used hydrogen and oxygen and had a delivered specific impulse of 453 seconds. In the early days of the space program, other propellants (or so called metapropellants) were suggested, including atomic hydrogen and liquid ozone. Theoretical and experimental studies of atomic hydrogen and ozone were conducted beginning in the late 1940s. This propellant research may have provided screenwriters with the idea of an atomic hydrogen-ozone rocket engine in the 1950 movie, Rocketship X-M. This paper presents analyses showing that an atomic hydrogen-ozone rocket engine could produce a specific impulse over a wide range of specific impulse values reaching as high as 1,600 s. A series of single stage and multistage rocket vehicle analyses were conducted to find the minimum specific impulse needed to conduct high energy round trip lunar missions.

  16. Measurements of high-energy radiation generation from laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schumaker, W. Vargas, M.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Maksimchuk, A.; Nees, J.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Sarri, G.; Dromey, B.; Zepf, M.

    2014-05-15

    Using high-energy (∼0.5 GeV) electron beams generated by laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA), bremsstrahlung radiation was created by interacting these beams with various solid targets. Secondary processes generate high-energy electrons, positrons, and neutrons, which can be measured shot-to-shot using magnetic spectrometers, short half-life activation, and Compton scattering. Presented here are proof-of-principle results from a high-resolution, high-energy gamma-ray spectrometer capable of single-shot operation, and high repetition rate activation diagnostics. We describe the techniques used in these measurements and their potential applications in diagnosing LWFA electron beams and measuring high-energy radiation from laser-plasma interactions.

  17. Future directions in high energy electron-positron experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Trilling, G.H.

    1988-09-01

    In this report, the possibilities of studying particle physics at the TeV scale with high energy electron-positron linear colliders are discussed. A status report on the SLC and the MARK II program is given to provide some insights on the feasibility of experiments at linear colliders. The technical issues in going from SLC to the development of TeV colliders are briefly discussed. Some of the elements of the e/sup +/e/sup -/ experimental environment which differentiate it from that in hadron colliders and give examples of processes particularly well suited to attack by e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation are summarized. Finally, some concluding remarks are given. 8 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Technical challenges for the future of high energy lasers

    SciTech Connect

    LaFortune, K N; Hurd, R L; Fochs, S N; Rotter, M D; Pax, P H; Combs, R L; Olivier, S S; Brase, J M; Yamamoto, R M

    2007-01-10

    The Solid-State, Heat-Capacity Laser (SSHCL) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a multi-generation laser development effort scalable to the megawatt power levels with current performance approaching 100 kilowatts. This program is one of many designed to harness the power of lasers for use as directed energy weapons. There are many hurdles common to all of these programs that must be overcome to make the technology viable. There will be a in-depth discussion of the general issues facing state-of-the-art high energy lasers and paths to their resolution. Despite the relative simplicity of the SSHCL design, many challenges have been uncovered in the implementation of this particular system. An overview of these and their resolution are discussed. The overall system design of the SSHCL, technological strengths and weaknesses, and most recent experimental results will be presented.

  19. Technical challenges for the future of high energy lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFortune, K. N.; Hurd, R. L.; Fochs, S. N.; Rotter, M. D.; Pax, P. H.; Combs, R. L.; Olivier, S. S.; Brase, J. M.; Yamamoto, R. M.

    2007-02-01

    The Solid-State, Heat-Capacity Laser (SSHCL) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a multi-generation laser development effort scalable to the megawatt power levels with current performance approaching 100 kilowatts. This program is one of many designed to harness the power of lasers for use as directed energy weapons. There are many hurdles common to all of these programs that must be overcome to make the technology viable. There will be a in-depth discussion of the general issues facing state-of-the-art high energy lasers and paths to their resolution. Despite the relative simplicity of the SSHCL design, many challenges have been uncovered in the implementation of this particular system. An overview of these and their resolution are discussed. The overall system design of the SSHCL, technological strengths and weaknesses, and most recent experimental results will be presented.

  20. Progress report on future accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, W.K.H.

    1984-02-01

    SLAC intends to pursue high energy physics work in the future along three lines: (1) continued exploration of electron and photon physics on stationary targets; (2) colliding beam physics using electron-positron storage rings; (3) single-pass collider physics with electrons using first the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) and eventually a single-pass collider operating near the highest practical upper limit for such devices. These long-range plans are discussed.

  1. Two-stage acceleration of interstellar ions driven by high-energy lepton plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, YunQian; Sheng, ZhengMing; Lu, QuanMing; Li, YuTong; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    We present the particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results of the interaction of a high-energy lepton plasma flow with background electron-proton plasma and focus on the acceleration processes of the protons. It is found that the acceleration follows a two-stage process. In the first stage, protons are significantly accelerated transversely (perpendicular to the lepton flow) by the turbulent magnetic field "islands" generated via the strong Weibel-type instabilities. The accelerated protons shows a perfect inverse-power energy spectrum. As the interaction continues, a shockwave structure forms and the protons in front of the shockwave are reflected at twice of the shock speed, resulting in a quasi-monoenergetic peak located near 200 MeV under the simulation parameters. The presented scenario of ion acceleration may be relevant to cosmic-ray generation in some astrophysical environments.

  2. Acceleration and collision of ultra-high energy particles using crystal channels

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Noble, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    We assume that, independent of any near-term discoveries, the continuing goal of experimental high-energy physics (HEP) will be to achieve ultra-high center-of-mass energies early in the next century. To progress to these energies in such a brief span of time will require a radical change in accelerator and collider technology. We review some of our recent theoretical work on high-gradient acceleration of charged particles along crystal channels and the possibility of colliding them in these same strong-focusing atomic channels. An improved understanding of energy and emittance limitations in natural crystal accelerators leads to the suggestion that specially manufactured nano-accelerators may someday enable us to accelerate particles beyond 10{sup 8} eV with emittances limited only by the uncertainty principle of quantum mechanics.

  3. High energy neutrinos from primary cosmic rays accelerated in the cores of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Done, C.; Salamon, M. H.; Sommers, P.

    1991-01-01

    The spectra and high-energy neutrino fluxes are calculated from photomeson production in active galactic nuclei (AGN) such as quasars and Seyfert galaxies using recent UV and X-ray observations to define the photon fields and an accretion-disk shock-acceleration model for producing ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays in the AGN. Collectively AGN should produce the dominant isotropic neutrino background between 10 exp 4 and 10 exp 10 GeV. Measurement of this background could be critical in determining the energy-generation mechanism, evolution, and distribution of AGN. High-energy background spectra and spectra from bright AGN such as NGC4151 and 3C273 are predicted which should be observable with present detectors. High energy AGN nus should produce a sphere of stellar disruption around their cores which could explain their observed broad-line emission regions.

  4. High energy neutrinos from primary cosmic rays accelerated in the cores of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Done, C.; Salamon, M. H.; Sommers, P.

    1991-01-01

    The spectra and high-energy neutrino fluxes are calculated from photomeson production in active galactic nuclei (AGN) such as quasars and Seyfert galaxies using recent UV and X-ray observations to define the photon fields and an accretion-disk shock-acceleration model for producing ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays in the AGN. Collectively AGN should produce the dominant isotropic neutrino background between 10 exp 4 and 10 exp 10 GeV. Measurement of this background could be critical in determining the energy-generation mechanism, evolution, and distribution of AGN. High-energy background spectra and spectra from bright AGN such as NGC4151 and 3C273 are predicted which should be observable with present detectors. High energy AGN nus should produce a sphere of stellar disruption around their cores which could explain their observed broad-line emission regions.

  5. Raman distributed temperature measurement at CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toccafondo, Iacopo; Nannipieri, Tiziano; Signorini, Alessandro; Guillermain, Elisa; Kuhnhenn, Jochen; Brugger, Markus; Di Pasquale, Fabrizio

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a validation of distributed Raman temperature sensing (RDTS) at the CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM), newly developed in order to qualify electronics for the challenging radiation environment of accelerators and connected high energy physics experiments. By investigating the effect of wavelength dependent radiation induced absorption (RIA) on the Raman Stokes and anti-Stokes light components in radiation tolerant Ge-doped multi-mode (MM) graded-index optical fibers, we demonstrate that Raman DTS used in loop configuration is robust to harsh environments in which the fiber is exposed to a mixed radiation field. The temperature profiles measured on commercial Ge-doped optical fibers is fully reliable and therefore, can be used to correct the RIA temperature dependence in distributed radiation sensing systems based on P-doped optical fibers.

  6. High-field dipoles for future accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wipf, S.L.

    1984-09-01

    This report presents the concept for building superconducting accelerator dipoles with record high fields. Economic considerations favor the highest possible current density in the windings. Further discussion indicates that there is an optimal range of pinning strength for a superconducting material and that it is not likely for multifilamentary conductors to ever equal the potential performance of tape conductors. A dipole design with a tape-wound, inner high-field winding is suggested. Methods are detailed to avoid degradation caused by flux jumps and to overcome problems with the dipole ends. Concerns for force support structure and field precision are also addressed. An R and D program leading to a prototype 11-T dipole is outlined. Past and future importance of superconductivity to high-energy physics is evident from a short historical survey. Successful dipoles in the 10- to 20-T range will allow interesting options for upgrading present largest accelerators.

  7. Disk-accreting magnetic neutron stars as high-energy particle accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Russell J.; Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman

    1994-01-01

    Interaction of an accretion disk with the magnetic field of a neutron star produces large electromotive forces, which drive large conduction currents in the disk-magnetosphere-star circuit. Here we argue that such large conduction currents will cause microscopic and macroscopic instabilities in the magnetosphere. If the minimum plasma density in the magnetosphere is relatively low is less than or aproximately 10(exp 9)/cu cm, current-driven micro-instabilities may cause relativistic double layers to form, producing voltage differences in excess of 10(exp 12) V and accelerating charged particles to very high energies. If instead the plasma density is higher (is greater than or approximately = 10(exp 9)/cu cm, twisting of the stellar magnetic field is likely to cause magnetic field reconnection. This reconnection will be relativistic, accelerating plasma in the magnetosphere to relativistic speeds and a small fraction of particles to very high energies. Interaction of these high-energy particles with X-rays, gamma-rays, and accreting plasma may produce detectable high-energy radiation.

  8. Disk-accreting magnetic neutron stars as high-energy particle accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Russell J.; Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman

    1994-01-01

    Interaction of an accretion disk with the magnetic field of a neutron star produces large electromotive forces, which drive large conduction currents in the disk-magnetosphere-star circuit. Here we argue that such large conduction currents will cause microscopic and macroscopic instabilities in the magnetosphere. If the minimum plasma density in the magnetosphere is relatively low is less than or aproximately 10(exp 9)/cu cm, current-driven micro-instabilities may cause relativistic double layers to form, producing voltage differences in excess of 10(exp 12) V and accelerating charged particles to very high energies. If instead the plasma density is higher (is greater than or approximately = 10(exp 9)/cu cm, twisting of the stellar magnetic field is likely to cause magnetic field reconnection. This reconnection will be relativistic, accelerating plasma in the magnetosphere to relativistic speeds and a small fraction of particles to very high energies. Interaction of these high-energy particles with X-rays, gamma-rays, and accreting plasma may produce detectable high-energy radiation.

  9. High energy physics advisory panel`s composite subpanel for the assessment of the status of accelerator physics and technology

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    In November 1994, Dr. Martha Krebs, Director of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research (OER), initiated a broad assessment of the current status and promise of the field of accelerator physics and technology with respect to five OER programs -- High Energy Physics, Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Fusion Energy, and Health and Environmental Research. Dr. Krebs asked the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) to establish a composite subpanel with representation from the five OER advisory committees and with a balance of membership drawn broadly from both the accelerator community and from those scientific disciplines associated with the OER programs. The Subpanel was also charged to provide recommendations and guidance on appropriate future research and development needs, management issues, and funding requirements. The Subpanel finds that accelerator science and technology is a vital and intellectually exciting field. It has provided essential capabilities for the DOE/OER research programs with an enormous impact on the nation`s scientific research, and it has significantly enhanced the nation`s biomedical and industrial capabilities. Further progress in this field promises to open new possibilities for the scientific goals of the OER programs and to further benefit the nation. Sustained support of forefront accelerator research and development by the DOE`s OER programs and the DOE`s predecessor agencies has been responsible for much of this impact on research. This report documents these contributions to the DOE energy research mission and to the nation.

  10. Neutron dose per fluence and weighting factors for use at high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.Donald; Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    In June 2007, the United States Department of Energy incorporated revised values of neutron weighting factors into its occupational radiation protection Regulation 10 CFR Part 835 as part of updating its radiation dosimetry system. This has led to a reassessment of neutron radiation fields at high energy proton accelerators such as those at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). Values of dose per fluence factors appropriate for accelerator radiation fields calculated elsewhere are collated and radiation weighting factors compared. The results of this revision to the dosimetric system are applied to americium-beryllium neutron energy spectra commonly used for instrument calibrations. A set of typical accelerator neutron energy spectra previously measured at Fermilab are reassessed in light of the new dosimetry system. The implications of this revision are found to be of moderate significance.

  11. Neutron dose per fluence and weighting factors for use at high energy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Cossairt, J Donald; Vaziri, Kamran

    2009-06-01

    In June 2007, the United States Department of Energy incorporated revised values of neutron weighting factors into its occupational radiation protection regulation Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, as part of updating its radiation dosimetry system. This has led to a reassessment of neutron radiation fields at high energy accelerators such as those at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in the context of the amended regulation and contemporary guidance of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Values of dose per fluence factors appropriate for accelerator radiation fields calculated elsewhere are collated and radiation weighting factors compared. The results of this revision to the dosimetric system are applied to americium-beryllium neutron energy spectra commonly used for instrument calibrations. Also, a set of typical accelerator neutron energy spectra previously measured at Fermilab are reassessed in light of the new dosimetry system. The implications of this revision and of recent ICRP publications are found to be of moderate significance.

  12. High-energy ions from near-critical density plasmas via magnetic vortex acceleration.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Bulanov, Sergei V; Esirkepov, Timur Zh; Kando, Masaki

    2010-09-24

    Ultraintense laser pulses propagating in near-critical density plasmas generate magnetic dipole vortex structures. In the region of decreasing plasma density, the vortex expands both in forward and lateral directions. The magnetic field pressure pushes electrons and ions to form a density jump along the vortex axis and induces a longitudinal electric field. This structure moves together with the expanding dipole vortex. The background ions located ahead of the electric field are accelerated to high energies. The energy scaling of ions generated by this magnetic vortex acceleration mechanism is derived and corroborated using particle-in-cell simulations.

  13. High-Energy Ions from Near-Critical Density Plasmas via Magnetic Vortex Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Bulanov, Sergei V.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki

    2010-09-24

    Ultraintense laser pulses propagating in near-critical density plasmas generate magnetic dipole vortex structures. In the region of decreasing plasma density, the vortex expands both in forward and lateral directions. The magnetic field pressure pushes electrons and ions to form a density jump along the vortex axis and induces a longitudinal electric field. This structure moves together with the expanding dipole vortex. The background ions located ahead of the electric field are accelerated to high energies. The energy scaling of ions generated by this magnetic vortex acceleration mechanism is derived and corroborated using particle-in-cell simulations.

  14. High-Energy Ion Acceleration Mechanisms in a Dense Plasma Focus Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson, D. P.; Link, A.; Schmidt, A.; Welch, D.

    2016-10-01

    The compression of a Z-pinch plasma, specifically in a dense plasma focus (DPF), is known to accelerate high-energy electrons, ions and, if using fusion-reactant ions (e.g. D, T), neutrons. The acceleration of particles is known to coincide with the peak constriction of the pinch, however, the exact physical mechanism responsible for the acceleration remains an area of debate and uncertainty. Recent work has suggested that this acceleration is linked to the growth of an m =0 (sausage) instability that evacuates a region of low-density, highly-magnetized plasma and creates a strong (>MV/cm) electric field. Using the fully kinetic particle-in-cell code LSP in 2D-3V, we simulate the compression of a 2 MA, 35 kV DPF plasma and investigate in detail the formation of the electric field. The electric field is found to be predominantly in the axial direction and driven via charge-separation effects related to the resistivity of the kinetic plasma. The strong electric and magnetic fields are shown to induce non-Maxwellian distributions in both the ions and electrons and lead to the acceleration of high-energy tails. We compare the results in the kinetic simulations to assumptions of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Neutron dose measurements with the GSI ball at high-energy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, G; Gutermuth, F; Kozlova, E; Radon, T; Schuetz, R

    2007-01-01

    A moderator-type neutron monitor containing pairs of TLD 600/700 elements (Harshaw) modified with the addition of a lead layer (GSI ball) for the measurement of the ambient dose equivalent from neutrons at medium- and high-energy accelerators, is introduced in this work. Measurements were performed with the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) ball as well as with conventional polyethylene (PE) spheres at the high-energy accelerator SPS at European Organization for Nuclear Research [CERN (CERF)] and in Cave A of the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS at GSI. The measured dose values are compared with dose values derived from calculated neutron spectra folded with dose conversion coefficients. The estimated reading of the spheres calculated by means of the response functions and the neutron spectra is also included in the comparison. The analysis of the measurements shows that the PE/Pb sphere gives an improved estimate on the ambient dose equivalent of the neutron radiation transmitted through shielding of medium- and high-energy accelerators.

  16. The Cherenkov Telescope Array: A Very-High-Energy Complement to Future High-Energy Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David A.; CTA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be a new observatory for the study of very-high-energy gamma-ray sources, designed to achieve an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity in the 30 GeV to 100 TeV energy band compared to currently operating instruments: VERITAS, MAGIC, and H.E.S.S. CTA will probe known sources with unprecedented sensitivity, angular resolution, and spectral coverage, while also detecting hundreds of new sources. CTA will provide access to data in this energy band to members of the wider astronomical community for the first time. The CTA Consortium will also conduct a number of Key Science Projects, including a Galactic Plane survey and a survey of one quarter of the extragalactic sky, creating legacy data sets that will also be available to the public. This presentation will highlight synergies between CTA and future high-energy missions in space. CTA is supported by the organizations listed at http://www.cta-observatory.org

  17. Future directions for probing two and three nucleon short-range correlations at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Frankfurt, Leonid; Sargsian, Misak; Strikman, Mark

    2008-10-13

    We summarize recent progress in the studies of the short-rang correlations (SRC) in nuclei in high energy electron and hadron nucleus scattering and suggest directions for the future high energy studies aimed at establishing detailed structure of two-nucleon SRCs, revealing structure of three nucleon SRC correlations and discovering non-nucleonic degrees of freedom in nuclei.

  18. Plasma Wake Field Acceleration for Ultra High-Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pisin

    2002-07-31

    A cosmic acceleration mechanism is introduced which is based on the wakefields excited by the Alfven shocks in a relativistically flowing plasma. We show that there exists a threshold condition for transparency below which the accelerating particle is collision-free and suffers little energy loss in the plasma medium. The stochastic encounters of the random accelerating-decelerating phases results in a power-law energy spectrum: f({epsilon}) {proportional_to} 1/{epsilon}{sup 2}. As an example, we discuss the possible production of super-GZK ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) in the atmosphere of gamma ray bursts. The estimated event rate in our model agrees with that from UHECR observations.

  19. On ultra-high energy cosmic ray acceleration at the termination shock of young pulsar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Martin; Kotera, Kumiko; Pétri, Jérôme

    2015-07-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are outstanding accelerators in Nature, in the sense that they accelerate electrons up to the radiation reaction limit. Motivated by this observation, this paper examines the possibility that young pulsar wind nebulae can accelerate ions to ultra-high energies at the termination shock of the pulsar wind. We consider here powerful PWNe, fed by pulsars born with ~ millisecond periods. Assuming that such pulsars exist, at least during a few years after the birth of the neutron star, and that they inject ions into the wind, we find that protons could be accelerated up to energies of the order of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cut-off, for a fiducial rotation period P ~ 1 msec and a pulsar magnetic field Bstar ~ 1013 G, implying a fiducial wind luminosity Lp ~ 1045 erg/s and a spin-down time tsd ~ 3× 107 s. The main limiting factor is set by synchrotron losses in the nebula and by the size of the termination shock; ions with Z>= 1 may therefore be accelerated to even higher energies. We derive an associated neutrino flux produced by interactions in the source region. For a proton-dominated composition, our maximum flux lies slightly below the 5-year sensitivity of IceCube-86 and above the 3-year sensitivity of the projected Askaryan Radio Array. It might thus become detectable in the next decade, depending on the exact level of contribution of these millisecond pulsar wind nebulae to the ultra-high energy cosmic ray flux.

  20. On ultra-high energy cosmic ray acceleration at the termination shock of young pulsar winds

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoine, Martin; Kotera, Kumiko; Pétri, Jérôme E-mail: kotera@iap.fr

    2015-07-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are outstanding accelerators in Nature, in the sense that they accelerate electrons up to the radiation reaction limit. Motivated by this observation, this paper examines the possibility that young pulsar wind nebulae can accelerate ions to ultra-high energies at the termination shock of the pulsar wind. We consider here powerful PWNe, fed by pulsars born with ∼ millisecond periods. Assuming that such pulsars exist, at least during a few years after the birth of the neutron star, and that they inject ions into the wind, we find that protons could be accelerated up to energies of the order of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cut-off, for a fiducial rotation period P ∼ 1 msec and a pulsar magnetic field B{sub *} ∼ 10{sup 13} G, implying a fiducial wind luminosity L{sub p} ∼ 10{sup 45} erg/s and a spin-down time t{sub sd} ∼ 3× 10{sup 7} s. The main limiting factor is set by synchrotron losses in the nebula and by the size of the termination shock; ions with Z≥ 1 may therefore be accelerated to even higher energies. We derive an associated neutrino flux produced by interactions in the source region. For a proton-dominated composition, our maximum flux lies slightly below the 5-year sensitivity of IceCube-86 and above the 3-year sensitivity of the projected Askaryan Radio Array. It might thus become detectable in the next decade, depending on the exact level of contribution of these millisecond pulsar wind nebulae to the ultra-high energy cosmic ray flux.

  1. Flare vs. Shock Acceleration of High-energy Protons in Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies have presented evidence for a significant to dominant role for a flare-resident acceleration process for high-energy protons in large (“gradual”) solar energetic particle (SEP) events, contrary to the more generally held view that such protons are primarily accelerated at shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The new support for this flare-centric view is provided by correlations between the sizes of X-ray and/or microwave bursts and associated SEP events. For one such study that considered >100 MeV proton events, we present evidence based on CME speeds and widths, shock associations, and electron-to-proton ratios that indicates that events omitted from that investigation’s analysis should have been included. Inclusion of these outlying events reverses the study’s qualitative result and supports shock acceleration of >100 MeV protons. Examination of the ratios of 0.5 MeV electron intensities to >100 MeV proton intensities for the Grechnev et al. event sample provides additional support for shock acceleration of high-energy protons. Simply scaling up a classic “impulsive” SEP event to produce a large >100 MeV proton event implies the existence of prompt 0.5 MeV electron events that are approximately two orders of magnitude larger than are observed. While classic “impulsive” SEP events attributed to flares have high electron-to-proton ratios (≳5 × 105) due to a near absence of >100 MeV protons, large poorly connected (≥W120) gradual SEP events, attributed to widespread shock acceleration, have electron-to-proton ratios of ˜2 × 103, similar to those of comparably sized well-connected (W20-W90) SEP events.

  2. A Stable High-Energy Electron Source from Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Baozhen; Liu, Cheng; Yan, Wenchao; Golovin, Grigory; Banerjee, Sudeep; Chen, Shouyuan; Haden, Daniel; Fruhling, Colton; Umstadter, Donald

    2016-10-01

    The stability of the electron source from laser wake-field acceleration (LWFA) is essential for applications, such as novel x-ray sources and fundamental experiments in high field physics. To obtain such a stable source, we used an optimal laser pulse and a novel gas nozzle. The high-power laser pulse on target was focused to a diffraction-limited spot by the use of adaptive wavefront correction and the pulse duration was transform limited by the use of spectral feedback control. An innovative design for the nozzle led to a stable, flat-top profile with diameters of 4 mm and 8 mm with a high Mach-number ( 6). In experiments to generate high-energy electron beams by LWFA, we were able to obtain reproducible results with beam energy of 800 MeV and charge >10 pC. Higher charge but broader energy spectrum resulted when the plasma density was increased. These developments have resulted in a laser-driven wakefield accelerator that is stable and robust. With this device, we show that narrowband high-energy x-rays beams can be generated by the inverse-Compton scattering process. This accelerator has also been used in recent experiments to study nonlinear effects in the interaction of high-energy electron beams with ultraintense laser pulses. This material is based upon work supported by NSF No. PHY-153700; US DOE, Office of Science, BES, # DE-FG02-05ER15663; AFOSR # FA9550-11-1-0157; and DHS DNDO # HSHQDC-13-C-B0036.

  3. High-energy Laser-accelerated Electron Beams for Long-range Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Nathaniel J.; Banerjee, Sudeep; Ramanathan, Vidya; Powers, Nathan; Chandler-Smith, Nate; Umstadter, Donald; Vane, Randy; Schultz, David; Beene, James; Pozzi, Sara; Clarke, Shaun

    2009-03-10

    We are studying the use of 0.1-1.0 GeV laser-accelerated electron beams as active interrogation probes for long-standoff radiography or nuclear activation of concealed special nuclear material. Use of beams in this energy range is largely unexplored, but such beams could provide notable advantages over lower-energy beams and x-rays. High-energy laser-accelerated electrons exhibit large penetration range through air and solids, and low beam divergence for both direct beams and secondary Bremsstrahlung x-rays. We present laboratory measurements of radiography and activation, using the high-power Diodes laser system at the University of Nebraska, as well as MCNP and GEANT Monte Carlo simulation results used to aid experiment design and interpretation.

  4. High-Energy Laser-Accelerated Electron Beams for Long-Range Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Cummingham, N. J.; Banerjee, Sudeep; Ramanathan, Vidya; Powell, Nathan; Chandler-Smith, Nate; Vane, C Randy; Schultz, David Robert; Pozzi, Sara; Clarke, Shaun; Beene, James R; Umstadter, Donald

    2009-01-01

    We are studying the use of 0.1 1.0 GeV laser-accelerated electron beams as active interrogation probes for long-standoff radiography or nuclear activation of concealed special nuclear material. Use of beams in this energy range is largely unexplored, but such beams could provide notable advantages over lower-energy beams and x-rays. High-energy laser-accelerated electrons exhibit large penetration range through air and solids, and low beam divergence for both direct beams and secondary Bremsstrahlung x-rays. We present laboratory measurements of radiography and activation, using the high-power Diodes laser system at the University of Nebraska, as well as MCNP and GEANT Monte Carlo simulation results used to aid experiment design and interpretation.

  5. High energy focused ion beam technology and applications at the Louisiana Accelerator Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, G. A.; Dymnikov, A. D.; Rout, B.; Zachry, D. P.

    2007-07-01

    The high energy focused ion beam (HEFIB) system at the Louisiana Accelerator Center (LAC) of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, USA, is constructed on one of the beamlines of a National Electrostatics Corporation 1.7 MV 5SDH-2 tandem accelerator. The HEFIB system has several components, including a versatile magnetic quadrupole sextuplet lens focusing system defined as the Russian magnetic sextuplet (RMS) system having the same demagnifications, the same focal lengths and the same positions of the focal points in xz and yz planes as the Russian quadruplet and a one-piece concrete supporting base and integrated endstation with air isolation. A review of recent microlithography and HEFIB system developments at LAC are presented, as well as new results using heavy ion (HI) beam lithography on crystalline silicon.

  6. Load management strategy for Particle-In-Cell simulations in high energy particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Dérouillat, J.

    2016-09-01

    In the wake of the intense effort made for the experimental CILEX project, numerical simulation campaigns have been carried out in order to finalize the design of the facility and to identify optimal laser and plasma parameters. These simulations bring, of course, important insight into the fundamental physics at play. As a by-product, they also characterize the quality of our theoretical and numerical models. In this paper, we compare the results given by different codes and point out algorithmic limitations both in terms of physical accuracy and computational performances. These limitations are illustrated in the context of electron laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). The main limitation we identify in state-of-the-art Particle-In-Cell (PIC) codes is computational load imbalance. We propose an innovative algorithm to deal with this specific issue as well as milestones towards a modern, accurate high-performance PIC code for high energy particle acceleration.

  7. Ultra-high-energy cosmic ray acceleration in engine-driven relativistic supernovae.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, S; Ray, A; Soderberg, A M; Loeb, A; Chandra, P

    2011-02-01

    The origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) remains an enigma. They offer a window to new physics, including tests of physical laws at energies unattainable by terrestrial accelerators. They must be accelerated locally, otherwise, background radiations would severely suppress the flux of protons and nuclei, at energies above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) limit. Nearby, gamma ray bursts (GRBs), hypernovae, active galactic nuclei and their flares have all been suggested and debated as possible sources. A local sub-population of type Ibc supernovae (SNe) with mildly relativistic outflows have been detected as sub-energetic GRBs, X-ray flashes and recently as radio afterglows without detected GRB counterparts. Here, we measure the size-magnetic field evolution, baryon loading and energetics, using the observed radio spectra of SN 2009bb. We place such engine-driven SNe above the Hillas line and establish that they can readily explain the post-GZK UHECRs.

  8. High-energy gamma-ray emission from solar flares: Constraining the accelerated proton spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, David; Dunphy, Philip P.; Mackinnon, Alexander L.

    1994-01-01

    Using a multi-component model to describe the gamma-ray emission, we investigate the flares of December 16, 1988 and March 6, 1989 which exhibited unambiguous evidence of neutral pion decay. The observations are then combined with theoretical calculations of pion production to constrain the accelerated proton spectra. The detection of pi(sup 0) emission alone can indicate much about the energy distribution and spectral variation of the protons accelerated to pion producing energies. Here both the intensity and detailed spectral shape of the Doppler-broadened pi(sup 0) decay feature are used to determine the spectral form of the accelerated proton energy distribution. The Doppler width of this gamma-ray emission provides a unique diagnostic of the spectral shape at high energies, independent of any normalisation. To our knowledge, this is the first time that this diagnostic has been used to constrain the proton spectra. The form of the energetic proton distribution is found to be severely limited by the observed intensity and Doppler width of the pi(sup 0) decay emission, demonstrating effectively the diagnostic capabilities of the pi(sup 0) decay gamma-rays. The spectral index derived from the gamma-ray intensity is found to be much harder than that derived from the Doppler width. To reconcile this apparent discrepancy we investigate the effects of introducing a high-energy cut-off in the accelerated proton distribution. With cut-off energies of around 0.5-0.8 GeV and relatively hard spectra, the observed intensities and broadening can be reproduced with a single energetic proton distribution above the pion production threshold.

  9. Extended Acceleration in Slot Gaps and Pulsar High-Energy Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor); Muslimov, Alex G.; Harding, Alice K.

    2003-01-01

    We revise the physics of primary electron acceleration in the "slot gap" (SG) above the pulsar polar caps (PCs), a regime originally proposed by Arons and Scharlemann (1979) in their electrodynamic model of pulsar PCs. We employ the standard definition of the SG as a pair-free space between the last open field lines and the boundary of the pair plasma column which is expected to develop above the bulk of the PC. The rationale for our revision is that the proper treatment of primary acceleration within the pulsar SGs should take into account the effect of the narrow geometry of the gap on the electrodynamics within the gap and also to include the effect of inertial frame dragging on the particle acceleration. We show that the accelerating electric field within the gap, being significantly boosted by the effect of frame dragging, becomes reduced because of the gap geometry by a factor proportional to the square of the SG width. The combination of the effects of frame dragging and geometrical screening in the gap region naturally gives rise to a regime of extended acceleration, that is not limited to favorably curved field lines as in earlier models, and the possibility of multiple-pair production by curvature photons at very high altitudes, up to several stellar radii. We present our estimates of the characteristic SG thickness across the PC, energetics of primaries accelerated within the gap, high-energy bolometric luminosities emitted from the high altitudes in the gaps, and maximum heating luminosities produced by positrons returning from the elevated pair fronts. The estimated theoretical high-energy luminosities are in good agreement with the corresponding empirical relationships for gamma-ray pulsars. We illustrate the results of our modeling of the pair cascades and gamma-ray emission from the high altitudes in the SG for the Crab pulsar. The combination of the frame-dragging field and high-altitude SG emission enables both acceleration at the smaller

  10. The Ability of American Football Helmets to Manage Linear Acceleration With Repeated High-Energy Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Cournoyer, Janie; Post, Andrew; Rousseau, Philippe; Hoshizaki, Blaine

    2016-01-01

    Context:  Football players can receive up to 1400 head impacts per season, averaging 6.3 impacts per practice and 14.3 impacts per game. A decrease in the capacity of a helmet to manage linear acceleration with multiple impacts could increase the risk of traumatic brain injury. Objective:  To investigate the ability of football helmets to manage linear acceleration with multiple high-energy impacts. Design:  Descriptive laboratory study. Setting:  Laboratory. Main Outcome Measure(s):  We collected linear-acceleration data for 100 impacts at 6 locations on 4 helmets of different models currently used in football. Impacts 11 to 20 were compared with impacts 91 to 100 for each of the 6 locations. Results:  Linear acceleration was greater after multiple impacts (91−100) than after the first few impacts (11−20) for the front, front-boss, rear, and top locations. However, these differences are not clinically relevant as they do not affect the risk for head injury. Conclusions:  American football helmet performance deteriorated with multiple impacts, but this is unlikely to be a factor in head-injury causation during a game or over a season. PMID:26967549

  11. The Ability of American Football Helmets to Manage Linear Acceleration With Repeated High-Energy Impacts.

    PubMed

    Cournoyer, Janie; Post, Andrew; Rousseau, Philippe; Hoshizaki, Blaine

    2016-03-01

    Football players can receive up to 1400 head impacts per season, averaging 6.3 impacts per practice and 14.3 impacts per game. A decrease in the capacity of a helmet to manage linear acceleration with multiple impacts could increase the risk of traumatic brain injury. To investigate the ability of football helmets to manage linear acceleration with multiple high-energy impacts. Descriptive laboratory study. Laboratory. We collected linear-acceleration data for 100 impacts at 6 locations on 4 helmets of different models currently used in football. Impacts 11 to 20 were compared with impacts 91 to 100 for each of the 6 locations. Linear acceleration was greater after multiple impacts (91-100) than after the first few impacts (11-20) for the front, front-boss, rear, and top locations. However, these differences are not clinically relevant as they do not affect the risk for head injury. American football helmet performance deteriorated with multiple impacts, but this is unlikely to be a factor in head-injury causation during a game or over a season.

  12. Microstructured snow targets for high energy quasi-monoenergetic proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleifer, E.; Nahum, E.; Eisenmann, S.; Botton, M.; Baspaly, A.; Pomerantz, I.; Abricht, F.; Branzel, J.; Priebe, G.; Steinke, S.; Andreev, A.; Schnuerer, M.; Sandner, W.; Gordon, D.; Sprangle, P.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Zigler, A.

    2013-05-01

    Compact size sources of high energy protons (50-200MeV) are expected to be key technology in a wide range of scientific applications 1-8. One promising approach is the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) scheme 9,10, holding record level of 67MeV protons generated by a peta-Watt laser 11. In general, laser intensity exceeding 1018 W/cm2 is required to produce MeV level protons. Another approach is the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) scheme which is a more efficient acceleration scheme but requires an extremely clean pulse with contrast ratio of above 10-10. Increasing the energy of the accelerated protons using modest energy laser sources is a very attractive task nowadays. Recently, nano-scale targets were used to accelerate ions 12,13 but no significant enhancement of the accelerated proton energy was measured. Here we report on the generation of up to 20MeV by a modest (5TW) laser system interacting with a microstructured snow target deposited on a Sapphire substrate. This scheme relax also the requirement of high contrast ratio between the pulse and the pre-pulse, where the latter produces the highly structured plasma essential for the interaction process. The plasma near the tip of the snow target is subject to locally enhanced laser intensity with high spatial gradients, and enhanced charge separation is obtained. Electrostatic fields of extremely high intensities are produced, and protons are accelerated to MeV-level energies. PIC simulations of this targets reproduce the experimentally measured energy scaling and predict the generation of 150 MeV protons from laser power of 100TW laser system18.

  13. Kinetic Modeling of Radiative Turbulence in Relativistic Astrophysical Plasmas: Particle Acceleration and High-Energy Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri

    Relativistic astrophysical plasma environments routinely produce intense high-energy emission, which is often observed to be nonthermal and rapidly flaring. The recently discovered gamma-ray (> 100 MeV) flares in Crab Pulsar Wind Nebula (PWN) provide a quintessential illustration of this, but other notable examples include relativistic active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets, including blazars, and Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs). Understanding the processes responsible for the very efficient and rapid relativistic particle acceleration and subsequent emission that occurs in these sources poses a strong challenge to modern high-energy astrophysics, especially in light of the necessity to overcome radiation reaction during the acceleration process. Magnetic reconnection and collisionless shocks have been invoked as possible mechanisms. However, the inferred extreme particle acceleration requires the presence of coherent electric-field structures. How such large-scale accelerating structures (such as reconnecting current sheets) can spontaneously arise in turbulent astrophysical environments still remains a mystery. The proposed project will conduct a first-principles computational and theoretical study of kinetic turbulence in relativistic collisionless plasmas with a special focus on nonthermal particle acceleration and radiation emission. The main computational tool employed in this study will be the relativistic radiative particle-in-cell (PIC) code Zeltron, developed by the team members at the Univ. of Colorado. This code has a unique capability to self-consistently include the synchrotron and inverse-Compton radiation reaction force on the relativistic particles, while simultaneously computing the resulting observable radiative signatures. This proposal envisions performing massively parallel, large-scale three-dimensional simulations of driven and decaying kinetic turbulence in physical regimes relevant to real astrophysical systems (such as the Crab PWN), including the

  14. “ESPRESSO” ACCELERATION OF ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioli, Damiano

    2015-10-01

    We propose that ultra-high-energy (UHE) cosmic rays (CRs) above 10{sup 18} eV are produced in relativistic jets of powerful active galactic nuclei via an original mechanism, which we dub “espresso” acceleration: “seed” galactic CRs with energies ≲10{sup 17} eV that penetrate the jet sideways receive a “one-shot” boost of a factor of ∼Γ{sup 2} in energy, where Γ is the Lorentz factor of the relativistic flow. For typical jet parameters, a few percent of the CRs in the host galaxy can undergo this process, and powerful blazars with Γ ≳ 30 may accelerate UHECRs up to more than 10{sup 20} eV. The chemical composition of espresso-accelerated UHECRs is determined by that at the Galactic CR knee and is expected to be proton-dominated at 10{sup 18} eV and increasingly heavy at higher energies, in agreement with recent observations made at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  15. Orbit error correction on the high energy beam transport line at the KHIMA accelerator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chawon; Yim, Heejoong; Hahn, Garam; An, Dong Hyun

    2016-09-01

    For the purpose of treatment of various cancers and medical research, a synchrotron based medical machine has been developed under the Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) project and is scheduled for use to treat patient at the beginning of 2018. The KHIMA synchrotron is designed to accelerate and extract carbon ion (proton) beams with various energies from 110 to 430 MeV/u (60 to 230 MeV). Studies on the lattice design and beam optics for the High Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) line at the KHIMA accelerator system have been carried out using the WinAgile and the MAD-X codes. Because magnetic field errors and misalignments introduce deviations from the design parameters, these error sources should be treated explicitly, and the sensitivity of the machine's lattice to different individual error sources should be considered. Various types of errors, both static and dynamic, have been taken into account and have been consequentially corrected with a dedicated correction algorithm by using the MAD-X program. Based on the error analysis, the optimized correction setup is decided, and the specifications for the correcting magnets of the HEBT lines are determined.

  16. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group. Progress report, May 1, 1980--March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, G.A.

    1980-12-01

    The major activities of the High Energy Physics Group at the University of Maryland during the current contract period have been: analysis of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} events from the PLUTO detector at PETRA, design and construction of modifications to PLUTO for 2{gamma} physics, analyses of {nu}{sub {mu}}D{sub 2} bubble chamber pictures from Fermilab, completion of the {nu}{sub {mu}}e elastic scattering experiment at Fermilab, development and demonstration of an ultra cold neutron source produced by Doppler shifting, testing of equipment for the hadron jet experiment at Fermilab that is about to begin, and planning for large projects in the future.

  17. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-09-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  18. The slingshot effect: A possible new laser-driven high energy acceleration mechanism for electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Fiore, Gaetano; Fedele, Renato; Angelis, Umberto de

    2014-11-15

    We show that under appropriate conditions the impact of a very short and intense laser pulse onto a plasma causes the expulsion of surface electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to the one of the propagations of the pulse. This is due to the combined effects of the ponderomotive force and the huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation (“slingshot effect”). The effect should also be present with other states of matter, provided the pulse is sufficiently intense to locally cause complete ionization. An experimental test seems to be feasible and, if confirmed, would provide a new extraction and acceleration mechanism for electrons, alternative to traditional radio-frequency-based or laser-wake-field ones.

  19. Accelerator Technology and High Energy Physics Experiments, Photonics Applications and Web Engineering, Wilga, May 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2012-05-01

    The paper is the second part (out of five) of the research survey of WILGA Symposium work, May 2012 Edition, concerned with accelerator technology and high energy physics experiments. It presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from different technical universities from this country during the XXXth Jubilee SPIE-IEEE Wilga 2012, May Edition, symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposium embraced, among others, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonicselectronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET and pi-of-the sky experiments development. The symposium is an annual summary in the development of numerable Ph.D. theses carried out in this country in the area of advanced electronic and photonic systems. It is also a great occasion for SPIE, IEEE, OSA and PSP students to meet together in a large group spanning the whole country with guests from this part of Europe. A digest of Wilga references is presented [1-275].

  20. Mount Aragats as a stable electron accelerator for atmospheric high-energy physics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Ashot; Hovsepyan, Gagik; Mnatsakanyan, Eduard

    2016-03-01

    Observation of the numerous thunderstorm ground enhancements (TGEs), i.e., enhanced fluxes of electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons detected by particle detectors located on the Earth's surface and related to the strong thunderstorms above it, helped to establish a new scientific topic—high-energy physics in the atmosphere. Relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) are believed to be a central engine initiating high-energy processes in thunderstorm atmospheres. RREAs observed on Mount Aragats in Armenia during the strongest thunderstorms and simultaneous measurements of TGE electron and gamma-ray energy spectra proved that RREAs are a robust and realistic mechanism for electron acceleration. TGE research facilitates investigations of the long-standing lightning initiation problem. For the last 5 years we were experimenting with the "beams" of "electron accelerators" operating in the thunderclouds above the Aragats research station. Thunderstorms are very frequent above Aragats, peaking in May-June, and almost all of them are accompanied with enhanced particle fluxes. The station is located on a plateau at an altitude 3200 asl near a large lake. Numerous particle detectors and field meters are located in three experimental halls as well as outdoors; the facilities are operated all year round. All relevant information is being gathered, including data on particle fluxes, fields, lightning occurrences, and meteorological conditions. By the example of the huge thunderstorm that took place at Mount Aragats on August 28, 2015, we show that simultaneous detection of all the relevant data allowed us to reveal the temporal pattern of the storm development and to investigate the atmospheric discharges and particle fluxes.

  1. The coherent acceleration of ultra high energy cosmic rays and the galactic dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1995-05-01

    In order to accelerate cosmic rays to ultra high energy, >10{sup 18} ev, requires that the step size in energy in a diffusive process be very much larger than occurs in galactic or extra galactic hydrodynamic mechanisms where {Delta}E/F {approximately} v/c{approximately}1/300 per step. This step size requires >10{sup 5} scatterings per doubling in energy (the shock mechanism) and therefore <10{sup {minus}5} energy loss per scattering. Coherent acceleration (CA), on the other hand, is proposed in which the energy gained, {Delta}E per particle in the CA region is very much larger so that only one or several scatterings are required to reach the final energy. The power law spectrum is created by the probability of loss from the CA region where this probability is inversely proportional to the particle`s rigidity, E. Therefore the fractional loss in number per fractional gain in energy, dN/N {approximately} {minus}{Gamma} dE/E, results in a power law spectrum. CA depends upon the electric field, E = {eta}J, J, the current density, in a force free field, where magnetic helicity, J={alpha}B, arises universally in all evolving mass condensations due to twisting of magnetic flux by the large number of turns before pressure support. The acceleration process is E*v, where universe beam instabilities enhance {eta} leading to phased coherent acceleration (PCA). The result of the energy transfer from field energy to matter energy is the relaxation of the field helicity, or reconnection but with J{parallel}B rather than J{perpendicular}B.

  2. Radiation protection challenges in the management of radioactive waste from high-energy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Ulrici, Luisa; Algoet, Yvon; Bruno, Luca; Magistris, Matteo

    2015-04-01

    The European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) has operated high-energy accelerators for fundamental physics research for nearly 60 y. The side-product of this activity is the radioactive waste, which is mainly generated as a result of preventive and corrective maintenance, upgrading activities and the dismantling of experiments or accelerator facilities. Prior to treatment and disposal, it is common practice to temporarily store radioactive waste on CERN's premises and it is a legal requirement that these storage facilities are safe and secure. Waste treatment typically includes sorting, segregation, volume and size reduction and packaging, which will depend on the type of component, its chemical composition, residual activity and possible surface contamination. At CERN, these activities are performed in a dedicated waste treatment centre under the supervision of the Radiation Protection Group. This paper gives an overview of the radiation protection challenges in the conception of a temporary storage and treatment centre for radioactive waste in an accelerator facility, based on the experience gained at CERN. The CERN approach consists of the classification of waste items into 'families' with similar radiological and physical-chemical properties. This classification allows the use of specific, family-dependent techniques for radiological characterisation and treatment, which are simultaneously efficient and compliant with best practices in radiation protection. The storage was planned on the basis of radiological and other possible hazards such as toxicity, pollution and fire load. Examples are given of technical choices for the treatment and radiological characterisation of selected waste families, which could be of interest to other accelerator facilities. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Short-pulse, high-energy radiation generation from laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumaker, Will

    2013-10-01

    Recent experimental results of laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) of ~GeV electrons driven by the 200TW HERCULES and the 400TW ASTRA-GEMINI laser systems and their subsequent generation of photons, positrons, and neutrons are presented. In LWFA, high-intensity (I >1019 W /cm2), ultra-short (τL < 1 / (2 πωpe)) laser pulses drive highly nonlinear plasma waves which can trap ~ nC of electrons and accelerate them to ~GeV energies over ~cm lengths. These electron beams can then be converted by a high-Z target via bremsstrahlung into low-divergence (< 20 mrad) beams of high-energy (<600 MeV) photons and subsequently into positrons via the Bethe-Heitler process. By increasing the material thickness and Z, the resulting Ne+ /Ne- ratio can approach unity, resulting in a near neutral density plasma jet. These quasi-neutral beams are presumed to retain the short-pulse (τL < 40 fs) characteristic of the electron beam, resulting in a high peak density of ne- /e+ ~ 1016 cm-3 , making the source an excellent candidate for laboratory study of astrophysical leptonic jets. Alternatively, the electron beam can be interacted with a counter-propagating, ultra-high intensity (I >1021 W /cm2) laser pulse to undergo inverse Compton scattering and emit a high-peak brightness beam of high-energy photons. Preliminary results and experimental sensitivities of the electron-laser beam overlap are presented. The high-energy photon beams can be spectrally resolved using a forward Compton scattering spectrometer. Moreover, the photon flux can be characterized by a pixelated scintillator array and by nuclear activation and (γ,n) neutron measurements from the photons interacting with a secondary solid target. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed using FLUKA to support the yield estimates. This research was supported by DOE/NSF-PHY 0810979, NSF CAREER 1054164, DARPA AXiS N66001-11-1-4208, SF/DNDO F021166, and the Leverhulme Trust ECF-2011-383.

  4. Understanding nature's particle accelerators using high energy gamma-ray survey instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeysekara, Anushka Udara

    Nature's particle accelerators, such as Pulsars, Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Active Galactic Nuclei and Supernova Remnants accelerate charged particles to very high energies that then produce high energy photons. The particle acceleration mechanisms and the high energy photon emission mechanisms are poorly understood phenomena. These mechanisms can be understood either by studying individual sources in detail or, alternatively, using the collective properties of a sample of sources. Recent development of GeV survey instruments, such as Fermi-LAT, and TeV survey instruments, such as Milagro, provides a large sample of high energy gamma-ray flux measurements from galactic and extra-galactic sources. In this thesis I provide constraints on GeV and TeV radiation mechanisms using the X-ray-TeV correlations and GeV-TeV correlations. My data sample was obtained from three targeted searches for extragalactic sources and two targeted search for galactic sources, using the existing Milagro sky maps. The first extragalactic candidate list consists of Fermi-LAT GeV extragalactic sources, and the second extragalactic candidate list consists of TeVCat extragalactic sources that have been detected by Imaging Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescopes (IACTs). In both extragalactic candidate lists Markarian 421 was the only source detected by Milagro. A comparison between the Markarian 421 time-averaged flux, measured by Milagro, and the flux measurements of transient states, measured by IACTs, is discussed. The third extragalactic candidate list is a list of potential TeV emitting BL Lac candidates that was synthesized using X-ray observations of BL Lac objects and a Synchrotron Self-Compton model. Milagro's sensitivity was not sufficient to detect any of those candidates. However, the 95% confidence flux upper limits of those sources were above the predicted flux. Therefore, these results provide evidence to conclude that the Synchrotron Self-Compton model for BL Lac objects is still a viable

  5. Particle dynamics and its consequences in wakefield acceleration in a high energy collider

    SciTech Connect

    Cheshkov, S.; Tajima, T.; Horton, W.; Yokoya, K.

    1998-09-01

    The performance of a wakefield accelerator in a high energy collider application is analyzed by use of a nonlinear dynamics map built on a simple theoretical model of the wakefield generated by the laser pulse (or whatever other method) and a code based on this map. The crucial figures of merit for such a system other than the final energy include the emittance (that determines the luminosity). The more complex the system is, the more opportunities the system has to degrade the emittance (or entropy of the beam). This the map guides one to identify where the crucial elements lie that affect the emittance. If the focusing force of the wakefield is strong when there is a jitter in the position (or laser aiming) of each stage coupled with the spread in the individual particle betatron frequencies, particles experience a phase space mixing. This effect sensitively controls the emittance degradation. They investigate these effects both in a uniform plasma and in a plasma channel. They also study the effect of beam loading. Further, they briefly consider collision point physics issues for a collider expected or characteristic of such a construction based on a scenario for the multi-staged wakefield accelerators.

  6. Treatment planning for laser-accelerated very-high energy electrons.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, T; Szymanowski, H; Oelfke, U; Glinec, Y; Rechatin, C; Faure, J; Malka, V

    2009-06-07

    In recent experiments, quasi-monoenergetic and well-collimated very-high energy electron (VHEE) beams were obtained by laser-plasma accelerators. We investigate their potential use for radiation therapy. Monte Carlo simulations are used to study the influence of the experimental characteristics such as beam energy, energy spread and initial angular distribution on the dose distributions. It is found that magnetic focusing of the electron beam improves the lateral penumbra. The dosimetric properties of the laser-accelerated VHEE beams are implemented in our inverse treatment planning system for intensity-modulated treatments. The influence of the beam characteristics on the quality of a prostate treatment plan is evaluated. In comparison to a clinically approved 6 MV IMRT photon plan, a better target coverage is achieved. The quality of the sparing of organs at risk is found to be dependent on the depth. The bladder and rectum are better protected due to the sharp lateral penumbra at low depths, whereas the femoral heads receive a larger dose because of the large scattering amplitude at larger depths.

  7. Luminescent tracks of high-energy photoemitted electrons accelerated by plasmonic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Vece, Marcel; Giannakoudakis, Giorgos; Bjørkøy, Astrid; Tang, Wingjohn

    2015-12-01

    The emission of an electron from a metal nanostructure under illumination and its subsequent acceleration in a plasmonic field forms a platform to extend these phenomena to deposited nanoparticles, which can be studied by state-of-the-art confocal microscopy combined with femtosecond optical excitation. The emitted and accelerated electrons leave defect tracks in the immersion oil, which can be revealed by thermoluminescence. These photographic tracks are read out with the confocal microscope and have a maximum length of about 80 μm, which corresponds to a kinetic energy of about 100 keV. This energy is consistent with the energy provided by the intense laser pulse combined with plasmonic local field enhancement. The results are discussed within the context of the rescattering model by which electrons acquire more energy. The visualization of electron tracks originating from plasmonic field enhancement around a gold nanoparticle opens a new way to study with confocal microscopy both the plasmonic properties of metal nano objects as well as high energy electron interaction with matter.

  8. SLC status and SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.

    1989-08-01

    In this presentation, I shall discuss the linear collider program at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center as it is now, and as we hope to see it evolve over the next few years. Of greatest interest to the high energy accelerator physics community gathered here is the development of the linear collider concept, and so I shall concentrate most of this paper on a discussion of the present status and future evolution of the SLC. I will also briefly discuss the research and development program that we are carrying out aimed at the realization of the next generation of high-energy linear colliders. SLAC had a major colliding-beam storage-ring program as well, including present rings and design studies on future high-luminosity projects, but time constraints preclude a discussion of them. 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Can low-energy electrons affect high-energy physics accelerators?

    SciTech Connect

    Cimino, R.; Collins, I.R.; Furman, M.A.; Pivi, M.; Ruggiero, F.; Rumolo, G.; Zimmermann, F.

    2004-02-09

    Present and future accelerators performances may be limited by the electron cloud (EC) effect. The EC formation and evolution are determined by the wall-surface properties of the accelerator vacuum chamber.We present measurements of the total secondary electron yield (SEY) and the related energy distribution curves of the secondary electrons as a function of incident-electron energy. Particular attention has been paid to the emission process due to very low-energy primary electrons (<20 eV). It is shown that the SEY approaches unity and the reflected electron component is predominant in the limit of zero primary incident electron energy. Motivated by these measurements, we have used state-of-the-art EC simulation codes to predict how these results may impact the production of the electron cloud in the Large Hadron Collider, under construction at CERN, and the related surface heat load.

  10. Simulation studies of the high-energy component of a future imaging Cherenkov telescope array

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Hinton, J. A.

    2008-12-24

    The current generation of Imaging Atmospheric telescopes (IACTs) has demonstrated the power of the technique in an energy range between {approx}100 GeV up to several tens of TeV. At the high-energy end, these instruments are limited by photon statistics. Future arrays of IACTs such as CTA or AGIS are planned to push into the energy range beyond 100 TeV. Scientifically, this region is very promising, providing a probe of particles up to the 'knee' in the cosmic ray spectrum and access to an unexplored region in the spectra of nearby extragalactic sources. We present first results from our simulation studies of the high-energy part of a future IACT array and discuss the design parameters of such an array.

  11. Photon Activation Analysis—An Analytical Application Of High-Energy Electron Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segebade, Christian R.; Goerner, Wolf

    2009-03-01

    Photon activation analysis (PAA) was introduced about contemporarily with the other activation analysis methods (neutron, NAA, and charged particle activation, CPAA). Nonetheless, for different reasons, PAA has been applied less frequently than the other techniques mentioned. The incident photon energy should exceed about 12 MeV (except in some special rare applications) so as to obtain appreciably high activity yields of the product nuclides. Thus, cyclic electron accelerators (LINACs or microtrons) are used for activation preferably. The predominant photonuclear reaction is of the (γ,n)-type. Thus, normally neutron-deficient nuclides are produced. These usually emit gamma rays, annihilation quanta and characteristic X-ray fluorescence, all of whom can be used for analytical evaluation. The spectrometry equipment is the same as used for the other activation techniques (semiconductor detectors, sodium iodide crystals in coincidence geometry). Being uncharged high energy photons have a large penetration power, thus do not suffer from strong matrix absorption. Although not having a detection power as large as in NAA (in the most cases), PAA offers several further convincing advantages, e.g. several elements not or hardly detectable by NAA can be analysed: Titanium, nickel, thallium, lead, bismuth and, in particular, the light elements carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine, phosphorus. Several typical applications will be described.

  12. Canted-Cosine-Theta Superconducting Accelerator Magnets for High Energy Physics and Ion Beam Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, Lucas Nathan

    Advances in superconducting magnet technology have historically enabled the construction of new, higher energy hadron colliders. Looking forward to the needs of a potential future collider, a significant increase in magnet field and performance is required. Such a task requires an open mind to the investigation of new design concepts for high field magnets. Part I of this thesis will present an investigation of the Canted-Cosine-Theta (CCT) design for high field Nb3Sn magnets. New analytic and finite element methods for analysis of CCT magnets will be given, along with a discussion on optimization of the design for high field. The design, fabrication, and successful test of the 2.5 T NbTi dipole CCT1 will be presented as a proof-of-principle step towards a high field Nb3Sn magnet. Finally, the design and initial steps in the fabrication of the 16 T Nb3Sn dipole CCT2 will be described. Part II of this thesis will investigate the CCT concept extended to a curved magnet for use in an ion beam therapy gantry. The introduction of superconducting technology in this field shows promise to reduce the weight and cost of gantries, as well as open the door to new beam optics solutions with high energy acceptance. An analytic approach developed for modeling curved CCT magnets will be presented, followed by a design study of a superconducting magnet for a proton therapy gantry. Finally, a new magnet concept called the "Alternating Gradient CCT" (AG-CCT) will be introduced. This concept will be shown to be a practical magnet solution for achieving the alternating quadrupole fields desired for an achromatic gantry, allowing for the consideration of treatment with minimal field changes in the superconducting magnets. The primary motivation of this thesis is to share new developments for Canted-Cosine-Theta superconducting magnets, with the hope this design will improve technology for high energy physics and ion beam cancer therapy.

  13. Neutron-induced electronic failures around a high-energy linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Kry, Stephen F; Johnson, Jennifer L; White, R Allen; Howell, Rebecca M; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Gillin, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    After a new in-vault CT-on-rails system repeatedly malfunctioned following use of a high-energy radiotherapy beam, we investigated the presence and impact of neutron radiation on this electronic system, as well as neutron shielding options. We first determined the CT scanner's failure rate as a function of the number of 18 MV monitor units (MUs) delivered. We then re-examined the failure rate with both 2.7-cm-thick and 7.6-cm-thick borated polyethylene (BPE) covering the linac head for neutron shielding. To further examine shielding options, as well as to explore which neutrons were relevant to the scanner failure, Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the neutron fluence and spectrum in the bore of the CT scanner. Simulations included BPE covering the CT scanner itself as well as covering the linac head. We found that the CT scanner had a 57% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MUs. While the addition of neutron shielding to the accelerator head reduced this risk of failure, the benefit was minimal and even 7.6 cm of BPE was still associated with a 29% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MU. This shielding benefit was achieved regardless of whether the linac head or CT scanner was shielded. Additionally, it was determined that fast neutrons were primarily responsible for the electronic failures. As illustrated by the CT-on-rails system in the current study, physicists should be aware that electronic systems may be highly sensitive to neutron radiation. Medical physicists should therefore monitor electronic systems that have not been evaluated for potential neutron sensitivity. This is particularly relevant as electronics are increasingly common in the therapy vault and newer electronic systems may exhibit increased sensitivity.

  14. Neutron-induced electronic failures around a high-energy linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kry, Stephen F.; Johnson, Jennifer L.; White, R. Allen; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Gillin, Michael T.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: After a new in-vault CT-on-rails system repeatedly malfunctioned following use of a high-energy radiotherapy beam, we investigated the presence and impact of neutron radiation on this electronic system, as well as neutron shielding options. Methods: We first determined the CT scanner's failure rate as a function of the number of 18 MV monitor units (MUs) delivered. We then re-examined the failure rate with both 2.7-cm-thick and 7.6-cm-thick borated polyethylene (BPE) covering the linac head for neutron shielding. To further examine shielding options, as well as to explore which neutrons were relevant to the scanner failure, Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the neutron fluence and spectrum in the bore of the CT scanner. Simulations included BPE covering the CT scanner itself as well as covering the linac head. Results: We found that the CT scanner had a 57% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MUs. While the addition of neutron shielding to the accelerator head reduced this risk of failure, the benefit was minimal and even 7.6 cm of BPE was still associated with a 29% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MU. This shielding benefit was achieved regardless of whether the linac head or CT scanner was shielded. Additionally, it was determined that fast neutrons were primarily responsible for the electronic failures. Conclusions: As illustrated by the CT-on-rails system in the current study, physicists should be aware that electronic systems may be highly sensitive to neutron radiation. Medical physicists should therefore monitor electronic systems that have not been evaluated for potential neutron sensitivity. This is particularly relevant as electronics are increasingly common in the therapy vault and newer electronic systems may exhibit increased sensitivity.

  15. The future of high energy gamma ray astronomy and its potential astrophysical implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    Future satellites should carry instruments having over an order of magnitude greater sensitivity than those flown thus far as well as improved energy and angular resolution. The information to be obtained from these experiments should greatly enhance knowledge of: the very energetic and nuclear processes associated with compact objects; the structure of our galaxy; the origin and dynamic pressure effects of the cosmic rays; the high energy particles and energetic processes in other galaxies; and the degree of matter-antimatter symmetry of the universe. The relevant aspects of extragalactic gamma ray phenomena are emphasized along with the instruments planned. The high energy gamma ray results of forthcoming programs such as GAMMA-1 and the Gamma Ray Observatory should justify even more sophisticated telescopes. These advanced instruments might be placed on the space station currently being considered by NASA.

  16. Report of the HEPAP (High Energy Physics Advisory Panel) Subpanel on Future Modes of Experimental Research in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Particle physics is the study of matter and its interaction on the most microscopic of scales. Since mid-century, our view of the most elementary forms of matter has shifted from the neutrons, protons, and electrons that make up atoms to the more pointlike quarks and leptons. Although open questions and challenges abound, a comprehensive picture that successfully describes these entities and their interactions on a scale down to at least 10/sup -16/ cm has been forged through the intellectual efforts of experimental and theoretical physicists alike. The strides taken have been aided by accelerators of ever increasing energy and, correspondingly, ever increasing physical size. The nature of experimental research has gradually changed over the years from individual and small group efforts to large team projects involving hundreds of physicists. Among other things, it is our purpose in this report to examine how one can continue this research, which is now often on a massive scale, in ways that best preserve the qualities of individual, intellectual input. 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  17. Ultra-high energy cosmic rays: Recent results and future plans of Auger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampert, Karl-Heinz

    2017-06-01

    Over the last decade a number of important observational results have been reported using data from the Pierre Auger Observatory. We shall review some of the recent key findings that have significantly advanced our understanding of ultra-high energy cosmic rays and that have called into question the `classical' interpretation of the flux-suppression above 5 . 1019 eV as being caused (solely) by the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin effect. Instead, the data suggest seeing mostly the maximum energy of extragalactic cosmic ray accelerators. This has a number of implications, ranging from reduced prospects of doing particle physics with cosmogenic neutrinos to reduced chances of seeing the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays at all. To address these emerging and pressing scientific questions, the Pierre Auger Observatory is presently being upgraded to AugerPrime. It will enable composition measurements into the flux-suppression region and also improve the particle physics capabilities. An Engineering Array has been deployed and is taking data. Full construction will start late 2017.

  18. Evaluation of ‘OpenCL for FPGA’ for Data Acquisition and Acceleration in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Srikanth

    2015-12-01

    The increase in the data acquisition and processing needs of High Energy Physics experiments has made it more essential to use FPGAs to meet those needs. However harnessing the capabilities of the FPGAs has been hard for anyone but expert FPGA developers. The arrival of OpenCL with the two major FPGA vendors supporting it, offers an easy software-based approach to taking advantage of FPGAs in applications such as High Energy Physics. OpenCL is a language for using heterogeneous architectures in order to accelerate applications. However, FPGAs are capable of far more than acceleration, hence it is interesting to explore if OpenCL can be used to take advantage of FPGAs for more generic applications. To answer these questions, especially in the context of High Energy Physics, two applications, a DAQ module and an acceleration workload, were tested for implementation with OpenCL on FPGAs2. The challenges on using OpenCL for a DAQ application and their solutions, together with the performance of the OpenCL based acceleration are discussed. Many of the design elements needed to realize a DAQ system in OpenCL already exists, mostly as FPGA vendor extensions, but a small number of elements were found to be missing. For acceleration of OpenCL applications, using FPGAs has become as easy as using GPUs. OpenCL has the potential for a massive gain in productivity and ease of use enabling non FPGA experts to design, debug and maintain the code. Also, FPGA power consumption is much lower than other implementations. This paper describes one of the first attempts to explore the use of OpenCL for applications outside the acceleration workloads.

  19. Workplace characterisation in mixed neutron-gamma fields, specific requirements and available methods at high-energy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Silari, Marco

    2007-01-01

    A good knowledge of the radiation field present outside the shielding of high-energy particle accelerators is very important to be able to select the type of detectors (active and/or passive) to be employed for area monitoring and the type of personal dosemeter required for estimating the doses received by individuals. Around high-energy electron and proton accelerators the radiation field is usually dominated by neutrons and photons, with minor contributions from other charged particles. Under certain circumstances, muon radiation in the forward beam direction may also be present. Neutron dosimetry and spectrometry are of primary importance to characterise the radiation field and thus to correctly evaluate personnel exposure. Starting from the beam parameters important for radiation monitoring, the paper first briefly reviews the stray radiation fields encountered around high-energy accelerators and then addresses the relevant techniques employed for their monitoring. Recent developments to increase the response of neutron measuring devices beyond 10-20 MeV are illustrated. Instruments should be correctly calibrated either in reference monoenergetic radiation fields or in a field similar to the field in which they are used (workplace calibration). The importance of the instrument calibration is discussed and available neutron calibration facilities are briefly reviewed.

  20. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.

  1. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE PAGES

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable ofmore » handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.« less

  2. Generation of high energy electron accelerated by using a tapered capillary discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minseok; Nam, Inhyuk; Lee, Taehee; Lee, Seungwoo; Suk, Hyyong

    2014-10-01

    The tapered plasma density in a gas-filled capillary waveguide can suppress the dephasing problem in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). As a result, the acceleration distance and the gained electron energy are expected to be increased. For this purpose, we developed a tapered capillary waveguide, which can produce a plasma density of ~ 1018 cm-3. Using this capillary discharge plasma, we performed the acceleration experiments with the high power laser system (20 TW/40 fs) constructed at GIST. In this presentation, the detailed electron acceleration experiments will be reported.

  3. Cerium Doped LSO/LYSO Crystal Development for future High Energy Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2012-03-25

    Because of their high stopping power and fast and bright scintillation, cerium doped LSO and LYSO crystals have attracted a broad interest in the physics community pursuing precision electromagnetic calorimeter for future high energy physics experiments. Their excellent radiation hardness against gamma-rays, neutrons and charged hadrons also makes them a preferred material for calorimeters to be operated in a severe radiation environment, such as the HL-LHC. An effort was made at SIPAT to grow 25 X{sub 0} (28 cm) long LYSO crystals for high energy physics applications. In this paper, the optical and scintillation properties and its radiation hardness against gamma-ray irradiations up to 1 Mrad are presented for the first 2.5 X 2.5 X 28 cm LYSO sample. An absorption band was found at the seed end of this sample and three other 20 cm long samples, which was traced back to a bad seed crystal used in the corresponding crystal growth process. Significant progresses in optical and scintillation properties were achieved for large size LYSO crystals after eliminating this absorption band.

  4. High energy particle accelerators that can fit on a (large) tabletop by using lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leemans, Wim

    2008-04-01

    Accelerators are essential tools of discovery and have many practical uses. At the forefront of accelerator technology are the machines that deliver beams for particle physics, for synchrotron and free electron based radiation sources. The technology that drives these accelerators is extremely sophisticated but is limited by the maximum sustainable accelerating field. This impacts the size and cost of the device. More than two decades ago, lasers were proposed as power source for driving novel accelerators based on plasmas as the accelerating medium. An overview will be presented of what these devices can produce to date, including the 2004 demonstration of high quality electron beams [1] and the 2006 demonstration of GeV class beams from a 3 cm long accelerating structure [2]. We then discuss the key challenges for broad applicability of the technology and our goal of making a laser accelerator driven a VUV/soft x-ray free electron laser. [1] C.G.R. Geddes et al., Nature 431, 538-541 (2004); S.P.D. Mangles et al., ibid 535-538; J. Faure et al., ibid. 541-544. [2] W.P. Leemans et al., Nature Physics 2, 696-699 (2006).

  5. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Barish, B C

    1983-12-31

    Continuing research in high energy physics carried out by the group from the California Institute of Technology. The program includes research in theory, phenomenology, and experimental high energy physics. The experimental program includes experiments at SLAC, FERMILAB, and DESY.

  6. High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group: Progress report, March 1, 1987-February 29, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    Progress is reported on the OPAL experiment at LEP, including construction and assembly of the hadron calorimeter and development of OPAL software. Progress on the JADE experiment, which examines e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions at PETRA, and of the PLUTO collaboration are also discussed. Experiments at Fermilab are reported, including deep inelastic muon scattering at TeV II, the D0 experiment at TeV I, and hadron jet physics. Neutrino-electron elastic scattering and a search for point-sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays are reported. Other activities discussed include polarization in electron storage rings, participation in studies for the SSC and LEP 200, neutron-antineutron oscillations, and the work of the electronics support group. High energy physics computer experience is also discussed. 158 refs. (LEW)

  7. Future accelerators using micro-fabrication technology

    SciTech Connect

    Maschke, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    Historically, each generation of new accelerators has produced a thousand-fold increase over their predecessors. Thus, the d.c. accelerators were surpassed by weak focusing cyclotrons and synchrotrons. Then strong focusing machines surpassed the weak focusing ones, and now we are in the process of designing machines for 10 to 20 TeV. This paper is devoted to the study of the next generation of accelerators which we can contemplate will be in the range of 1000 TeV. The radiation loss in a circular machine would correspond to approximately 20 TeV/turn. It is clear then that the future generation of accelerators will have to be linear accelerators. Furthermore, since the center of mass energy of a 1000 TeV machine is only approximately 1.5 TeV, these linacs will be built in pairs and operated primarily as linear colliders. This meas that the average beam power in one of the devices will be quite large. This in turn leads us toward high efficiency acceleration schemes, capable of high repetition rates. The poor efficiency of laser accelerators and other exotic proposals make them poor candidates for a future generation collider.

  8. Beam manipulation techniques, nonlinear beam dynamics, and space charge effect in high energy high power accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.

    2014-04-07

    We had carried out a design of an ultimate storage ring with beam emittance less than 10 picometer for the feasibility of coherent light source at X-ray wavelength. The accelerator has an inherent small dynamic aperture. We study method to improve the dynamic aperture and collective instability for an ultimate storage ring. Beam measurement and accelerator modeling are an integral part of accelerator physics. We develop the independent component analysis (ICA) and the orbit response matrix method for improving accelerator reliability and performance. In collaboration with scientists in National Laboratories, we also carry out experimental and theoretical studies on beam dynamics. Our proposed research topics are relevant to nuclear and particle physics using high brightness particle and photon beams.

  9. High-Brightness High-Energy Electron Beams from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator via Energy Chirp Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. T.; Li, W. T.; Liu, J. S.; Zhang, Z. J.; Qi, R.; Yu, C. H.; Liu, J. Q.; Fang, M.; Qin, Z. Y.; Wang, C.; Xu, Y.; Wu, F. X.; Leng, Y. X.; Li, R. X.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2016-09-01

    By designing a structured gas density profile between the dual-stage gas jets to manipulate electron seeding and energy chirp reversal for compressing the energy spread, we have experimentally produced high-brightness high-energy electron beams from a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator with peak energies in the range of 200-600 MeV, 0.4%-1.2% rms energy spread, 10-80 pC charge, and ˜0.2 mrad rms divergence. The maximum six-dimensional brightness B6 D ,n is estimated as ˜6.5 ×1 015 A /m2/0.1 % , which is very close to the typical brightness of e beams from state-of-the-art linac drivers. These high-brightness high-energy e beams may lead to the realization of compact monoenergetic gamma-ray and intense coherent x-ray radiation sources.

  10. Introduction to high-energy physics and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-03-01

    The type of research done at SLAC is called High Energy Physics, or Particle Physics. This is basic research in the study of fundamental particles and their interactions. Basic research is research for the sake of learning something. Any practical application cannot be predicted, the understanding is the end in itself. Interactions are how particles behave toward one another, for example some particles attract one another while others repel and still others ignore each other. Interactions of elementary particles are studied to reveal the underlying structure of the universe.

  11. Optimized undulator to generate low energy photons from medium to high energy accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Ting-Yi; Chiu, Mau-Sen; Luo, Hao-Wen; Yang, Chin-Kang; Huang, Jui-Che; Jan, Jyh-Chyuan; Hwang, Ching-Shiang

    2017-07-01

    While emitting low energy photons from a medium or high energy storage ring, the on-axis heat load on the beam line optics can become a critical issue. In addition, the heat load in the bending magnet chamber, especially in the vertical and circular polarization mode of operation may cause some concern. In this work, we compare the heat loads for the APPLE-II and the Knot-APPLE, both optimized to emit 10 eV photons from the 3 GeV TPS. Under this constraint the heat load analysis, synchrotron radiation performance and features in various polarization modes are presented. Additional consideration is given to beam dynamics effect.

  12. Electron acceleration to high energies at quasi-parallel shock waves in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, G.; Classen, H.-T.

    1995-01-01

    In the solar corona shock waves are generated by flares and/or coronal mass ejections. They manifest themselves in solar type 2 radio bursts appearing as emission stripes with a slow drift from high to low frequencies in dynamic radio spectra. Their nonthermal radio emission indicates that electrons are accelerated to suprathermal and/or relativistic velocities at these shocks. As well known by extraterrestrial in-situ measurements supercritical, quasi-parallel, collisionless shocks are accompanied by so-called SLAMS (short large amplitude magnetic field structures). These SLAMS can act as strong magnetic mirrors, at which charged particles can be reflected and accelerated. Thus, thermal electrons gain energy due to multiple reflections between two SLAMS and reach suprathermal and relativistic velocities. This mechanism of accelerating electrons is discussed for circumstances in the solar corona and may be responsible for the so-called 'herringbones' observed in solar type 2 radio bursts.

  13. Magnetowave Induced Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Feng-Yin; Chen, Pisin; Lin, Guey-Lin; Noble, Robert; Sydora, Richard; /Alberta U.

    2009-10-17

    Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration (MPWA) in a relativistic astrophysical outflow has been proposed as a viable mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic particles to ultrahigh energies. Here we present simulation results that clearly demonstrate the viability of this mechanism for the first time. We invoke the high frequency and high speed whistler mode for the driving pulse. The plasma wakefield obtained in the simulations compares favorably with our newly developed relativistic theory of the MPWA. We show that, under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over hundreds of plasma skin depths. Invoking active galactic nuclei as the site, we show that MPWA production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays beyond ZeV (10{sup 21} eV) is possible.

  14. High-energy particle acceleration by explosive electromagnetic interaction in an accretion disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haswell, C. A.; Tajima, T.; Sakai, J.-I.

    1992-01-01

    By examining electromagnetic field evolution occurring in an accretion disk around a compact object, we arrive at an explosive mechanism of particle acceleration. Flux-freezing in the differentially rotating disk causes the seed and/or generated magnetic field to wrap up tightly, becoming highly sheared and locally predominantly azimuthal in orientation. We show how asymptotically nonlinear solutions for the electromagnetic fields may arise in isolated plasma blobs as a result of the driving of the fluid equations by the accretion flow. These fields are capable of rapidly accelerating charged particles from the disk. Acceleration through the present mechanism from AGN can give rise to energies beyond 10 exp 20 eV. Such a mechanism may present an explanation for the extragalactic origin of the most energetic observed cosmic rays.

  15. Controlled high-energy ion acceleration with intense chirped standing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenroth, Felix; Gonoskov, Arkady; Marklund, Mattias

    2016-10-01

    We present the latest results of the recently proposed ion acceleration mechanism ``chirped standing wave acceleration''. This mechanism is based on locking the electrons of a thin plasma layer to the moving nodes of a standing wave formed by a chirped laser pulse reflected from a mirror behind the thin layer. The resulting longitudinal charge separation field between the displaced electrons and the residual ions then accelerates the latter. Since the plasma layer is stabilized by the standing wave, the formation of plasma instabilities is suppressed. Furthermore, the experimentally accessible laser chirp provides a versatile tool for manipulating the resulting ion beam in terms of maximum particle energy, particle number and spectral distribution. Through this scheme, proton beams, with energy spectra peaked around 100 MeV, were shown to be feasible for pulse energies at the level of 10 J. Wallenberg Foundation within the Grant ''Plasma based compact ion sources'' (PLIONA).

  16. High-brightness, high-energy radiation generation from non-linear Thomson scattering of laser wakefield accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumaker, W.; Zhao, Z.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Sarri, G.; Corvan, D.; Zepf, M.; Cole, J.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.

    2014-10-01

    To date, all-optical sources of high-energy (>MeV) photons have only been reported in the linear (a0 < 1) regime of Thomson scattering using laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). We present novel results of high-brightness, high-energy photons generated via non-linear Thomson scattering using the two-beam Astra-Gemini laser facility. With one 300 TW beam, electrons were first accelerated to 500 MeV energies inside gas cells through the process of LWFA. A second 300 TW laser pulse focused to a0 = 2 was subsequently scattered off these electrons, resulting in a highly directional, small source size, and short pulse beam of photons with >10 MeV energies. The photon beam was propagated through a low- Z converter and produced Compton-scattered electrons that were spectrally measured by magnetic deflection and correlated with the incident photons. The measured photon yield at 15 MeV was 2 ×106 photons/MeV and, when coupled with the small source size, divergence, and pulse duration, results in a record peak brightness of 2 ×1019 photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1%bandwidth at 15 MeV photon energy. Current Affiliation: Stanford University/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

  17. SU-E-T-543: Measurement of Neutron Activation From Different High Energy Varian Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Thatcher, T; Madsen, S; Sudowe, R; Meigooni, A Soleimani

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Linear accelerators producing photons above 10 MeV may induce photonuclear reactions in high Z components of the accelerator. These liberated neutrons can then activate the structural components of the accelerator and other materials in the beam path through neutron capture reactions. The induced activity within the accelerator may contribute to additional dose to both patients and personnel. This project seeks to determine the total activity and activity per activated isotope following irradiation in different Varian accelerators at energies above 10 MeV. Methods: A Varian 21IX accelerator was used to irradiate a 30 cm × 30 cm × 20 cm solid water phantom with 15 MV x-rays. The phantom was placed at an SSD of 100 cm and at the center of a 20 cm × 20 cm field. Activation induced gamma spectra were acquired over a 5 minute interval after 1 and 15 minutes from completion of the irradiation. All measurements were made using a CANBERRA Falcon 5000 Portable HPGe detector. The majority of measurements were made in scattering geometry with the detector situated at 90° to the incident beam, 30 cm from the side of the phantom and approximately 10 cm from the top. A 5 minute background count was acquired and automatically subtracted from all subsequent measurements. Photon spectra were acquired for both open and MLC fields. Results: Based on spectral signatures, nuclides have been identified and their activities calculated for both open and MLC fields. Preliminary analyses suggest that activities from the activation products in the microcurie range. Conclusion: Activation isotopes have been identified and their relative activities determined. These activities are only gross estimates since efficiencies have not been determined for this source-detector geometry. Current efforts are focused on accurate determination of detector efficiencies using Monte Carlo calculations.

  18. High-energy x-ray imaging diagnostics of nanosecond pulse accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graham W.; Hohlfelder, Robert J.; Tribe, Alun J.; Beutler, David E.; Gallegos, Roque R.; Seymour, Calvin L. G.; Thompson, Jon A.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray imaging has been undertaken on Sandia National Laboratories' radiation effects x-ray simulators. These simulators typically yield a single very short (<20ns) pulse of high-energy (MeV endpoint energy bremsstrahlung) x-ray radiation with doses in the kilorad (krad (Si)) region. X-ray source targets vary in size from 2 to 25cm diameter, dependent upon the particular simulator. Electronic imaging of the source x-ray emission under dynamic conditions yields valuable information upon how the simulator is performing. The resultant images are of interest to the simulator designer who may configure new x-ray source converter targets and diode designs. The images can provide quantitative information about machine performance during radiation effects testing of components under active conditions. The effects testing program is a valuable interface for validation of high performance computer codes and models for the radiation effects community. A novel high-energy x-ray imaging spectrometer is described whereby the spectral energy (0.5 to 1.8MeV) profile may be discerned from the digitally recorded and viewable images via a pinhole/scintillator/CCD imaging system and knowledge of the filtration parameters. Unique images, analysis and an evaluation of the capability of the spectrometer are presented.

  19. New estimation method of neutron skyshine for a high-energy particle accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Joo-Hee; Jung, Nam-Suk; Lee, Hee-Seock; Ko, Seung-Kook

    2016-09-01

    A skyshine is the dominant component of the prompt radiation at off-site. Several experimental studies have been done to estimate the neutron skyshine at a few accelerator facilities. In this work, the neutron transports from a source place to off-site location were simulated using the Monte Carlo codes, FLUKA and PHITS. The transport paths were classified as skyshine, direct (transport), groundshine and multiple-shine to understand the contribution of each path and to develop a general evaluation method. The effect of each path was estimated in the view of the dose at far locations. The neutron dose was calculated using the neutron energy spectra obtained from each detector placed up to a maximum of 1 km from the accelerator. The highest altitude of the sky region in this simulation was set as 2 km from the floor of the accelerator facility. The initial model of this study was the 10 GeV electron accelerator, PAL-XFEL. Different compositions and densities of air, soil and ordinary concrete were applied in this calculation, and their dependences were reviewed. The estimation method used in this study was compared with the well-known methods suggested by Rindi, Stevenson and Stepleton, and also with the simple code, SHINE3. The results obtained using this method agreed well with those using Rindi's formula.

  20. High-energy electron acceleration in the gas-puff Z-pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasugi, Keiichi; Miyazaki, Takanori; Nishio, Mineyuki

    2014-12-01

    The characteristics of hard x-ray generation were examined in the gas-puff z-pinch experiment. The experiment on reversing the voltage was conducted. In both of the positive and negative discharges, the x-ray was generated only from the anode surface, so it was considered that the electrons were accelerated by the induced electromagnetic force at the pinch time.

  1. High-energy electron acceleration in the gas-puff Z-pinch plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Takasugi, Keiichi; Miyazaki, Takanori; Nishio, Mineyuki

    2014-12-15

    The characteristics of hard x-ray generation were examined in the gas-puff z-pinch experiment. The experiment on reversing the voltage was conducted. In both of the positive and negative discharges, the x-ray was generated only from the anode surface, so it was considered that the electrons were accelerated by the induced electromagnetic force at the pinch time.

  2. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator to drive the future FEL Light Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Power, J.; Zholents, A. )

    2011-04-20

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expensive instruments and a large part of the cost of the entire facility is driven by the accelerator. Using a high-energy gain dielectric wake-field accelerator (DWA) instead of the conventional accelerator may provide a significant cost saving and reduction of the facility size. In this article, we investigate using a collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator to provide a high repetition rate, high current, high energy beam to drive a future FEL x-ray light source. As an initial case study, a {approx}100 MV/m loaded gradient, 850 GHz quartz dielectric based 2-stage, wakefield accelerator is proposed to generate a main electron beam of 8 GeV, 50 pC/bunch, {approx}1.2 kA of peak current, 10 x 10 kHz (10 beamlines) in just 100 meters with the fill factor and beam loading considered. This scheme provides 10 parallel main beams with one 100 kHz drive beam. A drive-to-main beam efficiency {approx}38.5% can be achieved with an advanced transformer ratio enhancement technique. rf power dissipation in the structure is only 5 W/cm{sup 2} in the high repetition rate, high gradient operation mode, which is in the range of advanced water cooling capability. Details of study presented in the article include the overall layout, the transform ratio enhancement scheme used to increase the drive to main beam efficiency, main wakefield linac design, cooling of the structure, etc.

  3. Possible production of high-energy gamma rays from proton acceleration in the extragalactic radio source markarian 501

    PubMed

    Mannheim

    1998-01-30

    The active galaxy Markarian 501 was discovered with air-Cerenkov telescopes at photon energies of 10 tera-electron volts. Such high energies may indicate that the gamma rays from Markarian 501 are due to the acceleration of protons rather than electrons. Furthermore, the observed absence of gamma ray attenuation due to electron-positron pair production in collisions with cosmic infrared photons implies a limit of 2 to 4 nanowatts per square meter per steradian for the energy flux of an extragalactic infrared radiation background at a wavelength of 25 micrometers. This limit provides important clues about the epoch of galaxy formation.

  4. Theory of elementary particles and accelerator theory: Task C: Experimental high energy physics. [Univ. of Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental high energy physics group at the University of Oregon broadened its effort during the past year. The SLD effort extends from maintaining and operating the SLD luminosity monitor which was built at Oregon, to significant responsibility in physics analysis, such as event selection and background analysis for the left-right asymmetry measurement. The OPAL work focussed on the luminosity monitor upgrade to a silicon-tungsten calorimeter. Building on the work done at Oregon for SLD, the tungsten for this upgrade was machined by the Oregon shops and shipped to CERN for assembly. The Oregon GEM effort now concentrates on tracking, specifically silicon tracking. Oregon also has developed a silicon strip preradiator prototype, and tested it in a Brookhaven beam.

  5. Theory of elementary particles and accelerator theory: Task C: Experimental high energy physics. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, J.E.

    1992-12-31

    The experimental high energy physics group at the University of Oregon broadened its effort during the past year. The SLD effort extends from maintaining and operating the SLD luminosity monitor which was built at Oregon, to significant responsibility in physics analysis, such as event selection and background analysis for the left-right asymmetry measurement. The OPAL work focussed on the luminosity monitor upgrade to a silicon-tungsten calorimeter. Building on the work done at Oregon for SLD, the tungsten for this upgrade was machined by the Oregon shops and shipped to CERN for assembly. The Oregon GEM effort now concentrates on tracking, specifically silicon tracking. Oregon also has developed a silicon strip preradiator prototype, and tested it in a Brookhaven beam.

  6. Novel x-ray imaging diagnostics of high-energy nanosecond pulse accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graham W.; Beutler, David E.; Bell, John D.; Seymour, Calvin L. G.; Hohlfelder, Robert J.; Gallegos, Roque R.; Dudley, John

    2005-03-01

    Pioneering x-ray imaging has been undertaken on a number of AWE"s and Sandia National Laboratories" radiation effects x-ray simulators. These simulators typically yield a single very short (<50ns) pulse of high-energy (MeV endpoint energy bremsstrahlung) x-ray radiation with doses in the kilorad (krad(Si)) region. X-ray source targets vary in size from 2 to 25cm diameter, dependent upon the particular simulator. Electronic imaging of the source x-ray emission under dynamic conditions yields valuable information upon how the simulator is performing. The resultant images are of interest to the simulator designer who may configure new x-ray source converter targets and diode designs. The images can provide quantitative information about machine performance during radiation effects testing of components under active conditions. The effects testing program is a valuable interface for validation of high performance computer codes and models for the radiation effects community. A novel high-energy x-ray imaging spectrometer is described whereby the spectral energy (0.1 to 2.5MeV) profile may be discerned from the digitally recorded and viewable images via a pinhole/scintillator/CCD imaging system and knowledge of the filtration parameters. Unique images, analysis and a preliminary evaluation of the capability of the spectrometer are presented. Further, a novel time resolved imaging system is described that captures a sequence of high spatial resolution temporal images, with zero interframe time, in the nanosecond timeframe, of our source x-rays.

  7. Radiation protection aspects of a new high-energy linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, P; Michaels, H B; Gillies, B; Aldrich, J E; Andrew, J W

    1985-01-01

    The Therac-25 is a new 25-MeV linear accelerator manufactured by Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd. The first two units have recently been installed in Toronto, Ontario and Halifax, Nova Scotia. Calculations and measurements of primary and secondary radiation levels were made. Neutron dose-equivalent rates were measured inside and outside the room. The maximum leakage rate at 1 m from the accelerator target was 0.4% Sv per peak photon Gy. The tenth value layer for neutrons from the Therac-25, at the entrance to a one-legged maze was found to be 5.5 cm of polyethylene. Measurements were done to estimate daily technologist exposure due to induced activity in the treatment room.

  8. Radiation protection aspects of a new high-energy linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, P.; Michaels, H.B.; Gillies, B.; Aldrich, J.E.; Andrew, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Therac-25 is a new 25-MeV linear accelerator manufactured by Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd. The first two units have recently been installed in Toronto, Ontario and Halifax, Nova Scotia. Calculations and measurements of primary and secondary radiation levels were made. Neutron dose-equivalent rates were measured inside and outside the room. The maximum leakage rate at 1 m from the accelerator target was 0.4% Sv per peak photon Gy. The tenth value layer for neutrons from the Therac-25, at the entrance to a one-legged maze was found to be 5.5 cm of polyethylene. Measurements were done to estimate daily technologist exposure due to induced activity in the treatment room.

  9. Mechanical Design of a High Energy Beam Absorber for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Baffes, C.; Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Oplt, S.; Rakhno, I.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-10

    A high energy beam absorber has been built for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab. In the facility's initial configuration, an electron beam will be accelerated through 3 TTF-type or ILC-type SRF cryomodules to an energy of 750MeV. The electron beam will be directed to one of multiple downstream experimental and diagnostic beam lines and then deposited in one of two beam absorbers. The facility is designed to accommodate up to 6 cryomodules, which would produce a 75kW beam at 1.5GeV; this is the driving design condition for the beam absorbers. The beam absorbers consist of water-cooled graphite, aluminum and copper layers contained in a helium-filled enclosure. This paper describes the mechanical implementation of the beam absorbers, with a focus on thermal design and analysis. The potential for radiation-induced degradation of the graphite is discussed.

  10. Tolerance of imperfections in high-energy circular accelerators for polarized protons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Courant, E.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Realistic calculations show that imperfection-spin-resonance strengths {epsilon}{sub imp} can be corrected to {epsilon}{sub imp}{lt}1, at 20 TeV, Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) energy. Statistical analysis agrees well with the numerical calculation. The polarized proton must be accelerated through overlapping intrinsic and imperfection resonances. We found a correlation between the tolerable strengths of intrinsic and imperfection resonances {epsilon}{sub int} and {epsilon}{sub imp}, that is, at smaller {epsilon}{sub int}, the tolerable {epsilon}{sub imp} becomes larger, and vice versa. To obtain a larger tolerable {epsilon}{sub imp}, we suggest that the number of snakes should be chosen according to {ital N}{sub {ital S}}{ge}5{epsilon}{sub int}. When a large number of snakes is used in the accelerator, the tolerable deviation of the spin rotational angle from 180{degree} for each snake becomes more stringent. The error in the spin rotation angle gives rise to (1) an equivalent picket-fence imperfection resonance {epsilon}{sub imp}{sup eq} and (2) an energy-dependent spin tune {nu}{sub {ital s}}. Both of these effects may cause depolarization. Further, when the snake axis is not properly arranged, the spin tune deviates from half-integer. In this case, depolarization may arise from the snake resonances. Our analysis indicates that acceleration of polarized protons in the SSC is technically feasible if care is taken in constructing the snakes.

  11. Information Resources in High-Energy Physics: Surveying the Present Landscape and Charting the Future Course

    SciTech Connect

    Gentil-Beccot, Anne; Mele, Salvatore; Holtkamp, Annette; O'Connell, Heath B.; Brooks, Travis C.

    2008-04-22

    Access to previous results is of paramount importance in the scientific process. Recent progress in information management focuses on building e-infrastructures for the optimization of the research workflow, through both policy-driven and user-pulled dynamics. For decades, High-Energy Physics (HEP) has pioneered innovative solutions in the field of information management and dissemination. In light of a transforming information environment, it is important to assess the current usage of information resources by researchers and HEP provides a unique test-bed for this assessment. A survey of about 10% of practitioners in the field reveals usage trends and information needs. Community-based services, such as the pioneering arXiv and SPIRES systems, largely answer the need of the scientists, with a limited but increasing fraction of younger users relying on Google. Commercial services offered by publishers or database vendors are essentially unused in the field. The survey offers an insight into the most important features that users require to optimize their research workflow. These results inform the future evolution of information management in HEP and, as these researchers are traditionally 'early adopters' of innovation in scholarly communication, can inspire developments of disciplinary repositories serving other communities.

  12. Muon Acceleration Concepts for Future Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Bogacz, Slawomir Alex

    2016-05-01

    Here, we summarize current state of concept for muon acceleration aimed at future Neutrino Factory. The main thrust of these studies was to reduce the overall cost while maintaining performance through exploring interplay between complexity of the cooling systems and the acceptance of the accelerator complex. To ensure adequate survival of the short-lived muons, acceleration must occur at high average gradient. The need for large transverse and longitudinal acceptances drives the design of the acceleration system to initially low RF frequency, e.g. 325 MHz, and then increased to 650 MHz, as the transverse size shrinks with increasing energy. High-gradient normal conducting RF cavities at these frequencies require extremely high peak-power RF sources. Hence superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are chosen. Here, we considered two cost effective schemes for accelerating muon beams for a stagable Neutrino Factory: Exploration of the so-called 'dual-use' linac concept, where the same linac structure is used for acceleration of both H- and muons and alternatively, the SRF efficient design based on multi-pass (4.5) 'dogbone' RLA, extendable to multi-pass FFAG-like arcs.

  13. Niobium cavity development for the high-energy linac of the rare isotope accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    D. Barni; C. Pagani; P. Pierini; C. Compton; T. Grimm; W. Hartung; H. Podlech; R. York; G. Ciovati; P. Kneisel

    2001-08-01

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) is being designed to supply an intense beam of exotic isotopes for nuclear physics research [1]. Superconducting cavities are to be used to accelerate the CW beam of heavy ions to 400 MeV per nucleon, with a beam power of up to 400 kW. Because of the varying velocity of the ion beam along the linac, a number of different types of superconducting structures are needed. The RIA linac will accelerate heavy ions over the same velocity range as the proton linac for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). It was decided to use the 6-cell axisymmetric 805 MHz cavities and cryostats of SNS for the downstream portion of the RIA linac, thereby saving the non-recurring development and engineering costs. For additional cost saving, it was decided to extend the SNS multi-cell axisymmetric cavity design to lower velocity, {beta} = v/c = 0.4, using the same cryostats and RF systems. Axisymmetric cavities will thus constitute about three-quarters of RIA's total accelerating voltage, and most of that voltage will be provided by cavities already developed for SNS. The axisymmetric cavities will accelerate the RIA beam from {beta} = 0.4 to {beta} = 0.72. This velocity range can be efficiently covered with two different types of 6-cell cavities, one with a geometric {beta}, {beta}{sub g}, of 0.47, and the other with a {beta}{sub g} of 0.61. The {beta}{sub g} = 0.61 cavity will be of the existing SNS design; some {beta}{sub g} = 0.81 SNS cavities may also be desired at the end of the RIA linac for acceleration of light ions above 400 MeV per nucleon. Prototypes for both {beta}{sub g} = 0.61 and {beta}{sub g} = 0.81 have been fabricated and tested [2]. The {beta}{sub g} = 0.47 cavity is the focus of the present work. The reduction in {beta}{sub g} to 0.47 results in less favourable electromagnetic and mechanical properties, and opens up the possibility of multipacting, but several groups have already designed and prototyped cavities in this range. These

  14. Biological Effects of Particles with Very High Energy Deposition on Mammalian Cells Utilizing the Brookhaven Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Janapriya; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wang, Minli

    2013-01-01

    High LET radiation from GCR (Galactic Cosmic Rays) consisting mainly of high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei and secondary protons and neutrons, and secondaries from protons in SPE (Solar Particle Event) pose a major health risk to astronauts due to induction of DNA damage and oxidative stress. Experiments with high energy particles mimicking the space environment for estimation of radiation risk are being performed at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL. Experiments with low energy particles comparing to high energy particles of similar LET are of interest for investigation of the role of track structure on biological effects. For this purpose, we report results utilizing the Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator at BNL. The primary objective of our studies is to elucidate the influence of high vs low energy deposition on track structure, delta ray contribution and resulting biological responses. These low energy ions are of special relevance as these energies may occur following absorption through the spacecraft and shielding materials in human tissues and nuclear fragments produced in tissues by high energy protons and neutrons. This study will help to verify the efficiency of these low energy particles and better understand how various cell types respond to them.

  15. High energy gain in three-dimensional simulations of light sail acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sgattoni, A.; Sinigardi, S.; Macchi, A.

    2014-08-25

    The dynamics of radiation pressure acceleration in the relativistic light sail regime are analysed by means of large scale, three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulations. Differently to other mechanisms, the 3D dynamics leads to faster and higher energy gain than in 1D or 2D geometry. This effect is caused by the local decrease of the target density due to transverse expansion leading to a “lighter sail.” However, the rarefaction of the target leads to an earlier transition to transparency limiting the energy gain. A transverse instability leads to a structured and inhomogeneous ion distribution.

  16. Survey and alignment of high energy physics accelerators and transport lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R.E.

    1992-11-01

    This talk summarizes the survey and alignment processes of accelerators and transport lines and discusses the propagation of errors associated with these processes. The major geodetic principles governing the survey and alignment measurement space are revisited and their relationship to a lattice coordinate system shown. The paper continues with a broad overview about the activities involved in the step by step sequence from initial absolute alignment to final smoothing. Emphasis is given to the relative alignment of components, in particular to the importance of incorporating methods to remove residual systematic effects in surveying and alignment operations.

  17. High energy focused shock wave therapy accelerates bone healing. A blinded, prospective, randomized canine clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kieves, N R; MacKay, C S; Adducci, K; Rao, S; Goh, C; Palmer, R H; Duerr, F M

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of shock wave therapy (SWT) on radiographic evidence of bone healing after tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO). Healthy dogs between two to nine years of age that underwent TPLO were randomly assigned to receive either electro-hydraulic SWT (1,000 shocks) or sham treatment (SHAM). Treatment or SHAM was administered to the osteotomy site immediately postoperatively and two weeks postoperatively. Three blinded radiologists evaluated orthogonal radiographs performed eight weeks postoperatively with both a 5-point and a 10-point bone healing scale. Linear regression analysis was used to compare median healing scores between groups. Forty-two dogs (50 stifles) were included in the statistical analysis. No major complications were observed and all osteotomies healed uneventfully. The median healing scores were significantly higher at eight weeks postoperatively for the SWT group compared to the SHAM group for the 10-point (p <0.0002) and 5-point scoring systems (p <0.0001). Shock wave therapy applied immediately and two weeks postoperatively led to more advanced bone healing at the eight week time point in this study population. The results of this study support the use of electro-hydraulic SWT as a means of accelerating acute bone healing of canine osteotomies. Additional studies are needed to evaluate its use for acceleration of bone healing following fracture, or with delayed union.

  18. High Energy Electron Acceleration from Underdense Plasma Channeling Using the OMEGA EP Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batson, Thomas; Raymond, Anthony; Hussein, Amina; Krushelnick, Karl; Willingale, Louise; Nilson, Phil; Froula, Dustin; Harberberger, Dan; Davies, Andrew; Theobald, Wolfgang; Williams, Jackson; Chen, Hui; Arefiev, Alexey

    2016-10-01

    For intense, ps scale lasers, propagation through underdense plasmas results in forces which expel electrons from along the laser axis, resulting in the formation of channels. Electrons can then be injected from the channel walls into the laser path, which results in the direct laser acceleration (DLA) of these electrons and the occurrence of an electron beam of 100's of MeV. Experiments performed at the OMEGA EP laser studied the formation of a laser channel in an underdense CH plasma, as well as the spatial properties and energy of an electron beam created via DLA mechanisms. The 4 omega optical probe diagnostic was used to characterize the density of the plasma plume, while proton radiography was used to observe the electromagnetic fields of the channel formation. These electric fields as well as the spectra of the accelerated electrons have been studied across different plasma density profiles. The channel behavior and electron spectra are compared to 2D particle-in-cell simulations.

  19. Modeling particle acceleration and transport during high-energy solar gamma-ray events: Results from the HESPERIA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus; Vainio, Rami; Rouillard, Alexis; Aran, Angels; Sipola, Robert; Pomoell, Jens

    2016-04-01

    The EU/H2020 project "High Energy Solar Particle Events foRecastIng and Analysis" (HESPERIA) has an objective to gain improved understanding of solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration, release and transport related to long-duration gamma-ray emissions recently observed by Fermi/LAT. We have performed simulation studies for particle acceleration and transport for the 17 May 2012 event, which is also a Ground Level Enhancement (GLE) of solar cosmic rays. The particle event is modeled assuming that it is accelerated by the shock wave driven by the erupting coronal mass ejection (CME). We first analyze the 3-dimensional propagation of the shock through the corona using imaging observations from SDO, SOHO and STEREO spacecraft. The derived kinematics of the shock is combined with magnetohydrodynamic and potential field modeling of the ambient corona to derive the evolution of the shock parameters on a large set of field lines. We then employ the self-consistent Coronal Shock Acceleration (CSA) simulation model of the University of Turku to study the acceleration process on selected field lines and combine it with a new model of downstream particle transport to assess the energy spectrum and time profile of accelerated particles precipitating in the dense surface regions below the corona. We also employ the Shock and Particle (SaP) simulation model of the University of Barcelona to analyze the interplanetary counterpart of the Fermi event. In this paper, we will present the observations of the event, our approach to the modeling and the first results of the analysis. The work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA).

  20. Conceptual design of a 15-TW pulsed-power accelerator for high-energy-density–physics experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Spielman, R. B.; Froula, D. H.; Brent, G.; ...

    2017-06-21

    We have developed a conceptual design of a 15-TW pulsed-power accelerator based on the linear-transformer-driver (LTD) architecture described by Stygar [W. A. Stygar et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 18, 110401 (2015)]. The driver will allow multiple, high-energy-density experiments per day in a university environment and, at the same time, will enable both fundamental and integrated experiments that are scalable to larger facilities. In this design, many individual energy storage units (bricks), each composed of two capacitors and one switch, directly drive the target load without additional pulse compression. Ten LTD modules in parallel drive the load. Each modulemore » consists of 16 LTD cavities connected in series, where each cavity is powered by 22 bricks connected in parallel. This design stores up to 2.75 MJ and delivers up to 15 TW in 100 ns to the constant-impedance, water-insulated radial transmission lines. The transmission lines in turn deliver a peak current as high as 12.5 MA to the physics load. To maximize its experimental value and flexibility, the accelerator is coupled to a modern, multibeam laser facility (four beams with up to 5 kJ in 10 ns and one beam with up to 2.6 kJ in 100 ps or less) that can provide auxiliary heating of the physics load. The lasers also enable advanced diagnostic techniques such as x-ray Thomson scattering and multiframe and three-dimensional radiography. In conclusion, the coupled accelerator-laser facility will be the first of its kind and be capable of conducting unprecedented high-energy-density-physics experiments.« less

  1. High-energy Coherent THz radiation From Laser Wakefield Accelerated Ultrashort Electron Bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tilborg, J.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, C.; Esarey, E. H.; Schroeder, C. B.; Leemans, W. P.

    2003-10-01

    We report on the observation of coherent THz radiation from femtosecond laser-accelerated electron bunches [1]. These multi-nC bunches, concentrated in a length of a few plasma periods (several tens of microns) will experience a strongly reduced space charge force due to shielding by the background ions. The radiation, scaling quadratically with bunch charge, is a combination of diffraction and transition radiation by the electrons passing the plasma-vacuum boundary. If both a large collection angle as well as a large transverse plasma size are realized, theory predicts energies on the other of 0.1 mJ per THz pulse for current electron beam properties. A first improvement of the collection angle has increased the detected energy from 5 nJ to 80 nJ. Recent results on the characterization of this source (such as the spectrum) will be discussed and electron beam properties at the boundary will be addressed. (This work is performed under DOE-contract DE-AC-03-76SF0098) [1] W. P. Leemans et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., in press (2003)

  2. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators: Implementation of ALARA in Design and Operation of Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fasso, A.; Rokni, S.; /SLAC

    2011-06-30

    It used to happen often, to us accelerator radiation protection staff, to be asked by a new radiation worker: ?How much dose am I still allowed?? And we smiled looking at the shocked reaction to our answer: ?You are not allowed any dose?. Nowadays, also thanks to improved training programs, this kind of question has become less frequent, but it is still not always easy to convince workers that staying below the exposure limits is not sufficient. After all, radiation is still the only harmful agent for which this is true: for all other risks in everyday life, from road speed limits to concentration of hazardous chemicals in air and water, compliance to regulations is ensured by keeping below a certain value. It appears that a tendency is starting to develop to extend the radiation approach to other pollutants (1), but it will take some time before the new attitude makes it way into national legislations.

  3. Kinetic Modeling of Radiative Turbulence in Relativistic Astrophysical Plasmas: Particle Acceleration and High-Energy Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, John

    In the near future, next-generation telescopes, covering most of the electromagnetic spectrum, will provide a view into the very earliest stages of galaxy formation. To accurately interpret these future observations, accurate and high-resolution simulations of the first stars and galaxies are vital. This proposal is centered on the formation of the first galaxies in the Universe and their observational signatures in preparation for these future observatories. This proposal has two overall goals: 1. To simulate the formation and evolution of a statistically significant sample of galaxies during the first billion years of the Universe, including all relevant astrophysics while resolving individual molecular clouds, in various cosmological environments. These simulations will utilize a sophisticated physical model of star and black hole formation and feedback, including radiation transport and magnetic fields, which will lead to the most realistic and resolved predictions for the early universe; 2. To predict the observational features of the first galaxies throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, allowing for optimal extraction of galaxy and dark matter halo properties from their photometry, imaging, and spectra; The proposed research plan addresses a timely and relevant issue to theoretically prepare for the interpretation of future observations of the first galaxies in the Universe. A suite of adaptive mesh refinement simulations will be used to follow the formation and evolution of thousands of galaxies observable with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) that will be launched during the second year of this project. The simulations will have also tracked the formation and death of over 100,000 massive metal-free stars. Currently, there is a gap of two orders of magnitude in stellar mass between the smallest observed z > 6 galaxy and the largest simulated galaxy from "first principles", capturing its entire star formation history. This project will eliminate this

  4. Solar Flares as Natural Particle Accelerators: A High-energy View from X-ray Observations and Theoretical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei

    2008-07-01

    Solar flares, which have significant space weather consequences, are natural particle accelerators and one of the most spectacular phenomena of solar activity. RHESSI is the most advanced solar X-ray and gamma-ray mission ever flown and has opened a new era in solar flare research following its launch in 2002. This book offers a glimpse of this active research area from a high-energy perspective and contains a comprehensive guideline for RHESSI data analysis. Its main theme is the investigation of particle acceleration and transport in solar flares. The strength of this book lies in its well-balanced account of the latest X-ray observations and theoretical models. The observational focus is on the morphology and spectra of imaged X-ray sources produced by nonthermal electrons or hot plasma. The modeling takes the novel approach of combining the Fokker-Planck treatment of the accelerated particles with the hydrodynamic treatment of the heated atmosphere. Applications of this modeling technique reach beyond the Sun to other exotic environments in the universe, such as extrasolar planetary auroras, stellar flares, and flares on accretion disks around neutron stars and black holes.

  5. Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic-Ray Acceleration by Magnetic Reconnection in Newborn Accretion-induced Collapse Pulsars.

    PubMed

    de Gouveia Dal Pino EM; Lazarian

    2000-06-10

    We here investigate the possibility that the ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) events observed above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) limit are mostly protons accelerated in reconnection sites just above the magnetosphere of newborn millisecond pulsars that are originated by accretion-induced collapse (AIC). We formulate the requirements for the acceleration mechanism and show that AIC pulsars with surface magnetic fields 1012 Gaccelerate particles to energies >/=10(20) eV. Because the expected rate of AIC sources in our Galaxy is very small ( approximately 10(-5) yr(-1)), the corresponding contribution to the flux of UHECRs is negligible and the total flux is given by the integrated contribution from AIC sources produced by the distribution of galaxies located within the distance that is unaffected by the GZK cutoff ( approximately 50 Mpc). We find that reconnection should convert a fraction xi greater, similar0.1 of magnetic energy into UHECRs in order to reproduce the observed flux.

  6. An accelerator scenario for a hard X-ray free electron laser combined with high energy electron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Li, Yiding; Yang, Guojun; Pang, Jian; Li, Yuhui; Li, Peng; Pflueger, Joachim; He, Xiaozhong; Lu, Yaxin; Wang, Ke; Long, Jidong; Zhang, Linwen; Wu, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    In order to study the dynamic response of the material and the physical mechanism of fluid dynamics, an accelerator scenario which can be applied to both hard X-ray free electron laser and high energy electron radiography is proposed. This accelerator is mainly composed of a 12 GeV linac, an undulator branch and an eRad beamline. In order to characterize a sample’s dynamic behavior in situ and real-time with XFEL and eRad simultaneously, the linac should be capable of accelerating the two kinds of beam within the same operation mode. Combining in-vacuum and tapering techniques, the undulator branch can produce more than 1011 photons per pulse in 0.1% bandwidth at 42 keV. Finally, an eRad amplifying beamline with 1:10 ratio is proposed as an important complementary tool for the wider view field and density identification ability. Supported by China Academy of Engineering Physics (2014A0402016) and Institute of Fluid Physics (SFZ20140201)

  7. PHYSICS OF OUR DAYS Physical conditions in potential accelerators of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays: updated Hillas plot and radiation-loss constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptitsyna, Kseniya V.; Troitsky, Sergei V.

    2010-10-01

    We review basic constraints on the acceleration of ultra-high-energy (UHE) cosmic rays (CRs) in astrophysical sources, namely, the geometric (Hillas) criterion and the restrictions from radiation losses in different acceleration regimes. Using the latest available astrophysical data, we redraw the Hillas plot and find potential UHECR accelerators. For the acceleration in the central engines of active galactic nuclei, we constrain the maximal UHECR energy for a given black hole mass. Among active galaxies, only the most powerful ones, radio galaxies and blazars, are able to accelerate protons to UHE, although acceleration of heavier nuclei is possible in much more abundant lower-power Seyfert galaxies.

  8. Identifying nearby accelerators of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays using ultrahigh energy (and very high energy) photons.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A M; Hinton, J A; Blasi, P; Ave, M

    2009-07-31

    Ultrahigh energy photons (UHE, E>10(19) eV) are inevitably produced during the propagation of approximately 10(20) eV protons in extragalactic space. Their short interaction lengths (<20 Mpc) at these energies, combined with the impressive sensitivity of the Pierre Auger Observatory detector to these particles, makes them an ideal probe of nearby ultrahigh energy cosmic ray (UHECR) sources. We here discuss the particular case of photons from a single nearby (within 30 Mpc) source in light of the possibility that such an object might be responsible for several of the UHECR events published by the Auger collaboration. We demonstrate that the photon signal accompanying a cluster of a few >6 x 10(19) eV UHECRs from such a source should be detectable by Auger in the near future. The detection of these photons would also be a signature of a light composition of the UHECRs from the nearby source.

  9. Extrapolation chamber mounted on perspex for calibration of high energy photon and electron beams from a clinical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, R; Binukumar, J P; Sivakumar, S S; Krishnamurthy, K; Davis, C A

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to establish radiation standards for absorbed doses, for clinical high energy linear accelerator beams. In the nonavailability of a cobalt-60 beam for arriving at Nd, water values for thimble chambers, we investigated the efficacy of perspex mounted extrapolation chamber (EC) used earlier for low energy x-rays and beta dosimetry. Extrapolation chamber with facility for achieving variable electrode separations 10.5mm to 0.5mm using micrometer screw was used for calibrations. Photon beams 6 MV and 15 MV and electron beams 6 MeV and 15 MeV from Varian Clinac linacs were calibrated. Absorbed Dose estimates to Perspex were converted into dose to solid water for comparison with FC 65 ionisation chamber measurements in water. Measurements made during the period December 2006 to June 2008 are considered for evaluation. Uncorrected ionization readings of EC for all the radiation beams over the entire period were within 2% showing the consistency of measurements. Absorbed doses estimated by EC were in good agreement with in-water calibrations within 2% for photons and electron beams. The present results suggest that extrapolation chambers can be considered as an independent measuring system for absorbed dose in addition to Farmer type ion chambers. In the absence of standard beam quality (Co-60 radiations as reference Quality for Nd,water) the possibility of keeping EC as Primary Standards for absorbed dose calibrations in high energy radiation beams from linacs should be explored. As there are neither Standard Laboratories nor SSDL available in our country, we look forward to keep EC as Local Standard for hospital chamber calibrations. We are also participating in the IAEA mailed TLD intercomparison programme for quality audit of existing status of radiation dosimetry in high energy linac beams. The performance of EC has to be confirmed with cobalt-60 beams by a separate study, as linacs are susceptible for minor variations in dose

  10. Extrapolation chamber mounted on perspex for calibration of high energy photon and electron beams from a clinical linear accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, R.; Binukumar, J. P.; Sivakumar, S. S.; Krishnamurthy, K.; Davis, C. A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to establish radiation standards for absorbed doses, for clinical high energy linear accelerator beams. In the nonavailability of a cobalt-60 beam for arriving at Nd, water values for thimble chambers, we investigated the efficacy of perspex mounted extrapolation chamber (EC) used earlier for low energy x-rays and beta dosimetry. Extrapolation chamber with facility for achieving variable electrode separations 10.5mm to 0.5mm using micrometer screw was used for calibrations. Photon beams 6 MV and 15 MV and electron beams 6 MeV and 15 MeV from Varian Clinac linacs were calibrated. Absorbed Dose estimates to Perspex were converted into dose to solid water for comparison with FC 65 ionisation chamber measurements in water. Measurements made during the period December 2006 to June 2008 are considered for evaluation. Uncorrected ionization readings of EC for all the radiation beams over the entire period were within 2% showing the consistency of measurements. Absorbed doses estimated by EC were in good agreement with in-water calibrations within 2% for photons and electron beams. The present results suggest that extrapolation chambers can be considered as an independent measuring system for absorbed dose in addition to Farmer type ion chambers. In the absence of standard beam quality (Co-60 radiations as reference Quality for Nd,water) the possibility of keeping EC as Primary Standards for absorbed dose calibrations in high energy radiation beams from linacs should be explored. As there are neither Standard Laboratories nor SSDL available in our country, we look forward to keep EC as Local Standard for hospital chamber calibrations. We are also participating in the IAEA mailed TLD intercomparison programme for quality audit of existing status of radiation dosimetry in high energy linac beams. The performance of EC has to be confirmed with cobalt-60 beams by a separate study, as linacs are susceptible for minor variations in dose

  11. The effect of field modifier blocks on the fast photoneutron dose equivalent from two high-energy medical linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Seyed Mehdi; Hashemi-Malayeri, Bijan; Raisali, Gholamreza; Shokrani, Parvaneh; Sharafi, Ali Akbar; Jafarizadeh, Mansour

    2008-01-01

    High-energy linear accelerators (linacs) have several advantages, including low skin doses and high dose rates at deep-seated tumours. But, at energies more than 8 MeV, photonuclear reactions produce neutron contamination around the therapeutic beam, which may induce secondary malignancies. In spite of improvements achieved in medical linac designs, many countries still use conventional (non-intensity-modulated radiotherapy) linacs. Hence, in these conventional machines, fitting the beam over the treatment volume may require using blocks. Therefore, the effect of these devices on neutron production of linacs needs to be studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of field shaping blocks on photoneutron dose in the treatment plane for two high-energy medical linacs. Two medical linacs, a Saturn 43 (25 MeV) and an Elekta SL 75/25 (18 MeV), were studied. Polycarbonate (PC) films were used to measure the fluence of photoneutrons produced by these linacs. After electrochemical etching of the PC films, the neutron dose equivalent was calculated at the isocentre and 50 cm away from the isocentre. It was noted that by increasing the distance from the centre of the X-ray beam towards the periphery, the photoneutron dose equivalent decreases rapidly for both the open and blocked fields. Increasing the energy of the photons causes an increase in the amount of photoneutron dose equivalent. At 25 MeV photon energy, the lead blocks cause a meaningful increase in the dose equivalent of photoneutrons. In this research, a 30% increase was seen in neutron dose contribution to central axis dose at the isocentre of a 25 MeV irregular field shaped by lead blocks. It is concluded that lead blocks must be considered as a source of photoneutron production when treating irregular fields with high-energy photons.

  12. Dynamics of high-energy proton beam acceleration and focusing from hemisphere-cone targets by high-intensity lasers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, B; Foord, M E; Wei, M S; Stephens, R B; Key, M H; McLean, H; Patel, P K; Beg, F N

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration and focusing of high-energy proton beams from fast-ignition (FI) -related hemisphere-cone assembled targets have been numerically studied by hybrid particle-in-cell simulations and compared with those from planar-foil and open-hemisphere targets. The whole physical process including the laser-plasma interaction has been self-consistently modeled for 15 ps, at which time the protons reach asymptotic motion. It is found that the achievable focus of proton beams is limited by the thermal pressure gradients in the co-moving hot electrons, which induce a transverse defocusing electric field that bends proton trajectories near the axis. For the advanced hemisphere-cone target, the flow of hot electrons along the cone wall induces a local transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement in proton focusing; however, it leads to a significant loss of longitudinal sheath potential, reducing the total conversion efficiency from laser to protons.

  13. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-05

    This report discusses high energy physics research in the following areas: Research in theoretical physics; phenomenology; experimental computer facility at Caltech; Beijing BES; MACRO; CLEO II; SLD; L3 at LEP; the B Factory R & D Program; SSC GEM Detector; and a high resolution barium fluoride calorimeter for the SSC.

  14. Accelerator Design Concept for Future Neutrino Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    ISS Accelerator Working Group; Zisman, Michael S; Berg, J. S.; Blondel, A.; Brooks, S.; Campagne, J.-E.; Caspar, D.; Cevata, C.; Chimenti, P.; Cobb, J.; Dracos, M.; Edgecock, R.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Fernow, R.; Filthaut, F.; Gallardo, J.; Garoby, R.; Geer, S.; Gerigk, F.; Hanson, G.; Johnson, R.; Johnstone, C.; Kaplan, D.; Keil, E.; Kirk, H.; Klier, A.; Kurup, A.; Lettry, J.; Long, K.; Machida, S.; McDonald, K.; Meot, F.; Mori, Y.; Neuffer, D.; Palladino, V.; Palmer, R.; Paul, K.; Poklonskiy, A.; Popovic, M.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rossi, C.; Rovelli, T.; Sandstrom, R.; Sevior, R.; Sievers, P.; Simos, N.; Torun, Y.; Vretenar, M.; Yoshimura, K.; Zisman, Michael S

    2008-02-03

    This document summarizes the findings of the Accelerator Working Group (AWG) of the International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Future Neutrino Factory and Superbeam Facility. The work of the group took place at three plenary meetings along with three workshops, and an oral summary report was presented at the NuFact06 workshop held at UC-Irvine in August, 2006. The goal was to reach consensus on a baseline design for a Neutrino Factory complex. One aspect of this endeavor was to examine critically the advantages and disadvantages of the various Neutrino Factory schemes that have been proposed in recent years.

  15. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bailey, J. E.; Bennett, N. L.; Breden, E. W.; Campbell, E. M.; Clark, R. E.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ennis, J. B.; Fehl, D. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Gomez, M. R.; Greiser, G. W.; Gruner, F. R.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hutsel, B. T.; Jennings, C. A.; Jobe, D. O.; Jones, B. M.; Jones, M. C.; Jones, P. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Lash, J. S.; LeChien, K. R.; Leckbee, J. J.; Leeper, R. J.; Lewis, S. A.; Long, F. W.; Lucero, D. J.; Madrid, E. A.; Martin, M. R.; Matzen, M. K.; Mazarakis, M. G.; McBride, R. D.; McKee, G. R.; Miller, C. L.; Moore, J. K.; Mostrom, C. B.; Mulville, T. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reisman, D. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Rochau, G. E.; Rose, D. V.; Rovang, D. C.; Savage, M. E.; Sceiford, M. E.; Schmit, P. F.; Schneider, R. F.; Schwarz, J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Thoma, C.; Vesey, R. A.; Wakeland, P. E.; Welch, D. R.; Wisher, M. L.; Woodworth, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    suggest Z 300 will deliver 4.3 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 18 MJ. Z 800 is 52 m in diameter and stores 130 MJ. This accelerator generates 890 TW at the output of its LTD system, and delivers 65 MA in 113 ns to a MagLIF target. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF liner is 2500 TW. The principal goal of Z 800 is to achieve high-yield thermonuclear fusion; i.e., a yield that exceeds the energy initially stored by the accelerator's capacitors. 2D MHD simulations suggest Z 800 will deliver 8.0 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 440 MJ. Z 300 and Z 800, or variations of these accelerators, will allow the international high-energy-density-physics community to conduct advanced inertial-confinement-fusion, radiation-physics, material-physics, and laboratory-astrophysics experiments over heretofore-inaccessible parameter regimes.

  16. Optimization of laser parameters to obtain high-energy, high-quality electron beams through laser-plasma acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Samant, Sushil Arun; Sarkar, Deepangkar; Krishnagopal, Srinivas; Upadhyay, Ajay K.; Jha, Pallavi

    2010-10-15

    The propagation of an intense (a{sub 0}=3), short-pulse (L{approx}{lambda}{sub p}) laser through a homogeneous plasma has been investigated. Using two-dimensional simulations for a{sub 0}=3, the pulse-length and spot-size at three different plasma densities were optimized in order to get a better quality beam in laser wakefield accelerator. The study reveals that with increasing pulse-length the acceleration increases, but after a certain pulse-length (L>0.23{lambda}{sub p}) the emittance blows-up unacceptably. For spot-sizes less than that given by k{sub p0}r{sub s}=2{radical}(a{sub 0}), trapping is poor or nonexistent, and the optimal spot-size is larger. The deviation of the optimal spot-size from this formula increases as the density decreases. The efficacy of these two-dimensional simulations has been validated by running three-dimensional simulations at the highest density. It has been shown that good quality GeV-class beams can be obtained at plasma densities of {approx}10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. The quality of the beam can be substantially improved by selecting only the high-energy peak; in this fashion an energy-spread of better than 1% and a current in tens of kA can be achieved, which are important for applications such as free-electron lasers.

  17. Towards a Strategy for Future Projects in High-Energy Physics (European Perspective)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelen, J.

    2006-07-01

    This write-up is a very brief `telegram style' summary of a much more extensive talk delivered at the Conference. The subject of the talk is of current topical interest, in particular because the CERN Council has installed a Strategy Group with the mandate to formulate a strategy for European high energy physics. The recommendations of the Strategy Group will be discussed during a special session of CERN Council in Lisbon, Portugal, on July 14 2006.

  18. Low energy and high energy dumps for ELI-NP accelerator facility: rational and Monte-Carlo calculations results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, A.; Frasciello, O.; Pelliccioni, M.

    2017-09-01

    ELI-NP will be a new international research infrastructure facility for laser-based Nuclear Physics to be built in Magurele, south west of Bucharest, Romania. For the machine to operate as an intense γ rays' source based on Compton back-scattering, electron beams are employed, undergoing a two stage acceleration to 320 MeV and 740 MeV (and, with an eventual energy upgrade, also to 840 MeV) beam energies. In order to assess the radiation safety issues, concerning the effectiveness of the dumps in absorbing the primary electron beams, the generated prompt radiation field and the residual dose rates coming from the activation of constituent materials, as well as the shielding of the adjacent environments against both prompt and residual radiation fields, an extensive design study by means of Monte Carlo simulations with FLUKA code was performed, for both low energy 320 MeV and high energy 720 MeV (840 MeV) beam dumps. For the low energy dump we discuss also the rational of the choice to place it in the building basement, instead of installing it in one of the shielding wall at the machine level, as it was originally conceived. Ambient dose equivalent rate constraints, according to the Rumenian law in force in radiation protection matter were 0.1 /iSv/h everywhere outside the shielding walls and 1.4 μiSv/h outside the high energy dump area. The dumps' placements and layouts are shown to be fully compliant with the dose constraints and environmental impact.

  19. Lepton Acceleration in the Vicinity of the Event Horizon: High-energy and Very-high-energy Emissions from Rotating Black Holes with Various Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotani, Kouichi; Pu, Hung-Yi; Chun-Che Lin, Lupin; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Inoue, Makoto; Kong, Albert K. H.; Matsushita, Satoki; Tam, Pak-Hin T.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the electrostatic acceleration of electrons and positrons in the vicinity of the event horizon, applying the pulsar outer-gap model to black hole (BH) magnetospheres. During a low accretion phase, the radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) cannot emit enough MeV photons that are needed to sustain the force-free magnetosphere via two-photon collisions. In such a charge-starved region (or a gap), an electric field arises along the magnetic field lines to accelerate electrons and positrons into ultra-relativistic energies. These relativistic leptons emit copious gamma rays via curvature and inverse-Compton (IC) processes. Some of such gamma rays collide with the submillimeter-IR photons emitted from the RIAF to materialize as pairs, which polarize to partially screen the original acceleration electric field. It is found that the gap gamma-ray luminosity increases with decreasing accretion rate. However, if the accretion rate decreases too much, the diminished RIAF soft photon field can no longer sustain a stationary pair production within the gap. As long as a stationary gap is formed, the magnetosphere becomes force-free outside the gap by the cascaded pairs, irrespective of the BH mass. If a nearby stellar-mass BH is in quiescence, or if a galactic intermediate-mass BH is in a very low accretion state, its curvature and IC emissions are found to be detectable with Fermi/LAT and imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACT). If a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus is located within about 30 Mpc, the IC emission from its supermassive BH is marginally detectable with IACT.

  20. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bennett, N L; ...

    2015-11-30

    ) simulations suggest Z 300 will deliver 4.3 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 18 MJ. Z 800 is 52 m in diameter and stores 130 MJ. This accelerator generates 890 TW at the output of its LTD system, and delivers 65 MA in 113 ns to a MagLIF target. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF liner is 2500 TW. The principal goal of Z 800 is to achieve high-yield thermonuclear fusion; i.e., a yield that exceeds the energy initially stored by the accelerator’s capacitors. 2D MHD simulations suggest Z 800 will deliver 8.0 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 440 MJ. Z 300 and Z 800, or variations of these accelerators, will allow the international high-energy-density-physics community to conduct advanced inertial-confinement-fusion, radiation-physics, material-physics, and laboratory-astrophysics experiments over heretofore-inaccessible parameter regimes.« less

  1. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bennett, N L; Breden, E. W.; Campbell, E. M.; Clark, R. E.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ennis, J. B.; Fehl, D. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Gomez, M. R.; Greiser, G. W.; Gruner, F. R.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hutsel, B. T.; Jennings, C. A.; Jobe, D. O.; Jones, B. M.; Jones, M. C.; Jones, P. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Lash, J. S.; LeChien, K. R.; Leckbee, J. J.; Leeper, R. J.; Lewis, S. A.; Long, F. W.; Lucero, D. J.; Madrid, E. A.; Martin, M. R.; Matzen, M. K.; Mazarakis, M. G.; McBride, R. D.; McKee, G. R.; Miller, C. L.; Moore, J. K.; Mostrom, C. B.; Mulville, T. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reisman, D. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Rochau, G. E.; Rose, D. V.; Savage, M. E.; Sceiford, M. E.; Schmit, P. F.; Schneider, R. F.; Schwarz, J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Thoma, C.; Vesey, R. A.; Wakeland, P. E.; Welch, D. R.; Wisher, M. L.; Woodworth, J. R.; Bailey, J. E.; Rovang, D. C.

    2015-11-30

    ) simulations suggest Z 300 will deliver 4.3 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 18 MJ. Z 800 is 52 m in diameter and stores 130 MJ. This accelerator generates 890 TW at the output of its LTD system, and delivers 65 MA in 113 ns to a MagLIF target. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF liner is 2500 TW. The principal goal of Z 800 is to achieve high-yield thermonuclear fusion; i.e., a yield that exceeds the energy initially stored by the accelerator’s capacitors. 2D MHD simulations suggest Z 800 will deliver 8.0 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 440 MJ. Z 300 and Z 800, or variations of these accelerators, will allow the international high-energy-density-physics community to conduct advanced inertial-confinement-fusion, radiation-physics, material-physics, and laboratory-astrophysics experiments over heretofore-inaccessible parameter regimes.

  2. Lepton Acceleration in the Vicinity of the Event Horizon: Very High Energy Emissions from Supermassive Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotani, Kouichi; Pu, Hung-Yi; Lin, Lupin Chun-Che; Kong, Albert K. H.; Matsushita, Satoki; Asada, Keiichi; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Tam, Pak-Hin T.

    2017-08-01

    Around a rapidly rotating black hole (BH), when the plasma accretion rate is much less than the Eddington rate, the radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) cannot supply enough MeV photons that are capable of materializing as pairs. In such a charge-starved BH magnetosphere, the force-free condition breaks down in the polar funnels. Applying the pulsar outer-magnetospheric lepton accelerator theory to supermassive BHs, we demonstrate that a strong electric field arises along the magnetic field lines in the direct vicinity of the event horizon in the funnels, that the electrons and positrons are accelerated up to 100 TeV in this vacuum gap, and that these leptons emit copious photons via inverse-Compton (IC) processes between 0.1 and 30 TeV for a distant observer. It is found that these IC fluxes will be detectable with Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes, provided that a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus is located within 1 Mpc for a million-solar-mass central BH or within 30 Mpc for a billion-solar-mass central BH. These very high energy fluxes are beamed in a relatively small solid angle around the rotation axis because of the inhomogeneous and anisotropic distribution of the RIAF photon field and show an anticorrelation with the RIAF submillimeter fluxes. The gap luminosity depends little on the 3D magnetic field configuration, because the Goldreich-Julian charge density, and hence the exerted electric field, is essentially governed by the frame-dragging effect, not by the magnetic field configuration.

  3. The High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) Facility onboard China's Future Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bobing

    2015-08-01

    The High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) facility is one of several space astronomy payloads of the cosmic lighthouse program onboard China's Space Station, which is planned for operation starting around 2020 for about 10 years. The main scientific objectives of HERD are indirect dark matter search, precise cosmic ray spectrum and composition measurements up to the knee energy, and high energy gamma-ray monitoring and survey. HERD is composed of a 3-D cubic calorimeter (CALO) surrounded by microstrip silicon trackers (STKs)from five sides except the bottom. CALO is made of about 10^4 cubes of LYSO crystals, corresponding to about 55 radiation lengths and 3 nuclear interaction lengths, respectively. HERD can achieve the following performance: energy resolution of 1% for electrons and gamma-rays beyond 100 GeV, 20% for protons from 100 GeV to 1 PeV; 2) electron/proton separation power better than 10^5 ; effective geometrical factors of > 3 m^2 sr for electron and diffuse gamma-rays, > 2 m^2 sr for cosmic ray nuclei. The prototype of about 1/40 of HERD calorimeter is under construction. A beam test in CERN with the prototype is approved and will be carried out in Nov. 2015.

  4. Panel discussion on laboratory accelerator programs: present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.

    1986-09-01

    The present SLAC accelerator program is summarized briefly, and the future of electron-positron colliders is discussed. Present activities discussed include the PEP storage ring, the SPEAR storage ring, the Linear Accelerator, and the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) project. Future prospects include a larger scale linear collider. The stability requirements on acceleration are briefly discussed. (LEW)

  5. An Analysis of the Expected Degradation of Silicon Detectors in the Future Ultra High Energy Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazanu, Ionel; Lazanu, Sorina

    2006-04-01

    In this contribution we discuss how to prepare some possible detectors - only silicon option being considered, for the new era of HEP challenges because the bulk displacement damage in the detector, consequence of irradiation, produces effects at the device level that limit their long time utilisation, increasing the leakage current and the depletion potential, eventually up to breakdown, and thus affecting the lifetime of detector systems. Physical phenomena that conduce to the degradation of the detector are analysed both at the material and device levels, and some predictions of the time degradation of silicon detectors in the radiation environments expected in the LHC machine upgrade in luminosity and energy as SLHC or VLHC, or at ULHC are given. Possible effects at the detector level after high energy cosmic proton bombardment are investigated as well. Time dependences of these device parameters are studied in conditions of continuous irradiation and the technological options for detector materials are discussed, to obtain devices harder to radiation.

  6. Qualification of coolants and cooling pipes for future high-energy-particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Sorin; Tavlet, Marc

    2001-12-01

    In the next generation of high-energy-particle detectors to be installed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, materials and components will be exposed to a significant level of ionising radiation. Silicon detectors and related electronics will have to be cooled down to -20 °C and therefore appropriate cooling fluids and cooling pipes have to be selected. Analytical methods such as UV-visible and FT-IR spectrometries, electronic microscopy and gas chromatography were used to characterise the radiation-induced effects on some organic coolants irradiated with both gamma and neutron fields. Some impurities were identified as a major source for radio-induced polymerisation and also for hydrofluoric acid (HF) evolution. Mechanical tests were performed to assess the operability of the rubber hoses and plastic pipes. Possible synergistic effects between the pipe material and the environment had to be considered.

  7. Future science issues for Galactic very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Diego F.

    2008-12-01

    This work intends to provide a brief summary of some of the Galactic science issues for the next generation of very high energy (VHE) instruments. The latter is here generically understood, as an instrument or set of instruments providing about one order of magnitude more sensitivity at its central energy (at about 1 TeV), but extending the observational window to have a real broadband capability (from a few tens of GeV up to tens of TeV) exceeding at low energies the current VHE threshold for observations set by MAGIC as well as the few-tens-of-GeV sensitivity set by Fermi. Science topics regarding populations of emitters, pulsars and their nebula, binaries, supernova remnants, stars, and their associations, are discussed.

  8. The FuturICT education accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J.; Buckingham Shum, S.; Willis, A.; Bishop, S.; Zamenopoulos, T.; Swithenby, S.; MacKay, R.; Merali, Y.; Lorincz, A.; Costea, C.; Bourgine, P.; Louçã, J.; Kapenieks, A.; Kelley, P.; Caird, S.; Bromley, J.; Deakin Crick, R.; Goldspink, C.; Collet, P.; Carbone, A.; Helbing, D.

    2012-11-01

    Education is a major force for economic and social wellbeing. Despite high aspirations, education at all levels can be expensive and ineffective. Three Grand Challenges are identified: (1) enable people to learn orders of magnitude more effectively, (2) enable people to learn at orders of magnitude less cost, and (3) demonstrate success by exemplary interdisciplinary education in complex systems science. A ten year `man-on-the-moon' project is proposed in which FuturICT's unique combination of Complexity, Social and Computing Sciences could provide an urgently needed transdisciplinary language for making sense of educational systems. In close dialogue with educational theory and practice, and grounded in the emerging data science and learning analytics paradigms, this will translate into practical tools (both analytical and computational) for researchers, practitioners and leaders; generative principles for resilient educational ecosystems; and innovation for radically scalable, yet personalised, learner engagement and assessment. The proposed Education Accelerator will serve as a `wind tunnel' for testing these ideas in the context of real educational programmes, with an international virtual campus delivering complex systems education exploiting the new understanding of complex, social, computationally enhanced organisational structure developed within FuturICT.

  9. A novel position-sensitive mega-size dosimeter for photoneutrons in high-energy X-ray medical accelerators.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, Mehdi; Hakimi, Amir; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabi

    2016-06-01

    A novel position-sensitive mega-size polycarbonate (MSPC) dosimeter is introduced. It provides photoneutron (PN) dose equivalent matrix of positions in and out of a beam of a high energy X-ray medical accelerator under a single exposure. A novel position-sensitive MSPC dosimeter was developed and applied. It has an effective etched area of 50×50cm(2), as used in this study, processed in a mega-size electrochemical etching chamber to amplify PN-induced-recoil tracks to a point viewed by the unaided eyes. Using such dosimeters, PN dose equivalents, dose equivalent profiles and isodose equivalent distribution of positions in and out of beams for different X-ray doses and field sizes were determined in a Siemens ONCOR Linac. The PN dose equivalent at each position versus X-ray dose was linear up to 20Gy studied. As the field size increased, the PN dose equivalent in the beam was also increased but it remained constant at positions out of the beam up to 20cm away from the beam edge. The jaws and MLCs due to material differences and locations relative to the target produce different PN contributions. The MSPC dosimeter introduced in this study is a perfect candidate for PN dosimetry with unique characteristics such as simplicity, efficiency, dose equivalent response, large size, flexibility to be bent, resembling the patient's skin, highly position-sensitive with high spatial resolution, highly insensitive to X-rays, continuity in measurements and need to a single dosimeter to obtain PN dose equivalent matrix data under a single X-ray exposure. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Current status and future perspectives of accelerator-based x-ray light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    State-of-the-art x-ray light sources are nowadays based on large-scale electron accelerators, because the synchrotron radiation (SR) and x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) radiation generated by high-energy electron beams have many advantages over other alternatives in terms of the wavelength tunability, high brightness and flux, high coherence, flexible polarization states, and so on. This is the reason why SR and XFEL light sources have largely contributed to the evolution of x-ray science. This paper reviews the current status of such accelerator-based x-ray light source facilities and discusses their future perspectives.

  11. Detector Noise Susceptibility Issues for the Future Generation of High Energy Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Arteche, F.; Esteban, C.; Iglesias, M.; Rivetta, C.; Arcega, F.J.; /Zaragoza U.

    2011-11-22

    The front-end electronics (FEE) noise characterization to electromagnetic interference and the compatibility of the different subsystems are important topics to consider for the LHC calorimeter upgrades. A new power distribution scheme based on switching power converters is under study and will define a noticeable noise source very close to the detector's FEE. Knowledge and experience with both FFE noise and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) issues from previous detectors are important conditions to guarantee the design goals and the good functionality of the upgraded LHC detectors. This paper shows an overview of the noise susceptibility studies performed in different CMS subdetectors. The impact of different FEE topologies in the final sensitivity to electromagnetic interference of the subsystem is analyzed and design recommendations are presented to increase the EMC of the detectors to the future challenging power distribution topologies.

  12. Do you want to build such a machine? : Designing a high energy proton accelerator for Argonne National Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, E.

    2004-04-05

    Argonne National Laboratory's efforts toward researching, proposing and then building a high-energy proton accelerator have been discussed in a handful of studies. In the main, these have concentrated on the intense maneuvering amongst politicians, universities, government agencies, outside corporations, and laboratory officials to obtain (or block) approval and/or funds or to establish who would have control over budgets and research programs. These ''top-down'' studies are very important but they can also serve to divorce such proceedings from the individuals actually involved in the ground-level research which physically served to create theories, designs, machines, and experiments. This can lead to a skewed picture, on the one hand, of a lack of effect that so-called scientific and technological factors exert and, on the other hand, of the apparent separation of the so-called social or political from the concrete practice of doing physics. An exception to this approach can be found in the proceedings of a conference on ''History of the ZGS'' held at Argonne at the time of the Zero Gradient Synchrotron's decommissioning in 1979. These accounts insert the individuals quite literally as they are, for the most part, personal reminiscences of those who took part in these efforts on the ground level. As such, they are invaluable raw material for historical inquiry but generally lack the rigor and perspective expected in a finished historical work. The session on ''Constructing Cold War Physics'' at the 2002 annual History of Science Society Meeting served to highlight new approaches circulating towards history of science and technology in the post-WWII period, especially in the 1950s. There is new attention towards the effects of training large numbers of scientists and engineers as well as the caution not to equate ''national security'' with military preparedness, but rather more broadly--at certain points--with the explicit ''struggle for the hearts and minds of

  13. IGBT PEBB Technology for Future High Energy Physics Machine Operation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Macken, K.J.P.; MacNair, D.; Nguyen, M.N.; Hugyik, J.; Olsen, J.; Kemp, M.; /SLAC

    2012-04-11

    Terascale physics is driving the demand for innovative pulsed power modulators having greater compactness and better manufacturability with increasingly superior performance. A particularly promising route for such modulators is Marx-architecture based. Moreover, there is opportunity for improvement and gain of greater benefits through further development of topology and architecture, gate driver method, and control schemes. Prior work discussed a new concept of droop correction, which was the result of topology hybridisation using a nesting approach, and illustrated its great potential. This is further investigated here. This paper details various design aspects of a hybrid Marx cell Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB) and includes specifics about estimated losses and efficiency, thermal management issues, protection strategies, gate driver development, and control implementation. In addition, figures-of-merit of the cell design are given for comparison and evaluation purposes. Experimental results, based on both single-cell and three-cell hardware prototypes, are presented demonstrating the functionality and performance of the new topology. This is a significant milestone in the progression toward constructing a full 32-cell PEBB-based Marx klystron modulator with nested droop correction. Lessons learned during various stages of the prototype development and future directions are commented on.

  14. High-energy quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields: existing facilities and future needs.

    PubMed

    Pomp, S; Bartlett, D T; Mayer, S; Reitz, G; Röttger, S; Silari, M; Smit, F D; Vincke, H; Yasuda, H

    2014-10-01

    The argument that well-characterised quasi-monoenergetic neutron (QMN) sources reaching into the energy domain >20 MeV are needed is presented. A brief overview of the existing facilities is given, and a list of key factors that an ideal QMN source for dosimetry and spectrometry should offer is presented. The authors conclude that all of the six QMN facilities currently in existence worldwide operate in sub-optimal conditions for dosimetry. The only currently available QMN facility in Europe capable of operating at energies >40 MeV, TSL in Uppsala, Sweden, is threatened with shutdown in the immediate future. One facility, NFS at GANIL, France, is currently under construction. NFS could deliver QMN beams up to about 30 MeV. It is, however, so far not clear if and when NFS will be able to offer QMN beams or operate with only so-called white neutron beams. It is likely that by 2016, QMN beams with energies >40 MeV will be available only in South Africa and Japan, with none in Europe.

  15. Recirculating Linear Accelerators for Future Muon Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Bogacz, K.B.Beard, R.P. Johnson

    2010-05-01

    Neutrino Factories (NF) and Muon Colliders (MC) require rapid acceleration of short-lived muons to multi-GeV and TeV energies. A Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA) that uses superconducting RF structures can provide exceptionally fast and economical acceleration to the extent that the focusing range of the RLA quadrupoles allows each muon to pass several times through each high-gradient cavity. A new concept of rapidly changing the strength of the RLA focusing quadrupoles as the muons gain energy is being developed to increase the number of passes that each muon will make in the RF cavities, leading to greater cost effectiveness.

  16. Recirculating Linac Accelerators For Future Muon Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Yves Roblin, Alex Bogacz, Vasiliy Morozov, Kevin Beard

    2012-04-01

    Neutrino Factories (NF) and Muon Colliders (MC) require rapid acceleration of shortlived muons to multi-GeV and TeV energies. A Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA) that uses superconducting RF structures can provide exceptionally fast and economical acceleration to the extent that the focusing range of the RLA quadrupoles allows each muon to pass several times through each high-gradient cavity. A new concept of rapidly changing the strength of the RLA focusing quadrupoles as the muons gain energy is being developed to increase the number of passes that each muon will make in the RF cavities, leading to greater cost effectiveness. We discuss the optics and technical requirements for RLA designs, using RF cavities capable of simultaneous acceleration of both m+ and m- species. The design will include the optics for the multi-pass linac and droplet-shaped return arcs.

  17. Prospects for future very high-energy gamma-ray sky survey: Impact of secondary gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Kalashev, Oleg E.; Kusenko, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Very high-energy gamma-ray measurements of distant blazars can be well explained by secondary gamma rays emitted by cascades induced by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. The secondary gamma rays will enable one to detect a large number of blazars with future ground based gamma-ray telescopes such as Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). We show that the secondary emission process will allow CTA to detect 100, 130, 150, 87, and 8 blazars above 30 GeV, 100 GeV, 300 GeV, 1 TeV, and 10 TeV, respectively, up to z~8 assuming the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) strength B=10-17 G and an unbiased all sky survey with 0.5 h exposure at each field of view, where total observing time is ~540 h. These numbers will be 79, 96, 110, 63, and 6 up to z~5 in the case of B=10-15 G. This large statistics of sources will be a clear evidence of the secondary gamma-ray scenarios and a new key to studying the IGMF statistically. We also find that a wider and shallower survey is favored to detect more and higher redshift sources even if we take into account secondary gamma rays.

  18. Future Accelerators, Muon Colliders, and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A Carrigan, Jr.

    2001-12-19

    Particle physics is driven by five great topics. Neutrino oscillations and masses are now at the fore. The standard model with extensions to supersymmetry and a Higgs to generate mass explains much of the field. The origins of CP violation are not understood. The possibility of extra dimensions has raised tantalizing new questions. A fifth topic lurking in the background is the possibility of something totally different. Many of the questions raised by these topics require powerful new accelerators. It is not an overstatement to say that for some of the issues, the accelerator is almost the experiment. Indeed some of the questions require machines beyond our present capability. As this volume attests, there are parts of the particle physics program that have been significantly advanced without the use of accelerators such as the subject of neutrino oscillations and many aspects of the particle-cosmology interface. At this stage in the development of physics, both approaches are needed and important. This chapter first reviews the status of the great accelerator facilities now in operation or coming on within the decade. Next, midrange possibilities are discussed including linear colliders with the adjunct possibility of gamma-gamma colliders, muon colliders, with precursor neutrino factories, and very large hadron colliders. Finally visionary possibilities are considered including plasma and laser accelerators.

  19. High energy cosmic ray composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, E. S.

    Cosmic rays are understood to result from energetic processes in the galaxy, probably from supernova explosions. However, cosmic ray energies extend several orders of magnitude beyond the limit thought possible for supernova blast waves. Over the past decade several ground-based and space-based investigations were initiated to look for evidence of a limit to supernova acceleration in the cosmic-ray chemical composition at high energies. These high-energy measurements are difficult because of the very low particle fluxes in the most interesting regions. The space-based detectors must be large enough to collect adequate statistics, yet stay within the weight limit for space flight. Innovative approaches now promise high quality measurements over an energy range that was not previously possible. The current status of high energy cosmic-ray composition measurements and planned future missions are discussed in this paper.

  20. The Efficiency of the BC-720 Scintillator in a High-Energy (20--800 MeV) Accelerator Neutron Field

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Leslie H.

    2005-12-01

    High-energy neutron doses (>20 MeV) are of little importance to most radiation workers. However, space and flight crews, and people working around medical and scientific accelerators receive over half of their radiation dose from high-energy neutrons. Unfortunately, neutrons are difficult to measure, and no suitable dosimetry has yet been developed to measure this radiation. In this paper, basic high-energy neutron interactions, characteristics of high-energy neutron environments, present neutron dosimetry, and quantities used in neutron dosimetry are discussed before looking into the potential of the BC-720 scintillator to improve dosimetry. This research utilized 800 MeV protons impinging upon the WNR Facility spallation neutron source at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Time-of-flight methods and a U-238 Fission Chamber were used to aid evaluation of the efficiency of the BC-720. Results showed that the efficiency is finite over the 20–650 MeV energy region studied, although it decreases by a factor of ten between 40 and 100 MeV. This limits the use of this dosimeter to measure doses at sitespecific locations. It also encourages modifications to use this dosimeter for any unknown neutron field. As such, this dosimeter has the potential for a small, lightweight, real-time dose measurement, which could impact neutron dosimetry in all high-energy neutron environments.

  1. Accelerating Technologies: Consequences for the Future Wellbeing of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltinski, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Today's students, K-12 and beyond, will face an ominous future unless educators quickly invest in preparing student perspectives for the accelerating technologies that will have global implications for the wellbeing of all humanity. Accelerating technologies are quietly, almost insidiously, transforming the world with little fanfare and certainly…

  2. Future short-baseline sterile neutrino searches with accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Spitz, J.

    2015-07-15

    A number of experimental anomalies in neutrino oscillation physics point to the existence of at least one light sterile neutrino. This hypothesis can be precisely tested using neutrinos from reactors, radioactive isotopes, and particle accelerators. The focus of these proceedings is on future dedicated short-baseline sterile neutrino searches using accelerators.

  3. Challenge of ultra-high energies: ultimate limits, possible directions of technology, an approach to collective acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1982-11-01

    At the request of Panel Chairman Amaldi, the oral version of this rpeort was largely devoted to a recapitulation and critique of the various methods of collective acceleration, including plasma-laser methods, which had been presented at the meeting.

  4. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  5. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    ScienceCinema

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2016-07-12

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  6. Future Particle Accelerator Developments for Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels

    During the last decade particle beam cancer therapy has seen a rapid increase in interest, and several new centers have been built, are currently under construction, or are in an advanced stage of planning. Typical treatment centers today consist of an accelerator capable of producing proton or ion beams in an energy range of interest for medical treatment, i.e. providing a penetration depth in water of about 30 cm, a beam delivery system to transport the produced beam to the patient treatment rooms, and several patient stations, allowing for an optimal usage of the continuously produced beam. This makes these centers rather large and consequently expensive. Only major hospital centers situated in an area where they can draw on a population of several million can afford such an installation. In order to spread the use of particle beam cancer therapy to a broader population base it will be necessary to scale down the facility size and cost. This can in principle be done by reducing the number of treatment rooms to one, eliminating the need of an elaborate beam delivery system, and thereby reducing the building size and cost. Such a change should be going in parallel with a reduction of the accelerator itself, and a number of approaches to this are currently being pursued. If successful, such developments could eventually lead to a compact system where all components would fit into a single shielded room, not much different in size from a typical radiation vault for radiotherapy with X-rays.

  7. Observations of high-energy jets in the corona above the quiet sun, the heating of the corona, and the acceleration of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, G. E.; Bartoe, J.-D. F.

    1983-01-01

    High spatial resolution observations of the ultraviolet solar spectrum which reveal high-energy events in the quiet sun are presented. The tandem Wadsworth spectrograph used to make the observations is described along with the observing techniques, and a brief description of the characteristics of high-resolution transition zone spectra is given. The sizes, velocities, line profiles, time behavior, temperature range, differential emission measures, densities, masses, energies, and birthrates of turbulent events and jets in the quiet sun are derived from the observations and discussed. Possible accelerating mechanisms for these events are discussed, and the consequences of these events for the heating of the solar corona are discussed. A cloud model of the solar wind is proposed and possible correlations between the high-energy events and other solar fine-structure features are discussed.

  8. The sensitivity of past and near-future lunar radio experiments to ultra-high-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, J. D.

    2016-04-01

    Various experiments have been conducted to search for the radio emission from ultra-high-energy (UHE) particles interacting in the lunar regolith. Although they have not yielded any detections, they have been successful in establishing upper limits on the flux of these particles. I present a review of these experiments in which I re-evaluate their sensitivity to radio pulses, accounting for effects which were neglected in the original reports, and compare them with prospective near-future experiments. In several cases, I find that past experiments were substantially less sensitive than previously believed. I apply existing analytic models to determine the resulting limits on the fluxes of UHE neutrinos and cosmic rays (CRs). In the latter case, I amend the model to accurately reflect the fraction of the primary particle energy which manifests in the resulting particle cascade, resulting in a substantial improvement in the estimated sensitivity to CRs. Although these models are in need of further refinement, in particular to incorporate the effects of small-scale lunar surface roughness, their application here indicates that a proposed experiment with the LOFAR telescope would test predictions of the neutrino flux from exotic-physics models, and an experiment with a phased-array feed on a large single-dish telescope such as the Parkes radio telescope would allow the first detection of CRs with this technique, with an expected rate of one detection per 140 h.

  9. Compact, High Energy 2-micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Development for NASA's Future 3-D Winds Measurement from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Beyon, Jeffrey; Kavaya, Michael J.; Trieu, Bo; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, paul; Modlin, Edward A.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Demoz, Belay B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of 2-micron laser transmitter development at NASA Langley Research Center for coherent-detection lidar profiling of winds. The novel high-energy, 2-micron, Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser technology developed at NASA Langley was employed to study laser technology currently envisioned by NASA for future global coherent Doppler lidar winds measurement. The 250 mJ, 10 Hz laser was designed as an integral part of a compact lidar transceiver developed for future aircraft flight. Ground-based wind profiles made with this transceiver will be presented. NASA Langley is currently funded to build complete Doppler lidar systems using this transceiver for the DC-8 aircraft in autonomous operation. Recently, LaRC 2-micron coherent Doppler wind lidar system was selected to contribute to the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Earth Science Division (ESD) hurricane field experiment in 2010 titled Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP). The Doppler lidar system will measure vertical profiles of horizontal vector winds from the DC-8 aircraft using NASA Langley s existing 2-micron, pulsed, coherent detection, Doppler wind lidar system that is ready for DC-8 integration. The measurements will typically extend from the DC-8 to the earth s surface. They will be highly accurate in both wind magnitude and direction. Displays of the data will be provided in real time on the DC-8. The pulsed Doppler wind lidar of NASA Langley Research Center is much more powerful than past Doppler lidars. The operating range, accuracy, range resolution, and time resolution will be unprecedented. We expect the data to play a key role, combined with the other sensors, in improving understanding and predictive algorithms for hurricane strength and track. 1

  10. Highly efficient generation of ultraintense high-energy ion beams using laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Badziak, J.; Jablonski, S.; Raczka, P.

    2012-08-20

    Results of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of fast ion generation in the recently proposed laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration (LICPA) scheme in which a picosecond circularly polarized laser pulse of intensity {approx}10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} irradiates a carbon target placed in a cavity are presented. It is shown that due to circulation of the laser pulse in the cavity, the laser-ions energy conversion efficiency in the LICPA scheme is more than twice as high as that for the conventional (without a cavity) radiation pressure acceleration scheme and a quasi-monoenergetic carbon ion beam of the mean ion energy {approx}0.5 GeV and the energy fluence {approx}0.5 GJ/cm{sup 2} is produced with the efficiency {approx}40%. The results of PIC simulations are found to be in fairly good agreement with the predictions of the generalized light-sail model.

  11. High energy conversion efficiency in laser-proton acceleration by controlling laser-energy deposition onto thin foil targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, C. M.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Markey, K.; Scott, R. H. H.; Gray, R. J.; Rosinski, M.; Deppert, O.; Badziak, J.; Batani, D.; Davies, J. R.; Hassan, S. M.; Lancaster, K. L.; Li, K.; Musgrave, I. O.; Norreys, P. A.; Pasley, J.; Roth, M.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Spindloe, C.; Tatarakis, M.; Winstone, T.; Wolowski, J.; Wyatt, D.; McKenna, P.; Neely, D.

    2014-02-01

    An all-optical approach to laser-proton acceleration enhancement is investigated using the simplest of target designs to demonstrate application-relevant levels of energy conversion efficiency between laser and protons. Controlled deposition of laser energy, in the form of a double-pulse temporal envelope, is investigated in combination with thin foil targets in which recirculation of laser-accelerated electrons can lead to optimal conditions for coupling laser drive energy into the proton beam. This approach is shown to deliver a substantial enhancement in the coupling of laser energy to 5-30 MeV protons, compared to single pulse irradiation, reaching a record high 15% conversion efficiency with a temporal separation of 1 ps between the two pulses and a 5 μm-thick Au foil. A 1D simulation code is used to support and explain the origin of the observation of an optimum pulse separation of ˜1 ps.

  12. On the retention of high-energy protons and nuclei with charges Z or equal to 2 in large solar flares after the process of their acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volodichev, N. N.; Kuzhevsky, B. M.; Nechaev, O. Y.; Savenko, I. A.

    1985-01-01

    Data which suggest that the protons with energies of up to several GeV should be retained on the Sun after the process of their acceleration are presented. The protons are on the average retained for 15 min, irrespectively of the solar flare heliolatitude and of the accelerated particle energy ranging from 100 MeV to several GeV. It is suggested that the particles are retained in a magnetic trap formed in a solar active region. No Z or = 2 nuclei of solar origin during large solar flares. The absence of the 500 MeV/nucleon nuclei with Z or = 2 may be due to their retention in the magnetic trap which also retains the high-energy protons. During the trapping time the approx. 500 MeV/nucleon nuclei with Z or = 2 may escape due to nuclear interactions and ionization loss.

  13. Landscape of Future Accelerators at the Energy and Intensity Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M. J.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2016-11-21

    An overview is provided of the currently envisaged landscape of charged particle accelerators at the energy and intensity frontiers to explore particle physics beyond the standard model via 1-100 TeV-scale lepton and hadron colliders and multi-Megawatt proton accelerators for short- and long- baseline neutrino experiments. The particle beam physics, associated technological challenges and progress to date for these accelerator facilities (LHC, HL-LHC, future 100 TeV p-p colliders, Tev-scale linear and circular electron-positron colliders, high intensity proton accelerator complex PIP-II for DUNE and future upgrade to PIP-III) are outlined. Potential and prospects for advanced “nonlinear dynamic techniques” at the multi-MW level intensity frontier and advanced “plasma- wakefield-based techniques” at the TeV-scale energy frontier and are also described.

  14. Laser ion acceleration toward future ion beam cancer therapy - Numerical simulation study -

    PubMed Central

    Kawata, Shigeo; Izumiyama, Takeshi; Nagashima, Toshihiro; Takano, Masahiro; Barada, Daisuke; Kong, Qing; Gu, Yan Jun; Wang, Ping Xiao; Ma, Yan Yun; Wang, Wei Min

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ion beam has been used in cancer treatment, and has a unique preferable feature to deposit its main energy inside a human body so that cancer cell could be killed by the ion beam. However, conventional ion accelerator tends to be huge in its size and its cost. In this paper a future intense-laser ion accelerator is proposed to make the ion accelerator compact. Subjects and methods: An intense femtosecond pulsed laser was employed to accelerate ions. The issues in the laser ion accelerator include the energy efficiency from the laser to the ions, the ion beam collimation, the ion energy spectrum control, the ion beam bunching and the ion particle energy control. In the study particle computer simulations were performed to solve the issues, and each component was designed to control the ion beam quality. Results: When an intense laser illuminates a target, electrons in the target are accelerated and leave from the target; temporarily a strong electric field is formed between the high-energy electrons and the target ions, and the target ions are accelerated. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions was improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or by a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation was realized by holes behind the solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching were successfully realized by a multi-stage laser-target interaction. Conclusions: The present study proposed a novel concept for a future compact laser ion accelerator, based on each component study required to control the ion beam quality and parameters. PMID:24155555

  15. Shaping laser accelerated ions for future applications - The LIGHT collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busold, S.; Almomani, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Barth, W.; Bedacht, S.; Blažević, A.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Brabetz, C.; Burris-Mog, T.; Cowan, T. E.; Deppert, O.; Droba, M.; Eickhoff, H.; Eisenbarth, U.; Harres, K.; Hoffmeister, G.; Hofmann, I.; Jaeckel, O.; Jaeger, R.; Joost, M.; Kraft, S.; Kroll, F.; Kaluza, M.; Kester, O.; Lecz, Z.; Merz, T.; Nürnberg, F.; Al-Omari, H.; Orzhekhovskaya, A.; Paulus, G.; Polz, J.; Ratzinger, U.; Roth, M.; Schaumann, G.; Schmidt, P.; Schramm, U.; Schreiber, G.; Schumacher, D.; Stoehlker, T.; Tauschwitz, A.; Vinzenz, W.; Wagner, F.; Yaramyshev, S.; Zielbauer, B.

    2014-03-01

    The generation of intense ion beams from high-intensity laser-generated plasmas has been the focus of research for the last decade. In the LIGHT collaboration the expertise of heavy ion accelerator scientists and laser and plasma physicists has been combined to investigate the prospect of merging these ion beams with conventional accelerator technology and exploring the possibilities of future applications. We report about the goals and first results of the LIGHT collaboration to generate, handle and transport laser driven ion beams. This effort constitutes an important step in research for next generation accelerator technologies.

  16. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices.

    PubMed

    Pilan, N; Antoni, V; De Lorenzi, A; Chitarin, G; Veltri, P; Sartori, E

    2016-02-01

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF6 instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming.

  17. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pilan, N. Antoni, V.; De Lorenzi, A.; Chitarin, G.; Veltri, P.; Sartori, E.

    2016-02-15

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF{sub 6} instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming.

  18. Trapping of high-energy electrons into regime of surfatron acceleration by electromagnetic waves in space plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Erokhin, A. N.; Erokhin, N. S.; Milant'ev, V. P.

    2012-05-15

    The phenomenon of trapping of weakly relativistic charged particles (with kinetic energies on the order of mc{sup 2}) into a regime of surfatron acceleration by an electromagnetic wave that propagates in plasma across a weak external magnetic field has been studied using nonlinear numerical calculations based on a solution of the relativistic equations of motion. Analysis showed that, for the wave amplitude above a certain threshold value and the initial wave phase outside the interval favorable for the surfing regime, the trajectory of a charged particle initially corresponds to its cyclotron rotation in the external magnetic field. For the initial particle energies studied, the period of this rotation is relatively short. After a certain number (from several dozen to several thousand and above) of periods of rotation, the wave phase takes a value that is favorable for trapping of the charged particle on its trajectory by the electromagnetic wave, provided the Cherenkov resonance conditions are satisfied. As a result, the wave traps the charged particle and imparts it an ultrarelativistic acceleration. In momentum space, the region of trapping into the regime of surfing on an electromagnetic wave turns out to be rather large.

  19. Final Report for "Non-Accelerator Physics – Research in High Energy Physics: Dark Energy Research on DES"

    SciTech Connect

    Ritz, Steve; Jeltema, Tesla

    2016-12-01

    One of the greatest mysteries in modern cosmology is the fact that the expansion of the universe is observed to be accelerating. This acceleration may stem from dark energy, an additional energy component of the universe, or may indicate that the theory of general relativity is incomplete on cosmological scales. The growth rate of large-scale structure in the universe and particularly the largest collapsed structures, clusters of galaxies, is highly sensitive to the underlying cosmology. Clusters will provide one of the single most precise methods of constraining dark energy with the ongoing Dark Energy Survey (DES). The accuracy of the cosmological constraints derived from DES clusters necessarily depends on having an optimized and well-calibrated algorithm for selecting clusters as well as an optical richness estimator whose mean relation and scatter compared to cluster mass are precisely known. Calibrating the galaxy cluster richness-mass relation and its scatter was the focus of the funded work. Specifically, we employ X-ray observations and optical spectroscopy with the Keck telescopes of optically-selected clusters to calibrate the relationship between optical richness (the number of galaxies in a cluster) and underlying mass. This work also probes aspects of cluster selection like the accuracy of cluster centering which are critical to weak lensing cluster studies.

  20. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  1. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  2. Impact of intermediate and high energy nuclear data on the neutronic safety parameters of MYRRHA accelerator driven system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankovskiy, Alexey; Çelik, Yurdunaz; Eynde, Gert Van den

    2017-09-01

    Perturbation of external neutron source can cause significant local power changes transformed into undesired safety-related events in an accelerator driven system. Therefore for the accurate design of MYRRHA sub-critical core it is important to evaluate the uncertainty of power responses caused by the uncertainties in nuclear reaction models describing the particle transport from primary proton energy down to the evaluated nuclear data table range. The calculations with a set of models resulted in quite low uncertainty on the local power caused by significant perturbation of primary neutron yield from proton interactions with lead and bismuth isotopes. The considered accidental event of prescribed proton beam shape loss causes drastic increase in local power but does not practically change the total core thermal power making this effect difficult to detect. In the same time the results demonstrate a correlation between perturbed local power responses in normal operation and misaligned beam conditions indicating that generation of covariance data for proton and neutron induced neutron multiplicities for lead and bismuth isotopes is needed to obtain reliable uncertainties for local power responses.

  3. Radiation containment at a 1 MW high energy electron accelerator: Status of LCLS-II radiation physics design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, M. Santana; Blaha, J.; Guetg, M. W.; Li, Z.; Liu, J. C.; Mao, S. X.; Nicolas, L.; Rokni, S. H.; Xiao, S.; Ge, L.

    2017-09-01

    LCLS-II will add a 4 GeV, 1 MHz, SCRF electron accelerator in the first 700 meters of the SLAC 2-mile Linac, as well as adjustable gap polarized undulators in the down-beam electron lines, to produce tunable, fully coherent X-rays in programmable bunch patterns. This facility will work in unison with the existing Linac Coherent Light Source, which uses the legacy copper cavities in the last third of the linac to deliver electrons between 2 and 17 GeV to an undulator line. The upgrade plan includes new beam lines, five stages of state of the art collimation that shall clean the high-power beam well up-beam of the radio-sensitive undulators, and new electron and photon beam dumps. This paper describes the challenges encountered to define efficient measures to protect machine, personnel, public and the environment from the potentially destructive power of the beam, while maximizing the reuse of existing components and infrastructure, and allowing for complex operational modes.

  4. High average power lasers for future particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Jay W.; Crane, John K.; Messerly, Michael J.; Prantil, Matthew A.; Pax, Paul H.; Sridharan, Arun K.; Allen, Graham S.; Drachenberg, Derrek R.; Phan, Henry H.; Heebner, John E.; Ebbers, Christopher A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Hartouni, Edward P.; Siders, Craig W.; Spinka, Thomas M.; Barty, C. P. J.; Bayramian, Andrew J.; Haefner, Leon C.; Albert, Felicie; Lowdermilk, W. Howard; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Bonanno, Regina E.

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are of increasing interest to the accelerator community and include applications as diverse as stripping electrons from hydrogen atoms, sources for Compton scattering, efficient high repetition rate lasers for dielectric laser acceleration, peta-watt peak power lasers for laser wake field and high energy, short pulse lasers for proton and ion beam therapy. The laser requirements for these applications are briefly surveyed. State of the art of laser technologies with the potential to eventually meet those requirements are reviewed. These technologies include diode pumped solid state lasers (including cryogenic), fiber lasers, OPCPA based lasers and Ti:Sapphire lasers. Strengths and weakness of the various technologies are discussed along with the most important issues to address to get from the current state of the art to the performance needed for the accelerator applications. Efficiency issues are considered in detail as in most cases the system efficiency is a valuable indicator of the actual ability of a given technology to deliver the application requirements.

  5. Energetic negative ion and neutral atom beam generation at passage of laser accelerated high energy positive ions through a liquid spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abicht, F.; Prasad, R.; Priebe, G.; Braenzel, J.; Ehrentraut, L.; Andreev, A.; Nickles, P. V.; Schnürer, M.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Ter-Avetisyan, Sargis

    2013-05-01

    Beams of energetic negative ions and neutral atoms are obtained from water and ethanol spray targets irradiated by high intensity (5×1019 W/cm2) and ultrashort (50 fs) laser pulses. The resulting spectra were measured with the Thomson parabola spectrometer, which enabled absolute measurements of both: positive and negative ions. The generation of a beam of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms was confirmed with CR-39 track detectors and their spectral characteristics have been measured using time of flight technique. Generation is ascribed to electron-capture and -loss processes in the collisions of laser-accelerated high-energy protons with spray of droplets. The same method can be applied to generate energetic negative ions and neutral atoms of different species.

  6. Heavy ion acceleration at the AGS: Present and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.

    1989-01-01

    The Brookhaven AGS is alternating gradient synchrotron, 807 meters in circumference, which was originally designed for only protons. Using the 15 MV Brookhaven Tandem Van de Graaff as an injector, the AGS started to accelerate heavy ions of mass lighter than sulfur. Because of the relatively poor vacuum (/approximately/10/sup /minus/8/ Torr), the AGS is not able to accelerate heavier ions which could not be fully stripped of electrons at the Tandem energy. When the AGS Booster, which is under construction, is completed the operation will be extended to all species of heavy ions including gold and uranium. Because ultra-high vacuum (/approximately/10/sup /minus/11/ Torr) is planned, the Booster can accelerate partially stripped elements. The operational experience, the parameters, and scheme of heavy ion acceleration will be presented in detail from injection to extraction, as well as future injection into the new Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). A future plan to improve intensity of the accelerator will also be presented. 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. INVESTIGATION OF THE EXTENDED RANGE REM-COUNTER SMARTREM-LINUS IN REFERENCE AND WORKPLACE FIELDS EXPECTED AROUND HIGH-ENERGY ACCELERATORS.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Eike; Trovati, S; Strauch, U; Mayer, S

    2016-09-01

    Radiation survey instrumentation is adequate for the use around high-energy accelerators if capable to measure the dose arising from neutrons with energies ranging from thermal up to a few gigaelectronvolts. The SmartREM-LINUS is a commercial extended range rem-counter, consisting of a central (3)He-proportional counter surrounded by a spherical moderator made of borated polyethylene with an internal shield made of lead. The dose rate indicated by the SmartREM-LINUS was investigated for two different irradiation conditions. The linearity and the angular dependence of the indicated dose rate were investigated using reference neutron fields produced by (241)AmBe and (252)Cf. Additional measurements were performed in two different workplace fields with a component of neutrons with energies >20 MeV, namely the CERN-EU high-energy reference field and near the beam dump of the SwissFEL injector test facility. The measured dose rates were compared to a commercial rem-counter (WENDI2) and the results of Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. High energy beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  9. Flare physics at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1990-01-01

    High-energy processes, involving a rich variety of accelerated particle phenomena, lie at the core of the solar flare problem. The most direct manifestation of these processes are high-energy radiations, gamma rays, hard X-rays and neutrons, as well as the accelerated particles themselves, which can be detected in interplanetary space. In the study of astrophysics from the moon, the understanding of these processes should have great importance. The inner solar system environment is strongly influenced by activity on the sun; the physics of solar flares is of great intrinsic interest; and much high-energy astrophysics can be learned from investigations of flare physics at high energies.

  10. The theory and design of a chirped-pulse inverse free-electron laser: An innovative, compact, high-energy, vacuum-based, electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troha, Anthony Lawrence

    As current high-energy accelerator facilities continue to increase in both size and cost, there is a growing need for a relatively small and inexpensive alternative. Numerous experiments over the past decade have shown the inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) to be a feasible laser-driven particle accelerator. In the present work, a new variant of the IFEL is proposed, which uses a short-duration, chirped laser pulse to greatly increase the energy exchange from the drive-laser pulse to the electron bunch. An extensive investigation is then conducted, starting with analytical and numerical studies of the dynamics of an electron interacting with a high-intensity, focused laser pulse. Following a review of the physics behind a free-electron laser (FEL), a detailed analysis of several variants of the IFEL is performed, from which it is determined that an IFEL driven by a chirped laser pulse will not suffer the detrimental effects experienced by other IFEL schemes. The design specifications for the chirped-pulse inverse free-electron laser (CPIFEL) are then obtained from theoretical and computational models of the interaction, which culminates in a device that has an acceleration gradient approaching 1 GeV/m over an interaction distance of less than 5 cm. The acceleration mechanism is very efficient, providing a nearly uniform acceleration to a picosecond-duration charge bunch. The demands on laser technology are stringent, but not extreme. The laser must produce chirped-pulse durations only a few optical cycles long and intensities near 9 x 1016 W/cm2 at the focal plane. The IFEL is also an appealing choice, because it is essentially an FEL functioning in a different operational mode. FEL's are a well-established, familiar technology, routinely and reliably employed in a variety of research facilities throughout the world. Thus, the development of the IFEL has a strong foundation upon which to build, a heritage that will hopefully hasten the realization of a CPIFEL

  11. Fast-cycling superconducting synchrotrons and possible path to the future of US experimental high-energy particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; /Fermilab

    2008-02-01

    The authors outline primary physics motivation, present proposed new arrangement for Fermilab accelerator complex, and then discuss possible long-range application of fast-cycling superconducting synchrotrons at Fermilab.

  12. Electronics Packaging Issues for Future Accelerators and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.

    2004-11-11

    Standard instrument modules for physics reached their zenith of industrial development from the early 1960s through late 1980s. Started by laboratory engineering groups in Europe and North America, modular electronic standards were successfully developed and commercialized. In the late 1980's a major shift in large detector design toward custom chips mounted directly on detectors started a decline in the use of standard modules for data acquisition. With the loss of the detector module business, commercial support declined. Today the engineering communities supporting future accelerators and experiments face a new set of challenges that demand much more reliable system design. The dominant system metric is Availability. We propose (1) that future accelerator and detector systems be evaluated against a Design for Availability (DFA) metric; (2) that modular design and standardization applied to all electronic and controls subsystems are key to high Availability; and (3) that renewed Laboratory-Industry collaboration(s) could make an invaluable contribution to design and implementation.

  13. Report on Workshop on Future Directions for Accelerator R&D at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Church, M.; Spentzouris, P.; Chou, W.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    Accelerator R&D has played a crucial role in enabling scientific discovery in the past century and will continue to play this role in the years to come. In the U.S., the Office of High Energy Physics of DOE's Office of Science is developing a plan for national accelerator R&D stewardship. Fermilab undertakes accelerator research, design, and development focused on superconducting radio-frequency (RF), superconducting magnet, beam cooling, and high intensity proton technologies. In addition, the Lab pursues comprehensive integrated theoretical concepts and simulations of complete future facilities on both the energy and intensity frontiers. At present, Fermilab (1) supplies integrated design concept and technology development for a multi-MW proton source (Project X) to support world-leading programs in long baseline neutrino and rare processes experiments; (2) plays a leading role in the development of ionization cooling technologies required for muon storage ring facilities at the energy (multi-TeV Muon Collider) and intensity (Neutrino Factory) frontiers, and supplies integrated design concepts for these facilities; and (3) carries out a program of advanced accelerator R&D (AARD) in the field of high quality beam sources, and novel beam manipulation techniques.

  14. Present and future prospects of accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kutschera, W.

    1987-04-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) has become a powerful technique for measuring extremely low abundances (10/sup -10/ to 10/sup -15/ relative to stable isotopes) of long-lived radioisotopes with half-lives in the range from 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 8/ years. With a few exceptions, tandem accelerators turned out to be the most useful instruments for AMS measurements. Both natural (mostly cosmogenic) and man-made (anthropogenic) radioisotopes are studied with this technique. In some cases very low concentrations of stable isotope are also measured. Applications of AMS cover a large variety of fields including anthropology, archaeology, oceanography, hydrology, climatology, volcanology, minerals exploration, cosmochemistry, meteoritics, glaciology, sedimentary processes, geochronology, environmental physics, astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics. Present and future prospects of AMS are discussed as an interplay between the continuous development of new techniques and the investigation of problems in the above mentioned fields. Typical factors to be considered are energy range and type of accelerator, and the possibilities of dedicated versus partial use of new or existing accelerators.

  15. Present and future prospects of accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, Walter

    1988-05-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has become a powerful technique for measuring extremely low abundances (10 -10 to 10 -15 relative to stable isotopes) of long-lived radioisotopes with half-lives in the range from 10 2 to 10 8 years. With a few exceptions, tandem accelerators turned out to be the most useful instruments for AMS measurements. Both natural (mostly cosmogenic) and manmade (anthropogenic) radioisotopes are studied with this technique. In some cases very low concentrations of stable isotopes are also measured. Applications of AMS cover a large variety of fields including anthropology, archaeology, oceanography, hydrology, climatology, volcanology, mineral exploration, cosmochemistry, meteoritics, glaciology, sedimentary processes, geochronology, environmental physics, astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics. Present and future prospects of AMS will be discussed as an interplay between the continuous development of new techniques and the investigation of problems in the above mentioned fields. Depending on the specific problem to be investigated, different aspects of an AMS system are of importance. Typical factors to be considered are energy range and type of accelerator, and the possibilities of dedicated versus partial use of new or existing accelerators.

  16. Development of long-lived thick carbon stripper foils for high energy heavy ion accelerators by a heavy ion beam sputtering method

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Kawasaki, Katsunori; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2013-04-19

    In the past decade, we have developed extremely long-lived carbon stripper foils of 1-50 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} thickness prepared by a heavy ion beam sputtering method. These foils were mainly used for low energy heavy ion beams. Recently, high energy negative Hydrogen and heavy ion accelerators have started to use carbon stripper foils of over 100 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} in thickness. However, the heavy ion beam sputtering method was unsuccessful in production of foils thicker than about 50 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} because of the collapse of carbon particle build-up from substrates during the sputtering process. The reproduction probability of the foils was less than 25%, and most of them had surface defects. However, these defects were successfully eliminated by introducing higher beam energies of sputtering ions and a substrate heater during the sputtering process. In this report we describe a highly reproducible method for making thick carbon stripper foils by a heavy ion beam sputtering with a Krypton ion beam.

  17. Studies of equation of state properties of high-energy density matter using intense heavy ion beams at the future FAIR facility: The HEDgeHOB collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Spiller, P.; Udrea, S.; Cortazar, O. D.; Deutsch, C.; Fortov, V. E.; Gryaznov, V.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Ni, P.; Piriz, A. R.; Shutov, A.; Temporal, M.; Varentsov, D.

    2006-04-01

    This paper shows with the help of numerical simulations the capabilities of intense heavy ion beams to induce states of high-energy density (HED) in matter. Two different experimental schemes are considered, namely, HIHEX (heavy ion heating and expansion) and LAPLAS (laboratory planetary sciences). The first scheme considers isochoric heating and subsequent isentropic expansion of matter while the latter deals with low entropy compression of matter using multiple shock reflection technique. This work has been done within the framework of the HEDgeHOB (high-energy density matter generated by heavy ion beams) collaboration that has been formed to organize and facilitate construction of experimental facilities and later to perform experimental work in the field of HED matter at the future FAIR (facility for antiprotons and ion research) facility.

  18. Optical signal acquisition and processing in future accelerator diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, G.P. ); Elliott, A. )

    1992-01-01

    Beam detectors such as striplines and wall current monitors rely on matched electrical networks to transmit and process beam information. Frequency bandwidth, noise immunity, reflections, and signal to noise ratio are considerations that require compromises limiting the quality of the measurement. Recent advances in fiber optics related technologies have made it possible to acquire and process beam signals in the optical domain. This paper describes recent developments in the application of these technologies to accelerator beam diagnostics. The design and construction of an optical notch filter used for a stochastic cooling system is used as an example. Conceptual ideas for future beam detectors are also presented.

  19. Optical signal acquisition and processing in future accelerator diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, G.P.; Elliott, A.

    1992-12-31

    Beam detectors such as striplines and wall current monitors rely on matched electrical networks to transmit and process beam information. Frequency bandwidth, noise immunity, reflections, and signal to noise ratio are considerations that require compromises limiting the quality of the measurement. Recent advances in fiber optics related technologies have made it possible to acquire and process beam signals in the optical domain. This paper describes recent developments in the application of these technologies to accelerator beam diagnostics. The design and construction of an optical notch filter used for a stochastic cooling system is used as an example. Conceptual ideas for future beam detectors are also presented.

  20. Use of permanent magnets in accelerator technology: Present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Halbach, K.

    1987-05-01

    This report is a collection of viewgraphs discussing accelerator magnets. Permanent magnet systems have some generic properties that, under some circumstances, make them not only mildly preferable over electromagnets, but make it possible to do things that can not be done with any other technology. After a general discussion of these generic advantages, some specific permanent magnet systems will be described. Special emphasis will be placed on systems that have now, or are likely to have in the future, a significant impact on how some materials research is conducted. 4 refs., 33 figs.

  1. Recent Progress on Ferroelectric Polymer-Based Nanocomposites for High Energy Density Capacitors: Synthesis, Dielectric Properties, and Future Aspects.

    PubMed

    Prateek; Thakur, Vijay Kumar; Gupta, Raju Kumar

    2016-04-13

    Dielectric polymer nanocomposites are rapidly emerging as novel materials for a number of advanced engineering applications. In this Review, we present a comprehensive review of the use of ferroelectric polymers, especially PVDF and PVDF-based copolymers/blends as potential components in dielectric nanocomposite materials for high energy density capacitor applications. Various parameters like dielectric constant, dielectric loss, breakdown strength, energy density, and flexibility of the polymer nanocomposites have been thoroughly investigated. Fillers with different shapes have been found to cause significant variation in the physical and electrical properties. Generally, one-dimensional and two-dimensional nanofillers with large aspect ratios provide enhanced flexibility versus zero-dimensional fillers. Surface modification of nanomaterials as well as polymers adds flavor to the dielectric properties of the resulting nanocomposites. Nowadays, three-phase nanocomposites with either combination of fillers or polymer matrix help in further improving the dielectric properties as compared to two-phase nanocomposites. Recent research has been focused on altering the dielectric properties of different materials while also maintaining their superior flexibility. Flexible polymer nanocomposites are the best candidates for application in various fields. However, certain challenges still present, which can be solved only by extensive research in this field.

  2. Probing BSM neutrino physics with flavor and spectral distortions: Prospects for future high-energy neutrino telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Ian M.; Murase, Kohta

    2016-04-01

    The flavor of cosmic neutrinos may help unveil their sources and could reveal the presence of new physics in the neutrino sector. We consider impacts of next-generation neutrino detectors, including the planned upgrade to neutrino detector, IceCube-Gen2, which is well positioned to make dramatic improvements in both flavor and spectral measurements. We show that various models in neutrino physics beyond the Standard Model, such as neutrino decay, pseudo-Dirac states, and neutrino self-scattering, may be found or strongly constrained at IceCube-Gen2 and Cubic Kilometre Neutrino Telescope. We find that the additional flavor discriminants given by Glashow resonance events and so-called "double-bang" topologies improve the ability to access the flavor of the cosmic high-energy neutrinos and probe the beyond the Standard Model physics. In addition, although details depend on source properties, Glashow resonance events have the additional feature of being able to inform us of the relative strengths of neutrino and antineutrino emission, which may help us discriminate astrophysical scenarios.

  3. Study of the very high energy gamma-ray spectrum from the Galactic Center and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Alexander V.; Moulin, Emmanuel; Silk, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    Ground-based gamma-ray observations of the Galactic Center region have revealed a high energy gamma-ray source spatially coincident with the gravitational centroid of our Galaxy. The pointlike emission detected by HESS exhibits an energy cutoff at about 10 TeV. We identify the parameters of the best fit of the exponential and the superexponential cutoff models to the spectrum of the pointlike source and find that the superexponential one provides a similar quality of fit to the spectrum of the pointlike source as the best-fit exponential cutoff model, while a dark matter interpretation does not provide as good a fit in the whole energy range of the signal. Based on the magnitude of the flux we derive constraints in the plane of the slope of the density profile γ and the critical radius, below which the density is assumed to be constant, rc. Motivated by recent results on the spectrum and morphology from HESS and by the possible observation of a superexponential cutoff, we forecast the observations of superexponential versus exponential cutoffs by the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array. We derive a formula for J -factor in the small-angle approximation and propose approximate morphological constraints on the central source.

  4. Updated results from the RICE experiment and future prospects for ultra-high energy neutrino detection at the south pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, I.; Hussain, S.; Seckel, D.; Besson, D.; Fensholt, E.; Ralston, J.; Taylor, J.; Ratzlaff, K.; Young, R.

    2012-03-01

    The RICE experiment seeks observation of ultra-high energy (UHE; Eν>1017eV) neutrinos interacting in Antarctic ice, by measurement of the radio frequency (RF) Cherenkov radiation resulting from the collision of a neutrino with an ice molecule. RICE was initiated in 1999 as a first-generation prototype for an eventual, large-scale in-ice UHE neutrino detector. Herein, we present updated limits on the diffuse UHE neutrino flux, based on 12 years of data taken between 1999 and 2010. We find no convincing neutrino candidates, resulting in 95% confidence-level model-dependent limits on the flux Eν2dϕ/dEν<0.5×10-6GeV/(cm2s-sr) in the energy range 1017

  5. Magnetic Reconnection-Powered Relativistic Particle Acceleration, High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission, and Pair Production in Coronae of Accreting Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental plasma process believed to play an important role in energetics of magnetically-dominated coronae of various astrophysical objects including accreting black holes. Building up on recent advances in kinetic simulations of relativistic collisionless reconnection, we investigate nonthermal particle acceleration and its key observational consequences for these systems. We argue that reconnection can efficiently accelerate coronal electrons (as well as ions) up to hundreds of MeV or even GeV energies. In brightest systems, radiation back-reaction due to inverse-Compton (and/or synchrotron) emission becomes important at these energies and limits any further electron acceleration, thereby turning reconnection layers into powerful and efficient radiators of γ-rays. We then evaluate the rate of absorption of the resulting γ-ray photons by the ambient soft (X-ray) photon fields and show that it can be a significant source of pair production, with important implications for the composition of black-hole coronae and jets. Finally, we assess the prospects of laboratory studies of magnetic reconnection in the physical regimes relevant to black-hole accretion flows using modern and future laser-plasma facilities. This work is supported by DOE, NSF, and NASA.

  6. Accelerators for America's Future Workshop: Medicine and Biology.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Jose R

    2012-11-01

    "Medicine and Biology" was one of five working groups of the "Accelerators for America's Future" Workshop held October 2009. The recently-released workshop report stresses that the leadership position of the United States in fields where accelerators play an important part is being seriously eroded because of lack of coordinated agency support for accelerator research and development. This is particularly true for biology and medicine. Radiation therapy with beams of protons and light ions was pioneered in the United States and has proven successful in the treatment of several different tumor sites in the body. Proton therapy is available in the United States in a number of centers; however, all but one contain accelerator and beam-delivery components manufactured abroad. Light-ion therapy is only available overseas. Why has the United States lost its lead in this field? The Working Group noted that in other countries, central governments are subsidizing construction and technology development by their industries, whereas in the United States funding for purchasing and building clinical facilities must be raised from private sources. As a result, most proton facilities in the United States, by virtue of having to recover investment costs, favor reimbursable treatments, detracting from the development of research protocols. The financial hurdle for starting a light-ion facility in the United States has been totally prohibitive for the private-equity market. While technological advances are being made that will provide some reduction in capital costs, the field will not flourish in the United States until effective funding means are developed that do not put the full burden on the private sector.

  7. SU-E-T-268: Evaluation of Photoneutron Contamination in Elekta Synergy-S High-Energy Linear Accelerator and Indigenous Novel Solution: The AIIMS Experience.

    PubMed

    Subramani, V; Singh, M; Sharma, S; Bisht, R; Gopishankar, N; Rath, G

    2012-06-01

    The photoneutron contamination problem was encountered due to laminated barrier wall and short maze. The purpose of this study was to report our experience in evaluating the photoneutron contamination during radiation safety survey and solution. The photoneutron contamination measurement was carried out in Elekta Synergy-S high-energylinear accelerator for 15MV beam. A NE Neutron survey meter and for photon, Victoreen and RADOS survey meters were used. The laminated barrier wall composed of 37cm steel with 30cm concrete both side and short maze length of 5 meter. During safety survey, higher photoneutron levels for 15MV X-rays at treatment room door found. The effect of photoneutron contamination as function of neutron shielding materials of wood, polyethylene and boron and thickness, distance, locations and directions to the control console at distance upto 7 meter were investigated for 4 gantry angles at locations of treatment room entry doors namely door1(A), door2(B), console(C), conduit (D) and above-ceiling(G) for 15MV. The initial safety survey showed that neutron level of 47mR/h and photon leakage of 3.2mR/hr at the treatment entry room door1. The neutron values could bring down to the level of acceptance at the treatment entry door2, but the photon values are not acceptable. Therefore, 30cm concrete wall block was made at the location of door2 and another bend was taken. Finally, treatment entrance room door was made using 3cm polyethylene neutron shielding materials in order to achieve the both neutron contamination and photon leakage within the acceptable levels. The neutron sliding-door is operated manually in finger-push by technologist for day-to-day usage. This simple solution is cost effective and increases the patient throughput. This study underlines that one needs to take appropriate safety measures prior to facility design whenever the space constraints situations arises for high energy linear accelerator. © 2012 American Association of

  8. Dosimetric properties of radiophotoluminescent glass rod detector in high-energy photon beams from a linear accelerator and cyber-knife.

    PubMed

    Arakia, Fujio; Moribe, Nobuyuki; Shimonobou, Toshiaki; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2004-07-01

    A fully automatic radiophotoluminescent glass rod dosimeter (GRD) system has recently become commercially available. This article discusses the dosimetric properties of the GRD including uniformity and reproducibility of signal, dose linearity, and energy and directional dependence in high-energy photon beams. In addition, energy response is measured in electron beams. The uniformity and reproducibility of the signal from 50 GRDs using a 60Co beam are both +/- 1.1% (one standard deviation). Good dose linearity of the GRD is maintained for doses ranging from 0.5 to 30 Gy, the lower and upper limits of this study, respectively. The GRD response is found to show little energy dependence in photon energies of a 60Co beam, 4 MV (TPR20(10)=0.617) and 10 MV (TPR(20)10=0.744) x-ray beams. However, the GRD responses for 9 MeV (mean energy, Ez = 3.6 MeV) and 16 MeV (Ez = 10.4 MeV) electron beams are 4%-5% lower than that for a 60Co beam in the beam quality dependence. The measured angular dependence of GRD, ranging from 0 degrees (along the long axis of GRD) to 120 degrees is within 1.5% for a 4 MV x-ray beam. As applications, a linear accelerator-based radiosurgery system and Cyber-Knife output factors are measured by a GRD and compared with those from various detectors including a p-type silicon diode detector, a diamond detector, and an ion chamber. It is found that the GRD is a very useful detector for small field dosimetry, in particular, below 10 mm circular fields.

  9. Photoneutron depth dose equivalent distributions in high-energy X-ray medical accelerators by a novel position-sensitive dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, Amir; Sohrabi, Mehdi

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to; (1) investigate employing a novel position-sensitive mega-size polycarbonate (MSPC) dosimeter for photoneutron (PN) depth, profile and dose equivalent distributions studies in a multilayer polyethylene phantom in a Siemens ONCOR accelerator, and (2) develop depth dose equivalent distribution matrix data at different depths and positions of the phantom for patient PN dose equivalent determination and in particular for PN secondary cancer risk estimation. Position-sensitive MSPC dosimeters were successfully exposed at 9 different depths of the phantom in a 10×10cm(2) X-ray field. The dosimeters were processed in mega-size electrochemical chambers at optimum conditions. Each MSPC dosimeter was placed at a known phantom depth for PN depth dose equivalents and profiles on transverse, longitudinal and diagonal axes and isodose equivalent distribution studies in and out of the X-ray beam. PN dose equivalent distributions at any depth showed the highest value at the beam central axis and decreases as the distance increases. PN dose equivalent at any position studied in the axes has a maximum value on the phantom surface which decreases as depth increases due to flux reduction by multi-elastic scattering interactions. Extensive PN dose equivalent matrix data at different depths and positions in the phantom were determined. The position-sensitive MSPC dosimeters proved to be highly efficient for PN depth, profile and isodose equivalent distribution studies. The extensive data obtained highly assists for determining PN dose equivalent of a patient undergoing high-energy X-ray therapy and for PN secondary cancer risk estimation. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Intercomparison of high energy neutron personnel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Akabani, G.; Loesch, R.M.

    1993-03-01

    An intercomparison of high-energy neutron personnel dosimeters was performed to evaluate the uniformity of the response characteristics of typical neutron dosimeters presently in use at US Department of Energy (DOE) accelerator facilities. It was necessary to perform an intercomparison because there are no national or international standards for high-energy neutron dosimetry. The testing that is presently under way for the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is limited to the use of neutron sources that range in energy from about 1 keV to 2 MeV. Therefore, the high-energy neutron dosimeters presently in use at DOE accelerator facilities are not being tested effectively. This intercomparison employed neutrons produced by the {sup 9}Be(p,n){sup 9}B interaction at the University of Washington cyclotron, using 50-MeV protons. The resulting neutron energy spectrum extended to a maximum of approximately 50-MeV, with a mean energy of about 20-MeV. Intercomparison results for currently used dosimeters, including Nuclear Type A (NTA) film, thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo, and track-etch dosimeters (TEDs), indicated a wide variation in response to identical doses of high-energy neutrons. Results of this study will be discussed along with a description of plans for future work.

  11. Ion effects in future circular and linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, the author discusses ion effects relevant to future storage rings and linear colliders. The author first reviews the conventional ion effects observed in present storage rings and then discusses how these effects will differ in the next generation of rings and linacs. These future accelerators operate in a new regime because of the high current long bunch trains and the very small transverse beam emittances. Usually, storage rings are designed with ion clearing gaps to prevent ion trapping between bunch trains or beam revolutions. Regardless, ions generated within a single bunch train can have significant effects. The same is true in transport lines and linacs, where typical vacuum pressures are relatively high. Amongst other effects, the author addresses the tune spreads due to the ions and the resulting filamentation which can severely limit emittance correction techniques in future linear colliders, the bunch-to-bunch coupling due to the ions which can cause a multi-bunch instability with fast growth rates, and the betatron coupling and beam halo creation which limit the vertical emittance and beam lifetimes.

  12. ELIMED, future hadrontherapy applications of laser-accelerated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, Giuseppe A. P.; Carpinelli, Massimo; Cuttone, Giacomo; Gammino, Santo; Bijan Jia, S.; Korn, Georg; Maggiore, Mario; Manti, Lorenzo; Margarone, Daniele; Prokupek, Jan; Renis, Marcella; Romano, Francesco; Schillaci, Francesco; Tomasello, Barbara; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Tramontana, Antonella; Velyhan, Andriy

    2013-12-01

    Laser-ion acceleration has recently gained a great interest as an alternative to conventional and more expensive acceleration techniques. These ion beams have desirable qualities such as small source size, high luminosity and small emittance to be used in different fields as Nuclear Physics, Medical Physics, etc. This is very promising specially for the future perspective of a new concept of hadrontherapy based on laser-based devices could be developed, replacing traditional accelerating machines. Before delivering laser-driven beams for treatments they have to be handled, cleaned from unwanted particles and characterized in order to have the clinical requirements. In fact ion energy spectra have exponential trend, almost 100% energy spread and a wide angular divergence which is the biggest issue in the beam transport and, hence, in a wider use of this technology. In order to demonstrate the clinical applicability of laser-driven beams new collaboration between ELI-Beamlines project researchers from Prague (Cz) and a INFN-LNS group from Catania (I) has been already launched and scientists from different countries have already express their will in joining the project. This cooperation has been named ELIMED (MEDical application at ELIBeamlines) and will take place inside the ELI-Beamlines infrastructure located in Prague. This work describes the schedule of the ELIMED project and the design of the energy selector which will be realized at INFN-LNS. The device is an important part of the whole transport beam line which will be realised in order to make the ion beams suitable for medical applications.

  13. Accelerator Challenges and Opportunities for Future Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S

    2010-12-24

    There are three types of future neutrino facilities currently under study, one based on decays of stored beta-unstable ion beams (?Beta Beams?), one based on decays of stored muon beams (?Neutrino Factory?), and one based on the decays of an intense pion beam (?Superbeam?). In this paper we discuss the challenges each design team must face and the R&D being carried out to turn those challenges into technical opportunities. A new program, the Muon Accelerator Program, has begun in the U.S. to carry out the R&D for muon-based facilities, including both the Neutrino Factory and, as its ultimate goal, a Muon Collider. The goals of this program will be briefly described.

  14. Status and Future Developments in Large Accelerator Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. White

    2006-10-31

    Over the years, accelerator control systems have evolved from small hardwired systems to complex computer controlled systems with many types of graphical user interfaces and electronic data processing. Today's control systems often include multiple software layers, hundreds of distributed processors, and hundreds of thousands of lines of code. While it is clear that the next generation of accelerators will require much bigger control systems, they will also need better systems. Advances in technology will be needed to ensure the network bandwidth and CPU power can provide reasonable update rates and support the requisite timing systems. Beyond the scaling problem, next generation systems face additional challenges due to growing cyber security threats and the likelihood that some degree of remote development and operation will be required. With a large number of components, the need for high reliability increases and commercial solutions can play a key role towards this goal. Future control systems will operate more complex machines and need to present a well integrated, interoperable set of tools with a high degree of automation. Consistency of data presentation and exception handling will contribute to efficient operations. From the development perspective, engineers will need to provide integrated data management in the beginning of the project and build adaptive software components around a central data repository. This will make the system maintainable and ensure consistency throughout the inevitable changes during the machine lifetime. Additionally, such a large project will require professional project management and disciplined use of well-defined engineering processes. Distributed project teams will make the use of standards, formal requirements and design and configuration control vital. Success in building the control system of the future may hinge on how well we integrate commercial components and learn from best practices used in other industries.

  15. High Energy Physics Advisory Panel. A report of the 1980 Subpanel on review and planning for the US High Energy Physics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    The status of high energy physics in the US is examined, and some recommendations for future activities in this field are made: utilization of the forefront accelerator facilities should be intensified, the new superconducting projects should proceed with all deliberate speed, and increasing support should be devoted to detector and accelerator R and D. (RWR)

  16. A New Method for the Reconstruction of Very-High-Energy Gamma-Ray Spectra and Application to Galactic Cosmic-Ray Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Milton Virgílio

    2014-06-01

    In this thesis, high-energy (HE; E > 0.1 GeV) and very-high-energy (VHE; E > 0.1 TeV) γ-ray data were investigated to probe Galactic stellar clusters (SCs) and star-forming regions (SFRs) as sites of hadronic Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) acceleration. In principle, massive SCs and SFRs could accelerate GCRs at the shock front of the collective SC wind fed by the individual high-mass stars. The subsequently produced VHE γ rays would be measured with imaging air-Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). A couple of the Galactic VHE γ-ray sources, including those potentially produced by SCs, fill a large fraction of the field-of-view (FoV) and require additional observations of source-free regions to determine the dominant background for a spectral reconstruction. A new method of reconstructing spectra for such extended sources without the need of further observations is developed: the Template Background Spectrum (TBS). This methods is based on a method to generate skymaps, which determines background in parameter space. The idea is the creation of a look-up of the background normalisation in energy, zenith angle, and angular separation and to account for possible systematics. The results obtained with TBS and state-of-the-art background-estimation methods on H.E.S.S. data are in good agreement. With TBS even those sources could be reconstructed that normally would need further observations. Therefore, TBS is the third method to reconstruct VHE γ-ray spectra, but the first one to not need additional observations in the analysis of extended sources. The discovery of the largest VHE γ-ray source HESS J1646-458 (2.2° in size) towards the SC Westerlund 1 (Wd 1) can be plausibly explained by the SC-wind scenario. But owing to its size, other alternative counterparts to the TeV emission (pulsar, binary system, magnetar) were found in the FoV. Therefore, an association of HESS J1646-458 with the SC is favoured, but cannot be confirmed. The SC Pismis 22 is located in the centre of

  17. Status and future directions for advanced accelerator research - conventional and non-conventional collider concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between advanced accelerator research and future directions for particle physics is discussed. Comments are made about accelerator research trends in hadron colliders, muon colliders, and e{sup +}3{sup {minus}} linear colliders.

  18. High energy transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woosley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    A meeting was convened on the campus of the University of California at Santa Cruz during the two-week interval July 11 through July 22, 1983. Roughly 100 participants were chosen so as to give broad representation to all aspects of high energy transients. Ten morning review sessions were held in which invited speakers discussed the current status of observations and theory of the above subjects. Afternoon workshops were also held, usually more than one per day, to informally review various technical aspects of transients, confront shortcomings in theoretical models, and to propose productive courses for future research. Special attention was also given to the instrumentation used to study high energy transient and the characteristics and goals of a dedicated space mission to study transients in the next decade were determined. A listing of articles written by various members of the workshop is included.

  19. Astrophysical High-Energy Neutrinos and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta

    2008-10-22

    High-energy neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been expected in various scenarios. Many predictions for prompt and afterglow emission were done in the pre-Swift era. After the launch of Swift, several new discoveries such as flares have allowed us to expect additional new possibilities of high-energy neutrino emission from GRBs. In this paper, we overview various predictions of GRB neutrino emission, and discuss feature prospects. High-energy neutrino signals may be detected by future-coming large neutrino detectors such as IceCube and KM3Net. If detected, they should be very useful to know the nature of cosmic-ray acceleration sites. It would also help us to reveal the possible connection between ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) and GRBs. Finally, we also compare a prediction of GRB neutrinos with several predictions for other sources such as active galactic nuclei (AGN) and clusters of galaxies.

  20. Radio frequency systems for present and future accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Raka, E.C.

    1987-01-01

    Rf systems are described for the FNAL Main Ring and Tevatron Ring, CERN SPS and LEP, and HERA proton acceleration system, CERN PS e/sup +/e/sup minus/ acceleration system, and CERN EPA monochromatic cavity. Low impedance rf systems in CERN ISR, the Brookhaven CBA, and SSC are also discussed.

  1. Future-singularity-free accelerating expansion with modified Poisson brackets

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Wontae; Son, Edwin J.

    2007-01-15

    We show that the second accelerating expansion of the universe appears smoothly from the decelerating phase, which follows the initial inflation, in the two-dimensional soluble semiclassical dilaton gravity along with the modified Poisson brackets with noncommutativity between the relevant fields. This is in contrast to the fact that the ordinary solution of the equations of motion following from the conventional Poisson algebra describes a permanent accelerating universe without any phase change. In this modified model, it turns out that the noncommutative Poisson algebra is responsible for the remarkable phase transition to the second accelerating expansion.

  2. Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, P.; Cary, J.; McInnes, L.C.; Mori, W.; Ng, C.; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-14

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors. ComPASS is in the first year of executing its plan to develop the next-generation HPC accelerator modeling tools. ComPASS aims to develop an integrated simulation environment that will utilize existing and new accelerator physics modules with petascale capabilities, by employing modern computing and solver technologies. The ComPASS vision is to deliver to accelerator scientists a virtual accelerator and virtual prototyping modeling environment, with the necessary multiphysics, multiscale capabilities. The plan for this development includes delivering accelerator modeling applications appropriate for each stage of the ComPASS software evolution. Such applications are already being used to address challenging problems in accelerator design and optimization. The ComPASS organization

  3. Wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The search for new methods to accelerate particle beams to high energy using high gradients has resulted in a number of candidate schemes. One of these, wakefield acceleration, has been the subject of considerable R D in recent years. This effort has resulted in successful proof of principle experiments and in increased understanding of many of the practical aspects of the technique. Some wakefield basics plus the status of existing and proposed experimental work is discussed, along with speculations on the future of wake field acceleration. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science And Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators And Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Cary, John; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; Mori, Warren; Ng, Cho; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-10-21

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  5. Community petascale project for accelerator science and simulation : Advancing computational science for future accelerators and accelerator technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, P.; Cary, J.; McInnes, L. C.; Mori, W.; Ng, C.; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.

    2008-01-01

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R & D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  6. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Cary, John; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; Mori, Warren; Ng, Cho; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2008-07-01

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators is essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modeling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multi-physics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  7. Current and future uses of accelerators in particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    Beams of artificially accelerated heavy ions, protons, antiprotons, electrons, and positrons currently available at (and planned for) numerous facilities around the world are a valuable resource to the Cosmic Ray community. Such beams have been used to test detector concepts, calibrate balloon-borne and space flight experiments and to measure fundamental nuclear physics parameter necessary for the interpretation of Cosmic Ray data. As new experiments are flown the quality and extent of Cosmic Ray measurements will continue to improve. It will be necessary to increase activity at ground based accelerators in order to test/calibrate these new instruments and to maintain (or possibly improve) the ability to interpret these data. In this area, the newly formed Transport Collaboration, supported by NASA, will be providing new nuclear interaction cross section measurements for beams with Z less than or = 58 and supporting new instrument calibrations at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac accelerator.

  8. Current and future uses of accelerators in particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    Beams of artificially accelerated heavy ions, protons, antiprotons, electrons, and positrons currently available at (and planned for) numerous facilities around the world are a valuable resource to the Cosmic Ray community. Such beams have been used to test detector concepts, calibrate balloon-borne and space flight experiments and to measure fundamental nuclear physics parameter necessary for the interpretation of Cosmic Ray data. As new experiments are flown the quality and extent of Cosmic Ray measurements will continue to improve. It will be necessary to increase activity at ground based accelerators in order to test/calibrate these new instruments and to maintain (or possibly improve) the ability to interpret these data. In this area, the newly formed Transport Collaboration, supported by NASA, will be providing new nuclear interaction cross section measurements for beams with Z less than or = 58 and supporting new instrument calibrations at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac accelerator.

  9. Particle Accelerators for Radiotherapy:. Present Status and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciszewski, Wieslaw; Scharf, Waldemar

    2004-07-01

    The paper describes the development of the application of particle accelerators in the treatment of cancer diseases over the past fifty years. Special emphasis is put on the routine application of conventional electron accelerators delivering electron and photon beams. This is the largest group of devices for radiotherapy (over 7500 machines operating worldwide). The number of patients reaches 5 million per year. The medical electron linacs have recently undergone considerable modifications of construction, in particular the systems of radiation field shaping. Contemporary accelerators for radiotherapy are equipped with multi-leaf collimators (MLC) which, in conjunction with IMRT (Intensity Modulation Radiation Therapy) technique and special system of therapy planning, assure considerably higher precision, effectiveness and quality of treatment.

  10. Proceedings of the DOE workshop on the role of a high-current accelerator in the future of nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, D.C.; Peterson, E.J.

    1989-05-01

    The meeting was prompted by recent problems with isotope availability from DOE accelerator facilities; these difficulties have resulted from conflicting priorities between physics experiments and isotope production activities. The workshop was a forum in which the nuclear medicine community, isotope producers, industry, and other interested groups could discuss issues associated with isotope availability (including continuous supply options), the role of DOE and industry in isotope production, and the importance of research isotopes to the future of nuclear medicine. The workshop participants endorsed DOE's presence in supplying radioisotopes for research purposes and recommended that DOE should immediately provide additional support for radionuclide production in the form of personnel and supplies, DOE should establish a policy that would allow income from sales of future ''routine'' radionuclide production to be used to support technicians, DOE should obtain a 70-MeV, 500-/mu/A variable-energy proton accelerator as soon as possible, and DOE should also immediately solicit proposals to evaluate the usefulness of a new or upgraded high-energy, high-current machine for production of research radionuclides. This proceedings volume is a summary of workshop sessions that explored the future radionuclide needs of the nuclear medicine community and discussed the DOE production capabilities that would be required to meet these needs.

  11. Current trends in non-accelerator particle physics: 1, Neutrino mass and oscillation. 2, High energy neutrino astrophysics. 3, Detection of dark matter. 4, Search for strange quark matter. 5, Magnetic monopole searches

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yudong |

    1995-07-01

    This report is a compilation of papers reflecting current trends in non-accelerator particle physics, corresponding to talks that its author was invited to present at the Workshop on Tibet Cosmic Ray Experiment and Related Physics Topics held in Beijing, China, April 4--13, 1995. The papers are entitled `Neutrino Mass and Oscillation`, `High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics`, `Detection of Dark Matter`, `Search for Strange Quark Matter`, and `Magnetic Monopole Searches`. The report is introduced by a survey of the field and a brief description of each of the author`s papers.

  12. Towards Attosecond High-Energy Electron Bunches: Controlling Self-Injection in Laser-Wakefield Accelerators Through Plasma-Density Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tooley, M. P.; Ersfeld, B.; Yoffe, S. R.; Noble, A.; Brunetti, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Islam, M. R.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2017-07-01

    Self-injection in a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator is usually achieved by increasing the laser intensity until the threshold for injection is exceeded. Alternatively, the velocity of the bubble accelerating structure can be controlled using plasma density ramps, reducing the electron velocity required for injection. We present a model describing self-injection in the short-bunch regime for arbitrary changes in the plasma density. We derive the threshold condition for injection due to a plasma density gradient, which is confirmed using particle-in-cell simulations that demonstrate injection of subfemtosecond bunches. It is shown that the bunch charge, bunch length, and separation of bunches in a bunch train can be controlled by tailoring the plasma density profile.

  13. Designing high energy accelerators under DOE's New Culture'' for environment and safety: An example, the Fermilab 150 GeV Main Injector proton synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, W.B.

    1991-05-01

    Fermilab has initiated a design for a new Main Injector (150 GeV proton synchrotron) to take the place of the current Main Ring accelerator. New Culture'' environmental and safety questions are having to be addressed. The paper will detail the necessary steps that have to be taken in order to obtain the permits which control the start of construction. Obviously these depend on site-specific circumstances, however some steps are universally applicable. In the example, floodplains and wetlands are affected and therefore the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance is a significant issue. The important feature is to reduce the relevant regulations to a concise set of easily understandable requirements. The effort required and the associated time line will be presented so that other new accelerator proposals can benefit from the experience gained from this example.

  14. Harvard University High Energy Physics progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The principal goals of this work are to carry out forefront programs in high energy physics research and to provide first rate educational opportunities for students. The experimental program supported through HEPL is carried out at the major accelerator centers in the world and addresses some of the most important questions in high energy physics. The program is based at Harvard`s High Energy Physics Laboratory, which has offices, computing facilities, and engineering support, and both electronics and machine shops.

  15. Harvard University High Energy Physics progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The principal goals of this work are to carry out forefront programs in high energy physics research and to provide first rate educational opportunities for students. The experimental program supported through HEPL is carried out at the major accelerator centers in the world and addresses some of the most important questions in high energy physics. The program is based at Harvard's High Energy Physics Laboratory, which has offices, computing facilities, and engineering support, and both electronics and machine shops.

  16. The ANSTO high energy heavy ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegele, Rainer; Cohen, David D.; Dytlewski, Nick

    1999-10-01

    Recently the construction of the ANSTO High Energy Heavy Ion Microprobe (HIMP) at the 10 MV ANTARES tandem accelerator has been completed. The high energy heavy ion microprobe focuses not only light ions at energies of 2-3 MeV, but is also capable of focusing heavy ions at high energies with ME/ q2 values up to 150 MeV amu and greater. First performance tests and results are reported here.

  17. LIGHT - from laser ion acceleration to future applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Markus; Light Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Creation of high intensity multi-MeV ion bunches by high power lasers became a reliable tool during the last 15 years. The laser plasma source provides for TV/m accelerating field gradients and initially sub-ps bunch lengths. However, the large envelope divergence and the continuous exponential energy spectrum are substential drawbacks for many possible applications. To face this problem, the LIGHT collaboration was founded (Laser Ion Generation, Handling and Transport). The collaboration consists of several university groups and research centers, namely TU Darmstadt, JWGU Frankfurt, HI Jena, HZDR Dresden and GSI Darmstadt. The central goal is building a test beamline for merging laser ion acceleration with conventional accelerator infrastructure at the GSI facility. In the latest experiments, low divergent proton bunches with a central energy of up to 10 MeV and containing >109 particles could be provided at up to 2.2 m behind the plasma source, using a pulsed solenoid. In a next step, a radiofrequency cavity will be added to the beamline for phase rotation of these bunches, giving access to sub-ns bunch lengths and reaching highest intensities. An overview of the LIGHT objectives and the recent experimental results will be given. This work was supported by HIC4FAIR.

  18. Dielectric wakefield accelerator to drive to the future FEL light sourcei.

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J.G.; Zholents, A.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A. )

    2011-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expensive instruments and the accelerator holds the largest portion of the cost of the entire facility. Using a high-energy gain dielectric wake-field accelerator (DWA) instead of the conventional accelerator may facilitate reduction of the facility size and significant cost saving. We show that a collinear dielectric wake-field accelerator can, in principle, accelerate low charge and high peak current electron bunches to a few GeV energy with up to 100 kHz bunch repetition rate. Several such accelerators can share the same tunnel and same CW superconducting linac (operating with a few MHz bunch repetition rate) whose sole purpose is feeding the DWAs with wake producing low energy, high charge electron bunches with a desirable periodicity. Then, ten or more x-ray FELs can operate independently, each using its own linac. In this paper, we present an initial case study of a single stage 850 GHz DWA based on a quartz tube with a {approx}100MV/m loaded gradient sufficient to accelerate a 50 pC main electron beam to 2.4 GeV at a 100 kHz bunch repetition rate in just under 30 meters.

  19. Operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-12-21

    The operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. Beamstrahlung limits the charge per bunch at low plasma densities. Reduced laser intensity is examined to improve accelerator efficiency in the beamstrahlung-limited regime.

  20. Status and future directions for advanced accelerator research-conventional and non-conventional collider concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.

    1997-03-01

    The relationship between advanced accelerator research and future directions for particle physics is discussed. Comments are made about accelerator research trends in hadron colliders, muon colliders, and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. The International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA): 1976 to the present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Roy

    2016-12-01

    The origins of the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) are described, together with its role in the particle physics community; also discussed are some of its past and current major activities.

  2. The International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA): 1976 to the present

    DOE PAGES

    Rubinstein, Roy

    2016-12-14

    The International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) has been in existence now for four decades. It plays an important role in allowing discussions by the world particle physics community on the status and future of very large particle accelerators and the particle physics and related fields associated with them. Here, this paper gives some indication of what ICFA is and does, and also describes its involvement in some of the more important developments in the particle physics field since its founding.

  3. High-Energy Amplitudes in the Next-to-Leading Order

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Balitsky

    2011-03-01

    High-energy scattering in the saturation region is described by the evolution of color dipoles. In the leading order this evolution is governed by the non-linear BK equation. To see if this equation is relevant for existing or future accelerators (like EIC or LHeC) one needs to know how big are the next-to-leading order (NLO) corrections. I review the calculation of the NLO corrections to high-energy amplitudes in QCD.

  4. An accelerator-driven reactor for meeting future energy demand

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Yang, Y.; Yu, A.

    1997-12-31

    Fissile fuel can be produced at a high rate using an accelerator-driven Pu-fueled subcritical fast reactor which avoids encountering a shortage of Pu during a high growth rate in the production of nuclear energy. Furthermore, the necessity of the early introduction of the fast reactor can be moderated. Subcritical operation provides flexible nuclear energy options along with high neutron economy for producing the fuel, for transmuting high-level waste such as minor actinides, and for efficiently converting excess and military Pu into proliferation-resistant fuel.

  5. Comment on ;Acceleration of particles to high energy via gravitational repulsion in the Schwarzschild field; [Astropart. Phys. 86 (2017) 18-20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.

    2017-09-01

    Comments are due on a recent paper by McGruder III (2017) in which the author deals with the concept of gravitational repulsion in the context of the Schwarzschild-Droste solution. Repulsion (deceleration) for ingoing particles into a black hole is a concept proposed several times starting from Droste himself in 1916. It is a coordinate effect appearing to an observer at a remote distance from the black hole and when coordinate time is employed. Repulsion has no bearing and relation to the local physics of the black hole, and moreover it cannot be held responsible for accelerating outgoing particles. Thereby, the energy boost of cosmic rays cannot be produced by repulsion.

  6. INTEGRAL IGR J18135-1751 = HESS J1813-178: A New Cosmic High-Energy Accelerator from keV to TeV Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubertini, P.; Bassani, L.; Malizia, A.; Bazzano, A.; Bird, A. J.; Dean, A. J.; De Rosa, A.; Lebrun, F.; Moran, L.; Renaud, M.; Stephen, J. B.; Terrier, R.; Walter, R.

    2005-08-01

    We report the discovery of a soft gamma-ray source, namely, IGR J18135-1751, detected with IBIS, the Imager on Board the INTEGRAL Satellite. The source is persistent and has a 20-100 keV luminosity of ~5.7× 1034 ergs s-1 (assuming a distance of 4 kpc). This source is coincident with one of the eight unidentified objects recently reported by the HESS collaboration as part of the first TeV survey of the inner part of the Galaxy. Two of these new sources found along the Galactic plane, HESS J1813-178 and HESS J1614-518, have no obvious lower energy counterparts, a fact that motivated the suggestion that they might be dark cosmic ray accelerators. HESS J1813-178 has a strongly absorbed X-ray counterpart, the ASCA source AGPS 273.4-17.8, showing a power-law spectrum with photon index ~1.8 and a total (Galactic plus intrinsic) absorption corresponding to NH~5×1022 cm-2. We hypothesize that the source is a pulsar wind nebula embedded in its supernova remnant. The lack of X-ray or gamma-ray variability, the radio morphology, and the ASCA spectrum are all compatible with this interpretation. In any case we rule out the hypothesis that HESS J1813-178 belongs to a new class of TeV objects or that it is a cosmic ``dark particle'' accelerator. Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data center funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Spain), the Czech Republic, and Poland and with the participation of Russia and the US.

  7. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  8. Generation of high-energy electron-positron pairs in the collision of a laser-accelerated electron beam with a multipetawatt laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobet, M.; Davoine, X.; d'Humières, E.; Gremillet, L.

    2017-04-01

    Generation of electron-positron pairs via the multiphoton Breit-Wheeler process in an all-optical scheme will be made possible on forthcoming high-power laser facilities through the collision of wakefield-accelerated GeV electrons with a counter-propagating laser pulse of 1 022- 1 023 W cm-2 peak intensity. By means of integrated 3D particle-in-cell simulations, we show that the production of high-density sources of ultrarelativistic electron-positron pairs is within the reach of soon-to-be-available laser systems. Under physical conditions accessible to the dual-beam CILEX-Apollon facility, we find that the generated positrons can carry a total charge of 0.05-1 nC, with a mean energy of 100-400 MeV and an angular divergence of 0.01-0.1 rad. The variations of the positron source's properties with respect to the laser parameters are also examined.

  9. DOSE AND GAMMA-RAY SPECTRA FROM NEUTRON-INDUCED RADIOACTIVITY IN MEDICAL LINEAR ACCELERATORS FOLLOWING HIGH-ENERGY TOTAL BODY IRRADIATION.

    PubMed

    Keehan, S; Taylor, M L; Smith, R L; Dunn, L; Kron, T; Franich, R D

    2016-12-01

    Production of radioisotopes in medical linear accelerators (linacs) is of concern when the beam energy exceeds the threshold for the photonuclear interaction. Staff and patients may receive a radiation dose as a result of the induced radioactivity in the linac. Gamma-ray spectroscopy was used to identify the isotopes produced following the delivery of 18 MV photon beams from a Varian 21EX and an Elekta Synergy. The prominent radioisotopes produced include (187)W, (63)Zn, (56)Mn, (24)Na and (28)Al in both linac models. The dose rate was measured at the beam exit window (12.6 µSv in the first 10 min) following 18 MV total body irradiation (TBI) beams. For a throughput of 24 TBI patients per year, staff members are estimated to receive an annual dose of up to 750 μSv at the patient location. This can be further reduced to 65 μSv by closing the jaws before re-entering the treatment bunker. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Accelerated partial breast irradiation: Past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Tann, Anne W; Hatch, Sandra S; Joyner, Melissa M; Wiederhold, Lee R; Swanson, Todd A

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) focuses higher doses of radiation during a shorter interval to the lumpectomy cavity, in the setting of breast conserving therapy for early stage breast cancer. The utilization of APBI has increased in the past decade because of the shorter treatment schedule and a growing body of outcome data showing positive cosmetic outcomes and high local control rates in selected patients undergoing breast conserving therapy. Technological advances in various APBI modalities, including intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy, intraoperative radiation therapy, and external beam radiation therapy, have made APBI more accessible in the community. Results of early APBI trials served as the basis for the current consensus guidelines, and multiple prospective randomized clinical trials are currently ongoing. The pending long term results of these trials will help us identify optimal candidates that can benefit from ABPI. Here we provide an overview of the clinical and cosmetic outcomes of various APBI techniques and review the current guidelines for selecting suitable breast cancer patients. We also discuss the impact of APBI on the economics of cancer care and patient reported quality of life. PMID:27777879

  11. Beam instrumentation for future high intense hadron accelerators at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, M.; Hu, M.; Tassotto, G.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Scarpine, V.; Shin, S.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    High intensity hadron beams of up to 2 MW beam power are a key element of new proposed experimental facilities at Fermilab. Project X, which includes a SCRF 8 GeV H{sup -} linac, will be the centerpiece of future HEP activities in the neutrino sector. After a short overview of this, and other proposed projects, we present the current status of the beam instrumentation activities at Fermilab with a few examples. With upgrades and improvements they can meet the requirements of the new beam facilities, however design and development of new instruments is needed, as shown by the prototype and conceptual examples in the last section.

  12. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-01: Dose and Energy Spectra From Neutron Induced Radioactivity in Medical Linear Accelerators Following High Energy Total Body Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Keehan, S; Taylor, M; Franich, R; Smith, R; Dunn, L; Kron, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the risk posed by neutron induced activation of components in medical linear accelerators (linacs) following the delivery of high monitor unit 18 MV photon beams such as used in TBI. Methods: Gamma spectroscopy was used to identify radioisotopes produced in components of a Varian 21EX and an Elekta Synergy following delivery of photon beams. Dose and risk estimates for TBI were assessed using dose deliveries from an actual patient treatment. A 1 litre spherical ion chamber (PTW, Germany) has been used to measure the dose at the beam exit window and at the total body irradiation (TBI) treatment couch following large and small field beams with long beam-on times. Measurements were also made outside of the closed jaws to quantify the benefit of the attenuation provided by the jaws. Results: The radioisotopes produced in the linac head have been identified as {sup 187}W, {sup 56}Mn, {sup 24}Na and {sup 28}Al, which have half-lives from between 2.3 min to 24 hours. The dose at the beam exit window following an 18 MV 2197 MU TBI beam delivery was 12.6 µSv in ten minutes. The dose rate at the TBI treatment couch 4.8 m away is a factor of ten lower. For a typical TBI delivered in six fractions each consisting of four beams and an annual patient load of 24, the annual dose estimate for a staff member at the treatment couch for ten minutes is 750 µSv. This can be further reduced by a factor of about twelve if the jaws are closed before entering the room, resulting in a dose estimate of 65 µSv. Conclusion: The dose resulting from the activation products for a representative TBI workload at our clinic of 24 patients per year is 750 µSv, which can be further reduced to 65 µSv by closing the jaws.

  13. High Energy Missile Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    hypervelocity missile concept has been investigated. This research and development project called High Energy Missile (HEMi) technology...currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 00 DEC 2004 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High Energy

  14. SU-E-T-472: Characterization of the Very High Energy Electrons, ISO - 250 MeV (VHEE) Beam Generated by ALPHA-X Laser Wakefield Accelerator Beam Line for Utilization in Monte Carlo Simulation for Biomedical Experiment Planning.

    PubMed

    Moskvin, V; Subiel, A; Desrosiers, C; Wiggins, M; Maryanski, M; Mendonca, M; Boyd, M; Sorensen, A; Cipiccia, S; Issac, R; Welsh, G; Brunetti, E; Aniculaesei, C; Jaroszynski, D A

    2012-06-01

    Progress in the development of compact high-energy pulsed laser- plasma wakefield accelerators is opening up the potential for using Very High Energy Electron (VHEEs) beams in the range of 150 - 250 MeV for biomedical studies. Initial experiments using VHEE for this purpose have been carried out using the ALPHA-X laser-plasma wakefield accelerator beam line at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK. The purpose of this investigation is to use Monte Carlo simulations to plan experiments and compare with characterization of the interaction of the VHEE beam using a dosimeter. An experiment using the VHEE beam to irradiate a muscle-equivalent BANG polymer gel dosimeter has been carried out. Simulations have been used to prepare for the experiments. These were undertaken using the expected average energy for a pulse set and an energy spread approximated by Gaussian distribution. The model was implemented in FLUKA Monte Carlo code with follow up modeling using the Geant4 toolkit. The results have been compared with 1mm̂3 voxel laser CT based measurements of the dose deposited in the BANG dosimeter and with measurement of the induced radioactivity. The results of the measured dose from induced radioactivity have been compared with data from the FLUKA simulations. The beam model based on an average energy of particles in irradiation gives an acceptable estimate of the induced radioactivity and the dose deposited in the BANG dosimeter. Comparison with the dosimeter scanned profiles shows that the structure of the spectra of VHEE beams in the experiment and secondary scattered particles in the beam line should be accounted for in any model. Such model description of the VHEE beam for the ALPHA-X beam line has been developed. Monte Carlo simulations using the FLUKA code is an efficient way to plan a VHEE experiment and analyze data from measurements. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Intense and exciting: current and future accelerator-based measurements of neutrino oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Accelerator-based experiments have been crucial in our understanding of neutrino oscillations. In this talk, I will give an overview of current accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments, which have observed electron neutrino appearance and made precision measurements of the parameters governing muon neutrino disappearance. I will discuss what the current set of experiments can contribute to the remaining questions in neutrino oscillation physics, including measuring the CP violating phase, determining the mass hierarchy, resolving the θ23 octant, and searching for sterile neutrinos. Finally, I will describe the plans and physics goals for future accelerator-based neutrino experiments.

  16. Very High Energy Neutrinos from nearby long GRB Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jessymol K.; Moharana, Reetanjali; Razzaque, Soebur

    2017-09-01

    Long duration Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are well-motivated sources of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) and neutrinos. During the afterglow phase these particles can be produced as a result of acceleration and interaction there in. We have modeled afterglow spectra and light curves from synchrotron cooling of accelerated electrons. We have fitted data of 17 long GRBs detected within redshift 0.5 in case of the GRB blastwave evolving in a wind and constant density interstellar medium. The afterglow photons can interact with the shock accelerated protons to produce very high energy neutrinos. We have calculated the neutrino flux for photo-pion interactions for all these GRBs. As IceCube have been detecting very high energy neutrinos for the last four years and a larger future extension called Gen 2 is planned, this calculation will help in understanding more about GRB neutrino production. Calculation of flux and estimation of events for Northern Hemisphere GRBs are done for the upcoming neutrino observatory KM3NeT.

  17. A high energy physics perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1997-01-13

    The status of the Standard model and role of symmetry in its development are reviewed. Some outstanding problems are surveyed and possible solutions in the form of additional {open_quotes}Hidden Symmetries {close_quotes} are discussed. Experimental approaches to uncover {open_quotes}New Physics{close_quotes} associated with those symmetries are described with emphasis on high energy colliders. An outlook for the future is given.

  18. Adsorption behavior of beryllium(II) on copper-oxide nanoparticles dispersed in water: A model for (7)Be colloid formation in the cooling water for electromagnets at high-energy accelerator facilities.

    PubMed

    Bessho, Kotaro; Kanaya, Naoki; Shimada, Saki; Katsuta, Shoichi; Monjushiro, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of Be(II) on CuO nanoparticles dispersed in water was studied as a model for colloid formation of radioactive (7)Be nuclides in the cooling water used for electromagnets at high-energy proton accelerator facilities. An aqueous Be(II) solution and commercially available CuO nanoparticles were mixed, and the adsorption of Be(II) on CuO was quantitatively examined. From a detailed analysis of the adsorption data measured as a function of the pH, it was confirmed that Be(II) is adsorbed on the CuO nanoparticles by complex formation with the hydroxyl groups on the CuO surface (>S-OH) according to the following equation: n > S-OH + Be(2+) ⇔ (>S-O)n Be((2-n)+) + nH(+) (n = 2, 3) S : solid surface. The surface-complexation constants corresponding to the above equilibrium, β(s,2) and β(s,3), were determined for four types of CuO nanoparticles. The β(s,2) value was almost independent of the type of nanoparticle, whereas the β(s,3) values varied with the particle size. These complexation constants successfully explain (7)Be colloid formation in the cooling water used for electromagnets at the 12-GeV proton accelerator facility.

  19. The Extreme and Variable High Energy Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A critically important region of the astrophysical spectrum is the hard X-ray/gamma-ray band, from the keV to the GeV energy range. In this band, an unusually rich range of astrophysical processes occur: this is the energy domain where fundamental changes from thermal to non-thermal sources/phenomena are expected, where the effects of absorption are drastically reduced and a clearer picture of the Universe is possible. This is also the energy range where most of the extreme astrophysical behavior is taking place, e.g. cosmic acceleration, explosions and accretion onto black holes and neutron stars; where variability is more the rule than the exception and where a number of instruments are actively working (e.g. INTEGRAL, SWIFT, Suzaku, MAXI, AGILE, Fermi and HESS). These telescopes are providing an unprecedented view of the high energy sky. Combined with data obtained at lower energies from a number of satellites and ground based telescopes we have for the first time the possibility of studying this extreme and variable sky over a very broad energy band and with unprecedented sensitivity.The workshop is aimed at bringing together scientists active across the field of high energy astrophysics in order to focus on the opportunities offered by the high energy window both from the observational and theoretical viewpoints, while a dedicated section will also be devoted to discuss the current status of planned and future missions. The meeting will consist of invited talks and contributions which are welcome as either posters or as short presentations. There will be time for open discussions throughout.We intend to cover the most extreme phenomena associated with acceleration, explosions and accretion onto galactic and extragalactic objects as well as to study variability in all types of objects and environments. In view of the extension of INTEGRAL operational lifetime, the workshop will provide a unique opportunity to prepare for extra observational possibility and to

  20. Fermilab's SC Accelerator Magnet Program for Future U.S. HEP Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, Michael; Zlobin, Alexander; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The invention of SC accelerator magnets in the 1970s opened wide the possibilities for advancing the energy frontier of particle accelerators, while limiting the machine circumference and reducing their energy consumption. The successful development of SC accelerator magnets based on NbTi superconductor have made possible a proton-antiproton collider (Tevatron) at Fermilab, an electron-proton collider (HERA) at DESY, a relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) at BNL and recently a proton-proton collider (LHC) at CERN. Further technological innovations and inventions are required as the US HEP looks forward towards the post-LHC energy or/and intensity frontiers. A strong, goal oriented national SC accelerator magnet program must take on this challenge to provide a strong base for the future of HEP in the U.S. The results and experience obtained by Fermilab during the past 30 years will allow us to play a leadership role in the SC accelerator magnet development in the U.S., in particular, focusing on magnets for a Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory [1]-[2]. In this paper, we summarize the required Muon Collider magnet needs and challenges, summarize the technology advances in the Fermilab accelerator magnet development over the past few years, and present and discuss our vision and long-term plans for these Fermilab-supported accelerator initiatives.

  1. Practical neutron dosimetry at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    McCaslin, J.B.; Thomas, R.H.

    1980-10-01

    Dosimetry at high energy particle accelerators is discussed with emphasis on physical measurements which define the radiation environment and provide an immutable basis for the derivation of any quantities subsequently required for risk evaluation. Results of inter-laboratory dosimetric comparisons are reviewed and it is concluded that a well-supported systematic program is needed which would make possible detailed evaluations and inter-comparisons of instruments and techniques in well characterized high energy radiation fields. High-energy dosimetry is so coupled with radiation transport that it is clear their study should proceed concurrently.

  2. High Energy Electron Detection with ATIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Ahn, H.; Ampe, J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) balloon-borne ionization calorimeter is well suited to record and identify high energy cosmic ray electrons. The instrument was exposed to high-energy beams at CERN H2 bean-dine in September of 1999. We have simulated the performance of the instrument, and compare the simulations with actual high energy electron exposures at the CERN accelerator. Simulations and measurements do not compare exactly, in detail, but overall the simulations have predicted actual measured behavior quite well.

  3. High energy physics in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M.

    1985-10-16

    The US program in high energy physics from 1985 to 1995 is reviewed. The program depends primarily upon work at the national accelerator centers, but includes a modest but diversified nonaccelerator program. Involvement of universities is described. International cooperation in high energy physics is discussed, including the European, Japanese, USSR, and the People's Republic of China's programs. Finally, new facilities needed by the US high energy physics program are discussed, with particular emphasis given to a Superconducting Super Collider for achieving ever higher energies in the 20 TeV range. (LEW)

  4. High-energy detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E [South Setauket, NY; Camarda, Giuseppe [Farmingville, NY; Cui, Yonggang [Upton, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  5. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidia, S. M.; Anderson, D. E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Houck, T. L.; Westenskow, G. A.; Vanecek, D. L.; Yu, S. S.

    1999-05-01

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  6. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S.M.; Anderson, D.E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Vanecek, D.L.; Yu, S.S.; Westenskow, G.A.

    1999-05-01

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1{percent} energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D E; Eylon, S; Henestroza, E; Houck, T L; Lidia, M; Vanecek, D L; Westenskow, G A; Yu, S S

    1998-10-05

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2&A, l-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-n-n. The prototype accelerator will be used to study physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  8. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S. M.; Anderson, D. E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Vanecek, D. L.; Yu, S. S.; Houck, T. L.; Westenskow, G. A.

    1999-05-07

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  9. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA (Universities Space Research Association) contract team during the six months during the reporting period (10/95 - 3/96) and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science, Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  10. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed-by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, visiting the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA); X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE); X-ray Spectrometer (XRS); Astro-E; High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  11. High Energy Colliders as Tools to Understand the Early Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Tait, Tim

    2008-08-16

    Cosmological observations have reached a new era of precision, and reveal many interesting and puzzling features of the Universe. I will briefly review two of the most exciting mysteries: the nature of the dark components of the Universe, and the origin of the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter. I will argue that our best hope of unraveling these questions will need to combine information from the heavens with measurements in the lab at high energy particle accelerators. The end of run II of the Tevatron, the up-coming Large Hadron Collider and proposed International Linear Collider all have great potential to help us answer these questions in the near future.

  12. High Energy Exoplanet Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llama, Joe; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.

    2017-10-01

    X-ray and ultraviolet transits of exoplanets allow us to probe the atmospheres of these worlds. High energy transits have been shown to be deeper but also more variable than in the optical. By simulating exoplanet transits using high-energy observations of the Sun, we can test the limits of our ability to accurately measure the properties of these planets in the presence of stellar activity. We use both disk-resolved images of the Solar disk spanning soft X-rays, the ultraviolet, and the optical and also disk-integrated Sun-as-a-star observations of the Lyα irradiance to simulate transits over a wide wavelength range. We find that for stars with activity levels similar to the Sun, the planet-to-star radius ratio can be overestimated by up to 50% if the planet occults an active region at high energies. We also compare our simulations to high energy transits of WASP-12b, HD 189733, 55 Cnc b, and GJ 436b.

  13. High energy colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-02-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p{anti p}), lepton (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed.

  14. Inorganic High Energy Oxidisers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    properties may contribute significantly to the energy of the whole system. A book entitled ’Inorganic High - Energy Oxidisers’ by E.W. Lawless and I.C. Smith is the subject of this Essay Review by W.E. Batty.

  15. High Energy Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An overview of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory 2 contributions to X-ray astronomy is presented along with a brief description of the satellite and onboard telescope. Observations relating to galaxies and galactic clusters, black holes, supernova remnants, quasars, and cosmology are discussed.

  16. Experimental And Theoretical High Energy Physics Research At UCLA

    SciTech Connect

    Cousins, Robert D.

    2013-07-22

    This is the final report of the UCLA High Energy Physics DOE Grant No. DE-FG02- 91ER40662. This report covers the last grant project period, namely the three years beginning January 15, 2010, plus extensions through April 30, 2013. The report describes the broad range of our experimental research spanning direct dark matter detection searches using both liquid xenon (XENON) and liquid argon (DARKSIDE); present (ICARUS) and R&D for future (LBNE) neutrino physics; ultra-high-energy neutrino and cosmic ray detection (ANITA); and the highest-energy accelerator-based physics with the CMS experiment and CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. For our theory group, the report describes frontier activities including particle astrophysics and cosmology; neutrino physics; LHC interaction cross section calculations now feasible due to breakthroughs in theoretical techniques; and advances in the formal theory of supergravity.

  17. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim

    2008-07-08

    July 8, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  18. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim

    2008-07-08

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  19. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Leemans, Wim [LOASIS Program, AFRD

    2016-07-12

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  20. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Leemans, Wim [LOASIS Program, AFRD

    2016-07-12

    July 8, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  1. High energy gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    High energy gamma ray astronomy has evolved with the space age. Nonexistent twenty-five years ago, there is now a general sketch of the gamma ray sky which should develop into a detailed picture with the results expected to be forthcoming over the next decade. The galactic plane is the dominant feature of the gamma ray sky, the longitude and latitude distribution being generally correlated with galactic structural features including the spiral arms. Two molecular clouds were already seen. Two of the three strongest gamma ray sources are pulsars. The highly variable X-ray source Cygnus X-3 was seen at one time, but not another in the 100 MeV region, and it was also observed at very high energies. Beyond the Milky Way Galaxy, there is seen a diffuse radiation, whose origin remains uncertain, as well as at least one quasar, 3C 273. Looking to the future, the satellite opportunities for high energy gamma ray astronomy in the near term are the GAMMA-I planned to be launched in late 1987 and the Gamma Ray Observatory, scheduled for launch in 1990. The Gamma Ray Observatory will carry a total of four instruments covering the entire energy range from 30,000 eV to 3 x 10 to the 10th eV with over an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity relative to previous satellite instruments.

  2. High energy from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, Bruce; Canizares, Claude; Catura, Richard C.; Clark, George W.; Fichtel, Carl E.; Friedman, Herbert; Giacconi, Riccardo; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Helfand, David J.; Holt, Stephen S.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) important scientific problems for high energy astrophysics (stellar activity, the interstellar medium in galaxies, supernovae and endpoints of stellar evolution, nucleosynthesis, relativistic plasmas and matter under extreme conditions, nature of gamma-bursts, identification of black holes, active nuclei, accretion physics, large-scale structures, intracluster medium, nature of dark matter, and the X- and gamma-ray background); (2) the existing experimental programs (Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO), X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE), High Energy Transient Experiment (HETE), U.S. participation in foreign missions, and attached Shuttle and Space Station Freedom payloads); (3) major missions for the 1990's; (4) a new program of moderate missions; (5) new opportunities for small missions; (6) technology development issues; and (7) policy issues.

  3. Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, Richard; Brooks, Travis; Le Diberder, Francois; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory; Neal, Homer; Bellis, Matt; Boehnlein, Amber; Votava, Margaret; White, Vicky; Wolbers, Stephen; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Roser, Robert; Snider, Rick; Lucchesi, Donatella; Denisov, Dmitri; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; Li, Qizhong; Varnes, Erich; Jonckheere, Alan; Gasthuber, Martin; Gulzow, Volker; /DESY /Marseille, CPPM /Dortmund U. /DESY /Gent U. /DESY, Zeuthen /KEK, Tsukuba /CC, Villeurbanne /CERN /INFN, Bari /Gjovik Coll. Engineering /Karlsruhe, Forschungszentrum /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Carleton U. /Cornell U. /Rutherford

    2012-04-03

    Data from high-energy physics (HEP) experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. At the same time, HEP has no coherent strategy for data preservation and re-use. An inter-experimental Study Group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis was convened at the end of 2008 and held two workshops, at DESY (January 2009) and SLAC (May 2009). This document is an intermediate report to the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) of the reflections of this Study Group. Large data sets accumulated during many years of detector operation at particle accelerators are the heritage of experimental HEP. These data sets offer unique opportunities for future scientific studies, sometimes long after the shut-down of the actual experiments: new theoretical input; new experimental results and analysis techniques; the quest for high-sensitivity combined analyses; the necessity of cross checks. In many cases, HEP data sets are unique; they cannot and most likely will not be superseded by data from newer generations of experiments. Once lost, or in an unusable state, HEP data samples cannot be reasonably recovered. The cost of conserving this heritage through a collaborative, target-oriented long-term data preservation program would be small, compared to the costs of past experimental projects or to the efforts to re-do experiments. However, this cost is not negligible, especially for collaborations close or past their end-date. The preservation of HEP data would provide today's collaborations with a secure way to complete their data analysis and enable them to seize new scientific opportunities in the coming years. The HEP community will benefit from preserved data samples through reanalysis, combination, education and outreach. Funding agencies would receive more scientific return, and a positive image, from their initial investment leading to the production and the first analysis of preserved data.

  4. Invited Article: Advanced drag-free concepts for future space-based interferometers: acceleration noise performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerardi, D.; Allen, G.; Conklin, J. W.; Sun, K.-X.; DeBra, D.; Buchman, S.; Gath, P.; Fichter, W.; Byer, R. L.; Johann, U.

    2014-01-01

    Future drag-free missions for space-based experiments in gravitational physics require a Gravitational Reference Sensor with extremely demanding sensing and disturbance reduction requirements. A configuration with two cubical sensors is the current baseline for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) and has reached a high level of maturity. Nevertheless, several promising concepts have been proposed with potential applications beyond LISA and are currently investigated at HEPL, Stanford, and EADS Astrium, Germany. The general motivation is to exploit the possibility of achieving improved disturbance reduction, and ultimately understand how low acceleration noise can be pushed with a realistic design for future mission. In this paper, we discuss disturbance reduction requirements for LISA and beyond, describe four different payload concepts, compare expected strain sensitivities in the "low-frequency" region of the frequency spectrum, dominated by acceleration noise, and ultimately discuss advantages and disadvantages of each of those concepts in achieving disturbance reduction for space-based detectors beyond LISA.

  5. Invited article: advanced drag-free concepts for future space-based interferometers: acceleration noise performance.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, D; Allen, G; Conklin, J W; Sun, K-X; DeBra, D; Buchman, S; Gath, P; Fichter, W; Byer, R L; Johann, U

    2014-01-01

    Future drag-free missions for space-based experiments in gravitational physics require a Gravitational Reference Sensor with extremely demanding sensing and disturbance reduction requirements. A configuration with two cubical sensors is the current baseline for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) and has reached a high level of maturity. Nevertheless, several promising concepts have been proposed with potential applications beyond LISA and are currently investigated at HEPL, Stanford, and EADS Astrium, Germany. The general motivation is to exploit the possibility of achieving improved disturbance reduction, and ultimately understand how low acceleration noise can be pushed with a realistic design for future mission. In this paper, we discuss disturbance reduction requirements for LISA and beyond, describe four different payload concepts, compare expected strain sensitivities in the "low-frequency" region of the frequency spectrum, dominated by acceleration noise, and ultimately discuss advantages and disadvantages of each of those concepts in achieving disturbance reduction for space-based detectors beyond LISA.

  6. Introductory talk Particle accelerators have a history, do they have a future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulvey, J. H.

    This talk outlines some of the challenges tomorrow's particle accelerator proponents will face in establishing the technical, financial and political feasibility of future higher energy machines. The next step in e + e - collliders takes accelerator technology into a domain where new frontiers in the handling of particle beams must be crossed. Limits also begin to appear in the energy of pp colliders, and radical new approaches will be required of the physicists designing detectors. It is suggested that greater efforts need to be made to communicate the intrinsic interest of science to the public at large, and to put the planning of future major facilities in the world on a clearly rational basis. Finally, illustrations from the history of science show that there is nothing new in the need to defend curiosity-driven research. *** DIRECT SUPPORT *** A3418228 00007

  7. Trends in experimental high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.

    1982-06-01

    Data from a scan of papers in Physical Review Letters and Physical Review are used to demonstrate that American high-energy physicists show a pattern of accelerator and instrumentation usage characteristic of that expected from the logistic-substitution model of Marchetti and of Fischer and Pry.

  8. High energy beam lifetime analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Sterne, P.A.; Hartley, J.; Cowan, T.E.

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a positron lifetime defect analysis capability based on a 3 MeV electrostatic accelerator. The high energy beam lifetime spectrometer is operational with a 60 mCi {sup 22}Na source providing a current of 7 10{sup 5} positrons per second. Lifetime data are derived from a thin plastic transmission detector providing an implantation time and a BaF{sub 2} detector to determine the annihilation time. Positron lifetime analysis is performed with a 3 MeV positron beam on thick sample specimens at counting rates in excess of 2000 per second. The instrument is being used for bulk sample analysis and analysis of samples encapsulated in controlled environments for in situ measurements.

  9. High-energy neutrino astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaruli, Teresa

    2012-07-01

    Neutrino astronomy, conceptually conceived four decades ago, has entered an exciting phase for providing results on the quest for the sources of the observed highest energy particles. IceCube and ANTARES are now completed and are scanning in space and time possible signals of high energy neutrinos indicating the existence of such sources. DeepCore, inside IceCube, is a playground for vetoed neutrino measurement with better potential below 1 TeV. A larger and denser detector is now being discussed. ARA, now in test phase, will be composed by radio stations that could cover up to ~ 100 km2 and aims at the highest energy region of cosmogenic neutrinos. The non observation of cosmic events is on one side a source of disappointment, on the other it represents by itself an important result. If seen in the context of a multi-messenger science, the combination of photon and cosmic ray experiment results brings invaluable information. The experimental upper bounds of the cubic-kilometer telescope IceCube are now below the theoretical upper bounds for extragalactic fluxes of neutrinos from optically thin sources. These are responsible for accelerating the extragalactic cosmic rays. Such limits constrain the role of gamma-ray bursts, described by the fireball picture, as sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. Neutrino telescopes are exciting running multi-task experiments that produce astrophysics and particle physics results some of which have been illustrated at this conference and are summarized in this report.

  10. PREFACE: Joint IPPP Durham/Cockcroft Institute/ICFA Workshop on Advanced QED methods for Future Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, I. R.; Barber, D. P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Hartin, A.; Heinzl, T.; Hesselbach, S.; Moortgat-Pick, G. A.

    2009-11-01

    The joint IPPP Durham/Cockcroft Institute/ICFA workshop on advanced QED methods for future accelerators took place at the Cockcroft Institute in early March 2009. The motivation for the workshop was the need for a detailed consideration of the physics processes associated with beam-beam effects at the interaction points of future high-energy electron-positron colliders. There is a broad consensus within the particle physics community that the next international facility for experimental high-energy physics research beyond the Large Hadron Collider at CERN should be a high-luminosity electron-positron collider working at the TeV energy scale. One important feature of such a collider will be its ability to deliver polarised beams to the interaction point and to provide accurate measurements of the polarisation state during physics collisions. The physics collisions take place in very dense charge bunches in the presence of extremely strong electromagnetic fields of field strength of order of the Schwinger critical field strength of 4.4×1013 Gauss. These intense fields lead to depolarisation processes which need to be thoroughly understood in order to reduce uncertainty in the polarisation state at collision. To that end, this workshop reviewed the formalisms for describing radiative processes and the methods of calculation in the future strong-field environments. These calculations are based on the Furry picture of organising the interaction term of the Lagrangian. The means of deriving the transition probability of the most important of the beam-beam processes - Beamsstrahlung - was reviewed. The workshop was honoured by the presentations of one of the founders, V N Baier, of the 'Operator method' - one means for performing these calculations. Other theoretical methods of performing calculations in the Furry picture, namely those due to A I Nikishov, V I Ritus et al, were reviewed and intense field quantum processes in fields of different form - namely those

  11. High-energy Neutrino Emission from White Dwarf Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Mészáros, Peter; Murase, Kohta; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2016-11-01

    The merger of two white dwarfs is expected to result in a central fast-rotating core surrounded by a debris disk, in which magnetorotational instabilities give rise to a hot magnetized corona and a magnetized outflow. The dissipation of magnetic energy via reconnection could lead to the acceleration of cosmic-rays (CRs) in the expanding material, which would result in high energy neutrinos. We discuss the possibility of using these neutrino signals as probes of the outflow dynamics, magnetic energy dissipation rate, and CR acceleration efficiency. Importantly, the accompanying high-energy gamma-rays are absorbed within these sources because of the large optical depth, so these neutrino sources can be regarded as hidden cosmic-ray accelerators that are consistent with the non-detection of gamma-rays with Fermi-LAT. While the CR generation rate is highly uncertain, if it reaches ∼ {10}45 {erg} {{Mpc}}-3 {{yr}}-1, the diffuse neutrino flux could contribute a substantial fraction of the IceCube observations. We also evaluate the prospect of observing individual merger events, which provides a means for testing such sources in the future.

  12. Investigating in-field and out-of-field neutron contamination in high-energy medical linear accelerators based on the treatment factors of field size, depth, beam modifiers, and beam type.

    PubMed

    Biltekin, Fatih; Yeginer, Mete; Ozyigit, Gokhan

    2015-07-01

    We analysed the effects of field size, depth, beam modifier and beam type on the amount of in-field and out-of-field neutron contamination for medical linear accelerators (linacs). Measurements were carried out for three high-energy medical linacs of Elekta Synergy Platform, Varian Clinac DHX High Performance and Philips SL25 using bubble detectors. The photo-neutron measurements were taken in the first two linacs with 18 MV nominal energy, whereas the electro-neutrons were measured in the three linacs with 9 MeV, 10 MeV, 15 MeV and 18 MeV. The central neutron doses increased with larger field sizes as a dramatic drop off was observed in peripheral areas. Comparing with the jaws-shaped open-field of 10 × 10 cm, the motorised and physical wedges contributed to neutron contamination at central axis by 60% and 18%, respectively. The similar dose increment was observed in MLC-shaped fields. The contributions of MLCs were in the range of 55-59% and 19-22% in Elekta and Varian linacs comparing with 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm open fields shaped by the jaws, respectively. The neutron doses at shallow depths were found to be higher than the doses found at deeper regions. The electro-neutron dose at the 18 MeV energy was higher than the doses at the electron energies of 15 MeV and 9 MeV by a factor of 3 and 50, respectively. The photo- and electro-neutron dose should be taken into consideration in the radiation treatment with high photon and electron energies. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Computing in high-energy physics

    DOE PAGES

    Mount, Richard P.

    2016-05-31

    I present a very personalized journey through more than three decades of computing for experimental high-energy physics, pointing out the enduring lessons that I learned. This is followed by a vision of how the computing environment will evolve in the coming ten years and the technical challenges that this will bring. I then address the scale and cost of high-energy physics software and examine the many current and future challenges, particularly those of management, funding and software-lifecycle management. Lastly, I describe recent developments aimed at improving the overall coherence of high-energy physics software.

  14. Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2014-07-14

    we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

  15. High energy electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  16. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, Tor O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of γϵx = 3x10-6 m-rad and γϵy = 3x10-8 m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate ``fundamental`` limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  17. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}6} m-rad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate fundamental'' limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  18. Accelerator mass spectrometry-enabled studies: current status and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Arjomand, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry is a detection platform with exceptional sensitivity compared with other bioanalytical platforms. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is widely used in archeology for radiocarbon dating applications. Early exploration of the biological and pharmaceutical applications of AMS began in the early 1990s. AMS has since demonstrated unique problem-solving ability in nutrition science, toxicology and pharmacology. AMS has also enabled the development of new applications, such as Phase 0 microdosing. Recent development of AMS-enabled applications has transformed this novelty research instrument to a valuable tool within the pharmaceutical industry. Although there is now greater awareness of AMS technology, recognition and appreciation of the range of AMS-enabled applications is still lacking, including study-design strategies. This review aims to provide further insight into the wide range of AMS-enabled applications. Examples of studies conducted over the past two decades will be presented, as well as prospects for the future of AMS. PMID:20440378

  19. Accelerator mass spectrometry-enabled studies: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Arjomand, Ali

    2010-03-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry is a detection platform with exceptional sensitivity compared with other bioanalytical platforms. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is widely used in archeology for radiocarbon dating applications. Early exploration of the biological and pharmaceutical applications of AMS began in the early 1990s. AMS has since demonstrated unique problem-solving ability in nutrition science, toxicology and pharmacology. AMS has also enabled the development of new applications, such as Phase 0 microdosing. Recent development of AMS-enabled applications has transformed this novelty research instrument to a valuable tool within the pharmaceutical industry. Although there is now greater awareness of AMS technology, recognition and appreciation of the range of AMS-enabled applications is still lacking, including study-design strategies. This review aims to provide further insight into the wide range of AMS-enabled applications. Examples of studies conducted over the past two decades will be presented, as well as prospects for the future of AMS.

  20. High energy particles and quanta in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, F. B. (Editor); Fichtel, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    The various subdisciplines of high-energy astrophysics are surveyed in a series of articles which attempt to give an overall view of the subject as a whole by emphasizing the basic physics common to all fields in which high-energy particles and quanta play a role. Successive chapters cover cosmic ray experimental observations, the abundances of nuclei in the cosmic radiation, cosmic electrons, solar modulation, solar particles (observation, relationship to the sun acceleration, interplanetary medium), radio astronomy, galactic X-ray sources, the cosmic X-ray background, and gamma ray astronomy. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  1. High-energy cosmic ray interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, Ralph; Orellana, Mariana; Reynoso, Matias M.; Vila, Gabriela S.

    2009-04-30

    Research into hadronic interactions and high-energy cosmic rays are closely related. On one hand--due to the indirect observation of cosmic rays through air showers--the understanding of hadronic multiparticle production is needed for deriving the flux and composition of cosmic rays at high energy. On the other hand the highest energy particles from the universe allow us to study the characteristics of hadronic interactions at energies far beyond the reach of terrestrial accelerators. This is the summary of three introductory lectures on our current understanding of hadronic interactions of cosmic rays.

  2. High energy real-time imaging studies

    SciTech Connect

    Haskins, J.J.; Dolan, K.W.; Perkins, D.E.; Rikard, D.; Schneberk, D.J.

    1993-04-01

    Performance characteristics of high energy real-time radiography (RTR) systems were optimized by interchanging components and varying optical coupling methods. Phosphor screens, fiber optic scintillation plates, monolithic high density glass scintillation plates, mirror coatings, different cameras and integration times were studied. X-ray sources were 4- and 9-MeV linear accelerators. High density monolithic glass, high resolution and wide dynamic range CCD cameras, and special focusing and fixturing methods have provided significantly improved spatial resolution and contrast for our high energy real-rime imaging. RTR systems with improved performance characteristics and proper translational/rotational staging were adapted for computed tomography applications.

  3. Accelerators in our past, present, and future: A challenge to radiological protection in the twenty-first century

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.H. |

    1993-09-01

    The foundations of many of the subdisciplines of radiological protection laid in accelerator laboratories began with the invention of accelerators. This paper suggests that the discipline of accelerator radiological protection has played and will continue play a more significant part in our lives than is generally recognized. A brief review of some existing uses of accelerators by society is given, and a few probable future uses are described. These future applications will result in the exposure of accelerator (or {open_quotes}mixed{close_quotes}) radiation fields to an increased population. Consequently, what are perceived to be the rather specialized concerns of today`s accelerator health physicists will -- by necessity -- become of general interest to all health physicists.

  4. High energy reactor neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raper, Neill

    We present the first measurement of a nonzero reactor neutrino flux with energies above 8 MeV. Measurements are taken with the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiments detectors, using the Guangdong Nuclear Power Station as a source. Disagreement between data and theory regarding rate and shape of reactor neutrino spectra have made the need for direct measurement clear. Data are especially useful at high energies, where far fewer isotopes contribute. Neutrino candidates are correlated to reactor power and reactor power is extrapolated to zero in order to separate neutrino events from background. We find evidence of reactor neutrinos up to ˜12.5 MeV at 1.92 sigma above 0 and include a survey of isotopes likely to be contributing neutrinos in this energy range.

  5. Prospects at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    1988-11-01

    I discuss some possibilities for neutrino experiments in the fixed-target environment of the SPS, Tevatron, and UNK, with their primary proton beams of 0.4, 0.9, and 3.0 TeV. The emphasis is on unfinished business: issues that have been recognized for some time, but not yet resolved. Then I turn to prospects for proton-proton colliders to explore the 1-TeV scale. I review the motivation for new physics in the neighborhood of 1 TeV and mention some discovery possibilities for high-energy, high-luminosity hadron colliders and the implications they would have for neutrino physics. I raise the possibility of the direct study of neutrino interactions in hadron colliders. I close with a report on the status of the SSC project. 38 refs., 17 figs.

  6. Irradiation imposed degradation of the mechanical and electrical properties of electrical insulation for future accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Polinski, J.; Chorowski, M.; Bogdan, P.; Strychalski, M.; Rijk, G. de

    2014-01-27

    Future accelerators will make extensive use of superconductors made of Nb{sub 3}Sn, which allows higher magnetic fields than NbTi. However, the wind-and-react technology of Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting magnet production makes polyimide Kapton® non applicable for the coils' electrical insulation. A Nb{sub 3}Sn technology compatible insulation material should be characterized by high radiation resistivity, good thermal conductivity, and excellent mechanical properties. Candidate materials for the electrical insulation of future accelerator's magnet coils have to be radiation certified with respect to potential degradation of their electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. This contribution presents procedures and results of tests of the electrical and mechanical properties of DGEBA epoxy + D400 hardener, which is one of the candidates for the electrical insulation of future magnets. Two test sample types have been used to determine the material degradation due to irradiation: a untreated one (unirradiated) and irradiated at 77 K with 11 kGy/min intense, 4MeV energy electrons beam to a total dose of 50 MGy.

  7. FSU High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Prosper, Harrison B.; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Berg, Bernd; Blessing, Susan K.; Okui, Takemichi; Owens, Joseph F.; Reina, Laura; Wahl, Horst D.

    2014-12-01

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the

  8. The European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 2013 Europhysics conference on High Energy Physics is a biennial conference organized by the High Energy and Particle Physics Division of the European Physical Society since 1971. The conference in this series usually attracts 600-700 participants and is one of the worlds largest conferences in this field. The latest conferences in this series were held in Grenoble, Krakow, Manchester, Lisabon and Aachen. The conference has parallel, plenary and poster sessions as well as an industrial exhibition. The conference is jointly organised by the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm University, Chalmers University of Technology, Lund University, Uppsala University, Nordita and the Oskar Klein Centre. Topics covered are: Standard Model and Beyond Electroweak Symmetry Breaking Neutrino Physics Flavour Physics CP Violation and Tests of Fundamental Symmetries QCD and Hadronic Physics Heavy Ions Astroparticle Physics High Energy Astrophysics Cosmology Non-perturbative Field Theory String Theory Detectors and Data Handling Accelerator R&D Future Facilities. Special ECFA session 20 July: Particle Physics after the European strategy update

  9. Diamond sensors for future high energy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmair, Felix

    2016-09-01

    With the planned upgrade of the LHC to High-Luminosity-LHC [1], the general purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with more radiation tolerant technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition CVD diamond is one such technology. CVD diamond sensors are an established technology as beam condition monitors in the highest radiation areas of all LHC experiments. The RD42-collaboration at CERN is leading the effort to use CVD diamond as a material for tracking detectors operating in extreme radiation environments. An overview of the latest developments from RD42 is presented including the present status of diamond sensor production, a study of pulse height dependencies on incident particle flux and the development of 3D diamond sensors.

  10. High Energy Physics, Past, Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Hirotaka

    At the beginning of last century we witnessed the emergence of new physics, quantum theory and gravitational theory, which gave us correct understanding of the world of atoms and deep insight into the structure of universe we live in. Towards the end of the century, string theory emerged as the most promising candidate to unify these two theories...

  11. Damped accelerator structures for future linear e/sup/plus minus// colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Deruyter, H.; Hoag, H.A.; Lisin, A.V.; Loew, G.A.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Rago, C.E.; Wang, J.W.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes preliminary work on accelerator structures for future TeV linear colliders which use trains of e/sup +-/ bunches to reach the required luminosity. These bunch trains, if not perfectly aligned with respect to the accelerator axis, induce transverse wake field modes into the structure. Unless they are sufficiently damped, these modes cause cummulative beam deflections and emittance growth. The envisaged structures, originally proposed by R. B. Palmer, are disk-loaded waveguides in which the disks are slotted radially into quadrants. Wake field energy is coupled via the slots and double-ridged waveguides into a lossy region which is external to the accelerator structure. The requirement is that the Q of the HEM/sub 11/ mode be reduced to a value of less than 30. The work done so far includes MAFIA code computations and low power rf measurements to study the fields. A four-cavity 2..pi../3 mode standing-wave structure has been built to find whether the slots lower the electric breakdown thresholds below those reached with conventional disk-loaded structures. We set out to assess the microwave properties of the structure and the problems which might be encountered in fabricating it. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Field Emission in CEBAF's SRF Cavities and Implications for Future Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jay Benesch

    2006-02-15

    Field emission is one of the key issues in superconducting RF for particle accelerators. When present, it limits operating gradient directly or via induced heat load at 2K. In order to minimize particulate contamination of and thus field emission in the CEBAF SRF cavities during assembly, a cold ceramic RF window was placed very close to the accelerating cavity proper. As an unintended consequence of this, the window is charged by field-emitted electrons, making it possible to monitor and model field emission in the CEBAF cavities since in-tunnel operation began. From January 30, 1995, through February 10, 2003, there were 64 instances of spontaneous onset or change in cavity field emission with a drop in usable gradient averaging 1.4 ({sigma} 0.8) MV/m at each event. Fractional loss averaged 0.18 ({sigma} 0.12) of pre-event gradient. This event count corresponds to 2.4 events per century per cavity, or 8 per year in CEBAF. It is hypothesized that changes in field emission are due to adsorbed gas accumulation. The possible implications of this and other observations for the International Linear Collider (ILC) and other future accelerators will be discussed.

  13. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics program at the University of California at Riverside. In hadron collider physics the authors will complete their transition from experiment UA1 at CERN to the DZERO experiment at Fermilab. On experiment UA1 their effort will concentrate on data analysis at Riverside. At Fermilab they will coordinate the high voltage system for all detector elements. They will also carry out hardware/software development for the D0 muon detector. The TPC/Two-Gamma experiment has completed its present phase of data-taking after accumulating 160 pb{sup {minus}}1 of luminosity. The UC Riverside group will continue data and physics analysis and make minor hardware improvement for the high luminosity run. The UC Riverside group is participating in design and implementation of the data acquisition system for the OPAL experiment at LEP. Mechanical and electronics construction of the OPAL hadron calorimeter strip readout system is proceeding on schedule. Data analysis and Monte Carlo detector simulation efforts are proceeding in preparation for the first physics run when IEP operation comenses in fall 1989.

  14. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics Program at the University of California, Riverside. In 1990, we will concentrate on analysis of LEP data from the OPAL detector. We expect to record 10{sup 5} Z`s by the end of 1989 and 10{sup 6} in 1990. This data will be used to measure the number of quark-lepton families in the universe. In the second half of 1990 we will also be occupied with the installation of the D-Zero detector in the Tevatron Collider and the preparation of software for the 1991 run. A new initiative made possible by generous university support is a laboratory for detector development at UCR. The focus will be on silicon strip tracking detectors both for the D-Zero upgrade and for SSC physics. The theory program will pursue further various mass-generating radiative mechanisms for understanding small quark and lepton masses as well as some novel phenomenological aspects of supersymmetry.

  15. High Energy Astrophysics Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Ormes, Jonathan F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The nature of gravity and its relationship to the other three forces and to quantum theory is one of the major challenges facing us as we begin the new century. In order to make progress we must challenge the current theories by observing the effects of gravity under the most extreme conditions possible. Black holes represent one extreme, where the laws of physics as we understand them break down. The Universe as whole is another extreme, where its evolution and fate is dominated by the gravitational influence of dark matter and the nature of the Cosmological constant. The early universe represents a third extreme, where it is thought that gravity may somehow be unified with the other forces. NASA's "Cosmic Journeys" program is part of a NASA/NSF/DoE tri-agency initiative designed to observe the extremes of gravity throughout the universe. This program will probe the nature of black holes, ultimately obtaining a direct image of the event horizon. It will investigate the large scale structure of the Universe to constrain the location and nature of dark matter and the nature of the cosmological constant. Finally it will search for and study the highest energy processes, that approach those found in the early universe. I will outline the High Energy Astrophysics part of this program.

  16. High Energy Astrophysics Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Ormes, Jonathan F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The nature of gravity and its relationship to the other three forces and to quantum theory is one of the major challenges facing us as we begin the new century. In order to make progress we must challenge the current theories by observing the effects of gravity under the most extreme conditions possible. Black holes represent one extreme, where the laws of physics as we understand them break down. The Universe as whole is another extreme, where its evolution and fate is dominated by the gravitational influence of dark matter and the nature of the Cosmological constant. The early universe represents a third extreme, where it is thought that gravity may somehow be unified with the other forces. NASA's "Cosmic Journeys" program is part of a NASA/NSF/DoE tri-agency initiative designed to observe the extremes of gravity throughout the universe. This program will probe the nature of black holes, ultimately obtaining a direct image of the event horizon. It will investigate the large scale structure of the Universe to constrain the location and nature of dark matter and the nature of the cosmological constant. Finally it will search for and study the highest energy processes, that approach those found in the early universe. I will outline the High Energy Astrophysics part of this program.

  17. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  18. Process Performance of Optima XEx Single Wafer High Energy Implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. H.; Yoon, Jongyoon; Kondratenko, S.; David, J.; Rubin, L. M.; Jang, I. S.; Cha, J. C.; Joo, Y. H.; Lee, A. B.; Jin, S. W.

    2011-01-07

    To meet the process requirements for well formation in future CMOS memory production, high energy implanters require more robust angle, dose, and energy control while maintaining high productivity. The Optima XEx high energy implanter meets these requirements by integrating a traditional LINAC beamline with a robust single wafer handling system. To achieve beam angle control, Optima XEx can control both the horizontal and vertical beam angles to within 0.1 degrees using advanced beam angle measurement and correction. Accurate energy calibration and energy trim functions accelerate process matching by eliminating energy calibration errors. The large volume process chamber and UDC (upstream dose control) using faraday cups outside of the process chamber precisely control implant dose regardless of any chamber pressure increase due to PR (photoresist) outgassing. An optimized RF LINAC accelerator improves reliability and enables singly charged phosphorus and boron energies up to 1200 keV and 1500 keV respectively with higher beam currents. A new single wafer endstation combined with increased beam performance leads to overall increased productivity. We report on the advanced performance of Optima XEx observed during tool installation and volume production at an advanced memory fab.

  19. The great high-energy write-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    The US Congress wrote off $2bn and 10,000 person-years of effort in 1993 when it cancelled the giant, high-energy particle accelerator project known as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), approved in 1987.

  20. High energy photon emission from wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Farinella, D. M. Lau, C. K.; Taimourzadeh, S.; Hwang, Y.; Abazajian, K.; Canac, N.; Taborek, P.; Tajima, T.; Zhang, X. M.; Koga, J. K.; Ebisuzaki, T.

    2016-07-15

    Experimental evidence has accumulated to indicate that wakefield acceleration (WFA) accompanies intense and sometimes coherent emission of radiation such as from betatron radiation. The investigation of this issue has additional impetus nowadays because we are learning (1) there is an additional acceleration process of the ponderomotive acceleration; (2) WFA may become relevant in much higher density regimes; (3) WFA has been proposed as the mechanism for extreme high energy cosmic ray acceleration and gamma ray bursts for active galactic nuclei. These require us to closely examine the radiative mechanisms in WFA anew. We report studies of radiation from wakefield (self-injected betatron) and ponderomotive (laser field) mechanisms in scalings of the frequency and intensity of the driver, as well as the plasma density.

  1. Status of (US) High Energy Physics Networking

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, H.E.

    1987-02-01

    The current status of Networking to and between computers used by the High Energy Physics community is discussed. Particular attention is given to developments over the last year and to future prospects. Comparison between the current status and that of two years ago indicates that considerable strides have been made but that much remains to be done to achieve an acceptable level of functionality.

  2. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS POTENTIAL AT MUON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-04-07

    In this paper, high energy physics possibilities and future colliders are discussed. The {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collider and experiments with high intensity muon beams as the stepping phase towards building Higher Energy Muon Colliders (HEMC) are briefly reviewed and encouraged.

  3. Scaling magnetized liner inertial fusion on Z and future pulsed-power accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Slutz, Stephen A.; Stygar, William A.; Gomez, Matthew R.; ...

    2016-02-04

    In this study, the MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] has demonstrated fusion–relevant plasma conditions [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z accelerator with a peak drive current of about 18 MA. We present 2D numerical simulations of the scaling of MagLIF on Z as a function of drive current, preheat energy, and applied magnetic field. The results indicate that deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion yields greater than 100 kJ could be possible on Z when all of these parameters are at the optimum values:more » i.e., peak current = 25 MA, deposited preheat energy = 5 kJ, and Bz = 30 T. Much higher yields have been predicted [S. A. Slutz and R. A. Vesey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 025003 (2012)] for MagLIF driven with larger peak currents. Two high performance pulsed-power accelerators (Z300 and Z800) based on linear-transformer-driver technology have been designed [W. A. Stygar et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 18, 110401 (2015)]. The Z300 design would provide 48 MA to a MagLIF load, while Z800 would provide 65 MA. Parameterized Thevenin-equivalent circuits were used to drive a series of 1D and 2D numerical MagLIF simulations with currents ranging from what Z can deliver now to what could be achieved by these conceptual future pulsed-power accelerators. 2D simulations of simple MagLIF targets containing just gaseous DT have yields of 18 MJ for Z300 and 440 MJ for Z800. The 2D simulated yield for Z800 is increased to 7 GJ by adding a layer of frozen DT ice to the inside of the liner.« less

  4. Scaling magnetized liner inertial fusion on Z and future pulsed-power accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutz, S. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Gomez, M. R.; Peterson, K. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Vesey, R. A.; Campbell, E. M.; Betti, R.

    2016-02-01

    The MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] has demonstrated fusion-relevant plasma conditions [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z accelerator with a peak drive current of about 18 MA. We present 2D numerical simulations of the scaling of MagLIF on Z as a function of drive current, preheat energy, and applied magnetic field. The results indicate that deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion yields greater than 100 kJ could be possible on Z when all of these parameters are at the optimum values: i.e., peak current = 25 MA, deposited preheat energy = 5 kJ, and Bz = 30 T. Much higher yields have been predicted [S. A. Slutz and R. A. Vesey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 025003 (2012)] for MagLIF driven with larger peak currents. Two high performance pulsed-power accelerators (Z300 and Z800) based on linear-transformer-driver technology have been designed [W. A. Stygar et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 18, 110401 (2015)]. The Z300 design would provide 48 MA to a MagLIF load, while Z800 would provide 65 MA. Parameterized Thevenin-equivalent circuits were used to drive a series of 1D and 2D numerical MagLIF simulations with currents ranging from what Z can deliver now to what could be achieved by these conceptual future pulsed-power accelerators. 2D simulations of simple MagLIF targets containing just gaseous DT have yields of 18 MJ for Z300 and 440 MJ for Z800. The 2D simulated yield for Z800 is increased to 7 GJ by adding a layer of frozen DT ice to the inside of the liner.

  5. (High energy physics)

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B.E.; Roberts, J.B. Jr.

    1991-09-01

    An intense analysis effort on the data we obtained in a seven month run on E704 last year has produced a flood of new results on polarization effects in particle production at 200 GeV/c. We are fortunate to be able to report in detail on those results. Our other Fermilab experiment, E683 (photoproduction of jets) has been delayed an unbelievable amount of time by Fermilab schedule slippages. It was scheduled and ready for beam two years ago As this report is being written, we have been running for two months and are expecting four months of production data taking. In this report we show some of our preliminary results. In addition we are near the end of a six month run on our CERN experiment, NA47 (SMC) which will measure the spin dependent structure functions for the proton and neutron. It is with a sense of relief, mixed with pride, that we report that all the equipment which we constructed for that experiment is currently working as designed. The random coincidence of accelerator schedules has left us slightly dazed, but all experiments are getting done and analyzed in a timely fashion. As members of the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration, we have been preparing for the only currently approved experiment at the SSC. Here we report on our scintillating fiber tracker design and simulation activities. In addition we report the results of our investigation of the detector response to heavy Z particles. Since our last report, we have joined the D0 collaboration with the primary aim of contributing to the D0 upgrade over the next few years. It is also important for us to gain experience in collider physics during the period leading up to the SDC turn-on.

  6. Summary of the Working Group 4: Future accelerator concepts including gamma-gamma, beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seryi, Andrei

    2014-03-01

    The working group WG4 was aiming to focus its attention on various topics related to the future and novel accelerator concepts of colliders, new beam manipulation and focusing techniques, novel FEL schemes. The group planned in particular to consider new concepts of plasma (and other such method) based colliders; novel concepts of colliders including Higgs factories based on advanced linacs (and recirculating linacs), gamma-gamma collider, etc.; novel schemes of beam focusing including local chromaticity correction; beam control and manipulation schemes; emittance exchange, micro-bunch train, beam shaping (ramped beams, special distributions), flat beam transformations; novel FEL schemes, such as transversely tapered undulator, RF, optical and plasma based undulators. As many of these topics (e.g. novel concepts of plasma based colliders, the methods to create micro-bunch train and ramped beam distributions) could be of joint interest with WG1, the sought ways to arrange joint working group sessions for discussion of these topics.

  7. REVIEW: Back to the future: the history and development of the clinical linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thwaites, David I.; Tuohy, John B.

    2006-07-01

    The linear accelerator (linac) is the accepted workhorse in radiotherapy in 2006. The first medical linac treated its first patient, in London, in 1953, so the use of these machines in clinical practice has been almost co-existent with the lifetime of Physics in Medicine and Biology. This review is a personal selection of things the authors feel are interesting in the history, particularly the early history, and development of clinical linacs. A brief look into the future is also given. One significant theme throughout is the continuity of ideas, building on previous experience. We hope the review might re-connect younger radiotherapy physicists in particular with some of the history and emphasize the continual need, in any human activity, to remain aware of the past, in order to make best use of past experience when taking decisions in the present.

  8. Preliminary report on the utilization of the Fermilab site for a future accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Site Utilization Working Group

    1996-10-01

    This report is a preliminary assessment of the utility of the Fermilab site for future accelerator projects. It responds to a request from the Director to evaluate how the Fermilab site and infrastructure may be relevant to future accelerator projects in the U.S. The SSC experience suggests that any major new project will have to be based on the existing infrastructure at one of the National Laboratories. This work presents only the technical issues and the benefits of the Fermilab site and infrastructure. The projects treated are: (1) A really large hadron collider based on the ``Pipetron`` vision of low-field (2 Tesla) magnets in a small diameter tunnel. Another option, not treated in detail, is a hadron collider using high field magnets. (2) Muon Colliders with 250 GeV and 2 TeV per beam. (3) A linear electron collider with 250 to 500 GeV per beam. The infrastructure of the state of Illinois - geology, hydrology, power and surface water- seems remarkably well suited to any of these projects. The geology of most of Illinois, including Fermilab, contains a dolomite layer that: has low seismic activity, is at an appropriate depth to provide radiation protection, is essentially impervious to water movement and thus satisfies hydrology requirements. There is adequate electrical power - both locally and statewide. We first give brief overviews of the Fermilab and Illinois infrastructure - geology, hydrology, power, and water - and then a summary of each project. On the basis of what we have learned, we feel that Fermilab must be considered seriously as a site for any of these projects. Beyond this point, however site-specific plans will need to be developed for each of the projects.

  9. Gamma-ray bursts at high and very high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piron, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are extra-galactic and extremely energetic transient emissions of gamma rays, which are thought to be associated with the death of massive stars or the merger of compact objects in binary systems. Their huge luminosities involve the presence of a newborn stellar-mass black hole emitting a relativistic collimated outflow, which accelerates particles and produces non-thermal emissions from the radio domain to the highest energies. In this article, I review recent progresses in the understanding of GRB jet physics above 100 MeV, based on Fermi observations of bright GRBs. I discuss the physical implications of these observations and their impact on GRB modeling, and I present some prospects for GRB observation at very high energies in the near future. xml:lang="fr"

  10. Scientific applications for high-energy lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.W.

    1994-03-01

    The convergence of numerous factors makes the time ripe for the development of a community of researchers to use the high-energy laser for scientific investigations. This document attempts to outline the steps necessary to access high-energy laser systems and create a realistic plan to implement usage. Since an academic/scientific user community does not exist in the USA to any viable extent, we include information on present capabilities at the Nova laser. This will briefly cover laser performance and diagnostics and a sampling of some current experimental projects. Further, to make the future possibilities clearer, we will describe the proposed next- generation high-energy laser, named for its inertial fusion confinement (ICF) goal, the multi-megaJoule, 500-teraWatt National Facility, or NIF.

  11. Early Commissioning Experience and Future Plans for the 12 GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Spata, Michael F.

    2014-12-01

    Jefferson Lab has recently completed the accelerator portion of the 12 GeV Upgrade for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. All 52 SRF cryomodules have been commissioned and operated with beam. The initial beam transport goals of demonstrating 2.2 GeV per pass, greater than 6 GeV in 3 passes to an existing experimental facility and greater than 10 GeV in 5-1/2 passes have all been accomplished. These results along with future plans to commission the remaining beamlines and to increase the performance of the accelerator to achieve reliable, robust and efficient operations at 12 GeV are presented.

  12. Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon, Rafael Antonio; Moncada, Roberto; Guerra, Juan; Anchordoqui, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The search for the origin(s) of ultra-high energy (UHE) cosmic rays (CR) remains one of the cornerstones of high energy astrophysics. The previously proposed sources of acceleration for these UHECRs were gamma-ray bursts (GRB) and active galactic nuclei (AGN) due to their energetic activity and powerful jets. However, a problem arises between the acceleration method and the observed CR spectrum. The CRs from GRBs or AGN jets are assumed to undergo Fermi acceleration and a source injection spectrum proportional to E^-2 is expected. However, the most recent fits to the spectrum and nuclear composition suggest an injection spectrum proportional to E^-1. It is well known that such a hard spectrum is characteristic of unipolar induction of rotating compact objects. When this method is applied to the AGN cores, they prove to be much too luminous to accelerate CR nuclei without photodisintegrating, thus creating significant energy losses. Instead, here we re-examine the possibility of these particles being accelerated around the much less luminous quasar remnants, or dead quasars. We compare the interaction times of curvature radiation and photodisintegration, the two primary energy loss considerations with the acceleration time scale. We show that the energy losses at the source are not significant enough as to prevent these CRs from reaching the maximum observed energies. Using data from observatories in the northern and southern sky, the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory respectively, two hotspots have been discerned which have some associated quasar remnants that help to motivate our study.

  13. A Future Accelerated Cognitive Distributed Hybrid Testbed for Big Data Science Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halem, M.; Prathapan, S.; Golpayegani, N.; Huang, Y.; Blattner, T.; Dorband, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    As increased sensor spectral data volumes from current and future Earth Observing satellites are assimilated into high-resolution climate models, intensive cognitive machine learning technologies are needed to data mine, extract and intercompare model outputs. It is clear today that the next generation of computers and storage, beyond petascale cluster architectures, will be data centric. They will manage data movement and process data in place. Future cluster nodes have been announced that integrate multiple CPUs with high-speed links to GPUs and MICS on their backplanes with massive non-volatile RAM and access to active flash RAM disk storage. Active Ethernet connected key value store disk storage drives with 10Ge or higher are now available through the Kinetic Open Storage Alliance. At the UMBC Center for Hybrid Multicore Productivity Research, a future state-of-the-art Accelerated Cognitive Computer System (ACCS) for Big Data science is being integrated into the current IBM iDataplex computational system `bluewave'. Based on the next gen IBM 200 PF Sierra processor, an interim two node IBM Power S822 testbed is being integrated with dual Power 8 processors with 10 cores, 1TB Ram, a PCIe to a K80 GPU and an FPGA Coherent Accelerated Processor Interface card to 20TB Flash Ram. This system is to be updated to the Power 8+, an NVlink 1.0 with the Pascal GPU late in 2016. Moreover, the Seagate 96TB Kinetic Disk system with 24 Ethernet connected active disks is integrated into the ACCS storage system. A Lightweight Virtual File System developed at the NASA GSFC is installed on bluewave. Since remote access to publicly available quantum annealing computers is available at several govt labs, the ACCS will offer an in-line Restricted Boltzmann Machine optimization capability to the D-Wave 2X quantum annealing processor over the campus high speed 100 Gb network to Internet 2 for large files. As an evaluation test of the cognitive functionality of the architecture, the

  14. What is learned from high energy bursts and flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneid, Edward J.

    1990-01-01

    The Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) with its large Nal Total Absorption Shower Counter (TASC) has the scientific capability of performing spectroscopy of high energy cosmic gamma ray bursts and solar flares. EGRET, with a spectroscopy energy range from 0.6 to 140 MeV, provides an opportunity to increase the understanding of the high energy mechanisms of gamma ray bursts and solar flares. A likely interpretation of gamma ray burst sources is that they are rotating, magnetized neutron stars. High magnetic fields can influence the emission of high energy gamma rays, so observational spectroscopic data at high energies can provide information on the upper limits of the magnetic fields in the GRB regions of magnetized neutron stars. Likewise, spectroscopy of high energy gamma rays can provide information useful for deriving the flare proton spectrum which in turn can lead to an understanding of high energy solar flare particle acceleration mechanisms.

  15. A Cerenkov-delta E-Cerenkov detector for high energy cosmic ray isotopes and an accelerator study of Ar-40 and Fe-56 fragmentation. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. H.

    1985-01-01

    A high energy cosmic ray detector--the High Energy Isotope Spectrometer Telescope (HEIST) is described. It is a large area (0.25 m(swp 2) SR) balloon borne isotope spectrometer designed to make high resolution measurements of isotopes in the element range from neon to nickel (10 Z 28) at energies of about 2 GeV/nucleon. HEIST determines the mass of individual nuclei by measuring both the change in the Lorentz factor (delta gamma) that results from traversing the NaI stack, and the energy loss (delta E) in the stack. Since the total energy of an isotope is given by E = (gamma M), the mass M can be determined by M = delta E/delta, gamma. The instrument is designed to achieve a typical mass resolution of 0.2 amu. The isotopic composition of the fragments from the breakup of high energy An-40 and Fe-56 nuclei are measured experimentally. Isotope yields are compared with calculated yields based on semi-empirical cross-section formulae.

  16. Orbitally-Modulated High Energy Emission from Millisecond Pulsar Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Kust Harding, Alice; Venter, Christo; Boettcher, Markus; Baring, Matthew G.

    2017-08-01

    Radio, optical and X-ray followup of unidentified Fermi sources has expanded the number of known galactic-field "black widow" and "redback" millisecond pulsar binaries from four to nearly 30. Several systems observed by Chandra, XMM, Suzaku, and NuSTAR exhibit double-peaked X-ray orbital modulation. This is attributed to synchrotron emission from electrons accelerated in an intrabinary shock and Doppler boosting by mildly relativistic bulk flow along the shock. It is anticipated that NICER will also detect such emission from B1957+20 and other targets. The structure of the orbital X-ray light curves depend upon the binary inclination, shock geometry, and particle acceleration distribution. In particular, the spatial variation along the shock of the underlying electron power-law index yields energy-dependence in the shape of light curves motivating future high energy phase-resolved spectroscopic studies to probe the unknown physics of pulsar winds and relativistic shock acceleration therein. We also briefly discuss stability of the shock to dynamical perturbations for redbacks and how observations of correlated X ray-optical variability may test self-regulatory stabilizing mechanisms.

  17. Identifying the nature of high energy Astroparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomé Caballero Mora, Karen

    2016-10-01

    High energy Astroparticles include Cosmic Ray (CR), gamma ray and neutrinos, all of them coming from the universe. The origin and production, acceleration and propagation mechanisms of ultrahigh-energy CR (UHECR ∼ 1020 eV) are still unknown. Knowledge on particle interactions taking place at those energies, useful for studying current theories on particle physics, can be obtained only from measurements of high energy astroparticles. In the present document some techniques on data analysis of mass composition of UHECR with the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. The relevance of the muon component of air showers produced by the primary CR, as well as some low energy simulations of that component, are explained.

  18. New Prospects in High Energy Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, Roger; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-15

    Recent discoveries using TeV, X-ray and radio telescopes as well as Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray arrays are leading to new insights into longstanding puzzles in high energy astrophysics. Many of these insights come from combining observations throughout the electromagnetic and other spectra as well as evidence assembled from different types of source to propose general principles. Issues discussed in this general overview include methods of accelerating relativistic particles, and amplifying magnetic field, the dynamics of relativistic outflows and the nature of the prime movers that power them. Observational approaches to distinguishing hadronic, leptonic and electromagnetic outflows and emission mechanisms are discussed along with probes of the velocity field and the confinement mechanisms. Observations with GLAST promise to be very prescriptive for addressing these problems.

  19. Wake field acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Where and how will wake field acceleration devices find use for other than, possibly, accelerators for high energy physics. I don't know that this can be responsibly answered at this time. What I can do is describe some recent results from an ongoing experimental program at Argonne which support the idea that wake field techniques and devices are potentially important for future accelerators. Perhaps this will spawn expanded interest and even new ideas for the use of this new technology. The Argonne program, and in particular the Advanced Accelerator Test Facility (AATF), has been reported in several fairly recent papers and reports. But because this is a substantially new audience for the subject, I will include a brief review of the program and the facility before describing experiments. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Scaling magnetized liner inertial fusion on Z and future pulsed-power accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Slutz, S. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Gomez, M. R.; Peterson, K. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Vesey, R. A.; Campbell, E. M.; Betti, R.

    2016-02-15

    The MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] has demonstrated fusion–relevant plasma conditions [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z accelerator with a peak drive current of about 18 MA. We present 2D numerical simulations of the scaling of MagLIF on Z as a function of drive current, preheat energy, and applied magnetic field. The results indicate that deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion yields greater than 100 kJ could be possible on Z when all of these parameters are at the optimum values: i.e., peak current = 25 MA, deposited preheat energy = 5 kJ, and B{sub z} = 30 T. Much higher yields have been predicted [S. A. Slutz and R. A. Vesey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 025003 (2012)] for MagLIF driven with larger peak currents. Two high performance pulsed-power accelerators (Z300 and Z800) based on linear-transformer-driver technology have been designed [W. A. Stygar et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 18, 110401 (2015)]. The Z300 design would provide 48 MA to a MagLIF load, while Z800 would provide 65 MA. Parameterized Thevenin-equivalent circuits were used to drive a series of 1D and 2D numerical MagLIF simulations with currents ranging from what Z can deliver now to what could be achieved by these conceptual future pulsed-power accelerators. 2D simulations of simple MagLIF targets containing just gaseous DT have yields of 18 MJ for Z300 and 440 MJ for Z800. The 2D simulated yield for Z800 is increased to 7 GJ by adding a layer of frozen DT ice to the inside of the liner.

  1. High-energy emission from transients.

    PubMed

    Hinton, J A; Starling, R L C

    2013-06-13

    Cosmic explosions dissipate energy into their surroundings on a very wide range of time scales: producing shock waves and associated particle acceleration. The historical culprits for the acceleration of the bulk of Galactic cosmic rays are supernova remnants: explosions on approximately 10(4) year time scales. Increasingly, however, time-variable emission points to rapid and efficient particle acceleration in a range of different astrophysical systems. Gamma-ray bursts have the shortest time scales, with inferred bulk Lorentz factors of approximately 1000 and photons emitted beyond 100 GeV, but active galaxies, pulsar wind nebulae and colliding stellar winds are all now associated with time-variable emission at approximately teraelectron volt energies. Cosmic photons and neutrinos at these energies offer a powerful probe of the underlying physical mechanisms of cosmic explosions, and a tool for exploring fundamental physics with these systems. Here, we discuss the motivations for high-energy observations of transients, the current experimental situation, and the prospects for the next decade, with particular reference to the major next-generation high-energy observatory, the Cherenkov Telescope Array.

  2. Electron-Proton and High Energy Telescopes for Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivasrao R.; Grunau, Jan; Boden, Sebastian; Steinhagen, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Boettcher, Stephan; Rodríguez-Pacheco, Javier; Seimetz, Lars; Schuster, Bjoern; Kulemzin, Alexander; Wetzel, Moritz; Ravanbakhsh, Ali

    2013-04-01

    The Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) suite for ESA's Solar Orbiter will provide key measurements to address particle acceleration at and near the Sun. The EPD suite consists of five sensors (STEIN, SIS, EPT, LET and HET). The University of Kiel in Germany is responsible for the design, development, and build of EPT and HET which are presented here. The Electron Proton Telescope (EPT) is designed to cleanly separate and measure electrons in the energy range from 20 - 400 keV and protons from 20 - 7000 keV. The Solar Orbiter EPT electron measurements from 20 - 400 keV will cover the gap with some overlap between suprathermal electrons measured by STEIN and high energy electrons measured by HET. The proton measurements from 20 -7000 keV will cover the gap between STEIN and LET. The Electron and Proton Telescope relies on the magnet/foil-technique. The High-Energy Telescope (HET) on ESA's Solar Orbiter mission, will measure electrons from 300 keV up to about 30 MeV, protons from 10 -100 MeV, and heavy ions from ~20 to 200 MeV/nuc. Thus, HET covers the energy range which is of specific interest for studies of the space environment and will perform the measurements needed to understand the origin of high-energy events at the Sun which occasionally accelerate particles to such high energies that they can penetrate the Earth's atmosphere and be measured at ground level (ground-level events). These measurement capabilities are reached by a combination of solid-state detectors and a scintillator calorimeter which allows use of the dE/dx vs. total E technique for particle identification and energy measurement. The upper limits on energy listed above refer to particles (ions) stopping in the scintillator and careful modeling of HET properties will allow discrimination of forward/backward penetrating particles in a wider energy range. Here we present the current development status of EPT-HET units focusing on the test and calibration results obtained with the demonstration

  3. High-energy spectroscopic astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, Manuel; Walter, Roland

    After three decades of intense research in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, the time was ripe to summarize basic knowledge on X-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy for interested students and researchers ready to become involved in new high-energy missions. This volume exposes both the scientific basics and modern methods of high-energy spectroscopic astrophysics. The emphasis is on physical principles and observing methods rather than a discussion of particular classes of high-energy objects, but many examples and new results are included in the three chapters as well.

  4. Experimental High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Distefano, Carla

    2005-10-12

    Neutrinos are considered promising probes for high energy astrophysics. More than four decades after deep water Cerenkov technique was proposed to detect high energy neutrinos. Two detectors of this type are successfully taking data: BAIKAL and AMANDA. They have demonstrated the feasibility of the high energy neutrino detection and have set first constraints on TeV neutrino production astrophysical models. The quest for the construction of km3 size detectors have already started: in the South Pole, the IceCube neutrino telescope is under construction; the ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR Collaborations are working towards the installation of a neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea.

  5. Particle Accelerators in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuang; Fang, Shouxian

    As the special machines that can accelerate charged particle beams to high energy by using electromagnetic fields, particle accelerators have been widely applied in scientific research and various areas of society. The development of particle accelerators in China started in the early 1950s. After a brief review of the history of accelerators, this article describes in the following sections: particle colliders, heavy-ion accelerators, high-intensity proton accelerators, accelerator-based light sources, pulsed power accelerators, small scale accelerators, accelerators for applications, accelerator technology development and advanced accelerator concepts. The prospects of particle accelerators in China are also presented.

  6. Strongly Interacting Matter at Very High Energy Density

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, L.

    2011-06-05

    The authors discuss the study of matter at very high energy density. In particular: what are the scientific questions; what are the opportunities to makes significant progress in the study of such matter and what facilities are now or might be available in the future to answer the scientific questions? The theoretical and experimental study of new forms of high energy density matter is still very much a 'wild west' field. There is much freedom for developing new concepts which can have order one effects on the way we think about such matter. It is also a largely 'lawless' field, in that concepts and methods are being developed as new information is generated. There is also great possibility for new experimental discovery. Most of the exciting results from RHIC experiments were unanticipated. The methods used for studying various effects like flow, jet quenching, the ridge, two particle correlations etc. were developed as experiments evolved. I believe this will continue to be the case at LHC and as we use existing and proposed accelerators to turn theoretical conjecture into tangible reality. At some point this will no doubt evolve into a precision science, and that will make the field more respectable, but for my taste, the 'wild west' times are the most fun.

  7. Impact of accelerated future global mean sea level rise on hypoxia in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, H. E. M.; Höglund, A.; Eilola, K.; Almroth-Rosell, E.

    2017-07-01

    Expanding hypoxia is today a major threat for many coastal seas around the world and disentangling its drivers is a large challenge for interdisciplinary research. Using a coupled physical-biogeochemical model we estimate the impact of past and accelerated future global mean sea level rise (GSLR) upon water exchange and oxygen conditions in a semi-enclosed, shallow sea. As a study site, the Baltic Sea was chosen that suffers today from eutrophication and from dead bottom zones due to (1) excessive nutrient loads from land, (2) limited water exchange with the world ocean and (3) perhaps other drivers like global warming. We show from model simulations for the period 1850-2008 that the impacts of past GSLR on the marine ecosystem were relatively small. If we assume for the end of the twenty-first century a GSLR of +0.5 m relative to today's mean sea level, the impact on the marine ecosystem may still be small. Such a GSLR corresponds approximately to the projected ensemble-mean value reported by the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. However, we conclude that GSLR should be considered in future high-end projections (>+1 m) for the Baltic Sea and other coastal seas with similar hydrographical conditions as in the Baltic because GSLR may lead to reinforced saltwater inflows causing higher salinity and increased vertical stratification compared to present-day conditions. Contrary to intuition, reinforced ventilation of the deep water does not lead to overall improved oxygen conditions but causes instead expanded dead bottom areas accompanied with increased internal phosphorus loads from the sediments and increased risk for cyanobacteria blooms.

  8. Identifying ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray accelerators with future ultrahigh-energy neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ke; Kotera, Kumiko; Miller, M. Coleman; Murase, Kohta; Oikonomou, Foteini

    2016-12-01

    The detection of ultrahigh-energy (UHE) neutrino sources would contribute significantly to solving the decades-old mystery of the origin of the highest-energy cosmic rays. We investigate the ability of a future UHE neutrino detector to identify the brightest neutrino point sources, by exploring the parameter space of the total number of observed events and the angular resolution of the detector. The favored parameter region can be translated to requirements for the effective area, sky coverage and angular resolution of future detectors, for a given source number density and evolution history. Moreover, by studying the typical distance to sources that are expected to emit more than one event for a given diffuse neutrino flux, we find that a significant fraction of the identifiable UHE neutrino sources may be located in the nearby Universe if the source number density is above ~10-6 Mpc-3. If sources are powerful and rare enough, as predicted in blazar scenarios, they can first be detected at distant locations. Our result also suggests that if UHE cosmic-ray accelerators are neither beamed nor transients, it will be possible to associate the detected UHE neutrino sources with nearby UHE cosmic-ray and gamma-ray sources, and that they may also be observed using other messengers, including ones with limited horizons such as TeV gamma rays, UHE gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for a gtrsim5σ detection of UHE neutrino sources with a uniform density, ns~10-7-10-5 Mpc-3, at least ~100-1000 events and sub-degree angular resolution are needed, and the results depend on the source evolution model.

  9. Impact of accelerated future global mean sea level rise on hypoxia in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, H. E. M.; Höglund, A.; Eilola, K.; Almroth-Rosell, E.

    2016-08-01

    Expanding hypoxia is today a major threat for many coastal seas around the world and disentangling its drivers is a large challenge for interdisciplinary research. Using a coupled physical-biogeochemical model we estimate the impact of past and accelerated future global mean sea level rise (GSLR) upon water exchange and oxygen conditions in a semi-enclosed, shallow sea. As a study site, the Baltic Sea was chosen that suffers today from eutrophication and from dead bottom zones due to (1) excessive nutrient loads from land, (2) limited water exchange with the world ocean and (3) perhaps other drivers like global warming. We show from model simulations for the period 1850-2008 that the impacts of past GSLR on the marine ecosystem were relatively small. If we assume for the end of the twenty-first century a GSLR of +0.5 m relative to today's mean sea level, the impact on the marine ecosystem may still be small. Such a GSLR corresponds approximately to the projected ensemble-mean value reported by the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. However, we conclude that GSLR should be considered in future high-end projections (>+1 m) for the Baltic Sea and other coastal seas with similar hydrographical conditions as in the Baltic because GSLR may lead to reinforced saltwater inflows causing higher salinity and increased vertical stratification compared to present-day conditions. Contrary to intuition, reinforced ventilation of the deep water does not lead to overall improved oxygen conditions but causes instead expanded dead bottom areas accompanied with increased internal phosphorus loads from the sediments and increased risk for cyanobacteria blooms.

  10. [Experimental and theoretical high energy physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, J.; Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1993-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics research at Purdue is summarized in a number of reports. Subjects treated include the following: the CLEO experiment for the study of heavy flavor physics; gas microstrip detectors; particle astrophysics; affine Kac{endash}Moody algebra; nonperturbative mass bounds on scalar and fermion systems due to triviality and vacuum stability constraints; resonance neutrino oscillations; e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions at CERN; {bar p}{endash}p collisions at FNAL; accelerator physics at Fermilab; development work for the SDC detector at SSC; TOPAZ; D-zero physics; physics beyond the standard model; and the Collider Detector at Fermilab. (RWR)

  11. Energy spectra of high energy atmospheric neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsui, K.; Minorikawa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on high energy neutrinos ( or = 1 TeV), a new calculation of atmospheric neutrino intensities was carried out taking into account EMC effects observed in P-A collisions by accelerator, recent measurement of primary cosmic ray spectrum and results of cosmic ray muon spectrum and charge ratio. Other features of the present calculation are (1) taking into account kinematics of three body decays of kaons and charm particles in diffusion equations and (2) taking into account energy dependence of kaon production.

  12. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1979-01-01

    Managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by TRW, the third High Energy Astronomy Observatory was launched September 20, 1979. HEAO-3 was designed to study gamma-rays and cosmic ray particles.

  13. Summary report of working group 3: Laser and high-gradient structure-based acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andonian, Gerard; Simakov, Evgenya

    2017-03-01

    High-gradient particle acceleration with reduced power demands is essential for miniaturization and cost reduction of future accelerators. Applications for compact accelerators span collider research for High Energy Physics, light source development for Basic Energy Sciences and National Security, and industrial accelerators for Energy and Environmental Applications. Working Group 3 discussed and surveyed the recent advances in achieving higher gradients and better acceleration efficiency in externally powered, structure-based accelerators. The topics covered in Working Group 3 included dielectric laser acceleration, millimeter-wave accelerators, breakdown phenomena, exotic topologies such as photonic band-gap structures, artificial materials, and nanostructures, and novel rf technology.

  14. Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses topics related to high-energy, gamma-ray astronomy (including cosmic radiation, gamma-ray detectors, high-energy gamma-ray sources, and others). Also considers motivation for the development of this field, the principal results to date, and future prospects. (JN)

  15. Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses topics related to high-energy, gamma-ray astronomy (including cosmic radiation, gamma-ray detectors, high-energy gamma-ray sources, and others). Also considers motivation for the development of this field, the principal results to date, and future prospects. (JN)

  16. Applications of particle accelerators in medicine.

    PubMed

    Silari, Marco

    2011-07-01

    There are nearly 20,000 particle accelerators in operation worldwide, about half of them employed for biomedical uses. This paper focuses on some recent advances in the two main medical domains where accelerators find their use, radionuclide production and radiation therapy. The paper first discusses the use of high-energy electron and proton accelerators for the potential, future production of (99)Mo, which is presently provided by fission reactors. Next, it reviews the rationale for the use of protons and carbon ions in cancer therapy, discussing the requirements imposed on accelerator technology and looking at some recent developments.

  17. The HESP (High Energy Solar Physics) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kai, K.

    1986-01-01

    A project for space observations of solar flares for the coming solar maximum phase is briefly described. The main objective is to make a comprehensive study of high energy phenomena of flares through simultaneous imagings in both hard and soft X-rays. The project will be performed with collaboration from US scientists. The HESP (High Energy Solar Physics) WG of ISAS (Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences) has extensively discussed future aspects of space observations of high energy phenomena of solar flares based on successful results of the Hinotori mission, and proposed a comprehensive research program for the next solar maximum, called the HESP (SOLAR-A) project. The objective of the HESP project is to make a comprehensive study of both high energy phenomena of flares and quiet structures including pre-flare states, which have been left uncovered by SMM and Hinotori. For such a study simultaneous imagings with better resolutions in space and time in a wide range of energy will be extremely important.

  18. Establishment of 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray calibration fields produced using the 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator at the Facility of Radiation Standards, Japan Atomic Energy Agency.

    PubMed

    Kowatari, Munehiko; Tanimura, Yoshihiko

    2016-03-01

    A 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field, produced by the nuclear reaction of (19)F(p, αγ)(16)O, has been established at the Facility of Radiation Standards (FRS) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency for calibration purposes. Basic dosimetric quantities (i.e. averaged gamma-ray energy, air-kerma-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficients and air kerma rates at the point of test) have been precisely determined through a series of measurements using the NaI(Tl) spectrometer and an ionisation chamber coupled with an appropriate build-up material. The measurements obtained comply with values recommended by the International Organization for Standardization for an 'R-F field'. The neutron contamination component for the field has also been measured by means of a conventional neutron dose equivalent meter (the so-called neutron rem-counter) and determined to be ∼ 0.5 % of the total dose equivalent.

  19. Gamma-ray, neutron, and hard X-ray studies and requirements for a high-energy solar physics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Dennis, B. R.; Emslie, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements for future high-resolution spatial, spectral, and temporal observation of hard X-rays, gamma rays and neutrons from solar flares are discussed in the context of current high-energy flare observations. There is much promise from these observations for achieving a deep understanding of processes of energy release, particle acceleration and particle transport in a complicated environment such as the turbulent and highly magnetized atmosphere of the active sun.

  20. Gamma-ray, neutron, and hard X-ray studies and requirements for a high-energy solar physics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Dennis, B. R.; Emslie, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements for future high-resolution spatial, spectral, and temporal observation of hard X-rays, gamma rays and neutrons from solar flares are discussed in the context of current high-energy flare observations. There is much promise from these observations for achieving a deep understanding of processes of energy release, particle acceleration and particle transport in a complicated environment such as the turbulent and highly magnetized atmosphere of the active sun.

  1. First observations of power MOSFET burnout with high energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Oberg, D.L.; Wert, J.L.; Normand, E.; Majewski, P.P.; Wender, S.A.

    1996-12-01

    Single event burnout was seen in power MOSFETs exposed to high energy neutrons. Devices with rated voltage {ge}400 volts exhibited burnout at substantially less than the rated voltage. Tests with high energy protons gave similar results. Burnout was also seen in limited tests with lower energy protons and neutrons. Correlations with heavy-ion data are discussed. Accelerator proton data gave favorable comparisons with burnout rates measured on the APEX spacecraft. Implications for burnout at lower altitudes are also discussed.

  2. Anomalous Transport of High Energy Cosmic Rays in Galactic Superbubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, Nasser F.

    2014-01-01

    High-energy cosmic rays may exhibit anomalous transport as they traverse and are accelerated by a collection of supernovae explosions in a galactic superbubble. Signatures of this anomalous transport can show up in the particles' evolution and their spectra. In a continuous-time-random- walk (CTRW) model assuming standard diffusive shock acceleration theory (DSA) for each shock encounter, and where the superbubble (an OB stars association) is idealized as a heterogeneous region of particle sources and sinks, acceleration and transport in the superbubble can be shown to be sub-diffusive. While the sub-diffusive transport can be attributed to the stochastic nature of the acceleration time according to DSA theory, the spectral break appears to be an artifact of transport in a finite medium. These CTRW simulations point to a new and intriguing phenomenon associated with the statistical nature of collective acceleration of high energy cosmic rays in galactic superbubbles.

  3. Causes of accelerating sea level on the East Coast of North America: Implications for future sea-level change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. L.; Vinogradova, N. T.

    2016-12-01

    The tide-gauge record from the North American east coast reveals significant accelerations in sea level starting in the late 20th century. We analyze the tide-gauge data using a model in which the accelerations are assumed to be zero prior to 1990. The estimated accelerations range from near zero to 0.3 mm yr-2 and exhibit a systematic spatial variability. (See figure, points with error bars.) We model this variability using several processes: ongoing mass change in Greenland and Antarctica as measured by the GRACE satellites; ocean dynamic and steric variability provided by the GECCO2 ocean synthesis; and the inverted barometer effect. We find that the spatial variability of observed sea-level acceleration is well modeled by the sum of these processes. (See figure, blue line.) However, to achieve this fit requires estimation of an admittance for the dynamical and steric contribution, possibly due to the coarse resolution of this analysis or to simplifications associated with parameterization of bottom friction in the shallow coastal areas. Although the ocean dynamic and pressure contributions to the acceleration may fluctuation in the future, other studies indicate that the ice-mass component will increase systematically with time. This component of sea-level acceleration is 0.1-0.15 mm yr-2, which if it continues is by itself capable of increasing sea level in a century by 0.5-0.75 m on the east coast of North America.

  4. Detection of Yarkovsky acceleration in the context of precovery observations and the future Gaia catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmars, J.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The Yarkovsky effect is a weak non-gravitational force leading to a small variation of the semi-major axis of an asteroid. Using radar measurements and astrometric observations, it is possible to measure a drift in semi-major axis through orbit determination. Aims: This paper aims to detect a reliable drift in semi-major axis of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) from ground-based observations and to investigate the impact of precovery observations and the future Gaia catalogue in the detection of a secular drift in semi-major axis. Methods: We have developed a precise dynamical model of an asteroid's motion taking the Yarkovsky acceleration into account and allowing the fitting of the drift in semi-major axis. Using statistical methods, we investigate the quality and the robustness of the detection. Results: By filtering spurious detections with an estimated maximum drift depending on the asteroid's size, we found 46 NEAs with a reliable drift in semi-major axis in good agreement with the previous studies. The measure of the drift leads to a better orbit determination and constrains some physical parameters of these objects. Our results are in good agreement with the 1 /D dependence of the drift and with the expected ratio of prograde and retrograde NEAs. We show that the uncertainty of the drift mainly depends on the length of orbital arc and in this way we highlight the importance of the precovery observations and data mining in the detection of consistent drift. Finally, we discuss the impact of Gaia catalogue in the determination of drift in semi-major axis.

  5. High Energy Electron and Gamma - Ray Detection with ATIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon borne ionization calorimeter is well suited to record and identify high energy cosmic ray electrons, and at very high energies gamma-ray photons as well. We have simulated the performance of the instrument, and compare the simulations with actual high energy electron exposures at the CERN accelerator. Simulations and measurements do not compare exactly, in detail, but overall the simulations have predicted actual measured behavior quite well. ATIC has had its first 16 day balloon flight at the turn of the year over Antarctica, and first results obtained using the analysis methods derived from simulations and calibrations will be reported.

  6. Graduate Student Program in Materials and Engineering Research and Development for Future Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, Linda

    2016-07-07

    The objective of the proposal was to develop graduate student training in materials and engineering research relevant to the development of particle accelerators. Many components used in today's accelerators or storage rings are at the limit of performance. The path forward in many cases requires the development of new materials or fabrication techniques, or a novel engineering approach. Often, accelerator-based laboratories find it difficult to get top-level engineers or materials experts with the motivation to work on these problems. The three years of funding provided by this grant was used to support development of accelerator components through a multidisciplinary approach that cut across the disciplinary boundaries of accelerator physics, materials science, and surface chemistry. The following results were achieved: (1) significant scientific results on fabrication of novel photocathodes, (2) application of surface science and superconducting materials expertise to accelerator problems through faculty involvement, (3) development of instrumentation for fabrication and characterization of materials for accelerator components, (4) student involvement with problems at the interface of material science and accelerator physics.

  7. A role of accelerator-driven reactor to meet future energy demands

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H.; An, Y.; Yang, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Tsoupas, N.

    1998-03-01

    Fissile fuel can be produced at a high rate using an accelerator driven Pu fueled fast reactor operated at deep subcriticality; this approach avoids encountering a shortage of Pu during a high rate of growth in the production of nuclear energy. Slightly reducing the acceleration field minimizes the tripping of the beam and the radiation dose from the accelerator; hence the accelerator can be operated as a highly reliable industrial machine. The usefulness of a windowless liquid jet target, which eliminates the spreading of the beam and problems of radiation damage is emphasized, in association with the small size of the target. The requirements for a proton beam accelerator for this system are discussed.

  8. Constraining sources of ultra high energy cosmic rays using high energy observations with the Fermi satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Pe'er, Asaf; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2012-03-01

    We analyze the conditions that enable acceleration of particles to ultra-high energies, ∼ 10{sup 20} eV (UHECRs). We show that broad band photon data recently provided by WMAP, ISOCAM, Swift and Fermi satellites, yield constraints on the ability of active galactic nuclei (AGN) to produce UHECRs. The high energy (MeV–GeV) photons are produced by Compton scattering of the emitted low energy photons and the cosmic microwave background or extra-galactic background light. The ratio of the luminosities at high and low photon energies can therefore be used as a probe of the physical conditions in the acceleration site. We find that existing data excludes core regions of nearby radio-loud AGN as possible acceleration sites of UHECR protons. However, we show that giant radio lobes are not excluded. We apply our method to Cen A, and show that acceleration of protons to ∼ 10{sup 20} eV can only occur at distances ∼>100 kpc from the core.

  9. SU-E-T-381: Evaluation of Calculated Dose Accuracy for Organs-At-Risk Located at Out-Of-Field in a Commercial Treatment Planning System for High Energy Photon Beams Produced From TrueBeam Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L; Ding, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dose calculation accuracy for the out-of-field dose is important for predicting the dose to the organs-at-risk when they are located outside primary beams. The investigations on evaluating the calculation accuracy of treatment planning systems (TPS) on out-of-field dose in existing publications have focused on low energy (6MV) photon. This study evaluates out-of-field dose calculation accuracy of AAA algorithm for 15MV high energy photon beams. Methods: We used the EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) codes to evaluate the AAA algorithm in Varian Eclipse TPS (v.11). The incident beams start with validated Varian phase-space sources for a TrueBeam linac equipped with Millennium 120 MLC. Dose comparisons between using AAA and MC for CT based realistic patient treatment plans using VMAT techniques for prostate and lung were performed and uncertainties of organ dose predicted by AAA at out-of-field location were evaluated. Results: The results show that AAA calculations under-estimate doses at the dose level of 1% (or less) of prescribed dose for CT based patient treatment plans using VMAT techniques. In regions where dose is only 1% of prescribed dose, although AAA under-estimates the out-of-field dose by 30% relative to the local dose, it is only about 0.3% of prescribed dose. For example, the uncertainties of calculated organ dose to liver or kidney that is located out-of-field is <0.3% of prescribed dose. Conclusion: For 15MV high energy photon beams, very good agreements (<1%) in calculating dose distributions were obtained between AAA and MC. The uncertainty of out-of-field dose calculations predicted by the AAA algorithm for realistic patient VMAT plans is <0.3% of prescribed dose in regions where the dose relative to the prescribed dose is <1%, although the uncertainties can be much larger relative to local doses. For organs-at-risk located at out-of-field, the error of dose predicted by Eclipse using AAA is negligible. This work was conducted in part using the

  10. High Energy Density Extended Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2009-06-01

    Application of high pressure significantly alters the interatomic distance and, thus, the nature of intermolecular interaction, chemical bonding, molecular configuration, crystal structure, and stability of solid. With modern advances in high-pressure technologies, it is feasible to achieve a large (often up to a several-fold) compression of lattice, at which condition material can be easily forced into a new physical and chemical configuration. The high-pressure thus offers enhanced opportunities to discover new phases, both stable and metastable ones, and to tune novel properties in a wide-range of atomistic length scale, substantially greater than (often being several orders of) those achieved by other thermal (varying temperatures) and chemical (varying composition or making alloys) means. Over the past decade or two, a large number of new materials and novel phenomena have been discovered and predicted at extreme pressure-temperature conditions. Commonly observed under extreme conditions is the transformation of solids into more compact structures with itinerant electrons such as metallic and nonmetallic extended phases. Nonmolecular extended solids, particularly made of low Z elements such as hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine, constitute a new class of high energy density solids, which can store a large sum of energy in their three-dimensional network structure (˜ several eV/bond). Yet, a large cohesive energy of singly bonded (or sp3 hybridized) electrons gives rise to an extremely stiff lattice and novel electronic and optical properties. Broadly speaking, these molecular-to-nonmolecular transitions occur due to electron delocalization manifested as a rapid increase in electron kinetic energy at high density, but there are many outstanding questions as well regarding the exact nature of chemical bonding, phase stability, chemical mechanisms, and so on. These questions constitute fundamental chemistry unique to extreme pressure

  11. Experimental High Energy Physics Research

    SciTech Connect

    Hohlmann, Marcus

    2016-01-13

    This final report summarizes activities of the Florida Tech High Energy Physics group supported by DOE under grant #DE-SC0008024 during the period June 2012 – March 2015. We focused on one of the main HEP research thrusts at the Energy Frontier by participating in the CMS experiment. We were exploiting the tremendous physics opportunities at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and prepared for physics at its planned extension, the High-Luminosity LHC. The effort comprised a physics component with analysis of data from the first LHC run and contributions to the CMS Phase-2 upgrades in the muon endcap system (EMU) for the High-Luminosity LHC. The emphasis of our hardware work was the development of large-area Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) for the CMS forward muon upgrade. We built a production and testing site for such detectors at Florida Tech to complement future chamber production at CERN. The first full-scale CMS GE1/1 chamber prototype ever built outside of CERN was constructed at Florida Tech in summer 2013. We conducted two beam tests with GEM prototype chambers at CERN in 2012 and at FNAL in 2013 and reported the results at conferences and in publications. Principal Investigator Hohlmann served as chair of the collaboration board of the CMS GEM collaboration and as co-coordinator of the GEM detector working group. He edited and authored sections of the detector chapter of the Technical Design Report (TDR) for the GEM muon upgrade, which was approved by the LHCC and the CERN Research Board in 2015. During the course of the TDR approval process, the GEM project was also established as an official subsystem of the muon system by the CMS muon institution board. On the physics side, graduate student Kalakhety performed a Z' search in the dimuon channel with the 2011 and 2012 CMS datasets that utilized 20.6 fb⁻¹ of p-p collisions at √s = 8 TeV. For the dimuon channel alone, the 95% CL lower limits obtained on the mass of a Z' resonance are 2770 GeV for a Z

  12. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella; Corcoran, Michael; Drake, Stephen; McGlynn, Thomas A.; Snowden, Stephen; Mukai, Koji; Cannizzo, John; Lochner, James; Rots, Arnold; Christian, Eric; hide

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by the members of the USRA contract team during the 6 months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming 6 months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in astrophysics. Supported missions include advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-Ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) and others.

  13. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L.

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  14. High energy physics and very high energy astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lawrence W.

    2017-06-01

    The current research programs at the CERN LHC and at the U.S. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) and other activities are briefly reviewed. The programs which are related to cosmic ray issues and which form a link between the cosmic ray community and the particle accelerator community are noted. The AMS-02 satellite program is also noted.

  15. Comparison of build-up dose between Elekta and Varian linear accelerators for high-energy photon beams using radiochromic film and clinical implications for IMRT head and neck treatments.

    PubMed

    Paelinck, L; De Wagter, C; Van Esch, A; Duthoy, W; Depuydt, T; De Neve, W

    2005-02-07

    Skin toxicity has been reported for IMRT of head and neck cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose in the build-up region delivered by a 6 MV treatment plan for which important skin toxicity was observed. We also investigated if the different designs of the treatment head of an Elekta and a Varian linear accelerator, especially the lower position of the Varian multi-leaf collimator, give rise to different build-up doses. For regular square open beams, the build-up dose along the central beam axis is higher for the Varian machine than for the Elekta machine, both for 6 MV and 18 MV. At the Elekta machine at 18 MV, the superficial dose of a diamond shaped 10 x 10 cm2 field is 3.6% lower than the superficial dose of a regular 10 x 10 cm2 field. This effect is not seen at 6 MV. At the Varian machine, the superficial dose of the diamond shaped field is respectively 3.5 and 14.2% higher than the superficial dose of the regular 10 x 10 cm2 field for 6 MV and 18 MV. Despite the differences measured in build-up dose for single beams between the Elekta and the Varian linear accelerator, there were no measurable differences in superficial dose when a typical IMRT dose plan of 6 MV for a head and neck tumour is executed at the two machines.

  16. Mexican High Energy Physics Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Olivo, J. C.; Napsuciale, M.; Pérez-Angón, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    The Mexican High Energy Physics Network is one of CONACYT's thematic research networks, created with the aim of increasing the communication and cooperation of the scientific and technology communities of Mexico in strategic areas. In this report we review the evolution, challenges, achievements and opportunities faced by the network.

  17. Extraterrestrial high energy neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    Using the most recent cosmic ray spectra up to 2x10 to the 20th power eV, production spectra of high energy neutrinos from cosmic ray interactions with interstellar gas and extragalactic interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays with 3K universal background photons are presented and discussed. Estimates of the fluxes from cosmic diffuse sources and the nearby quasar 3C273 are made using the generic relationship between secondary neutrinos and gammas and using recent gamma ray satellite data. These gamma ray data provide important upper limits on cosmological neutrinos. Quantitative estimates of the observability of high energy neutrinos from the inner galaxy and 3C273 above atmospheric background for a DUMAND type detector are discussed in the context of the Weinberg-Salam model with sq sin theta omega = 0.2 and including the atmospheric background from the decay of charmed mesons. Constraints on cosmological high energy neutrino production models are also discussed. It appears that important high energy neutrino astronomy may be possible with DUMAND, but very long observing times are required.

  18. HIGH ENERGY CRYSTALLINE LASER MATERIALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The object of this research is to obtain improved laser materials for high energy lasers. During the third quarter of this contract, the study of... energy transfer from Cr to Nd in GdAlO3 and YAlG continued. In order to study the Nd fluorescence arising via transfer from Cr, the material was excited

  19. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1978-01-01

    Managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by TRW, the second High Energy Astronomy Observatory was launched November 13, 1978. The observatory carried the largest X-ray telescope ever built and was renamed the Einstein Observatory after achieving orbit.

  20. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1977-01-01

    Managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and designed by TRW, the first High Energy Astronomy Observatory was launched August 12, 1977 aboard an Atlas Centaur rocket. HEAO-1, devoted to the study of X-rays in space, carried four instruments all used primarily in a scarning mode. The mission lasted seventeen months.

  1. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1977-08-01

    This picture is of an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle, carrying the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-1, on Launch Complex 36 at the Air Force Eastern Test Range prior to launch on August 12, 1977. The Kennedy Space Center managed the launch operations that included a pre-aunch checkout, launch, and flight, up through the observatory separation in orbit.

  2. Neutrino factory and beta beam: accelerator options for future neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2012-06-03

    Two accelerator options for producing intense neutrino beams a Neutrino Factory based on stored muon beams and a Beta Beam facility based on stored beams of beta unstable ions are described. Technical challenges for each are described and current R&D efforts aimed at mitigating these challenges are indicated. Progress is being made in the design of both types of facility, each of which would extend the state-of-the-art in accelerator science.

  3. The 1993 European school of high-energy physis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, N.

    1994-06-01

    The European School of High-Energy Physics is intended to give young experimental physicists an introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. These proceedings contain lectures on quantum field theory, quantum chromodynamics, CP violation, radiative corrections, cosmology, particle detectors and e(+)e(-) accelerators, as well as reports on results from Hadron - Electron - Ring - Accelerator (HERA) and Laboratory for Extraterrestial Physics (LEP) and accounts of particle physics research at CERN and in Poland and Russia.

  4. Very-high energy observations of the galactic center region by VERITAS in 2010-2012

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Chen, W.; Barnacka, A.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Biteau, J.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V; Dickinson, H. J.; Eisch, J. D.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dumm, J.; and others

    2014-08-01

    The Galactic center is an interesting region for high-energy (0.1-100 GeV) and very-high-energy (E > 100 GeV) γ-ray observations. Potential sources of GeV/TeV γ-ray emission have been suggested, e.g., the accretion of matter onto the supermassive black hole, cosmic rays from a nearby supernova remnant (e.g., Sgr A East), particle acceleration in a plerion, or the annihilation of dark matter particles. The Galactic center has been detected by EGRET and by Fermi/LAT in the MeV/GeV energy band. At TeV energies, the Galactic center was detected with moderate significance by the CANGAROO and Whipple 10 m telescopes and with high significance by H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS. We present the results from three years of VERITAS observations conducted at large zenith angles resulting in a detection of the Galactic center on the level of 18 standard deviations at energies above ∼2.5 TeV. The energy spectrum is derived and is found to be compatible with hadronic, leptonic, and hybrid emission models discussed in the literature. Future, more detailed measurements of the high-energy cutoff and better constraints on the high-energy flux variability will help to refine and/or disentangle the individual models.

  5. Magnetar giant flare high-energy emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elenbaas, C.; Huppenkothen, D.; Omand, C.; Watts, A. L.; Bissaldi, E.; Caiazzo, I.; Heyl, J.

    2017-10-01

    High-energy (>250 keV) emission has been detected persisting for several tens of seconds after the initial spike of magnetar giant flares (GFs). It has been conjectured that this emission might arise via inverse Compton scattering in a highly extended corona generated by super-Eddington outflows high up in the magnetosphere. In this paper, we undertake a detailed examination of this model. We investigate the properties of the required scatterers, and whether the mechanism is consistent with the degree of pulsed emission observed in the tail of the GF. We conclude that the mechanism is consistent with current data, although the origin of the scattering population remains an open question. We propose an alternative picture in which the emission is closer to that star and is dominated by synchrotron radiation. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager observations of the 2004 December flare modestly favour this latter picture. We assess the prospects for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to detect and characterize a similar high-energy component in a future GF. Such a detection should help to resolve some of the outstanding issues.

  6. Coastal marsh response to historical and future sea-level acceleration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirwan, M.; Temmerman, S.

    2009-01-01

    We consider the response of marshland to accelerations in the rate of sea-level rise by utilizing two previously described numerical models of marsh elevation. In a model designed for the Scheldt Estuary (Belgium-SW Netherlands), a feedback between inundation depth and suspended sediment concentrations allows marshes to quickly adjust their elevation to a change in sea-level rise rate. In a model designed for the North Inlet Estuary (South Carolina), a feedback between inundation and vegetation growth allows similar adjustment. Although the models differ in their approach, we find that they predict surprisingly similar responses to sea-level change. Marsh elevations adjust to a step change in the rate of sea-level rise in about 100 years. In the case of a continuous acceleration in the rate of sea-level rise, modeled accretion rates lag behind sea-level rise rates by about 20 years, and never obtain equilibrium. Regardless of the style of acceleration, the models predict approximately 6-14 cm of marsh submergence in response to historical sea-level acceleration, and 3-4 cm of marsh submergence in response to a projected scenario of sea-level rise over the next century. While marshes already low in the tidal frame would be susceptible to these depth changes, our modeling results suggest that factors other than historical sea-level acceleration are more important for observations of degradation in most marshes today.

  7. Surprises in High Energy Density Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Edward Teller's work on what is now called High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) is not so well known as some of his work in other areas of physics. Yet he made substantial contributions since the 1940s and the models that he developed and the problems that he worked on are still relevant today. In this talk we shall look at two major areas in HEDP with the first treated more historically and the second more with a view to recent work that the author and others have undertaken which perhaps indicates future directions.

  8. Three Decades of Explosive High Energy Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are the most brilliant explosions in space. The first GRB was discovered on 1967, just 40 years ago. It took several years and multiple generations of space and ground instruments to unravel some of the mysteries of this phenomenon. However, many questions remain open today. I will discuss the history, evolution and current status of the GRB field and its contributions in our understanding of the transient high energy sky. Finally, I will describe how GRBs can be utilized in future missions as tools, to probe the cosmic chemical evolution of the Universe and the star formation rates.

  9. High-efficiency high-energy Ka source for the critically-required maximum illumination of x-ray optics on Z using Z-petawatt-driven laser-breakout-afterburner accelerated ultrarelativistic electrons LDRD .

    SciTech Connect

    Sefkow, Adam B.; Bennett, Guy R.

    2010-09-01

    Under the auspices of the Science of Extreme Environments LDRD program, a <2 year theoretical- and computational-physics study was performed (LDRD Project 130805) by Guy R Bennett (formally in Center-01600) and Adam B. Sefkow (Center-01600): To investigate novel target designs by which a short-pulse, PW-class beam could create a brighter K{alpha} x-ray source than by simple, direct-laser-irradiation of a flat foil; Direct-Foil-Irradiation (DFI). The computational studies - which are still ongoing at this writing - were performed primarily on the RedStorm supercomputer at Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque site. The motivation for a higher efficiency K{alpha} emitter was very clear: as the backlighter flux for any x-ray imaging technique on the Z accelerator increases, the signal-to-noise and signal-to-background ratios improve. This ultimately allows the imaging system to reach its full quantitative potential as a diagnostic. Depending on the particular application/experiment this would imply, for example, that the system would have reached its full design spatial resolution and thus the capability to see features that might otherwise be indiscernible with a traditional DFI-like x-ray source. This LDRD began FY09 and ended FY10.

  10. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1975-01-01

    The family of High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) instruments consisted of three unmarned scientific observatories capable of detecting the x-rays emitted by the celestial bodies with high sensitivity and high resolution. The celestial gamma-ray and cosmic-ray fluxes were also collected and studied to learn more about the mysteries of the universe. High-Energy rays cannot be studied by Earth-based observatories because of the obscuring effects of the atmosphere that prevent the rays from reaching the Earth's surface. They had been observed initially by sounding rockets and balloons, and by small satellites that do not possess the needed instrumentation capabilities required for high data resolution and sensitivity. The HEAO carried the instrumentation necessary for this capability. In this photograph, an artist's concept of three HEAO spacecraft is shown: HEAO-1, launched on August 12, 1977; HEAO-2, launched on November 13, 1978; and HEAO-3, launched on September 20. 1979.

  11. High energy density aluminum battery

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  12. Cosmology for high energy physicists

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, A.

    1987-11-01

    The standard big bang model of cosmology is presented. Although not perfect, its many successes make it a good starting point for most discussions of cosmology. Places are indicated where well understood laboratory physics is incorporated into the big bang, leading to successful predictions. Much less established aspects of high energy physics and some of the new ideas they have introduced into the field of cosmology are discussed, such as string theory, inflation and monopoles. 49 refs., 5 figs.

  13. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-01-01

    This schematic details the third High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-3. The HEAO-3's mission was to survey and map the celestial sphere for gamma-ray flux and make detailed measurements of cosmic-ray particles. It carried three scientific experiments: a gamma-ray spectrometer, a cosmic-ray isotope experiment, and a heavy cosmic-ray nuclei experiment. The HEAO-3 was originally identified as HEAO-C but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit.

  14. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1978-11-13

    The launch of an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle is shown in this photograph. The Atlas/Centaur, launched on November 13, 1978, carried the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2 into the required orbit. The second observatory, the HEAO-2 (nicknamed the Einstein Observatory in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein) carried the first telescope capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects.

  15. Remote procedure calls for accelerator control at CERN current status and future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Krzysztof

    1994-12-01

    RPC (Remote Procedure Call) is, due to it's transparency and ease of use, the simplest way to implement distributed client-server applications. At CERN this technique has been used for accelerator control since 1987. The tool developed by the control group called NC/RPC has been steadily improved and compares favorable with commercial RPC products. This tool is currently implemented on every significant UNIX workstation platform as well as on LynxOS, OS9, VMS and MS-DOS. We discuss RPC features which are essential in our accelerator control environment and compare NC/RPC with other RPC systems.

  16. Argonne National Laboratory, High Energy Physics Division, semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1989--December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory in the following areas: Experimental High Energy Physics; Theoretical High Energy Physics; Experimental Facilities Research; Accelerator Research and Development; and SSC Detector Research and Development.

  17. High energy physics division semiannual report of research activities

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R. )

    1991-08-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1991--June 30, 1991. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  18. Flux profile scanners for scattered high-energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, R. S.; Decowski, P.; Arroyo, C.; Breuer, M.; Celli, J.; Chudakov, E.; Kumar, K. S.; Olson, M.; Peterson, G. A.; Pope, K.; Ricci, J.; Savage, J.; Souder, P. A.

    2005-11-01

    The paper describes the design and performance of flux integrating Cherenkov scanners with air-core reflecting light guides used in a high-energy, high-flux electron scattering experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The scanners were highly radiation resistant and provided a good signal to background ratio leading to very good spatial resolution of the scattered electron flux profile scans.

  19. The Large Hadron Collider: Redefining High Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, Sarah

    2007-06-19

    Particle physicists have a description of the forces of nature known as the Standard Model that has successfully withstood decades of testing at laboratories around the world. Though the Standard Model is powerful, it is not complete. Important details like the masses of particles are not explained well, and realities as fundamental as gravity, dark matter, and dark energy are left out altogether. I will discuss gaps in the model and why there is hope that some puzzles will be solved by probing high energies with the Large Hadron Collider. Beginning next year, this machine will accelerate protons to record energies, hurling them around a 27 kilometer ring before colliding them 40 million times per second. Detectors the size of five-story buildings will record the debris of these collisions. The new energy frontier made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider will allow thousands of physicists to explore nature's fundamental forces and particles from a fantastic vantage point.

  20. High energy neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles.

    PubMed

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Razzaque, Soebur

    2012-06-01

    Recently the Fermi-LAT data have revealed two gamma-ray emitting bubble-shaped structures at the Galactic center. If the observed gamma rays have hadronic origin (collisions of accelerated protons), the bubbles must emit high energy neutrinos as well. This new, Galactic, neutrino flux should trace the gamma-ray emission in spectrum and spatial extent. Its highest energy part, above 20-50 TeV, is observable at a kilometer-scale detector in the northern hemisphere, such as the planned KM3NeT, while interesting constraints on it could be obtained by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The detection or exclusion of neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles will discriminate between hadronic and leptonic models, thus bringing unique information on the still mysterious origin of these objects and on the time scale of their formation.

  1. High Energy Neutrinos from the Fermi Bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Razzaque, Soebur

    2012-06-01

    Recently the Fermi-LAT data have revealed two gamma-ray emitting bubble-shaped structures at the Galactic center. If the observed gamma rays have hadronic origin (collisions of accelerated protons), the bubbles must emit high energy neutrinos as well. This new, Galactic, neutrino flux should trace the gamma-ray emission in spectrum and spatial extent. Its highest energy part, above 20–50 TeV, is observable at a kilometer-scale detector in the northern hemisphere, such as the planned KM3NeT, while interesting constraints on it could be obtained by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The detection or exclusion of neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles will discriminate between hadronic and leptonic models, thus bringing unique information on the still mysterious origin of these objects and on the time scale of their formation.

  2. ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhoff, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    One of the most striking astrophysical phenomena today is the existence of cosmic ray particles with energies in excess of 1020 eV. While their presence has been confirmed by a number of experiments, it is not clear where and how these particles are accelerated to these energies and how they travel astronomical distances without substantial energy loss. We are entering an exciting new era in cosmic ray physics, with instruments now producing data of unprecedented quality and quantity to tackle the many open questions. This paper reviews the current experimental status of cosmic ray physics and summarizes recent results on the energy spectrum and arrival directions of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

  3. PASOTRON high-energy microwave source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Schumacher, Robert W.; Butler, Jennifer M.; Hyman, Jay, Jr.; Santoru, Joseph; Watkins, Ron M.; Harvey, Robin J.; Dolezal, Franklin A.; Eisenhart, Robert L.; Schneider, Authur J.

    1992-04-01

    A unique, high-energy microwave source, called PASOTRON (Plasma-Assisted Slow-wave Oscillator), has been developed. The PASOTRON utilizes a long-pulse E-gun and plasma- filled slow-wave structure (SWS) to produce high-energy pulses from a simple, lightweight device that utilizes no externally produced magnetic fields. Long pulses are obtained from a novel E-gun that employs a low-pressure glow discharge to provide a stable, high current- density electron source. The electron accelerator consists of a high-perveance, multi-aperture array. The E-beam is operated in the ion-focused regime where the plasma filling the SWS space-charge neutralizes the beam, and the self-pinch force compresses the beamlets and increases the beam current density. A scale-model PASOTRON, operating as a backward- wave oscillator in C-band with a 100-kV E-beam, has produced output powers in the 3 to 5 MW range and pulse lengths of over 100 microsecond(s) ec, corresponding to an integrated energy per pulse of up to 500 J. The E-beam to microwave-radiation power conversion efficiency is about 20%.

  4. Alignment tolerance of accelerating structures and corrections for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, K.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.L.F.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Thompson, K.A.

    1995-06-01

    The alignment tolerance of accelerating structures is estimated by tracking simulations. Both single-bunch and multi-bunch effects are taken into account. Correction schemes for controlling the single and multi-bunch emittance growth in the case of large misalignment are also tested by simulations.

  5. Future evolution and finite-time singularities in F(R) gravity unifying inflation and cosmic acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    2008-08-15

    We study the future evolution of quintessence/phantom-dominated epoch in modified F(R) gravity which unifies the early-time inflation with late-time acceleration and which is consistent with observational tests. Using the reconstruction technique it is demonstrated that there are models where any known (big rip, II, III, or IV type) singularity may classically occur. From another side, in Einstein frame (scalar-tensor description) only IV type singularity occurs. Near the singularity the classical description breaks up, and it is demonstrated that quantum effects act against the singularity and may prevent its appearance. The realistic F(R) gravity which is future singularity free is proposed. We point out that additional modification of any F(R) gravity by the terms relevant at the early universe is possible, in such a way that future singularity does not occur even classically.

  6. High energy electromagnetic particle transportation on the GPU

    SciTech Connect

    Canal, P.; Elvira, D.; Jun, S. Y.; Kowalkowski, J.; Paterno, M.; Apostolakis, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present massively parallel high energy electromagnetic particle transportation through a finely segmented detector on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). Simulating events of energetic particle decay in a general-purpose high energy physics (HEP) detector requires intensive computing resources, due to the complexity of the geometry as well as physics processes applied to particles copiously produced by primary collisions and secondary interactions. The recent advent of hardware architectures of many-core or accelerated processors provides the variety of concurrent programming models applicable not only for the high performance parallel computing, but also for the conventional computing intensive application such as the HEP detector simulation. The components of our prototype are a transportation process under a non-uniform magnetic field, geometry navigation with a set of solid shapes and materials, electromagnetic physics processes for electrons and photons, and an interface to a framework that dispatches bundles of tracks in a highly vectorized manner optimizing for spatial locality and throughput. Core algorithms and methods are excerpted from the Geant4 toolkit, and are modified and optimized for the GPU application. Program kernels written in C/C++ are designed to be compatible with CUDA and OpenCL and with the aim to be generic enough for easy porting to future programming models and hardware architectures. To improve throughput by overlapping data transfers with kernel execution, multiple CUDA streams are used. Issues with floating point accuracy, random numbers generation, data structure, kernel divergences and register spills are also considered. Performance evaluation for the relative speedup compared to the corresponding sequential execution on CPU is presented as well.

  7. High energy electromagnetic particle transportation on the GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal, P.; Elvira, D.; Jun, S. Y.; Kowalkowski, J.; Paterno, M.; Apostolakis, J.

    2014-06-01

    We present massively parallel high energy electromagnetic particle transportation through a finely segmented detector on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). Simulating events of energetic particle decay in a general-purpose high energy physics (HEP) detector requires intensive computing resources, due to the complexity of the geometry as well as physics processes applied to particles copiously produced by primary collisions and secondary interactions. The recent advent of hardware architectures of many-core or accelerated processors provides the variety of concurrent programming models applicable not only for the high performance parallel computing, but also for the conventional computing intensive application such as the HEP detector simulation. The components of our prototype are a transportation process under a non-uniform magnetic field, geometry navigation with a set of solid shapes and materials, electromagnetic physics processes for electrons and photons, and an interface to a framework that dispatches bundles of tracks in a highly vectorized manner optimizing for spatial locality and throughput. Core algorithms and methods are excerpted from the Geant4 toolkit, and are modified and optimized for the GPU application. Program kernels written in C/C++ are designed to be compatible with CUDA and OpenCL and with the aim to be generic enough for easy porting to future programming models and hardware architectures. To improve throughput by overlapping data transfers with kernel execution, multiple CUDA streams are used. Issues with floating point accuracy, random numbers generation, data structure, kernel divergences and register spills are also considered. Performance evaluation for the relative speedup compared to the corresponding sequential execution on CPU is presented as well.

  8. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Harkay, K. C.; Rosenberg, R. A.

    2003-03-20

    Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in a positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Furthermore, such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.

  9. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    DOE PAGES

    Harkay, K. C.; Rosenberg, R. A.

    2003-03-20

    Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in amore » positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Furthermore, such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.« less

  10. Wake fields and wake field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Wilson, P.B.; Weiland, T.

    1984-12-01

    In this lecture we introduce the concepts of wake fields and wake potentials, examine some basic properties of these functions, show how they can be calculated, and look briefly at a few important applications. One such application is wake field acceleration. The wake field accelerator is capable of producing the high gradients required for future very high energy e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear colliders. The principles of wake field acceleration, and a brief description of experiments in progress in this area, are presented in the concluding section. 40 references, 27 figures.

  11. High-energy neutrino astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halzen, Francis

    2017-03-01

    The chargeless, weakly interacting neutrinos are ideal astronomical messengers as they travel through space without scattering, absorption or deflection. But this weak interaction also makes them notoriously di cult to detect, leading to neutrino observatories requiring large-scale detectors. A few years ago, the IceCube experiment discovered neutrinos originating beyond the Sun with energies bracketed by those of the highest energy gamma rays and cosmic rays. I discuss how these high-energy neutrinos can be detected and what they can tell us about the origins of cosmic rays and about dark matter.

  12. HIGH ENERGY GASEOUS DISCHARGE DEVICES

    DOEpatents

    Josephson, V.

    1960-02-16

    The high-energy electrical discharge device described comprises an envelope, a pair of main discharge electrodes supported in opposition in the envelope, and a metallic shell symmetrically disposed around and spaced from the discharge path between the electrodes. The metallic shell comprises a first element of spaced helical turns of metallic material and a second element of spaced helical turns of methllic material insulatedly supported in superposition outside the first element and with the turns overlapping the gap between the turns of the first element.

  13. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This is an artist's concept describing the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO). The HEAO project involved the launching of three unmarned scientific observatories into low Earth orbit between 1977 and 1979 to study some of the most intriguing mysteries of the universe; pulsars, black holes, neutron stars, and super nova. This concept was painted by Jack Hood of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Hardware support for the imaging instruments was provided by American Science and Engineering. The HEAO spacecraft were built by TRW, Inc. under project management of the MSFC.

  14. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-01-01

    This artist's concept depicts the third observatory, the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-3 in orbit. Designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center, the HEAO-3's mission was to survey and map the celestial sphere for gamma-ray flux and make detailed measurements of cosmic-ray particles. It carried three scientific experiments: a gamma-ray spectrometer, a cosmic-ray isotope experiment, and a heavy cosmic-ray nuclei experiment. The HEAO-3 was originally identified as HEAO-C but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit.

  15. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1978-01-01

    This photograph was taken during the assembly of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2 at TRW, Inc., the prime contractor for the HEAOs. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. TRW, Inc. designed and developed the HEAO, under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center. The HEAO-2 was originally identified as HEAO-B but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit.

  16. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1977-01-01

    This photograph shows the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-1 being assembled at TRW Systems of Redondo Beach, California. The HEAO was designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center. The first observatory, designated HEAO-1, was launched on August 12, 1977 aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle and was designed to survey the sky for additional x-ray and gamma-ray sources as well as pinpointing their positions. The HEAO-1 was originally identified as HEAO-A but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit.

  17. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1979-09-20

    This Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle, carrying the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-3, lifted off on September 20, 1979. The HEAO-3's mission was to survey and map the celestial sphere for gamma-ray flux and make detailed measurements of cosmic-ray particles. It carried three scientific experiments: a gamma-ray spectrometer, a cosmic-ray isotope experiment, and a heavy cosmic-ray nuclei experiment. The HEAO-3 was originally identified as HEAO-C but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit.

  18. How can accelerated development of bioenergy contribute to the future UK energy mix? Insights from a MARKAL modelling exercise

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Donna; Jablonski, Sophie; Moran, Brighid; Anandarajah, Gabrial; Taylor, Gail

    2009-01-01

    Background This work explores the potential contribution of bioenergy technologies to 60% and 80% carbon reductions in the UK energy system by 2050, by outlining the potential for accelerated technological development of bioenergy chains. The investigation was based on insights from MARKAL modelling, detailed literature reviews and expert consultations. Due to the number and complexity of bioenergy pathways and technologies in the model, three chains and two underpinning technologies were selected for detailed investigation: (1) lignocellulosic hydrolysis for the production of bioethanol, (2) gasification technologies for heat and power, (3) fast pyrolysis of biomass for bio-oil production, (4) biotechnological advances for second generation bioenergy crops, and (5) the development of agro-machinery for growing and harvesting bioenergy crops. Detailed literature searches and expert consultations (looking inter alia at research and development needs and economic projections) led to the development of an 'accelerated' dataset of modelling parameters for each of the selected bioenergy pathways, which were included in five different scenario runs with UK-MARKAL (MED). The results of the 'accelerated runs' were compared with a low-carbon (LC-Core) scenario, which assesses the cheapest way to decarbonise the energy sector. Results Bioenergy was deployed in larger quantities in the bioenergy accelerated technological development scenario compared with the LC-Core scenario. In the electricity sector, solid biomass was highly utilised for energy crop gasification, displacing some deployment of wind power, and nuclear and marine to a lesser extent. Solid biomass was also deployed for heat in the residential sector from 2040 in much higher quantities in the bioenergy accelerated technological development scenario compared with LC-Core. Although lignocellulosic ethanol increased, overall ethanol decreased in the transport sector in the bioenergy accelerated technological

  19. Duke University high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, L.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Walker, W.D.

    1992-07-01

    This Progress Report presents a review of the research done in 1992 by the Duke High Energy Physics Group. This is the first year of a three-year grant which was approved by the Office of High Energy Physics at DOE after an external review of our research program during the summer of 1991. Our research is centered at Fermilab where we are involved with two active experiments, one using the Tevatron collider (CDF, the Collider Detector Facility) and the other using a proton beam in the high intensity laboratory (E771, study of beauty production). In addition to these running experiments we are continuing the analysis of data from experiments E735 (collider search for a quark-gluon plasma), E705 (fixed target study of direct photon and {sub {Chi}} meson production) and E597 (particle production from hadron-nucleus collisions). Finally, this year has seen an expansion of our involvement with the design of the central tracking detector for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) and an increased role in the governance of the collaboration. Descriptions of these research activities are presented in this report.

  20. High Energy Laser Diagnostic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, James R.; Goddard, Douglas N.; Lewis, Jay; Thomas, David

    2010-10-01

    Recent advancements in high energy laser (HEL) sources have outpaced diagnostic tools capable of accurately quantifying system performance. Diagnostic tools are needed that allow system developers to measure the parameters that define HEL effectiveness. The two critical parameters for quantifying HEL effectiveness are the irradiance on target and resultant rise in target temperature. Off-board sensing has its limitations, including unpredictable changes in the reflectivity of the target, smoke and outgassing, and atmospheric distortion. On-board sensors overcome the limitations of off-board techniques but must survive high irradiance levels and extreme temperatures. We have developed sensors for on-target diagnostics of high energy laser beams and for the measurement of the thermal response of the target. The conformal sensors consist of an array of quantum dot photodetectors and resistive temperature detectors. The sensor arrays are lithographically fabricated on flexible substrates and can be attached to a variety of laser targets. We have developed a nanoparticle adhesive process that provides good thermal contact with the target and that ensures the sensor remains attached to the target for as long as the target survives. We have calibrated the temperature and irradiance sensors and demonstrated them in a HEL environment.

  1. Ultra high energy photons and neutrinos with JEM-EUSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    Ultra high energy photons and neutrinos are carriers of very important astrophysical information. They may be produced at the sites of cosmic ray acceleration or during the propagation of the cosmic rays in the intergalactic medium. In contrast to charged cosmic rays, photon and neutrino arrival directions point to the production site because they are not deflected by the magnetic fields of the Galaxy or the intergalactic medium. In this work we study the characteristics of the longitudinal development of showers initiated by photons and neutrinos at the highest energies. These studies are relevant for development of techniques for neutrino and photon identification by the JEM-EUSO telescope. In particular, we study the possibility of observing the multi-peak structure of very deep horizontal neutrino showers with JEM-EUSO. We also discuss the possibility to determine the flavor content of the incident neutrino flux by taking advantage of the different characteristics of the longitudinal profiles generated by different type of neutrinos. This is of grate importance for the study of the fundamental properties of neutrinos at the highest energies. Regarding photons, we discuss the detectability of the cosmogenic component by JEM-EUSO and also estimate the expected upper limits on the photon fraction which can be obtained from the future JEM-EUSO data for the case in which there are no photons in the samples.

  2. High-energy pulsar models: Developments and new questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.

    2014-03-01

    The past few years have seen a major advance in observational knowledge of high-energy (HE) pulsars. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and {AGILE} have increased the number of known γ-ray pulsars by an order of magnitude, its members being divided roughly equally among millisecond pulsars (MSPs), young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. Many new and diverse emission characteristics are being measured, while radio and X-ray follow-up observations increase the pulsar detection rate and enrich our multiwavelength picture of these extreme sources. The wealth of new data has provided impetus for further development and improvement of existing theoretical pulsar models. Geometric light curve (LC) modelling has uncovered three broad classes into which HE pulsars fall: those where the radio profile leads, is aligned with, or lags the γ-ray profile. For example, the original MSP and original black widow system are members of the second class, requiring co-located emission regions and thereby breaking with traditional notions of radio emission origin. These models imply narrow accelerator gaps in the outer magnetosphere, indicating copious pair production even in MSP magnetospheres that were previously thought to be pair-starved. The increased quality and variety of the LCs necessitate construction of ever more sophisticated models. We will review progress in global magnetosphere solutions which specify a finite conductivity on field lines above the stellar surface, filling the gap between the standard vacuum and force-free (FF; plasma-filled) models. The possibility of deriving phase-resolved spectra for the brightest pulsars, coupled with the fact that the HE pulsar population is sizable enough to allow sampling of various pulsar geometries, will enable much more stringent testing of future radiation models. Reproduction of the observed phase-resolved behavior of this disparate group will be one of the next frontiers in pulsar science, impacting on our

  3. High-Energy Pulsar Models: Developments and New Questions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    The past few years have seen a major advance in observational knowledge of high-energy (HE) pulsars. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and AGILE have increased the number of known gamma-ray pulsars by an order of magnitude, its members being divided roughly equally among millisecond pulsars (MSPs), young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. Many new and diverse emission characteristics are being measured, while radio and X-ray follow-up observations increase the pulsar detection rate and enrich our multiwavelength picture of these extreme sources. The wealth of new data has provided impetus for further development and improvement of existing theoretical pulsar models. Geometric light curve (LC) modelling has uncovered three broad classes into which HE pulsars fall: those where the radio profile leads, is aligned with, or lags the gamma-ray profile. For example, the original MSP and original black widow system are members of the second class, requiring co-located emission regions and thereby breaking with traditional notions of radio emission origin. These models imply narrow accelerator gaps in the outer magnetosphere, indicating copious pair production even in MSP magnetospheres that were previously thought to be pair-starved. The increased quality and variety of the LCs necessitate construction of ever more sophisticated models. We will review progress in global magnetosphere solutions which specify a finite conductivity on field lines above the stellar surface, filling the gap between the standard vacuum and force-free (FF; plasma-filled) models. The possibility of deriving phase-resolved spectra for the brightest pulsars, coupled with the fact that the HE pulsar population is sizable enough to allow sampling of various pulsar geometries, will enable much more stringent testing of future radiation models. Reproduction of the observed phase-resolved behavior of this disparate group will be one of the next frontiers in pulsar science, impacting on

  4. Perspectives on High-Energy-Density Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul

    2008-11-01

    Much of 21st century plasma physics will involve work to produce, understand, control, and exploit very non-traditional plasmas. High-energy density (HED) plasmas are often examples, variously involving strong Coulomb interactions and few particles per Debeye sphere, dominant radiation effects, strongly relativistic effects, or strongly quantum-mechanical behavior. Indeed, these and other modern plasma systems often fall outside the early standard theoretical definitions of ``plasma''. This presentation will focus on two types of HED plasmas that exhibit non-traditional behavior. Our first example will be the plasmas produced by extremely strong shock waves. Shock waves are present across the entire realm of plasma densities, often in space or astrophysical contexts. HED shock waves (at pressures > 1 Mbar) enable studies in many areas, from equations of state to hydrodynamics to radiation hydrodynamics. We will specifically consider strongly radiative shocks, in which the radiative energy fluxes are comparable to the mechanical energy fluxes that drive the shocks. Modern HED facilities can produce such shocks, which are also present in dense, energetic, astrophysical systems such as supernovae. These shocks are also excellent targets for advanced simulations due to their range of spatial scales and complex radiation transport. Our second example will be relativistic plasmas. In general, these vary from plasmas containing relativistic particle beams, produced for some decades in the laboratory, to the relativistic thermal plasmas present for example in pulsar winds. Laboratory HED relativistic plasmas to date have been those produced by laser beams of irradiance ˜ 10^18 to 10^22 W/cm^2 or by accelerator-produced HED electron beams. These have applications ranging from generation of intense x-rays to production of proton beams for radiation therapy to acceleration of electrons. Here we will focus on electron acceleration, a spectacular recent success and a rare

  5. 'HESPERIA' HORIZON 2020 project: High Energy Solar Particle Events foRecastIng and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malandraki, Olga; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Vainio, Rami; Agueda, Neus; Nunez, Marlon; Heber, Bernd; Buetikofer, Rolf; Sarlanis, Christos; Crosby, Norma; Bindi, Veronica; Murphy, Ronald; Tyka, Allan J.; Rodriguez, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are of prime interest for fundamental astrophysics. However, due to their high energies they are a space weather concern for technology in space as well as human space exploration calling for reliable tools with predictive capabilities. The two-year EU HORIZON 2020 project HESPERIA (High Energy Solar Particle Events foRecastIng and Analysis, http://www.hesperia-space.eu/) will produce two novel operational SEP forecasting tools based upon proven concepts (UMASEP, REleASE). At the same time the project will advance our understanding of the physical mechanisms that result into high-energy SEP events through the systematic exploitation of the high-energy gamma-ray observations of the FERMI mission and other novel published datasets (PAMELA, AMS), together with in situ SEP measurements near 1 AU. By using multi-frequency observations and performing simulations, the project will address the chain of processes from particle acceleration in the corona, particle transport in the magnetically complex corona and interplanetary space to their detection near 1 AU. Furthermore, HESPERIA will explore the possibility of incorporating the derived results into future innovative space weather services. Publicly available software to invert neutron monitor observations of relativistic SEPs to physical parameters, giving information on the high-energy processes occurring at or near the Sun during solar eruptions, will be provided for the first time. The results of this inversion software will complement the space-borne measurements at adjacent higher energies. In order to achieve these goals HESPERIA will exploit already existing large datasets that are stored into databases built under EU FP7 projects NMDB and SEPServer. The structure of the HESPERIA project, its main objectives and forecasting operational tools, as well as the added value to SEP research will be presented and discussed. Acknowledgement: This project has received funding from the

  6. HIGH ENERGY POLARIZATION OF BLAZARS: DETECTION PROSPECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, N.; Pavlidou, V.; Fields, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (with X-Calibur offering the most promising prospects), space-based missions should detect the brightest blazars for polarization fractions down to a few percent. Typical flaring activity of blazars could boost the overall number of polarimetric detections by nearly a factor of five to six purely accounting for flux increase of the brightest of the comprehensive, all-sky, Fermi-LAT blazar distribution. The instantaneous increase in the number of detections is approximately a factor of two, assuming a duty cycle of 20% for every source. The detectability of particular blazars may be reduced if variations in the flux and polarization fraction are anticorrelated. Simultaneous use of variability and polarization trends could guide the selection of blazars for high-energy polarimetric observations.

  7. High Energy Polarization of Blazars: Detection Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, N.; Pavlidou, V.; Fields, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (with X-Calibur offering the most promising prospects), space-based missions should detect the brightest blazars for polarization fractions down to a few percent. Typical flaring activity of blazars could boost the overall number of polarimetric detections by nearly a factor of five to six purely accounting for flux increase of the brightest of the comprehensive, all-sky, Fermi-LAT blazar distribution. The instantaneous increase in the number of detections is approximately a factor of two, assuming a duty cycle of 20% for every source. The detectability of particular blazars may be reduced if variations in the flux and polarization fraction are anticorrelated. Simultaneous use of variability and polarization trends could guide the selection of blazars for high-energy polarimetric observations.

  8. High energy protons generation by two sequential laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Shen, Baifei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Wang, Wenpeng; Xu, Jiancai; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin

    2015-04-15

    The sequential proton acceleration by two laser pulses of relativistic intensity is proposed to produce high energy protons. In the scheme, a relativistic super-Gaussian (SG) laser pulse followed by a Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) pulse irradiates dense plasma attached by underdense plasma. A proton beam is produced from the target and accelerated in the radiation pressure regime by the short SG pulse and then trapped and re-accelerated in a special bubble driven by the LG pulse in the underdense plasma. The advantages of radiation pressure acceleration and LG transverse structure are combined to achieve the effective trapping and acceleration of protons. In a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, protons of 6.7 GeV are obtained from a 2 × 10{sup 22 }W/cm{sup 2} SG laser pulse and a LG pulse at a lower peak intensity.

  9. High-energy neutrinos from active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Done, C.; Salamon, M. H.; Sommers, P.

    1991-01-01

    The spectrum and high-energy neutrino background flux from photomeson production in active galactic nuclei (AGN) is calculated using the recent UV and X-ray observations to define the photon fields and an accretion-disk shock-acceleration model for producing high-energy particles. Collectively, AGN produce the dominant isotropic neutrino background between 10,000 and 10 to the 10th GeV, detectable with current instruments. AGN neutrinos should produce a sphere of stellar disruption which may explain the 'broad-line region' seen in AGN.

  10. High-energy neutrinos from active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Done, C.; Salamon, M. H.; Sommers, P.

    1991-01-01

    The spectrum and high-energy neutrino background flux from photomeson production in active galactic nuclei (AGN) is calculated using the recent UV and X-ray observations to define the photon fields and an accretion-disk shock-acceleration model for producing high-energy particles. Collectively, AGN produce the dominant isotropic neutrino background between 10,000 and 10 to the 10th GeV, detectable with current instruments. AGN neutrinos should produce a sphere of stellar disruption which may explain the 'broad-line region' seen in AGN.

  11. Prospects for observations of high-energy cosmic tau neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athar, H.; Parente, G.; Zas, E.

    2000-11-01

    We study the prospects for the observation of high-energy cosmic tau neutrinos (E >=106 GeV) originating from proton acceleration in the cores of active galactic nuclei. We consider the possibility that vacuum flavor neutrino oscillations induce a tau to muon neutrino flux ratio greatly exceeding the rather small value expected from intrinsic production. The criteria and event rates for under water or ice light Čerenkov neutrino telescopes are given by considering the possible detection of downgoing high-energy cosmic tau neutrinos through characteristic double shower events.

  12. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  13. Managing the future: the Special Virus Leukemia Program and the acceleration of biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Robin Wolfe

    2014-12-01

    After the end of the Second World War, cancer virus research experienced a remarkable revival, culminating in the creation in 1964 of the United States National Cancer Institute's Special Virus Leukemia Program (SVLP), an ambitious program of directed biomedical research to accelerate the development of a leukemia vaccine. Studies of cancer viruses soon became the second most highly funded area of research at the Institute, and by far the most generously funded area of biological research. Remarkably, this vast infrastructure for cancer vaccine production came into being before a human leukemia virus was shown to exist. The origins of the SVLP were rooted in as much as shifts in American society as laboratory science. The revival of cancer virus studies was a function of the success advocates and administrators achieved in associating cancer viruses with campaigns against childhood diseases such as polio and leukemia. To address the urgency borne of this new association, the SVLP's architects sought to lessen the power of peer review in favor of centralized Cold War management methods, fashioning viruses as "administrative objects" in order to accelerate the tempo of biomedical research and discovery.

  14. Pion exchange at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.M.

    1980-07-01

    The state of Regge pion exchange calculations for high-energy reactions is reviewed. Experimental evidence is summarized to show that (i) the pion trajectory has a slope similar to that of other trajectories; (ii) the pion exchange contribution can dominate contributions of higher trajectories up to quite a large energy; (iii) many two-body cross sections with large pion contributions can be fit only by models which allow for kinematical conspiracy at t=0. The theory of kinematic conspiracy is reviewed for two-body amplitudes, and calculations of the conspiring pion--Pomeron cut discussed. The author then summarizes recent work on pion exchange in Reggeized Deck models for multiparticle final states, with emphasis on the predictions of various models (with and without resonances) for phases of the partial wave amplitudes.

  15. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A

    2004-11-11

    High-energy-density (HED) physics refers broadly to the study of macroscopic collections of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density. The experimental facilities most widely used for these studies are high-power lasers and magnetic-pinch generators. The HED physics pursued on these facilities is still in its infancy, yet new regimes of experimental science are emerging. Examples from astrophysics include work relevant to planetary interiors, supernovae, astrophysical jets, and accreting compact objects (such as neutron stars and black holes). In this paper, we will review a selection of recent results in this new field of HED laboratory astrophysics and provide a brief look ahead to the coming decade.

  16. Oxides having high energy densities

    DOEpatents

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-09-10

    Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

  17. Multiplicities in high energy interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Derrick, M.

    1985-05-13

    This paper reviews the data on multiplicities in high energy interactions. Results from e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, from neutrino interactions, and from hadronic collisions, both diffractive and nondiffractive, are compared and contrasted. The energy dependence of the mean charged multiplicity, , as well as the rapidity density at Y = 0 are presented. For hadronic collisions, the data on neutral pion production shows a strong correlation with . The heavy particle fractions increase with ..sqrt..s up to the highest energies. The charged particle multiplicity distributions for each type of reaction show a scaling behavior when expressed in terms of the mean. Attempts to understand this behavior, which was first predicted by Koba, Nielsen, and Olesen, are discussed. The multiplicity correlations and the energy variation of the shape of the KNO scaling distribution provide important constraints on models. Some extrapolations to the energies of the Superconducting Super Collider are made. 51 refs., 27 figs.

  18. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1979-01-01

    This photograph was taken during encapsulation of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-3. Designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center, the objectives of the HEAO-3 were to survey and map the celestial sphere for gamma-ray flux and make detailed measurements of cosmic-ray particles. It carried three scientific experiments: a gamma-ray spectrometer, a cosmic-ray isotope experiment, and a heavy cosmic-ray nuclei experiment. The HEAO-3 was originally identified as HEAO-C but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit. The Marshall Space Flight Center had the project management responsibilities for the HEAO missions.

  19. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1978-01-01

    Both of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) 2/Einstein Observatory imaging devices were used to observe the Great Nebula in Andromeda, M31. This image is a wide field x-ray view of the center region of M31 by the HEAO-2's Imaging Proportional Counter. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  20. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1982-01-01

    This artist's conception depicts the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-1 in orbit. The first observatory, designated HEAO-1, was launched on August 12, 1977 aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle and was designed to survey the sky for additional x-ray and gamma-ray sources as well as pinpointing their positions. The HEAO-1 was originally identified as HEAO-A but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit. The HEAO project involved the launching of three unmarned scientific observatories into low Earth orbit between 1977 and 1979 to study some of the most intriguing mysteries of the universe; pulsars, black holes, neutron stars, and super nova. Hardware support for the imaging instruments was provided by American Science and Engineeing. The HEAO spacecraft were built by TRW, Inc. under project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center.